WorldWideScience

Sample records for delivering educational services

  1. Delivering Collaborative Web Labs as a Service for Engineering Education

    OpenAIRE

    Bochicchio, Mario A.; Antonella Longo

    2012-01-01

    As Internet speed grows up and academic networks reach more users, engineering schools take interest in online laboratories as a mean to increase the spectrum of offered services and to reduce costs by sharing expensive lab equipments. In this perspective, online labs must comply both with the scientific and pedagogic requirements coming from the lab users (students, researchers, …) and with the requirements coming from the administrative and technical staff in charge to manage and deliver th...

  2. TRENDS IN DELIVERING EDUCATIONAL SERVICES WITHIN THE KNOWLEDGE-BASED SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAMFIR Andreea

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Education and implicitly educational services become extremely important in the context of the knowledge-based society. Therefore, this study investigates the trends in delivering services identified through research of literature, as well as based on personal experience in providing educational services. It has been concluded that information and communication technology creates a vast opportunity to improve the way of delivering educational services within the knowledge-based society, to develop (educate peoples awareness of the need for knowledge, as well as their skills for the knowledge-based society.

  3. Denying or Delivering Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Stuart A.; Greenley, James R.

    1974-01-01

    Many who apply to agencies for service do not receive it. To make service more accessible, changing the behavior patterns of organizations may be as important as changing organizational structure. (Author)

  4. Systematic review and narrative synthesis of the effectiveness of contraceptive service interventions for young people, delivered in educational settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Lindsay; Baxter, Susan K; Payne, Nick; Guillaume, Louise R; Pilgrim, Hazel

    2010-12-01

    This review was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of contraception service interventions for young people that were delivered in educational settings. We conducted a systematic review and narrative synthesis. Interventions were included where they were delivered in educational institutions, including schools, colleges, and pupil referral units. Young people aged 19 and under. Studies of wider age groups were included if the majority of participants were aged under 19 years. We included interventions which consisted of contraceptive service provision, and also interventions to encourage young people to use existing contraceptive services. The main outcome measures used in the studies were: rate of teenage pregnancy, rate of contraceptive use, and sexual behavior. Many outcome measures were self reported. Twenty-nine papers were included which reported on interventions to prevent adolescent pregnancy (and repeat pregnancy), school-based health centers, contraceptive use in college students, and multicomponent interventions. Intensive case management intervention conducted by a culturally matched school-based social worker (along with other components including peer education) were shown to be effective in preventing repeat adolescent pregnancy, at least for the duration of the intervention. Also, school-based health centers appear to be most effective when contraception provision is made available on site. The evidence from these papers is limited, in terms of both quality and quantity, along with consistency of findings, but some recommendations in relation to effective interventions can be made. Copyright © 2010 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Moving People to Deliver Services

    OpenAIRE

    Mattoo, Aaditya; Carzaniga, Antonia

    2003-01-01

    The World Trade Organization (WTO) is today dealing with an issue that lies at the interface of two major challenges the world faces, trade liberalization and international migration. Greater freedom for the "temporary movement of individual service suppliers" is being negotiated under the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). Conditions in many developed economies - ranging from ...

  6. Delay Efficient Method for Delivering IPTV Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangamesh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Internet Protocol Television (IPTV is a system through which Internet television services are delivered using the architecture and networking methods of the Internet Protocol Suite over a packet-switched network infrastructure, e.g., the Internet and broadband Internet access networks, instead of being delivered through traditional radio frequency broadcast, satellite signal, and cable television (CATV formats. IPTV provides mainly three services: live TV, catch up TV, and video on demand (VoD.This paper focuses on delivering the live TV services by exploiting the virtualised cloud architecture of the IPTV and statistical multiplexing. The VoD tasks are prescheduled so that there will be less Instant Channel Change (ICC delay. We select a proper scheduling algorithm for rescheduling the VoD tasks. We then implement the scheduling algorithm for preshifting the VoD tasks.

  7. Utilization of Innovations and Techniques of Educational Technology in Delivering of Educational Practicum and Its Impact on Increasing Academic Achievement among Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Hatim G.

    2017-01-01

    The current study aims to identify the utilization of innovations and techniques of educational technology in teaching of educational practicum and its impact on increasing academic achievement among pre-service teachers. The study sample consisted of (60) pre-service teachers (student teachers) randomly selected from public middle and secondary…

  8. ISES Experience in Delivering Space Weather Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boteler, David

    The International Space Environment Service has over eighty years experience in providing space weather services to meet a wide variety of user needs. This started with broadcast on December 1, 2008 from the Eiffel Tower about radio conditions. The delivery of information about ionospheric effects on high frequency (HF) radio propagation continue to be a major concern in many parts of the world. The movement into space brought requirements for a new set of space weather services, ranging from radiation dangers to man in space, damage to satellites and effects on satellite communication and navigation systems. On the ground magnetic survey, power system and pipeline operators require information about magnetic disturbances that can affect their operations. In the past these services have been delivered by individual Regional Warning Centres. However, the needs of new trans-national users are stimulating the development of new collaborative international space weather services.

  9. Combining Technologies to Deliver Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki Freeman

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1997 a Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA grant was awarded to the Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences (CLS at The University of Texas Medical Branch - Galveston (UTMB for support of the Laboratory Education and Advancement Project (LEAP. The project entailed three primary objectives, targeting laboratory practitioners in rural and medically underserved areas of Texas for delivering a bachelor's degree, laboratory-intensive course of study via distance education. Several delivery mechanisms were utilized and evaluated for their effectiveness and friendliness to both the faculty and students. The authors discuss and describe the mechanisms utilized for delivery of courses, the advantages and disadvantages encountered with each mechanism, and subjective evaluation of the effectiveness of the courses. Also discussed are the lessons learned and plans for future development.

  10. Learning to deliver education in fragile states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Greeley

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The Fragile States Group within the Development AssistanceCommittee (DAC of the Organisation for EconomicCooperation and Development is working to advise donors onprovision of education (and other services in ‘fragile states’.

  11. Ecosystem services delivered by weaver ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offenberg, Joachim

    Weaver ants (Oecopgylla spp.) are increasingly being utilized as efficient biocontrol agents in a number of tropical tree crops, as they prey on pest insects and increase yields. However, recent studies and a review of the literature reveal that a number of other services may derive from the pres......Weaver ants (Oecopgylla spp.) are increasingly being utilized as efficient biocontrol agents in a number of tropical tree crops, as they prey on pest insects and increase yields. However, recent studies and a review of the literature reveal that a number of other services may derive from...... crops, and lastly, (iii) ant waste products deposited ias anal spots contain urea that may be taken up by plant leaves and in this way fertilize ant-plants. On top of chemical services, weaver ants have been shown to reduce plant disease incidence via competitive exclusion of other ant species because...

  12. How Does PCSI Help Deliver Integrated Services?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-12-07

    This podcast describes how PCSI strengthens collaborative work across disease areas and integrates services that are provided by related programs, especially prevention activities related to HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis, other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and tuberculosis (TB) at the client level.  Created: 12/7/2009 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 12/7/2009.

  13. Ecosystem services delivered by weaver ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offenberg, Joachim

    Weaver ants (Oecopgylla spp.) are increasingly being utilized as efficient biocontrol agents in a number of tropical tree crops, as they prey on pest insects and increase yields. However, recent studies and a review of the literature reveal that a number of other services may derive from the pres......Weaver ants (Oecopgylla spp.) are increasingly being utilized as efficient biocontrol agents in a number of tropical tree crops, as they prey on pest insects and increase yields. However, recent studies and a review of the literature reveal that a number of other services may derive from...... the presence of these ants. First of all, the chemical footprint left by the high density of ants in managed host trees may results in additional benefits. (i) Ant deposits may lead to improved fruit quality, e.g. increased sugar content, (ii) ant deposits may deter important pests (chemical deterrence) from...... crops, and lastly, (iii) ant waste products deposited ias anal spots contain urea that may be taken up by plant leaves and in this way fertilize ant-plants. On top of chemical services, weaver ants have been shown to reduce plant disease incidence via competitive exclusion of other ant species because...

  14. Teacher Preparation to Deliver Inclusive Services to Students with Disabilities: TQ Connection Issue Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdheide, Lynn R.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Teacher preparation to deliver inclusive services to students with disabilities is increasingly important because of changes in law and policy emphasizing student access to, and achievement in, the general education curriculum. Inclusion of students with disabilities in general education environments has a long history in special education law;…

  15. Changes in nurse education: delivering the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Graham

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine changes in pre-registration nursing education through the personal accounts of nurse teachers. This paper is based on 37 in-depth interviews within a central London Healthcare Faculty. Each interview was subjected to a process of content analysis described by Miles and Huberman. The interviews took place between August 2003 and March 2004 and totalled 34.4 hours or 305,736 words. There were thirty female and seven male participants, who shared 1015 years of nursing experience, averaging at 27.4 years (min 7-max 42). These were supplemented by 552 years of teaching practice, the average being 15 years (min 0.5-max 29). This paper--delivering the nursing curriculum--identifies that the nature of nursing has changed as it has both expanded and contracted. Participants identified three major changes; the nature of nursing, selection of future nurses and the current impact that large cohorts have on our traditional model of person-centred education. The practice placements remain central to nursing education and it is the nursing role that should define the curriculum and the values of higher education should be supportive of this identity.

  16. Delivering cervical cancer prevention services in low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J; Barone, M; Mahé, C; Lewis, R; Luciani, S

    2005-05-01

    The goals of any cervical cancer prevention program should be threefold: to achieve high coverage of the population at risk, to screen women with an accurate test as part of high-quality services, and to ensure that women with positive test results are properly managed. This article focuses on the experiences of the Alliance for Cervical Cancer Prevention (ACCP) in delivery of screening and treatment services as part of cervical cancer prevention projects in Africa, Latin America, and Asia. Research and experience show that cervical cancer can be prevented when strategies and services are well planned and well managed and when attention is paid to program monitoring and evaluation. Coordination of program components, reduction of the number of visits, improvement of service quality, and flexibility in how services are delivered are all essential features of an effective service.

  17. A service model for delivering care closer to home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Joanna; Taylor, Charlotte Elizabeth; Bunyan, Paul; White, Philippa Mary; Thomas, Siân Myra; Upton, Dominic

    2011-04-01

    Upton Surgery (Worcestershire) has developed a flexible and responsive service model that facilitates multi-agency support for adult patients with complex care needs experiencing an acute health crisis. The purpose of this service is to provide appropriate interventions that avoid unnecessary hospital admissions or, alternatively, provide support to facilitate early discharge from secondary care. Key aspects of this service are the collaborative and proactive identification of patients at risk, rapid creation and deployment of a reactive multi-agency team and follow-up of patients with an appropriate long-term care plan. A small team of dedicated staff (the Complex Care Team) are pivotal to coordinating and delivering this service. Key skills are sophisticated leadership and project management skills, and these have been used sensitively to challenge some traditional roles and boundaries in the interests of providing effective, holistic care for the patient.This is a practical example of early implementation of the principles underlying the Department of Health's (DH) recent Best Practice Guidance, 'Delivering Care Closer to Home' (DH, July 2008) and may provide useful learning points for other general practice surgeries considering implementing similar models. This integrated case management approach has had enthusiastic endorsement from patients and carers. In addition to the enhanced quality of care and experience for the patient, this approach has delivered value for money. Secondary care costs have been reduced by preventing admissions and also by reducing excess bed-days. The savings achieved have justified the ongoing commitment to the service and the staff employed in the Complex Care Team. The success of this service model has been endorsed recently by the 'Customer Care' award by 'Management in Practice'. The Surgery was also awarded the 'Practice of the Year' award for this and a number of other customer-focussed projects.

  18. Is International Accounting Education Delivering Pedagogical Value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chris; Millanta, Brian; Tweedie, Dale

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines whether universities are delivering pedagogical value to international accounting students commensurate with the costs of studying abroad. The paper uses survey and interview methods to explore the extent to which Chinese Learners (CLs) in an Australian postgraduate accounting subject have distinct learning needs. The paper…

  19. Is International Accounting Education Delivering Pedagogical Value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chris; Millanta, Brian; Tweedie, Dale

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines whether universities are delivering pedagogical value to international accounting students commensurate with the costs of studying abroad. The paper uses survey and interview methods to explore the extent to which Chinese Learners (CLs) in an Australian postgraduate accounting subject have distinct learning needs. The paper…

  20. Engineering a plant community to deliver multiple ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkey, Jonathan; Döring, Thomas; Baddeley, John; Collins, Rosemary; Roderick, Stephen; Jones, Hannah; Watson, Christine

    2015-06-01

    The sustainable delivery of multiple ecosystem services requires the management of functionally diverse biological communities. In an agricultural context, an emphasis on food production has often led to a loss of biodiversity to the detriment of other ecosystem services such as the maintenance of soil health and pest regulation. In scenarios where multiple species can be grown together, it may be possible to better balance environmental and agronomic services through the targeted selection of companion species. We used the case study of legume-based cover crops to engineer a plant community that delivered the optimal balance of six ecosystem services: early productivity, regrowth following mowing, weed suppression, support of invertebrates, soil fertility building (measured as yield of following crop), and conservation of nutrients in the soil. An experimental species pool of 12 cultivated legume species was screened for a range of functional traits and ecosystem services at five sites across a geographical gradient in the United Kingdom. All possible species combinations were then analyzed, using a process-based model of plant competition, to identify the community that delivered the best balance of services at each site. In our system, low to intermediate levels of species richness (one to four species) that exploited functional contrasts in growth habit and phenology were identified as being optimal. The optimal solution was determined largely by the number of species and functional diversity represented by the starting species pool, emphasizing the importance of the initial selection of species for the screening experiments. The approach of using relationships between functional traits and ecosystem services to design multifunctional biological communities has the potential to inform the design of agricultural systems that better balance agronomic and environmental services and meet the current objective of European agricultural policy to maintain viable food

  1. Delivering Cost-Efficient Public Services in Health Care, Education and Housing in Chile. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 606

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccero, D.

    2008-01-01

    The Chilean authorities plan to raise budgetary allocations over the medium term for a variety of social programmes, including education, health care and housing. This incremental spending will need to be carried out in a cost-efficient manner to make sure that it yields commensurate improvements in social outcomes. Chile's health indicators show…

  2. "Distance Learning" or "Learning at a Distance"? Case Study of an Education Initiative to Deliver an In-Service Bachelors Degree in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    In 1998, as part of what was then Zambia's Department of Technical Education and Vocational Training's (DTEVT) human resources capacity building initiative, under the Ministry of Science, Technology and Vocational Training (MSTVT), donor funding was secured to provide degree-level training for key teachers and managers within the technical…

  3. Delivering Physical Education in selected schools in Soweto, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delivering Physical Education in selected schools in Soweto, South Africa: ... Principals and sport masters of all five schools made up the 10 interviewees. ... preparedness of teachers, as well as the level of motivation and workload of teachers.

  4. 20 CFR 669.330 - How are services delivered to the customer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How are services delivered to the customer... Farmworker Jobs Program Customers and Available Program Services § 669.330 How are services delivered to the customer? To ensure that all services are focused on the customer's needs, services are provided through a...

  5. BUSINESS PROCESS RE-ENGINEERING: THE TECHNIQUE TO IMPROVE DELIVERING SPEED OF SERVICE INDUSTRY IN TANZANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Joseph Sungau; Philibert C. Ndunguru; Joseph Kimeme

    2013-01-01

    Problem statement: Delivering speed is very critical in today’s business environment. In most cases, service organizations and customers are sensitive to time spent at delivering or receiving a service. Therefore, service organizations must change in order to meet this challenge. Overtime, service organizations have worked hard to identify techniques that enhance service delivering speed for improved performance. Business process re-engineering is one of such techniques that improves busines...

  6. Internet delivered diabetes self-management education: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Katherine; Phillips, Beth; Johnson, Constance; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-management education is a cornerstone of successful diabetes management. Various methods have been used to reach the increasing numbers of patients with diabetes, including Internet-based education. The purpose of this article is to review various delivery methods of Internet diabetes education that have been evaluated, as well as their effectiveness in improving diabetes-related outcomes. Literature was identified in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Medline, EBSCO, the Cochrane Library, and the Web of Science databases through searches using the following terms: "type 2 diabetes AND internet/web based AND education" and "type 2 diabetes AND diabetes self-management education (DSME) AND web-based/internet OR technology assisted education." The search was limited to English language articles published in the last 10 years. The search yielded 111 articles; of these, 14 met criteria for inclusion in this review. Nine studies were randomized controlled trials, and study lengths varied from 2 weeks to 24 months, for a total of 2,802 participants. DSME delivered via the Internet is effective at improving measures of glycemic control and diabetes knowledge compared with usual care. In addition, results demonstrate that improved eating habits and increased attendance at clinic appointments occur after the online DSME, although engagement and usage of Internet materials waned over time. Interventions that included an element of interaction with healthcare providers were seen as attractive to participants. Internet-delivered diabetes education has the added benefit of easier access for many individuals, and patients can self-pace themselves through materials. More research on the cost-benefits of Internet diabetes education and best methods to maintain patient engagement are needed, along with more studies assessing the long-term impact of Internet-delivered DSME.

  7. Preparing pharmacists to deliver a targeted service in hypertension management: evaluation of an interprofessional training program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bajorek, Beata V; Lemay, Kate S; Magin, Parker J; Roberts, Christopher; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol L

    2015-01-01

    ...) control in hypertension. In this study, a training program was designed to enable community pharmacists to deliver a service in hypertension management targeting therapeutic adjustments and medication adherence...

  8. 45 CFR 1321.45 - Transfer between congregate and home-delivered nutrition service allotments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... nutrition service allotments. 1321.45 Section 1321.45 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION... Responsibilities § 1321.45 Transfer between congregate and home-delivered nutrition service allotments. (a) A...

  9. Delivering research data management services fundamentals of good practice

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Sarah; Whyte, Angus

    2014-01-01

    The research landscape is changing, with key global research funders now requiring institutions to demonstrate how they will preserve and share research data. However, the practice of structured research data management is very new, and the construction of services remains experimental and in need of models and standards of approach. This groundbreaking guide will lead researchers, institutions and policy makers through the processes needed to set up and run effective institutional research data management services. This book will provide a step-by-step explanation of the components for an institutional service - effectively a 'how to guide'. Case studies from the newly emerging service infrastructures in the UK, USA and Australia will draw out the lessons learnt from working (or near to delivery) exemplars. Different approaches are highlighted and compared, for example, a case study of a researcher-focused strategy from Australia contrasted with a national, top-down approach. A chapter on the redeveloped UK ...

  10. Delivering Interactive Multimedia Services in Dynamic Pervasive Computing Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselman, C.; Cesar Garcia, P.S.; Vaishnavi, I.; Boussard, M.; Kernchen, R.; Meissner, S.; Spedalieri, A.; Sinfreu, A.; Raeck, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces a distributed system for next generation multimedia support in dynamically changing pervasive computing environments. The overall goal is to enhance the experience of mobile users by intelligently adapting the way a service is presented, in particular by adapting the way the us

  11. The ability of health promoters to deliver group diabetes education in South African primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S. Botes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes makes a significant contribution to the burden of disease in South Africa.This study assesses a group diabetes education programme using motivational interviewingin public sector health centres serving low socio-economic communities in Cape Town.The programme was delivered by mid-level health promotion officers (HPOs.Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore the experience of the HPOs and to observetheir fidelity to the educational programme.Methods: Three focus group interviews were held with the 14 HPOs who delivered theeducational programme in 17 health centres. Thirty-three sessions were observed directly andthe audio tapes were analysed using the motivational interviewing (MI integrity code.Results: The HPOs felt confident in their ability to deliver group education after receiving thetraining. They reported a significant shift in their communication style and skills. They feltthe new approach was feasible and better than before. The resource material was found to berelevant, understandable and useful. The HPOs struggled with poor patient attendance and alack of suitable space at the facilities. They delivered the majority of the content and achievedbeginning-level proficiency in the MI guiding style of communication and the use of openquestions. The HPOs did not demonstrate proficiency in active listening and continued to offersome unsolicited advice.Conclusion: The HPOs demonstrated their potential to deliver group diabetes education despiteissues that should be addressed in future training and the district health services. Thefindings will help with the interpretation of results from a randomised controlled trial evaluatingthe effectiveness of the education.

  12. How natural capital delivers ecosystem services: A typology derived from a systematic review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, AC

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available There is no unified evidence base to help decision-makers understand how the multiple components of natural capital interact to deliver ecosystem services. We systematically reviewed 780 papers, recording how natural capital attributes (29 biotic...

  13. Outsourcing Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Anne S.; Bishop, Anna M.

    2009-01-01

    The Lower Pioneer Valley Educational Collaborative, organized in 1974, consists of seven school districts legally bound in a governance structure. Although the member districts are located in Hampden County, Massachusetts, the collaborative provides educational programs and services to school districts and municipalities throughout western…

  14. Outsourcing Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Anne S.; Bishop, Anna M.

    2009-01-01

    The Lower Pioneer Valley Educational Collaborative, organized in 1974, consists of seven school districts legally bound in a governance structure. Although the member districts are located in Hampden County, Massachusetts, the collaborative provides educational programs and services to school districts and municipalities throughout western…

  15. Using mobile electronic devices to deliver educational resources in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazal, Jonathan Robert; Ludwig, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Developing countries have far fewer trained radiography professionals than developed countries, which exacerbates the limited access to imaging services. The lack of trained radiographers reflects, in part, limited availability of radiographer-specific educational resources. Historically, organizations that provided such resources in the developing world faced challenges related to the limited stock of current materials as well as expenses associated with shipping and delivery. Four mobile electronic devices (MEDs) were loaded with educational content (e-books, PDFs, and digital applications) spanning major radiography topics. The MEDs were distributed to 4 imaging departments in Ghana, India, Nepal, and Nigeria based on evidence of need for radiography-specific resources, as revealed by survey responses. A cost comparison of postal delivery vs digital delivery of educational content was performed. The effectiveness of delivering additional content via Wi-Fi transmission also was evaluated. Feedback was solicited on users' experience with the MEDs as a delivery tool for educational content. An initial average per e-book expense of $30.05, which included the cost of the device, was calculated for the MED delivery method compared with $15.56 for postal delivery of printed materials. The cost of the MED delivery method was reduced to an average of $10.05 for subsequent e-book deliveries. Additional content was successfully delivered via Wi-Fi transmission to all recipients during the 3-month follow-up period. Overall user feedback on the experience was positive, and ideas for enhancing the MED-based method were identified. Using MEDs to deliver radiography-specific educational content appears to be more cost effective than postal delivery of printed materials on a long-term basis. MEDs are more efficient for providing updates to educational materials. Customization of content to department needs, and using projector devices could enhance the usefulness of MEDs for

  16. The Psychology of Delivering a Psychological Service: Self-Organised Learning as a Model for Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Steve; Jenner, Simon

    2006-01-01

    The article describes how one Educational Psychology Service in the UK developed a service delivery based on self-organised learning (SOL). This model is linked to the paradigms and discourses within which educational psychology and special educational needs work. The work described here is dedicated to the memory of Brian Roberts, academic, close…

  17. Non-Dam Alternatives for Delivering Water Services at Least Cost and Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Totten

    2010-06-01

    We present evidence that a value-adding and risk-minimising water planning process can be achieved by shifting from the conventional focus on supply expansion to one that concentrates on efficiently delivering services at and near the point of use. The State of California has two decades of experience with this approach, demonstrating that market-based policy and regulatory innovations can unleash efficiency gains resulting in more utility water services and energy services delivered with less supply expansion at lower costs, while minimising climate-change risk, pollution and the social cost that accompany large infrastructural projects. Efficiency in delivered water services could be accomplished with investments in the range of US$10-25 billion annually, while obviating the need for spending hundreds of billions of dollars on more expensive hydropower and related infrastructural expansion projects. The shift to a regulatory system that encompasses cost-effective end-use efficiency improvements in delivering water and energy services could eliminate the need for an estimated half of all proposed dams globally, thus allowing for the maintenance of other ecosystem service benefits and offer the best hopes of meeting basic human needs for water at a more achievable level of investment.

  18. The Leicester Model of Interprofessional education: developing, delivering and learning from student voices for 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Elizabeth S; Lennox, Angela

    2009-11-01

    There are few sustained interprofessional learning opportunities in practice which engage the whole cohort of health and social care students across a region, the Leicester Model of Interprofessional Education is such an example. Since 1995 the Leicester Model has evolved to enable health and social care students to learn about the complexities of delivering multi-agency care in a range of health and social care settings. The learning environment is situated at the front line of service delivery. The education model takes students through a cycle of learning and applies a problem-solving, experiential learning approach which promotes deep learning. Follow-up data indicates that deep learning is achieved. This paper describes the original setting and presents the evaluation outcomes of the Leicester Model's "Health in the Community" course, which is delivered in city-centre communities, where inequalities in health are greatest. It traces a ten-year trajectory of interprofessional student group evaluations which helped shape this learning experience. Year-on-year positive student outcomes indicate the potential of the model to motivate and prepare future professionals for team working. Its sustainability has been achieved through ensuring the integration of education research in the development process, engagement of practitioners who value the student contributions to team working, placing patients central to the learning experience and establishing working partnerships between Higher Education Institutions, local health and social care organizations and the voluntary sector.

  19. It Takes a Village to Deliver and Test Child and Family-Focused Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Mary M; Gopalan, Geetha; Franco, Lydia M; Kalogerogiannis, Kosta; Umpierre, Mari; Olshtain-Mann, Orly; Bannon, William; Elwyn, Laura; Goldstein, Leah

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this article is to highlight the benefits of collaboration in child focused mental health services research. METHOD: Three unique research projects are described. These projects address the mental health needs of vulnerable, urban, minority children and their families. In each one, service delivery was codesigned, interventions were co-delivered and a team of stakeholders collaboratively tested the impact of each one. RESULTS: The results indicate that the three interventions designed, delivered, and tested are associated with reductions in youth mental health symptoms. CONCLUSION: These interventions are feasible alternatives to traditional individualized outpatient treatment.

  20. Delivering and Incentivizing Data Management Education to Geoscience Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, S. L.; Johnson, A. M.; Hauser, T.

    2015-12-01

    Good data management practices are imperative for all researchers who want to ensure the usability of their research data. For geoscientists, this is particularly important due to the vast amount of data collected as part of field work, model studies, or other efforts. While many geoscientists want to ensure their data is appropriately maintained, they are generally not trained in good data management, which, realistically, has a much lower priority in the "publish or perish" cycle of research. Many scientists learn programming or advanced computational and data skills during the process of developing their research. With the amount of digital data being collected in the sciences increasing, and the interest federal funding agencies are taking in ensuring data collected is well maintained, there is pressure to quickly and properly educate and train geoscientists on its management. At the University of Colorado Boulder (CU-Boulder), Research Data Services (RDS) has developed several educational and outreach activities centered at training researchers and students in ways to properly manage their data, including "boot camps", workshops, individual consultations, and seminars with topics of interest to the CU-Boulder community. Part of this effort is centered at incentivizing the researcher to learn these tools and practices despite their busy schedule. Much of this incentive has come through small grant competitions at the university level. The two competitions most relevant are a new "Best Digital Data Management Plan" competition, awarding unrestricted funds to the best plan submitted in each of five categories, and an added data management plan requirement to an existing faculty competition. This presentation will focus on examples of user outreach and educational opportunities given to researchers at CU-Boulder, incentives given to the researchers to participate, and assessment of the impact of these activities.

  1. Increasing Customer Service Behaviors Using Manager-Delivered Task Clarification and Social Praise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Anna; Austin, John; Gravina, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    This project assessed an intervention to improve employee customer service behaviors (correct greetings and closing behaviors). A combination of task clarification and manager-delivered social praise resulted in increased correct greeting from 11.5% to 66% and correct closing from 8% to 70%. The effect was maintained at a 48-week follow-up for…

  2. Increasing Customer Service Behaviors Using Manager-Delivered Task Clarification and Social Praise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Anna; Austin, John; Gravina, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    This project assessed an intervention to improve employee customer service behaviors (correct greetings and closing behaviors). A combination of task clarification and manager-delivered social praise resulted in increased correct greeting from 11.5% to 66% and correct closing from 8% to 70%. The effect was maintained at a 48-week follow-up for…

  3. Preparedness of South African deep rural SMMEs to deliver e-government services to local communities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlodlo, N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a research to assess the readiness of Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) to deliver e-government services to deep rural communities through information dissemination by the SMMEs. This research was conducted as a case...

  4. Key Questions in Career Counseling. Techniques To Deliver Effective Career Counseling Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Janice M.; Allen, Robert Glenn

    This book, which was written for people responsible for career advising, employee development, performance improvement, organizational planning, and outplacement, explains techniques to deliver effective career counseling services. The book begins with an introductory examination of the factors driving the need for effective career counseling…

  5. Key Questions in Career Counseling. Techniques To Deliver Effective Career Counseling Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Janice M.; Allen, Robert Glenn

    This book, which was written for people responsible for career advising, employee development, performance improvement, organizational planning, and outplacement, explains techniques to deliver effective career counseling services. The book begins with an introductory examination of the factors driving the need for effective career counseling…

  6. Minority Education in Georgia: Is It Delivering What Is Expected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatadze, Shalva

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the issue of minority education in the nation of Georgia, and this research aims to identify the reasons for minority educational problems. The results of school exit exams, literacy research studies, and the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment were used to highlight the differences in educational achievements…

  7. Readiness of health facilities to deliver safe male circumcision services in Tanzania: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Felix Mosha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the readiness of health facilities to deliver safe male circumcision services is more important in sub-Saharan Africa because of the inadequacy state of health facilities in many ways. The World Health Organization recommends that only facilities equipped with available trained staff, capable to perform at least minor surgery, able to offer minimum MC package and appropriate equipment for resuscitation, and compliant with requirements for sterilization and infection control should be allowed to deliver safe circumcision services. A cross-sectional study using quantitative data collection technique was conducted to assess the readiness of the health facilities to deliver safe circumcision services in selected districts of Tanzania. All hospitals, health centres and 30% of all dispensaries in these districts were selected to participate in the study. Face-toface questionnaires were administered to the heads of the health facilities and to health practitioners. Overall, 49/69 (59% of the facilities visited provided circumcision services and only 46/203 (24% of the health practitioners performed circumcision procedures. These were mainly assistant medical officers and clinical officers. The vast majority – 190/203 (95% – of the health practitioners require additional training prior to providing circumcision services. Most facilities – 63/69 (91% – had all basic supplies (gloves, basin, chlorine and waste disposal necessary for infection prevention, 44/69 (65% provided condoms, HIV counselling and testing, and sexuallytransmitted infections services, while 62/69 (90% had the capability to perform at least minor surgery. However, only 25/69 (36% and 15/69 (22% of the facilities had functioning sterilization equipment and appropriate resuscitation equipment, respectively. There is readiness for roll out of circumcision services; however, more practitioners need to be trained on circumcision procedures, demand forecasting

  8. Service Quality of Delivered Care from the Perception of Women with Caesarean Section and Normal Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar S. Tabrizi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our aim was to determine the service quality of delivered care for people with Caesarean Section and Normal Delivery. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 people who had caesarean section and normal delivery in Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital in Tabriz, north western Iran. Service quality was calculated using: Service Quality = 10 – (Importance × Performance based on importance and performance of service quality aspects from the postpartum women‟s perspective.A hierarchical regression analysis was applied in two steps using the enter method to examine the associations between demographics and SQ scores. Data were analysed using the SPSS-17 software. Results: “Confidentiality”, “autonomy”, “choice of care provider” and “communication” achieved scores at the highest level of quality; and “support group”, “prompt attention”, “prevention and early detection”, “continuity of care”, “dignity”, “safety”, “accessibility and “basic amenities” got service quality score less than eight. Statistically significant relationship was found between service quality score and continuity of care (P=0.008. Conclusion: A notable gap between the participants‟ expectations and what they have actually received in most aspects of provided care. So, there is an opportunityto improve the quality of delivered care.

  9. Service quality of delivered care from the perception of women with caesarean section and normal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Jafar S; Askari, Samira; Fardiazar, Zahra; Koshavar, Hossein; Gholipour, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the service quality of delivered care for people with Caesarean Section and Normal Delivery. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 people who had caesarean section and normal delivery in Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital in Tabriz, north western Iran. Service quality was calculated using: Service Quality = 10 - (Importance × Performance) based on importance and performance of service quality aspects from the postpartum women's perspective.A hierarchical regression analysis was applied in two steps using the enter method to examine the associations between demographics and SQ scores. Data were analysed using the SPSS-17 software. "Confidentiality", "autonomy", "choice of care provider" and "communication" achieved scores at the highest level of quality; and "support group", "prompt attention", "prevention and early detection", "continuity of care", "dignity", "safety", "accessibility and "basic amenities" got service quality score less than eight. Statistically significant relationship was found between service quality score and continuity of care (P=0.008). A notable gap between the participants‟ expectations and what they have actually received in most aspects of provided care. So, there is an opportunityto improve the quality of delivered care.

  10. Peer-Delivered Recovery Support Services for Addictions in the United States: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassuk, Ellen L; Hanson, Justine; Greene, R Neil; Richard, Molly; Laudet, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    This systematic review identifies, appraises, and summarizes the evidence on the effectiveness of peer-delivered recovery support services for people in recovery from alcohol and drug addiction. Nine studies met criteria for inclusion in the review. They were assessed for quality and outcomes including substance use and recovery-related factors. Despite significant methodological limitations found in the included studies, the body of evidence suggests salutary effects on participants. Current limitations and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  11. Delivering Civic Education in Hong Kong: Why Is It Not an Independent Subject?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yan Wing; Ng, Hoi Yu

    2014-01-01

    Internationally there have been serious efforts to identify effective modes of delivering civic education for preparing youth for the future challenges of citizenship. This article addresses the research question, "why is an independent subject not preferred in civic education by Hong Kong civic education teachers?". It starts with a…

  12. Delivering Higher Education to Adults: An Interview with Robert Mendenhall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Joni E.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Robert Mendenhall, president of Western Governors University, who is the 2012 recipient of the Virginia B. Smith (VBS) Innovative Leadership Award. The annual award recognizes his leadership in redesigning higher education delivery for adult students. In the interview, Robert Mendenhall talks about his work…

  13. Market-Oriented Cloud Computing: Vision, Hype, and Reality for Delivering IT Services as Computing Utilities

    CERN Document Server

    Buyya, Rajkumar; Venugopal, Srikumar

    2008-01-01

    This keynote paper: presents a 21st century vision of computing; identifies various computing paradigms promising to deliver the vision of computing utilities; defines Cloud computing and provides the architecture for creating market-oriented Clouds by leveraging technologies such as VMs; provides thoughts on market-based resource management strategies that encompass both customer-driven service management and computational risk management to sustain SLA-oriented resource allocation; presents some representative Cloud platforms especially those developed in industries along with our current work towards realising market-oriented resource allocation of Clouds by leveraging the 3rd generation Aneka enterprise Grid technology; reveals our early thoughts on interconnecting Clouds for dynamically creating an atmospheric computing environment along with pointers to future community research; and concludes with the need for convergence of competing IT paradigms for delivering our 21st century vision.

  14. Organisational Culture of Further Education Colleges Delivering Higher Education Business Programmes: Developing a Culture of "HEness"--What Next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feather, Denis

    2016-01-01

    This paper draws on the views of lecturers working in and delivering college-based higher education (CBHE) in the UK. There have been numerous works on the culture of higher education in further education (HE in FE). However, as noted by some literati, the culture of further education (FE) is not easy to define, and does not readily lend itself to…

  15. Delivering healthcare services to children with cerebral palsy and their families: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayles, Emily; Jones, Anne; Harvey, Desley; Plummer, David; Ruston, Sally

    2015-05-01

    Children with cerebral palsy have complex healthcare needs and often require complex multidisciplinary care. It is important for clinicians to understand which approaches to healthcare service delivery for this population are supported in the literature and how these should be applied in clinical practice. This narrative review aims to identify and review the evidence for current approaches to healthcare service delivery for children with cerebral palsy. Databases were searched using key terms to identify relevant research articles and grey literature from December 2011 to September 2013. Search results were screened and sorted according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Thirty-two documents were included for evaluation and their content was analysed thematically. Three current approaches to healthcare service delivery for children with cerebral palsy identified in this narrative review were family-centred care, the World Health Organisation's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and collaborative community-based primary care. However, healthcare services for children with cerebral palsy and their families are inconsistently delivered according to these approaches and the identified guidelines or standards of care for children with cerebral palsy have limited incorporation of these approaches. Future research is required to investigate how these approaches to healthcare service delivery can be integrated into clinical practices to enable clinicians to improve services for this population.

  16. Who wants to deliver public service? Do institutional antecedents of public service motivation provide an answer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenabeele, W.V.

    2011-01-01

    Public service motivation has rapidly become one of the important concepts in contemporary public administration research. However, until now, research has mainly focused on its measurement and its consequences, whereas relatively ignoring its origins. This study investigates where the antecedents o

  17. Software-as-a-Service Vendors: Are They Ready to Successfully Deliver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart, Tsipi; Tsur, Noa Shamir; Pliskin, Nava

    Software as a service (SaaS) is a software sourcing option that allows organizations to remotely access enterprise applications, without having to install the application in-house. In this work we study vendors' readiness to deliver SaaS, a topic scarcely studied before. The innovation classification (evolutionary vs. revolutionary) and a new, Seven Fundamental Organizational Capabilities (FOCs) Model, are used as the theoretical frameworks. The Seven FOCs model suggests generic yet comprehensive set of capabilities that are required for organizational success: 1) sensing the stakeholders, 2) sensing the business environment, 3) sensing the knowledge environment, 4) process control, 5) process improvement, 6) new process development, and 7) appropriate resolution.

  18. Mobile Web 2.0 Developing and Delivering Services to Mobile Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Ahson, Syed A

    2010-01-01

    From basic concepts to research grade material, Mobile Web 2.0: Developing and Delivering Services to Mobile Devices provides complete and up-to-date coverage of the range of technical topics related to Mobile Web 2.0. It brings together the work of 51 pioneering experts from around the world who identify the major challenges in Mobile Web 2.0 applications and provide authoritative insight into many of their own innovations and advances in the field. To help you address contemporary challenges, the text details a conceptual framework that provides modeling facilities for context-aware, multi-c

  19. Preparing pharmacists to deliver a targeted service in hypertension management: evaluation of an interprofessional training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajorek, Beata V; Lemay, Kate S; Magin, Parker J; Roberts, Christopher; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol L

    2015-09-28

    Non-adherence to medicines by patients and suboptimal prescribing by clinicians underpin poor blood pressure (BP) control in hypertension. In this study, a training program was designed to enable community pharmacists to deliver a service in hypertension management targeting therapeutic adjustments and medication adherence. A comprehensive evaluation of the training program was undertaken. Tailored training comprising a self-directed pre-work manual, practical workshop (using real patients), and practice scenarios, was developed and delivered by an inter-professional team (pharmacists, GPs). Supported by practical and written assessment, the training focused on the principles of BP management, BP measurement skills, and adherence strategies. Pharmacists' experience of the training (expectations, content, format, relevance) was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. Immediate feedback was obtained via a questionnaire comprising Likert scales (1 = "very well" to 7 = "poor") and open-ended questions. Further in-depth qualitative evaluation was undertaken via semi-structured interviews several months post-training (and post service implementation). Seventeen pharmacists were recruited, trained and assessed as competent. All were highly satisfied with the training; other than the 'amount of information provided' (median score = 5, "just right"), all aspects of training attained the most positive score of '1'. Pharmacists most valued the integrated team-based approach, GP involvement, and inclusion of real patients, as well as the pre-reading manual, BP measurement workshop, and case studies (simulation). Post-implementation the interviews highlighted that comprehensive training increased pharmacists' confidence in providing the service, however, training of other pharmacy staff and patient recruitment strategies were highlighted as a need in future. Structured, multi-modal training involving simulated and inter-professional learning is effective in preparing

  20. ON SERVICES RESEARCH AND EDUCATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James M. TIEN; Daniel BERG

    2006-01-01

    The importance of the services sector can not be overstated; it employs 82.1 percent of the U. S.workforce and 69 percent of graduates from an example technological university. Yet, university research and education have not followed suit. Clearly, services research and education deserve our critical attention and support since services - and services innovation - serve as an indispensable engine for global economic growth. The theme of this paper is that we can and should build services research and education on what has occurred in manufacturing research (especially in regard to customization and intellectual property) and education; indeed, services and manufactured goods become indistinguishable as they are jointly co-produced in real-time. Fortunately, inasmuch as manufacturing concepts, methodologies and technologies have been developed and refined over a long period of time (i.e., since the 1800s), the complementary set of concepts, methodologies and technologies for services are more obvious. However, while new technologies (e.g., the Internet) and globalization trends have served to enable, if not facilitate, services innovation, the same technologies (e.g., the Internet) and 21st Century realities (e.g., terrorism) are making services innovation a far more complex problem and, in fact, may be undermining previous innovations in both services andmanufacturing. Finally, there is a need to define a "knowledge-adjusted" GDP metric that can more adequately measure the growing knowledge economy, one driven by intangible ideas and services innovation.

  1. An evaluation of a collaborative bibliotherapy scheme delivered via a library service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, J; Vallance, D; McGrath, M

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports on the evaluation of a bibliotherapy scheme delivered via a local library service, in conjunction with General Practice (GP) practices, local social welfare agencies and through self-referral. The Read Yourself Well (RYW) scheme was based on principles established from other similar schemes and as a way of delivering support for adults experiencing mild to moderate mental health problems for whom clinical treatments are not appropriate. The intervention consisted of initial referral and evaluation by the scheme bibliotherapist, a one-hour session at the beginning and end of the intervention where a purpose-designed questionnaire and two mental health assessments were carried out (the General Health Questionnaire and the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation questionnaire). Contact and support from the bibliotherapist was provided during the intervention period. One hundred and fifty-seven participants were recruited to the evaluation of whom 114 provided full data. Statistical analyses of the mental health scores showed significant improvements post treatment, for, both male and female participants, for all three referral routes, and for participants who were previously library users, and those who joined the library service to participate in the RYW scheme. The results of this large sample evaluation support the proposal that library-based bibliotherapy can be effective in the treatment of mental health problems.

