WorldWideScience

Sample records for deliquescence relative humidity

  1. Deliquescence Relative Humidities of Organic and Inorganic Salts Important in the Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Jason R; Beyer, Keith D

    2016-12-22

    The deliquescence relative humidities (DRH) as a function of temperature have been determined for several salts of atmospheric importance using humidity controlled thermogravimetric analysis (HTGA): sodium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate (NaHC2O4·H2O), sodium oxalate (Na2C2O4), sodium ammonium sulfate dihydrate (NaNH4SO4·2H2O, lecontite), sodium hydrogen malonate monohydrate (NaHC3H2O4·H2O), sodium malonate monohydrate (Na2C3H2O4·H2O), and ammonium hydrogen malonate (NH4HC3H2O4). The temperature-dependent onset DRH values (where a dry mixture begins to take up water) were also determined for mixtures of ammonium sulfate with malonic acid, and ammonium sulfate with sodium oxalates and sodium malonates, respectively. We demonstrate that the onset DRH is independent of the ratio of solids in the mixture. In general, onset DRH values were always lower than the pure component DRH values.

  2. Reversible wetting of NaCl nanoparticles at relative humidities below deliquescence observed by environmental non-contact AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzewicz, D.A.; Lewis, E.; Ocko, B. M.; McGraw, R. L.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2009-12-14

    The behavior of NaCl nanoparticles as a function of relative humidity (RH) was characterized by depositing particles on a prepared hydrophobic surface and measuring their height via non-contact environmental atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact AFM allows greater sensitivity to changes in the size of particles than does contact AFM or scanning electron microscopy, and greater sensitivity to changes in shape than do mass-based techniques. Crystalline cubic NaCl nanoparticles with sides of 35 to 150 nm were found to reversibly take up water with increasing RH, and to form a liquid-like surface layer of thickness 2 to 4 nm at humidities well below the deliquescence point of 75.0% at 20°C. Measurable uptake begins at 70% RH. The maximum thickness of the layer increases with increasing RH for a given particle size and, for a given RH, increases with increasing particle size over the range studied. The liquid-like behavior of the layer is indicated by a reversible “rounding” at the tops of the particles, where the ratio of particle height to radius of curvature increases from zero (flat top) at 68% RH to 0.7 at 74% RH. These observations suggest that a reorganization of mass occurs on the solid NaCl nanoparticle, and hence that the behavior of NaCl aerosol nanoparticles at RH between 70 and 75% RH is more complex than an abrupt first-order phase transition. Theoretical treatments of the phase transition should therefore account for both the presence of a liquid-like layer prior to deliquescence, and the RH-dependent thickness of the layer.

  3. Determination of interfacial parameters of a soluble particle in a nonideal solution from measured deliquescence and efflorescence humidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmuth, O.; Shchekin, A. K.

    2015-04-01

    In order to study the growth/shrinking of a hygroscopic nanoparticle during hydration/dehydration in an atmosphere of water vapour, we have employed a thermodynamic approach proposed by Shchekin et al. (2008). This approach uses the mechanic and thermodynamic concept of disjoining pressure of thin films and allows, among others, the prediction of the humidity growth factor of both (i) a homogeneous solution droplet with completely dissolved residual core and (ii) a heterogeneous solution droplet with partially dissolved residual core as a function of the ambient relative humidity. For application to a nanometric sodium chloride particle we have extended the original approach by (i) considering the nonideality of the solution through the dependence of molecular volumes of the solvent and solute molecules and the solute and solvent activities on the solution concentration, (ii) deriving an equation for the estimation of the efflorescence properties of a homogeneous solution droplet, and (iii) combining the empirical power law fittings for the size dependence of the deliquescence and efflorescence relative humidity values by Biskos et al. (2006a). It was demonstrated how the solution/solute interface energy and the correlation length of a thin solution film can be determined from a combination of experimentally determinable efflorescence and deliquescence humidities with the present calculus. The solution/solute interface energy was found to be in close agreement with some previous values reported in the literature, while it strongly differs from data of some other sources. The calculated deliquescence humidity shows a low sensitivity to the choice of the numerical value for the film correlation length. The estimated film correlation length of 1 nm for a nanometric sodium chloride particle with dry particle radius of 5 nm was found to be reconcilable with available a priori estimates of the correlation length from the literature when the measurement uncertainty of the

  4. Measuring Relative Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkham, Chester A.; Barrett, Kristin Burrows

    1992-01-01

    Describes four experiments that enable students to explore the phenomena of evaporation and condensation and determine the relative humidity by measuring air temperature and dew point on warm September days. Provides tables to calculate saturation points and relative humidity. (MDH)

  5. Deliquescence and efflorescence of small particles: Unifying perspectives from nucleation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw,R.; Lewis, E.

    2009-02-23

    We examine size dependent deliquescence/efflorescence phase transformation for particles down to several nanometers in size. A thin layer criterion (TLC) is introduced to define a deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) for small particles. The usual bulk deliquescence conditions are recovered in the limit of large dry particle size. Nano-size particles are shown to deliquesce to metastable states via a nucleation process at relative humidity just below the DRH. The nucleation barrier is located at a critical solution layer thickness and vanishes at the DRH defined by the TLC. Methods from nucleation theory form the basis for the analysis and yield new insights into the theory, facilitate the interpretation of measurements, and point to unification of deliquescence and efflorescence processes for particles in the nano regime. Methods include thermodynamic area constructions, Legendre transforms relating the binary free-energy surfaces for deliquescence and efflorescence processes, and application of nucleation theorems.

  6. Brines formed by multi-salt deliquescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, S; Rard, J; Alai, M; Staggs, K

    2005-11-04

    The FY05 Waste Package Environment testing program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory focused on determining the temperature, relative humidity, and solution compositions of brines formed due to the deliquescence of NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures. Understanding the physical and chemical behavior of these brines is important because they define conditions under which brines may react with waste canister surfaces. Boiling point experiments show that NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures form brines that transform to hydrous melts that do not truly 'dry out' until temperatures exceed 300 and 400 C, respectively. Thus a conducting solution is present for these salt assemblages over the thermal history of the repository. The corresponding brines form at lower relative humidity at higher temperatures. The NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has a mutual deliquescence relative humidity (MDRH) of 25.9% at 120 C and 10.8% at 180 C. Similarly, the KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has MDRH of 26.4% at 120 C and 20.0% at 150 C. The KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture salts also absorb some water (but do not appear to deliquesce) at 180 C and thus may also contribute to the transfer of electrons at interface between dust and the waste package surface. There is no experimental evidence to suggest that these brines will degas and form less deliquescent salt assemblages. Ammonium present in atmospheric and tunnel dust (as the chloride, nitrate, or sulfate) will readily decompose in the initial heating phase of the repository, and will affect subsequent behavior of the remaining salt mixture only through the removal of a stoichiometric equivalent of one or more anions. Although K-Na-NO{sub 3}-Cl brines form at high temperature and low relative humidity, these brines are dominated by nitrate, which is known to inhibit corrosion at lower

  7. Brine formation via deliquescence by salts found near Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Laboratory experiments and field observational results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, R. V.; Wong, J.; Dickson, J. L.; Levy, J. S.; Head, J. W.; Marchant, D. R.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2017-10-01

    The observed darkening of water tracks near Don Juan Pond (DJP) as well as the formation of wet patches elsewhere in the McMurdo Dry Valleys is attributed at least partially to deliquescence, a process by which salts absorb atmospheric water vapor and form brine, coupled with liquid-phase growth when the atmospheric relative humidity exceeds the water activity. Here we perform laboratory experiments to investigate the temperature and relative humidity conditions necessary for deliquescence to occur in calcium chloride-rich sediments collected from the DJP watershed. We use a Raman microscope equipped with an environmental cell to study both deliquescence and efflorescence (recrystallization) of the soluble salt component of DJP soils between -30 and +15 °C. In this temperature range, we find that the soluble salt component of the DJP sediments begins to deliquesce between 19 and 46% RH, slightly higher than the deliquescence relative humidity of the primary pure component, calcium chloride. We find a limited hysteresis between deliquescence and efflorescence, but much greater supersaturation of the salt brine can occur at temperatures above 0 °C. The relative humidity conditions were varied either slowly (over ∼8 h) to observe near-equilibrium phases or rapidly (over work can help predict when deliquescence could be actively occurring in the soils near Don Juan Pond and explain darkening of the salt pan after a high humidity period. In tandem with field data, our experimental results suggest that brines can be generated near Don Juan Pond via deliquescence frequently during the southern summer and autumn. Additionally, the soluble salts may persist in the aqueous phase continuously for several months during the southern summer. This work also suggests that salt deliquescence could be impacting the year-round hydrological cycle of the DJP watershed. Steep-sloped water tracks found near DJP have been suggested as a terrestrial analog for recurring slope lineae on

  8. Cocrystallization as a tool to solve deliquescence issues: The case of L-lactic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Maere d'Aertrycke, J. B.; Robeyns, K.; Willocq, J.; Leyssens, T.

    2017-08-01

    L-Lactic acid is an organic acid used in various fields such as food, cosmetic or pharmaceutical industry. It furthermore is the building-block of poly-lactic acid, a biodegradable and bioavailable polymer. Still, handling L-lactic acid under its solid form remains less straightforward mainly due to its deliquescent behavior, a phase transition from the solid to the dissolved state resulting from air humidity absorption. If several techniques are already known to avoid or reduce deliquescence, the use of cocrystallization in this context is still poorly investigated. In this paper, we investigate whether cocrystallization can be used as a suitable solution for deliquescence in the case of L-lactic acid. Out of 32 possible coformers tested, four were found to form cocrystals with L-lactic acid and the crystal structures of 1:1 L-lactic acid:D-tryptophan and 1:1 L-lactic acid:3-nitrobenzamide were determined. The hygroscopic behavior of these latter two was studied and compared to the behavior of pure L-lactic acid. Significant improvement was observed: dynamic vapor sorption at 25 °C revealed that water absorbed at 90% relative humidity dropped from 1.3157 g/gsample to 0.0017 g/gsample or 0.0299 g/gsample, with cocrystals of D-tryptophan and 3-nitrobenzamide respectively. This illustrates the effectiveness of cocrystallization as a tool to treat deliquescent materials.

  9. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.;

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  10. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  11. Variations of relative humidity in relation to meningitis in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seefeldt, M. W.; Hopson, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    The meningitis belt is a region covering Sub-Saharan Africa from the Sahel of West Africa eastward to western Ethiopia. The region is prone to meningitis epidemics during the dry season extending from approximately January to May, depending on the region. Relative humidity has been found to be a critical environmental factor indicating the susceptibility of a region to meningitis epidemics. This study evaluates the variation of relative humidity across West Africa over 30 dry-seasons (1979 - 2009) using the NASA-MERRA dataset. The method of self-organizing maps is employed to characterize the changes in relative humidity patterns across the region within a given dry season as well as changes over the 30 years. A general pattern of changes in relative humidity is indicated as the rainbelt retreats to the south at the onset of the dry season and then returns to the region at the end of the dry season. Within each dry season there is a unique pattern. The climatological conditions of relative humidity at the onset of the dry season provide an indication of the moisture environment for the entire dry season. Year to year variation in the relative humidity patterns are found to be gradual. Future applications involve using the results from the SOM evaluation to be used for future decisions involving prevention of meningitis epidemics.

  12. Formation of liquid water at low temperatures via the deliquescence of calcium chloride: Implications for Antarctica and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, R. V.; Chevrier, V. F.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    There is significant interest in the potential existence of even small amounts of liquid brine on current Mars. It has been proposed that aqueous solutions could form on Mars via the deliquescence of hygroscopic salts in contact with atmospheric water vapor, and these hygroscopic salts have recently been detected in recurring slope linae (RSL). While past work has largely focused on perchlorate species, another Mars-relevant salt that has a low eutectic temperature and may be deliquescent is calcium chloride, CaCl2. This salt may be linked to RSL formation on Mars, and deliquescence of CaCl2 is also known to be responsible for the only terrestrial RSL analog features known thus far: water tracks in the McMurdo Dry Valleys. Here we use Raman microscopy to monitor the low-temperature (223-273 K) deliquescence (solid to aqueous phase transition) and efflorescence (aqueous to solid phase transition) of two hydration states of CaCl2, the dihydrate and the hexahydrate. We find the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) decreases with decreasing hydration state and with increasing temperature. Average DRH values over the temperature range studied are 15.8±3.5% RH for the dihydrate and 63.3±12.5% RH for the hexahydrate, making this salt at least as deliquescent as many perchlorate salts. A remarkable property of CaCl2 is its ability to persist as metastable, supersaturated brine. Once an aqueous solution was formed, efflorescence (recrystallization) of the liquid did not occur until single-digit RH values were reached (3.9±2.4% RH on average). We show that temperature and relative humidity conditions in the martian subsurface are sufficient to allow deliquescence of CaCl2, and the resulting brines may persist for over half of a martian sol. Therefore, this salt could play a role in RSL formation, the martian water cycle, and have implications for the potential habitability of Mars.

  13. Raoult's law revisited: accurately predicting equilibrium relative humidity points for humidity control experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, Michael G; Bowler, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium relative humidity values for a number of the most commonly used precipitants in biological macromolecule crystallisation have been measured using a new humidity control device. A simple argument in statistical mechanics demonstrates that the saturated vapour pressure of a solvent is proportional to its mole fraction in an ideal solution (Raoult's Law). The same argument can be extended to the case where solvent and solute molecules are of different size.

  14. Is Obsidian Hydration Dating Affected by Relative Humidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; Trembour, F.W.; Smith, G.I.; Smith, F.L.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments carried out under temperatures and relative humidities that approximate ambient conditions show that the rate of hydration of obsidian is a function of the relative humidity, as well as of previously established variables of temperature and obsidian chemical composition. Measurements of the relative humidity of soil at 25 sites and at depths of between 0.01 and 2 m below ground show that in most soil environments, at depths below about 0.25 m, the relative humidity is constant at 100%. We have found that the thickness of the hydrated layer developed on obsidian outcrops exposed to the sun and to relative humidities of 30-90% is similar to that formed on other portions of the outcrop that were shielded from the sun and exposed to a relative humidity of approximately 100%. Surface samples of obsidian exposed to solar heating should hydrate more rapidly than samples buried in the ground. However, the effect of the lower mean relative humidity experiences by surface samples tends to compensate for the elevated temperature, which may explain why obsidian hydration ages of surface samples usually approximate those derived from buried samples.

  15. On the distribution of relative humidity in cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Spichtinger

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analysed relative humidity statistics from measurements in cirrus clouds taken unintentionally during the Measurement of OZone by Airbus In-service airCraft project (MOZAIC. The shapes of the in-cloud humidity distributions change from nearly symmetric in relatively warm cirrus (warmer than −40° to considerably positively skew (i.e. towards high humidities in colder clouds. These results are in agreement to findings obtained recently from the INterhemispheric differences in Cirrus properties from Anthropogenic emissions (INCA campaign (Ovarlez et al., 2002. We interprete the temperature dependence of the shapes of the humidity distributions as an effect of the length of time a cirrus cloud needs from formation to a mature equilibrium stage, where the humidity is close to saturation. The duration of this transitional period increases with decreasing temperature. Hence cold cirrus clouds are more often met in the transitional stage than warm clouds.

  16. On the distribution of relative humidity in cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Spichtinger

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analysed relative humidity statistics from measurements in cirrus clouds taken unintentionally during the Measurement of OZone by Airbus In-service airCraft project (MOZAIC. The shapes of the in-cloud humidity distributions change from nearly symmetric in relatively warm cirrus (warmer than −40°C to considerably positively skew (i.e. towards high humidities in colder clouds. These results are in agreement to findings obtained recently from the INterhemispheric differences in Cirrus properties from Anthropogenic emissions (INCA campaign (Ovarlez et al., 2002. We interprete the temperature dependence of the shapes of the humidity distributions as an effect of the length of time a cirrus cloud needs from formation to a mature equilibrium stage, where the humidity is close to saturation. The duration of this transitional period increases with decreasing temperature. Hence cold cirrus clouds are more often met in the transitional stage than warm clouds.

  17. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Quarterly, Relative Humidity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has quarterly Relative Humidity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  18. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Monthly, Relative Humidity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has monthly Relative Humidity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  19. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Daily, Relative Humidity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has daily Relative Humidity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  20. Computational Model for Internal Relative Humidity Distributions in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wondwosen Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational model is developed for predicting nonuniform internal relative humidity distribution in concrete. Internal relative humidity distribution is known to have a direct effect on the nonuniform drying shrinkage strains. These nonuniform drying shrinkage strains result in the buildup of internal stresses, which may lead to cracking of concrete. This may be particularly true at early ages of concrete since the concrete is relatively weak while the difference in internal relative humidity is probably high. The results obtained from this model can be used by structural and construction engineers to predict critical drying shrinkage stresses induced due to differential internal humidity distribution. The model uses finite elment-finite difference numerical methods. The finite element is used to space discretization while the finite difference is used to obtain transient solutions of the model. The numerical formulations are then programmed in Matlab. The numerical results were compared with experimental results found in the literature and demonstrated very good agreement.

  1. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Relative Humidity, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Relative Humidity data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not...

  2. Solder Flux Residues and Humidity-Related Failures in Electronics: Relative Effects of Weak Organic Acids Used in No-Clean Flux Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    (RH) to ∼99%RH at 25°C. The following parameters were used for characterization of WOAs: mass gain due to water adsorption and deliquescence of the WOA (by quartz crystal microbalance), resistivity of the water layer formed on the printed circuit board (by impedance spectroscopy), and leakage current...... measured using the surface insulation resistance pattern in the potential range from 0 V to 10 V. The combined results indicate the importance of the WOA chemical structure for the water adsorption and therefore conductive water layer formation on the printed circuit board assembly (PCBA). A substantial...... increase of leakage currents and probability of electrochemical migration was observed at humidity levels above the RH corresponding to the deliquescence point of WOAs present as contaminants on the printed circuit boards. The results suggest that use of solder fluxes with WOAs having higher deliquescence...

  3. Modeling of humidity-related reliability in enclosures with electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hygum, Morten Arnfeldt; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Reliability of electronics that operate outdoor is strongly affected by environmental factors such as temperature and humidity. Fluctuations of these parameters can lead to water condensation inside enclosures. Therefore, modelling of humidity distribution in a container with air and freely exposed...... to predict humidity-related reliability of a printed circuit board (PCB) located in a cabinet by combining structural reliability methods and non-linear diffusion models. This framework can, thus, be used for reliability prediction from a climatic point-of-view. The proposed numerical approach is then tested...

  4. Influenza virus transmission is dependent on relative humidity and temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anice C Lowen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the guinea pig as a model host, we show that aerosol spread of influenza virus is dependent upon both ambient relative humidity and temperature. Twenty experiments performed at relative humidities from 20% to 80% and 5 degrees C, 20 degrees C, or 30 degrees C indicated that both cold and dry conditions favor transmission. The relationship between transmission via aerosols and relative humidity at 20 degrees C is similar to that previously reported for the stability of influenza viruses (except at high relative humidity, 80%, implying that the effects of humidity act largely at the level of the virus particle. For infected guinea pigs housed at 5 degrees C, the duration of peak shedding was approximately 40 h longer than that of animals housed at 20 degrees C; this increased shedding likely accounts for the enhanced transmission seen at 5 degrees C. To investigate the mechanism permitting prolonged viral growth, expression levels in the upper respiratory tract of several innate immune mediators were determined. Innate responses proved to be comparable between animals housed at 5 degrees C and 20 degrees C, suggesting that cold temperature (5 degrees C does not impair the innate immune response in this system. Although the seasonal epidemiology of influenza is well characterized, the underlying reasons for predominant wintertime spread are not clear. We provide direct, experimental evidence to support the role of weather conditions in the dynamics of influenza and thereby address a long-standing question fundamental to the understanding of influenza epidemiology and evolution.

  5. Polyimide-coated fiber Bragg grating for relative humidity sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yao; Gong, Yuan; Wu, Yu; Wu, Huijuan

    2015-03-01

    A fiber-optic humidity sensor has been fabricated by coating a moisture sensitive polymer film to the fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The Bragg wavelength of the polyimide-coated FBG changes while it is exposed to different humidity conditions due to the volume expansion of the polyimide coating. The characteristics of sensors, including sensitivity, temporal response, and hysteresis, were improved by controlling the coating thickness and the degree of imidization during the thermal curing process of the polyimide. In the relative humidity (RH) condition ranging from 11.3% RH to 97.3% RH, the sensitivity of the sensor was about 13.5 pm/% RH with measurement uncertainty of ±1.5% RH.

  6. Design of precision measurement circuits for the relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanpeng; Gao, Guanwang; Sha, Zhanyou

    2009-07-01

    The two methods of the relative humidity measurement are introduced in this paper. The one is adopting transistor and operational amplifier to compose a logarithmic amplifier, by which to realize the linearization of exponent mode character curve of moisture-sensitive resistor. And using the positive temperature coefficient of the adjustable current source (+0.33%/°C) compensate the negative temperature coefficient of the thermistor (-0.36%/°C). Zero temperature drift is realized by the methods and the measurement accuracy reached +/-2%. The two is adopting intelligent temperature/relative humidity sensor, which combined the multiple parameter sensor and transmitter, to realize the accurately measurement not only of the relative humidity, but also of the temperature and dew point. Through the 2-wires serial port the system can be connected to MCS-51 MCU. The accuracy of the relative humidity measurement is +/-1.8% the nonlinear error can be reduced to +/-0.1% after software arithmetic compensation. The temperature range measured is -40{ + 123.8°C. The accuracy of dew point measurement is ?+/-1°C

  7. Factors affecting relative humidity during wood vacuum drying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Hui; CAI Ying-chun

    2009-01-01

    Effects of pressure and temperature in the chamber during vacuum drying on the relative humidity and evaporation of wood surface were investigated by using the vacuum chamber. The setting temperature during vacuum drying included dry-bulb temperature td, the wet-bulb temperature tw and the temperature difference between the air in the vacuum chamber and the cooling water in the condenser. Results indicated that relative humidity during vacuum drying was affected by the dry-bulb temperature td, the wet-bulb temperature tw and the temperature difference between the air in the vacuum chamber and the water in the condenser. Relative humidity of wood decreased with the increase in temperature at the given temperature of the water in the condenser. The relative humidity was affected slightly by pressure in the vacuum chamber pA, and it decreased from 70% to 65% with pA increased from 50 kPa to 101 kPa. Moreover, there was nearly no evaporation under the vacuum without external heating.

  8. Water repellency of soils; the influence of ambient relative humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doerr, S.H.; Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.; Shakesby, R.A.; Bryant, R.

    2002-01-01

    Adverse effects of soil water repellency (hydrophobicity) are of concern during or following rainfall or irrigation, and are often preceded by conditions of high atmospheric relative humidity (RH). Assessments of repellency are, however, commonly conducted on air-dried samples at ambient laboratory

  9. Effects of relative humidity on banana fruit drop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saengpook, C.; Ketsa, S.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial ripening of banana fruit occurs at high relative humidity (RH), which prevents browning of damaged skin areas. In experiments with ripening at high RH (94 ± 1%) the individual fruit (fingers) of `Sucrier¿ (Musa acuminata, AA Group) banana exhibited a high rate of drop. The falling off of

  10. Diurnal variation of tropospheric relative humidity in tropical regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Isaac; Arkin, Philip; Ferraro, Ralph; Eriksson, Patrick; Fetzer, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Despite the importance of water vapor especially in the tropical region, the diurnal variations of water vapor have not been completely investigated in the past due to the lack of adequate observations. Measurements from Sondeur Atmosphérique du Profil d'Humidité Intertropicale par Radiométrie (SAPHIR) onboard the low inclination Megha-Tropiques satellite with frequent daily revisits provide a valuable dataset for investigating the diurnal and spatial variation of tropospheric relative humidity in the tropical region. In this study, we first transformed SAPHIR observations into layer-averaged relative humidity, then partitioned the data based on local observation time into 24 bins with a grid resolution of one degree. Afterwards, we fitted Fourier series to the binned data. Finally, the mean, amplitude, and diurnal peak time of relative humidity in tropical regions were calculated for each grid point using either the measurements or Fourier series. The results were separately investigated for different SAPHIR channels as well as for relative humidity with respect to both liquid and ice phases. The results showed that the wet and dry regions are, respectively, associated with convective and subsidence regions which is consistent with the previous studies. The mean tropospheric humidity values reported in this study are generally 10 to 15 % higher than those reported using infrared observations which is because of strict cloud screening for infrared measurements. The results showed a large inhomogeneity in diurnal variation of tropospheric relative humidity in tropical region. The diurnal amplitude was larger over land than over ocean and the oceanic amplitude was larger over convective regions than over subsidence regions. The results showed that the diurnal amplitude is less than 10 % in middle and upper troposphere, but it is up to 30 % in lower troposphere over land. Although the peak of RH generally occurs over night or in early morning, there are several

  11. Determination of equilibrium humidities using temperature and humidity controlled X-ray diffraction (RH-XRD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnow, Kirsten [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry - Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Steiger, Michael [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry - Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)]. E-mail: michael.steiger@chemie.uni-hamburg.de

    2007-01-30

    Confined growth of crystals in porous building materials is generally considered to be a major cause of damage. We report on the use of X-ray diffraction under controlled conditions of temperature and relative humidity (RH-XRD) for the investigation of potentially deleterious phase transition reactions. An improved procedure based on rate measurements is used for the accurate and reproducible determination of equilibrium humidities of deliquescence and hydration reactions. The deliquescence humidities of NaCl (75.4 {+-} 0.5% RH) and Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O (50.8 {+-} 0.7% RH) at 25 deg. C determined with this improved RH-XRD technique are in excellent agreement with available literature data. Measurement of the hydration of anhydrous Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} to form Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O revealed an equilibrium humidity of 10.2 {+-} 0.3%, which is also in reasonable agreement with available data. In conclusion, dynamic X-ray diffraction measurements are an appropriate method for the accurate and precise determination of equilibrium humidities with a number of interesting future applications.

  12. The aging correlation (RH + t): Relative humidity (%) + temperature (deg C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    An aging correlation between corrosion lifetime, and relative humidity RH (%) and temperature t (C) has been reported in the literature. This aging correlation is a semi-log plot of corrosion lifetime on the log scale versus the interesting summation term RH(%) + t(C) on the linear scale. This empirical correlation was derived from observation of experimental data trends and has been referred to as an experimental law. Using electrical resistivity data of polyvinyl butyral (PVB) measured as a function of relative humidity and temperature, it was found that the electrical resistivity could be expressed as a function of the term RH(%) t(C). Thus, if corrosion is related to leakage current through an organic insulator, which, in turn, is a function of RH and t, then some partial theoretical validity for the correlation is indicated. This article describes the derivation of the term RH(%) t(C) from PVB electrical resistivity data.

  13. Aerosol light scattering measurements as a function of relative humidity: a comparison between measurements made at three different sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.

    The water uptake by fine aerosol particles in the atmosphere has been investigated at three rural National Parks in the United States (Great Smoky Mountains, Grand Canyon and Big Bend National Parks). The relative humidity (RH) of sample aerosols was varied from less than 20% to greater than 90% using Perma Pure drying tubes as the scattering coefficient of the aerosol was measured with a Radiance Research M903 nephelometer. Data from these studies show that growth curves at all the three sites are similar in shape but the magnitude of growth can vary considerably from day to day. The growth curves from Great Smoky Mountains show smooth continuous growth over the entire range of RH, while the growth curves from the Grand Canyon and Big Bend show smooth and continuous growth on some days and deliquescence on other days. Comparing 12-h filter samples of chemical composition data with the aerosol growth curves, we find that higher fractions of soluble inorganic compounds (sulfate and nitrate) produce growth curves of greater magnitude than do higher concentrations of either organic carbon or soil material.

  14. Hydration behaviour of synthetic saponite at variable relative humidity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Karmous Mohamed Salah; Jean Louis Robert

    2011-10-01

    Hydration behaviour of synthetic saponite was examined by X-ray powder diffraction simulation at various relative humidities (RH). The basal spacing of the Ca-saponite increased stepwise with increase in RH. The (00) reflections observed reflect single or dual hydration states of smectite. Quasi-rational, intermediate, or asymmetrical reflections were observed for all XRD patterns and reflecting heterogeneity of the samples, especially along the transition between two hydration states.

  15. Aerosol light scattering measurements as a function of relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, D E; Malm, W C; Kreidenweis, S M

    2000-05-01

    The hygroscopic nature of atmospheric fine aerosol was investigated at a rural site in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park during July and August 1995. Passing the sample aerosol through an inlet, which housed an array of Perma Pure diffusion dryers, controlled the sample aerosol's relative humidity (RH). After conditioning the aerosol sample in the inlet, the light scattering coefficient and the aerosol size distribution were simultaneously measured. During this study, the conditioned aerosol's humidity ranged between 5% < RH < 95%. Aerosol response curves were produced using the ratio bspw/bspd; where bspw is the scattering coefficient measured at some RH greater than 20% and bspd is the scattering coefficient of the "dry" aerosol. For this work, any sample RH values below 15% were considered dry. Results of this investigation showed that the light scattering ratio increased continuously and smoothly over the entire range of relative humidity. The magnitude of the ratio at a particular RH value, however, varied considerably in time, particularly for RH values greater than approximately 60%. Curves of the scattering coefficient ratios as a function of RH were generated for each day and compared to the average 12-hour chemical composition of the aerosol. This comparison showed that for any particular RH value the ratio was highest during time periods of high sulfate concentrations and lowest during time periods of high soil or high organic carbon concentrations.

  16. Roller compaction: Effect of relative humidity of lactose powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Chalak S; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Palzer, Stefan; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2016-09-01

    The effect of storage at different relative humidity conditions, for various types of lactose, on roller compaction behaviour was investigated. Three types of lactose were used in this study: anhydrous lactose (SuperTab21AN), spray dried lactose (SuperTab11SD) and α-lactose monohydrate 200M. These powders differ in their amorphous contents, due to different manufacturing processes. The powders were stored in a climatic chamber at different relative humidity values ranging from 10% to 80% RH. It was found that the roller compaction behaviour and ribbon properties were different for powders conditioned to different relative humidities. The amount of fines produced, which is undesirable in roller compaction, was found to be different at different relative humidity. The minimum amount of fines produced was found to be for powders conditioned at 20-40% RH. The maximum amount of fines was produced for powders conditioned at 80% RH. This was attributed to the decrease in powder flowability, as indicated by the flow function coefficient ffc and the angle of repose. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was also applied to determine the velocity of primary particles during ribbon production, and it was found that the velocity of the powder during the roller compaction decreased with powders stored at high RH. This resulted in less powder being present in the compaction zone at the edges of the rollers, which resulted in ribbons with a smaller overall width. The relative humidity for the storage of powders has shown to have minimal effect on the ribbon tensile strength at low RH conditions (10-20%). The lowest tensile strength of ribbons produced from lactose 200M and SD was for powders conditioned at 80% RH, whereas, ribbons produced from lactose 21AN at the same condition of 80% RH showed the highest tensile strength. The storage RH range 20-40% was found to be an optimum condition for roll compacting three lactose powders, as it resulted in a minimum amount of fines in the

  17. Effect of humidity on the filter pressure drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendel, J.; Letourneau, P. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1995-02-01

    The effects of humidity on the filter pressure drop have been reported in some previous studies in which it is difficult to draw definite conclusions. These studies show contradictory effects of humidity on the pressure drop probably due to differences in the hygroscopicity of the test aerosols. The objective of this paper is to present experimental results on the evolution of the filter pressure drop versus mass loading, for different test aerosols and relative humidities. Present results are compared to those found in various publication. An experimental device has been designed to measure filter pressure drop as the function of the areal density for relative humidity varying in the range of 9 % to 85 %. Experiments have been conducted with hygroscopic: (CsOH) and nonhygroscopic aerosols (TiO{sub 2}). Cesium hydroxyde (CsOH) of size of 2 {mu} M AMMD has been generated by an ultrasonic generator and the 0.7 {mu}m AMMD titanium oxyde has been dispersed by a {open_quotes}turn-table{close_quotes} generator. As it is noted in the BISWAS`publication [3], present results show, in the case of nonhygroscopic aerosols, a linear relationship of pressure drop to mass loading. For hygroscopic aerosols two cases must be considered: for relative humidity below the deliquescent point of the aerosol, the relationship of pressure drop to mass loading remains linear; above the deliquescent point, the results show a sudden increase in the pressure drop and the mass capacity of the filter is drastically reduced.

  18. Using Relative Humidity Forecasts to Manage Meningitis in the Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, R. E.; Adams-Forgor, A.; Akweogno, P.; Awine, T.; Dalaba, M.; Dukic, V.; Dumont, A.; Hayden, M.; Hodgson, A.; Hopson, T. M.; Hugonnet, S.; Yoksas, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur quasi-regularly and with devastating impact. In 2008, for example, eighty-eight thousand people contracted meningitis and over five thousand died. Until very recently, the protection provided by the only available vaccine was so limited and short-lived that the only practical strategy for vaccination was reactive: waiting until an epidemic occurred in the region and then vaccinating in that region to prevent the epidemic's further growth. Even with that strategy, there were still times when demand outpaced available vaccine. While a new vaccine has recently been developed that is effective and inexpensive enough to be used more broadly and proactively, it is only effective against the strain of bacteria that causes the most common kind of bacterial meningitis. As a result, there will likely be continued need for reactive vaccination strategies. It is widely known that meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur only in the dry season. Our project investigated this relationship, and several independent lines of evidence demonstrate a robust relationship between the onset of the rainy season, as marked by weekly average relative humidity above 40%, and the end of meningitis epidemics. These lines of evidence include statistical analysis of two years of weekly meningitis and weather data across the Sahel, cross-correlation of ten years of meningitis and weather data in the Upper East region of northern Ghana, and high-resolution weather simulations of past meningitis seasons to interpolate available weather data. We also adapted two techniques that have been successfully used in public health studies: generalized additive models, which have been used to relate air quality and health, and a linearized version of the compartmental epidemics model that has been used to understand MRSA. Based on these multiple lines of evidence, average weekly relative humidity forecast two weeks in advance appears consistently and strongly related to

  19. Evaporation of sulfate aerosols at low relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Roldin, Pontus; Duplissy, Jonathan; Rondo, Linda; Tröstl, Jasmin; Slowik, Jay G.; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Kürten, Andreas; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Kirkby, Jasper; Petäjä, Tuukka; Baltensperger, Urs; Boy, Michael; Curtius, Joachim; Flagan, Richard C.; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Stratmann, Frank

    2017-07-01

    Evaporation of sulfuric acid from particles can be important in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus. However, the equilibrium constant for the dissociation of H2SO4 to bisulfate ions, which is the one of the fundamental parameters controlling the evaporation of sulfur particles, is not well constrained. In this study we explore the volatility of sulfate particles at very low relative humidity. We measured the evaporation of sulfur particles versus temperature and relative humidity in the CLOUD chamber at CERN. We modelled the observed sulfur particle shrinkage with the ADCHAM model. Based on our model results, we conclude that the sulfur particle shrinkage is mainly governed by H2SO4 and potentially to some extent by SO3 evaporation. We found that the equilibrium constants for the dissociation of H2SO4 to HSO4-(KH2SO4) and the dehydration of H2SO4 to SO3 (xKSO3) are KH2SO4 = 2-4 × 109 mol kg-1 and xKSO3 ≥ 1.4 × 1010 at 288.8 ± 5 K.

  20. Provision of water by halite deliquescence for Nostoc commune biofilms under Mars relevant surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jänchen, Jochen; Feyh, Nina; Szewzyk, Ulrich; de Vera, Jean-Pierre P.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by findings of new mineral related water sources for organisms under extremely dry conditions on Earth we studied in an interdisciplinary approach the water sorption behaviour of halite, soil component and terrestrial Nostoc commune biofilm under Mars relevant environmental conditions. Physicochemical methods served for the determination of water sorption equilibrium data and survival of heterotrophic bacteria in biofilm samples with different water contents was assured by recultivation. Deliquescence of halite provides liquid water at temperatures <273 K and may serve as water source on Mars during the morning stabilized by the CO2 atmosphere for a few hours. The protecting biofilm of N. commune is rather hygroscopic and tends to store water at lower humidity values. Survival tests showed that a large proportion of the Alphaproteobacteria dominated microbiota associated to N. commune is very desiccation tolerant and water uptake from saturated NaCl solutions (either by direct uptake of brine or adsorption of humidity) did not enhance recultivability in long-time desiccated samples. Still, a minor part can grow under highly saline conditions. However, the salinity level, although unfavourable for the host organism, might be for parts of the heterotrophic microbiota no serious hindrance for growing in salty Mars-like environments.

  1. Retrieval of relative humidity from CSIR-NLC mobile LIDAR backscatter measurements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tesfaye, M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available data was collected over 23 hours. The above data sets were used to determine the retrieved relative humidity and compared with Irene (near to Pretoria) weather balloon humidity measurements. The results of the comparative study are presented...

  2. Autogenous Deformation and Change of the Relative Humidity in Silica Fume-Modified Cement Paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1996-01-01

    Even during sealed curing and at a constant temperature a hardening cement paste will deform and the relative humidity within its pores will lower. This autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change may be so significant that the cement paste cracks if the deformation is restrained....... This article focuses on the influence of silica fume addition on autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change. Continuous measurement of autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change for more than 1 year and 1« years, respectively, was performed. The investigations show...... thatsilica fume addition markedly increases the autogenous shrinkage as well as the autogenous relative humidity change....

  3. Energy-Efficient Management of Mechanical Ventilation and Relative Humidity in Hot-Humid Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withers, Jr., Charles R. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    In hot and humid climates, it is challenging to energy-efficiently maintain indoor RH at acceptable levels while simultaneously providing required ventilation, particularly in high performance low cooling load homes. The fundamental problem with solely relying on fixed capacity central cooling systems to manage moisture during low sensible load periods is that they are oversized for cooler periods of the year despite being 'properly sized' for a very hot design cooling day. The primary goals of this project were to determine the impact of supplementing a central space conditioning system with 1) a supplemental dehumidifier and 2) a ductless mini-split on seasonal energy use and summer peak power use as well as the impact on thermal distribution and humidity control inside a completely furnished lab home that was continuously ventilated in accordance with ASHRAE 62.2-2013.

  4. Relative humidity and activity patterns of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, K.A.; Ginsberg, Howard S.; Gonzalez, L.; Mather, T.N.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory studies have shown clear relationships between relative humidity (RH) and the activity and survival of Ixodes scapularis Say (blacklegged tick). However, field studies have produced conflicting results. We examined this relationship using weekly tick count totals and hourly RH observations at three field sites, stratified by latitude, within the state of Rhode Island. Records of nymphal tick abundance were compared with several RH-related variables (e.g., RH at time of sampling and mean weekly daytime RH). In total, 825 nymphs were sampled in 2009, a year of greater precipitation, with a weighted average leaf litter RH recorded at time of sampling of 85.22%. Alternatively, 649 nymphs were collected in 2010, a year of relatively low precipitation, and a weighted average RH recorded at time of sampling was 75.51%. Negative binomial regression analysis of tick count totals identified cumulative hours <82% RH threshold as a significant factor observed in both years (2009: P = 0.0037; 2010: P < 0.0001). Mean weekly daytime RH did not significantly predict tick activity in either year. However, mean weekly daytime RH recorded with 1-wk lag before sample date was a significant variable (P = 0.0016) in 2010. These results suggest a lag effect between moisture availability and patterns of tick activity and abundance. Differences in the relative importance of each RH variable between years may have been due to abnormally wet summer conditions in 2009.

  5. Understanding Decreases in Land Relative Humidity with Global Warming: Conceptual Model and GCM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michael P.; O'Gorman, Paul A.

    2016-12-01

    Climate models simulate a strong land-ocean contrast in the response of near-surface relative humidity to global warming: relative humidity tends to increase slightly over oceans but decrease substantially over land. Surface energy balance arguments have been used to understand the response over ocean but are difficult to apply over more complex land surfaces. Here, a conceptual box model is introduced, involving moisture transport between the land and ocean boundary layers and evapotranspiration, to investigate the decreases in land relative humidity as the climate warms. The box model is applied to idealized and full-complexity (CMIP5) general circulation model simulations, and it is found to capture many of the features of the simulated changes in land relative humidity. The box model suggests there is a strong link between fractional changes in specific humidity over land and ocean, and the greater warming over land than ocean then implies a decrease in land relative humidity. Evapotranspiration is of secondary importance for the increase in specific humidity over land, but it matters more for the decrease in relative humidity. Further analysis shows there is a strong feedback between changes in surface-air temperature and relative humidity, and this can amplify the influence on relative humidity of factors such as stomatal conductance and soil moisture.

  6. Effect of relative humidity on lipid oxidation in freezedried emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinachoti, P.

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stability was studied in a freeze-dried emulsion consisting of linoleic acid (LA, Tween-20, sucrose and maltodextrin in the presence of a catalyst (FeSO4/ascorbic acid. Changes in residual LA and conjugated dienes as a function of time were monitored at 0, 32, 43 and 75% relative humidities (RH. Based on GC analyses, LA oxidation was more significant in the surface fraction than the entrapped. The loss of surface oil upon storage may also be due to partial entrapment. However faster oxidation of the surface oil was confirmed by measurement of diene conjugation. Oxidation was more rapid at the lower relative humidities (0 and 32% RH and decreased with increasing RH. At high moisture, physical modifications in the sample were observed, including reduced porosity, structural collapse, reduction of the surface oil and coalescence of oil droplets triggered by sucrose crystallization. These may be responsible for the decreased oxidation. Sucrose crystallization at the higher humidities inhibited oxidation. In addition, while samples with similar glass transition temperature (Tg range behaved differently, samples with different glass transition range showed similar oxidative behaviour. Microstructural changes leading to oil entrapment and oil droplet coalescence were found to be significant, in this case.Se ha estudiado la estabilidad oxidativa en una emulsión liofilizada compuesta de ácido linoleico (LA, Tween-20, sacarosa y maltodextrina en presencia de un catalizador (FeSO4/ácido ascórbico. Los cambios en ácido linoleico remanente (LA y dienos conjugados en función del tiempo fueron monitorizados a humedades relativas (RH del 0, 32, 43 y 75%. Basado en análisis por cromatografía gaseosa, la oxidación de LA fue más significativa en la fracción superficial que en la encapsulada. La pérdida de aceite superficial con el almacenamiento puede deberse también al encapsulado parcial. Sin embargo, la más rápida oxidación del aceite

  7. Clouds and relative humidity in climate models; or what really regulates cloud cover?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walcek, C. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The response and impact of clouds remains one of the largest outstanding questions in GCMs. Clouds are not homogeneous, though they are treated as such in the models. When averaged over areas typically used as numerical grid elements by GCMs, observations suggest that there are some clouds at all relative humidities. Fractional cloud cover at 100% relative humidity is rarely 100%, and totally clear skies rarely occur, even for low relative humidities. Relative humidity is the best single indicator of cloud coverage. However, if there is a relationship between cloud coverage and relative humidity, our current models and observations are inadequate to reveal exactly what that relationship is. It does appear that cloud coverage decreases exponentially as humidity falls below 100%. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Understanding decreases in land relative humidity with global warming: conceptual model and GCM simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Climate models simulate a strong land-ocean contrast in the response of near-surface relative humidity to global warming: relative humidity tends to increase slightly over oceans but decrease substantially over land. Surface energy balance arguments have been used to understand the response over ocean but are difficult to apply over more complex land surfaces. Here, a conceptual box model is introduced, involving moisture transport between the land and ocean boundary layers and evapotranspiration, to investigate the decreases in land relative humidity as the climate warms. The box model is applied to idealized and full-complexity (CMIP5) general circulation model simulations, and it is found to capture many of the features of the simulated changes in land relative humidity. The box model suggests there is a strong link between fractional changes in specific humidity over land and ocean, and the greater warming over land than ocean then implies a decrease in land relative humidity. Evapotranspiration is of sec...

  9. Effect of wind speed and relative humidity on atmospheric dust concentrations in semi-arid climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csavina, Janae; Field, Jason; Félix, Omar; Corral-Avitia, Alba Y; Sáez, A Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A

    2014-07-15

    Atmospheric particulate have deleterious impacts on human health. Predicting dust and aerosol emission and transport would be helpful to reduce harmful impacts but, despite numerous studies, prediction of dust events and contaminant transport in dust remains challenging. In this work, we show that relative humidity and wind speed are both determinants in atmospheric dust concentration. Observations of atmospheric dust concentrations in Green Valley, AZ, USA, and Juárez, Chihuahua, México, show that PM10 concentrations are not directly correlated with wind speed or relative humidity separately. However, selecting the data for high wind speeds (>4m/s at 10 m elevation), a definite trend is observed between dust concentration and relative humidity: dust concentration increases with relative humidity, reaching a maximum around 25% and it subsequently decreases with relative humidity. Models for dust storm forecasting may be improved by utilizing atmospheric humidity and wind speed as main drivers for dust generation and transport.

  10. Effect of Wind Speed and Relative Humidity on Atmospheric Dust Concentrations in Semi-Arid Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csavina, Janae; Field, Jason; Félix, Omar; Corral-Avitia, Alba Y.; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric particulate have deleterious impacts on human health. Predicting dust and aerosol emission and transport would be helpful to reduce harmful impacts but, despite numerous studies, prediction of dust events and contaminant transport in dust remains challenging. In this work, we show that relative humidity and wind speed are both determinants in atmospheric dust concentration. Observations of atmospheric dust concentrations in Green Valley, AZ, USA, and Juárez, Chihuahua, México, show that PM10 concentrations are not directly correlated with wind speed or relative humidity separately. However, selecting the data for high wind speeds (> 4 m/s at 10 m elevation), a definite trend is observed between dust concentration and relative humidity: dust concentration increases with relative humidity, reaching a maximum around 25% and it subsequently decreases with relative humidity. Models for dust storm forecasting may be improved by utilizing atmospheric humidity and wind speed as main drivers for dust generation and transport. PMID:24769193

  11. Aerosol hygroscopicity at high (99 to 100% relative humidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Ruehl

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The hygroscopicity of an aerosol largely determines its influence on climate and, for smaller particles, atmospheric lifetime. While much aerosol hygroscopicity data is available at lower relative humidities (RH and under cloud formation conditions (RH>100%, relatively little data is available at high RH (99.2 to 99.9%. We measured the size of droplets at high RH that had formed on particles composed of one of seven compounds with dry diameters between 0.1 and 0.5 μm, and calculated the hygroscopicity of these compounds. We use a parameterization of the Kelvin term, in addition to a standard parameterization (κ of the Raoult term, to express the hygroscopicity of surface-active compounds.

    For inorganic compounds, hygroscopicity could reliably be predicted using water activity data and assuming a surface tension of pure water. In contrast, most organics exhibited a slight to mild increase in hygroscopicity with droplet diameter. This trend was strongest for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, the most surface-active compound studied. The results suggest that partitioning of surface-active compounds away from the bulk solution, which reduces hygroscopicity, dominates any increases in hygroscopicity due to reduced surface tension. This is opposite to what is typically assumed for soluble surfactants. Furthermore, we saw no evidence that micellization limits SDS activity in micron-sized solution droplets, as observed in macroscopic solutions. These results suggest that while the high-RH hygroscopicity of inorganic compounds can be reliably predicted using readily available data, surface-activity parameters obtained from macroscopic solutions with organic solutes may be inappropriate for calculations of the hygroscopicity of micron-sized droplets.

  12. Relative effect of solder flux chemistry on the humidity related failures in electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    was studied by quartz crystal microbalance, while corrosive effects were studied by leakage current and impedance measurements on standard test boards. The measurements were performed as a function of relative humidity (RH) in the range from 60 to ~99 per cent at 25°C. The corrosiveness of solder flux systems...... of printed circuit boards under humid conditions. Originality/value - The classification of solder flux systems according to IPC J-STD-004 standard does not specify the WOAs in the flux; however, ranking of the flux systems based on the hygroscopic property of activators would be useful information when...... selecting no-clean flux systems for electronics with applications in humid conditions....

  13. Short term change in relative humidity during the festival of Diwali in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Nandita D.

    2015-07-01

    The changes in humidity levels during the Diwali festivities have been examined over a period of 13 years at three Indian metro cities: Ahmedabad, New Delhi and Kolkata. A small short term increase in relative humidity even in the absence of transport of humid air from Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal has been observed. The relative humidity levels were found to be exceeding the ambient levels during night and lying below the ambient levels during morning hours, indicating an increase in the survival rates of viruses responsible for the transmission of viral infections, as well as triggering immune-mediated illnesses such as asthma during Diwali.

  14. The impact of relative humidity and atmospheric pressure on mortality in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Chun Quan; Yang, Jun; Ou, Qiao Qun; Liu, Hua Zhang; Lin, Guo Zhen; Chen, Ping Yan; Qian, Jun; Guo, Yu Ming

    2014-12-01

    Although many studies have examined the effects of ambient temperatures on mortality, little evidence is on health impacts of atmospheric pressure and relative humidity. This study aimed to assess the impacts of atmospheric pressure and relative humidity on mortality in Guangzhou, China. This study included 213,737 registered deaths during 2003-2011 in Guangzhou, China. A quasi-Poisson regression with a distributed lag non-linear model was used to assess the effects of atmospheric pressure/relative humidity. We found significant effect of low atmospheric pressure/relative humidity on mortality. There was a 1.79% (95% confidence interval: 0.38%-3.22%) increase in non-accidental mortality and a 2.27% (0.07%-4.51%) increase in cardiovascular mortality comparing the 5th and 25th percentile of atmospheric pressure. A 3.97% (0.67%-7.39%) increase in cardiovascular mortality was also observed comparing the 5th and 25th percentile of relative humidity. Women were more vulnerable to decrease in atmospheric pressure and relative humidity than men. Age and education attainment were also potential effect modifiers. Furthermore, low atmospheric pressure and relative humidity increased temperature-related mortality. Both low atmospheric pressure and relative humidity are important risk factors of mortality. Our findings would be helpful to develop health risk assessment and climate policy interventions that would better protect vulnerable subgroups of the population. Copyright © 2014 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  15. Using the scanning probe microscope to measure the effect of relative humidity on sample stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, J. M.; Huson, M. G.

    2002-10-01

    The ability to manipulate environmental conditions while obtaining nanoscale information about a sample is invaluable. The current article describes the construction and use of a chamber to control the relative humidity while using the scanning probe microscope (SPM) to monitor changes in sample stiffness. Although the experimental setup described is simple, this work shows that the complex relationship between temperature and relative humidity needs to be fully understood for successful operation of the apparatus. In TappingMode™, increases in relative humidity caused the free amplitude of the oscillating cantilever to decrease. Force-distance measurements taken on glass, however, showed no changes in detector sensitivity, suggesting that force-distance mode could be used to measure changes sample stiffness as a function of relative humidity. Using the SPM in force-distance mode, three moisture-sensitive materials (gelatine, wool fibers, and cotton fibers), were examined as the relative humidity was gradually increased from ambient conditions to just under 100%. The results showed that each of the materials softened as the humidity increased and that the experiments were reproducible. From the data, it was estimated that gelatine passed through a glass transition at about 86% relative humidity at room temperature. Wool passed through a glass transition at about 85% relative humidity, which is consistent with previous findings.

  16. Retrieval of Layer Averaged Relative Humidity Profiles from MHS Observations over Tropical Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Gangwar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the retrieval of the atmospheric layer averaged relative humidity profiles using data from the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS onboard the MetOp satellite. The retrieval has been innovatively performed by firstly retrieving humidity for pairs of thick overlapping layers (TOLs used subsequently to derive humidity for associated thin isolated layer (TIL. A water vapour dependent (WVD algorithm has been developed and applied to infer the humidity of TOLs. Thus, the retrieved profiles have been finally compared with standard algorithm (NORM. These algorithms have been developed based on radiative transfer simulations and study of sensitivities of MHS channels on humidity of various types of layers (TOL, TIL. The algorithm has been tested with MHS data and validated using concurrent radiosonde as well as NCEP reanalysis data indicating profile errors of ~15% and ~19%, respectively.

  17. ANALYSIS OF DUST DELIQUESCENCE FOR FEP SCREENING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Bryan

    2005-08-26

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the potential for penetration of the Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) waste package outer barrier by localized corrosion due to the deliquescence of soluble constituents in dust present on waste package surfaces. The results support a recommendation to exclude deliquescence-induced localized corrosion (pitting or crevice corrosion) of the outer barrier from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Preparation of this report, and supporting laboratory studies and calculations, were performed as part of the planned effort in Work Package AEBM21, as implemented in ''Technical Work Plan for: Screening Evaluation for Dust Deliquescence and Localized Corrosion'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172804]), by Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC, and staff from three national laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis and conclusions presented in this report are quality affecting, as determined in the controlling technical work plan. A summary of background information, based on work that was not performed under a quality assurance program, is provided as Appendix E. In this instance, the use of unqualified information is provided for transparency and corroboration only, and is clearly separated from uses of qualified information. Thus, the qualification status of this information does not affect the conclusions of this report. The acceptance criteria addressed in Sections 4.2 and 7.2 were changed from the technical work plan in response to review comments received during preparation of this report.

  18. Relative humidity sensor based on SMS fiber structure using multimode coreless fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafrani, Sanif; Hatta, Agus M.; Kusumawardhani, Apriani

    2016-11-01

    Singlemode-Multimode-Singlemode (SMS) optical fiber structure using multimode coreless have been able to sense changes in relative humidity. In this experiment the measured humidity is 60 % -90 %, while the method is done by comparing the relative humidity changes with the change in output power in the optical fiber. Then the underlying phenomena is the change in the refractive index of air as the cladding MMF coreless due to changes in relative humidity. It has been done three length variations MMF coreless to add sensitivity sensor, and the obtained sensor by 22.30 mm MMF length have the greatest sensitivity, that is 0.0747 dBm / %. Obtained conclusions on length variation will cause any change in the sensitivity significantly in relative humidity between 75 % -80 %.

  19. The effect of relative humidity on germination of Sporangia of Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporangia of three isolates of P. ramorum representing three different clonal lineages were subjected to relative humidity (RH) levels between 80 and 100% for exposure periods ranging from 1 to 24 h at 20°C in darkness. Airtight snap-lid plastic containers (21.5 x 14.5 x 5 cm) were used as humidity ...

  20. Dynamics of adaptation of stomatal behaviour to moderate or high relative air humidity in Tradescantia virginiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaei Nejad, A.; Meeteren, van U.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging was used to measure stomatal closure in response to desiccation of Tradescantia virginiana leaves grown under high (90%) and moderate (55%) relative humidities (RHs), or transferred between these humidities. Stomata in leaves grown at high RH were less responsive to

  1. High accuracy acoustic relative humidity measurement in duct flow with air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Wilhelm; Grooten, Mart; Wernaart, Twan; van der Geld, Cees

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0-12 m/s with an error of ± 0.13 m/s, temperature 0-100 °C with an error of ± 0.07 °C and relative humidity 0-100% with accuracy better than 2 % RH above 50 °C. Main advantage over conventional humidity sensors is the high sensitivity at high RH at temperatures exceeding 50 °C, with accuracy increasing with increasing temperature. The sensors are non-intrusive and resist highly humid environments.

  2. Deliquescence of NaCl–NaNO3, KNO3–NaNO3, and NaCl–KNO3 salt mixtures from 90 to 120°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolery Thomas J

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available We conducted reversed deliquescence experiments in saturated NaCl–NaNO3–H2O, KNO3–NaNO3–H2O, and NaCl–KNO3–H2O systems from 90 to 120°C as a function of relative humidity and solution composition. NaCl, NaNO3, and KNO3 represent members of dust salt assemblages that are likely to deliquesce and form concentrated brines on high-level radioactive waste package surfaces in a repository environment at Yucca Mountain, NV. Discrepancy between model prediction and experiment can be as high as 8% for relative humidity and 50% for dissolved ion concentration. The discrepancy is attributed primarily to the use of 25°C models for Cl–NO3 and K–NO3 ion interactions in the current Yucca Mountain Project high-temperature Pitzer model to describe the nonideal behavior of these highly concentrated solutions.

  3. Crystallization speed of salbutamol as a function of relative humidity and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellnitz, Sarah; Narygina, Olga; Resch, Christian; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2015-07-15

    Spray dried salbutamol sulphate and salbutamol base particles are amorphous as a result of spray drying. As there is always the risk of recrystallization of amorphous material, the aim of this work is the evaluation of the temperature and humidity dependent recrystallization of spray dried salbutamol sulphate and base. Therefore in-situ Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD) studies of the crystallization process at various temperature (25 and 35 °C) and humidity (60%, 70%, 80%, 90% relative humidity) conditions were performed. It was shown that the crystallization speed of salbutamol sulphate and base is a non-linear function of both temperature and relative humidity. The higher the relative humidity the higher is the crystallization speed. At 60% relative humidity salbutamol base as well as salbutamol sulphate were found to be amorphous even after 12 h, however samples changed optically. At 70% and 90% RH recrystallization of salbutamol base is completed after 3 h and 30 min and recrystallization of salbutamol sulphate after 4h and 1h, respectively. Higher temperature (35 °C) also leads to increased crystallization speeds at all tested values of relative humidity.

  4. The course, stratification and possibility of simulating relative air humidity in winter wheat stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krčmářová, Jana; Pokorný, Radovan; Středa, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was: (i) long-term (2010, 2011 and 2013) evaluation of the relative air humidity in the winter wheat canopy, (ii) finding of relationships between relative air humidity in canopy and computed or measured meteorological values (precipitation totals, evapotranspiration, moisture balance, specific air humidity, volume soil moisture, % of available soil water content, value of soil water potential), (iii) testing of simulation of daily relative air humidity, based on selected meteorological values and potential evapotranspiration (FAO Penman-Monteith method) and actual evapotranspiration, (iv) testing of simulation of relative air humidity hourly values in the wheat canopy, (v) evaluation of dependence between relative air humidity and leaf wetness. The measurement was performed at the experimental field station of Mendel University in Žabčice (South Moravia, the Czech Republic). Data recording for wheat canopy was conducted by means of a meteostation equipped with digital air humidity and air temperature sensors positioned in the ground, effective height of the stand and in 2 m above the ground. The main vegetation period of wheat was divided into three stages to evaluate differences in various growing phases of wheat. The data from nearby standard climatological stations and from agrometeorological station in Žabčice were used for establishment of relationships between relative air humidity in winter wheat canopy and surrounding environment by correlation and regression analysis. Relative air humidity above 90% occurred substantially longer on the ground and at the effective height of the stand in comparison with the height of 2 m. By means of regression analysis we determined that the limit of 90% was reached in the canopy when at the climatological station it was just 60 to 90% for ground level and 70 to 90% for effective height, especially during the night. Slight dependence between measured or computed meteorological variables and

  5. Experimental study of water absorption of electronic components and internal local temperature and humidity into electronic enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion reliability of electronic products is a key factor for electronics industry, and today there is a large demand for performance reliability in large spans of temperature and humidity during day and night shifts. Corrosion failures are still seen due to the effects of temperature, humidity...... and corrosion accelerating species in the atmosphere, and moreover the surface region of printed circuit board assemblies is often contaminated by various contaminating species. In order to evaluate the level of humidity at which failures such as electrochemical migration start to appear on printed circuit......–75 % RH was reached, corresponding to the deliquescence relative humidity level of NaCl. The overall effect of climate (humidity and temperature) has been studied on the internal climate of typical electronic enclosures. The varied parameters included material used for casing, s ize of opening...

  6. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, 5-Day, Relative Humidity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has 5-day Relative Humidity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  7. High accuracy acoustic relative humidity measurement in duct flow with air

    OpenAIRE

    Cees van der Geld; Twan Wernaart; Mart Grooten; Wilhelm van Schaik

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0–12 m/s with an error of ±0.13 m/s, temp...

  8. Effect of relative humidity on migration of BP from paperboard into a food simulant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Line Lundbæk; Petersen, Jens Højslev

    In the scientific literature it is obligatory to control and report the test time and temperature applied when testing migration but it is not current practice to either control or report the relative humidity (RH).......In the scientific literature it is obligatory to control and report the test time and temperature applied when testing migration but it is not current practice to either control or report the relative humidity (RH)....

  9. Spectroscopic and Visual Evidence of Perchlorate Deliquescence Under Martian Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakakos, George; Whiteway, James

    2015-04-01

    One of the key findings during the Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory landed Mars missions has been the detection of perchlorate, a highly deliquescent salt. Perchlorates are of great interest on Mars due to their high affinity for water vapour as well as their ability to greatly depress the freezing point of water when in solution. This has intriguing biological implications as resulting brines could potentially provide a habitable environment for living organisms. Additionally, it has been speculated that these salts may play a significant role in influencing the hydrological cycle on Mars. In order to experimentally study water exchange processes between the surface and atmosphere on Mars and assess the feasibility of a future landed detection tool, a stand-off Raman spectroscopy instrument and environmental simulation chamber have been developed at York University. A sample of magnesium perchlorate consistent with the size of patches found at the Phoenix site has been subjected to the low water vapour pressure and temperatures found at polar Martian latitudes. Results indicate that at a water vapour pressure of ~2 Pa (-54°C frost point temperature), Raman spectroscopy is able to detect the onset of brine formation and provide a relative estimate of the quantity of water taken up by the sample until complete deliquescence is reached. Significant uptake of water from the atmosphere is observed to occur prior to the frost point temperature being reached and on time scales relevant to the Martian diurnal cycle. This result suggests that perchlorates in the Martian regolith can contribute to the hydrological cycle, pre-emptively reducing the water vapour pressure before saturation is reached.

  10. Relative humidity influence on the spreading dynamics of sessile drops of blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutin, David; Bouzeid, Wassim

    2014-11-01

    We studied the effect of relative humidity on the initial stages of spreading dynamics for drops of whole human blood. A range of relative humidities from 8% to 90% was studied. Drops of the same volume were gently deposited on ultra-clean microscope glass substrates. We show that the drop spreading is driven by two distinct regimes. The first is characterized by fast dynamics and competition between viscous forces and capillary forces, whereas the second regime is characterized by competition between viscous dissipation and evaporation and exhibits slower dynamics. At early stages of spreading, the power law r(t) ~ tn (n = 0.65) was observed regardless of the humidity. At later stages of spreading, the exponent of the power law r(t) ~ tn (n = 0.19) was found to be higher than that of Tanner's law because of the effect of humidity and Marangoni stresses. Spreading time and spreading dynamics were found to be related to relative humidity. This is explained by the adhesion of red blood cells to the substrate that is similar to the mechanism observed for nanofluid droplets. The mean velocity of the triple line followed the same behavior as Tanner's model, where the final wetting radius and the apparent contact angle are functions of relative humidity.

  11. Tapered Fiber Coated with Hydroxyethyl Cellulose/Polyvinylidene Fluoride Composite for Relative Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple relative humidity (RH sensor is demonstrated using a tapered fiber coated with hydroxyethyl cellulose/polyvinylidene fluoride (HEC/PVDF composite as a probe. This coating acts as an inner cladding whose refractive index decreases with the rise in humidity and thus allows more light to be transmitted in humid state. A difference of up to 0.89 dB of the transmitted optical power is observed when RH changes from 50% to 80% in case of the silica fiber probe. The proposed sensor has a sensitivity of about 0.0228 dB/%RH with a slope linearity of more than 99.91%. In case of the plastic optical fiber (POF probe, the output voltage of the sensor increases linearly with a sensitivity of 0.0231 mV/%RH and a linearity of more than 99.65% as the relative humidity increases from 55% to 80%.

  12. Anomalies in relative humidity profile in the boundary layer during convective rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rohit; Talukdar, Shamitaksha; Saha, Upal; Jana, Soumyajyoti; Maitra, Animesh

    2017-07-01

    Radiometric observations of relative humidity profile at Kolkata show a significant fall at around 1 to 2 km height during convective rain events. An extensive investigation shows that the fall of relative humidity is not seen during calm conditions but is strongly related to the characteristics of temperature lapse rate profiles. Moreover, the phenomenon may have strong association with boundary layer structure. The reason for such anomalies in the planetary boundary layer humidity profile might be due to the release of latent heat at the mentioned altitude. The abundance of pollutant aerosols in urban regions has also been found to contribute to this relative humidity anomaly. It has also been reported that this boundary layer relative humidity is accompanied by high latent heat release and condensation of vapour to liquid which is not much prominent in other rain types as observed in stratiform rain. Hence, convective rain produces some unique boundary layer characteristics which have also been partially supported with allied satellite and multi-station observations.

  13. Temperature and relative humidity dependence of radiochromic film dosimeter response to gamma electron radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Puhl, J.M.; Miller, A.

    1995-01-01

    on some earlier studies, their response functions have been reported to be dependent on the temperature and relative humidity during irradiation. The present study investigates differences in response over practical ranges of temperature, relative humidity, dose, and for different recent batches of films...... of both types. It is observed that for each new batch of film to be used for radiation processing, the effects of such parameters on response to both gamma rays and electrons should be investigated. It is also suggested that the films should be packaged under controlled atmospheric conditions (relative...

  14. THE IMPACT OF RELATIVE HUMIDITY ON THE RADIATIVE PROPERTY AND RADIATIVE FORCING OF SULFATE AEROSOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立盛; 石广玉

    2001-01-01

    With the data of complex refractive index of sulfate aerosol, the radiative properties of the aerosol under 8 relative humidity conditions are calculated in this paper. By using the concentration distribution from two CTM models and LASG GOALS/AGCM, the radiative forcing due to hygroscopic sulfate aerosol is simulated. The results show that: (1) With the increase of relative humidity, the mass extinction coefficiency factor decreases in the shortwave spectrum: single scattering albedo keeps unchanged except for a little increase in longwave spectrum, and asymmetry factor increases in whole spectrum. (2) Larger differences occur in radiative forcing simulated by using two CTM data, and the global mean forcing is -0. 268 and -0. 816 W/m2,respectively. (3) When the impact of relative humidity on radiative property is taken into account,the distribution pattern of radiative forcing due to the wet particles is very similar to that of dry sulfate, but the forcing value decreases by 6%.

