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Sample records for delhi north india

  1. Delhi: India's urban example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, B

    1988-06-01

    Demography, migration, economy, employment, education, planning, housing and transportation in the Delhi Union Territory are described. The Territory is an administrative district that includes Old Delhi, the site of the ancient walled city, the New Delhi Municipal Corporation, the center of government, the Delhi Cantonment, a military center, and 27 smaller towns, many of which are rural in character. The Delhi Territory is notable for its relatively high per capita income ($321), high sex ratio (124), high proportion of recent migrants (over half), but also high employment rate and educational status of these migrants. Much of the economy is based on government service, retail trade and services. School enrollment is high, nearly 100% of primary school age children, 77% of middle school, and 50% of secondary school. Rapid growth has stressed the public health, sanitation, housing, electric power systems. Transportation is coping relatively well, considering that 20% of all motor vehicles in India are in Delhi. 50% of daily trips are made by bus, 22% by bicycle, 10% by motorcycles, and 4% by cars. Accommodations for tourists in Delhi's old center are good in both expensive and inexpensive hotels.

  2. Prevalence of myopia and its risk factors in urban school children in Delhi: the North India Myopia Study (NIM Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Saxena

    Full Text Available Assess prevalence of myopia and identify associated risk factors in urban school children.This was a cross-sectional study screening children for sub-normal vision and refractive errors in Delhi. Vision was tested by trained health workers using ETDRS charts. Risk factor questionnaire was filled for children with vision 11 years children (p 5 hours per day (p 2 hours / day (p 2 hours in a day.Myopia is a major health problem in Indian school children. It is important to identify modifiable risk factors associated with its development and try to develop cost effective intervention strategies.

  3. New clonal strain of Candida auris, Delhi, India.

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    Chowdhary, Anuradha; Sharma, Cheshta; Duggal, Shalini; Agarwal, Kshitij; Prakash, Anupam; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Jain, Sarika; Kathuria, Shallu; Randhawa, Harbans S; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F

    2013-10-01

    A new clonal strain of Candida auris is an emerging etiologic agent of fungemia in Delhi, India. In 12 patients in 2 hospitals, it was resistant to fluconazole and genotypically distinct from isolates from South Korea and Japan, as revealed by M13 and amplified fragment length polymorphism typing.

  4. New clonal strain of Candida auris, Delhi, India.

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A new clonal strain of Candida auris is an emerging etiologic agent of fungemia in Delhi, India. In 12 patients in 2 hospitals, it was resistant to fluconazole and genotypically distinct from isolates from South Korea and Japan, as revealed by M13 and amplified fragment length polymorphism typing.

  5. An epidemiological study of dengue in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, Kumar; Nagpal, B N; Pande, Veena; Srivastava, Aruna; Saxena, Rekha; Anvikar, Anup; Das, Aparup; Singh, Himmat; Anushrita; Gupta, Sanjeev K; Tuli, N R; Telle, Olivier; Yadav, N K; Valecha, Neena; Paul, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Delhi, the capital of India, is an important metropolitan hub for major financial and sociocultural exchanges, offering challenging threats to current public health infrastructure. In recent past, an upsurge of dengue cases in Delhi posed a significant menace to the existing dengue control policies. To reform the control strategies and take timely intervention to prevent future epidemics, an epidemiological study on the proportion of both asymptomatic and symptomatic dengue infections in selected population was conducted. The aim of the study was to investigate and assess the epidemiology of dengue infection and to estimate the proportion of asymptomatic and symptomatic dengue infections in Delhi. In this study, around 50 confirmed dengue cases, a total of 2125 individuals as household and neighbourhood contacts, with or without dengue febrile illness, were finger pricked and serologically detected as dengue positive or negative using SD Duo Bioline Rapid Diagnostic Test (SD Inc, Korea) with NS1, IgM & IgG combo test, which detected dengue virus antigen and antibodies to dengue virus in human blood. Out of 2125 individuals, 768 (36.1%) individuals showed positive dengue test with past (25.5%), primary (1.88%) or secondary (8.8%) dengue infections. Higher percentage of IgG was found in age groups 15-24 years and 25-50 years (36% each). Infants (dengue infection was either primary or secondary. On the basis of these results, it may be hypothesized that there are large number of asymptomatic dengue infections in the community as compared to reported symptomatic cases in Delhi. For the effective control of dengue transmission in such community like Delhi where dengue epidemics have frequently been encountered, it is essential to ascertain the proportion of asymptomatic dengue infections which may act as a reservoir for dengue transmission, as well as threat for developing dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF).

  6. Dynamic soil properties for microzonation of Delhi, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Hanumantharao; G V Ramana

    2008-11-01

    Delhi, the capital of India, has experienced mild seismic shaking during several earthquakes in the past. The large variations of depth to bedrock and ground water table coupled with different soil types at different locations of Delhi necessitate a seismic microzonation study. Dynamic soil properties such as shear wave velocity, modulus reduction and damping characteristics of local soils are the basic and essential input parameters for conducting even a preliminary ground response analysis which is an essential input in microzonation studies. Shear wave velocity is not measured routinely due to its high cost and lack of the required expertise. Several researchers in the past developed correlations between shear wave velocity (s) and routinely measured values. In the present study, shear wave velocity profiles measured in the field at more than 80 borehole locations to a depth of about 20 to 32m using Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) are presented and correlations between shear wave velocity and values are also presented for use by engineers and designers. Results of strain and stress controlled cyclic triaxial tests on remoulded samples of sandsilt mixtures in the high strain range are used for generating the modulus reduction and damping curves and are compared with the well-known curves in the literature. The results presented in this article can be used for microzonation studies as well as site specific ground response analyses at Delhi.

  7. Travelling to India for the Delhi XIX Commonwealth Games 2010.

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    Shaw, Marc T M; Leggat, Peter A; Chatterjee, Santanu

    2010-05-01

    The 19th Commonwealth Games, conducted once in every four years since 1930, will be held in New Delhi from the 3rd through until the 14th of October, 2010. There will be approximately 17 sports on display and there will also be 15 para-sporting events. This paper focuses on health and safety issues for travellers to India in general, although it provides specific references to advice for visiting Commonwealth Games athletes and team staff, who will be travelling to the games. Whilst it needs be remembered that travel health advice can change, travellers are advised to seek up-to-date travel health advice for India, from their professional providers, closer to their departure. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Attitudes of Secondary Regular School Teachers toward Inclusive Education in New Delhi, India: A Qualitative Study

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    Bhatnagar, Nisha; Das, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the attitudes of regular school teachers in Delhi, India, toward the inclusion of students with disabilities. It also explored their views regarding facilitators of inclusive education. Respondents were secondary school teachers working in schools in Delhi that implement inclusive education for students with…

  9. Group B Streptococcal Colonization Among Pregnant Women in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Manu; Rench, Marcia A; Baker, Carol J; Singh, Pushpa; Hans, Charoo; Edwards, Morven S

    2017-07-01

    Little is known regarding maternal group B streptococcal (GBS) colonization prevalence and capsular (CPS) serotype distribution among pregnant women in India. The objective of this prospective cohort study was to determine GBS recto-vaginal colonization prevalence in pregnant women at Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital in Delhi, India. Literature review identified reports from India assessing GBS colonization prevalence in pregnant women. Rectal and vaginal swabs were inoculated into Strep B Carrot Broth (Hardy Diagnostics, Santa Maria, CA) and subcultured onto GBS Detect plates (Hardy Diagnostics, Santa Maria, CA). Isolates were serotyped using ImmuLex Strep-B latex kits (Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark). Thirteen studies were identified citing GBS colonization prevalence during pregnancy as 0.47%-16%. Among 300 pregnant women (mean age: 26.9 years; mean gestation: 34 weeks) enrolled (August 2015 to April 2016), GBS colonization prevalence was 15%. Fifteen percent of women had vaginal only, 29% had rectal only and 56% had both sites colonized. CPS types were Ia (13.3%), Ib (4.4%), II (20%), III (22.2%), V (20%) and VII (6.7%); 13.3% were nontypable. Fetal loss in a prior pregnancy at ≥20-weeks gestation was more common in colonized than noncolonized women (15.6% vs. 3.5%; P = 0.004). Employing recent census data for the birth cohort and estimating that 1%-2% of neonates born to colonized women develop early-onset disease, at least 39,000 cases of early-onset disease may occur yearly in India. Using optimal methods, 15% of third trimester pregnant women in India are GBS colonized. A multivalent vaccine containing 6 CPS types (Ia, Ib, II, III, V and VII) would encompass ~87% of GBS carried by pregnant women in India.

  10. Seasonality of Tuberculosis in Delhi, India: A Time Series Analysis

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    Varun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is highly cost effective to detect a seasonal trend in tuberculosis in order to optimize disease control and intervention. Although seasonal variation of tuberculosis has been reported from different parts of the world, no definite and consistent pattern has been observed. Therefore, the study was designed to find the seasonal variation of tuberculosis in Delhi, India. Methods. Retrospective record based study was undertaken in a Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS centre located in the south district of Delhi. Six-year data from January 2007 to December 2012 was analyzed. Expert modeler of SPSS ver. 21 software was used to fit the best suitable model for the time series data. Results. Autocorrelation function (ACF and partial autocorrelation function (PACF at lag 12 show significant peak suggesting seasonal component of the TB series. Seasonal adjusted factor (SAF showed peak seasonal variation from March to May. Univariate model by expert modeler in the SPSS showed that Winter’s multiplicative model could best predict the time series data with 69.8% variability. The forecast shows declining trend with seasonality. Conclusion. A seasonal pattern and declining trend with variable amplitudes of fluctuation were observed in the incidence of tuberculosis.

  11. Dengue fever among Israeli expatriates in Delhi, 2015: implications for dengue incidence in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, Ami; Turgeman, Avigail; Lustig, Yaniv; Schwartz, Eli

    2016-03-01

    We present the data of 13 dengue cases diagnosed between 1 August and 15 September 2015 among 240 Israeli expatriates residing in Delhi. Attack rates were similar between adults (6/128, 4.7%) and children (7/112, 6.3%). dengue virus (DENV-2) was identified in two and DENV-1 in one dengue-seropositive sample. Another febrile patient was diagnosed with chikungunya virus infection. The reported incidence of dengue fever among people living in Delhi was lower than 0.1% as of September 2015. Based on our results, we hypothesize that the incidence of dengue fever in Delhi is grossly underestimated.

  12. Beta-thalassaemia mutations in northern India (Delhi).

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    Madan, N; Sharma, S; Rusia, U; Sen, S; Sood, S K

    1998-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to define beta-thalassaemia mutations prevalent in northern India (Delhi). Forty six children of beta-thalassaemia major and their families were investigated. DNA was extracted from leucocytes and screened for mutations prevalent in the Indian population. These mutations included 619bp deletion, IVS 1-1 (G-T), IVS 1-5 (G-C), frameshift mutations FS 8/9 (+G), FS 41/42 (-CTTT), Codon 16(-C), Codon 15 (G-A), codon 30 (G-C), IVS 1-110 (G-A) and -88 (C-T). 619 bp deletion mutation was detected directly by amplification of DNA by PCR followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Other mutations were studied by DNA amplification and dot blot hybridization using synthetic normal and mutant oligonucleotide probes labelled at 5' end with gamma-32 P-ATP. Five mutations accounted for all the chromosomes in 46 patients. 619 bp deletion mutation was found to be the commonest mutation (34.8%) followed by IVS 1-5 (G-C) in 22.8 per cent, IVS 1-1 (G-T) in 19.6 per cent, FS 8/9 (+G) in 13 per cent and FS 41/42 (-CTTT) in 9.8 per cent. Nineteen (41.3%) patients were homozygous and 27 (58.7%) double heterozygous for different beta-thalassaemia mutations. This observation of limited number of mutations is significant and will be useful in planning strategies for prenatal diagnosis of beta-thalassaemia in northern India.

  13. 78 FR 68030 - U.S. Healthcare Education Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and Ahmedabad, India, January 27...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... Education Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and Ahmedabad, India to revise the contact. SUPPLEMENTARY... International Trade Administration U.S. Healthcare Education Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and Ahmedabad, India, January 27-February 1, 2014 AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Department of...

  14. Implementing Inclusive Education in Delhi, India: Regular School Teachers' Preferences for Professional Development Delivery Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ajay K.; Gichuru, Margaret; Singh, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the preferences of regular primary and secondary school teachers in Delhi, India regarding professional development delivery modes in the context of inclusive education for students with disabilities. A total of 223 primary school teachers and 130 secondary school teachers responded to a seven-item Likert-type questionnaire,…

  15. Private Schooling for Low-Income Families: A Census and Comparative Survey in East Delhi, India

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    Tooley, James; Dixon, Pauline

    2007-01-01

    A census and survey of schools in the slums of East Delhi, India, explored the nature and extent of private education serving low-income families, and compared inputs to public and private schooling. Around two-thirds of all schools were private unaided, with more unrecognised private than government schools. Teaching activity was found to be…

  16. 78 FR 70278 - Automotive Trade Mission to New Delhi, Pune and Chennai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... small or medium-sized enterprises (SME) \\1\\ and trade associations. The fee for each additional... trade media, direct mail, broadcast fax, notices by industry trade associations and other multiplier... International Trade Administration Automotive Trade Mission to New Delhi, Pune and Chennai, India April 24-April...

  17. 78 FR 66336 - U.S. Healthcare Education Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and Ahmedabad, India, January 27...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... amending the Notice published at 78 FR 42505, July 16, 2013, regarding the U.S. Healthcare Education... the U.S. Healthcare Education Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and Ahmedabad, India, January 27... International Trade Administration U.S. Healthcare Education Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and...

  18. 78 FR 76818 - U.S. Healthcare Education Trade Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and Ahmedabad, India, January 27...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... International Trade Administration U.S. Healthcare Education Trade Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and Ahmedabad, India, January 27-February 1, 2014; Correction AGENCY: International Trade Administration... Register of November 13, 2013 regarding the U.S. Healthcare Education Trade Mission to New Delhi,...

  19. State of municipal solid waste management in Delhi, the capital of India.

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    Talyan, Vikash; Dahiya, R P; Sreekrishnan, T R

    2008-01-01

    Delhi is the most densely populated and urbanized city of India. The annual growth rate in population during the last decade (1991-2001) was 3.85%, almost double the national average. Delhi is also a commercial hub, providing employment opportunities and accelerating the pace of urbanization, resulting in a corresponding increase in municipal solid waste (MSW) generation. Presently the inhabitants of Delhi generate about 7000tonnes/day of MSW, which is projected to rise to 17,000-25,000tonnes/day by the year 2021. MSW management has remained one of the most neglected areas of the municipal system in Delhi. About 70-80% of generated MSW is collected and the rest remains unattended on streets or in small open dumps. Only 9% of the collected MSW is treated through composting, the only treatment option, and rest is disposed in uncontrolled open landfills at the outskirts of the city. The existing composting plants are unable to operate to their intended treatment capacity due to several operational problems. Therefore, along with residue from the composting process, the majority of MSW is disposed in landfills. In absence of leachate and landfill gas collection systems, these landfills are a major source of groundwater contamination and air pollution (including generation of greenhouse gases). This study describes and evaluates the present state of municipal solid waste management in Delhi. The paper also summarizes the proposed policies and initiatives of the Government of Delhi and the Municipal Corporation of Delhi to improve the existing MSW management system.

  20. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban atmospheric particulate of NCR, Delhi, India

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    Sonwani, Saurabh; Amreen, Hassan; Khillare, P. S.

    2016-07-01

    The present study identifies the particulate Polycyclic Aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their sources in ambient atmosphere of Delhi, India. PM10 (aerodynamic diameter, ≤10 μm) samples were collected weekly at two residential areas from July 2013 to January 2014. First sampling site was located in centre of the city, while other was at city's background (located in South-East direction of the Delhi). PM10 was collected on Whatman GF/A (8"x10") glass fibre filters using High-Volume sampler having a constant flow rate of 1.10 m3/min. A total of 55 samples, 27 from city centre and 28 from background site were collected during sampling period, covering two different seasons. The samples were analysed for determination of 16 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons by using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) system (Waters, USA). A source apportionment study using Molecular Diagnostic Ratio (MDR) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were conducted for both sampling sites in order to identify the potential PAHs sources in Delhi. MDR was used for the preliminary identification of sources and PCA was used for further confirmation of the PAH sources at both the sites in Delhi. Results indicated towards traffic and coal combustion related sources as dominant contributors of urban atmospheric PAHs in Delhi.

  1. Challenges constraining access to insulin in the private-sector market of Delhi, India.

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    Sharma, Abhishek; Kaplan, Warren A

    2016-01-01

    India's majority of patients-including those living with diabetes-seek healthcare in the private sector through out-of-pocket (OOP) payments. We studied access to insulin in the private-sector market of Delhi state, India. A modified World Health Organization/Health Action International (WHO/HAI) standard survey to assess insulin availability and prices, and qualitative interviews with insulin retailers (pharmacists) and wholesalers to understand insulin market dynamics. In 40 pharmacy outlets analysed, mean availability of the human and analogue insulins on the 2013 Delhi essential medicine list was 44.4% and 13.1%, respectively. 82% of pharmacies had domestically manufactured human insulin phials, primarily was made in India under licence to overseas pharmaceutical companies. Analogue insulin was only in cartridge and pen forms that were 4.42 and 5.81 times, respectively, the price of human insulin phials. Domestically manufactured human phial and cartridge insulin (produced for foreign and Indian companies) was less expensive than their imported counterparts. The lowest paid unskilled government worker in Delhi would work about 1.5 and 8.6 days, respectively, to be able to pay OOP for a monthly supply of human phial and analogue cartridge insulin. Interviews suggest that the Delhi insulin market is dominated by a few multinational companies that import and/or license in-country production. Several factors influence insulin uptake by patients, including doctor's prescribing preference. Wholesalers have negative perceptions about domestic insulin manufacturing. The Delhi insulin market is an oligopoly with limited market competition. Increasing competition from Indian companies is going to require some additional policies, not presently in place. As more Indian companies produce biosimilars, brand substitution policies are needed to be able to benefit from market competition.

  2. Forecasting malaria cases using climatic factors in delhi, India: a time series analysis.

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    Kumar, Varun; Mangal, Abha; Panesar, Sanjeet; Yadav, Geeta; Talwar, Richa; Raut, Deepak; Singh, Saudan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Malaria still remains a public health problem in developing countries and changing environmental and climatic factors pose the biggest challenge in fighting against the scourge of malaria. Therefore, the study was designed to forecast malaria cases using climatic factors as predictors in Delhi, India. Methods. The total number of monthly cases of malaria slide positives occurring from January 2006 to December 2013 was taken from the register maintained at the malaria clinic at Rural Health Training Centre (RHTC), Najafgarh, Delhi. Climatic data of monthly mean rainfall, relative humidity, and mean maximum temperature were taken from Regional Meteorological Centre, Delhi. Expert modeler of SPSS ver. 21 was used for analyzing the time series data. Results. Autoregressive integrated moving average, ARIMA (0,1,1) (0,1,0)(12), was the best fit model and it could explain 72.5% variability in the time series data. Rainfall (P value = 0.004) and relative humidity (P value = 0.001) were found to be significant predictors for malaria transmission in the study area. Seasonal adjusted factor (SAF) for malaria cases shows peak during the months of August and September. Conclusion. ARIMA models of time series analysis is a simple and reliable tool for producing reliable forecasts for malaria in Delhi, India.

  3. Forecasting Malaria Cases Using Climatic Factors in Delhi, India: A Time Series Analysis

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    Varun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Malaria still remains a public health problem in developing countries and changing environmental and climatic factors pose the biggest challenge in fighting against the scourge of malaria. Therefore, the study was designed to forecast malaria cases using climatic factors as predictors in Delhi, India. Methods. The total number of monthly cases of malaria slide positives occurring from January 2006 to December 2013 was taken from the register maintained at the malaria clinic at Rural Health Training Centre (RHTC, Najafgarh, Delhi. Climatic data of monthly mean rainfall, relative humidity, and mean maximum temperature were taken from Regional Meteorological Centre, Delhi. Expert modeler of SPSS ver. 21 was used for analyzing the time series data. Results. Autoregressive integrated moving average, ARIMA (0,1,1 (0,1,012, was the best fit model and it could explain 72.5% variability in the time series data. Rainfall (P value = 0.004 and relative humidity (P value = 0.001 were found to be significant predictors for malaria transmission in the study area. Seasonal adjusted factor (SAF for malaria cases shows peak during the months of August and September. Conclusion. ARIMA models of time series analysis is a simple and reliable tool for producing reliable forecasts for malaria in Delhi, India.

  4. Entomo-epidemiological investigations of chikungunya outbreak in Delhi, India

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    Ruchi Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: An outbreak of fever with severe joint pain started in the Palam area of Delhi in August 2010. An entomological and epidemiological investigation of this outbreak was conducted to ascertain the nature and cause of the outbreak. Aim: Aim of the study was to investigate the nature and cause of the outbreak and to contain its further spread. Settings and Design: It was a cross-sectional study conducted in the Palam area of south-west Delhi, situated at a distance of about 20 km from Medical College. It is one of the field practice areas for training of undergraduate and postgraduate students of Department of Community Medicine of Medical College of Delhi. Materials and Methods: All patients attending OPD of Primary Health Center (PHC Palam, complaining of ever with incapacitating joint pain, were screened for chikungunya fever. Of the 750 suspected chikungunya patients, 130 blood samples were randomly drawn amongst these patients. Out of the 130 tested, 97 (70.8% were positive for the IgM antibodies against chikungunya virus. House-to-house survey was conducted in the affected area for more cases and to find out the vector-breeding sites. Statistical Analysis: Frequency distributions were calculated for age and sex. Results: The main breeding sites of the mosquitoes were the desert coolers of houses, water stored in metal and plastic containers, and water collections at construction sites. Aedes mosquito was present in almost all the houses surveyed in the area. Conclusions: It was concluded that the routine campaigns need to be organized regularly within the community highlighting the potential breeding grounds of mosquitoes and the possible control methods. Source reduction strategies like cleaning of desert coolers on weekly basis, emptying of water containers, and close monitoring of construction sites for potential breeding of the vector needs to be done on a regular basis to avoid future outbreaks.

  5. Hydro-chemical Survey of Groundwater of Delhi, India

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    Masood Alam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The physicochemical parameters and trace metal contents of water samples from Delhi were assessed. A total of 20 water samples were collected from boring, tube well and hand pump and analyzed for the various physicochemical parameters like pH, conductivity, total dissolved solid, total alkalinity, Ca2+ and Mg2+ hardness, chloride ion, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, sulphate and heavy metal contents like Cu, Cr, Cd, Co, Zn and Ni. The results were compared with BIS standards for drinking water. The quality of water samples under study were within the maximum permissible limits. Therefore, the groundwater samples are fit for human consumption without prior treatment.

  6. Simulating ozone concentrations using precursor emission inventories in Delhi - National Capital Region of India

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    Sharma, Sumit; Khare, Mukesh

    2017-02-01

    This study simulates ground level ozone concentrations in a heavily populated and polluted National Capital Region (NCR- Delhi) in India. Multi-sectoral emission inventories of ozone precursors are prepared at a high resolution of 4 × 4 km2 for the whole region covering the capital city of Delhi along with other surrounding towns and rural regions in NCR. Emission inventories show that transport sector accounts for 55% of the total NOx emissions, followed by power plants (23%) and diesel generator sets (7%). In NMVOC inventories, transport sector again accounts for 33%, followed by evaporative emissions released from solvent use and fuel handling activities (30%), and agricultural residue burning (28%). Refuse burning contributes to 73% of CO emissions mainly due to incomplete combustion, followed by agricultural residue burning (14%). These emissions are spatially and temporally distributed across the study domain and are fed into the WRF-CMAQ models to predict ozone concentrations for the year 2012. Model validations are carried out with the observed values at different monitoring stations in Delhi. The performance of the models over various metrics used for evaluation was found to be satisfactory. Summers and post-monsoon seasons were better simulated than monsoon and winter seasons. Simulations have shown higher concentrations of ozone formation during summers and lesser during winters and monsoon seasons, mainly due to varying solar radiation affecting photo-chemical activities. Ozone concentrations are observed lower at those locations where NOx emissions are higher, and concentrations increase close to the boundary of study domain when compared to the center of Delhi city. Downwind regions to Delhi are influenced by the ozone formed due to plume of precursor emissions released from Delhi. Considering significant background contributions, regional scale controls are required for reducing ozone in NCR.

  7. Psychosocial Determinants of Tobacco Use among School Going Adolescents in Delhi, India.

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    Kumar, Varun; Talwar, Richa; Roy, Neelam; Raut, Deepak; Singh, Saudan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tobacco use is one of the major preventable causes of premature death and disease in the world. Many psychosocial factors were found to influence tobacco use. Therefore the present study was designed to determine the role of psychosocial factors associated with tobacco use among school going adolescents in Delhi, India. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted from February 2013 to September 2013 in four government schools in South district of Delhi, India. The questionnaire contains questions adapted from GYTS (Global Youth Tobacco Survey) to find the prevalence and pattern of tobacco use among adolescents. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21. Results. The prevalence of ever and current tobacco use was found in 16.4% and 13.1%. Current smoking and current tobacco chewing were found in 10.2% and 9.4% students, respectively. The risk of current tobacco use was found to be higher among males (P value = 0.000) and in those who got higher pocket money (P value = 0.000). Psychosocial factors like lower general self-efficacy and maladjustments with peers, teachers, and schools were also found to be significant predictors of current tobacco use. Conclusion. The study has revealed higher prevalence of ever and current tobacco use among adolescent students in Delhi, India.

  8. Psychosocial Determinants of Tobacco Use among School Going Adolescents in Delhi, India

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    Varun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tobacco use is one of the major preventable causes of premature death and disease in the world. Many psychosocial factors were found to influence tobacco use. Therefore the present study was designed to determine the role of psychosocial factors associated with tobacco use among school going adolescents in Delhi, India. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted from February 2013 to September 2013 in four government schools in South district of Delhi, India. The questionnaire contains questions adapted from GYTS (Global Youth Tobacco Survey to find the prevalence and pattern of tobacco use among adolescents. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21. Results. The prevalence of ever and current tobacco use was found in 16.4% and 13.1%. Current smoking and current tobacco chewing were found in 10.2% and 9.4% students, respectively. The risk of current tobacco use was found to be higher among males (P value = 0.000 and in those who got higher pocket money (P value = 0.000. Psychosocial factors like lower general self-efficacy and maladjustments with peers, teachers, and schools were also found to be significant predictors of current tobacco use. Conclusion. The study has revealed higher prevalence of ever and current tobacco use among adolescent students in Delhi, India.

  9. Health effects of air quality regulations in Delhi, India

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    Foster, Andrew; Kumar, Naresh

    2011-03-01

    This, the first systematic study, quantifies the health effects of air quality regulations in Delhi, which adopted radical measures to improve air quality, including, for example, the conversion of all commercial vehicles to compressed natural gas (CNG), and the closure of polluting industries in residential areas from 2000 to 2002. Air pollution data, collected at 113 sites (spread across Delhi and its neighboring areas) from July-December 2003, were used to compute exposure at the place of residence of 3989 subjects. A socio-economic and respiratory health survey was administered in 1576 households. This survey collected time-use, residence histories, demographic information, and direct measurements of lung function with subjects. The optimal interpolation methods were used to link air pollution and respiratory health data at the place of their residence. Resident histories, in combination with secondary data, were used to impute cumulative exposure prior to the air-quality interventions, and the effects of recent air quality measures on lung function were then evaluated. Three important findings emerge from the analysis. First, the interventions were associated with a significant improvement in respiratory health. Second, the effect of these interventions varied significantly by gender and income. Third, consistent with a causal interpretation of these results, effects were the strongest among those individuals who spend a disproportionate share of their time out-of-doors.

  10. The changing epidemiology of dengue in Delhi, India

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    Kapoor Geetanjali

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major DHF outbreak occurred in Delhi in 1996. Following this another outbreak was reported in the year 2003. In the years 2004 and 2005, though no outbreak was reported, a definitely higher number of samples were received in the virology laboratory of A.I.I.M.S. from suspected cases of dengue infection. This study was designed to compare the serological and virological profiles of confirmed dengue cases in the years 2003, 2004 and 2005. Results Out of 1820 serum samples received from suspected cases in all three years, 811 (44.56% were confirmed as dengue infection serologically. Out of these confirmed dengue cases maximum cases, in all three years, were seen in the age group 21–30 years. There was an increase in the number of samples received in the post monsoon period (September to November with a peak in the second and third week of October. More samples were received from DHF cases in the year 2005 than 2004 and 2003. All four dengue serotypes were seen co-circulating in the year 2003, followed by complete predominance of dengue serotype 3 in 2005. Conclusion Epidemiology of dengue is changing rapidly in Delhi. Dengue infections are seen every year thus making it an endemic disease. After co-circulation of all serotypes in 2003, now dengue serotype 3 is emerging as the predominant serotype.

  11. Air quality of Beijing (China) and Delhi (India) and impact on Human Health and Climate in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S.; Singh, R. P.; Wu, Y.; Wu, C.

    2015-12-01

    Air pollution has been estimated to represent a significant fraction of the total mortality attributable to 26 risk factors assessed by the World Health Organization global burden of disease project. Delhi is distributed over 1484 km2 with population density of 11297/km2 (as in 2011) and surrounded by highly industrialized National Capital region (NCR) with population density of 1050/km2. Beijing covers an area of 16,800 km2, with population density of 1300/km2 (upto 2014). It is located at the foothills of Yan Mountains and Taihang Mountains, in the North China Plain. Both these cities suffer with poor air quality and are severely affected by dense haze, fog and smog during summer and winter seasons. Earlier studies in developing countries have concentrated on limited air quality parameters. Detailed results from trace gases (O3, NO, NO2, and CO) and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) in two Asian megacities, Delhi (India) and Beijing (China), will be presented. Trace gases and particulate matter in Beijing were collected at 31 sites during 2013-2014. The measurements in Delhi were carried out at 8 sites during October 2010 - March 2013. The annual average of PM10, PM2.5, O3, NO, NO2, and CO over Delhi in 2013 is 199 ug/m3, 123 ug/m3, 25.6 ppb, 21.5 ppb, 15.8 ppb, 1.7 ppb, respectively. The annual average of PM10, PM2.5, O3, NO2, CO, and SO2 over Beijing is 113 ug/m3, 85 ug/m3, 51 ug/m3, 46 ug/m3, 1.3 mg/m3, 23 ug/m3, respectively. The annual and seasonal variations of trace gases and particulate matter in Beijing and Delhi are also analyzed, as well as spatial changes of air pollution in these two cities. A comparative analysis in these two cities and the sources of pollution and their impact on human health and Asian climate will be discussed.

  12. Northeast Migrants in Delhi : Race, Refuge and Retail

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Northeast Migrants in Delhi: Race, Refuge and Retail is an ethnographic study of migrants from India's north-east border region living and working in Delhi, the nation's capital. Northeast India borders China, the Himalayas, and Southeast Asia. Despite burgeoning interest in the region, little attention is given to the thousands of migrants leaving the region for Indian cities for refuge, work, and study. The stories of Northeast migrants reveal an everyday Northeast India rarely captured els...

  13. Quantifying the effect of air quality control measures during the 2010 Commonwealth Games at Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beig, Gufran; Chate, Dilip M.; Ghude, Sachin. D.; Mahajan, A. S.; Srinivas, R.; Ali, K.; Sahu, S. K.; Parkhi, N.; Surendran, D.; Trimbake, H. R.

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, the XIX Commonwealth Games (CWG-2010) were held in India for the first time at Delhi and involved 71 commonwealth nations and dependencies with more than 6000 athletes participating in 272 events. This was the largest international multi-sport event to be staged in India and strict emission controls were imposed during the games in order to ensure improved air quality for the participating athletes as a significant portion of the population in Delhi is regularly exposed to elevated levels of pollution. The air quality control measures ranged from vehicular and traffic controls to relocation of factories and reduction of power plant emissions. In order to understand the effects of these policy induced control measures, a network of air quality and weather monitoring stations was set-up across different areas in Delhi under the Government of India's System of Air quality Forecasting And Research (SAFAR) project. Simultaneous measurements of aerosols, reactive trace gases (e.g. NOx, O3, CO) and meteorological parameters were made before, during and after CWG-2010. Contrary to expectations, the emission controls implemented were not sufficient to reduce the pollutants, instead in some cases, causing an increase. The measured pollutants regularly exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality limits over the games period. The reasons for this increase are attributed to an underestimation of the required control measures, which resulted in inadequate planning. The results indicate that any future air quality control measures need to be well planned and strictly imposed in order to improve the air quality in Delhi, which affects a large population and is deteriorating rapidly. Thus, the presence of systematic high resolution data and realistic emission inventories through networks such as SAFAR will be directly useful for the future.

  14. Scavenging of urban air emissions by Fog at Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, P.; Kulshrestha, U. C.