  2. Twelve tips for developing and delivering a massive open online course in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D; Henningsohn, Lars; DeRuiter, Marco C; de Jong, Peter G M; Reinders, Marlies E J

    2017-07-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are a novel mode of online learning. They are typically based on higher education courses and can attract a high number of learners, often in the thousands. They are distinct from on-campus education and deliver the learning objectives through a series of short videos, recommended readings and discussion fora, alongside automated assessments. Within medical education the role of MOOCs remains unclear, with recent proposals including continuing professional development, interprofessional education or integration into campus-based blended learning curricula. In this twelve tips article, we aim to provide a framework for readers to use when developing, delivering and evaluating a MOOC within medical education based on the literature and our own experience. Practical advice is provided on how to design the appropriate curriculum, engage with learners on the platform, select suitable assessments, and comprehensively evaluate the impact of your course.

  3. Sports Education Library Information Services

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许晓峰

    2014-01-01

    Library website, is the first window for readers to understand library information services. Sports Education academy library fully take advantage of homepage, combine open access resource searched with the library collections, after targeted collection, selection, sorting, processing, clustering or reorganization, establish a navigation system of open access resource of physical Sports Education.

  4. The use of smart technology to deliver efficient and effective pressure-damage education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpaul, Kumal; Acton, Claire

    2015-11-11

    This article outlines an innovative joint working strategy, as well as a partnership project, between two NHS Foundation Trusts-a community trust and industry partner-to develop a mobile training app to deliver pressure ulcer prevention and management for clinical staff. The aim of the innovation was to enable a new way of delivering education to large numbers of staff by moving away from traditional classroom-based training. The process included development of the app, along with testing and implementation, followed by a review of the qualitative data after the app's implementation. The review takes into account the key outcomes that have had an impact on this method of delivering education, its challenges and how it has been received by clinical staff and patients.

  5. A community-based diabetes prevention program: evaluation of the group lifestyle balance program delivered by diabetes educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, M Kaye; McWilliams, Janis R; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Siminerio, Linda M

    2011-01-01

    With growing numbers of people at risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, diabetes educators report increasing referrals for intervention in prevention of these conditions. Diabetes educators have expertise in diabetes self-management education; however, they are generally not prepared for delivery of chronic disease primary prevention. The purpose of this project was to determine if individuals at risk for diabetes who participate in an intervention delivered by trained diabetes educators in existing diabetes self-management education community-based programs can reduce risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Diabetes educators in 3 outpatient-hospital programs (urban, suburban, and rural) received training and support for implementation of the Group Lifestyle Balance program, an adaptation of the Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle intervention, from the Diabetes Prevention Support Center of the University of Pittsburgh. Adults with prediabetes and/or the metabolic syndrome were eligible to enroll in the program with physician referral. With use of existing diabetes educator networks, recruitment was completed via on-site physician in-services, informative letters, and e-mail contact as well as participant-directed newspaper advertisement. Eighty-one participants enrolled in the study (71 women, 10 men). Mean overall weight loss was 11.3 lb (5.1%, P fasting plasma glucose, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure. These results suggest that the Group Lifestyle Balance program delivered by diabetes educators was successful in reducing risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease in high-risk individuals. Furthermore, diabetes educators, already integrated within the existing health care system, provide yet another resource for delivery of primary prevention programs in the community.

  6. Innovative model of delivering quality improvement education for trainees – a pilot project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Ramar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: After incorporating quality improvement (QI education as a required curriculum for our trainees in 2010, a need arose to readdress our didactic sessions as they were too long, difficult to schedule, and resulting in a drop in attendance. A ‘flipped classroom’ (FC model to deliver QI education was touted to be an effective delivery method as it allows the trainees to view didactic materials on videos, on their own time, and uses the classroom to clarify concepts and employ learned tools on case-based scenarios including workshops. Methods: The Mayo Quality Academy prepared 29 videos that incorporated the previously delivered 17 weekly didactic sessions, for a total duration of 135 min. The half-day session clarified questions related to the videos, followed by case examples and a hands-on workshop on how to perform and utilize a few commonly used QI tools and methods. Results: Seven trainees participated. There was a significant improvement in knowledge as measured by pre- and post-FC model test results [improvement by 40.34% (SD 16.34, p<0.001]. The survey results were overall positive about the FC model with all trainees strongly agreeing that we should continue with this model to deliver QI education. Conclusions: The pilot project of using the FC model to deliver QI education was successful in a small sample of trainees.

  7. DELIVERING HOLISTIC EDUCATION USING ENGINEERING CURRICULUM THROUGH PERSONALIZED LEARNING, PEDAGOGY, TECHNOLOGY AND SPACE

    OpenAIRE

    C. P. YUNG; D. T. K. TIEN; ABDULKAREEM SH. MAHDI AL-OBAIDI

    2016-01-01

    The term “holistic education” can be defined in many different ways. In this study, holistic education is defined as learning that encompasses the cognitive, affective and psychomotor learning domains. Personalized learning is envisioned as an approach to help the students’ learn more effectively through tailoring the delivery to students’ preferred learning style. In addition, technology and learning space also play a very crucial role in student learning. “Can holistic education be deliv...

  8. Supportive supervision for volunteers to deliver reproductive health education: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Debra; Negin, Joel; Orach, Christopher Garimoi; Cumming, Robert

    2016-10-03

    Community Health Volunteers (CHVs) can be effective in improving pregnancy and newborn outcomes through community education. Inadequate supervision of CHVs, whether due to poor planning, irregular visits, or ineffective supervisory methods, is, however, recognized as a weakness in many programs. There has been little research on best practice supervisory or accompaniment models. From March 2014 to February 2015 a proof of concept study was conducted to compare training alone versus training and supportive supervision by paid CHWs (n = 4) on the effectiveness of CHVs (n = 82) to deliver education about pregnancy, newborn care, family planning and hygiene. The pair-matched cluster randomized trial was conducted in eight villages (four intervention and four control) in Budondo sub-county in Jinja, Uganda. Increases in desired behaviors were seen in both the intervention and control arms over the study period. Both arms showed high retention rates of CHVs (95 %). At 1 year follow-up there was a significantly higher prevalence of installed and functioning tippy taps for hand washing (p reproductive health care by addressing cultural norms and scientific misconceptions. Having a team of 2 CHWs to 40 CHVs enables close to community access to information, conversation and services. Supportive supervision involves creating a non-threatening, empowering environment in which both the CHV and the supervising CHW learn together and overcome obstacles that might otherwise demotivate the CHV. While the results seem promising for added value with supportive supervision for CHVs undertaking reproductive health activities, further research on a larger scale will be needed to substantiate the effect.

  9. Ghana - Community Services - Education

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The objectives in this ex-post performance evaluation target how the education sub-activity was implemented, if and how it has been sustained, and its perceived...

  10. Health service planning and sustainable development: considering what, where and how care is delivered through a pro-environmental lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Sharon

    2017-03-02

    The aim of the present paper was to review the opportunities currently available to health service planners to advance sustainable development in their future-facing roles within health service organisation. Critical challenges and enablers to facilitate health services planners in adopting a pro-environmental lens are discussed.What is known about the topic? Despite its harmful effect on the environment, health has been slower than other industries to embrace the sustainable development agenda. The attitudes and knowledge base of health service planners with regard to environmental sustainability has not been widely studied. For health service planners, embracing pro-environmental considerations in sustainable model of care development is a powerful opportunity to review care paradigms and prepare for the implementation of meaningful, improved health and system efficiency.What does this paper add? This paper advances the case for health service planners to embrace a pro-environmental stance and guides health service leaders in the preparation and implementation of sustainable and improved health and system efficiency.What are the implications for practitioners? Health service planers are in an ideal position to champion the sustainable development agenda as they explore what care is delivered, how care is delivered and where care is delivered. External policy, health service leadership and carbon literacy are advanced as critical contextual factors to facilitate the key role that health service planners can play in building sustainable healthcare organisations.

  11. Service user involvement in mental health practitioner education in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, A; Maguire, G; Watts, M; Creaner, M; McCann, E; Rani, S; Alexander, J

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, there is an ever increasing call to involve people who use mental health services in the development, delivery and evaluation of education programmes. Within Ireland, there is very little evidence of the degree of service user involvement in the educational preparation of mental health practitioners. This paper presents the findings on service user involvement in the education and training of professionals working in mental health services in Ireland. Findings from this study indicate that in the vast majority of courses curricula are planned and delivered without consultation or input from service users. Currently the scope of service user involvement is on teaching, with little involvement in curriculum development, student assessment and student selection. However, there is evidence that this is changing, with many respondents indicating an eagerness to move this agenda forward.

  12. Depolarization in Delivering Public Services? Impacts of Minimum Service Standards (MSS on the Quality of Health Services in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Roudo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Some scholars argue that decentralization policy tends to create polarization, i.e. an increase of inequality/disparity among districts. To deal with this problem, Minimum Service Standards (MSS were introduced as a key strategy in decentralizing Indonesia. In this research, we tried to find out through MSS performance measurements whether imposing standards can be effective in a decentralized system by seeking its impacts on polarization/depolarization in the delivery of public services, specifically in the health sector. This question is basically a response to the common criticism that decentralization is good to create equality between central government and local governments but often does not work to achieve equality among local governments. Using self-assessment data from a sample of 54 districts from 534 districts in Indonesia, from 2010 to 2013, we found that the existence of depolarization in the delivery of public services could potentially occur among regions by reducing the gap between their public service performance and the targets of MSS. We acknowledge that there are weaknesses in the validity of the self-assessment data, caused by a lack of knowledge and skills to execute the self-assessment according to the official guidelines, by the overrating of target achievements, as well as the lack of data from independent sources to confirm the self-assessment outcomes. We also acknowledge that differences in financial capacity are still the main determinant why one district is more successful in achieving the MSS targets compared to other districts. Keywords. Decentralization, Public Service, Minimum Standard Service

  13. Comparative performance of seven long-running telemedicine networks delivering humanitarian services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Richard; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Jethwani, Kamal; Kovarik, Carrie; Person, Donald A; Vladzymyrskyy, Anton; Zanaboni, Paolo; Zolfo, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Seven long-running telemedicine networks were surveyed. The networks provided humanitarian services (clinical and educational) in developing countries, and had been in operation for periods of 5-15 years. The number of experts serving each network ranged from 15 to 513. The smallest network had a total of 10 requesters and the largest one had more than 500 requesters. The networks operated in nearly 60 countries. The seven networks managed a total of 1857 cases in 2011, i.e. an average of 265 cases per year per network. There was a significant growth in total activity, amounting to 100.3 cases per year during the 15 year study period. In 2011, network activity was 50-700 teleconsultations per network. There were clear differences in the patterns of activity, with some networks managing an increasing caseload, and others managing a slowly reducing caseload. The seven networks had published a total of 44 papers listed in Medline which summarized the evidence resulting from the delivery of services by telemedicine. There was a dearth of information about clinical and cost-effectiveness. Nevertheless, the services were widely appreciated by referring doctors, considered to be clinically useful, and there were indications that clinical outcomes for telemedicine patients were often improved. Despite a lack of formal evidence, the present study suggests that telemedicine can provide clinically useful services in developing countries.

  14. Delivering health information services and technologies to urban community health centers: the Chicago AIDS Outreach Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E R; McDaniels, C; Crespo, J; Lanier, D

    1997-10-01

    Health professionals cannot address public health issues effectively unless they have immediate access to current biomedical information. This paper reports on one mode of access, the Chicago AIDS Outreach Project, which was supported by the National Library of Medicine through outreach awards in 1995 and 1996. The three-year project is an effort to link the programs and services of the University of Illinois at Chicago Library of the Health Sciences and the Midwest AIDS Training and Education Center with the clinic services of community-based organizations in Chicago. The project was designed to provide electronic access to AIDS-related information for AIDS patients, the affected community, and their care givers. The project also provided Internet access and training and continued access to library resources. The successful initiative suggests a working model for outreach to health professionals in an urban setting.

  15. Joining Forces: Collaborating Internationally to Deliver High-Quality, Online Postgraduate Education in Pain Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Devonshire

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective management of pain is a complex and costly global issue, requiring a range of innovative educational strategies to enable culturally appropriate and high-quality health care provision. In response to this issue, the Pain Management Research Institute at the University of Sydney (Sydney, Australia has established several strategic alliances with other overseas universities to deliver online postgraduate education in pain management. The present article discusses the rationale for joining forces, and the approach adopted in creating and maintaining these alliances. It also provides insights into the benefits, challenges and opportunities associated with collaborative educational initiatives of this nature, from institutional, academic and student perspectives.

  16. Delivering high-quality family planning services in crisis-affected settings I: program implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Dora Ward; Rattan, Jesse; Nzau, Jean Jose; Giri, Kamlesh

    2015-02-04

    In 2012, about 43 million women of reproductive age experienced the effects of conflict. Provision of basic sexual and reproductive health services, including family planning, is a recognized right and need of refugees and internally displaced people, but funding and services for family planning have been inadequate. This article describes lessons learned during the first 2.5 years of implementing the ongoing Supporting Access to Family Planning and Post-Abortion Care in Emergencies (SAFPAC) initiative, led by CARE, which supports government health systems to deliver family planning services in 5 crisis-affected settings (Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Mali, and Pakistan). SAFPAC's strategy focuses on 4 broad interventions drawn from public health best practices in more stable settings: competency-based training for providers, improved supply chain management, regular supervision, and community mobilization to influence attitudes and norms related to family planning. Between July 2011 and December 2013, the initiative reached 52,616 new users of modern contraceptive methods across the 5 countries (catchment population of 698,053 women of reproductive age), 61% of whom chose long-acting methods of implants or intrauterine devices. Prudent use of data to inform decision making has been an underpinning to the project's approach. A key approach to ensuring sustained ability to train and supervise new providers has been to build capacity in clinical skills training and supervision by establishing in-country training centers. In addition, monthly supervision using simple checklists has improved program and service quality, particularly with infection prevention procedures and stock management. We have generally instituted a "pull" system to manage commodities and other supplies, whereby health facilities place resupply orders as needed based on actual consumption patterns and stock-alert thresholds. Finally, reaching the community with mobilization

  17. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES TO DELIVER FINANCIAL SERVICES FOR THE LOW-INCOME POPULATION: CORRESPONDENT BANKING AT BANCO LEMON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Akira Yokomizo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian banks have developed innovative initiatives to deliver financial services for the lowincome population through correspondent banking (CB. Banco Lemon is such an interesting case to be studied because it has implemented a business model based exclusively on CB outlets and its focus was on low-income clients. This paper describes Banco Lemon’s adoption process of the CB technology to deliver financial services for the low-income population, promoting a historical description of the bank’s activities, since its creation and up to the year 2009. Eventually, this paper concludes that bill payment initiatives were successful while credit initiatives led to unexpressive outcomes.

  18. Prospects of concentrating solar power to deliver key energy services in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charikleia Karakosta, Charalampos Pappas, John Psarras

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available One of today's greatest challenges is the response to the worldwide continuously increasing energy demand. The need for supply of electricity is getting greater year by year. In addition, climate change problems and the limited fossil resources require new sustainable electricity generation options, which utilize Renewable Energy Sources (RES and are economical in the meantime. Concentrating Solar Power (CSP generation is a proven renewable energy technology that has the potential to become cost-effective in the future. This analysis explores for Chile the potential of CSP to deliver key energy services for the country. The specific technology has a significant technical potential within Chile, but ‘somehow’ do not receive sufficient attention from relevant stakeholders, because of gaps either in stakeholders awareness of the technology or in domestic research and development and/or public/private investment. The aim of this paper is to establish a well-informed discussion on the feasibility and potential of the specific sustainable energy technology, namely the CSP technology, within a given country context and particularly Chile. It provides an overview of the fundamental (macro-economic forces within an economy and identifies some of the blockages and barriers that can be expected when introducing a new technology.

  19. University Branding. An Analysis of University Services Delivered via the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Vrabie

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to assess how the information can be more easily disseminated on the Web sites of higher education institutions. Marshall McLuhan saw the language developed in a book as a proof in favor of knowledge. “When information comes in contact with another information, the results are sensational and effective”. In terms of talent and how fast they adapt, the youth of today, Generation Net as Don Tapscott calls them, have the power to transform the present. They come up with new approaches on collaboration, sharing information and innovation in business and governance from around the world. There is strong evidence that organizations that embrace these new ways of working are more efficient registering a growth and greater success. We selected for this purpose a number of foreign students on master programs (based on the experience they have already from two prestigious universities Hacettepe in Ankara, Turkey and NUPSPA in Bucharest, Romania, and based on some questions and interviews we set up a strategy for how to improve quality management for university - Web services for students based on their perceptions. We started with the assumption that better e-integration, infrastructure, and Web-services will go to better quality management and from here to better results on intake of international students (with more successful students, research and education of high quality - assuming that internationalization yield increase higher education quality, public benefit, better competition, better access to funds etc. The SWOT analysis will be the centerpiece of our discussions with the students from those two groups – one from Hacettepe and the second one from NUPSPA.

  20. Service Quality in Postgraduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Robert J.; Heffernan, Troy W.; Megicks, Phil

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring service quality in higher education is increasingly important for attracting and retaining tuition-based revenues. Nonetheless, whilst undergraduates have received substantial academic exposure, postgraduate-based research has been scant. Consequently, the objectives of this paper are threefold: first, to identify the service…

  1. Service Quality in Postgraduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Robert J.; Heffernan, Troy W.; Megicks, Phil

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring service quality in higher education is increasingly important for attracting and retaining tuition-based revenues. Nonetheless, whilst undergraduates have received substantial academic exposure, postgraduate-based research has been scant. Consequently, the objectives of this paper are threefold: first, to identify the service…

  2. Balancing patient care and student education: learning to deliver bad news in an optometry teaching clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spafford, Marlee M; Schryer, Catherine F; Creutz, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of seven senior optometry students and six optometrist instructors at a Canadian optometry teaching clinic. The participants described their experiences in learning to deliver bad news. Using a grounded theory approach, our analysis was informed by situated learning and activity theory. Optometry students received formal classroom training regarding how to deliver bad news, including exposure to the medically-based six-step SPIKES protocol (Baile et al. The Oncologist, 5, 302-311, 2000). Yet, application of this protocol to the teaching clinic was limited by the lack of exposure most instructors had received to this strategy. Determinants of the students' complex learning process during their clinical apprenticeship, included: (i) knowing one's place, (ii) knowing one's audience, (iii) knowing through feedback, and (iv) knowing who speaks. The experiences of these participants pointed toward the need for: (1) more instructional "scaffolding" (Bruner and Sherwood Play: Its role in development and evolution, p. 280, 1976) in the clinical setting when the learning task is complex, and (2) explicit discussions about the impacts that unfold when the activities of patient care and student education overlap. We reflect on the possible consequences to student education and patient care in the absence of these changes.

  3. Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis of the Effectiveness of Contraceptive Service Interventions for Young People, Delivered in Health Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Lindsay; Baxter, Susan K.; Payne, Nick; Guillaume, Louise R.; Squires, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review and narrative synthesis to determine the effectiveness of contraception service interventions for young people delivered in health care premises was undertaken. We searched 12 key health and medical databases, reference lists of included papers and systematic reviews and cited reference searches on included articles. All…

  4. DELIVERING GIS TRAINING USING GEOSPATIAL WEB SERVICE – A CASE STUDY OF LANDSLIDE RISK MAPPING IN HONG KONG

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper sketches a prototype of web-based landslide prediction service for delivering web-based training. The results show that the proposed landslide GWSC model can effectively compute the landslide risk level in different location, and consequently allow for early-warning, which starts with the sensor in the field and ending with user-opitmized warning messages and action advice.

  5. Delivering high-quality family planning services in crisis-affected settings II: results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Dora Ward; Rattan, Jesse; Huang, Shuyuan; Noznesky, Elizabeth

    2015-02-04

    An estimated 43 million women of reproductive age experienced the effects of conflict in 2012. Already vulnerable from the insecurity of the emergency, women must also face the continuing risk of unwanted pregnancy but often are unable to obtain family planning services. The ongoing Supporting Access to Family Planning and Post-Abortion Care (SAFPAC) initiative, led by CARE, has provided contraceptives, including long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), to refugees, internally displaced persons, and conflict-affected resident populations in Chad, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Djibouti, Mali, and Pakistan. The project works through the Ministry of Health in 4 key areas: (1) competency-based training, (2) supply chain management, (3) systematic supervision, and (4) community mobilization to raise awareness and shift norms related to family planning. This article presents data on program results from July 2011 to December 2013 from the 5 countries. Project staff summarized monthly data from client registers using hard-copy forms and recorded the data electronically in Microsoft Excel for compilation and analysis. The initiative reached 52,616 new users of modern contraceptive methods across the 5 countries, ranging from 575 in Djibouti to 21,191 in Chad. LARCs have predominated overall, representing 61% of new modern method users. The percentage of new users choosing LARCs varied by country: 78% in the DRC, 72% in Chad, and 51% in Mali, but only 29% in Pakistan. In Djibouti, those methods were not offered in the country through SAFPAC during the period discussed here. In Chad, the DRC, and Mali, implants have been the most popular LARC method, while in Pakistan the IUD has been more popular. Use of IUDs, however, has comprised a larger share of the method mix over time in all 4 of these countries. These results to date suggest that it is feasible to work with the public sector in fragile, crisis-affected states to deliver a wide range of quality

  6. Pilot project and evaluation of delivering diabetes work-based education using video conferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltinsky, W; Hall, S; Grant, L; Simpson, K; MacRury, S

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic long-term disease with an increasing incidence. There is a need to increase access to effective care and to ensure such care is delivered as locally as possible. The geographical spread of NHS Highland Scotland presents additional challenges to ensuring a skilled workforce given education is normally work-based tuition and assessment. The aim of this pilot project was to deliver teleconferenced diabetes training to healthcare and allied healthcare professionals who provide basic level care for, and management of, people with diabetes and to evaluate this training. Work-based diabetes education was designed to be delivered by a diabetes educator through videoconferencing or face to face (F2F) for healthcare professionals in peripheral settings in the Scottish Highlands region over two half-days. The education covered theoretical and practical training in diabetes. The evaluation of the project was through post-course questionnaires and assessment instruments to capture views of the content and delivery mode, as well as student performance. Feedback from participants indicated that the educational content was relevant and that the use of videoconferencing (VC) could provide accessibility to training where distance, cost and other issues may make access difficult. Student performance on the assessment instruments did not differ between those who received the training through video conferencing and those who received the training through F2F delivery. Video conferencing can counteract the difficulties of accessing training for clinical peripherally based professionals. Training through VC did not compromise student acquisition of learning outcomes. Feedback indicates that VC can reduce the interactive nature of the learning and teaching experience.

  7. Financial Implications Imbedded in Views of Education as a Service Enterprise and as a Product Enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, John B.

    Education is both a service enterprise and a product enterprise. Each view has direct bearing on the program structure that ties budget, accounting, and reporting data into classification matrices capable of computerized analysis. Service is defined as an activity or as a tangible object delivered to a specified client. An educational product is a…

  8. Social and Ecological Drivers of the Economic Value of Pollination Services Delivered to Coffee in Central Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Mushambanyi Théodore Munyuli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On-farm pollination experiments were conducted in 30 different small-scale coffee fields to determine monetary value attributable to pollination services in coffee production and to identify the degree of influences of various socio-ecological drivers in Uganda. Ecological-economic approaches were applied to determine the economic value of pollinating services. Economic value of bees increased significantly with increase in coffee farm size, bee diversity, and cover of seminatural habitats. The value of bees declined sharply (P<0.05 with forest distance and cultivation intensity. Economic values of pollinating services associated with coffee fields established in regions with low intensity were found to be high. Organically managed small-scale coffee fields were 2 times more profitable than commercially managed farms. The annual value of pollinating services delivered by wild bees oscillated between US$67.18 and US$1431.36. Central Uganda produces in total 0.401 million tons of coffee beans for an approximate economic value of US$214 million from which US$149.42 million are attributable to pollination services. Policy makers should strengthen environmental/agricultural extension service systems to better serve farmers. Farmers are recommended to protect/increase the cover of natural and semi-natural habitats in the vicinity of their coffee fields to receive high economic benefits from pollinating services delivered by bees.

  9. Behavioral health providers' perspectives of delivering behavioral health services in primary care: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beehler Gregory P

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-located, collaborative care (CCC is one component of VA’s model of Integrated Primary Care that embeds behavioral health providers (BHPs into primary care clinics to treat commonly occurring mental health concerns among Veterans. Key features of the CCC model include time-limited, brief treatments (up to 6 encounters of 30 minutes each and emphasis on multi-dimensional functional assessment. Although CCC is a mandated model of care, the barriers and facilitators to implementing this approach as identified from the perspective of BHPs have not been previously identified. Methods This secondary data analysis used interview data captured as part of a quality improvement project in 2008. Fourteen BHPs (48% of providers in a regional VA network agreed to participate in a 30-minute, semi-structured phone interview. The interview included questions about their perceived role as a CCC provider, depiction of usual practice styles and behaviors, and perceptions of typical barriers and facilitators to providing behavioral healthcare to Veterans in CCC. Interviews were transcribed verbatim into a text database and analyzed using grounded theory. Results Six main categories emerged from the analysis: (a Working in the VA Context, (b Managing Access to Care on the Front Line, (c Assessing a Care Trajectory, (d Developing a Local Integrated Model, (e Working in Collaborative Teams, and (f Being a Behavioral Health Generalist. These categories pointed to system, clinic, and provider level factors that impacted BHP’s role and ability to implement CCC. Across categories, participants identified ways in which they provided Veteran-centered care within variable environments. Conclusions This study provided a contextualized account of the experiences of BHP’s in CCC. Results suggest that these providers play a multifaceted role in delivering clinical services to Veterans while also acting as an interdependent component of the larger VA

  10. Appreciative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jennifer L.; Hutson, Bryant L.; He, Ye; Konkle, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Appreciative education is presented as a framework for leading higher education institutions, delivering truly student-centered services, and guiding higher education professionals' interactions with students.

  11. Appreciative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jennifer L.; Hutson, Bryant L.; He, Ye; Konkle, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Appreciative education is presented as a framework for leading higher education institutions, delivering truly student-centered services, and guiding higher education professionals' interactions with students.

  12. Abortion care services delivered from a community sexual and reproductive health setting: views of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, Lucy; Cameron, Sharon T; Glasier, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Abortion services should provide high-quality contraceptive care. The community sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services may be well placed to deliver more abortion care in the UK. We wished to determine the views of health professionals working in SRH regarding their attitudes towards providing more abortion services and also the views of staff within one community SRH centre in Scotland where a service providing early medical abortion (EMA) was due to commence. An anonymous questionnaire distributed to attendees at a UK SRH scientific meeting collected data on demographics, current practice of and attitude to abortion, and views on delivery of abortion services. An internet questionnaire distributed by e-mail to staff at a community SRH clinic in Scotland sought demographics, views regarding the planned introduction of an EMA service and willingness to participate in it. 165 questionnaires were completed out of 200 distributed at the scientific meeting (an 82% response rate). 128 (78%) respondents felt that abortion services were suited to community clinics and 115 (70%) stated that they would be willing to participate in them. 62/90 (69%) staff from the SRH clinic responded to the internet questionnaire. 44 (71%) felt the plan to introduce abortion services was a natural extension to services already offered and the same number would be willing to be involved in such a service. There is clear support amongst health professionals in community SRH in the UK towards greater participation in the provision of abortion care services.

  13. Operator models for delivering municipal solid waste management services in developing countries. Part A: The evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David C; Kanjogera, Jennifer Bangirana; Soós, Reka; Briciu, Cosmin; Smith, Stephen R; Whiteman, Andrew D; Spies, Sandra; Oelz, Barbara

    2017-08-01

    This article presents the evidence base for 'operator models' - that is, how to deliver a sustainable service through the interaction of the 'client', 'revenue collector' and 'operator' functions - for municipal solid waste management in emerging and developing countries. The companion article addresses a selection of locally appropriate operator models. The evidence shows that no 'standard' operator model is effective in all developing countries and circumstances. Each city uses a mix of different operator models; 134 cases showed on average 2.5 models per city, each applying to different elements of municipal solid waste management - that is, street sweeping, primary collection, secondary collection, transfer, recycling, resource recovery and disposal or a combination. Operator models were analysed in detail for 28 case studies; the article summarises evidence across all elements and in more detail for waste collection. Operators fall into three main groups: The public sector, formal private sector, and micro-service providers including micro-, community-based and informal enterprises. Micro-service providers emerge as a common group; they are effective in expanding primary collection service coverage into poor- or peri-urban neighbourhoods and in delivering recycling. Both public and private sector operators can deliver effective services in the appropriate situation; what matters more is a strong client organisation responsible for municipal solid waste management within the municipality, with stable political and financial backing and capacity to manage service delivery. Revenue collection is also integral to operator models: Generally the municipality pays the operator from direct charges and/or indirect taxes, rather than the operator collecting fees directly from the service user.

  14. G-quest: a single platform for delivering questionnaires, educational material, and checklists on mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzola, Giordano; Ginardi, Germana; Russo, Paola; Quaglini, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    We illustrate G-quest, a platform originally meant to deliver questionnaires on mobile devices that supports the accomplishment of studies involving outpatients. However the constructs made available by the platform proved to be useful also for distributing learning material and checklists, after a paradigm shift in their application was adopted. Thus, in addition to questionnaires, we designed a guide for educating patients affected by a rare disease and conducted a small survey to assess this new application context. Presently we are exploiting G-quest for the provision of medical checklists in critical care.

  15. Nutrition risk factors among home delivered and congregate meal participants: need for enhancement of nutrition education and counseling among home delivered meal participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, S; Bai, Y; Piemonte, J

    2011-11-01

    The short-term impact of nutrition education and counseling intervention on nutrition risk factors among home delivered (HDM) and congregate (CGM) meal participants using Nutrition Survey Risk Screening was studied. A two-year intervention was conducted with 355 participants (n=259 CGM, n=96 HDM). Various nutrition behaviors that affect the nutrition risk score were compared. Congregate and home delivered meal locations in a northern county of New Jersey. CGM and HDM participants in a northern county of New Jersey age 60 and older. CGM participants received regular topical nutrition education and counseling in a classroom format with cooking demo, discussion, and handouts. The HDM participants only received the printed material (same handouts) and counseling by telephone. Demographics, medical condition, risk factors data were collected. All participants completed the 12 items checklist Nutrition Survey Risk Screening. Nutritional behaviors assessed include number of meals eaten per day, servings of fruits and vegetables and nutrition risk score. A score of 6 or more points was defined as persons at high risk nutritionally. The impact of the intervention was evaluated using ANOVA/chi-square on Nutrition Survey Risk Screening. Nutrition education and counseling intervention improved nutrition risk scores; 5.76 to 5.32 (p=0.14) in CGM, 8.1 to 6.1 (peffective nutrition education and counseling.

  16. Defining Service and Education in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Debra; Gagne, Josh; Kesselheim, Jennifer C

    2016-12-01

    Program directors (PDs) and trainees are often queried regarding the balance of service and education during pediatric residency training. We aimed to use qualitative methods to learn how pediatric residents and PDs define service and education and to identify activities that exemplify these concepts. Focus groups of pediatric residents and PDs were performed and the data qualitatively analyzed. Thematic analysis revealed 4 themes from focus group data: (1) misalignment of the perceived definition of service; (2) agreement about the definition of education; (3) overlapping perceptions of the value of service to training; and (4) additional suggestions for improved integration of education and service. Pediatric residents hold positive definitions of service and believe that service adds value to their education. Importantly, the discovery of heterogeneous definitions of service between pediatric residents and PDs warrants further investigation and may have ramifications for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and those responsible for residency curricula.

  17. Support Services for Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Frieden

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The creation and operation of a distance education support infrastructure requires the collaboration of virtually all administrative departments whose activities deal with students and faculty, and all participating academic departments. Implementation can build on where the institution is and design service-oriented strategies that strengthen institutional support and commitment. Issues to address include planning, faculty issues and concerns, policies and guidelines, approval processes, scheduling, training, publicity, information-line operations, informational materials, orientation and registration processes, class coordination and support, testing, evaluations, receive site management, partnerships, budgets, staffing, library and e-mail support, and different delivery modes (microwave, compressed video, radio, satellite, public television/cable, video tape and online. The process is ongoing and increasingly participative as various groups on campus begin to get involved with distance education activities. The distance education unit must continuously examine and revise its processes and procedures to maintain the academic integrity and service excellence of its programs. It’s a daunting prospect to revise the way things have been done for many years, but each department has an opportunity to respond to new ways of serving and reaching students.

  18. A designerly approach to enable organizations to deliver product-service systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lille, C.S.H.; Roscam Abbing, E.; Kleinsmann, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Design is not only just for products, logo’s or websites anymore. More and more companies are embracing design as a way to enable their organization to adapt to changes in society. One of the challenges many organizations face at the moment is how to create value for their customers by delivering ex

  19. Development of Core Competencies for Paraprofessional Nutrition Educators Who Deliver Food Stamp Nutrition Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Susan S.; Pearson, Meredith; Chipman, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to describe the process used for the development of core competencies for paraprofessional nutrition educators in Food Stamp Nutrition Education (FSNE). The development process included the efforts of an expert panel of state and multicounty FSNE leaders to draft the core competencies and the validation of those…

  20. Development of Core Competencies for Paraprofessional Nutrition Educators Who Deliver Food Stamp Nutrition Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Susan S.; Pearson, Meredith; Chipman, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to describe the process used for the development of core competencies for paraprofessional nutrition educators in Food Stamp Nutrition Education (FSNE). The development process included the efforts of an expert panel of state and multicounty FSNE leaders to draft the core competencies and the validation of those…

  1. Cost of Delivering Health Care Services in Public Sector Primary and Community Health Centres in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditi; Verma, Ramesh; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Kumar, Dinesh; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background With the commitment of the national government to provide universal healthcare at cheap and affordable prices in India, public healthcare services are being strengthened in India. However, there is dearth of cost data for provision of health services through public system like primary & community health centres. In this study, we aim to bridge this gap in evidence by assessing the total annual and per capita cost of delivering the package of health services at PHC and CHC level. Secondly, we determined the per capita cost of delivering specific health services like cost per antenatal care visit, per institutional delivery, per outpatient consultation, per bed-day hospitalization etc. Methods We undertook economic costing of fourteen public health facilities (seven PHCs and CHCs each) in three North-Indian states viz., Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and Punjab. Bottom-up costing method was adopted for collection of data on all resources spent on delivery of health services in selected health facilities. Analysis was undertaken using a health system perspective. The joint costs like human resource, capital, and equipment were apportioned as per the time value spent on a particular service. Capital costs were discounted and annualized over the estimated life of the item. Mean annual costs and unit costs were estimated along with their 95% confidence intervals using bootstrap methodology. Results The overall annual cost of delivering services through public sector primary and community health facilities in three states of north India were INR 8.8 million (95% CI: 7,365,630–10,294,065) and INR 26.9 million (95% CI: 22,225,159.3–32,290,099.6), respectively. Human resources accounted for more than 50% of the overall costs at both the level of PHCs and CHCs. Per capita per year costs for provision of complete package of preventive, curative and promotive services at PHC and CHC were INR 170.8 (95% CI: 131.6–208.3) and INR162.1 (95% CI: 112–219

  2. NOAA's Regional Climate Services Program: Building Relationships with Partners and Customers to Deliver Trusted Climate Information at Usable Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecray, E. L.; Dissen, J.

    2016-12-01

    Federal agencies across multiple sectors from transportation to health, emergency management and agriculture, are now requiring their key stakeholders to identify and plan for climate-related impacts. Responding to the drumbeat for climate services at the regional and local scale, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) formed its Regional Climate Services (RCS) program to include Regional Climate Services Directors (RCSD), Regional Climate Centers, and state climatologists in a partnership. Since 2010, the RCS program has engaged customers across the country and amongst many of the nation's key economic sectors to compile information requirements, deliver climate-related products and services, and build partnerships among federal agencies and their regional climate entities. The talk will include a sketch from the Eastern Region that may shed light on the interaction of the multiple entities working at the regional scale. Additionally, we will show examples of our interagency work with the Department of Interior, the Department of Agriculture, and others in NOAA to deliver usable and trusted climate information and resources. These include webinars, print material, and face-to-face customer engagements to gather and respond to information requirements. NOAA/National Centers for Environmental Information's RCSDs work on-the-ground to learn from customers about their information needs and their use of existing tools and resources. As regional leads, the RCSDs work within NOAA and with our regional partners to ensure the customer receives a broad picture of the tools and information from across the nation.

  3. One stop shop versus collaborative integration: what is the best way of delivering sexual health services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R S; Coope, C M; Graham, A; Gerressu, M; Salisbury, C; Stephenson, J M

    2006-06-01

    To examine various models of integrated and/or one stop shop (OSS) sexual health services (including general practice, mainstream specialist services, and designated young people's services) and explore their relative strengths and weaknesses. Literature review and interviews with key informants involved in developing the National Strategy for Sexual Health and HIV (n = 11). The paper focuses on five broad perspectives (logistics, public health, users, staff, and cost). Contraceptive and genitourinary medicine issues are closely related. However, there is no agreement about what is meant by having "integrated" services, about which services should be integrated, or where integration should happen. There are concerns that OSSs will result in over-centralisation, to the disadvantage of stand alone and satellite services. OSS models are potentially more user focused, but the stigma that surrounds sexual health services may create an access barrier. From staff perspectives, the advantages are greater career opportunities and increased responsibility, while the disadvantages are concern that OSSs will result in loss of expertise and professional status. Cost effectiveness data are contradictory. Although there is a policy commitment to look at how integrated services can be better developed, more evidence is required on the impact and appropriateness of this approach.

  4. Students Delivering Health Care to a Vulnerable Appalachian Population through Interprofessional Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle L.; Hayes, Patricia A.; McConnell, Peggy; Henry, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    Interprofessional student service-learning experiences are integrated into the preventive care of older adult residents of public housing in Appalachia. Receiving a Health Resources and Services Administration grant provided the College of Nursing at East Tennessee State University the opportunity to expand interprofessional clinical experiences…

  5. Non-physician delivered intravitreal injection service is feasible and safe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasul, Asrin; Subhi, Yousif; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2016-01-01

    retinopathy. We systematically reviewed the existing literature to provide an overview of the experiences in this transformational process. METHODS: We searched for literature on 22 September 2015 using PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL and the Web of Science. Eligible studies had to address any...... outcome based on non-physician delivered intravitreal therapy regardless of the study design. Being non-physician was defined as the injecting personnel not being a physician, but no further restrictions were made. RESULTS: Five studies were included with a total of 31,303 injections having been performed...

  6. A systematic review of intimate partner violence educational interventions delivered to allied health care practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Simon; Coles, Jan; Williams, Angela; Williams, Brett

    2016-11-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in women worldwide. Numerous health organisations have called for increased education for health care practitioners who encounter IPV patients and the first clinical guidelines for health services responding to IPV were recently published. This renewed focus has created a need to examine the current evidence for IPV education so that it may inform the next generation of educational interventions. This study was designed to examine the effects of IPV educational interventions on the knowledge, attitudes, skills and behaviours of allied health care practitioners (AHCPs). We conducted a systematic search of multiple databases up to the end of May 2015. We selected studies that included IPV educational interventions for AHCPs and that measured knowledge, attitude, skill or behavioural outcomes. Studies were evaluated based on methodological quality, education context and outcome measurement. We found 2757 articles from which 18 were selected for inclusion. Study participants included nurses, dentists, social workers and paramedics. Educational interventions ranged widely in length, delivery format and topics covered. Findings indicate that improvements in some knowledge, attitudes, skills and behaviours are associated with education, although the lack of high-quality studies indicates that conclusions should be treated with caution. Future studies should be conducted using rigorous methodology and validated instruments to measure evidence-based outcomes and should target a wider range of AHCPs. Recommendations are provided on education content and delivery, study methodology and outcome measurement based on insights gained from selected studies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  7. Engaging an Urban African American Community to Deliver Cognitive Health Education to Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, Jennifer; Nolan, Timiya S; Vo, Jacqueline B; Gisiger-Camata, Silvia; Meneses, Karen

    2016-12-28

    Little is known about cognitive changes among African American (AA) breast cancer survivors (BCS). Here, we report our experience with engagement of leaders of urban AA churches in Birmingham, Alabama to deliver and evaluate Think Well: Healthy Living to Improve Cognitive Function, an educational cognitive health program for BCS. The Think Well team engaged leaders of urban AA churches using a 7-step process: 1) identify leaders, 2) develop connection with leaders, 3) assess AA community preferences, 4) tailor for cultural relevance, 5) plan seminars, 6) deliver seminars, and 7) evaluate cultural relevance and overall program quality. Program evaluation was via a 22-item survey and sociodemographic questionnaire. Data from AA participants were analyzed using SPSS. The engagement process resulted in sustained partnerships with three urban AA churches and delivery of three Think Well seminars to 172 participants. Of the 172 participants, 138 (80%) AA participants (40 BCS, 98 co-survivors) returned the program survey. Respondents reported Think Well to be culturally relevant (90%) and of high quality (94%). Think Well was developed and evaluated with the collaboration of urban AA church leaders. Engaging church leaders facilitated reach of AA BCS. Partnership facilitated a culturally relevant, high quality program for AA BCS and co-survivors.

  8. Identifying future models for delivering genetic services: a nominal group study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Peter

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background To enable primary care medical practitioners to generate a range of possible service delivery models for genetic counselling services and critically assess their suitability. Methods Modified nominal group technique using in primary care professional development workshops. Results 37 general practitioners in Wales, United Kingdom too part in the nominal group process. The practitioners who attended did not believe current systems were sufficient to meet anticipated demand for genetic services. A wide range of different service models was proposed, although no single option emerged as a clear preference. No argument was put forward for genetic assessment and counselling being central to family practice, neither was there a voice for the view that the family doctor should become skilled at advising patients about predictive genetic testing and be able to counsel patients about the wider implications of genetic testing for patients and their family members, even for areas such as common cancers. Nevertheless, all the preferred models put a high priority on providing the service in the community, and often co-located in primary care, by clinicians who had developed expertise. Conclusion There is a need for a wider debate about how healthcare systems address individual concerns about genetic concerns and risk, especially given the increasing commercial marketing of genetic tests.