  15. A vantage from space can detect earlier drought onset: an approach using relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Alireza; AghaKouchak, Amir; Teixeira, Joao

    2015-02-25

    Each year, droughts cause significant economic and agricultural losses across the world. The early warning and onset detection of drought is of particular importance for effective agriculture and water resource management. Previous studies show that the Standard Precipitation Index (SPI), a measure of precipitation deficit, detects drought onset earlier than other indicators. Here we show that satellite-based near surface air relative humidity data can further improve drought onset detection and early warning. This paper introduces the Standardized Relative Humidity Index (SRHI) based on the NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations. The results indicate that the SRHI typically detects the drought onset earlier than the SPI. While the AIRS mission was not originally designed for drought monitoring, we show that its relative humidity data offers a new and unique avenue for drought monitoring and early warning. We conclude that the early warning aspects of SRHI may have merit for integration into current drought monitoring systems.

  16. Retrieval of relative humidity profiles and its associated error from Megha-Tropiques measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivira, R.; Brogniez, H.; Mallet, C.; Oussar, Y.

    2013-05-01

    The combination of the two microwave radiometers, SAPHIR and MADRAS, on board the Megha-Tropiques platform is explored to define a retrieval method that estimates not only the relative humidity profile but also the associated confidence intervals. A comparison of three retrieval models was performed, in equal conditions of input and output data sets, through their statistical values (error variance, correlation coefficient and error mean) obtaining a profile of seven layers of relative humidity. The three models show the same behavior with respect to layers, mid-tropospheric layers reaching the best statistical values suggesting a model-independent problem. Finally, the study of the probability density function of the relative humidity at a given atmospheric pressure further gives insight of the confidence intervals.

  17. Control of stomatal opening after growth at high relative air humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaei Nejad, A.

    2007-01-01

    As a result of contemporary horticultural practices relative air humidities (RH) in greenhouses are often very high. In particular in cut flowers, this results in quality problems after harvest when flowers are transferred to low RH conditions at the consumers. The quality problems are related to ex

  18. The role of absorbent building materials in moderating changes of relative humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padfield, Tim

    The problem studied in this work is, how porous, absorbent materials surroundning or placed in a room influence the relative humidity of the room. This is of interest in designing precautions and machinery to monitor the indoor climate in museums and dwelling rooms. - A novel technique for the in......The problem studied in this work is, how porous, absorbent materials surroundning or placed in a room influence the relative humidity of the room. This is of interest in designing precautions and machinery to monitor the indoor climate in museums and dwelling rooms. - A novel technique...

  19. Relative humidity multi-point optical sensors system based on fast Fourier multiplexing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Aldaba, A.; Lopez-Torres, D.; Elosua, C.; Auguste, J.-L.; Jamier, R.; Roy, P.; Arregui, F. J.; Lopez-Amo, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a new multipoint optical fiber system for relative humidity measurements based on SnO2-FP (Fabry-Pérot) sensing heads and an optical interrogator as single active device is presented and characterized. The interrogation of the sensing heads is carried out by monitoring the Fast Fourier Transform phase variations of the FP (Fabry-Pérot) interference frequencies. This method allows to multiplex several sensors with different wavelength spacing interference pattern. The sensors operate within a wide humidity range (20%-90% relative humidity) with low crosstalk between them. Five sensing heads have been measured using two different channels of the optical interrogator. The availability of four channels in the interrogator allows to multiplex a higher number of sensors, reducing proportionally the cost of each sensing point.

  20. Magnesium sulfate salts and historic building materials: experimental simulation of limestone flaking by relative humidity cycling and crystallization of salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinchin, S.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium sulfate salts often result from the combination of incompatible construction materials, such as stone or mortar with high magnesium content and sulfates from adjacent mortars or polluted air. When combined with a source of moisture, these materials react to form soluble salts, often leading to significant damage by flaking of the stone, as the magnesium sulfate responds to fluctuating environmental conditions. Several laboratory experiments were performed to reproduce surface flaking on different types of limestone from Spain and the UK to evaluate the effects of humidity cycling on the damage of stone by salt crystallization. The two salt solutions used for the experiments were a single salt of magnesium sulfate and a mixture of magnesium sulfate, calcium sulfate and sodium chloride, a typical salt mixture found in damaged stone at the site of Howden Minster (UK. A climate chamber with precise and programmable temperature and humidity control was used to test the hypothesis that salt damage in the stone can be readily caused by humidity fluctuations. Damage was monitored using Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT, which measure transducers displacement by dimensional change on the order of microns. In addition, Ion Chromatography, Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (ESEM-EDX and X-ray Diffraction analyses (XRD were also carried out to analyze salt behavior. Damage by flaking took place in two types of magnesian limestone cubes impregnated with the salt mixture, from Cadeby quarry and York Minster, apparently by deliquescent salts of low equilibrium relative humidity (RHeq, while the rest of the samples developed a salt crust over the surface, but no damage was observed in the stone. It is important to verify hypotheses developed from field observations with laboratory experiments. By combining both field and laboratory data, a clearer understanding the different mechanisms of

  1. Effect of relative humidity on the peeling behavior of a thin film on a rigid substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhilong; Wang, Cong; Yang, Yazheng; Chen, Shaohua

    2016-09-01

    Inspired by gecko adhesion in humid environments, a modified Kendall's model is established in order to investigate the effect of relative humidity on the interfacial peeling behavior of a thin film adhering on a rigid substrate. When the humidity is less than 90%, a monolayer of water molecules adsorbed on the substrate surface induces a strong disjoining pressure at the interface. As a result, the steady-state peel-off force between the thin film and substrate is significantly enhanced. When the humidity is greater than 90%, water molecules condense into water droplets. Four different peeling models are established on this occasion, depending on the surface wettability of the film and substrate. It is found that the steady-state peel-off force is influenced by the water meniscus in a complicated manner, which is either enhanced or reduced by the water capillarity comparing to that predicted by the classical Kendall's model, i.e., a dry peeling model. It should be noted that, at the vicinity of the wetting transition, the peel-off force of the four models can be reduced to an identical one, which means the four peeling models can transit from one to another continuously. The present model, as an extension of the classical Kendall's one, should be useful not only for understanding gecko adhesion in humid environments, but also for analyzing interface behaviors of a film-substrate system in real applications.

  2. Effects of increasing temperatures on physiological changes in pigs at different relative humidities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huynh Thi Thanh Thuy,; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Heetkamp, M.J.W.; Kemp, B.; Canh, T.T.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of relative humidity (RH) and high ambient temperature (T) on physiological responses and animal performance were studied using 12 groups (10 gilts per group) in pens inside respiration chambers. The microclimate in the chamber was programmed so that T remained constant within a day. Eac

  3. Influence of temperature on autogenous deformation and relative humidity change in hardening cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change (RH change) in hardening cement paste. Theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented, which elucidate the influence of temperature on these properties. This is an important subject in the control...

  4. Elevated relative humidity increases the incidence of boron deficiency in bedding plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    High relative humidity (RH) can cause lower concentrations of B accumulating in plants. The common greenhouse practice of controlling excess temperatures by applying mist irrigation to youngplants (plugs) results in elevated RH levels. Reports of boron (B) deficiency have become more prevalent ove...

  5. Cultivar Differences in the Stomatal Characteristics of Cut Roses Grown at High Relative Humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanourakis, D.; Tapia, A.; Heuvelink, E.; Pinto De Carvalho, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    High relative air humidity (RH>85%) during cultivation is known to reduce the vase life of cut roses, but the magnitude of such effect is cultivar dependent. The reasons behind this genotypic variation are not yet known. In this study, the stomatal density and stomatal responses to two closing

  6. Cumalative Distribution Functions for the Relative Humidity Thresholds for the Onset of Carbon Steel Corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    1998-05-13

    The purpose of this calculation is to process the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) characterizing the relative humidity (RH) thresholds for the onset of carbon steel corrosion provided by expert elicitation and minimize the set of values to 200 points for use in WAPDEG.

  7. Measuring relative humidity in the radioactive environment of the IRRAD proton facility

    CERN Document Server

    Paerg, Marten

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the project was to obtain information on relative humidity conditions at different locations in the IRRAD proton facility. Due to high radiation levels inside the facility, different sensors had to be qualified and dedicated electronics had to be built to transfer the data of the sensors over long wires to a less radioactive area, where it could be collected.

  8. Equipment for Measuring Air Flow, Air Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Carbon Dioxide in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Bruce W.

    Information on equipment and techniques that school facility personnel may use to evaluate IAQ conditions are discussed. Focus is placed on the IAQ parameters of air flow, air temperature, relative humidity, as well as carbon dioxide and the equipment used to measure these factors. Reasons for measurement and for when the measurement of these…

  9. Relative Humidity as an Indicator for Cloud Formation over Heterogeneous land surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of land surface heterogeneity on potential cloud formation is investigated using relative humidity as an indicator. This is done by performing numerical experiments using a large-eddy simulation model (LES). The land surface in the model was divided into two patches that had the same s

  10. Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives under the Influence of Relative Humidity: Inner Structure and Failure Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Markus; Koller, Manuel; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-06-17

    Model pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) films of the statistical copolymer P(EHA-stat-20MMA), which comprises 80% ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA) and 20% methyl methacrylate (MMA), are studied. The PSA films are stored under different relative humidities from postproduction treatment, which also influence the tack performance. This finding is supported by tack measurements using punches with different roughness.

  11. Effect of relative humidity on the migration of benzophenone from paperboard into the food simulant Tenax and modelling hereof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Line Lundbæk; Petersen, Jens Højslev

    2013-01-01

    coefficients were derived from the results by using a software for modelling migration in multilayer materials. Both the diffusion coefficient and the partition coefficient, between paperboard and Tenax®, decrease with increasing relative humidity. The experimental results were correctly modelled only when...... carried out at a constant temperature of 34°C. It was found that the migration of benzophenone after more than 30 days was 4.8 times higher at a relative humidity of 64%-71%, and 7.3 times higher at a relative humidity of >73%, compared with that at a relative humidity of 39%-49%. Diffusion and partition...

  12. Impact of air temperature, relative humidity, air movement and pollution on eye blinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Lyubenova, Velina S.; Skwarczynski, Mariusz;

    2011-01-01

    The effect of indoor air temperature, relative humidity, velocity and pollution on occupants’ eye blink frequency (BF) was examined. In total sixty subjects participated in eight 4 hour experiments without and with facially applied air movement under individual control of the subjects. Air movement...... of either polluted room air supplied isothermally or clean and cool air was used. Eye blinking video record for the last 15 min of each exposure were analysed. The increase of the room air temperature and relative humidity from 23 °C and 40% to 26 °C and 70% or to 28 °C and 70% decreased the BF....... At temperature of 26 °C and relative humidity of 70% facially applied flow of polluted room air didn’t have significant impact on BF in comparison without air movement. The increase of BF due to decrease of temperature and humidity and increase of velocity may be compensated due to the increase in air cleanness....

  13. The effect of fatty acid surfactants on the uptake of nitric acid to deliquesced NaCl aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ammann

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface active organic compounds have been observed in marine boundary layer aerosol. Here, we investigate the effect such surfactants have on the uptake of nitric acid (HNO3, an important removal reaction of nitrogen oxides in the marine boundary layer. The uptake of gaseous HNO3 on deliquesced NaCl aerosol was measured in a flow reactor using HNO3 labelled with the short-lived radioactive isotope 13N. The uptake coefficient γ on pure deliquesced NaCl aerosol was γ=0.5±0.2 at 60% relative humidity and 30 ppb HNO3(g. The uptake coefficient was reduced by a factor of 5–50 when the aerosol was coated with saturated linear fatty acids with carbon chain lengths of 18 and 15 atoms in monolayer quantities. In contrast, neither shorter saturated linear fatty acids with 12 and 9 carbon atoms, nor coatings with the unsaturated oleic acid (C18, cis-double bond had a detectable effect on the rate of HNO3 uptake. It is concluded that it is the structure of the monolayers formed, which determines their resistance towards HNO3 uptake. Fatty acids (C18 and C15, which form a highly ordered film in the so-called liquid condensed state, represent a significant barrier towards HNO3 uptake, while monolayers of shorter-chain fatty acids (C9, C12 and of the unsaturated oleic acid form a less ordered film in the liquid expanded state and do not hinder the uptake. Similarly, high contents of humic acids in the aerosol, a structurally inhomogeneous, quite water soluble mixture of oxidised high molecular weight organic compounds did not affect HNO3 uptake. As surfactant films on naturally occurring aerosol are expected to be less structured due to their chemical inhomogeneity, it is likely that their inhibitory effect on HNO3 uptake is smaller than that observed here for the C15 and C18 fatty acid monolayers.

  14. Physical properties of iodate solutions and the deliquescence of crystalline I2O5 and HIO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary aerosol produced from marine biogenic sources in algal-rich coastal locations will initially be composed of iodine oxide species, most likely I2O5, or its hydrated form HIO3, formed as a result of iodine gas-phase chemistry. At present, there is no quantitative hygroscopic data for these compounds and very little data available for iodate solutions (HIO3 and I2O5 share a common aqueous phase. With increased interest in the role of such aerosol in the marine atmosphere, we have conducted studies of (i the deliquescence behaviour of crystalline HIO3 and I2O5 at 273–303 K, (ii the efflorescence behaviour of aqueous iodate solution droplets, and (iii properties (water activity, density, and viscosity of subsaturated and saturated iodate solutions. The deliquescence of I2O5 crystals at 293 K was observed to occur at a relative humidity (DRH of 80.8±1.0%, whereas for HIO3, a DRH of 85.0±1.0% was measured. These values are consistent with measured water activity values for saturated I2O5 and HIO3 solutions at 293 K of 0.80±0.01 and 0.84±0.01 respectively. At all temperatures, DRH values for HIO3 crystals were observed to be higher than for those of I2O5. The temperature-dependent DRH data, along with solubility and water activity data were used to evaluate the enthalpy of solution (ΔHsol for HIO3 and I2O5. A (ΔHsol value of 8.3±0.7 kJ mol−1 was determined for HIO3 which is consistent with a literature value of 8.8 kJ mol−1. For I2O5, we report for the first time its solubility at various temperatures and (ΔHsol=12.4±.6 kJ mol−1. The measured water activity values confirm that aqueous iodate solutions are strongly non-ideal, consistent with previous reports of complex ion formation and molecular aggregation.

  15. Physical properties of iodate solutions and the deliquescence of crystalline I2O5 and HIO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Secondary aerosol produced from marine biogenic sources in algal-rich coastal locations will initially be composed of iodine oxide species, most likely I2O5, or its hydrated form HIO3, formed as a result of iodine gas-phase chemistry. At present, there is no quantitative hygroscopic data for these compounds and very little data available for iodate solutions (HIO3 and I2O5 share a common aqueous phase. With increased interest in the role of such aerosol in the marine atmosphere, we have conducted studies of (i the deliquescence behaviour of crystalline HIO3 and I2O5 at 273–303 K, (ii the efflorescence behaviour of aqueous iodate solution droplets, and (iii properties (water activity, density, and viscosity of subsaturated and saturated iodate solutions. The deliquescence of I2O5 crystals at 293 K was observed to occur at a relative humidity (DRH of 80.8±1.0%, whereas for HIO3, a DRH of 85.0±1.0% was measured. These values are consistent with measured water activity values for saturated I2O5 and HIO3 solutions at 293 K of 0.80±0.01 and 0.84±0.01 respectively. At all temperatures, DRH values for HIO3 crystals were observed to be higher than for those of I2O5. The temperature-dependent DRH data, along with solubility and water activity data were used to evaluate the enthalpy of solution (ΔHsol for HIO3 and I2O5. A ΔHsol value of 8.3±0.7 kJ mol−1 was determined for HIO3 which is consistent with a literature value of 8.8 kJ mol−1. For I2O5, we report for the first time its solubility at various temperatures and ΔHsol = 12.4±0.6 kJ mol−1. The measured water activity values confirm that aqueous iodate solutions are strongly non-ideal, consistent with previous reports of complex ion formation and molecular aggregation.

  16. Characterization and prevention of humidity related degradation of atomic layer deposited Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückerl, Andreas; Zeisel, Roland; Mandl, Martin; Costina, Ioan; Schroeder, Thomas; Zoellner, Marvin H.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide (ALD-Al2O3) is a dielectric material, which is widely used in organic light emitting diodes in order to prevent their organic layers from humidity related degradation. Unfortunately, there are strong hints that in some cases, ALD-Al2O3 itself is suffering from humidity related degradation. Especially, high temperature and high humidity seem to enhance ALD-Al2O3 degradation strongly. For this reason, the degradation behavior of ALD-Al2O3 films at high temperature and high humidity was investigated in detail and a way to prevent it from degradation was searched. The degradation behavior is analyzed in the first part of this paper. Using infrared absorbance measurements and X-ray diffraction, boehmite (γ-AlOOH) was identified as a degradation product. In the second part of the paper, it is shown that ALD-Al2O3 films can be effectively protected from degradation using a silicon oxide capping. The deposition of very small amounts of silicon in a molecular beam epitaxy system and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation of the chemical bonding between the silicon and the ALD-Al2O3 surface led to the conclusion that a silicon termination of the ALD-Al2O3 surface (Al*-O-SiOx) is able to stop humidity related degradation of the underlying ALD-Al2O3 films. The third part of the paper shows that the protection mechanism of the silicon termination is probably due to the strong tendency of silicic acid to resilificate exposed ALD-Al2O3 surfaces. The protective effect of a simple silicon source on an ALD-Al2O3 surface is shown exemplary and the related chemical reactions are presented.

  17. Trends in the Frequency of High Relative Humidity over China: 1979 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, R.

    2015-12-01

    High relative humidity (HRH) is defined as a relative humidity of at least 80%, which is often associated with the occurrence of cloud layers. Thus, the frequency of HRH and its changes in the troposphere may be related to the occurrence frequency of cloud layers and their changes. In this study, trends in the frequency of HRH (defined as days with relative humidity ≥80%) over China from the surface to the mid-troposphere (≥400 hPa) from 1979 to 2012 were analyzed using a homogenized humidity dataset for spring (March-May), summer (June-August), autumn (September-November), and winter (December-February). The results for the ground level indicate decreasing trends at most stations in southeastern China in spring and in northern China in summer. In the lower troposphere (850 hPa and 700 hPa), most stations over China exhibited positive trends in summer, autumn, and winter. For the mid-troposphere (500 hPa to 400 hPa), increasing trends dominated over China in spring, summer, and autumn. Finally, six reanalysis datasets, including the NCEP/NCAR I, NCEP/DOE II, CFSR, ERA-Interim, MERRA, and JRA-55 datasets, were compared with the observed increasing trends in HRH frequency in the low-mid troposphere. Similar vertical profiles of HRH trends in the reanalysis datasets and the homogenized humidity dataset were observed in certain seasons and for certain regions, with positive or small negative trends at high levels and large negative trends at 850 hPa, respectively. These results are consistent with the increasing low-mid cloud amounts in recent decades.

  18. Building America Case Study: Energy Efficient Management of Mechanical Ventilation and Relative Humidity in Hot-Humid Climates, Cocoa, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    In hot and humid climates, it is challenging to energy-efficiently maintain indoor RH at acceptable levels while simultaneously providing required ventilation, particularly in high performance low cooling load homes. The fundamental problem with solely relying on fixed capacity central cooling systems to manage moisture during low sensible load periods is that they are oversized for cooler periods of the year despite being 'properly sized' for a very hot design cooling day. The primary goals of this project were to determine the impact of supplementing a central space conditioning system with 1) a supplemental dehumidifier and 2) a ductless mini-split on seasonal energy use and summer peak power use as well as the impact on thermal distribution and humidity control inside a completely furnished lab home that was continuously ventilated in accordance with ASHRAE 62.2-2013.

  19. Effect of relative humidity and temperature on PVC degradation under gamma irradiation: Evolution of HCl production Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labed, V.; Obeid, H.; Ressayre, K.

    2013-03-01

    The separate and combined effects of the relative humidity and temperature were investigated on the HCl production yields arising from two types of PVC subjected to gamma irradiation (pure PVC and PVC formulated with plasticizing additives). The test procedure developed included experiments performed at different dose rates (400 Gy h-1 and 4 kGy h-1), temperatures (room temperature and 70 °C) and relative humidity values (plasticized PVC at low dose rates, raising the temperature increases the HCl production by a factor of about 1.3, with either low or high relative humidity. For pure PVC, depending on the humidity and dose rate, G(HCl) varies differently with the temperature: at low humidity and low dose rates, G(HCl) increases by a factor of 1.7 for a 45 °C temperature increase; at high humidity, the same temperature increase does not result in a significant increase of G(HCl). The influence of the relative humidity on HCl production has not been clearly identified and interpreted. The relative humidity appears to be a factor limiting the effects of temperature on the formation of HCl from pure PVC at high dose rates. The G values remain constant and even diminish under some experimental conditions. For plasticized PVC, the relative humidity has no influence on the HCl production yields.

  20. Control of stomatal opening after growth at high relative air humidity

    OpenAIRE

    Rezaei Nejad, A.

    2007-01-01

    As a result of contemporary horticultural practices relative air humidities (RH) in greenhouses are often very high. In particular in cut flowers, this results in quality problems after harvest when flowers are transferred to low RH conditions at the consumers. The quality problems are related to excessive water loss caused by a disturbance in normal functioning of stomata. The general aim of this study was to investigate the effects of high RH during growth on the stomatal response characte...

  1. Effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on interfacial temperature during early stages of drop evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukatani, Yuki; Orejon, Daniel; Kita, Yutaku; Takata, Yasuyuki; Kim, Jungho; Sefiane, Khellil

    2016-04-01

    Understanding drop evaporation mechanisms is important for many industrial, biological, and other applications. Drops of organic solvents undergoing evaporation have been found to display distinct thermal patterns, which in turn depend on the physical properties of the liquid, the substrate, and ambient conditions. These patterns have been reported previously to be bulk patterns from the solid-liquid to the liquid-gas drop interface. In the present work the effect of ambient temperature and humidity during the first stage of evaporation, i.e., pinned contact line, is studied paying special attention to the thermal information retrieved at the liquid-gas interface through IR thermography. This is coupled with drop profile monitoring to experimentally investigate the effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on the drop interfacial thermal patterns and the evaporation rate. Results indicate that self-generated thermal patterns are enhanced by an increase in ambient temperature and/or a decrease in humidity. The more active thermal patterns observed at high ambient temperatures are explained in light of a greater temperature difference generated between the apex and the edge of the drop due to greater evaporative cooling. On the other hand, the presence of water humidity in the atmosphere is found to decrease the temperature difference along the drop interface due to the heat of adsorption, absorption and/or that of condensation of water onto the ethanol drops. The control, i.e., enhancement or suppression, of these thermal patterns at the drop interface by means of ambient temperature and relative humidity is quantified and reported.

  2. Effects of relative humidity, temperature, and population density on production of cuticular hydrocarbons in housefly Musca domestica L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, N; Den Otter, CJ

    The production of cuticular hydrocarbons by both males and females of Musca domestica L. under very wet conditions (90% relative humidity) compared to the production at 50 and 20% relative humidity is delayed up to at least 3 days after emergence from the pupae. Eight days after emergence, however,

  3. Effects of relative humidity, temperature, and population density on production of cuticular hydrocarbons in housefly Musca domestica L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, N; Den Otter, CJ

    2002-01-01

    The production of cuticular hydrocarbons by both males and females of Musca domestica L. under very wet conditions (90% relative humidity) compared to the production at 50 and 20% relative humidity is delayed up to at least 3 days after emergence from the pupae. Eight days after emergence, however,

  4. Effect of humidity on the sur-face adhesion force of inor-ganic crystals by the force spectrum method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Effect of relative humidity on the surface adhesion force of several inorganic crystals of mica, CaF2 and KCl was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the magnitude of surface adhesion force is mainly dependent on the surface free energy of the adsorbed liquid film, but almost independent of the thickness of the film. Furthermore, the deliquescence on the crystal surface was investigated, which demonstrated the capability of the force spectrum method to monitor changes in ionic concentrations of adsorbed liquid film in real-time.

  5. Temperature and relative humidity estimation and prediction in the tobacco drying process using Artificial Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martínez, Víctor; Baladrón, Carlos; Gomez-Gil, Jaime; Ruiz-Ruiz, Gonzalo; Navas-Gracia, Luis M; Aguiar, Javier M; Carro, Belén

    2012-10-17

    This paper presents a system based on an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for estimating and predicting environmental variables related to tobacco drying processes. This system has been validated with temperature and relative humidity data obtained from a real tobacco dryer with a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). A fitting ANN was used to estimate temperature and relative humidity in different locations inside the tobacco dryer and to predict them with different time horizons. An error under 2% can be achieved when estimating temperature as a function of temperature and relative humidity in other locations. Moreover, an error around 1.5 times lower than that obtained with an interpolation method can be achieved when predicting the temperature inside the tobacco mass as a function of its present and past values with time horizons over 150 minutes. These results show that the tobacco drying process can be improved taking into account the predicted future value of the monitored variables and the estimated actual value of other variables using a fitting ANN as proposed.

  6. Temperature and Relative Humidity Estimation and Prediction in the Tobacco Drying Process Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Carro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a system based on an Artificial Neural Network (ANN for estimating and predicting environmental variables related to tobacco drying processes. This system has been validated with temperature and relative humidity data obtained from a real tobacco dryer with a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN. A fitting ANN was used to estimate temperature and relative humidity in different locations inside the tobacco dryer and to predict them with different time horizons. An error under 2% can be achieved when estimating temperature as a function of temperature and relative humidity in other locations. Moreover, an error around 1.5 times lower than that obtained with an interpolation method can be achieved when predicting the temperature inside the tobacco mass as a function of its present and past values with time horizons over 150 minutes. These results show that the tobacco drying process can be improved taking into account the predicted future value of the monitored variables and the estimated actual value of other variables using a fitting ANN as proposed.

  7. Freezing thresholds and cirrus cloud formation mechanisms inferred from in situ measurements of relative humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Haag

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Factors controlling the distribution of relative humidity above ice saturation in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the presence of cirrus clouds are examined with the help of microphysical trajectory simulations using a box model. Our findings are related to results from recent field campaigns and global model studies. We suggest that the relative humidities at which ice crystals form in the atmosphere can be inferred from in situ measurements of water vapor and temperature close to, but outside of, cirrus clouds. The comparison with similar measurements performed inside cirrus clouds provides a clue to freezing mechanisms active in cirrus. The comparison with field data reveals distinct interhemispheric differences in cirrus cloud freezing thresholds. Combining the present findings with recent results addressing the frequency distributions of updraft speeds and cirrus ice crystal number densities (Kärcher and Ström, 2993} provides evidence for the existence of complex heterogeneous freezing mechanisms in cirrus, at least in the polluted northern hemisphere, and further emphasizes the key role of gravity wave-induced dynamical variability in vertical air motion at the mesoscale. The key features of distributions of upper tropospheric relative humidity simulated by a global climate model are shown to be in general agreement with both, microphysical simulations and field observations, delineating a feasible method to include and validate ice supersaturation in other large-scale models of the atmosphere, in particular chemistry-transport and weather forecast models.

  8. Quantitative Ethylene Measurements with MOx Chemiresistive Sensors at Different Relative Air Humidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivec, Matic; Mc Gunnigle, Gerald; Abram, Anže; Maier, Dieter; Waldner, Roland; Gostner, Johanna M; Überall, Florian; Leitner, Raimund

    2015-11-06

    The sensitivity of two commercial metal oxide (MOx) sensors to ethylene is tested at different relative humidities. One sensor (MiCS-5914) is based on tungsten oxide, the other (MQ-3) on tin oxide. Both sensors were found to be sensitive to ethylene concentrations down to 10 ppm. Both sensors have significant response times; however, the tungsten sensor is the faster one. Sensor models are developed that predict the concentration of ethylene given the sensor output and the relative humidity. The MQ-3 sensor model achieves an accuracy of ±9.2 ppm and the MiCS-5914 sensor model predicts concentration to ±7.0 ppm. Both sensors are more accurate for concentrations below 50 ppm, achieving ±6.7 ppm (MQ-3) and 5.7 ppm (MiCS-5914).

  9. [The use of thermoelectric modules (Peltier elements) in the relative humidity control of a hyperbaric environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stashkov, O A

    2002-01-01

    The author considers an option for automatic relative humidity control of a hyperbaric environment demonstrated in a pressure chamber for small animals. To achieve the purpose, a device has been developed to cool off gas mixture using the Peltier effect and then remove condensate. Experiments were performed with two different gas mixtures: O2-N2-He at 25.5 x 10(5) Pa and 30 degrees C and air at 6.9 x 10(5) Pa and 22 degrees C. The device enabled stabilization of relative humidity in the chamber at 30-40% without bio-objects and at 35-46% with bio-objects (Wistar rats).

  10. Quantitative Ethylene Measurements with MOx Chemiresistive Sensors at Different Relative Air Humidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matic Krivec

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of two commercial metal oxide (MOx sensors to ethylene is tested at different relative humidities. One sensor (MiCS-5914 is based on tungsten oxide, the other (MQ-3 on tin oxide. Both sensors were found to be sensitive to ethylene concentrations down to 10 ppm. Both sensors have significant response times; however, the tungsten sensor is the faster one. Sensor models are developed that predict the concentration of ethylene given the sensor output and the relative humidity. The MQ-3 sensor model achieves an accuracy of ±9.2 ppm and the MiCS-5914 sensor model predicts concentration to ±7.0 ppm. Both sensors are more accurate for concentrations below 50 ppm, achieving ±6.7 ppm (MQ-3 and 5.7 ppm (MiCS-5914.

  11. Inter-Laboratory Comparison for Calibration of Relative Humidity Devices Among Accredited Laboratories in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, F.; Khairuddin, S.; Othman, H.

    2017-01-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison in relative humidity measurements among accredited laboratories has been coordinated by the National Metrology Institute of Malaysia. It was carried out to determine the performance of the participating laboratories. The objective of the comparison was to acknowledge the participating laboratories competencies and to verify the level of accuracies declared in their scope of accreditation, in accordance with the MS ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation. The measurement parameter involved was relative humidity for the range of 30-90 %rh at a nominal temperature of 50°C. Eight accredited laboratories participated in the inter-laboratory comparison. Two units of artifacts have been circulated among the participants as the transfer standards.

  12. Effects of temperature and relative humidity on the solid-state chemical stability of ranitidine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, R; Otsuka, M; Matsuda, Y

    1993-06-01

    The chemical stability of ranitidine HCl in solution and in the solid state at various temperatures was investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Ranitidine HCl was unstable in lower pH buffer solutions, and the percent degradation after 72 h increased as the pH of the buffer solution was reduced. The percent degradation in the unbuffered solution increased dose dependently. The critical relative humidity (CRH) of the ranitidine HCl bulk powder was approximately 67% relative humidity (RH). The amount of water adsorbed onto the sample above the CRH was proportional to the RH level. The percent degradation of the powder below 50% RH was almost negligible because, at this level, it was a solid. The percent degradation at 60-70% RH was higher than that above 70% RH. Ranitidine HCl powder was unstable around the CRH.

  13. Estimation of relative humidity based on artificial neural network approach in the Aegean Region of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Abdulkadir; Simsek, Erdoğan; Bilgili, Mehmet; Yucel, Ahmet; Ilhan, Ilhami

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the monthly mean relative humidity (MRH) values in the Aegean Region of Turkey with the help of the topographical and meteorological parameters based on artificial neural network (ANN) approach. The monthly MRH values were calculated from the measurement in the meteorological observing stations established in Izmir, Mugla, Aydin, Denizli, Usak, Manisa, Kutahya and Afyonkarahisar provinces between 2000 and 2006. Latitude, longitude, altitude, precipitation and months of the year were used in the input layer of the ANN network, while the MRH was used in output layer of the network. The ANN model was developed using MATLAB software, and then actual values were compared with those obtained by ANN and multi-linear regression methods. It seemed that the obtained values were in the acceptable error limits. It is concluded that the determination of relative humidity values is possible at any target point of the region where the measurement cannot be performed.

  14. Metrological challenges for measurements of key climatological observables, Part 4: Atmospheric relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell-Smith, J W; Feistel, R; Harvey, A H; Hellmuth, O; Bell, S A; Heinonen, M; Cooper, J R

    Water in its three ambient phases plays the central thermodynamic role in the terrestrial climate system. Clouds control Earth's radiation balance, atmospheric water vapour is the strongest "greenhouse" gas, and non-equilibrium relative humidity at the air-sea interface drives evaporation and latent heat export from the ocean. In this paper, we examine the climatologically relevant atmospheric relative humidity, noting fundamental deficiencies in the definition of this key observable. The metrological history of this quantity is reviewed, problems with its current definition and measurement practice are analysed, and options for future improvements are discussed in conjunction with the recent seawater standard TEOS-10. It is concluded that the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, (BIPM), in cooperation with the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam, IAPWS, along with other international organisations and institutions, can make significant contributions by developing and recommending state-of-the-art solutions for this long standing metrological problem, such as are suggested here.

  15. Relative effect of solder flux chemistry on the humidity related failures in electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to investigate the effect of no-clean flux chemistry with various weak organic acids (WOAs) as activators on the corrosion reliability of electronics with emphasis on the hygroscopic nature of the residue. Design/methodology/approach - The hygroscopicity of flux residue...... of printed circuit boards under humid conditions. Originality/value - The classification of solder flux systems according to IPC J-STD-004 standard does not specify the WOAs in the flux; however, ranking of the flux systems based on the hygroscopic property of activators would be useful information when...... selecting no-clean flux systems for electronics with applications in humid conditions....

  16. Organic particulate material levels in the atmosphere: conditions favoring sensitivity to varying relative humidity and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, James F

    2010-04-13

    This study examines the sensitivity in predicted levels of atmospheric organic particulate matter (M(o), microg m(-3)) as those levels may potentially be affected by changes in relative humidity and temperature. In a given system, for each partitioning compound, f(g) and f(p) represent the gaseous and particulate fractions (f(g) + f(p) = 1). Sensitivity in the M(o) levels becomes dampened as the compounds contributing significantly to M(o) are increasingly found in the particle phase (f(p) --> 1). Thus, although local maxima in sensitivity can be encountered as M(o) levels increase, because as M(o) increases each f(p) --> 1, then increasing M(o) levels generally tend to reduce sensitivity in M(o) levels to changes in relative humidity and temperature. Experiments designed to elucidate the potential magnitudes of the effects of relative humidity and temperature on M(o) levels must be carried out at M(o) levels that are relevant for the ambient atmosphere: The f(p) values for the important partitioning compounds must not be elevated above ambient-relevant values. Systems in which M(o) levels are low (e.g., 1-2 microg m(-3)) and/or composed of unaged secondary organic aerosol are the ones most likely to show sensitivity to changing relative humidity and temperature. Results from two published chamber studies are examined in the above regard: [Warren B, et al. (2009) Atmos Environ 43:1789-1795] and [Prisle NL, et al. (2010) Geophys Res Lett 37:L01802].

  17. Monitoring of Indoor Relative Humidity Levels in Residential Dwellings: A Sensor Network Application

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Lizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Indoor Air Quality is an increasing concern in the world today. The mere presence of people in a building or residence can significantly alter indoor air quality. Relative humidity over the range of normal indoor temperatures (66 - 80 degrees Farenheit) has been linked both directly and indirectly to various health and structural problems. The purpose of this project was to discover whether residential dwellings might benefit from an indoor humidification system. The project consisted of the dep...

  18. How rainfall, relative humidity and temperature influence volatile emissions from apple trees in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Armelle; Gu, Hainan; Dorn, Silvia

    2005-07-01

    Headspace volatiles from apple-bearing twigs were collected in the field with a Radiello sampler during three different diurnal periods over the complete fruit growing season. Analyses by thermal desorption-GC-MS identified a total of 62 compounds in changing quantities, including the terpenoids alpha-pinene, camphene, beta-pinene, limonene, beta-caryophyllene and (E,E)-alpha-farnesene, the aldehydes (E)-2-hexenal, benzaldehyde and nonanal, and the alcohol (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol. The variations in emission of these plant odours were statistically related to temperature, humidity and rainfall in the field. Remarkably, rainfall had a significant positive influence on changes in volatile release during all three diurnal periods, and further factors of significance were temperature and relative humidity around noon, relative humidity in the late afternoon, and temperature and relative humidity during the night. Rainfall was associated consistently with an increase in the late afternoon in terpene and aldehyde volatiles with a known repellent effect on the codling moth, one of the key pests of apple fruit. During the summer of 2003, a season characterized by below-average rainfall, some postulated effects of drought on trees were tested by establishing correlations with rainfall. Emissions of the wood terpenes alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and limonene were negatively correlated with rainfall. Another monoterpene, camphene, was only detected in this summer but not in the previous years, and its emissions were negatively correlated with rainfall, further supporting the theory that drought can result in higher formation of secondary metabolites. Finally, the two green leaf volatiles (E)-2-hexenal and (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol were negatively correlated with rainfall, coinciding well with the expectation that water deficit stress increases activity of lipoxygenase. To our knowledge, this work represents the first empirical study concerning the influence of abiotic factors on volatile

  19. Monitoring of Indoor Relative Humidity Levels in Residential Dwellings: A Sensor Network Application

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Lizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Indoor Air Quality is an increasing concern in the world today. The mere presence of people in a building or residence can significantly alter indoor air quality. Relative humidity over the range of normal indoor temperatures (66 - 80 degrees Farenheit) has been linked both directly and indirectly to various health and structural problems. The purpose of this project was to discover whether residential dwellings might benefit from an indoor humidification system. The project consisted of the dep...

  20. Efficiency of producing anion and relative humidity of the indigenous woody plants in Jeju islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S.-G.; Kim, K.-J.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, C.-M.; Byun, K.-O.

    2009-04-01

    This study is to evaluate the ability of interior plants to produce anion and relative humidity that can purify polluted indoor air. Four indigenous woody plants in Jeju islands such as Sarcandra glaber (Thunb.) Nakai, Illicium anisatum L, Cleyera japonica Thunb. and Ilex rotunda Thunb. were used. Sansevieria trifasciata cv. Laurentii was also used as a comparative plant. The amount of anion and increment of relative humidity produced by five species of indoor plants was assessed by anion measurement (ITC-201A)in a sealed acryl chamber (118Ã-118Ã-119.5cm). The highest amount of anion was 515 ea/cm3produced by I. rotunda. The amounts of anion were 293 ea/cm3, 273 ea/cm3, and 211 ea/cm3 in S. glaber, I. anisatum and C. japonica, respecively while it was 220 ea/cm3 in S. trifasciata. The increment of relative humidity was highest in I. anisatum as 27.4% while it was lowest in S. trifasciata as 14.0%. This result suggested that all four indigenous plants tested were more effective to purify the indoor polluted air than S. trifasciata. Key words: interior plant, S. glaber, I. anisatum, C. japonica, I. rotunda, indoor polluted air

  1. Heterogeneous uptake of NO2 on soils under variable temperature and relative humidity conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Wang; Weigang Wang; Maofa Ge

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on soils collected from Dalian (S1) and Changsha (S2) were investigated over the relative humidity (RH) range of 5%-80% and temperature range of 278-328 K using a horizontal coated-wall flow tube.The initial uptake coefficients of NO2 on S2 exhibited a decreasing trend from (10 ± 1.3) × 10-8 to (3.1 ± 0.5) × 10-8 with the relative humidity increasing from 5% to 80%.In the temperature effect studies,the initial uptake coefficients of S1 and S2 decreased from (10 ± 1.2) ×10-8 to (3.8 ± 0.5) × 10-8 and from (16 ± 2.2) × 10-8 to (3.8 ± 0.4) × 10-8 when temperature increased from 278 to 288 K for S1 and from 278 to 308 K for S2,respectively.As the temperature continued to increase,the initial uptake coefficients of S1 and S2 returned to (7.9 ± 1.1) × 10-8 and (20 ± 3.1) × 10-8 at 313 and 328 K,respectively.This study shows that relative humidity could influence the uptake kinetics of NO2 on soil and temperature would impact the heterogeneous chemistry of NO2.

  2. Adhesion mechanisms on solar glass: Effects of relative humidity, surface roughness, and particle shape and size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, Helio R.; Jiang, Cun -Sheng; To, Bobby; Perkins, Craig; Muller, Mattthew; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.; Simpson, Lin J.

    2017-12-01

    To better understand and quantify soiling rates on solar panels, we are investigating the adhesion mechanisms between dust particles and solar glass. In this work, we report on two of the fundamental adhesion mechanisms: van der Waals and capillary adhesion forces. The adhesion was determined using force versus distance (F-z) measurements performed with an atomic force microscope (AFM). To emulate dust interacting with the front surface of a solar panel, we measured how oxidized AFM tips, SiO2 glass spheres, and real dust particles adhered to actual solar glass. The van der Waals forces were evaluated by measurements performed with zero relative humidity in a glove box, and the capillary forces were measured in a stable environment created inside the AFM enclosure with relative humidity values ranging from 18% to 80%. To simulate topographic features of the solar panels caused by factors such as cleaning and abrasion, we induced different degrees of surface roughness in the solar glass. We were able to 1) identify and quantify both the van der Waals and capillary forces, 2) establish the effects of surface roughness, relative humidity, and particle size on the adhesion mechanisms, and 3) compare adhesion forces between well-controlled particles (AFM tips and glass spheres) and real dust particles.

  3. Nacre-like hybrid films: Structure, properties, and the effect of relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abba, Mohammed T; Hunger, Philipp M; Kalidindi, Surya R; Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2015-03-01

    Functional materials often are hybrids composed of biopolymers and mineral constituents. The arrangement and interactions of the constituents frequently lead to hierarchical structures with exceptional mechanical properties and multifunctionality. In this study, hybrid thin films with a nacre-like brick-and-mortar microstructure were fabricated in a straightforward and reproducible manner through manual shear casting using the biopolymer chitosan as the matrix material (mortar) and alumina platelets as the reinforcing particles (bricks). The ratio of inorganic to organic content was varied from 0% to 15% and the relative humidities from 36% to 75% to determine their effects on the mechanical properties. It was found that increasing the volume fraction of alumina from 0% to 15% results in a twofold increase in the modulus of the film, but decreases the tensile strength by up to 30%, when the volume fraction of alumina is higher than 5%. Additionally, this study quantifies and illustrates the critical role of the relative humidity on the mechanical properties of the hybrid film. Increasing the relative humidity from 36% to 75% decreases the modulus and strength by about 45% and triples the strain at failure. These results suggest that complex hybrid materials can be manufactured and tailor made for specific applications or environmental conditions.

  4. Binary homogeneous nucleation: Temperature and relative humidity fluctuations and non-linearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easter, R.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Peters, L.K. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses binary homogeneous nucleation involving H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] and water vapor is thought to be the primary mechanism for new particle formation in the marine boundary layer. Temperature, relative humidity, and partial pressure of H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] vapor are the most important parameters in fixing the binary homogeneous nucleation rate in the H[sub 2]SO[sub 4]/H[sub 2]O system. The combination of thermodynamic calculations and laboratory experiments indicates that this rate varies roughly as the tenth power of the saturation ratio of H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] vapor. Furthermore, the vapor pressure of H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] is a function of temperature, and similar dependencies of the binary homogeneous nucleation rate on relative humidity can be noted as well. These factors thus introduce strong non-linearities into the system, and fluctuations of temperature, relative humidity, and H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] vapor concentrations about mean values may strongly influence the nucleation rate measured in the atmosphere.

  5. Binary homogeneous nucleation: Temperature and relative humidity fluctuations and non-linearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easter, R.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Peters, L.K. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses binary homogeneous nucleation involving H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and water vapor is thought to be the primary mechanism for new particle formation in the marine boundary layer. Temperature, relative humidity, and partial pressure of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor are the most important parameters in fixing the binary homogeneous nucleation rate in the H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O system. The combination of thermodynamic calculations and laboratory experiments indicates that this rate varies roughly as the tenth power of the saturation ratio of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor. Furthermore, the vapor pressure of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} is a function of temperature, and similar dependencies of the binary homogeneous nucleation rate on relative humidity can be noted as well. These factors thus introduce strong non-linearities into the system, and fluctuations of temperature, relative humidity, and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor concentrations about mean values may strongly influence the nucleation rate measured in the atmosphere.

  6. Study of broadband THz time-domain spectroscopy at different relative humidity levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chiajen Lin; Ichen Ho; X. C. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Two detection techniques of broadband terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy-THz air-biased coherent detection (THz-ABCD; from 0.3 to 14 THz) and electro-optical (EO) detection (from 0.3 to 7 THz) - are both performed at several different relative humidity levels.The THz power exponentially decays with the increase in relative humidity.The dynamic range of the main pulse in the time domain linearly decreases as the relative humidity increases from 0% to 40%,and linear fittings show that the slopes are -0.017 and -0.019 for THz-ABCD and EO detection,respectively.Because of the multiple reflections caused by the crystal in the common EO detection,THz-ABCD has better spectral resolution (17 GHz) than that of EO detection (170 GHz).The spectrum of water vapor absorption measured by THz-ABCD is also compared with that measured by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  7. Relative effect of solder flux chemistry on the humidity related failures in electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    of printed circuit boards under humid conditions. Originality/value - The classification of solder flux systems according to IPC J-STD-004 standard does not specify the WOAs in the flux; however, ranking of the flux systems based on the hygroscopic property of activators would be useful information when...

  8. EDITORIAL: Humidity sensors Humidity sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regtien, Paul P. L.

    2012-01-01

    All matter is more or less hygroscopic. The moisture content varies with vapour concentration of the surrounding air and, as a consequence, most material properties change with humidity. Mechanical and thermal properties of many materials, such as the tensile strength of adhesives, stiffness of plastics, stoutness of building and packaging materials or the thermal resistivity of isolation materials, all decrease with increasing environmental humidity or cyclic humidity changes. The presence of water vapour may have a detrimental influence on many electrical constructions and systems exposed to humid air, from high-power systems to microcircuits. Water vapour penetrates through coatings, cable insulations and integrated-circuit packages, exerting a fatal influence on the performance of the enclosed systems. For these and many other applications, knowledge of the relationship between moisture content or humidity and material properties or system behaviour is indispensable. This requires hygrometers for process control or test and calibration chambers with high accuracy in the appropriate temperature and humidity range. Humidity measurement methods can roughly be categorized into four groups: water vapour removal (the mass before and after removal is measured); saturation (the air is brought to saturation and the `effort' to reach that state is measured); humidity-dependent parameters (measurement of properties of humid air with a known relation between a specific property and the vapour content, for instance the refractive index, electromagnetic spectrum and acoustic velocity); and absorption (based on the known relation between characteristic properties of non-hydrophobic materials and the amount of absorbed water from the gas to which these materials are exposed). The many basic principles to measure air humidity are described in, for instance, the extensive compilations by Wexler [1] and Sonntag [2]. Absorption-type hygrometers have small dimensions and can be

  9. Transfer efficiency of bacteria and viruses from porous and nonporous fomites to fingers under different relative humidity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Gerardo U; Gerba, Charles P; Tamimi, Akrum H; Kitajima, Masaaki; Maxwell, Sheri L; Rose, Joan B

    2013-09-01

    Fomites can serve as routes of transmission for both enteric and respiratory pathogens. The present study examined the effect of low and high relative humidity on fomite-to-finger transfer efficiency of five model organisms from several common inanimate surfaces (fomites). Nine fomites representing porous and nonporous surfaces of different compositions were studied. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus thuringiensis, MS2 coliphage, and poliovirus 1 were placed on fomites in 10-μl drops and allowed to dry for 30 min under low (15% to 32%) or high (40% to 65%) relative humidity. Fomite-to-finger transfers were performed using 1.0 kg/cm(2) of pressure for 10 s. Transfer efficiencies were greater under high relative humidity for both porous and nonporous surfaces. Most organisms on average had greater transfer efficiencies under high relative humidity than under low relative humidity. Nonporous surfaces had a greater transfer efficiency (up to 57%) than porous surfaces (<6.8%) under low relative humidity, as well as under high relative humidity (nonporous, up to 79.5%; porous, <13.4%). Transfer efficiency also varied with fomite material and organism type. The data generated can be used in quantitative microbial risk assessment models to assess the risk of infection from fomite-transmitted human pathogens and the relative levels of exposure to different types of fomites and microorganisms.

  10. Spatial analysis of relative humidity during ungauged periods in a mountainous region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Myoung-Jin; Kim, Yeonjoo

    2017-08-01

    Although atmospheric humidity influences environmental and agricultural conditions, thereby influencing plant growth, human health, and air pollution, efforts to develop spatial maps of atmospheric humidity using statistical approaches have thus far been limited. This study therefore aims to develop statistical approaches for inferring the spatial distribution of relative humidity (RH) for a mountainous island, for which data are not uniformly available across the region. A multiple regression analysis based on various mathematical models was used to identify the optimal model for estimating monthly RH by incorporating not only temperature but also location and elevation. Based on the regression analysis, we extended the monthly RH data from weather stations to cover the ungauged periods when no RH observations were available. Then, two different types of station-based data, the observational data and the data extended via the regression model, were used to form grid-based data with a resolution of 100 m. The grid-based data that used the extended station-based data captured the increasing RH trend along an elevation gradient. Furthermore, annual RH values averaged over the regions were examined. Decreasing temporal trends were found in most cases, with magnitudes varying based on the season and region.

  11. Life table parameters of three Mirid Bug (Adelphocoris species (Hemiptera: Miridae under contrasted relative humidity regimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsheng Pan

    Full Text Available The genus Adelphocoris (Hemiptera: Miridae is a group of important insect pests of Bt cotton in China. The three dominant species are A. lineolatus, A. suturalis, and A. fasciaticollis, and these species have different population dynamics. The causal factors for the differences in population dynamics have not been determined; one hypothesis is that humidity may be important for the growth of Adelphocoris populations. In the laboratory, the demographic parameters of the three Adelphocoris species were compared when the mirid bugs were subjected to various levels of relative humidity (40, 50, 60, 70 and 80% RH. Middle to high levels of RH (60, 70 and 80% were associated with higher egg and nymph survival rates and increased adult longevity and female fecundity. Lower humidity levels (40 and 50% RH had negative effects on the survival of nymphs, adult longevity and fecundity. The intrinsic rate of increase (rm, the net reproductive rate (R0 and the finite rate of increase (λ for each Adelphocoris species increased with increasing RH. Significant positive relationships were found between RH and the life table parameters, rm, R0 and λ for the three Adelphocoris species. These results will help to better understand the phenology of the three Adelphocoris species, and the information can be used in population growth models to optimize pest forecasting and management strategies for these key pests.

  12. Effect of relative humidity on the deposition and coagulation of aerosolized SiO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youfeng; Chen, Lan; Chen, Rui; Tian, Guolan; Li, Dexing; Chen, Chunying; Ge, Xiujie; Ge, Guanglu

    2017-09-01

    The temporal evolution of aerosolized SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) released into an environmental test chamber has been investigated to interrogate the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the deposition and coagulation of the nanoparticles. The size-resolved deposition rate and Brownian coagulation coefficient for the particles at RH of 10%, 27%, 40%, 54%, and 64% are estimated. The results show that the effect of RH on the deposition rate is size-dependent; for particle diameter (Dp) 70 nm, it grows as the RH rises. Generally, both low and high RH tends to enhance the deposition rate, and the minimum rate appears at moderate RH ( 54%). Electrostatic repulsion is probable for the inter-particles interaction at the low RH while the surface roughness due to water molecular adsorption is a main reason for the particle-wall interaction at higher RH. The increasing coagulation coefficient at high humidity correlates to the strong inter-particle adhesion, which may be caused by the water molecular adsorption on the hydrophilic surfaces of the SiO2 NPs due to the formation of nanometer-thick water film. This study suggests that air humidity plays unignorable roles in particle deposition and coagulation.

  13. Transgenerational, Dynamic Methylation of Stomata Genes in Response to Low Relative Humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Hadley

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Transgenerational inheritance of abiotic stress-induced epigenetic modifications in plants has potential adaptive significance and might condition the offspring to improve the response to the same stress, but this is at least partly dependent on the potency, penetrance and persistence of the transmitted epigenetic marks. We examined transgenerational inheritance of low Relative Humidity-induced DNA methylation for two gene loci in the stomatal developmental pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana and the abundance of associated short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs. Heritability of low humidity-induced methylation was more predictable and penetrative at one locus (SPEECHLESS, entropy ≤ 0.02; χ2 < 0.001 than the other (FAMA, entropy ≤ 0.17; χ2 ns. Methylation at SPEECHLESS correlated positively with the continued presence of local siRNAs (r2 = 0.87; p = 0.013 which, however, could be disrupted globally in the progeny under repeated stress. Transgenerational methylation and a parental low humidity-induced stomatal phenotype were heritable, but this was reversed in the progeny under repeated treatment in a previously unsuspected manner.

  14. Static flexural properties of hedgehog spines conditioned in coupled temperature and relative humidity environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Emily B; Hsiung, Bor-Kai; Swift, Nathan B; Tan, Kwek-Tze

    2017-11-01

    Hedgehogs are agile climbers, scaling trees and plants to heights exceeding 10m while foraging insects. Hedgehog spines (a.k.a. quills) provide fall protection by absorbing shock and could offer insights for the design of lightweight, material-efficient, impact-resistant structures. There has been some study of flexural properties of hedgehog spines, but an understanding of how this keratinous biological material is affected by various temperature and relative humidity treatments, or how spine color (multicolored vs. white) affects mechanics, is lacking. To bridge this gap in the literature, we use three-point bending to analyze the effect of temperature, humidity, spine color, and their interactions on flexural strength and modulus of hedgehog spines. We also compare specific strength and stiffness of hedgehog spines to conventional engineered materials. We find hedgehog spine flexural properties can be finely tuned by modifying environmental conditioning parameters. White spines tend to be stronger and stiffer than multicolored spines. Finally, for most temperature and humidity conditioning parameters, hedgehog spines are ounce for ounce stronger than 201 stainless steel rods of the same diameter but as pliable as styrene rods with a slightly larger diameter. This unique combination of strength and elasticity makes hedgehog spines exemplary shock absorbers, and a suitable reference model for biomimicry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Water sorption in wood and modified wood at high values of relative humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical study of the amount of moisture held in wood as capillary condensed water in the relative humidity (RH) range of 90–99.9% is carried out. The study is based on idealized geometries of the softwood structure related to micrographs. It is confined to structural elements such as bordered...... pits and the pointed ends of tracheids. The theoretical amount of water in these elements is found by employing the Kelvin equation. An equal amount of earlywood and latewood cells with different geometries and with different amounts of pits is assumed. The effect of pit aspiration is considered...

  16. Evolution of arched roofs in salt caves: Role of gravity-induced stress and relative air humidity and temperature changes (Zagros Mts., Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruthans, Jiri; Filippi, Michal; Zare, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    In salt caves in the halite karst in SE Iran the disintegration of rock salt into individual grains can be observed. Highly disintegrated blocks and individual grains form a major volume of debris in many caves on islands in the Persian Gulf. Larger cave rooms have often perfectly arched roof. The perfect geometry of rooms and interlocking of salt grains indicate that evolution of room cross-sections in these caves is controlled by feedback between gravity-induced stress and rock salt disintegration in similar way as in evolution of sandstone landforms (Bruthans et al. 2014). Those portions of rock salt, which are under compressional stress, disintegrate much slower than portions under tensile stress. Important question is the kind of weathering mechanism responsible for intergranular disintegration of rock salt. The relationship between disintegration, its rate and cave climate was studied. Clearly the fastest disintegration rate was found in caves with strong air circulation (i.e, short caves with large cross-sections, open on both ends). Temperature and air humidity changes are considerable in these caves. On the other hand the disintegration is very slow in the inner parts of long caves with slow air circulation or caves with one entrance. The best example of such caves is the inner part of 3N Cave on Namakdan salt diapir with nearly no air circulation and stable temperature and humidity, where disintegration of rock salt into grains is missing. Strong effect of cave climate on disintegration rate can be explained by deliquescence properties of halite. Halite is absorbing air moisture forming NaCl solution if relative humidity (RH) exceeds 75 % (at 20-30 oC). In the Persian Gulf region the RH of the air is passing the 75 % threshold in case of 91% days (Qeshm Island, years 2002-2005), while in mountainous areas in mainland this threshold is less commonly reached. In most of nights (91 %) in Persian Gulf the air with RH >75 % is entering the salt caves and air

  17. Seasonal variations of indoor microbial exposures and their relation to temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Mika; Bekö, Gabriel; Timm, Michael; Gustavsen, Sine; Hansen, Erik Wind; Madsen, Anne Mette

    2012-12-01

    Indoor microbial exposure has been related to adverse pulmonary health effects. Exposure assessment is not standardized, and various factors may affect the measured exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate the seasonal variation of selected microbial exposures and their associations with temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates in Danish homes. Airborne inhalable dust was sampled in five Danish homes throughout the four seasons of 1 year (indoors, n = 127; outdoors, n = 37). Measurements included culturable fungi and bacteria, endotoxin, N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase, total inflammatory potential, particles (0.75 to 15 μm), temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates. Significant seasonal variation was found for all indoor microbial exposures, excluding endotoxin. Indoor fungi peaked in summer (median, 235 CFU/m(3)) and were lowest in winter (median, 26 CFU/m(3)). Indoor bacteria peaked in spring (median, 2,165 CFU/m(3)) and were lowest in summer (median, 240 CFU/m(3)). Concentrations of fungi were predominately higher outdoors than indoors, whereas bacteria, endotoxin, and inhalable dust concentrations were highest indoors. Bacteria and endotoxin correlated with the mass of inhalable dust and number of particles. Temperature and air exchange rates were positively associated with fungi and N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase and negatively with bacteria and the total inflammatory potential. Although temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates were significantly associated with several indoor microbial exposures, they could not fully explain the observed seasonal variations when tested in a mixed statistical model. In conclusion, the season significantly affects indoor microbial exposures, which are influenced by temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates.

  18. Central European high-resolution gridded daily data sets (HYRAS: Mean temperature and relative humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Frick

    Full Text Available High-resolution (5×5km2$5\\times5\\,\\text{km}^2$ gridded daily data sets of surface air temperature (DWD/BfG-HYRAS-TAS and relative humidity (DWD/BfG-HYRAS-HURS are presented in this study. The data sets cover Germany and the bordering river catchments and last from 1951 to 2006. Their data bases consist of daily station observations from Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Switzerland. The interpolation of the measurement data to the regular grid is performed using a method based upon Optimal Interpolation. A first climatological analysis for Germany and Central European river catchments of first and second order is performed. For the Rhine river catchment a summer mean temperature of 16.1 °C and relative humidity of 74 % are found. In contrast, the mean temperature of heat summer 2003 amounts to 19.9 °C with a related relative humidity of 65 % in this river catchment. The extreme character of this summer is also remarkable in the presented climate indices, e.g., the increased amount of summer hot days. The first validations of both data sets reveal a bias within the range of the provided data precisions. In addition, an elevation dependency of error scores is identified for temperature. Error scores increase with an increasing station height because height differences between station and grid cell increases with height. A comparison of HYRAS-TAS to another gridded temperature data set reveals a good agreement with again fewer differences at lower altitudes. The presented DWD/BfG-HYRAS data sets have a high spatial and temporal resolution which is unique for Germany and the bordering river catchments so far. They have a high potential for detailed studies of smaller scale structures in Central Europe and are already used as input for hydrological impact modelling, as climatological reference and for bias correction of regional climate models within the German research project KLIWAS

  19. Water sorption in wood and modified wood at high values of relative humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Engelund, Emil Tang; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    2010-01-01

    Desorption isotherms at 208C for untreated, acetylated, and furfurylated Norway spruce Picea abies (L.) Karst. sapwood were established in the 91.9–99.9% relative humidity (RH) range. Three methods were employed to secure various constant RH levels: saturated salt solutions, climate chambers......, and the pressure plate technique. The curve form for the untreated samples did not show an upward bend, except perhaps above 99.5% RH, indicating that – contrary to what has hitherto been assumed – capillary condensation does not play a significant role for water sorption in wood below fiber saturation. Three...

  20. Probabilistic models for assessment of extreme temperatures and relative humidity in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzbutas, Robertas; Šeputytė, Ilona

    2015-04-01

    Extreme temperatures are fairly common natural phenomenon in Lithuania. They have mainly negative effects both on the environment and humans. Thus there are important to perform probabilistic and statistical analyzes of possibly extreme temperature values and their time-dependant changes. This is especially important in areas where technical objects (sensitive to the extreme temperatures) are foreseen to be constructed. In order to estimate the frequencies and consequences of possible extreme temperatures, the probabilistic analysis of the event occurrence and its uncertainty has been performed: statistical data have been collected and analyzed. The probabilistic analysis of extreme temperatures in Lithuanian territory is based on historical data taken from Lithuanian Hydrometeorology Service, Dūkštas Meteorological Station, Lithuanian Energy Institute and Ignalina NNP Environmental Protection Department of Environmental Monitoring Service. The main objective of performed work was the probabilistic assessment of occurrence and impact of extreme temperature and relative humidity occurring in whole Lithuania and specifically in Dūkštas region where Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant is closed for decommissioning. In addition, the other purpose of this work was to analyze the changes of extreme temperatures. The probabilistic analysis of extreme temperatures increase in Lithuanian territory was based on more than 50 years historical data. The probabilistic assessment was focused on the application and comparison of Gumbel, Weibull and Generalized Value (GEV) distributions, enabling to select a distribution, which has the best fit for data of extreme temperatures. In order to assess the likelihood of extreme temperatures different probabilistic models were applied to evaluate the probability of exeedance of different extreme temperatures. According to the statistics and the relationship between return period and probabilities of temperatures the return period for 30

  1. Plant Growth Environments with Programmable Relative Humidity and Homogeneous Nutrient Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Kara R.; Lee, Nigel; Sizmur, Tom; Siemianowski, Oskar; Van Bruggen, Shawn; Ganapathysubramaniam, Baskar

    2016-01-01

    We describe the design, characterization, and use of “programmable”, sterile growth environments for individual (or small sets of) plants. The specific relative humidities and nutrient availability experienced by the plant is established (RH between 15% and 95%; nutrient concentration as desired) during the setup of the growth environment, which takes about 5 minutes and hydroponics conditions (e.g., root phenotyping, complete control over nutrient composition, scalability) and soil conditions (e.g., aeration of roots, shading of roots), while being comparable in cost and setup time to Magenta® boxes. PMID:27304431

  2. Determination of partition and diffusion coefficient of formaldehyde in selected building materials and impact of relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partition and effective diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde were measured for three materials (conventional gypsum wallboard, "green" gypsum wallboard, and "green" carpet) under three relative humidity (RH) conditions (20%, 50% and 70% RH). A dynamic dual-chamber test meth...

  3. Determination of partition and diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde in selected building materials and impact of relative humidity (journal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partition and effective diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde were measured for three materials (conventional gypsum wallboard, "green" gypsum wallboard, and "green" carpet) under three relative humidity (RH) conditions (20%, 50% and 70% RH). A dynamic dual-chamber test meth...

  4. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NDFD Gridded Forecasts of Surface Relative Humidity (%) (Time Offsets)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-offsets map service provides maps depicting the NWS Surface Relative Humidity forecasts from the National Digital Forecast...

  5. Plant Growth Environments with Programmable Relative Humidity and Homogeneous Nutrient Availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara R Lind

    Full Text Available We describe the design, characterization, and use of "programmable", sterile growth environments for individual (or small sets of plants. The specific relative humidities and nutrient availability experienced by the plant is established (RH between 15% and 95%; nutrient concentration as desired during the setup of the growth environment, which takes about 5 minutes and <1$ in disposable cost. These systems maintain these environmental parameters constant for at least 14 days with minimal intervention (one minute every two days. The design is composed entirely of off-the-shelf components (e.g., LEGO® bricks and is characterized by (i a separation of root and shoot environment (which is physiologically relevant and facilitates imposing specific conditions on the root system, e.g., darkness, (ii the development of the root system on a flat surface, where the root enjoys constant contact with nutrient solution and air, (iii a compatibility with root phenotyping. We demonstrate phenotyping by characterizing root systems of Brassica rapa plants growing in different relative humidities (55%, 75%, and 95%. While most phenotypes were found to be sensitive to these environmental changes, a phenotype tightly associated with root system topology-the size distribution of the areas encircled by roots-appeared to be remarkably and counterintuitively insensitive to humidity changes. These setups combine many of the advantages of hydroponics conditions (e.g., root phenotyping, complete control over nutrient composition, scalability and soil conditions (e.g., aeration of roots, shading of roots, while being comparable in cost and setup time to Magenta® boxes.

  6. Influence of Different Factors on Relative Air Humidity in Zaragoza, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrat, José M.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the spatial patterns of relative air humidity and its relation to urban, geographical and meteorological factors in the city of Zaragoza (Spain) is discussed. We created a relative humidity database by means of 32 urban transects. Data were taken on different days and with different weather types. This data set was used to map the mean spatial distribution of urban dry island (UDI). Using stepwise multiple regression analysis and Landsat ETM+ images the relationships between mean UDI and the main geographic-urban factors: topography, land cover and surface reflectivity, have been analyzed. Different spatial patterns of UDI were determined using Principal Component Analysis (Varimax rotation). The three components extracted accounted for 91% of the total variance. PC1 accounted for the most general patterns (similar to mean UDI); PC2 showed a shift of dry areas to the SE and PC3 a shift to NW. Using data on wind direction in Zaragoza, we have found that the displacement of dry areas to the SE (PC 2) was greater during NW winds while the shift to the NW (PC 3) was produced mainly by SE winds.

  7. The influence of relative humidity on iron corrosion under proton irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapuerta, S.; Bérerd, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Jaffrézic, H.; Crusset, D.; Féron, D.

    2008-03-01

    With regard to the storage for high-level radioactive waste and the reversible period of a geological repository, the influence of proton irradiation on the indoor atmospheric corrosion of iron has been investigated in relation to the relative humidity (RH) in the atmosphere. Irradiation experiments were performed using a 3-MeV extracted proton beam. Relative humidity varies from 0% to 85%. Before and after each irradiation, the surfaces of the sample were characterised by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in order to determine oxygen concentrations in the metal. The maximum oxidation rate was observed for 45% RH in air under proton irradiation and was compared with literature data without irradiation where the maximum oxidation rate was observed at 95% RH. The experimental results are discussed on the basis of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) model: they are explained by the contrast between the adsorption of O 2 and H 2O species on the active cathodic sites of the iron surface and by the formation of H +(H 2O) n.