    2015-12-01

    The present study focuses upon the understanding of fog water chemistry in Delhi city. Total seventy fog water samples were collected at two different sites in Delhi during December 2014 to March 2015. Selected parameters such as pH, major anions (Cl-, F-, NO3- and SO42-) and major cations (NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+) were determined in the samples. The pH of the fog water collected during the monitoring period at Site I (traffic intersection) varied from 4.68 to 5.58 indicating the acidic nature of fog water while at the site II (green cover area), it ranged from 6.11 to 6.88 having slightly lower acidity. At the Site I, the average concentration of Cl-, Na+, SO42-, NH4+ was recorded as 1.5 X 10-2, 8 X 10-3, 4 X 10-3 and 1 X 10-2 μEqu/L respectively. Such values of ionic species may be attributed to the local sources, including factories, motor vehicle emissions and civil construction etc. However, non-local sources such as moderate- and long-range transport of sea salt also had significant influence on ionic content of fog water. In general the Na+ ratio values were found to be higher side suggesting the influence of non-marine sources. Extremely high values of Cl-/ Na+ ratios indicated the contribution from combustion of organochlorine compounds. Hence, the higher ratios of inorganic ions and acidic pH revealed that fog is an effective mechanism for the scavenging of various pollutants emitted by different sources in the city.

  15. Evolutionary Analysis of Dengue Serotype 2 Viruses Using Phylogenetic and Bayesian Methods from New Delhi, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Afreen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is the most important arboviral disease in the tropical and sub-tropical countries of the world. Delhi, the metropolitan capital state of India, has reported many dengue outbreaks, with the last outbreak occurring in 2013. We have recently reported predominance of dengue virus serotype 2 during 2011-2014 in Delhi. In the present study, we report molecular characterization and evolutionary analysis of dengue serotype 2 viruses which were detected in 2011-2014 in Delhi. Envelope genes of 42 DENV-2 strains were sequenced in the study. All DENV-2 strains grouped within the Cosmopolitan genotype and further clustered into three lineages; Lineage I, II and III. Lineage III replaced lineage I during dengue fever outbreak of 2013. Further, a novel mutation Thr404Ile was detected in the stem region of the envelope protein of a single DENV-2 strain in 2014. Nucleotide substitution rate and time to the most recent common ancestor were determined by molecular clock analysis using Bayesian methods. A change in effective population size of Indian DENV-2 viruses was investigated through Bayesian skyline plot. The study will be a vital road map for investigation of epidemiology and evolutionary pattern of dengue viruses in India.

  16. Evolutionary Analysis of Dengue Serotype 2 Viruses Using Phylogenetic and Bayesian Methods from New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afreen, Nazia; Naqvi, Irshad H; Broor, Shobha; Ahmed, Anwar; Kazim, Syed Naqui; Dohare, Ravins; Kumar, Manoj; Parveen, Shama

    2016-03-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arboviral disease in the tropical and sub-tropical countries of the world. Delhi, the metropolitan capital state of India, has reported many dengue outbreaks, with the last outbreak occurring in 2013. We have recently reported predominance of dengue virus serotype 2 during 2011-2014 in Delhi. In the present study, we report molecular characterization and evolutionary analysis of dengue serotype 2 viruses which were detected in 2011-2014 in Delhi. Envelope genes of 42 DENV-2 strains were sequenced in the study. All DENV-2 strains grouped within the Cosmopolitan genotype and further clustered into three lineages; Lineage I, II and III. Lineage III replaced lineage I during dengue fever outbreak of 2013. Further, a novel mutation Thr404Ile was detected in the stem region of the envelope protein of a single DENV-2 strain in 2014. Nucleotide substitution rate and time to the most recent common ancestor were determined by molecular clock analysis using Bayesian methods. A change in effective population size of Indian DENV-2 viruses was investigated through Bayesian skyline plot. The study will be a vital road map for investigation of epidemiology and evolutionary pattern of dengue viruses in India.

  17. Microbiological evaluation of drinking water sold by roadside vendors of Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Abhishek; Goyal, Pankaj; Varma, Ajit; Jindal, Tanu

    2015-07-01

    Delhi has emerged as one of the greenest capital city of the world. Microbiological assessment of drinking water emphasizes estimation of the hygienic quality of the water sold with reference to community health significance. This study was conducted to evaluate the quality of drinking water sold by roadside vendors in east, west, north and south zones of capital of India. A total number of 36 samples (nine from each zone) were collected as per national guidelines and studied for microbiological assessment. All the drinking water samples were collected in gamma-sterilized bottles and were kept in an ice pack to prevent any significant change in the microbial flora of the samples during the transportation. The water samples were transported to the laboratory in vertical position maintaining the temperature 1-4 °C with ice pack enveloped conditions. Samples were analyzed for total MPN coliform per 100 ml and for the presence and absence of common human pathogenic bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All the samples were found to be contaminated with coliform organisms in the range of 14 to >1600 per 100 ml of sample. Out of 36 water samples, the occurrence of E. coli was 61 %, Salmonella 25 % S. aureus 14 % and P. aeruginosa 53 % as 22, 9, 5 and 19 samples were found contaminated, respectively. The numbers of coliform bacteria and presence of some common pathogenic bacteria suggested that the quality of drinking water sold by roadside vendors is not within the Indian standard and WHO guidelines laid down for drinking water quality. Hence, there is a vital need to study the root cause in terms of hygiene, sanitation of vendors and source of contamination to prevent waterborne diseases.

  18. Microbiological evaluation of drinking water sold by roadside vendors of Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Abhishek; Goyal, Pankaj; Varma, Ajit; Jindal, Tanu

    2017-07-01

    Delhi has emerged as one of the greenest capital city of the world. Microbiological assessment of drinking water emphasizes estimation of the hygienic quality of the water sold with reference to community health significance. This study was conducted to evaluate the quality of drinking water sold by roadside vendors in east, west, north and south zones of capital of India. A total number of 36 samples (nine from each zone) were collected as per national guidelines and studied for microbiological assessment. All the drinking water samples were collected in gamma-sterilized bottles and were kept in an ice pack to prevent any significant change in the microbial flora of the samples during the transportation. The water samples were transported to the laboratory in vertical position maintaining the temperature 1-4 °C with ice pack enveloped conditions. Samples were analyzed for total MPN coliform per 100 ml and for the presence and absence of common human pathogenic bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All the samples were found to be contaminated with coliform organisms in the range of 14 to >1600 per 100 ml of sample. Out of 36 water samples, the occurrence of E. coli was 61 %, Salmonella 25 % S. aureus 14 % and P. aeruginosa 53 % as 22, 9, 5 and 19 samples were found contaminated, respectively. The numbers of coliform bacteria and presence of some common pathogenic bacteria suggested that the quality of drinking water sold by roadside vendors is not within the Indian standard and WHO guidelines laid down for drinking water quality. Hence, there is a vital need to study the root cause in terms of hygiene, sanitation of vendors and source of contamination to prevent waterborne diseases.

  19. Reproductive Ethics in Commercial Surrogacy: Decision-Making in IVF Clinics in New Delhi, India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Malene; Reddy, Sunita; Patel, Tulsi

    2015-01-01

    success rates, surrogates faced the risk of multiple pregnancy and fetal reduction with little information regarding the risks involved. In the globalized market of Commercial surrogacy in India, and with clinics compromising on ethics, there is an urgent need for formulation of regulative law......As a neo-liberal economy, India has become one of the new health tourism destinations, with Commercial gestational surrogacy as an expanding market. Yet the Indian Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Bill has been pending for five years, and the guidelines issued by the Indian Council of Medical...... Research are somewhat vague and contradictory, resulting in self-regulated practices of fertility clinics. This paper broadly looks at clinical ethics in reproduction in the practice of surrogacy and decision-making in various procedures. Through empirical research in New Delhi, the capital of India, from...

  20. Attitude of doctors toward euthanasia in Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Deliberation over euthanasia has been enduring for an extended period of time. On one end, there are populaces talking for the sacrosanctity of life and on the other end, there are those, who promote individual independence. All over the world professionals from different areas have already spent mammoth period over the subject. A large number of cases around the world have explored the boundaries of current legal distinctions, drawn between legitimate and nonlegitimate instances of ending the life. The term euthanasia was derived from the Greek words "eu" and "thanatos" which means "good death" or "easy death." It is also known as mercy killing. Euthanasia literally means putting a person to painless death especially in case of incurable suffering or when life becomes purposeless as a result of mental or physical handicap. Objective: To study the attitude of doctors toward euthanasia in Delhi. Methodology: It was a questionnaire based descriptive cross-sectional study carried out between July 2014 and December 2014. The study population included Doctors from 28 hospitals in Delhi both public and private. Equal numbers of doctors from four specialties were included in this study (50 oncologists, 50 hematologists, 50 psychiatrists, and 50 intensivists. Demographic questionnaire, as well as the Euthanasia Attitude Scale (EAS, a 30 items Likert-scale questionnaire developed by (Holloway, Hayslip and Murdock, 1995 was used to measure attitude toward Euthanasia. The scale uses both positively (16 items and negatively (14 items worded statements to control the effect of acquiescence. The scale also has four response categories, namely "definitely agree," "agree," "disagree," and "definitely disagree." The total score for the EAS was generated by adding all the sub-scales (question′s responses. The demographic questionnaire and EAS, a 30 items Likert-scale questionnaire developed by (Holloway, Hayslip and Murdock, 1995 was distributed

  1. The impact of an IEC campaign on tuberculosis awareness and health seeking behaviour in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, N; Taneja, D K; Pagare, D; Saha, R; Vashist, R P; Ingle, G K A

    2005-11-01

    To study the impact of an intensive IEC campaign regarding the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme launched by the Government of Delhi on awareness generation among the general population and improvement in self-reporting by symptomatic cases in Delhi, India. Cross-sectional study. A pilot study wherein 1008 persons selected by systematic random sampling from the general population and 1012 patients selected from symptomatic cases reporting to DOTS centres were interviewed. Among the general population, 716 (71.0%) had been exposed to one or more IEC message through the media. The core message regarding symptoms, diagnosis, treatment centre and free treatment was recalled correctly by 144 (14.3%), 449 (44.5%), 659 (65.4%) and 900 (89.2%), respectively. In the post IEC period, a significant increase (P IEC campaign only 49 (9.8%) patients had chosen a DOTS centre as first source of treatment, which increased significantly (P IEC. The IEC campaign launched by the Government of Delhi has been effective in raising awareness and improving self-reporting, but it requires intensification with suitable modification to reach all sectors.

  2. Association between parent and child weight status among private school children in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene-Cramer, Blanche; Harrell, Melissa B; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Sharma, Shreela; Ranjit, Nalini; Gupta, Vinay; Nazar, Gaurang; Arora, Monika

    2016-07-28

    Over the past three decades there has been a surge in the prevalence of overweight and obesity worldwide in both adults and children. To date few studies have examined obesity in India and most have only looked at prevalence estimates. While studies in Western countries have identified parent weight status as a predictor of child weight status, there have been no studies examining this association in India. This study examined the relationship between parent weight status and child weight status using an internationally representative growth reference for children and Asian-specific action points for adults.Overall, this study found 29.6% of children and 77.7% of parents in a sample of private schools in Delhi, India were overweight/obese. Parent weight status was found to be associated with child weight status after controlling for child grade and sex. However, while maternal weight status was associated with child weight status (odds ratio=1.51, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-2.20), paternal weight status was not (odds ratio=1.10, 95% confidence interval: 0.81-1.48). The association was greatest between mothers and sons (odds ratio=2.13, 95% confidence interval: 1.39-3.27).These results provide initial evidence that parent weight status is associated with child weight status in Delhi, India. Future research should continue to explore the relationship between parent, particularly maternal, and child weight status to better understand the nature of the relationship and the differences between male and female children. Interventions to address child overweight and obesity in India should include parents as direct targets. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. A retrospective study of clinico-pathological spectrum of carcinoma breast in a West Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Singh Nigam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data on the demographic profile of breast cancer patients from Delhi is scarce and whatever is available is from higher referral center. Our hospital caters to patients from an urban population of the lower socioeconomic strata and is a representation of cases at a tertiary care hospital in west Delhi. In Delhi, breast cancer (26.8% is commonest cancer among the female followed by cervix (12.5%, gallbladder (7.2%, ovary (7.1%, and uterus (3.3%. Aims and Objectives: A retrospective audit of breast cancer patients presenting at a tertiary referral center from 2004 to 2011. Materials and Methods: A total of 328 cases diagnosed as carcinoma breast on histopathology from year 2004 to 2011 were retrieved and studied retrospectively with regards to demographic profile and their histological features with estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and Her2neu status. Results: The median age of presentation was 49 years of age. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC, not otherwise specified (NOS was the commonest histopathological variant (81.40% followed by medullary carcinoma (10.36% and mucinous carcinoma (2.74%. Triple negative were found to be the commonest group comprising 39.4% of all the cases followed by ER and PR both positive. Pathological tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM staging showed most common group was T 2 N 0 M 0 ( 19.5% followed by T 2 N 1 M 0 (17.1% and T 2 N 2 M 0 (14%. Conclusion: The incidence of breast cancer in the India and include a higher incidence of ER, PR, and Her2neu negative disease in west Delhi.

  4. Reproductive Ethics in Commercial Surrogacy: Decision-Making in IVF Clinics in New Delhi, India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Malene; Reddy, Sunita; Patel, Tulsi;

    2015-01-01

    success rates, surrogates faced the risk of multiple pregnancy and fetal reduction with little information regarding the risks involved. In the globalized market of Commercial surrogacy in India, and with clinics compromising on ethics, there is an urgent need for formulation of regulative law...... Research are somewhat vague and contradictory, resulting in self-regulated practices of fertility clinics. This paper broadly looks at clinical ethics in reproduction in the practice of surrogacy and decision-making in various procedures. Through empirical research in New Delhi, the capital of India, from...... for the clinical practice and maintenance of principles of reproductive ethics in order to ensure that the interests of surrogate mothers are safeguarded....

  5. Regular School Teachers’ Concerns and Perceived Barriers to Implement Inclusive Education in New Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Bhatnagar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the passage of The Persons with Disabilities (PWD Act in 1995 and subsequent implementation of various policies and programs by the Indian government to enhance the participation of students with disabilities in regular schools, there has been a steady growth of inclusive education. Such initiatives, however, have placed new demands on schools, especially on teachers who have the major responsibility for implementing inclusion at the classroom level. Literature from other countries indicates that for inclusion to be successful, it is essential that classroom teachers’ concerns about implementing such programs be identified and systematically addressed. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of research about teacher concerns regarding inclusive education in India. This study was undertaken to identify the concerns and perceived barriers of regular school teachers in Delhi, India about the inclusion of students with disabilities. Respondents were secondary school teachers working in schools in Delhi that were involved in teaching special needs children. Two focus group interviews and 20 individual semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect data from the participants. The flexible qualitative analysis program QRS NVivo was utilized for data analysis. Three concerns and eleven barrier themes emerged

  6. Concurrent infections by all four dengue virus serotypes during an outbreak of dengue in 2006 in Delhi, India

    OpenAIRE

    Guleria Randeep; Dar Lalit; Diddi Kavita; Pandey Anubhav; Chahar Harendra S; Bharaj Preeti; Kabra Sushil K; Broor Shobha

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Co-circulation of multiple dengue virus serotypes has been reported from many parts of the world including India, however concurrent infection with more than one serotype of dengue viruses in the same individual is rarely documented. An outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) occurred in and around Delhi in 2006. This is the first report from India with high percentage of concurrent infections with different dengue virus serotypes circulating d...

  7. Cancer related knowledge and behavior among women across various socio-economic strata: A study from Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rahul; Bhasin, Sanjiv K; Agrawal, Sandeep; Tewari, Reeti

    2013-04-01

    Cancer is predicted to be an increasingly important cause of morbidity and mortality in the next few decades worldwide. One important step in reducing the burden of morbidity and mortality from cancers is awareness among the population about the causes and prevention of cancers. To study the knowledge and preventive behavior regarding common cancers among the women from an area of Delhi, India. Cross-sectional study. Four purposively selected residential areas representing various socio-economic strata, in North-East Delhi. One thousand two hundred and six women in the age group 18-60 years. Proportions, Chi-square test. Majority of the women (43.9%) were graduates while 10.4% were illiterate. The awareness about breast cancer was maximum with 73.8% of the respondents being aware about it. The proportions of women aware about the other cancers were low. Only 52 (4.3%) had ever been for a preventive check-up for cancer. The most common cancer checkup for which the respondents reported visiting a hospital was, breast cancer. Among the respondents, 46 (3.8%) reported having a female member in their family who ever had cancer. Five hundred and seventy seven (47.8%) had not seen any message regarding cancers common in females in any mass media. Women with a higher education level, having a female family member with cancer, and those who could recall mass media message regarding cancers, were significantly more likely to have had a preventive cancer checkup for self. The knowledge and actual preventive behavior about cancers was found to be low among the women. Increased mass media exposure and targeted strategies can possibly increase the awareness and the cancer-related health behavior among the women.

  8. Status of Biomedical Waste Management in Nursing Homes of Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Jugal; Agarwal, Ravindra; Kohli, Charu; Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Kamat, NV; Tyagi, SC

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Improper management of biomedical waste (BMW) poses a risk for health and environment. Healthcare workers have an important responsibility to properly segregate and train the staff in its disposal. Objective: To study the awareness, attitude and practices of health care workers in biomedical waste management and to observe the appropriateness of the same in the private nursing homes in Delhi, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among private nursing homes in Delhi. In both south and east zones, 116 nursing homes were selected by random sampling method. Data was collected using a validated questionnaire of WHO. Data was analysed using SPSS software (version 16). Chi-square or fisher tests were used and accepted statistically significant if p-value was less than 0.05. Results: 41.7% of the workers in south zone and 25% in east zone had no knowledge about BMW generation (χ2=24.26, p=0.001). 57 (95%) workers in south zone and 55 (98.2%) in east zone agreed strongly that BMW management is helpful in reducing spread diseases in the community (χ2=1.22, p=0.5). On observation, it was found that 13 (21.7%) nursing homes in south zone and 15 (26.8%) in east zone did not have black bags. Practice of biomedical waste management in nursing homes in both the zones of Delhi was poor. Conclusion: The study concluded that the awareness regarding biomedical waste management was not satisfactory among health care workers in private sector. There is a need of strict implementation of guidelines of BMW management. PMID:24783081

  9. Quality of life, depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation among men who inject drugs in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Gregory; Nuken, Amenla; Samson, Luke; Singh, Shalini; Jorm, Anthony F; Kermode, Michelle

    2013-05-27

    Mental disorders such as depression, anxiety and suicide represent an important public health problem in India. Elsewhere in the world a high prevalence of symptoms of common mental disorders have been found among people who inject drugs (PWID). Research in India has largely overlooked symptoms of common mental disorders among this high risk group. This paper reports on the results of a survey examining quality of life, depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation among adult males who inject drugs living in Delhi. Participants (n = 420) were recruited from needle and syringe programs using time location sampling and were interviewed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Self-report symptom scales were used to measure the severity of symptoms of depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (GAD-2) within the preceding 2 weeks. We assessed the presence of suicidal thoughts and attempts within the past 12 months. The mean length of injecting career was 20.9 years indicating a sample of chronic injecting drug users, of whom only one-third (38%) were born in Delhi. The level of illiteracy was very high (62%), and just 2% had completed class 12. Scavenging / rag picking was the main form of income for 48%, and many were homeless (69%). One-third (33%) had been beaten up at least twice during the preceding 6 months, and many either never (45%) or rarely (27%) attended family events. We found a high prevalence of depressive (84%, cut-off ≥10) and anxiety (71%, cut-off score of ≥3) symptoms. Fifty-three percent thought about killing themselves in the past 12 months, and 36% had attempted to kill themselves. Our findings revealed a socially excluded population of PWID in Delhi who have minimal education and are often homeless, leaving them vulnerable to physical violence, poverty, poor health, imprisonment and disconnection from family. The high prevalence of psychological distress found in this study has implications for programmes seeking to engage, treat and

  10. Molecular characterization of Fasciola gigantica in Delhi, India and its phylogenetic relation to the species from South Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kei; Mohanta, Uday K; Neeraja, Tambireddy; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to phylogenetically analyze Fasciola gigantica (F. gigantica) from mainland India and to reveal the expansion history of F. gigantica in the Indian subcontinent. We analyzed 40 Fasciola flukes that were collected from Delhi, in the Indian mainland, and identified them as F. gigantica by using nucleotide analyses of the nuclear phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pepck) and DNA polymerase delta (pold) genes. Based on the nucleotide sequence of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) gene, the flukes had 18 haplotypes. The haplotypes were classified under haplogroup A, which is predominant in the F. gigantica of South Asia. The population genetics of haplogroup A revealed that Delhi population showed higher π value than eastern India population. These results suggest that F. gigantica of haplogroup A might have spread from the west to the east in India along with the artificial migration of the domestic Zebu cattle, Bos indicus.

  11. Hepatitis B virus genotypes in chronic liver disease patients from New Delhi, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saket Chattopadhyay; Bhudev Chandra Das; Premashis Kar

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and their effect on the progression and outcome in patients with chronic liver diseases from New Delhi, India.METHODS: Sera from 100 HBV-related chronic liver disease (CLDB) cases were tested for HBV genotype using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and Type-specific primers-based PCR (TSP-PCR) targeting to the surface (S)gene encoding hepatitis B surface antigen.RESULTS: Only genotypes A and D were present and genotype D was dominant. Genotype D was present in all CLDB patient categories. The genotype distribution for the 100 patients with CLDB was as follows: genotype A, 16/100 (16%) (7/40- 17% chronic hepatitis B (CHB);8/47, 17%, HBV-related cirrhosis (CRB); 1/13, 7.6%,HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCCB); genotype D- 84/100 (84%) (32/40- 80% CHB; 38/47- 81%, CRB;11/13, 85%, HCCB); genotype A + D, 3/100 (3%) (1/40-3% CHB; 1/47- 2%, CRB; 1/13, 7.6%, HCCB); C, 0; B, 0;E, 0; F, 0; G 0, H 0; (P < 0.01, genotype D vs A).CONCLUSION: Only HBV genotypes A and D were present in patients with CLDB from New Delhi, India.Compared with genotype D, genotype A patients had no significant clinical or biochemical differences (P > 0.05).Mixed infection with genotype A and D were seen in 3%of the cases. Genotype D was the dominant genotype prevalent in all patient categories.

  12. Occurrence of co-infection with dengue viruses during 2014 in New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazeen, A; Afreen, N; Abdullah, M; Deeba, F; Haider, S H; Kazim, S N; Ali, S; Naqvi, I H; Broor, S; Ahmed, A; Parveen, S

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever is an arthropod-borne viral infection that has become endemic in several parts of India including Delhi. We studied occurrence of co-infection with dengue viruses during an outbreak in New Delhi, India in 2014. For the present study, blood samples collected from symptomatic patients were analysed by RT-PCR. Eighty percent of the samples were positive for dengue virus. The result showed that DENV-1 (77%) was the predominant serotype followed by DENV-2 (60%). Concurrent infection with more than one serotype was identified in 43% of the positive samples. Phylogenetic analysis clustered DENV-1 strains with the American African and DENV-2 strains in Cosmopolitan genotypes. Four common amino-acid mutations were identified in the envelope gene of DENV-1 sequences (F337I, A369T, V380I and L402F) and one common mutation (N390S) in the DENV-2 sequences. Further analysis revealed purifying selection in both the serotypes. A significant number of patients were co-infected with DENV-1 and DENV-2 serotypes. Although we do not have direct evidence to demonstrate co-evolution of these two stereotypes, nonetheless their simultaneous occurrence does indicate that they are favoured by evolutionary forces. An ongoing surveillance and careful analysis of future outbreaks will strengthen the concept of co-evolution or otherwise. Whether the concurrent dengue viral infection is correlated with disease severity in a given population is another aspect to be pursued. This study is envisaged to be useful for future reference in the context of overall epidemiology.

  13. Phylogenetic and Molecular Clock Analysis of Dengue Serotype 1 and 3 from New Delhi, India.

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    Afreen, Nazia; Naqvi, Irshad H; Broor, Shobha; Ahmed, Anwar; Parveen, Shama

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever is the most prevalent arboviral disease in the tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. The present report describes molecular detection and serotyping of dengue viruses in acute phase blood samples collected from New Delhi, India. Phylogenetic and molecular clock analysis of dengue virus serotype 1 and 3 strains were also investigated. Dengue virus infection was detected in 68.87% out of 604 samples tested by RT-PCR between 2011 & 2014. Dengue serotype 1 was detected in 25.48% samples, dengue serotype 2 in 79.56% samples and dengue serotype 3 in 11.29% samples. Dengue serotype 4 was not detected. Co-infection by more than one dengue serotype was detected in 18.26% samples. Envelope gene of 29 DENV-1 and 14 DENV-3 strains were sequenced in the study. All the DENV-1 strains grouped with the American African genotype. All DENV-3 strains were found to belong to Genotype III. Nucleotide substitution rates of dengue 1 and 3 viruses were determined in the study. Time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of dengue 1 viruses was determined to be 132 years. TMRCA of DENV-3 viruses was estimated to be 149 years. Bayesian skyline plots were constructed for Indian DENV-1 and 3 strains which showed a decrease in population size since 2005 in case of DENV- 1 strains while no change was observed in recent years in case of DENV-3 strains. The study also revealed a change in the dominating serotype in Delhi, India in recent years. The study will be helpful in formulating control strategies for the outbreaks. In addition, it will also assist in tracking the movement and evolution of this emerging virus.

  14. Poverty indicators and mental health functioning among adults living with HIV in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ezer; Delzell, Darcie A P; McNamara, Paul E; Cuffey, Joel; Cherian, Anil; Matthew, Saira

    2016-01-01

    Poor mental health functioning among persons living with HIV (PLHIV) has gained considerable attention particularly in low-income countries that disproportionately carry the global HIV/AIDS burden. Fewer studies, however, have examined the relationship between poverty indicators and mental health among PHLIV in India. Based on this cross-sectional study of 196 HIV-seropositive adults who received medical services at Shalom AIDS Project in Delhi, India, structural equation modeling and mediation analysis were employed to estimate the associations between poverty indices (household asset index, food security, unemployment, water treatment, sanitation), HIV-health factors (illness in the past 3 months, co-morbid medical conditions), and psychological distress. In the final model, ownership of fewer household assets was associated with higher levels of food insecurity, which in turn was associated with higher psychological distress. Also, the household asset index, food insecurity, and unemployment had a larger effect on psychological distress than new opportunistic infections. These findings build on increasing evidence that support concerted efforts to design, evaluate, and refine HIV mental health interventions that are mainstreamed with livelihood programming in high poverty regions in India.

  15. An evaluation of outdoor school environments to promote physical activity in Delhi, India.

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    Tarun, Samiksha; Arora, Monika; Rawal, Tina; Benjamin Neelon, Sara E

    2017-01-05

    Increasing physical activity in children is an important public health goal in India. Schools may be a target for physical activity promotion, but little is known about outdoor school environments. The purpose of this study was to describe characteristics of the surrounding outdoor school environments that may promote children's physical activity in Delhi, India. For this cross-sectional study, we conducted a structured observation of outdoor school environments in a random sample of 16 private schools in Delhi, India using the Sport, Physical activity and Eating behavior: Environmental Determinants in Young people (SPEEDY) audit tool. The SPEEDY school audit measured six categories, including (1) access to the school; (2) surrounding area; (3) school grounds; (4) aesthetics; (5) usage; and (6) overall environment. Six trained data collectors conducted the audit independently in the summer of 2012 while schools were in session. Of the 16 schools, one had cycle lanes separated from the road while two schools had cycle lanes on the road. Two schools had pavement on both sides of the road for pedestrians. One school had marked pedestrian crossings. No schools had school warning signs, road safety signs, or route signs for cyclists that would help calm vehicular traffic. Fifteen schools had playground equipment and nine had courts, an assault course (a sequence of equipment designed to be used together), and a quadrangle (an enclosed or semi-enclosed courtyard) for outdoor physical activity. The majority of schools were shielded from the surrounding area by hedges, trees, or fences (n = 13) and were well maintained (n = 10). One school had evidence of vandalism. Two schools had graffiti, seven had litter, and 15 had murals or art. The majority of schools did not have infrastructure to support physical activity, such as cycle lanes, marked pedestrian crossings, or traffic calming mechanisms such as school warning signs. However, most had playground equipment

  16. Dental treatment at the Commonwealth Games, 23 September to 16 October 2010, Delhi, India.

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    Sharma, Rakesh; Verma, Mahesh; Mehrotra, Geeta

    2012-06-01

    To document and analyse the various dental ailments reported and treatments administered during the 2010 Commonwealth Games, held in Delhi, India, based on the treatment registries at the dental clinic in the medical centre in the Commonwealth Games Village and at the primary nodal centre.  A retrospective analysis of dental treatments administered at the Commonwealth Games Village medical centre, from 23 September to 16 October 2010, was conducted. Cases reported referred to athletes, their family members and ancillary staff. A total of 342 instances of various treatments were reported. Patients reporting dental complaints and/or receiving dental treatment represented 5.3% of games participants and ancillary personnel. The largest groups of patients categorised by country of origin came from India, the host nation, followed by Kenya and Nigeria. Most of the interventions were prescription-based and included medications for dental pain and infections, followed by restorative or conservative procedures. A standardised guideline on the minimum requirements for a dental clinic for the Commonwealth Games should be established by the Commonwealth Federation. © 2012 FDI World Dental Federation.

  17. Variation of OC, EC, WSIC and trace metals of PM10 in Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S. K.; Mandal, T. K.; Saxena, Mohit; Rashmi; Sharma, A.; Datta, A.; Saud, T.

    2014-06-01

    Variation of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water soluble inorganic ionic components (WSIC) and major and trace elements of particulate matter (PM10) were studied over Delhi, an urban site of the Indo Gangatic Plain (IGP), India in 2010. Strong seasonal variation was noticed in the mass concentration of PM10 and its chemical composition with maxima during winter (PM10: 213.1±14.9 μg m-3; OC: 36.05±11.60 μg m-3; EC: 9.64±2.56 μg m-3) and minima during monsoon (PM10: 134.7±39.9 μg m-3; OC: 14.72±6.95 μg m-3; EC: 3.35±1.45 μg m-3). The average concentration of major and trace elements (Na, Mg, Al, P, S, Cl, K, CA, Cr, Ti, Fe, Zn and Mn) was accounted for ~17% of the PM10 mass. Average values of K+/EC (0.28) and Cl-/EC (0.59) suggest the influences of biomass burning in PM10, whereas, higher concentration of Ca2+ suggests the soil erosion as possible source from the nearby agricultural field. Fe/Al ratio (0.34) indicates mineral dust as a source at the sampling site, similarly, Ca/Al ratio (2.45) indicates that aerosol over this region is rich in Ca mineral compared to average upper continental crust. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis quantifies the contribution of soil dust (20.7%), vehicle emissions (17.0%), secondary aerosols (21.7%), fossil fuel combustion (17.4%) and biomass burning (14.3%) to PM10 mass concentration at the observational site of Delhi.

  18. Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles in auto-rickshaws in New Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Joshua, S.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Reich, Alexander, H.; Deshpande, Shyam J.; Kaushik, Geetanjali; Chel, Arvind; Marshall, Julian D.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2011-08-01

    Concentrations of air pollutants from vehicles are elevated along roadways, indicating that human exposure in transportation microenvironments may not be adequately characterized by centrally located monitors. We report results from ˜180 h of real-time measurements of fine particle and black carbon mass concentration (PM 2.5, BC) and ultrafine particle number concentration (PN) inside a common vehicle, the auto-rickshaw, in New Delhi, India. Measured exposure concentrations are much higher in this study (geometric mean for ˜60 trip-averaged concentrations: 190 μg m -3 PM 2.5, 42 μg m -3 BC, 280 × 10 3 particles cm -3; GSD ˜1.3 for all three pollutants) than reported for transportation microenvironments in other megacities. In-vehicle concentrations exceeded simultaneously measured ambient levels by 1.5× for PM 2.5, 3.6× for BC, and 8.4× for PN. Short-duration peak concentrations (averaging time: 10 s), attributable to exhaust plumes of nearby vehicles, were greater than 300 μg m -3 for PM 2.5, 85 μg m -3 for BC, and 650 × 10 3 particles cm -3 for PN. The incremental increase of within-vehicle concentration above ambient levels—which we attribute to in- and near-roadway emission sources—accounted for 30%, 68% and 86% of time-averaged in-vehicle PM 2.5, BC and PN concentrations, respectively. Based on these results, we estimate that one's exposure during a daily commute by auto-rickshaw in Delhi is as least as large as full-day exposures experienced by urban residents of many high-income countries. This study illuminates an environmental health concern that may be common in many populous, low-income cities.

  19. Rapid assessment of visual impairment in urban population of Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Noopur; Vashist, Praveen; Malhotra, Sumit; Senjam, Suraj Singh; Misra, Vasundhara; Bhardwaj, Amit

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence, causes and associated demographic factors related to visual impairment amongst the urban population of New Delhi, India. A population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in East Delhi district using cluster random sampling methodology. This Rapid Assessment of Visual Impairment (RAVI) survey involved examination of all individuals aged 40 years and above in 24 randomly selected clusters of the district. Visual acuity (VA) assessment and comprehensive ocular examination were done during the door-to-door survey. A questionnaire was used to collect personal and demographic information of the study population. Blindness and Visual Impairment was defined as presenting VA visual impairment. Of 2421 subjects enumerated, 2331 (96.3%) were available for ophthalmic examination. Among those examined, 49.3% were males. The prevalence of visual impairment (VI) in the study population, was 11.4% (95% C.I. 10.1, 12.7) and that of blindness was 1.2% (95% C.I. 0.8, 1.6). Uncorrected refractive error was the leading cause of VI accounting for 53.4% of all VI followed by cataract (33.8%). With multivariable logistic regression, the odds of having VI increased with age (OR = 24.6[95% C.I.: 14.9, 40.7]; p visual impairment is considerable in this region despite availability of adequate eye care facilities. Awareness generation and simple interventions like cataract surgery and provision of spectacles will help to eliminate the major causes of blindness and visual impairment in this region.