  9. Cancer patients' questions and concerns expressed in an online nurse-delivered mail service: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Trine; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2009-01-01

    Internet-based online patient-nurse communication (OPNC) services can constitute an important opportunity to support patients to manage their illness between treatment and rehabilitation while being at home. We explored the content of messages sent by prostate and breast cancer patients to an OPNC service to identify symptoms, problems, concerns and information needs expressed in these messages. Using qualitative content analyses we examined 276 messages sent from 38 breast and 22 prostate cancer patients during 15 months. Two main themes emerged: Concerns about physical symptoms and treatment side effects; and worries and questions about treatment and follow up. Analyses showed that cancer patients have many serious unanswered questions and concerns that can create considerable uncertainty and anxiety. An OPNC service can to a great extent meet patients' need for advice and information and thus be an important health care supplement that can improve quality of care.

  10. Cloud based intelligent system for delivering health care as a service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Pankaj Deep; Chana, Inderveer

    2014-01-01

    The promising potential of cloud computing and its convergence with technologies such as mobile computing, wireless networks, sensor technologies allows for creation and delivery of newer type of cloud services. In this paper, we advocate the use of cloud computing for the creation and management of cloud based health care services. As a representative case study, we design a Cloud Based Intelligent Health Care Service (CBIHCS) that performs real time monitoring of user health data for diagnosis of chronic illness such as diabetes. Advance body sensor components are utilized to gather user specific health data and store in cloud based storage repositories for subsequent analysis and classification. In addition, infrastructure level mechanisms are proposed to provide dynamic resource elasticity for CBIHCS. Experimental results demonstrate that classification accuracy of 92.59% is achieved with our prototype system and the predicted patterns of CPU usage offer better opportunities for adaptive resource elasticity.

  11. Integrated Educational and Mental Health Services within a Day Treatment Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Greta; Radka, Dale F.

    This paper discusses the integration of educational and mental health services for children and adolescents within a psychiatric day treatment setting at the Bradley School housed in a private psychiatric hospital affiliated with Brown University in Rhode Island. A full range of mental health services are used, and therapies are delivered in the…

  12. NASA Enterprise Managed Cloud Computing (EMCC): Delivering an Initial Operating Capability (IOC) for NASA use of Commercial Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, Ames supported the NASA CIO in delivering an initial operating capability for Agency use of commercial cloud computing. This presentation provides an overview of the project, the services approach followed, and the major components of the capability that was delivered. The presentation is being given at the request of Amazon Web Services to a contingent representing the Brazilian Federal Government and Defense Organization that is interested in the use of Amazon Web Services (AWS). NASA is currently a customer of AWS and delivered the Initial Operating Capability using AWS as its first commercial cloud provider. The IOC, however, designed to also support other cloud providers in the future.

  13. Using ecosystem services in community-based landscape planning: science is not ready to deliver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, P.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Community-based landscape governance is considered as conditional to achieving sustainable landscape. I consider landscape governance from the point of view of adapting landscapes to create value out of ecosystem services, using the social–ecological system model as a theoretical framework. I advoca

  14. Distance Career Counseling: A Technology-Assisted Model for Delivering Career Counseling Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djadali, Yas; Malone, James F.

    The purpose of the present article is to demonstrate the need for distance career counseling services, and to present an evolving counseling model that combines the best practices of face-to-face career counseling with technology. The article begins by tracing the historical development of distance career counseling models, and then illustrates…

  15. Challenges and Opportunities To Deliver Research Services to Parliamentarians in the Japanese Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Michiyo

    This paper outlines the challenges and opportunities for the services of the Japanese National Diet Library (NDL), especially the Research and Legislative Reference Bureau by using a SWOT (Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis. The introduction lists the major goals of the NDL's reform. The second section discusses the NDL's…

  16. Organizing innovation to deliver financial services to the base of the Pyramid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthumus, B.; Homberg, M.J.C. van den; Boer, J. de; Klarsfeld, L.; Chevrollier, N.; Jaspert, T.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, the number of mobile phone subscriptions has risen from 12 million to more than six billion. 75% of the world has access to a mobile phone and the developing world is now more mobile than the developed world. However, the growth of non-voice services on these mobiles for

  17. The Use of Telecommunication to Deliver Services to Rural and Urban Vocational Rehabilitation Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipsen, Catherine; Rigles, Bethany; Arnold, Nancy; Seekins, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Telecommunication offers a cost-saving alternative to face-to-face vocational rehabilitation (VR) service delivery, yet little is known about the current use. This article describes findings from an exploratory survey of 1,187 counselors, representing 13 VR agencies across the United States. The online survey explored agency, counselor, and client…

  18. The Use of Telecommunication to Deliver Services to Rural and Urban Vocational Rehabilitation Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipsen, Catherine; Rigles, Bethany; Arnold, Nancy; Seekins, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Telecommunication offers a cost-saving alternative to face-to-face vocational rehabilitation (VR) service delivery, yet little is known about the current use. This article describes findings from an exploratory survey of 1,187 counselors, representing 13 VR agencies across the United States. The online survey explored agency, counselor, and client…

  19. Delivering Clinical Services to Vietnamese Americans: Implications for Speech-Language Pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Terry Irvine; Huer, Mary Blake; Doan, Julie Huong Diem; Heise, Melinda; Fulford, Lana

    2001-01-01

    This article summarizes what is known about: (1) Vietnamese history and immigration patterns; (2) probable demographics of consumers within the Vietnamese American community who would need speech-language services; (3) the culture and structure of the Vietnamese-American family; and (4) traditional Vietnamese medical practices. Six principles for…

  20. Tobacco industry manipulation messages in anti-smoking public service announcements: the effect of explicitly versus implicitly delivering messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadel, William G; Fryer, Craig S; Tharp-Taylor, Shannah

    2010-05-01

    Message content in anti-smoking public service announcements (PSAs) can be delivered explicitly (directly with concrete statements) or implicitly (indirectly via metaphor), and the method of delivery may affect the efficacy of those PSAs. The purpose of this study was to conduct an initial test of this idea using tobacco industry manipulation PSAs in adolescents. A 2 (age: 11-14 years old; 15-17 years old)x2 (message delivery: implicit, explicit) mixed model design was used. There was a significant main effect of message delivery: Tobacco industry manipulation PSAs that delivered their messages explicitly were associated with stronger levels of smoking resistance self-efficacy compared to tobacco industry manipulation PSAs that delivered their messages implicitly. No significant main effects of age were found nor were any interactions between age and message delivery. These results suggest that message delivery factors should be taken into account when designing anti-smoking PSAs. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Formative evaluation of a telemedicine model for delivering clinical neurophysiology services part I: Utility, technical performance and service provider perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breen Patricia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Formative evaluation is conducted in the early stages of system implementation to assess how it works in practice and to identify opportunities for improving technical and process performance. A formative evaluation of a teleneurophysiology service was conducted to examine its technical and sociological dimensions. Methods A teleneurophysiology service providing routine EEG investigation was established. Service use, technical performance and satisfaction of clinical neurophysiology personnel were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. These were contrasted with a previously reported analysis of the need for teleneurophysiology, and examination of expectation and satisfaction with clinical neurophysiology services in Ireland. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis was also conducted. Results Over the course of 40 clinical sessions during 20 weeks, 142 EEG investigations were recorded and stored on a file server at a satellite centre which was 130 miles away from the host clinical neurophysiology department. Using a virtual private network, the EEGs were accessed by a consultant neurophysiologist at the host centre for interpretation. The model resulted in a 5-fold increase in access to EEG services as well as reducing average waiting times for investigation by a half. Technically the model worked well, although a temporary loss of virtual private network connectivity highlighted the need for clarity in terms of responsibility for troubleshooting and repair of equipment problems. Referral quality, communication between host and satellite centres, quality of EEG recordings, and ease of EEG review and reporting indicated that appropriate organisational processes were adopted by the service. Compared to traditional CN service delivery, the teleneurophysiology model resulted in a comparable unit cost per EEG. Conclusion Observations suggest that when traditional organisational boundaries are crossed challenges associated with the

  2. Exploring New Ways to Deliver Value to Healthcare Organizations: Algorithmic Testing, Data Integration, and Diagnostic E-consult Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risin, Semyon A; Chang, Brian N; Welsh, Kerry J; Kidd, Laura R; Moreno, Vanessa; Chen, Lei; Tholpady, Ashok; Wahed, Amer; Nguyen, Nghia; Kott, Marylee; Hunter, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    As the USA Health Care System undergoes transformation and transitions to value-based models it is critical for laboratory medicine/clinical pathology physicians to explore opportunities and find new ways to deliver value, become an integral part of the healthcare team. This is also essential for ensuring financial health and stability of the profession when the payment paradigm changes from fee-for-service to fee-for-performance. About 5 years ago we started searching for ways to achieve this goal. Among other approaches, the search included addressing the laboratory work-ups for specialists' referrals in the HarrisHealth System, a major safety net health care organization serving mostly indigent and underserved population of Harris County, TX. We present here our experience in improving the efficiency of laboratory testing for the referral process and in building a prototype of a diagnostic e-consult service using rheumatologic diseases as a starting point. The service incorporates algorithmic testing, integration of clinical, laboratory and imaging data, issuing structured comprehensive consultation reports, incorporating all the relevant information, and maintaining personal contacts and an e-line of communications with the primary providers and referral center personnel. Ongoing survey of providers affords testimony of service value in terms of facilitating their work and increasing productivity. Analysis of the cost effectiveness and of other value indicators is currently underway. We also discuss our pioneering experience in building pathology residents and fellows training in integrated diagnostic consulting service.

  3. A Descriptive Analysis of Music Therapists' Perceptions of Delivering Services in Inclusive Settings: A Challenge to the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones; Cardinal

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of music therapists toward inclusion (providing services within general education settings) and to determine their willingness to provide their services in these settings. A questionnaire was sent to 560 music therapists of which 373 responded (67%). A descriptive analysis indicated that although the vast majority of music therapists are providing their services in a segregated setting, they (a) overwhelmingly know about inclusion, (b) perceive benefits to clients with and without disabilities, and (c) are willing to provide their services within an inclusive setting. Why then do therapists so overwhelmingly provide their services in noninclusive settings? Possible answers to this question as well as the challenge this creates to the field of music therapy are discussed.

  4. ENRICHED ETOM FRAMEWORK IN SERVICE DELIVER OPERATION THROUGH ALIGNMENT WITH SOME OF COBIT5 STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

    OpenAIRE

    Faride Latifi; Ramin Nasiri; Mehran Mohsenzadeh

    2014-01-01

    eTOM is a standard framework that is defined in telecommunication business processes area. It contains of three phases, 1. Operations 2. Infrastructure, Strategy and Product 3. Enterprise Management. The goal of this paper is to enrich the processes in operations phase included of service assurance and fulfillment and to increase customer retention and loyalty and SLA fulfillment. For this purpose some processes in DSS domain of COBIT5 is introduced and mapped in different area of eTOM operat...

  5. Economic analysis of delivering primary health care services through community health workers in 3 North Indian states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Prinja

    Full Text Available We assessed overall annual and unit cost of delivering package of services and specific services at sub-centre level by CHWs and cost effectiveness of Government of India's policy of introducing a second auxiliary nurse midwife (ANM at the sub-centre compared to scenario of single ANM sub-centre.We undertook an economic costing of health services delivered by CHWs, from a health system perspective. Bottom-up costing method was used to collect data on resources spent in 50 randomly selected sub-centres selected from 4 districts. Mean unit cost along with its 95% confidence intervals were estimated using bootstrap method. Multiple linear regression model was used to standardize cost and assess its determinants.Annually it costs INR 1.03 million (USD 19,381, or INR 187 (USD 3.5 per capita per year, to provide a package of preventive, curative and promotive services through community health workers. Unit costs for antenatal care, postnatal care, DOTS treatment and immunization were INR 525 (USD 10 per full ANC care, INR 767 (USD 14 per PNC case registered, INR 974 (USD 18 per DOTS treatment completed and INR 97 (USD 1.8 per child immunized in routine immunization respectively. A 10% increase in human resource costs results in 6% rise in per capita cost. Similarly, 10% increment in the ANC case registered per provider through-put results in a decline in unit cost ranging from 2% in the event of current capacity utilization to 3% reduction in case of full capacity utilization. Incremental cost of introducing 2nd ANM at sub-centre level per unit percent increase ANC coverage was INR 23,058 (USD 432.Our estimates would be useful in undertaking full economic evaluations or equity analysis of CHW programs. Government of India's policy of hiring 2nd ANM at sub-centre level is very cost effective from Indian health system perspective.

  6. Delivering Mental Health Services to OEF/OIF Veterans: A VHA Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signoracci, Gina M; Bahraini, Nazanin H; Matarazzo, Bridget B; Olson-Madden, Jennifer H; Brenner, Lisa A

    2014-09-01

    Veterans Health Administration (VHA) mental health (MH) professionals are providing care to increasing numbers of veterans who served in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). This study aimed to describe MH clinicians' views of OEF/OIF veteran needs and how providers meet those needs within a large system of care. Qualitative research methodology, specifically qualitative description, was used to explore VHA MH clinicians' experiences providing MH services to OEF/OIF veterans. Thirteen VA MH providers participated in semistructured interviews, which included questions regarding the following areas: psychiatric needs of OEF/OIF veterans; collaboration and referral; needs and resources; and the personal/professional impact of providing services to this cohort. Themes emerged which highlighted complex challenges faced by OEF/OIF veterans, barriers associated with matching the unique needs of these veterans with existing treatments, and the challenges and rewards associated with providing care to members of this population. Capturing provider perspectives within MH services suggest potential areas for innovation aimed at providing patient-centered care to this cohort of veterans. Results may also inform future work aimed at meeting the needs of both OEF/OIF veterans and MH providers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Consumer Education and the Human Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, Alan

    Consumer education has traditionally addressed activities related to the purchase of goods while the human services (e.g., health, education, and social welfare) have received far less attention. This condition stems from several factors, including the "doing good" attitude of human service providers and the role of government as the provider of…

  8. Feasibility of a clearing house for improved cooperation between telemedicine networks delivering humanitarian services: acceptability to network coordinators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Wootton

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Telemedicine networks, which deliver humanitarian services, sometimes need to share expertise to find particular experts in other networks. It has been suggested that a mechanism for sharing expertise between networks (a ‘clearing house’ might be useful. Objective: To propose a mechanism for implementing the clearing house concept for sharing expertise, and to confirm its feasibility in terms of acceptability to the relevant networks. Design: We conducted a needs analysis among eight telemedicine networks delivering humanitarian services. A small proportion of consultations (5–10% suggested that networks may experience difficulties in finding the right specialists from within their own resources. With the assistance of key stakeholders, many of whom were network coordinators, various methods of implementing a clearing house were considered. One simple solution is to establish a central database holding information about consultants who have agreed to provide help to other networks; this database could be made available to network coordinators who need a specialist when none was available in their own network. Results: The proposed solution was examined in a desktop simulation exercise, which confirmed its feasibility and probable value. Conclusions: This analysis informs full-scale implementation of a clearing house, and an associated examination of its costs and benefits.

  9. Delivering Coordinated, Community-Based Services by Putting Networks into Action: New York City's Change Capital Fund. No. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves, Aurelia De La Rosa; Greenberg, David M.; Schell, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    This brief is the third in a series documenting the implementation of an economic mobility initiative supported by New York City's Change Capital Fund (CCF). CCF is a consortium of New York City donors formed to invest in local nonprofits that undertake data-driven antipoverty strategies integrating housing, education, and employment services. CCF…

  10. Educational Technology Services, Customer Services Team. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhn, Bill; Keys, Terry; Bates, Pat; Cheasty, Diane; Christian, Marilyn; Cunningham, Bob; Ferguson, Bianca; Lewis, Millie; Mancuso, Ellen; Ryther, Dick; Weidel, Pam

    The report describes the evaluations of the current practices of Educational Technology Services (ETS) at Monroe Community College (New York) by the Customer Service Team. ETS provides all aspects of technology support to the College. The "customers" of ETS include students, faculty and staff. With the goal of developing a Customer…

  11. Using community partners to deliver low-cost and effective emergency management and business continuity services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joan; Roggiero, Jean Paul; Silva, Brian

    2010-11-01

    Small to medium-sized organisations enhance their business mission as well as their communities by continuing to offer services in extreme circumstances. Developing emergency preparedness and business continuity plans that are cost-effective, comprehensive and operational for small to medium-sized organisations with limited resources requires a consistent, supportive, hands-on approach over time with professionals to create appropriate and sustainable strategies. Using a unique, multi-layered and applied approach to emergency preparedness training, organisations have successfully created plans that are effective and sustainable.

  12. Using e-health applications to deliver new mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Helen; Hickie, Ian B

    2010-06-07

    Traditional clinic-based service delivery systems remain inaccessible to many Australians with mental health problems. If we are to substantially reduce the burden of mental illness, we need to develop more accessible, empowering and sustainable models of mental health care. E-health technologies have specific efficiencies and advantages in the domains of health promotion, prevention, early intervention and prolonged treatment. It is timely to use the best features of these technologies to start to build a more responsive and efficient mental health care system.

  13. A call for differentiated approaches to delivering HIV services to key populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Macdonald

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: The application of a differentiated service approach for KP could increase the number of people who know their status and receive effective and sustained prevention and treatment for HIV. However, while community-based and lay provider testing are effective and affordable, they are not implemented to scale. Furthermore regulatory barriers to legitimizing lay and peer providers as part of healthcare delivery systems need to be overcome in many settings. WHO recommendations on task shifting and decentralization of ART treatment and care are often not applied to KP settings.

  14. Formative evaluation of a telemedicine model for delivering clinical neurophysiology services part I: utility, technical performance and service provider perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Breen, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Formative evaluation is conducted in the early stages of system implementation to assess how it works in practice and to identify opportunities for improving technical and process performance. A formative evaluation of a teleneurophysiology service was conducted to examine its technical and sociological dimensions.

  15. Effectiveness of different methods for delivering tailored nutrition education to low income, ethnically diverse adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Kim M; Risica, Patricia M; Strolla, Leslie O; Fournier, Leanne; Kirtania, Usree; Upegui, David; Zhao, Julie; George, Tiffiney; Acharyya, Suddhasatta

    2009-05-05

    Computer-tailored written nutrition interventions have been shown to be more effective than non-tailored materials in changing diet, but continued research is needed. Your Healthy Life/Su Vida Saludable (YHL-SVS) was an intervention study with low income, ethnically diverse, English and Spanish-speaking participants to determine which methods of delivering tailored written nutrition materials were most effective in lowering fat and increasing fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake. YHL-SVS was a randomized controlled trial with four experimental conditions: 1) Nontailored (NT) comparison group; 2) Single Tailored (ST) packet; 3) Multiple Tailored (MT) packet mailed in four installments; 4) Multiple Re-Tailored (MRT) MT packets re-tailored between mailings via brief phone surveys. A baseline telephone survey collected information for tailoring as well as evaluation. Follow-up evaluation surveys were collected 4- and 7-months later. Primary outcomes included F&V intake and fat related behaviors. Descriptive statistics, paired t-test and ANOVA were used to examine the effectiveness of different methods of delivering tailored nutrition information. Both the ST and MT groups reported significantly higher F&V intake at 4-months than the NT and MRT groups. At 7 months, only the MT group still had significantly higher F&V intake compared to the NT group. For changes in fat-related behaviors, both the MT and MRT groups showed more change than NT at 4 months, but at 7 months, while these differences persisted, they were no longer statistically significant. There was a significant interaction of experimental group by education for change in F&V intake (P = .0085) with the lowest educational group demonstrating the most change. In this study, tailored interventions were more effective than non-tailored interventions in improving the short-term dietary behaviors of low income, ethnically diverse participants. Delivery of information in multiple smaller doses over time appeared to

  16. Exploring operational barriers encountered by community midwives when delivering services in two provinces of Pakistan: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ur Rehman, Shafiq; Ahmed, Jamil; Bahadur, Sher; Ferdoos, Amber; Shahab, Muhammad; Masud, Nazish

    2015-01-01

    to explore barriers experienced by community midwives (CMWs) when delivering services, from their own and their managers׳ perspectives, at provincial and district level in the context of organisational factors, and to determine other factors linked with the poor performance of CMWs in the delivery of maternal, neonatal and child health (MNCH)-related services within their communities. qualitative study design using in-depth interviews (IDIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs). two districts in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Punjab provinces in Pakistan. 41 participants were interviewed in depth; they included CMWs, lady health supervisors and managerial staff of the MNCH programme. participants were interviewed about administrative issues including financial and policy areas, training and deployment in the community, functioning in the community, and supervision and referral for emergency cases. CMWs reported financial constraints, training needs and difficulty with building relationships in the community. They required support in terms of logistics, essential supplies, and mechanisms for referral of complicated cases to higher-level health facilities. CMWs working in developing countries face many challenges; starting from their training, deployment in the field and delivery of services in their respective communities. Facilitating their work and efforts through improved programming of the CMW's services can overcome these challenges. the MNCH programme, provincial government and other stakeholders need to take ownership of the CMW programme and implement it comprehensively. Long-term adequate resource allocation is needed to sustain the programme so that improvements in maternal and child health are visible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quality of health care: the responsibility of health care professionals in delivering high quality services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangrande, A

    1998-11-01

    According to a recent definition, quality of care consists of the degree to which health services increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge; a definition that introduces both requirements of outcomes and the appropriateness of the process used. Clearly many different figures are interested in quality assessment initiatives in the health care field and these include patients, administrators and doctors each having different perspective. Doctors obviously pay greater attention to technical quality and results, giving greater emphasis to the health of the individual patient, tending to give priority to technical excellence and interaction between patient and doctor. Although the perspective of health care professionals is widely acknowledged to be important and useful, other perspectives on quality have been emphasised in recent years. The most important of these is the recognition that care must be responsive to the preferences and values of the consumers of health care services. In complete harmony with one's own professional commitment, the attention to the perspectives of patients must give physician the chance to identify methods of measuring and verifying quality which take account of the expectations of the many groups with an interest in improving the functioning of the health system. A global approach in the health field is needed the more specialization advances. The quality of medicine lies in its capacity to integrate what science says is appropriate and to be recommended, what can be reconciled with human rights and the self determination of the patient and what can be achieved by optimising available resources. In this complex context, the doctor could take on both the role of the person who decides on the use of resources and the one of social mediator.

  18. Measurement of Quality of Educational Hospital Services by the SERVQUAL Model: The Iranian Patients’ Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Rezaei, Satar; Matin, Behzad Karami; Moradi, Khalil; Bijan, Behroz; Fallahi, Masoud; Shokati, Behnam; Saeidi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The main mission of hospitals in any health system is to deliver high quality healthcare for patients and meet their needs and expectations. The aim of the current study was to assess the quality of the service of educational hospitals affiliated with Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2015, from the perspective of patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study, the perspectives of 400 patients were assessed about the quality of the services provided by educational hos...

  19. CHARACTERISTICS OF MARKETING IN PROFESIONAL SERVICES DELIVERED BY THE HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Gabriela SECARA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Equilibrium position of a competitive market must necessarily be an „pareto optimal”: with every transaction made, people get rich without anyone else to deplete. If there is no increasing income - economies of scale or proportion - in the production system, then each „pareto optimal” condition is a competitive equilibrium position, depending on the distribution of purchasing power. Where there are concerns about income distribution and hence of goods and services between individuals, the state can interfere by changing this algorithm of purchasing power distribution, within the economy. On the other hand, if some individuals are reluctant to risk (theory contradicted by the existence of gambling, then providing insurances is incumbent on mutually beneficial exchanges, because people are willing to pay for the convenience of not having to worry about the future events that may affect their existence. Another problem of the insurance field is that of ”moral hazard": since signing an insurance contract, the insured is no longer trying as hard to prevent accidents against which they have been insured, therefore the likelihood of occurrence for such accidents increases.

  20. Delivering biodefense continuing education to military medical providers by allowing a biodefense educational curriculum to unfold in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Donna M; D'Alessandro, Michael P

    2007-12-01

    A challenge today is how to deliver initial and continuing education on biodefense to military medical providers in a manner that can be integrated into their workflow and lifestyle. A summative evaluation of a prototypical biodefense digital library (BDL) and learning collaboratory was performed. The BDL posted daily links to biodefense news stories from January 2004 to December 2005. Four evaluations were completed, that is, content evaluation, curriculum comparison with a biodefense graduate program, usage evaluation, and impact factor analysis. News stories (N = 678) came from a broad range of authoritative national and international news sources (N = 178). News stories covered all of the categories in the required and elective formal biodefense graduate program courses. The BDL was consistently displayed on the first page of the top three Internet search engines, meaning that it was among the top 10 authoritative Internet sites on biodefense. Presenting biodefense news stories to busy military medical providers in an organized chronological fashion produces an unstructured biodefense educational curriculum that unfolds in practice and becomes an educational resource that is ultimately well regarded and may be efficient to use.

  1. Delivering quality improvements in patient care: the application of the Leicester Model of interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, A; Anderson, E S

    2012-01-01

    This paper places the importance of evidence-based models of interprofessional education (IPE) within the context of a changing National Health Service (NHS). The coalition government has placed integrated care at the heart of its vision for England's health system. Its principles are to put patients at the centre of the NHS, empower clinicians to lead commissioning and change the emphasis of measurement to quality clinical outcomes. As a result, NHS services are being increasingly tendered along evidence-based care pathways and commissioners are introducing payment by results tariffs, requiring providers to achieve quality outcomes as a requirement of full payment. We argue that in preparing the health and social care workforce for outcome-based practice, the development of technical skills should be complemented with skills for effective teamworking and collaborative practice. This paper shares the achievements of the Leicester Model of IPE which is underpinned by theoretical models of learning and implemented entirely in clinical practice; mixed research methods demonstrate that its learning potential is as relevant today as when it was first implemented in 1996. Our extensive research evidence demonstrates that students and healthcare professionals undertaking these programmes are enabled to perceive care pathways from service and providers perspectives; they gain valuable insights into how teams balance task- and patient-related issues, offer clarity about the team's effectiveness and gain new insights into collaborative opportunities to address patients' needs. We demonstrate that models such as ours offer evidence-based solutions which will support the achievement of quality outcomes for service providers, many of whom are reviewing their business plans to address the financial implications of payment by results. The current NHS reforms provide a hugely important lever in which IPE can come of age - in return we need to ensure that our NHS colleagues are

  2. Delivering good service: personal resources, job satisfaction and nurses' 'customer' (patient) orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gountas, Sandra; Gountas, John; Soutar, Geoffrey; Mavondo, Felix

    2014-07-01

    To explore the complex relationships between nurses' personal resources, job satisfaction and 'customer' (patient) orientation. Previous research has shown that nursing is highly intensive, emotionally charged work, which affects nurses' job performance and their customer orientation as well as patient or 'customer' satisfaction. This study contributes to the literature by examining how nurses' personal resources relate to their personal satisfaction and customer orientation and the relationships between them. Specifically, this study explores the effects of two facets of emotional labour (deep acting and surface acting), empathic concern, self-efficacy and emotional exhaustion on personal job satisfaction and customer orientation. We also test the moderating effects of inauthenticity and emotional contagion. A quantitative survey. Data were collected through a self-completion questionnaire administered to a sample of 159 Australian nurses, in a public teaching hospital, in 2010. The data were analysed using Partial Least Square analysis. Partial Least Square analysis indicates that the final model is a good fit to the data (Goodness of Fit = 0.51). Deep acting and surface acting have different effects (positive and negative) on job satisfaction and 'customer' orientation, self-efficacy has a positive effect on both and emotional exhaustion has a positive effect on customer orientation and a negative effect on job satisfaction. The moderating effects of emotional contagion and empathic concern, in the final model, are discussed. Understanding the complex interactions between personal resources, job satisfaction and customer orientation helps to increase service providers' (nurses in this study) personal satisfaction and 'customer' orientation particularly in difficult contexts. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. When Educational Material Is Delivered: A Mixed Methods Content Validation Study of the Information Assessment Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Hani; Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland

    2017-03-14

    =45,394], respectively). In part 2 (qualitative results), 22 items were deemed representative, while 1 item was not representative. In part 3 (mixing quantitative and qualitative results), the content validity of 21 items was confirmed, and the 2 nonrelevant items were excluded. A fully validated version was generated (IAM-v2014). This study produced a content validated IAM questionnaire that is used by clinicians and information providers to assess the clinical information delivered in continuing education programs.

  4. When Educational Material Is Delivered: A Mixed Methods Content Validation Study of the Information Assessment Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    (R=4.86% [N=234,196] and R=3.04% [n=45,394], respectively). In part 2 (qualitative results), 22 items were deemed representative, while 1 item was not representative. In part 3 (mixing quantitative and qualitative results), the content validity of 21 items was confirmed, and the 2 nonrelevant items were excluded. A fully validated version was generated (IAM-v2014). Conclusions This study produced a content validated IAM questionnaire that is used by clinicians and information providers to assess the clinical information delivered in continuing education programs. PMID:28292738

  5. Delivering Service Quality in Alcohol Treatment: A Qualitative Comparison of Public and Private Treatment Centres by Service Users and Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Sheilagh M.; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, quality of care has now been placed at the centre of the National Health Service (NHS) modernisation programme. To date, there has been little research on the service quality delivery of alcohol treatment services from the perspective of both the service user and service provider. Therefore, this qualitative study explored the…

  6. Delivering Service Quality in Alcohol Treatment: A Qualitative Comparison of Public and Private Treatment Centres by Service Users and Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Sheilagh M.; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, quality of care has now been placed at the centre of the National Health Service (NHS) modernisation programme. To date, there has been little research on the service quality delivery of alcohol treatment services from the perspective of both the service user and service provider. Therefore, this qualitative study explored the…

  7. Measuring what matters in delivering services to remote-dwelling Indigenous mothers and infants in the Northern Territory, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Malinda; Rumbold, Alice R; Kildea, Sue; Bar-Zeev, Sarah J; Kruske, Sue; Dunbar, Terry; Barclay, Lesley

    2012-08-01

    In the Northern Territory, 64% of Indigenous births are to remote-dwelling mothers. Delivering high-quality health care in remote areas is challenging, but service improvements, informed by participative action research, are under way. Evaluation of these initiatives requires appropriate indicators. Few of the many existing maternal and infant health indicators are specifically framed for the remote context or exemplify an Indigenous consumer perspective. We aimed to identify an indicator framework with appropriate indicators to demonstrate improvements in health outcomes, determinants of health and health system performance for remote-dwelling mothers and infants from pregnancy to first birthday. We reviewed existing indicators; invited input from experts; investigated existing administrative data collections and examined findings from a record audit, ethnographic work and the evaluation of the Darwin Midwifery Group Practice. Northern Territory. About 660 potentially relevant indicators were identified. We adapted the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework and populated the resulting framework with chosen indicators. We chose the indicators best able to monitor the impact of changes to remote service delivery by eliminating duplicated or irrelevant indicators using expert opinion, triangulating data and identifying key issues for remote maternal and infant health service improvements. We propose 31 indicators to monitor service delivery to remote-dwelling Indigenous mothers and infants. Our inclusive indicator framework covers the period from pregnancy to the first year of life and includes existing indicators, but also introduces novel ones. We also attempt to highlight an Indigenous consumer. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  8. A Pilot Initiative to Deliver Community-based Psychiatric Services in Rural Haiti After the 2010 Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grelotti, David J; Lee, Amy C; Fils-Aimé, Joseph Reginald; Jean, Jacques Solon; Therosmé, Tatiana; Petit-Homme, Handy; Oswald, Catherine M; Raviola, Giuseppe; Eustache, Eddy

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, there is a gap between the burden of mental distress and disorder and access to mental health care. This gap is particularly large in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). After the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the international health care organizations Partners in Health and Zanmi Lasante worked to expand local mental health services in rural Haiti. The aims of this study are to describe clinical characteristics of the patients served during a pilot project to deliver community-based psychiatric services in rural Haiti and to show how this experience complements the Mental Health Gap Action Programme ("mhGAP"), a tool developed by the World Health Organization to support mental health care delivery by nonspecialists in LMICs. The pilot was conducted in March 2011. A visiting psychiatrist traveled to rural Haiti and paired with local clinicians to evaluate patients and to support quality improvement practices in psychiatric care. Patients received a standard neuropsychiatric evaluation. mhGAP was an important clinical reference. To assess the experience, we conducted a retrospective chart review of outpatient encounters. Sixty-five patients presented with a wide range of common psychiatric, neurologic, and general medical conditions. Forty-nine of these patients (75%) reported primary problems subsumed by an mhGAP module. Fifteen patients (23%) reported headache as their chief complain, a condition that is not currently covered by mhGAP. Surprisingly, only 3 patients (5%), reported earthquake-related distress. Our clinical data reinforce the need for provision of standard psychiatric and neurologic services in LMICs. Such services ought to accompany interventions targeted specifically at disaster-related problems. Clinical situations falling outside existing mhGAP modules inspired the development of supplemental treatment protocols. These observations informed coordinated efforts at Zanmi Lasante to build a sustainable, integrated mental health system

  9. Evaluation of a university general education health and wellness course delivered by lecture or online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Ronald; George, James D; LeCheminant, James D; Bailey, Bruce W; Vincent, William J

    2012-01-01

    To assess a single-semester university general education (GE) health and wellness course influence on physical activity (PA) and dietary habits among university students and to compare the course delivered through lecture or online for these outcomes. A 15-week intervention with pre-post one-group design, allowing for comparative assessments in dietary and PA habits across time by delivery method (classroom lecture vs. online). A large Western university. Participants (n = 1638, female; n = 1333, male) were 82% university freshman or sophomores. Participants were required to take a GE health and wellness course either by classroom lecture or online. The lecture and online curriculum content were similar. Participation in the study was entirely voluntary and was not connected to course grade. PA and dietary outcomes were determined from questions used in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey and were assessed pre- and post-intervention. Other validated questions were used to assess fitness. The general linear model was utilized to determine group x period interactions when comparing the classroom lecture vs. online course. Students improved overall level of PA by 12%, daily minutes of moderate-intensity PA by 8%, and fitness level by 2%. Students improved fruit/vegetable consumption by 4%, bran/whole grain cereal consumption by 8%, and brown rice/whole wheat bread consumption by 11%. All improvements were statistically significant (p lecture course yielded stronger improvements in several PA and dietary outcomes than the online course. A single-semester university wellness course may positively influence multiple PA and dietary behaviors; however, classroom lecture may be superior to online delivery.

  10. Hegemonic Masculinity in Sport Education: Case Studies of Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers with Teaching Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, YuChun; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research had indicated that pre-service teachers (PTs) with coaching orientations reinforced sexism and masculine bias while employing the sport education (SE) model. The purpose of the current study was to examine whether or not and the degree to which SE delivered by PTs with teaching orientations served to combat or reinforce sexism…

  11. Mobile Health (mHealth) Services and Online Health Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshari, Muhammad; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology enables health-care organizations to extend health-care services by providing a suitable environment to achieve mobile health (mHealth) goals, making some health-care services accessible anywhere and anytime. Introducing mHealth could change the business processes in delivering services to patients. mHealth could empower patients as it becomes necessary for them to become involved in the health-care processes related to them. This includes the ability for patients to manage their personal information and interact with health-care staff as well as among patients themselves. The study proposes a new position to supervise mHealth services: the online health educator (OHE). The OHE should be occupied by special health-care staffs who are trained in managing online services. A survey was conducted in Brunei and Indonesia to discover the roles of OHE in managing mHealth services, followed by a focus group discussion with participants who interacted with OHE in a real online health scenario. Data analysis showed that OHE could improve patients' confidence and satisfaction in health-care services.

  12. Implementing Service Learning in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringle, Robert G.; Hatcher, Julie A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper argues that the current interest in service learning provides universities with a unique opportunity to engage their students in community service, expand their educational agenda, and build reciprocal partnerships with the community. Specific activities for implementation of such a program are delineated for the four constituencies of…

  13. E-service learning: A pedagogic innovation for healthcare management education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvey, Donna M; Hamby, Eileen F; Fottler, Myron D

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes an innovation in service learning that we identify as e-service learning. By adding the "e" to service learning, we create a service learning model that is dynamic, mediated by technology, and delivered online. This paper begins by examining service learning, which is a distinct learning concept. Service learning furnishes students with opportunities for applied learning through participation in projects and activities in community organizations. The authors then define and conceptualize e-service learning, including the anticipated outcomes of implementation such as enhanced access, quality, and cost effectiveness of healthcare management education. Because e-service learning is mediated by technology, we identify state of the art technologies that support e-service learning activities. In addition, possible e-service learning projects and activities that may be included in healthcare management courses such as finance, human resources, quality, service management/marketing and strategy are identified. Finally, opportunities for future research are suggested.

  14. The educational dimension of pastoral youth service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dra. Miriam Gallego

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The educational dimension of pastoral youth service is highlighted by the fact that it is about education on faith. Faith education means taking a young person towards a personal encounter with God. This fact is also known as an experience with God or religious experience. The religious experience favors cognitive and affective development, desire of the absolute, relationships development, commitments with justice, and the construction of a personal life and social history; in this regard, the religious experience turns into an educational one.The evangelist deed in the pastoral youth service, does not occur through isolated actions but through a process, that is, through a set of educational dynamisms that bring the young person to open up to his/her personal and social reality, to search for answers to his/her questions, be active in society, and build a life project. In pastoral ministries each gesture is, at the same time and with the same intensity, an educational event and a proposal of youth’s lives about God’s mysteries. The pastoral youth service brings educational means —objectives, contents, educational sites, processes, methodologies, people responsible for education, etc.— that can be no doubt evaluated.

  15. Main trends of the international market of educational services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Chinaeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The world education system everything will more be transformed to the multi-billion industry, one of the profitable directions of which is training of foreign students. Creation and development of successfully functioning system of the international education, attraction of a significant amount of foreign students are not only to increase the budget of higher education institution and to lift its prestige, but also and a method of promotion of policy, culture, economy, a conduct of life of the host country home. With respect there to research and practical interest has studying and the analysis of the main directions of development of the international market of educational services. This article in which changes of the main indicators reflecting the main vectors of export of education in the leading countries - exporters and in our country are considered is also devoted to these questions.The purpose of work is the analysis of development of the international market of educational services in recent years. The analysis of analytical and statistical information on the processes happening in this area, both at the international level, and in Russia is the basis.In the course of the research the methods of the analytical and logical analysis on the basis of statistical data promoting more detailed studying of dynamic and structural changes of the social and economic phenomena and processes were used.In general for the last 30 years the extent of the international student’s mobility increased more than by 6 times. The international educational market constantly develops, increasing the turnover. However flows of the international students periodically change the orientation, both on countries of source, and over the countries of training. At the same time it is possible to note that changes in structure of the largest countries recipients happen more slowly, than as a part of the countries delivering foreign students. The largest world sources of

  16. The Politics of Resistance to Workplace Cultural Diversity Education for Health Service Providers: An Australian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study has as its focus an exploration of health service providers' perceptions and experiences of the processes and implications of delivering workplace cultural diversity education for staff. Data were obtained from conducting in-depth individual and focus group interviews with a purposeful sample of 137 healthcare professionals,…

  17. The Politics of Resistance to Workplace Cultural Diversity Education for Health Service Providers: An Australian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study has as its focus an exploration of health service providers' perceptions and experiences of the processes and implications of delivering workplace cultural diversity education for staff. Data were obtained from conducting in-depth individual and focus group interviews with a purposeful sample of 137 healthcare professionals,…

  18. Use of spaced education to deliver a curriculum in quality, safety and value for postgraduate medical trainees: trainee satisfaction and knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckel, Jeffrey; Carballo, Victoria; Kalibatas, Orinta; Soule, Michael; Wynne, Kathryn E; Ryan, Megan P; Shaw, Tim; Co, John Patrick T

    2016-03-01

    Quality, patient safety and value are important topics for graduate medical education (GME). Spaced education delivers case-based content in a structured longitudinal experience. Use of spaced education to deliver quality and safety education in GME at an institutional level has not been previously evaluated. To implement a spaced education course in quality, safety and value; to assess learner satisfaction; and to describe trainee knowledge in these areas. We developed a case-based spaced education course addressing learning objectives related to quality, safety and value. This course was offered to residents and fellows about two-thirds into the academic year (March 2014) and new trainees during orientation (June 2014). We assessed learner satisfaction by reviewing the course completion rate and a postcourse survey, and trainee knowledge by the per cent of correct responses. The course was offered to 1950 trainees. A total of 305 (15.6%) enrolled in the course; 265/305 (86.9%) answered at least one question, and 106/305 (34.8%) completed the course. Fewer participants completed the March programme compared with the orientation programme (42/177 (23.7%) vs 64/128 (50.0%), pquality, safety and value principles. Offering a voluntary course may result in low completion. Learners were satisfied with their experience and were introduced to new concepts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. A Propensity Score Matching Analysis of the Effects of Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul L.; Frisco, Michelle; Farkas, George; Hibel, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    We sought to quantify the effectiveness of special education services as naturally delivered in U.S. schools. Specifically, we examined whether children receiving special education services displayed (a) greater reading or mathematics skills, (b) more frequent learning-related behaviors, or (c) less frequent externalizing or internalizing problem behaviors than closely matched peers not receiving such services. To do so, we used propensity score matching techniques to analyze data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal—Study Kindergarten Cohort, 1998–1999, a large scale, nationally representative sample of U.S. schoolchildren. Collectively, results indicate that receipt of special education services has either a negative or statistically non-significant impact on children’s learning or behavior. However, special education services do yield a small, positive effect on children’s learning-related behaviors. PMID:23606759

  20. Review and Analysis of Local Multipoint Distribution System (LMDS) to Deliver Voice, Data, Internet, and Video Services

    CERN Document Server

    Ahamed, S S Riaz

    2010-01-01

    Local multipoint distribution system (LMDS) uses cellular-like network architecture of microwave radios placed at the client's location and at the company's base station to deliver fixed services, mainly telephony, video and Internet access. The use of time-division multiple access (TDMA) and FDMA (frequency DMA) technology allows multiple customers within a 3-5 mile coverage radius to share the same radio channel. Customers can receive data rates between 64kbps to 155Mbps. LMDS was conceived as a broadband, fixed wireless, point-to-multipoint technology for utilization in the last mile. Throughput capacity and reliable distance of the link depends on common radio link constraints and the modulation method used - either phase-shift keying or amplitude modulation. In general deployment links of up to 5 miles (8 km) from the base station are possible, but distance is typically limited to about 1.5 miles due to rain fading attenuation constraints. Point-to-point systems are also capable of using the LMDS frequen...