  8. Evaporation kinetics of laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols at elevated relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jacqueline; Imre, Dan; Beránek, Josef; Shrivastava, Manish; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2015-01-06

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) dominate atmospheric organic aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and health. Recent studies indicate that, contrary to previously held assumptions, at low relative humidity (RH) these particles are semisolid and evaporate orders of magnitude slower than expected. Elevated relative humidity has the potential to affect significantly formation, properties, and atmospheric evolution of SOA particles. Here we present a study of the effect of RH on the room-temperature evaporation kinetics of SOA particles formed by ozonolysis of α-pinene and limonene. Experiments were carried out on α-pinene SOA particles generated, evaporated, and aged at evaporation begins with a relatively fast phase, during which 30-70% of the particle mass evaporates in 2 h, followed by a much slower evaporation rate. Evaporation kinetics at evaporates. In all cases, aging the particles prior to inducing evaporation reduces the evaporative losses; with aging at elevated RH leading to a more significant effect. In all cases, the observed SOA evaporation is nearly size-independent.

  9. Heterogeneous Reactions of Acetic Acid with Oxide Surfaces: Effects of Mineralogy and Relative Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingjin; Larish, Whitney A; Fang, Yuan; Gankanda, Aruni; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the heterogeneous uptake of gaseous acetic acid on different oxides including γ-Al2O3, SiO2, and CaO under a range of relative humidity conditions. Under dry conditions, the uptake of acetic acid leads to the formation of both acetate and molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on γ-Al2O3 and CaO and only molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on SiO2. More importantly, under the conditions of this study, dimers are the major form for molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on all three particle surfaces investigated, even at low acetic acid pressures under which monomers are the dominant species in the gas phase. We have also determined saturation surface coverages for acetic acid adsorption on these three oxides under dry conditions as well as Langmuir adsorption constants in some cases. Kinetic analysis shows that the reaction rate of acetic acid increases by a factor of 3-5 for γ-Al2O3 when relative humidity increases from 0% to 15%, whereas for SiO2 particles, acetic acid and water are found to compete for surface adsorption sites.

  10. Metrological challenges for measurements of key climatological observables. Part 4: atmospheric relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell-Smith, J. W.; Feistel, R.; Harvey, A. H.; Hellmuth, O.; Bell, S. A.; Heinonen, M.; Cooper, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    Water in its three ambient phases plays the central thermodynamic role in the terrestrial climate system. Clouds control Earth’s radiation balance, atmospheric water vapour is the strongest ‘greenhouse’ gas, and non-equilibrium relative humidity at the air-sea interface drives evaporation and latent heat export from the ocean. In this paper, we examine the climatologically relevant atmospheric relative humidity, noting fundamental deficiencies in the definition of this key observable. The metrological history of this quantity is reviewed, problems with its current definition and measurement practice are analysed, and options for future improvements are discussed in conjunction with the recent seawater standard TEOS-10. It is concluded that the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM), in cooperation with the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS), along with other international organizations and institutions, can make significant contributions by developing and recommending state-of-the-art solutions, such as are suggested here, for what are long-standing metrological problems.

  11. A Case Study of Assimilating Lightning-Proxy Relative Humidity with WRF-3DVAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lightning network data, considered as a useful supplement to radar observations, are a good indicator of severe convection, and has high temporal and spatial resolution. In Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP models, lightning data are a new source of data to improve the forecasting of convective systems. In this case study, lightning data assimilation is conducted by converting lightning data to water vapor mixing ratio via a simple smooth continuous function, with input variables of total flash rate and simulated graupel mixing ratio at 9 km gridded resolution. Relative humidity converted from the retrieved water vapor mixing ratio is assimilated into the background field utilizing the three-dimensional variational (3DVAR method in WRFDA (the Weather Research and Forecasting model Data Assimilation system. The benefits of assimilating lightning data are demonstrated in a series of experiments using data from a strong convection event that affected Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei and Shandong Province, on 31 July 2007. A nested domain with resolutions of 9 km and 3 km is implemented. For this case, assimilating lightning data shows some improvements in predictions of both reflectivity and neighboring precipitation, and in the temperature, dew-point temperature and relative humidity profile after seven hours.

  12. Microclimate in ski boots--temperature, relative humidity, and water absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Patrick; Hasler, Michael; Fauland, Gulnara; Bechtold, Thomas; Nachbauer, Werner

    2014-05-01

    Ski boot quality is determined by mechanical properties and comfort. Comfort is strongly affected by cold feet. The purpose of this study was to determine the microclimate in ski boots. Climate chamber tests with five male subjects and field tests with two male subjects were conducted. Temperature and relative humidity were measured using four sensors placed on the foot and one on the liner. Absorbed water in liners and socks was measured with a precision balance. The subjects gave subjective ratings for comfort. The toe sensor temperature dropped below 20 °C at an ambient temperature of 0 °C, -10 °C, and -20 °C. Relative humidity values at the foot were as high as 78% in the climate chamber and 93% in the field. Water absorption in socks and liners ranged from 4 to 10 g in the climate chamber and 19 to 45.5 g in the field. The results reveal the importance of keeping the feet and in particular the toes warm during skiing. One possible improvement may be to construct the liner so that sweat and melted snow are kept as far away as possible from the foot. Liner material with high water absorption capacity and hydrophobic socks were suggested to prevent wet feet.

  13. Influence of moisturizer and relative humidity on human emissions of fluorescent biological aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J; Fang, W; Cao, Q; Yang, L; Chang, V W-C; Nazaroff, W W

    2017-05-01

    Utilizing the ultraviolet light-induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) measurement technique as embodied in the Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A), we evaluated the fluorescent particle emissions associated with human shedding while walking in a chamber. The mean emission rates of supermicron (1-10 μm) fluorescent particles were in the range 6.8-7.5 million particles per person-h (~0.3 mg per person-h) across three participants, for conditions when the relative humidity was 60%-70% and no moisturizer was applied after showering. The fluorescent particles displayed a lognormal distribution with the geometric mean diameter in the range 2.5-4 μm and exhibited asymmetry factors that increased with particle size. Use of moisturizer was associated with changes in number and mass emission rates, size distribution, and particle shape. Emission rates were lower when the relative humidity was reduced, but these differences were not statistically significant. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Biases of the MET Temperature and Relative Humidity Sensor (HMP45) Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrouac, Jenni [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Theisen, Adam [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2017-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Data Quality (DQ) Office was alerted to a potential bias in the surface meteorological instrumentation (MET) temperature when compared with a nearby Mesonet station. This led to an investigation into this problem that was expanded to include many of the other extended facilities (EF) and both the temperature and relative humidity (RH) variables. For this study, the Mesonet was used as the standard reference due to results that showed an increased accuracy in high-humidity environments along with the fact that the Mesonet had previous documented a problem with the HMP45C sensors. Some differences between the sites were taken into account during the analysis: 1. ARM MET sensors were upgraded from an HMP35 to an HMP45 throughout 2007 2. Mesonet switched to aspirated shields in 2009 – To mitigate the differences between aspirated and non-aspirated measurements, data were only analyzed when the wind speed was higher than 3 m/s. This reduced the uncertainty for the non-aspirated measurements from 1.51 ºC to 0.4 ºC. 3. ARM MET is mounted 0.5m higher than the Mesonet station (2.0m versus 1.5m) – This is assumed to have a negligible effect on the differences. 4. Sites were not co-located – For some locations, the distances between sites were as much as 45 km. As part of the investigation into the differences, the Mesonet had reported that the HMP45 sensors had a low-temperature bias in high-humidity environments. This was verified at two different sites where the ARM measurements were compared with the Mesonet measurements. The Mesonet provided redundant temperature measurements from two different sensors at each site. These measurements compared fairly well, while the ARM sensor showed a bias overnight when the humidities were higher. After reviewing the yearly average differences in the data and analyzing the RH data during fog events when we assume it should be

  15. Performance Analysis of a Greenhouse Fan-Pad Cooling System: Gradients of Horizontal Temperature and Relative Humidity

    OpenAIRE

    DAYIOĞLU, Mehmet Ali

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the performance parameters of system, as well as gradients of temperature and humidity along greenhouse when opening fan-ped cooling system. Measurements related with greenhouse environment were carried out by using seven sensors for different locations, as well as portable instruments. For this purpose, the five digital temperature and humidity sensors and two pyranometers were used during experiments. Among them, two were located outside gree...

  16. High-resolution Surface Relative Humidity Computation Using MODIS Image in Peninsular Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Guangxiong; LI Jing; CHEN Yunhao; Abdul Patah NORIZAN; Liphong TAY

    2006-01-01

    Forest fire is a serious disaster all over the world. The Fire Weather Index (FWI) System can be used in applied forestry as a tool to investigate and manage all types of fire. Relative humidity (RH) is a very important parameter to calculate FWI. However, RH interpolated from meteorological data may not be able to provide precise and confident values for areas between far separated stations. The principal objective of this study is to provide high-resolution RH for FWI using MODIS data. The precipitable water vapor (PW) can be retrieved from MODIS using split window techniques. Four-year-time-series (2000-2003) of 8-day mean PW and specific humidity (Q) of Peninsular Malaysia were analyzed and the statistic expression between PW and Q was developed. The root-mean-square-error (RMSE) of Q estimated by PW is generally less than 0.0004 and the correlation coefficient is 0.90. Based on the experiential formula between PW and Q, surface RH can be computed with combination of auxiliary data such as DEM and air temperature (Ta). The mean absolute errors of the estimated RH in Peninsular Malaysia are less than 5% compared to the measured RH and the correlation coefficient is 0.8219. It is proven to be a simple and feasible model to compute high-resolution RH using remote sensing data.

  17. Effects of relative humidity and root temperature on calcium concentration and tipburn development in lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, G F; Tibbitts, T W

    1984-03-01

    Growth chamber studies were undertaken with a tipburn-sensitive cultivar of romaine lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Lobjoits Green Cos) grown under a photosynthetic photon flux density of 320 micromoles s-1 m-2 for 16 hours; light and dark temperatures were 26.0 degrees and 12.5 degrees C, respectively. As the relative humidity (RH) during the light period was decreased from 74% to 51%, growth was retarded, Ca concentration increased, and the onset of tipburn delayed. Decreasing RH during the dark period from 95% to 90% reduced growth and resulted in lower Ca concentrations and earlier tipburn development. Further decreases from 90% to 65% caused no additional change in growth or tipburn response. Root temperatures of 23.5 degrees, compared with 15.0 degrees, slightly increased Ca concentration but induced earlier tipburn development. Ca concentrations were increased and tipburn delayed by humidity conditions which provided large diurnal fluctuations in water potential in the plant and which encouraged root pressure flow during the dark period. Elevated root temperatures did not provide expected increases in Ca accumulation in young leaves.

  18. The (RH+t) aging correlation. Electrical resistivity of PVB at various temperatures and relative humidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    Electrical products having organic materials functioning as pottants, encapsulants, and insulation coatings are commonly exposed to elevated conditions of temperature and humidity. In order to assess service life potential from this method of accelerated aging, it was empirically observed that service life seems proportional to an aging correlation which is the sum of temperature in degrees Celsius (t), and the relative humidity (RH) expressed in percent. Specifically, the correlation involves a plot of time-to-failure on a log scale versus the variable RH + T plotted on a linear scale. A theoretical foundation is provided for this empirically observed correlation by pointing out that the correlation actually involves a relationship between the electrical resistivity (or conductivity) of the organic material, and the variable RH + t. If time-to-failure is a result of total number of coulombs conducted through the organic material, then the correlation of resistivity versus RH + t is synonymous with the empirical correlation of time-to-failure versus RH + t.

  19. Cultivar Differences in Plant Transpiration Rate at High Relative Air Humidity Are Not Related to Genotypic Variation in Stomatal Responsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebraegziabher, Habtamu Giday; Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Ottosen, Carl-Otto;

    2015-01-01

    Plants grown at high relative air humidity (RH) often show disturbed water relations due to less responsive stomata. The attenuation of stomatal responsiveness as a result of high RH during leaf expansion depends on the cultivar. We hypothesized that tolerant cultivars to high RH experience a lower...... a given cultivar, Tleaf was generally higher, (1.5-3.7°C) at high as compared to moderate RH. Following desiccation, leaf weight loss was differentially enhanced (8-66%) in high RH-grown plants, indicating a wide variation in high RH tolerance. High RH mainly decreased plant water loss during the light...

  20. The Effect of Low Ambient Relative Humidity on Physical Performance and Perceptual Responses during Load Carriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor B. Mekjavic

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The study evaluated the effect of low ambient relative humidity on physical performance and perceptual responses during load carriage in a hot environment.Methods: Ten heat-unacclimatized male subjects participated in three 130-min trials, during which they walked on a treadmill, carrying a load of ~35 kg, at a speed of 3.2 km.h−1, with an incident wind at the same velocity and ambient temperature at 45°C. Each trial commenced with a 10-min baseline at 20°C and 50% relative humidity (RH, the subjects transferred to a climatic chamber and commenced their simulated hike, comprising two 50-min walks separated by a 20-min rest period. In two, full protective equipment (FP trials, RH was 10% (partial pressure of water vapor, pH2O = 7.2 mmHg in one (FP10, and 20% (pH2O = 14.4 mmHg; FP20 in the other. In the control trial, subjects were semi-nude (SN and carried the equipment in their backpacks; RH was 20%. Measurements included oxygen uptake, ventilation, heart rate, rectal and skin temperatures, heat flux, temperature perception, and thermal comfort.Results: In FP20, four subjects terminated the trial prematurely due to signs of heat exhaustion; there were no such signs in FP10 or SN. Upon completion of the trials, pulmonary ventilation, heart rate, and rectal temperature were lower in FP10 (33 ± 5 l/min; 128 ± 21 bpm; 38.2 ± 0.4°C and SN (34 ± 4 l/min; 113 ± 18 bpm; 38.1 ± 0.4°C than in FP20 (39 ± 8 l/min; 145 ± 12 bpm; 38.6 ± 0.4°C. Evaporation was significantly greater in the SN compared to FP10 and FP20 trials. FP10 was rated thermally more comfortable than FP20.Conclusion: A lower ambient partial pressure of water vapor, reflected in a lower ambient relative humidity, improved cardiorespiratory, thermoregulatory, and perceptual responses during load carriage.

  1. Sensitivity of aerosol optical thickness and aerosol direct radiative effect to relative humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a sensitivity study of the effects of spatial and temporal resolution of atmospheric relative humidity (RH on calculated aerosol optical thickness (AOT and the aerosol direct radiative effects (DRE in a global model. We carry out different modeling experiments using the same aerosol fields simulated in the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI model at a resolution of 2° latitude by 2.5° longitude, using time-averaged fields archived every three hours by the Goddard Earth Observation System Version 4 (GEOS-4, but we change the horizontal and temporal resolution of the relative humidity fields. We find that, on a global average, the AOT calculated using RH at a 1°×1.25° horizontal resolution is 11% higher than that using RH at a 2°×2.5° resolution, and the corresponding DRE at the top of the atmosphere is 8–9% and 15% more negative (i.e., more cooling for total aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol alone, respectively, in the finer spatial resolution case. The difference is largest over surface escarpment regions (e.g. >200% over the Andes Mountains where RH varies substantially with surface terrain. The largest zonal mean AOT difference occurs at 50–60° N (16–21%, where AOT is also relatively larger. A similar impact is also found when the time resolution of RH is increased. This increase of AOT and aerosol cooling with the increase of model resolution is due to the highly non-linear relationship between RH and the aerosol mass extinction efficiency (MEE at high RH (>80%. Our study is a specific example of the uncertainty in model results highlighted by multi-model comparisons such as AeroCom, and points out one of the many inter-model differences that can contribute to the overall spread among models.

  2. Numerical investigation of impact of relative humidity on droplet accumulation and film cooling on compressor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugarin, Luz Irene

    During the summer, high inlet temperatures affect the power output of gas turbine systems. Evaporative coolers have gained popularity as an inlet cooling method for these systems. Wet compression has been one of the common evaporative cooling methods implemented to increase power output of gas turbine systems due to its simple installation and low cost. This process involves injection of water droplets into the continuous phase of compressor to reduce the temperature of the flow entering the compressor and in turn increase the power output of the whole gas turbine system. This study focused on a single stage rotor-stator compressor model with varying inlet temperature between 300K and 320K, as well as relative humidity between 0% and 100%. The simulations are carried out using the commercial CFD tool ANSYS: FLUENT. The study modeled the interaction between the two phases including mass and heat transfer, given different inlet relative humidity (RH) and temperature conditions. The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with k-epsilon turbulence model were applied as well as the droplet coalescence and droplet breakup model considered in the simulation. Sliding mesh theory was implemented to simulate the compressor movement in 2-D. The interaction between the blade and droplets were modeled to address all possible interactions; which include: stick spread, splash, or rebound and compared to an interaction of only reflect. The goal of this study is to quantify the relation between RH, inlet temperature, overall heat transfer coefficient, and the heat transferred from the droplets to the blades surface. The result of this study lead to further proof that wet compression yields higher pressure ratios and lower temperatures in the domain under all of the cases. Additionally, droplet-wall interaction has an interesting effect on the heat transfer coefficient at the compressor blades.

  3. Ammonia concentration and relative humidity in poultry houses affect the immune response of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, F X; Hu, X F; Xu, B; Zhang, M H; Li, S Y; Sun, Q Y; Lin, P

    2015-04-10

    To investigate the effect of ammonia (NH3) and humidity on the immune response of broilers, broilers were exposed to 30 or 70 mg/kg atmospheric NH3 for 21 days. Additionally, birds were exposed to 35, 60, and 85% relative humidity (RH). The relative weights of lymphoid organs, serum total protein, serum globulin, serum albumin, serum lysozyme, proliferation index of peripheral blood lymphocytes, and splenic cytokine gene expression were determined. Exposure to 70 mg/kg NH3 decreased the relative weight of the spleen during the experimental period, serum lysozyme concentration in the first and second weeks, and serum globulin concentration in the third week. The proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes was reduced. High levels of NH3 caused increase in IL-1β gene expression in the experimental period and IL-4 gene expression in the first week. Birds exposed to 85% RH had lower thymus and bursa of Fabricius weights in the third week and serum lysozyme concentration in the first week; IL-1β and IL-4 expressions were higher in the second and third weeks and first and second weeks, respectively, than in birds exposed to 60% RH. IL-4 expression was lower during the first week, and IL-1β expression was higher during the second week with 35% RH than with 60% RH. In conclusion, high NH3 level in the poultry house suppressed the immune response of broiler chickens. Neither high nor low RH benefited the immune response of broilers. Furthermore, there was an interactive effect between NH3 and RH on the immune response of broilers.

  4. The impact of relative humidity during electrospinning on the morphology and mechanical properties of nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelipenko, Jan; Kristl, Julijana; Janković, Biljana; Baumgartner, Saša; Kocbek, Petra

    2013-11-01

    Electrospinning is an efficient and flexible method for nanofiber production, but it is influenced by many systemic, process, and environmental parameters that govern the electrospun product morphology. This study systematically investigates the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the electrospinning process. The results showed that the morphology of the electrospun product (shape and diameter) can be manipulated with precise regulation of RH during electrospinning. Because the diameter of nanofibers correlates with their rigidity, it was shown that RH control can lead to manipulation of material mechanical properties. Finally, based on the solution's rheological parameter-namely, phase shift angle-we were able to predict the loss of homogenous nanofiber structure in correlation with RH conditions during electrospinning. This research addresses the mechanism of RH impact on the electrospinning process and offers the background to exploit it in order to better control nanomaterial properties and alter its applicability.

  5. Defining relative humidity in terms of water activity. Part 1: definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feistel, Rainer; Lovell-Smith, Jeremy W.

    2017-08-01

    Relative humidity (RH) is a quantity widely used in various fields such as metrology, meteorology, climatology or engineering. However, RH is neither uniformly defined, nor do some definitions properly account for deviations from ideal-gas properties, nor is the application range of interest fully covered. In this paper, a new full-range definition of RH is proposed that is based on the thermodynamics of activities in order to include deviations from ideal-gas behaviour. Below the critical point of pure water, at pressures p  ideal-gas limit of the new definition is consistent with de-facto standard RH definitions published previously and recommended internationally. Virial approximations are reported for estimating small corrections to the ideal-gas equations.

  6. A quantitative reconstruction of changes in relative humidity during the Younger Dryas in Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rach, O.; Kahmen, A.; Brauer, A.; Sachse, D.

    2013-12-01

    Hydroclimatic changes have a profound effect on terrestrial ecosystems from regional to continental scales. However, past hydrological changes linked to abrupt climate shifts and their effect on terrestrial ecosystems are not well understood due to the lack of direct quantitative hydrological reconstructions. In addition, most paleoclimate proxies record the environmental response to hydrological variations, such as vegetation changes inferred by changes in pollen abundance, rather than hydroclimatic change itself. Over the last decade hydrogen isotope ratios (δD value) of lipid biomarkers have emerged as a novel and direct hydrological proxy, since it aims to reconstruct the δD values of the water source used by photosynthetic organisms. However, the hydrogen isotope ratio of source water (such as precipitation) is an integrated signal of condensation temperature, moisture pathway, precipitation amount and evaporation. As such, it is difficult to separate a single parameter, for example relative humidity, required for a true quantitative interpretation. Here we present a novel approach to quantify changes in relative humidity (Δrh) based on the hydrogen isotope composition of terrestrial and aquatic n-alkanes. In this proof-of-concept study we generate a high-resolution Δrh record for the Younger Dryas period (YD) of Western Europe from Lake Meerfelder Maar, (MFM, Germany). We use aquatic macrophyte biomarker δD values as a recorder of lake water δD (aq), which represents an integrated annual precipitation signal, and terrestrial leaf wax n-alkane δD values (terr) as a record of leaf-water evapotranspiration. Therefore we consider the isotopic difference between δDterr and δDaq (ɛterr-aq) as a measure of mean leaf water enrichment (ΔL), which is mainly controlled by relative humidity and temperature. By employing a modified and parameterized Craig-Gordon leaf-water model we are able to extract past changes in relative humidity from a sedimentary record

  7. Anomalous partitioning of water in coexisting liquid phases of lipid multilayers near 100% relative humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yicong; Ghosh, Sajal K.; Bera, Sambhunath; Jiang, Zhang; Schleputz, Christian M.; Karapetrova, Evguenia; Lurio, L. B.; Sinha, Sunil K.

    2015-11-30

    X-ray diffraction is used to determine the hydration dependence of a ternary mixture lipid multilayer structure which has phase separated into liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases. An anomaly is observed in the swelling behavior of the Ld phase at a relative humidity (RH) close to 100%, which is different from the anomalous swelling happens close to the main lipid gel-fluid transition. The lamellar repeat distance of the Ld phase swells by an extra 4 Å, well beyond the equilibrium spacing predicted by the inter-bilayer forces. This anomalous swelling is caused by the hydrophobic mismatch energy at the domain boundaries, which produces surprisingly long range effect.

  8. Stability of whey protein hydrolysate powders: effects of relative humidity and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Liu, Dasong; Chen, Xiaoxia; Chen, Yingjia; Labuza, Theodore P

    2014-05-01

    Whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) is now considered as an important and special dairy protein ingredient for its nutritional and functional properties. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effect of environmental relative humidity (RH) and storage temperature on the physicochemical stability of three WPH powders with hydrolysis degrees (DH) of 5.2%, 8.8% and 14.9%, respectively. The water sorption isotherms of the three WPH powders fitted the Guggenheim-Andersson-DeBoer model well. An increase in water content leaded to a decrease in glass transition temperature (Tg), following a linear Tg vs log water content relationship. Moreover, an increase in DH caused the decrease in Tg at the same water content. Changes in microstructure and colour occurred significantly when the WPH powders were stored at high environmental RH or temperature, especially for those with high DH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intensity-modulated relative humidity sensing with polyvinyl alcohol coating and optical fiber gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingyi; Dong, Xinyong; Ni, Kai; Chan, Chi Chu; Shun, Perry Ping

    2015-04-01

    A relative humidity (RH) sensor in reflection mode is proposed and experimentally demonstrated by using a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-coated tilted-fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) cascaded by a reflection-band-matched chirped-fiber Bragg grating (CFBG). The sensing principle is based on the RH-dependent refractive index of the PVA coating, which modulates the transmission function of the TFBG. The CFBG is properly designed to reflect a broadband of light spectrally suited at the cladding mode resonance region of the TFBG, thus the reflected optical signal passes through and is modulated by the TFBG again. As a result, RH measurements with enhanced sensitivity of ∼1.80  μW/%RH are realized and demodulated in the range from 20% RH to 85% RH.

  10. Seasonal Variations of Indoor Microbial Exposures and Their Relation to Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Air Exchange Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Mika; Bekö, Gabriel; Timm, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    inflammatory potential, particles (0.75 to 15 μm), temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates. Significant seasonal variation was found for all indoor microbial exposures, excluding endotoxin. Indoor fungi peaked in summer (median, 235 CFU/m3) and were lowest in winter (median, 26 CFU/m3). Indoor...... bacteria peaked in spring (median, 2,165 CFU/m3) and were lowest in summer (median, 240 CFU/m3). Concentrations of fungi were predominately higher outdoors than indoors, whereas bacteria, endotoxin, and inhalable dust concentrations were highest indoors. Bacteria and endotoxin correlated with the mass...

  11. Towards retrieving critical relative humidity from ground-based remote sensing observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Weverberg, Kwinten; Boutle, Ian; Morcrette, Cyril J.; Newsom, Rob K.

    2016-08-22

    Nearly all parameterisations of large-scale cloud require the specification of the critical relative humidity (RHcrit). This is the gridbox-mean relative humidity at which the subgrid fluctuations in temperature and water vapour become so large that part of a subsaturated gridbox becomes saturated and cloud starts to form. Until recently, the lack of high-resolution observations of temperature and moisture variability has hindered a reasonable estimate of the RHcrit from observations. However, with the advent of ground-based measurements from Raman lidar, it becomes possible to obtain long records of temperature and moisture (co-)variances with sub-minute sample rates. Lidar observations are inherently noisy and any analysis of higher-order moments will be very dependent on the ability to quantify and remove this noise. We present an exporatory study aimed at understanding whether current noise levels of lidar-retrieved temperature and water vapour are sufficient to obtain a reasonable estimate of the RHcrit. We show that vertical profiles of RHcrit can be derived for a gridbox length of up to about 30 km (120) with an uncertainty of about 4 % (2 %). RHcrit tends to be smallest near the scale height and seems to be fairly insensitive to the horizontal grid spacing at the scales investigated here (30 - 120 km). However, larger sensitivity was found to the vertical grid spacing. As the grid spacing decreases from 400 to 100 m, RHcrit is observed to increase by about 6 %, which is more than the uncertainty in the RHcrit retrievals.

  12. Calibration of Relative Humidity Devices in Low-pressure, Low-temperature CO2 Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzer, Maria; Polkko, Jouni; Nikkanen, Timo; Hieta, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti

    2017-04-01

    Calibration of relative humidity devices requires in minimum two humidity points - dry (0%RH) and (near)saturation (95-100%RH) - over the expected operational temperature and pressure range of the device. In terrestrial applications these are relatively easy to achieve using for example N2 gas as dry medium, and water vapor saturation chambers for producing saturation and intermediate humidity points. But for example in applications intended for meteorological measurements on Mars there is a need to achieve at least dry and saturation points in low-temperature, low-pressure CO2 environment. We have developed a custom-made, small, relatively low-cost calibration chamber able to produce both dry points and saturation points in Martian range pressure CO2, in temperatures down to -70°C. The system utilizes a commercially available temperature chamber for temperature control, vacuum vessels and pumps. The main pressure vessel with the devices under test inside is placed inside the temperature chamber, and the pressure inside is controlled by pumps and manual valves and monitored with a commercial pressure reference with calibration traceable to national standards. Air, CO2, or if needed another gas like N2, is used for filling the vessel until the desired pressure is achieved. Another pressure vessel with a dedicated pressure pump is used as the saturation chamber. This vessel is placed in the room outside the temperature chamber, partly filled with water and used for achieving saturated water vapor in room-temperature low-pressure environment. The saturation chamber is connected to the main pressure vessel via valves. In this system dry point, low-pressure CO2 environment is achieved by filling the main pressure vessel with dry CO2 gas until the desired pressure is achieved. A constant flow of gas is maintained with the pump and valves and monitored with the pressure reference. The saturation point is then achieved by adding some water vapor from the saturation

  13. Retrieval of Upper Tropospheric Relative Humidity by the GMS-5 Water Vapor Channel:A Study of the Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄毅; 王美华; 毛节泰

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a technique for retrieving upper tropospheric relative humidity through the GMS-5 satellite's 6.7-micron water vapor channel brightness temperature.NCEP analysis shows that a critical assumption of the retrieval theory,namely the constant temperature lapse rate,matches only in the tropical atmosphere.By statistical analyses of brightness temperature simulated by a radiative transfer model and of relative humidity,we examine the effect of lapse rate on this retrieval method and obtain retrieval parameters and error estimates applicable to the GMS-5 satellite over East Asia.If the retrieval parameters are properly chosen,the relative error of retrieving the upper tropospheric relative humidity in this region is less than 10%,and if applied to the low-latitude summer atmosphere,it is less than 5%.

  14. Effect of relative humidity in high temperature oxidation of ceria nanoparticles coating on 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldez Pizarro, Luis Miguel

    A solution of 20 wt. % colloidal dispersion of Cerium Oxide (CeO2) in 2.5% of acetic acid, was used for depositing a coating film on an austenitic stainless steel 316L. Cerium compounds have been distinguished as potential corrosion inhibitors in coatings over several alloys. The oxidation behavior of the cerium oxide coating on 316L austenitic stainless steel alloy was evaluated in dry and humid environments, the weight changes (W/A) was monitored as a function of time using a custom built Thermogravimetrical Analysis (TGA) instrument at temperatures of 750°C, 800°C and 850°C, and different relative humidity levels (0%, 10% and 20%) respectively. The parabolic oxidation rate and activation energy is calculated experimentally for each relative humidity level. A measurement of the effective diameter size of the ceria nanoparticles was performed using a Light Scattering technique. A characterization of the film morphology and thickness before the oxidation was executed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microstructure and chemical composition of the oxidized coated substrates were analyzed using Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) was used to characterize oxides formed in the surface upon isothermal treatment. A comparison of activation energy values obtained to identify the influence of relative humidity in the oxidation process at high temperature was conducted. Cerium oxides coating may prevent crevice corrosion and increase pitting resistance of 316L relative to the uncoated substrate at high temperatures and different levels of relative humidity acting as a protective oxidation barrier. The calculated parabolic rate constants, kp, at the experimental temperatures tend to increase as a function of humidity levels. The activation energy tends to increase proportionally to higher level of humidity exposures. At 0% relative humidity a value of 319.29 KJ/mol of activation energy is being

  15. Effects of air temperature and relative humidity on coronavirus survival on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Lisa M; Jeon, Soyoung; Rutala, William A; Weber, David J; Sobsey, Mark D

    2010-05-01

    Assessment of the risks posed by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) on surfaces requires data on survival of this virus on environmental surfaces and on how survival is affected by environmental variables, such as air temperature (AT) and relative humidity (RH). The use of surrogate viruses has the potential to overcome the challenges of working with SARS-CoV and to increase the available data on coronavirus survival on surfaces. Two potential surrogates were evaluated in this study; transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) were used to determine effects of AT and RH on the survival of coronaviruses on stainless steel. At 4 degrees C, infectious virus persisted for as long as 28 days, and the lowest level of inactivation occurred at 20% RH. Inactivation was more rapid at 20 degrees C than at 4 degrees C at all humidity levels; the viruses persisted for 5 to 28 days, and the slowest inactivation occurred at low RH. Both viruses were inactivated more rapidly at 40 degrees C than at 20 degrees C. The relationship between inactivation and RH was not monotonic, and there was greater survival or a greater protective effect at low RH (20%) and high RH (80%) than at moderate RH (50%). There was also evidence of an interaction between AT and RH. The results show that when high numbers of viruses are deposited, TGEV and MHV may survive for days on surfaces at ATs and RHs typical of indoor environments. TGEV and MHV could serve as conservative surrogates for modeling exposure, the risk of transmission, and control measures for pathogenic enveloped viruses, such as SARS-CoV and influenza virus, on health care surfaces.

  16. Effects of Air Temperature and Relative Humidity on Coronavirus Survival on Surfaces▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Lisa M.; Jeon, Soyoung; Rutala, William A.; Weber, David J.; Sobsey, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of the risks posed by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) on surfaces requires data on survival of this virus on environmental surfaces and on how survival is affected by environmental variables, such as air temperature (AT) and relative humidity (RH). The use of surrogate viruses has the potential to overcome the challenges of working with SARS-CoV and to increase the available data on coronavirus survival on surfaces. Two potential surrogates were evaluated in this study; transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) were used to determine effects of AT and RH on the survival of coronaviruses on stainless steel. At 4°C, infectious virus persisted for as long as 28 days, and the lowest level of inactivation occurred at 20% RH. Inactivation was more rapid at 20°C than at 4°C at all humidity levels; the viruses persisted for 5 to 28 days, and the slowest inactivation occurred at low RH. Both viruses were inactivated more rapidly at 40°C than at 20°C. The relationship between inactivation and RH was not monotonic, and there was greater survival or a greater protective effect at low RH (20%) and high RH (80%) than at moderate RH (50%). There was also evidence of an interaction between AT and RH. The results show that when high numbers of viruses are deposited, TGEV and MHV may survive for days on surfaces at ATs and RHs typical of indoor environments. TGEV and MHV could serve as conservative surrogates for modeling exposure, the risk of transmission, and control measures for pathogenic enveloped viruses, such as SARS-CoV and influenza virus, on health care surfaces. PMID:20228108

  17. Hygrothermal Properties of Cross Laminated Timber and Moisture Response of Wood at High Relative Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSayegh, George

    Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) is a new wood-based material composed of cross laminated wood boards that form a structural panel. This study focuses on identifying the appropriate methods to determine the hygrothermal properties of CLTs fabricated with Canadian and European Lumber. The laboratory tests carried out in this study will help establish heat, air and moisture response properties to be used for hygrothermal simulation to assess the durability of CLTs in building envelope construction. Measurement of water vapour permeability, liquid water absorption, sorption isotherms, thermal conductivity, and air permeability were performed on three Canadian CLT specimens composed of Hem-Fir, Eastern Spruce-Pine-Fir, and Western Spruce-Pine-Fir and one European specimen composed of Spruce. The hygrothermal properties of CLT, considered in this study, appear to be similar to commonly used wood specimens reported in the literature. However, liquid water absorption coefficients of CLT were found to be generally lower than common wood species, possibly due to the presence of glue between the wood layers which limits the moisture movement across the specimen. On the other hand, the air permeability across the CLT specimens varied due to the glue discontinuity within the specimen which led some CLTs to be permeable, however all the European specimens were found to be impermeable. This study also critically analyzed the significance of equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood at high relative humidity, measured by means of a pressure plate apparatus and humidity chambers, on the moisture management performance of a wood-frame stucco wall, using the hygrothermal simulation tool hygIRC-2D. The simulation results indicate that the prediction of the moisture response of a wood-frame stucco wall assembly depends significantly on the method adopted to derive the EMC of wood at high RH.

  18. Direct radiative effect modeled for regional aerosols in central Europe including the effect of relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorga, G.; Hitzenberger, R.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Puxbaum, Hans

    2007-01-01

    In view of both the climatic relevance of aerosols and the fact that aerosol burdens in central Europe are heavily impacted by anthropogenic sources, this study is focused on estimating the regional-scale direct radiative effect of aerosols in Austria. The aerosol data (over 80 samples in total) were collected during measurement campaigns at five sampling sites: the urban areas of Vienna, Linz, and Graz and on Mt. Rax (1644 m, regional background aerosol) and Mt. Sonnblick (3106 m, background aerosol). Aerosol mass size distributions were obtained with eight-stage (size range: 0.06-16 μm diameter) and six-stage (size range 0.1-10 μm) low-pressure cascade impactors. The size-segregated samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC), black carbon (BC), and inorganic ions. The aerosol at these five locations is compared in terms of size distributions, optical properties, and direct forcing. Mie calculations are performed for the dry aerosol at 60 wavelengths in the range 0.3-40 μm. Using mass growth factors determined earlier, the optical properties are also estimated for higher relative humidities (60%, 70%, 80%, and 90%). A box model was used to estimate direct radiative forcing (DRF). The presence of absorbing species (BC) was found to reduce the cooling effect of the aerosols. The water-soluble substances dominate radiative forcing at the urban sites, while on Rax and Sonnblick BC plays the most important role. This result can be explained by the effect of the surface albedo, which is much lower in the urban regions (0.16) than at the ice and snow-covered mountain sites. Shortwave (below 4 μm) and longwave surface albedo values for ice were 0.35 and 0.5, while for snow surface albedo, values of 0.8 (shortwave) and 0.5 (longwave) were used. In the case of dry aerosol, especially for urban sites, the unidentified material may contribute a large part to the forcing. Depending on the sampling site the estimated forcing gets more negative with increasing humidity

  19. Biological activity of two new pyrrole derivatives against stored-product species: influence of temperature and relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukouvala, M C; Kavallieratos, N G; Athanassiou, C G; Hadjiarapoglou, L P

    2016-08-01

    Members of the pyrrole group are likely to have interesting properties that merit additional investigation as insecticides at the post-harvest stages of agricultural commodities. In the present work, the insecticidal effect of two new pyrrole derivatives, ethyl 3-(benzylthio)-4,6-dioxo-5-phenyl-2,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-carboxylate (3i) and isopropyl 3-(benzylthio)-4,6-dioxo-5-phenyl-2,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-carboxylate (3k) were studied as stored-wheat protectants against two major stored-product insect species, the confused flour beetle, Tribolium confusum Jaquelin du Val adults and larvae and the Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella Zeller larvae at different doses (0.1, 1 and 10 ppm), exposure intervals (7, 14 and 21 days), temperatures (20, 25 and 30°C) and relative humidity (55 and 75%) levels. For T. confusum adults, in the case of the pyrrole derivative 3i, mortality was low and it did not exceed 32.2% in wheat treated with 10 ppm 3i at 30°C and 55% relative humidity. Progeny production was very low (confusum larvae, in the case of the pyrrole derivative 3i, at the highest dose, mortality was 82.2% at 25°C and 55% relative humidity whereas in the case of 3k it reached 77.8% at the same combination. In contrast, mortality at 75% relative humidity remained very low and did not exceed 13.3%. For E. kuehniella larvae, the highest mortalities, 44.4 and 63.3%, were observed in 10 ppm at 25°C and 55% relative humidity for both pyrrole derivatives. The compounds tested here have a certain insecticidal effect, but this effect is moderated by the exposure, the target species, the temperature and the relative humidity.

  20. Physical activity profile of 2014 FIFA World Cup players, with regard to different ranges of air temperature and relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, Paweł; Konefał, Marek; Andrzejewski, Marcin; Kosowski, Jakub; Rokita, Andrzej; Chmura, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The present study attempts to assess changes in soccer players' physical activity profiles under the simultaneous influence of the different combinations of ambient temperature and relative humidity characterising matches of the 2014 FIFA World Cup hosted by Brazil. The study material consisted of observations of 340 players representing 32 national teams taking part in the tournament. The measured indices included total distances covered; distances covered with low, moderate, or high intensity; numbers of sprints performed, and peak running speeds achieved. The analysis was carried out using FIFA official match data from the Castrol Performance Index system. Ultimately, consideration was given to a combination of three air temperature ranges, i.e. below 22 °C, 22-28 °C, and above 28 °C; and two relative humidity ranges below 60 % and above 60 %. The greatest average distance recorded (10.54 ± 0.91 km) covered by players at an air temperature below 22 °C and a relative humidity below 60 %, while the shortest (9.83 ± 1.08 km) characterised the same air temperature range, but conditions of relative humidity above 60 % (p ≤ 0.001). Two-way ANOVA revealed significant differences (p ≤ 0.001) in numbers of sprints performed by players, depending on whether the air temperature range was below 22 °C (40.48 ± 11.17) or above 28 °C (30.72 ± 9.40), but only where the relative humidity was at the same time below 60 %. Results presented indicate that the conditions most comfortable for physical activity on the part of players occur at 22 °C, and with relative humidity under 60 %.

  1. Physical activity profile of 2014 FIFA World Cup players, with regard to different ranges of air temperature and relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, Paweł; Konefał, Marek; Andrzejewski, Marcin; Kosowski, Jakub; Rokita, Andrzej; Chmura, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The present study attempts to assess changes in soccer players' physical activity profiles under the simultaneous influence of the different combinations of ambient temperature and relative humidity characterising matches of the 2014 FIFA World Cup hosted by Brazil. The study material consisted of observations of 340 players representing 32 national teams taking part in the tournament. The measured indices included total distances covered; distances covered with low, moderate, or high intensity; numbers of sprints performed, and peak running speeds achieved. The analysis was carried out using FIFA official match data from the Castrol Performance Index system. Ultimately, consideration was given to a combination of three air temperature ranges, i.e. below 22 °C, 22-28 °C, and above 28 °C; and two relative humidity ranges below 60 % and above 60 %. The greatest average distance recorded (10.54 ± 0.91 km) covered by players at an air temperature below 22 °C and a relative humidity below 60 %, while the shortest (9.83 ± 1.08 km) characterised the same air temperature range, but conditions of relative humidity above 60 % ( p ≤ 0.001). Two-way ANOVA revealed significant differences ( p ≤ 0.001) in numbers of sprints performed by players, depending on whether the air temperature range was below 22 °C (40.48 ± 11.17) or above 28 °C (30.72 ± 9.40), but only where the relative humidity was at the same time below 60 %. Results presented indicate that the conditions most comfortable for physical activity on the part of players occur at 22 °C, and with relative humidity under 60 %.

  2. Relative humidity sensor based on surface plasmon resonance of D-shaped fiber with polyvinyl alcohol embedding Au grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Haitao; Han, Daofu; Li, Ming; Lin, Bo

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a D-shaped fiber coated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) embedding an Au grating-based relative humidity (RH) sensor. The Au grating is fabricated on a D-shaped fiber to match the wave-vector and excite the surface plasmon, and the PVA is embedded in the Au grating as a sensitive cladding film. The refractive index of PVA changes with the ambient humidity. Measurements in a controlled environment show that the RH sensor can achieve a sensitivity of 5.4 nm per relative humidity unit in the RH range from 0% to 70% RH. Moreover, the surface plasmon resonance can be realized and used for RH sensing at the C band of optical fiber communication instead of the visible light band due to the metallic grating microstructure on the D-shaped fiber.

  3. Probabilistic description of ice-supersaturated layers in low resolution profiles of relative humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Dickson

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The global observation, assimilation and prediction in numerical models of ice super-saturated (ISS regions (ISSR are crucial if the climate impact of aircraft condensations trails (contrails is to be fully understood, and if, for example, contrail formation is to be avoided through aircraft operational measures. A robust assessment of the global distribution of ISSR will further this debate, and ISS event occurrence, frequency and spatial scales have recently attracted significant attention. The mean horizontal path length through ISSR as observed by MOZAIC aircraft is 150 km (±250 km. The average vertical thickness of ISS layers is 600–800 m (±575 m but layers ranging from 25 m to 3000 m have been observed, with up to one third of ISS layers thought to be less than 100 m deep. Given their small scales compared to typical atmospheric model grid sizes, statistical representations of the spatial scales of ISSR are required, in both horizontal and vertical dimensions, if global occurrence of ISSR is to be adequately represented in climate models.

    This paper uses radiosonde launches made by the UK Meteorological Office, from the British Isles, Gibraltar, St. Helena and the Falkland Islands between January 2002 and December 2006, to investigate the probabilistic occurrence of ISSR. Specifically each radiosonde profile is divided into 50- and 100-hPa pressure layers, to emulate the coarse vertical resolution of some atmospheric models. Then the high resolution observations contained within each thick pressure layer are used to calculate an average relative humidity and an ISS fraction for each individual thick pressure layer. These relative humidity pressure layer descriptions are then linked through a probability function to produce an s-shaped curve describing the ISS fraction in any average relative humidity pressure layer. An empirical investigation has shown that this one curve is statistically valid for mid-latitude locations

  4. Cultivar Differences in Plant Transpiration Rate at High Relative Air Humidity Are Not Related to Genotypic Variation in Stomatal Responsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebraegziabher, Habtamu Giday; Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    a given cultivar, Tleaf was generally higher, (1.5-3.7°C) at high as compared to moderate RH. Following desiccation, leaf weight loss was differentially enhanced (8-66%) in high RH-grown plants, indicating a wide variation in high RH tolerance. High RH mainly decreased plant water loss during the light......Plants grown at high relative air humidity (RH) often show disturbed water relations due to less responsive stomata. The attenuation of stomatal responsiveness as a result of high RH during leaf expansion depends on the cultivar. We hypothesized that tolerant cultivars to high RH experience a lower...... decline in plant transpiration by high RH, and that the variation in plant transpiration rate can be reflected by differences in leaf temperature (Tleaf). Plant leaf area, stomatal responsiveness to desiccation, together with plant transpiration and leaf temperature at growth conditions were analyzed...

  5. Sensitivity of aerosol optical thickness and aerosol direct radiative effect to relative humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a sensitivity study on the effects of spatial and temporal resolution of atmospheric relative humidity (RH on calculated aerosol optical thickness (AOT and the aerosol direct radiative effects (DRE in a global model. Using the same aerosol fields simulated in the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI model, we find that, on a global average, the calculated AOT from RH in 1° latitude by 1.25° longitude spatial resolution is 11% higher than that in 2° by 2.5° resolution, and the corresponding DRE at the top of the atmosphere is 8–9% higher for total aerosols and 15% higher for only anthropogenic aerosols in the finer spatial resolution case. The difference is largest over surface escarpment regions (e.g. >200% over the Andes Mountains where RH varies substantially with surface terrain. The largest zonal mean AOT difference occurs at 50–60°N (16–21%, where AOT is also relatively larger. A similar increase is also found when the time resolution of RH is increased. This increase of AOT and DRE with the increase of model resolution is due to the highly non-linear relationship between RH and the aerosol mass extinction efficiency (MEE at high RH (>80%. Our study suggests that caution should be taken in a multi-model comparison (e.g. AeroCom since the comparison usually deals with results coming from different spatial/temporal resolutions.

  6. Odors and sensations of humidity and dryness in relation to sick building syndrome and home environment in Chongqing, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    Full Text Available The prevalence of perceptions of odors and sensations of air humidity and sick building syndrome symptoms in domestic environments were studied using responses to a questionnaire on the home environment. Parents of 4530 1-8 year old children from randomly selected kindergartens in Chongqing, China participated. Stuffy odor, unpleasant odor, pungent odor, mold odor, tobacco smoke odor, humid air and dry air in the last three month (weekly or sometimes was reported by 31.4%, 26.5%, 16.1%, 10.6%, 33.0%, 32.1% and 37.2% of the parents, respectively. The prevalence of parents' SBS symptoms (weekly or sometimes were: 78.7% for general symptoms, 74.3% for mucosal symptoms and 47.5% for skin symptoms. Multi-nominal regression analyses for associations between odors/sensations of air humidity and SBS symptoms showed that the odds ratio for "weekly" SBS symptoms were consistently higher than for "sometimes" SBS symptoms. Living near a main road or highway, redecoration, and new furniture were risk factors for perceptions of odors and sensations of humid air and dry air. Dampness related problems (mold spots, damp stains, water damage and condensation were all risk factors for perceptions of odors and sensations of humid air and dry air, as was the presence of cockroaches, rats, and mosquitoes/flies, use of mosquito-repellent incense and incense. Protective factors included cleaning the child's bedroom every day and frequently exposing bedding to sunshine. In conclusion, adults' perceptions of odors and sensations of humid air and dry air are related to factors of the home environment and SBS symptoms are related to odor perceptions.

  7. Modeling and simulation of the transient response of temperature and relative humidity sensors with and without protective housing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller Sullivan Oliveira Rocha

    Full Text Available Based on the necessity for enclosure protection of temperature and relative humidity sensors installed in a hostile environment, a wind tunnel was used to quantify the time that the sensors take to reach equilibrium in the environmental conditions to which they are exposed. Two treatments were used: (1 sensors with polyvinyl chloride (PVC enclosure protection, and (2 sensors with no enclosure protection. The primary objective of this study was to develop and validate a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD model for analyzing the temperature and relative humidity distribution in a wind tunnel using sensors with PVC enclosure protection and sensors with no enclosure protection. A CFD simulation model was developed to describe the temperature distribution and the physics of mass transfer related to the airflow relative humidity. The first results demonstrate the applicability of the simulation. For verification, a sensor device was successfully assembled and tested in an environment that was optimized to ensure fast change conditions. The quantification setup presented in this paper is thus considered to be adequate for testing different materials and morphologies for enclosure protection. The results show that the boundary layer flow regime has a significant impact on the heat flux distribution. The results indicate that the CFD technique is a powerful tool which provides a detailed description of the flow and temperature fields as well as the time that the relative humidity takes to reach equilibrium with the environment in which the sensors are inserted.

  8. Absorbing aerosols at high relative humidity: linking hygroscopic growth to optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michel Flores

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the major uncertainties in the understanding of Earth's climate system is the interaction between solar radiation and aerosols in the atmosphere. Aerosols exposed to high humidity will change their chemical, physical, and optical properties due to their increased water content. To model hydrated aerosols, atmospheric chemistry and climate models often use the volume weighted mixing rule to predict the complex refractive index (RI of aerosols when they interact with high relative humidity, and, in general, assume homogeneous mixing. This study explores the validity of these assumptions. A humidified cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer (CRD-AS and a tandem hygroscopic DMA (differential mobility analyzer are used to measure the extinction coefficient and hygroscopic growth factors of humidified aerosols, respectively. The measurements are performed at 80% and 90%RH at wavelengths of 532 nm and 355 nm using size-selected aerosols with different degrees of absorption; from purely scattering to highly absorbing particles. The ratio of the humidified to the dry extinction coefficients (fRHext(%RH, Dry is measured and compared to theoretical calculations based on Mie theory. Using the measured hygroscopic growth factors and assuming homogeneous mixing, the expected RIs using the volume weighted mixing rule are compared to the RIs derived from the extinction measurements.

    We found a weak linear dependence or no dependence of fRH(%RH, Dry with size for hydrated absorbing aerosols in contrast to the non-monotonically decreasing behavior with size for purely scattering aerosols. No discernible difference could be made between the two wavelengths used. Less than 7% differences were found between the real parts of the complex refractive indices derived and those calculated using the volume weighted mixing rule, and the imaginary parts had up to a 20% difference. However, for substances with growth factor less than 1

  9. Investigating soil water retention characteristics at high suctions using relative humidity control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantikos Vasileios

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique for controlling relative humidity (RH is presented, which involves supplying a sealed chamber with a continuous flow of air at a computer-regulated RH. The desired value of RH is achieved by mixing dry and wet air at appropriate volumes and is measured for servo-control at three locations in the chamber with capacitive RH sensors and checked with a sensitive VAISALA sensor. The setup is capable of controlling RH steadily and continuously with a deviation of less than 0.2% RH. The technique was adopted to determine wetting soil-water retention curves (SWRC of statically compacted London Clay, under both free-swelling and constant volume conditions. The RH within the chamber was increased in a step-wise fashion, with each step maintained until vapour equilibrium between the chamber atmosphere and the soil samples was established. Independent filter paper measurements further validate the method, while the obtained retention curves complement those available in the literature for lower ranges of suction.

  10. Optical fibre Fabry-Perot relative humidity sensor based on HCPCF and chitosan film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Jiang, Mingshun; Sui, Qingmei; Geng, Xiangyi

    2016-09-01

    An optical fibre Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) sensor for relative humidity (RH) measurement is proposed. The FPI is formed by splicing a short section of hollow-core photonic crystal fibre(HCPCF) to single mode fibre and covering a chitosan film at the end of HCPCF. The refractive index of chitosan and film thickness will change with ambient RH, leading to the change in the reflected interference spectrum of FPI. RH response of the FPI sensor is analysed theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. It shows nonlinear response to RH values from 35 to 95%RH. The interference fringe shifts to shorter wavelength as RH increases with a maximum sensitivity of 0.28 nm/%RH at high RH level. And the fringe contrast also decreases as RH increases with an available maximum sensitivity of 0.5 dB/%RH. The sensor shows good stability and fast response time less than 1 min. With its advantages of compact structure, good performance, simple and safe fabrication, the proposed optical fibre FPI sensor has great potential for RH sensing.

  11. Sulfuric acid nucleation: power dependencies, variation with relative humidity, and effect of bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Zollner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleation of particles composed of sulfuric acid, water, and nitrogen base molecules was studied using a continuous flow reactor. The particles formed from these vapors were detected with an ultrafine condensation particle counter, while vapors of sulfuric acid and nitrogen bases were detected by chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Variation of particle numbers with sulfuric acid concentration yielded a power dependency on sulfuric acid of 5 ± 1 for relative humidities of 14–68% at 296 K; similar experiments with varying water content yielded power dependencies on H2O of ~7. The critical cluster contains about 5 H2SO4 molecules and a new treatment of the power dependency for H2O suggests about 12 H2O molecules for these conditions. Addition of 2-to-45 pptv of ammonia or methyl amine resulted in up to millions of times more particles than in the absence of these compounds. Particle detection efficiencies, sulfuric acid and nitrogen base detection, wall losses, and the extent of particle growth are discussed with the help of a recent computational fluid dynamics study that simulated the flow and chemistry in the flow reactor. Results are compared to previous laboratory nucleation studies and they are also discussed in terms of atmospheric nucleation scenarios.

  12. Tailoring the grooved texture of electrospun polystyrene nanofibers by controlling the solvent system and relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have successfully fabricated electrospun polystyrene (PS) nanofibers having a diameter of 326 ± 50 nm with a parallel grooved texture using a mixed solvent of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). We discovered that solvent system, solution concentration, and relative humidity were the three key factors to the formation of grooved texture and the diameter of nanofibers. We demonstrated that grooved nanofibers with desired properties (e.g., different numbers of grooves, widths between two adjacent grooves, and depths of grooves) could be electrospun under certain conditions. When THF/DMF ratio was higher than 2:1, the formation mechanism of single grooved texture should be attributed to the formation of voids on the jet surface at the early stage of electrospinning and subsequent elongation and solidification of the voids into a line surface structure. When THF/DMF ratio was 1:1, the formation mechanism of grooved texture should be ascribed to the formation of wrinkled surface on the jet surface at the early stage of electrospinning and subsequent elongation into a grooved texture. Such findings can serve as guidelines for the preparation of grooved nanofibers with desired secondary morphology. PMID:25114643

  13. Effects of relative humidity on the characterization of a photochemical smog chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaoshuo Hu; Yongfu Xu; Long Jia

    2011-01-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in many atmospheric chemical reactions.A self-made indoor environmental smog chamber was used to investigate the effects of relative humidity (RH) on its characterization,which included the wall effects of reactive species such as O3 and NOx,and the determination of chamber-dependent OH radicals in terms of CO-NOx irradiation experiments.Results showed that the rate constant of O3 wall losses increased with increasing RH,and that their relationship was linearly significant.Although RH affected the rate constant of NOx wall losses,their relationship was not statistically significant.Background air generated a small amount of ozone at both high and low RH.When RH varied from 5% to 79%,the apparent rate constant kNO2→HONO for the conversion of NO2 into gas phase HONO was estimated in the range of 0.70× 10-3-2.5× 10-3 min-1.A linear relationship between kNO2-HoNo and RH was obtained as kNO2-HONO (10-3 min-1) =-0.0255RH + 2.64,with R2 and P value being 0.978 and < 0.01.To our knowledge,this is the first report on their relationship.The generation mechanism for HONO and OH was also discussed in this work.

  14. The Effects of Relative Humidity on the Flowability and Dispersion Performance of Lactose Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiang-Yun; Chen, Lan; Wu, Chuan-Yu; Chan, Hak-Kim; Freeman, Tim

    2017-05-29

    The flowability and dispersion behavior are two important physicochemical properties of pharmaceutical formulations for dry powder inhalers (DPIs). They are usually affected by the environmental conditions, such as temperature and relative humidity (RH). However, very few studies have been focused on the relationship between the two properties and their dependence on RH during storage. In this research, model pharmaceutical formulations were prepared using mixtures of coarse and fine lactose. The fractions of fines in the mixtures were 0%, 5%, 10%, and 20%, respectively. These blends were stored at four different RH levels, 0%, 30%, 58%, and 85%, for 48 h. The FT4 Powder Rheometer was used to evaluate the powder flowability, and the Malvern Spraytec(®) laser diffraction system was employed to assess the powder dispersion performance. The results indicated that both the flow and dispersion properties of lactose blends deteriorate after being stored at 85% RH, but improved after being conditioned at 58% RH. The fine particle fractions (FPFs) of the blends with 5% and 10% fine fractions and the as-received coarse lactose decreased when they were conditioned at 30% RH. For the blend with 20% fine fraction, a high RH during storage (i.e., 85% RH) affected the dispersion property, but had a limited influence on its flowability, while, for the coarse lactose powder, the different RH conditions affected its flowability, but not the dispersion results. A strong correlation between the powder flowability and its dispersion performance was found.

  15. THE IMPACT OF LABORATORY AIR TEMPERATURE AND RELATIVE HUMIDITY ON BENTONITE WATER ABSORPTION CAPACITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Strgar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite, which is a mineral component of geosynthetic clay liners, has important physical and chemical properties that ensure very small hydraulic permeability. The main component of bentonite is a clay mineral called sodium montmorillonite whose very low permeability is due to its ability to swell. The deposits of bentonite are spread all over the world, however, only a very small number of those deposits satisfies all the quality and durability demands that must be met if the bentonite is to be used in the sealing barriers. Depending on the location of installation and their purpose, geosynthetic clay liners must meet certain requirements. Their compatibility with the prescribed criterion is confirmed through various laboratory procedures. Amongst them are tests examining the index indicators (free swell index, fluid loss index, and water absorption capacity. This paper presents results regarding the impact of laboratory air temperature and relative humidity of the testing area on the water absorption capacity. This is one of the criteria that bentonite must satisfy during the quality and durability control of the mineral component of geosynthetic clay liner (the paper is published in Croatian.

  16. Degradation kinetics of catechins in green tea powder: effects of temperature and relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Taylor, Lynne S; Mauer, Lisa J

    2011-06-08

    The stability of catechins in green tea powders is important for product shelf life and delivering health benefits. Most published kinetic studies of catechin degradation have been conducted with dilute solutions and, therefore, are limited in applicability to powder systems. In this study, spray-dried green tea extract powders were stored under various relative humidity (RH) (43-97%) and temperature (25-60 °C) conditions for up to 16 weeks. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine catechin contents. Catechin degradation kinetics were affected by RH and temperature, but temperature was the dominant factor. Kinetic models as functions of RH and temperature for the individual 2,3-cis-configured catechins (EGCG, EGC, ECG, and EC) were established. The reaction rate constants of catechin degradation also followed the Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) relationship. This study provides a powerful prediction approach for the shelf life of green tea powder and highlights the importance of glass transition in solid state kinetics studies.

  17. High relative humidity increases yield, harvest index, flowering, and gynophore growth of hydroponically grown peanut plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortley, D. G.; Bonsi, C. K.; Loretan, P. A.; Hill, W. A.; Morris, C. E.

    2000-01-01

    Growth chamber experiments were conducted to study the physiological and growth response of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) to 50% and 85% relative humidity (RH). The objective was to determine the effects of RH on pod and seed yield, harvest index, and flowering of peanut grown by the nutrient film technique (NFT). 'Georgia Red' peanut plants (14 days old) were planted into growth channels (0.15 x 0.15 x 1.2 m). Plants were spaced 25 cm apart with 15 cm between channels. A modified half-Hoagland solution with an additional 2 mM Ca was used. Solution pH was maintained between 6.4 and 6.7, and electrical conductivity (EC) ranged between 1100 and 1200 microS cm-1. Temperature regimes of 28/22 degrees C were maintained during the light/dark periods (12 hours each) with photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) at canopy level of 500 micromoles-m-2s-1. Foliage and pod fresh and dry weights, total seed yield, harvest index (HI), and seed maturity were greater at high than at low RH. Plants grown at 85% RH had greater total and individual leaflet area and stomatal conductance, flowered 3 days earlier and had a greater number of flowers reaching anthesis. Gynophores grew more rapidly at 85% than at 50% RH.

  18. High relative humidity increases yield, harvest index, flowering, and gynophore growth of hydroponically grown peanut plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortley, D. G.; Bonsi, C. K.; Loretan, P. A.; Hill, W. A.; Morris, C. E.

    2000-01-01

    Growth chamber experiments were conducted to study the physiological and growth response of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) to 50% and 85% relative humidity (RH). The objective was to determine the effects of RH on pod and seed yield, harvest index, and flowering of peanut grown by the nutrient film technique (NFT). 'Georgia Red' peanut plants (14 days old) were planted into growth channels (0.15 x 0.15 x 1.2 m). Plants were spaced 25 cm apart with 15 cm between channels. A modified half-Hoagland solution with an additional 2 mM Ca was used. Solution pH was maintained between 6.4 and 6.7, and electrical conductivity (EC) ranged between 1100 and 1200 microS cm-1. Temperature regimes of 28/22 degrees C were maintained during the light/dark periods (12 hours each) with photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) at canopy level of 500 micromoles-m-2s-1. Foliage and pod fresh and dry weights, total seed yield, harvest index (HI), and seed maturity were greater at high than at low RH. Plants grown at 85% RH had greater total and individual leaflet area and stomatal conductance, flowered 3 days earlier and had a greater number of flowers reaching anthesis. Gynophores grew more rapidly at 85% than at 50% RH.

  19. The Nottingham energy, health and housing study: reducing relative humidity, dust mites and asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretlove, S.E.C. [South Bank University, London (United Kingdom); Critchley, R. [Health and Housing Group, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Howard, R. [NEA, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Oreszczyn, T. [University College, London (United Kingdom). The Bartlett

    2002-04-01

    This paper describes the Nottingham energy, health and housing study, a project where seven Nottingham City Council households subject to either fuel poverty or heat poverty have been refurbished to improve the internal environmental conditions and therefore the health of the occupants. The main aim was to provide improvements in ventilation, insulation, draughtproofing and heating control in the dwellings. An intervention study was carried out in the seven dwellings where temperature, relative humidity, health, dust mite numbers and ventilation were measured before the introduction of a range of heating, ventilation and insulation improvements. These were then monitored again a year later. The results of the study indicate that with a limited budget, significant improvements have been realized in the comfort levels of the occupants and in their health. Modelling of the environmental conditions and energy consumption in each dwelling has been carried out using the steady-state Condensation Targeter II model. Comparisons between the model predictions and the measured data show that Condensation Targeter II can be used as an effective tool for selecting the most appropriate design modifications for an individual dwelling and can assess the impact that these modifications will have on the energy efficiency of the dwelling and the health of the occupants. (author)

  20. Decomposition of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAHs) on Mineral Surface under Controlled Relative Humidity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuji TAMAMURA; Tsutomu SATO; Yukie OTA; Ning TANG; Kazuichi HAYAKAWA

    2006-01-01

    The fate of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) residing in the atmosphere has received enormous attention in recent years due to their mutagenic and carcinogenic risks on human health. In this context, the stability of pyrene (as a representative PAHs) on quartz, alumina,montmoriilonite, kaolinite, humic acid and quartz coated with sorbed humic acid was investigated at controlled relative humidity (RH: i.e. 5% and 30%) without light irradiation in order to detect the presence of catalytic effect of mineral surface on PAHs decomposition. The stability of pyrene was found to depend strongly on the physicochemical properties of the substrates. Quartz showed a strong catalytic effect for the decomposition of pyrene even though it was coated with sorbed humic acid.Pyrene sorbed on montmorillonite and humic acid remained stable during the experimental period (i.e.3 days). Moisture in the experimental cell also affected the stability of pyrene in particular minerals.Especially, pyrene sorbed on alumina was rapidly decomposed at higher RH. However, there were almost no effect in the case of quartz, kaolinite and humic acid. Depending on the physicochemical properties of aerosols and RH, PAHs associated with minerals in the atmosphere would be decomposed and/or stably reside in the atmosphere.

  1. A distribution law for relative humidity in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere derived from three years of MOZAIC measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierens, K.; Schumann, U. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Helten, M.; Smit, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie und Dynamik der Geosphaere 2: Chemie der Belasteten Atmosphaere; Marenco, A. [CNRS, 31 - Toulouse (France). Lab. d`Aerologie

    1998-11-01

    Data of three years of MOZAIC measurements made it possible to determine a distribution law for the relative humidity in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. 13.5% of the data were obtained in regions with ice supersaturation. Troposphere and stratosphere are distinguished by an ozone concentration of 130 ppbv as threshold. The degree of ice supersaturation in the troposphere and the relative humidity in the stratosphere (both with respect to water and ice) are distributed exponentially. A model that can explain the exponential distribution is provided. Mean supersaturation in the troposphere is about 15%, whereas ice nucleation requires 30% supersaturation on the average. This explains the frequency of ice supersaturated regions which are only marked by persistent contrails, but are otherwise free of clouds. Ice supersaturated regions are 3-4 K colder and contain more than 50% more vapour than other regions in the upper troposphere. The stratosphere is dry, as expected, having mean relative humidity over water of 12% and over ice of 23%, respectively. However, 2% of the stratospheric data indicate ice supersaturation. Since water vapour is the most important greenhouse gas and since it might enhance the anthropogenic greenhouse effects via positive feedback mechanisms, it is important to represent its distribution correctly in climate models. The discovery of the distribution law of the relative humidity makes possible simple tests whether the hydrological cycle in climate models is represented in an adequate way or not. (orig.) 21 refs.