  20. Prevalence and pattern of self-medication practices in an urban area of Delhi, India

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    Varun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-medication is one of the major health concerns worldwide and World Health Organization has laid emphasis on correctly investigating and controlling it. There is much public and professional concern regarding self-medication practices, which has dramatically increased in the last few decades, especially in the developing countries. Hence, this study was designed to study the prevalence and practice of self-medication practices in an urban area of Delhi, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in March 2013 and data were collected by personal interviews using pretested questionnaires. An urban colony in the south district of Delhi was chosen and the eldest member of the family, present at the time of the visit was interviewed. Data were collected from 236 persons and analyzed using SPSS version 21. Results: The prevalence of self-medication was 92.8% (95 confidence interval: 66.5-79.4. 74.9% preferred allopathic medicines. Self-medication was found to be practiced more among younger persons than older age group persons (P = 0.000. Graduates and postgraduates practiced self-medication more than others (P = 0.002. Common cold (61.6% and fever (51.8% were the most common ailments for which self-medication were practiced. Paracetamol and cough syrups were the most commonly used class of drugs. Conclusion: The prevalence of self-medication in this study was high. Drugs especially antimicrobials were not taken for the proper length of time. Awareness regarding self-medication practices to help patients decide on the appropriateness of self-medication is required.

  1. Impact of health education based intervention on community's awareness of dengue and its prevention in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, Yadlapalli S; Burman, Deepa; Kumari, Rita; Lamkang, Anjana S; Babu, Bontha V

    2017-03-01

    Dengue is endemic in India. The capital, Delhi, continues to witness a higher number of cases due to urbanization-related factors. This study is intended to implement health education towards prevention of dengue, and to assess its impact on people's knowledge and practices related to causes and prevention of dengue among urban poor in Delhi. Pre- ( n = 484) and post- ( n = 496) intervention surveys from 15 sub-clusters from five slums/slum-like settlements in Delhi were carried out. Health education based intervention was carried out through partnership with the municipal bodies and non-governmental organizations. Socio-demographic characteristics of participants were similar in both surveys. Intervention resulted in significant increase in knowledge on cause, symptom perception and mosquito behaviour in terms of breeding and biting habits. Practice of personal protection measures increased significantly. The participation of people increased during intervention compared to the routine programme. Health education based interventions are instrumental in improving people's knowledge and behaviour. Hence, routine health educational activities as a supportive strategy in the health system need to be strengthened. New integrated approaches such as eco-bio-social approaches with community participation are to be developed and tested in endemic settings like Delhi.

  2. Adherence to diabetes care processes at general practices in the National Capital Region-Delhi, India

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    Roopa Shivashankar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the level of adherence to diabetes care processes, and associated clinic and patient factors at general practices in Delhi, India. Methods: We interviewed physicians (n = 23 and patients with diabetes (n = 406, and reviewed patient charts at general practices (government = 5; private = 18. We examined diabetes care processes, specifically measurement of weight, blood pressure (BP, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, lipids, electrocardiogram, dilated eye, and a foot examination in the last one year. We analyzed clinic and patient factors associated with a number of care processes achieved using multilevel Poisson regression model. Results: The average number of clinic visits per patient was 8.8/year (standard deviation = 5.7, and physicians had access to patient's previous records in only 19.7% of patients. Dilated eye exam, foot exam, and electrocardiogram were completed in 7.4%, 15.1%, and 29.1% of patients, respectively. An estimated 51.7%, 88.4%, and 28.1% had ≥1 measurement of HbA1c, BP, and lipids, respectively. Private clinics, physician access to patient's previous records, use of nonphysicians, patient education, and the presence of diabetes complication were positively associated with a number of care processes in the multivariable model. Conclusion: Adherence to diabetes care processes was suboptimal. Encouraging implementation of quality improvement strategies like Chronic Care Model elements at general practices may improve diabetes care.

  3. Abundance and distribution of gaseous ammonia and particulate ammonium at Delhi (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.; Kulshrestha, U. C.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports abundance and distribution of gaseous NH3 and particulate NH4+ at Delhi. Gaseous NH3 and particulate NH4+ concentrations were measured during pre monsoon, monsoon and postmonsoon seasons of the years 2010 and 2011. Average concentrations of gaseous NH3 during premonsoon, monsoon and post monsoon seasons were recorded as 26.4, 33.2 and 32.5 μg m-3, respectively. Gaseous NH3 concentrations were the highest during monsoon due to decay and decomposition of plants and other biogenic material under wet conditions which emit NH3. The results showed that particulate NH4+ was always lower than the gaseous NH3 during all the seasons. The concentrations of particulate NH4+ were recorded as 11.6, 22.9 and 8.5 μg m-3 during premonsoon, monsoon and postmonsoon seasons, respectively. The percent fraction of particulate NH4+ was noticed highest during monsoon season due to increased humidity levels. On anaverage, 33.3 % of total N-NHx was present as particulate NH4+. Higher concentrations of NH3 noticed during night time may be due to stable atmospheric conditions. Study highlighted that as compared to rural sites, urban sites showed higher concentrations of gaseous NH3 in India which may be due to higher population density, human activities and poor sanitation arrangements.

  4. Cardiovascular health promotion in schools of Delhi, India: A baseline evaluation of environment and policies

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    Ravneet Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality. Most of the risk factors of CVDs develop early in childhood. Schools immensely influence the thinking pattern of students and can thus shape their behavior. However, no amount of knowledge and awareness can change health behaviours of students until they get support from enabling environment in the schools. The Ottawa charter has also emphasized on building healthy public policy and creating supportive environments for health promotion in schools. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted in 10 schools in Delhi, India. School policies, environment, community participation and approach of school health agency were assessed by interviewing authorities, review of related documents and direct observation in schools. Results: It was found that none of the schools had any written health policy. Environment in most of the schools was not conducive for cardiovascular health promotion. Conclusion: The study highlights that the schools lack health policies and environment for cardiovascular health and also points out the approach of school health agency, focusing on medical check-ups and treatment of minor illnesses.

  5. Type 2 Diabetes and Anxiety Symptoms Among Women in New Delhi, India.

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    Weaver, Lesley Jo; Madhu, S V

    2015-11-01

    We explored the relationship between mental health and type 2 diabetes among women in New Delhi, India, in 2011. We recruited a convenience sample of 184 diabetic women from 10 public and private clinics. They completed a finger-stick blood test and a questionnaire assessing demographic characteristics, depression and anxiety symptoms, and diabetes-related disabilities restricting their performance of daily tasks. A subsample of 30 women participated in follow-up qualitative interviews at their homes. More than one quarter of our sample of diabetic women reported high levels of anxiety symptoms, whereas 18% reported high levels of depression symptoms. Anxiety symptoms were patterned according to recency of diabetes diagnosis, with 40% of women diagnosed less than 2 years before their interview reporting high anxiety symptom levels, as opposed to 23% of women diagnosed more than 2 years in the past. Depression and anxiety scores differed with respect to their relationship to recency of diagnosis, number of children, blood glucose level, and functional disabilities restricting performance of daily tasks. Screening for anxiety among people with diabetes has been overlooked in the past. Anxiety appears more prevalent than depression, especially during the first 2 years of the disease.

  6. Weight-related concerns and weight-control behaviors among overweight adolescents in Delhi, India: A cross-sectional study

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    Shrivastav Radhika

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is emerging as a public health problem among adolescents in India. The aim of this study was to describe specific weight-related concerns among school-going youth in Delhi, India and to assess the prevalence of weight control behaviors, including healthy and unhealthy ones. Differences by weight status, gender, grade level, and school-type (a proxy for SES in this setting are considered. Methods This study is cross-sectional by design. A sample of eighth and tenth graders (n = 1818 enrolled in Private (middle-high SES and Government (low SES schools (n = 8 in Delhi, India participated. All students' height and weight were measured. Students participated in a survey of weight-related concerns and weight-control behaviors, as well. Mixed-effects regression models were used to test for differences in weight-related concerns and weight-control behaviors across key factors of interest (i.e., weight status, gender, grade level, and SES. Results The combined prevalence of obesity and overweight was 16.6%, overall. Controlling one's weight was important to overweight and non-overweight youth, alike (94.2% v. 84.8%, p p Conclusions Interventions to promote healthy weight control should be pertinent to and well-received by school-going youth in India. Healthy weight control practices need to be explicitly encouraged and unhealthy practices reduced. Future interventions should address issues specific to body image, too, as body dissatisfaction was not uncommon among youth.

  7. Concurrent infections by all four dengue virus serotypes during an outbreak of dengue in 2006 in Delhi, India

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    Guleria Randeep

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-circulation of multiple dengue virus serotypes has been reported from many parts of the world including India, however concurrent infection with more than one serotype of dengue viruses in the same individual is rarely documented. An outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS occurred in and around Delhi in 2006. This is the first report from India with high percentage of concurrent infections with different dengue virus serotypes circulating during one outbreak. Results Acute phase sera from patients were tested for the presence of dengue virus RNA by RT-PCR assay. Of the 69 samples tested for dengue virus RNA, 48 (69.5% were found to be positive. All the four dengue virus serotypes were found to be co-circulating in this outbreak with DENV-3 being the predominant serotype. In addition in 9 of 48 (19% dengue virus positive samples, concurrent infection with more than one dengue virus serotype were identified. Conclusion This is the first report in which concurrent infections with different dengue virus serotypes is being reported during an outbreak from India. Delhi is now truly hyperendemic for dengue.

  8. Assessment of air quality after the implementation of compressed natural gas (CNG) as fuel in public transport in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Khaiwal; Wauters, Eric; Tyagi, Sushil K; Mor, Suman; Van Grieken, René

    2006-04-01

    Public transport in Delhi was amended by the Supreme Court of India to use Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) instead of diesel or petrol. After the implementation of CNG since April 2001, Delhi has the highest fraction of CNG-run public vehicles in the world and most of them were introduced within 20 months. In the present study, the concentrations of various criteria air pollutants (SPM, PM(10), CO, SO(2) and NO(x)) and organic pollutants such as benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were assessed before and after the implementation of CNG. A decreasing trend was found for PAHs, SO(2) and CO concentrations, while the NO(x) level was increased in comparison to those before the implementation of CNG. Further, SPM, PM(10), and BTX concentrations showed no significant change after the implementation of CNG. However, the BTX concentration demonstrated a clear relation with the benzene content of gasoline. In addition to the impact of the introduction of CNG the daily variation in PAHs levels was also studied and the PAHs concentrations were observed to be relatively high between 10 pm to 6 am, which gives a proof of a relation with the limited day entry and movement of heavy vehicles in Delhi.

  9. Abundance and distribution of gaseous ammonia and particulate ammonium at Delhi, India

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    Singh, S.; Kulshrestha, U. C.

    2012-12-01

    This study reports abundance and distribution of gaseous NH3 and particulate NH4+ at Delhi. Gaseous NH3 and particulate NH4+ concentrations were measured during pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons of the years 2010 and 2011. Average concentrations of gaseous NH3 during pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons were recorded as 26.4, 33.2 and 32.5 μg m-3, respectively. Gaseous NH3 concentrations were the highest during monsoon, thought to be due to decay and decomposition of plants and other biogenic material under wet conditions, leading to increased NH3 emission. The results showed that particulate NH4+ was always lower than the gaseous NH3 during all the seasons. The concentrations of particulate NH4+ were recorded as 11.6, 22.9 and 8.5 μg m-3 during pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. The percent fraction of particulate NH4+ was noticed to be highest during the monsoon season, which is attributed to increased humidity levels favouring partitioning into the aerosol phase. On an average, 33.3% of total N-NHx was present as particulate NH4+. Higher concentrations of NH3 noticed during night time may be due to stable atmospheric conditions. The study highlighted that, as compared with rural sites, urban sites showed higher concentrations of gaseous NH3 in India, which may be due to higher population density, human activities and poor sanitation arrangements.

  10. Numerical simulation of a rare winter hailstorm event over Delhi, India on 17 January 2013

    KAUST Repository

    Chevuturi, A.

    2014-12-19

    This study analyzes the cause of the rare occurrence of a winter hailstorm over New Delhi/NCR (National Capital Region), India. The absence of increased surface temperature or low level of moisture incursion during winter cannot generate the deep convection required for sustaining a hailstorm. Consequently, NCR shows very few cases of hailstorms in the months of December-January-February, making the winter hail formation a question of interest. For this study, a recent winter hailstorm event on 17 January 2013 (16:00–18:00 UTC) occurring over NCR is investigated. The storm is simulated using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) microphysics scheme with two different options: hail and graupel. The aim of the study is to understand and describe the cause of hailstorm event during over NCR with a comparative analysis of the two options of GCE microphysics. Upon evaluating the model simulations, it is observed that the hail option shows a more similar precipitation intensity with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observation than the graupel option does, and it is able to simulate hail precipitation. Using the model-simulated output with the hail option; detailed investigation on understanding the dynamics of hailstorm is performed. The analysis based on a numerical simulation suggests that the deep instability in the atmospheric column led to the formation of hailstones as the cloud formation reached up to the glaciated zone promoting ice nucleation. In winters, such instability conditions rarely form due to low level available potential energy and moisture incursion along with upper level baroclinic instability due to the presence of a western disturbance (WD). Such rare positioning is found to be lowering the tropopause with increased temperature gradient, leading to winter hailstorm formation.

  11. Prevalence of Unrecognised Depression Among Outpatient Department Attendees of A Rural Hospital in Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Charu; Kishore, Jugal; Agarwal, Paras; Singh, Satya Vir

    2013-01-01

    Background: Depression is one of the most common mental disorders affecting 121 million people in the world and it frequently goes unrecognised among patients. This study was carried out to find out the prevalence of unrecognised depression among out patient attendees of a rural hospital in Delhi, India and its socio demographic correlates. Material and Methods: This is a rural hospital based cross sectional study among 395 patients attending different non-psychiatric outpatient departments. Data was collected by using predesigned & pretested questionnaire and prevalence of depression was determined by PRIME MD (PHQ-9) and analysed by using SPSS version 16. Data was analysed using chi-square test with “p” value < 0.05 considered as significant. Independent association of socio demographic variables were determined by multi–variate logistic regression analysis using WHO EPI INFO software. Results: The study included 67% females and 33% males with mean age 31.73 + 12 years. Most were Hindu (80%), married (75%), illiterate (47%) and were unemployed (65%). Out of 395 patients, 119 (30.1%) were diagnosed to be having depression. Out of 119 patients who were found depressed, 25 (21%) were already diagnosed case of depression and 94 (79%) were detected by using PRIME-MD, giving prevalence of unrecognised depression 23.8%. Among socio demographic factors, gender, religion, education status and being widow/separated were found to be statistically significantly associated with hidden depression among the patients. Conclusion: Unrecognized depression is a common in non-psychiatric OPDs. There is a need to screen patients presenting in such OPDs for depression. PMID:24179898

  12. Myths, beliefs and perceptions about mental disorders and health-seeking behavior in Delhi, India

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    Kishore, Jugal; Gupta, Avni; Jiloha, Ram Chander; Bantman, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the myths, beliefs and perceptions about mental disorders and health-seeking behavior in general population and medical professionals of India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out with a sample of 436 subjects (360 subjects from urban and rural communities of Delhi and 76 medical professionals working in different organizations in Delhi). A pre-tested questionnaire consisting items on perceptions, myths, and beliefs about causes, treatment, and health-seeking behavior for mental disorders was used. The collected data were statistically analyzed using computer software package Epi-info. Appropriate tests of significance were applied to detect any significant association. Results: The mental disorders were thought to be because of loss of semen or vaginal secretion (33.9% rural, 8.6% urban, 1.3% professionals), less sexual desire (23.7% rural, 18% urban), excessive masturbation (15.3% rural, 9.8% urban), God's punishment for their past sins (39.6% rural, 20.7% urban, 5.2% professionals), and polluted air (51.5% rural, 11.5% urban, 5.2% professionals). More people (37.7%) living in joint families than in nuclear families (26.5%) believed that sadness and unhappiness cause mental disorders. 34.8% of the rural subjects and 18% of the urban subjects believed that children do not get mental disorders, which means they have conception of adult-oriented mental disorders. 40.2% in rural areas, 33.3% in urban areas, and 7.9% professionals believed that mental illnesses are untreatable. Many believed that psychiatrists are eccentric (46.1% rural, 8.4% urban, 7.9% professionals), tend to know nothing, and do nothing (21.5% rural, 13.7% urban, 3.9% professionals), while 74.4% of rural subjects, 37.1% of urban subjects, and 17.6% professionals did not know that psychiatry is a branch of medicine. More people in rural areas than in urban area thought that keeping fasting or a faith healer can cure them from mental illnesses, whereas

  13. Operational Efficiency of an Immunization Clinic Attached to Rural Health Training Centre in Delhi, India: A Time and Motion Study

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    Varun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obtaining baseline data about current patterns of work is important for assessing the effects of interventions designed to improve care delivery. Time and motion studies allow for the most accurate measurement of structured components. Therefore, the present study was conducted to study the operational efficiency of an immunization clinic in Delhi, India. Methods. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted at the immunization clinic of Rural Health Training Centre in Delhi, India, from January 2014 to March 2014. The study composed two stage evaluations, a passive observation and a time and motion study. Systemic random sampling method was used to select 863 mothers/caregivers attending the immunization clinic. Results. At the immunization clinic, the study participants spent 64.1% of their total time in waiting. For new cases, the mean time taken for initial registration and receiving postvaccination advice was found to be significantly longer than old cases. Delivering health care services took more time during Mondays and also during the first hour of the day. Conclusion. Results of this study will guide public health decision-makers at all government levels in planning and implementation of immunization programs in developing countries.

  14. Over the counter sale of drugs for medical abortion- Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of pharmacists of Delhi, India

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    Archana Mishra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the well defined law and highly liberal policy Government approved medical facilities are not the leading provider of abortion in Indian Scenario. Whether legally or not Pharmacists are already acting as provider of medical abortion for large number of women in India. Dispense of Medical abortion drugs via pharmacist has the advantages of convenience, relative anonymity, hasty transaction, easy accessibility and saving cost.Aims and Objectives: Objective of present study was to assess the over the counter sale of medical abortion in terms of knowledge, attitude and practices of pharmacists of Delhi, India.Material and Methods: It was a cross sectional interview based study conducted in 110 pharmacies of 6 districts of State of Delhi.Results: A total of 75 pharmacists and 35 pharmacy workers were interviewed. Knowledge and practices of all of them was inadequate in some aspects. 68% knew Medical abortion is legal and 57% thought that over the counter sale of drugs of medical abortion is also legal. Only 40.9% knew the correct regimen of mifepristone + misoprostol combination.Most of them is not aware of any serious side effects and failure rate. Their attitude is indifferent towards the clients but positive towards training in updating knowledge if given option.Conclusion: Their knowledge, attitude and practices while dispensing drugs for medical abortion were inappropriate to qualify them as an independent mid level provider in present scenario. Unregulated OTC sale of abortifacients is responsible for high number of self induced abortion related complications.

  15. Direct Determination of Zinc, Cadmium, Lead, Copper Metal in Tap Water of Delhi (India by Anodic Stripping Voltammetry Technique

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    Raj J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Salts of Zinc, Cadmium, Lead and Copper are taken incidentally or accidently and has become of great toxicological importance having toxic effect. In the present study direct determination of Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu metal was carried out from tap water of Delhi (India using differential pulse anodic stripping Voltammeter (DPASV at Hanging mercury dropping electrode (HMDE.Determination of Zn, Cd, Pb, Cu was done using Ammonium acetate buffer (pH 4.6 with a sweep rate (scan rate of 59.5 mV/s and pulse amplitude 50mV by HMDE by standard addition method. The solution was stirred during pre-electrolysis at -1150mV (vs. Ag/AgCl for 90 seconds and the potential was scanned from -1150V to +100V (vs..Ag/AgCl. As a result the minimum level of Zn, Cd, Pb, Cu was Zero and the concentration observed in the tap water sample of Delhi (India was determined as 0.174 mg/L-1, 0.001 mg/L-1, 0.002 mg/L-1, 0.011 mg/L-1 respectively.

  16. Report on the Global Seminar on the Role of Scientific & Engineering Societies in Development (New Delhi, India, December 1-5, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi.

    A global seminar on the role of scientific and engineering societies in development, held in New Delhi, India, in 1980, had as its objectives: (1) to document prior successful, and unsuccessful, activities of scientific and engineering societies in furthering development; (2) to identify and discuss the types of activities to which scientific and…

  17. Learning to Be Gendered: Gender Socialization in Early Adolescence Among Urban Poor in Delhi, India, and Shanghai, China.

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    Basu, Sharmistha; Zuo, Xiayun; Lou, Chaohua; Acharya, Rajib; Lundgren, Rebecka

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the study is to understand the gender socialization process in early adolescence. The study was located in two disadvantaged urban communities in Delhi, India and Shanghai, China and was part of the multicountry (15) Global Early Adolescent Study. Qualitative methodologies were used with boys and girls aged 11-13 years, including 16 group-based timeline exercises and 65 narrative interviews. In addition, 58 parents of participating adolescents were interviewed. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, translated, and uploaded into Atlas.ti for coding and thematic analysis. Boys and girls growing up in the same community were directed onto different pathways during their transition from early to late adolescence. Adolescents and parents in both sites identified mothers as the primary actor, socializing adolescents into how to dress and behave and what gender roles to play, although fathers were also mentioned as influential. Opposite-sex interactions were restricted, and violations enforced by physical violence. In Delhi, gender roles and mobility were more strictly enforced for girls than boys. Restrictions on opposite-sex interactions were rigid for both boys and girls in Delhi and Shanghai. Sanctions, including beating, for violating norms about boy-girl relationships were more punitive than those related to dress and demeanor, especially in Delhi. Education and career expectations were notably more equitable in Shanghai. Parents teach their children to adhere to inequitable gender norms in both Delhi and Shanghai. However, education and career expectations for boys and girls in the two sites differed. Although gender norms varied by site according to the particular cultural and historical context, similar patterns of gender inequity reflect the underlying patriarchal system in both settings. The tendency of parents to pass on the norms they grew up with is evident, yet these results illustrate the social construction of gender through children

  18. Abundance and distribution of gaseous ammonia and particulate ammonium at Delhi, India

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    S. Singh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study reports abundance and distribution of gaseous NH3 and particulate NH4+ at Delhi. Gaseous NH3 and particulate NH4+ concentrations were measured during pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons of the years 2010 and 2011. Average concentrations of gaseous NH3 during pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons were recorded as 26.4, 33.2 and 32.5 μg m−3, respectively. Gaseous NH3 concentrations were the highest during monsoon, thought to be due to decay and decomposition of plants and other biogenic material under wet conditions, leading to increased NH3 emission. The results showed that particulate NH4+ was always lower than the gaseous NH3 during all the seasons. The concentrations of particulate NH4+ were recorded as 11.6, 22.9 and 8.5 μg m−3 during pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. The percent fraction of particulate NH4+ was noticed to be highest during the monsoon season, which is attributed to increased humidity levels favouring partitioning into the aerosol phase. On an average, 33.3% of total N-NHx was present as particulate NH4+. Higher concentrations of NH3 noticed during night time may be due to stable atmospheric conditions. The study highlighted that, as compared with rural sites, urban sites showed higher concentrations of gaseous NH3 in India, which may be due to higher population density, human activities and poor sanitation arrangements.

  19. On the occurrence of Common Baron (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Limenitidinae: Euthalia aconthea Cramer, 1777 in the Delhi area and analysis of abiotic factors affecting its distribution in India

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    Rajv K. Singh Bais

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives details of the occurrence of Euthalia aconthea from Delhi area situated in the Indo-Gangetic plains.  Occurrence records of this species suggest that it is most frequent in five zones of India, despite the fact that its main larval food plant Mango Mangifera indica is abundantly available almost throughout India.  Possible abiotic factors are hypothesized for this distribution. 

  20. Prevalence and risk factors associated with the presence of Soil-Transmitted Helminths in children studying in Municipal Corporation of Delhi Schools of Delhi, India.

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    Ranjan, Sobhana; Passi, Santosh Jain; Singh, Som Nath

    2015-09-01

    To determine the type, prevalence, intensity and the potential risk factors for helminths infection harboured by primary school aged children from selected schools of Delhi, India. Stool samples collected from 347 boys and girls studying in grades I-IV (aged 5-15 years) were examined by the semi-quantitative Kato-Katz method for presence of eggs of soil-transmitted helminths. Questionnaire data on the potential risk factors, associated variables and consequences of infection were categorized as individual, household, hygiene/sanitation related and behavioural factors. Associations between infection and these factors were assessed by multiple logistic regressions. The overall prevalence of infection with any of the helminths was 29.7 %. The prevalence of single infection with Ascaris lumbricoides was 8.1 % while that of hookworm and Trichuris trichiura was 3.7 % each. Strongest predictors for the helminths presence were never deworming (OR = 1.76; 95 % CI: 1.05, 2.95), no facility for defection (OR = 4.31; 95 % CI: 1.22, 15.22), using left hand for cleaning anal region (OR = 2.01; 95 % CI: 1.18, 3.43) and not reporting pain in stomach (OR = 1.93; 95 % CI: 1.14, 3.26). Though the infection intensities were low, we highlighted some of the potential risk factors that increase the susceptibility to these infections. Periodic deworming along with improvement in hygiene and sanitation practices through concerted efforts, not only from the school infrastructure but also the community at large, will help prevent helminths transmission and reinfection.

  1. SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC CORRELATES OF OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY AMONG ADOLESCENTS OF AN URBAN AREA OF DELHI, INDIA

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    Rajesh Gupta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The problem of overweight and obesity is not confined only to developed countries. It may lead to adverse metabolic changes and increased risk of non communicable diseases. Most studies conducted in India are school based. The present community based study was undertaken to assess the prevalence of overweight and obesity and its sociodemographic correlates among adolescents of an urban area of Delhi.Material and Methods: A cross-sectional, community based study, using systematic random sampling was carried out during 2011 on 811 adolescents of both sexes from an urban area in South-West Delhi. A pre-designed and pre-tested proforma was used to collect information on socio-demographic and anthropometric variables. Subjects were classified as overweight or obese on the basis of NCHS/CDC 2000 Age and Sex Specific Percentile Growth Charts.Results: Prevalence of overweight and obesity was 15.1% and 7.2% respectively. When analyzed by gender, prevalence of overweight and obesity was 17.4% and 7.7% among boys and 12.4% and 6.7% among girls respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that prevalence was significantly higher among subjects studying in private schools (OR: 2.56; CI: 1.77 – 3.71Conclusion: Overnutrition is an emerging health problem in adolescent population which needs to be addressed with priority.

  2. CLIENT SATISFACTION AND PERCEPTIONS ABOUT QUALITY OF HEALTH CARE AT A PRIMARY HEALTH CENTRE OF DELHI, INDIA

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    N Rasheed

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quality of services shows a variation between the client and the provider. Therefore, it needs to be explored whether the quality of care or the lack of quality can explain the utilization of government health care. Objectives:This paper attempts to assess the utilization of health services and client satisfaction for services provided by a Primary Health Centre (PHC at Delhi, India. Setting and design: The study was a facility based cross sectional study. Exit interviews were conducted among 400 patients seeking outdoor patient department (OPD services of thePHC Palam, New Delhi from May 2010 to November 2010. Material and Methods: Exit interviews were conducted among the patients at each of the service delivery points in the PHC to assess the utilization of services and the satisfaction of clients with the available services. Results: Most respondents rated the services to be of good quality on various parameters of health delivery. The PHC was the preferred health facility (98% for treatment seeking in comparison to other healthcare facilities in the area.The main factors affecting utilization of primary health care services provided by the government were easy accessibility, low cost, less waiting time, and presence of co-operative health personnel. Conclusion:Provision of quality primary healthcare services to clients can result in better utilization of services at the primary level, thereby reducing the unnecessary burden of secondary and tertiary level facilities in addition to improving the health status of the community.

  3. A study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypic diversity & drug resistance mutations in Varanasi, north India

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    Anamika Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: One-fifth of the world′s new tuberculosis (TB cases and two-thirds of cases in the South East Asian region occur in India. Molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates has greatly facilitated to understand the transmission of TB. This study was aimed to investigate the molecular epidemiology of M. tuberculosis genotypes in Varanasi, north India, and their association with clinical presentation among patients with pulmonary TB. Methods: M. tuberculosis isolates from 104 TB patients attending a tertiary referral hospital of north India were screened for susceptibility to isoniazid (INH, rifampicin (RIF, ethambutol (EMB and streptomycin (STR by proportion method and multiplex-allele-specific-polymerase chain reaction (MAS-PCR. These were genotyped by spoligotyping. The spoligotype patterns were compared with those in the international SITVIT2 spoligotyping database. Results: Eighty three of 104 isolates were distributed in 38 SITs, of which SIT3366 was newly created within the present study. The mass of ongoing transmission with MDR-TB isolates in Varanasi, northern India, was linked to Beijing genotype followed by the CAS1_Delhi lineage. HIV-seropositive patients had a significantly higher proportion of clustered isolates than HIV-seronegative patients and compared with the wild type(wt isolates, the isolates with katG315Thr mutation were considerably more likely to be clustered. Interpretation & conclusions: This study gives an insight into the M. tuberculosis genetic biodiversity in Varanasi, north India, the predominant spoligotypes and their impact on disease transmission. In this region of north India, TB is caused by a wide diversity of spoligotypes with predominance of four genotype lineages: Beijing, CAS, EAI and T. The Beijing genotype was the most frequent single spoligotype and strongly associated with multi drug resistant (MDR-TB isolates. These findings may have important implications for control

  4. Headline violence and silenced pleasure: contested framings of consensual sex, power and rape in Delhi, India 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Emme; Gupta, Ankit

    2016-05-01

    Though coercion and rape have cast a persistent shadow over prospects of sexual health and consent in contemporary India, other narratives, agency and tools are quietly emerging to transform collective claims of power and bodily dignity. In these narratives from collectives, NGOs, on social media and among friends, dialogues about consent and pleasure feature prominently. This paper analyses statements in the news made by highly visible political and public figures regarding the subject of rape in the context of themes emerging from ethnography and semi-structured interviews with middle class people in Delhi. Using the device of social frameworks, contested framings of rape and consent are examined in order to interrogate essentialist gender norms, compare putative "causes" of rape, and highlight local efforts promoting sexual consent, health and well-being. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Association between full service and fast food restaurant density, dietary intake and overweight/obesity among adults in Delhi, India.

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    Patel, Opal; Shahulhameed, Safraj; Shivashankar, Roopa; Tayyab, Mohammad; Rahman, Atiqur; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tandon, Nikhil; Jaacks, Lindsay M

    2017-07-19

    The food environment has been implicated as an underlying contributor to the global obesity epidemic. However, few studies have evaluated the relationship between the food environment, dietary intake, and overweight/obesity in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The aim of this study was to assess the association of full service and fast food restaurant density with dietary intake and overweight/obesity in Delhi, India. Data are from a cross-sectional, population-based study conducted in Delhi. Using multilevel cluster random sampling, 5364 participants were selected from 134 census enumeration blocks (CEBs). Geographic information system data were available for 131 CEBs (n = 5264) from a field survey conducted using hand-held global positioning system devices. The number of full service and fast food restaurants within a 1-km buffer of CEBs was recorded by trained staff using ArcGIS software, and participants were assigned to tertiles of full service and fast food restaurant density based on their resident CEB. Height and weight were measured using standardized procedures and overweight/obesity was defined as a BMI ≥25 kg/m(2). The most common full service and fast food restaurants were Indian savory restaurants (57.2%) and Indian sweet shops (25.8%). Only 14.1% of full service and fast food restaurants were Western style. After adjustment for age, household income, education, and tobacco and alcohol use, participants in the highest tertile of full service and fast food restaurant density were less likely to consume fruit and more likely to consume refined grains compared to participants in the lowest tertile (both p food restaurant density were significantly more likely to be overweight/obese: odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 1.44 (1.24, 1.67). After adjustment for age, household income, and education, the effect was attenuated: 1.08 (0.92, 1.26). Results were consistent with further adjustment for tobacco and alcohol use, moderate physical

  6. Detection of dengue virus in individual Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in Delhi, India

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    Kumar Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusion: The study concludes that there was high MIR in the identified localities of low and medium income groups. Estimation of MIR in a female Aedes mosquito in the existing arsenals for dengue surveillance would be an added advantage for early warning of dengue outbreak. The presence of infected mosquitoes in identified localities of Delhi was alarming and require rigorous vector surveillance so that the severe outbreaks can be prevented.

  7. Awareness and Attitude of Select Professionals toward Euthanasia in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheetal; Gupta, Shakti; Singh, I B; Madaan, Nirupam

    2016-01-01

    The topic of euthanasia has induced differences not only among professionals in the medical fraternity but also in other fields as well. The dying process is being lengthened by the new state of art technologies erupting as such higher pace, and it is at the expense of standard quality of life and of a gracious death. To study the awareness and attitude toward euthanasia among select professionals in Delhi. It was a questionnaire-based descriptive cross-sectional study. The study population included doctors, nurses, judges, lawyers, journalist, and social activists of Delhi. Tool included a sociodemographic questionnaire, two questions to know awareness regarding euthanasia and a modified euthanasia attitude scale used to measure attitude toward euthanasia. Data were analyzed using Stata 11.2. Through our study, it is evident that professionals who participated in the study (judges, advocates, doctors, nurses, journalists, and social activists) in Delhi were familiar with the term euthanasia. No significant difference was seen in the attitude of professionals of different age group and sex toward euthanasia. Through this study, it is found that judiciary group most strongly endorsed euthanasia. The attitude of doctors was elicited from mixed group with doctors belonging to different specialties. Oncologists are not in favor of any form of euthanasia. However, doctors from other specialties did support euthanasia.