  1. Eat, Grow, Lead 4-H: An Innovative Approach to Deliver Campus- Based Field Experiences to Pre-Entry Extension Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Penny Pennington; Weeks, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Eat, Grow, Lead 4-H Club was created as a pilot program for college students seeking to gain experience as non-formal youth educators, specifically serving pre-entry level Extension educators through a university-based 4-H club. Seventeen student volunteers contributed an estimated 630 hours of service to the club during spring 2011. The club…

  2. Service Learning as Experiential Education's Bridge to Mainstream Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berv, Jason

    1998-01-01

    Experiential learning generally, and service learning specifically, can teach citizenship skills necessary to a democracy, unify the curriculum, better serve at-risk students, and accommodate different learning styles. Gives arguments and criteria for integrating service learning into mainstream education and examples of programs utilizing service…

  3. Partnerships for Urban Forestry and Green Infrastructure Delivering Services to People and the Environment: A Review on What They Are and Aim to Achieve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Hansmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Partnerships are a key mechanism in the planning, delivery and management of urban forestry (UF and green infrastructure (GI. They can facilitate locally rooted co-management and polycentric governance. They can also achieve synergies by combining the resources, commitment and expertise of diverse stakeholder groups in order to generate valuable outcomes and build social capital. Unfortunately, the term “partnerships” is not used consistently in literature and requires clarification. The characteristics which distinguish a partnership approach from other modes of co-operation are identified and described. The diversity of existing UF and GI oriented partnerships is outlined, with reference to their stakeholders, drivers, activities and goals, together with potential advantages of the partnership approach. Considerations to be made in their evaluation are derived from this background analysis and possible success factors are discussed. Materials and Methods: The diversity, aims and defining characteristics of a partnership approach are based on an extensive literature review. Results: Partnerships focus on diverse aspects and delivery phases of UF, ranging from the planning, design and creation of urban forests and GI to their management and use. Benefits delivered by such partnerships include environmental and economic services as well as social and cultural services such as environmental education, health, leisure and tourism. Generating valuable services whilst at the same time nurturing relationships between stakeholders helps to develop social capital and build capacity. In addition to environmental, economic and social benefits, the evaluation of partnerships may also address internal process variables such as social learning, the relationship between partners, and motivational outcomes that can influence future co-operation. Conclusions: Co-operative partnerships offer a promising approach for delivery in UF

  4. The Husky Byte Program: Delivering Nutrition Education One Sound Byte at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Michelle B.; Hudson, Kerrian A.; Lora, Karina R.; Havens, Erin K.; Ferris, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    The Husky Byte program uses interactive displays to deliver quick sound bytes of nutrition information to adults in frequented community settings. This innovative program considers time constraints, adult learning theory, diverse learning styles, and is easily accessible to adults. Both process and impact evaluations have demonstrated positive…

  5. The Husky Byte Program: Delivering Nutrition Education One Sound Byte at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Michelle B.; Hudson, Kerrian A.; Lora, Karina R.; Havens, Erin K.; Ferris, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    The Husky Byte program uses interactive displays to deliver quick sound bytes of nutrition information to adults in frequented community settings. This innovative program considers time constraints, adult learning theory, diverse learning styles, and is easily accessible to adults. Both process and impact evaluations have demonstrated positive…

  6. Data-as-a-Service Platform for Delivering Healthy Lifestyle and Preventive Medicine: Concept and Structure of the DAPHNE Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Catherine; Bailador Del Pozo, Gonzalo; Andrés, Javier; Lobstein, Tim; Manco, Melania; Lewy, Hadas; Bergman, Einat; O'Callaghan, David; Doherty, Gavin; Kudrautseva, Olga; Palomares, Angel; Ram, Roni; Olmo, Alberto

    2016-12-09

    Overweight and obesity is related to many health problems and diseases. The current obesity epidemic, which is a major health problem, is closely related to a lack of physical activity, high levels of sedentary behavior, and increased energy intake; with evidence to show increasing incidence of these issues in the younger population. Tackling obesity and its comorbid conditions requires a holistic approach encompassing attention on physical activity, healthy diet, and behavioral activation in order to enable and maintain meaningful and long-term weight loss and weight maintenance. The objective of the Data-as-a-Service Platform for Healthy Lifestyle and Preventive Medicine (DAPHNE) project is to develop a breakthrough information communications technology (ICT) platform for tracking health, weight, physical activity, diet, lifestyle, and psychological components within health care systems, whereby the platform and clinical support is linked. The DAPHNE platform aims to deliver personalized guidance services for lifestyle management to the citizen/patient by means of (1) advanced sensors and mobile phone apps to acquire and store continuous/real-time data on lifestyle aspects, behavior, and surrounding environment; (2) individual models to monitor their health and fitness status; (3) intelligent data processing for the recognition of behavioral trends; and (4) specific services for personalized guidance on healthy lifestyle and disease prevention. It is well known that weight loss and maintenance of weight loss are particularly difficult. This tool will address some of the issues found with conventional treatment/advice in that it will collect data in real time, thereby reducing reliability issues known with recalling events once they have passed and will also allow adjustment of behavior through timely support and recommendations sent through the platform without the necessity of formal one-to-one visits between patient and clinician. Patient motivation

  7. Early diagnosis and Early Start Denver Model intervention in autism spectrum disorders delivered in an Italian Public Health System service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devescovi R

    2016-06-01

    . Particularly in toddlers, it seems that an intervention model based on the ESDM principles, involving the active engagement of parents and nursery school teachers, may be effective even when the individual treatment is delivered at low intensity. Furthermore, our study supports the adaptation and the positive impact of the ESDM entirely sustained by the Italian Public Health System. Keywords: early diagnosis, early intervention, autism spectrum disorder, Early Start Denver Model, Public Health System service

  8. Exploring E-marketing Opportunities for Exporting Education Services : Case HAAGA-HELIA Global Education Services

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, Julio

    2013-01-01

    This Bachelor’s thesis examines online marketing opportunities for exporting education programs and education consulting services from Finland and internationally. The objective of the study is to determine how is the current B2B environment in e-marketing communications. The purpose of this research is to provide useful information on e-marketing strategies that would benefit HAAGA-HELIA Global Education Services (HAAGA-HELIA GES). This study consists of a theoretical section tha...

  9. Does Domestic Service Require A College Education?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A group of vocational college students recently came to Beijing to receive two months of hands-on work experience in domestic service. Dubbed "college-educated housemaids" by the media, their debut in the capital immediately created a sensation. A large number of Beijingers seeking household help went to interview them at a domestic service agency. Some clinched a deal after the first meeting. The students,

  10. 76 FR 40713 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Technology and Media Services for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Technology and Media Services for Individuals... Department. Dated: July 6, 2011. Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative...

  11. The University of Guam's Experience in Delivering Distance Education in Micronesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Bruce; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Description of the University of Guam focuses on its role in distance education for Micronesia. An experimental distance education model based on the use of commercially produced videotapes is described, cost comparisons are made with on-campus courses, sociocultural educational implications are discussed, and prospects for the future are…

  12. Developing the Vision: Preparing Teachers to Deliver a Digital World-Class Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jenny M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 Australians were promised a "Digital Education Revolution" by the government to dramatically change classroom education and build a "world-class education system". Eight billion dollars have been spent providing computer equipment for upper secondary classrooms, yet there is little evidence that a revolution has…

  13. The KwaZulu-Natal Child Eye Care Programme: Delivering refractive error services to primary school learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Mahraj

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Globally, over 300 million people are estimated to be visually impaired. Uncorrected refractive error is the primary cause of almost half of all visual impairment, resulting in the global economy losing $269 billion in productivity annually. There is a definitive level of urgency in the treatment of refractive error in children as uncorrected refractive error results in the failure of normal visual maturation, termed amblyopia, which cannot be corrected in adult life. In South Africa, the lack of appropriatechild eye care strategies has posed a serious problem to the visual health of children. In 2006, the International Centre for Eye Care Education (ICEE conducted a situational analysis of child eye care services in the province of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN. The findings of this analysis indicated a dire need for comprehensive services in the province. Stakeholders (the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Healthand the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Education were advised on the value of a short-term strategy as the underpinning of a long-term sustainable approach. This resulted in the formation of a trialliance to implement the KZN Child Eye Care Programme. Eighty (80 individuals who were previously volunteers for the KZN Department of Health were trained in vision screening. These vi-sion screeners screened 239 606 primary school children from February 2007 to May 2008. Seven percent (15 944 of the children failed the vision screening and were referred for optometric assessments. Of the 15 944 children that failed the vision screening, 10 707 children were examined by optometrists and 1083 were found to have a refractive error and were therefore supplied with spectacles. The study indicates that a short-term programme to address a backlog of services can reach many underserved children. This programme identified many challenges of implementing a vision screening programme such as poor uptake of refractive services by learners in the absence of an appropriate

  14. Implementation examined in a health center-delivered, educational intervention that improved infant growth in Trujillo, Peru: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Rebecca C; Gittelsohn, Joel; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary M; Penny, Mary E; Caulfield, Laura E; Narro, M Rocio; Steckler, Allan; Black, Robert E

    2007-06-01

    Process evaluation was used to examine the implementation of a randomized, controlled trial of an education intervention that improved infant growth in Trujillo, Peru. Health personnel delivered the multi-component intervention as part of usual care in the government health centers. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to examine process indicators, which included the extent of delivery (dose), fidelity to intervention protocol, barriers to implementation and context. Results demonstrated that most intervention components were delivered at a level of 50-90% of expectations. Fidelity to intervention protocol, where measured, was lower (28-70% of expectations). However, when compared with existing nutrition education, as represented by the control centers, significant improvements were demonstrated. This included both improved delivery of existing educational activities as well as delivery of new intervention components to strengthen overall nutrition education. Barriers to, and facilitators of, implementation were explored with health personnel and helped to explain results. This study demonstrates the importance of examining actual versus planned implementation in order to improve our understanding of how interventions succeed. The information gained from this study will inform future evaluation designs, and lead to the development and implementation of more effective intervention programs for child health.

  15. Towards Web Service-Based Educational Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Demetrios G.

    2005-01-01

    The need for designing the next generation of web service-based educational systems with the ability of integrating components from different tools and platforms is now recognised as the major challenge in advanced learning technologies. In this paper, we discuss this issue and we present the conceptual design of such environment, referred to as…

  16. Evolution of Career Services in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Farouk; Cruzvergara, Christine Y.

    2014-01-01

    Socioeconomic changes, technological advances, and generational trends have been the impetus behind every major paradigm shift in the delivery of career services in higher education during the past century, including the one taking shape today. This chapter will provide an overview of the changing nature and emerging trends that are shaping the…

  17. Active Citizenship, Education and Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, Jonathan; Scott, Ralph; Horley, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how active citizenship can be encouraged through education and community action. It proposes that service learning and a renewed focus on voluntarism can both promote social cohesion between different ethnic and cultural groups while also fostering among the population a greater understanding of and commitment to civic…

  18. Parental Expectations about Adapted Physical Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaapel, Holly; Columna, Luis; Lytle, Rebecca; Bailey, JoEllen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the expectations of parents of children with disabilities regarding adapted physical education services. Participants ("N" = 10) were parents of children with disabilities. Parents participated in one-on-one semistructured interviews. Transcripts were analyzed through a constant comparative…

  19. Cooperative Educational Service Agencies: The Wisconsin Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Judson A.; Bowles, B. Dean

    This paper gives a brief historical account of Wisconsin's Cooperative Educational Service Agencies (CESA's) and the need for changes, outlines some of the recommendations of a CESA fact-finding task force, and describes the current transition period. The first section describes the background and legislative history of the CESA, followed by an…

  20. Parental Expectations about Adapted Physical Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaapel, Holly; Columna, Luis; Lytle, Rebecca; Bailey, JoEllen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the expectations of parents of children with disabilities regarding adapted physical education services. Participants ("N" = 10) were parents of children with disabilities. Parents participated in one-on-one semistructured interviews. Transcripts were analyzed through a constant comparative…

  1. Disciplines in the Service of Educational Thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, Ian

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that the 20th century has been the century of the application of disciplines - philosophy, psychology, history, sociology, statistics, cognitive science, and computer science - to educational thought on an unprecedented scale. The same disciplines, in the service of the study of women by women, have led to a whole new complex of thought…

  2. Nurses' perceptions of educational gaps in delivering end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kenneth R; Coyne, Patrick J

    2011-11-01

    To assess end-of-life (EOL) care core competencies deemed most important with corresponding educational needs from oncology nurses and to describe the characteristics of the respondents that are associated with selection of the top-ranked core competencies. Descriptive, cross-sectional study. Mailed and online surveys. 714 members of the Oncology Nursing Society from Georgia, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. Responses to a mailed or e-mailed researcher-developed questionnaire during a six-month period were collated and analyzed. Ranking of EOL care core competencies and perceived gaps in EOL continuing education. Almost all of the respondents indicated that EOL care was a part of their practice and that continuing education was important, but more than half of the respondents had fewer than two hours of continuing education regarding EOL care in the past two years. Twenty-five percent of the respondents do not believe they are adequately prepared to effectively care for a dying patient. Symptom management was the top-rated core competency, consistent across age, education level, practice role, and practice setting. How to talk to patients and families about dying and what comprises palliative care also was selected frequently. Symptom management is the number one core competency, and the quantity and quality of EOL continuing education is inadequate. Educational gaps exist in EOL nursing care. Assessing what nurses believe to be leading EOL core competencies is useful in improving educational curricula along with considering characteristics of nurses when planning EOL educational programs.

  3. Educational Brokering; A New Service for Adult Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, James M.; And Others

    The emerging educational brokering service, functioning between adult learners and educational resources, aims to help them find their way into formal postsecondary education via counseling, advocacy, assessment and referral services. This monograph presents nine major issues concerning the educational brokering service: (1) definition and…

  4. Violence Prevention: The Development of Internet-Delivered, Experimentally-Evaluated, Psychological-Education Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, John J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes several multimedia-enhanced, psychological education courses capable of Internet delivery that specifically address changing the irrational beliefs that mediate low self-esteem and occupational stereotyping, educating parents on practices that affect the career outcomes of their children and altering attributions relevant to academic…

  5. Disrupting College: How Disruptive Innovation Can Deliver Quality and Affordability to Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Clayton M.; Horn, Michael B.; Caldera, Louis; Soares, Louis

    2011-01-01

    This report has not sought to study higher education to reach conclusions about higher education. Rather, it has been to treat the industry's challenges, at their core, as problems of managing innovation effectively. The authors therefore examine the industry through the lenses of the theories that have emerged from research on innovation. Higher…

  6. Free open access medical education can help rural clinicians deliver 'quality care, out there'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeuwenburg, Tim J; Parker, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Rural clinicians require expertise across a broad range of specialties, presenting difficulty in maintaining currency of knowledge and application of best practice. Free open access medical education is a new paradigm in continuing professional education. Use of the internet and social media allows a globally accessible crowd-sourced adjunct, providing inline (contextual) and offline (asynchronous) content to augment traditional educational principles and the availability of relevant resources for life-long learning. This markedly reduces knowledge translation (the delay from inception of a new idea to bedside implementation) and allows rural clinicians to further expertise by engaging in discussion of cutting edge concepts with peers worldwide.

  7. Examination of costs for a lay health educator-delivered translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program in senior centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukowski, Rebecca A; Pope, Rebecca A; Love, Sharhonda; Lensing, Shelly; Felix, Holly C; Prewitt, T Elaine; West, Delia

    2013-10-01

    Older adults in the U.S. have high rates of obesity. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of lifestyle interventions among older adults, lifestyle interventions are not widely implemented in community settings. Program delivery by lay health educators (LHEs) might support greater dissemination because of lower delivery cost and greater accessibility. We examined the costs of a LHE-delivered translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) evidence-based lifestyle intervention for older adults in Arkansas senior centers. This examination of costs used data from a cluster randomized control trial (conducted 2008-2010) in which 7 senior centers (116 participants) were randomized to implement a LHE-delivered 12-session translation of the DPP lifestyle intervention. We compiled direct lifestyle intervention implementation costs, including training, recruitment, materials, and ongoing intervention implementation support. Weight loss data (at 4-month follow-up) were collected from participants. Participant weight loss averaged 3.7kg at 4-months. The total estimated cost to implement the lifestyle intervention is $2731 per senior center, or $165 per participant. The implementation cost per kilogram lost is $45. A LHE-delivered DPP translation in senior centers is effective in achieving weight loss at low cost and offers promise for the dissemination of this evidence-based intervention. © 2013.

  8. Perspective: delivering effective and engaging continuing medical education on physicians' disruptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Kimberly; Lord, Julie; Murray, Suzanne

    2011-05-01

    Education about physicians' disruptive behavior is relevant for practicing physicians, who must demonstrate competence in professionalism for maintenance of certification. In addition, physicians need to know about newer regulatory standards that define disruptive behavior and mandated processes for dealing with such behavior, as health care organizations are now charged with having formal policies addressing this issue. There is a growing literature about dealing with disruptive behavior, but it has not addressed education, including continuing medical education (CME), aimed at reducing or preventing disruptive behavior. The authors suggest specific strategies for such CME educational programs, including knowing the audience before the presentation, avoiding potential pitfalls, defusing defensiveness, and increasing audience "buy-in." They present two viewpoints from which to approach the topic of disruptive behavior, depending on the audience: "rekindling of values" and "risk reduction." The authors also recommend interactive teaching methods designed to maximize audience participation and foster self-awareness and reflection.

  9. 34 CFR 200.45 - Supplemental educational services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplemental educational services. 200.45 Section 200... Improving Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Lea and School Improvement § 200.45 Supplemental educational services. (a) Definition. “Supplemental educational services” means tutoring and...

  10. Does Self-Contained Special Education Deliver on Its Promises? A Critical Inquiry into Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causton-Theoharis, Julie; Theoharis, George; Orsati, Fernanda; Cosier, Meghan

    2011-01-01

    Numerous scholars contend that students with and without disabilities benefit both socially and academically from inclusive services. Other researchers advocate for educating students with disabilities in self-contained settings. The aim of this article is to compare the literature on the rationale for use of self-contained special education…

  11. How do you deliver a good obstetrician? Outcome-based evaluation of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, David A; Nicholson, Sean; Srinivas, Sindhu K; Herrin, Jeph; Epstein, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The goal of medical education is the production of a workforce capable of improving the health and health care of patients and populations, but it is hard to use a goal that lofty, that broad, and that distant as a standard against which to judge the success of schools or training programs or particular elements within them. For that reason, the evaluation of medical education often focuses on elements of its structure and process, or on the assessment of competencies that could be considered intermediate outcomes. These measures are more practical because they are easier to collect, and they are valuable when they reflect activities in important positions along the pathway to clinical outcomes. But they are all substitutes for measuring whether educational efforts produce doctors who take good care of patients.The authors argue that the evaluation of medical education can become more closely tethered to the clinical outcomes medical education aims to achieve. They focus on a specific clinical outcome-maternal complications of obstetrical delivery-and show how examining various observable elements of physicians' training and experience helps reveal which of those elements lead to better outcomes. Does it matter where obstetricians trained? Does it matter how much experience they have? Does it matter how good they were to start? Each of these questions reflects a component of the production of a good obstetrician and, most important, defines a good obstetrician as one whose patients in the end do well.

  12. A Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Universal and Indicated Preventive Technology-Delivered Interventions for Higher Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Colleen S; Durlak, Joseph A; Shapiro, Jenna B; Kirsch, Alexandra C; Zahniser, Evan

    2016-08-01

    The uses of technology-delivered mental health treatment options, such as interventions delivered via computer, smart phone, or other communication or information devices, as opposed to primarily face-to-face interventions, are proliferating. However, the literature is unclear about their effectiveness as preventive interventions for higher education students, a population for whom technology-delivered interventions (TDIs) might be particularly fitting and beneficial. This meta-analytic review examines technological mental health prevention programs targeting higher education students either without any presenting problems (universal prevention) or with mild to moderate subclinical problems (indicated prevention). A systematic literature search identified 22 universal and 26 indicated controlled interventions, both published and unpublished, involving 4763 college, graduate, or professional students. As hypothesized, the overall mean effect sizes (ESs) for both universal (0.19) and indicated interventions (0.37) were statistically significant and differed significantly from each other favoring indicated interventions. Skill-training interventions, both universal (0.21) and indicated (0.31), were significant, whereas non-skill-training interventions were only significant among indicated (0.25) programs. For indicated interventions, better outcomes were obtained in those cases in which participants had access to support during the course of the intervention, either in person or through technology (e.g., email, online contact). The positive findings for both universal and indicated prevention are qualified by limitations of the current literature. To improve experimental rigor, future research should provide detailed information on the level of achieved implementation, describe participant characteristics and intervention content, explore the impact of potential moderators and mechanisms of success, collect post-intervention and follow-up data regardless of

  13. Giocampus school: a "learning through playing" approach to deliver nutritional education to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Alice; Brighenti, Furio; Finistrella, Viviana; Ingrosso, Lisa; Monti, Giorgia; Vanelli, Maurizio; Vitale, Marco; Volta, Elio; Scazzina, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    To improve nutritional knowledge of children, single-group educational interventions with pre/post knowledge assessment were performed in primary schools in Parma, Italy, participating to the Giocampus Program. A total of 8165 children (8-11 years old) of 3rd, 4th and 5th grades of primary school were involved in 3 hours per class nutritional lessons, with specifically designed games and activities for each school grade. To evaluate children learning, a questionnaire was administered before and after three months of educational intervention. A total of 16330 questionnaires were analysed. Children nutritional knowledge significantly increased (pnutritional knowledge. A stable integration of this method in primary school settings could prepare a new generation of citizens, better educated on health-promotion lifestyles.

  14. Evaluation of a School-Based Sex Education Programme Delivered to Grade Nine Students in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smylie, Lisa; Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Boyd, Dana

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of a multidimensional Canadian sex education programme was evaluated using 240 Grade Nine students. The intervention was offered by representatives from various community groups and involved instructional classes on anatomy/physiology of the reproductive system and sexually transmitted infections, a video and group discussion on…

  15. Delivering an A.S. Engineering Degree Program through Home Study Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, John

    Northern Virginia Community College (NVCC) and the Extended Learning Institute (ELI) undertook a project to develop the mathematics, science, and engineering courses required to complete an entire Associate of Science degree in Engineering through home study distance education. The project's ultimate goal was to create asynchronous learning…

  16. Data Changes Everything: Delivering on the Promise of Learning Analytics in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ellen; Ice, Phil

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, low background rumblings have been heard in the land of education and training--rumblings that are getting louder each day. These are the sounds of the learning world discovering what Internet professionals working in other market sectors have known for years: The "digital breadcrumbs" that learners leave behind about their…

  17. [nutritional Education In Public Health Services].

    OpenAIRE

    Boog, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discuss the implementation of nutritional education in public health services from the perspective of health professionals (physicians and nurses) working in them. The study was conducted in the Municipality of Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil, from October 1993 to July 1995, using action-based research methodology. The results describe the construction of nutritional knowledge in training and professional institutions; behavior towards food-related problems ...

  18. Wayfinding Services for Open Educational Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kalz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available To choose suitable resources for personalcompetence development in the vast amount of openeducational resources is a challenging task for a learner.Starting with a needs analysis of lifelong learners andlearning designers we introduce two wayfinding servicesthat are currently researched and developed in theframework of the Integrated Project TENCompetence.Then we discuss the role of these services to supportlearners in finding and selecting open educational resourcesand finally we give an outlook on future research.

  19. Evaluation of a Pilot Nutrition Education Program Delivered by Hmong Community Health Workers (CHWs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Treiber

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many members of the Hmong population in the United States suffer from comparatively bad health. Moreover, disease prevention messaging that has traditionally been used through various media and healthcare outlets is not as successful with the Hmong as with the general population, due in part to cultural barriers. This paper explores whether community health workers (CHWs may be a potentially successful way to deliver lessons in disease prevention, especially messages on healthy eating, drinking, and exercising. In addition, it explores the potential impact of a CHW program on participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP. Following a literature review, a pilot project that used CHWs in the Hmong Community of Sacramento, California is described. It used KAP (Knowledge, Attitude, Practice measures in a pre-post test. Statistically significant improvement was achieved in knowledge and attitude, and practice, but not in SNAP participation. The program and CHWs were well received as measured by a satisfaction survey of the 131 participants. Overall the pilot project proved to be successful.

  20. Service Quality in Higher Education Using an Enhanced SERVQUAL Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kay C.; Kek, Sei W.

    2004-01-01

    Customer service and quality are driving forces in the business community. As higher educational institutions tussle for competitive advantage and high service quality, the evaluation of educational service quality is essential to provide motivation for and to give feedback on the effectiveness of educational plans and implementation. This…

  1. Development and Evaluation of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Delivered by Psychologists and Non-Psychologists in an NHS Community Adult Mental Health Service: a Preliminary Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Thomas; Bell, Lorraine; Bolderston, Helen; Clarke, Sue

    2017-05-11

    Previous studies have demonstrated that acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is effective for depression and may be useful for complex transdiagnostic clients. To conduct a preliminary evaluation of whether ACT is feasible and effective when delivered by psychologists and non-psychologists for complex clients in a National Health Service (NHS) community mental health service for adults. Staff were trained in ACT and conducted one-to-one therapy with clients. Measures on general mental health, depression, fusion and values were given pre-therapy, post-therapy and at 3-month follow-up. Standardized measures showed significant improvements post-therapy for global mental health, depression, cognitive fusion and values post-treatment. These were partially maintained at follow-up and remained after an intent-to-treat analysis. There were no differences in outcomes between psychologists and non-psychologists. ACT may be delivered effectively with limited training for complex cases in secondary care, though further research is needed.

  2. MATURITY MODEL FOR IT SERVICE OUTSOURCING IN HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoriano Valencia García

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The current success of organizations depends on the successful implementation of Information and Comunication Technologies (ICTs. Good governance and ICT management are essential for delivering value, managing technological risks, managing resources and performance measurement. In addition, outsourcing is a strategic option which complements IT services provided internally in organizations. This paper proposes the design of a new holistic maturity model based on standards ISO/IEC 20000 and ISO/IEC 38500, the frameworks and best practices of ITIL and COBIT, with a specific focus on IT outsourcing. This model is validated by practices in the field of higher education, using a questionnaire and a metrics table among other measurement tools. Models, standards and guidelines are proposed in the model for facilitating adaptation to universities and achieving excellence in the outsourcing of IT services. The applicability of the model allows an effective transition to a model of good governance and management of outsourced IT services which, aligned with the core business of universities (teaching, research and innovation, affect the effectiveness and efficiency of its management, optimizes its value and minimizes risks.

  3. Broadband Radio Service (BRS) and Educational Broadband Service (EBS) Transmitters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Broadband Radio Service (BRS), formerly known as the Multipoint Distribution Service (MDS)/Multichannel Multipoint Distribution Service (MMDS), is a commercial...

  4. Extension and Higher Education Service-Learning: Toward a Community Development Service-Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoecker, Randy

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how on-the-ground Extension educators interface with higher education service-learning. Most service-learning in Extension has focused on precollege youth and 4-H. When we look at higher education service-learning and Extension in Wisconsin, we see that there is not as much connection as might be expected. County-based…

  5. 76 FR 40712 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Technology and Media Services for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Technology and Media Services for Individuals... Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. BILLING CODE 4000-01-P ...

  6. Impact evaluation of a health promotion-focused organisational development strategy on a health service's capacity to deliver comprehensive primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michelle; Taylor, Jane; O'Hara, Lily

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive primary health care approach is required to address complex health issues and reduce inequities. However, there has been limited uptake of this approach by health services nationally or internationally. Reorienting health services towards becoming more health promoting provides a mechanism to support the delivery of comprehensive primary health care. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a health promotion-focused organisational development strategy on the capacity of a primary health care service to deliver comprehensive primary health care. A questionnaire and semistructured individual interviews were used to collect quantitative and qualitative impact evaluation data, respectively, from 13 health service staff across three time points with regard to 37 indicators of organisational capacity. There were significant increases in mean scores for 31 indicators, with effect sizes ranging from moderate to nearly perfect. A range of key enablers and barriers to support the delivery of comprehensive primary health care was identified. In conclusion, an organisational development strategy to reorient health services towards becoming more health promoting may increase the capacity to deliver comprehensive primary health care.

  7. Providing Educationally Relevant Occupational and Physical Therapy Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverdure, Patricia A.; Rose, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    As defined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, occupational and physical therapists provide services to support students to access, participate, and progress in their educational program within the least restrictive educational environment. Educationally relevant occupational and physical therapy services in school…

  8. The Information-Seeking Habits of In-Service Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Todd; Bannon, Susan H.; Nunes-Bufford, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Research on information literacy and educators has focused on preservice educators and learning information literacy skills. Little research exists on in-service educators and their information literacy skills. Purposes of this study were to identify information sources that in-service educators used; to determine relationships between information…

  9. The Information-Seeking Habits of In-Service Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Todd; Bannon, Susan H.; Nunes-Bufford, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Research on information literacy and educators has focused on preservice educators and learning information literacy skills. Little research exists on in-service educators and their information literacy skills. Purposes of this study were to identify information sources that in-service educators used; to determine relationships between information…

  10. Beyond Accreditation: What Defines a Quality Funeral Service Education Program? An Investigation of the Relationship between Educational Correlates and Program Quality in Funeral Service Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritch, John Bradley

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to determine what defines a quality funeral service education program beyond accreditation. The study examined the opinions of funeral service education chairs (N = 45, representing 80% of the population) who are leaders of funeral service education programs accredited by the American Board of Funeral Service Education.…

  11. Delivering Flexible Education and Training to Health Professionals: Caring for Older Adults in Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Brian A; Gulley, Kelly H; Rossi, Carlo; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Schor, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    The National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health (NCDMPH), in collaboration with over 20 subject matter experts, created a competency-based curriculum titled Caring for Older Adults in Disasters: A Curriculum for Health Professionals. Educators and trainers of health professionals are the target audience for this curriculum. The curriculum was designed to provide breadth of content yet flexibility for trainers to tailor lessons, or select particular lessons, for the needs of their learners and organizations. The curriculum covers conditions present in the older adult population that may affect their disaster preparedness, response, and recovery; issues related to specific types of disasters; considerations for the care of older adults throughout the disaster cycle; topics related to specific settings in which older adults receive care; and ethical and legal considerations. An excerpt of the final capstone lesson is included. These capstone activities can be used in conjunction with the curriculum or as part of stand-alone preparedness training. This article describes the development process, elements of each lesson, the content covered, and options for use of the curriculum in education and training for health professionals. The curriculum is freely available online at the NCDMPH website at http://ncdmph.usuhs.edu (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:633-637).

  12. The development of NEdSERV: quantitative instrumentation to measure service quality in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, P

    1999-07-01

    The political climate of health care provision and education for health care in the latter years of the 20th century is evolving from the uncertainty of newly created markets to a more clearly focused culture of collaboration, dissemination of good practice, with an increased emphasis on quality provision and its measurement. The need for provider units to prove and improve efficiency and effectiveness through evidence-based quality strategies in order to stay firmly in the market place has never been more necessary. The measurement of customer expectations and perceptions of delivered service quality is widely utilized as a basis for customer retention and business growth in both commercial and non-profit organizations. This paper describes the methodological development of NEdSERV--quantitative instrumentation designed to measure and respond to ongoing stakeholder expectations and perceptions of delivered service quality within nurse education.

  13. Experiential Education Builds Student Self-Confidence in Delivering Medication Therapy Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy M. Parker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To determine the impact of advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPE on student self-confidence related to medication therapy management (MTM, fourth-year pharmacy students were surveyed pre/post APPE to: identify exposure to MTM learning opportunities, assess knowledge of the MTM core components, and assess self-confidence performing MTM services. An anonymous electronic questionnaire administered pre/post APPE captured demographics, factors predicted to impact student self-confidence (Grade point average (GPA, work experience, exposure to MTM learning opportunities, MTM knowledge and self-confidence conducting MTM using a 5-point Likert scale (1 = Not at all Confident; 5 = Extremely Confident. Sixty-two students (26% response rate responded to the pre-APPE questionnaire and n = 44 (18% to the post-APPE. Over 90% demonstrated MTM knowledge and 68.2% completed MTM learning activities. APPE experiences significantly improved students’ overall self-confidence (pre-APPE = 3.27 (0.85 SD, post-APPE = 4.02 (0.88, p < 0.001. Students engaging in MTM learning opportunities had higher self-confidence post-APPE (4.20 (0.71 vs. those not reporting MTM learning opportunities (3.64 (1.08, p = 0.05. Post-APPE, fewer students reported MTM was patient-centric or anticipated engaging in MTM post-graduation. APPE learning opportunities increased student self-confidence to provide MTM services. However, the reduction in anticipated engagement in MTM post-graduation and reduction in sensing the patient-centric nature of MTM practice, may reveal a gap between practice expectations and reality.

  14. Teacher education in the generative virtual classroom: developing learning theories through a web-delivered, technology-and-science education context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaverien, Lynette

    2003-12-01

    This paper reports the use of a research-based, web-delivered, technology-and-science education context (the Generative Virtual Classroom) in which student-teachers can develop their ability to recognize, describe, analyse and theorize learning. Addressing well-recognized concerns about narrowly conceived, anachronistic and ineffective technology-and-science education, this e-learning environment aims to use advanced technologies for learning, to bring about larger scale improvement in classroom practice than has so far been effected by direct intervention through teacher education. Student-teachers' short, intensive engagement with the Generative Virtual Classroom during their practice teaching is examined. Findings affirm the worth of this research-based e-learning system for teacher education and the power of a biologically based, generative theory to make sense of the learning that occurred.

  15. Quality Educational Services, Educational Imperative for a Competitive Global Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Modiga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the current context of economic development, human resources are a cornerstone of competition, both nationally and internationally. In the global competition of computerized economy, quality and inventiveness of the human resources are the main factors underlying the essential disparities between states. Starting from Alfred Marshall's statement “the most valuable of all capital is that invested in human beings”, the quality of human resources in general and education in particular as the key determinant of economic growth overall. Skilled in the art appreciate that there is a very close relationship between technological progress and investment in education with implications for all areas of life: economic, social, political, cultural. Although the widest spread idea about quality is that it is expensive ultimately, research has shown otherwise. Quality educational services are a desirable social objective and its contribution to improving the efficiency of the economy is crucial. Regarded as a model of corporate culture, total quality management: aims to customer oriented all its activities and processes and to optimize them so that to bring long-term benefits. Educational services customers are both individuals who receive education and their family and society as a whole.

  16. Combining infobuttons and semantic web rules for identifying patterns and delivering highly-personalized education materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Nathan C; Long, Jie; Tao, Cui

    2013-01-01

    Infobuttons have been established to be an effective resource for addressing information needs at the point of care, as evidenced by recent research and their inclusion in government-based electronic health record incentive programs in the United States. Yet their utility has been limited to wide success for only a specific set of domains (lab data, medication orders, and problem lists) and only for discrete, singular concepts that are already documented in the electronic medical record. In this manuscript, we present an effort to broaden their utility by connecting a semantic web-based phenotyping engine with an infobutton framework in order to identify and address broader issues in patient data, derived from multiple data sources. We have tested these patterns by defining and testing semantic definitions of pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome. We intend to carry forward relevant information to the infobutton framework to present timely, relevant education resources to patients and providers.

  17. The Education Challenge in Mexico: Delivering Good Quality Education to All. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 447

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    The growth of potential GDP in Mexico is not fast enough to narrow the income gap with other OECD countries at a sufficient pace. The persistent weakness in human capital development contributes to this situation. In particular, Mexicans spend comparatively few years in formal education, and the quality of the education they receive is lower than…

  18. The Country Profiles of the PHARMINE Survey of European Higher Educational Institutions Delivering Pharmacy Education and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The PHARMINE (Pharmacy Education in Europe consortium surveyed pharmacy education and practice in 2012. Surveys were updated in 2017 for publication. The PHARMINE consortium was especially interested in specialization in pharmacy education and practice (for community, hospital, and industrial pharmacy, and in the impact of the Bologna agreement and the directive of the European Commission on education and training for the sectoral profession of pharmacy on European degree courses. The surveys underline the varying attitudes of the different European countries to these various aspects. The surveys will now be published in Pharmacy. They will be useful to researchers in education, and to staff and students interested in mobility amongst different European and/or non-European countries. In order to assure a full understanding of the country profiles to be published in the journal Pharmacy, this introductory article describes the general format of the survey questionnaire used.

  19. Formative evaluation of a telemedicine model for delivering clinical neurophysiology services part II: the referring clinician and patient perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Breen, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Feedback from service users will provide insight into opportunities for improvement so that performance can be optimised. In the context of a formative evaluation referring clinician and patient satisfaction with a teleneurophysiology service was examined during a 20 week pilot period.

  20. Designing and delivering clinical risk management education for graduate nurses: an Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga; Currie, Tracey; Smith, Enid; McGennisken, Chris

    2007-07-01

    In order to enhance their capabilities in clinical risk management (CRM) and to be integrated into safe and effective patient safety organisational processes and systems, neophyte graduate nurses need to be provided with pertinent information on CRM at the beginning of their employment. What and how such information should be given to new graduate nurses, however, remains open to question and curiously something that has not been the subject either of critique or systematic investigation in the nursing literature. This article reports the findings of the third and final cycle of a 12 month action research (AR) project that has sought to redress this oversight by developing, implementing and evaluating a CRM education program for neophyte graduate nurses. Conducted in the cultural context of regional Victoria, Australia, the design, implementation and evaluation of the package revealed that it was a useful resource, served the intended purpose of ensuring that neophyte graduate nurses were provided with pertinent information on CRM upon the commencement and during their graduate nurse year, and enabled graduate nurses to be facilitated to translate that information into their everyday practice.

  1. 75 FR 55786 - Office of Special Education Programs, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education Programs, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department... Transition Technical Assistance Center (NSTTAC). Currently, the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP...

  2. The real governance of disaster risk management in peri-urban Senegal: Delivering flood response services through co-production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaer, Caroline; Hahonou, Eric Komlavi

    2017-01-01

    Disastrous and recurring floods have impacted West African urban centres over the last decade, accentuating already existing vulnerabilities in poor neighbourhoods. Climate change-induced changing weather patterns and more extreme weather events are only part of the explanation for this situation...... of public service delivery it also creates an environment favourable for brokers to take ownership of central processes of service delivery and for structural inequalities to be reinforced locally....

  3. Goal setting practice in services delivering community-based stroke rehabilitation: a United Kingdom (UK) wide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scobbie, Lesley; Duncan, Edward A; Brady, Marian C; Wyke, Sally

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the nature of services providing community-based stroke rehabilitation across the UK, and goal setting practice used within them, to inform evaluation of a goal setting and action planning (G-AP) framework. We designed, piloted and electronically distributed a survey to health professionals working in community-based stroke rehabilitation settings across the UK. We optimised recruitment using a multi-faceted strategy. Responses were analysed from 437 services. Services size, composition and input was highly variable; however, most were multi-disciplinary (82%; n = 335/407) and provided input to a mixed diagnostic group of patients (71%; n = 312/437). Ninety one percent of services (n = 358/395) reported setting goals with "all" or "most" stroke survivors. Seventeen percent (n = 65/380) reported that no methods were used to guide goal setting practice; 47% (n = 148/315) reported use of informal methods only. Goal setting practice varied, e.g. 98% of services (n = 362/369) reported routinely asking patients about goal priorities; 39% (n = 141/360) reported routinely providing patients with a copy of their goals. Goal setting is embedded within community-based stroke rehabilitation; however, practice varies and is potentially sub-optimal. Further evaluation of the G-AP framework is warranted to inform optimal practice. Evaluation design will take account of the diverse service models that exist. Implications for Rehabilitation Community-based stroke rehabilitation services across the UK are diverse and tend to see a mixed diagnostic group of patients. Goal setting is implemented routinely within community-based stroke rehabilitation services; however, practice is variable and potentially sub-optimal. Further evaluation of the G-AP framework is warranted to assess its effectiveness in practice.

  4. Service Learning and Teacher Education. Linking Learning with Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Kevin J.; Winecoff, H. Larry; Kemper, Richard; Rowls, Michael; Freeman, Nancy; Somerindyke, Jennifer; Mason, Janet; Williams, Terri

    This book concerns potential and actual uses of service learning as an instructional methodology in teacher education. Section 1 discusses how service and learning are primary to practically all roles teachers play. Section 2, a rationale for service learning and teacher education, shows consistency with Goals 2000, school-to-work transition, and…

  5. Comparing Alternative Instruments to Measure Service Quality in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochado, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance of five alternative measures of service quality in the high education sector--service quality (SERVQUAL), importance-weighted SERVQUAL, service performance (SERVPERF), importance-weighted SERVPERF, and higher education performance (HEdPERF). Design/methodology/approach: Data were…

  6. Comparing Alternative Instruments to Measure Service Quality in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochado, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance of five alternative measures of service quality in the high education sector--service quality (SERVQUAL), importance-weighted SERVQUAL, service performance (SERVPERF), importance-weighted SERVPERF, and higher education performance (HEdPERF). Design/methodology/approach: Data were…

  7. Trade and Investment Linkages in Higher Education Services in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Tham Siew Yean; Andrew Kam Jia Yi

    2007-01-01

    In the Third Industrial Master Plan, several service sub-sectors were identified as new sources of growth for the country, including education services. Apart from this sector’s contribution towards growth, private higher education institutions (PHEIs) can also contribute towards increasing access to education and equity. Malaysia aims to be a global education hub by 2010. In view of the above, this study aims to explore the trade and investment links in private higher education in Malaysia. ...