  2. Determination of partition and diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde in selected building materials and impact of relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Zhang, Jianshun S; Liu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Zhi

    2012-06-01

    The partition and effective diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde were measured for three materials (conventional gypsum wallboard, "green" gypsum wallboard, and "green" carpet) under three relative humidity (RH) conditions (20%, 50%, and 70% RH). The "green" materials contained recycled materials and were friendly to environment. A dynamic dual-chamber test method was used. Results showed that a higher relative humidity led to a larger effective diffusion coefficient for two kinds of wallboards and carpet. The carpet was also found to be very permeable resulting in an effective diffusion coefficient at the same order of magnitude with the formaldehyde diffusion coefficient in air. The partition coefficient (K(ma)) of formaldehyde in conventional wallboard was 1.52 times larger at 50% RH than at 20% RH, whereas it decreased slightly from 50% to 70% RH, presumably due to the combined effects of water solubility of formaldehyde and micro-pore blocking by condensed moisture at the high RH level. The partition coefficient of formaldehyde increased slightly with the increase of relative humidity in "green" wallboard and "green" carpet. At the same relative humidity level, the "green" wallboard had larger partition coefficient and effective diffusion coefficient than the conventional wallboard, presumably due to the micro-pore structure differences between the two materials. The data generated could be used to assess the sorption effects of formaldehyde on building materials and to evaluate its impact on the formaldehyde concentration in buildings.

  3. Influence of relative humidity and physical load during storage on dustiness of inorganic nanomaterials: implications for testing and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Marcus; Rojas, Elena; Vanhala, Esa

    2015-01-01

    Dustiness testing using a down-scaled EN15051 rotating drum was used to investigate the effects of storage conditions such as relative humidity and physical loading on the dustiness of five inorganic metal oxide nanostructured powder materials. The tests consisted of measurements of gravimetrical...

  4. Modeling the effects of temperature and relative humidity on gas exchange of prickly pear cactus (Opuntia spp.) stems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guevara-Arauza, J.C.; Yahia, E.M.; Cedeno, L.; Tijskens, L.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    A model to estimate gas profile of modified atmosphere packaged (MAP) prickly pear cactus stems was developed and calibrated. The model describes the transient gas exchange taking in consideration the effect of temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) on film permeability (FPgas), respiration rate

  5. Spore release of Bremia lactucae on lettuce is affected by timing of light initiation and decrease in relative humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, H.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Subbarao, K.V.

    2000-01-01

    A suction-impaction mini-spore trap was developed to study the effect of light initiation and decreasing relative humidity (RH) on spore release of Bremia lactucae in a controlled environment. Three light periods (from 0400 to 1600, 0600 to 1800, and 0800 to 2000 h, circadian time) at a constant RH

  6. Lower-tropospheric humidity: climatology, trends and the relation to the ITCZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Läderach

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The tropical region is an area of maximum humidity and serves as the major humidity source of the globe. Among other phenomena, it is governed by the so-called Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ which is commonly defined by converging low-level winds or enhanced precipitation. Given its importance as a humidity source, we investigate the humidity fields in the tropics in different reanalysis data sets, deduce the climatology and variability and assess the relationship to the ITCZ. Therefore, a new analysis method of the specific humidity distribution is introduced which allows detecting the location of the humidity maximum, the strength and the meridional extent. The results show that the humidity maximum in boreal summer is strongly shifted northward over the warm pool/Asia Monsoon area and the Gulf of Mexico. These shifts go along with a peak in the strength in both areas; however, the extent shrinks over the warm pool/Asia Monsoon area, whereas it is wider over the Gulf of Mexico. In winter, such connections between location, strength and extent are not found. Still, a peak in strength is again identified over the Gulf of Mexico in boreal winter. The variability of the three characteristics is dominated by inter-annual signals in both seasons. The results using ERA-interim data suggest a positive trend in the Gulf of Mexico/Atlantic region from 1979 to 2010, showing an increased northward shift in the recent years. Although the trend is only weakly confirmed by the results using MERRA reanalysis data, it is in phase with a trend in hurricane activity – a possible hint of the importance of the new method on hurricanes. Furthermore, the position of the maximum humidity coincides with one of the ITCZ in most areas. One exception is the western and central Pacific, where the area is dominated by the double ITCZ in boreal winter. Nevertheless, the new method enables us to gain more insight into the humidity distribution, its variability and

  7. Influence of high temperatures and relative humidity on heat exchange of miners subjected to measured physical load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapik, Z.; Lyubchin' ska-Koval' ska, V.; Kozerovski, Ch.; Yuzva, V.; Tsader, Ya.; Ponerevka, E.; Paradovski, L.; Stolyarska, B.

    1987-12-01

    Investigates influence of microclimate of mines (temperature and humidity) on health of miners. Two groups of healthy men (18 to 45 and 46 to 58 years of age) performed controlled amounts of physical work on a bicycle ergometer under conditions of microclimate of mines at temperatures of 28 to 34 C and relative humidity of 100%. Increase in body heat of miners was measured by a thermocouple in the external auditory meatus 1 to 2 mm from the eardrum. Results showed a significant increase in internal temperature of body and that internal temperature of body rises with increases in external temperatures from 28 to 34 C. Conditions of test in which healthy men carry out controlled work loads significantly decrease removal of endogenous heat from body. Humidity of 100% eliminates removal of body heat by evaporation, radiation and convection. Overheating of body produces exhaustion, loss of concentration, limits diuresis and thickens urine. Miners over 45 years of age overheat more than younger men under the same conditions and work loads; men of greater body weight exhibit the same response. Tables determining approximate energy demands at the time of carrying out controlled physical work loads must take into consideration size of body, temperature of work place and relative humidity of air. 6 refs.

  8. Relative effects of temperature, light, and humidity on clinging behavior of metacercariae-infected ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botnevik, C.F.; Malagocka, Joanna; Jensen, Annette Bruun

    2016-01-01

    . This behavior, hypothesized to involve cramping of the mandibular muscles in a state of tetany, was observed in naturally infected F. polyctena under controlled temperature, light, and humidity conditions. We found that low temperature significantly stimulated and maintained tetany in infected ants while light......, humidity, ant size, and infection intensity had no influence on this behavior. Under none of the experimental conditions did uninfected ants attach to vegetation, demonstrating that tetany was induced by D. dendriticum . Temperature likely has a direct impact on the initiation of clinging behavior...

  9. Aerosols, light, and water: Measurements of aerosol optical properties at different relative humidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Daniel

    The Earth's atmosphere is composed of a large number of different gases as well as tiny suspended particles, both in solid and liquid state. These tiny particles, called atmospheric aerosols, have an immense impact on our health and on our global climate. Atmospheric aerosols influence the Earth's radiation budget both directly and indirectly. In the direct effect, aerosols scatter and absorb sunlight changing the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. Aerosols indirectly influence the Earth's radiation budget by modifying the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds as well as their water content and lifetime. In ambient conditions, aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth due to the influence of relative humidity (RH), scattering more light than when the particles are dry. The quantitative knowledge of the RH effect and its influence on the light scattering coefficient and, in particular, on the phase function and polarization of aerosol particles is of substantial importance when comparing ground based observations with other optical aerosol measurements techniques such satellite and sunphotometric retrievals of aerosol optical depth and their inversions. This dissertation presents the aerosol hygroscopicity experiment investigated using a novel dryer-humidifier system, coupled to a TSI-3563 nephelometer, to obtain the light scattering coefficient (sp) as a function of relative humidity (RH) in hydration and dehydration modes. The measurements were performed in Porterville, CA (Jan 10-Feb 6, 2013), Baltimore, MD (Jul 3-30, 2013), and Golden, CO (Jul 12-Aug 10, 2014). Observations in Porterville and Golden were part of the NASA-sponsored DISCOVER-AQ project. The measured sp under varying RH in the three sites was combined with ground aerosol extinction, PM2:5mass concentrations, particle composition measurements, and compared with airborne observations performed during campaigns. The enhancement factor, f(RH), defined as the ratio of sp

  10. Effect of different relative humidities on the oil extracted from stored cottonseed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmy, H. E.

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Effect of different relative humidities (room, 10%, 46% and 97% R. H. on the oil extracted from cottonseed stored for one year was studied. The oil extracted from recent non-stored cottonseed was used as a control. Moisture content and oil content in the seed and acid value, peroxide value and percentage gossypol in the oil were determined. The results obtained for the oil extracted from the seed stored under (room, 10% and 46% R. H. showed a slight difference with the results obtained for the oil extracted from the non-stored conttonseed, while the results of the oil extracted from the seed stored under 97% R. H. showed a considerable difference. Fatty acids composition and unsaturated: saturated fatty acids ratio (U:S were also evaluated in previous oils. Unsaturated fatty acids were decreased by storage. Accordingly U:S was also decreased. Effect of relative humidity during storage of the cottonseeds on refining and bleaching of the oil was also investigated. The oil of the cottonseed stored under (room, 10% and 46% R. H. was satisfactorily refined and bleached, givining oils with good colour. While the oil of the cottonseed stored under 97% R. H. could not be satisfactorily refined and bleached. The oil was very dark in colour and did not response to refining and bleaching.

    Se ha estudiado el efecto de diferentes humedades relativas (ambiente, 10%, 46% y 97% en aceites extraídos de semilla de algodón almacenada durante un año. Se utilizó como control el aceite extraído de semilla de algodón reciente no almacenada. Se determinó la riqueza grasa y humedad en la semilla y el índice de acidez, índice de peróxidos y el porcentaje de gosipol en el aceite. Los resultados obtenidos para el aceite extraído a partir de la semilla almacenada bajo las condiciones de humedades relativas (ambiente, 10% y 46% mostraron una ligera diferencia con los resultados obtenidos para el aceite extraído a partir de semilla de algodón no almacenada

  11. High resolution dynamical downscaling of air temperature and relative humidity: performance assessment of WRF for Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Isilda; Pereira, Mário; Moreira, Demerval; Carvalheiro, Luís; Bugalho, Lourdes; Corte-Real, João

    2017-04-01

    Air temperature and relative humidity are two of the atmospheric variables with higher impact on human and natural systems, contributing to define the stress/comfortable conditions, affecting the productivity and health of the individuals as well as diminishing the resilience to other environmental hazards. Atmospheric regional models, driven by large scale forecasts from global circulation models, are the best way to reproduce such environmental conditions in high space-time resolution. This study is focused on the performance assessment of the WRF mesoscale model to perform high resolution dynamical downscaling for Portugal with three two-way nested grids, at 60 km, 20 km and 5 km horizontal resolution. The simulations of WRF models were produced with different initial and boundary forcing conditions. The NCEP-FNL Operational Global Analysis data available on 1-degree by 1-degree grid every six hours and ERA-Interim reanalyses dataset were used to drive the models. Two alternative configurations of the WRF model, including planetary boundary, layer schemes, microphysics, land-surface models, radiation schemes, were used and tested within the 5 km spatial resolution domain. Simulations of air temperature and relative humidity were produced for January and July of 2016 and compared with the observed datasets provided by the Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera (IPMA) for 83 weather stations. Different performance measures of bias, precision, and accuracy were used, namely normalized bias, standard deviation, mean absolute error, root mean square error, bias of root mean square error as well as correlation based measures (e.g., coefficient of determination) and goodness of fit measures (index of agreement). Main conclusions from the obtained results reveal: (i) great similarity between the spatial patterns of the simulated and observed fields; (ii) only small differences between simulations produced with ERA-Interim and NCEP-FNL, in spite of some differences

  12. Sanitizing radish seeds by simultaneous treatments with gaseous chlorine dioxide, high relative humidity, and mild heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Jihyun; Choi, Moonhak; Son, Hyeri; Beuchat, Larry R; Kim, Yoonsook; Kim, Hoikyung; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2016-11-21

    Sanitizing radish seeds intended for edible sprout production was achieved by applying simultaneous treatments with gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2), high relative humidity (RH, 100%), and mild heat (55°C). Gaseous ClO2 was produced from aqueous ClO2 (0.66ml) by mixing sulfuric acid (5% w/v) with sodium chlorite (10 mg/mL) in a sealed container (1.8L). Greater amounts of gaseous ClO2 were measured at 23% RH (144ppm after 6h) than at 100% RH (66ppm after 6h); however, the lethal activity of gaseous ClO2 against naturally occurring mesophilic aerobic bacteria (MAB) on radish seeds was significantly enhanced at 100% RH. For example, when exposed to gaseous ClO2 at 23% RH, the number of MAB on radish seeds decreased from 3.7logCFU/g to 2.6logCFU/g after 6h. However, when exposed to gaseous ClO2 at 100% RH for 6h, the MAB population decreased to 0.7logCFU/g after 6h. Gaseous ClO2 was produced in higher amounts at 55°C than at 25°C, but decreased more rapidly over time at 55°C than at 25°C. The lethal activity of gaseous ClO2 against MAB on radish seeds was greater at 55°C than at 25°C. When radish seeds were treated with gaseous ClO2 (peak concentration: 195ppm) at 100% RH and 55°C, MAB were reduced to populations below the detectable level (0.05) decreased after treatment for 6h. The information reported here will be useful when developing decontamination strategies for producing microbiologically safe radish seed sprouts.

  13. Influence of temperature and relative humidity conditions on the pan coating of hydroxypropyl cellulose molded capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Elena; Zema, Lucia; Pandey, Preetanshu; Gazzaniga, Andrea; Felton, Linda A

    2016-03-01

    In a previous study, hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC)-based capsular shells prepared by injection molding and intended for pulsatile release were successfully coated with 10mg/cm(2) Eudragit® L film. The suitability of HPC capsules for the development of a colon delivery platform based on a time dependent approach was demonstrated. In the present work, data logging devices (PyroButton®) were used to monitor the microenvironmental conditions, i.e. temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH), during coating processes performed under different spray rates (1.2, 2.5 and 5.5g/min). As HPC-based capsules present special features, a preliminary study was conducted on commercially available gelatin capsules for comparison purposes. By means of PyroButton data-loggers it was possible to acquire information about the impact of the effective T and RH conditions experienced by HPC substrates during the process on the technological properties and release performance of the coated systems. The use of increasing spray rates seemed to promote a tendency of the HPC shells to slightly swell at the beginning of the spraying process; moreover, capsules coated under spray rates of 1.2 and 2.5g/min showed the desired release performance, i.e. ability to withstand the acidic media followed by the pulsatile release expected for uncoated capsules. Preliminary stability studies seemed to show that coating conditions might also influence the release performance of the system upon storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ozone decomposition kinetics on alumina: effects of ozone partial pressure, relative humidity and repeated oxidation cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sullivan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The room temperature kinetics of gas-phase ozone loss via heterogeneous interactions with thin alumina films has been studied in real-time using 254nm absorption spectroscopy to monitor ozone concentrations. The films were prepared from dispersions of fine alumina powder in methanol and their surface areas were determined by an in situ procedure using adsorption of krypton at 77K. The alumina was found to lose reactivity with increasing ozone exposure. However, some of the lost reactivity could be recovered over timescales of days in an environment free of water, ozone and carbon dioxide. From multiple exposures of ozone to the same film, it was found that the number of active sites is large, greater than 1.4x1014 active sites per cm2 of surface area or comparable to the total number of surface sites. The films maintain some reactivity at this point, which is consistent with there being some degree of active site regeneration during the experiment and with ozone loss being catalytic to some degree. The initial uptake coefficients on fresh films were found to be inversely dependent on the ozone concentration, varying from roughly 10-6 for ozone concentrations of 1014 molecules/cm3 to 10-5 at 1013 molecules/cm3. The initial uptake coefficients were not dependent on the relative humidity, up to 75%, within the precision of the experiment. The reaction mechanism is discussed, as well as the implications these results have for assessing the effect of mineral dust on atmospheric oxidant levels.

  15. Effects of ozone and relative humidity on fluorescence spectra of octapeptide bioaerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Hill, Steven C.; Williamson, Chatt C.; Coleman, Mark; Bare, Christopher; Kinahan, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ozone and relative humidity (RH) at common atmospheric levels on the properties of single octapeptide bioaerosol particles were studied using an improved rotating reaction chamber, an aerosol generator, an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS), an improved single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS), and equipments to generate, monitor and control the ozone and RH. Aerosol particles (mean diameter 2 μm) were generated from a slurry of octapeptide in phosphate buffered saline, injected into the rotating chamber, and kept airborne for hours. Bioaerosols were sampled from the chamber hourly for the measurements of particle-size distribution, concentration, total fluorescence excited at 355-nm, and single particle fluorescence spectra excited at 266-nm and 351-nm under different controlled RH (20%, 50%, or 80%) and ozone concentration (0 or 150 ppb). The results show that: (1) Particle size, concentration, and the 263-nm-excited fluorescence intensity decrease at different rates under different combinations of the RH and ozone concentrations used. (2) The 263-nm-excited UV fluorescence (280-400 nm) decreased more rapidly than the 263-nm-excited visible fluorescence (400-560 nm), and decreased most rapidly when ozone is present and RH is high. (3) The UV fluorescence peak near 340 nm slightly shifts to the shorter wavelength (blue-shift), consistent with a more rapid oxidation of tryptophan than tyrosine. (4) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence (430-580 nm/380-700 nm) increases when ozone is present, especially when the RH is high. (5) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence increase that occurs as the tryptophan emission in the UV decreases, and the observation that these changes occur more rapidly at higher RH with the present of ozone, are consistent with the oxidation of tryptophan by ozone and the conversion of the resulting ozonides to N-formyl kynurenine and kynurenine.

  16. A relative humidity profile retrieval from Megha-Tropiques observations without explicit thermodynamical constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivira, R. G.; Brogniez, H.; Mallet, C.; Oussar, Y.

    2014-09-01

    A statistical method trained and optimized to retrieve relative humidity (RH) profiles is presented and evaluated with measurements from radiosoundings. The method makes use of the microwave payload of the Megha-Tropiques plateform, namely the SAPHIR sounder and the MADRAS imager. The approach, based on a Generalized Additive Model (GAM), embeds both the physical and statistical characteritics of the inverse problem in the training phase and no explicit thermodynamical constraint, such as a temperature profile or an integrated water vapor content, is provided to the model at the stage of retrieval. The model is built for cloud-free conditions in order to avoid the cases of scattering of the microwave radiation in the 18.7-183.31 GHz range covered by the payload. Two instrumental configurations are tested: a SAPHIR-MADRAS scheme and a SAPHIR-only scheme, to deal with the stop of data acquisition of MADRAS in January 2013 for technical reasons. A comparison to retrievals based on the Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) technique and on the Least Square-Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM) shows equivalent performance over a large realistic set, promising low errors (bias 0.8) throughout the troposphere (150-900 hPa). A comparison to radiosounding measurements performed during the international field experiment CINDY/DYNAMO/AMIE of winter 2011-2012 confirms these results for the mid-tropospheric layers (correlation between 0.6 and 0.92), with an expected degradation of the quality of the estimates at the surface and top layers. Finally a rapid insight of the large-scale RH field from Megha-Tropiques is discussed and compared to ERA-Interim.

  17. Micro-shear bond strength of adhesive resins to enamel at different relative humidity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavbek, Andaç Barkın; Demir, Erhan; Goktas, Barış; Ozcopur, Betül; Behram, Benin; Eskitascioglu, Gürcan; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    This study tested whether exhaled humid conditions would affect the adhesion of etch-and-rinse, two-step and one-step self-etch adhesive resins to enamel. Enamel surfaces of human maxillary anterior teeth (N=240, n=20) were exposed to four humid conditions (H1: 63-68%, H2: 73-78%, H3: 93-98%, H4: 36-45% RH) during bonding with Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2), Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) and Adper Easy Bond (AEB). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 ºC for 24 h and tested to failure using micro-shear bond strength (μSBS) test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (penamel with SB2, CSE and AEB was not significantly affected by humidity parameters. AEB resulted in significantly lower μSBS in all conditions. The frequency of adhesive failures was the highest at H2, H3 for SB2, H3 for CSE and H1-4 for AEB indicating that humidity conditions may decrease adhesion quality to enamel.

  18. Objective and Subjective Responses to Low Relative Humidity in an Office Intervention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagercrantz, Love Per; Wyon, David; Meyer, H. W.;

    2003-01-01

    and objective (clinical) measurements were applied. The following effects of increased humidity were significant, though small: the air was evaluated as less dry (though still on the dry side of neutral), eyes smarted less (by 10% of full scale) eye irritation decreased (by 11%), symptoms of dry throat, mouth...

  19. Particle backscatter and relative humidity measured across cirrus clouds and comparison with state-of-the-art cirrus modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brabec

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Advanced measurement and modelling techniques are employed to determine the partitioning of atmospheric water between the gas phase and the condensed phase in and around cirrus clouds, and thus to identify in-cloud and out-of-cloud supersaturations with respect to ice. In November 2008 the newly developed balloon-borne backscatter sonde COBALD (Compact Optical Backscatter and AerosoL Detector was flown 14 times together with a CFH (Cryogenic Frost point Hygrometer from Lindenberg, Germany (52° N, 14° E. The case discussed here in detail shows two cirrus layers with in-cloud relative humidities with respect to ice between 50% and 130%. Global operational analysis data of ECMWF (roughly 1° × 1° horizontal and 1 km vertical resolution, 6-hourly stored fields fail to represent ice water contents and relative humidities. Conversely, regional COSMO-7 forecasts (6.6 km × 6.6 km, 5-min stored fields capture the measured humidities and cloud positions remarkably well. The main difference between ECMWF and COSMO data is the resolution of small-scale vertical features responsible for cirrus formation. Nevertheless, ice water contents in COSMO-7 are still off by factors 2–10, likely reflecting limitations in COSMO's ice phase bulk scheme. Significant improvements can be achieved by comprehensive size-resolved microphysical and optical modelling along backward trajectories based on COSMO-7 wind and temperature fields, which allow accurate computation of humidities, ice particle size distributions and backscatter ratios at the COBALD wavelengths. However, only by superimposing small-scale temperature fluctuations, which remain unresolved by the NWP models, can we obtain a satisfying agreement with the observations and reconcile the measured in-cloud non-equilibrium humidities with conventional ice cloud microphysics.

  20. Influence of Temperature, Relative Humidity and Seasonal Variability on Ambient Air Quality in a Coastal Urban Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasamy Jayamurugan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of air pollutants in ambient air is governed by the meteorological parameters such as atmospheric wind speed, wind direction, relative humidity, and temperature. This study analyses the influence of temperature and relative humidity on ambient SO2, NOx, RSPM, and SPM concentrations at North Chennai, a coastal city in India, during monsoon, post-monsoon, summer, and pre-monsoon seasons for 2010-11 using regression analysis. The results of the study show that both SO2 and NOx were negatively correlated in summer (r2=0.25 for SO2 and r2=0.15 for NOx and moderately and positively correlated (r2=0.32 for SO2 and r2=0.51 for NOx during post-monsoon season with temperature. RSPM and SPM had positive correlation with temperature in all the seasons except post-monsoon one. These findings indicate that the influence of temperature on gaseous pollutant (SO2 & NOx is much more effective in summer than other seasons, due to higher temperature range, but in case of particulate, the correlation was found contradictory. The very weak to moderate correlations existing between the temperature and ambient pollutant concentration during all seasons indicate the influence of inconstant thermal variation in the coastal region. Statistically significant negative correlations were found between humidity and particulates (RSPM and SPM in all the four seasons, but level of correlation was found moderate only during monsoon (r2=0.51 and r2=0.41 in comparison with other three seasons and no significant correlation was found between humidity and SO2, NOx in all the seasons. It is suggested from this study that the influence of humidity is effective on subsiding particulates in the coastal region.

  1. Deliquescence and Efflorescence Processes of Aerosol Particles Studied by in situ FTIR and Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jun Zhao; Feng Wang; Kun Zhang; Qing-xuan Zeng; Yun-hong Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Deliquescence and efflorescence are the two most important physicochemical processes of aerosol particles.In deliquescence and efflorescence cycles of aerosol particles,many fundamental problems need to be investigated in detail on the molecular level,including ion and molecule interactions in supersaturated aerosols,metastable solid phases that may be formed,and microscopic structures and deliquescence mechanisms of aerosol particles.This paper presents a summary of the progress made in recent investigations of deliquescence and efflorescence processes of aerosol particles by four common spectral techniques,which are known as Raman/electrodynamic balance,Fourier transform infrared/aerosol flow tube,Fourier transform infrared/attenuated total reflection,and confocal Raman on a quartz substrate.

  2. Estimating the impact of air temperature and relative humidity change on the water quality of Lake Manzala, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehan A.H. Sallam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available By the late eighties the problem of climate change and its possible impacts had become an issue of global concern. Climate variables play an important role in controlling the water circulation and the water quality of lakes either as freshwater reservoirs, or as brackish lagoons. In Egypt, Lake Manzala is the largest and the most productive lake of the northern coastal lakes. In this study, continuous measurement data from the Real Time Water Quality Monitoring stations in Lake Manzala was statistically analyzed to determine the regional and seasonal variations of the selected water quality parameters in relation to changes in two climate variables: air temperature and relative humidity. Simple formulas are elaborated using the DataFit software to predict the selected water quality parameters of the Lake including Power of Hydrogen (pH, Dissolved Oxygen (DO, Electrical Conductivity (EC, Total Dissolved Solids (TDS, Turbidity, and Chlorophyll as a function of air temperature and relative humidity. It was revealed that there is a measured relation between air temperature and relative humidity and the pH, DO, EC and TDS parameters and there is no significant effect on the other two parameters: turbidity and chlorophyll.

  3. Role of Relative Humidity in Processing and Storage of Seeds and Assessment of Variability in Storage Behaviour in Brassica spp. and Eruca sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Suma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of relative humidity (RH while processing and storing seeds of Brassica spp. and Eruca sativa was investigated by creating different levels of relative humidity, namely, 75%, 50%, 32%, and 11% using different saturated salt solutions and 1% RH using concentrated sulphuric acid. The variability in seed storage behaviour of different species of Brassica was also evaluated. The samples were stored at 40±2°C in sealed containers and various physiological parameters were assessed at different intervals up to three months. The seed viability and seedling vigour parameters were considerably reduced in all accessions at high relative humidity irrespective of the species. Storage at intermediate relative humidities caused minimal decline in viability. All the accessions performed better at relative humidity level of 32% maintaining seed moisture content of 3%. On analyzing the variability in storage behaviour, B. rapa and B. juncea were better performers than B. napus and Eruca sativa.

  4. Role of relative humidity in processing and storage of seeds and assessment of variability in storage behaviour in Brassica spp. and Eruca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suma, A; Sreenivasan, Kalyani; Singh, A K; Radhamani, J

    2013-01-01

    The role of relative humidity (RH) while processing and storing seeds of Brassica spp. and Eruca sativa was investigated by creating different levels of relative humidity, namely, 75%, 50%, 32%, and 11% using different saturated salt solutions and 1% RH using concentrated sulphuric acid. The variability in seed storage behaviour of different species of Brassica was also evaluated. The samples were stored at 40 ± 2°C in sealed containers and various physiological parameters were assessed at different intervals up to three months. The seed viability and seedling vigour parameters were considerably reduced in all accessions at high relative humidity irrespective of the species. Storage at intermediate relative humidities caused minimal decline in viability. All the accessions performed better at relative humidity level of 32% maintaining seed moisture content of 3%. On analyzing the variability in storage behaviour, B. rapa and B. juncea were better performers than B. napus and Eruca sativa.

  5. An evaluation of ventilation system flow rates and levels of carbon dioxide, ambient temperature, and relative humidity in restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Tan, Yin; Brown, Eric N; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2002-09-01

    Studies of the indoor air quality of restaurants have rarely focused on ventilation system performance in relation to air pollutants and climatic factors. This study was conducted in eight restaurants to examine this issue by determining the ventilation flow rates and the levels of carbon dioxide (CO2), ambient temperature, and relative humidity during at least one complete shift of serving a meal. The mean values of number of dining patrons, ventilation flow rates, and the levels of CO2, ambient temperature, and relative humidity were not significantly different in the nonsmoking dining rooms and the smoking dining rooms. The mean ventilation flow rates in individual restaurants ranged from 42-113 cubic feet per minute per person (cfm/person), overall exceeding the recommended lower limit of 30 cfm/person. The mean levels of CO2 in two restaurants (646 and 819 ppm) were below, and in the other six restaurants (ranging 1,012-1,820 ppm) were above the recommended upper limit of 1000 ppm. The levels of CO2 in each restaurant significantly correlated with the number of dining patrons and in four restaurants accumulated gradually over time. In the nonsmoking dining rooms, the levels of CO2 increased significantly as the ventilation How rates decreased. The mean ambient temperature in restaurants (ranging from 22 degrees C - 24 degrees C) were within the recommended range of 20 degrees C - 26 degrees C. The mean relative humidity in six restaurants (ranging from 46%-59%) were within the recommended upper limit of 60 percent, and in two restaurants (62% and 71%) were slightly higher than this recommended limit. It was concluded that although the mean ventilation flow rates in all restaurants exceeded the recommended value, the design of the ventilation system or the distribution of air flow rate in some sections of restaurants were not appropriate to keep the levels of CO2 and relative humidity at some measurement locations below the recommended limits.

  6. Effects of drying temperature and relative humidity on the mechanical properties of amaranth flour films plasticized with glycerol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tapia-Blácido

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are made of biopolymers. In the casting technique, biofilms are obtained by the drying of a polymer suspension in the final stage of processing. The aim of the present paper was to analyze the effect of this drying process on the mechanical properties of films produced with amaranth flour. Variables considered include glycerol content (30, 35 and 40%, g/g dry flour and air-drying conditions (air temperatures of 30, 40 and 50ºC and relative humidities of 40, 55 and 70%. As amaranth flour films constitute a complex mixture of amylopectin and amylose as well as native protein and lipid, certain unexpected results were obtained. The toughest films were obtained at the lowest temperature and the lowest relative humidity (30ºC, 40%.

  7. Predicting Indian Summer Monsoon onset through variations of surface air temperature and relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolbova, Veronika; Surovyatkina, Elena; Kurths, Jurgen

    2015-04-01

    Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) rainfall has an enormous effect on Indian agriculture, economy, and, as a consequence, life and prosperity of more than one billion people. Variability of the monsoonal rainfall and its onset have a huge influence on food production, agricultural planning and GDP of the country, which on 22% is determined by agriculture. Consequently, successful forecasting of the ISM onset is a big challenge and large efforts are being put into it. Here, we propose a novel approach for predictability of the ISM onset, based on critical transition theory. The ISM onset is defined as an abrupt transition from sporadious rainfall to spatially organized and temporally sustained rainfall. Taking this into account, we consider the ISM onset as is a critical transition from pre-monsoon to monsoon, which take place in time and also in space. It allows us to suggest that before the onset of ISM on the Indian subcontinent should be areas of critical behavior where indicators of the critical transitions can be detected through an analysis of observational data. First, we identify areas with such critical behavior. Second, we use detected areas as reference points for observation locations for the ISM onset prediction. Third, we derive a precursor for the ISM onset based on the analysis of surface air temperature and relative humidity variations in these reference points. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of this precursor on two observational data sets. The proposed approach allows to determine ISM onset in advance in 67% of all considered years. Our proposed approach is less effective during the anomalous years, which are associated with weak/strong monsoons, e.g. El-Nino, La-Nina or positive Indian Ocean Dipole events. The ISM onset is predicted for 23 out of 27 normal monsoon years (85%) during the past 6 decades. In the anomalous years, we show that time series analysis in both areas during the pre-monsoon period reveals indicators whether the

  8. Temperature and relative humidity influence the microbial and physicochemical characteristics of Camembert-type cheese ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq-Perlat, M-N; Sicard, M; Trelea, I C; Picque, D; Corrieu, G

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of temperature and relative humidity (RH) on microbial and biochemical ripening kinetics, Camembert-type cheeses were prepared from pasteurized milk seeded with Kluyveromyces marxianus, Geotrichum candidum, Penicillium camemberti, and Brevibacterium aurantiacum. Microorganism growth and biochemical changes were studied under different ripening temperatures (8, 12, and 16°C) and RH (88, 92, and 98%). The central point runs (12°C, 92% RH) were both reproducible and repeatable, and for each microbial and biochemical parameter, 2 kinetic descriptors were defined. Temperature had significant effects on the growth of both K. marxianus and G. candidum, whereas RH did not affect it. Regardless of the temperature, at 98% RH the specific growth rate of P. camemberti spores was significantly higher [between 2 (8°C) and 106 times (16°C) higher]. However, at 16°C, the appearance of the rind was no longer suitable because mycelia were damaged. Brevibacterium aurantiacum growth depended on both temperature and RH. At 8°C under 88% RH, its growth was restricted (1.3 × 10(7) cfu/g), whereas at 16°C and 98% RH, its growth was favored, reaching 7.9 × 10(9) cfu/g, but the rind had a dark brown color after d 20. Temperature had a significant effect on carbon substrate consumption rates in the core as well as in the rind. In the rind, when temperature was 16°C rather than 8°C, the lactate consumption rate was approximately 2.9 times higher under 88% RH. Whatever the RH, temperature significantly affected the increase in rind pH (from 4.6 to 7.7 ± 0.2). At 8°C, an increase in rind pH was observed between d 6 and 9, whereas at 16°C, it was between d 2 and 3. Temperature and RH affected the increasing rate of the underrind thickness: at 16°C, half of the cheese thickness appeared ripened on d 14 (wrapping day). However, at 98% RH, the underrind was runny. In conclusion, some descriptors, such as yeast growth and the pH in the rind, depended solely on

  9. Environmental degradation of Opalinus Clay with cyclic variations in relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Katrin; Walter, Patric; Madonna, Claudio; Amann, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Clay shales are considered as favorable host rocks for nuclear waste repositories due to their low permeability, high sorption capacity and the potential for self-sealing. However, the favorable characteristics of the rock mass may change during tunnel excavation. Excavation is accompanied by stress redistribution and the development of an excavation damage zone. Furthermore, unloading and exposure to atmospheric conditions with a lower relative humidity (RH) causes desaturation of the rock mass close to the tunnel. This leads to shrinkage and the formation of desiccation cracks. During the open drift stage, seasonal atmospheric changes, especially RH variations, may alter the rock mass and influence the long-term crack evolution. This contribution discusses the influence of RH variation on the mechanical behavior of OPA. A series of specimens were exposed to short-term and long-term, stepwise cyclic RH variations between about 60 and 95% at constant temperature. Strains were measured using strain gauges to monitor the volumetric response during RH cycles. After each applied RH cycle, Brazilian tensile strength (BTS) tests were performed to identify whether there is a change in tensile strength due to environmental damage caused by the change in RH. Swelling and shrinkage of the specimens accompanied by irreversible volumetric expansion was observed as a consequence of the exposure to RH cycles. However, the irreversible strain was limited to the direction normal to bedding suggesting that internal damage is restricted along the bedding planes. No significant effect of cyclic RH variations on the BTS of the specimens was observed. The strength parallel to bedding remained constant over several cycles while the strength normal to bedding shows a slightly decreasing trend after 2 cycles. Furthermore, the water retention characteristics of the specimens were not altered significantly during stepwise RH cycling as the evolution of the water content was reversible

  10. Impact of relative humidity on visibility degradation during a haze event: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hua; Tan, Haobo; Li, Fei; Cai, Mingfu; Chan, P W; Xu, Hanbing; Huang, Xiaoying; Wu, Dui

    2016-11-01

    Light scattering of aerosols depends on ambient relative humidity (RH) since hygroscopic particles absorb significant water at high RH, and this results in low visibility. This paper used custom-made parallel nephelometers (PNEPs) to measure aerosol light scattering enhancement factor ƒ(RH), and utilized data including visibility, PM2.5, black carbon, water-soluble ions mass concentrations and surface meteorological parameters, in conjunction with background weather conditions, to analyze a haze event in Guangzhou during 8th-15th Dec. 2013. Unfavorable weather conditions, such as high RH and low wind speed, were observed during the haze event. The hourly average mass concentration of PM2.5 was 127μg/m(3), with concentration of 192.4μg/m(3) on 9th and 196μg/m(3) on 13th. The ƒ(RH) did not exhibit significant changes during this haze process, with value of ƒ(80%)=1.58±0.07. Although the mass fraction of water-soluble ions to PM2.5 decreased after 12th Dec., the aerosol hygroscopicity might not have changed significantly since the mass fraction of nitrate became more dominant, which has stronger ability to take up water. The best-fitted parameterized function for ƒ(RH) is ƒ(RH)=0.731+0.1375∗(1-RH/100)(-1)+0.00719∗(1-RH/100)(-2). Combining the fixed parameterization of ƒ(RH) above, the visibility was calculated with the measured light scattering and absorption coefficient of particles and gas under dry condition, as well as ambient RH. The predicted visibility range agrees well with the measurements without precipitation. Using ISORROPIA II model, the calculated aerosol liquid water content (ALWC) at ambient RH varied consistently with the PM2.5 under lower RH, while it was more influenced by high RH. This work also show that high RH accompanied with precipitation will enhance aerosol hygroscopic growth effect, leading to further visibility degradation, even if PM2.5 mass decreased due to precipitation.

  11. Printed Circuit Board Surface Finish and Effects of Chloride Contamination, Electric Field, and Humidity on Corrosion Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conseil-Gudla, Hélène; Jellesen, Morten S.; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-02-01

    Corrosion reliability is a serious issue today for electronic devices, components, and printed circuit boards (PCBs) due to factors such as miniaturization, globalized manufacturing practices which can lead to process-related residues, and global usage effects such as bias voltage and unpredictable user environments. The investigation reported in this paper focuses on understanding the synergistic effect of such parameters, namely contamination, humidity, PCB surface finish, pitch distance, and potential bias on leakage current under different humidity levels, and electrochemical migration probability under condensing conditions. Leakage currents were measured on interdigitated comb test patterns with three different types of surface finish typically used in the electronics industry, namely gold, copper, and tin. Susceptibility to electrochemical migration was studied under droplet conditions. The level of base leakage current (BLC) was similar for the different surface finishes and NaCl contamination levels up to relative humidity (RH) of 65%. A significant increase in leakage current was found for comb patterns contaminated with NaCl above 70% to 75% RH, close to the deliquescent RH of NaCl. Droplet tests on Cu comb patterns with varying pitch size showed that the initial BLC before dendrite formation increased with increasing NaCl contamination level, whereas electrochemical migration and the frequency of dendrite formation increased with bias voltage. The effect of different surface finishes on leakage current under humid conditions was not very prominent.

  12. Printed Circuit Board Surface Finish and Effects of Chloride Contamination, Electric Field, and Humidity on Corrosion Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conseil-Gudla, Hélène; Jellesen, Morten S.; Ambat, Rajan

    2016-10-01

    Corrosion reliability is a serious issue today for electronic devices, components, and printed circuit boards (PCBs) due to factors such as miniaturization, globalized manufacturing practices which can lead to process-related residues, and global usage effects such as bias voltage and unpredictable user environments. The investigation reported in this paper focuses on understanding the synergistic effect of such parameters, namely contamination, humidity, PCB surface finish, pitch distance, and potential bias on leakage current under different humidity levels, and electrochemical migration probability under condensing conditions. Leakage currents were measured on interdigitated comb test patterns with three different types of surface finish typically used in the electronics industry, namely gold, copper, and tin. Susceptibility to electrochemical migration was studied under droplet conditions. The level of base leakage current (BLC) was similar for the different surface finishes and NaCl contamination levels up to relative humidity (RH) of 65%. A significant increase in leakage current was found for comb patterns contaminated with NaCl above 70% to 75% RH, close to the deliquescent RH of NaCl. Droplet tests on Cu comb patterns with varying pitch size showed that the initial BLC before dendrite formation increased with increasing NaCl contamination level, whereas electrochemical migration and the frequency of dendrite formation increased with bias voltage. The effect of different surface finishes on leakage current under humid conditions was not very prominent.

  13. A Note on the Spatio Temporal Variations in the Temperature and Relative Humidity over Akure, Ondo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eludoyin, A. O.; Akinbode, O. M.; Archibong, E. O.

    2007-07-01

    This study was carried out in one of the Administrative State Capitals in the southwestern part of Nigeria. Its aim is to serve as a baseline data for highlighting the effect of spatial distribution of settlements, population, and socioeconomic activities on urban air temperature and relative humidity. The main objective of the study is to assess the impact of urban growth on the microclimate of the administrative city. Temperature and relative humidity data from 1992 to 2001 were obtained from the three existing meteorological stations in Akure, the Administrative Capital of Ondo State, Nigeria, namely the Federal Ministry of Aviation, Akure Airport station (FMA), Federal University of Technology, Akure (FUTA) and the Federal School of Agriculture (SOA). Air temperature and relative humidity measurements along primary roads and in the built up areas were obtained from seventeen stations, using sling psychrometer. The data were subsequently analysed for spatial and temporal variations. The results obtained indicated that while the maximum, average and minimum temperatures showed significant annual variations, the spatial variations among the existing meteorological stations were not significant. The city is characterized by increasing annual mean temperatures whose maximum was significantly higher than that of Ondo town — another important town within the state. The annual mean temperatures ranged between 26.2°C and 30.4°C. Minimum and maximum temperatures varied from 12.3°C to 26°C and 22.5°C to 39.6°C, respectively while the relative humidity ranged between 27.5% and 98.2%. Urban `heat island' intensity was exhibited around central business district of the Oba market. 2007 American Institute of Physics

  14. Design and fabrication of a data logger for atmospheric pressure, temperature and relative humidity for gas-filled detector development

    CERN Document Server

    Sahu, S; Rudra, Sharmili; Biswas, S; Mohanty, B; Sahu, P K

    2015-01-01

    A novel instrument has been developed to monitor and record the ambient pa- rameters such as temperature, atmospheric pressure and relative humidity. These parameters are very essential for understanding the characteristics such as gain of gas filled detectors like Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and Multi Wire Propor- tional Counter (MWPC). In this article the details of the design, fabrication and operation processes of the device has been presented.

  15. Pollen production in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is affected by air temperature and relative humidity during early reproductive growth

    OpenAIRE

    Astiz, V.; Hernández, Luis Francisco

    2013-01-01

    During microsporogenesis, sunflower florets might be exposed to episodes of day- and night-time temperatures exceeding 30 and 20 °C, respectively, that can affect pollen availability and consequently plant’s yield. The relationship between air temperature and relative humidity during the meiotic phase of microsporogenesis, and the quantity and quality of pollen produced by the flowers, were studied in two sunflower hybrids during two years. The hybrids were grown on irrigated plots in Bahía B...

  16. Phototransformation of 4-phenoxyphenol sensitised by 4-carboxybenzophenone: Evidence of new photochemical pathways in the bulk aqueous phase and on the surface of aerosol deliquescent particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Laurentiis, Elisa; Socorro, Joanna; Vione, Davide; Quivet, Etienne; Brigante, Marcello; Mailhot, Gilles; Wortham, Henri; Gligorovski, Sasho

    2013-12-01

    In addition to direct photolysis, degradation of organic compounds by solar light can also occur by indirect photolysis or photo-sensitised processes. These reactions are important because they are involved in, among others, direct and indirect climate changes, adverse health effects from inhaled particles, effects on cloud chemistry and ozone production. In this work, the importance of atmospheric photo-sensitisation is evaluated in bulk aqueous solution and on the surface of aerosol deliquescent particles. Irradiation experiments in aqueous solution indicate that 4-carboxybenzophenone (CBP) is able to photosensitise the degradation of 4-phenoxyphenol (4 PP). The process takes place via the CBP triplet state (3CBP*), which has an oxidising nature. 4 PP is fluorescent, unlike the photosensitiser CBP, with two emission bands at ˜320 and ˜380 nm. However, addition of CBP to a 4 PP solution considerably decreases the intensity of 4 PP fluorescence bands and causes a very intense new band to appear at ˜420 nm. This behaviour suggests a possible interaction between CBP and 4 PP in solution, which could favour further light-induced processes. Moreover, the new band overlaps with the fluorescence spectrum of atmospheric HULIS (HUmic-LIke Substances), suggesting that supramolecular photosensitiser-substrate interactions may have a role in HULIS fluorescence properties. The interaction between CBP and 4 PP coated on silica particles (gas-solid system) was also investigated under simulated sunlight, and in the presence of variable relative humidity. The water molecules inhibit the degradation of 4 PP, induced by 3CBP* on the surface of aerosol particles, indicating that the process could be even faster on particles than in solution. We demonstrate that phenol substances adsorbed on aerosol surfaces and in bulk solution are substantially altered upon photosensitised processes.

  17. Modeling indoor odor-odorant concentrations and the relative humidity effect on odor perception at a water reclamation plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Sattayatewa, Chakkrid; Venkatesan, Dhesikan; Noll, Kenneth E.; Pagilla, Krishna R.; Moschandreas, Demetrios J.

    2011-12-01

    Models formulated to associate odors and odorants in many industrial and agricultural fields ignore the potential effect of relative humidity on odor perception, and are not validated. This study addresses literature limitations by formulating a model that includes relative humidity and by validating the model. The model employs measured paired values, n = 102, of indoor odors and odorants from freshly dewatered biosolids in a post-digestion dewatering building of a Water Reclamation Plant (WRP). A random sub-sample of n = 32 is used to validate the model by associating predicted vs. measured values ( R2 = 0.90). The model is validated again with a smaller independent database from a second WRP ( R2 = 0.85). Moreover this study asserts that reduction of hydrogen sulfide concentrations, conventionally used as a surrogate of sewage odors, to acceptable levels does not assure acceptable odor levels. It is concluded that: (1) The addition of relative humidity results in a stronger association between odors and odorants than the use of H 2S alone; (2) the two step model validation indicates that the model is not simply site-specific but can be applied to similar facilities; and (3) the model is a promising tool for designing odor and odorant control strategies, the ultimate goal of engineering studies.

  18. Effect of temperature, relative humidity and rainfall on dengue fever and leptospirosis infections in Manila, the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, A; Telan, E F O; Chagan-Yasutan, H; Piolo, M B; Hattori, T; Kobayashi, N

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) and leptospirosis are serious public problems in tropical regions, especially in Manila, the Philippines. In attempting to understand the causes of DF and leptospirosis seasonality, meteorological factors have been suspected, but quantitative correlation between seasonality and meteorological factors has not been fully investigated. In this study, we investigated correlation of temporal patterns of reported numbers of laboratory-confirmed cases of both DF and leptospirosis with meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity, rainfall) in Manila. We used time-series analysis combined with spectral analysis and the least squares method. A 1-year cycle explained underlying variations of DF, leptospirosis and meteorological data. There was a peak of the 1-year cycle in temperature during May, followed by maxima in rainfall, relative humidity and number of laboratory-confirmed DF and leptospirosis cases. This result suggests that DF and leptospirosis epidemics are correlated not only with rainfall but also relative humidity and temperature in the Philippines. Quantifying the correlation of DF and leptospirosis infections with meteorological conditions may prove useful in predicting DF and leptospirosis epidemics, and health services should plan accordingly.

  19. Degree of Hydration of OPC and OPC/Fly ash Paste Samples Conditioned at Different Relative Humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Shafiq

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Degree of hydration of cement paste controls many properties of hardened concrete and/or mortar such as compressive strength. During the drying process, the degree and the rate of hydration of cement paste in concrete/mortar samples are significantly affected by the ambient relative humidity of the exposure conditions. There are various parameters such as the amount of calcium hydroxide, Ca(OH2 in the paste, quantity of the chemically bound water, specific gravity of the paste, fraction of un-hydrated cement, liberated heat of hydration and strength of the hydrated cement may be used to determine the degree of hydration of the cement paste. This paper presents the results of the experimental investigation for the determination of the degree of hydration of 100% cement paste and fly ash blended cement pastes. After 28 days moist curing, the samples were conditioned in 100%, 75%, 65%, 40% and 12% relative humidity. Conditioning of samples in different relative humidity had significant effects on the compressive strength of the mortar samples and the degree of hydration of the paste samples. Conditioning of samples in 100% RH resulted in higher compressive strength and the degree of hydration. Because of the 28 days moist curing and 12 weeks moisture conditioning in different RH, fly ash based samples showed better compressive strength than the OPC samples.

  20. Effect of Harvest of Air Relative Humidity on Water and Heat Transfer in Soil With Crops Under Arid Climatic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Khadir LAKHAL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the main objective is to analyze the effect of the harvest of air relative humidity on soil temperature, soil water storage and evaporation. An experiment work was conducted in order to evaluate the quantity of soil water adsorbed by harvesting of relative air humidity. This experimental work was conducted on hilly areas with various hypsographic and microclimatic conditions greatly affecting daily fluctuations of air humidity and soil characteristics. The metrological data needed by SISPAT model were obtained by using a Campbell Scientific equipments Station recorder on data loggers every half hour. A numerical model based on SiSPAT (Système d’Interaction Sol Plante Atmosphère formulation is adopted. The general equations of the proposed model are based on heat and mass transfer in the soil, atmosphere and plant system. This study shows that Soil Water Adsorption (SWA induce an increasing in the total evaporation and in soil water storage especially on the upper layers. The effect of Soil Water Adsorption on soil temperature appears for the first layers of soil and become absent in the profound zone because the vapour condensation phenomenon is very important at night for the first layers.

  1. Uptake of HNO3 to deliquescent sea-salt particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. W. Gäggeler

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The uptake of HNO3 to deliquescent airborne sea-salt particles (RH = 55%, P = 760 torr, T = 300 K at concentrations from 2 to 575 ppbv is measured in an aerosol flow tube using 13N as a tracer. Small particles (~ 70 nm diameter are used in order to minimize the effect of diffusion in the gas phase on the mass transfer. Below 100 ppbv, an uptake coefficient (gupt of 0.50 ± 0.20 is derived. At higher concentrations, the uptake coefficient decreases along with the consumption of aerosol chloride. Data interpretation is further supported by using the North American Aerosol Inorganics Model (AIM, which predicts the aqueous phase activities of ions and the gas-phase partial pressures of H2O, HNO3, and HCl at equilibrium for the NaCl/HNO3/H2O system. These simulations show that the low concentration data are obtained far from equilibrium, which implies that the uptake coefficient derived is equal to the mass accommodation coefficient under these conditions. The observed uptake coefficient can serve as input to modeling studies of atmospheric sea-salt aerosol chemistry. The main sea-salt aerosol burden in the marine atmosphere is represented by coarse mode particles (> 1 mm diameter. This implies that diffusion in the gas-phase is the limiting step to HNO3 uptake until the sea-salt has been completely processed.

  2. Mitigation of aflatoxin contamination in maize kernels is related to the metabolic alternation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental factors have been shown to be linked to exacerbated infection of maize kernels by Aspergillus flavus and subsequent aflatoxin contamination. Kernel resistance to aflatoxin contamination is associated with kernel water content and relative humidity during in vitro assays examining aflat...

  3. Relative humidity across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum via combined hydrogen-oxygen isotope paleohygrometry (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, F. A.; Bloch, J. I.; Secord, R.; Wing, S. L.; Kraus, M. J.; Boyer, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) presents an opportunity to characterize continental hydrologic changes during rapid and extreme global warming. The Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA, has long been recognized for the PETM sequences preserved there and sits in an ideal location for recording hydrologic changes in the interior of North America. The southeast Bighorn Basin is of particular interest because it contains not only alluvial paleosols and vertebrate fossils, but also macrofloral remains from the PETM. The carbon isotope excursion associated with this event is preserved in this part of the Basin in leaf wax lipids, tooth enamel, and bulk organic matter. To characterize the hydrologic changes that occurred during the PETM we are applying a suite of isotopic, paleobotanical and paleopedological approaches to sections in the southeast Bighorn Basin. Reported here are results from the combined hydrogen and oxygen isotope analysis aimed at reconstructing relative humidity. Oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of biogenic apatite from mammalian tooth enamel and fish scales vary with environment, physiology and diet. Because mammals are homeothermic, they primarily track surface water values with predictable physiological offsets. Hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) of leaf-wax lipids (long-chain n-alkanes) reflect both meteoric water δD values and additional D-enrichment caused by evapotranspiration. The enrichment factor between water δD and n-alkane δD can therefore be used as a proxy for relative humidity (RH). In this study, δ18O of surface water is estimated using the δ18O of Coryphodon tooth enamel. We use these δ18O values to estimate surface water δD values using the Global Meteoric Water Line (δD = 8δ18O + 10). We then calculate relative humidity from n-alkane δD values using a Craig-Gordon type isotopic model for D-enrichment caused by transpiration from leaves. Results of the combined hydrogen-oxygen isotope paleohygrometer indicate a general rise in

  4. Effect of impregnating agent and relative humidity on surface characteristics of sorbents determined by inverse gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasperkowiak, M; Kołodziejek, J; Strzemiecka, B; Voelkel, A

    2013-05-03

    Sorbents that potentially can be used for separation of the products of biotechnological conversion of glycerol were examined. Properties of Zeolite 5A, resins: Amberlite, Diaion and their samples impregnated with an aqueous solutions of 1,2,3-propanetriol, 1,3-propanediol, 2,3-butanediol, acetic acid, succinic acid and model fermentation broth were investigated. Because surface properties will probably depend on the ambient humidity the IGC experiments were carried out under different conditions of relative humidity RH=0, 40 and 80%. Activity of the sorbents surface was expressed by the value of the dispersive component of the free surface energy. Inverse gas chromatography was also used to express acid-base properties of materials described by KA and KD parameters. The changes in the activity of investigated sorbents significantly varied depending on the type of impregnating agent. Moreover, the obtained results demonstrate that humidity can strongly influence, in some cases, the dispersive component of the free surface energy and the ability to specific interactions (KA and KD).

  5. Health symptoms in relation to temperature, humidity, and self-reported perceptions of climate in New York City residential environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Ashlinn; Shaman, Jeffrey

    2017-07-01

    Little monitoring has been conducted of temperature and humidity inside homes despite the fact that these conditions may be relevant to health outcomes. Previous studies have observed associations between self-reported perceptions of the indoor environment and health. Here, we investigate associations between measured temperature and humidity, perceptions of indoor environmental conditions, and health symptoms in a sample of New York City apartments. We measured temperature and humidity in 40 New York City apartments during summer and winter seasons and collected survey data from the households' residents. Health outcomes of interest were (1) sleep quality, (2) symptoms of heat illness (summer season), and (3) symptoms of respiratory viral infection (winter season). Using mixed-effects logistic regression models, we investigated associations between the perceptions, symptoms, and measured conditions in each season. Perceptions of indoor temperature were significantly associated with measured temperature in both the summer and the winter, with a stronger association in the summer season. Sleep quality was inversely related to measured and perceived indoor temperature in the summer season only. Heat illness symptoms were associated with perceived, but not measured, temperature in the summer season. We did not find an association between any measured or perceived condition and cases of respiratory infection in the winter season. Although limited in size, the results of this study reveal that indoor temperature may impact sleep quality, and that thermal perceptions of the indoor environment may indicate vulnerability to heat illness. These are both important avenues for further investigation.

  6. Health symptoms in relation to temperature, humidity, and self-reported perceptions of climate in New York City residential environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Ashlinn; Shaman, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Little monitoring has been conducted of temperature and humidity inside homes despite the fact that these conditions may be relevant to health outcomes. Previous studies have observed associations between self-reported perceptions of the indoor environment and health. Here, we investigate associations between measured temperature and humidity, perceptions of indoor environmental conditions, and health symptoms in a sample of New York City apartments. We measured temperature and humidity in 40 New York City apartments during summer and winter seasons and collected survey data from the households' residents. Health outcomes of interest were (1) sleep quality, (2) symptoms of heat illness (summer season), and (3) symptoms of respiratory viral infection (winter season). Using mixed-effects logistic regression models, we investigated associations between the perceptions, symptoms, and measured conditions in each season. Perceptions of indoor temperature were significantly associated with measured temperature in both the summer and the winter, with a stronger association in the summer season. Sleep quality was inversely related to measured and perceived indoor temperature in the summer season only. Heat illness symptoms were associated with perceived, but not measured, temperature in the summer season. We did not find an association between any measured or perceived condition and cases of respiratory infection in the winter season. Although limited in size, the results of this study reveal that indoor temperature may impact sleep quality, and that thermal perceptions of the indoor environment may indicate vulnerability to heat illness. These are both important avenues for further investigation.

  7. Novel Knob-integrated fiber Bragg grating sensor with polyvinyl alcohol coating for simultaneous relative humidity and temperature measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guofeng; Liang, Yanhong; Lee, El-Hang; He, Sailing

    2015-06-15

    A novel high performance optical fiber sensor for simultaneous measurement of relative humidity (RH) and temperature based on our newly designed knob-integrated fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The knob-shaped taper followed by an FBG works as a multifunctional joint that not only excites the cladding modes but also recouples the cladding modes reflected by the FBG back into the leading single mode fiber. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film is plated on the fiber surface by dip-coating technique as a humidity-to-refractive index (RI) transducer, and affects the intensity of reflected cladding modes by way of evanescent fields. By monitoring the intensity and wavelength of the reflected cladding modes, the RH and temperature variance can be determined simultaneously. Experimental results show an RH sensitivity of up to 1.2 dB/%RH within an RH range of 30-95%, which is significantly better than previously reported values. And the temperature sensitivity of 8.2 pm/°Ccould be achieved in the temperature range of 25-60°C. A fast and reversible time response has also been demonstrated, enabling to pick up a humidity change as fast as 630 ms. The capability of simultaneous measurement of RH and temperature, the fast response, the reusability and the simple fabrication process make this structure a highly promising sensor for real-time practical RH monitoring applications.

  8. Relative Effects of Temperature, Light, and Humidity on Clinging Behavior of Metacercariae-Infected Ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botnevik, C F; Malagocka, J; Jensen, A B; Fredensborg, B L

    2016-10-01

    The lancet fluke, Dicrocoelium dendriticum, is perhaps the best-known example of parasite manipulation of host behavior, which is manifested by a radically changed behavior that leaves infected ants attached to vegetation at times when transmission to an herbivore host is optimal. Despite the publicity surrounding this parasite, curiously little is known about factors inducing and maintaining behavioral changes in its ant intermediate host. This study examined the importance of 3 environmental factors on the clinging behavior of red wood ants, Formica polyctena , infected with D. dendriticum . This behavior, hypothesized to involve cramping of the mandibular muscles in a state of tetany, was observed in naturally infected F. polyctena under controlled temperature, light, and humidity conditions. We found that low temperature significantly stimulated and maintained tetany in infected ants while light, humidity, ant size, and infection intensity had no influence on this behavior. Under none of the experimental conditions did uninfected ants attach to vegetation, demonstrating that tetany was induced by D. dendriticum . Temperature likely has a direct impact on the initiation of clinging behavior, but it may also serve as a simple but reliable indicator of the encounter rate between infected ants and ruminant definitive hosts. In addition, temperature-sensitive behavior manipulation may protect infected ants from exposure to temperatures in the upper thermal range of the host.

  9. Relative humidity sensing using dye-doped polymer thin-films on metal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Madhuri; Ding, Boyang; Blaikie, Richard

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate humidity sensors based on optical resonances sustained in sub-wavelength thick dye-doped polymer coatings on reflecting surfaces. As a result of coupling between dye molecular absorption and Fabry-Perot resonances in the air-coating-surface cavity, the absorption spectra of such thin-film structures show a strong resonant peak under certain illumination conditions. These resonances are sensitive to the structural and material properties of the thin-film, metal underlayer and ambient conditions and hence can be used for gas and vapor sensing applications. Specifically, we present our proof of principle experimental results for humidity sensing using a thin-film structure comprising Rhodamine6G-doped polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films on silver substrates. Depending on the PVA film thickness, dye-concertation and angle of incidence, the resonant absorption peak can undergo either red-shift or blue-shift as RH level increases in the range 20% to 60%. Also, the absorption magnitude at certain wavelengths near to resonance show almost linear reduction which can be used as the sensing signal. Our simulation studies show a very good agreement with the experimental data. The spectral and temporal sensitivity of this thin-film structure is attributed to the changes in the thickness of the PVA layer which swells by absorbing water molecules

  10. Identification of the Temperature and The Relative Humidity in a Heating, Ventilating and air Conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Fernández Rodríguez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This document demonstrates mathematical models for the variation of the drive temperature and therelative humidity as part of climate control for a room dedicated to the formulation of vaccines. Thesemodels will allow a correct estimate of the dynamic behaviors of these variables and further design inthe future, of controllers with better benefits than the existing ones. A methodology is proposed forsystem identification, that will guarantee a bigger and better organization and integration of steps tocontinue to achieve the proposed objectives. Also an interesting idea is the generation and applicationof pseudo-random binary signals (PRBS during the identification. The estimate of the parameters andsimulation according to the selected structures, are carried out with the mathematical tool Matlab®.For the validation of the resulting pattern a statistical technique analysis is utilized apart from datacomparison.

  11. Use of inverse gas chromatography to characterize cotton fabrics and their interactions with fragrance molecules at controlled relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantergiani, Ennio; Benczédi, Daniel

    2002-09-06

    The present work focused on the surface characterization and fragrance interactions of a common cotton towel at different relative humidities (RHs) using inverse gas chromatography (IGC) and dynamic vapour sorption. The sigmoidal water sorption isotherms showed a maximum of 16% (w/w) water uptake with limited swelling at 100% RH. This means that water interacts strongly with cotton and might change its initial physico-chemical properties. The same cotton towel was then packed in a glass column and characterized by IGC at different relative humidities, calculating the dispersive and specific surface energy components. The dispersive component of the surface energy decreases slightly as a function of relative humidity (42 mJ/m2 at 0% RH to 36 mJ/m2 at 80% RH) which would be expected from swelling of the humidified cotton. The Gutmann's donor constant Kd increased from 0.28 kJ/mol at 0% RH to 0.42 kJ/mol at 80% RH, indicating that a greater hydrophilic surface exists at 80% RH, which is also as expected. Water, undecane and four fragrance molecules (dimetol, benzyl acetate, decanal and phenylethanol) were used to investigate cotton-fragrance interactions between 0 and 80% RH. The adsorption enthalpies and the Henry's constants were calculated and are discussed. The higher values for the adsorption enthalpies of polar molecules such as dimetol and phenylethanol suggest the presence of hydrogen bonds as the main adsorption mechanism. The Henry's constant of dimetol was also determined by headspace gas chromatography measurements at 20% RH, giving a similar value (230 nmol/Pa g by IGC and 130 nmol/Pa g by headspace GC), supporting the usefulness of IGC for such determinations. This work confirms the usefulness of chromatographic methods to investigate biopolymers such as textiles, starches and hairs.

  12. An XPS study of copper corrosion originated by formic acid vapour at 40% and 80% relative humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, E.; Torres, C.L.; Bastidas, J.M. [National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2001-09-01

    Copper corrosion products originated by the action of formic acid vapours at 40% and 80% relative humidity for a period of 21 days were analysed. Three formic vapour concentration levels (10, 100 and 300 ppm) were generated in laboratory tests at 30 C. The corrosion product layers were characterised using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in conjunction with Ar{sup +}-ion sputtering. The components identified in the patina layers were cuprite (Cu{sub 2}O), copper hydroxide (Cu(OH){sub 2}) and copper formate (Cu(HCOO){sub 2}). Copper formate was formed by a complex mechanism including copper hydroxide and formic acid. (orig.)

  13. Effect of Pre-wetted Light-weight Aggregate on Internal Relative Humidity and Autogenous Shrinkage of Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This research indicates that the gradient of internal relative humidity (IRH) decreases rapidly within 7-day curing age in HPC.The amount of water imported by pre-wetted light-weight aggregate can regulate IRH of concrete.By importing a proper amount of water, the process of the decline of IRH can be delayed and the antogenous shrinkage can be reduced.The relationship among the amount of water imported by pre- wetted lightweight aggregate, IRH and AS was established.The result provides a new method of reducing early AS and enhancing early cracking resistance of HPC.

  14. Determining the long-term effects of H₂S concentration, relative humidity and air temperature on concrete sewer corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangming; Keller, Jurg; Bond, Philip L

    2014-11-15

    Many studies of sewer corrosion are performed in accelerated conditions that are not representing the actual corrosion processes. This study investigated the effects of various factors over 3.5 years under controlled conditions simulating the sewer environment. Concrete coupons prepared from precorroded sewers were exposed, both in the gas phase and partially submerged in wastewater, in laboratory controlled corrosion chambers. Over the 45 month exposure period, three environmental factors of H2S concentration, relative humidity and air temperature were controlled at different levels in the corrosion chambers. A total of 36 exposure conditions were investigated to determine the long term effects of these factors by regular retrieval of concrete coupons for detailed analysis of surface pH, corrosion layer sulfate levels and concrete loss. Corrosion rates were also determined for different exposure periods. It was found that the corrosion rate of both gas-phase and partially-submerged coupons was positively correlated with the H2S concentration in the gas phase. Relative humidity played also a role for the corrosion activity of the gas-phase coupons. However, the partially-submerged coupons were not affected by humidity as the surfaces of these coupons were saturated due to capillary suction of sewage on the coupon surface. The effect of temperature on corrosion activity varied and possibly the acclimation of corrosion-inducing microbes to temperature mitigated effects of that factor. It was apparent that biological sulfide oxidation was not the limiting step of the overall corrosion process. These findings provide real insights into the long-term effects of these key environmental factors on the sewer corrosion processes.

  15. Role of Relative Humidity in Processing and Storage of Seeds and Assessment of Variability in Storage Behaviour in Brassica spp. and Eruca sativa

    OpenAIRE

    Suma, A; Kalyani Sreenivasan; Singh, A. K.; Radhamani, J.

    2013-01-01

    The role of relative humidity (RH) while processing and storing seeds of Brassica spp. and Eruca sativa was investigated by creating different levels of relative humidity, namely, 75%, 50%, 32%, and 11% using different saturated salt solutions and 1% RH using concentrated sulphuric acid. The variability in seed storage behaviour of different species of Brassica was also evaluated. The samples were stored at 40 ± 2°C in sealed containers and various physiological parameters were assessed at di...