  8. Awareness and Attitude of Select Professionals toward Euthanasia in Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheetal; Gupta, Shakti; Singh, IB; Madaan, Nirupam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The topic of euthanasia has induced differences not only among professionals in the medical fraternity but also in other fields as well. The dying process is being lengthened by the new state of art technologies erupting as such higher pace, and it is at the expense of standard quality of life and of a gracious death. Aim: To study the awareness and attitude toward euthanasia among select professionals in Delhi. Methodology: It was a questionnaire-based descriptive cross-sectional study. The study population included doctors, nurses, judges, lawyers, journalist, and social activists of Delhi. Tool included a sociodemographic questionnaire, two questions to know awareness regarding euthanasia and a modified euthanasia attitude scale used to measure attitude toward euthanasia. Data were analyzed using Stata 11.2. Results: Through our study, it is evident that professionals who participated in the study (judges, advocates, doctors, nurses, journalists, and social activists) in Delhi were familiar with the term euthanasia. No significant difference was seen in the attitude of professionals of different age group and sex toward euthanasia. Conclusion: Through this study, it is found that judiciary group most strongly endorsed euthanasia. The attitude of doctors was elicited from mixed group with doctors belonging to different specialties. Oncologists are not in favor of any form of euthanasia. However, doctors from other specialties did support euthanasia. PMID:27803572

  9. Impact of current policies on future air quality and health outcomes in Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholakia, Hem H.; Purohit, Pallav; Rao, Shilpa; Garg, Amit

    2013-08-01

    A key policy challenge in Indian megacities is to curb high concentrations of PM2.5 and mitigate associated adverse health impacts. Using the Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies (GAINS) model we carry out an integrated analysis of the air quality regulations across different sectors for the city of Delhi. Our findings show that PM2.5 concentrations for Delhi will not reach the recommended national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) even by 2030 under the current policies scenario. Adopting advanced control technologies reduces PM2.5 concentrations by about 60% and all-cause mortality by half in 2030. Climate change mitigation policies significantly reduce greenhouse gases, but have a modest impact on reducing PM2.5 concentrations. Stringent policies to control the net flow of air pollution from trans-boundary sources will play a crucial role in reducing pollution levels in Delhi city. Achieving NAAQS requires a stringent policy portfolio that combines advanced control technologies with a switch to cleaner fuels and the control of trans-boundary pollution.

  10. Reporting adverse transfusion reactions: A retrospective study from tertiary care hospital from New Delhi, India.

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    Pahuja, Sangeeta; Puri, Vandana; Mahajan, Gunjan; Gupta, Prajwala; Jain, Manjula

    2017-01-01

    Blood transfusion services have achieved newer heights in the last decade, with developments in cellular techniques, component separation, and integration of molecular methods. However, the system of recording and reporting of the adverse events related to blood transfusion is developing countries like India is grossly inadequate and voluntary in nature. This study was undertaken to analyze the retrospective data on adverse events related to blood transfusions in our hospital. This retrospective study was done to examine all the transfusion related adverse events reported in a Regional Blood Bank Transfusion Centre of North India over a period of 9 years. Adverse transfusion events related to whole blood, red cell concentrates (RCCs), and all other components were analyzed and classified on the basis of their clinical features and laboratory tests. Average rate of transfusion reactions with the components was also assessed. Categorical variables were analyzed using the Chi-square test. P < 0.05 was taken to indicate a significant difference. During this period, a total of 1,60,973 blood/blood component units were issued by our blood bank to various departments of the hospital and 314 immediate transfusion events were reported. The rate of immediate transfusion reactions during the study was 0.19%. Average transfusion reaction rate with RCC was 0.25% with febrile nonhemolytic reactions being the most common type of adverse event (37.2%). Awareness should be increased among clinicians to correctly prevent, identify, and report transfusion-related adverse events. These measures should be implemented to increase blood transfusion quality and safety.

  11. Chromobacterium violaceum septicaemia from north India.

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    Ray, Pallab; Sharma, Jyoti; Marak, Rungmei S K; Singhi, S; Taneja, Neelam; Garg, Raj Kumar; Sharma, Meera

    2004-12-01

    Though Chromobacterium violaceum is a common inhabitant of soil and water in tropical and sub-tropical regions, human infections are rare but when they do occur result in high mortality. Since the first case from Malaysia in 1927, about 150 cases have been reported in world literature. Till date 6 cases have been reported from southern and eastern parts of India. We report here a case of C. violaceum septicaemia, probably the first case from north India. The patient, a 6 and a half year old boy was admitted with high fever. The patient had anaemia, neutrophilic leucocytosis and bilateral chest infiltrates. Routine and bacteriological investigations were carried out to establish the aetiological diagnosis. C. violaceum was isolated in pure culture from blood and pus. The patient was successfully treated with ciprofloxacin and amikacin. This is probably the first documented case report of C. violaceum infection from north India and the only Indian case with septicaemia which survived.

  12. The Spread of Dengue in an Endemic Urban Milieu--The Case of Delhi, India.

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    Olivier Telle

    Full Text Available Dengue is a major international public health concern, one of the most important arthropod-borne diseases. More than 3.5 billion people are at risk of dengue infection and there are an estimated 390 million dengue infections annually. This prolific increase has been connected to societal changes such as population growth and increasing urbanization generating intense agglomeration leading to proliferation of synanthropic mosquito species. Quantifying the spatio-temporal epidemiology of dengue in large cities within the context of a Geographic Information System is a first step in the identification of socio-economic risk factors.This Project has been approved by the ethical committee of Institut Pasteur. Data has been anonymized and de-identified prior to geolocalisation and analysis. A GIS was developed for Delhi, enabling typological characterization of the urban environment. Dengue cases identified in the Delhi surveillance system from 2008 to 2010 were collated, localised and embedded within this GIS. The spatio-temporal distribution of dengue cases and extent of clustering were analyzed. Increasing distance from the forest in Delhi reduced the risk of occurrence of a dengue case. Proximity to a hospital did not increase risk of a notified dengue case. Overall, there was high heterogeneity in incidence rate within areas with the same socio-economical profiles and substantial inter-annual variability. Dengue affected the poorest areas with high density of humans, but rich areas were also found to be infected, potentially because of their central location with respect to the daily mobility network of Delhi. Dengue cases were highly clustered in space and there was a strong relationship between the time of introduction of the virus and subsequent cluster size. At a larger scale, earlier introduction predicted the total number of cases.DENV epidemiology within Delhi has a forest fire signature. The stochastic nature of this invasion process

  13. The Spread of Dengue in an Endemic Urban Milieu–The Case of Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telle, Olivier; Vaguet, Alain; Yadav, N. K.; Lefebvre, B.; Daudé, Eric; Paul, Richard E.; Cebeillac, A.; Nagpal, B. N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is a major international public health concern, one of the most important arthropod-borne diseases. More than 3.5 billion people are at risk of dengue infection and there are an estimated 390 million dengue infections annually. This prolific increase has been connected to societal changes such as population growth and increasing urbanization generating intense agglomeration leading to proliferation of synanthropic mosquito species. Quantifying the spatio-temporal epidemiology of dengue in large cities within the context of a Geographic Information System is a first step in the identification of socio-economic risk factors. Methodology/Principal Findings This Project has been approved by the ethical committee of Institut Pasteur. Data has been anonymized and de-identified prior to geolocalisation and analysis. A GIS was developed for Delhi, enabling typological characterization of the urban environment. Dengue cases identified in the Delhi surveillance system from 2008 to 2010 were collated, localised and embedded within this GIS. The spatio-temporal distribution of dengue cases and extent of clustering were analyzed. Increasing distance from the forest in Delhi reduced the risk of occurrence of a dengue case. Proximity to a hospital did not increase risk of a notified dengue case. Overall, there was high heterogeneity in incidence rate within areas with the same socio-economical profiles and substantial inter-annual variability. Dengue affected the poorest areas with high density of humans, but rich areas were also found to be infected, potentially because of their central location with respect to the daily mobility network of Delhi. Dengue cases were highly clustered in space and there was a strong relationship between the time of introduction of the virus and subsequent cluster size. At a larger scale, earlier introduction predicted the total number of cases. Conclusions/Significance DENV epidemiology within Delhi has a forest fire signature

  14. Multi drug resistance and Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamases in clinical isolates of Shigella: A study from New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Prabhav; Uppal, Beena; Ghosh, Roumi; Krishna Prakash, S; Chakravarti, Anita; Jha, Arun Kumar; Rajeshwari, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is an important cause of gastroenteritis in local Indian population, as well as of traveler's diarrhea in the international visitors to India. These patients often require appropriate antimicrobial therapy; however, rapid development of antimicrobial resistance poses a major hurdle in achieving this goal. A prospective study was conducted during 2009-12 in New Delhi, India, including 6339 stool samples from gastroenteritis patients. 121 Shigella strains were identified on the basis of colony morphology, biochemical reactions, serotyping and ipaH gene based PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing by disc diffusion, MIC determination by Vitek(®) 2 and phenotypic tests for ESBL/AmpC production were done. Nineteen percent strains (23/121) were found to be resistant to third generation cephalosporins and all were phenotypically confirmed to be ESBL producers; one strain was positive for AmpC. ESBL producing strains were also found to be significantly more resistant (p Shigella is a matter of concern for the local population as well as international travelers. Therefore, better national level antimicrobial management programs are the priority needs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Performance of skylight illuminance inside a dome shaped adobe house under composite climate at New Delhi (India): A typical zero energy passive house

    OpenAIRE

    Arvind Chel

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents annual experimental performance of pyramid shaped skylight for daylighting of a dome shaped adobe house located at solar energy park in New Delhi (India). This approach of single story dome shaped building with skylight is more useful for rural and semi-urban sectors for both office and residential buildings reducing artificial lighting energy consumption. The hourly measured data of inside and outside illuminance for three different working surface levels inside the exist...

  16. Detection of hepatitis B virus subgenotypes D1, D3 and A1 in blood donors in NCT of Delhi, India

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetically hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been classified into eight major genotypes. The dominant genotype in New Delhi is genotype D. HBV genotype D and A have been well documented from different parts of India. In this study, the sequences of HBV isolates from 12 asymptomatic blood donors were amplified; the resulting amplicons were sequenced. Analysis showed that 6 isolates belonged to HBV genotype D1, 3 belonged to D3 and rest 3 belonged to A1.

  17. Size distributions of n-alkanes, fatty acids and fatty alcohols in springtime aerosols from New Delhi, India.

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    Kang, Mingjie; Fu, Pingqing; Aggarwal, Shankar G; Kumar, Sudhanshu; Zhao, Ye; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-12-01

    Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected in New Delhi, India from March 6 to April 6, 2012. Homologous series of n-alkanes (C19C33), n-fatty acids (C12C30) and n-alcohols (C16C32) were measured using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results showed a high-variation in the concentrations and size distributions of these chemicals during non-haze, haze, and dust storm days. In general, n-alkanes, n-fatty acids and n-alcohols presented a bimodal distribution, peaking at 0.7-1.1 μm and 4.7-5.8 μm for fine modes and coarse modes, respectively. Overall, the particulate matter mainly existed in the coarse mode (≥2.1 μm), accounting for 64.8-68.5% of total aerosol mass. During the haze period, large-scale biomass burning emitted substantial fine hydrophilic smoke particles into the atmosphere, which leads to relatively larger GMDs (geometric mean diameter) of n-alkanes in the fine mode than those during the dust storms and non-haze periods. Additionally, the springtime dust storms transported a large quantity of coarse particles from surrounding or local areas into the atmosphere, enhancing organic aerosol concentration and inducing a remarkable size shift towards the coarse mode, which are consistent with the larger GMDs of most organic compounds especially in total and coarse modes. Our results suggest that fossil fuel combustion (e.g., vehicular and industrial exhaust), biomass burning, residential cooking, and microbial activities could be the major sources of lipid compounds in the urban atmosphere in New Delhi.

  18. Study on air pollution trends (2010-2015 due to fireworks during Diwali festival in Delhi, India

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    Abhinav Pandey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The burning of massive amount of fire crackers on the evening(s of a nation-wide celebrated festival called ‘Diwali’ in India, gives rise to a remarkably high concentration of criteria air pollutants and it is of utmost importance to investigate the impact of such high loads originated during a relatively shorter time span in a mega-city like Delhi where the situation of ambient air quality has already been alarming almost through-out the year. In view of the same, the present study analyzes available concentration data during this festival’s night for five criteria pollutants namely PM10, PM2.5, SO2, NO2, and CO (Particulate Matter, Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon Monoxide respectively along with NH3 at six key locations of Delhi. Following the analysis, PM10 concentration in Anand Vihar during nighttime of Diwali was reported to be ~8 times higher than the 24 hours values prescribed by National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS. On the other hand, the same at IGI airport was recorded lowest even though about 3.5 times that of the guiding standard. PM2.5 concentrations were reported as highest and lowest at RK Puram and Civil lines respectively, in both the cases quite exceeding the comparable standard values. Interestingly, remaining criteria pollutants, namely, SO2, NO2 and CO along with NH3 measured in 2015 showed no values in excess of corresponding 24-hrs guidelines, thereby reporting a better scenario compared to previous years. Further, the extensive use of firecrackers during Diwali festival leads to substantial increase in air pollutants necessitating special measures to control.

  19. Mineralogical Mapping using Field and Image Based Spectra in Parts of Delhi-Aravalli Fold Belt, Rajasthan, India

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    Mahmuda Khatun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to retrieve reflectance utilizing the raw (radiance data from EO-1 Hyperion dataset and to evaluate its application potential in mineral exploration in parts of Delhi-Aravalli Fold Belt region of western India. The area is marked by basement Precambrian gneissic rocks, overlain by supra crustal cover of the Aravalli Super group, Delhi Super group, Vindhyan Super group and younger rocks. These rocks are highly metamorphosed, structurally deformed and show sporadic occurrences of important ore minerals deposits of metallic (Pb, Zn, Cu and non metallic minerals (Apatite and Marbles. This paper involves generation of hyperspectral image spectra and field spectra to identify spectral characteristics of minerals. FLAASH (expansion atmospheric correction model was applied to retrieve reflectance image from the radiance data. Preprocessing techniques involved selection of good spectral bands, correction of missing lines and pixels before application of FLAASH atmospheric model. Using image processing techniques suitable for hyperspectral image analysis (Spectral Angle Mapper, MNF, End-member matching, Hyperion data over Udaipur, Dungarpur and Chittorgarh districts was analysed and minerals were identified such as rectorite, pyrope, dolomite, montmorillonite, erionite, talc, phologopite, pyrrohite, hematite,olivine, diopside, pyrite, tephrite, lepidolite, andalusite and Fe-rich chlorite. The end member map generated by using advance techniques like SAM was validated using ground truth and spot sample collected, therein, was further analyzed using spectro radiometer in VNIR range. Keeping view on the ubiquitous hydrothermal origin of base metals, special emphasis was put to clay-mica group of minerals as they often proxy for the zone of alteration. This lead to defining the exact zone of hydrothermal alteration throwing light on proximity with igneous intrusion and type associated of metal. Application of such technology

  20. Health Literacy Levels among Outpatients at a Tertiary Hospital in Delhi, India

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    Monika Sahoo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health literacy is defined as the cognitive and social skills which determine the motivation and ability of individuals to gain access to, understand, and use information in ways which promote and maintain good health. This study was conducted to determine health literacy levels and the associated factors among patients attending the outpatient departments of a tertiary care hospital in Delhi. Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Delhi over a period of four months. A total of 150 patients were included in the study. Fifty patients from the Diabetes Clinic, 50 patients from the Hypertension Clinic, and 50 patients with anemia from the Antenatal Outpatient Department (OPD were selected using a convenience sampling method. Data was analyzed using Epi Info software. Statistical analysis was conducted with the chi-square test and the Fisher’s exact test. P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Out of 50 diabetic subjects, 37 (74% understood the information about their blood sugar levels as explained to them by the doctor. Similar results were found among hypertensive subjects as well. Furthermore, education status was significantly associated with health literacy. In terms of understanding the regimen of medications, significant association was seen with age, sex, and education. Conclusion: Education status, age, and gender are important determinants of health literacy. Our results support that innovative strategies of communication should be used to improve health literacy among patients.

  1. Frequency dependent attenuation of seismic waves for Delhi and surrounding area, India

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    Babita Sharma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The attenuation properties of Delhi & surrounding region have been investigated using 62 local earthquakes recorded at nine stations. The frequency dependent quality factors Qa (using P-waves and Qb (using S-waves have been determined using the coda normalization method. Quality factor of coda-waves (Qc has been estimated using the single backscattering model in the frequency range from 1.5 Hz to 9 Hz. Wennerberg formulation has been used to estimate Qi (intrinsic attenuation parameter and Qs (scattering attenuation parameter for the region. The values Qa, Qb, Qc, Qi and Qs estimated are frequency dependent in the range of 1.5Hz-9Hz. Frequency dependent relations are estimated as Qa=52f1.03, Qb=98f1.07 and Qc=158f0.97. Qc estimates lie in between the values of Qi and Qs but closer to Qi at all central frequencies. Comparison between Qi and Qs shows that intrinsic absorption is predominant over scattering for Delhi and surrounding region. 

  2. Memories of me: comparisons from Osnabrueck (Germany) and Delhi (India) students and their mothers.

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    Demuth, Carolin; Chaudhary, Nandita; Keller, Heidi

    2011-03-01

    The present study explores the dialogical relationship between autobiographical remembering, self and culture from a developmental and trans-generational perspective. It draws on a comparative design including self-describing memories of 10 Indian students from Delhi and 13 German students from Osnabrueck. Moreover, stories often told about oneself during childhood were investigated from the students' as well as from their mothers' perspective. Analysis revealed not only culture-specific ways of telling about one's past that point to different prevailing socio-cultural philosophies, but also trans-generational similarities of stories repeatedly told to and about the child. The findings suggest that self-defining stories develop and are dialogically intertwined with the cultural narrative practices that children engage in during the course of socialization. Theoretical implications for our understanding of self-development are discussed from a Bakhtinian perspective.

  3. Field and Microstructure Study of Transpressive Jogdadi shear zone near Ambaji, Aravalli- Delhi Mobile Belt, NW India and its tectonic implication on the exhumation of granulites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Sudheer Kumar; Biswal, Tapas Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Aravalli- Delhi mobile belt is situated in the northwestern part of Indian shield. It comprises tectono- magmatic histories from Archean to Neoproterozoic age. It possesses three tectono- magmatic metamorphic belts namely Bhilwara Supergroup (3000 Ma), Aravalli Supergorup (1800 Ma) and Delhi Supergroup (1100 -750Ma). The Delhi Supergroup is divided in two parts North Delhi and South Delhi; North Delhi (1100 Ma to 850 Ma) is older than South Delhi (850 Ma to 750 Ma). The study area falls in the South Delhi terrane; BKSK granulites are the major unit in this terrane. BKSK granulites comprise gabbro- norite-basic granulite, pelitic granulite, calcareous granulite and occur within the surrounding of low grade rocks as meta- rhyolite, quartzite, mica schist and amphibolites. The high grade and low grade terranes share a sheared margin. Granulites have undergone three phases of folding, intruded by three phases of granites and traversed by many shear zones. One of the shear zones is Jogdadi shear zone which consists of granitic mylonites and other sheared rocks. Jogdadi shear zone carries the evidence of both ductile as well as brittle shearing. It strikes NW- SE; the mylonitic foliation dip moderately to SW or NE and stretching lineations are oblique towards SE. The shear zone is folded and gabbro- norite - basic granulite occurs at the core. One limb of fold passes over coarse grained granite while other limb occurs over gabbro- norite- basic granulite. Presence of mylonitic foliation, asymmetric folding, S-C fabrics, porphyroclasts, mica fishes and book shelf- gliding are indicative of ductile deformation. Most of the porphyroclasts are sigmoidal and delta types but there are also some theta and phi type porphyroclasts. Book shelf-gliding structures are at low angle to the C plane. The shear zone successively shows protomylonite, mylonite and ultramylonites from margin to the centre. As the mylonitization increases recrystallized quartz grains appear. Porphyroclasts

  4. Emissions Inventory of Anthropogenic PM2.5 and PM10 in Mega city, Delhi, India for Air Quality Forecasting during CWG- 2010

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    Sahu, S.; Beig, G.; Schultz, M.; Parkhi, N.; Stein, O.

    2012-04-01

    The mega city of Delhi is the second largest urban agglomeration in India with 16.7 mio. inhabitants. Delhi has the highest per capita power consumption of electricity in India and the demand has risen by more than 50% during the last decade. Emissions from commercial, power, domestic and industrial sectors have strongly increased causing more and more environmental problems due to air pollution and its adverse impacts on human health. Particulate matter (PM) of size less than 2.5-micron (PM2.5) and 10 micron (PM10) have emerged as primary pollutants of concern due to their adverse impact on human health. As part of the System of Air quality Forecasting and Research (SAFAR) project developed for air quality forecasting during the Commonwealth Games (CWG) - 2010, a high resolution Emission Inventory (EI) of PM10 and PM2.5 has been developed for the metropolitan city Delhi for the year 2010. The comprehensive inventory involves detailed activity data and has been developed for a domain of 70km×65km with a 1.67km×1.67km resolution covering Delhi and its surrounding region (i.e. National Capital Region (NCR)). In creating this inventory, Geographical Information System (GIS) based techniques were used for the first time in India. The major sectors considered are, transport, thermal power plants, industries, residential and commercial cooking along with windblown road dust which is found to play a major role for the megacity environment. Extensive surveys were conducted among the Delhi slum dwellers (Jhuggi) in order to obtain more robust estimates for the activity data related to domestic cooking and heating. Total emissions of PM10 and PM2.5 including wind blown dust over the study area are found to be 236 Gg/yr and 94 Gg/yr respectively. About half of the PM10 emissions stem from windblown road dust. The new emission inventory has been used for regional air quality forecasts in the Delhi region during the Commonwealth games (SAFAR project), and they will soon be

  5. Role of meteorology in seasonality of air pollution in megacity Delhi, India.

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    Guttikunda, Sarath K; Gurjar, Bhola R

    2012-05-01

    The winters in megacity Delhi are harsh, smoggy, foggy, and highly polluted. The pollution levels are approximately two to three times those monitored in the summer months, and the severity is felt not only in the health department but also in the transportation department, with regular delays at airport operations and series of minor and major accidents across the road corridors. The impacts felt across the city are both manmade (due to the fuel burning) and natural (due to the meteorological setting), and it is hard to distinguish their respective proportions. Over the last decade, the city has gained from timely interventions to control pollution, and yet, the pollution levels are as bad as the previous year, especially for the fine particulates, the most harmful of the criteria pollutants, with a daily 2009 average of 80 to 100 μg/m(3). In this paper, the role of meteorology is studied using a Lagrangian model called Atmospheric Transport Modeling System in tracer mode to better understand the seasonality of pollution in Delhi. A clear conclusion is that irrespective of constant emissions over each month, the estimated tracer concentrations are invariably 40% to 80% higher in the winter months (November, December, and January) and 10% to 60% lower in the summer months (May, June, and July), when compared to annual average for that year. Along with monitoring and source apportionment studies, this paper presents a way to communicate complex physical characteristics of atmospheric modeling in simplistic manner and to further elaborate linkages between local meteorology and pollution.

  6. Growing stock and woody biomass assessment in Asola-Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary, Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, S P S; Nandy, S; Gupta, Mohini

    2014-09-01

    Biomass is an important entity to understand the capacity of an ecosystem to sequester and accumulate carbon over time. The present study, done in collaboration with the Delhi Forest Department, focused on the estimation of growing stock and the woody biomass in the so-called lungs of Delhi--the Asola-Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary in northern Aravalli hills. The satellite-derived vegetation strata were field-inventoried using stratified random sampling procedure. Growing stock was calculated for the individual sample plots using field data and species-specific volume equations. Biomass was estimated from the growing stock and the specific gravity of the wood. Among the four vegetation types, viz. Prosopis juliflora, Anogeissus pendula, forest plantation and the scrub, the P. juliflora was found to be the dominant vegetation in the area, covering 23.43 km(2) of the total area. The study revealed that P. juliflora forest with moderate density had the highest (10.7 m(3)/ha) while A. pendula forest with moderate density had the lowest (3.6 m(3)/ha) mean volume. The mean woody biomass was also found to be maximum in P. juliflora forest with moderate density (10.3 t/ha) and lowest in A. pendula forest with moderate density (3.48 t/ha). The total growing stock was estimated to be 20,772.95 m(3) while total biomass worked out to be 19,366.83 t. A strong correlation was noticed between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the growing stock (R(2) = 0.84)/biomass (R(2) = 0.88). The study demonstrated that growing stock and the biomass of the woody vegetation in Asola-Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary could be estimated with high accuracy using optical remote sensing data.

  7. 75 FR 58361 - U.S. Franchise Trade Mission to India Mumbai, Hyderabad, and New Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... and travel/tourism. Based on these market trends and previous successes at post, we will focus on food... India's rapid economic growth. Education and training services, professional services, and hospitality...

  8. Fungi of Delhi. XXXIV. Zygorhynchus japonicus, a new record from India and its hyperparasite

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    Rani Grupta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Zygorhynchus japonicus was isolated from decaing leaves of Corchorus olitorius. This is a new record from India and a second report after its isolation. Aspergillus flavus was observed to parasitize it quite frequently and distinctly.

  9. Determination of wood burning and fossil fuel contribution of black carbon at Delhi, India using aerosol light absorption technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S; Pipal, A S; Srivastava, A K; Bisht, D S; Pandithurai, G

    2015-02-01

    A comprehensive measurement program of effective black carbon (eBC), fine particle (PM2.5), and carbon monoxide (CO) was undertaken during 1 December 2011 to 31 March 2012 (winter period) in Delhi, India. The mean mass concentrations of eBC, PM2.5, and CO were recorded as 12.1 ± 8.7 μg/m(3), 182.75 ± 114.5 μg/m(3), and 3.41 ± 1.6 ppm, respectively, during the study period. Also, the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) was estimated from eBC and varied from 0.38 to 1.29 with a mean value of 1.09 ± 0.11. The frequency of occurrence of AAE was ~17 % less than unity whereas ~83 % greater than unity was observed during the winter period in Delhi. The mass concentrations of eBC were found to be higher by ~34 % of the average value of eBC (12.1 μg/m(3)) during the study period. Sources of eBC were estimated, and they were ~94 % from fossil fuel (eBCff) combustion whereas only 6 % was from wood burning (eBCwb). The ratio between eBCff and eBCwb was 15, which indicates a higher impact from fossil fuels compared to biomass burning. When comparing eBCff during day and night, a factor of three higher concentrations was observed in nighttime than daytime, and it is due to combustion of fossil fuel (diesel vehicle emission) and shallow boundary layer conditions. The contribution of eBCwb in eBC was higher between 1800 and 2100 hours due to burning of wood/biomass. A significant correlation between eBC and PM2.5 (r = 0.78) and eBC and CO (r = 0.46) indicates the similarity in location sources. The mass concentration of eBC was highest (23.4 μg/m(3)) during the month of December when the mean visibility (VIS) was lowest (1.31 km). Regression analysis among wind speed (WS), VIS, soot particles, and CO was studied, and significant negative relationships were seen between VIS and eBC (-0.65), eBCff (-0.66), eBCwb (-0.34), and CO (-0.65); however, between WS and eBC (-0.68), eBCff (-0.67), eBCwb (-0.28), and CO (-0.53). The regression analysis indicated

  10. Public-Private roundtables at the fourth Clean Energy Ministerial, 17-18 April 2013, New Delhi, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, Tracey [Energetics, Incorporated, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-06-30

    The Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM) is a high-level global forum to share best practices and promote policies and programs that advance clean energy technologies and accelerate the transition to a global clean energy economy. The CEM works to increase energy efficiency, expand clean energy supply, and enhance clean energy access worldwide. To achieve these goals, the CEM pursues a three-part strategy that includes high-level policy dialogue, technical cooperation, and engagement with the private sector and other stakeholders. Each year, energy ministers and other high-level delegates from the 23 participating CEM governments come together to discuss clean energy, review clean energy progress, and identify tangible next steps to accelerate the clean energy transition. The U.S. Department of Energy, which played a crucial role in launching the CEM, hosted the first annual meeting of energy ministers in Washington, DC, in June 2010. The United Arab Emirates hosted the second Clean Energy Ministerial in 2011, and the United Kingdom hosted the third Clean Energy Ministerial in 2012. In April 2013, India hosted the fourth Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM4) in New Delhi. Key insights from CEM4 are summarized in the report. It captures the ideas and recommendations of the government and private sector leaders who participated in the discussions on six discussion topics: reducing soft costs of solar PV; energy management systems; renewables policy and finance; clean vehicle adoption; mini-grid development; and power systems in emerging economies.

  11. Accelerated Failure Time Shared Frailty Models: Application to HIV/AIDS Patients on Anti-Retroviral Therapy in Delhi, India

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    Prafulla Kumar SWAIN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present paper demonstrates the applications of Accelerated Failure Time (AFT model with gamma and inverse Gaussian frailty distributions to estimate the effect of prognostic factors on the survival of HIV/AIDS patients undergoing Antiretroviral Therapy (ART in Delhi, India. Material and Methods: The results of both these models have been compared to without frailty model. Akaike Information Criterion (AIC and Bayesian Information criterion (BIC have been used to select best model for HIV/AIDS data. Results: The prognostic factors sex, mode of transmission, baseline hemoglobin and weight are found to be statistically significant (P-value <0.05 for HIV/AIDS patients on ART. Gamma shared frailty model with lognormal as baseline distribution is found to be the best model for HIV/AIDS patients. The model also reflected there is strong evidence of high degree of heterogeneity in the HIV/AIDS patients. Conclusion: Therefore shared frailty model is an appropriate approach for analyzing the HIV/AIDS data than without frailty model.

  12. From rakhi to romance: negotiating 'acceptable' relationships in co-educational secondary schools in New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Padmini

    2017-07-14

    Based on a multi-method study conducted with middle-class young people (aged 15-17) in three secondary schools in New Delhi, India, this paper focuses on heterosocial dynamics within school peer cultures as an important site of learning about gender and sexuality. Findings indicate that young people negotiate and adapt rakhi (brother-sister) relationships to form less strictly platonic heterosocial friendships, which leave open the possibility of romance. Students' preferences for certain heterosocial relationships are considered within the context of wider cultural narratives. For example, students often rejected rakhi relationships, tied to traditional, conservative values, in favour of heterosocial friendships associated with more modern and desirable social patterns. Moreover, students' own definitions of acceptable heterosocial interactions within peer cultures suggest that they are adept at negotiating norms of gender segregation that are enforced in co-educational schools. In contrast to other formal and informal sources of sexual learning available to them, experiences and stories of romances circulating in schools seemed to offer students alternative, more positive ways of understanding teenage intimacy and sexuality.

  13. Impact of introducing the line probe assay on time to treatment initiation of MDR-TB in Delhi, India.

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    Neeta Singla

    Full Text Available SETTING: National Institute of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases (erstwhile Lala Ram Sarup Institute in Delhi, India. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate before and after the introduction of the line Probe Assay (LPA a the overall time to MDR-TB diagnosis and treatment initiation; b the step-by-step time lapse at each stage of patient management; and c the lost to follow-up rates. METHODS: A retrospective cohort analysis was done using data on MDR-TB patients diagnosed during 2009-2012 under Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme at the institute. RESULTS: Following the introduction of the LPA in 2011, the overall median time from identification of patients suspected for MDR-TB to the initiation of treatment was reduced from 157 days (IQR 127-200 to 38 days (IQR 30-79. This reduction was attributed mainly to a lower diagnosis time at the laboratory. Lost to follow-up rates were also significantly reduced after introduction of the LPA (12% versus 39% pre-PLA. CONCLUSION: Introduction of the LPA was associated with a major reduction in the delay between identification of patients suspected for MDR-TB and initiation of treatment, attributed mainly to a reduction in diagnostic time in the laboratory.