  8. Can We Teach Civic Education and Service-Learning in a World of Privatization, Inequality, and Interdependence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Benjamin R.

    2012-01-01

    This essay is an excerpt from a keynote speech delivered by Benjamin Barber at the 2nd Annual Summer Research Institute on the "Future of Community Engagement in Higher Education." The speech focuses on six conditions that will impact community service-learning and voluntarism efforts in the years ahead: the ideology of neo-liberalism and…

  9. Adherence to COPD guidelines in general practice: impact of an educational programme delivered on location in Danish general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Sørensen, Tina Brandt; Højmark, Torben Brunse; Olsen, Kim Rose; Vedsted, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The general practitioner (GP) is often the first healthcare contact for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To determine whether participating in a standardised educational programme delivered in the GP's own practice is associated with adherence to COPD guidelines. A nationwide register-based observational before and after study was undertaken with a control group of propensity-matched practices (follow-up period 6 months). COPD was defined as age 40+ years and at least two prescriptions for inhaled medication. The educational programme consisted of a 3-hr teaching lesson with a respiratory specialist and five visits by a representative from the sponsoring pharmaceutical company focusing on assessment and management of patients including written algorithms. A one-to-one propensity-matched control group of practices was selected. Register data were used to compare the rate of spirometry testing, preventive consultations, and influenza vaccinations provided to COPD patients and the rate of spirometry testing in non-COPD individuals, assumed to reflect diagnostic activity. Data for 102 participating GP practices were analysed. Participating clinics had a significant increase in preventive consultations and influenza vaccinations (ppractices may improve adherence to COPD guidelines, not least for clinics with a high potential for improvement.

  10. An Educational Extension Service in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krichevsky, M. I.

    2001-12-01

    A strength of US education is interaction with the public under the Land Grant University program. The public benefits from outreach through extension services which evolved for communication with end users, e.g., farmers, homemakers, public health providers, schoolchildren and entrepreneurs i.e., the public with problems and the extension agents who advise on solutions. Further, the agents can seek specialized advice from university faculty. No such system exists in India. The University of Pune (UP), Bionomics International (BI), and WorldSpace Foundation (WSF) will use digital radio broadcasts to facilitate educational extension services. The UP (350,000 students, 250 campuses, among dispersed communities) is a useful institutional setting to demonstrate the value of an outreach system in India. The UP will coordinate development of the broadcast content and the teaching faculty. The campuses will be focal points for outreach. BI will consult on development of the extension structure. WSF will provide the facilities and technical expertise for use of the digital system under the terms of an agreement with Bionomics International. Digital radios (&$slash75-150 each) and PCs will be at each campus and community. The major components of the Extension Service are broadcast of 1) University lecture and examination material in many disciplines; 2) outreach to the general population with of "canned" presentations and talks, skits, songs, games. The steps are: 1) Enhance communication among the campuses by use of satellite digital audio and multimedia broadcasts with feedback by telephone, mail, fax, etc. 2) Develop course material for training of extension personnel. 3) Train extension personnel to interface between the faculty of the University and the local population. 4) Extend digital radio services to population centers for communication of locally useful information. 5) Utilize extension personnel for system maintenance, motivating use of the broadcast

  11. The real governance of disaster risk management in peri-urban Senegal: Delivering flood response services through co-production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaer, Caroline; Hahonou, Eric Komlavi

    2016-01-01

    Disastrous and recurring floods have impacted West African urban centres over the last decade, accentuating already existing vulnerabilities in poor neighbourhoods. Climate change-induced changing weather patterns and more extreme weather events are only part of the explanation for this situation...... of the state in a poor peri-urban municipality of Pikine, Dakar. The authors show how the organization of collective services pertaining to flood response and climate change adaptation is maintained through co-production among service users and providers entailing a mixture of diverse governance modes...

  12. Key informant perspectives on policy- and service-level challenges and opportunities for delivering integrated sexual and reproductive health and HIV care in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Jennifer A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integration of sexual and reproductive health (SRH and HIV services is a policy priority, both globally and in South Africa. Recent studies examining SRH/HIV integration in South Africa have focused primarily on the SRH needs of HIV patients, and less on the policy and service-delivery environment in which these programs operate. To fill this gap we undertook a qualitative study to elicit the views of key informants on policy-and service-level challenges and opportunities for improving integrated SRH and HIV care in South Africa. This study comprised formative research for the development of an integrated service delivery model in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN Province. Methods Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 21 expert key informants from the South African Department of Health, and local and international NGOs and universities. Thematic codes were generated from a subset of the transcripts, and these were modified, refined and organized during coding and analysis. Results While there was consensus among key informants on the need for more integrated systems of SRH and HIV care in South Africa, a range of inter-related systems factors at policy and service-delivery levels were identified as challenges to delivering integrated care. At the policy level these included vertical programming, lack of policy guidance on integrated care, under-funding of SRH, program territorialism, and weak referral systems; at the service level, factors included high client load, staff shortages and insufficient training and skills in SRH, resistance to change, and inadequate monitoring systems related to integration. Informants had varying views on the best way to achieve integration: while some favored a one-stop shop approach, others preferred retaining sub-specialisms while strengthening referral systems. The introduction of task-shifting policies and decentralization of HIV treatment to primary care provide opportunities for

  13. Curricular Placement of Academic Service-Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Amy; Bolduc, Steven R.; Gallo, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The higher education service-learning literature is rich with case studies, guidelines for service-learning course and program development, and demonstrations of the impact of service-learning on students. Minimal discussion, however, focuses on the "strategic placement" of service-learning in disciplinary curricula, and how curricular…

  14. A study of service level agreement for Office365 Education

    OpenAIRE

    上田, 浩

    2014-01-01

    In this study, an outline of SLA (Service Level Agreement) for Office365 Education and case studies about consistency on-service incidents with SLA are provided. After that, we discuss about required service level of online services for institute such as university through the examples.

  15. A Comparison of Speech Sound Intervention Delivered by Telepractice and Side-by-Side Service Delivery Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan-Johnson, Sue; Schmidt, Anna Marie; Schenker, Jason; Alvares, Robin; Rowan, Lynne E.; Taylor, Jacquelyn

    2013-01-01

    Telepractice has the potential to provide greater access to speech-language intervention services for children with communication impairments. Substantiation of this delivery model is necessary for telepractice to become an accepted alternative delivery model. This study investigated the progress made by school-age children with speech sound…

  16. Delivering Satisfaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xinlian

    2012-01-01

    With more Chinese customers abandoning bricks-and-mortar department stores n favor of onine alternatives,express delivery services have sprouted up in recent years,riding the heels of the online shopping craze.Unfortunately for customers,delivery companies are renowned for providing unreliable service,sparking consumer ire and quickly becoming the bane of most netizens' online shopping experiences.

  17. Case Study: The Role of eLearning in Midwifery Pre-Service Education in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appiagyei, Martha; Trump, Alison; Danso, Evans; Yeboah, Alex; Searle, Sarah; Carr, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The issues and challenges of implementing eLearning in pre-service health education were explored through a pilot study conducted in six nurse-midwifery education programs in Ghana. Case-based, interactive computer mediated eLearning modules, targeted to basic emergency and obstetrical signal functions, were delivered both online and offline using a free-for-use eLearning platform, skoool HE(®). Key success factors included broad stakeholder support, an established curriculum and student and tutor interest. Challenges included infrastructure limitations, large class sizes and added workloads for tutors and information technology staff. National scale up is planned.

  18. Collaboration between Government and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs in Delivering Curative Health Services in North Darfur State, Sudan- a National Report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah I A Yagub

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available North Darfur State has been affected by conflict since 2003 and the government has not been able to provide adequate curative health services to the people. The government has come to rely on Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs to provide curative health services. This study was conducted to examine the existing collaboration between government and NGOs in curative health service delivery in North Darfur State, and to identify the challenges that affect their collaboration.Documentary data were collected from government offices and medical organizations. Primary data were obtained through interviews with government and NGOs representatives. The interviews were conducted with (1 expatriates working for international NGOs (N=15 and (2, health professionals and administrators working in the health sector (N= 45.The collaboration between the government and NGOs has been very weak because of security issues and lack of trust. The NGOs collaborate by providing human and financial resources, material and equipment, and communication facilities. The NGOs supply 70% of curative health services, and contribute 52.9% of the health budget in North Darfur State. The NGOs have employed 1 390 health personnel, established 44 health centres and manage and support 83 health facilities across the State.The NGOs have played a positive role in collaborating with the government in North Darfur State in delivering curative health services, while government's role has been negative. The problem that faces the government in future is how health facilities will be run should a peaceful settlement be reached and NGOs leave the region.

  19. When Outbound Mobility Programs and Service Learning Align in Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Anne; Truong, Son; Gray, Tonia; Downey, Greg; Hall, Tim; Jones, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    This project sought to investigate the learning that comes about from the intersection of outbound mobility experience programs (OMEs) with service learning in pre-service teacher education settings. The aim of the program of international service learning in the case study was to encourage pre-service teachers to rethink potentially ethnocentric…

  20. Pre-Service and In-Service Preschool Teachers' Views Regarding Creativity in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkus, Simge; Olgan, Refika

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated the views of pre-service and in-service preschool teachers concerning the developing of children's creativity in early childhood education by determining the similarities and/or differences among their views. The data were gathered from 10 pre-service and 11 in-service teachers through focus group meetings, and then from…

  1. A cross-sectional study of the feasibility of pharmacy-delivered harm reduction services among people who inject drugs in Xichang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Latkin, Carl A; Luan, Rongsheng; Yang, Cui

    2015-09-14

    HIV prevalence is high in Liangshan, China (1.1 %). In 2012, people who inject drugs (PWID) in Xichang, the capital city, contributed to 60.0 % of the HIV infections. The goal of the current study was to examine the feasibility of implementing pharmacy-delivered harm reduction services (PDHRS) for PWID. Face-to-face structured interviews with 403 PWID included questions on PWID's experiences of syringe services and their specific experiences, acceptance, and potential usage of PDHRS. There were some reports of harassment/bad treatment from pharmacists (12.2 %) and police (17.6 %). Non-prescription syringe sales (NPSS) from pharmacies in single piece were the main source (82.1 %) of syringes. 72.5 % of PWID reported visiting 31.5 % of the identified pharmacies. Most (74.7 %) PWID disposed of their used syringes by throwing them away. Only one PWID brought used syringes back to a pharmacy in the past 30 days. Half of the PDHRS, such as printed materials about HIV, Hepatitis C and STIs; risk reduction services; (16.9 %) and sharps container to dispose of syringes (0.2 %) were offered by a few pharmacies (pharmacies provided many PWID in Liangshan with new syringes. However, disposal of used syringes was problematic. At the time of investigation, half of 16 assessed PDHRS were already available in pharmacies in Xichang. PWID were ready to use all the potential PDHRS and14 of 16 PDHRS were feasible to provide. HIV testing kits may be available in pharmacies in the future. Many pharmacy-delivered harm reduction services are feasible and acceptable among PWID in Xichang, China.

  2. What works in delivering dementia education or training to hospital staff? A critical synthesis of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surr, Claire A; Gates, Cara

    2017-08-12

    The quality of care delivered to people with dementia in hospital settings is of international concern. People with dementia occupy up to one quarter of acute hospital beds, however, staff working in hospitals report lack of knowledge and skills in caring for this group. There is limited evidence about the most effective approaches to training hospital staff on dementia. The purpose of this literature review was to examine published evidence on the most effective approaches to dementia training and education for hospital staff. The review was conducted using critical synthesis and included qualitative, quantitative and mixed/multi- methods studies. Kirkpatrick's four level model for the evaluation of training interventions was adopted to structure the review. The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, AMED, British Education Index, Education Abstracts, ERIC (EbscoHost), The Cochrane Library-Cochrane reviews, Economic evaluations, CENTRAL (Wiley), HMIC (Ovid), ASSIA, IBSS (Proquest), Conference Proceedings Citation Indexes (Web of Science), using a combination of keyword for the following themes: Dementia/Alzheimer's, training/education, staff knowledge and patient outcomes. A total of 20 papers were included in the review, the majority of which were low or medium quality, impacting on generalisability. The 16 different training programmes evaluated in the studies varied in terms of duration and mode of delivery, although most employed face-to-face didactic techniques. Studies predominantly reported on reactions to training and knowledge, only one study evaluated outcomes across all of the levels of the Kirkpatrick model. Key features of training that appeared to be more acceptable and effective were identified related to training content, delivery methods, practicalities, duration and support for implementation. The review methodology enabled inclusion of a broad range of studies and permitted common features of successful programmes to be

  3. The gap in human resources to deliver the guaranteed package of prevention and health promotion services at urban and rural primary care facilities in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde-Rabanal, Jacqueline Elizabeth; Nigenda, Gustavo; Bärnighausen, Till; Velasco-Mondragón, Héctor Eduardo; Darney, Blair Grant

    2017-08-03

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the gap between the available and the ideal supply of human resources (physicians, nurses, and health promoters) to deliver the guaranteed package of prevention and health promotion services at urban and rural primary care facilities in Mexico. We conducted a cross-sectional observational study using a convenience sample. We selected 20 primary health facilities in urban and rural areas in 10 states of Mexico. We calculated the available and the ideal supply of human resources in these facilities using estimates of time available, used, and required to deliver health prevention and promotion services. We performed descriptive statistics and bivariate hypothesis testing using Wilcoxon and Friedman tests. Finally, we conducted a sensitivity analysis to test whether the non-normal distribution of our time variables biased estimation of available and ideal supply of human resources. The comparison between available and ideal supply for urban and rural primary health care facilities reveals a low supply of physicians. On average, primary health care facilities are lacking five physicians when they were estimated with time used and nine if they were estimated with time required (P facilities. There is a shortage of health promoters in urban primary health facilities (P facilities.

  4. Service Learning: Practical Learning Experiences in Sport and Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason W.; Bush, Gayle; Smith, Edith W.

    2005-01-01

    Experiential education is a teaching methodology employed to facilitate learning. All forms of experiential education require students to "learn by doing" as they participate in activities outside the classroom. Common forms of experiential education utilized by sport and physical educators include field and laboratory activities, service learning…

  5. Increasing Dutch adolescents' willingness to register their organ donation preference: the effectiveness of an education programma delivered by kidney transplantation patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Borne, B. van den; Dijker, A.J.; Ryckman, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study assessed the effects of an educational programme about organ donation delivered by (ex-)patients with a successfully transplanted donor kidney on the willingness of adolescents to register their organ donation preference. METHODS: A total of 319 secondary school students were

  6. Increasing Dutch adolescents' willingness to register their organ donation preference: the effectiveness of an education programma delivered by kidney transplantation patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Borne, B. van den; Dijker, A.J.; Ryckman, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study assessed the effects of an educational programme about organ donation delivered by (ex-)patients with a successfully transplanted donor kidney on the willingness of adolescents to register their organ donation preference. METHODS: A total of 319 secondary school students were

  7. ANALYSIS OF THE RATIO OF FREE AND PAID EDUCATIONAL SERVICES IN HIGHER PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Dmitrievich Naydenov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the relationship of public and private ownership in education in the Russian Federation. Recommendations to improve theoperating conditions of education by sector of free and paid educational services system of higher education are given.Modernization of production necessitates a clear understanding of private and public ownership in education, dynamics of free and paid educational services. In the economic literature there is not enough attention to the analysis of rational combination of paid and free educational services, particularly in the higher education system.In the article the analysis of trends in the delimitation of the sphere of higher professional education by form of ownership and the nature of reimbursement of educational services in the Russian Federation for the years 1993-2010 is given.Research methods: abstract-analytical method, statistical methods, analysis, aggregation, interviews.The society localizes areas of public and private property in accordance with the maximum efficiency of resources involved.The main trend in the development of higher professional education in the Russian Federation and CIS (The Commonwealth of independent States countries is the adoption by universities of properties of business structures. The share of the commercial sector in educational services is growing. «Free» educational services are dominated in the field of fundamental education. Paid public and private educational services are dominated in the field of specia-lized professional educational services.

  8. Price Determination for Educational Services Based on the Investments in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaga Radu Lucian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study aims at highlighting the link between educational marketing (product/service and price determination for educational services and investment in education, using empirical models and customization of classic approaches (interpolation method addressed to individual educational investment.

  9. Interactive Distance Education for In-Service Teachers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Santosh

    2000-01-01

    Discusses interactive television technologies that are under development and experimentation in India for in-service teacher education at the Indira Gandhi National Open University. Describes the VSAT (Very Small Aperture Terminal) system and ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) that are used for video technology in distance education.…

  10. Service-learning in dental education: meeting needs and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Janet Grobe

    2009-04-01

    Community-based service-learning is increasingly common in dental education. By definition, service-learning combines educational goals with service to the community, and the community and school are equal partners. The three main goals of service-learning are improving learning, promoting civic engagement, and strengthening communities. There have been calls from many groups to reform dental education to better serve the public, and service-learning is one of the most often recommended methods to help meet this goal. One of the key attributes of service-learning is its potential to promote civic engagement and social responsibility during the student's education. The social responsibility of dentists and aspects of professionalism can be learned by students through participation in well-structured service-learning programs. Community-based service-learning programs can also address societal needs by improving the public's access to oral health care through partnerships among dental schools, oral health providers, and communities. This article describes service-learning programs at several dental schools to illustrate application of this educational strategy in predoctoral dental education. This article also describes challenges that confront schools desiring to implement and sustain service-learning programs, including academic quality, faculty development and training, interprofessionalism, making time in the curriculum, budget, faculty shortages and time, student credit, quality control, and remote sites away from the dental school.

  11. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry - Delivering high-quality products and embarking on observations of the next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothnagel, A.; Artz, T.; Behrend, D.; Malkin, Z.

    2016-09-01

    The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) regularly produces high-quality Earth orientation parameters from observing sessions employing extensive networks or individual baselines. The master schedule is designed according to the telescope days committed by the stations and by the need for dense sampling of the Earth orientation parameters (EOP). In the pre-2011 era, the network constellations with their number of telescopes participating were limited by the playback and baseline capabilities of the hardware (Mark4) correlators. This limitation was overcome by the advent of software correlators, which can now accommodate many more playback units in a flexible configuration. In this paper, we describe the current operations of the IVS with special emphasis on the quality of the polar motion results since these are the only EOP components which can be validated against independent benchmarks. The polar motion results provided by the IVS have improved continuously over the years, now providing an agreement with IGS results at the level of 20-25 μ as in a WRMS sense. At the end of the paper, an outlook is given for the realization of the VLBI Global Observing System.

  12. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry. Delivering high-quality products and embarking on observations of the next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothnagel, A.; Artz, T.; Behrend, D.; Malkin, Z.

    2017-07-01

    The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) regularly produces high-quality Earth orientation parameters from observing sessions employing extensive networks or individual baselines. The master schedule is designed according to the telescope days committed by the stations and by the need for dense sampling of the Earth orientation parameters (EOP). In the pre-2011 era, the network constellations with their number of telescopes participating were limited by the playback and baseline capabilities of the hardware (Mark4) correlators. This limitation was overcome by the advent of software correlators, which can now accommodate many more playback units in a flexible configuration. In this paper, we describe the current operations of the IVS with special emphasis on the quality of the polar motion results since these are the only EOP components which can be validated against independent benchmarks. The polar motion results provided by the IVS have improved continuously over the years, now providing an agreement with IGS results at the level of 20-25 μas in a WRMS sense. At the end of the paper, an outlook is given for the realization of the VLBI Global Observing System.

  13. Strategies for service-learning assessment in dental hygiene education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Sharlee

    2013-10-01

    A large body of literature exists on the instructional pedagogy known as service-learning. Service-learning is a teaching and learning approach characterized by the dental hygiene student's practical application of academic studies and occurs within a community setting, to the benefit of both the student and community. Dental hygiene educators use service-learning to enhance student knowledge and application of oral health curriculum. This manuscript reports on the importance of service-learning assessment to the National Dental Hygiene Research Agenda as well as the future of the profession of dental hygiene and the successful strategies in service-learning evaluation available for utilization by dental hygiene educators.

  14. Comparing alternative instruments to measure service quality in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to examine the performance of five alternative measures of service quality in the high education sector – SERVQUAL (Service Quality), Importance-weighted SERVQUAL, SERVPERF (Service Performance), Importance-weighted SERVPERF and HedPERF (Higher Education Performance). We aim at determining which instrument has the superior measurement capability. Data were collected by means of a structured questionnaire containing perception items enhanced from the SERVPERF and HE...

  15. Stand & Deliver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villano, Matt

    2006-01-01

    October is national Cyber Security Awareness Month, and for the world of higher education, that means it is time to take a look at defense systems and plan for the future. Clearly, more planning is needed now than ever before. According to the majority of IT market research firms, phishing and identity theft have leapfrogged spam and spyware as…

  16. Service User Involvement in UK Social Service Agencies and Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossen, Carolyn; Austin, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Forming partnerships with service users became a requirement for social work education programs in the United Kingdom as of 2003, leading to the development of innovative approaches to social work education that involve service users as experts who are helping to teach the future generation of social workers. This article examines the perceptions…

  17. Service User Involvement in UK Social Service Agencies and Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossen, Carolyn; Austin, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Forming partnerships with service users became a requirement for social work education programs in the United Kingdom as of 2003, leading to the development of innovative approaches to social work education that involve service users as experts who are helping to teach the future generation of social workers. This article examines the perceptions…

  18. Development and nationwide scale-up of Climate Matters, a localized climate change education program delivered by TV weathercasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, H. M.; Maibach, E.

    2016-12-01

    Most Americans view climate change as a threat that is distant in space (i.e., not here), time (i.e., not now), and species (i.e., not us). TV weathercasters are ideally positioned to educate Americans about the current and projected impacts of climate change in their community: they have tremendous reach, are trusted sources of climate information, and are highly skilled science communicators. In 2009, we learned that many weathercasters were potentially interested in reporting on climate change, but few actually were, citing significant barriers including a lack of time to prepare and air stories, and lack of access to high quality content. To test the premise that TV weathercasters can be effective climate educators - if supported with high quality localized climate communication content - in 2010 George Mason University, Climate Central and WLTX-TV (Columbia, SC) developed and pilot-tested Climate Matters, a series of short on-air (and online) segments about the local impacts of climate change, delivered by the station's chief meteorologist. During the first year, more than a dozen stories aired. To formally evaluate Climate Matters, we conducted pre- and post-test surveys of local TV news viewers in Columbia. After one year, WLTX viewers had developed a more science-based understanding of climate change than viewers of other local news stations, confirming our premise that when TV weathercasters report on the local implications of climate change, their viewers learn. Through a series of expansions, including the addition of important new partners - AMS, NASA, NOAA & Yale University - Climate Matters has become a comprehensive nationwide climate communication resource program for American TV weathercasters. As of March 2016, a network of 313 local weathercasters nationwide (at 202 stations in 111 media markets) are participating in the program, receiving new content on a weekly basis. This presentation will review the theoretical basis of the program, detail

  19. Informing mental health policies and services in the EMR: cost-effective deployment of human resources to deliver integrated community-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivbijaro, G; Patel, V; Chisholm, D; Goldberg, D; Khoja, T A M; Edwards, T M; Enum, Y; Kolkiewic, L A

    2015-09-28

    For EMR countries to deliver the expectations of the Global Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 & the ongoing move towards universal health coverage, all health & social care providers need to innovate and transform their services to provide evidence-based health care that is accessible, cost-effective & with the best patient outcomes. For the primary and community workforce, this includes general medical practitioners, practice & community nurses, community social workers, housing officers, lay health workers, nongovernmental organizations & civil society, including community spiritual leaders/healers. This paper brings together the current best evidence to support transformation & discusses key approaches to achieve this, including skill mix and/or task shifting and integrated care. The important factors that need to be in place to support skill mix/task shifting and good integrated care are outlined with reference to EMR countries.

  20. Service Learning as a Practicum Experience in a Pre-Service Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynes, Nancy; Hatt, Blaine; Wideman, Ron

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents research on the benefits of service learning for pre-service teachers in the final year of their concurrent education program. The purpose of the research was to determine whether liberatory learning (Chambers, 2009) occurred for those students during a four-week service learning placement in organizations other than schools.…

  1. International Trade in Educational Services: Good or Bad?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kurt; Vincent-Lancrin, Stephan

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the challenges and opportunities that international trade in educational services represents for higher education systems in industrialized and developing countries and shows the importance of international quality assurance in education. Makes the case that the lifelong learning sector is most likely to be affected by developments…

  2. The purchasing of maintenance service delivery in the Dutch social housing sector: optimising commodity strategies for delivering maintenance services to tenants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mossel, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    For housing associations, maintenance is an opportunity for high quality interaction with their tenants, and thus an opportunity for effectively influencing the quality of service delivery to tenants. Dutch housing associations have a market share of about one third of the entire Dutch housing stock

  3. The purchasing of maintenance service delivery in the Dutch social housing sector: optimising commodity strategies for delivering maintenance services to tenants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mossel, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    For housing associations, maintenance is an opportunity for high quality interaction with their tenants, and thus an opportunity for effectively influencing the quality of service delivery to tenants. Dutch housing associations have a market share of about one third of the entire Dutch housing

  4. A failing medical educational model: a self-assessment by physicians at all levels of training of ability and comfort to deliver bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgel, Etan; McCarter, Robert; Jacobs, Shana

    2010-06-01

    Patient surveys consistently show physician communication remains less than ideal. While previous studies have demonstrated a lack of trainee confidence in delivering bad news, our study explores communication skills at all levels of practice and highlights potential barriers to improvement. Pediatric residents, fellows, and attendings involved in direct patient care at a major academic center participated in a voluntary questionnaire, consisting of self-assessed scales of comfort level, knowledge level, amount of training, and attitudes towards communication education. We also elicited barriers to learning and teaching as well as significant experiences. Eligible responses (n = 253) were evenly divided between trainees and faculty. Almost half of attendings and two thirds of fellows did not feel sufficiently knowledgeable to deliver bad news. Many attendings felt disproportionately more comfortable than they felt knowledgeable. All trainees felt insufficiently knowledgeable for independent practice of this skill. Educational barriers centered on time constraints, a deemphasis, a lack of positive modeling, and minimal awareness of existing resources. Poor experiences revolved around inappropriate language and settings as well as insufficient empathy or preparedness. Positive anecdotes highlighted the importance of education and the impact of role models. Independent of level of training, this study reveals a lack of self-assessed preparedness from many responsible for delivering bad news to patients and families. A significant barrier to improvement is the disproportionate level of self-assessed comfort versus knowledge level. Educational models should include both didactics to learn the skills and practice-based learning to refine the techniques.

  5. A phase II clinical trial of a dental health education program delivered by aboriginal health workers to prevent early childhood caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is a widespread problem in Australian Aboriginal communities causing severe pain and sepsis. In addition dental services are difficult to access for many Aboriginal children and trying to obtain care can be stressful for the parents. The control of dental caries has been identified as a key indictor in the reduction of Indigenous disadvantage. Thus, there is a need for new approaches to prevent ECC, which reflect the cultural norms of Aboriginal communities. Methods/Design This is a Phase II single arm trial designed to gather information on the effectiveness of a dental health education program for Aboriginal children aged 6 months, followed over 2 years. The program will deliver advice from Aboriginal Health Workers on tooth brushing, diet and the use of fluoride toothpaste to Aboriginal families. Six waves of data collection will be conducted to enable estimates of change in parental knowledge and their views on the acceptability of the program. The Aboriginal Health Workers will also be interviewed to record their views on the acceptability and program feasibility. Clinical data on the child participants will be recorded when they are 30 months old and compared with a reference population of similar children when the study began. Latent variable modeling will be used to interpret the intervention effects on disease outcome. Discussion The research project will identify barriers to the implementation of a family centered Aboriginal oral health strategy, as well as the development of evidence to assist in the planning of a Phase III cluster randomized study. Trial registration ACTRN12612000712808 PMID:22909327

  6. A phase II clinical trial of a dental health education program delivered by aboriginal health workers to prevent early childhood caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blinkhorn Fiona

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early Childhood Caries (ECC is a widespread problem in Australian Aboriginal communities causing severe pain and sepsis. In addition dental services are difficult to access for many Aboriginal children and trying to obtain care can be stressful for the parents. The control of dental caries has been identified as a key indictor in the reduction of Indigenous disadvantage. Thus, there is a need for new approaches to prevent ECC, which reflect the cultural norms of Aboriginal communities. Methods/Design This is a Phase II single arm trial designed to gather information on the effectiveness of a dental health education program for Aboriginal children aged 6 months, followed over 2 years. The program will deliver advice from Aboriginal Health Workers on tooth brushing, diet and the use of fluoride toothpaste to Aboriginal families. Six waves of data collection will be conducted to enable estimates of change in parental knowledge and their views on the acceptability of the program. The Aboriginal Health Workers will also be interviewed to record their views on the acceptability and program feasibility. Clinical data on the child participants will be recorded when they are 30 months old and compared with a reference population of similar children when the study began. Latent variable modeling will be used to interpret the intervention effects on disease outcome. Discussion The research project will identify barriers to the implementation of a family centered Aboriginal oral health strategy, as well as the development of evidence to assist in the planning of a Phase III cluster randomized study. Trial registration ACTRN12612000712808

  7. 75 FR 5291 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Technology and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Technology and Media... budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may... Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. BILLING CODE 4000-01-P ...

  8. APPLICATIONS OF CLOUD COMPUTING SERVICES IN EDUCATION – CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Cieplak

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Applications of Cloud Computing in enterprises are very wide-ranging. In opposition, educational applications of Cloud Computing in Poland are someway limited. On the other hand, young people use services of Cloud Computing frequently. Utilization of Facebook, Google or other services in Poland by young people is almost the same as in Western Europe or in the USA. Taking into account those considerations, few years ago authors have started process of popularization and usage of Cloud Computing educational services in their professional work. This article briefly summarizes authors’ experience with selected and most popular Cloud Computing services.

  9. Marketing services of higher education: theoretical aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenyi Polonskyi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to theoretical aspects of the use of marketing activities in institutions of higher education. The author analyzes of education from the standpoint of the marketing mix. The main factors of the external and internal environments affecting the educational institution.

  10. THE DOCUMENTATION AND EDUCATIONAL CENTRE INFORMATION AND INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Morales Navarro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This writing has three targets. Firstly, our aim is to establish the difference between complementary and extra-school activities, because there is confusion according to regulations. Secondly, to know if extra-school activities complement the education and formation learnt in our Educational System, and, therefore, to illuminate if they are necessary in order to reach a well-rounded education. And, finally, to analyze in what way these extra-school activities and complementary services can damage educational equity and social cohesion in schools or, on the other hand, if these activities and services suit them.

  11. The influence of staff training and education on prosthetic and orthotic service quality: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghany, Saeed; Sadeghi-Demneh, Ebrahim; Trinler, Ursula; Onmanee, Pornsuree; Dillon, Michael P; Baker, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Education and training in prosthetics and orthotics typically comply with International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics standards based on three categories of prosthetic and orthotic professionals. This scoping study sought to describe the evidence base available to answer the question, How are prosthetic and orthotic services influenced by the training of staff providing them? Scoping review. A structured search of the peer-reviewed literature catalogued in major electronic databases yielded 3039 papers. Following review of title and abstract, 93 articles were considered relevant. Full-text review reduced this number to 25. Only two articles were identified as providing direct evidence of the effects of training and education on service provision. While both suggested that there was an impact, it is difficult to see how the more specific conclusions of either could be generalised. The other 23 articles provide a useful background to a range of issues including the specification of competencies that training programmes should deliver (3 articles), descriptions of a range of training programmes and the effects of training and education on student knowledge and skills. Although it is considered axiomatic, the service quality is dependent on practitioner education and training. There is insufficient evidence to establish whether levels of training and education in prosthetics and orthotics have an effect on the quality of prosthetic and orthotic services. Clinical relevance There is very little evidence about the effects of training and education of prosthetists and orthotists on service quality. While this is a somewhat negative finding, we feel that it is important to bring this to the attention of the prosthetics and orthotics community.

  12. A comprehensive review of the barriers and promoters health workers experience in delivering prevention of vertical transmission of HIV services in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Roseanne C; McMahon, Devon E; Young, Sera L

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant biomedical and policy advances, 199,000 infants and young children in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) became infected with HIV in 2013, indicating challenges to implementation of these advances. To understand the nature of these challenges, we sought to (1) characterize the barriers and facilitators that health workers encountered delivering prevention of vertical transmission of HIV (PVT) services in SSA and (2) evaluate the use of theory to guide PVT service delivery. The PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched using keywords barriers, facilitators, HIV, prevention of vertical transmission of HIV, health workers, and their synonyms to identify relevant studies. Barriers and facilitators were coded at ecological levels according to the Determinants of Performance framework. Factors in this framework were then classified as affecting motivation, opportunity, or ability, per the Motivation-Opportunity-Ability (MOA) framework in order to evaluate domains of health worker performance within each ecological level. We found that the most frequently reported challenges occurred within the health facility level and spanned all three MOA domains. Barriers reported in 30% or more of studies from most proximal to distal included those affecting health worker motivation (stress, burnout, depression), patient opportunity (stigma), work opportunity (poor referral systems), health facility opportunity (overburdened workload, lack of supplies), and health facility ability (inadequate PVT training, inconsistent breastfeeding messages). Facilitators were reported in lower frequencies than barriers and tended to be resolutions to challenges (e.g., quality supervision, consistent supplies) or responses to an intervention (e.g., record systems and infrastructure improvements). The majority of studies did not use theory to guide study design or implementation. Interventions addressing health workers' multiple ecological levels of interactions, particularly the health

  13. ‘Get Healthy, Stay Healthy’: protocol for evaluation of a lifestyle intervention delivered by text-message following the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Behavioural lifestyle interventions can be effective at promoting initial weight loss and supporting physical activity and dietary behaviour change, however maintaining improvements in these outcomes is often more difficult to achieve. Extending intervention contact to reinforce learnt behavioural skills has been shown to improve maintenance of behaviour change and weight loss. This trial aims to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of a text message-delivered extended contact intervention to enhance or maintain change in physical activity, dietary behaviour and weight loss among participants who have completed a six month Government-funded, population-based telephone coaching lifestyle program: the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service (GHS). Methods/Design GHS completers will be randomised to the 6-month extended contact intervention (Get Healthy, Stay Healthy, GHSH) or a no contact control group (standard practice following GHS completion). GHSH participants determine the timing and frequency of the text messages (3–13 per fortnight) and content is tailored to their behavioural and weight goals and support preferences. Two telephone tailoring calls are made (baseline, 12-weeks) to facilitate message tailoring. Primary outcomes, anthropometric (body weight and waist circumference via self-report) and behavioural (moderate-vigorous physical activity via self-report and accelerometer, fruit and vegetable intake via self-report), will be assessed at baseline (at GHS completion), 6-months (end of extended contact intervention) and 12-months (6-months post intervention contact). Secondary aims include evaluation of: the feasibility of program delivery; the acceptability for participants; theoretically-guided, potential mediators and moderators of behaviour change; dose-responsiveness; and, costs of program delivery. Discussion Findings from this trial will inform the delivery of the GHS in relation to the maintenance of behaviour

  14. 'Get Healthy, Stay Healthy': protocol for evaluation of a lifestyle intervention delivered by text-message following the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeldsoe, Brianna; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Bauman, Adrian; Goode, Ana; Maher, Genevieve; Eakin, Elizabeth

    2014-02-04

    Behavioural lifestyle interventions can be effective at promoting initial weight loss and supporting physical activity and dietary behaviour change, however maintaining improvements in these outcomes is often more difficult to achieve. Extending intervention contact to reinforce learnt behavioural skills has been shown to improve maintenance of behaviour change and weight loss. This trial aims to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of a text message-delivered extended contact intervention to enhance or maintain change in physical activity, dietary behaviour and weight loss among participants who have completed a six month Government-funded, population-based telephone coaching lifestyle program: the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service (GHS). GHS completers will be randomised to the 6-month extended contact intervention (Get Healthy, Stay Healthy, GHSH) or a no contact control group (standard practice following GHS completion). GHSH participants determine the timing and frequency of the text messages (3-13 per fortnight) and content is tailored to their behavioural and weight goals and support preferences. Two telephone tailoring calls are made (baseline, 12-weeks) to facilitate message tailoring. Primary outcomes, anthropometric (body weight and waist circumference via self-report) and behavioural (moderate-vigorous physical activity via self-report and accelerometer, fruit and vegetable intake via self-report), will be assessed at baseline (at GHS completion), 6-months (end of extended contact intervention) and 12-months (6-months post intervention contact). Secondary aims include evaluation of: the feasibility of program delivery; the acceptability for participants; theoretically-guided, potential mediators and moderators of behaviour change; dose-responsiveness; and, costs of program delivery. Findings from this trial will inform the delivery of the GHS in relation to the maintenance of behaviour change and weight loss, and will

  15. The Role of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in Delivering Higher Education--A Case of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Shah Md. Safiul; Alam, S. M. Shafiul

    2010-01-01

    At present a new era has evolved in the education sector by means of ICTs. Different ICTs are now set to become instrumental to help expand access to education, strengthen the relevance of education to the increasingly digital workplace, and raise educational quality by, among others, helping make teaching and learning into an engaging, active…

  16. Application of Service Quality Model in Education Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ding Hooi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of the ideas on service quality stem from the West. The massive developments in research in the West are undeniable of their importance. This leads to the generation and development of new ideas. These ideas were subsequently channeled to developing countries. Ideas obtained were then formulated and used by these developing countries in order to obtain better approach in channeling service quality. There are ample to be learnt from the service quality model, SERVQUAL which attain high acceptance in the West. Service quality in the education system is important to guarantee the effectiveness and quality of education. Effective and quality education will be able to offer quality graduates, which will contribute to the development of the nation. This paper will discuss the application of the SERVQUAL model into the education environment.

  17. 15 CFR 296.32 - Technical and educational services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INNOVATION PROGRAM Dissemination of Program Results § 296.32 Technical and educational services. (a) Under... resources for purposes of further development and diffusion of TIP-related technologies. In no event...

  18. Service-Learning in Community College Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Anne Safran

    2002-01-01

    A community college nursing program in Hawaii partners with the American Red Cross in service learning projects that prepare nursing students as AIDS prevention educators. Flexibility and partner commitment eased the challenges of time constraints, funding gaps, and workloads. (SK)

  19. A MODEL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION CAMPUS HEALTH SERVICES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-17

    Mar 17, 2010 ... nurses who are employed at a higher education campus' health service to render a healthcare ..... effectively perform roles and tasks expected of him or her in .... all times by those with whom the individual comes into contact.

  20. A MODEL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION CAMPUS HEALTH SERVICES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-17

    Mar 17, 2010 ... nurses who are employed at a higher education campus' health service to render a healthcare ..... extremely diverse in terms of gender, age, religion, culture, .... the environment, with relative freedom from pain, disability,.

  1. Overcoming the Barriers to Expanded Pharmacy Service--Pharmaceutical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, William H.

    1979-01-01

    Cognitive, situational, and attitudinal barriers to expanding the role of the pharmacist in the health care services are discussed. Attention is focused on how pharmacy education can overcome some of these barriers. (SF)

  2. Delivering Educational Multimedia Contents through an Augmented Reality Application: A Case Study on Its Impact on Knowledge Acquisition and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, David; Contero, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study to analyze the use of augmented reality (AR) for delivering multimedia content to support the teaching and learning process of the digestive and circulatory systems at the primary school level, and its impact on knowledge retention. Our AR application combines oral explanations and 3D models and animations of anatomical…

  3. Congenital Heart Defects and Receipt of Special Education Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Autry, Andrew; Razzaghi, Hilda; Boyle, Coleen A; Mahle, William T; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Correa, Adolfo

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the prevalence of receipt of special education services among children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) compared with children without birth defects. Children born from 1982 to 2004 in metropolitan Atlanta with CHDs (n = 3744) were identified from a population-based birth defect surveillance program; children without birth defects (n = 860 715) were identified from birth certificates. Cohorts were linked to special education files for the 1992-2012 school years to identify special education services. Children with noncardiac defects or genetic syndromes were excluded; children with CHDs were classified by presence or absence of critical CHDs (ie, CHDs requiring intervention by age one year). We evaluated the prevalence of receipt of special education services and prevalence rate ratios using children without birth defects as a reference. Compared with children without birth defects, children with CHDs were 50% more likely to receive special education services overall (adjusted prevalence rate ratio [aPRR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-1.7). Specifically, they had higher prevalence of several special education categories including: intellectual disability (aPRR = 3.8; 95% CI: 2.8-5.1), sensory impairment (aPRR = 3.0; 95% CI: 1.8-5.0), other health impairment (aPRR = 2.8; 95% CI: 2.2-3.5), significant developmental delay (aPRR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3-2.8), and specific learning disability (aPRR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.1-1.7). For most special education services, the excess prevalence did not vary by presence of critical CHDs. Children with CHDs received special education services more often than children without birth defects. These findings highlight the need for special education services and the importance of developmental screening for all children with CHDs. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Congenital Heart Defects and Receipt of Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Autry, Andrew; Razzaghi, Hilda; Boyle, Coleen A.; Mahle, William T.; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Correa, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND We investigated the prevalence of receipt of special education services among children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) compared with children without birth defects. METHODS Children born from 1982 to 2004 in metropolitan Atlanta with CHDs (n = 3744) were identified from a population-based birth defect surveillance program; children without birth defects (n = 860 715) were identified from birth certificates. Cohorts were linked to special education files for the 1992–2012 school years to identify special education services. Children with noncardiac defects or genetic syndromes were excluded; children with CHDs were classified by presence or absence of critical CHDs (ie, CHDs requiring intervention by age one year). We evaluated the prevalence of receipt of special education services and prevalence rate ratios using children without birth defects as a reference. RESULTS Compared with children without birth defects, children with CHDs were 50% more likely to receive special education services overall (adjusted prevalence rate ratio [aPRR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4–1.7). Specifically, they had higher prevalence of several special education categories including: intellectual disability (aPRR = 3.8; 95% CI: 2.8–5.1), sensory impairment (aPRR = 3.0; 95% CI: 1.8–5.0), other health impairment (aPRR = 2.8; 95% CI: 2.2–3.5), significant developmental delay (aPRR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3–2.8), and specific learning disability (aPRR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.1–1.7). For most special education services, the excess prevalence did not vary by presence of critical CHDs. CONCLUSIONS Children with CHDs received special education services more often than children without birth defects. These findings highlight the need for special education services and the importance of developmental screening for all children with CHDs. PMID:26283775

  5. Integration of Medical Education and Healthcare Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Khojasteh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nThe Ministry of Health and Medical Education in Iran is responsible for public health, medical treatment and the management and planning of medical education, that is, training under supervision, of which expertise at all levels, from first degree to doctorate, is organized. The plan to create a health and treatment network and integrate medical education into healthcare system was designed to revolutionize the health machine in the country.