  16. Maneuvering the Internal Porosity and Surface Morphology of Electrospun Polystyrene Yarns by Controlling the Solvent and Relative Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a simple and reliable method for generating polystyrene (PS) yarns composed of bundles of nanofibrils by using a proper combination of solvent and relative humidity. We elucidated the mechanism responsible for the formation of this new morphology by systematically investigating the molecular interactions among the polymer, solvent(s), and water vapor. We demonstrated that vapor-induced phase separation played a pivotal role in generating the yarns with a unique structure. Furthermore, we discovered that the low vapor pressure of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) was critical to the evolution of pores in the interiors. On the contrary, the relatively high vapor pressure of tetrahydrofuran (THF) hindered the formation of interior pores but excelled in creating a rough surface. In all cases, our results clearly indicate that the formation of either internal porosity or surface roughness required the presence of water vapor, a nonsolvent of the polymer, at a proper level of relative humidity. The exact morphology or pore structure was dependent on the speed of evaporation for the solvent(s) (DMF, THF, and their mixtures), as well as the inter-diffusion and penetration of the nonsolvent (water) and solvent(s). Our findings can serve as guidelines for the preparation of fibers with desired porosity both internally and externally through electrospinning. PMID:23530752

  17. Role of relative humidity in colony founding and queen survivorship in two carpenter ant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankowski, Mark E; Morrell, J J

    2011-06-01

    Conditions necessary for optimal colony foundation in two carpenter ant species, Camponotus modoc Wheeler and Camponotus vicinus Mayr, were studied. Camponotus modoc and C. vicinus queens were placed in Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco) and Styrofoam blocks conditioned in sealed chambers at 70, 80, or 100% RH. Nanitic workers produced after 12 wk were used to assess the effects of substrate and moisture content on colony initiation. Queens of C. vicinus in Douglas-fir and Styrofoam produced worker numbers that did not differ significantly with moisture content; however, the number of colonies initiated by C. modoc differed significantly with moisture content. The results indicate that colony founding in C. vicinus is less sensitive to moisture content than C. modoc for Douglas-fir and Styrofoam. In another test, groups of queens of each species were exposed to 20, 50, 70, and 100% RH and the time until 50% mortality occurred was recorded for each species. C. vicinus lived significantly longer at each of the test humidities than C. modoc, suggesting that the former species is adapted to better survive under xeric conditions.

  18. Multi-decadal carbon and water relations of African tropical humid forests: a tree-ring stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufkens, Koen; Helle, Gerd; Beeckman, Hans; de Haulleville, Thales; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Boeckx, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about the temporal dynamics of the carbon sequestering capacity and dynamics of African tropical humid forest ecosystems in response to various environmental drivers. This lack of knowledge is mainly due to the absence of ecosystem scale flux measurements of gas exchange. However, tree growth often displays itself as alternating pattern of visible rings due to the seasonally varying growth speed of the vascular cambium. Consequently, analysis of tree growth through tree-ring analysis provides us with insights into past responses of the carbon sequestering capacity of key species to abrupt ecosystem disturbances and, while slower, a changing climate. Not only does the width and density of growth rings reflect annual growth but their isotopic composition of 13C/12C and 18O/16O isotopes also reveal the environmental conditions in which the trees were growing. In particular, stable isotope ratios in tree-rings of carbon are influenced by fractionation through carboxylation during photosynthesis and changes in leaf stomatal conductance. Similarly, fractionation of oxygen isotopes of soil water occurs at the leaf level through evapo-transipiration. As a consequence, 18O/16O (δ18O) values in wood cores will reflect both the signal of the source water as well as that of for example summer humidity. Therefore, both C and O stable isotopes might not only be valuable as proxy data for past climatic conditions but they also serve as an important tool in understanding carbon and water relations within a tropical forest ecosystems. To this end we correlate long term climate records (1961 - present) with tree ring measurement of incremental growth and high resolution analysis of tree-core stable isotope composition(δ13C , δ18O) at a tropical humid forests in the DR Congo. The Yangambi Man And Biosphere (MAB) reserve is located in the north-eastern part of DR Congo, with a distinct tropical rainforest climate. In addition to the tree-core data records and

  19. Organic solvents vapor pressure and relative humidity effects on the phase transition rate of α and β forms of tegafur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkune, Sanita; Bobrovs, Raitis; Actiņš, Andris

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the relative humidity (RH) and solvent vapor pressure effects on the phase transition dynamics between tegafur polymorphic forms that do not form hydrates and solvates. The commercially available α and β modifications of 5-fluoro-1-(tetrahydro-2-furyl)-uracil, known as the antitumor agent tegafur, were used as model materials for this study. While investigating the phase transitions of α and β tegafur under various partial pressures of methanol, n-propanol, n-butanol, and water vapor, it was determined that the phase transition rate increased in the presence of solvent vapors, even though no solvates were formed. By increasing the relative air humidity from 20% to 80%, the phase transition rate constant of α and β tegafur was increased about 60 times. After increasing the partial pressure of methanol, n-propanol, or n-butanol vapor, the phase transition rate constant did not change, but the extent of phase transformation was increased. In the homologous row of n-alcohols, the phase transition rate constant decreased with increasing carbon chain length. The dependence of phase transformation extent versus the RH corresponded to the polymolecular adsorption isotherm with a possible capillary condensation effect.

  20. Control of Relative Air Humidity as a Potential Means to Improve Hygiene on Surfaces: A Preliminary Approach with Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoz, Fiona; Iaconelli, Cyril; Lang, Emilie; Iddir, Hayet; Guyot, Stéphane; Grandvalet, Cosette; Gervais, Patrick; Beney, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Relative air humidity fluctuations could potentially affect the development and persistence of pathogenic microorganisms in their environments. This study aimed to characterize the impact of relative air humidity (RH) variations on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterium persisting on food processing plant surfaces. To assess conditions leading to the lowest survival rate, four strains of L. monocytogenes (EGDe, CCL500, CCL128, and LO28) were exposed to different RH conditions (75%, 68%, 43% and 11%) with different drying kinetics and then rehydrated either progressively or instantaneously. The main factors that affected the survival of L. monocytogenes were RH level and rehydration kinetics. Lowest survival rates between 1% and 0.001% were obtained after 3 hours of treatment under optimal conditions (68% RH and instantaneous rehydration). The survival rate was decreased under 0.001% after prolonged exposure (16h) of cells under optimal conditions. Application of two successive dehydration and rehydration cycles led to an additional decrease in survival rate. This preliminary study, performed in model conditions with L. monocytogenes, showed that controlled ambient RH fluctuations could offer new possibilities to control foodborne pathogens in food processing environments and improve food safety.

  1. A systematic experimental study on the evaporation rate of supercooled water droplets at subzero temperatures and varying relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruberto, S.; Reutzsch, J.; Roth, N.; Weigand, B.

    2017-05-01

    Supercooled water droplets (SWD) are present in clouds at high altitude and subjected to very low temperatures and high relative humidity. These droplets exist in a metastable state. The understanding of the evaporation of SWD at these extreme conditions is of high interest to understand rain, snow, and hail generating mechanisms in clouds. This paper focuses on the experimental results of the measurements of the evaporation rates β of supercooled water droplets. For this purpose, single SWDs are trapped by means of optical levitation. During the evaporation process, the elastically scattered light in the forward regime is recorded and evaluated. Experiments have been performed for different relative humidities φ at three constant ambient temperatures, namely, {T_∞}=268.15; 263.15; 253.15 {{K}} ({t_∞} = -5; -10; -20°C). The experimental data agrees well with direct numerical simulations (DNS) carried out with the in-house code Free Surface 3D (FS3D) and shows that the use of a simplified model is permissible for these ambient conditions.

  2. Temperature and Relative Humidity Inside Trailers During Finishing Pig Loading and Transport in Cold and Mild Weather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John McGlone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bedding levels and trailer compartment on internal trailer temperature and relative humidity (RH during loading and transport of finishing pigs was evaluated in cold and mild weather. Three levels of bedding were used in each experiment: 0.6 m3, 1.2 m3, and 2.4 m3. In mild weather, internal temperatures were lower when 1.2 m3 or 2.4 m3 of bedding were used during loading and transport compared to 0.6 m3 (P < 0.05. Internal trailer temperature increased in a quadratic fashion in the top front compartment when 1.2 m3 was used (P < 0.05, and in a linear fashion in the top rear compartment when 2.4 m3 were used in cold weather (P < 0.05. In mild weather, temperature increased linearly in the top front compartment with heavy bedding levels. Relative humidity increased in a linear fashion in the top front compartment with 0.6 m3, bottom front with 1.2 m3, and top front with 1.2 m3 in cold weather (P < 0.05. In general, temperature and RH increased as bedding levels increased in both cold and mild temperatures. Excess bedding can absorb more moisture, resulting in transport loss and decreased animal welfare.

  3. Evaluation of a ZrO2 composite membrane in PEM fuel operating at high temperature and low relativity humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, C.; Alvarez, A.; Godinez, Luis A.; Herrera, O.E.; Merida, W.; Ledesma-Garcia, J.; Arriaga, L.G.

    2011-01-15

    Using proton exchange fuel cells (PEMFC's) is a sustainable way to generate electrical power. High temperature PEMFC's (HT - PEMFC's) have enhanced electrode kinetics, increased CO tolerance and simplified water management that these operation conditions imply. Unfortunately, Nafion and other perfluorosulfonic acid membranes (PFSA) are characterized by a decreased proton conductivity at high temperatures (above 100 degree C) due to dehydration which also causes shrinkage and increases the contact resistance between the membrane and the electrode. For these reasons, fuel cell research aims to create new membranes capable of working at high temperatures and low relative humidity conditions. The inclusion of inorganic materials into the Nafion matrix are employed to improve the mechanical properties of the membrane and enhance the membrane's hydration. In this study, the composite membrane ZrO2 showed better performance at high temperature and low relative humidity than commercial Nafion membrane. The performance results confirmed that composite membranes retain water and help retain the membrane hydration.

  4. An integrated evaluation of thirteen modelling solutions for the generation of hourly values of air relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregaglio, Simone; Donatelli, Marcello; Confalonieri, Roberto; Acutis, Marco; Orlandini, Simone

    2010-11-01

    The availability of hourly air relative humidity (HARH) data is a key requirement for the estimation of epidemic dynamics of plant fungal pathogens, in particular for the simulation of both the germination of the spores and the infection process. Most of the existing epidemic forecasting models require these data as input directly or indirectly, in the latter case for the estimation of leaf wetness duration. In many cases, HARH must be generated because it is not available in historical series and when there is the need to simulate epidemics either on a wide scale or with different climate scenarios. Thirteen modelling solutions (MS) for the generation of this variable were evaluated, with different input requirements and alternative approaches, on a large dataset including several sites and years. A composite indicator was developed using fuzzy logic to compare and to evaluate the performances of the models. The indicator consists of four modules: Accuracy, Correlation, Pattern and Robustness. Results showed that when available, daily maximum and minimum air relative humidity data substantially improved the estimation of HARH. When such data are not available, the choice of the MS is crucial, given the difference in predicting skills obtained during the analysis, which allowed a clear detection of the best performing MS. This study represents the first step of the creation of a robust modelling chain coupling the MS for the generation of HARH and disease forecasting models, including the systematic validation of each step of the simulation.

  5. Evaporative Cooler Use Influences Temporal Indoor Relative Humidity but Not Dust Mite Allergen Levels in Homes in a Semi-Arid Climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Johnston

    Full Text Available Concerns about energy consumption and climate change make residential evaporative coolers a popular alternative to central air conditioning in arid and semi-arid climates. However, evaporative coolers have been shown to significantly increase indoor relative humidity and dust mite allergen levels in some studies, while showing no association in other studies. Improved measurement of temporal fluctuations in indoor relative humidity may help identify factors that promote mite growth in homes in dry climates. Dust samples and continuous indoor relative humidity measurements were collected from homes with central air conditioning and homes with evaporative coolers in Utah. Samples were collected over two seasons, winter/spring (Jan-Apr and summer (July-Sept, 2014. Dust samples were analyzed for Der p 1 and Der f 1 using a two-site monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA analysis. Housing characteristics including age of home, occupant density, and age of mattresses, furniture, and carpeting were also measured. Positive Der p 1 or Der f 1 samples were found in 25.0% of the homes and there was no difference in mean allergen levels by type of air conditioning. Indoor relative humidity was significantly higher in homes with evaporative coolers compared to those with central air conditioning during the summer. Homes with evaporative coolers also spent significantly more time during summer above 55.0% and 65.0% relative humidity compared to central air homes, but not above 75.0%. Findings from this study suggest that increased humidity from evaporative coolers may not be sufficient to exceed the critical equilibrium humidity or maintain humidity excursions for sufficient duration in relatively larger single-family homes in semi-arid climates to support mite growth and reproduction.

  6. Accelerated Testing and Modeling of Potential-Induced Degradation as a Function of Temperature and Relative Humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter; Spataru, Sergiu; Terwilliger, Kent; Perrin, Greg; Glick, Stephen; Kurtz, Sarah; Wohlgemuth, John

    2015-06-14

    An acceleration model based on the Peck equation was applied to power performance of crystalline silicon cell modules as a function of time and of temperature and humidity, the two main environmental stress factors that promote potential-induced degradation. This model was derived from module power degradation data obtained semi-continuously and statistically by in-situ dark current-voltage measurements in an environmental chamber. The modeling enables prediction of degradation rates and times as functions of temperature and humidity. Power degradation could be modeled linearly as a function of time to the second power; additionally, we found that coulombs transferred from the active cell circuit to ground during the stress test is approximately linear with time. Therefore, the power loss could be linearized as a function of coulombs squared. With this result, we observed that when the module face was completely grounded with a condensed phase conductor, leakage current exceeded the anticipated corresponding degradation rate relative to the other tests performed in damp heat.

  7. Effects of 6-h exposure to low relative humidity and low air pressure on body fluid loss and blood viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, N; Takeda, A; Yasuyama, Y; Chishaki, A; Tochihara, Y

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 6-h exposure to low relative humidity (RH) and low air pressure in a simulated air cabin environment on body fluid loss (BFL) and blood viscosity. Fourteen young healthy male subjects were exposed to four conditions, which combined RH (10% RH or 60% RH) and air pressure (NP: sea level or LP: equivalent to an altitude of 2000 m). Subjects remained seated on a chair in the chamber for 6 h. Their diet and water intake were restricted before and during the experiment. Insensible water loss (IWL) in LP10% condition was significantly greater than in NP60% condition; thus, combined 10%RH and LP conditions promoted a greater amount of IWL. The BFL under the LP condition was significantly greater than that under the NP condition. Blood viscosity significantly increased under LP conditions. Increases in red blood cell counts (RBCs) and BFL likely contributed to the increased blood viscosity. These findings suggest that hypobaric-induced hypoxia, similar to the conditions in the air cabin environment, may cause increased blood viscosity and that the combined low humidity and hypobaric hypoxia conditions increase IWL. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Optimization of parameters of the SeDeM Diagram Expert System: Hausner index (IH) and relative humidity (%RH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suñé-Negre, Josep M; Pérez-Lozano, Pilar; Roig, Manel; Fuster, Roser; Hernández, Carmen; Ruhí, Ramon; García-Montoya, Encarna; Miñarro, Montserrat; Ticó, Josep R

    2011-10-01

    As a methodology for characterizing substances in relation to their viability in direct compression, the SeDeM Diagram Expert System may be considered an open system in terms of the number of parameters applied and the optimization of these parameters. With the experience acquired from applying the SeDeM Diagram, in this study, we propose optimizing the parameters corresponding to the Hausner index (IH) and relative humidity (%HR) in order to simplify the mathematical calculation, so that it provides reliable data that can be extrapolated. The proposed optimization does not involve a conceptual change in the parameters considered nor a significant change in the results obtained compared with the previous calculation methodology initially established for the SeDeM Diagram Expert System, which means that the conclusions obtained by applying this method are equivalent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluating the “critical relative humidity” as a measure of subgrid-scale variability of humidity in general circulation model cloud cover parameterizations using satellite data

    OpenAIRE

    Quaas, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    A simple way to diagnose fractional cloud cover in general circulation models is to relate it to the simulated relative humidity, and allowing for fractional cloud cover above a “critical relative humidity” of less than 100%. In the formulation chosen here, this is equivalent to assuming a uniform “top-hat” distribution of subgrid-scale total water content with a variance related to saturation. Critical relative humidity has frequently been treated as a “tunable” constant, yet it is an observ...

  10. Measuring Error Analysis of Relative Humidity with Dry and Wet Bulb Method%干湿球法测量相对湿度的误差分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛相美; 许文革

    2011-01-01

    根据干湿球法测量相对湿度的原理,分析了干球温度、湿球温度、风速对相对湿度测量误差影响,对相对湿度测量合理选择测试仪表有一定的指导意义。%Based on the dry and wet bulb method,the influence of dry bulb temperature,wet bulb temperature and wind velocity on measurement error of relative humidity were analyzed,the results have demonstrated that the measurement error is higher in low temperature and high humidity than that of in high temperature and low humidity.The studies are practicably instructive for selecting reasonable humidity measurement instruments.

  11. Importance of relative humidity in the oxidative ageing of organic aerosols: case study of the ozonolysis of maleic acid aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Gallimore

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many important atmospheric aerosol processes depend on the chemical composition of the aerosol, e.g. water uptake and particle cloud interactions. Atmospheric ageing processes, such as oxidation reactions, significantly and continuously change the chemical composition of aerosol particles throughout their lifetime. These ageing processes are often poorly understood. In this study we utilize an aerosol flow tube set up and an ultra-high resolution mass spectrometer to explore the effect of relative humidity (RH in the range of <5–90% on the ozonolysis of maleic acid aerosol which is employed as model organic aerosol system. Due to the slow reaction kinetics relatively high ozone concentrations of 160–200 ppm were used to achieve an appreciable degree of oxidation of maleic acid. The effect of oxidative ageing on the hygroscopicity of maleic acid particles is also investigated using an electrodynamic balance and thermodynamic modelling. RH has a profound effect on the oxidation of maleic acid particles. Very little oxidation is observed at RH < 50% and the only observed reaction products are glyoxylic acid and formic acid. In comparison, when RH > 50% there are about 15 oxidation products identified. This increased oxidation was observed even when the particles were exposed to high humidities long after a low RH ozonolysis reaction. This result might have negative implications for the use of water as an extraction solvent for the analysis of oxidized organic aerosols. These humidity-dependent differences in the composition of the ozonolyzed aerosol demonstrate that water is both a key reactant in the oxidation scheme and a determinant of particle phase and hence diffusivity. The measured chemical composition of the processed aerosol is used to model the hygroscopic growth, which compares favourably with water uptake results from the electrodynamic balance measurements. A reaction mechanism is presented which takes into account the RH dependent

  12. Influence of exposure temperature and relative humidity on the response of pinto bean foliage to sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rist, D.L.; Davis, D.D.

    1979-01-01

    When 20-day-old pinto bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris Pinto 111) were exposed to 0.9 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO/sup 2/) the amount of trifoliate leaf injury induced by SO/sub 2/ generally was greater at 32 C than at either 13 or 21 C, and greater at 80% relative humidity (RH) than at 40 and 60% RH. However, injury was less following exposures at 32 C for 1 hr and 21 C for 1 and 2 hr than that caused by equivalent exposures at 13 C. Stomatal conductance increased significantly with increased temperature and RH. Stomatal conductance of trifoliate leaves from plants exposed to SO/sub 2/ was less than that of exposed control plants. The foliar content of SO/sub 2/ evaluated after exposures at 21 and 32C, generally at the higher temperatures. 34 references, 5 figures.

  13. Lead Research and Development Activity for DOE's High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program (Topic 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Fenton, PhD; Darlene Slattery, PhD; Nahid Mohajeri, PhD

    2012-09-05

    The Department of Energy’s High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program was begun in 2006 with the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) as the lead organization. During the first three years of the program, FSEC was tasked with developing non-Nafion® proton exchange membranes with improved conductivity for fuel cells. Additionally, FSEC was responsible for developing protocols for the measurement of in-plane conductivity, providing conductivity measurements for the other funded teams, developing a method for through-plane conductivity and organizing and holding semiannual meetings of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group (HTMWG). The FSEC membrane research focused on the development of supported poly[perfluorosulfonic acid] (PFSA) – Teflon membranes and a hydrocarbon membrane, sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The fourth generation of the PFSA membrane (designated FSEC-4) came close to, but did not meet, the Go/No-Go milestone of 0.1 S/cm at 50% relative humidity at 120 °C. In-plane conductivity of membranes provided by the funded teams was measured and reported to the teams and DOE. Late in the third year of the program, DOE used this data and other factors to decide upon the teams to continue in the program. The teams that continued provided promising membranes to FSEC for development of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) that could be tested in an operating fuel cell. FSEC worked closely with each team to provide customized support. A logic flow chart was developed and discussed before MEA fabrication or any testing began. Of the five teams supported, by the end of the project, membranes from two of the teams were easily manufactured into MEAs and successfully characterized for performance. One of these teams exceeded performance targets, while the other requires further optimization. An additional team developed a membrane that shows great promise for significantly reducing membrane costs and increasing membrane lifetime.

  14. Subsurface monitoring of reservoir pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and water content at the CAES Field Experiment, Pittsfield, Illinois: system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hostetler, D.D.; Childs, S.W.; Phillips, S.J.

    1983-03-01

    This subsurface-instrumentation design has been developed for the first Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) field experiment to be performed in porous media. Energy storage will be accomplished by alternating the injection and withdrawal of compressed air in a confined sandstone aquifer near Pittsfield, Illinois. The overall experiment objective is to characterize the reservoir's geochemical and thermohydraulic response to imposed CAES conditions. Specific experiment objectives require monitoring: air-bubble development; thermal development; cyclic pressure response; reservoir dehydration; and water coning. Supporting these objectives, four parameters will be continuously monitored at depth in the reservoir. They are: temperature; pressure; pore-air relative humidity; and pore-water content. Reservoir temperatures and pressures will range to maximum values approaching 200/sup 0/C and 300 psi, respectively. Both pore-air relative humidity and pore-water content will range from approx. 0 to 100%. This report discusses: instrumentation design; sensor and sensor system calibration; field installation and testing; and instrument-system operation. No comprehensive off-the-shelf instrument package exists to adequately monitor CAES reservoir parameters at depth. The best available sensors were selected and adapted for use under expected ranges of reservoir conditions. The instrumentation design criteria required: suitable sensor accuracy; continuous monitoring capability; redundancy; maximum sensor integrity; contingency planning; and minimum cost-information ratio. Three wells will be instrumented: the injection/withdrawal (I/W) well and the two instrument wells. Sensors will be deployed by wireline suspension in both open and backfilled (with sand) wellbores. The sensors deployed in the I/W well will be retrievable; the instrument-well sensors will not.

  15. Relative Humidity of 40% Inhibiting the Increase of Pulse Rate, Body Temperature, and Blood Lactic Acid During Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengah Sandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive sweating of the body is a reaction to decrease the heat caused by prolonged exercise at high relative humidity (RH. This situation may cause an increase in pulse rate (PR, body temperature (BT, and blood lactic acid (BLA workout. Objective: This study aimed to prove that a RH of 40% better than a RH of 50% and 60% RH in inhibiting the increase of PR, BT, and BLA during exercise. Methods: The study was conducted on 54 samples randomly selected from the IKIP PGRI Bali students. The samples were divided into three groups, and each group was given cycling exercise with a load of 80 Watt for 2 x 30 minutes with rest between sets for five minutes. Group-1 of cycling at 40% of RH, Group-2 at a RH of 50%, and the Group-3 at a RH of 60%. Data PR, BT, and BLA taken before and during exercise. The mean difference between groups before and during exercise were analyzed by One-way Anova and a further test used Least Significant Difference (LSD. Significance used was α = 0.05. Results: The mean of PR during exercise was significantly different between groups with p = 0.045, the mean of BT during exercises was significantly different between groups with p = 0.006, and the mean of BLA during exercises was significantly different between groups with p = 0.005 (p <0.05. Also found that PR, BT, and BLA during exercise at 40% RH was lower than 50% RH and 60% RH (p <0.05. Conclusion: Thus, the RH of 40% was better than RH of 50% and 60 % in inhibiting the increase of PR, BT, and BLA during exercise. Therefore, when practiced in a closed room is expected at 40% relative humidity.

  16. Seasonal behavior of PM2.5 deliquescence, crystallization, and hygroscopic growth in the Po Valley (Milan): Implications for remote sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Luca; Rovelli, Grazia; Casati, Marco; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Perrone, Maria Grazia; Bolzacchini, Ezio; Ferrero, Luca

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols deliquescence and crystallization relative humidity (DRH and CRH) are rarely measured compared to the worldwide number of hygroscopicity measurements; this feature comes from the lack of an efficient method able to capture the whole complexity of chemical composition of aerosols. Despite this, the knowledge of both DRH and CRH are crucial for a correct parameterization of the aerosol hygroscopic growth used in different applications, among which the remote sensing is very important. In this paper, a newly developed technique (direct current conductance method) was applied in an aerosol chamber to Milan PM2.5 samples, to identify aerosol DRH and CRH both during winter and summer. These results were compared with those independently obtained by gravimetric measurements conducted in the chamber using a microbalance. Microbalance data allowed also the determination of the mass hygroscopic growth factor on the collected PM2.5 samples. Results evidenced first a good agreement between the two methods (RMSE = 2.7% and 2.3% for DRH and CRH, respectively). Collected data evidenced the hysteresis behavior of ambient particles and variability in both DRH and CRH between the two seasons. Summer samples showed higher DRH and CRH (on average 71.4 ± 1.0% RH and 62.6 ± 1.2% RH, respectively) than the winter ones (on average 55.2 ± 0.7% RH and 46.9 ± 0.6% RH). This behavior was related to the higher content of sulfates during the summer season. Conversely, the mass hygroscopic growth factor at 90% RH was higher for winter samples (2.76 ± 0.06) with respect to the summer ones (1.91 ± 0.11). Since hysteresis behavior affects optical properties of aerosols, when RH conditions are within the loop, the hygroscopic growth factor could be assigned in a wrong way. Thus, the growth factor was calculated within the hysteresis loop for both upper and lower branches: results showed that difference in hygroscopic growth factor could reach up the 24%.

  17. Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity: A comparison of observations from the Southern and Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes obtained during the INCA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ström

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence frequency of cirrus clouds as function of ambient relative humidity over ice, based on in-situ observations performed during the INCA experiment, show a clear difference between the campaign carried out at Southern Hemisphere (SH midlatitudes and the campaign carried out at Northern Hemisphere (NH midlatitudes. At a given relative humidity above ice saturation, clouds are more frequent in the NH. At relative humidities near ice saturation, clouds defined as containing particles with sizes larger than 0.55 μm diameter and an integral number density above 0.2 cm−3 were present 70% of the time during the SH campaign, whereas clouds where present 95% of the time during the NH campaign. Using a size threshold of 1 μm diameter to define the presence of clouds result in a less frequent occurrence of 60% of the time in the SH campaign and 75% of the time in the NH campaign. The data show that the presence of particles is a common characteristic of cirrus clouds. Clouds at ice saturation defined as having crystal sizes of at least 5 μm diameter and a number density exceeding 0.001 cm−3 were present in about 80% of the time during the SH campaign, and almost 90% of the time during the NH campaign. The observations reveal a significant cloud presence fraction at humidities well below ice saturation. Local minima in the cloud presence fraction as a function of relative humidity are interpreted as systematic underestimation of cloud presence because cloud particles may become invisible to cloud probes. Based on this interpretation the data suggests that clouds in the SH form preferentially at relative humidities between 140 and 155%, whereas clouds in the NH formed at relative humidities less than 130%. A simple assumption about the probability to reach successively higher humidities in an ice supersaturated air parcel provides a model that explains the main trend of the cloud presence fraction as function of

  18. Effects of Relative Humidity on the Molecular Transformation of Aqueous Organic Droplets Oxidized by Gas-Phase Hydroxyl (OH) Radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chim, M. M.; Chow, C. Y.; Davies, J. F.; Chan, M. N.

    2016-12-01

    Organic aerosols can exist as aqueous droplets, with a variable water content depending on their composition and environmental conditions (e.g. relative humidity (RH)). Recent laboratory studies reveal that oxidations kinetics in highly concentrated droplets can differ from those in dilute solutions. In this work we explore the role of water in the formation of reaction products upon oxidation. We focus on the heterogeneous chemistry of aqueous organic droplets consisting of 2-methylglutaric acid (2-MGA), measuring the reaction kinetics upon heterogeneous OH oxidation over a range of RH. An atmospheric pressure aerosol mass spectrometer, which combines an atmospheric pressure soft ionization source (Direct Analysis in Real Time, DART) with a high-resolution mass spectrometer, is used to obtain real- time molecular information of the reaction products. The analysis of reaction products from the aerosol mass spectra show that the same reaction products are formed at all measured RH. At a given reaction extent of the parent 2-MGA, the aerosol composition is independent of RH. These results suggest the availability of aerosol phase water does not alter the reaction mechanisms significantly. Furthermore, kinetic measurements find that the effective OH uptake coefficient, γOH, decreases with decreasing RH below 72.0 ± 1.5%. Isotopic exchange measurements performed using an aerosol optical tweezers reveal water diffusion coefficients in 2-MGA droplets to be 3.5 × 10-13 to 8.0 × 10-13 ms-1 over the RH range of 52 to 58%. These values represent an upper limit for the diffusion of the larger organic molecules and are comparable to that of other viscous organic aerosols (e.g. citric acid and sucrose), indicating that the 2- MGA droplets are likely to be viscous at low humidity. Taken together, these results suggest that the observed relationship between the γOH and RH may be attributed to the changes in aerosol viscosity rather than changes in reaction mechanisms.

  19. Effects of atmospheric relative humidity on Stratum Corneum structure at the molecular level: ex vivo Raman spectroscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyumvuhore, Raoul; Tfayli, Ali; Duplan, Hélène; Delalleau, Alexandre; Manfait, Michel; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2013-07-21

    Skin hydration plays an important role in the optimal physical properties and physiological functions of the skin. Despite the advancements in the last decade, dry skin remains the most common characteristic of human skin disorders. Thus, it is important to understand the effect of hydration on Stratum Corneum (SC) components. In this respect, our interest consists in correlating the variations of unbound and bound water content in the SC with structural and organizational changes in lipids and proteins using a non-invasive technique: Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra were acquired on human SC at different relative humidity (RH) levels (4-75%). The content of different types of water, bound and free, was measured using the second derivative and curve fitting of the Raman bands in the range of 3100-3700 cm(-1). Changes in lipidic order were evaluated using νC-C and νC-H. To analyze the effect of RH on the protein structure, we examined in the Amide I region, the Fermi doublet of tyrosine, and the νasymCH3 vibration. The contributions of totally bound water were found not to vary with humidity, while partially bound water varied with three different rates. Unbound water increased greatly when all sites for bound water were saturated. Lipid organization as well as protein deployment was found to be optimal at intermediate RH values (around 60%), which correspond to the maximum of SC water binding capacity. This analysis highlights the relationship between bound water, the SC barrier state and the protein structure and elucidates the optimal conditions. Moreover, our results showed that increased content of unbound water in the SC induces disorder in the structures of lipids and proteins.

  20. Relative humidity effects on the surface electrical properties of resistive plate chamber melaminic laminates uncoated and coated with polymerized linseed oil film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearzotti, Andrea; Palummo, Lucrezia

    2007-09-01

    Relative humidity is an important quantity to control in many manufacturing environments such as semiconductor industry. Humidity and moisture can affect many electronic devices, generally rendering their operation worse. In this study we present results showing that in some specific applications, humidity can improve the performance of an electronic device. Resistive plate chambers are used as trigger detectors of the muon system in LHC (large hadron collider) experiments ATLAS (a toroidal LHC apparatus), CMS (compact muon solenoid) and ALICE (a large ion collider experiment) and as detector in cosmic rays experiment ARGO (astrophysical radiation with ground-based observatory). These detectors are made of phenolic-melaminic laminate electrodes, coated with a polymerized linseed oil film delimiting the gaseous sensitive volume. The loss of some of the detector capability can be progressive in time and due to the intrinsic limits of the detector materials. One of these effects is due to an increase of the total plate resistance, that is correlated to ion migration and relativity humidity phenomena. Our purpose is to understand the relative humidity (RH) influence on the conduction mechanisms on the electrodes surface. Results of amperometric measurements on laminate samples kept at a fixed temperature of 22°C, cycling RH between 10% and 90% are here presented.

  1. Secondary Organic Aerosol Produced from Aqueous Reactions of Phenols in Fog Drops and Deliquesced Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.; Anastasio, C.

    2014-12-01

    The formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in atmospheric condensed phases (i.e., aqueous SOA) can proceed rapidly, but relatively little is known of the important aqueous SOA precursors or their reaction pathways. In our work we are studying the aqueous SOA formed from reactions of phenols (phenol, guaiacol, and syringol), benzene-diols (catechol, resorcinol, and hydroquinone), and phenolic carbonyls (e.g., vanillin and syringaldehyde). These species are potentially important aqueous SOA precursors because they are released in large quantities from biomass burning, have high Henry's Law constants (KH = 103 -109 M-1 atm-1) and are rapidly oxidized. To evaluate the importance of aqueous reactions of phenols as a source of SOA, we first quantified the kinetics and SOA mass yields for 11 phenols reacting via direct photodegradation, hydroxyl radical (•OH), and with an excited organic triplet state (3C*). In the second step, which is the focus of this work, we use these laboratory results in a simple model of fog chemistry using conditions during a previously reported heavy biomass burning event in Bakersfield, CA. Our calculations indicate that under aqueous aerosol conditions (i.e., a liquid water content of 100 μg m-3) the rate of aqueous SOA production (RSOA(aq)) from phenols is similar to the rate in the gas phase. In contrast, under fog/cloud conditions the aqueous RSOA from phenols is 10 times higher than the rate in the gas phase. In both of these cases aqueous RSOA is dominated by the oxidation of phenols by 3C*, followed by direct photodegradation of phenolic carbonyls, and then •OH oxidation. Our results suggest that aqueous oxidation of phenols is a significant source of SOA during fog events and also during times when deliquesced aerosols are present.

  2. Influence of L-cysteine, oxygen and relative humidity upon survival throughout storage of probiotic bacteria in whey protein-based microcapsules

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, D; Sousa, S.; Rocha-Santos, T.; Silva, J. P.; Lobo, J. M. Sousa; Costa, P.; Amaral, M. H.; Pintado, M. M.; Gomes, A. M.; Malcata, F. X.; Freitas, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    The survival rates of Lactobacilus acidophilus Ki, Lactobacillus paracasei L26 and Bifidobacterium animalis BB-12 were studied after whey protein microencapsulation via spray-drying, with or without L-cysteine- HCl, and storage up to 6 months at 5 C and 22 C, with variation in relative air humidity and oxygen levels. Lb. paracasei L26 was the least susceptible to storage conditions: above 106 cfu g 1 were recorded by 180 d at 22 C, irrespective of relative humidity, and the pre...

  3. Impact of relative humidity and particles size distribution on aerosol light extinction in urban area of Guangzhou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. J. Lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In urban area of Guangzhou, an experiment was conducted at the monitoring site of SCIES in order to recognize the impact of relative humidity (RH and particles size distribution on aerosol light extinction during 2009 to 2010. Water-soluble ions and OC/EC in daily PM2.5 samples was determined by the Dionex ion chromatography and the DIR model 2001 carbon analyzer, respectively; particles size distribution was measured by TSI 3321 APS; and total light scattering coefficient was measured by TSI 3565 Nephelometer. Inorganic salts that constitute PM2.5 were recognized under an assumption of the electrical charge neutrality, while chemical components as POM, EC and water content were determined by means of hygroscopic growth calculation and chemical mass closure. As a result, (NH42SO4, NaNO3, POM, EC and water content were found to be the major components. By the Mie Model, light scattering and absorption coefficient of PM0.5–2.5 were estimated on the basis of the chemical composition of PM2.5 and the size distribution of number concentration of PM0.5–2.5. This estimation was evaluated by results from Nephelometer measurement and proved to have high accuracy. With the knowledge of hygroscopic growth of some inorganic salts, it was realized that optical properties of PM2.5 greatly depended on relative humidity, while light extinction was enhanced averagely 1.23, 1.38 and 1.75 times at 70%, 80% and 90% RH, respectively. Moreover, light extinction coefficient of PM0.5–2.5 increased averagely 1.24 to 1.28 times during wet days while merely 1.04 times in dry days. Furthermore, combined results from Nephelometer, the knowledge of relation between EC and aerosol light absorption and the Mie Model estimation, size distribution of total light extinction coefficient was determined. PM1 contributed averagely 76%, 85%, 94% and

  4. Determination of the deliquesce point in double salts and in in-situ multicomponent salts with DVS equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge

    2014-01-01

    the literature. Also in-situ-multi salt samples were measured including the difference between the second critical relative humidity and the efflorescence relative humidity being a measure for the critical supersaturation required for crystallization at the specific experimental conditions. The DVS equipment...

  5. Influence of temperature and relative humidity on dentin and enamel bonding: a critical review of the literature. Part 1. Laboratory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquot, Bruno; Durand, Jean-Cédric; Farge, Pierre; Valcarcel, Jean; Deville de Périère, Dominique; Cuisinier, Frédéric

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this literature review was to investigate the results from in vitro laboratory studies on the influence of temperature and relative humidity present before polymerization on enamel and dentin bonding systems. A systematic search was carried out including articles published in English, in peer reviewed journals, and indexed in MEDLINE/PubMed database. The search was carried out using the terms: relative AND humidity AND dental. In vitro studies were retrieved and divided into laboratory simulation studies and studies on physical properties. Laboratory simulation studies were addressed by subtopic: resin-enamel bond strength, resin-dentin bond strength, and dentin-enamel microleakage. Studies on physical properties tested the influence of humidity and temperature through polymerization contraction, flexural strength, and dentin wettability. Laboratory simulation studies demonstrated a strong influence of humidity and temperature on dentin and enamel bond strength and microleakage with dental adhesives systems. The studies on physical properties failed to demonstrate any influence of humidity on the adhesion performance, except for wettability measurement. The clinical relevance of these in vitro results remains to be demonstrated. A review of in vivo clinical studies will complete the literature data presented here.

  6. Endurance of Nafion-composite membranes in PEFCs operating at elevated temperature under low relative-humidity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Sahu; A Jalajakshi; S Pitchumani; P Sridhar; A K Shukla

    2012-03-01

    PEFCs employing Nafion-silica (Nafion-SiO2) and Nafion-mesoporous zirconium phosphate (Nafion-MZP) composite membranes are subjected to accelerated-durability test at 100°C and 15% relative humidity (RH) at open-circuit voltage (OCV) for 50 h and performance compared with the PEFC employing pristine Nafion-1135 membrane. PEFCs with composite membranes sustain the operating voltage better with fluoride-ion-emission rate at least an order of magnitude lower than PEFC with pristine Nafion-1135 membrane. Reduced gas-crossover, fast fuel-cell-reaction kinetics and superior performance of the PEFCs with Nafion-SiO2 and Nafion-MZP composite membranes in relation to the PEFC with pristine Nafion-1135 membrane support the long-term operational usage of the former in PEFCs. An 8-cell PEFC stack employing Nafion-SiO2 composite membrane is also assembled and successfully operated at 60°C without external humidification.

  7. Effects of relative humidity and ambient temperature on the ballistic delivery of micro-particles to excised porcine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Mark; Rishworth, Stephen; Carter, Fiona; Mitchell, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    The effectiveness of ballistic particle delivery to the skin is often dependent upon breaching the stratum corneum (SC) and targeting cells within defined layers of the viable epidermis. This paper experimentally determines the influence of relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the ballistic delivery of particles to the skin. Gold particles of radius 0.9+/-0.6 microm were accelerated by a hand-held supersonic device to impact freshly excised porcine skin at 410-665 m per s. Increasing the RH from 15% to 95% (temperature at 25 degrees C) led to a particle penetration increase by a factor of 1.8. Temperature increases from 20 degrees C to 40 degrees C (RH at 15%) enhanced particle penetration 2-fold. In both cases, these increases were sufficient to move the target layer from the SC to the viable epidermis. Relative trends in particle penetration compared well with predictions from a theoretical model well. Calculated absolute penetration depths are 6-fold greater than the measurements. The inversely calculated dynamic yield stress of the SC is up to a factor of 10 higher than reported quasi-static measurements, due to changes in tissue failure modes over a strain-rate range spanning 10 orders of magnitude. If targeted particle delivery is required, it is recommended that the environmental RH and temperature be monitored.

  8. Stabilized composite membranes and membrane electrode assemblies for high temperature/low relative humidity polymer electrolyte fuel cell operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Vijay Krishna

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have a variety of applications in the stationary power, mobile power and automotive power sectors. Existing membrane technology presently permits fuel cell operation at temperatures less than 100°C under fully saturated conditions. However, several advantages such as easier heat rejection rates and improved impurities tolerance by the anode electrocatalyst result by operating a PEMFC at elevated temperatures (above 100°C) and lower relative humidities. In an attempt to extend the operating range of the polymer electrolyte membrane, perfluorosulfonic acid (NafionRTM) based organic/inorganic (heteropolyacid) composite membranes were investigated in terms of thermal and electrochemical stability, additive stability and conductivity. Tungsten based heteropolyacids (HPAs) were found to be electrochemically stable as opposed to molybdenum based additives. The stability of the inorganic heteropolyacid additive in aqueous environments was enhanced by ion exchanging the protons of the HPAs with larger counter ions. An additional stabilization technique developed involved improving the interaction of HPA with NafionRTM by linking the particles to the sulfonic acid clusters via a sol-gel induced metal oxide linkage. The proton conductivity of the composite membranes was found to depend on the particle size of the HPA additive. A two order of magnitude change in additive particle size was attained by modification of the membrane preparation technique. This modification resulted in a nearly 50% increase in conductivity. The membranes prepared were characterized by thermal analysis, spectroscopy and microscopy. A technique was developed to incorporate existing MEA preparation and HPA stabilization techniques to the composite membranes with small HPA particles. All MEAs prepared were evaluated at high temperatures (120°C) and low relative humidities (35%) in an operating fuel cell, with membrane resistance and hence conductivity

  9. Performance Characteristics of a PEM Fuel Cell with Parallel Flow Channels at Different Cathode Relative Humidity Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Sang Soon Hwang; Pil Hyong Lee

    2009-01-01

    In fuel cells flow configuration and operating conditions such as cell temperature, humidity at each electrode and stoichiometric number are very crucial for improving performance. Too many flow channels could enhance the performance but result in high parasite loss. Therefore a trade-off between pressure drop and efficiency of a fuel cell should be considered for optimum design. This work focused on numerical simulation of the effects of operating conditions, especially cathode humidity, wit...

  10. [New potentials for monitoring the temperature and the relative and absolute humidity of the air-oxygen mixture during the prolonged artificial ventilation of newborn infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenin, O B; Efimov, M S

    1998-01-01

    A new HTM-902 monitor (UCCP, Germany/Serviceinstrument, Russia) was used for continuous measurements of the temperature and relative and absolute humidity of inspired gas during prolonged mechanical ventilation in 86 neonates with respiratory failure caused by the respiratory distress syndrome (n = 42), meconium aspiration syndrome (n = 28), and congenital pneumonia (n = 16). All measurements were performed with a special probe connected to the inspiratory contour through a standard adapter close to the patient's T-piece. The monitor helped maintain the optimal values of the inspired gas conditioning during assisted ventilation of the neonates. The optimal relationships between gas temperature and humidity can be attained only with humidifiers with a servocontrol of temperature and heated wire inside the inspiratory circle tube. For maintaining adequate humidity of inspired gas after any changes in the ventilator flow rate or in the temperature inside the incubator, the heating power of the humidifier had to be corrected. However, even with servocontrolled humidifiers and humidity regulation, an increase of temperature inside the incubator over 35 degrees C made impossible the maintenance of the inspired gas humidity at the level of 96-100% with its temperature at the level of the patient's T-piece no higher than 37 degrees C.

  11. Importance of stress-response genes to the survival of airborne Escherichia coli under different levels of relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tsz Wai; Chan, Wing Lam; Lai, Ka Man

    2017-12-01

    Other than the needs for infection control to investigate the survival and inactivation of airborne bacterial pathogens, there has been a growing interest in exploring bacterial communities in the air and the effect of environmental variables on them. However, the innate biological mechanism influencing the bacterial viability is still unclear. In this study, a mutant-based approach, using Escherichia coli as a model, was used to prove the concept that common stress-response genes are important for airborne survival of bacteria. Mutants with a single gene knockout that are known to respond to general stress (rpoS) and oxidative stress (oxyR, soxR) were selected in the study. Low relative humidity (RH), 30-40% was more detrimental to the bacteria than high RH, >90%. The log reduction of ∆rpoS was always higher than that of the parental strain at all RH levels but the ∆oxyR had a higher log reduction than the parental strain at intermediate RH only. ∆soxR had the same viability compared to the parental strain at all RH levels. The results hint that although different types and levels of stress are produced under different RH conditions, stress-response genes always play a role in the bacterial viability. This study is the first reporting the association between stress-response genes and viability of airborne bacteria.

  12. Effects of host, temperature and relative humidity on competitive displacement of two invasive Bemisia tabaci biotypes [Q and B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Chu; Yun-Li Tao; You-Jun Zhang; Fang-Hao Wan; Judith K Brown

    2012-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci shifted unexpectedly in China from a predominance of B biotype to Q biotype during 2005-2008.This observation stimulated an interest in investigating whether environmental factors,including host,temperature and relative humidity (RH) could possibly explain the observed shift in biotypes distribution.Results indicated that all three parameters examined influenced biotype survivability.The percentage of B biotype,when reared together on pepper plants with the Q biotype,decreased significantly from 66.7% in the founder population,to 13.6% and 3.7% in the first and second generations,respectively.When the B (founder at 66.7%) and Q (founder at 33.3%) biotypes were reared together on eggplant alone,or on pepper-plus-eggplant combination,the population size of the B biotype either remained constant,or increased somewhat in the first and second generations.On eggplant,the effects of RH and temperature on the competitiveness between the Q and B biotypes (3 pairs of Q and 6 pairs of B) were not significant.

  13. Enhanced MEA Performance for PEMFCs under Low Relative Humidity and Low Oxygen Content Conditions via Catalyst Functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Le; Yang, Fan; Xie, Jian; Yang, Zhiwei; Kariuki, Nancy N.; Myers, Deborah J.; Peng, Jui-Kun; Wang, Xiaohua; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Yu, Kang; Ferreira, Paulo J.; Bonastre, Alex Martinez; Fongalland, Dash; Sharman, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    This work demonstrates that functionalizing annealed-Pt/Ketjen black EC300j (a-Pt/KB) and dealloyed-PtNi/Ketjen black EC300j (d-PtNi/KB) catalysts using p-phenyl sulfonic acid can effectively enhance performance in the membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The functionalization increased the size of both Pt and PtNi catalyst particles and resulted in the further leaching of Ni from the PtNi catalyst while promoting the formation of nanoporous PtNi nanoparticles. The size of the SO3H-Pt/KB and SO3H-PtNi/KB carbon-based aggregates decreased dramatically, leading to the formation of catalyst layers with narrower pore size distributions.MEA tests highlighted the benefits of the surface functionalization, in which the cells with SO3H-Pt/KB and SO3H-PtNi/KB cathode catalysts showed superior high current density performance under reduced RH conditions, in comparison with cells containing annealed Pt/KB (a-Pt/KB) and de-alloyed PtNi/KB (d-PtNi/KB) catalysts. The performance improvement was particularly evident when using reactant gases with low relative humidity, indicating that the hydrophilic functional groups on the carbon improved the water retention in the cathode catalyst layer. These results show a new avenue for enhancing catalyst performance for the next generation of catalytic materials for PEMFCs.

  14. INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE AND RELATIVE HUMIDITY ON GRAIN MOISTURE, GERMINATION AND VIGOUR OF THREE WHEAT CULTIVARS DURING ONE YEAR STORAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Strelec

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in grain moisture, germination and vigour of three wheat cultivars packed in paper bags and stored for one year under four different conditions of environmental temperature and relative humidity (RH were investigated. During the first ninety days of storage significant reduction in grain moisture content of 4, 2.5 and 0.9 %, respectively, under 40 °C, 25 °C and 4 °C and RH of 45 % occurred. Subsequently grain moisture remained constant until the end of storage. Seeds of examined cultivars lost their germination ability and vigour only under elevated storage temperatures. Germination and vigour loss after one year of storage differed between cultivars being higher for seeds kept under 40°C, RH = 45% (35-85 % and 55-94 %, respectively, than under 25°C, RH = 45 % (10-20 % and 15-22 %, respectively. Obtained data indicate significant influence of storage conditions on moisture content, germination and vigour changes during storage of wheat seeds, as well as varietal dependence of seed viability.

  15. Effect of storage conditions (relative humidity, duration, and temperature) on the germination time of Aspergillus carbonarius and Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattab, Nadia; Kalai, Safaa; Bensoussan, Maurice; Dantigny, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Fungal conidia are disseminated, often in the air, for a certain period of time, prior to contaminating food products. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of the relative humidity, RH (%), time (day), and temperature (°C) during this period of time, called "storage", on the germination time, τ (h), of Aspergillus carbonarius and Penicillium chrysogenum. A Doehlert design was used in the range, 20-100% RH, 2-28 days, and 5-25 °C. As compared to un-stored conidia, the germination time of conidia stored at 60% RH, 15 days, 5 °C was increased by 23 and 28%, for A. carbonarius and P. chrysogenum, respectively. Stored conidia exhibited a minimum τ value at 60% RH, and 100% RH for A. carbonarius and P. chrysogenum, respectively. For these species, τ was minimum for 2 days of storage. The effect of temperature was RH dependent for A. carbonarius. The germination time of stored conidia was clearly greater than that of fresh conidia obtained in the laboratory. This result should be taken into account to determine the mould free shelf-life of food products.

  16. A Kinetic Model for Predicting the Relative Humidity in Modified Atmosphere Packaging and Its Application in Lentinula edodes Packages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-xin Lu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adjusting and controlling the relative humidity (RH inside package is crucial for ensuring the quality of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP of fresh produce. In this paper, an improved kinetic model for predicting the RH in MAP was developed. The model was based on heat exchange and gases mass transport phenomena across the package, gases heat convection inside the package, and mass and heat balances accounting for the respiration and transpiration behavior of fresh produce. Then the model was applied to predict the RH in MAP of fresh Lentinula edodes (one kind of Chinese mushroom. The model equations were solved numerically using Adams-Moulton method to predict the RH in model packages. In general, the model predictions agreed well with the experimental data, except that the model predictions were slightly high in the initial period. The effect of the initial gas composition on the RH in packages was notable. In MAP of lower oxygen and higher carbon dioxide concentrations, the ascending rate of the RH was reduced, and the RH inside packages was saturated slowly during storage. The influence of the initial gas composition on the temperature inside package was not much notable.

  17. An Approximate Method of Calculation of Relative Humidity Required to Prevent Frosting on Inside of Aircraft Pressure Cabin Windows, Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alun R.

    1940-01-01

    This report has been prepare in response to a request for information from an aircraft company. A typical example was selected for the presentation of an approximate method of calculation of the relative humidity required to prevent frosting on the inside of a plastic window in a pressure type cabin on a high speed airplane. The results of the study are reviewed.

  18. Influence of the relative humidity on the morphology of inkjet printed spots of IgG on a non-porous substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Siregar, D.P.; Amerongen, van A.; Norde, Willem

    2014-01-01

    During the drying of inkjet printed droplets, the solute particles (IgG-Alexa-635 molecules) in the drop may distribute unevenly on the substrate, resulting in a “coffee-stain” spot morphology. In our study, we investigated the influence of the relative humidity on the distribution of inkjet printed

  19. The development of a model to describe the influence of temperature and relative humidity on respiration rate of prickly pear cactus stems in reduced O2 conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yahia, E.M.; Guevara, J.C.; Beaudry, R.M.; Tijskens, L.M.M.; Cedeno, L.

    2010-01-01

    Respiration rate (RO2) of prickly pear cactus stems (Opuntia spp.) was measured as a function of 4 temperature (T) and 6 relative humidity (RH) combinations for O2 partial pressures between 15 and 0.8 kPa, which were considered to support aerobic respiration. The rate of respiration (RO2) was determ

  20. Evaluation of measurement errors of temperature and relative humidity from HOBO data logger under different conditions of exposure to solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Antonio Ribeiro

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to assess measurements of temperature and relative humidity obtained with HOBO a data logger, under various conditions of exposure to solar radiation, comparing them with those obtained through the use of a temperature/relative humidity probe and a copper-constantan thermocouple psychrometer, which are considered the standards for obtaining such measurements. Data were collected over a 6-day period (from 25 March to 1 April, 2010), during which the equipment was monitored continuously and simultaneously. We employed the following combinations of equipment and conditions: a HOBO data logger in full sunlight; a HOBO data logger shielded within a white plastic cup with windows for air circulation; a HOBO data logger shielded within a gill-type shelter (multi-plate prototype plastic); a copper-constantan thermocouple psychrometer exposed to natural ventilation and protected from sunlight; and a temperature/relative humidity probe under a commercial, multi-plate radiation shield. Comparisons between the measurements obtained with the various devices were made on the basis of statistical indicators: linear regression, with coefficient of determination; index of agreement; maximum absolute error; and mean absolute error. The prototype multi-plate shelter (gill-type) used in order to protect the HOBO data logger was found to provide the best protection against the effects of solar radiation on measurements of temperature and relative humidity. The precision and accuracy of a device that measures temperature and relative humidity depend on an efficient shelter that minimizes the interference caused by solar radiation, thereby avoiding erroneous analysis of the data obtained.

  1. Hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at high relative humidity and their diurnal variations in the North China Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol particles were determined at a suburban site (Wuqing in the North China Plain among a cluster of cities during the period 17 July to 12 August 2009. A High Humidity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (HH-TDMA instrument was applied to measure the hygroscopic growth factor (GF at 90%, 95% and 98.5% relative humidity (RH for particles with dry diameter between 50–250 nm. The probability distribution of GF (GF-PDF averaged over the period shows a distinct bimodal pattern, namely, a dominant more-hygroscopic (MH group and a smaller nearly-hydrophobic (NH group. The MH group particles were highly hygroscopic, and their GF was relatively constant during the period with average values of 1.54±0.02, 1.81±0.04 and 2.45±0.07 at 90%, 95% and 98.5% RH (D0=100 nm, respectively. The NH group particles grew very slightly when exposed to high RH, with GF values of 1.08±0.02, 1.13±0.06 and 1.24±0.13, respectively at 90%, 95% and 98.5% RH (D0=100 nm. The hygroscopic growth behaviours at different RHs were well represented by the hygroscopicity parameter κ with a single-parameter Köhler model. Thus, the calculation of GF as a function of RH and dry diameter could be facilitated by an empirical parameterization of κ as function of dry diameter. A strong diurnal pattern in number fraction of different hygroscopic groups was observed, indicating a diurnal variation of aerosol mixing state and/or chemical composition. The average number fraction of NH particles during the day was about 8%, while during the nighttime fractions up to 20% were reached. Correspondingly, the state of mixing in terms of water uptake varied significantly during a day. The high fraction of NH particles measured during the night denotes a high degree of external mixing of ambient aerosols, while during the day the degree of external mixing decreased. Simulations using a particle-resolved aerosol

  2. Coupled isotopes of plant wax and hemicellulose markers record information on relative humidity and isotopic composition of precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tuthorn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The δ2H isotopic composition of leaf waxes is used increasingly for paleohydrological and -climate reconstructions. However, it is challenging to disentangle past changes in the isotopic composition of precipitation and changes in evapotranspirative enrichment of leaf water. We analyzed δ2H on n-alkanes and fatty acids in topsoils along a climate transect in Argentina, for which we had previously measured δ18O on plant-derived sugars. Our results indicate that leaf wax biomarker δ2H values (δ2Hlipids primarily reflect δ2Hsource water (precipitation, but are modulated by evapotranspirative enrichment. A mechanistic model is able to produce the main trends in δ2Hlipids along the transect, but seems to slightly underestimate evapotranspirative enrichment in arid regions and overestimate it in grass-dominated ecosystems. Furthermore, the (i coupling of the δ2Hlipid and δ18Osugar biomarker results and (ii application of biosynthetic fractionation factors allows calculating the δ2H-δ18O isotopic composition of leaf water along the transect. This also yields the deuterium excess (d excess of leaf water, which mainly reflects evapotranspirative enrichment, and can be used to model relative air humidity (RH. The high correlation of modeled (reconstructed based on biomarker results and measured RH, as well as the good agreement between modeled and actual δ2H and δ18O of precipitation along the transect lends support to the coupled δ2Hlipid and δ18Osugar biomarker approach for future paleoclimate research.

  3. Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity: a comparison of observations obtained during the INCA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ström

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on in-situ observations performed during the Interhemispheric differences in cirrus properties from anthropogenic emissions (INCA experiment, we introduce and discuss the cloud presence fraction (CPF defined as the ratio between the number of data points determined to represent cloud at a given ambient relative humidity over ice (RHI divided by the total number of data points at that value of RHI. The CPFs are measured with four different cloud probes. Within similar ranges of detected particle sizes and concentrations, it is shown that different cloud probes yield results that are in good agreement with each other. The CPFs taken at Southern Hemisphere (SH and Northern Hemisphere (NH midlatitudes differ from each other. Above ice saturation, clouds occurred more frequently during the NH campaign. Local minima in the CPF as a function of RHI are interpreted as a systematic underestimation of cloud presence when cloud particles become invisible to cloud probes. Based on this interpretation, we find that clouds during the SH campaign formed preferentially at RHIs between 140 and 155%, whereas clouds in the NH campaign formed at RHIs somewhat below 130%. The data show that interstitial aerosol and ice particles coexist down to RHIs of 70-90%, demonstrating that the ability to distinguish between different particle types in cirrus conditions depends on the sensors used to probe the aerosol/cirrus system. Observed distributions of cloud water content differ only slightly between the NH and SH campaigns and seem to be only weakly, if at all, affected by the freezing aerosols.

  4. Light absorption by secondary organic aerosol from α-pinene: Effects of oxidants, seed aerosol acidity, and relative humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chen [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Winston-Salem North Carolina USA; Gyawali, Madhu [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Nevada System of Higher Education, Reno Nevada USA; Now at Desert Research Institute, Nevada System of Higher Education, Reno Nevada USA; Zaveri, Rahul A. [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Shilling, John E. [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Arnott, W. Patrick [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Nevada System of Higher Education, Reno Nevada USA

    2013-10-25

    It is well known that light absorption from dust and black carbon aerosols has a warming effect on climate while light scattering from sulfate, nitrate, and sea salt aerosols has a cooling effect. However, there are large uncertainties associated with light absorption and scattering by different types of organic aerosols, especially in the near-UV and UV spectral regions. In this paper, we present the results from a systematic laboratory study focused on measuring light absorption by secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated from dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems in the presence of neutral and acidic sulfate seed aerosols. Light absorption was monitored using photoacoustic spectrometers at four different wavelengths: 355, 405, 532, and 870 nm. Significant light absorption at 355 and 405 nm was observed for the SOA formed from α-pinene + O3 + NO3 system only in the presence of highly acidic sulfate seed aerosols under dry conditions. In contrast, no absorption was observed when the relative humidity was elevated to greater than 27% or in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols. Organic nitrates in the SOA formed in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols were found to be nonabsorbing, while the light-absorbing compounds are speculated to be aldol condensation oligomers with nitroxy organosulfate groups that are formed in highly acidic sulfate aerosols. Finally and overall, these results suggest that dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems do not form light-absorbing SOA under typical atmospheric conditions.

  5. A layer-averaged relative humidity profile retrieval for microwave observations: design and results for the Megha-Tropiques payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivira, R. G.; Brogniez, H.; Mallet, C.; Oussar, Y.

    2015-03-01

    A statistical method trained and optimized to retrieve seven-layer relative humidity (RH) profiles is presented and evaluated with measurements from radiosondes. The method makes use of the microwave payload of the Megha-Tropiques platform, namely the SAPHIR sounder and the MADRAS imager. The approach, based on a generalized additive model (GAM), embeds both the physical and statistical characteristics of the inverse problem in the training phase, and no explicit thermodynamical constraint - such as a temperature profile or an integrated water vapor content - is provided to the model at the stage of retrieval. The model is built for cloud-free conditions in order to avoid the cases of scattering of the microwave radiation in the 18.7-183.31 GHz range covered by the payload. Two instrumental configurations are tested: a SAPHIR-MADRAS scheme and a SAPHIR-only scheme to deal with the stop of data acquisition of MADRAS in January 2013 for technical reasons. A comparison to learning machine algorithms (artificial neural network and support-vector machine) shows equivalent performance over a large realistic set, promising low errors (biases 0.8) throughout the troposphere (150-900 hPa). A comparison to radiosonde measurements performed during the international field experiment CINDY/DYNAMO/AMIE (winter 2011-2012) confirms these results for the mid-tropospheric layers (correlations between 0.6 and 0.92), with an expected degradation of the quality of the estimates at the surface and top layers. Finally a rapid insight of the estimated large-scale RH field from Megha-Tropiques is presented and compared to ERA-Interim.

  6. Influences of relative humidity and particle chemical composition on aerosol scattering properties during the 2006 PRD campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingang; Cheng, Yafang; Zhang, Yuanhang; Jung, Jinsang; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Chang, Shih-Yu; Kim, Young J.; Fan, Shaojia; Zeng, Limin

    In situ measurements of the physical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosols were carried out in Guangzhou city, China, from 1 to 31 July 2006 during the Pearl River Delta (PRD) Campaign. The light extinction coefficient of the ambient atmosphere, the aerosol scattering coefficient under dry conditions, the aerosol absorption coefficient under ambient conditions, NO 2 concentration, and relative humidity (RH) were measured by transmissionmeter, an integrating nephelometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), a NO X analyzer, and an automatic meteorological station, respectively. Meanwhile, the molecular scattering coefficient was calculated by the Rayleigh scattering function using the US Standard Atmosphere. A method to calculate the aerosol hygroscopic growth factor f(RH), defined as the ratio of the aerosol scattering coefficient under a wet condition to that under a dry condition (40% RH), is proposed based on these optical parameters. The mean and standard deviation aerosol hygroscopic growth factors at 80% RH ( f(RH)=80%) in Ganzhou were 2.04±0.28, 2.29±0.28, and 2.68±0.59 for urban aerosols, mixed aerosols, and marine aerosols, respectively, with the air mass classification being based on the air mass source region. The relationship between f(RH) and RH is fitted by empirical equations and the fitting parameters are calculated. The relationships between f(RH)=80% and total carbon mass fraction (TCF) in PM 2.5, the water-soluble mass fraction (WSF) in PM 10, and the sea-salt aerosol mass fraction (SSF) in PM 10 reveal that the hygroscopic properties of the observed aerosol have a good positive correlation with the WSF and SSF, but have a negative correlation with the TCF.

  7. Egg hatch and survival and development of beet webworm (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) larvae at different combinations of temperature and relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand the role that temperature and humidity play in the population dynamics of the beet webworm, Loxostege sticticalis L. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), egg hatchability, survival of 1st - 5th instars, survival of the complete larval stage, survival curves, and larval development rates were inve...

  8. Accelerated Testing and Modeling of Potential-Induced Degradation as a Function of Temperature and Relative Humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hacke, Peter; Spataru, Sergiu; Terwilliger, Kent;

    2015-01-01

    An acceleration model based on the Peck equation was applied to power performance of crystalline silicon cell modules as a function of time and of temperature and humidity, which are the two main environmental stress factors that promote potential-induced degradation (PID). This model was derived...

  9. Accelerated Testing and Modeling of Potential-Induced Degradation as a Function of Temperature and Relative Humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hacke, Peter; Spataru, Sergiu; Terwilliger, Kent;

    2015-01-01

    An acceleration model based on the Peck equation was applied to power performance of crystalline silicon cell modules as a function of time and of temperature and humidity, the two main environmental stress factors that promote potential-induced degradation. This model was derived from module pow...

  10. Decontamination method using heat and relative humidity for radish seeds achieves a 7-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 without affecting product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y B; Kim, H W; Song, M K; Rhee, M S

    2015-05-18

    We developed a novel decontamination method to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 on radish seeds without adversely affecting seed germination or product quality. The use of heat (55, 60, and 65 °C) combined with relative humidity (RH; 25, 45, 65, 85, and 100%) for 24h was evaluated for effective microbial reduction and preservation of seed germination rates. A significant two-way interaction of heat and RH was observed for both microbial reduction and germination rate (Pgermination rate (Pseeds (7.0 log CFU/g reduction) and had no significant effect on the germination rate (85.4%; P>0.05) or product quality. The method uses only heat and relative humidity without chemicals, and is thus applicable as a general decontamination procedure in spout producing plants where the use of growth chambers is the norm.

  11. The Relative Humidity of the Atmosphere in the Encasements Containing the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution (Pages 1 and 4), and the Bill of Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, James W.; Burkett, Cecil G.; Levine, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    In 1951, the four pages of the US Constitution, the Letter of Transmittal, the Bill of Rights and the Declaration of Independence, collectively called the 'Charters of Freedom,' were hermetically sealed individually in glass encasements. The atmosphere in the encasements consisted of a mixture of helium with water vapor at a relative humidity between 25 and 35% at room temperature. In 1998, Margaret Kelly of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), contacted Dr. Joel S. Levine at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to request assistance in determining the chemical composition of the atmosphere inside the encasements. Several different Langley learns were assembled to address that request. each using a different measurement technique. This report describes the method and results of one team's relative humidity measurements on encasements containing pages 1 and 4 of the US Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence performed at NARA, College Park. Maryland, on July 23, 2001.