  14. Short term effects of criteria air pollutants on daily mortality in Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Sanjoy; Ahmed, Sirajuddin; Siddiqui, Weqar Ahmad; Ghosh, Santu

    2017-02-01

    Various epidemiological studies conducted in different parts of the world have conclusively established that the adverse health effects are associated with common urban air pollutants. Although several recent studies revealed the poor air quality status in Delhi, but limited evidence of the impact of criterion air pollutants on human health remains a big limitation for relevant policy changes. So we conducted a time series to estimate the short term effects of ambient air pollution on all-natural-cause mortality in Delhi for the period 2008 to 2010. The study examined the impact of criteria air pollutants [particulate matter less than 10 μm in diameter (PM10), sulphur di-oxide (SO2), Nitrogen di-oxide (NO2), Carbon monoxide (CO) and Ozone (O3)] on daily all-cause-mortality rate. A semi-parametric regression model was developed to estimate the short term effects of air pollutants on daily all-natural-cause-mortality adjusting nonlinear confounding of time, temperature and relative humidity. A significant association of all-natural-cause mortality in association with short-term exposure to particulate as well as the gaseous pollutants were observed. The study estimated 0.14% (95% CI 0.02%-0.26%) increase in all-cause-mortality for every 10 μg/m3 increase in PM10 concentration. Among the gaseous pollutants, NO2 has been found to show most significant positive association of 1.00% (95% CI 0.07%-1.93%) increase in all-cause-mortality with every 10 μg/m3 increase in daily NO2 concentration. The effect of O3 and CO has been observed to be significant after controlling the effects of NO2. Analysis by different age groups reveals that particulate matter has maximum effect estimate in the age group ≥65 years (RR 1.002, 95% CI 1.000 to 1.004) whereas gaseous pollutants have been found to exhibit maximum effect estimate (RR 1.016, 95% CI 1.002 to 1.030) in the age group 5-44 years. The results of the present effect estimates appeared consistent with previous findings and

  15. Evaluation of pharmacists' services for dispensing emergency contraceptive pills in Delhi, India: A mystery shopper study

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    Pikee Saxena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although emergency contraceptive pills are available over the counter, the quality of consultation, including key areas of contraceptive counseling and prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STI, has not been well documented. Objective: To evaluate actual pharmacist services while dispensing emergency contraception through a mystery shopper technique. Material and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 81 pharmacies situated in Delhi by 4 trained mystery shoppers posed as customers over a period of 6 months. Results: None of the pharmacists asked about the time lapsed since last unprotected sexual intercourse or last menstrual period before deciding the eligibility of the customer. The majority were unclear about side effects associated with emergency contraception (78.57% or with anticipated changes in menstrual flow (78.57%; 85.71% did not know whether subsequent unprotected intercourse would be protected. Only 15.71% counseled shoppers regarding risk of STI on asking leading questions and 88.5% did not provide any contraceptive advice. Conclusion: There is a huge gap in the technical knowledge and mindset of the pharmacists when it comes to checking for the eligibility of the client and providing advice regarding use of regular contraception and barrier for protection from STI, which needs to be addressed in order to realize the full benefit of making emergency contraceptive pills available over the counter.

  16. Treatment pathways of extrapulmonary patients diagnosed at a tertiary care hospital in Delhi, India

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    Manoj Grover

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to put extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients early on treatment, it is important to study pathways, which these patients adopt in for seeking treatment. Materials and Methods: In order to study the treatment pathways of extrapulmonary patients and assess appropriate points for intervention, a cross-sectional study was conducted in chest clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Delhi. Results: Factors associated with longer paths included reason for going to first health facility (nearness and known provider, availing more than one health facilities, presenting symptoms of fever, joint pain, nodular skin swelling and skin lesion. Self-referral to the chest clinic was associated with shorter paths. Lower level of education, occupation, non-serious perception of the disease and visiting five health facilities were significantly associated with patient delay of more than 3.5 weeks. Symptoms of fever, joint pain and skin lesion, visiting private health facility first, availing more than two health facilities and travelling distance of more than 100 km to reach chest clinic were significantly associated with the health facility delay of more than 4.5 weeks. Conclusions: Increasing public awareness, training of private practitioners and capacity building of government facilities will help in reducing delay.

  17. Molecular characterization of dengue and chikungunya virus strains circulating in New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afreen, Nazia; Deeba, Farah; Khan, Wajihul H; Haider, Shakir H; Kazim, Syed Naqui; Ishrat, Romana; Naqvi, Irshad Hussain; Shareef, Mohammad Y; Broor, Shobha; Ahmed, Anwar; Parveen, Shama

    2014-12-01

    Dengue and chikungunya are acute viral infections with overlapping clinical symptoms. Both diseases are transmitted by common mosquito vectors resulting in their co-circulation in a region. Molecular and serological tests specific for both dengue and chikungunya infections were performed on 87 acute phase blood samples collected from patients with suspected dengue/chikungunya infections in Delhi from September to December, 2011. RT-PCR and IgM ELISA were performed to detect dengue virus (DENV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV). NS1 and IgG ELISA were also performed to detect DENV specific antigen and secondary DENV infection. DENV infection was detected in 49%, CHIKV infection in 29% and co-infection with DENV and CHIKV in 10% of the samples by RT-PCR. DENV serotypes 1, 2 and 3 were detected in this study. Nine DENV-1 strains, six DENV-2 strains and 20 CHIKV strains were characterized by DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of their respective envelope protein genes. DENV-1 strains grouped in the American African genotype, DENV-2 strains in the Cosmopolitan genotype and CHIKV strains in the East Central South African genotype by phylogenetic analysis. This is one of the few studies reporting the phylogeny of two dengue virus serotypes (DENV-1 and DENV-2) and CHIKV. Surveillance and monitoring of DENV and CHIKV strains are important for design of strategies to control impending epidemics.

  18. Socio-cultural aspects of menstruation in an urban slum in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, S; Sharma, N; Sahay, R

    2001-05-01

    This paper attempts to understand the experience of menstruation in the socio-cultural context of an urban Indian slum. Observations were gathered as part of a larger study of reproductive tract infections in women in Delhi, using both qualitative and quantitative methods. The qualitative phase consisted of 52 in-depth interviews, three focus groups discussions and five key informant interviews. In the quantitative phase inferences were drawn from 380 respondents. Mean age at menarche was 13.5. Onset of menarche is associated with physical maturity and the ability to marry and reproduce. However, a culture of silence surrounds menarche, an event which took the women interviewed almost by surprise. Most were previously unaware that it would happen and the information they were given was sparse. Menstruation is associated with taboos and restrictions on work, sex, food and bathing, but the taboos observed by most of the women were avoidance of sex and not participating in religious practices; the taboo on not going into the kitchen, which had been observed in rural joint households, was not being observed after migration from rural areas due to lack of social support mechanisms. There is a clear need to provide information to young women on these subjects in ways that are acceptable to their parents, schools and the larger community, and that allow them to raise their own concerns. Education on these subjects should be envisaged as a long-term, continuous process, beginning well before menarche and continuing long after it.

  19. Uterine rupture: A seven year review at a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India

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    Maruti Sinha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the obstetric risk factors, incidence, and causes of uterine rupture, management modalities, and the associated maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality in one of the largest tertiary level women care hospital in Delhi. Materials and Methods: A 7-year retrospective analysis of 47 cases of uterine rupture was done. The charts of these patients were analyzed and the data regarding demographic characteristics, clinical presentation, risk factors, management, operative findings, maternal and fetal outcomes, and postoperative complications was studied. Results: The incidence of rupture was one in 1,633 deliveries (0.061%. The vast majority of patients had prior low transverse cesarean section (84.8%. The clinical presentation of the patients with rupture of the unscarred uterus was more dramatic with extensive tears compared to rupture with scarred uterus. The estimated blood loss ranged from 1,200 to 1,500 cc. Hemoperitoneum was identified in 95.7% of the patient and 83% of the patient underwent repair of rent with or without simultaneous tubal ligation. Subtotal hysterectomy was performed in five cases. There were no maternal deaths in our series. However, there were 32 cases of intrauterine fetal demise and five cases of stillbirths. Conclusions: Uterine rupture is a major contributor to maternal morbidity and neonatal mortality. Four major easily identifiable risk factors including history of prior cesarean section, grand multiparity, obstructed labor, and fetal malpresentations constitute 90% of cases of uterine rupture. Identification of these high risk women, prompt diagnosis, immediate transfer, and optimal management needs to be overemphasized to avoid adverse fetomaternal complications.

  20. An epidemiological study of traumatic brain injury cases in a trauma centre of New Delhi (India)

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    Shekhar, Chandra; Gupta, Laxmi Narayan; Premsagar, Ishwar Chandra; Sinha, Madhu; Kishore, Jugal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trauma is one of the leading causes of death and disability in Indian population. Aim: To correlate various variables like epidemiology, clinical status, severity of TBI & associated co-morbid conditions and its outcome. Settings and Design: This study involved retrospective collection, prospective management and follow up of 796 cases of TBI admitted to the neurosurgery department of a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi during one year study duration. Materials and Methods: All the relevant variables recorded and analyzed with Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) in 6 months into 3 groups i.e. group 1 (GOS-1/Dead), group 2 (GOS-2&3/Bad) and group 3- (GOS-3&4/good). Statistical Analysis: Compiled data collected, analyzed and difference between two proportions was analyzed using Chi Square test. Results: This study included 791 cases with 569 (72%) males and 222 (28%) females with average age of 24 years. Fall from height was the main cause of TBI (56%) followed by road traffic injury (RTI) (36%). Majority (61%) patients reached the hospital within 6 hours of injury out of which 27% patients were unconscious. As per Glasgow coma scale mild, moderate & severe grade of TBI was seen in 62%, 22% &16% cases respectively. Radiological examination of other body parts revealed injuries in 11% cases. Only 11% cases required surgical management, rest was managed conservatively. Good outcome noted in 80% cases and 20% cases expired. Average duration of hospital stay was 5 days. According to multivariate analysis, the factors which correlated with poor prognosis are presence of radiological injuries to other body parts, GCS, abnormal cranial nerve examination, abnormal plantar and abnormal pupillary reflex. (P < 0.05) Conclusion: TBI predominantly affects young male population and most of these are preventable. Early transportation to the hospital and first aid results in good outcome. Mortality increases with the severity of TBI and associated injuries therefore

  1. Epidemiological study of ocular trauma in an urban slum population in Delhi, India

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    Vats, S; Chandra, M; Gupta, S K; Vashist, P; Gogoi, M

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To study the epidemiology and clinical profile of victims of ocular trauma in an urban slum population. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted on 500 families each in three randomly selected urban slums in Delhi, collected demographic data for all members of these families, and clinical data for all those who suffered ocular trauma at any time, that required medical attention. Data was managed on SPSS 11.0. Results: Of 6704 participants interviewed, 163 episodes of ocular trauma were reported by 158 participants (prevalence = 2.4%, confidence interval = 2.0 to 2.7) Mean age at trauma was 24.2 years. The association between the age of participants and the history of ocular trauma was significant (P < 0.001), when adjusted for sex, education and occupation. Males were significantly more affected. Blunt trauma was the commonest mode of injury (41.7%). Blindness resulted in 11.4% of injured eyes ( P = 0.028). Of 6704 participants, 1567 (23.4%) were illiterate, and no association was seen between education status and trauma, when adjusted for sex and age at injury. A significant association was noted between ocular trauma and workplace (Chi-square = 43.80, P < 0.001), and between blindness and place (Chi-square = 9.98, P = 0.041) and source (Chi-square = 10.88, P = 0.028) of ocular trauma. No association was found between visual outcome and the time interval between trauma and first consultation (Chi-square = 0.50, P = 0.78), between receiving treatment and the best corrected visual acuity (Chi-square = 0.81, P = 0.81), and between the person consulted and blinding ocular trauma (Chi-square = 1.88, P = 0.170). Conclusion: A significant burden of ocular trauma in the community requires that its prevention and early management be a public health priority. PMID:18579991

  2. Epidemiological study of ocular trauma in an urban slum population in Delhi, India

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    Vats S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the epidemiology and clinical profile of victims of ocular trauma in an urban slum population. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted on 500 families each in three randomly selected urban slums in Delhi, collected demographic data for all members of these families, and clinical data for all those who suffered ocular trauma at any time, that required medical attention. Data was managed on SPSS 11.0. Results: Of 6704 participants interviewed, 163 episodes of ocular trauma were reported by 158 participants (prevalence = 2.4%, confidence interval = 2.0 to 2.7 Mean age at trauma was 24.2 years. The association between the age of participants and the history of ocular trauma was significant ( P < 0.001, when adjusted for sex, education and occupation. Males were significantly more affected. Blunt trauma was the commonest mode of injury (41.7%. Blindness resulted in 11.4% of injured eyes ( P = 0.028. Of 6704 participants, 1567 (23.4% were illiterate, and no association was seen between education status and trauma, when adjusted for sex and age at injury. A significant association was noted between ocular trauma and workplace (Chi-square = 43.80, P < 0.001, and between blindness and place (Chi-square = 9.98, P = 0.041 and source (Chi-square = 10.88, P = 0.028 of ocular trauma. No association was found between visual outcome and the time interval between trauma and first consultation (Chi-square = 0.50, P = 0.78, between receiving treatment and the best corrected visual acuity (Chi-square = 0.81, P = 0.81, and between the person consulted and blinding ocular trauma (Chi-square = 1.88, P = 0.170. Conclusion: A significant burden of ocular trauma in the community requires that its prevention and early management be a public health priority.

  3. Immunological evidence of monoclonal gammopathy in North India: a hospital based study

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    Kalpana Singh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Kalpana Singh1, Bhawna Singh2, Sarika Arora2, Alpana Saxena11Department of Biochemistry, Maulana Azad Medical College and LN Hospital, New Delhi, India; 2Department of Biochemistry, GB Pant Hospital, New Delhi, IndiaBackground: Monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS is a condition in which a paraprotein is found in the blood during standard laboratory tests. It is age-related and characterized by accumulation of bone marrow plasma cells derived from a single abnormal clone. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of MGUS in North Indian urban population.Methods: Serum and urine samples were collected from 320 suspected cases of gammopathy, were analyzed by sensitive immunological technique based protein electrophoresis followed by immunofixation for detection and type of monoclonal/polyclonal gammopathies. Twenty-five healthy subjects were included as controls.Results: Gammopathies were observed in 38 (11.88% patients. Out of these 7.5% were ¬monoclonal and 4.3% were polyclonal. Overall age of presentation of these monoclonal ¬gammopathies in both sexes was between 21 and 76 years. Gender-related ratio (men:women for these gammopathies was 1:1.18. Predominant heavy chain isotype was IgG (62.5% followed by IgA (37.5%. Among light chains, kappa (κ and lambda (λ chains appeared in 91.6% and 8.4% gammopathies respectively. Paraprotein fractions obtained were IgGκ (58.3%, IgGλ (4.16%, IgAκ (33.3%, and IgAλ (4.16% with 25% samples being positive for Bence Jones proteinuria.Conclusions: Clinical laboratories play an important role in confirming the immunological diagnosis of gammopathies. Determination of nature of paraproteinemia and its associated diseases calls for more extensive studies in India.Keywords: monoclonal gammopathy, immunoelectrophoresis, multiple myeloma, bence jones protein, immunoglobulins

  4. Performance of skylight illuminance inside a dome shaped adobe house under composite climate at New Delhi (India: A typical zero energy passive house

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    Arvind Chel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents annual experimental performance of pyramid shaped skylight for daylighting of a dome shaped adobe house located at solar energy park in New Delhi (India. This approach of single story dome shaped building with skylight is more useful for rural and semi-urban sectors for both office and residential buildings reducing artificial lighting energy consumption. The hourly measured data of inside and outside illuminance for three different working surface levels inside the existing rooms are presented for each month of the year. The embodied energy payback time of the skylight is also determined on the basis of lighting energy saving potential.

  5. Elevated Concentrations of Lead in Particulate Matter on the Neighborhood-Scale in Delhi, India As Determined by Single Particle Analysis.

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    Shen, Hongru; Peters, Thomas M; Casuccio, Gary S; Lersch, Traci L; West, Roger R; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Naresh; Ault, Andrew P

    2016-05-17

    High mass concentrations of atmospheric lead particles are frequently observed in the Delhi, India metropolitan area, although the sources of lead particles are poorly understood. In this study, particles sampled across Delhi (August - December 2008) were analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX) to improve our understanding of the spatial and physicochemical variability of lead-rich particles (>90% lead). The mean mass concentration of lead-rich particles smaller than 10 μm (PM10) was 0.7 μg/m(3) (1.5 μg/m(3) std. dev.) with high variability (range: 0-6.2 μg/m(3)). Four samples (16% of 25 samples) with PM10 lead-rich particle concentrations >1.4 μg/m(3) were defined as lead events and studied further. The temporal characteristics, heterogeneous spatial distribution, and wind patterns of events, excluded regional monsoon conditions or common anthropogenic sources from being the major causes of the lead events. Individual particle composition, size, and morphology analysis indicate informal recycling operations of used lead-acid batteries as the likely source of the lead events. This source is not typically included in emission inventories, and the observed isolated hotspots with high lead concentrations could represent an elevated exposure risk in certain neighborhoods of Delhi.

  6. Five-year measurements of ambient ammonia and its relationships with other trace gases at an urban site of Delhi, India

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    Saraswati; Sharma, S. K.; Mandal, T. K.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we present the 5-year measurements of ambient ammonia (NH3), oxides of nitrogen (NO and NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) along with the meteorological parameters at an urban site of Delhi, India from January 2011 to December 2015. The average mixing ratios of ambient NH3, NO, NO2 and CO over the entire period of observations were recorded as 19.3 ± 4.4 (ppb), 20.1 ± 5.9 (ppb), 18.6 ± 4.6 (ppb) and 1.8 ± 0.5 (ppm), respectively. The mixing ratios of NH3, NO, NO2 and CO were recorded highest during winter season, followed by summer and monsoon season. In the present case, a substantial seasonal variation of NH3 was observed during all the seasons except NO, NO2 and CO. The results emphasized that the traffic could be one of the significant sources of ambient NH3 at the urban site of Delhi as illustrated by positive correlations of NH3 with traffic related pollutants (NO x and CO). Surface wind as well as back trajectory analysis also supports the road side traffic and agricultural activities at the nearby area indicating possible major sources of ambient NH3 at observational site. Trajectory analysis, potential source contribution function and concentration weighted trajectory analysis indicated the surrounding nearby areas (NCR, Haryana, Punjab, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh) as a significant source region of ambient NH3 at the observational site of Delhi.

  7. Perceptions of nonsurgical permanent contraception among potential users, providers, and influencers in Wardha district and New Delhi, India: Exploratory research

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    Jennifer C Aengst

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: New permanent contraceptive methods are in development, including nonsurgical permanent contraception (NSPC. Objective: In the present study, perceptions of NSPC in India among married women, married men, mothers-in-law, providers, and health advocates in Eastern Maharashtra (Wardha district and New Delhi were examined. Methods: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 40 married women and 20 mothers-in-law; surveys with 150 married men; and focus group discussions with obstetrics/gynecology providers and advocates. Transcripts were coded and analyzed using a grounded theory approach, where emerging themes are analyzed during the data collection period. Results: The majority of female respondents expressed support of permanent contraception and interest in NSPC, stating the importance of avoiding surgery and minimizing recovery time. They expressed concerns about safety and efficacy; many felt that a confirmation test would be necessary regardless of the failure rate. Most male respondents were supportive of female permanent contraception (PC and preferred NSPC to a surgical method, as long as it was safe and effective. Providers were interested in NSPC yet had specific concerns about safety, efficacy, cost, uptake, and government pressure. They also had concerns that a nonsurgical approach could undermine the inherent seriousness of choosing PC. Advocates were interested in NSPC but had concerns about safety and potential misuse in the Indian context. Conclusion: Although perceptions of NSPC were varied, all study populations indicated interest in NSPC. Concerns about safety, efficacy, appropriate patient counseling, and ethics emerged from the present study and should be considered as NSPC methods continue to be developed.

  8. Informal e-waste recycling: environmental risk assessment of heavy metal contamination in Mandoli industrial area, Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Jatindra Kumar; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, e-waste is a major source of environmental problems and opportunities due to presence of hazardous elements and precious metals. This study was aimed to evaluate the pollution risk of heavy metal contamination by informal recycling of e-waste. Environmental risk assessment was determined using multivariate statistical analysis, index of geoaccumulation, enrichment factor, contamination factor, degree of contamination and pollution load index by analysing heavy metals in surface soils, plants and groundwater samples collected from and around informal recycling workshops in Mandoli industrial area, Delhi, India. Concentrations of heavy metals like As (17.08 mg/kg), Cd (1.29 mg/kg), Cu (115.50 mg/kg), Pb (2,645.31 mg/kg), Se (12.67 mg/kg) and Zn (776.84 mg/kg) were higher in surface soils of e-waste recycling areas compared to those in reference site. Level exceeded the values suggested by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). High accumulations of heavy metals were also observed in the native plant samples (Cynodon dactylon) of e-waste recycling areas. The groundwater samples collected form recycling area had high heavy metal concentrations as compared to permissible limit of Indian Standards and maximum allowable limit of WHO guidelines for drinking water. Multivariate analysis and risk assessment studies based on total metal content explains the clear-cut differences among sampling sites and a strong evidence of heavy metal pollution because of informal recycling of e-waste. This study put forward that prolonged informal recycling of e-waste may accumulate high concentration of heavy metals in surface soils, plants and groundwater, which will be a matter of concern for both environmental and occupational hazards. This warrants an immediate need of remedial measures to reduce the heavy metal contamination of e-waste recycling sites.

  9. Motivating and demotivating factors for community health workers: A qualitative study in urban slums of Delhi, India.

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    George, Mathew Sunil; Pant, Shradha; Devasenapathy, Niveditha; Ghosh-Jerath, Suparna; Zodpey, Sanjay P

    2017-04-01

    Background Community health workers play an important role in delivering health-care services, especially to underserved populations in low- and middle-income countries. They have been shown to be successful in providing a range of preventive, promotive and curative services. This qualitative study investigated the factors motivating or demotivating community health workers in urban settings in Delhi, India. Methods In this sub-study of the ANCHUL (Ante Natal and Child Healthcare in Urban Slums) implementation research project, four focus-group discussions and nine in-depth interviews were conducted with community health workers and medical officers. Utilizing a reflexive and inductive qualitative methodology, the data set was coded, to allow categories of motivating and demotivating factors to emerge. Results Motivating factors identified were: support from family members for their work, improved self-identity, job satisfaction and a sense of social responsibility, prior experiences of ill health, the opportunity to acquire new skills and knowledge, social recognition and status conferred by the community, and flexible work and timings. Negative experiences in the community and at health centres, constraints in the local health system in response to the demand generated by the community health workers, and poor pay demotivated community health workers in this study, even causing some to quit their jobs. Conclusion Community-health-worker programmes that focus on ensuring the technical capacity of their staff may not give adequate attention to the factors that motivate or discourage these workers. As efforts get under way to ensure universal access to health care, it is important that these issues are recognized and addressed, to ensure that community health worker programmes are effective and sustainable.

  10. Phenotypic and Genetic Heterogeneity in Vibrio cholerae O139 Isolated from Cholera Cases in Delhi, India during 2001-2006

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    Raikamal Ghosh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of epidemic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 has declined in cholera endemic countries. However, sporadic cholera caused by V. cholerae O139 with notable genetic changes is still reported from many regions. In the present study, 42 V. cholerae O139 strains isolated from 2001 to 2006 in Delhi, India, were retrospectively analyzed to understand their phenotype and molecular characteristics. The majority of isolates were resistant to ampicillin, furazolidone and nalidixic acid. Though the integrative conjugative element was detected in all the O139 isolates, the 2004-2006 isolates remained susceptible to co-trimoxazole, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin. Cholera toxin genotype 1 was present in the majority of the O139 isolates while few had type 3 or a novel type 4. In the cholera toxin encoding gene (ctx restriction fragment length polymorphism, the majority of the isolates harbored three copies of CTX element, of which one was truncated. In this study, the ctx was detected for the first time in the small chromosome of V. cholerae O139 and one isolate harbored 5 copies of CTX element, of which 3 were truncated. The ribotype BII pattern was found in most of the O139 isolates. Three V. cholerae O139 isolated in 2001 had a new ribotype BVIII. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed clonal variation in 2001 isolates compared to the 2004-2006 isolates. Molecular changes in V. cholerae O139 have to be closely monitored as this information may help in understanding the changing genetic features of this pathogen in relation to the epidemiology of cholera.

  11. Phenotypic and Genetic Heterogeneity in Vibrio cholerae O139 Isolated from Cholera Cases in Delhi, India during 2001-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Raikamal; Sharma, Naresh C; Halder, Kalpataru; Bhadra, Rupak K; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Shinoda, Sumio; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Nair, G Balakrish; Ramamurthy, Thadavarayan

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of epidemic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 has declined in cholera endemic countries. However, sporadic cholera caused by V. cholerae O139 with notable genetic changes is still reported from many regions. In the present study, 42 V. cholerae O139 strains isolated from 2001 to 2006 in Delhi, India, were retrospectively analyzed to understand their phenotype and molecular characteristics. The majority of isolates were resistant to ampicillin, furazolidone and nalidixic acid. Though the integrative conjugative element was detected in all the O139 isolates, the 2004-2006 isolates remained susceptible to co-trimoxazole, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin. Cholera toxin genotype 1 was present in the majority of the O139 isolates while few had type 3 or a novel type 4. In the cholera toxin encoding gene (ctx) restriction fragment length polymorphism, the majority of the isolates harbored three copies of CTX element, of which one was truncated. In this study, the ctx was detected for the first time in the small chromosome of V. cholerae O139 and one isolate harbored 5 copies of CTX element, of which 3 were truncated. The ribotype BII pattern was found in most of the O139 isolates. Three V. cholerae O139 isolated in 2001 had a new ribotype BVIII. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed clonal variation in 2001 isolates compared to the 2004-2006 isolates. Molecular changes in V. cholerae O139 have to be closely monitored as this information may help in understanding the changing genetic features of this pathogen in relation to the epidemiology of cholera.

  12. Work-related neck pain among desk job workers of tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India: Burden and determinants

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    Surendra Babu Darivemula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work-related Neck Pain (WRNP is a leading cause of disability and absenteeism. There is dearth of information about burden and determinants of WRNP in health facility setting in India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out at tertiary care hospital in New Delhi. All Group C desk job workers involved in the administrative work were included in the study. Participants were screened for WRNP by using pretested semi-structured questionnaire. Detailed information on probable risk factors was collected among patients with WRNP. Neck examination by trained investigator was done. Work place assessment was done by using observation check-list using the recommendations of the ISO Standard (Ergonomic requirements for office work with visual display terminals. Crude and adjusted odds ratio was calculated with 95% confidence interval to understand the determinants of WRNP. Results: In total, 441 participants were included in the study. Of them, 58% were males. Majority of participants aged between31-50 years. One-year prevalence of neck pain and WRNP was reported as 43.3%, (95% CI 38.7%-47.9% and 28.3%, (95% CI 24.3%-32.7% respectively. On multivariate analysis, female gender (OR-2.0 95% CI and poor perception of breaks during working hours (OR-2.4 95% CI, along with work place related factors such as posture (OR-5.4 95% CI and height of the screen (<10 cms (OR-2.6 were identified as independent determinants of WRNP. Conclusion: High one-year prevalence of WRNP was reported among desk job workers. Burden of WRNP was reported more among females as compared to males. Most common factor identified was Computer use for more than 4-6 hours was most important predictor of WRNP followed by work related factors such as height of screen and posture are associated with WRNP.

  13. Food acquisition and intra-household consumption patterns: a study of low and middle income urban households in Delhi, India

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    MR Pradhan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food habits and choices in India are shifting due to many factors: changing food markets, fast urbanization, food price inflation, uncertain food production and unequal distribution during the past decade. This study aims to explore food acquisition and intra-household consumption patterns in urban low and middle income (LMI households in Delhi. Methods: Twenty households were randomly selected from the Center for Cardio-metabolic Risk Reduction in South Asia (CARRS surveillance study. Data were derived from 20 questionnaires administered to women responsible for food preparation, four key-informant-interviews, and 20 in-depth interviews with household heads during September-November 2011. STATA and ATLAS.ti software were used for data analysis. Results: Half of the households spent at least two-thirds of their income on food. The major expenditures were on vegetables (22% of total food expenditure, milk and milk products (16%, and cereal and related products (15%. Income, food prices, food preferences, and seasonal variation influenced food expenditure. Adults usually ate two to three times a day while children ate more frequently. Eating sequence was based on the work pattern within the household and cultural beliefs. Contrary to previous evidence, there was no gender bias in intra-household food distribution. Women considered food acquisition, preparation and distribution part of their self-worth and played a major role in food related issues in the household. Conclusion: Women’s key roles in food acquisition, preparation and intra household food consumption should be considered in formulating food policies and programs. 

  14. Reproductive Ethics in Commercial Surrogacy: Decision-Making in IVF Clinics in New Delhi, India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Malene; Reddy, Sunita; Patel, Tulsi

    2015-01-01

    As a neo-liberal economy, India has become one of the new health tourism destinations, with Commercial gestational surrogacy as an expanding market. Yet the Indian Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Bill has been pending for five years, and the guidelines issued by the Indian Council of Medical......, doctors were willing to go to the greatest extent possible in their medical practice. Autonomy and decision-making regarding choice of the number of embryos to transfer and the mode of delivery lay neither with commissioning parents nor surrogate mothers but mostly with doctors. In order to ensure higher...

  15. Comparison of abundances, compositions and sources of elements, inorganic ions and organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols from Xi'an and New Delhi, two megacities in China and India.

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    Li, Jianjun; Wang, Gehui; Aggarwal, Shankar G; Huang, Yao; Ren, Yanqin; Zhou, Bianhong; Singh, Khem; Gupta, Prabhat K; Cao, Junji; Zhang, Rong

    2014-04-01

    Wintertime TSP samples collected in the two megacities of Xi'an, China and New Delhi, India were analyzed for elements, inorganic ions, carbonaceous species and organic compounds to investigate the differences in chemical compositions and sources of organic aerosols. The current work is the first time comparing the composition of urban organic aerosols from China and India and discussing their sources in a single study. Our results showed that the concentrations of Ca, Fe, Ti, inorganic ions, EC, PAHs and hopanes in Xi'an are 1.3-2.9 times of those in New Delhi, which is ascribed to the higher emissions of dust and coal burning in Xi'an. In contrast, Cl(-), levoglucosan, n-alkanes, fatty alcohols, fatty acids, phthalates and bisphenol A are 0.4-3.0 times higher in New Delhi than in Xi'an, which is attributed to strong emissions from biomass burning and solid waste incineration. PAHs are carcinogenic while phthalates and bisphenol A are endocrine disrupting. Thus, the significant difference in chemical compositions of the above TSP samples may suggest that residents in Xi'an and New Delhi are exposed to environmental hazards that pose different health risks. Lower mass ratios of octadecenoic acid/octadecanoic acid (C18:1/C18:0) and benzo(a)pyrene/benzo(e)pyrene (BaP/BeP) demonstrate that aerosol particles in New Delhi are photochemically more aged. Mass closure reconstructions of the wintertime TSP indicate that crustal material is the most abundant component of ambient particles in Xi'an and New Delhi, accounting for 52% and 48% of the particle masses, respectively, followed by organic matter (24% and 23% in Xi'an and New Delhi, respectively) and secondary inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate plus ammonium, 16% and 12% in Xi'an and New Delhi, respectively). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genotype profiles of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates recovered from animals, commercial milk, and human beings in North India.

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    Singh, S V; Sohal, J S; Singh, P K; Singh, A V

    2009-09-01

    To understand the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) isolates recovered from domestic and wild ruminants, commercial milk, and human beings in North India. Genotyping of MAP isolates (N=117) recovered from animals, commercial milk, and human beings in different regions of North India between 1998 and 2007 was carried out using IS1311 PCR-restriction enzyme analysis (REA) and short sequence repeat (SSR) typing (G and GGT repeat loci). Of the 117 MAP isolates recovered from North India, bison-type was the predominant (83.8%) genotype followed by cattle-type (16.2%). Bison-type was the exclusive genotype recovered from goats, sheep, buffaloes, and blue bulls. However, both bison-type and cattle-type genotypes were recovered from cattle, humans, and commercial bovine milk samples. The relative distribution of the two genotypes was different in the different regions. Bison-type was the major genotype at the Central Institute for Research on Goats (CIRG), Akos, Ajmer, and Mathura, whereas, cattle-type was the major genotype from New Delhi and Agra. SSR typing of these isolates revealed that all MAP bison-type isolates had an identical profile (7g4ggt) with respect to G and GGT repeat SSR loci. In this study the sheep-type genotype was not found in North India. This study is the first from India to report the presence of two kinds of MAP genotypes (cattle-type and bison-type). However, non-reporting of the sheep-type genotype may not mean that it is absent in North India; the use of multiple culture media to recover MAP from clinical samples for future investigations is advised.

  17. Human Resource Development in Tourism Industry in India: A Case Study of Air India Ltd., New Delhi

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    Nafees A. Khan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El propósito del Desarrollo del Recurso Humano es mejorar la capacidad de estos recursos mediante el aprendizaje y el rendimiento de cada individuo por medio de procesos y niveles organizados. Para la aplicación de un mejor orden y profesionalización del Desarrollo de Recursos Humanos en el acercamiento al trabajo en las áreas terreno; las habilidades, los conocimientos y aptitudes del personal serán enriquecidas y estas crearan una mayor calidad en el trabajo. Existe un numero de problemas y contradicciones, las cuales conciernen al desarrollo de los recursos humanos en la industria del turismo, como son, la escases de mano de obra calificada, la escases de infraestructura en formación turística, las condiciones de trabajo en la industria turística, la falta de estrategias y políticas para el desarrollo de los recursos humanos. El presente estudio es un intento de análisis del Desarrollo de los Recursos Humanos en las iniciativas de la industria turística, con especial relevancia en Air India Ltd, para mejorar y afinar las capacidades de sus empleados. El estudio solo identifica la necesidad de Air India en incorporar, un espíritu de DRH en el día a día, la funcionalidad en la utilización de los recursos humanos en todos los sistemas y mecanismos de la organización.