  6. Service Learning: Packing Parachutes for the Jump into Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Amy Stevens

    2005-01-01

    Service learning adds instructional value to any curriculum area, and it is especially appropriate for education courses. Its benefits include development of critical thinking, deeper processing of course content, and practical related experience. Using action research, this article examines the impact of service learning on preservice teachers'…

  7. Leadership of Education Psychological Services: Fit for Purpose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Roger

    2013-01-01

    At a time of great change for educational psychology services in England, this paper reviews current theories of leadership and proposes how an integration of key aspects of these can be applied to support a self review of leadership practice, both by individual leaders and by services. The message from current theory is that in the midst of…

  8. In-Service Education for Rural School Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdin, Joel L., Ed.; Poliakoff, Lorraine L., Ed.

    This publication focuses on in-service education for rural teachers who are remote from universities or other training centers. Section 1 consists of three models for in-service programs presented at a writing conference by Lawrence Heldman, Edward Krahmer, and Lionel Orlikow. The models include specifications for a national organization to serve…

  9. Promoting Experiential Learning in Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    This report introduces the experiential learning initiative at a major university in Hong Kong that prepares pre-service teachers with experience of engaging with social and cultural issues in teaching. It calls on teacher educators in different contexts to work together on similar initiatives that help pre-service teachers grow professionally…

  10. Making IBSE durable through pre-service teacher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den Ed; Damsma, Welmoet; Herik, van den Maaike; Mulken, van Frans; Ruis, Paul; Blagotinsek, Ana; Cronin, Sue; Holub, Sigrid; Holub, Peter; Sokolowska, Dagmara; Sporea, Dan; Sporea, Adelina

    2013-01-01

    How can we make Inquiry-Based Science and Mathematics Education (IBSME) durable? …. by incorporating it in the pre-service programs for elementary teachers! With pre-service students the training can be much more intensive than with inservice teachers. To have an impact in the classroom the minimum

  11. 75 FR 55785 - Office of Special Education Programs, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education Programs, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department... Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) funds NCEO to address national, State, and local assessment...

  12. Inclusion Reconceptualized: Pre-Service Teacher Education and Disability Studies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilham, Christopher M.; Tompkins, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    In this article, two teacher educators describe and explain how they are reconceptualizing a pre-service teacher education course on inclusion using disability studies in education (DSE) scholarship. The DSE approach better connects the oft-separated field of diversity and inclusion, and builds on the program's overall focus on equity education.…

  13. Cooking Healthy, Eating Smart (CHES): Evaluating the feasibility of using volunteers to deliver nutrition and food safety education to rural older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Morgan

    Due to their limited resources, rural, older adults in the United States are at risk for poor diet-related health outcomes. Nutrition education is a key component in improving health outcomes in older adults. Cooking Healthy, Eating Smart (CHES) is a nine-lesson curriculum designed to teach rural, older adults culturally appropriate nutrition and food safety information. Funding to hire health professionals to deliver such a curriculum is limited, presenting the need to explore a less expensive mode of dissemination. In this community-based, participatory research study, a formative evaluation and feasibility study were conducted to examine the use of volunteers to deliver a nutrition and food safety curriculum to rural, older adults in South Carolina. Seven focus groups were conducted with members of the South Carolina Family and Community Leaders (SCFCL) and members of the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) in the four regions of South Carolina to explore barriers and facilitators of volunteers delivering CHES (N=65 participants). The focus group findings informed the development of the volunteer training manual. A comparative case study method was used to examine the feasibility of a volunteer-based approach by observing and describing the delivery of CHES by two groups of volunteers in SC. The case study findings, including volunteer knowledge change, self-efficacy change, curriculum experience, program experience, and project team observations of volunteers indicated that using volunteers to deliver CHES is a plausible approach with the assistance of paid staff or project team members.

  14. Making Knowledge Services Work in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Donald M.; Lefrere, Paul; Mason, Jon

    2006-01-01

    Over the past three years, knowledge-based practices in higher education have advanced, driving the development of low/no-cost, mass-market tools for knowledge sharing and reducing some barriers to change. New investors in higher education are developing strategies to exploit the knowledge-driven value propositions. Existing institutions, anxious…

  15. The Organization of Correctional Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Thom

    2007-01-01

    There have been five major types of correctional education organizations over the centuries: Sabbath school, traditional or decentralized, bureau, correctional school district (CSD), and integral education. The middle three are modern organizational patterns that can be implemented throughout a system: Decentralized, bureau, and CSD. The…

  16. Theorising Service Learning in Higher Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Ruksana; Castle, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Policy on service learning is framed in the discourse of reciprocity, partnership and engagement. It is tasked with transforming higher education to bring about opportunities for integrating theory and practice, work-based learning and academic learning, so that higher education engages with knowledge created in other sites of practice. While…

  17. Homeschool Parents and Satisfaction with Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Albert; Tuchman, Sivan; Wolf, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Homeschooling is controversial for a variety of reasons. One concern is whether families are sufficiently equipped to serve students with disabilities. We investigate this issue by assessing parental satisfaction with the special education services that their child is receiving in various educational sectors (e.g., homeschool, traditional public,…

  18. Constraints on the Professional Service of Education Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Hal A.

    1990-01-01

    Increases in external services performed by faculty are integral to K-12 school, college, and department of education reform agendas, but there are limiting constraints, including the quest for prestige; tenure, promotion, and reward systems; and faculty recruitment, education, and role orientations. Changing these factors appropriately may help…

  19. Post-Mao China: Educational Services for Exceptional Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Yang, Ling-Yan; Xiao, Fei; Van Dyke, Don C.

    2008-01-01

    When William Moore, a Scottish Presbyterian pastor, established the first special school in China in 1874, the country began her long and circuitous journey toward establishing formal educational services for individuals with special needs. Special education in China developed slowly on the infertile soil of continual wars, political instability,…

  20. The Use of Service-Learning among Special Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeper, Lance S.; Dymond, Stacy K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the use of service-learning (SL) by special education faculty at 4-year colleges and universities across the United States, and to determine faculty attitudes and beliefs about the application of SL in special education. Participants included faculty with experience in SL teaching and/or research in…

  1. OT - Education for the health services of the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bodil Winther; Sørensen, Annette; Hove, Anne

    2008-01-01

    as a result of the rapid pace of change in society. The Faculty of Occupational Therapy in Copenhagen wanted to enable the graduates in the best possible way to meet the employers’ demands as to qualifications. Furthermore, the aim was to develop and guarantee the quality of the educations offered......OT - Education for the health services of the future This presentation offers knowledge about which qualifications the health services and OT practice in general demand from Occupational Therapists. The study was developed in a wider context of the constant reflection within higher education...... by University College Oeresund. To express the level of education to be achieved in terms of competences and learning outcome, the study was inspired by the tuning process of educational structures in Europe, which is part of the Bologna process to integrate higher education area in Europe. The study is based...

  2. The Students’ Viewpoint on Quality of Educational Services in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamian, Hasan; Rostami, Farideh; Ghara, Aliasghar Nadi; Abedi, Ghassem

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recently, focusing on higher education quality has got increasingly critical. The novel managerial attitudes have defined the customer-demanded quality. Based on this, recognizing the receivers’ perception of the quality of the services offered and evaluating the quality of the service is considered of the basic measures taken in order to develop quality promotion programs. Therefore, this is a qualitative research conducted for students’ viewpoint on quality of educational services. Material and Methods: This qualitative study has been performed by the phenomenological method. The samples have been selected based on goal-oriented approach. In this qualitative research, the required data have been collected in two phases (90 individual interviews and 30 focus group discussions) at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences during which the participants have conveyed their experiences and expectations encountering the educational quality topic. All the interviews have been recorded and implemented. The interviews analysis has been carried out simultaneously with the implementation and using theme analysis by Smith method. Results: According to the findings regarding the definition of quality, the students have emphasized two important aspects including “educational services standards by the teacher “and “the students’ satisfaction”. Thus the final education quality resulted from the students’ experiences and perception is this way: “Presenting the students educational services in class and out of class compatible with the educational services standards so that it results in the students’ satisfaction”. When a person views her/him-self rightful as a customer, whatever seems necessary to them appears like a requirement. Then regarding paying attention and reflecting on the customers’ perceived needs, it is possible to determine their expectations limit to some extent. Conclusion: Therefore, designing educational quality standards in

  3. Strengthening citizenship education in secondary school: a service- learning proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela María Figueroa Iberico

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To form people that develop in an active and compromised way their citizenship to solve community and country problems is the objective of our present education. However some specialists observe mistakes in our civic education noticing that it needs an integral and structural change. School is the perfect place to constantly practice citizenship through the practice of values, capacities and abilities that allow students interact among them, with their authorities and with society members. In this article, it presents a service-learning proposal which links learning and solidarity service in order to apply the acquired knowledge in the classroom for community service developing competences in daily contexts.

  4. A Comparison of Service Delivery Models for Special Education Middle School Students Receiving Moderate Intervention Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Mason, Keely S.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to improve academic performance for students receiving special education services, a large urban school district in Tennessee has implemented Integrated Service Delivery Model. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of students receiving instruction in self-contained classrooms to the performance of students…

  5. Education as Service: The Understanding of University Experience through the Service Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Irene C. L.; Forbes, Jeannie

    2009-01-01

    With the marketization of UK higher education, this paper develops a framework from services marketing that can assist universities in understanding what market orientation means and how students would value their offerings. Our study shows that the core service in a university experience is a learning experience that is cocreated and that the…

  6. Veterinary education: a basis for good governance leading to effective veterinary services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, E A; DeHaven, W R

    2012-08-01

    Veterinary education serves as the foundation on which a country can build effective Veterinary Services (VS). In addition, an appropriately well-educated animal health workforce will be better poised to actively participate in and advance good governance practices. Good governance, in turn, will lead to improved animal and veterinary public heath infrastructures and help advance economic development across the globe. A crucial first step in establishing a strong educational foundation is to define minimum competencies for both public- and private-practice veterinarians to perform veterinary service tasks. Defining minimum competencies will also assist veterinary education establishments (VEEs) in developing and implementing curricula to allow graduates to achieve those competencies. Incorporating veterinary educational prerequisites and requirements into governance documents that regulate VS will help to ensure that those who deliver VS have an adequate knowledge and skills base to do so. Public-private partnerships may be particularly effective in designing and implementing curricula that address defined minimum competencies and assure the quality of VEEs. Through these partnerships, a system of continuous quality improvement is established that embodies the qualities essential to good governance practices. Such practices will ultimately strengthen national VS, better protect animal and public health, and ensure food security.

  7. Attitudes of pre-service teachers about computer supported education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Yıldırım

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A lot of technologies can be used in education environment. Computer has an important place in these technologies. The aim of this study is to investigate the attitude of the students of Computer and Instructional Technologies Education Department towards computer supported education in terms of class level, income level, and gender. 120 pre-service teachers from the Department of Computer and Instructional Technologies Education at Kazim Karabekir Educational Faculty participated in the survey. The results showed that the participants have a high level positive attitude about Computer Supported Education (CSE. No significant differences obtained depending on class level, income level, and gender. However, differences among groups obtained in terms of the questionnaire items which are creativity skills, preferring traditional teaching CSE, encouraging computer usage, using computer actively, reconciled computer with education, educational addition of CSE according to spent work; and enjoying.

  8. Training Manual in Population Education. Population Education Programme Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    Population education is at different stages of development in the Asian countries, but almost all of the countries show an interest in developing population education programs. This manual for designing and implementing population education programs consists of six chapters. Chapter one highlights issues and problems arising in connection with…

  9. Measurement of Quality of Educational Hospital Services by the SERVQUAL Model: The Iranian Patients’ Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Satar; Matin, Behzad Karami; Moradi, Khalil; Bijan, Behroz; Fallahi, Masoud; Shokati, Behnam; Saeidi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The main mission of hospitals in any health system is to deliver high quality healthcare for patients and meet their needs and expectations. The aim of the current study was to assess the quality of the service of educational hospitals affiliated with Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2015, from the perspective of patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study, the perspectives of 400 patients were assessed about the quality of the services provided by educational hospitals in Kermanshah (western Iran) in 2015. The quality was assessed by the SERVQUAL questionnaire with five dimensions, i.e., tangibility, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy. In addition, the Wilcoxon test and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used to explore any association between the dependent variable and explanatory variables. The data were analyzed using Stata V.12 software. Results There were negative gaps in all five dimensions. The highest and lowest gaps in the mean score were found in the assurance (−0.88) and responsiveness (−0.56) dimensions. The patients ranked responsiveness as the most important dimension of the quality of healthcare. Conclusion There were gaps between the patients’ perceptions and their expectation about the five dimensions that were studied based on the SERVQUAL model. Also, it is recommended that improving the quality of healthcare is possible by various policies, such as good responsiveness, access to health workers, and delivering healthcare in less time. PMID:27123218

  10. Palliative care providers' perspectives on service and education needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellick, S M; Charles, K; Dagsvik, J; Kelley, M L

    1996-01-01

    To obtain the information necessary for coordinated regional program development, we examined (a) the multidisciplinary viewpoint of palliative care service provision and (b) the continuing education needs reported by non-physician service providers. Of 146 surveys distributed to care providers from multiple settings, 135 were returned. Respondents cited these problems: fragmented services, poor pain and symptom control, lack of education for providers, lack of public awareness, problems with the continuity and coordination of care, lack of respite, and lack of hospice beds. Stress management for caregivers, pain management, communication skills, and symptom assessment were rated as priorities in continuing education. Lectures, small group discussions, practicum, and regular medical centre rounds were the preferred learning formats, while costs and staff shortages were cited as educational barriers.

  11. Public Service Advertising to Promote Cooperative Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sylvia J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes an advertising campaign designed to create awareness of cooperative education in students, parents, and business people who can sponsor co-op jobs. Discusses benefits to students, employers, and society. (JM)

  12. In-Service Education Hits the Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Martha R.; Harker, Beverley

    1976-01-01

    A mobile inservice unit providing continuing education for staff members of nursing homes, extended care facilities, and small hospitals has been developed by Phoenix College for Maricopa County, Arizona. (LH)

  13. Service Learning Using English Language Teaching in Pre-Service Teacher Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Rozario, Vilma; Low, Ee Ling; Avila, Ava Patricia; Cheung, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    In line with the Ministry of Education's vision of the delivery of twenty-first century competencies amongst all students in Singapore, the National Institute of Education in Singapore employs service learning as a pedagogical tool to develop community outreach and engagement. This paper begins with a review of related literature on service…

  14. The students’ viewpoint on the quality gap in educational services

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAHIM KHANLI, MARZIYEH; DANESHMANDI, HADI; CHOOBINEH, ALIREZA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Students and university community are social and human resources of the country. The students’ viewpoints about the quality of educational services can be considered as a basis for planning quality promotion and improving organizational performance. This study was conducted to determine the quality gap in educational services by the students of Health and Nutrition School of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 140 students participated voluntarily (age range=19 to 40 years). The service quality (SERVQUAL) questionnaire was used for data collection. This questionnaire measured the quality gap in 5 dimensions of educational service including assurance, responsiveness, empathy, reliability, and tangibility. The students’ perception about the current conditions and their expectations as to optimal conditions can be determined, using this questionnaire. The score of the gap in quality of educational services is calculated from difference between perception and expectation scores. Due to non-normality of data, non-parametric tests were used. To this end, data were analyzed by statistical tests including Wilcoxon, Friedman, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whiteny tests in SPSS 14. Results: The results showed that there was quality gap in all 5 dimensions of educational services. The largest and the smallest gaps were observed in "responsiveness" with a mean±SD of -0.94±0.74 and in "reliability" with a mean±SD of -0.76±0.69, respectively. There was a significant difference in quality gap between the 5 dimensions (p<0.001). Conclusion: According to the results, the students’ expectations were higher than their perceptions of current conditions; also, in all aspects of the services their expectations were not met. It is recommended that workshops on customer services, communication skills and personnel’s technical skills development should be planned and held. Also, allocating more resources for improving

  15. The students' viewpoint on the quality gap in educational services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARZIYEH RAHIM-KHANLI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Students and university community are social and human resources of the country. The students’ viewpoints about the quality of educational services can be considered as a basis for planning quality promotion and improving organizational performance. This study was conducted to determine the quality gap in educational services by the students of Health and Nutrition School of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 140 students participated voluntarily (age range=19 to 40 years. The service quality (SERVQUAL questionnaire was used for data collection. This questionnaire measured the quality gap in 5 dimensions of educational service including assurance, responsiveness, empathy, reliability, and tangibility. The students’ perception about the current conditions and their expectations as to optimal conditions can be determined, using this questionnaire. The score of the gap in quality of educational services is calculated from difference between perception and expectation scores. Due to non-normality of data, non-parametric tests were used. To this end, data were analyzed by statistical tests including Wilcoxon, Friedman, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whiteny tests in SPSS 14. Results: The results showed that there was quality gap in all 5 dimensions of educational services. The largest and the smallest gaps were observed in "responsiveness" with a mean±SD of -0.94±0.74 and in "reliability" with a mean±SD of -0.76±0.69, respectively. There was a significant difference in quality gap between the 5 dimensions (p<0.001. Conclusion: According to the results, the students’ expectations were higher than their perceptions of current conditions; also, in all aspects of the services their expectations were not met. It is recommended that workshops on customer services, communication skills and personnel’s technical skills development should be planned and held. Also, allocating more resources for

  16. Continuing healthcare education: a strategy to connect teaching and services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alves Morais Filho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This experience report aims to describe the experience of implementing a project for continuing education with the nursing staff of the emergency service at three hospitals, highlighting the connection between teaching and service. This project was developed by professors and undergraduate nursing students of the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte in 2011, and conducted at the urgent care services of three hospitals. In each hospital were worked themes chosen by service professionals according to local needs. At the meetings, we used questioning with daily issues, round-table discussions of professional experiences, practical classes in the emergency care facility and laboratory, discussion of texts, and lecture/dialogue classes. The experience of this project reveals the importance and potential of integrating teaching-services in the continuing education of health workers in order to improve care quality and solidify the National Health System in Brazil

  17. Leadership of education psychological services: fit for purpose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Roger

    2013-01-01

    At a time of great change for educational psychology services in England, this paper reviews current theories of leadership and proposes how an integration of key aspects of these can be applied to support a self review of leadership practice, both by individual leaders and by services. The message from current theory is that in the midst of complexity and rapid change, a primary focus on the head of service is outdated; there should instead be a focus to develop the leadership capacity of the service as a whole. Key constructs considered are systems thinking, social identity, authenticity, and leadership as social construction. PMID:26157196

  18. Making IBSE durable through pre-service teacher education

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, van den, Aad; Damsma, Welmoet; Herik, van den, H.J.; Mulken, van, M.; Ruis, Paul; Blagotinsek, Ana; Cronin, Sue; Holub, Sigrid; Holub, Peter; Sokolowska, Dagmara; Sporea, Dan; Sporea, Adelina

    2013-01-01

    How can we make Inquiry-Based Science and Mathematics Education (IBSME) durable? …. by incorporating it in the pre-service programs for elementary teachers! With pre-service students the training can be much more intensive than with inservice teachers. To have an impact in the classroom the minimum contact time in IBSME in-service and coaching has to be more than 90 hours (Supovitz & Turner, 2000). That number is hard to achieve in in-service but it is quite possible in preservice teacher edu...

  19. A Simulation Pedagogical Approach to Engaging Generalist Pre-Service Teachers in Physical Education Online: The GoPro Trial 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, Brendon P.

    2017-01-01

    There has been a continuous increase in enrolments within teacher education programs in recent years delivered via online and external modes. Such levels of enrolment have raised discussion around the theory-practice nexus and whether pre-service teachers (PSTs) can optimally engage with practical learning components via online platforms. This…

  20. Nutrition Education and Gerontology Services Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckler, Terry Anne; Vogler, James D.

    The Nutrition and Gerontology Services Project attempted to affect basal nutrition knowledge and address dietary changes for 478 California senior citizens who were live-in residents in homes for the aged. Two instruments were employed to measure study variables. Knowledge of nutrition was measured by the Nutritional Learning Scale, an orally…

  1. The students' viewpoint on the quality gap in educational services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim Khanli, Marziyeh; Daneshmandi, Hadi; Choobineh, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    Students and university community are social and human resources of the country. The students' viewpoints about the quality of educational services can be considered as a basis for planning quality promotion and improving organizational performance. This study was conducted to determine the quality gap in educational services by the students of Health and Nutrition School of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. In this cross-sectional study, 140 students participated voluntarily (age range=19 to 40 years). The service quality (SERVQUAL) questionnaire was used for data collection. This questionnaire measured the quality gap in 5 dimensions of educational service including assurance, responsiveness, empathy, reliability, and tangibility. The students' perception about the current conditions and their expectations as to optimal conditions can be determined, using this questionnaire. The score of the gap in quality of educational services is calculated from difference between perception and expectation scores. Due to non-normality of data, non-parametric tests were used. To this end, data were analyzed by statistical tests including Wilcoxon, Friedman, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whiteny tests in SPSS 14. The results showed that there was quality gap in all 5 dimensions of educational services. The largest and the smallest gaps were observed in "responsiveness" with a mean±SD of -0.94±0.74 and in "reliability" with a mean±SD of -0.76±0.69, respectively. There was a significant difference in quality gap between the 5 dimensions (pservices their expectations were not met. It is recommended that workshops on customer services, communication skills and personnel's technical skills development should be planned and held. Also, allocating more resources for improving educational facilities and physical environment is recommended.

  2. Has e-Learning Delivered on Its Promises? Expert Opinion on the Impact of e-Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanuka, Heather; Kelland, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of agreement among experts on the impact of e-learning technology in Canadian higher education learning experiences. Fourteen participants who are experts in e-learning in higher education agreed there are contentions about e-learning technologies in the following areas: (1) a platform for…

  3. Delivering Food Safety Education to Middle School Students Using a Web-Based, Interactive, Multimedia, Computer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Rebecca A.; Steen, M. Dale; Pritchard, Todd J.; Buzzell, Paul R.; Pintauro, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    More than 76 million persons become ill from foodborne pathogens in the United States each year. To reduce these numbers, food safety education efforts need to be targeted at not only adults, but school children as well. The middle school grades are ideal for integrating food safety education into the curriculum while simultaneously contributing…

  4. Delivering Food Safety Education to Middle School Students Using a Web-Based, Interactive, Multimedia, Computer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Rebecca A.; Steen, M. Dale; Pritchard, Todd J.; Buzzell, Paul R.; Pintauro, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    More than 76 million persons become ill from foodborne pathogens in the United States each year. To reduce these numbers, food safety education efforts need to be targeted at not only adults, but school children as well. The middle school grades are ideal for integrating food safety education into the curriculum while simultaneously contributing…

  5. Distance education in nursing: an integrated review of online nursing students' experiences with technology-delivered instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso-Murphy, Josephine

    2007-06-01

    One proposed solution to educating more nurses to decrease and eventually eliminate the nursing shortage is distance education. But what are nursing students' experiences with distance education? Answering this question can assist in the development of effective teaching and learning strategies to provide for the development of quality distance education programs. This article provides an integrative review of the nursing literature to ascertain the student perspective of distance education. A review of nursing literature was completed using a number of databases and specific criteria to locate research studies specific to this topic. The studies were analyzed for validity and reliability, and limitations were mentioned. Student perceptions garnered from the research studies analyzed are summarized with the acronym DISTANCE ED. Implications, recommendations, and needs for future research are discussed. A supplementary review of the literature is used to augment the findings.

  6. Satellite-delivered medical education and training for central Europe: a TEMPUS project. Trans-European Mobility Programme for University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, H L

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the experience gained in delivering continuing and postgraduate medical education by satellite to update medical teachers in Central Europe. An infrastructure of receiving sites was established in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland and Hungary. The sites participated in regular, live interactive broadcasts on a range of medical education topics. Over three years a network of sites was established incrementally and a national coordinator identified for each country, who fed back from national coordinating committees to an overall steering body. In the final year a formal evaluation revealed high satisfaction levels and maintenance of activity during the grant period. The major problems related to a lack of telephone lines to facilitate interactivity, the timing of the programmes, and the need for training in medical English language. Video libraries were established, and the majority continued to be active at the end of the project grant. Material was incorporated into both undergraduate and postgraduate education. It is calculated that continuing professional development can be delivered at less than 18 ECU per participant per country.

  7. An overview of infusing service-learning in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Trae; Wubbena, Zane

    2014-08-04

    To identify and review existing empirical research about service-learning and medical education and then to develop a framework for infusing service-learning in Doctor of Medicine or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine curricula. We selected literature on service-learning and medical education. Articles were screened with a protocol for inclusion or exclusion at two separate stages. At stage one, articles were screened according to their titles, abstracts, and keywords. The second stage involved a full-text review. Finally, a thematic analysis using focused and selective coding was conducted. Eighteen studies were analyzed spanning the years 1998 to 2012. The results from our analysis informed the development of a four-stage service-learning framework: 1) planning and preparation, 2) action, 3) reflection and demonstration, and 4) assessment and celebration. The presented service-learning framework can be used to develop curricula for the infusion of service-learning in medical school. Service-learning curricula in medical education have the potential to provide myriad benefits to faculty, students, community members, and university-community partnerships.

  8. Using Service-Learning to Educate Students about Stakeholder Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Walter Honadle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Using Lee’s definition of service-learning as “an instructional method in which students learn course content by actively participating in thoughtfully organized service experiences related to that content”, this article offers a case of action-oriented service- learning. It shows one way to combine traditional teaching methods with an action-oriented approach to service-learning that benefits both the community and imparts critical know-how into the education of planning students. Through service-learning students acquire valuable skills and also increase their competence as practitioners and increase their confidence in their field in a way that nurtures their abilities and provides minimal risk to the clientele because the students are working under the guidance of faculty. As previous research from diverse fields have shown, service-learning benefits the students and the groups they encounter through their projects. KEYWORDSservice-learning, civic engagement, community development

  9. Service Learning in Undergraduate Audiology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Lata A; Richards, K Andrew R; Bajek, Mary

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to incorporate a service learning project in an undergraduate audiology course and evaluate how it affected student learning in the class. The study involved partnering with a group of students enrolled in a band learning community. Students in the audiology course learned about hearing assessment procedures in class and practiced the procedures on each other in labs. Toward the end of the semester, they assessed the hearing of the band students and provided counseling regarding the importance of hearing protection. Qualitative data were obtained in the form of preflections and final reflection papers completed by the students in the audiology course at the start and conclusion of the semester. Quantitative data included completion of the Community Service Attitudes Scale (CSAS; Shiarella, McCarthy, & Tucker, 2000) prior to and at the conclusion of the course. Results revealed overwhelmingly positive comments from the students in their final reflections, although there were no significant changes in the pre- and post-administration of the CSAS. Incorporating service learning projects into undergraduate curricula in speech and hearing has the potential to enhance academic and civic learning while also benefitting the community.

  10. 75 FR 3454 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of Correspondence AGENCY: Department of... appropriate instructional strategies is permissible and when an evaluation for special education and related...: January 14, 2010. Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services...

  11. 75 FR 66743 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of Correspondence AGENCY: Department of... State Directors of Special Education Executive Director Bill East, reiterating that the calculation of State financial support for special education and related services for children with disabilities...

  12. 75 FR 13106 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview Information; Migrant and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview Information; Migrant and Seasonal..., Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. BILLING CODE 4000-01-P ...

  13. 75 FR 21606 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Rehabilitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Rehabilitation Training... single budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative.... Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. BILLING CODE 4000-01...

  14. 75 FR 21273 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Rehabilitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Rehabilitation Training...: April 20, 2010. Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services...

  15. 75 FR 47801 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Special...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Special Demonstration.... Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. BILLING CODE 4000-01...

  16. 75 FR 21614 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Rehabilitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Rehabilitation Short-Term... single budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative... 21, 2010. Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. BILLING...

  17. 75 FR 27539 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services: Overview Information: National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services: Overview Information: National Interpreter... Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. BILLING CODE 4000-01-P ...

  18. Flow cytometry as the spearhead for delivering sustainable and versatile laboratory services to HIV-burdened health care systems of the developing world: a Caribbean model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayomi, E Akinola; Landis, R Clive

    2008-01-01

    HIV is targeting the developing nations of the world, threatening their economic development, overwhelming public health systems, and depleting human capital. The Caribbean is no exception, with the second highest incidence of HIV/AIDS outside Sub-Saharan Africa, sharing similar mixed fortunes from a postcolonial heritage, limited resources, and an HIV population dispersed in small population centers. Here we share the experience of Barbados, an island state of 280,000 people, in mounting a holistic and sustainable program against HIV/AIDS. At the forefront of this response has been the growth in clinical flow cytometry used for CD4 monitoring, which has prompted a welcome expansion in diagnostic capacity even beyond HIV/AIDS. A pan-Caribbean extension to Barbados' program has been the founding of the Caribbean Cytometry & Analytical Society (CCAS), which acts as a regional forum to accelerate technology transfer and develop the human resources needed to mount an effective response against HIV/AIDS. The 4th CCAS workshop in 2007 produced a consensus statement on the desirable characteristics for a "diagnostic dream machine": a simple-to-use, rugged flow cytometer capable of carrying out multiple diagnostic functions at the point of patient care in rural or island settings of the developing world, including CD4 count, blood count, and opportunistic infections, without the need for a supply cold-chain or dependable power source. It is our ambitious vision that the spread of flow cytometry, primarily to monitor CD4 in HIV/AIDS, can act as a Trojan horse to deliver better general and specialized diagnostic services to the developing world.

  19. Factors Influencing the Educational Success of Minority Pre-Service Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Mary Ann; Brooks, Michael; Lee, Sang Min; Daley, Lauren Pasquarella; Crawford, Yashica; Maxis, Sophie

    2007-01-01

    A mixed methods study surveying minority pre-service educators to examine the factors deemed to be important in their educational success was conducted. Forty-three scholarship studies in a College of Education provided quantitative and qualitative data on their perceptions of factors that contributed to their journey to success in college and/or…

  20. The Pathway Program: A Collaboration between 3 Universities to Deliver a Social Work Distance Education (DL) Program to Underserved Areas of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Teresa; Jones, Celeste A.; Sehrawats, Seema

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a partnership between three campuses to develop a (DL) education program-serving employees of county and tribal Health and Human Service Departments in remote rural areas of California. Specifically, the program supports the development of a career pathway for students living in isolated regions of Northern…

  1. Leadership of education psychological services: fit for purpose?

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    At a time of great change for educational psychology services in England, this paper reviews current theories of leadership and proposes how an integration of key aspects of these can be applied to support a self review of leadership practice, both by individual leaders and by services. The message from current theory is that in the midst of complexity and rapid change, a primary focus on the head of service is outdated; there should instead be a focus to develop the leadership capacity of th...

  2. An evaluation of a body image intervention in adolescent girls delivered in single-sex versus co-educational classroom settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, Candice J; Paxton, Susan J; McLean, Siân A

    2017-04-01

    Body dissatisfaction is now recognized as having considerable negative impact on social, psychological, and physical health, particularly in adolescent girls. Consequently, we have developed a six-session co-educational body image intervention (Happy Being Me Co-educational) designed to reduce body dissatisfaction and its risk factors in Grade 7 girls. In addition to evaluating the program's efficacy, we aimed to identify whether girls would benefit equally when it was delivered as a universal intervention to a whole class including both boys and girls (co-educational delivery), or delivered as a selective intervention to girls only (single-sex delivery). Participants were 200 Grade 7 girls from five schools in Melbourne, Australia. Schools were randomly allocated to receive the intervention in single-sex classes (n=74), co-educational classes (n=73), or participate as a no-intervention control (n=53). Girls completed self-report assessments of body dissatisfaction, psychological (internalization of the thin ideal, appearance comparison, and self-esteem) and peer environment (weight-related teasing and appearance conversations) risk factors for body dissatisfaction, and dietary restraint, at baseline, post-intervention, and at 6-month follow-up. Significant improvements in body dissatisfaction and psychological risk factors were observed in the intervention group at post-intervention and these were maintained at follow-up for psychological risk factors. Importantly, no significant differences between universal and selective delivery were observed, suggesting that the intervention is appropriate for dissemination in both modes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Can shared care deliver better outcomes for patients undergoing total hip replacement? A prospective assessment of patient outcomes and associated service use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosendal, H.; Beekum, W.T. van; Nijhof, P.; Witte, L.P. de; Schrijvers, A.J.P.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To assess whether shared care for patients undergoing total hip replacement delivers better outcomes compared to care as usual. Design: Prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: Two regions in the Netherlands where different organisational health care models have been

  4. The choice of indicators to assess the quality of educational services of the institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Елена Егоровна Кулик

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of well-known international and national systems of indicators that make it possible to assess the development of the education system, educational system identified indicators to assess the quality of educational services to secondary schools. In the article the author formulated the original definition of concepts such as quality, quality of education, educational service, quality of education services and indicators of education.

  5. Effects of Fixed-Time Reinforcement Delivered by Teachers for Reducing Problem Behavior in Special Education Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlin, Michelle; Reed, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The effects of fixed-time (FT) reinforcement schedules on the disruptive behavior of 4 students in special education classrooms were studied. Attention provided on FT schedules in the context of a multiple-baseline design across participants substantially decreased all students' challenging behavior. Disruptive behavior was maintained at levels…

  6. Impact of Different Types of Knowledge on Two Preservice Teachers' Ability to Learn and Deliver the Sport Education Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stran, Margaret; Curtner-Smith, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Background: Teachers' and pupils' responses to the Sport Education (SE) model have been very positive. Pupils clearly enjoy SE and the model created lasting changes in teachers' beliefs and perspectives on teaching. While much research has been done on the impact of SE on teachers and students, there has been relatively little research on how both…

  7. Integrating the Multimedia Builder Software as an Educational Tool to Deliver Fairy Tales: Promoting Multiliteracies and Multimodality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eteokleous, Nikleia; Pavlou, Victoria; Tsolakidis, Simos

    2015-01-01

    As a way to respond to the contemporary challenges for promoting multiliteracies and multimodality in education, the current study proposes a theoretical framework--the multiliteracies model--in identifying, developing and evaluating multimodal material. The article examines, first theoretically and then empirically, the promotion of…

  8. An Agent-Based Approach for Delivering Educational Contents through Interactive Digital TV in the Context of T-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes Neto, Francisco Milton; de Carvalho Muniz, Raphael; Filgueira Burlamaqui, Aquiles Medeiros; Castro de Souza, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The support of technological resources in teaching and learning has contributed to make them more efficient and enjoyable. Through this support has become quite common to use media resources before explored only for entertainment for educational purposes, among them the TV. The interactive Digital TV (iDTV) provides resources that make possible…

  9. Self-Service and E-Education: The Relationship to Self-Directed Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Marilyn A.; Brook, Phillip W. J.

    Self-service via the Internet is becoming a common method of selling goods or services as customers have access to retailers’ websites whenever the “need” takes them. Higher education institutions are increasingly offering e-education which means that traditional teaching methods need modifying. Traditional teaching often consists of presenting and expanding upon material found in a prescribed text and delivering this content in lecture, seminar or workshop mode. Studies have confirmed that students learn more effectively when they can discuss the material with others and treat learning as a collaborative process. This chapter reports a case study, where students were required to decide on their level of involvement, discuss and propose the criteria for assessment evaluation, share ideas, concepts and understanding amongst themselves: in effect, self-directed learning. The learning environment used computer-mediated tools, such as discussion forums and chat rooms, and the case study assesses both the expectations of the teaching staff and the experiences of the students, and relates the outcomes to self-directed learning in a self-service environment.

  10. Engaged Service Learning--Implications for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tony; Burgin, Shelley

    2009-01-01

    Dwindling resources for tertiary education, has resulted in reduced emphasis on intensive, small group, staff-student collaborative project-based service learning. However, training scientists to manage significant issues, such as sustainable water use, requires an ability to engage both industry and community stakeholders. This paper describes…

  11. Incorporating Integrative Health Services in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gant, Larry; Benn, Rita; Gioia, Deborah; Seabury, Brett

    2009-01-01

    More than one third of Americans practice complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Social workers continue to provide most first-line health, mental health, and psychological referral and direct practice services in the United States, despite a lack of systematic education and training opportunities in CAM. Schools of social work are…

  12. Black African Parents' Experiences of an Educational Psychology Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Zena

    2014-01-01

    The evidence base that explores Black African parents' experiences of an Educational Psychology Service (EPS) is limited. This article describes an exploratory mixed methods research study undertaken during 2009-2011, that explored Black African parents' engagement with a UK EPS. Quantitative data were gathered from the EPS preschool database and…

  13. Student-Life Stress in Education and Health Service Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascavage, Victoria; Winterman, Kathleen G.; Buot, Max; Wies, Jennifer R.; Lyzinski, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the effects of student-life stress on Education and Health Service majors (n = 195) at a private, religious, Midwestern university in the USA, we assessed student perception of overall stress level and physical stress level using the Student-life Stress Inventory. The targeted sample consisted of students with…

  14. Black African Parents' Experiences of an Educational Psychology Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Zena

    2014-01-01

    The evidence base that explores Black African parents' experiences of an Educational Psychology Service (EPS) is limited. This article describes an exploratory mixed methods research study undertaken during 2009-2011, that explored Black African parents' engagement with a UK EPS. Quantitative data were gathered from the EPS preschool database and…

  15. Consumer Attitude Towards Service Failure and Recovery in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Hardeep; Devi, Pinkey

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore consumer attitude towards service failure and recovery in the higher education in general and with respect to teaching, examination, library, computer lab, administration and infrastructure in particular. Design/Methodology/Approach: The data are collected from 120 students of three undergraduate colleges of…

  16. Spaces and Physical Education Pre-Service Teachers' Narrative Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrench, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Stories or narratives are integral to meaning making in relation to selves, others and the choices we make in living. It follows that pre-service teachers' narratives can provide a means for understanding experiences and processes of becoming teachers of physical education (PE). This paper reports on an interview-based inquiry from which…

  17. Student-Life Stress in Education and Health Service Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascavage, Victoria; Winterman, Kathleen G.; Buot, Max; Wies, Jennifer R.; Lyzinski, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the effects of student-life stress on Education and Health Service majors (n = 195) at a private, religious, Midwestern university in the USA, we assessed student perception of overall stress level and physical stress level using the Student-life Stress Inventory. The targeted sample consisted of students with…

  18. Federal Policies on Civic Education and Service. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Emily Hoban; Levine, Peter; Elrod, Brent

    2006-01-01

    The Federal government supports programs designed to encourage civic participation and increase civic knowledge. This fact sheet summarizes current federal legislation intended to mandate or encourage civic education and service programs for young people. In addition, it contains a list of relevant federally funded programs. (Contains 4 endnotes.)…

  19. Institutional Logics and Community Service-Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alison; Kahlke, Renate

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores how community service-learning (CSL) participants negotiate competing institutional logics in Canadian higher education. Drawing theoretically from new institutionalism and work on institutional logics, we consider how CSL has developed in Canadian universities and how participants discuss CSL in relation to other dominant…

  20. Public Service Motivation and Socialization in Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the extent to which the characteristics of public administration degree programs are related to public service motivation (PSM) using a higher education socialization framework. Using a sample of approximately 500 students enrolled in 26 Master's degree programs across the country, this study confirms that…

  1. Identifying Satisfied/Dissatisfied Service Encounters in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Hardeep; Devi, Pinkey

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to explore satisfactory and dissatisfactory service encounters in higher education. Design/methodology/approach: The data are collected through the well established critical incident technique (CIT) method. All the satisfied and dissatisfied critical incidents are then grouped on the basis of Bitner et al.'s…

  2. Professional Education and the Public Service; an Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Frederick C.

    This study was designed to assess major linkages of professionalism and professional education with the public service, to highlight some of the resulting problems within, and among, different professions, and to set forth hypotheses and questions to provoke and guide more intensive future research. Results indicate that professionalism is rapidly…

  3. Defining and Characterizing Ecosystem Services for Education: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, John; Duncan, Ravit Golan

    2017-01-01

    Recent advancements in science have led to an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the many ways in which humans benefit from environmental systems. These benefits, termed Ecosystem Services, are sparsely characterized in education literature, but were included in the most recent iteration of US national science standards: the Next…

  4. Public Service Motivation and Socialization in Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the extent to which the characteristics of public administration degree programs are related to public service motivation (PSM) using a higher education socialization framework. Using a sample of approximately 500 students enrolled in 26 Master's degree programs across the country, this study confirms that…

  5. Qualifying in-service education of Science Teachers (QUEST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Keld; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Pontoppidan, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    The Danish QUEST-project is a large-scale (450 teachers), long-term (4 years) professional development project for science teachers. The project aims at closing the gap between the present inconsequential practice in in-service education and recent research results documenting conditions...

  6. Marketing and Distributive Education Curriculum Guide for Agricultural Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Vocational Education Studies.