  12. Modelling the association of dengue fever cases with temperature and relative humidity in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia-A generalised linear model with break-point analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhaldy, Ibrahim

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of environmental factors in the temporal distribution of dengue fever in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The relationship between dengue fever cases and climatic factors such as relative humidity and temperature was investigated during 2006-2009 to determine whether there is any relationship between dengue fever cases and climatic parameters in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia. A generalised linear model (GLM) with a break-point was used to determine how different levels of temperature and relative humidity affected the distribution of the number of cases of dengue fever. Break-point analysis was performed to modelled the effect before and after a break-point (change point) in the explanatory parameters under various scenarios. Akaike information criterion (AIC) and cross validation (CV) were used to assess the performance of the models. The results showed that maximum temperature and mean relative humidity are most probably the better predictors of the number of dengue fever cases in Jeddah. In this study three scenarios were modelled: no time lag, 1-week lag and 2-weeks lag. Among these scenarios, the 1-week lag model using mean relative humidity as an explanatory variable showed better performance. This study showed a clear relationship between the meteorological variables and the number of dengue fever cases in Jeddah. The results also demonstrated that meteorological variables can be successfully used to estimate the number of dengue fever cases for a given period of time. Break-point analysis provides further insight into the association between meteorological parameters and dengue fever cases by dividing the meteorological parameters into certain break-points.

  13. Drivers of weathering-related magnetic concentration changes in lacustrine sediments of the Tibetan Plateau - cases in dry and humid climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, E.; Zhang, W.; Hu, S.; Herb, C.; Goddu, S.; Koutsodendris, A.; Pross, J.; Fang, X.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) variations in lacustrine cores from the westerlies-dominated arid Qaidam basin (NE Tibetan Plateau) and the monsoon- dominated humid Heqing basin (SE Tibetan Plateau) have turned out to record changes in moisture fluxes throughout the Pleistocene. In both cases humidity-related weathering of magnetite to maghemite and hematite by low-temperature oxidation in the catchment is recognized as a main driver. In Qaidam basin fluctuations of low and high MS values show orbital cyclicities and reflect relatively higher and lower humidity, respectively, as revealed by calibration to pollen results. The range and possible changes of the catchment area, remains unclear. A tectonic control of the proxy record becomes evident by comparing results in an overlapping age interval (~2.7-1.7 Ma) of two cores in ~20 km distance. The records in the sediments of the Qaidam basin may be dominated by paleo-environmental changes near the lakeshore and controlled by regional water recycling. In Heqing basin the extent of the catchment is far clearer and processes in the catchment and their pathway into lake sediments are better understood. These processes comprise chemical weathering of limestone rocks, strong magnetic enhancement in soils by both enrichment of coarser-grained magnetite inherited from the bedrock and bacterial production of ultrafine magnetite. Relative changes of wind and surface water transport in more and less humid periods led to systematic variations of MS values and carbonate contents on a clear eccentricity (100-kyr) scale. Amplitudes of the cycles can be interpreted with the relative influence of the Indian summer monsoon in this area.

  14. Long-term variation of Surface Ozone, NO2, temperature and relative humidity on crop yield over Andhra Pradesh (AP), India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, M. S.; Obili, Manjula; Srimurali, M.

    2016-07-01

    Long-term variation of Surface Ozone, NO2, Temperature, Relative humidity and crop yield datasets over thirteen districts of Andhra Pradesh(AP) has been studied with the help of OMI, MODIS, AIRS, ERA-Interim re-analysis and Directorate of Economics and Statistics (DES) of AP. Inter comparison of crop yield loss estimates according to exposure metrics such as AOT40 (accumulated ozone exposure over a threshold of 40) and non-linear variation of surface temperature for twenty and eighteen varieties of two major crop growing seasons namely, kharif (April-September) and rabi (October-March), respectively has been made. Study is carried to establish a new crop-yield-exposure relationship for different crop cultivars of AP. Both ozone and temperature are showing a correlation coefficient of 0.66 and 0.87 with relative humidity; and 0.72 and 0.80 with NO2. Alleviation of high surface ozone results in high food security and improves the economy thereby reduces the induced warming of the troposphere caused by ozone. Keywords: Surface Ozone, NO2, Temperature, Relative humidity, Crop yield, AOT 40.

  15. circadian rhythm of calling behavior in the emei music frog (babina daunchina)is associated with habitat temperature and relative humidity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    generally,the function of vocalizations made by male anurans are to attract females or defend resources.typically,males vocalize in choruses during one or more periods in a twenty-four-hour cycle,which varies,however,among species.nevertheless,the causal factors influencing circadian variations of calling patterns in anuran species are not clear.in this study,male chorus vocalizations were monitored in the emei music frog (babina daunchina)for 17 consecutive days during the breeding season,while its habitat air temperature and relative humidity in the course of experiments were measured as well.the results revealed that the circadian calling patterns were characterized by two periods of peak vocalization,which were observed from 0500 h to 0700 h and from 1300 h to 2000 h,while the lowest activity period was found from 2100 h to 2200 h.both calls/h and notes/h were positively correlated with air temperature and negatively with relative humidity.overall,our data indicate that the emei music frogs (b.daunchina)could regulate their vocal activities based on the changes of physical micro-environment (e.g.,temperature or humidity)to maximize reproductive success.

  16. Temperature, Humidity, And Polymer Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddihy, Edward F.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents analysis of experimental data on electrical resistivity of polymer (polyvinyl butyral) as function of temperature and relative humidity. Resulting theoretical expression for electrical resistivity resembles generally accepted empirical law for the corrosion rate.

  17. Shelf-life of Roasted Cashew Nuts as Affected by Relative Humidity, Thickness of Polythene Packaging Material and Duration of Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Irtwange

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of relative humidity, thickness of polythene packaging material and duration of storageon the shelf life of roasted cashew was determined to provide inform ation for packaged roasted cashew nutsmarketers. For this study, split plot in Randomized Complete Block Design was used with a total number of180 observations (3 relative humidity x 4 polythene thicknesses x 5 duration levels of storage x 3 replicationseach for moisture content, microbial count and quality index, which w ere measured using standard procedures.The initial mean moisture content, total fungal counts and percentage quality index of the nuts were found tobe 1.17%db, 30CFU/g and 100% respectively, which were all deemed appropriate in comparison with the setacceptable storage moisture content of 5.8%db, tolerable fungal levels of 103 and 104/g and acceptablepercentage quality index of 45% for roasted cashew nuts which did not exceed its shelf-life and still deemedfit for human consumption. The results of the study indicates that relative humidity, polythene thickness andduration of storage have a highly significant effect (P≤0.01 on moisture content and quality index while forthe microbial count, polythene thickness and duration of storage has significant effect (P≤0.05 with relativehumidity showing non-significance. For all levels of relative humidity and polythene thickness, moisturecontent and microbial count increased with increase in duration of storage w hile quality index decreased withincrease in duration of storage. As the polythene thickness increased at constant storage duration, the moisturecontent decreased. The moisture content of all the samples increased with increase in duration of storage atconstant polythene thickness level. As the thickness of the polythene packaging material increased, the amountof moisture absorbed over time (in days decreases; the total fugal growth decreases, and the percentage qualityindex increases. It is recommended that

  18. 湿度对骨内压电信号的影响%On the Influence of Relative Humidity on Piezoelectric Signals in Bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    富东慧; 侯振德; 秦庆华; 卢晨霞

    2009-01-01

    对不同相对湿度下的骨压电电压和压电电荷信号进行测量研究,来考察湿度对骨压电信号的影响.采用三点弯曲干骨试样,以梯形脉冲载荷的方式进行加载,分别应用超高输入阻抗的生物信号放大器和电荷放大器测量了三种不同相对湿度下的骨压电电压和压电电荷信号波形.结果表明,骨压电电压峰值随湿度的增加而下降很快,当湿度从30%增至60%时,电压降幅达到了80%左右;基于测试原理的不同,骨压电电荷也随湿度的增加而下降,其降幅较小.由此可以推断,骨在体内湿润的状态下,受力变形时压电电压幅值可能趋于零.电荷的产生和瞬时泄放有可能是骨在体内的动态载荷作用下的压电效应的表现形式.%The piezoelectric effect of bone is related to relative humidity levels. Under trapezoidal pulse loading, piezoelectric signals of dry bone samples three-point bending were measured at different relative humidity levels. Piezo-voltages were obtained by using an ultra high input impedance bioamplifier. For the sake of comparing, piezo-charges of bone were also measured. Results show that piezo-voltage of bone quickly decreases with humidity increasing. Piezo-voltage decreases around 80% along with the relative humidity increases from 30% to 60%. The measured piezo-charge also decreases at lower rate along with humidity increasing due to different test principle. It is concluded that piezo-voltage induced by deformation of bone may be performed in a pulse style under dynamic loads.

  19. Inorganic-based proton conductive composite membranes for elevated temperature and reduced relative humidity PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunmei

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are regarded as highly promising energy conversion systems for future transportation and stationary power generation and have been under intensive investigations for the last decade. Unfortunately, cutting edge PEM fuel cell design and components still do not allow economically commercial implementation of this technology. The main obstacles are high cost of proton conductive membranes, low-proton conductivity at low relative humidity (RH), and dehydration and degradation of polymer membranes at high temperatures. The objective of this study was to develop a systematic approach to design a high proton conductive composite membrane that can provide a conductivity of approximately 100 mS cm-1 under hot and dry conditions (120°C and 50% RH). The approach was based on fundamental and experimental studies of the proton conductivity of inorganic additives and composite membranes. We synthesized and investigated a variety of organic-inorganic Nafion-based composite membranes. In particular, we analyzed their fundamental properties, which included thermal stability, morphology, the interaction between inorganic network and Nafion clusters, and the effect of inorganic phase on the membrane conductivity. A wide range of inorganic materials was studied in advance in order to select the proton conductive inorganic additives for composite membranes. We developed a conductivity measurement method, with which the proton conductivity characteristics of solid acid materials, zirconium phosphates, sulfated zirconia (S-ZrO2), phosphosilicate gels, and Santa Barbara Amorphous silica (SBA-15) were discussed in detail. Composite membranes containing Nafion and different amounts of functionalized inorganic additives (sulfated inorganics such as S-ZrO2, SBA-15, Mobil Composition of Matter MCM-41, and S-SiO2, and phosphonated inorganic P-SiO2) were synthesized with different methods. We incorporated inorganic particles within Nafion clusters

  20. Temperatura e umidade relativa na qualidade da tangerina "Montenegrina" armazenada Temperature and relative humidity during cold storage of 'Montenegrina' tangerine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auri Brackmann

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho foi conduzido com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito da temperatura e da umidade relativa do ar (UR sobre a manutenção da qualidade de tangerinas durante o período de armazenamento refrigerado (AR. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi inteiramente casualizado, em esquema bifatorial, com oito repetições, contendo 15 frutos cada. Os tratamentos avaliados constituíram-se da combinação das temperaturas 2, 3 e 4°C, com UR do ar de 90 e 96%. Após oito e 12 semanas de armazenamento, mais três dias de exposição a 20°C, foram realizadas as seguintes análises: acidez total titulável (ATT, sólidos solúveis totais (SST, consistência dos frutos, incidência de podridões e suculência. De acordo com os resultados obtidos, os frutos armazenados a 3°C + UR do ar de 90% apresentaram ATT, SST e consistência mais elevada, após oito e 12 semanas de AR. A incidência de podridão foi significativamente superior nos tratamentos com alta UR do ar (96%. Injúrias provocadas pela baixa temperatura ocorreram em alguns frutos no tratamento a 2°C. Não se constatou diferença significativa na suculência entre os tratamentos em ambas as datas de avaliação. A temperatura de 3°C combinada com UR de 90% apresentou os melhores resultados na conservação de tangerinas "Montenegrina", que podem ser armazenadas por um período de até oito semanas.This research was conducted in order to evaluate the effect of temperature and relative humidity (RH on the quality of tangerines during cold storage. The experimental design was entirely randomized, in a bifatorial design with eight replications of 15 fruits. The treatments were the combination of three temperatures (2, 3 and 4oC and two RH levels (90 and 96%. Evaluations of quality were performed after 8 and 12 weeks of cold storage plus 3 days of shelf life at 20°C. The analyzed parameters were: total titratable acidity (TTA, total soluble solids (TSS, fruits consistency, rot

  1. Case study of airborne fungi according to air temperature and relative humidity in houses with semi-basements adjacent to a forested hillside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Ikuko; Azuma, Michiyo; Hamada, Nobuo; Kubo, Hiroko; Isoda, Norio

    2014-01-01

    We studied airborne concentrations of fungal spores and the thermal environment in houses with semi-basements surrounded by a natural forest. We examined the relationship between airborne fungi and the thermal environment, surrounding natural environment, structures of houses and use of a dehumidifier. The subject residential area was located in the northern part of Nara city, Nara prefecture, Japan. Six detached houses were included in this study. In residential areas, outdoor airborne concentrations were high during summer and autumn, correlated with humidity. The presence of Basidiomycetes was particularly notable, although the indoor concentration was lower than the outdoor level. In the semi-basement rooms, relative humidity was nearly always >80% when the residence was built; however, both the indoor humidity and fungal concentrations decreased greatly when a dehumidifier was used in this study. High levels of Aspergillus and Basidiomycetes were detected in semi-basements. Basidiomycetes are likely of outdoor origin, whereas Aspergillus might grow indoors. Moreover, the composition of fungal species differed according to room-structure and usage. Due to the health risks associated with high indoor concentrations of fungi, the utilization of the semi-basement or basement space requires adequate ventilation and dehumidification, beginning immediately after construction.

  2. Indoor air quality in two urban elementary schools--measurements of airborne fungi, carpet allergens, CO2, temperature, and relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Adgate, John L; Banerjee, Sudipto; Church, Timothy R; Jones, David; Fredrickson, Ann; Sexton, Ken

    2005-11-01

    This article presents measurements of biological contaminants in two elementary schools that serve inner city minority populations. One of the schools is an older building; the other is newer and was designed to minimize indoor air quality problems. Measurements were obtained for airborne fungi, carpet loadings of dust mite allergens, cockroach allergens, cat allergens, and carpet fungi. Carbon dioxide concentrations, temperature, and relative humidity were also measured. Each of these measurements was made in five classrooms in each school over three seasons--fall, winter, and spring. We compared the indoor environments at the two schools and examined the variability in measured parameters between and within schools and across seasons. A fixed-effects, nested analysis was performed to determine the effect of school, season, and room-within-school, as well as CO2, temperature and relative humidity. The levels of all measured parameters were comparable for the two schools. Carpet culturable fungal concentrations and cat allergen levels in the newer school started and remained higher than in the older school over the study period. Cockroach allergen levels in some areas were very high in the newer school and declined over the study period to levels lower than the older school. Dust mite allergen and culturable fungal concentrations in both schools were relatively low compared with benchmark values. The daily averages for temperature and relative humidity frequently did not meet ASHRAE guidelines in either school, which suggests that proper HVAC and general building operation and maintenance procedures are at least as important as proper design and construction for adequate indoor air quality. The results show that for fungi and cat allergens, the school environment can be an important exposure source for children.

  3. The Vertical Structure of Relative Humidity and Ozone in the Tropical Upper Troposphere: Intercomparisons Among In Situ Observations, A-Train Measurements and Large-Scale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne R.; Oman, Luke; Pawson, Steven; Ott, Lesley; Benson, Craig; Stolarski, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In situ measurements in the tropics have shown that in regions of active convection, relative humidity with respect to ice in the upper troposphere is typically close to saturation on average, and supersaturations greater than 20% are not uncommon. Balloon soundings with the cryogenic frost point hygrometer (CFH) at Costa Rica during northern summer, for example, show this tendency to be strongest between 11 and 15.5 km (345-360 K potential temperature, or approximately 250-120 hPa). this is the altitude range of deep convective detrainment. Additionally, simultaneous ozonesonde measurements show that stratospheric air (O3 greater than 150 ppbv) can be found as low as approximately 14 km (350 K/150 hPa). In contrast, results from northern winter show a much drier upper troposphere and little penetration of stratospheric air below the tropopause at 17.5 km (approximately 383 K). We show that these results are consistent with in situ measurements from the Measurement of Ozone and water vapor by Airbus In-service airCraft (MOZAIC) program which samples a wider, though still limited, range of tropical locations. To generalize to the tropics as a whole, we compare our insitu results to data from two A-Train satellite instruments, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aqua and Aura satellites respectively. Finally, we examine the vertical structure of water vapor, relative humidity and ozone in the NASA Goddard MERRA analysis, an assimilation dataset, and a new version of the GEOS CCM, a free-running chemistry-climate model. We demonstrate that conditional probability distributions of relative humidity and ozone are a sensitive diagnostic for assessing the representation of deep convection and upper troposphere/lower stratosphere mixing processes in large-scale analyses and climate models.

  4. Rapid Formation of Molecular Bromine from Deliquesced NaBr Aerosol in the Presence of Ozone and UV Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    The formation of gas-phase bromine from aqueous sodium bromide aerosols is investigated through a combination of chamber experiments and chemical kinetics modeling. Experiments show that Br2(g) is produced rapidly from deliquesced NaBr aerosols in the presence of OH radicals prod...

  5. 玉米淀粉液化条件的研究%Research on Maize Starch Deliquesce Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    衣海龙

    2015-01-01

    采用单因素试验研究了耐高温α-淀粉酶的添加量、液化时间、CaCl2保护剂的添加量对液化DE值的影响,采用二次回归正交旋转组合试验对玉米淀粉液化条件进行了优化.研究结果表明最优液化条件为:耐高温α-酶添加量为20u/g干基淀粉、液化时间为20min、CaCl2保护剂添加量为0.2%,DE值达到16.14%.%The single factor experiment were used to study the impacts of thermostable α-amylase addition, deliquesce time, CaCl 2 protectant addition on DE values. Optimize the conditions of deliquesce maize starch with the design of rotation-regression-orthogonal combination.The results show that the optimal deliquesce conditions are:thermostableα-amylase addition is 20u/g starch, deliquesce time is 20min, CaCl2 protectant addition is 0.2%, DE value reachs to 16.14%.

  6. Characterization of Bacterial Polysaccharide Capsules and Detection in the Presence of Deliquescent Water by Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Hai-Nan; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Liu, Sheng-Bo; Qiao, Li-Ping; Chen, Xiu-Lan; He, Hai-Lun; Zhao, Xian; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    We detected polysaccharide capsules from Zunongwangia profunda SM-A87 with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The molecular organization of the capsules at the single-polysaccharide-chain level was reported. Furthermore, we found that with ScanAsyst mode the polysaccharide capsules could be detected even in the presence of deliquescent water covering the capsule.

  7. Effect of concentration, exposure time, temperature, and relative humidity on the toxicity of sulfur dioxide to the spores of Botrytis cinerea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couey, H.M.; Uota, M.

    1961-12-01

    When spores of Botrytis cinerea are exposed to SO/sub 2/ gas, the subsequent reduction in spore germination is quantitatively proportional to the SO/sub 2/ concentration and the exposure time. The toxicity of SO/sub 2/ increases with increasing relative humidity. In an atmosphere of 96% RH, SO/sub 2/ is more than 20 times as effective as at 75% RH. The toxicity also increases about 1.5 times for each 10/sup 0/C rise in temperature between 0/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/C. 8 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  8. Effects of relative humidity on aerosol light scattering and its importance for the comparison of remote sensing with in-situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieger, Paul; Clemer, Katrijn; Yilmaz, Selami; Frieß, Udo; Irie, Hitoshi; Henzing, Bas; Fierz-Schmidhauser, Rahel; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Baltensperger, Urs; Weingartner, Ernest

    2010-05-01

    In the field, in-situ measurements of aerosol light scattering are often performed under dry conditions (relative humidity RH MAAP). This combination of measurements allows the determination of the aerosol extinction coefficient at ambient RH. Three MAX-DOAS (multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy) instruments retrieved vertical profiles of the aerosol extinction coefficient during CINDI. The retrieved aerosol extinction corresponding to the lowest profile layer can now be directly compared to the in-situ value, which is now re-calculated to ambient RH.

  9. Transepidermal water loss in newborn infants. I. Relation to ambient humidity and site of measurement and estimation of total transepidermal water loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarl-nd, K; Nilsson, G E; Oberg, P A; Sedin, G

    1977-09-01

    Insensible water loss (IWL) is an important factor in the thermoregulation and water balance of the newborn infant. A method for direct measurement of the rate of evaporation from the skin surface has been developed. The method, which is based on determination of the vapour pressure gradient close to the skin surface, allows free evaporation. From measurements performed on 19 newborns placed in incubators, a linear relation was found between the evaporation rate (ER) and the humidity of the environment at a constant ambient temperature. A 40% lower ER was recorded at a high relative humidity (60%) than at a low one (20%) in the incubator. At measurements on different sites of the body, a high ER was observed on the face and peripheral parts of the extremities, while ER at other sites was relatively low. By determining ER from different parts of the body and calculating the areas of the corresponding surfaces, the total cutaneous insensible water loss for the infant in question could be obtained. The transepidermal water loss (TEWL) for the whole body surface area was calculated to be 8.1 g/m2h. On the basis of measurements performed it was found that the total cutaneous insensible water loss can be estimated with a reasonable degree of accuracy by recording ER from only three easily accessible measurement points.

  10. Effect of temperature, relative humidity and light on conidial germination of oak powdery mildew (Microsphaera alphitoides Griff. et Maubl. under controlled conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pap P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of temperature, humidity and light on the conidial germination and germ tube elongation of oak powdery mildew (Microsphaera alphitoides Griff. et Maubl. was studied in controlled conditions. The maximal germ tube length was attained at 25°C, whereas at lower and higher than optimal temperatures, germ tube growth was significantly lower. Germ tubes begin to develop at all values of relative humidity (10-100%, reaching the maximum length at 90%. The development of germ tubes was the most intense in full light and the lowest in total darkness. The artificial infection of floating leaves showed that an increasing age had an inhibitory effect on the mycelium development and spore formation. Since conidia play a crucial role in powdery mildew epidemiology, it is of particular importance to elucidate the influence of environmental factors in the complex relations that exist between the plant and its pathogen. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43007: Studying climate change and its influence on the environment: Impacts, adaptation and mitigation

  11. Impact of temperature-humidity index on egg-laying characteristics and related stress and immunity parameters of Japanese quails

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tarabany, Mahmoud Salah

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature-humidity index (THI) level on productive parameters, welfare, and immunity in Japanese quails. One hundred and eighty (180) birds of Japanese quail, 14 weeks old, were used. Birds were divided randomly into three equal groups, control (at low THI, less than 70), H1 (at moderate THI, 70-75), and H2 (at high THI, 76-80). Birds in the control group had higher body weight (281.2 g, p = 0.001), egg mass (745 g, p = 0.001), fertility (85.4 %, p = 0.039), hatchability (80.4 %, p = 0.001), and immune response titer to Newcastle disease virus ( p = 0.031), compared with H2 group. Furthermore, the thermoneutral group had higher internal egg quality score [albumen height (5.14 mm, p = 0.001), yolk height (10.88 mm, p = 0.015), yolk index (42.32 %, p = 0.039), and Haugh unit (92.67, p = 0.001)]. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences in fertility percentage, immune response, and corticosterone concentration between control and H1 group. Birds in the H2 group had the lowest total leucocytic count and lymphocyte percentage ( p = 0.001 and 0.020, respectively) but the highest H/L ratio (0.83, p = 0.001). Corticosterone concentration was lower in control and H1 groups (5.49 and 6.41 ng/mL, respectively, p = 0.024) than that in H2 group. Japanese quail exposed to heat stress revealed drop in production and immunological parameters, as well as a detrimental effects on welfare. Thus, practical approaches might be used to reduce the detrimental effects of greater THI level.

  12. DESIGN NOTE: A simple and inexpensive humidity control chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, K. D.; Huizinga, A.; Brett, M. J.

    2002-01-01

    A low-cost humidity control chamber is described which is capable of varying the relative humidity of an enclosed volume between nominal values of 1 and 97%. The humidity is controlled by varying the duty cycle of two fans supplying respectively dry and humid air to the chamber.

  13. Characterization of water binding and germination traits of magnetically exposed maize (Zea mays L.) seeds equilibrated at different relative humidities at two temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashisth, Ananta; Nagarajan, Shantha

    2009-04-01

    A study was undertaken to characterize the water sorption properties and enhancement in germination and seedling vigour of maize (Zea mays L.) seeds exposed to static magnetic fields of 100 mT and 200 mT for 2 and 1 h, respectively. Water sorption isotherms were constructed for magnetically- exposed and unexposed seeds by equilibrating over different saturated salt solutions at 25 and 35 degrees C. The germination and vigour parameters were evaluated for magnetically-exposed and unexposed seeds, equilibrated over the wide range of relative humidities (RHs) at 25 and 35 degrees C. Moisture content increased with increase in RH and decreased with increase in equilibrium temperature. The germination and vigour reduced at high and very low humidities. Magnetically-exposed seeds maintained higher germination and vigour at both temperatures and all RHs, indicating the better quality of magnetically-exposed seeds. The leachate conductivity of magnetically-exposed seeds was lower than unexposed seeds at all RHs, suggesting better membrane integrity in magnetically-exposed seeds. Analysis of the isotherms using D'Arcy-Watt equation revealed that irrespective of the temperature, in magnetically-treated seeds weak binding sites were more and strong and multi-molecular binding sites were less compared to the unexposed seeds. Total binding sites were more in unexposed control seeds. The modification of binding properties of seed water and increased seed membrane integrity in magnetically-exposed seeds might have enhanced the germination traits and early seedling growth of maize.

  14. Effect of Relative Humidity on the Tribological Properties of Self-Lubricating H3BO3 Films Formed on the Surface of Steel Suitable for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hernández-Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of environmental humidity on the self-lubricating properties of a thin film of boric acid (H3BO3 was evaluated. H3BO4 films were successfully formed on the surface of AISI 316L steel. The study was conducted on AISI 316L steel because of its use in biomedical applications. First, the samples were exposed to boriding to generate a continuous surface layer of iron borides. The samples were then exposed to a short annealing process (SAP at 1023 K for 5 min and cooled to room temperature while controlling the relative humidity (RH. Five different RH conditions were tested. The purpose of SAP was to promote the formation of a surface film of boric acid from the boron atoms present in the iron boride layers. The presence of the boric acid at the surface of the borided layer was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The self-lubricating capability of the films was demonstrated using the pin-on-disk technique. The influence of RH was reflected by the friction coefficient (FC, as the samples cooled with 20% of RH exhibited FC values of 0.16, whereas the samples cooled at 60% RH showed FC values of 0.02.

  15. A study of the water vapor sorption isotherms of hardened cement pastes: Possible pore structure changes at low relative humidity and the impact of temperature on isotherms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    Using water vapor sorption isotherms measured by the “dynamic vapor sorption” (DVS) method, a resaturation study was conducted to investigate possible pore structure changes of hardened cement paste samples caused by the drying at low relative humidity during desorption measurements. The results...... indicate that either the relatively short term drying does not cause any microstructure changes or the pore structure of the hardened cement paste samples can be restored during the absorption process. Additionally, the temperature dependency of sorption isotherms was investigated using both hardened...... cement paste samples and a model material MCM-41. The pronounced impact of temperature on desorption isotherms of cement based materials as reported in literature was not found in this investigation. The results suggest that the differences between the sorption isotherms measured at different...

  16. A Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber Study of Sea Salt Particles Acting as Cloud Seeds: Deliquescence, Ice Nucleation and Sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, X.; Wolf, M. J.; Garimella, S.; Roesch, M.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Sea Salt Aerosols (SSA) are abundant in the atmosphere, and important to the Earth's chemistry and energy budget. However, the roles of sea salts in the context of cloud formation are still poorly understood, which is partially due to the complexity of the water-salt phase diagram. At ambient temperatures, even well below 0°C, SSA deliquesces at sub-water saturated conditions. Since the ratio of the partial pressure over ice versus super-cooled water continuously declines with decreasing temperatures, it is interesting to consider if SSA continues to deliquesce under a super-saturated condition of ice, or if particles act as depositional ice nuclei when a critical supersaturation is reached. Some recent studies suggest hydrated NaCl and simulated sea salt might deliquesce between -35°C to -44°C, and below that deposition freezing becomes possible. Deliquesced droplets can subsequently freeze via the immersion or homogenous freezing mode, depending on if the deliquescence processes is complete. After the droplets or ice particles are formed, it is also interesting to consider how the different processes influence physical properties after evaporation or sublimation. This data is important for climate modeling that includes bromine burst observed in Antarctica, which is hypothesized to be relevant to the sublimation of blowing snow particles. In this study we use a SPectrometer for Ice Nuclei (SPIN; DMT, Inc., Boulder, CO) to perform experiments over a wide range of temperature and RH conditions to quantify deliquescence, droplet formation and ice nucleation. The formation of droplets and ice particles is detected by an advanced Optical Particle Counter (OPC) and the liquid/solid phases are distinguished by a machine learning method based on laser scattering and polarization data. Using an atomizer, four different sea salt samples are generated: pure NaCl and MgCl2 solutions, synthetic seawater, and natural seawater. Downstream of the SPIN chamber, a Pumped

  17. Efficiency of oxygen: absorbing sachets in different relative humidities and temperatures Eficiência de absorvedores de oxigênio sob diferentes umidades relativas e temperaturas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Souza Cruz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of oxygen - absorbing sachets at relative humidity of 75%, 80% and 85% and different temperatures, 10±2 ºC and 25±2 ºC. The experiment consisted in determining the O2 absorption under these conditions. A sachet was placed in desiccators with an internal air homogenization system. Aliquots of air were removed at pre-established time intervals and analyzed for oxygen content. The results showed that oxygen absorption by the sachet increased as the relative humidity increased for both temperature. Therefore the oxygen - absorbing sachets were most active under 25±2ºC and 85% relative humidity. At ambient condition (25±2ºC/75%RH the rate of oxygen absorbed was 50 mL/day and 18,5 mL/day for 10±2ºC. It was used a totally casualized design with three replicates.O objetivo principal deste trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência de sachês absorvedores de oxigênio a 75%, 80% e 85% de umidade relativa e diferentes temperaturas, 10±2 ºC e 25±2 ºC. O experimento consiste em determinar a absorção de O2 sob essas condições. Um sachê foi colocado dentro de um dessecador contendo um sistema de homogeneização do ar interno. Alíquotas de ar são retiradas dos dessecadores em intervalos de tempos pré-estabelecido e seu conteúdo de oxigênio analisado. Os resultados mostraram que a absorção de oxigênio pelos saches aumentaram com o aumento da temperatura para ambas as temperaturas. No entanto, os sachês mostraram uma maior eficiência para 85% de umidade relativa e 25±2ºC de temperatura. Na condição ambiente (25±2ºC/75%RH, a taxa de absorção dos sachês foi de 50 mL/dia e 18,5 mL/dia para 10±2ºC. O experimento foi conduzido com delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado, com três repetições.

  18. Spectroscopic Evidence of Keto-enol Tautomerism in Deliquesced Malonic Acid Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorai, Suman; Laskin, Alexander; Tivanski, Alexei V.

    2011-04-11

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy combined with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and optical microscopy coupled with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (micro-FTIR) have been applied to observe hygroscopic growth and chemical changes in malonic acid particles deposited on substrates. Extent of the hygroscopic growth of particles has been quantified in terms of the corresponding water-to-solute ratios (WSR) based on STXM/NEXAFS and micro-FTIR data sets. WSR values derived separately from two applied methods displayed a remarkable agreement with previous data reported in the literature. Comparison of NEXAFS and FTIR spectra acquired at different relative humidity (RH) shows efficient keto-enol tautomerization of malonic acid, with the enol form dominated at higher RH. The keto-enol equilibrium constants were calculated using relevant peak intensities in the carbon and oxygen K-edge NEXAFS spectra as a function of RH.

  19. Daily changes of radon concentration in soil gas under influence of atmospheric factors: room temperature, soil surface temperature and relative humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Evelise G.; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de, E-mail: evelise.lara@gmail.com, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Rocha, Zildete; Rios, Francisco Javier, E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br, E-mail: javier@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work aims at relating the daily change in the radon concentration in soil gas in a Red Yellow Acrisol (SiBCS) under influence of atmospheric factors: room temperature, soil surface temperature and relative humidity. The {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, U content and permeability were also performed. The measurements of radon soil gas were carried out by using an AlphaGUARD monitor. The {sup 226}Ra activity concentration was made by Gamma Spectrometry (HPGe); the permeability was carried out using the RADON-JOK permeameter and ICP-MS analysis to {sup 232}Th and U content. The soil permeability is 5.0 x 10{sup -12}, which is considered average. The {sup 226}Ra (22.2 ± 0.3 Bq.m{sup -3}); U content (73.4 ± 3.6 Bq.kg{sup -1}) and {sup 232}Th content (55.3 ± 4.0 Bq.kg{sup -1}) were considered above of average concentrations, according to mean values for soils typical (~ 35.0 Bq.kg{sup -1}) by UNSCEAR. The results showed a difference of 26.0% between the highest and the lowest concentration of radon in soil gas: at midnight (15.5 ± 1.0 kBq.m{sup -3}) and 3:00 pm, the highest mean radon concentration (21.0 ± 1.0 kBq.m{sup -3}). The room temperature and surface soil temperature showed equivalent behavior and the surface soil temperature slightly below room temperature during the entire monitoring time. Nevertheless, the relative humidity showed the highest cyclical behavior, showing a higher relationship with the radon concentration in soil gas. (author)

  20. Influence of Nitrogen-di-Oxide, Temperature and Relative Humidity on Surface Ozone Modeling Process Using Multigene Symbolic Regression Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa F. Sheta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Automatic monitoring, data collection, analysis and prediction of environmental changes is essential for all living things. Understanding future climate changes does not only helps in measuring the influence on people life, habits, agricultural and health but also helps in avoiding disasters. Giving the high emission of chemicals on air, scientist discovered the growing depletion in ozone layer. This causes a serious environmental problem. Modeling and observing changes in the Ozone layer have been studied in the past. Understanding the dynamics of the pollutants features that influence Ozone is ex-plored in this article. A short term prediction model for surface Ozone is offered using Multigene Symbolic Regression Genetic Programming (GP. The proposed model customs Nitrogen-di-Oxide, Temperature and Relative Humidity as the main features to predict the Ozone level. Moreover, a comparison between GP and Artificial Neural Network (ANN in modeling Ozone is presented. The developed results show that GP outperform the ANN.

  1. Design and Development of a Relative Humidity and Room Temperature Measurement System with On Line Data Logging Feature for Monitoring the Fermentation Room of Tea Factory

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    Utpal SARMA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The design and development of a Relative Humidity (RH and Room Temperature (RT monitoring system with on line data logging feature for monitoring fermentation room of a tea factory is presented in this paper. A capacitive RH sensor with on chip signal conditioner is taken as RH sensor and a temperature to digital converter (TDC is used for ambient temperature monitoring. An 8051 core microcontroller is the heart of the whole system which reads the digital equivalent of RH data with the help of a 12-bit Analog to Digital (A/D converter and synchronize TDC to get the ambient temperature. The online data logging is achieved with the help of RS-232C communication. Field performance is also studied by installing it in the fermentation room of a tea factory.

  2. Measurements of VOC/SVOC emission factors from burning incenses in an environmental test chamber: influence of temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoukian, A; Buiron, D; Temime-Roussel, B; Wortham, H; Quivet, E

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the influence of three environmental indoor parameters (i.e., temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate) on the emission of 13 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) during incense burning. Experiments have been carried out using an environmental test chamber. Statistical results from a classical two-level full factorial design highlight the predominant effect of ventilation on emission factors. The higher the ventilation, the higher the emission factor. Moreover, thanks to these results, an estimation of the concentration range for the compounds under study can be calculated and allows a quick look of indoor pollution induced by incense combustion. Carcinogenic substances (i.e., benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, and formaldehyde) produced from the incense combustion would be predicted in typical living indoors conditions to reach instantaneous concentration levels close to or higher than air quality exposure threshold values.

  3. Screening in humid air plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Anatoly; Derbenev, Ivan; Dyatko, Nikolay; Kurkin, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    Low temperature air plasmas containing H2O molecules are of high importance for atmospheric phenomena, climate control, biomedical applications, surface processing, and purification of air and water. Humid air plasma created by an external ionization source is a good model of the troposphere where ions are produced by the galactic cosmic rays and decay products of air and soil radioactive elements such as Rn222. The present paper is devoted to study the ionic composition and the screening in an ionized humid air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The ionization rate is varied in the range of 101 -1018 cm-3s-1. The humid air with 0 - 1 . 5 % water admixture that corresponds to the relative humidity of 0 - 67 % at the air temperature equal to 20°C is considered. The ionic composition is determined on the analysis of more than a hundred processes. The system of 41 non-steady state particle number balance equations is solved using the 4th order Runge-Kutta method. The screening of dust particle charge in the ionized humid air are studied within the diffusion-drift approach. The screening constants are well approximated by the inverse Debye length and characteristic lengths of recombination and attachment processes. This work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, Project No. 16-12-10424.

  4. Seed orientation and magnetic field strength have more influence on tomato seed performance than relative humidity and duration of exposure to non-uniform static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinapen, Danny; Brown, Daniel C W; Beeharry, Girish K

    2013-09-15

    Different factors (e.g., light, humidity, and temperature) including exposure to static magnetic fields (SMFs), referred here as critical factors, can significantly affect horticultural seed performance. However, the link between magnetic field parameters and other interdependent factors affecting seed viability is unclear. The importance of these critical factors affecting tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) var. MST/32 seed performance was assessed after performing several treatments based on a L9 (3(4)) (four factors at three levels) orthogonal array (OA) design. The variable factors in the design were magnetic flux density (R1=332.1±37.8mT; R2=108.7±26.9mT; and R3=50.6±10.5mT), exposure time (1, 2, and 24h), seed orientation (North polarity, South polarity, and control - no magnetic field), and relative humidity (RH) (7.0, 25.5, and 75.5%). After seed moisture content stabilisation at the different chosen RH, seeds were exposed in dark under laboratory conditions to several treatments based on the OA design before performance evaluation. Treatments not employing magnetic field exposure were used as controls. Results indicate that electrolyte leakage rate was reduced by a factor of 1.62 times during seed imbibition when non-uniform SMFs were employed. Higher germination (∼11.0%) was observed in magnetically-exposed seeds than in non-exposed ones, although seedlings emerging from SMF treatments did not show a consistent increase in biomass accumulation. The respective influence of the four critical factors tested on seed performance was ranked (in decreasing order) as seed orientation to external magnetic fields, magnetic field strength, RH, and exposure time. This study suggests a significant effect of non-uniform SMFs on seed performance with respect to RH, and more pronounced effects are observed during seed imbibition rather than during later developmental stages.

  5. Co-adsorption of gaseous benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene (BTEX) and SO2 on recyclable Fe3O4 nanoparticles at 0-101% relative humidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Connie Z; Ariya, Parisa A

    2015-05-01

    We herein used Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) as an adsorption interface for the concurrent removal of gaseous benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene (BTEX) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), at different relative humidities (RH). X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, and transmission electron microscopy were deployed for nanoparticle surface characterization. Mono-dispersed Fe3O4 (Fe2O3·FeO) NPs synthesized with oleic acid (OA) as surfactant, and uncoated poly-dispersed Fe3O4 NPs demonstrated comparable removal efficiencies. Adsorption experiments of BTEX on NPs were measured using gas chromatography equipped with flame ionization detection, which indicated high removal efficiencies (up to (95±2)%) under dry conditions. The humidity effect and competitive adsorption were investigated using toluene as a model compound. It was observed that the removal efficiencies decreased as a function of the increase in RH, yet, under our experimental conditions, we observed (40±4)% toluene removal at supersaturation for Fe3O4 NPs, and toluene removal of (83±4)% to (59±6)%, for OA-Fe3O4 NPs. In the presence of SO2, the toluene uptake was reduced under dry conditions to (89±2)% and (75±1)% for the uncoated and coated NPs, respectively, depicting competitive adsorption. At RH>100%, competitive adsorption reduced the removal efficiency to (27±1)% for uncoated NPs whereas OA-Fe3O4 NPs exhibited moderate efficiency loss of (55±2)% at supersaturation. Results point to heterogeneous water coverage on the NP surface. The magnetic property of magnetite facilitated the recovery of both types of NPs, without the loss in efficiency when recycled and reused. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Relative humidity distribution from SAPHIR experiment on board Megha-Tropiques satellite mission: Comparison with global radiosonde and other satellite and reanalysis data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Basha, Ghouse; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Jayaraman, A.

    2013-09-01

    For better understanding the life cycle of the convective systems and their interactions with the environment, a joint Indo-French satellite mission named Megha-Tropiques has been launched in October 2011 in a low-inclination (20°) orbit. In the present study, we show the first results on the comparison of relative humidity (RH) obtained using a six-channel microwave sounder, covering from surface to 100 hPa, from one of the payloads SAPHIR (Sounder for Atmospheric Profiling of Humidity in the Inter-tropical Regions). The RH observations from SAPHIR illustrated the numerous scales of variability in the atmosphere both vertically and horizontally. As a part of its validation, we compare SAPHIR RH with simultaneous observations from a network of radiosondes distributed across the world (±30° latitude), other satellites (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer, Constellation Observation System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC)), and various reanalysis (National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts reanalysis (ERA)-Interim, Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA)) products. Being at a low inclination, SAPHIR is able to show better global coverage when compared to any other existing satellites in the tropical region where some important weather processes take place. A very good correlation is noticed with the RH obtained from a global radiosonde network particularly in the altitude range corresponding to 850-250 hPa, thus providing a valuable data set for investigating the convective processes. In the case of satellite data sets, SAPHIR RH is well comparable with COSMIC RH. Among the reanalysis products, NCEP shows less difference with SAPHIR followed by ERA-Interim, and the MERRA products show large differences in the middle and upper troposphere.

  7. Soil moisture and relative humidity effects during post-diapause on emergence of western cherry fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran, is a pest of sweet cherry, Prunus avium (L.) L., in western North America that is found in relatively moist and dry habitats. In this study, fly pupae from Kennewick and Roslyn in Washington state, U.S.A., were used to test the hypotheses tha...

  8. Hydrogen generation from deliquescence of ammonia borane using Ni-Co/r-GO catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chang-Chen; Chen, Bing-Hung

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen generation from the catalyzed deliquescence/hydrolysis of ammonia borane (AB) using the Ni-Co catalyst supported on the graphene oxide (Ni-Co/r-GO catalyst) under the conditions of limited water supply was studied with the molar feed ratio of water to ammonia borane (denoted as H2O/AB) at 2.02, 3.97 and 5.93, respectively. The conversion efficiency of ammonia borane to hydrogen was estimated both from the cumulative volume of the hydrogen gas generated and the conversion of boron chemistry in the hydrolysates analyzed by the solid-state 11B NMR. The conversion efficiency of ammonia borane could reach nearly 100% under excess water dosage, that is, H2O/AB = 3.97 and 5.93. Notably, the hydrogen storage capacity could reach as high as 6.5 wt.% in the case with H2O/AB = 2.02. The hydrolysates of ammonia borane in the presence of Ni-Co/r-GO catalyst were mainly the mixture of boric acid and metaborate according to XRD, FT-IR and solid-state 11B NMR analyses.

  9. Impact of dust aerosols on Hurricane Helene's early development through the deliquescent heterogeneous freezing mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zhang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An ice nucleation parameterization accounting for the deliquescent heterogeneous freezing (DHF mode was implemented into the Weather Research Forecast (WRF model. The DHF mode refers to the freezing process for internally mixed aerosols with soluble and insoluble species that can serve as both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and ice nuclei (IN, such as dust. A modified version of WRF was used to examine the effect of Saharan dust on the early development of Hurricane Helene (2006 via acting as CCN and IN. The WRF simulations showed the tendency of DHF mode to promote ice formation at lower altitudes in strong updraft cores, increase the local latent heat release, and produce more low clouds and less high clouds. The inclusion of dust acting as CCN and IN through the DHF mode modified the storm intensity, track, hydrometeor distribution, cloud top temperature (hence the storm radiative energy budget, and precipitation and latent heat distribution. However, changes in storm intensity, latent heating rate, and total precipitation exhibit nonlinear dependence on the dust concentration. Improvement in the representation of atmospheric aerosols and cloud microphysics has the potential to contribute to better prediction of tropical cyclone development.

  10. Rate and peak concentrations of off-gas emissions in stored wood pellets--sensitivities to temperature, relative humidity, and headspace volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xingya; Shankar, Tumuluru Jaya; Bi, Xiaotao T; Lim, C Jim; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Melin, Staffan

    2009-11-01

    Wood pellets emit CO, CO(2), CH(4), and other volatiles during storage. Increased concentration of these gases in a sealed storage causes depletion of concentration of oxygen. The storage environment becomes toxic to those who operate in and around these storages. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature, moisture, and the relative size of storage headspace on emissions from wood pellets in an enclosed space. Twelve 10-l plastic containers were used to study the effects of headspace ratio (25, 50, and 75% of container volume) and temperatures (10-50 degrees C). Another eight containers were set in uncontrolled storage relative humidity (RH) and temperature. Concentrations of CO(2), CO, and CH(4) were measured by gas chromatography (GC). The results showed that emissions of CO(2), CO, and CH(4) from stored wood pellets are more sensitive to storage temperature than to RH and the relative volume of headspace. Higher peak emission factors are associated with higher temperatures. Increased headspace volume ratio increases peak off-gas emissions because of the availability of oxygen associated with pellet decomposition. Increased RH in the enclosed container increases the rate of off-gas emissions of CO(2), CO, and CH(4) and oxygen depletion.

  11. Hydraulic Conductivity Functions in Relation to Some Chemical Properties in a Cultivated Oxisols of a Humid Region, Delta State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egbuchua, C. N.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to evaluate hydraulic conductivity functions in relation to some soil chemical properties in an oxisols of the tropics. Field and laboratory studies were carried out and data collected, subjected to statistical analytical procedure for computing coefficient of variability and correlation among soil properties. Results of the study showed that hydraulic conductivity functions varied spatially and temporarily across the experimental points with a moderate mean value of 0.0026 cm/h and a coefficient o variation of 31.45% soil chemical properties showed that the soils were acidic with a mean pH value of 5.12. Organic carbon, total nitrogen and available phosphorus were low with mean values of 1.29%, 0.68% and 4.43 mgkg-1. Coefficient of variability among soil properties indicated less to moderately variable. Soil pH had negative correlation with all the soil properties evaluated.

  12. Modelling the prey detection performance of Rhinonicteris aurantia (Chiroptera: Hipposideridae) in different atmospheric conditions discounts the notional role of relative humidity in adaptive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kyle N; Kerry, Leonard J

    2011-06-07

    We examined a recent notion that differences in echolocation call frequency amongst geographic groups of constant frequency (CF)-emitting bats is the result of a trade-off between maximising prey detection range at lower frequencies and enhancing small-prey resolution at higher frequencies in different atmospheric (relative humidity; RH) environments. Isolated populations of the endemic Australian orange leaf-nosed bat Rhinonicteris aurantia were used as an example since geographic isolation in different environments has been a precursor to differences in their characteristic echolocation call frequencies (mean difference c. 6 kHz; means of 114.64 and 120.99 kHz). The influence of both atmospheric temperature and RH on maximum prey detection range was explored through mathematical modelling. This revealed that temperature was of similar importance to relative humidity and that under certain circumstances, each could reduce the effect of the other on ultrasound attenuation rates. The newly developed models contain significant conceptual improvements in method compared to other recent approaches, and can be applied to the situation of any other species of bat. For a given set of atmospheric conditions, the prey detection range of R. aurantia was reduced slightly when call frequency increased by 6 kHz, but an increase in RH, temperature or both reduced detection range significantly. A similar trend was also evident in prey detection volume ratios calculated for the same conditions. Spatial volume ratios were applied to assess the impact of changed atmospheric conditions and prey size on foraging ecology. Reductions in detection range associated with increases in RH and/or temperature also varied in relation to the size (cross sectional area) of insect prey. Modelling demonstrated that small (6 kHz) movements in call frequency could not compensate for the changes in prey detection range and spatial detection volumes that result from significant changes in atmospheric

  13. PENGARUH SUHU DAN KELEMBABAN UDARA TERHADAP PERUBAHAN MUTU TABLET EFFERVESCEN SARI BUAH SELAMA PENYIMPANAN [Influence of Temperature and Relative Humidity on the Quality of Fruit Juice Effervescent Tablet During Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the influence of temperature and relative humidity on the quality of the fruit juice effervescent tablet. Sample of the passion fruit effervescent tablet was prepared from passion fruit granular, aspartame, polyetilene glycol, citric acid, and sodium bicarbonate. Variable analyzed was dissolution rate of the tablet during storage. The results indicated that temperature and humidity significantly affect dissolution rate of the fruit juice effervescent tablet. The reason for the decrease in dissolution rate was because at high storage temperature (35oC, sodium bicarbonate was not stable. The bicarbonate amount gradually decreased because it reacted with citric acid. Consequently, when the tablet was dissolved, the reaction between sodium bicarbonate and citric acid was slow. At high relative humidity (85.5% of storage, the reaction occurred prior to the dissolution due to moisture intake.

  14. Using a low-temperature carbon electrode for preparing hole-conductor-free perovskite heterojunction solar cells under high relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyong; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Sun, Bo; Liao, Guanglan

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the application of a low-temperature carbon counter electrode with good flexibility and high conductivity in fabricating perovskite solar cells. A modified two-step method was used for the deposition of nanocrystalline CH3NH3PbI3 under high relative humidity. The carbon counter electrode was printed on a perovskite layer directly, with different sizes of graphite powder being employed. The interfacial charge transfer and transport in solar cells were investigated through photoluminescence and impedance measurements. We find that the existence of nano-graphite powder in the electrode has a noticeable influence on the back contact and cell performance. The prepared devices of hole-conductor-free perovskite heterojunction solar cells without encapsulation exhibit advantageous stability in air in the dark, with the optimal power conversion efficiency reaching 6.88%. This carbon counter electrode has the features of low-cost and low-temperature preparation, giving it potential for application in the large-scale flexible fabrication of perovskite solar cells in the future.We demonstrate the application of a low-temperature carbon counter electrode with good flexibility and high conductivity in fabricating perovskite solar cells. A modified two-step method was used for the deposition of nanocrystalline CH3NH3PbI3 under high relative humidity. The carbon counter electrode was printed on a perovskite layer directly, with different sizes of graphite powder being employed. The interfacial charge transfer and transport in solar cells were investigated through photoluminescence and impedance measurements. We find that the existence of nano-graphite powder in the electrode has a noticeable influence on the back contact and cell performance. The prepared devices of hole-conductor-free perovskite heterojunction solar cells without encapsulation exhibit advantageous stability in air in the dark, with the optimal power conversion efficiency reaching 6.88%. This carbon

  15. Humidity Effects on Conductivity of DNA Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Xun-Ling; DONG Rui-Xin; LIN Qing-De

    2006-01-01

    We present a model related to the humidity to describe the conductivity of homogeneous DNA molecule,where the hydration of phosphate group and bases are taken into account. The calculated results show the oscillation feature of dⅠ/dⅤ-Ⅴ curves and the semiconductor behavior of DNA. With the relative humidity increasing, the voltage gap becomes narrow and the maximum of conductance increases nonlinearly. The conductivity of DNA approaches to stabilization when the relative humidity reaches a certain value. These results are in agreement with experimental measurements.

  16. Measuring OVOCs and VOCs by PTR-MS in an urban roadside microenvironment of Hong Kong: relative humidity and temperature dependence, and field intercomparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Long; Zhang, Zhou; Huang, Yu; Lee, Shun Cheng; Blake, Donald Ray; Ho, Kin Fai; Wang, Bei; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Xin Ming; Kwok Keung Louie, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) control is an important issue of air quality management in Hong Kong because ozone formation is generally VOC limited. Several oxygenated volatile organic compound (OVOC) and VOC measurement techniques - namely, (1) offline 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) cartridge sampling followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis; (2) online gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection (FID); and (3) offline canister sampling followed by GC with mass spectrometer detection (MSD), FID, and electron capture detection (ECD) - were applied during this study. For the first time, the proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) technique was also introduced to measured OVOCs and VOCs in an urban roadside area of Hong Kong. The integrated effect of ambient relative humidity (RH) and temperature (T) on formaldehyde measurements by PTR-MS was explored in this study. A Poly 2-D regression was found to be the best nonlinear surface simulation (r = 0.97) of the experimental reaction rate coefficient ratio, ambient RH, and T for formaldehyde measurement. This correction method was found to be better than correcting formaldehyde concentrations directly via the absolute humidity of inlet sample, based on a 2-year field sampling campaign at Mong Kok (MK) in Hong Kong. For OVOC species, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, and MEK showed good agreements between PTR-MS and DNPH-HPLC with slopes of 1.00, 1.10, 0.76, and 0.88, respectively, and correlation coefficients of 0.79, 0.75, 0.60, and 0.93, respectively. Overall, fair agreements were found between PTR-MS and online GC-FID for benzene (slope = 1.23, r = 0.95), toluene (slope = 1.01, r = 0.96) and C2-benzenes (slope = 1.02, r = 0.96) after correcting benzene and C2-benzenes levels which could be affected by fragments formed from ethylbenzene. For the intercomparisons between PTR-MS and offline canister measurements by GC-MSD/FID/ECD, benzene showed good agreement

  17. Observation of biogenic secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere of a mountain site in central China: temperature and relative humidity effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosols (SOA derived from isoprene, pinene and caryophyllene were determined for PM10 and size-segregated (9-stage aerosols collected at the summit (2060 m, a.s.l. of Mt. Hua, central China during the summer of 2009. Concentrations of estimated isoprene, α-/β-pinene and β-caryophyllene derived SOC are 81± 53, 29 ± 14 and 98 ± 53 ng m−3, accounting for 2.7± 1.0%, 0.8 ± 0.2% and 2.1 ± 1.0% of OC, respectively. Concentrations of biogenic (BSOA, the isoprene/pinene/caryophyllene oxidation products and anthropogenic (ASOA, mainly aromatic acids SOA positively correlated with temperature (R=0.57–0.90. However, a decreasing trend of BSOA concentration with an increase in relative humidity (RH was observed during the sampling period, although a clear trend between ASOA and RH was not found. Based on the AIM Model calculation, we found that during the sampling period an increase in RH resulted in a decrease in the aerosol acidity and thus reduced the effect of acid-catalysis on BSOA formation. Size distribution measurement showed that most of the determined isoprene derived SOA may form in aerosol phase and enriched in the fine mode (cis-pinonic acid presents a large peak in the coarse mode (>2.1 μm due to its highly volatile nature.

  18. Photocatalysis of gaseous trichloroethylene (TCE) over TiO2: the effect of oxygen and relative humidity on the generation of dichloroacetyl chloride (DCAC) and phosgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Hsin-Hung; Lo, Shang-Lien

    2007-07-19

    Batch photocatalytic degradation of 80+/-2.5 ppm V trichloroethylene (TCE) was conducted to investigate the effect of the oxygen and relative humidity (RH) on the formation of the dichloroacetyl chloride (DCAC) and phosgene. Based on the simultaneous ordinary differential equations (ODEs), the reaction rate constants of TCE ((2.31+/-0.28) approximately (9.41+/-0.63)x10(-2) min(-1)) are generally larger than that of DCAC ((0.94+/-1.25) approximately (9.35+/-1.71)x10(-3) min(-1)) by approximate one order. The phenomenon indicates the degradation potential of TCE is superior to that of DCAC. DCAC appreciably delivers the same degradation behavior with TCE that means there exists an optimum RH and oxygen concentration for photocatalysis of TCE and DCAC. At the time the peak yield of DCAC appears, the conversion ratio based on the carbon atom from TCE to DCAC is within the range of 30-83% suggesting that the DCAC generation is significantly attributed to TCE degradation. Regarding the phosgene formation, the increasing oxygen amount leads to the inhibitory effect on the phosgene yield which fall within the range of 5-15%. The formation mechanism of phosgene was also inferred that the Cl atoms attacking the C-C bond of DCAC results to the generation of phosgene rather than directly from the TCE destruction.

  19. Diffusion of counterfeit drugs in developing countries and stability of galenics stored for months under different conditions of temperature and relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratta, Francesca; Germano, Antonio; Brusa, Paola

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the diffusion of counterfeit medicines in developing countries and to verify the stability of galenic dosage forms to determine the stability of galenics prepared and stored in developing countries. We purchased 221 pharmaceutical samples belonging to different therapeutic classes both in authorized and illegal pharmacies and subjected them to European Pharmacopoeia, 7th ed. quality tests. An UV-visible spectrophotometric assay was used to determine the galenics stability under different conditions of temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH). A substantial percentage of samples was substandard (52%) and thus had to be considered as counterfeit. Stability tests for galenics showed that the tested dosage forms were stable for 24 months under "standard" (t=25±2°C, RH=50±5%) conditions. Under "accelerated" (t=40±2°C, RH=50±5%) conditions, samples were stable for 3 months provided that they were stored in glass containers. Stability results of samples stored in "accelerated" conditions were similar to those obtained by on site in tropical countries and could so supply precious information on the expected stability of galenics in tropical countries. This study gives useful information about the presence of counterfeit medicinal products in the pharmacies of many developing countries. This should serve as an alarm bell and an input for the production of galenics. We recommend setting up of galenic laboratories in developing countries around the globe.

  20. Sistema automatizado para aquisição de dados de umidade relativa do ar Automated system for relative humidity data acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Késia O. da Silva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Devido à importância do ambiente na produção animal e vegetal e, portanto, controle ambiental adequado, o trabalho propõe como objetivo a construção de um sistema de aquisição automatizada de dados de umidade relativa do ar, utilizando-se de microcontrolador de dimensões reduzidas e de baixo custo. A calibração do sensor de umidade relativa foi realizada em três etapas de simulação desenvolvidas em laboratório: caixas perfuradas, dessecador sem tampa contendo sílica-gel em seu fundo e psicrometria. As etapas de calibração, utilizando situações naturais e artificiais, bem como as metodologias desenvolvidas, apresentaram resultados que permitem concluir que o sistema pode ser utilizado com segurança no monitoramento dessa variável.Due the importance of the environment in animal and crop production and therefore an appropriate environmental control, the main objective of this work is the construction of an automated system for relative humidity data acquisition, using a controller with reduced dimensions and low cost. Calibration was performed under natural and artificial conditions. The methodology showed results that the system can be used for monitoring this environmental factor.

  1. Influence of environmental temperature and relative humidity on photocatalytic oxidation of toluene on activated carbon fibers coated TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    TiO2 supported on active carbon fiber (TiO2/ACF),an absorbable photocatalyst,is a new kind of material applied in air purification.In this paper,the influence of environmental temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH)on the gas-solid adsorption of toluene and the photocatalyric oxidation (PCO) efficiency of adsorbed toluene on TiO2/ACF were studied,and then,the purification capabil ity of TiO2/ACF was estimated.PCO results showed that although the PCO efficiency increased under high RH and T levels,the amount of adsorption of toluene decreased.Moreover,quantitative analysis results of intermediates indicated that more environmental risk emerged when PCO of toluene was carried out at higher environmental T and RH levels because more toxic intermediates would be accumulated on the TiO2/ACF.So,it is significant to control the environmental T and RH conditions in the application of the PCO technique.T = 25℃ and RH = 30% is the optimal condition for purifying toluene in our experimental system.

  2. Affordable Open-Source Data Loggers for Distributed Measurements of Sap-Flux, Stem Growth, Relative Humidity, Temperature, and Soil Water Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T.; Jencso, K. G.; Hoylman, Z. H.; Hu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing the mechanisms that lead to differences in forest ecosystem productivity across complex terrain remains a challenge. This difficulty can be partially attributed to the cost of installing networks of proprietary data loggers that monitor differences in the biophysical factors contributing to tree growth. Here, we describe the development and initial application of a network of open source data loggers. These data loggers are based on the Arduino platform, but were refined into a custom printed circuit board (PCB). This reduced the cost and complexity of the data loggers, which made them cheap to reproduce and reliable enough to withstand the harsh environmental conditions experienced in Ecohydrology studies. We demonstrate the utility of these loggers for high frequency, spatially-distributed measurements of sap-flux, stem growth, relative humidity, temperature, and soil water content across 36 landscape positions in the Lubrecht Experimental Forest, MT, USA. This new data logging technology made it possible to develop a spatially distributed monitoring network within the constraints of our research budget and may provide new insights into factors affecting forest productivity across complex terrain.

  3. Effect of Relative Humidity on Adsorption of Formaldehyde on Modified Activated Carbons%相对湿度对甲醛在改性活性炭上吸附的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶; 李忠; 刘冰; 夏启斌; 奚红霞

    2008-01-01

    This work mainly involves the study of effect of relative humidity on adsorption of formaldehyde on the activated carbons modified with organosilane solution. Modification of activated carbons was carried out by impregnating activated carbon with organosilane/methanol-containing solutions. The breakthrough curves of formaldehyde in the packed beds of original and modified activated carbons were measured, respectively, at relative humidity of 30%, 60%, and 80%. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments were used to estimate the activation energy for desorption of formaldehyde from the activated carbon. Results showed that the relative humidity had strongly influence on breakthrough curves of formaldehyde in the packed beds. The higher the relative humidity of gas mixtures through the packed beds was, the smaller the breakthrough time of formaldehyde became. The use of organosilane compounds to modify surfaces of the activated carbon can enhance the interaction between formaldehyde and the surfaces, and as a result, the breakthrough times of formaldehyde in the packed beds of the modified activated carbon were longer than that in the packed bed of the unmodified activated carbon.

  4. Academics explore humidity's benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Dave

    2008-11-01

    The effects of humidification on hospital superbugs are being explored by some of the UK's top academics, in what Dave Mortimer, national sales manager for Vapac Humidity Control, explains are the UK's first such studies.

  5. [Spatiotempaoral distribution patterns of photosynthetic photon flux density, air temperature, and relative air humidity in forest gap of Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest in Xi-ao Xing' an Mountains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Duan, Wen-biao; Chen, Li-xin

    2009-12-01

    A continuous measurement of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), air temperature, and relative air humidity was made in the forest gap in primary Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest in Xiao Xing' an Mountains to compare the spatiotemporal distribution patterns of the parameters. The diurnal maximum PPFD in the forest gap appeared between 11:00 and 13:00 on sunny and overcast days. On sunny days, the maximum PPFD during various time periods did not locate in fixed locations, the diurnal maximum PPFD occurred in the canopy edge of northern part of the gap; while on overcast days, it always occurred in the center of the gap. The mean monthly PPFD in the gap was the highest in June and the lowest in September, with the largest range observed in July. The maximum air temperature happened between 9:00 and 15:00 on sunny days, between 15:00 and 19:00 on overcast days, the locations were 8 m in the southern part of gap center both on sunny and overcast days. From 5:00 to 9:00, the air temperature at measured positions in the gap was higher on overcast days than on sunny days; but from 9:00 to 19:00, it was opposite. The mean monthly air temperature was the highest in June, and the lowest in September. The maximum relative humidity appeared between 5:00 and 9:00 on sunny and overcast days, and occurred in the canopy border of western part of the gap, with the relative air humidity on overcast days being always higher than that on sunny days. The mean monthly relative humidity was the highest in July, and the lowest in June. The heterogeneity of PPFD was higher on sunny days than on overcast days, but the heterogeneities of air temperature and relative humidity were not obvious. The maximum PPFD, air temperature, and relative humidity were not located in the same positions among different months during growing season. For mean monthly PPFD and air temperature, their variation gradient was higher in and around the center of gap; while for mean monthly

  6. 腔增强拉曼技术下的过饱和硫酸镁液滴蒸发动力学初探%Preliminary Assessment of Evaporating Supersaturated MgSO4 Droplet at Low Relative Humidity with Cavity Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈斯华; 蔡宸; 冷春波; 张韫宏

    2013-01-01

    This paper is aimed to study the response of a single MgSO4 droplet to the variation of relative humidity through the combination of single beam gradient force optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy.The evaporation dynamic of a single MgSO4 droplet which is trapped by a single beam gradient force optical tweezers is investigated by varying the relative humidity in a stepwise manner.The measurements of the variation in equilibrium wet droplet size with relative humidity (RH) are made using cavity enhanced Raman scattering(CERS),where the stimulated Raman signals appear at wavelength commensurate to the Whispering Gallery Modes (WGMs) are applied to determine the size of droplet with high precision.This study demonstrates the real time monitoring of MgSO4 droplet size over a RH range that had not previously been explored with aerosol optical tweezers.The results show that the MgSO4 droplet radius variation gradually becomes smaller as the RH=~44% and is greatly depressed when RH lower than 40%,indicating that water evaporation rate of captured MgSO4 droplet is limited at high concentration.On the other hand,the deliquescence of shrinked MgSO4 droplet is not equivalent with the dehumidification process.The re-growth of MgSO4 droplet size is observed to be significantly slower in response to the increase of RH.It is suggested that mass transfer effect caused by the gel formation has contributed to the retardation of water mass transfer.%本文通过单光束梯度力光学镊子-拉曼光谱系统,对硫酸镁单液滴随着相对湿度变化的反应进行了探究.当硫酸镁单液滴被光镊捕获之后,通过相对湿度的梯度变化探究了捕获液滴的蒸发动力学变化.发生在与耳语回音模相称波长的受激拉曼散射可以用来准确地确定液滴半径,因此,可以通过腔增强拉曼散射得到在不同湿度下处于平衡的液滴半径信息.本研究通过光镊对硫酸镁单液滴的实时监测,阐述了在某个相对

  7. Simulation of Ventilation Efficiency, Temperatures, and Relative Humidities in Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Using Monte Carlo and Composite Thermal-Pulse Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Case; D. Buesch

    2004-04-06

    Predictions of waste canister and repository driftwall temperatures as a function of space and time are of fundamental importance to evaluating pre-closure and post-closure design requirements and performance assessment of the proposed repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Variations in the lithostratigraphic features in densely welded and crystallized rocks of the 12.8-million-year-old Topopah Spring Tuff, especially the porosity resulting from lithophysal cavities, are projected 50 to 800 m from the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block cross drift to a simulated ''Panel 1'' emplacement drift. Lithophysal cavity porosity varies from 0.00 to 0.05 cm{sup 3}/cm{sup 3} in the middle nonlithophysal zone and from 0.03 to 0.28 cm{sup 3}/cm{sup 3} in the lower lithophysal zone. Many thermal properties are related to lithophysal cavity porosity, and computer code titled ''Monte Carlo Simulation of Ventilation'' (MCSIMVENT) has been developed for simulating statistical variability and uncertainty along the simulated emplacement drift. The MCSIMVENT code, which is based on a composite thermal-pulse calculation, is used to calculate pre-closure ventilation efficiency and peak post-closure temperatures and relative humidities along the simulated emplacement drift for as much as 1,000 years. Variations in lithophysal porosity along the drift can result in a range in peak waste-package temperatures from 160 to 180 C for a single emplacement drift.