  18. Environmental and comfort upgrading through lean technologies in informal settlements: Case study in Nairobi, Kenia and New Delhi, India

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    De Angelis, Enrico; Tagliabue, Lavinia Chiara; Zecchini, Paolo; Milanesi, Mattia

    2016-07-01

    Informal settlements, namely slums (or bidonville or favelas) are one of the stronger challenge for urban context in developing countries. The increase of urban population leads to a widespread poverty and critical life conditions for a large segment of population, in particular in Sub-Saharan Africa, where a high percentage of people lives in informal settlements. The problems in slums are multiple: people suffer malnutrition and poor sanitation, flooding or drought, and live in shelters providing no thermal comfort in many days of the year, furthermore scarce and highly polluting energy sources are available. Climate change and an unavoidable heat island effect make these living conditions nearly catastrophic. This paper focuses on the main characters of these slums and on how to what promote the improvement of living conditions with a lean, low cost, low impact, feasible upgrading of the housing or more properly shelters. The subject of the analysis is the Mathare 4A Upgrading Programme in the city of Nairobi, Kenya, one of the highest slum-dwellers growing rate. The technological solutions applied in this context have been verified in a different climate condition such as the city of New Delhi, India where the phenomenon of the slums is significantly burdensome. The analysis of the comfort conditions inside a type housing has been carried out using hourly weather data and dynamic heat transfer simulation, without any HVAC system and striving only natural ventilation. Data about internal temperature and relative humidity conditions have been applied to evaluate the comfort hours using the Predicted Mean Vote method, the adaptive thermal comfort principles and the bioclimatic charts for the two climates in Nairobi and New Delhi. The percentage of hours within the comfort range and the amount of degree-hours exceeding comfort values showed for different upgrading strategies, how it is possible to deeply influence the living conditions by technological and

  19. Stature in Holocene foragers of North India.

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    Lukacs, John R; Pal, J N; Nelson, Greg C

    2014-03-01

    The Ganga Plain of North India provides an archaeological and skeletal record of semi-nomadic Holocene foragers in association with an aceramic Mesolithic culture. Prior estimates of stature for Mesolithic Lake Cultures (MLC) used inappropriate equations from an American White reference group and need revision. Attention is given to intralimb body proportions and geo-climatic provenance of MLC series in considering the most suitable reference population. Regression equations from ancient Egyptians are used in reconstructing stature for MLC skeletal series from Damdama (DDM), Mahadaha (MDH), and Sarai Nahar Rai (SNR). Mean stature is estimated at between 174 (MDH) and 178 cm (DDM and SNR) for males, and between 163 cm (MDH) and 179 cm (SNR) for females. Stature estimates based on ancient Egyptian equations are significantly shorter (from 3.5 to 7.1 cm shorter in males; from 3.2 to 7.5 cm shorter in females) than estimates using the American White reference group. Revised stature estimates from tibia length and from femur + tibia more accurately estimate MLC stature for two reasons: a) these elements are highly correlated with stature and have lower standard estimates of error, and b) uncertainty regarding methods of measuring tibia length is avoided. When compared with Holocene samples of native Americans and Mesolithic Europeans, MLC series from North India are tall. This aspect of their biological variation confirms earlier assessments and results from the synergistic influence of balanced nutrition from broad-spectrum foraging, body-proportions adapted to a seasonally hot and arid climate, and the functional demands of a mobile, semi-nomadic life-style.

  20. Beliefs and perceptions about cancers among patients attending radiotherapy OPD in Delhi, India.

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    Kishore, Jugal; Ahmad, Irfan; Kaur, Ravneet; P K, Mohanta

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of beliefs and myths amongst cancer patients is a reflection of the level of knowledge in the community regarding cancer. Such beliefs influence the health seeking behaviour of patients and may lead to delay in seeking medical care. The present study revealed that myths and misconceptions are widely prevalent among cancer patients in India. The perception regarding causation of cancer among cancer patients varied from curses, evil eye and spirits to past sins. Only one third of the patients believed that cancer can be detected in its early stages and that it can be cured. The average time taken by patients to report to a doctor after suspecting their disease was 2 years. The majority of patients held fatalistic views about the outcome of cancer. Most (60%) were being discriminated against by their family and society. All these findings highlight that despite considerable medical knowledge of risk factors and treatment modalities, possible social-behavioral strategies for the prevention and control of cancer have not been adequately addressed, especially among South Asian patients.

  1. Genital Ulcer Disease: How Worrisome Is It Today? A Status Report from New Delhi, India

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    Sumathi Muralidhar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Genital ulcer diseases represent a diagnostic dilemma, especially in India, where few STI clinics have access to reliable laboratory facility. The changing STI trends require that a correct diagnosis be made in order to institute appropriate treatment and formulate control policies. The objective of this study was to determine recent trends in aetiology of genital ulcers, by using accurate diagnostic tools. Methods. Specimens from 90 ulcer patients were processed for dark field microscopy, stained smears, culture for H. ducreyi, and real-time PCR. Blood samples were collected for serological tests. Results. Prevalence of GUD was 7.45 with mean age at initial sexual experience as 19.2 years. Use of condom with regular and nonregular partners was 19.5% and 42.1%, respectively. Sexual orientation was heterosexual (92.2% or homosexual (2.2%. There were 8 cases positive for HIV (8.9%. Herpes simplex virus ulcers were the commonest, followed by syphilis and chancroid. There were no cases of donovanosis and LGV. Conclusions. A valuable contribution of this study was in validating clinical and syndromic diagnoses of genital ulcers with an accurate aetiological diagnosis. Such reliable data will aid treatment and better define control measures of common agents and help eliminate diseases amenable to elimination, like donovanosis.

  2. Alineando uso energético, calidad del aire y cambio climático vía desarrollo sostenible: El caso de Delhi en India

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    Amit Garg

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available La rápida industrialización y urbanización en India en la última década ha resultado en un alto consumo de combustibles fósiles, incremento en la emisión de gases de invernadero y deterioro de la calidad del aire. India ha emprendido varias iniciativas para resolver estos problemas como son nuevas políticas de combustibles de automóviles, medidas de uso eficiente de la energía, promoción del uso de recursos renovables, relocalización de industrias altamente contaminantes, uso de combustibles bajos en emisiones como el CNG en ciudades grandes, e introducción de redes de metro-ferrocarriles en mega-ciudades. El presente artículo resume los resultados de políticas adoptadas en Delhi que muestran los nexos entre calidad del aire y cambio climático teniendo como fuerza impulsora el desarrollo sostenible con énfasis en las dimensiones ambientales y sociales./ High consumption of fossil fuels, increased greenhouse gas emissions and deterioration of local air quality have resulted from rapid industrialization and urbanization in India in the last decade. India has taken many initiatives to address these problems such as new automobile fuel policies, energy efficiency measures, promotion of renewable energy use, relocation of highly polluting industries, enforcing use of low emission fuels like CNG for public transport in large cities, and introducing metro rail networks in megacities. This paper highlights results of adopted policies in Delhi showing relationships between air quality and climate change and having sustainable development as the driving force with focus on environmental and social dimensions.

  3. Evaluating awareness and practices pertaining to radioactive waste management among scrap dealers in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkar, Nayani; Chandra, Tany; Agrawal, Prachi; Bansal, Harshit; Singh, Simranjeet; Anand, Tanu; Gupta, Mannan Kumar; Kumar, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    With nuclear technology rapidly taking the spotlight in the last 50 years, radiation accidents seem to be a harsh reality of the modern world. The Mayapuri Radiation accident of 2010 was the worst radiation accident India has yet dealt with. Two years thereafter, we designed a study to assess the awareness and practices regarding radioactive waste among scrap dealers aiming to assess deficiencies in radiation disaster preparedness. A community based cross-sectional study. The study population consisted of 209 volunteers (from 108 scrap dealerships) including 108 shop-owners and 101 workers segregated as Group A consisting of 54 dealerships in Mayapuri and Group B of 54 dealerships from the rest of the city. Subjects were then interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Awareness about radioactive waste varied significantly with level of education (p = 0.024), Kuppuswamy's socio-economic scale (p = 0.005), age of the scrap dealer (p = 0.049) and his work experience (p = 0.045). The larger dealerships in Mayapuri were more aware about radioactive waste (p = 0.0004), the accident in 2010 (p = 0.0002), the symbol for radiation hazard (p = 0.016), as well as the emergency guidelines and the agencies to contact in the event of a radiation accident. Our findings seem to signify that while governmental and non-governmental agencies were successful in implementing prompt disaster response and awareness programs, the community continues to be inadequately prepared. These go on to suggest that though concerted awareness and training programs do benefit the affected community, economic and social development is the key to disaster prevention and mitigation.

  4. Determinants of childhood immunisation coverage in urban poor settlements of Delhi, India: a cross-sectional study

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    Devasenapathy, Niveditha; Ghosh Jerath, Suparna; Sharma, Saket; Allen, Elizabeth; Shankar, Anuraj H; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Aggregate data on childhood immunisation from urban settings may not reflect the coverage among the urban poor. This study provides information on complete childhood immunisation coverage among the urban poor, and explores its household and neighbourhood-level determinants. Setting Urban poor community in the Southeast district of Delhi, India. Participants We randomly sampled 1849 children aged 1–3.5 years from 13 451 households in 39 clusters (cluster defined as area covered by a community health worker) in 2 large urban poor settlements. Of these, 1343 completed the survey. We collected information regarding childhood immunisation (BCG, oral polio vaccine, diphtheria–pertussis–tetanus vaccine, hepatitis B and measles) from vaccination cards or mothers’ recall. We used random intercept logistic regression to explore the sociodemographic determinants of complete immunisation. Results Complete immunisation coverage was 46.7% and 7.5% were not immunised. The odds of complete vaccination (OR, 95% CI) were lower in female children (0.70 (0.55 to 0.89)) and Muslim households (0.65 (0.45 to 0.94)). The odds of complete vaccination were higher if the mother was literate (1.6 (1.15 to 2.16)), if the child was born within the city (2.7 (1.97 to 3.65)), in a health facility ( 1.5 (1.19 to 2.02)), belonged to the highest wealth quintile (compared with the poorest; 2.46 (1.5 to 4.02)) or possessed a birth certificate (1.40 (1.03 to 1.91)). Cluster effect due to unmeasured neighbourhood factors expressed as median OR was 1.32. Conclusions Immunisation coverage in this urban poor area was much lower than that of regional surveys reporting overall urban data. Socioeconomic status of the household, female illiteracy, health awareness and gender inequality were important determinants of coverage in this population. Hence, in addition to enhancing the infrastructure for providing mother and child services, efforts are also needed to address these issues in

  5. Diurnal and seasonal variations of black carbon and PM2.5 over New Delhi, India: Influence of meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S.; Srivastava, A. K.; Bisht, D. S.; Parmita, P.; Srivastava, Manoj K.; Attri, S. D.

    2013-05-01

    Black carbon (BC), which is one of the highly absorbing capacities of solar radiation, reduces albedo of atmospheric aerosol. BC along with fine particulate matters (PM2.5), which play crucial role in climate and health, was monitored online for an entire year of 2011 at an urban megacity of Delhi, situated in the northern part of India. Daily mass concentration of BC varies from 0.9 to 25.5 μg m- 3, with an annual mean of 6.7 ± 5.7 μg m- 3 displayed clear monsoon minima and winter maxima; however, PM2.5 concentration was ranging from 54.3 to 338.7 μg m- 3, with an annual mean of 122.3 ± 90.7 μg m- 3. BC typically peaked between 0800 and 1000 LST and again between 2100 and 2300 LST, corresponding to the morning and evening traffic combined with the ambient meteorological effect. During summer and monsoon, the BC concentrations were found less than 5 μg m- 3; however, the highest concentrations occurred during winter in segments from 10 μg m- 3. In over all study, the BC mass concentration was accounted for ~ 6% of the total PM2.5 mass, with a range from 1.0% to 14.3%. The relationship between meteorological parameters and BC mass concentrations was studied and a clear inverse relationship (r = - 0.53) between BC and wind speed was observed. Relation between visibility and BC mass concentrations was also significantly negative (- 0.81), having relatively higher correlation during post-monsoon (- 0.85) and winter (- 0.78) periods and lower during summer (- 0.45) and monsoon (- 0.54) periods. The mixed layer depths (MLDs) were found to be shallower during post monsoon (379 m) and winter (335 m) as compared during summer (1023 m) and monsoon (603 m). The study indicated that during post-monsoon season, the impact of biomass burning is higher as compared to combustion of fossil fuels. Results are well associated with the rapid growth of anthropogenic emissions and ambient meteorological conditions over the station.

  6. Endemic Indian clones of Klebsiella pneumoniae-harbouring New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 on a hybrid plasmid replicon type: A case of changing New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase plasmid landscapes in India?

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    G K Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: blaNDM genes are MBL genes that confer resistance to carbapenems. Globally, they are associated with diverse clones and plasmids. In this study, we characterised three isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae-harbouring blaNDM1 from patients undergoing chronic haemodialysis and renal transplantation. Materials and Methods: 3 blaNDM1 -producing K. pneumoniae were isolated from end-stage renal disease patients undergoing haemodialysis and renal transplantation from a nephrology unit. All the three isolates were screened for clinically relevant resistant genes. Plasmid replicon content was analysed by polymerase chain reaction based replicon typing. Conjugation assays were done using azide-resistant Escherichia coli J53 as the recipient strain. Multilocus sequence typing and variable number tandem repeat typing were done to find the clonality. Replicon sequence based typing was attempted to find the diversity of replicon-associated sequences in IncHI3 plasmids. Results: All the 3 blaNDM positive isolates possessed the New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1 allele with an IncHI3 plasmid which was not transferable in one isolate. The isolates were found to be sequence type 14 (ST14; 2 nos and ST38 both of which were previously reported to be the NDM-producing K. pneumoniae STs prevalent in India. Replicon sequence analysis revealed limited sequence diversity within the repHI3 and repFIB locus. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of IncHI3, a newly assigned enterobacterial plasmid incompatibility group from India. This could either be a case of importation or a widely circulating NDM plasmid type in India.

  7. [An imported Chikungunya fever case from New Delhi, India to Ankara, Turkey: the first imported case of Turkey and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yağcı Çağlayık, Dilek; Uyar, Yavuz; Korukluoğlu, Gülay; Ertek, Mustafa; Unal, Serhat

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne alphavirus that causes an acute febrile illness, chikungunya fever. CHIKV virus is geographically distributed in Africa, India, and South-East Asia. Chikungunya fever outbreaks have been reported from India since 2006. The incubation period is 3-7 days, and the disease is characterized by sudden onset of high fever and severe arthralgia. Other symptoms can be rash, headache, fatigue, nausea-vomiting, and myalgias. Here, we report the first Chikungunya case imported from India, New-Delhi to Ankara, Turkey. In December 2010, a 55-year-old female Turkish government employee living in urban area of New Delhi for the last 3 years had sudden onset fever up to 38.4°C for 2 days. Itching rash and arthralgia also developed. Symptomatic treatment was given to patient in New Delhi. She returned to Turkey and was admitted to Hacettepe University Medical Faculty, Department of Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases Unit, since arthralgia has continued on the 26th day of her complaints. Hepatomegaly and tenosynovitis were detected in her physical examination. Serum sample sent to Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency, Virology Reference and Research Laboratory, yielded negative results for specific IgM and IgG antibodies against Hantavirus and Dengue virus types 1-4; however, the results were positive for CHIKV specific IgM and IgG antibodies by commercial immunofluorescence method (Euroimmun, Germany). CHIKV RNA which was searched by in-house real-time RT-PCR was negative. The second serum sample obtained three weeks later also found positive for CHIKV specific IgM and IgG antibodies. This was the first laboratory confirmed imported Chikungunya case in Turkey. There are predictions regarding the presence of Aedes species mosquitos that can transmit this virus in Turkey. This case report will be an alarming signal for the clinicians in our country to consider Chikungunya fever in the differential diagnosis of patients

  8. Meteorologically-adjusted trend analysis of surface observed ozone at three monitoring sites in Delhi, India: 2007-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, J.; Farooqui, Z.; Guttikunda, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that meteorological parameters have significant impact on surface ozone concentrations. Therefore it is important to remove the effects of meteorology on ozone concentrations to correctly estimate long-term trends in ozone levels due to the alterations in precursor emissions. This is important for the development of effectual control strategies. In this study surface observed ozone trends in New Delhi are analyzed using Komogorov-Zurbenko (KZ) filter, US EPA ozone adjustment due to weather approach and the classification and regression tree method. The statistical models are applied to the ozone data at three observational sites in New Delhi metropolitan areas, 1) Income Tax Office (ITO) 2) Sirifort and 3) Delhi College of Engineering (DCE). The ITO site is located adjacent to a traffic crossing, Sirifort is an urban site and the DCE site is located in a residential area. The ITO site is also influenced by local industrial emissions. DCE has higher ozone levels than the other two sites. It was found that ITO has lowest ozone concentrations amongst the three sites due to ozone titrating due to industrial and on-road mobile NOx emissions. The statistical methods employed can assess ozone trends at these sites with a high degree of confidence and the results can be used to gauge the effectiveness of control strategies on surface ozone levels in New Delhi.

  9. Timeline trend profile and seasonal variations in nicotine present in ambient PM10 samples: A four year investigation from Delhi region, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Shweta; Tandon, Ankit; Attri, Arun K.

    2014-12-01

    The detection of nicotine, an organic tracer for Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS), in the collected PM10 samples from Delhi region's ambient environment, in a appropriately designed investigation was initiated over four years (2006-2009) to: (1) Comprehend seasonal and inter-annual variations in the nicotine present in PM10; (2) Extract regression based linear trend profile manifested by nicotine in PM10; (3) Determine the non-linear trend timeline from the nicotine data, and compare it with the obtained linear trend; (4) Suggest the possible use of the designed experiment and analysis to have a qualitative appraisal of Tobacco Smoking activity in the sampling region. The PM10 samples were collected in a monthly time-series sequence at a known receptor site. Quantitative estimates of nicotine (ng m-3) were made by using a Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). The annual average concentrations of nicotine (ng m-3) were 516 ± 302 (2008) > 494 ± 301 (2009) > 438 ± 250 (2007) > 325 ± 149 (2006). The estimated linear trend of 5.4 ng m-3 month-1 corresponded to 16.3% per annum increase in the PM10 associated nicotine. The industrial production of India's tobacco index normalized to Delhi region's consumption, pegged an increase at 10.5% per annum over this period.

  10. Prevalence of dental caries and periodontal diseases, and their association with socio-demographic risk factors among older persons in Delhi, India: a community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rahul; Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Mathur, Vijay Prakash; Goswami, Anil; Nongkynrih, Baridalyne

    2013-05-01

    Dental health is often neglected in the older persons, and dental conditions associated with aging are complex, adversely affecting the quality of life. The present study was undertaken to estimate the prevalence of dental caries and periodontal diseases among older persons from Delhi, India, and to study their association with selected socio-behavioral risk factors. We conducted a community-based cross sectional study among persons aged > or = 60 years from Delhi during 2009-2010. A questionnaire was used to interview elderly regarding dental health. The World Health Organization (WHO) oral health assessment form was used for examining the study participants. A total of 448 participants were examined and included in the study. Of the dentate, 47.1% had active dental caries. The mean decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) score for the study population was 14.4. The prevalence of gingival bleeding, periodontal pockets and loss of attachment was 96.6, 89.1, and 80.3%, respectively. The prevalence of tobacco use was 47.9%. Age, frequency of teeth cleaning, and method used for teeth cleaning were statistically associated with the DMFT score. The prevalence of dental caries and periodontal disease was high in the study population, and warrants intervention.

  11. Nature and time of emplacement of a pegmatoidal granite within the Delhi Fold Belt near Bayalan, Rajasthan, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, N.; Sen, J.; Pal, T.; Ghosh, T.

    2009-04-01

    The study area is situated about 70 km south east of Ajmer, in Rajasthan, India around the village Bayala (26o 02' 19 N''; 74o 21' 01'') within the Ajmer district of Central Rajasthan. The area is along the eastern flank of the central portion of the Precambrian South Delhi Fold Belt (SDFB) and it stratigraphically belongs to the Bhim Group of rocks. Basement rocks of Archaean age, commonly known as the Banded gneissic Complex (BGC), is exposed to the east, where the rocks of the Bhim Group rests unconformably over BGC. To the west gneissic basement rocks of mid-Proterozoic times underlie the Bhim Group and have been referred to as the Beawar gneiss (BG). The Bhim Group of rocks comprises of metamorphosed marls and calc-silicate gneisses with minor amounts of quartzites and pelitic schists, indicative of its shallow marine origin. Within the Bhim Group, a pegmatoidal granite has intruded the calc silicate gneisses of the area. The pegmatoidal granite body is elliptical in outline with the long dimension(20 km) trending N-S and covers an area of 300 sq. km. approximately. This granite have so far been mapped as basement rocks (BG) surrounding the Beawar town (26o 06' 05'' N; 74o 19' 03'' E), 50 km south east of Ajmer. Rafts of calc-silicate gneisses, belonging to the Bhim Group, are seen to be entrapped within granite. Fragments of BG and its equivalents have also been found as caught up blocks within this pegmatoidal granite body near Andheri Devari, a small hamlet east of Beawar. The objective of the study was to map this pegmatoidal body, and decipher the mechanism and time of emplacement of this granite. A detailed structural mapping of the area in a 1:20000 scale spread over a 30 sq. km area in the vicinity of Bayala was carried out to analyse the geometry and the time of emplacement of the pegmatitic granite. The ridges of calc silicates and marbles adjoining the area were studied for the structural analyses of the Delhi fold belt rocks of the area. The calc

  12. Artificial intelligence based approach to forecast PM2.5 during haze episodes: A case study of Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Dhirendra; Goyal, P.; Upadhyay, Abhishek

    2015-02-01

    Delhi has been listed as the worst performer across the world with respect to the presence of alarmingly high level of haze episodes, exposing the residents here to a host of diseases including respiratory disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder and lung cancer. This study aimed to analyze the haze episodes in a year and to develop the forecasting methodologies for it. The air pollutants, e.g., CO, O3, NO2, SO2, PM2.5 as well as meteorological parameters (pressure, temperature, wind speed, wind direction index, relative humidity, visibility, dew point temperature, etc.) have been used in the present study to analyze the haze episodes in Delhi urban area. The nature of these episodes, their possible causes, and their major features are discussed in terms of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and relative humidity. The correlation matrix shows that temperature, pressure, wind speed, O3, and dew point temperature are the dominating variables for PM2.5 concentrations in Delhi. The hour-by-hour analysis of past data pattern at different monitoring stations suggest that the haze hours were occurred approximately 48% of the total observed hours in the year, 2012 over Delhi urban area. The haze hour forecasting models in terms of PM2.5 concentrations (more than 50 μg/m3) and relative humidity (less than 90%) have been developed through artificial intelligence based Neuro-Fuzzy (NF) techniques and compared with the other modeling techniques e.g., multiple linear regression (MLR), and artificial neural network (ANN). The haze hour's data for nine months, i.e. from January to September have been chosen for training and remaining three months, i.e., October to December in the year 2012 are chosen for validation of the developed models. The forecasted results are compared with the observed values with different statistical measures, e.g., correlation coefficients (R), normalized mean square error (NMSE), fractional bias (FB) and index of agreement (IOA). The performed

  13. 78 FR 42505 - U.S. Healthcare Education Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and Ahmedabad, India, January 27...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... undergraduate) from India were studying in the United States. India is the second leading place of origin for... the institutions working in the field of higher education. Several regulatory bodies, including the..., January 27, 2014 --Embassy Briefing --Government of India (GOI) meeting(s) --Working Lunch hosted...

  14. Candida Species Prevalence Profile in HIV Seropositive Patients from a Major Tertiary Care Hospital in New Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Monika; Kaur, Ravinder; Chadha, Sanjim

    2016-01-01

    Candida is a common opportunistic pathogen during the course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression. Changes in the clinical severity of candidiasis and the Candida species prevalence profile may be a reflection of immunological changes in HIV positive patients. The aim of this study was to document the changing pattern of Candida species prevalence profile in HIV seropositive patients from a tertiary care hospital in North India. One hundred and twenty HIV seropositive subjects were recruited for Candida microbial screening. Clinical specimens including blood, oral swabs, expectorated or induced sputum/bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and urine were collected depending on the patient's symptoms. A total of 128 Candida isolates were obtained from 88 cases and 7 different Candida species were identified. C. albicans (50%) was the most common species isolated followed by C. glabrata (17%) and C. dubliniensis (12.5%). Other species isolated were C. parapsilosis (7.8%), C. krusei, C. tropicalis (4.6% each), and C. kefyr (3%). Strong clinical suspicion along with optimal sampling of an accurate diagnosis of Candida species involved would go a long way in decreasing the morbidity associated with non-albicans Candida species. PMID:27092278

  15. Candida Species Prevalence Profile in HIV Seropositive Patients from a Major Tertiary Care Hospital in New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Monika; Kaur, Ravinder; Chadha, Sanjim

    2016-01-01

    Candida is a common opportunistic pathogen during the course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression. Changes in the clinical severity of candidiasis and the Candida species prevalence profile may be a reflection of immunological changes in HIV positive patients. The aim of this study was to document the changing pattern of Candida species prevalence profile in HIV seropositive patients from a tertiary care hospital in North India. One hundred and twenty HIV seropositive subjects were recruited for Candida microbial screening. Clinical specimens including blood, oral swabs, expectorated or induced sputum/bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and urine were collected depending on the patient's symptoms. A total of 128 Candida isolates were obtained from 88 cases and 7 different Candida species were identified. C. albicans (50%) was the most common species isolated followed by C. glabrata (17%) and C. dubliniensis (12.5%). Other species isolated were C. parapsilosis (7.8%), C. krusei, C. tropicalis (4.6% each), and C. kefyr (3%). Strong clinical suspicion along with optimal sampling of an accurate diagnosis of Candida species involved would go a long way in decreasing the morbidity associated with non-albicans Candida species.

  16. Candida Species Prevalence Profile in HIV Seropositive Patients from a Major Tertiary Care Hospital in New Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Maheshwari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida is a common opportunistic pathogen during the course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV disease progression. Changes in the clinical severity of candidiasis and the Candida species prevalence profile may be a reflection of immunological changes in HIV positive patients. The aim of this study was to document the changing pattern of Candida species prevalence profile in HIV seropositive patients from a tertiary care hospital in North India. One hundred and twenty HIV seropositive subjects were recruited for Candida microbial screening. Clinical specimens including blood, oral swabs, expectorated or induced sputum/bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and urine were collected depending on the patient’s symptoms. A total of 128 Candida isolates were obtained from 88 cases and 7 different Candida species were identified. C. albicans (50% was the most common species isolated followed by C. glabrata (17% and C. dubliniensis (12.5%. Other species isolated were C. parapsilosis (7.8%, C. krusei, C. tropicalis (4.6% each, and C. kefyr (3%. Strong clinical suspicion along with optimal sampling of an accurate diagnosis of Candida species involved would go a long way in decreasing the morbidity associated with non-albicans Candida species.

  17. Disability-adjusted life years and economic cost assessment of the health effects related to PM2.5 and PM10 pollution in Mumbai and Delhi, in India from 1991 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Kamal Jyoti; Dikshit, Anil Kumar; Deshpande, Ashok

    2016-12-15

    Particulate air pollution is becoming a serious public health concern in urban cities in India due to air pollution-related health effects associated with disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and economic loss. To obtain the quantitative result of health impact of particulate matter (PM) in most populated Mumbai City and most polluted Delhi City in India, an epidemiology-based exposure-response function has been used to calculate the attributable number of mortality and morbidity cases from 1991 to 2015 in a 5-year interval and the subsequent DALYs, and economic cost is estimated of the health damage based on unit values of the health outcomes. Here, we report the attributable number of mortality due to PM10 in Mumbai and Delhi increased to 32,014 and 48,651 in 2015 compared with 19,291 and 19,716 in year 1995. And annual average mortality due to PM2.5 in Mumbai and Delhi was 10,880 and 10,900. Premature cerebrovascular disease (CEV), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) causes are about 35.3, 33.3, and 22.9% of PM2.5-attributable mortalities. Total DALYs due to PM10 increased from 0.34 million to 0.51 million in Mumbai and 0.34 million to 0.75 million in Delhi from average year 1995 to 2015. Among all health outcomes, mortality and chronic bronchitis shared about 95% of the total DALYs. Due to PM10, the estimated total economic cost at constant price year 2005 US$ increased from 2680.87 million to 4269.60 million for Mumbai City and 2714.10 million to 6394.74 million for Delhi City, from 1995 to 2015, and the total amount accounting about 1.01% of India's gross domestic product (GDP). A crucial presumption is that in 2030, PM10 levels would have to decline by 44% (Mumbai) and 67% (Delhi) absolutely to maintain the same health outcomes in year 2015 levels. The results will help policy makers from pollution control board for further cost-benefit analyses of air pollution management programs in Mumbai and Delhi.

  18. Congener specific distribution of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzo-p-furans in ambient air particulates (less than PM10 in Delhi, India

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    Bhupander Kumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-furans (PCDFs are unintentionally formed during inefficient combustions and as a by-product. Due to their resistance to degradation and their toxic effect on health, PCDD/Fs are listed by the Stockholm Convention as persistent organic pollutants (POPs. Once released into the atmosphere, most of them are adsorbed to air particles and transported away from sources in atmosphere. India signed the Stockholm Convention India agreeing thereby to reduce and eliminate the use of POPs. The German agency for Technical Cooperation helped develop facilities for monitoring POPs at a national level in Delhi. This paper presents the data generated during a training assignment for Central Pollution Control Board officials at the German laboratory. Air borne particulate matter (Delhi, India and analyzed in a German laboratory for 17 congeners of PCDD/Fs. The concentrations of ΣPCDD/Fs ranged between 1720-9010 fg m-3 (mean 5559 fg m-3 and their toxic equivalency values ranged from 67 to 460 fg I-toxic equivalent quantities (TEQ m-3, with an average of 239 fg I-TEQ m-3 which was lower than the ambient air standards. The dominant congeners were octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD, octachlorinated dibenzo-p-furans (OCDF, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptachlorinated dibenzo- p-furans, and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin. The contributions of individual homologs for ΣPCDDs/Fs I-TEQ was in the order of OCDD (31%>HCDF (21%>hexachlorodibenzofurans (13%=OCDF (13%> HCDF (12% and other individual congeners contribute less than 5%. High chlorinated congeners contributed with more than 80% for ΣPCDD/Fs I-TEQ. Rough estimates of tolerable daily intake (TDI shows low health risk of exposure to ΣPCDD/Fs with inhalation of 0.098 pg I-TEQ kg1day1 for adult and 0.152 pg TEQ kg-1day-1 for children, which is much lower than World Health Organization

  19. Theory and social practice of agency in combining breastfeeding and employment: A qualitative study among health workers in New Delhi, India.

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    Omer-Salim, Amal; Suri, Shobha; Dadhich, Jai Prakash; Faridi, Mohammad Moonis Akbar; Olsson, Pia

    2014-12-01

    Women's agency, or intentional actions, in combining breastfeeding and employment is significant for health and labour productivity. Previous research in India showed that mothers use various collaborative strategies to ensure a "good enough" combination of breastfeeding and employment. Bandura's theoretical agency constructs previously applied in various realms could facilitate the exploration of agency in an Indian context. To explore manifestations of agency in combining breastfeeding and employment amongst Indian health workers using Bandura's theoretical constructs of agency and women's experiences. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten women employees within the governmental health sector in New Delhi, India. Both deductive and inductive qualitative content analyses were used. Bandura's features and modes of agency revealed that intentionality is underpinned by knowledge, forethought means being prepared, self-reactiveness includes collaboration and that self-reflectiveness gives perspective. Women's interviews revealed four approaches to agency entitled: 'All within my stride or the knowledgeable navigator'; 'Much harder than expected, but ok overall'; This is a very lonely job'; and 'Out of my control'. Agency features and their elements are complex, dynamic and involve family members. Bandura's theoretical agency constructs are partially useful in this context, but additional social practice constructs of family structure and relationship quality are needed for better correspondence with women's experiences of agency. The variation in individual approaches to agency has implications for supportive health and workplace services. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding urban vehicular pollution problem vis-a-vis ambient air quality--case study of a megacity (Delhi, India).

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    Goyal, S K; Ghatge, S V; Nema, P; M Tamhane, S

    2006-08-01

    Air pollution has become a growing problem in megacities and large urban areas through out the globe, and transportation is recognized as the major source of air pollution in many cities, especially in developing countries. Contribution of automobiles is reported in the range of 40 to 80% of the total air pollution. The challenge facing megacities is how to reduce the adverse environmental impacts and other negative effects of transportation without giving up the benefits of mobility. The dilemma becomes most pressing under conditions of rapid urban growth, which is likely to increase travel demand significantly. The paper is aimed at understanding the problem of vehicular pollution vis-a-vis ambient air quality for a highly traffic affected megacity, Delhi, wherein, the contribution of transport sector was estimated to be as high as 72%. An effort has been made to review and evaluate the benefits (in terms of improved air quality) of the technological interventions/policies adopted for vehicular pollution control in Delhi. It also highlights the outcome of the efforts and suggests further improvements thereon. The importance of public participation and awareness are also discussed. The paper focuses on deriving the benefits of the implementation of management strategies, supported by scientific and technical data/interpretation, so that the people can realize and participate in the government's endeavor for clean city drive in a more effective manner.