    This curriculum guide provides curriculum coordinators with a basis for planning a comprehensive program in the career field of marketing agricultural services and allows marketing and distributive education teachers maximum flexibility. Introductory materials include information on use of the guide, information on careers in agricultural…

  7. Zambian Pre-Service Teachers' Voices about Successful Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muwana, Florence C.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2014-01-01

    While inclusion has been studied in many parts of the world, there is a dearth of research on this topic in Zambia. This study investigated the perceptions of pre-service teachers about the benefits of inclusion and the resources needed to successfully include students with disabilities in general education settings in Zambia. Participants…

  8. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an educational intervention for practice teams to deliver problem focused therapy for insomnia: rationale and design of a pilot cluster randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ørner Roderick

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep problems are common, affecting over a third of adults in the United Kingdom and leading to reduced productivity and impaired health-related quality of life. Many of those whose lives are affected seek medical help from primary care. Drug treatment is ineffective long term. Psychological methods for managing sleep problems, including cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBTi have been shown to be effective and cost effective but have not been widely implemented or evaluated in a general practice setting where they are most likely to be needed and most appropriately delivered. This paper outlines the protocol for a pilot study designed to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an educational intervention for general practitioners, primary care nurses and other members of the primary care team to deliver problem focused therapy to adult patients presenting with sleep problems due to lifestyle causes, pain or mild to moderate depression or anxiety. Methods and design This will be a pilot cluster randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention. General practices will be randomised to an educational intervention for problem focused therapy which includes a consultation approach comprising careful assessment (using assessment of secondary causes, sleep diaries and severity and use of modified CBTi for insomnia in the consultation compared with usual care (general advice on sleep hygiene and pharmacotherapy with hypnotic drugs. Clinicians randomised to the intervention will receive an educational intervention (2 × 2 hours to implement a complex intervention of problem focused therapy. Clinicians randomised to the control group will receive reinforcement of usual care with sleep hygiene advice. Outcomes will be assessed via self-completion questionnaires and telephone interviews of patients and staff as well as clinical records for interventions and prescribing. Discussion Previous studies in adults

  9. Integrative Review of Service-Learning Assessment in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Susan L; Leffers, Jeanne M

    The aim of the research is to review all qualitative research studies related to service-learning assessment in nursing education. Recent literature reviews have examined quantitative but not qualitative research studies on service-learning assessment in nursing education. An integrative review analyzed the results of published qualitative research of service-learning assessment. Articles included in this review were published in English in peer-reviewed journals from 1997 to 2014 and encompassed information on outcomes, assessment or evaluation, nursing education, and service-learning. Nine articles containing thematic analysis were included in the final review. Findings were synthesized into a higher order of analysis. Eight categories from that analysis were created: professional competency development, integration of knowledge for the professional nursing role, greater understanding of community strengths and needs, collaboration and teamwork, transformation and personal growth, civic engagement, emotions and adjustment, and culture awareness and competency. The integrative review will aid in the development of measurement categories for further nursing service-learning assessment work.

  10. SERVICE LEARNING IN DISTANCE EDUCATION: Foreign Language Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhlise Coşgun OGEYIK

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In general education, in particular foreign language education, can be acknowledged as a lifelong learning process which can be transformed beyond the borders in global sense. Learning a foreign language requires proficiency in four basic skills which are reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Of these skills, speaking and listening are the most daunting tasks for learners and create obstacles when learners of target language do not get the chance of meeting native speakers. Such obstacles can be overwhelmed by integrating certain applications into education process. Service-learning through the internet as a teaching method can be considered one of the most striking one of those applications for foreign language learners. In this paper, the benefits of service-learning are discussed and some suggestions are offered for introducing this method in foreign language settings. By implementing service-learning, it is concluded that learners of any foreign language may get the chance of communicating with native speakers during the course time in foreign language without going abroad. Such an application may also enhance learners to get information about foreign culture by raising awareness of “otherness” and comparing other culture and their own culture. In addition, service-learning as a method of teaching, learning and reflecting combines academic classroom curriculum with meaningful service from the members of learning community and may generate conditions in which lifelong learning will continue.

  11. Modern advertising of educational services in the education system.

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Before the educational organizations are constantly arising questions: "Where can I find willing to learn and ability to pay students? What to teach? How to teach? How to take the money? What kind of advertising do? "Find the answers to these questions can be found in this article.

  12. Institutions and organisations in Russian higher education: the example of Rostov region education services market

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Volchik Vyacheslav, V; Kot Vera, V; Shiriaev Igor, M

    2015-01-01

    ... (Rostov Region is taken as an example). Adaptive economic behavior of key actors on the Russian education services market has been studied in the context of constantly changing institutional and organizational environments...

  13. Microfinance against malaria: impact of Freedom from Hunger's malaria education when delivered by rural banks in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, Natalie; Crookston, Benjamin; Gray, Bobbi; Alder, Steve; Dearden, Kirk

    2009-12-01

    A community randomized pre-test/post-test design was used to compare the knowledge and behaviors of microfinance clients receiving malaria education (n=213) to those receiving diarrhea education (n=223) and to non-client controls (n=268). Comparisons assessed differences at follow-up as well as within-group changes over time. At follow-up, malaria clients had significantly better malaria knowledge than comparison groups: 48.4% of malaria clients were able to identify groups most vulnerable to malaria compared with 39.2% of diarrhea clients (P=0.044) and 37.7% of non-clients (P=0.024). Malaria clients were more likely than diarrhea clients (P=0.024) (Pmicrofinance institutions can effectively contribute to community and national malaria initiatives.

  14. Pre-Service Education of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay

    Although teachers are prepared in various ways to teach science depending on the certification standards of their locality and level at which they plan to teach few are formally prepared to teach Astronomy. In the United States although Astronomy is required for National Science Teacher certification in Earth/Space Science and recommended for Physical Science few teachers attempt this certification. The National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education does not mention astronomy as a topic. Some certification degree programs require or recommend an astronomy course but it is often at the introductory non-science major level or several weeks of astronomy within a science methods course for future elementary school teachers. The situation in other countries is no better. In Mexico essentially no astronomy is taught except at the graduate school level. In South Africa it is not taught at any teachers' college and only at some of the universities. In Portugal it is not part of teacher preparation. In many countries earth-sun relations appear in the geography curriculum but the remainder of astronomy is ignored in teacher preparation. In summary although astronomy is found in some school curricula teachers are often not formally prepared to teach it.

  15. Issues in Accessing Services. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 13. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, discusses how to access the formalized human service delivery systems in the United States, which often replace the networks of extended families and friends that immigrants relied on in…

  16. Delivering Knowledge of Stroke to Parents Through Their Children Using a Manga for Stroke Education in Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigami, Akiko; Yokota, Chiaki; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Ohyama, Satoshi; Tomari, Shinya; Hino, Tenyu; Arimizu, Takuro; Wada, Shinichi; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2017-02-01

    School-based intervention would be promising to spread stroke knowledge widely. This study aimed to clarify the effectiveness of our new educational aids that were developed for elementary school children to impart information about stroke to children and their parents in 2 different ways: with or without stroke lessons by a neurologist. We enrolled 562 children (aged 11 to 12 years) and their parents (n = 485). The students were divided into 2 groups: 323 received a lesson on stroke by a stroke neurologist without watching an animated cartoon (Group I), and 239 watched an animated cartoon without the lesson (Group II). All of the children took the manga home, and talked about stroke with their parents. Questionnaires on stroke knowledge were administered at baseline (BL), immediately after the lesson (IL), and 3 months (3M) after the lesson. There were significant increases in the adjusted mean scores for risk factors as well as stroke symptoms at 3M in both groups compared with BL scores, although the children in Group I scored significantly better than those in Group II at IL and 3M (P < .05). In both children and parents, the correct answer rates of the FAST mnemonic at 3M were around 90%, with no significant differences between groups. Stroke education for elementary school children using our educational aids provided knowledge of stroke symptoms to the children as well as their parents even without lessons on stroke, although a better understanding of stroke was obtained from lessons led by stroke neurologists. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Barriers and facilitators for promotoras' success in delivering pesticide safety education to Latino farmworker families: La Familia Sana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo, Grisel; Arcury, Thomas A; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Tapia, Janeth; Quandt, Sara A

    2013-01-01

    Despite widespread use of lay health advisor (LHA) programs, factors related to success of LHAs remain largely unexamined. This study describes experiences and personal transformations of LHAs (promotoras de salud) in a pesticide safety education program targeting farmworker families in North Carolina, using postintervention in-depth interviews conducted with 17 LHAs. LHAs identified assets and barriers that affected their success. LHAs also described increases in self-efficacy and empowerment resulting in perceived improvements in ability to teach and impact their community. Such positive changes are essential benefits to the LHAs. Evaluations that address these topics are needed to better understand continuity and attrition in LHA programs.

  18. Metaphor Perceptions of Pre-Service Teachers towards Mathematics and Mathematics Education in Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Oguz; Tas, Isil; Aslan, Durmus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the thoughts of pre-service teachers, who play an important role in the early preschool experience of children in mathematics, towards the concepts of mathematics and education of mathematics with the help of metaphors. The study group of the research consists of a total of 227 pre-service teachers at the…

  19. From psycho-social theory to sustainable classroom practice: developing a research-based teacher-delivered sex education programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, D; Abraham, C

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes the development of a theoretically based sex education programme currently undergoing a randomized controlled trial in the UK. It considers some of the practical difficulties involved in translating research-based conclusions into acceptable, replicable and potentially effective classroom lessons. The discussion acknowledges that the implications of social psychological research and the requirements of rigorous evaluation may conflict with accepted principles inherent in current sex education practice. It also emphasizes that theoretical ideas must be carefully embedded in lessons which are informed by an awareness of classroom culture, and the needs and skills of teachers. For example, the use of same-sex student groups to reflect on the gendered construction of sexuality may be problematic. Materials must be tailored to recipients' circumstances, which may require substituting for limited experience with the use of detailed scripts and scenarios. Furthermore, role-play techniques for sexual negotiation that work elsewhere may not be effective in the UK. The use of trigger video sessions and other techniques are recommended. Finally, the problems involved in promoting condom-related skills are discussed. The paper concludes that, if an intervention is to be sustainable beyond the research stage, it must be designed to overcome such problems while remaining theoretically informed.

  20. Telehealth technologies: changing the way we deliver efficacious and cost-effective diabetes self-management education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, Karen K; Heckinger, Elizabeth; Tulas, Katrina M; Specker, James; McKoy, June

    2014-11-01

    Nearly 26 million people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus in the U.S. must actively engage in self-management of the disease. Telehealth is a population-based approach with the potential to optimize resources and increase access to diabetes self-management education/training (DSME/T). We conducted a systematic literature review on diabetes education and telehealth (2009–April 2014) to determine whether remote DSME/T sufficiently improves behavioral, clinical, and economic outcomes and access. Twenty-five out of 213 identified systematic literature reviews or meta-analyses (two on mobile health were identified via a Google search) met our criteria and were fully reviewed; 22 additional studies and reports of diabetes-related technologies and interventions were also identified. Telemedicine has the potential to offer great utility, but guidelines for high research standards must be introduced, adopted, and proactively refined to determine the strengths of this technology for DSME/T, behavioral change, cost-effective care, and improved access in chronic disease self-management.

  1. The Efficacies of Secretarial Profession by Ghana Education Service and Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Abdul-Kahar

    2015-01-01

    This project is carried out by employing an empirical method through questionnaire design and administration and tapped the perceptions and knowledge of the target elements of this study. The research frame was about Ghana Education Service office workers within the Accra Metropolis including higher education institutions. A qualitative data…

  2. The Status of Technology-Enhanced Education and Service Delivery in Rehabilitation Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Gina R.; Huber, Mary J.; Wilson, Josephine F.; Embree, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss the upsurge of technology-enhanced rehabilitation education programs and telerehabilitation services, to provide examples of these advancements, and to discuss the implications of this technology for education and the field including the unique advantage to developing technological skills through…

  3. New Educational Services Development: Framework for Technology Entrepreneurship Education at Universities in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Warda, Sherein Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The overall objective of the current study is to explore how universities can better developing new educational services. The purpose of this paper is to develop framework for technology entrepreneurship education (TEPE) within universities. Design/Methodology/Approach: Qualitative and quantitative research approaches were employed. This…

  4. Bridging the Gap between Education & Practice: A Cooperative Effort between Education and Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcherson, Annette H.

    1986-01-01

    Looks at inservice and educational solutions to the problem of reality shock (i.e., conflict between the values of school and work) in the nursing profession. Describes a cooperative education-service program, which focuses on role expectation, competency, the health care system, and self-concept in a concentrated, comprehensive clinical…

  5. Modeling Universal Design for Learning Techniques to Support Multicultural Education for Pre-Service Secondary Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    As with all levels of education, secondary level classrooms, typically from grades fifth or sixth to grade twelve, are increasingly becoming more diverse as the population of students changes in the Unites States. Pre-service mid-level or secondary level educators need increased training on how they can best teach in a multicultural setting to…

  6. New Educational Services Development: Framework for Technology Entrepreneurship Education at Universities in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Warda, Sherein Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The overall objective of the current study is to explore how universities can better developing new educational services. The purpose of this paper is to develop framework for technology entrepreneurship education (TEPE) within universities. Design/Methodology/Approach: Qualitative and quantitative research approaches were employed. This…

  7. Integrating HIV & AIDS education in pre-service mathematics education for social justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda van Laren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1999, many South African education policy documents have mandated integration of HIV & AIDS education in learning areas/disciplines. Policy document research has shown that although South African politicians and managers have produced volumes of eloquent and compelling legislation regarding provision for HIV & AIDS education, little of this is translated into action. The impact of HIV & AIDS permeates the social, economic and political arenas in South Africa. Integration of HIV & AIDS education across disciplines can serve as a strategy to further the ideals of social justice. This paper focuses on how integration in the teaching and learning of Mathematics Education provides opportunities to take action for social justice. The inquiry explores the following question: How can the myth that there is 'nothing we can do' about HIV & AIDS, which is linked to social justice issues, be addressed through integration of HIV & AIDS education in Mathematics pre-service teacher education? Drawing on self-study, the work of a Mathematics teacher educator who worked with pre-service teachers to integrate HIV & AIDS education at a higher education institution is described. By considering integration of HIV & AIDS education in Mathematics Education and taking action it is possible to develop strategies which directly relate to social justice.

  8. Interprofessional education through service-learning: lessons from a student-led free clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlow, Janice L; Goodwin, Charles; Sevilla, Javier

    2015-05-01

    The academic community must replicate and strengthen existing models for interprofessional education (IPE) to meet widespread calls for team-based patient-centered care. One effective but under-explored possibility for IPE is through student-led clinics, which now exist in the majority of medical schools. This short report presents the Indiana University Student Outreach Clinic (IU-SOC), which involves seven different professional programs across three institutions, as a model for how IPE can be delivered formally through service learning. Lessons learned, such as nurturing an intentional interprofessional program, structured orientation and reflection, and resource and knowledge sharing between the clinic and academic institutions, can be applied to all student-led clinics, but also can inform other IPE initiatives in health professional curricula.

  9. A follow-up study of Eco Education's environmental service-learning program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobert, Thomas Milton

    The purpose of the study is to determine student views of the influence of the Eco Education Urban Stewards program's impact on their involvement in community environmental initiatives. Eco Education is a non-profit organization in St. Paul that facilitates an urban, environmental, year-long science curriculum delivered in middle schools in Minnesota. The year-long program ends with an urban, environmental service-learning project. Ten high school students from the Inter District Downtown School who had completed Urban Stewards in middle school took a survey and were interviewed and compared with ten high school students who had a more traditional middle school science experience. Semi-structured oral interviews were conducted with each student. Transcriptions of the interviews were analyzed and compared to the survey results. The survey results were tabulated and given numerical values to compare the Eco Education and non-Eco Education students. Common themes and differences were discovered when comparing the survey results and interview transcriptions of the two groups. Urban Stewards students demonstrated more awareness of environmental issues, concerns and community projects but not by a significant amount.

  10. The Associating Abilities of Pre-Service Teachers Science Education Program Acquisitions with Engineering According to STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumen, Ozlem Ozcakir; Calisici, Hamza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the associating abilities of elementary education pre-service teachers science education program acquisitions with engineering using STEM education. In the study which is a case study, firstly pre-service teachers were trained about the STEM education approach. Then "Elementary School Science Education…

  11. Educational clusters as a tool ofpublic policy on the market of educational services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Vorona

    2016-08-01

    Due to this, the innovative educational cluster has been determined as a voluntary association of geographically close interacting entities, educational institutions, government, banking and private sector, innovative enterprises/organizations infrastructure. Such interaction is characterized by the production of competitive educational, cultural, social services, the availability of the agreed development strategy aimed at the interests of each participant and the region being a territory of cluster’s localization.

  12. Educational clusters as a tool ofpublic policy on the market of educational services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Vorona

    2016-08-01

    Due to this, the innovative educational cluster has been determined as a voluntary association of geographically close interacting entities, educational institutions, government, banking and private sector, innovative enterprises/organizations infrastructure. Such interaction is characterized by the production of competitive educational, cultural, social services, the availability of the agreed development strategy aimed at the interests of each participant and the region being a territory of cluster’s localization.

  13. Experiences and Engagement with the Design Features and Strategies of an Internet-Delivered Treatment Programme for Generalised Anxiety Disorder: A Service-Based Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Amy; Richards, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Background: Outcome research has highlighted the efficacy of internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT). Some process research has examined users experiences of iCBT. Understanding the user experience provides valuable feedback to developers of internet-delivered interventions. Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate user's experiences…

  14. Experiences and Engagement with the Design Features and Strategies of an Internet-Delivered Treatment Programme for Generalised Anxiety Disorder: A Service-Based Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Amy; Richards, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Background: Outcome research has highlighted the efficacy of internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT). Some process research has examined users experiences of iCBT. Understanding the user experience provides valuable feedback to developers of internet-delivered interventions. Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate user's experiences…

  15. An evaluation of the effect of an educational intervention for Australian social workers on competence in delivering brief cognitive behavioural strategies: A randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulding R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Broad community access to high quality evidence-based primary mental health care is an ongoing challenge around the world. In Australia one approach has been to broaden access to care by funding psychologists and other allied health care professionals to deliver brief psychological treatments to general practitioners' patients. To date, there has been a scarcity of studies assessing the efficacy of social worker delivered psychological strategies. This study aims to build the evidence base by evaluating the impact of a brief educational intervention on social workers' competence in delivering cognitive behavioural strategies (strategies derived from cognitive behavioural therapy. Methods A randomised controlled trial design was undertaken with baseline and one-week follow-up measurement of both objective and self-perceived competence. Simulated consultations with standardised depressed patients were recorded on videotape and objective competence was assessed by blinded reviewers using the Cognitive Therapy Scale. Questionnaires completed by participants were used to measure self-perceived competence. The training intervention was a 15 hour face-to-face course involving presentations, video example consultations, written materials and rehearsal of skills in pairs. Results 40 Melbourne-based (Australia social workers enrolled and were randomised and 9 of these withdrew from the study before the pre training simulated consultation. 30 of the remaining 31 social workers (97% completed all phases of the intervention and evaluation protocol (16 from intervention and 14 from control group. The intervention group showed significantly greater improvements than the control group in objective competence (mean improvement of 14.2 (7.38-21.02 on the 66 point Cognitive Therapy Scale and in subjective confidence (mean improvement of 1.28 (0.84-1.72 on a 5 point Likert scale. On average, the intervention group improved from below to above

  16. Qualifying in-service education of science teachers (QUEST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Keld; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Pontoppidan, Birgitte Schou

    2013-01-01

    The Danish QUEST-project is a large-scale (450 teachers), long-term (4 years) professional development project for science teachers. The project aims at closing the gap between the present inconsequential practice in in-service education and recent research results documenting conditions for effe......The Danish QUEST-project is a large-scale (450 teachers), long-term (4 years) professional development project for science teachers. The project aims at closing the gap between the present inconsequential practice in in-service education and recent research results documenting conditions...... and peer involvement in collaborative practices in the school science teacher group is specifically addressed and targeted throughout the project. A special way of working (the QUEST-Rhythm) has been developed to increase the degree of teacher collaboration and networking over the 4 years. The accompanying...

  17. Qualifying in-service education of Science Teachers (QUEST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Keld; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Pontoppidan, Birgitte

    The Danish QUEST-project is a large-scale (450 teachers), long-term (4 years) professional development project for science teachers. The project aims at closing the gap between the present inconsequential practice in in-service education and recent research results documenting conditions for effe......The Danish QUEST-project is a large-scale (450 teachers), long-term (4 years) professional development project for science teachers. The project aims at closing the gap between the present inconsequential practice in in-service education and recent research results documenting conditions...... and peer involvement in collaborative practices in the school science teacher group is specifically addressed and targeted throughout the project. A special way of working (the QUEST-Rhythm) has been developed to increase the degree of teacher collaboration and networking over the 4 years. The accompanying...

  18. Public services, personal benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bob Kuhry; Evert Pommer; Jedid-Jah Jonker; John Stevens

    2006-01-01

    Original title: Publieke productie & persoonlijk profijt. This report looks in detail at the costs of public services (such as care, education, public administration and safety) and the benefits that citizens derive from the government expenditure involved in delivering those services. In

  19. Public services, personal benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bob Kuhry; Evert Pommer; Jedid-Jah Jonker; John Stevens

    2006-01-01

    Original title: Publieke productie & persoonlijk profijt. This report looks in detail at the costs of public services (such as care, education, public administration and safety) and the benefits that citizens derive from the government expenditure involved in delivering those services. In 2003,

  20. Inclusive Services Innovation Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdheide, Lynn R.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher preparation to deliver inclusive services to students with disabilities is increasingly important because of changes in law and policy emphasizing student access to, and achievement in, the general education curriculum. This innovation configuration identifies the components of inclusive services that should be incorporated in teacher…

  1. Customer Relationship Management and Service Quality: Influences in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This study with international students in the UK Higher Education (HE) sector adopts a qualitative research approach to examine the impact of customer relationship management (CRM) and service quality. From the literature six construct themes for measuring customer relationship management were suggested and the interview data with focus groups from a university in the north of Britain were analysed using a thematic template analysis technique. The study showed that an effective CRM programme ...

  2. Anger management for people with mild to moderate learning disabilities: Study protocol for a multi-centre cluster randomized controlled trial of a manualized intervention delivered by day-service staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttall Jacqueline

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT is the treatment of choice for common mental health problems, but this approach has only recently been adapted for people with learning disabilities, and there is a limited evidence base for the use of CBT with this client group. Anger treatment is the one area where there exists a reasonable number of small controlled trials. This study will evaluate the effectiveness of a manualized 12-week CBT intervention for anger. The intervention will be delivered by staff working in the day services that the participants attend, following training to act as 'lay therapists' by a Clinical Psychologist, who will also provide supervision. Methods/Design This is a multi-centre cluster randomized controlled trial of a group intervention versus a 'support as usual' waiting-list control group, with randomization at the level of the group. Outcomes will be assessed at the end of the intervention and again 6-months later. After completion of the 6-month follow-up assessments, the intervention will also be delivered to the waiting-list groups. The study will include a range of anger/aggression and mental health measures, some of which will be completed by service users and also by their day service key-workers and by home carers. Qualitative data will be collected to assess the impact of the intervention on participants, lay therapists, and services, and the study will also include a service-utilization cost and consequences analysis. Discussion This will be the first trial to investigate formally how effectively staff working in services providing day activities for people with learning disabilities are able to use a therapy manual to deliver a CBT based anger management intervention, following brief training by a Clinical Psychologist. The demonstration that service staff can successfully deliver anger management to people with learning disabilities, by widening the pool of potential therapists, would have

  3. Anger management for people with mild to moderate learning disabilities: study protocol for a multi-centre cluster randomized controlled trial of a manualized intervention delivered by day-service staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Paul; Jahoda, Andrew; Rose, John; Stenfert-Kroese, Biza; Hood, Kerenza; Townson, Julia K; Nuttall, Jacqueline; Gillespie, David; Felce, David

    2011-02-09

    Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for common mental health problems, but this approach has only recently been adapted for people with learning disabilities, and there is a limited evidence base for the use of CBT with this client group. Anger treatment is the one area where there exists a reasonable number of small controlled trials. This study will evaluate the effectiveness of a manualized 12-week CBT intervention for anger. The intervention will be delivered by staff working in the day services that the participants attend, following training to act as 'lay therapists' by a Clinical Psychologist, who will also provide supervision. This is a multi-centre cluster randomized controlled trial of a group intervention versus a 'support as usual' waiting-list control group, with randomization at the level of the group. Outcomes will be assessed at the end of the intervention and again 6-months later. After completion of the 6-month follow-up assessments, the intervention will also be delivered to the waiting-list groups. The study will include a range of anger/aggression and mental health measures, some of which will be completed by service users and also by their day service key-workers and by home carers. Qualitative data will be collected to assess the impact of the intervention on participants, lay therapists, and services, and the study will also include a service-utilization cost and consequences analysis. This will be the first trial to investigate formally how effectively staff working in services providing day activities for people with learning disabilities are able to use a therapy manual to deliver a CBT based anger management intervention, following brief training by a Clinical Psychologist. The demonstration that service staff can successfully deliver anger management to people with learning disabilities, by widening the pool of potential therapists, would have very significant benefits in relation to the current policy of

  4. 75 FR 25845 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS); Overview Information; Centers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS); Overview Information; Centers for... Administration (RSA) staff from the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. The pre-application.... Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. BILLING CODE 4000-01...

  5. 75 FR 9189 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Assistive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Assistive Technology Act... Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through a notice published in... period exceeding 60 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may...

  6. 75 FR 21270 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute on... budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may... call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services between 1:00 p.m...

  7. 75 FR 34298 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Vocational...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    .... 75, No. 115 / Wednesday, June 16, 2010 / Notices#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Vocational Rehabilitation Services Projects for... Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. BILLING CODE 4000-01-P ...

  8. 75 FR 9193 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Assistive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Assistive Technology Act... Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through a notice published in... period exceeding 60 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may...

  9. Educational Administrative Guidelines in the Schools under the Secondary Education Service Area 20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanruethai Nammala

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research has objective to (1 study the current situation of the educational administration in the schools (2 study the problem of educational administration (3 compare the current situation and the problem of educational administration and (4 propose the guidelines to develop the educational administration in the schools. The examples in this research are the 111 administrators and 342 teachers. These samples are selected by the Stratified Random Sampling Methods. For key informants, there are 3 administrators by direct selection and 3 of the educational affairs. The research methods including ; one questionnaire survey of educational administration in the school by using rating scale to evaluate, which has reliability 0.96 and one interview questionnaire of educational administration in the school. The statistics to analyst the information is in the form of percentage, average, deviation and use one way- ANOVA test. The research found that 1. The situation of educational administration in the school under the secondary school service area 20, in general and each domain, is high practical level, appraisal evaluation, compare and transfer education results domain is in high practical level ; following by learning development domains ; curriculum development domain ; media development domain ; innovation and educational technology domain ; educational supervision domain and leaning center development domain. 2. The problem of educational administration in the school under the secondary school service area 20, in general and each domain, is in less level including ; curriculum domain has most problems, following by leaning process development domain, appraisal, evaluation, compare and transfer education results domain, media development domain ; innovation and educational technology domain and educational supervision domain. 3. The schools, under the secondary school service area 20, have different size, situation and problems of educational

  10. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Education and Training Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Peters, Jane S.; Albers, Nathaniel; Stuart, Elizabeth; Fuller, Merrian C.

    2010-03-19

    This report provides a baseline assessment of the current state of energy efficiency-related education and training programs and analyzes training and education needs to support expected growth in the energy efficiency services workforce. In the last year, there has been a significant increase in funding for 'green job' training and workforce development (including energy efficiency), through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Key segments of the energy efficiency services sector (EESS) have experienced significant growth during the past several years, and this growth is projected to continue and accelerate over the next decade. In a companion study (Goldman et al. 2009), our research team estimated that the EESS will increase two- to four-fold by 2020, to 220,000 person-years of employment (PYE) (low-growth scenario) or up to 380,000 PYE (high-growth scenario), which may represent as many as 1.3 million individuals. In assessing energy efficiency workforce education and training needs, we focus on energy-efficiency services-related jobs that are required to improve the efficiency of residential and nonresidential buildings. Figure ES-1 shows the market value chain for the EESS, sub-sectors included in this study, as well as the types of market players and specific occupations. Our assessment does not include the manufacturing, wholesale, and retail distribution subsectors, or energy efficiency-focused operations and maintenance performed by facility managers.

  11. Assessing Interprofessional Education Collaborative Competencies in Service-Learning Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevin, Alexa M; Hale, Kenneth M; Brown, Nicole V; McAuley, James W

    2016-03-25

    Objective. To investigate the effect of an interprofessional service-learning course on health professions students' self-assessment of Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competencies. Design. The semester-long elective course consisted of two components: a service component where students provided patient care in an interprofessional student-run free clinic and bi-weekly workshops in which students reflected on their experiences and discussed roles, team dynamics, communication skills, and challenges with underserved patient populations. Assessment. All fifteen students enrolled in the course completed a validated 42-question survey in a retrospective post-then-pre design. The survey instrument assessed IPEC competencies in four domains: Values and Ethics, Roles and Responsibilities, Interprofessional Communication, and Teams and Teamwork. Students' self-assessment of IPEC competencies significantly improved in all four domains after completion of the course. Conclusion. Completing an interprofessional service-learning course had a positive effect on students' self-assessment of interprofessional competencies, suggesting service-learning is an effective pedagogical platform for interprofessional education.

  12. Service Matters: Single Service Point as a Collaborative and Professional Learning Initiative for Service Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Marianne; Bourbous, Vicki; Liston, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Changes and innovations in higher education learning and teaching acted as a catalyst for rethinking the way in which service was delivered to library clients at Australian Catholic University. The Single Service Point was piloted at one campus library in 2014 to develop a best practice approach to service delivery. The merging of cultures within…

  13. PROBLEMS OF IMPLEMENTATION IN RUSSIAN STATE ACHIEVED BY PROVIDING EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FOR HIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAMME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Alexandrovna Krokhmal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, university funding was based on individual standards, taking into account only the volume of financial support prior periods for a particular university. In 2010, radical changes in the activities of universities introduced the Federal Law on changing the status of public institutions, which radically changed the conditions of functioning of universities and suggested that new tools of state regulation. The leading and recognized, a tool in the organization of financing of Russian institutions of higher education today is a state task for the implementation of educational services. For the universities the amount of the provision of public education services is determined by the Russian Ministry of Education enrollment by calculating the average annual contingent with the expected acceptance and release. The state has become a defining task of university development tool on the amount of which depends on the economic well-being of the university. On financial support for implementation of the state task universities are subsidized from the respective budget. Using state task, the executive authorities and evaluate the qualitative characteristics of services to be implemented by universities. There is no doubt that the state assignment for the provision of educational services contributes to the functioning of universities to stimulate the search for new areas of training, as well as the diversification of funding sources. At the same time, a new and still not adapted to the conditions of functioning of universities tool, which the study will create the best conditions for university activities. The practice of arranging financing based on the state task for the implementation of educational services contains a number of contradictions that have a negative impact on the activities of the universities, and complicate the process of adaptation to the new requirements. The article discusses the contradictions that arise in the

  14. Optimizing education on the inpatient dermatology consultative service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Ladan; Shinkai, Kanade

    2017-03-01

    A consultative dermatology service plays an important role in patient care and education in the hospital setting. Optimizing education in balance with high-quality dermatology consultative services is both a challenge and an opportunity for dermatology consultation teams. There is an emergence of new information about how dermatology can best be taught in the hospital, much of which relies on principles of workplace learning as well as the science of how learning and teaching best happen in work settings. These best practices are summarized in this narrative review with integrated discussion of concepts from outpatient dermatology education and lessons learned from other inpatient teaching models. In addition, consultative dermatology curricula should utilize a blended curriculum model comprised of patient care and active learning and self-study modalities. Specific educational methods will discuss 2 strategies: (1) direct patient-care activities (ie, bedside teaching rounds) and (2) nonpatient care activities (ie, case presentations, didactic sessions, online modules, and reading lists). ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  15. Evidence supporting a promotora-delivered entertainment education intervention for improving mothers' dietary intake: the Entre Familia: Reflejos de Salud Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Guadalupe X; Ibarra, Leticia; Horton, Lucy; Arredondo, Elva M; Slymen, Donald J; Engelberg, Moshe; Rock, Cheryl L; Hernandez, Erika; Parada, Humberto; Elder, John P

    2015-01-01

    Entertainment education and the promotora model are 2 evidence-based health communication strategies. This study examined their combined effect on promoting healthy eating among mothers in a family-based intervention. Participants were 361 Mexican-origin families living in Imperial County, California, who were randomly assigned to an intervention or delayed treatment condition. The intervention involved promotoras (community health workers) who delivered 11 home visits and 4 telephone calls. Home visits included a 12-minute episode of a 9-part situation comedy depicting a family struggling with making healthy eating choices; an accompanying family workbook was reviewed to build skills and left with the family. Baseline and immediate postintervention data were collected from the mothers, including the primary outcome of daily servings of fruits and vegetables. Other dietary and psychosocial factors related to healthy eating were examined. At postintervention, mothers in the intervention reported increases in daily vegetable servings (p ≤ .05); however, no changes were observed in fruit consumption. Improvements were observed in behavioral strategies to increase fiber (p ≤ .001) and to decrease fat intake (p ≤ .001), unhealthy eating behaviors (p ≤ .001), and individual (p ≤ .05) and family-related (p ≤ .01) perceived barriers to healthy eating. Entertainment education and promotoras engaged families and improved mothers' diets. Further research should examine the dose needed for greater changes.

  16. 75 FR 27737 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... Doc No: 2010-11876] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services... Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  17. 75 FR 23254 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Training and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Training and Information... work collaboratively with personnel responsible for providing special education, early intervention... at home, including information available through the Office of Special Education Programs' (OSEP...

  18. PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER CANDIDATES’ PERCEPTIONS TOWARDS COMMUNITY SERVICE COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakkı ULUCAN

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine how physical education teacher candidates in Physical Education and Sports Higher Schools in different universities perceive the Community Service Course and to find out whether their perceptions change depending on several variables. The population of the study is composed of 146 fourth-year teacher candidate students who take the community service course in Physical Education and Sports Higher Schools in Ahi Evran, Aksaray, Kastamonu and Inönü Universities in 2011-2012 academic year. The data is collected through “Teacher Candidates’ Perceptions towards Community Service Course Scale” developed by Elma et al. (2010, and the alpha reliability coefficient of the scale is .88. Frequency, percentage, arithmetic mean, t-test and one-way analysis of variance are applied on the data collected. SPSS 15 statistical package is used to analyse the obtained data in computer environment and a significance level of 0.05 is taken into consideration for relationships and differences between variables. According to the physical education teacher candidates’ average points on the scale; it is observed that their perception towards the course is positive. According to the analysis of study results in terms of the independent variables of the study, there is a significant relationship in the sub-dimension of personal development of teacher candidates according to their universities. However, according to the analysis in terms of the variables of gender and membership to non-governmental organisations, no significant relationship is found in any sub dimension (P > 0.05.

  19. Coordination of Instructional Services by Washington State's Educational Service Districts. REL 2015-041

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endsley, Mark; Speth, Timothy; Akey, Terri; Krasnoff, Basha; Barton, Rhonda; Singh, Malkeet; Scott, Caitlin; Fantz, Traci

    2014-01-01

    This REL Northwest study looked at the funding, delivery, and coordination of instructional services offered by Washington state's network of nine Educational Service Districts (ESDs). REL Northwest examined 13 statewide teaching and learning support areas, including the percentages of districts served, the funding for each service, and ESD…

  20. The Impact of Service Learning on the Training of Pre-Service Teachers: Analysis from a Physical Education Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Gómez, Jesús; Chiva-Bartoll, Óscar; Martí-Puig, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of the use of service learning in pre-service teachers (PSTs). This methodology has been applied for two academic years at a Spanish university, providing a direct service for children with special educational needs (SEN) through motor and expressive games. We used Butin's model for the analysis of data collected…

  1. Collaboration between the University Pre-Service Teacher Education Program and the Local Elementary School on English Remedial Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chin-Wen

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed 24 pre-service elementary school English teachers' design and delivery of remedial education to the fifth and sixth graders in the collaboration between the university pre-service teacher education program and the local elementary school in a city in northwest Taiwan. The pre-service teachers were encouraged by the elementary…

  2. The Quality of Educational Services- Institutional Case Study From the Romanian Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminiţa NICOLESCU

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper approaches the topic of the quality of educational services, emphasizing on higher education, as a field of services of large public interest that has high influences at individual, group and society level. The paper starts by looking at the influencing factors for the quality of higher education from the perspective of the regulations and practices at both European and national level. In this context, the internal evaluation of quality at institutional level is a new requirement for higher education institutions in Romania. Part of the evaluation process is represented by the requirement to develop informational data bases. The paper exemplifies the results that can be obtained by monitoring quality and collecting information, and concludes with a set of recommendations for managing quality at institutional level.

  3. On Racism and Prejudice: Exploring Post-Critical Possibilities for Service-Learning within Physical Education Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Service-learning (S-L) is becoming an increasingly prominent pedagogical practice within physical education teacher education (PETE) contexts [Miller, M. P., & Nendell, J. D. (Eds.). (2011). "Service-learning in physical education and related professions: A global perspective." Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett]. While numerous…

  4. THE DOCUMENTATION AND EDUCATIONAL CENTRE INFORMATION AND INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Mabel Linares Bonilla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is written by authors from Santa Clara, Cuba, that belong to the Pedagogical University "Félix Varela" and is titled: The Center for Educational Documentation and Information (CDIP and information services, referring to work done by the CDIP, which highlights the main objective of preparing users based on them aware and know to use the resources that have been created to facilitate the search for information from the bibliography and use of new information technologies. They work at the University of Pedagogical Sciences and are responsible for selecting, acquiring, processing, store and make available to its users all the documents, audiovisual materials and technology related to education, pedagogy and other related sciences, with the aim of offer specialized information to all levels of education of the Ministry of Education, providing to all teachers and all who are interested in the educational field, the information necessary for their work pedagogical, both for development and improvement, as to investigate and solve problems in your classroom, school or community.

  5. Conditions underpinning success in joint service-education workforce planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Styles Laureen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vancouver Island lies just off the southwest coast of Canada. Separated from the large urban area of Greater Vancouver (estimated population 2.17 million by the Georgia Strait, this geographical location poses unique challenges in delivering health care to a mixed urban, rural and remote population of approximately 730 000 people living on the main island and the surrounding Gulf Islands. These challenges are offset by opportunities for the Vancouver Island Health Authority (VIHA to collaborate with four publicly funded post-secondary institutions in planning and implementing responses to existing and emerging health care workforce needs. In this commentary, we outline strategies we have found successful in aligning health education and training with local health needs in ways that demonstrate socially accountable outcomes. Challenges encountered through this process (i.e. regulatory reform, post-secondary policy reform, impacts of an ageing population, impact of private, for-profit educational institutions have placed demands on us to establish and build on open and collaborative working relationships. Some of our successes can be attributed to evidence-informed decision-making. Other successes result from less tangible but no less important factors. We argue that both rational and "accidental" factors are significant – and that strategic use of "accidental" features may prove most significant in our efforts to ensure the delivery of high-quality health care to our communities.

  6. Tertiary Students’ Entrepreneurial Ability of Entrepreneurship-Embedded Internship Program in Education Service Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Mei Chou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to explore tertiary students’ entrepreneurial ability of entrepreneurship-embedded internship program in education service industry. To achieve this goal, the study uses interviews, and panel discussions to confirm entrepreneurial ability. In addition, the study utilizes transformation of knowledge and ability to select representative knowledge items and to confirm the entrepreneurial ability structure of entrepreneurship-embedded internship program in education service industry through panel discussions. Entrepreneurs in education service industry should have these ten categories, total 42 items, such as essential professional knowledge item; that is, entrepreneurial skills, education ability, marketing ability, computer ability, service ability, and management ability, in order to cultivate entrepreneurs’ abilities of education service industry effectively. Core entrepreneurial ability of education service industry entrepreneurs should include 13 items in total, including entrepreneurial skills, education ability, marketing ability and service ability and so on.

  7. Defining and delivering appropriate technology for sustainable access to safe drinking water in un- and under-serviced rural South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maposa, Sibonginkosi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experiences and lessons from the Accelerating Sustainable Water Services Delivery (ASWSD) initiative that is currently being implemented in South Africa. The initiative is being spearheaded by the Department of Science...

  8. Active learning in pre-service science teacher education

    CERN Document Server

    Montalbano, Vera

    2013-01-01

    We report a course on teaching in physics lab for teachers enrolled in Formative Active Training, which actually allows to obtain the teacher qualification in Italy. The course was designed with the purpose of showing in practice what means active learning in physics and how effective activities can be realized in practice. Two different type of teachers attended to the course, a small group, with physics or mathematics degree, for teacher qualification in secondary school of second grade (age 14-19) and a more numerous group for qualification in secondary school of first grade (age 11-14), usually with a different science degree such as biology, environmental sciences and so on. We compare this training in physics lab between the two groups and with other experiences we performed in previous years in pre-service education and updating courses for teachers in-service.

  9. Response Across the Health-Literacy Spectrum of Kidney Transplant Recipients to a Sun-Protection Education Program Delivered on Tablet Computers: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, June K; Friedewald, John J; Desai, Amishi; Gordon, Elisa J

    2015-08-18

    Sun protection can reduce skin cancer development in kidney transplant recipients, who have a greater risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma than the general population. A culturally sensitive sun-protection program (SunProtect) was created in English and Spanish with the option of choosing audio narration provided by the tablet computer (Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 10.1). The intervention, which showed skin cancer on patients with various skin tones, explained the following scenarios: skin cancer risk, the ability of sun protection to reduce this risk, as well as offered sun-protection choices. The length of the intervention was limited to the time usually spent waiting during a visit to the nephrologist. The development of this culturally sensitive, electronic, interactive sun-protection educational program, SunProtect, was guided by the "transtheoretical model," which focuses on decision making influenced by perceptions of personal risk or vulnerability to a health threat, importance (severity) of the disease, and benefit of sun-protection behavior. Transportation theory, which holds that narratives can have uniquely persuasive effects in overcoming preconceived beliefs and cognitive biases because people transported into a narrative world will alter their beliefs based on information, claims, or events depicted, guided the use of testimonials. Participant tablet use was self-directed. Self-reported responses to surveys were entered into the database through the tablet. Usability was tested through interviews. A randomized controlled pilot trial with 170 kidney transplant recipients was conducted, where the educational program (SunProtect) was delivered through a touch-screen tablet to 84 participants. The study involved 62 non-Hispanic white, 60 non-Hispanic black, and 48 Hispanic/Latino kidney transplant recipients. The demographic survey data showed no significant mean differences between the intervention and control groups in age, sex, income, or time since

  10. Process evaluation determines the pathway of success for a health center-delivered, nutrition education intervention for infants in Trujillo, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Rebecca C; Gittelsohn, Joel; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary M; Penny, Mary E; Caulfield, Laura E; Narro, M Rocio; Black, Robert E

    2006-03-01

    Process evaluation was used to explain the success of a randomized, controlled trial of an educational intervention to improve the feeding behaviors of caregivers and the nutritional status of infants in Trujillo, Peru. Health personnel delivered a multicomponent intervention within the environment of usual care at government health centers. We created a model of the expected intervention pathway to successful outcomes. Process data were then collected on health center implementation of the intervention and caregiver reception to it. Using multivariate models, we found that variables of health center implementation, caregiver exposure, and caregiver message recall were all significant determinants in the pathway leading to improved feeding behaviors. These outcomes were consistent with our original intervention model. Further support for our model arose from the differences in caregiver reception between intervention and control centers. Process data allowed us to characterize the pathway through which an effective nutrition intervention operated. This study underscores the importance of including process evaluation, which will lead to the development and implementation of more effective nutrition interventions.