  8. Dropwise condensation dynamics in humid air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Chacon, Julian Eduardo

    Dropwise condensation of atmospheric water vapor is important in multiple practical engineering applications. The roles of environmental factors and surface morphology/chemistry on the condensation dynamics need to be better understood to enable efficient water-harvesting, dehumidication, and other psychrometric processes. Systems and surfaces that promote faster condensation rates and self-shedding of condensate droplets could lead to improved mass transfer rates and higher water yields in harvesting applications. The thesis presents the design and construction of an experimental facility that allows visualization of the condensation process as a function of relative humidity. Dropwise condensation experiments are performed on a vertically oriented, hydrophobic surface at a controlled relative humidity and surface subcooling temperature. The distribution and growth of water droplets are monitored across the surface at different relative humidities (45%, 50%, 55%, and 70%) at a constant surface subcooling temperature of 15 °C below the ambient temperature. The droplet growth dynamics exhibits a strong dependency on relative humidity in the early stages during which there is a large population of small droplets on the surface and single droplet growth dominates over coalescence effects. At later stages, the dynamics of droplet growth is insensitive to relative humidity due to the dominance of coalescence effects. The overall volumetric rate of condensation on the surface is also assessed as a function of time and ambient relative humidity. Low relative humidity conditions not only slow the absolute rate of condensation, but also prolong an initial transient regime over which the condensation rate remains significantly below the steady-state value. The current state-of-the-art in dropwise condensation research indicates the need for systematic experimental investigations as a function of relative humidity. The improved understanding of the relative humidity

  9. Changes in visibility with PM2.5 composition and relative humidity at a background site in the Pearl River Delta region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaoxin; Wang, Xinming; Hu, Qihou; Li, Guanghui; Ding, Xiang; Zhang, Yanli; He, Quanfu; Liu, Tengyu; Zhang, Zhou; Yu, Qingqing; Shen, Ruqing; Bi, Xinhui

    2016-02-01

    In fall-winter, 2007-2013, visibility and light scattering coefficients (bsp) were measured along with PM2.5 mass concentrations and chemical compositions at a background site in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region. The daily average visibility increased significantly (p<0.01) at a rate of 1.1 km/year, yet its median stabilized at ~13 km. No haze days occurred when the 24-hr mean PM2.5 mass concentration was below 75 μg/m(3). By multiple linear regression on the chemical budget of particle scattering coefficient (bsp), we obtained site-specific mass scattering efficiency (MSE) values of 6.5 ± 0.2, 2.6 ± 0.3, 2.4 ± 0.7 and 7.3 ± 1.2m(2)/g, respectively, for organic matter (OM), ammonium sulfate (AS), ammonium nitrate (AN) and sea salt (SS). The reconstructed light extinction coefficient (bext) based on the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) algorithm with our site-specific MSE revealed that OM, AS, AN, SS and light-absorbing carbon (LAC) on average contributed 45.9% ± 1.6%, 25.6% ± 1.2%, 12.0% ± 0.7%, 11.2% ± 0.9% and 5.4% ± 0.3% to light extinction, respectively. Averaged bext displayed a significant reduction rate of 14.1/Mm·year (p<0.05); this rate would be 82% higher if it were not counteracted by increasing relative humidity (RH) and hygroscopic growth factor (f(RH)) at rates of 2.5% and 0.16/year(-1) (p<0.01), respectively, during the fall-winter, 2007-2013. This growth of RH and f(RH) partly offsets the positive effects of lowered AS in improving visibility, and aggravated the negative effects of increasing AN to impair visibility.

  10. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-03-01

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometer (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.

  11. On the comparisons of tropical relative humidity in the lower and middle troposphere among COSMIC radio occultations, MERRA and ECMWF data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vergados

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variability of the tropical tropospheric relative humidity (RH throughout the vertical extent of the troposphere is examined using Global Positioning System Radio Occultation (GPSRO observations from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC mission. These high vertical resolution observations capture the detailed structure and moisture budget of the Hadley Cell circulation. We compare the COSMIC observations with the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecast (ECMWF Re-Analysis Interim (ERA-Interim and the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA climatologies. Qualitatively, the spatial pattern of RH in all data sets matches up remarkably well, capturing distinct features of the general circulation. However, RH discrepancies exist between ERA-Interim and COSMIC data sets, which are noticeable across the tropical boundary layer. Specifically, ERA-Interim shows a drier Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ by 15–20% compared both to COSMIC and MERRA data sets, but this difference decreases with altitude. Unlike ECMWF, MERRA shows an excellent agreement with the COSMIC observations except above 400 hPa, where GPSRO observations capture drier air by 5–10%. RH climatologies were also used to evaluate intraseasonal variability. The results indicate that the tropical middle troposphere at ±5–25° is most sensitive to seasonal variations. COSMIC and MERRA data sets capture the same magnitude of the seasonal variability, but ERA-Interim shows a weaker seasonal fluctuation up to 10% in the middle troposphere inside the dry air subsidence regions of the Hadley Cell. Over the ITCZ, RH varies by maximum 9% between winter and summer.

  12. Survival Kinetics of Salmonella enterica and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli on a Plastic Surface at Low Relative Humidity and on Low-Water Activity Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokunan, Hidekazu; Koyama, Kento; Hasegawa, Mayumi; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the survival kinetics of Salmonella enterica and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli under various water activity (aw) conditions to elucidate the net effect of aw on pathogen survival kinetics and to pursue the development of a predictive model of pathogen survival as a function of aw. Four serotypes of S. enterica (Stanley, Typhimurium, Chester, and Oranienburg) and three serotypes of enterohemorrhagic E. coli ( E. coli O26, E. coli O111, and E. coli O157:H7) were examined. These bacterial strains were inoculated on a plastic plate surface at a constant relative humidity (RH) (22, 43, 58, 68, or 93% RH, corresponding to the aw) or on a surface of almond kernels (aw 0.58), chocolate (aw 0.43), radish sprout seeds (aw 0.58), or Cheddar cheese (aw 0.93) at 5, 15, or 25°C for up to 11 months. Under most conditions, the survival kinetics were nonlinear with tailing regardless of the storage aw, temperature, and bacterial strain. For all bacterial serotypes, there were no apparent differences in pathogen survival kinetics on the plastic surface at a given storage temperature among the tested RH conditions, except for the 93% RH condition. Most bacterial serotypes were rapidly inactivated on Cheddar cheese when stored at 5°C compared with their inactivation on chocolate, almonds, and radish sprout seeds. Distinct trends in bacterial survival kinetics were also observed between almond kernels and radish sprout seeds, even though the aws of these two foods were not significantly different. The survival kinetics of bacteria inoculated on the plastic plate surface showed little correspondence to those of bacteria inoculated on food matrices at an identical aw. Thus, these results demonstrated that, for low-aw foods and/or environments, aw alone is insufficient to account for the survival kinetics of S. enterica and enterohemorrhagic E. coli .

  13. Temperature- and Relative Humidity-Dependent Life History Traits of Phenacoccus solenopsis (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) on Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (Malvales: Malvaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H S; Yang, L; Huang, L F; Wang, W L; Hu, Y; Jiang, J J; Zhou, Z S

    2015-08-01

    Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), a worldwide distributive invasive pest, originated from the United States, and it was first reported in Guangdong province, China, in 2008. The effects of temperature and relative humidity (RH) on the life history traits of P. solenopsis on Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. (Malvales: Malvaceae) were studied at seven constant temperatures (15, 20, 25, 27.5, 30, 32.5, and 35°C) and three RHs (45, 60, and 75%). The results showed that temperature, RH, and their interactions significantly influenced the life history traits of P. solenopsis. First instar was the most sensitive stage to extreme temperatures with very low survival rates at 15 and 35°C. At 25-32.5°C and the three RHs, the developmental periods of entire immature stage were shorter with values between 12.5-18.6 d. The minimum threshold temperature and the effective accumulative temperature for the pest to complete one generation were 13.2°C and 393.7 degree-days, respectively. The percentage and longevity of female adults significantly differed among different treatments. It failed to complete development at 15 or 35°C and the three RHs. Female fecundity reached the maximum value at 27.5°C and 45% RH. The intrinsic rate for increase (r), the net reproductive rate (R0), and the finite rate of increase (λ) reached the maximum values at 27.5°C and 45% RH (0.22 d(-1), 244.6 hatched eggs, and 1.25 d(-1), respectively). Therefore, we conclude that 27.5°C and 45% RH are the optimum conditions for the population development of the pest.

  14. Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot: The roles of relative humidity and surface composition of soot in surface sulfate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Jinzhu; Ma, Qingxin; He, Hong

    2017-03-01

    The conversion of SO2 to sulfates on the surface of soot is still poorly understood. Soot samples with different fractions of unsaturated hydrocarbons and oxygen-containing groups were prepared by combusting n-hexane under well-controlled conditions. The heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot was investigated using in situ attenuated total internal reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, ion chromatography (IC) and a flow tube reactor at the ambient pressure and relative humidity (RH). Water promoted SO2 adsorption and sulfate formation at the RH range from 6% to 70%, while exceeded water condensed on soot was unfavorable for sulfate formation due to inhibition of SO2 adsorption when RH was higher than 80%. The surface composition of soot, which was governed by combustion conditions, also played an important role in the heterogeneous reaction of SO2 with soot. This effect was found to greatly depend on RH. At low RH of 6%, soot with the highest fuel/oxygen ratio of 0.162 exhibited a maximum uptake capacity for SO2 because it contained a large amount of aromatic Csbnd H groups, which acted as active sites for SO2 adsorption. At RH of 54%, soot produced with a fuel/oxygen ratio of 0.134 showed the highest reactivity toward SO2 because it contained appropriate amounts of aromatic Csbnd H groups and oxygen-containing groups, subsequently leading to the optimal surface concentrations of both SO2 and water. These results suggest that variation in the surface composition of soot from different sources and/or resulting from chemical aging in the atmosphere likely affects the conversion of SO2 to sulfates.

  15. A molecular-scale study on the role of lactic acid in new particle formation: Influence of relative humidity and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Zhang, Haijie; Zhang, Xiuhui; Ge, Maofa

    2017-10-01

    It is well established that oxidation products of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a major role in atmospheric new-particle formation (NPF). However, the mechanism of their effect and the corresponding influence under various atmospheric conditions remain unclear. Meanwhile, considering the difficulty of experiment in determining the water content of the cluster and performing at low temperature, we combine Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Atmospheric Clusters Dynamic Code (ACDC) model to investigate a multicomponent system involving lactic acid (LA) and atmospheric nucleation precursors (sulfuric acid (SA), dimethylamine (DMA), water (W)) under a wide range of atmospheric conditions (relative humidity (RH) from 20% to 100%, temperature (T) from 220 K to 300 K). Conformational analysis shows that LA could enhance NPF in two direction due to its two highly oxidized function groups. Then, the results from ACDC simulation present a direct evidence of its enhancement effect on NPF when the concentration of LA is larger than 1010 molecules cm-3 . The corresponding enhancement strength presents a positive dependence on its concentrations and a negative dependence on RH and T, respectively. Besides, LA·nW (n = 0-1) reflect their enhancement effect on the cluster growth paths by acting as ;bridge;, which contributes to pure SA-DMA-W-based clusters by evaporating LA contained clusters. The corresponding contribution presents a positive dependence on the concentration of LA, RH and T, respectively. We hope our study could provide theoretical clues to better understand the characteristic of NPF in polluted area, where NPF commonly involves oxidized organics, sulfuric acid, amine and water.

  16. Short communication: Little change takes place in Camembert-type cheese water activities throughout ripening in terms of relative humidity and salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq-Perlat, M-N; Hélias, A; Corrieu, G

    2013-01-01

    Water activity (a(w)) affects the growth and activity of ripening microorganisms. Moreover, it is generally accepted that a(w) depends on relative humidity (RH) and salt content; these 3 variables were usually measured on a given day in a cheese without the microorganism layer and without accounting for a distinction between the rind, the underrind, and the core. However, a(w) dynamics have never been thoroughly studied throughout cheese ripening. Experimental Camembert cheeses were ripened under controlled and aseptic conditions (temperature, gaseous atmosphere, and RH) for 14 d. In this study, only RH was varied. Samples were taken from the cheese (microorganism layer)-air interface, the rind, and the core. The aw of the cheese-air interface did not change over ripening when RH varied between 91 and 92% or between 97 and 98%. However, on d 5, we observed a small but significant increase in a(w), which coincided with the beginning of growth of Penicillium camemberti mycelia. After d 3, no significant differences were found between the a(w) of the cheese-air interface, the rind, and the core. From d 0 to 3, cheese rind a(w) increased from 0.94 to 0.97, which was probably due to the diffusion of salt from the rind to the core: NaCl content in the rind decreased from 3.7 to 1.6% and NaCl content in the core increased from 0.0 to 1.6%. Nevertheless, aw did not significantly vary in the core, raising questions about the real effect of salt on a(w).

  17. The effects of a systematic increase in relative humidity on thermoregulatory and circulatory responses during prolonged running exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Muhamed, Ahmad Munir; Atkins, Kerry; Stannard, Stephen R; Mündel, Toby; Thompson, Martin William

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the thermoregulatory and circulatory responses, and exercise performance of trained distance runners during exercise in the heat (31°C) at varying relative humidity (RH). In a randomized order, 11 trained male distance runners performed 5 60 min steady-state runs at a speed eliciting 70% of VO2max in RH of 23, 43, 52, 61 and 71%. This was followed immediately with an incremental exercise test to volitional exhaustion. Core (Tre) and mean skin temperature (T¯sk), cardiac output (Q), heart rate (HR), and stroke volume (SV) were recorded at regular intervals. A significant (P = 0.003) main effect was detected for RH on mean body temperature (Tb), with a significantly higher Tb detected during steady-state exercise in the 61 and 71% RH compared to that in the 23% RH. During the steady-state exercise, no differences were detected in whole body sweat loss (P = 0.183). However, a significant main effect of RH was observed for HR and SV (P = 0.001 and 0.006, respectively) but not Q (P = 0.156). The time to exhaustion of the incremental exercise test was significantly reduced at 61 and 71% RH compared with 23% RH (P = 0.045 and 0.005, respectively). Despite an increase in dry heat loss, a greater thermoregulatory and circulatory stress was evident during steady-state exercise at 61 and 71% RH. This ultimately limits the capacity to perform the subsequent incremental exercise to exhaustion. This study highlighted that in a warm environment, the range of the prescriptive zone progressively narrows as RH increases.

  18. Optimization of heat and relative humidity conditions to reduce Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination and maximize the germination of radish seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, M K; Kim, H W; Rhee, M S

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that a combination of heat and relative humidity (RH) had a marked bactericidal effect on Escherichia coli O157:H7 on radish seeds. Here, response surface methodology with a Box-Behnken design was used to build a model to predict reductions in E. coli O157:H7 populations based on three independent variables: heating temperature (55 °C, 60 °C, or 65 °C), RH (40%, 60%, and 80%), and holding time (8, 15, or 22 h). Optimum treatment conditions were selected using a desirability function. The predictive model for microbial reduction had a high regression coefficient (R(2) = 0.97), and the accuracy of the model was verified using validation data (R(2) = 0.95). Among the three variables examined, heating temperature (P seed germination, respectively. The optimum conditions for microbial reduction (6.6 log reduction) determined by ridge analysis were as follows: 64.5 °C and 63.2% RH for 17.7 h. However, when both microbial reduction and germination rate were taken into consideration, the desirability function yielded optimal conditions of 65 °C and 40% RH for 8 h (6.6 log reduction in the bacterial population; 94.4% of seeds germinated). This study provides comprehensive data that improve our understanding of the effects of heating temperature, RH, and holding time on the E. coli O157:H7 population on radish seeds. Radish seeds can be exposed to these conditions before sprouting, which greatly increases the microbiological safety of the products.

  19. The effects of a systematic increase in relative humidity on thermoregulatory and circulatory responses during prolonged running exercise in the heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Muhamed, Ahmad Munir; Atkins, Kerry; Stannard, Stephen R.; Mündel, Toby; Thompson, Martin William

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study examined the thermoregulatory and circulatory responses, and exercise performance of trained distance runners during exercise in the heat (31°C) at varying relative humidity (RH). In a randomized order, 11 trained male distance runners performed 5 60 min steady-state runs at a speed eliciting 70% of VO2max in RH of 23, 43, 52, 61 and 71%. This was followed immediately with an incremental exercise test to volitional exhaustion. Core (Tre) and mean skin temperature (T¯sk), cardiac output (Q), heart rate (HR), and stroke volume (SV) were recorded at regular intervals. A significant (P = 0.003) main effect was detected for RH on mean body temperature (Tb), with a significantly higher Tb detected during steady-state exercise in the 61 and 71% RH compared to that in the 23% RH. During the steady-state exercise, no differences were detected in whole body sweat loss (P = 0.183). However, a significant main effect of RH was observed for HR and SV (P = 0.001 and 0.006, respectively) but not Q (P = 0.156). The time to exhaustion of the incremental exercise test was significantly reduced at 61 and 71% RH compared with 23% RH (P = 0.045 and 0.005, respectively). Despite an increase in dry heat loss, a greater thermoregulatory and circulatory stress was evident during steady-state exercise at 61 and 71% RH. This ultimately limits the capacity to perform the subsequent incremental exercise to exhaustion. This study highlighted that in a warm environment, the range of the prescriptive zone progressively narrows as RH increases.

  20. To Evaluate the Effect of Solvents and Different Relative Humidity Conditions on Thermal and Rheological Properties of Microcrystalline Cellulose 101 Using METHOCEL™ E15LV as a Binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagia, Moksh; Trivedi, Maitri; Dave, Rutesh H

    2016-08-01

    The solvent used for preparing the binder solution in wet granulation can affect the granulation end point and also impact the thermal, rheological, and flow properties of the granules. The present study investigates the effect of solvents and percentage relative humidity (RH) on the granules of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) with hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) as the binder. MCC was granulated using 2.5% w/w binder solution in water and ethanol/water mixture (80:20 v/v). Prepared granules were dried until constant percentage loss on drying, sieved, and further analyzed. Dried granules were exposed to different percentage RH for 48 h at room temperature. Powder rheometer was used for the rheological and flow characterization, while thermal effusivity and differential scanning calorimeter were used for thermal analysis. The thermal effusivity values for the wet granules showed a sharp increase beginning 50% w/w binder solution in both cases, which reflected the over-wetting of granules. Ethanol/water solvent batches showed greater resistance to flow as compared to the water solvent batches in the wet granule stage, while the reverse was true for the dried granule stage, as evident from the basic flowability energy values. Although the solvents used affected the equilibration kinetics of moisture content, the RH-exposed granules remained unaffected in their flow properties in both cases. This study indicates that the solvents play a vital role on the rheology and flow properties of MCC granules, while the different RH conditions have little or no effect on them for the above combination of solvent and binder.

  1. A Simple Drought Product and Indicator Derived from Temperature and Relative Humidity Observed by the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, S. L.; Behrangi, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the United States, drought results in agricultural losses, impacts to industry, power and energy production, natural resources, municipal water supplies and human health making it one of the costliest natural hazards in the nation. Monitoring drought is therefore critical to help local governments, resource managers, and other groups make effective decisions, yet there is no single definition of drought, and because of the complex nature of drought there is no universal best drought indicator. Remote sensing applications in drought monitoring are advantageous due to the large spatial and temporal frequency of observations, leading to a better understanding of the spatial extent of drought and its duration, and in detecting the onset of drought and its intensity. NASA Earth Observing System (EOS)-era data have potential for monitoring and assessing drought and many are already used either directly or indirectly for drought monitoring. Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) sensor are widely used for agricultural and environmental plant-stress monitoring via the USDM, the VegDRI project and FEWSNet. However there remain underutilized sources of information from NASA satellite observations that may have promise for characterizing and understanding meteorological drought. Once such sensor is NASA's Advanced Infra-Red Sounder (AIRS) aboard the Aqua satellite. AIRS and it's sister sensor the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) that together provide meteorological information of high relevance to meteorological drought, e.g., profiles of water vapor, surface air temperature, and precipitation. Recent work undertaken to develop simple indicators of drought based on temperature and relative humidity from the AIRS suite of instruments is promising. Although there are more sophisticated indicators developed through the application of a variety of

  2. Comparison of Relative Humidity obtained from SAPHIR on board Megha-Tropiques and Ground based Microwave Radiometer Profiler over an equatorial station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renju, Ramachandran Pillai; Uma, K. N.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Mathew, Nizy; Raju C, Suresh

    A comparison has been made between the SAPHIR on board Megha-Tropiques (MT) derived Relative Humidity (RH (%)) with that derived from a ground based multi-frequency Microwave Radiometer Profiler (MRP) observations over an equatorial station Thiruvananthapuram (8.5(°) N and 76.9(°) E) for a one year period. As a first step, the validation of MRP has been made against the radiosonde for two years (2010 and 2011) during the Indian monsoon period July-September. This analysis shows a wet bias below 6 km and dry bias above. The comparison between the MRP and the MT derived RH has been made at five different altitudinal levels (0.75, 2.25, 4.0, 6.25 and 9.2 km range) strictly under clear sky condition. The regression analysis between the two reveals very good correlation (>0.8) in the altitudinal layer of 2.25 to 6.25 km. The differences between the two observations had also been explained interms of percentage of occurrence between MT and the MRP at each altitudinal layer. About 70-80% of the time, the difference in the RH is found to below 10% at first three layer. The RMSE of 2% is observed at almost all the height layers. The differences have been attributed to the different measurement and retrieval techniques involved in the ground based and satellite based measurements. Since MRP frequecy channels are not sensitive to small water vapor variabilities above 6 km, large differences are observed. Radiative Transfer computation for the channels of both MRP and SAPHIR will be carried out to understand the variabilities.

  3. Dependence of aerosol scattering coefficients on relative humidity observed at two coastal sites on the East China Sea: Comparison to remote observations and influence of chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Y.; Taketani, F.; Irie, H.; Komazaki, Y.; Takashima, H.; Xiaole, P.; Takami, A.; Wang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    We employed an integrating nephelometer equipped with a humidifier (where the relative humidity (RH) was scanned between 40 and 90%) to measure the aerosol scattering coefficients and their dependence on RH at Fukue Island (32.75N, 128.68E), west of Japan, in May 2009 and at Rudong, Jiangsu, China (32.26N, 121.37E) in May/June 2010, aiming at better characterization of optical properties of the regional-scale aerosol pollution over East Asia. The two coastal sites are located east and west of the East China Sea and are separated by about 700 km. The observed scattering coefficients are normalized by the concurrently measured PM2.5 mass concentrations and thereby behaviors of the mass scattering coefficients are discussed. At Fukue, the mass scattering coefficients under the ambient RH conditions were >1.5 times higher than those observed under the dry condition (RH = 40%), suggesting that the RH effect was crucial in determining optical properties under ambient conditions. The coefficients under the ambient RH conditions, rather than the dry values, agreed better with the extinction coefficients determined by MAX-DOAS (Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) technique based on remote measurements of O4 optical depths. The single-scattering albedo (SSA), estimated in combination to the absorption coefficients determined by a MAAP (Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer) instrument, had similar average values (~0.95) at the two sites. The SSA values at the two sites were commonly lowered (to below 0.90) when the air traveled from the North China Plain region. At Fukue, the RH dependence was found to be weakened when the organics/sulfate ratio increased (as observed by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer), while such influence of chemical composition was less clear at Rudong, possibly masked by large temporal variations in the particle size distributions.

  4. The Design of The Porous Silicon Relative Humidity Sensor%多孔硅相对湿度传感器的设计∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张胜兵; 许高斌; 陈兴; 马渊明

    2015-01-01

    基于对三明治型与平铺型两种多孔硅湿度传感器结构的灵敏度分析与比较,结合两种结构的优点,设计出新的传感器的结构。通过对该结构湿度传感器的性能测试,得出该传感器的灵敏度为1.1 pF/RH%,响应时间为73 s,温度湿度系数为0.5%RH/℃,该湿度传感器适用于在中低湿环境中测量,在每隔20 d的时间对传感器跟踪测试,证明该传感具有较好的稳定性。此外为了传感器可以自解吸附,该传感器采用多晶硅为传感器加热除湿,在金属电极上溅射一层钝化层以防止电极被水汽腐蚀。%This paper analyses and compares the sensitivity of two types of porous silicon humidity sensor—the sand-wich type and the tiled type. A structure of porous silicon humidity sensor which combines the advantages of these two kinds of structure is designed in this paper. By testing the performance of the structure of humidity sensor,it is concluded that the sensitivity of the sensor is 1.1 pF/RH%,the response time is 73 seconds and the temperature hu-midity coefficient is 0.5%RH/℃. The humidity sensor is used in low and medium humidity environment and the re-sults show that the sensor has an outstanding performance of stability in the sensor tracking test of every 20 days. The polysilicon for heating and dehumidification is adopted for the sensor’s desorption. The metal electrode is also covered with a passivation layer to prevent the corrosion caused by water vapor.

  5. Relative humidity-dependent viscosity of secondary organic material from toluene photo-oxidation and possible implications for organic particulate matter over megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mijung; Liu, Pengfei F.; Hanna, Sarah J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Potter, Katie; You, Yuan; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2016-07-01

    To improve predictions of air quality, visibility, and climate change, knowledge of the viscosities and diffusion rates within organic particulate matter consisting of secondary organic material (SOM) is required. Most qualitative and quantitative measurements of viscosity and diffusion rates within organic particulate matter have focused on SOM particles generated from biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as α-pinene and isoprene. In this study, we quantify the relative humidity (RH)-dependent viscosities at 295 ± 1 K of SOM produced by photo-oxidation of toluene, an anthropogenic VOC. The viscosities of toluene-derived SOM were 2 × 10-1 to ˜ 6 × 106 Pa s from 30 to 90 % RH, and greater than ˜ 2 × 108 Pa s (similar to or greater than the viscosity of tar pitch) for RH ≤ 17 %. These viscosities correspond to Stokes-Einstein-equivalent diffusion coefficients for large organic molecules of ˜ 2 × 10-15 cm2 s-1 for 30 % RH, and lower than ˜ 3 × 10-17 cm2 s-1 for RH ≤ 17 %. Based on these estimated diffusion coefficients, the mixing time of large organic molecules within 200 nm toluene-derived SOM particles is 0.1-5 h for 30 % RH, and higher than ˜ 100 h for RH ≤ 17 %. As a starting point for understanding the mixing times of large organic molecules in organic particulate matter over cities, we applied the mixing times determined for toluene-derived SOM particles to the world's top 15 most populous megacities. If the organic particulate matter in these megacities is similar to the toluene-derived SOM in this study, in Istanbul, Tokyo, Shanghai, and São Paulo, mixing times in organic particulate matter during certain periods of the year may be very short, and the particles may be well-mixed. On the other hand, the mixing times of large organic molecules in organic particulate matter in Beijing, Mexico City, Cairo, and Karachi may be long and the particles may not be well-mixed in the afternoon (15:00-17:00 LT) during certain times of the

  6. Does the modification in "critical relative humidity" of NCEP CFSv2 dictate Indian mean summer monsoon forecast? Evaluation through thermodynamical and dynamical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, S.; Hazra, Anupam; Chaudhari, Hemantkumar S.

    2016-02-01

    An accurate seasonal prediction of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) is intriguing as well as the most challenging job for monsoon meteorologists. As there is a cause and effect relationship between clouds and precipitation, the modulation of cloud formation in a dynamical model affects profoundly on ISMR. It has already been established that the critical relative humidity (CRH) plays a crucial role on the realistic cloud formation in a general circulation model. Hence, it may be hypothesized that the proper choice of CRH can be instrumental in driving the large scale Indian monsoon by modulating the cloud formation in a global climate model. An endeavor has been made for the first time to test the above hypothesis on the NCEP-CFSv2 model in the perspective of seasonal prediction of ISMR by modifying the CRH profile. The model sensitivity experiments have been carried out for two different CRH profiles along with the existing profile during the normal (2003) and deficient (2009) monsoon years. First profile is the constant CRH following the existing one but with increased magnitude and the second one is the variable CRH at different cloud levels based on the observations and MERRA reanalysis. The ensemble mean of model runs for four initial conditions of each year has revealed that the variable CRH profile in CFSv2 represents seasonal ISMR and its variability best among the three CRH experiments linking with the thermodynamical and dynamical parameters like precipitable water, tropospheric temperature and its gradient, cloud structure and radiation, water vapour flux, systematic error energy with its nonlinear error growth and the length of the rainy seasons during the contrasting years. It has also been shown that the improved depiction of seasonal ISMR has been achieved without disturbing much the forecast biases at other global tropical regions. The indigenous part of this paper is that the CRH modification can play a seminal role in modulating the large

  7. Reconstruction of late Quaternary relative humidity changes on the southern slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro, East Africa, using a coupled δ2H-δ18O biomarker paleohygrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Johannes; Zech, Roland; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Tuthorn, Mario; Glaser, Bruno; Greule, Markus; Keppler, Frank; Huang, Yongsong; Zech, Wolfgang; Zech, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of African paleoclimate/-hydrological history is decisively based on lake level and lake sediment studies. It furthermore improved remarkably during the last decade thanks to emerging stable isotope techniques such as compound-specific deuterium analysis of sedimentary leaf wax biomarkers (δ2Hleaf wax). Here we present results from a multi-proxy biomarker study carried out on a ~100 ka paleosol sequence developed in the Maundi crater at ~2780 m a.s.l. on the southeastern slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro in equatorial East Africa. The Maundi stable isotope records established for hemicellulose-derived sugars, lignin- and pectin-derived methoxyl groups and leaf wax-derived fatty acid and n-alkane biomarkers (δ18Osugars, δ2Hmethoxyl groups, δ2Hfatty acids and δ2Hn-alkanes) reveal differences but also similar patterns. Maxima characterize the period from 70 to 60 ka, the last glacial maximum (LGM) and the Younger Dryas (YD), whereas minima occur during the Holocene. The application of a 'coupled δ2Hn-alkane-δ18Osugar paleohygrometer' allows the reconstruction of the Late Quaternary relative humidity (RH) history of the Maundi study site. Accordingly, the reconstructed RH changes are well in agreement with the Maundi pollen results. Apart from the overall regional moisture availability, the intensification versus weakening of the trade wind inversion, which affects the diurnal montane atmospheric circulation on the slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro, is suggested as local second important factor controlling the RH history at Maundi. Furthermore, the Maundi results of the coupled δ2Hn-alkane-δ18Osugar approach caution against interpreting δ2Hleaf wax (as well as δ18Osugar) records straight forwards in terms of reflecting δ2Hprec, because variably and primarily RH-dependent isotopic evapotranspirative enrichment of leaf water can mask δ2Hprec changes. Concerning the biomarker-based reconstructed Maundi δ2H/δ18Oprec record, the comparison with the

  8. The δ18O of Atmospheric Water Vapour is Recorded in the Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Leaf water and Organic Molecules at High Relative Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, M. M.; Goldsmith, G. R.; Schmid, L.; Siegwolf, R. T.; Gessler, A.; Saurer, M.

    2016-12-01

    The oxygen stable isotope ratios (δ18O) of water and organic molecules in plants hold information about plant physiology, ecohydrology, and environmental conditions. For instance, the δ18O ratio of leaf water reflects both the δ18O ratios of water in the soil and in the atmosphere. This water, which is incorporated into organic molecules at the time of synthesis, thus serves to record the environment in which the plant was growing. However, how δ18O of atmospheric water vapour affects the δ18O ratio of organic molecules remains poorly understood. In order to investigate the effects of fog and rain (e.g. high atmospheric water availability) on δ18O ratios of leaf water and organic molecules, we exposed oak tree saplings (Quercus robur) in wet and dry soil treatments to 18O-depleted water vapour at ca. 90% relative humidity for 5 h. We harvested plant material over 24 h to trace the movement of the isotopic label in water and organics throughout the plant from the leaves to the stem. The atmospheric water vapour caused a strong 18O-depletion in leaf and xylem water, as well as in leaf carbohydrates, with the most negative ratios observed at the end of the fogging. Moreover, the label was clearly observed in twig and stem phloem carbohydrates following a short delay. A detailed compound-specific isotope analysis of the leaf carbohydrates revealed that the label caused an 18O-depletion in fructose, glucose, and sucrose. Quercitol, an oak-specific alditol, did not show 18O-depletion. Clear soil moisture treatment effects were only observed for twig phloem carbohydrates, with a stronger 18O-depletion in wet plants than in dry plants, suggesting retarded leaf-to-phloem sugar export in trees under drought. We demonstrate that labelling with 18O-depleted water is a potential tool to trace the movement and incorporation of oxygen stable isotopes in plants. We clearly show that changes in δ18O of atmospheric water vapour are quickly imprinted on leaf water and

  9. Effects of low humidity on the rat middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, H M; McGuirt, W F; Ayres, P H; Hayes, A W; Coggins, C R; Sagartz, J

    1994-09-01

    Secretory otitis media is common in the winter, and the possible risk factors are numerous. This study examines the effect of low humidity on the middle ear using a Sprague-Dawley rat model: 23 test rats housed for 5 days in a low-humidity environment (10% to 12% relative humidity) and 23 control rats housed at 50% to 55% relative humidity. Microscopic ear examinations were graded for otitis media with effusion (OME) before testing and on test days 3 and 5. The mucosa of the middle ears and eustachian tubes was examined histopathologically. Significantly more effusions were observed in the low-humidity group on test days 3 (P = .003) and 5 (P = .01), but no intergroup histopathologic differences were noted. We conclude that a low-humidity environment contributed to the development of OME in the test animals, and that low-humidity warrants further investigation as a contributing factor in childhood middle ear disease.

  10. Effect of relative humidity on properties of gelatin-pullulan-based edible films%环境湿度对明胶—普鲁兰多糖可食性膜性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张超; 高丹丹; 马越; 王丹; 赵晓燕; 江连洲

    2012-01-01

    Gelatin -puilulan -based film is a water-soluble package material. The effect of relative humidity on mechanical properties, water-vapor transmission ratio, oxygen transmission ratio, oil transmission ratio, color and water solubility of gelatin-pullulan-based film were evaluated,and the effect of relative humidity on properties of geiatin-puliulan-based film,gelatin film and pullulan film were compared. The relative humidity of 80% lowered the tensile strength of gelatin-pullulan-based film,improved its flexibility,and showed no significant different on its oxygen resistance,oil resistance and transparency. The properties of gelatin-pullulan- based film were better than that of gelatin film and pullulan film in the same relative humidity.%明胶-普鲁兰多糖膜是一种可以快速溶解于热水的可食性包装材料,研究环境湿度对明胶-普鲁兰多糖膜机械性能、氧气透过率、水蒸气透过率、油脂透过率、颜色以及水溶性的影响,并比较环境湿度对明胶膜、明胶-普鲁兰多糖膜和普鲁兰多糖膜性能的影响。结果显示,较高的环境湿度(80%)会降低明胶-普鲁兰多糖膜的抗拉强度,提高其柔韧性,而对其阻氧性、阻油性和透明度没有显著的影响;明胶-普鲁兰多糖膜的各方面性能优于明胶膜和普鲁兰多糖膜。

  11. Energy-absorption diagrams of honeycomb paperboards under dynamic compression in different relative humidities%基于湿度影响的蜂窝纸板动态压缩能量吸收图

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐烁; 王志伟

    2012-01-01

    基于三种不同厚跨比的蜂窝纸板在不同湿度条件下的动态压缩应力-应变曲线,构建含相对湿度、蜂窝纸板厚跨比等信息的能量吸收图,结果表明:随着相对湿度的增大,蜂窝纸板最佳能量吸收点向左下方偏移,其单位体积吸收能量的能力减弱.并将该能量吸收图应用于一项工程实例,指导包装设计.%Based on stress-strain curves of honeycomb paperboards with different thickness-to-length ratios under dynamic compression in different relative humidities, the energy-absorption diagrams were modeled and constructed, they included the information of thickness-to-length ratios and relative humidity conditions. It was shown that the optimal energy-absorption point shifts to the lower left and the energy-absorption capacity per unit volume decreases with increase in relative humidity. The energy-absorption diagram was used in a project case to guide the package design.

  12. Influence of relative humidity and temperature on the production of pinonaldehyde and OH radicals from the ozonolysis of α-pinene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Iinuma

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The ozonolysis of α-pinene has been investigated under dry and humid conditions in the temperature range of 243–303 K. The results provided new insight into the role of water and temperature in the degradation mechanism of α-pinene and in the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA. The SOA yields were higher at humid conditions than at dry conditions. The water induced gain was largest for the lowest temperatures investigated (243 and 253 K. The increase in the SOA yields was dominated by water (and temperature effects on the organic product distribution, whilst physical uptake of water was negligible. This will be demonstrated for the example of pinonaldehyde (PA which was formed as a major product in the humid experiments with total molar yields of 0.30±0.06 at 303 K and 0.15±0.03 at 243 K. In the dry experiments the molar yields of PA were only 0.07±0.02 at 303 K and 0.02±0.02 at 253 K. The observed partitioning of PA as a function of the SOA mass present at 303 K limited the effective vapour pressure of pure PA pPA0 to the range of 0.01–0.001 Pa, 3–4 orders of magnitude lower than literature values. The corresponding mass partitioning coefficient was determined to KPA=0.005±0.004 m3 μg−1 and the total mass yield αPAtotal=0.37±0.08. At 303 K PA preferably stayed in the gas-phase, whereas at 253 K and 243 K it exclusively partitioned into the particulate phase. PA could thus account at least for half of the water induced gain in SOA mass at 253 K. The corresponding effect was negligible at 303 K because the PA preferably remained in the gas-phase. The yield of OH radicals, which were produced in the ozonolysis, was indirectly determined by means of the yield of cyclohexanone formed in the reaction of OH radicals with cyclohexane. OH yields of the α-pinene ozonolysis were determined to 0.67±0.17 for humid and 0.54±0.13 for dry conditions at 303 K, indicating a water dependent path of OH radical formation. For 253 and

  13. Influence of relative humidity and temperature on the production of pinonaldehyde and OH radicals from the ozonolysis of α-pinene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Iinuma

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The ozonolysis of α-pinene has been investigated under dry and humid conditions in the temperature range of 243–303 K. The results provided new insight into the role of water and temperature in the degradation mechanism of α-pinene and in the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA. The SOA yields were higher at humid conditions than at dry conditions. The water induced gain was largest for the lowest temperatures investigated (243 and 253 K. The increase in the SOA yields was dominated by water (and temperature effects on the organic product distribution, whilst physical uptake of water was negligible. This will be demonstrated for the example of pinonaldehyde (PA which was formed as a~major product in the humid experiments with total molar yields of 0.30±0.06 at 303 K and 0.15±0.03 at 243 K. In the dry experiments the molar yields of PA were only 0.07±0.02 at 303 K and 0.02±0.02 at 253 K. The observed partitioning of PA as a function of the SOA mass present at 303 K limited the effective vapour pressure of pure PA pPA0 to the range of 0.01–0.001 Pa, 3–4 orders of magnitude lower than literature values. The corresponding mass partitioning coefficient was determined to KPA=0.005±0.004 m3/μg and the total mass yield αPA.total=0.37±0.08. At 303 K PA preferably stayed in the gas-phase, whereas at 253 K and 243 K it exclusively partitioned into the particulate phase. PA could thus account at least for half of the water induced gain in SOA mass at 253 K. The corresponding effect was negligible at 303 K because the PA preferably remained in the gas-phase. The yield of OH radicals, which were produced in the ozonolysis, was indirectly determined by means of the yield of cyclohexanone formed in the reaction of OH radicals with cyclohexane. OH yields of the α-pinene ozonolysis were determined to 0.67±0.17 for humid and 0.54±0.13 for dry conditions at 303 K, indicating a water dependent path of OH radical formation. For 253 and 243

  14. Positive impedance humidity sensors via single-component materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jingwen; Peng, Zhijian; Shen, Zhenguang; Zhao, Zengying; Zhang, Guoliang; Fu, Xiuli

    2016-05-06

    Resistivity-type humidity sensors have been investigated with great interest due to the increasing demands in industry, agriculture and daily life. To date, most of the available humidity sensors have been fabricated based on negative humidity impedance, in which the electrical resistance decreases as the humidity increases, and only several carbon composites have been reported to present positive humidity impedance. However, here we fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors only via single-component WO3-x crystals. The resistance of WO3-x crystal sensors in response to relative humidity could be tuned from a negative to positive one by increasing the compositional x. And it was revealed that the positive humidity impedance was driven by the defects of oxygen vacancy. This result will extend the application field of humidity sensors, because the positive humidity impedance sensors would be more energy-efficient, easier to be miniaturized and electrically safer than their negative counterparts for their lower operation voltages. And we believe that constructing vacancies in semiconducting materials is a universal way to fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors.

  15. Positive impedance humidity sensors via single-component materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jingwen; Peng, Zhijian; Shen, Zhenguang; Zhao, Zengying; Zhang, Guoliang; Fu, Xiuli

    2016-05-01

    Resistivity-type humidity sensors have been investigated with great interest due to the increasing demands in industry, agriculture and daily life. To date, most of the available humidity sensors have been fabricated based on negative humidity impedance, in which the electrical resistance decreases as the humidity increases, and only several carbon composites have been reported to present positive humidity impedance. However, here we fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors only via single-component WO3-x crystals. The resistance of WO3-x crystal sensors in response to relative humidity could be tuned from a negative to positive one by increasing the compositional x. And it was revealed that the positive humidity impedance was driven by the defects of oxygen vacancy. This result will extend the application field of humidity sensors, because the positive humidity impedance sensors would be more energy-efficient, easier to be miniaturized and electrically safer than their negative counterparts for their lower operation voltages. And we believe that constructing vacancies in semiconducting materials is a universal way to fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors.

  16. Effect of NO{sub 2} and/or SO{sub 2} atmospheric contaminants and relative humidity on copper corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feliu, S.; Mariaca, L.; Simancas, J.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Morcillo, M.

    2003-07-01

    A study has been made of the individual and combined roles of NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} atmospheric contaminants on corrosion and patina formation on copper in humid atmosphere. In most cases the combined effect of the two contaminants has been greater than the sum of their individual effects, although exception have been found with the mixture of 800 {mu}g/m''3 NO{sub 2} + 800 {mu}g/m''3 SO{sub 2} XPS analysis has revealed important composition changes in the outermost layer of films formed on copper, depending on the nature of the atmospheric contaminant and humidity level. The presence of sulphates and sulphites has been clearly observed in exposure to atmospheres contaminated with SO{sub 2} at 50, 70 and 90% RH. Nitrates and nitrites have been detected in exposure to NO{sub 2} at 50 and 70% RH, but not at 90% RH. A hydrogenated nitrogen compound has been detected with the mixture of NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} at 90% RH. In this atmosphere, a certain inhibiting effect has been seen. (Author) 46 refs.

  17. Humidity Sensing Properties of Pre-irradiation Grafted HDPE Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jiao; Qun Fu; Xiang Geng; Zhen Li; Haijian Zhong

    2006-01-01

    Grafted high density polyethylene (HDPE) films have been prepared by grafting sodium styrene sulfonate (SSS) and acrylic acid (AA) onto HDPE using preirradiation method. The structure and surface morphology of both grafted and ungrafted HDPE films were observed by FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The humidity sensing properties of grafted HDPE films were investigated. The results show that the impedance of the film decreases with increasing of relative humidity (RH). The films display high sensitivity with nearly three orders of magnitude change in the resistance during the relative humidity variation from 5% to 98%. Grafted HDPE films exhibit excellent properties as humidity sensors.

  18. Humidity control tool for neonatal incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdiche, M; Farges, G; Delanaud, S; Bach, V; Villon, P; Libert, J P

    1998-03-01

    In the first days of life, the daily evaporative loss from premature neonates can reach up to 20% of body mass. Such loss can be reduced by increasing the air humidity inside the incubator. Neither passive humidification nor open loop systems allow high humidity rates to be maintained or easily controlled: at 34 degrees C, the maximum levels vary with the system from 40% to 77% of relative humidity. The skin evaporative exchanges between the neonate and the environment are directly proportional to the water vapour partial pressure difference between the neonate's skin and the air. An active closed loop system has been designed, which permits reliable and accurate control of humidity according to the water vapour partial pressure set, between 1 and 6 kPa, in an air temperature range of 28-39 degrees C. It is characterised by variations of about 0.05 kPa around the set value and a maximum humidification speed of 0.25 kPa min-1. The algorithm is based on optimal control and the dynamic programming principles. Test results place this active system above usual systems for its power, precision and adaptability. It is an exploitable tool in fundamental and clinical research, to precisely study the humidity effects on neonatal comfort and thermo-regulation evolution.

  19. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  20. Trehalose in hair care: heat styling benefits at high humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, Susan; Paul, Prem K C

    2012-01-01

    Human hair switches that have been treated with trehalose solution and straightened using hot irons show longevity of the straight style even in high-humidity conditions. This anti-humidity benefit is especially noticeable if the straight style has been created at low relative humidity. It is proposed that hot-iron straightening of trehalose-treated switches produces in situ glassy forms of the sugar that act as water sinks at high humidity to provide anti-humidity benefits. Adsorption isotherms and powder x-ray studies of different forms of trehalose and moisture uptake of hair treated with the sugar suggest that the ability of a glassy form of trehalose to regulate moisture in the fiber and consequently affect its viscoelastic properties is a major factor in providing long-lasting straight style in humid conditions.

  1. The influence of humidity fluxes on offshore wind speed profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Barthelmie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy developments offshore focus on larger turbines to keep the relative cost of the foundation per MW of installed capacity low. Hence typical wind turbine hub-heights are extending to 100 m and potentially beyond. However, measurements to these heights are not usually available, requiring extrapolation from lower measurements. With humid conditions and low mechanical turbulence offshore, deviations from the traditional logarithmic wind speed profile become significant and stability corrections are required. This research focuses on quantifying the effect of humidity fluxes on stability corrected wind speed profiles. The effect on wind speed profiles is found to be important in stable conditions where including humidity fluxes forces conditions towards neutral. Our results show that excluding humidity fluxes leads to average predicted wind speeds at 150 m from 10 m which are up to 4% higher than if humidity fluxes are included, and the results are not very sensitive to the method selected to estimate humidity fluxes.

  2. All-Optical Graphene Oxide Humidity Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Hong Lim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The optical characteristics of graphene oxide (GO were explored to design and fabricate a GO-based optical humidity sensor. GO film was coated onto a SU8 polymer channel waveguide using the drop-casting technique. The proposed sensor shows a high TE-mode absorption at 1550 nm. Due to the dependence of the dielectric properties of the GO film on water content, this high TE-mode absorption decreases when the ambient relative humidity increases. The proposed sensor shows a rapid response (<1 s to periodically interrupted humid air flow. The transmission of the proposed sensor shows a linear response of 0.553 dB/% RH in the range of 60% to 100% RH.

  3. Attribution of observed surface humidity changes to human influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Katharine M; Gillett, Nathan P; Jones, Philip D; Thorne, Peter W

    2007-10-11

    Water vapour is the most important contributor to the natural greenhouse effect, and the amount of water vapour in the atmosphere is expected to increase under conditions of greenhouse-gas-induced warming, leading to a significant feedback on anthropogenic climate change. Theoretical and modelling studies predict that relative humidity will remain approximately constant at the global scale as the climate warms, leading to an increase in specific humidity. Although significant increases in surface specific humidity have been identified in several regions, and on the global scale in non-homogenized data, it has not been shown whether these changes are due to natural or human influences on climate. Here we use a new quality-controlled and homogenized gridded observational data set of surface humidity, with output from a coupled climate model, to identify and explore the causes of changes in surface specific humidity over the late twentieth century. We identify a significant global-scale increase in surface specific humidity that is attributable mainly to human influence. Specific humidity is found to have increased in response to rising temperatures, with relative humidity remaining approximately constant. These changes may have important implications, because atmospheric humidity is a key variable in determining the geographical distribution and maximum intensity of precipitation, the potential maximum intensity of tropical cyclones, and human heat stress, and has important effects on the biosphere and surface hydrology.

  4. Heat or humidity, which triggers tree phenology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Julia; Sparks, Tim H.; Estrella, Nicole; Menzel, Annette

    2014-05-01

    An overwhelming number of studies confirm that temperature is the main driver for phenological events such as leafing, flowering or fruit ripening, which was first discovered by Réaumur in 1735. Since then, several additional factors which influence onset dates have been identified, such as length of the chilling period, photoperiod, temperature of the previous autumn, nutrient availability, precipitation, sunshine and genetics (local adaptations). Those are supposed to capture some of the remaining, unexplained variance. But our ability to predict onset dates remains imprecise, and our understanding of how plants sense temperature is vague. From a climate chamber experiment on cuttings of 9 tree species we present evidence that air humidity is an important, but previously overlooked, factor influencing the spring phenology of trees. The date of median leaf unfolding was 7 days earlier at 90% relative humidity compared to 40% relative humidity. A second experiment with cuttings shows that water uptake by above-ground tissue might be involved in the phenological development of trees. A third climate chamber experiment suggests that winter dormancy and chilling might be linked to dehydration processes. Analysis of climate data from several meteorological stations across Germany proves that the increase in air humidity after winter is a reliable signal of spring, i.e. less variable or susceptible to reversal compared to temperature. Finally, an analysis of long-term phenology data reveals that absolute air humidity can even be used as a reliable predictor of leafing dates. Current experimental work tries to elucidate the involved foliar uptake processes by using deuterium oxide marked water and Raman spectroscopy. We propose a new framework, wherein plants' chilling requirements and frost tolerance might be attributed to desiccation processes, while spring development is linked to re-humidification of plant tissue. The influence of air humidity on the spring

  5. 南方塑料大棚冬春季温湿度的神经网络模拟%Neural Network Simulation on Air Temperature and Relative Humidity inside Plastic Greenhouse during Winter and Spring in Southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李倩; 申双和; 曹雯; 邹学智

    2012-01-01

    Based on the meteorological data both inside and outside the plastic greenhouse in Cixi, Zhejiang province and agricultural meteorological experimental station of Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, three BP neural network models were established, which the input variable was chosen as radiation solar outdoor, air temperature, relative humidity and wind speed, and output variable was chosen as temperature indoor and relative humidity. The results showed that all of the root mean square error (RMSE) between trained air temperature and measured value from three models was no more than 2℃ and the relative error (RE) no more than 4% respectively. Both RMSE and RE between trained relative humidity and measured value was no more than 7 percent points and 7% . All of the RMSE between predicted air temperature and measured value from three models was 2℃ approximately, and their RE was no more than 6% in spring, less than that in winter. RMSE and RE predicated relative humidity and measured value was no more than 7 percent points and 9% respectively. The results indicated that three BP neural network models had quite precisely for predicting temperature indoor and relative humidity in plastic greenhouse, which could meet the forecast requirements for plastic greenhouse microclimate.%利用浙江省慈溪市草莓塑料大棚和南京信息工程大学农业气象试验站番茄塑料大棚的小气候观测数据及气象站资料,建立3个以棚外辐射、温度、相对湿度和风速为输入变量,棚内温度和相对湿度为输出变量的BP神经网络预测模型.结果表明,3个模型气温训练值与实测值的均方根误差(RMSE)都在2℃以内,相对误差都在4%左右;相对湿度训练值的RMSE都在7个百分点以内,相对误差不超过7%.利用此模型得到的气温预测值与实测值的RMSE都在2℃左右,冬季气温的相对误差较大,春季通风和不通风模型气温的相对误差不超过6%;

  6. Effect of NO2 and/or SO2 atmospheric contaminants and relative humidity on copper corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feliu, S.

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available A study has been made of the individual and combined roles of NO2 and SO2 atmospheric contaminants on corrosion and patina formation on copper in humid atmospheres. In most cases the combined effect of the two contaminants has been greater than the sum of their individual effects, although exception have been found with the mixture of 800 μg/m+3NO2 + 800 μg/m+3 SO2- XPS analysis has revealed important composition changes in the outermost layer of films formed on copper, depending on the nature of the atmospheric contaminant and humidity level. The presence of sulphates and sulphites has been clearly observed in exposure to atmospheres contaminated with SO2 at 50, 70 and 90 % RH. Nitrates and nitrites have been detected in exposure to NO2 at 50 and 70 %RH, but not at 90 % RH. A hydrogenated nitrogen compound has been detected with the mixture of NO2 and SO2 at 90 % RH .In this atmosphere, a certain inhibiting effect has been seen.

    Se ha estudiado el papel de los contaminantes atmosféricos NO2 y SO2 y de una mezcla de ambos, en la corrosión y formación de pátina sobre el cobre expuesto en atmósferas húmedas. Por lo general, el efecto combinado de los dos contaminantes es mayor que la suma de los efectos individuales, aunque se han encontrado excepciones con la mezcla de 800 μg/m+3NO2 + 800 μg/m+3 SO2. El análisis por XPS ha revelado cambios importantes en la composición de las películas superficiales más externas formadas sobre el cobre, según la naturaleza del contaminante y nivel de humedad. En la exposición al SO2 se ha revelado la formación de sulfatos y sulfitos a todas las humedades ensayadas (50, 70 y 90 % HR. En la exposición al NO2 se han detectado nitratos y nitritos, pero sólo cuando la humedad atmosférica era del

  7. Efecto de la temperatura y humedad relativa en la germinación de esporangios de Bremia lactucae Regel Effect of temperature and relative humidity on the germination of Bremia lactucae Regel sporangia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Yáñez López

    Full Text Available El propósito de este trabajo realizado en 2009, fue estudiar el efecto de la temperatura, y la humedad relativa, en la germinación de esporangios de Bremia lactucae Regel. El efecto de estas variables sobre la germinación de esporangios in vitro, se evaluó en cámaras de incubación mediante 21 tratamientos formados por los niveles de temperatura de 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 ºC en combinación con humedades de 70, 80, 90%. La germinación se evaluó a las 24 h de establecer el tratamiento. Se realizó un análisis estadístico para determinar la importancia de estas variables y su interacción sobre la germinación de esporangios e inferir sobre el rango óptimo de temperatura y humedad. Se encontró que existe efecto significativo de la interacción entre estas variables sobre la germinación, presentándose esta desde los 5 ºC hasta los 25 ºC. El tratamiento que presentó el mayor porcentaje de germinación fue el de 10 ºC en combinación con humedad relativa 90%. Con base en una análisis de superficie de respuesta. Se concluyó que el óptimo de germinación de esporangios se consigue con temperaturas de entre 9.5 y 12.5 ºC con una humedad de 90%.The purpose of this work, performed in 2009, was to study the effect of temperature and relative humidity on the germination of Bremia lactucae Regel sporangia. The effect of these variables on the in vitro germination of sporangia was evaluated in incubation chambers, with 21 treatments formed by the temperature levels of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 ºC combined with humidities of 70, 80, 90%. Germination was evaluated 24 h after the treatment was established. A statistical analysis was carried out to determine the importance of these variables and their interaction on the germination of sporangia and infer on the optimum temperature and humidity ranges. We found that there is a significant effect of the interaction between these variables on germination, which appears starting at 5 º

  8. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  9. Optimizing the Materials Response in Humidity Capacitive Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Noroozi Afshar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The number of humidity outputs on the cap of a cylindrical capacitance sensor is optimized by designing three different probes with direct and indirect windows. The time interval is measured within which 30-70 % humidity can influence the dielectric constant and conductivity of the capacitance when exposed to a range of relative humidity. It is then compared with a simple set-up including a simplified equivalent circuit. The direct probes had four and double outputs on the window of the cylindrical capacitive sensor while the indirect probe had a thin plastic layer only. We observed that the dielectric constant and its conductivity depend closely to the humidity outgoing pathway and also to the increasing rate of humidity between the capacitance plates. The final variation in the materials properties alters the capacitance of the sensor which is measured simply by a LCR. This technique presents a simple method for tracking the recovery and reliability of the humidity sensors over time and assists in optimizing and controlling the materials response to the relative environment humidity. As a result, by controlling the environment humidity rate (0.02 %/s., we could measure the increment rate of capacitance with accuracy of 0.01 pf/%.

  10. Research on Monitoring of Soil Humidity Based on AMSR-E Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to establish AMSR-E soil humidity monitoring model to realize the real-time monitoring of soil humidity.[Method] By dint of evaporation(small type) in Guangxi,daily precipitation,daily average maximum temperature,daily minimum relative humidity,≤ 5 mm precipitation day,as well as AMSR-E soil humidity data,with Stepwise regression method,soil humidity real-time monitoring was studied based on GIS technology,and monitoring result.[Result] The low soil humidity in Guangxi on September 2...

  11. Effects of deliquescent salts in soils of polar Mars on the flow of the Northern Ice Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, D. A.; Hecht, M. H.; Kounaves, S.; Catling, D.

    2008-12-01

    The discovery of substantial amounts of magnesium and perchlorate by Phoenix' "Wet Chemistry Lab" (WCL) in the soil of Polar Mars suggests that magnesium perchlorate could be the dominant salt in the polar region's soils. This prospect opens some unexpected doors for moving liquid water around at temperatures as low as -68C. In its fully hydrated form ,this salt water mixture has a high density (~ 1700 kgm /cubic meter) (Besley and Bottomley,1969) and a freezing point of -68C (Pestova et al., 2005).This perchlorate is very deliquescent and gives off heat as it melts ice. About 1.8 gram of ice can be 'melted' by 1 gm of pure magnesium perchlorate . If the reported 1 percent perchlorate is typical of polar soils and if 5 percent of the Northern Permanent Ice Cap is soil then the perchorate , makes up about 0.0005 the of the ice cap. Given the average thickness of the ice cap is about 2000 meters,this suggests there enough perchorate in the ice cap to generate about 2m of salty water at the bed. Because of its density the perclorate salty water would pool over impervious layers and make the bed into a perchorate sludge that could be mobilized and deformed by the overburden of ice. The deformation of mobile beds is a well known phenomenon on some terrestrial glaciers presently and was thought to have played a major role during the Wisconsinan ice age (Fisher et al., 1985) . The perchorate sludge would be deformed and moved outwards possibly resulting its re-introduction to the polar environment. Having a deliquescent salt sludge at the bed whose melting point is -68C would mean that the ice cap could slide on its deformable bed while the ice itself was still very cold and stiff . This possibility has been modeled with a 2D time varying model . Adding the deformable bed material allows ice cap motion even at ice temperatures cold enough to generate and preserve the scarp/trough features. When the perchlorate formation mechanisms and rates are known the ultimate

  12. Influences of relative humidities and temperatures on the collection of C2-C5 aliphatic hydrocarbons with multi-bed (Tenax TA, Carbograph 1TD, Carboxen 1003) sorbent tube method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Wang, Liqin; Qu, Linli; Dai, Wenting; Huang, Yu; Cao, Junji

    2017-02-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are measured with sorbent tubes followed by thermal desorption (TD) analysis. Water vapor in the atmosphere affects sampling breakthrough and results in low collection efficiency. This paper reports the effect of relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the collection of 57 ozone precursors with a multi-bed tube composed of three different strengths of adsorbents (Tenax TA, Carbograph 1 TD, and Carboxen 1003). Unacceptable breakthrough values for volatile C2-C5 aliphatic compounds were observed under high (>60%) RHs. The breakthrough volumes (BV) for C2 aliphatic compounds were reduced 13-22 fold under 90% RH. Dry-purge with inert helium gas removes excessive water content before the TD analysis but also causes a maximum of 40% loss of target analytes. Condensation is another pathway for water retention. The tube temperature should be regulated at 5-10 °C above the air temperature to minimize condensation under RHs >30%.

  13. 重庆市万州区相对湿润度指数法旱灾评价研究%Study on Evaluation of Drought with Relative Humidity Index Method in Wanzhou District of Chongqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟新利; 段晓超; 童欣雨; 刘晶; 董伟杰; 谭娅

    2016-01-01

    采用逐月计算的相对湿润度指数评价了重庆市万州区1955-2013年共59年间的气象干旱状况,并与历史文献记录的干旱数据进行了比对。结果发现,气象干旱发生年份最多的为冬旱,而历史干旱数据则显示伏旱发生年份最多;剔除掉跨季干旱的影响,气象干旱中有关历史资料记录正确率为65.6%。气象伏旱有19次被历史记录,正确率最高达到了95%。相对湿润度指数在万州区干旱评估,尤其是伏旱的评估中具有较好的效果。%The meteorological drought of Wanzhou District in Chongqing in 1955-2013 were evaluated by using rel-ative humidity index calculated monthly, and compared with the historical litera-ture data record drought. The results showed that the winter drought occurred most in meteorological drought years. Drought and the historical data displayed years with drought was the most. Weed-ing out influences of cross drought sea-son,the correct rate of relevant histori-cal data recording meteorological drought was 65.6%.The 19 views of meteorologi-cal summer drought was recorded,and the highest accuracy rate reached 95%. Relative humidity index method had good results in drought assessment of Wanzhou District,especially in summer drought assessment.

  14. Single time point isothermal drug stability experiments at constant humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jian-Lin; Zhan, Xian-Cheng; Li, Lin-Li; Lin, Bing; Jiang, Lu

    2009-03-01

    A single time point isothermal drug stability experiments at constant humidity is introduced. In the new method, kinetic parameters related to both moisture and temperature were obtained by a single pair of experiments: these related to moisture by one with a group of testing humidities and a fixed temperature, those related to temperature by the other with a group of testing temperatures and a constant humidity. By a simulation, the estimates for the kinetic parameters (E(a), m, A) obtained by the proposed method and the reported programmed humidifying and heating method were statistically evaluated and were compared with those obtained by the isothermal measurements at constant humidity. Results indicated that under the same experimental conditions, the estimates obtained by the proposed method were significantly more precise than those obtained by the reported programmed humidifying and heating method. The estimates obtained by the isothermal method at constant humidity were somewhat more precise than those obtained by the proposed method. However, the experimental period needed by the isothermal method at constant humidity was greatly longer than that needed by the proposed method. The stability of dicloxacillin sodium, as a solid state model, was investigated by the single time point isothermal drug stability experiments at constant humidity. The results indicated that the kinetic parameters obtained by the proposed method were comparable to those from the reported.

  15. State of microbial communities in paleosols buried under kurgans of the desert-steppe zone in the Middle Bronze Age (27th–26th centuries BC) in relation to the dynamics of climate humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomutova, T. E.; Demkina, T. S.; Borisov, A. V.; Shishlina, I. I.

    2017-02-01

    The size and structure of microbial pool in light chestnut paleosols and paleosolonetz buried under kurgans of the Middle Bronze Age 4600-4500 years ago (the burial mound heights are 45-173 cm), as well as in recent analogues in the desert-steppe zone (Western Ergeni, Salo-Manych Ridge), have been studied. In paleosol profiles, the living microbial biomass estimated from the content of phospholipids varies from 35 to 258% of the present-day value; the active biomass (responsive to glucose addition) in paleosols is 1‒3 orders of magnitude lower than in recent analogues. The content of soil phospholipids is recalculated to that of microbial carbon, and its share in the total soil organic carbon is determined: it is 4.5-7.0% in recent soils and up to three times higher in the remained organic carbon of paleosols. The stability of microbial communities in the B1 horizon of paleosols is 1.3-2.2 times higher than in the upper horizon; in recent soils, it has a tendency to a decrease. The share of microorganisms feeding on plant residues in the ecological-trophic structure of paleosol microbial communities is higher by 23-35% and their index of oligotrophy is 3-5 times lower than in recent analogues. The size of microbial pool and its structure indicate a significantly higher input of plant residues into soils 4600-4500 years ago than in the recent time, which is related to the increase in atmospheric humidity in the studied zone. However, the occurrence depths of salt accumulations in profiles of the studied soils contradict this supposition. A short-term trend of increase in climate humidity is supposed, as indicated by microbial parameters (the most sensitive soil characteristics) or changes in the annual variation of precipitation (its increase in the warm season) during the construction of the mounds under study.

  16. Impact of temperature and humidity on perceived indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Lei

    1997-11-01

    This thesis deals with the impact of temperature and humidity on the emission of pollutants from five building materials and on the perception of air polluted by the material emissions. The impact was studied in the temperature range 18-28 deg. C and the humidity range 30-70%RH, corresponding to conditions often pertaining in normal non-industrial indoor environments. The five building materials used in the study were: PVC flooring, waterborne acrylic floor varnish, loomed polyamide carpet with latex backing, waterborn acrylic wall paint and acrylic sealant; all these materials are commonly use din buildings. The effect of temperature and humidity on emission and perception of air pollutant emitted from the five building materials is described, using a specially developed exposure system. A computer-controlled exposure system was developed. The design of the system allowed the impact of temperature and humidity on the emission of pollutants from the materials to be judged separately from the impact on perception. The effect of temperature and humidity on emission and on perception was investigated at nine different combinations of three temperature levels 18 deg. C, 23 deg. C, 28 deg. C and three relative humidity levels 30%, 50%, 70%. A sensory panel assessed the acceptability of the air after facial exposure. Chemical measurements of the pollutants emitted were also made. The impact of temperature and humidity on perception of air quality during whole-body exposure is discussed. The influence of the pre-exposure temperature/humidity on perception of air quality and the time course of adaptation of air quality perception with different combinations of temperature and humidity were also investigated. It is recommended that future ventilation standards should include the effect of indoor air temperature and humidity in ventilation requirements. (EG) 86 refs.