  1. Providers′ knowledge, attitude and dispensing practices of E-Pills in government dispensaries of south district in Delhi, India

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    Kishore Vertika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Delhi is one of the well developed districts in the capital with best public health care facilities. Knowledge, attitude and dispensing practices of emergency contraceptive pills (E-pills were assessed among health care providers of government dispensaries in South Delhi. Study Design: A descriptive epidemiological study. Materials and Methods: Both medical and paramedical (n = 428 providers in 63 government health care facilities were interviewed between August to December 2007 using a semi-structured interview schedule. Results: Among the different categories of the providers, medical officers were observed to be most knowledgeable about E-pills and the pharmacists were the least. The correct prescribed dose of E-pill was known only to 32% of the providers while 49% knew about its right time of intake. Misconceptions and apprehensions for promoting its use were very much prevalent even among medical officers as majority felt that open access to E-pills would increase promiscuity. The dispensing practice of providers was found positively ( P < 0.05 correlated with their knowledge. Training resulted a significant ( P < 0.05 improvement in knowledge, attitude and dispensing practice of the providers. Knowledge and training combined together contributed 35% to the dispensing practice (R 2 = 0.35. Conclusion: Besides knowledge, behavior change communication strategies should form a part of the training curricula of health care providers that would help to improve the dispensing practice of E-pills.

  2. Suicidal ideation and HIV risk behaviors among a cohort of injecting drug users in New Delhi, India

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    Sarin Enisha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data on mental health among injecting drug users in South Asia is scarce yet poor mental health among users has significant implications for the success of HIV prevention and treatment programmes. A cohort of 449 injecting drug users in Delhi was examined on the following issues (1 examine trends in suicidal ideation, suicide plan and suicidal attempts over a 12-month period, (2 examine association between injecting practices (receive and give used syringes and suicidal ideation over a 12 month study period. Methods An observational study was conducted providing phased interventions with follow up interviews every 3 months to 449 injecting drug users (IDUs, from August 2004 to November 2005. The study was conducted in Yamuna Bazaar, a known hub of drug peddling in Delhi. Interventions included nutrition, basic medical services, needle exchange, health education, HIV voluntary counseling and testing, STI diagnosis and treatment, oral buprenorphine substitution, and detoxification, each introduced sequentially. Results Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts, did not significantly change over 12 months of observation, while suicide plans actually increased over the time period. Keeping other factors constant, IDUs with suicidal ideation reported more giving and receiving of used syringes in the recent past. Conclusions: Mental health services are warranted within harm reduction programmes. Special attention must be paid to suicidal IDUs given their higher risk behaviours for acquiring HIV and other blood borne infections. IDU intervention programmes should assess and address suicide risk through brief screening and enhanced counseling.

  3. Prevalence of goitre and autoimmune thyroiditis in schoolchildren in Delhi, India, after two decades of salt iodisation.

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    Gopalakrishnan, Sripathy; Singh, S P; Prasad, Walia Ram; Jain, Sushil Kumar; Ambardar, Vinod Kumar; Sankar, Rajan

    2006-07-01

    Delhi lies in the sub-Himalayan plains and the existence of iodine deficiency is well established. Iodised salt was introduced in Delhi nearly two decades ago. The aim of the present study was to determine the status of iodine nutrition in school-aged children and the prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis. A total of 4,320 schoolchildren (2,218 [51.3%] boys) aged 10-16 years were studied. Goitre was detected in 396 children, an overall goitre prevalence of 9.2%. Of the 396 children with goitre, 112 (28.3%) had evidence of autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT). The median urinary iodine (UI) excretion in the study population as a whole was 14.6 microg/dl. The median UI in the group of children with goiter was 13.3 microg/dl, whereas UI in children with goiter and evidence of AIT was 16.6 microg/dl (p <0.01). Of the 112 children with AIT, 77 (68.7%) were euthyroid, 23 (20.5%) had subclinical hypothyroidism, eight (7.2%) had hypothyroidism and the remaining four (3.6%) had hyperthyroidism. UI was high in goitrous children with AIT, and in children with thyroid dysfunction. Further studies are needed to clarify whether the higher UI in goitrous children with AIT is causally related to AIT or is due to the inability of the diseased thyroid to trap available iodine efficiently.

  4. A Study of Workplace Violence Experienced by Doctors and Associated Risk Factors in a Tertiary Care Hospital of South Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Das, Timiresh; Pardeshi, Geeta; Kishore, Jugal; Padmanandan, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The increasing incidences of violence against doctors in their workplaces are an important reason for stress among these healthcare workers. Many incidences of workplace violence against doctors have been reported in the past and are also being continuously reported from different parts of the country as well as the world. Aim To determine the prevalence of workplace violence among doctors and to study the associated risk factors in a tertiary care hospital of Delhi, India. Material and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered semi-structured questionnaire. The contents were: data related to the workplace, incidences at work, violence prevention policy of the institution, reporting of incidences and follow-up, education and training for violence management. A total of 151 doctors participated in the study. Results Total participants in the study were 151. The mean age of study participants was 26.73±4.24 years. Almost half (47.02%; 44.56% of males and 50.84% of females) of the doctors reported having an experience of violence during work hours in past 12 months. Among the cases, 39.4% were reported from Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology while Surgery, Medicine and other departments reported 29.6%, 26.8% and 4.2% respectively. Patients or their relatives were perpetrators in most of the cases. Maximum (87.3%) of the reported cases were of verbal violence while 8.6% of the cases were of physical violence. Younger doctors with less work experience were more prone to physical violence. Regarding the time of violence, 35.1% of such cases occurred during afternoon while 30.1% of them took place at night. Conclusion A large number of doctors had experienced violence in past 12 months in a tertiary care hospital of South Delhi, India. Verbal violence came out to be most common form of violence experienced by the doctors. Afternoon or night hours were the timings when majority of such cases were reported. PMID:28050406

  5. An urban systems framework to assess the trans-boundary food-energy-water nexus: implementation in Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, Anu; Boyer, Dana; Singh Nagpure, Ajay; Fang, Andrew; Bogra, Shelly; Bakshi, Bhavik; Cohen, Elliot; Rao-Ghorpade, Ashish

    2017-02-01

    This paper develops a generalizable systems framework to analyze the food-energy-water (FEW) nexus from an urban systems perspective, connecting in- and trans-boundary interactions, quantifying multiple environmental impacts of community-wide FEW provisioning to cities, and visualizing FEW supply-chain risks posed to cities by the environment. Delhi’s community-wide food demand includes household consumption by socio-economic-strata, visitors- and industrial food-use. This demand depends 90%, 76%, and 86% on trans-boundary supply of FEW, respectively. Supply chain data reveal unique features of trans-boundary FEW production regions (e.g. irrigation-electricity needs and GHG intensities of power-plants), yielding supply chain-informed coupled energy-water-GHG footprints of FEW provisioning to Delhi. Agri-food supply contributes to both GHG (19%) and water-footprints (72%-82%) of Delhi’s FEW provisioning, with milk, rice and wheat dominating these footprints. Analysis of FEW interactions within Delhi found >75% in-boundary water-use for food is for urban agriculture and >76% in-boundary energy-use for food is from cooking fuels. Food waste-to-energy and energy-intensity of commercial and industrial food preparation are key data gaps. Visualizing supply chains shows >75% of water embodied in Delhi’s FEW supply is extracted from locations over-drafting ground water. These baseline data enable evaluation of future urban FEW scenarios, comparing impacts of demand shifts, production shifts, and emerging technologies and policies, within and outside of cities.

  6. Morphological and biochemical changes in Azadirachta indica from coal combustion fly ash dumping site from a thermal power plant in Delhi, India.

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    Qadir, Sami Ullah; Raja, Vaseem; Siddiqui, Weqar A

    2016-07-01

    The foliar and biochemical traits of Azadirachta indica A. Juss from fly ash (FA) dumping site in Badarpur thermal power plant (BTPP) New Delhi, India was studied. Three different experimental sites were selected at different distances from the thermal power plant. Ambient suspended particulate matter (SPM) and plant responses such as leaf pigments (chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and carotenoids), total chlorophyll, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal index (SI), stomatal conductance (SC), intercellular carbon dioxide concentration [CO2]i, net photosynthetic rate (NPR), nitrogen, nitrate, nitrate reductase activity, proline, protein, reducing sugar and sulphur content were measured. Considerable reduction in pigments (chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids), and total chlorophyll was observed at fly ash dumping site. Fly ash stress revealed the inhibitory effect on Nitrate reductase activity (NRA), Nitrate, soluble protein, and reducing sugar content, whereas stimulatory effect was found for the stomatal index, nitrogen, proline, antioxidants and sulphur content in the leaves. Under fly ash stress, stomatal conductance was low, leading to declining in photosynthetic rate and increase in the internal CO2 concentration of leaf. Single leaf area (SLA), leaf length and leaf width also showed a declining trend from control to the polluted site. Antioxidant enzymes increased in leaves reflecting stress and extenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  7. Prevalence and mechanism of triazole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus in a referral chest hospital in Delhi, India and an update of the situation in Asia

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    Anuradha eChowdhary

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus causes varied clinical syndromes ranging from colonization to deep infections. The mainstay of therapy of Aspergillus diseases is triazoles but several studies globally highlighted variable prevalence of triazole resistance, which hampers the management of aspergillosis. We studied the prevalence of resistance in clinical A. fumigatus isolates during 4 years in a referral Chest Hospital in Delhi, India and reviewed the scenario in Asia and the Middle East. Aspergillus species (n=2117 were screened with selective plates for azole resistance. The isolates included 45.4% A. flavus, followed by 32.4% A. fumigatus, 15.6% Aspergillus species and 6.6% A. terreus. Azole resistance was found in only 12 (1.7% A. fumigatus isolates.These triazole resistant A. fumigatus (TRAF isolates were subjected to (a calmodulin and β tubulin gene sequencing (b in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing against triazoles using CLSI M38-A2 (c sequencing of cyp51A gene and real-time PCR assay for detection of mutations and (d microsatellite typing of the resistant isolates. TRAF harbored TR34/L98H mutation in 10 (83.3% isolates with a pan-azole resistant phenotype. Among the remaining 2 TRAF isolates, one had G54E and the other had three non-synonymous point mutations. The majority of patients were diagnosed as invasive aspergillosis followed by allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis. The Indian TR34/L98H isolates had a unique genotype and were distinct from the Chinese, Middle East and European TR34/L98H strains. This resistance mechanism has been linked to the use of fungicide azoles in agricultural practices in Europe as it has been mainly reported from azole naïve patients. Reports published from Asia demonstrate the same environmental resistance mechanism in A. fumigatus isolates from two highly populated countries in Asia i.e., China and India and also from the neighboring Middle East.

  8. 'Negotiating the tensions of having to attach and detach concurrently': a qualitative study on combining breastfeeding and employment in public education and health sectors in New Delhi, India.

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    Omer-Salim, Amal; Suri, Shoba; Dadhich, Jai Prakash; Faridi, Mohammad Moonis Akbar; Olsson, Pia

    2015-04-01

    the aim of this study was to explore the factors involved in combining breastfeeding and employment in the context of six months of maternity leave in India. qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach. Health and Education sectors in New Delhi, India. 20 first-time mothers with one 8-12 month-old infant and who had returned to work after six months׳ maternity leave. the interviews followed a pre-tested guide with a vignette, one key question and six thematic areas; intentions, strategies, barriers, facilitators, actual experiences and appraisal of combining breastfeeding and employment. Probing covered pre-pregnancy, pregnancy, maternity leave, the transition and return to work. This study revealed a model of how employed women negotiate the tensions of concurrently having to attach and detach from their infant, work, and family. Women managed competing interests to ensure trusted care and nutrition at home; facing workplace conditions; and meeting roles and responsibilities in the family. In order to navigate these tensions, they used various satisficing actions of both an anticipatory and troubleshooting nature. in spite of a relatively generous maternity leave of six months available to these women, several individual, familial and workplace factors interacted to both hinder and facilitate the process of combining breastfeeding and employment. Tension, negotiation and compromise are inherent to the process. antenatal and postnatal interventions providing information and support for working mothers need to address factors at the individual, family and workplace levels in addition to the provision of paid maternity leave to enable the successful combination of breastfeeding and employment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence for natural vertical transmission of chikungunya viruses in field populations of Aedes aegypti in Delhi and Haryana states in India-a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Jaspreet; Kushwah, Raja Babu S; Singh, Shashi S; Sharma, Anil; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P; Bhatnagar, Raj Kamal; Subbarao, Sarala K; Sunil, Sujatha

    2016-10-01

    Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are principal vectors for the transmission of chikungunya virus (CHIKV). India is a hub for both dengue and chikungunya infections and there are several reports of co-infection of dengue and chikungunya virus in the clinical scenario. The present pilot entomological survey was conducted to evaluate vertical transmission of CHIKV in Aedes field populations. Aedes immature (larvae and pupae) collection was done in 2012, over a period of six months from selected sites in Delhi and Haryana, India. The immatures collected were reared for adult emergence and species identification was done. A. aegypti male and female mosquitoes were separated and pooled collection spot-wise, RNA extracted and RT PCR performed to test for the presence of CHIKV in the pools. Container index (CI) and minimum infection rate (MIR) were estimated. From study areas that tested positive for CHIKV, adult collections were made and females upon feeding on uninfected blood in laboratory were allowed to lay eggs. The progeny that emerged from these field-collected mothers were tested for CHIKV presence. Our pilot survey showed the existence of A. aegypti population even during peak summer season in a few foci which eventually helped the mosquitoes to tide over adverse environmental conditions and with the start of rainfall, the population exploded within a short period of time. Immatures collected from field and progeny of adults collected from the field were CHIKV positive demonstrating the presence of vertical transmission of chikungunya virus in field population of A. aegypti. The present study further demonstrates the importance of identifying permanent breeding sites for proper Aedes species control.

  10. A qualitative study examining psychosocial distress and coping mechanisms among orphan and vulnerable children living in institutional care in New Delhi, India

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    Abhishek Saraswat

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: India is home to the largest population of orphaned children in the South Asia, who are at increased risk of poor psychosocial well-being. In the Indian context, literature on the psychosocial well-being of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC is scarce. Our research was aimed at fulfilling this gap by understanding self-reported psychosocial distress among OVC and subsequent coping strategies adopted during their stay at orphanages. Methods: The present study was conducted in three randomly selected orphanages of Delhi, India, during August-December 2016. Fifteen children (M = 9, F = 6 aged 10-17, were selected for in-depth interviews through a non-probability purposive sampling. Descriptive analysis was used to describe the characteristics of the study participants. Data analysis required the examination and comparison of interview transcripts for content analysis and themes identification. Results and Discussion: Our findings revealed psychological turmoil and poor social cognition among OVC. Even though children were happy to enjoy their basic necessities of life, the majority of them faced parental bereavement yearning for love, and desiring advocacy and guidance in life. OVC showed low self-concept and lack of purpose in life. Isolation from outside world resulted in feelings of mistrust among OVC. They also felt stigmatized, socially excluded and remained distressed. Coping strategies adopted by OVC included praying to God, forgetting parents, shifting focus, avoiding crowded places, and treating inmates as their family. They also reported indulgence in self-discrimination, substance abuse, and delinquency to avoid psychosocial distress. Conclusions: Ongoing programs aimed exclusively at fulfilling materialistic needs of OVC could lose focus on their psychosocial issues. New robust interventions are required not only for sufficing the quality services, but also for identifying psychological issues, enhancing social skills

  11. Palaeoproterozoic continental arc magmatism, and Neoproterozoic metamorphism in the Aravalli-Delhi orogenic belt, NW India: New constraints from in situ zircon U-Pb-Hf isotope systematics, monazite dating and whole-rock geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Parampreet; Zeh, Armin; Chaudhri, Naveen

    2017-04-01

    Presently, the extent, origin and petrogenesis of late Palaeoproterozoic (ca. 1.85 Ga) magmatism in the north-central Aravalli-Delhi orogenic belt, NW India and subsequent metamorphic overprints are poorly constrained. Results of new in situ zircon U-Pb-Hf isotope analyses in combination with whole-rock elemental and isotopic data provide the first hard evidence that granitoid magmatism occurred in a continental magmatic arc setting between 1.86 and 1.81 Ga. The Hf-Nd model ages of 3.0-2.6 Ga and inherited zircon grains of 3.3-2.5 Ga indicate abundant reworking of Archaean crust. Flat HREE patterns with negative Eu anomalies furthermore reveal that the granitoids were generated from garnet-free and plagioclase-rich sources at shallow depths. Significant isotope variation among granitoid samples (εHft = -3.7 to -9.0; εNdt = -4.8 to -7.9) indicate that the reworked Archaean crust was not completely homogenised during the Palaeoproterozoic. This is best reflected by zircon Hf-isotope variation of ca. 9.5 epsilon units within the oldest granitoid sample. Zircon grains from this sample define three discrete Hf-isotope groups at εHf1.86Ga = -8.9, -4.8 and -1.6. These are interpreted to result from mixing of zircon-saturated magmas derived from three distinct sources within the crust prior to solidification. A monazite U-Pb isochron age of 868 ± 4 Ma from one of the granitoid samples furthermore indicates that the Aravalli fold belt was affected by an important post-magmatic overprint, perhaps related to the widespread metasomatic, granulite metamorphic and/or magmatic events during the same time span.

  12. Deep seismic image enhancement with the common reflection surface (CRS) stack method: evidence from the Aravalli-Delhi fold belt of northwestern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Biswajit; Sen, Mrinal K.; Vaidya, Vijaya Rao; Mann, Juergen

    2014-02-01

    Imaging of deep crustal features from narrow-angle deep seismic reflection data, especially from fold belt region, has been a challenging task. The common reflection surface (CRS) stack is an alternative seismic imaging technique for multicoverage reflection data. It is an automatic stacking process, which does not require explicit knowledge of stacking velocity. This CRS stack is especially useful when the data quality is poor and foldage is low. In this paper, we demonstrate an application of the CRS stack to a deep seismic reflection data set acquired across the Aravalli-Delhi fold belt of the northwestern India, which provides a seismic stack section with much improved signal-to-noise ratio. Comparing the conventional common mid-point (CMP) Stack with the CRS stack, we find that the Moho and other crustal reflections have been resolved clearly and the continuity of the reflectors has also been enhanced with the CRS stack method. The major findings from our CRS processing include clear image of the Moho discontinuity below the Marwar Basin and Sandmata Complex, and prominent upper and mid-crustal reflections. Our study for the first time images an extension of crustal-scale Jahazpur thrust below the Sandmata Complex, which becomes listric at the Moho. Some of the crustal features derived in this study were not identified in the earlier investigations using the CMP stack. Our study clearly demonstrates that the CRS stacking method is more appropriate for imaging the crustal and subcrustal structures of the thrust fold belt region than the conventional CMP method, where limited velocity information is available. Crustal thickness across the Proterozoic orogenic Aravalli-Delhi fold belt varies between 38 and 50 km. Global correlation of the seismic results suggests no relation between crustal thickness and age of the crustal block, but it depends on the thermorheological and tectonic history of the region. Palaeosignatures of the Proterozoic subduction and

  13. Association of breakfast intake with obesity, dietary and physical activity behavior among urban school-aged adolescents in Delhi, India: results of a cross-sectional study

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    Arora Monika

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developed countries, regular breakfast consumption is inversely associated with excess weight and directly associated with better dietary and improved physical activity behaviors. Our objective was to describe the frequency of breakfast consumption among school-going adolescents in Delhi and evaluate its association with overweight and obesity as well as other dietary, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors. Methods Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Eight schools (Private and Government of Delhi in the year 2006. Participants: 1814 students from 8th and 10th grades; response rate was 87.2%; 55% were 8th graders, 60% were boys and 52% attended Private schools. Main outcome measures: Body mass index, self-reported breakfast consumption, diet and physical activity related behaviors, and psychosocial factors. Data analysis: Mixed effects regression models were employed, adjusting for age, gender, grade level and school type (SES. Results Significantly more Government school (lower SES students consumed breakfast daily as compared to Private school (higher SES students (73.8% vs. 66.3%; p. More 8th graders consumed breakfast daily vs.10th graders (72.3% vs. 67.0%; p. A dose–response relationship was observed such that overall prevalence of overweight and obesity among adolescents who consumed breakfast daily (14.6% was significantly lower vs. those who only sometimes (15.2% or never (22.9% consumed breakfast (p. This relationship was statistically significant for boys (15.4 % vs. 16.5% vs. 26.0; p but not for girls. Intake of dairy products, fruits and vegetables was 5.5 (95% CI 2.4-12.5, 1.7 (95% CI 1.1-2.5 and 2.2 (95% CI 1.3-3.5 times higher among those who consumed breakfast daily vs. those who never consumed breakfast. Breakfast consumption was associated with greater physical activity vs. those who never consumed breakfast. Positive values and beliefs about healthy eating; body image satisfaction; and positive

  14. Education for All Summit of Nine High-Population Countries (New Delhi, India, December 12-16, 1993). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Chitra, Ed.; And Others

    This final report on an international conference of nine high population developing countries on education for all (EFA) begins with a declaration of goals by the representatives of each of the nine nations represented. Participating nations were Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, and Pakistan. After a scene…

  15. Education for All Summit of Nine High-Population Countries (New Delhi, India, December 12-16, 1993). Panel Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Chitra, Ed.; And Others

    This collection of panel proceedings is divided into five sections each of which is devoted to one panel. Panel 1 focused on mobilization, people's participation, and decentralization for "Education For All (EFA)." Panel 2 was devoted to external and internal financial resources for EFA (Government of India). Panel 3 was on girls' and…

  16. Politics, Society and Cosmology in India's North East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brara, Vijalakshmi N.

    Perched on the north eastern border of India, Manipur has evolved from a collection of heterogeneous principalities into a homogeneous society with a well-developed state structure. The author uses Clifford Geertz's concept of the theatre state to help analyse contemporary politics and ethnic relations in this region. The Meiteis, who are mainly Hindus, inhabit the Manipur Valley, whilst various Naga and Kuki tribes, who are predominantly Christians, live in the surrounding hills.

  17. Sex selection through traditional drugs in rural north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandyopadhyay S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Repidly declining sex ratio has highlighted a strong son preference among many societies various methods are employed by people to get a son. Objective: To determine the use pattern of sex selection drugs (SSDs in rural North India. Methods: An integrated qualitative and quantitative study was conducted in rural North India. A rapid population and hospital based survey of women in their early reproductive life was done in the study area to enlist the respondents. Few SSD samples were collected and analyzed. Results: SSDs were freely available from grocers, chemist shops and specific people in villages. These contained Shivalingi (Bryonia Laciniosa and Majuphal (Gtuercus infectoria. SSD use rate was 46% and 30% in community based and hospital based studies respectively. Use rate was significantly higher in women who did not have any son. Of the SSD samples and two individual ingredients analyzed by thin layer chromatography, 3 contained testosterone and one progesterone; one ingredient contained testosterone and the other natural steroids. Conclusion: Use of SSDs seems to be very common in North India. Implication of presence of steroids in SSDs needs further evaluation.

  18. Early detection of multi-drug resistance and common mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Delhi using GenoType MTBDRplus assay

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: There is scarcity of prevalence data of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) data and common mutations responsible in North India. This study aimed to detect MDR-TB among MDR-TB suspects from Delhi and mutation patterns using GenoType MTBDRplus assay. Materials and Methods: All MDR suspects in five districts of New Delhi were referred to the laboratory from 1 st October 2011 to 31 st December 2012 as per criterion defined by Programmatic Management of Drug Resistant Tuberculosi...

  19. Mafic rocks from Erinpura gneiss terrane in the Sirohi region: Possible ocean-floor remnants in the foreland of the Delhi Fold Belt, NW India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Pandit; H De Wall; H Daxberger; J Just; M Bestmann; K K Sharma

    2011-08-01

    A small isolated mafic body occurs to the south of Sirohi near village Daba within the Neoproterozoic Erinpura Granite in the southern sector of the Proterozoic Delhi Fold Belt in NW India. This mafic body occurs close to a 100 m wide NE–SW trending shear zone (Daba Shear Zone) which overprints the felsic rock fabrics. Further south, a small mafic body near village Kui was also sampled which forms the southern limit of the Phulad Ophiolite Suite which is a 300 km long major NE–SW trending lineament, described as Western Margin Fault. Some of the lithological components of the Daba mafic body show locally preserved magmatic fabric but completely transformed mineralogies under lower amphibolites facies metamorphic conditions where two-stage deformation has been inferred. Magnetic fabric analysis underlines a general correspondence of structural elements in both felsic and mafic lithologies. Binary correlations of Zr with other high field strength elements underline fractionation as the main process in the evolution of Daba and Kui rocks. Geochemical characteristics indicate subalkaline tholeiitic basalt affinity for these mafic rocks. The trace element characteristics, such as enriched LIL elements, high Th, absence of negative Nb anomalies and depletion in compatible elements in Daba samples suggest an enriched mantle source and lower degree of melting. The trace and rare earth element characteristics for Kui (Th anomaly, Nb–Ta trough and less spiked patterns, flat REE trends) indicate derivation from a refractory mantle source affected by fluids derived from subduction. Distinct differences in trace and REE characteristics between Daba and Kui can be interpreted in terms of different stages of ophiolite development.

  20. A comparative study of job satisfaction among regular and staff on contract in the primary health care system in Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Job satisfaction is a pleasant emotional state associated with the appreciation of one′s work and contributes immensely to performance in an organization. The purpose of this study was to assess the comparative job satisfaction among regular and staff on contract in Government Primary Urban Health Centers in Delhi, India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in 2013, on a sample of 333 health care providers who were selected using a multistage random sampling technique. The sample included medical officers (MOs, auxiliary nurses and midwives (ANMs, pharmacists and laboratory technicians (LTs/laboratory assistants (LAs among regular and staff on contract. Analysis was done using SPSS version 18, and appropriate statistical tests were applied. Results: The job satisfaction for all the regular staff that is, MOs, ANMs, pharmacists, LAs, and LTs were relatively higher (3.3 ± 0.44 than the contract staff (2.7 ± 0.45 with ′t′value 10.54 (P < 0.01. The mean score for regular and contract MOs was 3.2 ± 0.46 and 2.7 ± 0.56, respectively, and the same trends were found between regular and ANMs on the contract which was 3.4 ± 0.30 and 2.7 ± 0.38, regular and pharmacists on the contract was 3.3 ± 0.50 and 2.8 ± 0.41, respectively. The differences between groups were significant with a P < 0.01. Conclusion: Overall job satisfaction level was relatively low in both regular and contract staff. The factors contributing to satisfaction level were privileges, interpersonal relations, working-environment, patient relationship, the organization′s facilities, career development, and the scarcity of human resources (HRs. Therefore, specific recommendations are suggested to policy makers to take cognizance of the scarcity of HRs and the on-going experimentation with different models under primary health care system.

  1. Risk of internet addiction among undergraduate medical, nursing, and lab technology students of a health institution from Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Sulania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess prevalence, usage pattern, and risk of internet addiction (IA among undergraduate students of a health institution from Delhi. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out during March-April 2015 using 20-item Young′s IA test, a Likert scale-based interview schedule with scores ranging from 0 to 100 points with a higher score indicating greater internet dependency. Background variables included sociodemographic details, general health practices, self-assessment of mental health status, inter-personal relation (family/friends, personality type, and global satisfaction in life. The scoring pattern was analyzed in the form of low risk (score ≤49 points and high risk (score ≥50 points for IA. The proportion, Chi-square test, adjusted, and un-adjusted odds ratio (OR (95% confidence interval were computed using regression analysis. Results: Out of 202, 40.6% were MBBS students, followed by 35.6% from nursing, and 23.8% from medical lab technology stream; 68.3% were females; the mean age was 20.3 ± 1.4 years; and 61.9% were residing in hostels. It was observed that 44 (21.8% and 22 (10.9% students had ever consumed alcohol and smoked, respectively, while only 42 (20.8% were engaged in physical activity (≥30 min during most (≥5 of the days of the week. Based on self-assessment, 33 (16.3% were globally dissatisfied and 88 (43.6% reported themselves to be introverts. The majority of students were using internet for educational purpose (98%, entertainment (95.0%, accessing social sites (92.5%, checking E-mails (76.2%, and pornographic websites (45%. With regard to IA, 171 (84.7% were at low risk (score ≤49 and 31 (15.4% were at high risk (score ≥50. Male students (P = 0.001, ever consumed alcohol (P = 0.003, ever smoker (P = 0.02, and regular physical activity (P = 0.04 were found to be significantly associated with a high risk of IA based on Chi-square test, but none were found significant

  2. Searching for Sexual Revolutions in India: Non-Governmental Organisation-Designed Sex Education Programmes as a Means towards Gender Equality and Sexual Empowerment in New Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, Mette

    2012-01-01

    At the foundation of most inequalities in expression of sexuality lie social constructions of gender. In this paper, sex education is considered as a possibility to challenge sexism and promote healthy and self-affirmative sex lives. In the past decade, the discourse of sex education in India has become a "battle of morality" where concerned…

  3. Effects of inbreeding on marriage payment in north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badaruddoza; Afzal, M

    1995-07-01

    This study examines the relationships between consanguineous marriages and marriage payment, using data from two Muslim qaums living in urban and rural areas in Aligarh District, Uttar Pradesh, North India. Qaum and locality were found to have no significant association with the dowry system. Marriage payment is less common in consanguineous than in non-consanguineous marriages. However, the association between marriage payment and the type of marriage is significant at p dowry system is more prevalent among the higher socioeconomic groups, while the bride-wealth system is more common among the lower socioeconomic groups.

  4. Primary cutaneous coccidioidomycosis: First imported case in north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Narang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease found only in the Western Hemisphere. In recent years, the incidence of the disease has increased in California and Arizona, which may be partially due to the rapid immigration of previously unexposed persons from states outside the endemic areas. The disease in the nonendemic areas is usually imported. Determining a history of exposure is critical for performing the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis in these cases. Histopathological examination is the key to the diagnosis when fungal culture and molecular studies are not available. We hereby report an imported case of cutaneous coccidioidomycosis, which to the best of our knowledge is the first case report from North India.

  5. Occult Dirofilariosis in Dogs of North Eastern Region in India

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    Sonjoy Kumar-Borthakur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The North Eastern Region in India is endemic for canine heartworm disease but in clinics accurate diagnosis is some times difficult. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of occult infections for heartworm disease in canine in two geographical regions of North Eastern India.Methods: A total of 782 numbers of three categories of dogs namely, working dogs of military and paramilitary forces, pet dogs and stray dogs were screened for the presence of heartworm infection from August 2011 to July, 2012 in Guwahati (Assam and Aizawl (Mizoram. Conventional, immunological and molecular techniques were followed for this epidemiological study. The criteria to determine the occult heartworm cases were based on the dif­ferences between heartworm positive cases in PCR test and antigen ELISA test.Results: The findings revealed an overall 22.69 percent occult case. The working dogs had highest prevalence (60% followed by pet (29.16% and stray dogs (17.75%.Conclusion: The highest percentage of occult heartworm infection was present in working dogs maintained under military or paramilitary forces. 

  6. Rubella outbreak in the union territory of Chandigarh, North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mini P; Kumar, Archit; Gautam, Neha; Khurana, Jasmine; Gupta, Madhu; Ratho, Radha Kanta

    2015-02-01

    Rubella virus outbreaks usually occur when a large numbers of susceptible individuals accumulate. The disease presents clinically with fever and maculopapular rash. The present study reports the investigation of rubella outbreak in a modern and well-planned village near Chandigarh, North India. The blood samples were collected from 39 cases with febrile rash and from 15 age and sex matched healthy controls residing in the same locality and subjected for the detection of Rubella IgM and IgG antibodies by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The throat swabs, urine and blood samples from acute cases were also collected and subjected to RT-PCR using the primers targeting the E1 region. The genetic characterization of the rubella virus was carried out to identify the circulating genotypes. In the present outbreak, 13 laboratory confirmed cases were reported. Rubella IgM antibodies were detected in 12/39 (30.7%) patients. Rubella RNA could be detected in 83.3% (5/6) of urine, 22.2% (2/9) of throat swabs, and 8.3% (1/12) of blood samples. The rubella genotype responsible for the present outbreak was identified as genotype 1a. This outbreak highlights the need for the introduction of rubella vaccine in the National Immunization Programme of India to prevent outbreaks and to aim towards the eradication of this disease. This study reports the presence of genotype 1a in North India for the first time and stresses the need for further molecular work to identify the circulating strains of the virus.

  7. Population distance between Dakshina Kannada (South India) and Gujarati (North India) population using infracranial nonmetric traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, S R; Kumar, Madhan; Krishnamurthy, A; Prabhu, Latha V; D'Costa, Sujatha; Ramanathan, Lakshmi A; Potu, Bhagath K; Gorantla, Vasavi R

    2007-01-01

    Infracranial nonmetric variations have been considered for determining population distance between different regions and continents, in recent times. We studied different infracranial nonmetric traits from the Dakshina Kannada (South India) region to compare with the data available from the Gujarati (North India) region. The mean measure of divergence between the two different geographic regions showed significant variation. In our study, the incidence like i) Allen's fossa of the femur, ii) plaque formation in the upper end of the femur, iii) exostosis in trochanteric fosse of femur, iv) third trochanter of femur, v) os trigonum of talus, vi) medial talar facet, vii) peroneal tubercle of calcaneus, viii) bipartite transverse foramen in the cervical vertebra, too showed significant side difference.