  11. Physical activity among adolescents and barriers to delivering physical education in Cornwall and Lancashire, UK: A qualitative study of heads of PE and heads of schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walters Stephen J

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent initiatives have been introduced by the UK government into secondary schools to increase pupils' access to physical activity (PA. Despite this, not enough is known about pupils' levels of physical activity or whether the delivery of these initiatives in schools facilitates or creates a barrier for pupils' PA. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of adolescents PA levels from the perspective of those responsible for delivering physical education (PE in schools; heads of PE (HOPE and heads of school (HS. Methods Seventeen semi-structured qualitative interviews were carried out with a snowball sample of HOPE and HS in schools in the Northwest and Southwest of England. Thematic data analysis using NVIVO was used to identify emergent themes. Results 17 core themes were generated, 12 of which confirmed the findings from similar research. However, five themes relating to 'ethos of performance/elitism', 'lower fitness leads to lower ability', 'undervaluing activities within PE dept' or school as a whole', 'role of the school' and 'PE department doing all it can' offer valuable new insight into the factors which may encourage or prevent PA inside or outside the curriculum. Conclusion Despite many positive perceptions of the delivery of PE in schools, it is evident that barriers still exist within that delivery which discourages physical activity. More research is needed to particularly address the complex issues of elitism and the ethos of PA in schools.

  12. Challenges of a negative work load and implications on morale, productivity and quality of service delivered in NHS laboratories in England

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erhabor Osaro; Njemanze Chima

    2014-01-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) is a term used to describe the publicly funded healthcare delivery system providing quality healthcare services in the United Kingdom. There are several challenges militating against the effective laboratory service delivery in the NHS in England. Biomedical scientists work in healthcare to diagnose disease and evaluate the effectiveness of treatment through the analysis of body fluids and tissue samples from patients. They provide the “engine room” of modern medicine with 70% of diagnosis based on the laboratory results generated by them. This review involved the search of literature for information on working condition of biomedical scientist in the NHS in England. Laboratory service delivery in the NHS in England faces numerous daunting challenges;staffing levels in the last few years have become dangerously low, less remunerated, relatively less experienced and predominantly band 5’s, multidisciplinary rather than specialty based, associated with working more unsocial hours without adequate recovery time, de-banding of staff, high staff turnaround, profit and cost driven rather than quality. These factors has resulted in burn out, low morale, high sickness absences, increased error rate, poor team spirit, diminished productivity and suboptimal laboratory service delivery. There is the urgent need to retract our steps on unpopular policies to ensure that patient care is not compromised by ensuring adequate staffing level and mix, ensuring adequate remuneration of laboratory staff, implementing evidenced-based specialty oriented service, determining the root cause/s for the high staff turnover and implementing corrective action, identifying other potential sources of waste in the system rather than pruning the already dangerously low staffing levels and promoting a quality delivery side by side cost effectiveness.

  13. Performance-Based Budgeting for Continuing and Lifelong Education Services: The Thai Higher Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiumvibool, Payear; Chonglerttham, Supasith

    2017-01-01

    This study presents analyses of panel data from 2007 to 2011 from various authoritative sources of information on public universities in Thailand. The focus is on factors that influence the budgetary decision-making process in providing educational services to the general public under a recently implemented performance-based budgeting system.…

  14. Service-Learning in Physical Education Teacher Training. Physical Education in the Modelo Prison, Barcelona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lleixà, Teresa; Ríos, Merche

    2015-01-01

    In the Psychiatric Unit of the Modelo Prison, Barcelona, a physical education programme is carried out annually with the participation of University of Barcelona (UB) students. In this context, we carried out a study based on service-learning parameters. The aim of the study was twofold: to determine the impact on inmates of the physical education…

  15. SERVQUAL Application and Adaptation for Educational Service Quality Assessments in Russian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeeva, Railya B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate an adaptation of the SERVQUAL survey method for measuring the quality of higher educational services in a Russian university context. We use a new analysis and a graphical technique for presentation of results. Design/methodology/approach: The methodology of this research follows the classic…

  16. Adding a Community University Educational Summit (CUES) to Enhance Service Learning in Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Catherine; Schriehans, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    For this study, one hundred and twenty student reflection papers (undergraduate and graduate) from a service learning extracurricular event titled, "Community University Educational Summit" (CUES) was analyzed. Over a two-year period, this event was held on one Saturday during the month of October at California State University San…

  17. METHODS FOR DESCRIPTION OF EDUCATION AND SCIENTIFIC SERVICES IN INFORMATION AND EDUCATION ON THE BASIS OF INTEROPERABILITY STACK EIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina V. Pavlova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with methodology for description of scientifi c and educational services in education and information on the basis of interoperability stack EIF (European Interoperability Framework. The passage describes operation factors to depict services on every level of the methodology, tools used to describe the services and the content. We also provide the link between methodology of description with the life span of the service. The article presents an example of service description according to the methodology considering the current education and professional standards, ITIL recommendations, ontology on the OWL basis and WSDL-description. 

  18. Designing role of online health educators in healthcare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshari, Muhammad; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil

    2015-01-01

    Web technology provides healthcare organizations the ability to broaden services beyond usual practices, and thus provides a particularly advantageous environment to achieve complex e-health goals. Furthermore, introducing web technology in healthcare services may add value to the overall healthcare process. Web technology helps healthcare organizations to extend the online health services (e-health) beyond their traditional mechanism. The changes enable customers (patients) to participate more in the process of healthcare, such as through their ability to generate personal health data to their personalized web-based interface. It allows patients to have greater control of information flow between healthcare organizations and customers, and among customers themselves. In this study the authors investigate the extended role of healthcare staff that provide e-health services. The authors have developed e-health models that accommodate customers' participation to engage more actively in the healthcare system. Through the model the authors developed a prototype--namely Clinic 2.0. Clinic 2.0 is set up to facilitate interactions between healthcare providers and customers. In the proposed systems, the authors introduced Online Health Educator (OHE)--a healthcare staff that is specifically responsible for administering Clinic 2.0. The authors have conducted a survey in Indonesia to draw the expectation of participants regarding the important role of OHE in Clinic 2.0 through a semi-structured interview conducted with participants to further investigate the pivotal roles of OHE. The authors found that e-health services need OHE to achieve customers' satisfaction.

  19. Institutions and organisations in Russian higher education: the example of Rostov region education services market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volchik Vyacheslav, V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the process of transformation in institutional and organizational structures of Russian Higher Education (Rostov Region is taken as an example. Adaptive economic behavior of key actors on the Russian education services market has been studied in the context of constantly changing institutional and organizational environments. Original institutional approach in the tradition of J. Commons and J. Hodgson has been applied to analyze interconnections between institutions and organizations. The evolution of institutional and organizational structures in Russian Higher education has been divided into three stages. We distinguish between those stages taking into account the dynamics of quantitative indicators and the change in norms and standards that regulate actors’ behavior in the field. The period of 1990-2002 can be characterized by weakening of government regulation and, simultaneously, lack of financial support of Higher Education. Meanwhile, private Higher Education and paid university programmes developed rapidly during that period. These changes resulted in quantitative growth in the field on the one hand, and devaluation of Higher Education, on the other hand. It is assumed that the “bubble” in Russian Higher Education, which arose in 2002-2008, occurred to a great extent because of the expansion in extramural and lowquality full-time education aimed only at getting graduate diplomas. During the period of bubble formation and latter decline in demand on the Russian education services market, the Government strengthened norms and standards referring to regulation of Higher Education. Recent “optimization processes” of 2009-2015 resulted in reducing the number of students and lecturers, universities and their branches.

  20. E-Education with Facebook - A Social Network Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Derawi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the social networking websi te, Facebook, for conducting courses as a replacement of high-cost classical electronic learn ing platforms. At the early stage of the Internet community, users of the Interned used emai l as the main communication mean. Although email is still the essential approach of c ommunication in a suitable but offline mode, other services were introduced, such as many Instan t Messaging (IM software applications like ICQ, Skype, Viber, WhatsApp and MSN, which enable p eople to connect in a real-time mode. However, the communication between people was furth er improved to the next phase, when Facebook came to reality as a social networking hom epage that wires many features. People do not only link with others, but also establish all k inds of connections between them. Facebook offers rich functions for forming associations. The framework of Facebook actually delivers without charge software that were provided by tradi tional electronic learning. This paper looks at how people apply Facebook for teaching and learn ing, together with recommendations provided

  1. Developing Knowledge and Leadership in Pre-Service Teacher Education Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jo-Anne; Ryan, Lisa; Davis, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Pre-service teacher education institutions are large and complex organisations that are notoriously difficult to change. One factor is that many change efforts focus largely on individual pre-service teacher educators altering their practice. We report here on our experience using a model for effecting change, which views pre-service teacher…

  2. On International Trade in Educational Services: An Interpretation of the Regulations and China's WTO Commitments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xi-bin

    2006-01-01

    The "General Agreement on Trade in Services" (GATS) of the World Trade Organization (WTO) covers educational trade services. Hence, all the regulations of the GATS have to be followed in the international trade of educational services. Having acceded to the WTO, China is starting to fulfill the rights and obligations as a member by…

  3. A Public Service-Dominant Logic for the Executive Education of Public Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiedemann, Alexander M.; Nasi, Greta; Saporito, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    Building on the concept of Public Service-Dominant Logic (PSDL), this article aims to apply the public service-dominant logic to executive education. We argue that fit-for-purpose and effective executive master programs for public managers (EMPA) need to be designed from a public service perspective. Framing executive education as a service…

  4. On International Trade in Educational Services: An Interpretation of the Regulations and China's WTO Commitments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xi-bin

    2006-01-01

    The "General Agreement on Trade in Services" (GATS) of the World Trade Organization (WTO) covers educational trade services. Hence, all the regulations of the GATS have to be followed in the international trade of educational services. Having acceded to the WTO, China is starting to fulfill the rights and obligations as a member by completely…

  5. Developing Knowledge and Leadership in Pre-Service Teacher Education Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jo-Anne; Ryan, Lisa; Davis, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Pre-service teacher education institutions are large and complex organisations that are notoriously difficult to change. One factor is that many change efforts focus largely on individual pre-service teacher educators altering their practice. We report here on our experience using a model for effecting change, which views pre-service teacher…

  6. Questions Often Asked about Special Education Services = Preguntas sobre los servicios de educacion especial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupper, Lisa, Ed.

    This guide, available in both English and Spanish, answers questions often asked by parents about special education services. Questions and answers address the following topics: where to begin if a parent believes a child needs special education services, services available to very young children, the evaluation process, the Individualized…

  7. American Elementary Education Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes towards Biotechnology Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalengula, Vivien Mweene; Mumba, Frackson; Chitiyo, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This study examined elementary education pre-service teachers' attitudes towards biotechnology processes. A sample comprised 88 elementary education pre-service teachers at a mid-sized university in the Midwest of the USA. Sixty and 28 of these pre-service teachers were enrolled in Introductory Science Methods course and Advance Science Methods…

  8. Service-Learning within Higher Education: Rhizomatic Interconnections between University and the Real World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses Service-learning within an Australian higher education context as pedagogy to teach about inclusive education. Using Deleuze and Guattari's (1987) model of the rhizome, this study conceptualises pre-service teachers' learning experiences as multiple, hydra and continuous. Data from reflection logs of pre-service teachers…

  9. A Medical Student–Delivered Smoking Prevention Program, Education Against Tobacco, for Secondary Schools in Brazil: Study Protocol for a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Luiz Eduardo De Freitas; Bernardes-Souza, Breno; Lisboa, Oscar Campos; Seeger, Werner; Groneberg, David Alexander; Tran, Thien-An; Fries, Fabian Norbert; Corrêa, Paulo César Rodrigues Pinto

    2017-01-01

    Background Smoking is the largest preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in Brazil. Education Against Tobacco (EAT) is a large network of medical students in 13 countries who volunteer for school-based prevention in the classroom setting. A recent quasi-experimental EAT study conducted in Germany showed significant short-term smoking cessation effects on 11- to 15-year-old adolescents. Objective The aim of this study is both to describe and to provide the first randomized long-term evaluation of the EAT intervention involving a photoaging app for its effectiveness to reduce the smoking prevalence among 12- to 17-year-old pupils in Brazilian public schools. Methods A randomized controlled trial will be conducted among approximately 1500 adolescents aged 12 to 17 years in grades 7-11 of public secondary schools in Brazil. The prospective experimental study design includes measurements at baseline and at 6 and 12 months postintervention. The study groups will consist of randomized classes receiving the standardized EAT intervention (90 minutes of mentoring in a classroom setting) and control classes within the same schools (no intervention). The questionnaire measures smoking status, gender, social, and cultural aspects as well as predictors of smoking. Biochemical validation of smoking status is conducted via random carbon monoxide measurements. The primary end point is the difference of the change in smoking prevalence in the intervention group versus the difference in the control group at 12 months of follow-up. The differences in smoking behavior (smoking onset, quitting) between the 2 groups as well as effects on the different genders will be studied as secondary outcomes. Results The recruitment of schools, participating adolescents, and medical students was conducted from August 2016 until January 2017. The planned period of data collection is February 2017 until June 2018. Data analysis will follow in July 2018 and data presentation/publication will

  10. Current status of educational services in higher agricultural education in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Cobets’

    2016-07-01

    of passing students into the production, which is an absolute necessity in terms of training of qualified specialists. It is necessary to realize the concept of continuous and multi­level agricultural education focused on the holistic development of the individual, increasing social adaptation in today’s mobile world. It is important to ensure cooperation between higher education institutions from producers, services employment. Key terms of agricultural education European level is to create research universities and development of such scientific and educational centers. This is the way to competitive scientific developments, Bank of innovation, promotion of scientific and research work of local scientists in the international market of high technology products. Ukrainian experts are to be competitive in internal and world market.

  11. Professional Preparation of Teachers for Rural Schools: Abstracts of Addresses Delivered at a Conference Called by the United States Commissioner of Education, at the Lenox Hotel, Boston, February 25, 1928. Bulletin, 1928, No. 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Katherine M.

    1928-01-01

    This bulletin contains abstracts of the addresses delivered at a conference called by the United States Commissioner of Education to consider problems concerned with the professional preparation of teachers for rural schools. They were prepared from copies of the addresses or abstracts of them furnished by the speakers who prepared or delivered…

  12. Sandia Agile MEMS Prototyping, Layout Tools, Education and Services Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schriner, H.; Davies, B.; Sniegowski, J.; Rodgers, M.S.; Allen, J.; Shepard, C.

    1998-05-01

    Research and development in the design and manufacture of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) is growing at an enormous rate. Advances in MEMS design tools and fabrication processes at Sandia National Laboratories` Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) have broadened the scope of MEMS applications that can be designed and manufactured for both military and commercial use. As improvements in micromachining fabrication technologies continue to be made, MEMS designs can become more complex, thus opening the door to an even broader set of MEMS applications. In an effort to further research and development in MEMS design, fabrication, and application, Sandia National Laboratories has launched the Sandia Agile MEMS Prototyping, Layout Tools, Education and Services Program or SAMPLES program. The SAMPLES program offers potential partners interested in MEMS the opportunity to prototype an idea and produce hardware that can be used to sell a concept. The SAMPLES program provides education and training on Sandia`s design tools, analysis tools and fabrication process. New designers can participate in the SAMPLES program and design MEMS devices using Sandia`s design and analysis tools. As part of the SAMPLES program, participants` designs are fabricated using Sandia`s 4 level polycrystalline silicon surface micromachine technology fabrication process known as SUMMiT (Sandia Ultra-planar, Multi-level MEMS Technology). Furthermore, SAMPLES participants can also opt to obtain state of the art, post-fabrication services provided at Sandia such as release, packaging, reliability characterization, and failure analysis. This paper discusses the components of the SAMPLES program.

  13. 75 FR 22760 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute on... period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  14. Republication of "A Propensity Score Matching Analysis of the Effects of Special Education Services"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul L.; Frisco, Michelle L.; Farkas, George; Hibel, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Since the landmark enactment of Education of the Handicapped Act in 1975, special education supports and services have been provided to children with disabilities. Although costly, the intentionality of these specialized services has been to advance the educational and societal opportunities of children with disabilities as they progress to…

  15. 75 FR 39216 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute on... period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  16. 75 FR 36239 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute on... period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  17. 75 FR 13111 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview Information; National Institute on... Program--Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training (ARRT) Projects AGENCY: Office of Special Education and..., Assistant Secretary for Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. BILLING CODE 4000-01-P ...

  18. 75 FR 77624 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview Information; National Institute on... months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum... the Department of Education (34 CFR 100.4, 104.5, 106.4, 108.8, and 110.23). 3. Special Conditions...

  19. 75 FR 38510 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Personnel Development to Improve...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Personnel Development to Improve Services and... Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. We are correcting the use of the word ``scholar'' in the Special....html . Dated: June 25, 2010. Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative...

  20. 75 FR 39431 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute on... Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through a notice published in... this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  1. 75 FR 55788 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of Correspondence AGENCY: Department of... identifiable information redacted) regarding students with high cognition who also require special education... IEP information on the frequency, duration, and location of the special education and related services...

  2. 75 FR 33274 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

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    2010-06-11

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute on... Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  3. 75 FR 32435 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Technical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Technical Assistance on... applications on how they will work with experts in large-scale assessment and special education to ensure that... single State, OA, or FAS. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may...

  4. 75 FR 39426 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute on... Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  5. Faculty Involvement in Inservice Education--Research and Service in a Teaching University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Donald J.

    Faculty members in schools, colleges, and departments of education can and should be actively involved in research, teaching, and service. Research and service functions are as integral to the mission of the school of education as teaching, and should be scheduled with as much care and planning. In one school of education, a 5-year plan to…

  6. The IEP Meeting: Perceptions of Parents of Students Who Receive Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Wade W.

    2008-01-01

    The author investigated parental perceptions of the individualized education program (IEP) meeting among 51 parents of students who were receiving special education services from 1 family support service agency. Survey questions pertained to the following areas: (a) IEP meeting experiences, (b) knowledge level of special education law, (c)…

  7. Pre-Service Educators and Anti-Oppressive Pedagogy: Interrupting and Challenging LGBTQ Oppression in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitton-Kukner, Jennifer; Kearns, Laura-Lee; Tompkins, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    There are increasing calls for pre-service educators to be responsive and responsible for anti-homophobic education. This research builds on the ongoing efforts to integrate Positive Space training in our two-year Bachelor of Education programme. We found through a series of focus group and individual interviews that pre-service teachers were…

  8. Learner-oriented distance education supporting service system model and applied research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liyong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distance education is a product of social progress and an emerging way of life-long learning as well. This paper describes the construction of the distance education supporting service system and establishes the distance education supporting service system from the perspective of distance education learners. Under the premise of considering to provide six influencing factors--learning facilities, learning coaching and counseling, learning resources, education and teaching information, assessment of student learning situation and organization of practical teaching activities, this paper assesses the distance education supporting service system of Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen by using AHP.

  9. Challenges of a negative work load and implications on morale, productivity and quality of service delivered in NHS laboratories in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhabor Osaro

    2014-06-01

    There is the urgent need to retract our steps on unpopular policies to ensure that patient care is not compromised by ensuring adequate staffing level and mix, ensuring adequate remuneration of laboratory staff, implementing evidenced-based specialty oriented service, determining the root cause/s for the high staff turnover and implementing corrective action, identifying other potential sources of waste in the system rather than pruning the already dangerously low staffing levels and promoting a quality delivery side by side cost effectiveness.

  10. Essential basic and emergency obstetric and newborn care: from education and training to service delivery and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otolorin, Emmanuel; Gomez, Patricia; Currie, Sheena; Thapa, Kusum; Dao, Blami

    2015-06-01

    Approximately 15% of expected births worldwide will result in life-threatening complications during pregnancy, delivery, or the postpartum period. Providers skilled in emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC) services are essential, particularly in countries with a high burden of maternal and newborn mortality. Jhpiego and its consortia partners have implemented three global programs to build provider capacity to provide comprehensive EmONC services to women and newborns in these resource-poor settings. Providers have been educated to deliver high-impact maternal and newborn health interventions, such as prevention and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia and management of birth asphyxia, within the broader context of quality health services. This article describes Jhpiego's programming efforts within the framework of the basic and expanded signal functions that serve as indicators of high-quality basic and emergency care services. Lessons learned include the importance of health facility strengthening, competency-based provider education, global leadership, and strong government ownership and coordination as essential precursors to scale-up of high impact evidence-based maternal and newborn interventions in low-resource settings.

  11. 34 CFR 300.534 - Protections for children not determined eligible for special education and related services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... special education and related services. 300.534 Section 300.534 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES... children not determined eligible for special education and related services. (a) General. A child who has...

  12. Service, training, mentorship: first report of an innovative education-support program to revitalize primary care social service in Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Van Wieren

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Mexican mandatory year of social service following medical school, or pasantía, is designed to provide a safety net for the underserved. However, social service physicians (pasantes are typically unpracticed, unsupervised, and unsupported. Significant demotivation, absenteeism, and underperformance typically plague the social service year. Objective: Compañeros en Salud (CES aimed to create an education-support package to turn the pasantía into a transformative learning experience. Design: CES recruited pasantes to complete their pasantía in CES-supported Ministry of Health clinics in rural Chiapas. The program aims to: 1 train pasantes to more effectively deliver primary care, 2 expose pasantes to central concepts of global health and social medicine, and 3 foster career development of pasantes. Program components include supportive supervision, on-site mentorship, clinical information resources, monthly interactive seminars, and improved clinic function. We report quantitative and qualitative pasante survey data collected from February 2012 to August 2013 to discuss strengths and weaknesses of this program and its implications for the pasante workforce in Mexico. Results: Pasantes reported that their medical knowledge, and clinical and leadership skills all improved during the CES education-support program. Most pasantes felt the program had an overall positive effect on their career goals and plans, although their self-report of preparedness for the Mexican residency entrance exam (ENARM decreased during the social service year. One hundred percent reported they were satisfied with the CES-supported pasantía experience and wished to help the poor and underserved in their careers. Conclusions: Education-support programs similar to the CES program may encourage graduating medical students to complete their social service in underserved areas, improve the quality of care provided by pasantes, and address many of the known

  13. Service Learning in Baccalaureate Social Work Education: Results of a National Survey of Accredited Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracchi, Helen E.; Weaver, Addie; Schelbe, Lisa; Song, Hyun-a

    2016-01-01

    Service learning is neither field education nor volunteerism. Rather, it is a pedagogical approach designed to reinforce classroom instruction with concurrent service activities occurring in the local community. This service is driven by community-identified needs. Service learning supports social work values, yet the profession has been slow to…

  14. Getting Engaged: Factors Enhancing Perceived Student Benefits from Service-Learning in Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Timothy B.; Short, Jeremy C.

    2010-01-01

    Service-learning is an instructional method that incorporates community service into the curriculum. The integration of service-learning into business pedagogy provides benefits that are particularly valuable to business students. Yet business educators have been slow to integrate service-learning into their classes. The authors explore the…

  15. Service Recovery in Marketing Education: It's What We Do that Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rajesh; Muncy, James A.

    2008-01-01

    One thing that higher education has in common with other service providers is that service failures occur. There are times when students are negatively impacted by mistakes made in the classroom. An extensive body of literature has developed in the area of services marketing about what to do when such service failures occur. The current study…

  16. Service Learning in Baccalaureate Social Work Education: Results of a National Survey of Accredited Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracchi, Helen E.; Weaver, Addie; Schelbe, Lisa; Song, Hyun-a

    2016-01-01

    Service learning is neither field education nor volunteerism. Rather, it is a pedagogical approach designed to reinforce classroom instruction with concurrent service activities occurring in the local community. This service is driven by community-identified needs. Service learning supports social work values, yet the profession has been slow to…

  17. Service Recovery in Marketing Education: It's What We Do that Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rajesh; Muncy, James A.

    2008-01-01

    One thing that higher education has in common with other service providers is that service failures occur. There are times when students are negatively impacted by mistakes made in the classroom. An extensive body of literature has developed in the area of services marketing about what to do when such service failures occur. The current study…

  18. Patient satisfaction- comparison of the comprehensive care model with traditional model of delivering dental services in Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Pakdaman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: One of the important aspects for evaluating an organization is assessing the level of satisfaction of the clients. This study was conducted to compare the level of satisfaction between traditional and new methods of delivering dental care in the clinic of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.   Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 308 patients received dental care at the dental clinics of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in spring 2010. Data were collected from Comprehensive Care Unit (CCU in addition to 7 isolated clinics including restorative, periodontics, endodontics, radiology, and prosthodontics (fix and removable using translated version of the Dental Satisfaction Questionnaire (DSQ, consisted of 19 questions in three main domains in addition to demographic questions. Descriptive statistics was used as percentage of answers. In order to compare the mean score between domains ANOVA test was used.   Results: The standardized mean scores in each domain were: pain control 58±17, access 59±12, quality 68±11 and total Dental Satisfaction Index (DSI score of 62±10. 92.5% of the respondents reported that students were very careful when examining their patients. 96.8% reported that they treat their patients with respect . The most common reasons for dissatisfaction apart from waiting time and getting appointments were not providing preventive care and pain control.   Conclusion: The results of this study shows acceptable level of satisfaction with dental care in teaching clinics of this dental school, however efforts on implementing preventive care and pain control strategies are suggested.

  19. Critical incident stress: the role of hospital-based social work in developing a statewide intervention system for first-responders delivering emergency services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, W J; Neely, K

    1992-01-01

    Emotional, cognitive and behavioral stress can negatively affect the performance of fire, rescue and law enforcement personnel responding to emergency situations. Impaired professional performance in these crises not only endangers the incident victims, all involved responders and their families, but potentially the lives and property of entire communities. This article describes the major administrative and clinical leadership of a hospital-based Social Work department in implementing one of the few statewide critical incident stress debriefing teams for emergency service personnel in the United States. It represents a model for program development by other organizations.

  20. Impact of bandwidth for various services in heterogeneous network and quality of service via communication technologies in Malaysian higher educational

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    Mohd Nazri ISMAIL

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on heterogeneous services and communication technologies for retrieving and sending information between students and lecturers in Malaysian higher educational institutes. It intends to investigate pattern and significant level of various services implementation, convergence of communication technologies and bandwidth capacity for last mile users (students and lecturers. It is designed to determine which communication technologies, services, bandwidth capacity and QoS will achieve the highest level acceptance in Malaysian higher educational institutes. Heterogeneous environment can also generate mobility approaches. A survey method is used to collect data from respondents (System Network Administrator in Malaysian higher educational institutes. Statistical Analysis using t-test shows that implementation of high speed bandwidth for Internet (WAN achieved significant level. Frequency test are used to analyze the various services implementation via convergence of communication technologies in heterogeneous environment for retrieving information. The most apparent finding of this study is that various services implementation in higher educational institutes can affect convergence of communication technologies usage in accessing information over heterogeneous network environment between students and lecturers. The study or analysis confirms that Malaysia higher educational institutes have not achieved a maximum level of various services implementation via convergence of communication technologies between students and lecturers in heterogeneous network environment. Therefore, low convergence of communication technologies can produce a low mobility and ubiquitous interaction between students and lectures in Malaysian higher educational institutes.

  1. Service user involvement in pre-registration general nurse education: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Scammell, Janet; Heaslip, Vanessa; Crowley, Emma J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and objectives: A systematic review of published studies on service user involvement in undergraduate, pre-registration general nursing education (excluding mental health-specific programmes). The objective is to examine how students are exposed to engagement with service users. Background: The requirement of service user involvement in all nurse education is policy expectation of health professional education providers, in response to the increased public and political expectations. Pre...

  2. Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members and Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-17

    AND SUBTITLE Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members and Veterans 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Testimony Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members...Jennie W. Wenger1 The RAND Corporation Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members and Veterans2 Before the Committees on

  3. Multiracial Student Services Come of Age: The State of Multiracial Student Services in Higher Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael Paul A.; Buckner, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    This article provides insight into the recent appearance of multiracial student services in U.S. higher education by presenting a review of current practice within student affairs administration. The authors begin by discussing the historical and social context for multiracial student services within prevailing approaches to multicultural identity…

  4. The consumer revolution arrives. Using smart customer service to attract, educate, & retain satisfied members & lower costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, K

    1994-06-01

    Across the country, managed care organizations pursue ways to enhance customer service and maintain member satisfaction, without breaking the bank by authorizing unnecessary services. One method gaining popularity is reducing customer demand for inappropriate services through education. Approaches include welcome-to-the-plan calls, member education, automated and in-person answer lines, and 24-hour telephone coverage. Several firms have recognized the need for such services, and offer them to HMOs on an outsourcing basis, with generally positive results.

  5. Moving Into Communities: Developing Cultural Competence with Pre-service Educators through Community Service-Learning Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Coffey

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Research in teacher education suggests that field experiences in community settings can offer pre-service teachers a context for understanding the link between theory and practice. This paper documents the experiences of pre-service educators who participated in service-learning partnerships for thirty hours in multiple community settings in the southeast United States. Pre-service teachers not only volunteered in the community, but they also engaged in critically reflective journal writing and participated in evaluative class discussions. Students praised the benefits of a service experience in both school and community placements and discussed how interactions with the community agencies gave them the insight into how community organizations often play a significant role in the lives of the underserved students they will eventually teach. The author argues that the inclusion of a service-learning component in early pre-service teacher education field experiences has the potential to facilitate the examination of the relationships between community organizations and schools and encourage development of cultural competence among pre-service teachers. KEYWORDSservice-learning, pre-service teacher preparation, community partnerships

  6. Delivering PrePex Medical Male Circumcision Services Through a Mobile Clinic: The Experience From a Pilot Project in North West Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufa, Tendesayi; Chetty-Makkan, Candice; Maraisane, Mpho; Charalambous, Salome; Chihota, Violet; Toledo, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    We describe the implementation of a pilot project to demonstrate the safety and feasibility of providing PrePex circumcision from a mobile clinic. We analyzed available project diary entries and staff meeting minutes to identify challenges encountered. The main challenges identified were (1) daily time constraints because of setting up procedures, (2) transportation logistics for clients when the mobile clinic had moved to a different location, (3) integration and coordination of staff responsibilities, and (4) recruitment for PrePex services in the mobile clinic. The provision of PrePex device circumcision through a mobile clinic was feasible but careful planning and review of operational procedures were needed to resolve the implementation challenges.

  7. Structure, Content, Delivery, Service, and Outcomes: Quality e-Learning in higher education

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    Colla J. MacDonald

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the need for quality e-Learning experiences. We used the Demand-Driven Learning Model (MacDonald, Stodel, Farres, Breithaupt, and Gabriel, 2001 to evaluate an online Masters in Education course. Multiple data collection methods were used to understand the experiences of stakeholders in this case study: the learners, design team, and facilitators. We found that all five dimensions of the model (structure, content, delivery, service, and outcomes must work in concert to implement a quality e-Learning course. Key themes include evolving learner needs, the search for connection, becoming an able e-participant, valued interactions, social construction of content, integration of delivery partners, and mindful weighing of benefits and trade-offs. By sharing insights into what is needed to design and deliver an e-Learning experience, our findings add to the growing knowledge of online learning. Using this model to evaluate perceptions of quality by key stakeholders has led to insights and recommendations on the Demand Driven Learning Model itself which may be useful for researchers in this area and strengthen the model. Quality has been defined in terms of the design of the e-Learning experience, the contextualized experience of learners, and evidence of learning outcomes (Carr and Carr, 2000; Jung 2000; Salmon, 2000. Quality and design of e-Learning courses, however, are sometimes compromised in an “ . . . effort to simply get something up and running��� in response to pressing consumer demands (Dick, 1996, p. 59. Educators and researchers have voiced concern over the lack of rigorous evaluation studies of e-Learning programs (e.g., Arbaugh, 2000; Howell, Saba, Lindsay, and Williams, 2004; Lockyer, Patterson, and Harper, 1999; Robinson, 2001. McGorry (2003 adds, “although the number of courses being delivered via the Internet is increasing rapidly, our knowledge of what makes these courses effective learning experiences

  8. "The Strawberry Generation… They Are Too Pampered": Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers' Perspectives on Outdoor Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atencio, Matthew; Tan, Yuen Sze Michelle; Ho, Susanna; Ching, Chew Ting

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores pre-service PE teachers' conceptions of outdoor education (OE) in Singapore. Survey questionnaires were administered to 120 pre-service teachers; 14 teachers participated in follow-up semi-structured interviews. The findings indicate that OE is predominantly situated within the outdoor camp environment. Pre-service teachers…

  9. A Survey Study of Chinese In-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy about Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Zan, Fei; Liu, Jiaqiu; Liu, Chunling; Sharma, Umesh

    2012-01-01

    A survey study was conducted to a total of 323 in-service teachers (110 special education teachers and 213 general education teachers) in Shanghai regarding their self-efficacy and concerns about inclusive education. Multivariate analysis results reveal that special teachers have significantly higher self-efficacy about inclusive education than…

  10. A Survey Study of Chinese In-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy about Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Zan, Fei; Liu, Jiaqiu; Liu, Chunling; Sharma, Umesh

    2012-01-01

    A survey study was conducted to a total of 323 in-service teachers (110 special education teachers and 213 general education teachers) in Shanghai regarding their self-efficacy and concerns about inclusive education. Multivariate analysis results reveal that special teachers have significantly higher self-efficacy about inclusive education than…

  11. Can Hong Kong Export Its Higher Education Services to the Asian Markets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shun Wing

    2011-01-01

    Internationalization becomes increasingly important in higher education in a globalized world. Exporting higher education services by recruiting overseas students is an integral facet of internationalization of higher education. It not only helps develop the place as an education hub but also facilitate internationalized environment of higher…

  12. Can Hong Kong Export Its Higher Education Services to the Asian Markets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shun Wing

    2011-01-01

    Internationalization becomes increasingly important in higher education in a globalized world. Exporting higher education services by recruiting overseas students is an integral facet of internationalization of higher education. It not only helps develop the place as an education hub but also facilitate internationalized environment of higher…

  13. Educational service specialist: reality reflection of a municipality paulista

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taísa Grasiela Gomes Liduenha Gonçalves

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article was to analyze the Specialized Educational Care (AEE, in Portuguese in Brazil, southeast region, state of São Paulo, specifically in a paulista municipality. Therefore, was used the laws that guide the pedagogical work within this space, official social indicators and empirical data, which was created during visits to the city, when was realized the observation in the resource room and an interview with the responsible teacher. The results indicate: increase in the number of classes that offer the AEE in Brazilian schools, in the southeast region and in the state of São Paulo; with respect to the municipality analyzed, was found that teaching the AEE is isolated from the school context and the service is directed to students with learning disabilities, although there is presence of students with other disabilities in school, in addition, the service is limited to an autonomous life activities , especially in the development of mental processes. The results showed that still there are difficulties in implementing the AEE in school that need more policies and actions based on local realities.

  14. Area health education centers and health science library services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R T; Howard, F H

    1977-07-01

    A study to determine the impact that the Area Health Education Center type of programs may have on health science libraries was conducted by the Extramural Programs, National Library of Medicine, in conjunction with a contract awarded by the Bureau of Health Manpower, Health Resources Administration, to develop an inventory of the AHEC type of projects in the United States. Specific study tasks included a review of these programs as they relate to library and information activities, on-site surveys on the programs to define their needs for library services and information, and a categorization of library activities. A major finding was that health science libraries and information services are generally not included in AHEC program planning and development, although information and information exchange is a fundamental part of the AHEC type of programs. This study suggests that library inadequacies are basically the result of this planning failure and of a lack of financial resources; however, many other factors may be contributory. The design and value of library activities for these programs needs explication.

  15. In-service and pre-service teacher education in IBSE: The ESTABLISH approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ješková, Zuzana; Kireš, Marián; McLoughlin, Eilish; Finlayson, Odilla; Ottander, Christina; Ekborg, Margareta

    2016-05-01

    One of the main goals of the ESTABLISH 7fp project (available on line at http://www.establish-fp7.eu/) was the development and implementation of the professional development teacher education programmes (TEP) to support teachers in adopting inquiry-based strategies in their teaching. Within the project there was a model for in-service and pre-service teacher training in IBSE designed and implemented across 12 participating countries. The programme is based on 4 core elements and 4 additional elements that are built around the IBSE teaching units developed within the project. As accepted by ESTABLISH partners, all teacher training programmes include the minimum of the four elements, i.e. introduction to IBSE, industrial content knowledge, teacher as implementer and teacher as developer of IBSE teaching materials. There are also four additional elements designed in detail, i.e. ICT for IBSE, argumentation in the classroom, research and design projects for students, assessment of IBSE. These can be added to the programme optionally with regard to the level of teachers' IBSE skills and current situation in education and teachers' professional development within the country. This ESTABLISH model of TEP was followed in participating countries in order to change teachers' attitudes from traditional ways of teaching towards adopting inquiry strategies and their successful implementation in the classroom. Within the face-to-face workshops teachers experienced and developed their inquiry based teaching strategies using specifically developed materials. In addition, the e-platform has been developed to provide on-line support. This platform provides educators and teachers with all the necessary materials for the training and IBSE teaching units and other teaching materials for teachers' ongoing help. The teacher training programme was successfully implemented in Slovakia. There were two runs of teacher training workshops on IBSE already carried out. Moreover, the additional

  16. Changes of the dental service delivered to patients with intellectual disability under general anaesthesia in Dental Polyclinic Split, Croatia, during the years 1985-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacić, Ivan; Tadin, Antonija; Petricević, Nikola; Mikelić, Branimira; Vidović, Neven; Palac, Antonija; Filipović-Zore, Irina; Celebić, Asja

    2012-09-01

    People with intellectual disability (ID) usually have a poor quality of oral health, which include poor oral hygiene, untreated caries and high proportion of missing teeth. Due to their fear and repulsive attitude towards medical staff general anesthesia is often a useful method for dental treatment. One thousand and fifty four intellectual disability patients for the period of 1985-2009 who received dental treatment under general anesthesia in Dental Polyclinic Split, were included in the study. Patients were divided into five groups based upon the period when a specific dental treatment had been received. Each period was analyzed for the number of ID patients treated and the type of dental treatment. The results showed that the most services provided were 4006 fillings, followed by 3225 extracted teeth and finally 274 endodontic treatments. Significantly the lowest number of fillings and endodontic treatments were found among patients in group II (1990-1994), with significantly the highest number of extracted teeth. In Conclusion, the types of dental treatment have changed during twenty five years. Number of extracted teeth decreased while the number of fillings and endodontic treatment increased. However, dental status of people with intellectual disability should be improved with more restorative treatments and with better oral health prevention program.

  17. The impact of including husbands in antenatal health education services on maternal health practices in urban Nepal: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullany, Britta C; Becker, S; Hindin, M J

    2007-04-01

    Observational studies suggest that including men in reproductive health interventions can enhance positive health outcomes. A randomized controlled trial was designed to test the impact of involving male partners in antenatal health education on maternal health care utilization and birth preparedness in urban Nepal. In total, 442 women seeking antenatal services during second trimester of pregnancy were randomized into three groups: women who received education with their husbands, women who received education alone and women who received no education. The education intervention consisted of two 35-min health education sessions. Women were followed until after delivery. Women who received education with husbands were more likely to attend a post-partum visit than women who received education alone [RR = 1.25, 95% CI = (1.01, 1.54)] or no education [RR = 1.29, 95% CI = (1.04, 1.60)]. Women who received education with their husbands were also nearly twice as likely as control group women to report making >3 birth preparations [RR = 1.99, 95% CI = (1.10, 3.59)]. Study groups were similar with respect to attending the recommended number of antenatal care checkups, delivering in a health institution or having a skilled provider at birth. These data provide evidence that educating pregnant women and their male partners yields a greater net impact on maternal health behaviors compared with educating women alone.

  18. Exploration of mobile educational technology

    OpenAIRE

    Hosny, W.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in mobile and wireless technology could be utilised to enhance the delivery of educational programmes. The use of this technology is known as “Mobile Education”. Mobile education technology provides unique opportunities for educators to flexibly deliver their educational material to learners via mobile services anywhere at any time. Moreover, the material delivered could be adapted to the learners’ needs and preferences. Examples of mobile devices which could be used in mobile...

  19. In-service education and teachers’ perception about key competences development with Sport Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Calderón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to analyze the perception of physical education teachers on job opportunities of key competences of a particular teaching model. To this end, 12 teachers, Secondary and Primary, conducted an in-service education course on the model, and once completed, implemented a teaching unit in their respective schools. It was then through a questionnaire, they were asked about their perception of the development of key competences. To check whether there were differences in the perception of teachers on the development of each of the core competencies, it was calculated means and standard deviations of all variables recorded, and used the Mann-Whitney U test for independent samples. Teachers see great potential to work competence through Sport Education Model primarily on social and civic competence, lifelong learning, and autonomy and personal initiative.

  20. Perceptual Study of School Principals' Working Knowledge of Special Education and Schools' Level of Educational Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to determine the relationship between the schools principal's working knowledge of special education laws, diagnosis procedures, and instructional best practices a relates to the level of educational services within a school's special education department. To examine this relationship,…