  17. Humid free efficient solar panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjwani, Manoj Kumar; Panjwani, Suresh Kumar; Mangi, Fareed Hussain; Khan, Danish; Meicheng, Li

    2017-09-01

    The paper examines the impact of the humidity on the Solar panels which makes a space for the drastic variation in the power generated and makes the device less efficient. Humidity readily affects the efficiency of the solar cells and creates a minimal layer of water on its surface. It also decreases the efficiency by 10-20% of the total power output produced. Moreover, to handle this issue, all around characterized measures are required to be taken to guarantee the smooth working of the solar panels utilized in humid areas. In connection with this issue, Karachi, the biggest city of Pakistan which is located near the costal line touching Arabian Sea, was taken as a reference city to measure the humidity range. In Karachi, the average humidity lies between 25-70% (as per Pakistan Meteorological Department PMD), that indirectly leads in decreasing power acquired from a Solar Panel and develops various complexities for the solar system. The system on average experiences stability issues, such as those of power fluctuations etc., due to which, the whole solar system installed observes abnormal variations in acquired power. Silica Gel was used as a desiccant material in order to assure dryness over the solar panel. More than four experiments were conducted with the usage of water absorbent to improve the efficiency and to make system more power efficient.

  18. Air humidity requirements for human comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Fanger, Povl Ole

    1999-01-01

    level near 100% rh. For respiratory comfort are the requirements much more stringent and results in lower permissible indoor air humidities. Compared with the upper humidity limit specified in existing thermal comfort standards, e.g. ASHRAE Addendum 55a, the humidity limit based on skin humidity...

  19. A Study on Measurement of Relative Humidity of Atmosphere Based on Dark Current from DC High-Voltage Corona Discharge of a Needle-Needle Electrode%基于针-针电极直流高压电晕放电暗电流测量大气相对湿度的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚德新; 邹应全; 蒋沛

    2014-01-01

    To examine relationships between dark current from DC high-voltage corona discharge and relative humid-ity of atmosphere and make new methods available for measuring atmospheric humidity,a high-voltage DC needle-needle electrode was applied for discharging electricity. Meanwhile,theoretical relationships between dark current and humidity were deduced according to gas discharge theory. Then,an experimental model was built for measuring dark current,so as to measure the dark current discharged from the circuit outside the electrode in case of different input high voltage and humidity. Consistent with the rules of theoretical calculation,the results provided theoretical and experimental evidences for examining the measurement of atmospheric humidity based on the dark current from corona discharge. The results of experiment and calculation suggested that dark current from corona discharge de-clined with the decrease of input voltage and relative humidity. Under conditions of high relative humidity,dark cur-rent from corona discharge drastically increased with the rise of relative humidity.%为了研究直流高压电晕放电暗电流与大气相对湿度的关系,为大气湿度的测量提供新的方法。采用针-针电极结构的直流高压放电模型,通过气体放电理论推导了暗电流与湿度的理论关系;建立暗电流测量的实验模型,测量不同输入高压和不同湿度下电极外回路放电暗电流。实验结果与理论计算的规律一致,为电晕放电暗电流测量大气湿度的研究提供了理论和实验依据。实验和计算结果表明:电晕放电暗电流随着输入电压的降低和相对湿度的降低而减小;高相对湿度环境中,电晕放电暗电流随着相对湿度的升高而剧烈增大。

  20. Refractive Index of Humid Air in the Infrared: Model Fits

    CERN Document Server

    Mathar, R J

    2006-01-01

    The theory of summation of electromagnetic line transitions is used to tabulate the Taylor expansion of the refractive index of humid air over the basic independent parameters (temperature, pressure, humidity, wavelength) in five separate infrared regions from the H to the Q band at a fixed percentage of Carbon Dioxide. These are least-squares fits to raw, highly resolved spectra for a set of temperatures from 10 to 25 C, a set of pressures from 500 to 1023 hPa, and a set of relative humidities from 5 to 60%. These choices reflect the prospective application to characterize ambient air at mountain altitudes of astronomical telescopes.

  1. Impact of heat stress on conception rate of dairy cows in the moderate climate considering different temperature-humidity index thresholds, periods relative to breeding, and heat load indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüller, L K; Burfeind, O; Heuwieser, W

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this retrospective study were to investigate the relationship between temperature-humidity index (THI) and conception rate (CR) of lactating dairy cows, to estimate a threshold for this relationship, and to identify periods of exposure to heat stress relative to breeding in an area of moderate climate. In addition, we compared three different heat load indices related to CR: mean THI, maximum THI, and number of hours above the mean THI threshold. The THI threshold for the influence of heat stress on CR was 73. It was statistically chosen based on the observed relationship between the mean THI at the day of breeding and the resulting CR. Negative effects of heat stress, however, were already apparent at lower levels of THI, and 1 hour of mean THI of 73 or more decreased the CR significantly. The CR of lactating dairy cows was negatively affected by heat stress both before and after the day of breeding. The greatest negative impact of heat stress on CR was observed 21 to 1 day before breeding. When the mean THI was 73 or more in this period, CR decreased from 31% to 12%. Compared with the average maximum THI and the total number of hours above a threshold of more than or 9 hours, the mean THI was the most sensitive heat load index relating to CR. These results indicate that the CR of dairy cows raised in the moderate climates is highly affected by heat stress.

  2. Interrelations between the pollution with sulfur dioxide and the movements of stomata in Pelargonium X hortorum: effect of the relative humidity and the air content in carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonte, J.; Louguet, P.

    1975-01-01

    The 10/sup -6/ (V/V) concentration of sulphur dioxide, maintained during a sufficient time, causes necrosis on the Pelargonium X hortorum leaves, the importance of which is related to the initial degree of stomatal opening. At light, exposure to SO/sub 2/ is followed by a temporary stomatal closing in dry as in moist air. Nevertheless, damages are greatly enhanced in moist air because the rate of stomatal closing is much slower. If SO/sub 2/ is given in darkness to stomata opened in air without CO/sub 2/, the closing reaction is also observed. At light the sensitivity of the leaves to pollution is greatly increased without CO/sub 2/. The authors consider the possible ways of SO/sub 2/ action upon the mechanisms of stomatal movement and discuss the hypothesis of the protecting role of CO/sub 2/.

  3. Effect of fabric texture and material on perceived discomfort at high humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Rasmussen, Leif W.; Mackeprang, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of material (cotton/polyester) and texture (woven/knitted) of the inner layer of a clothing ensemble on human discomfort at high skin humidity. No clear effect on discomfort of material and texture could be detected. However, acceptability of skin humidity de......-crea-sed with increasing relative skin humidity. A model was developed that predicts the percentage of persons dissatisfied due to humid skin as a function of relative skin humidity. The model applies for woven and knitted cot-ton and polyester materials and for activity levels typical for office work. Even at very high...

  4. Photogated humidity-driven motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lidong; Liang, Haoran; Jacob, Jolly; Naumov, Panče

    2015-06-01

    Hygroinduced motion is a fundamental process of energy conversion that is essential for applications that require contactless actuation in response to the day-night rhythm of atmospheric humidity. Here we demonstrate that mechanical bistability caused by rapid and anisotropic adsorption and desorption of water vapour by a flexible dynamic element that harnesses the chemical potential across very small humidity gradients for perpetual motion can be effectively modulated with light. A mechanically robust material capable of rapid exchange of water with the surroundings is prepared that undergoes swift locomotion in effect to periodic shape reconfiguration with turnover frequency of <150 min-1. The element can lift objects ~85 times heavier and can transport cargos ~20 times heavier than itself. Having an azobenzene-containing conjugate as a photoactive dopant, this entirely humidity-driven self-actuation can be controlled remotely with ultraviolet light, thus setting a platform for next-generation smart biomimetic hybrids.

  5. Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. Cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air in older homes in warm-humid climates. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long-off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

  6. Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-10-01

    This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. In older homes in warm-humid climates, cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and some winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and avoids adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

  7. High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity, Polymer-type Membranes Based on Disulfonated Poly(arylene ether) Block and Random Copolymers Optionally Incorporating Protonic Conducting Layered Water insoluble Zirconium Fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, James E.; Baird, Donald G.

    2010-06-03

    hydrophobic segments. If, like in Nafion, connectivity is established between the hydrophilic domains in these multiblock copolymers, they will not need as much water, and hence will show much better protonic conductivity than the random copolymers (with similar degree of sulfonation, or IEC) at partially hydrated conditions. The goal of this research is to develop a material suitable for use as a polymer electrolyte membrane which by the year 2010 will meet all the performance requirements associated with fuel cell operation at high temperatures and low relative humidity, and will out-perform the present standard Nafion{reg_sign}. In particular, it is our objective to extend our previous research based on the use of thermally, oxidatively, and hydrolytically, ductile, high Tg ion containing polymers based on poly(arylene ethers) to the production of polymer electrolyte membranes which will meet all the performance requirements in addition to having an areal resistance of < 0.05 ohm-cm{sup 2} at a temperature of up to 120 C, relative humidity of 25 to 50%, and up to 2.5 atm total pressure. In many instances, our materials already out performs Nafion{reg_sign}, and it is expected that with some modification by either combining with conductive inorganic fillers and/or synthesizing as a block copolymer it will meet the performance criteria at high temperatures and low relative humidity. A key component in improving the performance of the membranes (and in particular proton conductivity) and meeting the cost requirements of $40/m{sup 2} is our development of a film casting process, which shows promise for generation of void free thin films of uniform thickness with controlled polymer alignment and configuration.

  8. The near-surface methane humidity on Titan

    CERN Document Server

    Lora, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    We retrieve vertical and meridional variations of methane mole fraction in Titan's lower troposphere by re-analyzing near-infrared ground-based observations from 17 July 2014 UT (Adamkovics et al., 2016). We generate synthetic spectra using atmospheric methane profiles that do not contain supersaturation or discontinuities to fit the observations, and thereby retrieve minimum saturation altitudes and corresponding specific humidities in the boundary layer. We relate these in turn to surface-level relative humidities using independent surface temperature measurements. We also compare our results with general circulation model simulations to interpret and constrain the relationship between humidities and surface liquids. The results show that Titan's lower troposphere is undersaturated at latitudes south of 60N, consistent with a dry surface there, but increases in humidity toward the north pole indicate appreciable surface liquid coverage. While our observations are consistent with considerably more liquid met...

  9. Effect of temperature and relative-humidity on the development of Liriomyza sativae Blanchard (Diptera: Agromyzidae) in Vigna unguiculata; Efeito da temperatura e umidade relativa do ar no desenvolvimento de Liriomyza sativae Blanchard (Diptera: Agromyzidae) em Vigna unguiculata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Tiago C. Costa; Geremias, Leandro D; Parra, Jose R.P. [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: tcclima@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: geremias@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: jrpparra@esalq.usp.br

    2009-07-01

    This research aimed to study the influence of temperature and relative-humidity (RH) on the development of Liriomyza sativae Blanchard during the egg-adult period, in cowpea, to provide essential information for future biological control projects against the pest. An inverse relation was observed between temperature increase in the range from 15 deg C to 32 deg C and development duration. Larval survival was not affected in the temperature range studied, while a high mortality of pupae was observed at 32 deg C (59.9%). RH did not affect the development time of the immature stages, although it influenced their survival. The lower developmental temperature threshold obtained for the egg-adult period was low (7.3 deg C) when compared with other species of Liriomyza, and was rather low for the larval stage (3.4 deg C ). Based on the thermal requirements for L. sativae, it was possible to estimate the occurrence of 24.5 annual generations at a melon producing region in state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. For laboratory rearing aimed at biological control pest programs, the best rearing conditions are 30 deg C and 50% RH for the larval stage and 90% RH for the pupal stage. (author)

  10. Influence of humidity on the aerosol scattering coefficient and its effect on the upwelling radiance during ACE-2[Special issue with manuscripts related to the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2), 16 June-25 July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasso, S. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Geophysics Program; Hegg, D.A.; Covert, D.S. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Science; Collins, D. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Noone, K.J.; Oestroem, E. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology; Schmid, B. [Bay Area Environmental Research Inst., San Francisco, CA (United States); Russell, P.B. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Moffett Field, CA (United States). Ames Research Center; Livingston, J.M. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Durkee, P.A.; Jonsson, H.H. [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2000-04-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients ({sigma}{sub sp}) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of altitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions, absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of {sigma}{sub sp} as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands of the EOS-AM ('Terra') detectors, MODIS and MISR. The UWPH measured {sigma}{sub sp} at 2 RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient {sigma}{sub sp} was obtained by interpolation of these 2 measurements. The data were stratified in terms of 3 types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., 2- or 1-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of {sigma}{sub sp} on RH, defined by {sigma}{sub sp} P(RH)= k. (1 - RH/100){sup -{gamma}}, was used with the hygroscopic exponent {gamma} derived from the data. The following {gamma} values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: {gamma}(dust) = 0.23 {+-} 0.05, {gamma}(clean marine) = 0.69 {+-} 0.06 and {gamma}(polluted marine) = 0.57 {+-} 0.06. Based on the measured {gamma}'s, the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each of those aerosol models at several ambient humidities. For the prelaunch

  11. Modelo de simulação da temperatura e umidade relativa do ar no interior de estufa plástica Simulation model of air temperature and relative humidity in to plastic greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilson Costa

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A simulação dos parâmetros climáticos de temperatura e umidade relativa do ar no interior de uma estufa plástica, por meio do balanço de energia, pode propiciar ao produtor uma ferramenta de auxílio na tomada de decisão. Nesse propósito, realizou-se uma simulação das condições no interior de estufa plástica, em função de parâmetros externos e internos a ela. A simulação revelou uma temperatura no interior da estufa plástica de 23,6 ºC, e os sensores revelaram um valor médio de 24,1 ºC para o período de cultivo da alface. Para a umidade relativa no interior da estufa plástica, o valor simulado foi de 61,6%, e o obtido com o auxílio de sensores foi de 66,0%. Os valores simulados apresentaram-se próximos dos valores obtidos pelos sensores, mostrando que o modelo pode ser usado para a estimativa da temperatura e umidade relativa do ar no interior da estufa plástica.Simulation of climatic parameters inside air temperature and relative humidity of plastic greenhouse, trough energy balance, allows to growers a good technical tool on the decision making to improve the performance of inside environments. A simulation of internal conditions based on external and internal parameters was evaluated. The results showed the inside mean temperature of 23.6 ºC in comparison with the experimental value of 24.1 ºC, for the cultivated period. The simulated relative humidity presented a value of 61.6% against 66.0% obtained by the sensors. The simulated values were closed to the values obtained by the sensors, which means that the model can be used to determine the internal conditions of plastic greenhouses.

  12. Humidity Sensors Printed on Recycled Paper and Cardboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matija Mraović

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Research, design, fabrication and results of various screen printed capacitive humidity sensors is presented in this paper. Two types of capacitive humidity sensors have been designed and fabricated via screen printing on recycled paper and cardboard, obtained from the regional paper and cardboard industry. As printing ink, commercially available silver nanoparticle-based conductive ink was used. A considerable amount of work has been devoted to the humidity measurement methods using paper as a dielectric material. Performances of different structures have been tested in a humidity chamber. Relative humidity in the chamber was varied in the range of 35%–80% relative humidity (RH at a constant temperature of 23 °C. Parameters of interest were capacitance and conductance of each sensor material, as well as long term behaviour. Process reversibility has also been considered. The results obtained show a mainly logarithmic response of the paper sensors, with the only exception being cardboard-based sensors. Recycled paper-based sensors exhibit a change in value of three orders of magnitude, whereas cardboard-based sensors have a change in value of few 10s over the entire scope of relative humidity range (RH 35%–90%. Two different types of capacitor sensors have been investigated: lateral (comb type sensors and modified, perforated flat plate type sensors. The objective of the present work was to identify the most important factors affecting the material performances with humidity, and to contribute to the development of a sensor system supported with a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID chip directly on the material, for use in smart packaging applications. Therefore, the authors built a passive and a battery-supported wireless module based on SL900A smart sensory tag’s IC to achieve UHF-RFID functionality with data logging capability.

  13. Humidity sensors printed on recycled paper and cardboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mraović, Matija; Muck, Tadeja; Pivar, Matej; Trontelj, Janez; Pleteršek, Anton

    2014-07-28

    Research, design, fabrication and results of various screen printed capacitive humidity sensors is presented in this paper. Two types of capacitive humidity sensors have been designed and fabricated via screen printing on recycled paper and cardboard, obtained from the regional paper and cardboard industry. As printing ink, commercially available silver nanoparticle-based conductive ink was used. A considerable amount of work has been devoted to the humidity measurement methods using paper as a dielectric material. Performances of different structures have been tested in a humidity chamber. Relative humidity in the chamber was varied in the range of 35%-80% relative humidity (RH) at a constant temperature of 23 °C. Parameters of interest were capacitance and conductance of each sensor material, as well as long term behaviour. Process reversibility has also been considered. The results obtained show a mainly logarithmic response of the paper sensors, with the only exception being cardboard-based sensors. Recycled paper-based sensors exhibit a change in value of three orders of magnitude, whereas cardboard-based sensors have a change in value of few 10s over the entire scope of relative humidity range (RH 35%-90%). Two different types of capacitor sensors have been investigated: lateral (comb) type sensors and modified, perforated flat plate type sensors. The objective of the present work was to identify the most important factors affecting the material performances with humidity, and to contribute to the development of a sensor system supported with a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chip directly on the material, for use in smart packaging applications. Therefore, the authors built a passive and a battery-supported wireless module based on SL900A smart sensory tag's IC to achieve UHF-RFID functionality with data logging capability.

  14. Integrating transient heterogeneity of non-photochemical quenching in shade-grown heterobaric leaves of avocado (Persea americana L.): responses to CO2 concentration, stomatal occlusion, dehydration and relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kotaro; King, Diana; Robinson, Sharon A; Osmond, Barry

    2013-11-01

    Long-lived shade leaves of avocado had extremely low rates of photosynthesis. Gas exchange measurements of photosynthesis were of limited use, so we resorted to Chl fluorescence imaging (CFI) and spot measurements to evaluate photosynthetic electron transport rates (ETRs) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Imaging revealed a remarkable transient heterogeneity of NPQ during photosynthetic induction in these hypostomatous, heterobaric leaves, but was adequately integrated by spot measurements, despite long-lasting artifacts from repeated saturating flashes during assays. Major veins (mid-vein, first- and second-order veins) defined areas of more static large-scale heterogeneous NPQ, with more dynamic small-scale heterogeneity most strongly expressed in mesophyll cells between third- and fourth-order veins. Both responded to external CO2 concentration ([CO2]), occlusion of stomata with Vaseline™, leaf dehydration and relative humidity (RH). We interpreted these responses in terms of independent behavior of stomata in adjacent areoles that was largely expressed through CO2-limited photosynthesis. Heterogeneity was most pronounced and prolonged in the absence of net CO2 fixation in 100 p.p.m. [CO2] when respiratory and photorespiratory CO2 cycling constrained the inferred ETR to ~75% of values in 400 or 700 p.p.m. [CO2]. Likewise, sustained higher NPQ under Vaseline™, after dehydration or at low RH, also restricted ETR to ~75% of control values. Low NPQ in chloroplast-containing cells adjacent to major veins but remote from stomata suggested internal sources of high [CO2] in these tissues.

  15. Evaluation of a consolidation treatment in dolostones by mean of calcium hydroxide nanoparticles in high relative humidity conditions; Evaluacion del tratamiento de consolidacion de dolomias mediante nanoparticulas de hidroxido de calcio en condiciones de alta humedad relativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Villalba, L. s.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Zornoza, A.; Alvares de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2011-07-01

    In this article, the results of a treatment applied to dolomitic stones using an isopropyl colloidal solution based on calcium hydroxide nanoparticles with a concentration of 2.0g/l are presented. The consolidation process in the stone has been checked before and after 28 days of exposure to 75% relative humidity. Morphologic and structural studies of the consolidating product confirmed the carbonation process. X ray diffraction, electron microscopy (TEM and ESEM), and electron diffraction carried out on the consolidating product have confirmed the transformation of portlandite phase to calcium carbonate polymorph, calcite, aragonite and vaterite. Petrophysical tests performed on the stone before and after the application of the product have shown the improvement in the physical and hydrical properties due to the increase in the ultrasound velocity and density of the material, and a decrease in the capillarity coefficient and open porosity without significant changes in colour and brightness. The application of the consolidating product in the proposed experimental conditions is a natural method, compatible with the petrological characteristics of the substrate, without secondary damages on the stone, being an effective method to improve the durability of carbonate stones. (Author) 26 refs.

  16. Experimental investigation of air relative humidity (RH) cycling tests on MEA/cell aging in PEMFC. Pt. II. Study of low RH cycling test with air RH at 62%/0%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.T.; Chatillon, Y.; Bonnet, C.; Lapicque, F. [Laboratoire Reactions et Genie des Procedes, CNRS-Nancy University, Nancy (France); Leclerc, S. [Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee, CNRS-Nancy University, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Hinaje, M.; Rael, S. [Groupe de Recherche en Electrotechnique et Electronique de Nancy, Nancy University, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2012-06-15

    The effect of low relative humidity (RH) cycling (RH{sub C} 62%/0%) on the degradation mechanisms of a single proton exchange membrane fuel cell (5 x 5 cm{sup 2}) was investigated and compared to a cell operated at constant humidification (RH{sub C} = 62%). The overall cell performance loss was near 33 {mu}V h{sup -1}, which is greater than the voltage decay under constant RH condition near 3 {mu}V h{sup -1}. The electroactive surface was reduced but to an acceptable level. Impedance spectroscopy revealed that the ohmic and charge transfer resistances were reduced by the likely improved hydration of the ionomeric layer at the catalyst due to hydrogen crossover. This was so important that H{sub 2} starvation was finally responsible for the collapse of the cell after 650 h. Transmission electron microscopy showed occurrence of various phenomena, e.g., bubbles and pinholes formation in the membrane due to local overheat from hydrogen combustion at the cathode, and thickness reduction of catalytic layers. The water up take obtained by {sup 1}H NMR within the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) after low RH cycling reduced by 24% compared to a fresh MEA. Observations are also compared to those obtained at high RH cycling (RH{sub C} 62%/100%) presented in Part I of this study [1]. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. The influence of humidity fluxes on offshore wind speed profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Sempreviva, Anna Maria; Pryor, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Wind energy developments offshore focus on larger turbines to keep the relative cost of the foundation per MW of installed capacity low. Hence typical wind turbine hub-heights are extending to 100 m and potentially beyond. However, measurements to these heights are not usually available, requiring...... extrapolation from lower measurements. With humid conditions and low mechanical turbulence offshore, deviations from the traditional logarithmic wind speed profile become significant and stability corrections are required. This research focuses on quantifying the effect of humidity fluxes on stability corrected...... wind speed profiles. The effect on wind speed profiles is found to be important in stable conditions where including humidity fluxes forces conditions towards neutral. Our results show that excluding humidity fluxes leads to average predicted wind speeds at 150 m from 10 m which are up to 4% higher...

  18. Impact of individually controlled facially applied air movement on perceived air quality at high humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skwarczynski, M.A. [Faculty of Environmental Engineering, Institute of Environmental Protection Engineering, Department of Indoor Environment Engineering, Lublin University of Technology, Lublin (Poland); International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Copenhagen (Denmark); Melikov, A.K.; Lyubenova, V. [International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Copenhagen (Denmark); Kaczmarczyk, J. [Faculty of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Department of Heating, Ventilation and Dust Removal Technology, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice (Poland)

    2010-10-15

    The effect of facially applied air movement on perceived air quality (PAQ) at high humidity was studied. Thirty subjects (21 males and 9 females) participated in three, 3-h experiments performed in a climate chamber. The experimental conditions covered three combinations of relative humidity and local air velocity under a constant air temperature of 26 C, namely: 70% relative humidity without air movement, 30% relative humidity without air movement and 70% relative humidity with air movement under isothermal conditions. Personalized ventilation was used to supply room air from the front toward the upper part of the body (upper chest, head). The subjects could control the flow rate (velocity) of the supplied air in the vicinity of their bodies. The results indicate an airflow with elevated velocity applied to the face significantly improves the acceptability of the air quality at the room air temperature of 26 C and relative humidity of 70%. (author)

  19. Assessment of lettuce quality during storage at low relative humidity using Global Stability Index methodology Avaliação da qualidade da alface durante o armazenamento em baixa umidade relativa usando o Índice Global da Estabilidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Roberta Ansorena

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available During postharvest, lettuce is usually exposed to adverse conditions (e.g. low relative humidity that reduce the vegetable quality. In order to evaluate its shelf life, a great number of quality attributes must be analyzed, which requires careful experimental design, and it is time consuming. In this study, the modified Global Stability Index method was applied to estimate the quality of butter lettuce at low relative humidity during storage discriminating three lettuce zones (internal, middle, and external. The results indicated that the most relevant attributes were: the external zone - relative water content, water content , ascorbic acid, and total mesophilic counts; middle zone - relative water content, water content, total chlorophyll, and ascorbic acid; internal zone - relative water content, bound water, water content, and total mesophilic counts. A mathematical model that takes into account the Global Stability Index and overall visual quality for each lettuce zone was proposed. Moreover, the Weibull distribution was applied to estimate the maximum vegetable storage time which was 5, 4, and 3 days for the internal, middle, and external zone, respectively. When analyzing the effect of storage time for each lettuce zone, all the indices evaluated in the external zone of lettuce presented significant differences (p Durante a pós-colheita a alface é exposta a condições adversas (baixa umidade relativa que reduzem a qualidade do vegetal. A fim de avaliar sua vida útil, um grande número de índices de qualidade tem que ser analisado, requerendo um cuidadoso delineamento experimental e um longo consumo de tempo. Neste trabalho, o método modificado do Índice Global da Estabilidade foi aplicado para estimar a qualidade da alface manteiga a uma baixa umidade relativa durante o armazenamento diferenciando três zonas (interna, média e externa. Os resultados indicaram que, para a zona externa, os índices mais relevantes foram o conte

  20. Uncertainty Analysis in Humidity Measurements by the Psychrometer Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiunyuan; Chen, Chiachung

    2017-01-01

    The most common and cheap indirect technique to measure relative humidity is by using psychrometer based on a dry and a wet temperature sensor. In this study, the measurement uncertainty of relative humidity was evaluated by this indirect method with some empirical equations for calculating relative humidity. Among the six equations tested, the Penman equation had the best predictive ability for the dry bulb temperature range of 15–50 °C. At a fixed dry bulb temperature, an increase in the wet bulb depression increased the error. A new equation for the psychrometer constant was established by regression analysis. This equation can be computed by using a calculator. The average predictive error of relative humidity was <0.1% by this new equation. The measurement uncertainty of the relative humidity affected by the accuracy of dry and wet bulb temperature and the numeric values of measurement uncertainty were evaluated for various conditions. The uncertainty of wet bulb temperature was the main factor on the RH measurement uncertainty. PMID:28216599

  1. A Humidity Sensing Organic-Inorganic Composite for Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khasan S. Karimov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the effect of varying humidity levels on the electrical parameters and the multi frequency response of the electrical parameters of an organic-inorganic composite (PEPC+NiPc+Cu2O-based humidity sensor. Silver thin films (thickness ~200 nm were primarily deposited on plasma cleaned glass substrates by the physical vapor deposition (PVD technique. A pair of rectangular silver electrodes was formed by patterning silver film through standard optical lithography technique. An active layer of organic-inorganic composite for humidity sensing was later spun coated to cover the separation between the silver electrodes. The electrical characterization of the sensor was performed as a function of relative humidity levels and frequency of the AC input signal. The sensor showed reversible changes in its capacitance with variations in humidity level. The maximum sensitivity ~31.6 pF/%RH at 100 Hz in capacitive mode of operation has been attained. The aim of this study was to increase the sensitivity of the previously reported humidity sensors using PEPC and NiPc, which has been successfully achieved.

  2. Dynamics of Environmental Humidity and Water Content in Tobacco Leaf and Metabolism of Starch During Curing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Chang-rong; YUAN Hong-tao; CHEN Jiang-hua; WANG Na

    2003-01-01

    Effect of environmental humidity and water content in tobacco leaf on starch metabolism was studied by using the electric-heated auto-controlled flue-curing barn supplied by Henan Agricultural University, China. The results indicated that the degradation of starch and decrease of water content in tobacco leaf during early yellowing at low humidity was the most rapid, and the water loss was the highest while the lowest under high humidity. The duration for starch degradation under low humidity was longer than that of CK. So the starch residue in cured leaf of different treatment took the order of high humidity yellowing treatment>low humidity yellowing treatment> CK. When the leaf water content was decreased to around 50%, the starch degradation became slow and the content of starch was stable. Starch degradation and decrease of leaf water content was not synchronous. Starch in tobacco leaf during yellowing degraded more rapidly when humidity was decreased at a high speed, but the degradation stopped earlier at late stage. There was a quicker and higher degradation of starch under high environmental humidity. When the humidity decreased to 70 %,the content of starch was stable. The activity of amylase began to decrease when relative humidity was below 75 %, but it kept a high level of activity when the environmental humidity was below 70 %.

  3. Density of loose-fill insulation material exposed to cyclic humidity conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    the granulated loose-fill material is exposed to a climate that is characterised as cyclic humidity conditions (a constant temperature and a relative humidity alternating between two predetermined constant relative humidity levels). A better understanding of the behaviour of granulated loose-fill material...... is provided and a standardised method is proposed. This enables control of the settling and prediction of densities necessary to prevent settling. The Nordtest, Organisation for Testing in Scandinavia funded the Nordtest Projekt 1623-03....

  4. Curved Surface Fitting Analysis of Sensory Indexes of Cigarette Affected by Temperature and Relative Humidity%温度和相对湿度对卷烟感官指标影响的曲面拟合分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国荣; 许健; 倪朝敏; 李忠任

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the influences of temperature and relative humidity (RH) on the sensory indexes of cigarette, samples of a cigarette brand were evaluated in 16 cities, and their sensory indexes were analyzed by multilevel bicubic spline interpolation. The results showed that: 1) In the temperature range of 4-10 ℃, flavor note, aroma quality, aroma quantity, harmony, strength, irritancy, cleanness and offensive odor scored lower. 2) In the temperature range of 10-20 ℃, flavor note, aroma quality, aroma quantity, strength, offensive odor, cleanness and irritancy scored higher at RH 30%-40%; harmony scored higher at RH 30%-70%. 3) At 20-30 ℃and RH 30%-70%, harmony scored higher. 4) At 30-35 ℃ and RH 50%-70%, flavor note, aroma quality, harmony, strength and irritancy scored higher. 5) Taking into account the influences of temperature and relative humidity on the smoking sensation of cigarette and placing right products on major markets could ensure the better sensory quality of cigarette in the markets.%为研究不同温度和相对湿度对卷烟感官指标的影响,采用多层次双三次样条插值的分析方法,在16个不同城市分别对某品牌卷烟的感官质量(11个评吸指标)进行评价。结果表明:①温度4~10℃,香气韵调、香气质、香气量、谐调性、劲头、刺激性、干净度、杂气等指标分值低;②温度10~20℃,相对湿度30%~40%时,香气韵调、香气质、劲头、杂气、干净度、刺激性、香气量等指标分值高;相对湿度30%~70%时,谐调性指标分值高;③温度20~30℃,相对湿度30%~70%时,谐调性指标分值高;④温度30~35℃,相对湿度50%~70%时,香气韵调、香气质、谐调性、劲头、刺激性等指标分值高。⑤根据温度和相对湿度对卷烟感官指标的影响关系,对国内卷烟产品销售的重点区域进行调整,可确保卷烟产品在投放市场区域有较好的品质表现。

  5. MIPAS reduced spectral resolution UTLS-1 mode measurements of temperature, O3, HNO3, N2O, H2O and relative humidity over ice: retrievals and comparison to MLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schwartz

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available During several periods since 2005 the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS on Envisat has performed observations dedicated to the region of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS. For the duration of November/December 2005 global distributions of temperature and several trace gases from MIPAS UTLS-1 mode measurements have been retrieved using the IMK/IAA (Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung/Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía scientific processor. In the UTLS region a vertical resolution of 2.5 to 3 km has been achieved. The retrieved temperature, H2O, O3, HNO3, N2O, and relative humidity over ice are intercompared with the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS/Aura v2.2 data. In general, MIPAS and MLS temperatures agree within ±4 K over the whole pressure range of 316–0.68 hPa. Systematic, latitude-independent differences of −2 to −4 K (MIPAS-MLS at 121 hPa are explained by previously observed biases in the MLS v2.2 temperature retrievals. Temperature differences of −4 K up to 12 K above 10.0 hPa are present similarly in MIPAS and MLS with respect to ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts and are likely due to deficiencies of the ECMWF analysis data. MIPAS and MLS stratospheric volume mixing ratios (vmr of H2O agree within ±1 ppmv, with indication of oscillations between 146 and 26 hPa in the MLS dataset. Tropical upper tropospheric values of relative humidity over ice measured by the two instruments differ by ±20% in the pressure range ~146 to 68 hPa. These differences are mainly caused by the MLS temperature biases. Ozone mixing ratios agree within 0.5 ppmv (10 to 20% between 68 and 14 hPa. At pressures smaller than 10 hPa, MIPAS O3 vmr are higher than MLS by an average of 0.5 ppmv (10%. General agreement between MIPAS and MLS HNO3 is within the range of −1.0 (−10% to 1.0 ppbv (20%. MIPAS HNO3 is 1.0 ppbv (10% higher compared to MLS in the height range of 46 to 10 h

  6. Retrofit device and method to improve humidity control of vapor compression cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Robert Paul; Hahn, David C.; Scaringe, Robert P.

    2016-08-16

    A method and device for improving moisture removal capacity of a vapor compression system is disclosed. The vapor compression system is started up with the evaporator blower initially set to a high speed. A relative humidity in a return air stream is measured with the evaporator blower operating at the high speed. If the measured humidity is above the predetermined high relative humidity value, the evaporator blower speed is reduced from the initially set high speed to the lowest possible speed. The device is a control board connected with the blower and uses a predetermined change in measured relative humidity to control the blower motor speed.

  7. Experimental investigation of air relative humidity (RH) cycling tests on MEA/cell aging in PEMFC. Pt. I. Study of high RH cycling test with air RH at 62%/100%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.T.; Chatillon, Y.; Bonnet, C.; Lapicque, F. [Laboratoire Reactions et Genie des Procedes, CNRS-Nancy University, Nancy (France); Leclerc, S. [Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee, CNRS-Nancy University, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Hinaje, M.; Rael, S. [Groupe de Recherche en Electrotechnique et Electronique de Nancy, CNRS-Nancy University, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2012-06-15

    The effect of high air relative humidity (RH) cycling (RH{sub C} 62%/100%) on the degradation mechanisms of a single (5 x 5 cm{sup 2}) proton exchange membrane fuel cells was investigated. The cell performance was compared to a cell operated at constant humidification (RH{sub C} = 62%). Runs were conducted over approximately 1,500 h at 0.3 A cm{sup -2}. The overall loss in cell performance for the high RH cycling test was 12 {mu}V h{sup -1} whereas it was at 3 {mu}V h{sup -1} under constant humidification. Impedance spectroscopy reveals that the ohmic and charge transfer resistances were little modified in both runs. H{sub 2} crossover measurement indicated that both high RH cycling and constant RH test did not promote serious effect on gas permeability. The electroactive surface loss for anode and cathode during high air RH cycling was more significant than at constant RH operation. The water uptake determined by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance within the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) after high RH cycling was reduced by 12% in comparison with a fresh MEA. Transmission electron microscopy showed bubbles and pinholes formation in the membrane, catalyst particles agglomeration (also observed by X-ray diffraction), catalyst particles migration in the membrane and thickness reduction of the catalytic layers. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted to observe the changes in morphology of gas diffusion layers after the runs. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Dry heat microbial reduction at various humidity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberer, Klaus; Schuehlein, Karl-Heinz

    In accordance with interplanetary protection requirements space-craft intended to land on other planets must be of high microbiological purity. High temperatures and long exposure times are needed, to sufficiently treat space craft materials with dry heat. Humidity has been reported to have a major influence on dry heat inactivation of microorganisms. Data obtained in the 1970es show, that dry heat sterilization lethality in the temperature range 104C to 125C increased significantly if environmental humidity during treatment was lowered. However, lethality of the process might no longer be affected by humidity at temperatures under 125C. In order to expand the available body of data, an equipment for simultaneous exposure of multiple inoculated coupons under controlled ambient temperature conditions has been designed. The thermal exposure concept is based on constant heat radiation from an insulated heating block. Exposure chambers are continuously flushed by a pre-heated stream of air of controlled absolute humidity. The systems allows for rapid heating of steel carriers loaded with a defined number of bacterial spores. Relative sterilization effectiveness under changing exposure conditions including heat-up and cool down phases was determined, based on temperature profiles. Parallel exposure of 20 replicate carriers allowed for statistical analysis of the kill time by evaluation of the number of samples showing growth / no growth (fraction negative analysis). Experiments performed at temperatures between 120C and 200C at 5 absolute humidity conditions between 0.1 and 10 g/m of air showed no clear influence of absolute humidity. Pre-equilibration of the spores at relative humidity levels of 15, 48, and 85 percent showed higher sensitivity of the spores pre-incubated under dry conditions.

  9. Influence of Air Humidity and Water Particles on Dust Control Using Ultrasonic Atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Hirokazu; Nishi, Kentaro; Shindo, Dai; Kawamura, Youhei

    2012-07-01

    The influence of air humidity and water particles on dust control was examined using ultrasonic atomization at 2.4 MHz, an acrylic box (61 L), and four types of ore dust samples: green tuff (4 µm), green tuff (6 µm), kaolin, and silica. It was clearly demonstrated that ultrasonic atomization was effective in raising humidity rapidly. However, at high relative air humidity, the water particles remained stable in the box without changing to water vapor. Ultrasonic atomization was applied to suppress dust dispersion and 40-95% dust reduction was achieved at 83% relative air humidity. Dust dispersion was more effective with ultrasonic atomization than without.

  10. Development of La3+ Doped CeO2 Thick Film Humidity Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjie Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The humidity sensitive characteristics of the sensor fabricated from 10 mol% La2O3 doped CeO2 nanopowders with particle size 17.26 nm synthesized via hydrothermal method were investigated at different frequencies. It was found that the sensor shows high humidity sensitivity, rapid response-recovery characteristics, and narrow hysteresis loop at 100 Hz in the relative humidity range from 11% to 95%. The impedance of the sensor decreases by about five orders of magnitude as relative humidity increases. The maximum humidity hysteresis is about 6% RH, and the response and recovery time is 12 and 13 s, respectively. These results indicate that the nanosized La2O3 doped CeO2 powder has potential application as high-performance humidity sensor.

  11. Fabrication of Porous Silicon Based Humidity Sensing Elements on Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero Jalkanen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A roll-to-roll compatible fabrication process of porous silicon (pSi based sensing elements for a real-time humidity monitoring is described. The sensing elements, consisting of printed interdigitated silver electrodes and a spray-coated pSi layer, were fabricated on a coated paper substrate by a two-step process. Capacitive and resistive responses of the sensing elements were examined under different concentrations of humidity. More than a three orders of magnitude reproducible decrease in resistance was measured when the relative humidity (RH was increased from 0% to 90%. A relatively fast recovery without the need of any refreshing methods was observed with a change in RH. Humidity background signal and hysteresis arising from the paper substrate were dependent on the thickness of sensing pSi layer. Hysteresis in most optimal sensing element setup (a thick pSi layer was still noticeable but not detrimental for the sensing. In addition to electrical characterization of sensing elements, thermal degradation and moisture adsorption properties of the paper substrate were examined in connection to the fabrication process of the silver electrodes and the moisture sensitivity of the paper. The results pave the way towards the development of low-cost humidity sensors which could be utilized, for example, in smart packaging applications or in smart cities to monitor the environment.

  12. Hologram-based humidity indicator for domestic and packaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naydenova, I.; Jallapuram, R.; Toal, V.; Martin, S.

    2007-04-01

    A passive indicator for Relative Humidity based on a photopolymer recorded hologram has been developed. The indicator works on the principle that the wavelength reconstructed by a reflection hologram is dependent on the spacing between the fringe planes of the hologram. As the Relative Humidity changes, the hologram swells or shrinks and the apparent colour of the reconstructed image changes. The response time, operational range and reversibility of the indicator have been studied in a controlled humidity environment. Response times from less than a minute to tens of minutes depending on the holograms physical properties have been measured. Indicators with different operational ranges have been designed. For some indicators the operational range extends from 10% RH to 80% RH. The indicator is completely reversible in its present formulation. It could have an extensive market in industrial monitoring, food packaging and household applications.

  13. Thermal Conductivity of Humid Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirão, S. G. S.; Ribeiro, A. P. C.; Lourenço, M. J. V.; Santos, F. J. V.; Nieto de Castro, C. A.

    2012-09-01

    In this article, measurements of the thermal conductivity of humid air as a function of pressure, temperature, and mole fraction of water, for pressures up to 5 MPa and temperatures up to 430 K, for different water contents (up to 10 % vapor mole fraction) are reported. Measurements were performed using a transient hot-wire apparatus capable of obtaining data with an uncertainty of 0.8 % for gases. However, as moist air becomes corrosive above 373 K and at pressures >5 MPa, the apparatus, namely, the pressure vessel and the cells had to be modified, by coating all stainless-steel parts with a titanium nitride thin film coating, about 4 μm thick, obtained by physical vapor deposition. The expanded uncertainty (coverage factor k = 2) of the present experimental thermal conductivity data is 1.7 %, while the uncertainty in the mole fraction is estimated to be better than 0.0006. Experimental details regarding the preparation of the samples, the precautions taken to avoid condensation in the tubes connected to the measuring cell, and the method developed for obtaining reliable values of the water content for the gas mixtures are discussed. A preliminary analysis of the application of the kinetic theory of transport properties in reacting mixtures to interpret the complex dependence of the thermal conductivity of humid air on water composition is addressed.

  14. Variation of elastic moduli of clays with humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuila, U.; Prasad, M.

    2012-12-01

    The elastic moduli of clays are highly variable. The reported values of elastic moduli of clays in the literature provide a large range: ranging from 0.15 GPa to 400 GPa. One of the many probable reasons for this variation is different external experimental environments leading to varied amounts of cations and bound water in the interlayers. The clay structure is affected by the kind of water associated with it: free water and bound water, the water in the interlayer. Smectite and mixed-layered illite-smectite (I-S) are capable of retaining significant electrostatic bound water in excess of 200C and can rapidly adsorb moisture from the air depending upon the humidity conditions. These can lead to the variation in their elastic properties. Prior experimental studies of acoustic velocity measurement in compacted clay pellets showed comparable trends (Figure 1) but different velocities for same reported porosity. This can be attributed to the humidity difference in the lab ambient conditions where the measurements were made. Molecular simulation studies on montmorillonite clays shows similar dependence of Young's Modulus on the hydration state of the clays (Pal Bathija 2009). In this paper, we studied the effect of humidity on the elastic properties of compacted pellets of Na-montmorillonite. This can be achieved by placing the Na-montmorillonite pellets in bell jars containing different saturated salt solutions. These salt solutions are used as a standard for relative humidity measurements. Figure 2 shows an experimental set-up used to the experiment. We will present the results of the variation of elastic properties of clays with varying humidity conditions. Preliminary results suggest that acoustic velocities through the compacted Na-montmorillonite pellet depend on the humidity conditions. The varying amount of interlayer clay-bound water and capillary condensation of water in small micropores in clays with varying humidity conditions resulted in the change in the

  15. Humidity Dependence of Adhesion for Silane Coated Microcantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; MAYER,THOMAS M.; CARPICK,ROBERT W.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

    1999-11-09

    This study examines adhesion between silane-coated micromachined surfaces that are exposed to humid conditions. Our quantitative values for interfacial adhesion energies are determined from an in-situ optical measurement of deformations in partly-adhered cantilever beams. We coated micromachined cantilevers with either ODTS (C{sub 18}H{sub 37}SiCl{sub 3}) or FDTS (C{sub 8}F{sub 17}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}SiCl{sub 3}) with the objective of creating hydrophobic surfaces whose adhesion would be independent of humidity. In both cases, the adhesion energy is significantly lower than for uncoated, hydrophilic surfaces. For relative humidities (RH) less than 95% (ODTS) and 80% (FDTS) the adhesion energy was extremely low and constant. In fact, ODTS-coated beams exposed to saturated humidity conditions and long (48 hour) exposures showed only a factor of two increase in adhesion energy. Surprisingly, FDTS coated beams, which initially have a higher contact angle (115{degree}) with water than do ODTS coated beams (112{degree}), proved to be much more sensitive to humidity. The FDTS coated surfaces showed a factor of one hundred increase in adhesion energy after a seven hour exposure to 90% RH. Atomic force microscopy revealed agglomerated coating material after exposed to high RH, suggesting a redistribution of the monolayer film. This agglomeration was more prominent for FDTS than ODTS. These findings suggest a new mechanism for uptake of moisture under high humidity conditions. At high humidities, the silane coatings can reconfigure from a surface to a bulk phase leaving behind locally hydrophilic sites which increase the average measured adhesion energy. In order for the adhesion increase to be observed, a significant fraction of the monolayer must be converted from the surface to the bulk phase.

  16. A New Humidity-Sensitive Material Based on PPBT Prepared with Palladium Complex Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Soluble Poly(propargyl benzoate) (PPBT) with p -conjugated structure was synthesized using a novel bis(triphenylphosphine)-bisacetylide palladium complex catalyst [Pd(PPh3)2(Co CCH2OOCPh)2] (PPB). An interdigital gold electrode was covered by screen printing films of doped PPBT (DPPBT) to prepare a resistance-type humidity sensor, which exhibits electrical response towards relative humidity (RH%) variations in the range 11%-96%. PPBT shows promise as a new humidity-sensitive material.

  17. Relative humidity-­dependent viscosity of secondary organic material from toluene  photo-­oxidation and possible implications for organic particulate matter over megacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mijung; Liu, Pengfei; Hanna, Sarah; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Potter, K.; You, Yuan; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2016-07-19

    To improve predictions of air quality, visibility, and climate change, knowledge of the viscosities and diffusion rates within organic particulate matter consisting of secondary organic material (SOM) is required. Most qualitative and quantitative measurements of viscosity and diffusion rates within organic particulate matter have focused on SOM particles generated from biogenic VOCs such as α-pinene and isoprene. In this study, we quantify the relative humidity (RH)-dependent viscosities at 295 ± 1 K of SOM produced by photo-oxidation of toluene, an anthropogenic VOC. The viscosities of toluene-derived SOM were 2 × 10-1 to ~ 6 × 10 Pa·s from 30 to 90% RH, and greater than ~2 × 108 Pa·s (similar to or greater than the viscosity of tar pitch) for RH ≤ 17%. These viscosities correspond to Stokes-Einstein-equivalent diffusion   coefficients for large organic molecules of ~2 × 10-15 cm2·s-1 for 30% RH, and lower than ~3 × 10-17 cm2·s-1 for RH ≤ 17%. Based on these estimated diffusion coefficients, the mixing time of large organic molecules within 200 nm toluene-derived SOM particles is 0.1 - 5 hr for 30% RH, and higher than ~100 hr for RH ≤ 17%. These results were used, as a first-order approximation, to estimate if organic particulate matter will be in equilibrium with large organic molecules over the world’s top 15 most populous megacities. If the organic particulate matter in the megacities is similar to the toluene-derived SOM in this study, in Kolkata, Istanbul, Dhaka, Tokyo, Shanghai, and Mumbai, mixing times in organic particulate matter during extended periods of the year will be very short, and equilibrium can be assumed. On the other hand, the mixing times of large organic molecules in organic particulate matter in Delhi, Beijing, Mexico City, Cairo, and Karachi may be long and the particles may be out of equilibrium in the afternoon (3:00 – 15  5:00 local time) during certain times of the year.

  18. Effects of humidity on sterilization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores with plasma-excited neutral gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the effects of relative humidity on the sterilization process using a plasma-excited neutral gas that uniformly sterilizes both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Only reactive neutral species such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals were separated from the plasma and sent to the reactor chamber for chemical sterilization. The plasma source gas is nitrogen mixed with 0.1% oxygen, and the relative humidity in the source gas is controlled by changing the mixing ratio of water vapor. The relative humidity near the sample in the reactor chamber is controlled by changing the sample temperature. As a result, the relative humidity near the sample should be kept in the range from 60 to 90% for the sterilization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores. When the relative humidity in the source gas increases from 30 to 90%, the sterilization effect is enhanced by the same degree.

  19. Humidity sensor base on the ZnO nanorods and fiber modal interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Huan; Cao, Zhigang; Zhang, Xinyu; Yin, Chenchen; Li, Kang; Zhang, Guosheng; Yu, Benli

    2016-10-01

    A novel fiber relative humidity (RH) sensor is demonstrated in this paper. The sensor is composed of a fiber Michelson modal interferometer (MMI) and the ZnO nanorods which grown on the fiber to improve the sensitivity of the sensor. Two standard single mode fibers are spliced to form the MMI, misaligned splicing program is used at the spliced point. Relative humidity sensing experiment shows that the intensity of interference spectrum changes linearly with relative humidity. With the relative humidity increasing in the range from 30% to 85%, the intensity of the dip in the interference spectrum linearly increases higher than 50%. The relative humidity response of the sensor is induced by the interference between core mode and cladding mode. The ZnO nanorods with high surface to volume ratio grown outside of the fiber cladding enhance the sensitivity of the sensor.

  20. Humidity data for 9975 shipping packages with cane fiberboard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The 9975 surveillance program is developing a technical basis to support extending the storage period of 9975 packages in K-Area Complex beyond the currently approved 15 years. A key element of this effort is developing a better understanding of degradation of the fiberboard assembly under storage conditions. This degradation is influenced greatly by the moisture content of the fiberboard, which is not well characterized on an individual package basis. Direct measurements of humidity and fiberboard moisture content have been made on two test packages with cane fiberboard and varying internal heat levels from 0 up to 19W. With an internal heat load, a temperature gradient in the fiberboard assembly leads to varying relative humidity in the air around the fiberboard. However, the absolute humidity tends to remain approximately constant throughout the package. The moisture content of fiberboard varies under the influence of several phenomena. Changes in local fiberboard temperature (from an internal heat load) can cause fiberboard moisture changes through absorption or evaporation. Fiberboard degradation at elevated temperature will produce water as a byproduct. And the moisture level within the package is constantly seeking equilibrium with that of the surrounding room air, which varies on a daily and seasonal basis. One indicator of the moisture condition within a 9975 package might be obtained by measuring the relative humidity in the upper air space, by inserting a humidity probe through a caplug hole. However, the data indicate that for the higher internal heat loads (15 and 19 watts), a large variation in internal moisture conditions produces little or no variation in the air space relative humidity. Therefore, this approach does not appear to be sensitive to fiberboard moisture variations at the higher heat loads which are of most interest to maintaining fiberboard integrity.

  1. Effect of humid air exposure on photoemissive and structural properties of KBr thin film photocathode

    CERN Document Server

    Rai, R; Ghosh, N; Singh, B K

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of water molecule absorption on photoemissive and structural properties of potassium bromide (KBr) thin film photocathode under humid air exposure at relative humidity (RH) 65%. It is evident from photoemission measurement that the photoelectron yield of KBr photocathode is degraded exponentially with humid air exposed time. Structural studies of the "as-deposited" and "humid air aged" films reveal that there is no effect of RH on film's crystalline face centered cubic (fcc) structure. However, the average crystallite size of "humid air exposed film" KBr film has been increased as compared to "as-deposited". In addition, topographical properties of KBr film are also examined by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) and it is observed that granular characteristic of film has been altered, even for short exposure to humid air.

  2. Scaling behaviour in daily air humidity fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Vattay, G; Vattay, Gabor; Harnos, Andrea

    1994-01-01

    We show that the daily average air humidity fluctuations exhibit non-trivial $1/f^{\\alpha}$ behaviour which different from the spectral properties of other meteorological quantities. This feature and the fractal spatial strucure found in clouds make it plausible to regard air humidity fluctuations as a manifestation of self-organized criticality. We give arguments why the dynamics in air humidity can be similar to those in sandpile models of SOC.

  3. Encapsulation for smart textile electronics - humidity and temperature sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Andreas; Tran, Thanh-Nam; Aasmundtveit, Knut E; Seeberg, Trine M

    2015-01-01

    A combined humidity and temperature sensor was packaged by vacuum casting onto three different types of textiles; cotton, nylon and a waterproof fabric. This was done in order to integrate the sensor in a jacket in a soft and reliable way without changing the sensor performance. A membrane was custom made and integrated into the device to protect the sensor from the environment. The packaged sensors performance was characterized in a climate chamber were the relative humidity and temperature ranged from 25 % to 95 % and -10 °C to 75 °C respectively. The packaged sensors showed insignificant to limited performance degradation.

  4. Temperature, Humidity, Wind and Pressure Sensors (THWAPS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-01-17

    The temperature, humidity, wind, and pressure system (THWAPS) provide surface reference values of these measurements for balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) launches. The THWAPS is located adjacent to the SONDE launch site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility. The THWAPS system is a combination of calibration-quality instruments intended to provide accurate measurements of meteorological conditions near the surface. Although the primary use of the system is to provide accurate surface reference values of temperature, pressure, relative humidity (RH), and wind velocity for comparison with radiosonde readings, the system includes a data logger to record time series of the measured variables.

  5. The Humidity Sensor Using the Polyacrylic Emulsion Containing Magnesium Chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Han Yu; Jung-Chuan Chou; Tai-Ping Sun; Shen-Kan Hsiung

    2006-01-01

    An impedance type humidity sensor based on the polyacrylic emulsion containing magnesium chloride (MgCl2)without chemical modification was investigated. The impedances of the sensor were measured from various relative humidity in the frequency range between 0.1kHz and 100 kHz. The sensor has a good sensitivity from 60%RH to 90%RH. According to the experimental results, the response time is about 240 seconds in the adsorption process and 310 seconds in the desorption process.

  6. Miniature environmental chambers for temperature humidity bias testing of microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Michael David; Mayer, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Environmental chambers are commonly used for reliability testing of microelectronics and other products and materials. These chambers are large, expensive, and limit electrical connectivity to devices under test. In this paper, we present a collection of ten small, low-cost environmental chambers, with humidity control based on mixtures of water and glycerol placed inside the chambers. We demonstrate relative humidities from 44% to 90%, at temperatures from 30 to 85 °C, enabling industry-standard testing at 85% humidity and 85 °C. The division of samples between ten separate chambers allows different conditions to be applied to each sample, in order to quickly characterize the effects of the environment on device reliability, enabling extrapolation to estimate lifetimes in working conditions.

  7. Application of activated charcoal radon collectors in high humidity environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iimoto, Takeshi E-mail: iimoto@rcnst.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Tokonami, Shinji; Morishita, Yasuaki; Kosako, Toshiso

    2004-09-01

    Most commercially based activated charcoal radon collectors were designed for use in indoor environments. However, at present, they are often used for research in radon surveys in unique environments, such as in the bathrooms, underground areas, mines, caves and tunnels. In these environments, the relative humidity would be around 100%, and a change in the sensitivity of cpm(Bq m{sup -3}){sup -1}(radon) would occur. For this study, the reduction in the sensitivity of activated charcoal radon collector due to environmental humidity was investigated, and the data correction was discussed. Here, ST-100 (Pico-Rad) was selected as an example of a familiar activated charcoal radon collector. According to our performance test, the humidity of 90% (20 deg. C) resulted in a 15% reduction of the sensitivity for 24 h collection. The ST-100 user should discuss the necessity of data correction by comparing the change of sensitivity with other levels of estimation errors.

  8. Application of activated charcoal radon collectors in high humidity environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimoto, Takeshi; Tokonami, Shinji; Morishita, Yasuaki; Kosako, Toshiso

    2005-01-01

    Most commercially based activated charcoal radon collectors were designed for use in indoor environments. However, at present, they are often used for research in radon surveys in unique environments, such as in the bathrooms, underground areas, mines, caves and tunnels. In these environments, the relative humidity would be around 100%, and a change in the sensitivity of cpm(Bq m(-3))(-1)(radon) would occur. For this study, the reduction in the sensitivity of activated charcoal radon collector due to environmental humidity was investigated, and the data correction was discussed. Here, ST-100 (Pico-Rad) was selected as an example of a familiar activated charcoal radon collector. According to our performance test, the humidity of 90% (20 degrees C) resulted in a 15% reduction of the sensitivity for 24 h collection. The ST-100 user should discuss the necessity of data correction by comparing the change of sensitivity with other levels of estimation errors.

  9. A flexible humidity sensor based on KC-MWCNTs composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaoyan; Chu, Jin; Aldalbahi, Ali; Rivera, Manuel; Wang, Lidan; Duan, Shukai; Feng, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were dispersed in the biopolymer kappa-carrageenan (KC) to form a flexible composite via evaporative casting method. The glycerin was used as plasticizer to increase the flexibility of the composite. The KC-CNTs was examined by using FESEM and Raman, and then the humidity sensing properties of the samples were characterized under alternating current (AC). The purpose for using AC power supply is to avoid the possible polarization effect during measurements of the humidity properties. The experimental data exhibit that the fabricated sensors have high response to relative humidity (RH) with good repeatability, stability, and low hysteresis. A phenomenon that the impedance of the sensor decreases with ascending RH was also found and the basic sensing mechanisms were discussed.

  10. Humidity Data for 9975 Shipping Packages with Softwood Fiberboard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-12

    The 9975 surveillance program is developing a technical basis to support extending the storage period of 9975 packages in K-Area Complex beyond the currently approved 15 years. A key element of this effort is developing a better understanding of degradation of the fiberboard assembly under storage conditions. This degradation is influenced greatly by the moisture content of the fiberboard, which is not well characterized on an individual package basis. Direct measurements of humidity and fiberboard moisture content have been made on two test packages with softwood fiberboard and varying internal heat levels from 0 up to 19W. Comparable measurements with cane fiberboard have been reported previously. With an internal heat load, a temperature gradient in the fiberboard assembly leads to varying relative humidity in the air around the fiberboard. However, the absolute humidity tends to remain approximately constant throughout the package, especially at lower heat loads.

  11. System-in Package of Integrated Humidity Sensor Using CMOS-MEMS Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Pil

    2015-10-01

    Temperature/humidity microchips with micropump were fabricated using a CMOS-MEMS process and combined with ZigBee modules to implement a sensor system in package (SIP) for a ubiquitous sensor network (USN) and/or a wireless communication system. The current of a diode temperature sensor to temperature and a normalized current of FET humidity sensor to relative humidity showed linear characteristics, respectively, and the use of the micropump has enabled a faster response. A wireless reception module using the same protocol as that in transmission systems processed the received data within 10 m and showed temperature and humidity values in the display.

  12. Humidity sensing properties of Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles synthesized via sonochemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian, Hamed; Ghanbari, Davood

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on humidity sensor based Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles. The sonochemical method was employed to prepare nanoparticles and impedance analysis was used to characterize sensitivity, response, and recovery time of the prepared sensor. The Ni(OH)2 sensor was found to have high sensitivity and fast response/recovery time to humidity, and its impedance changed approximately two orders of magnitude from about 2.01 MΩ in dry air 20% RH (relative humidity) to 0.0258 MΩ in 90% RH air. Our results demonstrate the potential application of Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles for fabricating high performance humidity sensors.

  13. Passive Wireless SAW Humidity Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the preliminary development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based humidity sensors for NASA application to distributed...

  14. 干燥介质相对湿度对胡萝卜片热风干燥特性的影响%Effect of hot air relative humidity on drying characteristics of carrot slabs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巨浩羽; 肖红伟; 郑霞; 郭秀良; 刘嫣红; 张卫鹏; 袁婧; 高振江

    2015-01-01

    Drying is one of the most common processing methods for fruits and vegetables. Enhancing drying rate and dried products’ quality as well as energy efficiency is very tempting for drying industry. Recently, a lot of investigations have illustrated that drying temperature, air velocity and sample’s thickness have a significant influence on drying process. High drying temperature and velocity can extensively reduce drying time and enhance drying rate. However, few investigations take into account hot air relative humidity (RH) as important drying parameter in drying process. Some literatures showed that decreasing RH would lead to a steeper slope of moisture ratio decreasing. Whereas, some researches pointed out that there was no effect of RH on the drying rate in specified range of RH. In general, high RH can contribute to a rapid increase of product temperature. It is expected that with high RH pretreatment, the temperature and moisture tend to be equivalent and after that the RH can be reduced to enhance drying rate. In this circumstance, the temperature and moisture gradient between sample and drying air become consistent and the high efficient drying process could be achieved. Drying process refers to heat and mass transfer efficiency, energy consuming and products quality. Theoretical models, semi-theoretical and empirical models are widely used to describe drying process. However, those models neglect the fundamentals of the drying process and their parameters have no physical meaning and do not help in the optimization. Recently, Weibull model was used to describe drying process because of its applicability. Based on Weibull model, the relationship between scale parameters as well as shape parameters and drying process could be developed. So in current work, carrot slabs were used to explore the drying characteristics under the drying condition of constant RH and of decreasing RH step by step, together with constant drying temperature and constant air

  15. Kinetic Stability of MOF-5 in Humid Environments: Impact of Powder Densification, Humidity Level, and Exposure Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yang; Purewal, Justin; Yang, Jun; Xu, Chunchuan; Soltis, Rick; Warner, James; Veenstra, Mike; Gaab, Manuela; Müller, Ulrich; Siegel, Donald J

    2015-05-05

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are an emerging class of microporous, crystalline materials with potential applications in the capture, storage, and separation of gases. Of the many known MOFs, MOF-5 has attracted considerable attention because of its ability to store gaseous fuels at low pressure with high densities. Nevertheless, MOF-5 and several other MOFs exhibit limited stability upon exposure to reactive species such as water. The present study quantifies the impact of humid air exposure on the properties of MOF-5 as a function of exposure time, humidity level, and morphology (i.e., powders vs pellets). Properties examined include hydrogen storage capacity, surface area, and crystallinity. Water adsorption/desorption isotherms are measured using a gravimetric technique; the first uptake exhibits a type V isotherm with a sudden increase in uptake at ∼50% relative humidity. For humidity levels below this threshold only minor degradation is observed for exposure times up to several hours, suggesting that MOF-5 is more stable than generally assumed under moderately humid conditions. In contrast, irreversible degradation occurs in a matter of minutes for exposures above the 50% threshold. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that molecular and/or dissociated water is inserted into the skeletal framework after long exposure times. Densification into pellets can slow the degradation of MOF-5 significantly, and may present a pathway to enhance the stability of some MOFs.

  16. Heat and humidity buildup under earmuff-type hearing protectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rickie R Davis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A major barrier to effective wear of hearing protection is comfort. This study examined several comfort indicators in the earmuff-type hearing protectors. Twenty subjects wore hearing protectors instrumented with two different temperature/humidity measurement systems (Omega and iButton while walking a corridor for about 25 min. The instruments recorded the temperature and humidity every 10 s and their results were compared. In addition, skin surface pH was measured at the ear canal entrance before and after the task. Finally, the subject indicated earmuff comfort at the beginning and end of the session. Earmuff comfort decreased significantly over the course of the walking task. Ear canal pH became slightly less acidic, but the change was not statistically significant. The two temperature/humidity systems provided comparable results. Heat increased at about 0.3°F while humidity built up at about 0.5%/min. However, the study found some limitations on the instrumentation. The complexity of the electrical connections and equipment in the Omega probe system led to loss of three subject′s data. The iButton device was more robust, but provided only 256 gradations of temperature and relative humidity. Even with its limitations, the iButton device would be a valuable tool for field studies. The present study showed that the buildup of heat and humidity can be modeled using linear equations. The present study demonstrates that relatively inexpensive tools and a low-exertion task can provide important information about the under-earmuff environment, which can inform assumptions about comfort during use.

  17. Limiting criteria for human exposure to low humidity indoors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyon, David; Fang, Lei; Meyer, H.;

    2002-01-01

    % RH. The subjects performed simulated office work throughout each exposure. Building Related Symptom (BRS) intensity was reported on visual-analogue scales. Tests of eye, nose and skin function were applied. In these short exposures subjective discomfort, though significantly increased by low humidity...

  18. Whey protein concentrate storage at elevated temperature and humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dairy processors are finding new export markets for whey protein concentrate (WPC), a byproduct of cheesemaking, but they need to know if full-sized bags of this powder will withstand high temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels during unrefrigerated storage under tropical conditions. To answ...

  19. Humidity affects the performance of von Frey monofilaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, M U; Nielsen, Per Rotbøll; Ellehuus-Hilmersson, C

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of tactile and nociceptive thresholds of the skin with calibrated polyamide monofilaments is an established testing method both in animal and in human research. It is known that changes in relative humidity may affect the physical properties of the monofilaments. As this effect has only...

  20. Humidity Buildup in Electronic Enclosures Exposed to Constant Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Staliulionis, Zygimantas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    parameters such as openings in the enclosure (drain holes, intentional openings or leak) and sealing and casing material. Related corrosion reliability issues due to humidity buildup have been evaluated using an interdigitated surface insulation resistance pattern placed inside the enclosure during exposure...

  1. A high sensitivity humidity sensor based on micro-ring resonator with three coupling points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shi-liang; Wang, Wen-juan; Hu, Chun-hai

    2014-12-01

    A novel high sensitivity humidity sensor based on micro-ring resonator with three coupling points (MRRTCP) is reported. Since the dielectric constant of Polyimide is highly sensible to the relative humidity of the environment, we choose the Polyimide (PI) as the moisture material. The effective refractive index of the sensing part of the sensor changes as the relative humidity of the environment changes, this leading to an obvious shift of the output spectrum. The sensing range of the relative humidity sensor is 0~100%RH, and the sensitivity is 0.0017μm/%RH, and the structure is relatively simple and could be used in micro-scale humidity sensing.

  2. Organic particulate matter formation at varying relative humidity using surrogate secondary and primary organic compounds with activity corrections in the condensed phase obtained using a method based on the Wilson equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Chang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation in the atmosphere is currently often modeled using a multiple lumped "two-product" (N·2p approach. The N·2p approach neglects: 1 variation of activity coefficient (ζi values and mean molecular weight MW in the particulate matter (PM phase; 2 water uptake into the PM; and 3 the possibility of phase separation in the PM. This study considers these effects by adopting an (N·2pζpMW,ζ approach (θ is a phase index. Specific chemical structures are assigned to 25 lumped SOA compounds and to 15 representative primary organic aerosol (POA comp