  8. Pulmonary Function Tests In Young Healthy Subjects Of North India

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    Parag Rastogi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives : The diagnosis of disease done by skiagram can be substantiated by pulmonary function tests. Substantial data of Indians on PFTs is not available. The present study therefore has been planned on young healthy north Indians.Setting : 119 males and 49 female medical students of North India.Measurements : PFT's, T.V. FEV1, FVC, FER and PEFR were measured. P<0.05 was considered as significant.Results : In North Indian males, mean T. V was 437.56 ± 65.83 ml, FEV1 3.26 ±041 L, FVC 3.82 ± 0.48 L, FER 85.09 ± 2.42% and PEFR was 495.42 ± 101.82 L / min. In North Indian females, average T. V was 386.12 ± 37.90 ml, FEV1 2.39 ± 0.38 L, FVC 2.79 ± 0.43 L, FER 85.38 ± 257% and PEFR was 307.12 ± 75.74 L / min.Conclusions: Males in comparison to females had more value of PFTs. All the PFTs showed positive correlation with Height, Weight and Surface area except Tidal Volume and FER.

  9. Are falls more common than road traffic accidents in pediatric trauma?Experience from a Level 1 trauma centre in New Delhi, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annu Babu; Amulya Rattan; Piyush Ranjan; Maneesh Singhal; Amit Gupta; Subodh Kumar; Biplab Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose:The epidemiology of pediatric trauma is different in different parts of the world.Some researchers suggest falls as the most common mechanism,whereas others report road traffic accidents (RTAs) as the most common cause.The aim of this study is to find out the leading cause of pediatric admissions in Trauma Surgery in New Delhi,India.Methods:Inpatient data from January 2012 to September 2014 was searched retrospectively in Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre Trauma Registry.All patients aged 18 years or less on index presentation admitted to surgical ward/ICU or later taken transfer by the Department of Trauma Surgery were included.Data were retrieved in predesigned proformas.Information thus compiled was coded in unique alphanumeric codes for each variable and subjected to statistical analysis using SPSS version 21.Results:We had 300 patients over a 33 month period.Among them,236 (78.6%) were males and 64 (21.3%) females.Overall the predominant cause was RTAs in 132 (43%) patients.On subgroup analysis of up to 12 years age group (n =147),the most common cause was found to be RTAs again.However,falls showed an incremental upward trend (36.05% in up to 12 age group versus 27% overall),catching up with RTAs (44.89%).Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS) ranged from 0 to 12 with a mean of 8.12 + 2.022.223 (74.33%) patients experienced trauma limited to one anatomic region only,whereas 77 (25.66%) patients suffered polytrauma.288 patients were discharged to home care.Overall,12 patients expired in the cohort.Median hospital stay was 6 days (range 1-182).Conclusion:Pediatric trauma is becoming a cause of increasing concern,especially in the developing countries.The leading cause of admissions in Trauma Surgery is RTAs (43%) as compared to falls from height (27%);however,falls from height are showing an increasing trend as we move to younger age groups.Enhancing road safety alone may not be a lasting solution for prevention of pediatric trauma and

  10. Earthquake precursory studies in Kangra valley of North West Himalayas, India, with special emphasis on radon emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Singh, Surinder; Mahajan, Sandeep; Bajwa, Bikramjit Singh; Kalia, Rajeev; Dhar, Sunil

    2009-10-01

    The continuous soil gas radon monitoring is carried out at Palampur and the daily monitoring of radon concentration in water is carried out at Dharamshala region of Kangra valley of North West Himalayas, India, a seismic zone V, to study the correlation of radon anomalies in relation to seismic activities. In this study, radon monitoring in soil was carried out by using barasol probe manufactured by Algade France, whereas the radon content in water was recorded using RAD 7 radon monitoring system of Durridge Company USA. The effect of meteorological parameters viz. temperature, pressure, wind velocity, rainfall, and humidity on radon emission has been studied. The seasonal average value and standard deviation of radon in soil and water is calculated to find the radon anomaly to minimize the effect of meteorological parameters on radon emission. The radon anomalies observed in the region have been correlated with the seismic events of M>or=2 reported by Wadia Institute of Himalayas Geology Dehradoon and Indian Meteorological Department, New Delhi in NW Himalayas within 250km distance from the monitoring stations.

  11. Earthquake precursory studies in Kangra valley of North West Himalayas, India, with special emphasis on radon emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Arvind [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Singh, Surinder [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India)], E-mail: surinder_s1951@yahoo.co.in; Mahajan, Sandeep; Bajwa, Bikramjit Singh [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Kalia, Rajeev; Dhar, Sunil [Department of Geology, Government College, Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh (India)

    2009-10-15

    The continuous soil gas radon monitoring is carried out at Palampur and the daily monitoring of radon concentration in water is carried out at Dharamshala region of Kangra valley of North West Himalayas, India, a seismic zone V, to study the correlation of radon anomalies in relation to seismic activities. In this study, radon monitoring in soil was carried out by using barasol probe manufactured by Algade France, whereas the radon content in water was recorded using RAD 7 radon monitoring system of Durridge Company USA. The effect of meteorological parameters viz. temperature, pressure, wind velocity, rainfall, and humidity on radon emission has been studied. The seasonal average value and standard deviation of radon in soil and water is calculated to find the radon anomaly to minimize the effect of meteorological parameters on radon emission. The radon anomalies observed in the region have been correlated with the seismic events of M{>=}2 reported by Wadia Institute of Himalayas Geology Dehradoon and Indian Meteorological Department, New Delhi in NW Himalayas within 250 km distance from the monitoring stations.

  12. The North-South divide in snake bite envenomation in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Chauhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake bite envenomations are common in rural areas and the incidence peaks during monsoons in India. Prominent venomous species have been traditionally labeled as the ′big four′ that includes Cobra, Krait, Russel′s viper and Saw scaled viper. Systematic attempts for identification and classification of prevalent snakes in various states of India are missing till now and there is no concrete data on this aspect. The published literature however shows that some species of snakes are more prevalent in a particular region than the other parts of India e.g. Saw scaled vipers in Rajasthan. We reviewed the published literature from various parts of India and found that there is a North-South divide in the snake bite profile from India. Neurotoxic envenomations are significantly higher in North India compared to South India where Hematotoxic envenomations are prevalent. Russel′s viper causes local necrosis, gangrene and compartment syndrome. These manifestations have never been reported in North Indian snake bite profile in the published literature. Early morning neuroparalysis caused by Krait is a common problem in North India leading to high mortality after snake bite. This review presents supporting evidence for the North-South divide and proposes a way forward in formulation and revision of guidelines for snake bite in India.

  13. The North-South divide in snake bite envenomation in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Vivek; Thakur, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Snake bite envenomations are common in rural areas and the incidence peaks during monsoons in India. Prominent venomous species have been traditionally labeled as the 'big four' that includes Cobra, Krait, Russel's viper and Saw scaled viper. Systematic attempts for identification and classification of prevalent snakes in various states of India are missing till now and there is no concrete data on this aspect. The published literature however shows that some species of snakes are more prevalent in a particular region than the other parts of India e.g. Saw scaled vipers in Rajasthan. We reviewed the published literature from various parts of India and found that there is a North-South divide in the snake bite profile from India. Neurotoxic envenomations are significantly higher in North India compared to South India where Hematotoxic envenomations are prevalent. Russel's viper causes local necrosis, gangrene and compartment syndrome. These manifestations have never been reported in North Indian snake bite profile in the published literature. Early morning neuroparalysis caused by Krait is a common problem in North India leading to high mortality after snake bite. This review presents supporting evidence for the North-South divide and proposes a way forward in formulation and revision of guidelines for snake bite in India.

  14. Study of knowledge, perception and attitude of adolescent girls towards STIs/HIV, safer sex and sex education: (A cross sectional survey of urban adolescent school girls in South Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Lipi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI's, including HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus mainly affects sexually active young people. Young adults aged 15–29 years, account for 32% of AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome cases reported in India and the number of young women living with HIV/AIDS is twice that of young men. The aim of the study was to evaluate adolescent school girls' knowledge, perceptions and attitudes towards STIs/HIV and safer sex practice and sex education and to explore their current sexual behaviour in India. Methods A cross sectional study was carried out in 2007 in South Delhi, India to investigate the perception, knowledge and attitude of adolescent urban schoolgirls towards sexually transmitted Infections (STIs, HIV/AIDS, safer sex practice and sex education. the self-administered questionnaire was completed by 251 female students from two senior secondary schools. Results More than one third of students in this study had no accurate understanding about the signs and symptoms of STIs other than HIV/AIDS. About 30% of respondents considered HIV/AIDS could be cured, 49% felt that condoms should not be available to youth, 41% were confused about whether the contraceptive pill could protect against HIV infection and 32% thought it should only be taken by married women. Conclusion Though controversial, there is an immense need to implement gender-based sex education regarding STIs, safe sex options and contraceptives in schools in India

  15. Human leucocyte antigen Class I and II alleles associated with anti-hepatitis C virus-positive patients of North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Chowdhry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Humans are the only known natural hosts of hepatitis C virus (HCV. This study was undertaken to examine the frequencies of human leucocyte antigens (HLAs Class I and Class II genotype profiles in anti-HCV-infected patients of Northern India. Materials and Methods: From a period of January 2013 to August 2014, 148 anti-HCV-positive patients of North India referred to the Department of Molecular Biology and Transplant Immunology, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, New Delhi, for performing HLA typing were included in the study. Results: AFNx0102, AFNx0131 allele frequency decreased significantly in anti-HCV-positive patients. Frequencies for HLA-B loci did not reach any statistical significance. Among the Class II alleles, HLA-DRB1FNx0103 and HLA-DRB1FNx0110 were significantly higher in the patient population, and HLA-DRB1FNx0115 was significantly decreased in the patient population as compared to the controls. Conclusion: HLA-AFNx0133 was significantly increased as compared to control population and showed geographic variation in HCV-infected individuals of India.

  16. 76 FR 70113 - Executive-Led Medical Trade Mission to India Mumbai, New Delhi and Hyderabad March 2-8, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... trade mission calendar-- www.trade.gov/trade-missions--and other Internet Web sites, press releases to... market but also and especially small- and medium- sized enterprises (SMEs), and new-to-market (NTM... Mission in two- cities (Delhi and Hyderabad) will be $3,275.00 for SMEs or trade organizations, and $3950...

  17. Writing sex and sexuality: archives of colonial North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Charu

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on disparate sites and subjects to reflect on and problematize the relationship between sexuality and the archives in colonial north India. I dwell on how ‘recalcitrant’ and hidden histories of sexuality can be gleaned by not only expanding our arenas of archives, but also by decentering and recasting colonial archives. I do so by specifically investigating some of the “indigenous” writings in Hindi, through texts concerning homosexuality, sex manuals, the writings of a woman ayurvedic practitioner, didactic literature and its relationship to Dalit (outcaste) sexuality, and current popular Dalit literature and its representations of the past. The debate for me here is not about the flaws of archival uses but rather of playing one archive against another, of appropriating many parallel, alternative, official, and popular archives simultaneously to shape a more nuanced and layered understanding of sexuality.

  18. Bioclimatism and vernacular architecture of north-east India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Manoj Kumar; Atreya, S.K. [Instrument Design and Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Mahapatra, Sadhan [Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India)

    2009-05-15

    Vernacular architecture based on bioclimatism concepts was developed and used through the centuries by many civilizations across the world. Different civilizations have produced their own architectural styles based on the local conditions. This study is carried out on the vernacular buildings of north-east India across all the bioclimatic zones. A survey of 42 houses, more than 70 years old was carried out at representative locations across all bioclimatic zones. The study has yielded findings relating bioclimatism, socio-economic status and cultural setup to the vernacular architecture of the region. Also, different solar passive features are available in most of these houses, related to temperature control and promoting natural ventilation. These houses are constructed using locally available materials like wood, cane, bamboo, stone, mud, jute, lime and represent unique examples towards sustainable building design. (author)

  19. Neuroimaging in Cerebral Palsy – Report from North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju AGGARWAL

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Aggarwal A, Mittal H, Debnath SKR, Rai A. Neuroimaging in Cerebral Palsy–Report from North India. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Autumn; 7(3:41- 46. ObjectiveOnly few Indian reports exist on neuroimaging abnormalities in children with cerebral palsy (CP from India. Materials & MethodsWe studied the clinico-radiological profile of 98 children diagnosed as CP at a tertiary centre in North India. Relevant investigations were carried out to determine the etiology. ResultsAmong the 98 children studied, 80.5% were males and 22.2% were premature. History of birth asphyxia was present in 41.9%. Quadriplegic CP was seen in 77.5%, hemiplegic in 11.5%, and diplegic in 10.5%. Other abnormalities were microcephaly (60.5%, epilepsy (42%, visual abnormality (37%, and hearing abnormality (20%. Neuroimaging was abnormal in 94/98 (95.91%.Abnormalities were periventricular white matter abnormalities (34%, deep grey matter abnormalities (47.8%, malformations (11.7%, and miscellaneous lesions (6.4%. Neuroimaging findings did not relate to the presence of birth asphyxia, sex, epilepsy, gestation, type of CP, or microcephaly. ConclusionsNeuroimaging is helpful for etiological diagnosis, especially malformations.  ReferencesSinghi PD, Ray M, Suri G. Clinical spectrum of cerebral palsy in north India-an analysis of 1000 cases. J Trop Pediatr 2002 48(3; 162-6.Sharma P, Sharma U, Kabra A. Cerebral Palsy-Clinical Profile and Predisposing Factors. Indian Pediatr 1999;36(10:1038-42.Nelson KB, Ellenberg JH. Antecedents of cerebral palsy. Multivariate analysis of risk. N Engl J Med 1986 315(2:81-6.Krägeloh-Mann I, Horber V. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in elucidating the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy: a systematic review. Dev Med Child Neurol 2007; 49(2:144-51.Rosenbaum P, Paneth N, Leviton A, Goldstein M, Bax M, Damiano D, et al. A report: the definition and classification of cerebral palsy April 2006. Dev Med Child Neurol Suppl 2007

  20. Folklore medicinal plants of North Andaman Islands, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, P Rama Chandra; Reddy, C Sudhakar; Raza, S H; Dutt, C B S

    2008-09-01

    The rural folk of North Andaman, India use the traditional medicine for their primary health care. Folklore medicinal uses of 72 interesting medicinal plant species along with botanical name, local name, family, habit, part used, disease for which the drug is administrated, mode of administration are presented. These 72 plant species which provide the crude drugs pertain to 67 genera and 43 families of Magnoliophyta from tropical rainforests. These plants used to cure 40 ailments. Most remedies were taken orally, accounting for 76% of medicinal use. Most of the remedies were reported to have been from trees (55.6%) and herb (22.2%) species. The most widely sought after plant parts in the preparation of remedies in the areas are the stem bark (33.8%) and root (23.9%).

  1. Seasonal prediction skill of winter temperature over North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, P. R.; Kar, S. C.; Mohanty, U. C.; Dey, S.; Kumari, S.; Sinha, P.

    2016-04-01

    The climatology, amplitude error, phase error, and mean square skill score (MSSS) of temperature predictions from five different state-of-the-art general circulation models (GCMs) have been examined for the winter (December-January-February) seasons over North India. In this region, temperature variability affects the phenological development processes of wheat crops and the grain yield. The GCM forecasts of temperature for a whole season issued in November from various organizations are compared with observed gridded temperature data obtained from the India Meteorological Department (IMD) for the period 1982-2009. The MSSS indicates that the models have skills of varying degrees. Predictions of maximum and minimum temperature obtained from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) climate forecast system model (NCEP_CFSv2) are compared with station level observations from the Snow and Avalanche Study Establishment (SASE). It has been found that when the model temperatures are corrected to account the bias in the model and actual orography, the predictions are able to delineate the observed trend compared to the trend without orography correction.

  2. Microbial evaluation of bottled water marketed in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawna Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Drinking unsafe and unhygienic water can cause waterborne diseases such as diarrhea and typhoid. The present study describes the microbial evaluation of bottled water sold in North India. The samples were analyzed for total viable count and coliforms and susceptibility to different antibiotics. Though free of coliforms, the samples had a total viable count ranging from 0.01 × 10 [1] cfu/mL to 2.40 × 10 [3] cfu/mL and in 17% of the samples, total viable count was much higher than specified by the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS, Government of India. Among the samples, 6.5% also showed fungal growth. On checking the sensitivity of bacteria isolates to different antibiotics, most of the strains were found to be resistant to a number of antibiotics. It can thus be concluded that the consumption of bottled water with a high viable count and that was bacteria-resistant to different antibiotics may have an effect on the health of the consumers, especially immune-compromised individuals.

  3. Modulation of aerosol radiative forcing due to mixing state in clear and cloudy-sky: A case study from Delhi National Capital Region, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Parul; Dey, Sagnik; Srivastava, Atul K.; Singh, Sachchidanand; Tiwari, Suresh; Agarwal, Poornima

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol properties change with the change in mixing state of aerosols and therefore it is a source of uncertainty in estimated aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) from observations or by models assuming a specific mixing state. The problem is important in the Indo-Gangetic Basin, Northern India, where various aerosol types mix and show strong seasonal variations. Quantifying the modulation of ARF by mixing state is hindered by lack of knowledge about proper aerosol composition. Hence, first a detailed chemical composition analysis of aerosols for Delhi National capital region (NCR) is carried out. Aerosol composition is arranged quantitatively into five major aerosol types - accumulation dust, coarse dust, water soluble (WS), water insoluble (WINS), and black carbon (BC) (directly measured by Athelometer). Eight different mixing cases - external mixing, internal mixing, and six combinations of core- shell mixing (BC over dust, WS over dust, WS over BC, BC over WS, WS over WINS, and BC over WINS; each of the combinations externally mixed with other species) have been considered. The spectral aerosol optical properties - extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (g) for each of the mixing cases are calculated and finally 'clear-sky' and 'cloudy-sky' ARF at the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) and surface are estimated using a radiative transfer model. Comparison of surface-reaching flux for each of the cases with MERRA downward shortwave surface flux reveals the most likely mixing state. 'BC-WINS+WS+Dust' show least deviation relative to MERRA during the pre-monsoon (MAMJ) and monsoon (JAS) seasons and hence is the most probable mixing states. During the winter season (DJF), 'BC-Dust+WS+WINS' case shows the closest match with MERRA, while external mixing is the most probable mixing state in the post-monsoon season (ON). Lowest values for both TOA and surface 'clear-sky' ARF is observed for 'BC-WINS+WS+ Dust' mixing case. TOA ARF is 0.28±2

  4. Resurgence of diphtheria in rural areas of North Karnataka, India

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    Mahantesh V Parande

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A diphtheria outbreak was identified from Vijayapura (formerly Bijapur district in the South Indian state of Karnataka in 2011. There was a surge in the number of throat swab samples received under the Integrated Disease Surveillance Programme (IDSP in North Karnataka since then. Objectives: A microbiological study was undertaken to generate information on the status of resurgence of the disease in the region. Materials and Methods: Throat swabs from 432 suspected cases of diphtheria during 2012–2015 were obtained from government hospitals and primary health centres of 8 districts in North Karnataka and were processed for the culture and identification of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Polymerase chain reaction for the presence of toxin gene (toxA and toxB was carried out on the isolates. Antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed on the isolates with a panel of 14 antibiotics. Results: Thirty-eight (8.79% out of 432 samples yielded C. diphtheriae on culture. All isolates possessed the diphtheria toxin gene. Out of the 38 confirmed cases, whereas 21 (55.26% were between 1 and 5 years of age, 14 (36.84% were aged between 5 and 10 years. Male children were three times more than females in confirmed cases. No information was available on the immunisation status of the cases. Emergence of resistance to penicillin was found with minimum inhibitory concentration reaching up to 6.00 μg/ml. Conclusion and Discussion: Our study identified an upsurge in cases of diphtheria in North Karnataka, particularly in Vijayapura District, and to the best of our knowledge, reports the emergence of penicillin resistance for the first time in India. The study calls for enhanced surveillance for the disease, making antidiphtheritic serum available in key hospitals in the region and serves to provide a baseline for future assessment of the impact of the recently launched 'Mission Indradhanush' programme in strengthening Universal Immunisation Programme

  5. Influence of Delhi Pollution on Aerosol Properties Over Greater Noida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Singh, R. P.; Kumar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Influence of Delhi Pollution on Aerosol Properties over Greater NoidaManish Sharma1, Ramesh P. Singh2 and Rajesh Kumar3 1Research and Technology Development Centre, Sharda University, Greater Noida, India. 2School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science, Chapman University, Orange 92866, USA 3School of Basic Sciences and Research, Sharda University, Greater Noida, India. Delhi capital of India is highly polluted during winter and summer seasons. Due to dominant westerly winds the air mass influence its neighboring city Greater Noida which is located 60 km south east of Delhi. Detailed analysis of multi satellite data and ground observations have been carried out during 2001-2015. The ground observation and satellite data show dynamic aerosol optical parameters over Greater Noida. During winter and summer seasons, dominant westerly wind outflow pollutants of Delhi that mix with the local anthropogenic emissions of Greater Noida influencing aerosol properties at different pressure levels. The characteristics of trace gases and aerosol parameters over Delhi and Greater Noida will be presented. The air quality is severely affected from the outflow of pollutants from Delhi which is threat to people living in the area. Due to dominant winds the air mass further transported towards eastern parts of Indo-Gangetic plains affecting weather conditions of the major cities.

  6. Size distribution and source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aerosol particle samples from the atmospheric environment of Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandeep; Kumar, Krishan; Srivastava, Arun; Srivastava, Alok; Jain, V K

    2011-10-15

    Ambient aerosol particles were collected using a five-stage impactor at six different sites in Delhi. The impactor segregates the TSPM into five different sizes (viz. >10.9, 10.9-5.4, 5.4-1.6, 1.6-0.7, and 10.9+10.9 to 5.4+5.4 to 1.6μm) and fine (1.6 to 0.7+<0.7μm). It was observed that the dominant PAHs found were pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(ghi)perylene and benzo(b)fluoranthene for both the coarse and fine fractions. Source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been carried out using principal component analysis method (PCA) in both coarse and fine size modes. The major sources identified in this study, responsible for the elevated concentration of PAHs in Delhi, are vehicular emission and coal combustion. Some contribution from biomass burning was also observed.

  7. Understanding heavy mineral dynamics using magnetic fingerprinting technique: A case study of North Maharashtra Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Badesab, F.K.; Iyer, S.D.; Gujar, A; Naik, D.K.; Gaonkar, S.S.; Luis, R.A.A; Shirodkar, P.; Naik, Smita

    Environmental magnetic and grain size measurements were carried out on sand samples collected from nine sand pits along a 20-km coastal stretch of Arnala Beach, North Maharashtra, India. This study sets out to identify the potential heavy (magnetite...

  8. Theory of Adaptive Change (TAC): Understanding Origin of Agricultural Lifestyle in North-Western India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amrita Sarkar; Sonika Kulkarni

    2017-01-01

    .... This paper discusses that the origin of agricultural lifestyle in north-western India did not happen only because of the collapse of the foraging economies due to climatic factor but also because...

  9. Knowledge and perceptions on antibiotic use and resistance among high school students and teachers in New Delhi, India: A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Kotwani; Chand Wattal; P.C. Joshi; Kathleen Holloway

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the perceptions and knowledge of school teachers and students about antibiotic use, resistance, and suggestions for practical interventions for the rational use of antibiotics. Methodology: Five focus group discussions (FGDs) with high school students (Class: 9–11) and five with teachers were conducted in two private and three public schools (one teacher and one student FGD per school) in five municipal wards of Delhi. Qualitative data on antibiotic knowledge, resistance...

  10. Congenital anomalies in paediatric surgery in North India

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    Babita Jangra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenitalmal formation represents defects in morphogenesis during early foetal life. Congenital anomalies account for 8-15% of perinatal deaths and 13-16% of neonatal deaths in India. The proportion of perinatal deaths due to congenital malformations is increasing as a result of reduction of mortality due to other causes owing to the improvement in perinatal and neonatal care. Materials and Methods: A retrospective record based study was conducted in the Paediatric Surgery Department of a Tertiary Care Institute of North India. The records of over a decade (2003-2012 were analysed. A total of 4305 cases of congenital anomalies were recorded in the study. All the data were entered in the excel spread sheet and analysed in SPSS version 17. (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, a software package used for statistical analysis, officially named "IBM SPSS Statistics". Results: Over the decade, a total of 14264 children were admitted in the paediatric surgery department with various problems. Out of these about one-third children (30.18% had one or other type of congenital anomalies. This trend remained almost constant over the decade within a range of 26.8-33.6%. About half of the total congenital anomalies belonged to the gastro-intestinal tract, followed by genitourinary tract, central nervous system and other anomalies. All the anomalies were more common in males and were found in children belonging to rural communities. Conclusions: All the neonates should be examined with scrutiny for overt as well as occult congenital anomalies and Paediatric surgical care should be considered as an essential component of child health programmes in developing populations. Moreover, it is necessary to establish a registry system for congenital anomalies.

  11. Informal rural healthcare providers in North and South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautham, Meenakshi; Shyamprasad, K M; Singh, Rajesh; Zachariah, Anshi; Singh, Rajkumari; Bloom, Gerald

    2014-07-01

    Rural households in India rely extensively on informal biomedical providers, who lack valid medical qualifications. Their numbers far exceed those of formal providers. Our study reports on the education, knowledge, practices and relationships of informal providers (IPs) in two very different districts: Tehri Garhwal in Uttarakhand (north) and Guntur in Andhra Pradesh (south). We mapped and interviewed IPs in all nine blocks of Tehri and in nine out of 57 blocks in Guntur, and then interviewed a smaller sample in depth (90 IPs in Tehri, 100 in Guntur) about market practices, relationships with the formal sector, and their knowledge of protocol-based management of fever, diarrhoea and respiratory conditions. We evaluated IPs' performance by observing their interactions with three patients per condition; nine patients per provider. IPs in the two districts had very different educational backgrounds-more years of schooling followed by various informal diplomas in Tehri and more apprenticeships in Guntur, yet their knowledge of management of the three conditions was similar and reasonably high (71% Tehri and 73% Guntur). IPs in Tehri were mostly clinic-based and dispensed a blend of allopathic and indigenous drugs. IPs in Guntur mostly provided door-to-door services and prescribed and dispensed mainly allopathic drugs. In Guntur, formal private doctors were important referral providers (with commissions) and source of new knowledge for IPs. At both sites, IPs prescribed inappropriate drugs, but the use of injections and antibiotics was higher in Guntur. Guntur IPs were well organized in state and block level associations that had successfully lobbied for a state government registration and training for themselves. We find that IPs are firmly established in rural India but their role has grown and evolved differently in different market settings. Interventions need to be tailored differently keeping in view these unique features.

  12. SPECTRUM OF SECONDARY PERITONITIS IN NORTH COASTAL ANDHRA PRADESH, INDIA

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    Janardhana Rao Konkena

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Secondary peritonitis due to perforation of Gastrointestinal Tract (GIT is one of the most common surgical emergencies worldwide. The spectrum of aetiology of secondary peritonitis in tropical countries differs from western countries. This study was conducted in King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam, in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India. The purpose of this study is to highlight the salient causes of secondary peritonitis and its outcome. METHODS A retrospective analysis of 603 patients of secondary peritonitis was done from January 2013 to December 2015 at King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India. All cases which were found to have peritonitis as a result of perforation of any part of GIT at the time of surgery were included in the study. All cases with either primary peritonitis or that due to anastomotic dehiscence were excluded. RESULTS A total of 603 patients were studied. Among them, 493 (81.7% were males and 110 (18.3% were females. Most common cause of secondary peritonitis in our study was acid peptic disease(52.40% followed by appendicular pathology(11.2%, gastrointestinal perforation due to injury of abdomen (9.62%, small bowel perforation due to typhoid aetiology (7.63%, gangrenous bowel (6.30%, ruptured liver abscess (2.98%, biliary peritonitis (1.99% and some miscellaneous rare causes. Overall, mortality in this study was found to be 8.95%. CONCLUSION The spectrum of secondary peritonitis in North Coastal Andhra Pradesh differs from other areas in India and western countries. Highest incidence of secondary peritonitis is due to perforation noted in gastroduodenal region, which is in contrast to western hemisphere where the predominant cause is lower gastrointestinal tract. Considering the relatively higher rate of gastroduodenal perforation quoted in this study, it is vital that awareness about the role of Helicobacter pylori ought to be considered. Special focus must also be made to increase awareness

  13. Enhanced formation of secondary air pollutants and aggravation of urban smog due to crop residue burning emissions in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Chinmoy; Kumar, Vinod; Sinha, Vinayak

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning causes intense perturbations to regional atmospheric chemistry and air quality and is a significant global source of reactive pollutants to the atmosphere (Andreae and Merlet, 2001). In November 2012, large areas in North India including New Delhi experienced several weeks of aggravated smog and poor air quality due to the impact of crop residue burning, which is a biannual post harvest activity that occurs during Oct-Nov and April-May every year in the agricultural belts of North western India. In-situ high temporal resolution (1 measurement every minute) measurements of a suite of volatile organic compounds measured using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) such as acetonitrile (biomass burning tracer) and aromatic hydrocarbons were performed simultaneously with carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, ozone and aerosol mass concentrations (PM 2.5 and PM 10) at a suburban site (30.667°N, 76.729°E and 310 m asl), impacted by air masses that had passed over the burning fields less than 72 hours ago. By using data from the same season but before the post harvest crop residue burning activity had commenced, we were able to quantify enhancements in ambient levels of the measured species due to the crop residue burning activity. When air masses influenced by the fire emissions reached the measurement site, peak values of about 8 ppbV acetonitrile, 4 ppmV CO, 100 ppbV NOx , 30 ppbV toluene and 15 ppbV benzene were observed which represented a factor of 2-5 increase over their ambient levels in the non-fire influenced period. Emission ratios of aromatic hydrocarbons/CO also showed a marked increase. Non fire event (N.F. E.) influenced and fire event (F.E.) influenced air masses had the following emission ratio enhancements: benzene/CO (N.F.E = 3; F.E. = 5), toluene/CO (N.F.E = 4; F.E. = 8.7) and sum of C8 aromatics/CO (N.F.E = 4; F.E. = 7.3) and sum of C9 aromatics/CO (N.F.E = 2.6; F.E. = 3.4). The OH reactivity of air masses which has strong

  14. Aetiology of childhood viral gastroenteritis in Lucknow, north India

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    Shilpi Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Due to limited availability of data on viral aetiology of acute gastroenteritis in north India, the present study was planned to detect rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus and astrovirus in stool samples of both in hospitalized and non-hospitalized children less than five years of age presenting with acute gastroenteritis. Methods: A total of 278 stool samples from equal number of children were tested for rotavirus antigen using ELISA and for norovirus, sapovirus and astroviruses by reverse transcription (RT-PCR. Results: Of the 169 samples from hospitalized patients, rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus and astrovirus were detected in 19.5, 2.3, 3.5 and 2.9 per cent samples, respectively. Of the 109 samples collected from the non-hospitalized patients, frequency of rotavirus and sapovirus detection was 9.1 and 1.8 per cent, respectively while norovirus and astrovirus were not detected. Interpretation & conclusions: Rotavirus was the most frequent cause of viral gastroenteritis in both hospitalized and non-hospitalized children. Maximum positivity of the viruses was seen in children less than two years of age.

  15. TRADITIONAL BIRTH ATTENDAN T: TRAINING PROFILE, KNOWLEDGE, BELIEF AND PRACTICES IN INTRANATAL PERIOD OF MOTHERS IN TWO URBAN RESETTLEMENT COLONIES OF NORTH - EAST DELHI

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    Shalini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To find out the training profile , knowledge , beliefs and practices of TBAs (Traditional birth attendants during intranatal period . SETTING AND DESIGN: Community based cross - sectional study conducted in Nand n agri & Sunde r n agri (two resettlement colonies of North - east Delhi MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pregnant women at 28 2 wks. were contacted individually through the health worker , TBA s/Dais. Each woman enrolled was subjected to a semi - structured pre - tested , pre - coded questionnaire. Relative precision was taken as 10% At 95% confidence level sample size was estimated to be 112. Additional allowance of attrition is taken as 20%.Total Sample Size wa s calculated to be 270. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Analysis was done using SPSS version (11.0 and Chi Square was applied to find the association between the variables and p value less than 0.05 was taken as significant. RESULTS: Most of the dais were trained i n both the areas (80% , although dais in Sundernagri were better with regards to number of trainings received. Clean cord was known to 10% dais in Nandnagri as against 30.4% dais in Sundernagri. Most of the dais in both Nandnagri (50% as well Sundernagri (45.5% ensured that the items or Instruments were sterile by boiling or buying new instruments. All the dais in Nandnagri perceived malpresentation & obstructed labor as a danger sign during labor (100% as against 91% of the dais in Sundernagri . 60% of t he dais in Nandnagri could not name the drug or injection that they had used as against 50% in Sundernagri. All the dais in both the study area s could enumerate only one drug and that was inj T.T. which was given soon after completion of third stage. CONCLUSIONS : Dais of Sundernagri area where RCH activities were augmented were trained more often and the knowledge and practices regarding antenatal , intranatal and postnatal care was better. Thus , dais need to receive training and refresher courses perio dically so that they

  16. Soil Health Management under Hill Agroecosystem of North East India

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    R. Saha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of soil quality/health is the combined result of soil fertility, biological degradation (decline of organic matter, biomass C, decrease in activity and diversity of soil fauna, increase in erodibility, acidity, and salinity, and exposure of compact subsoil of poor physicochemical properties. Northeast India is characterized by high soil acidity/Al+3 toxicity, heavy soil, and carbon loss, severe water scarcity during most parts of year though it is known as high rainfall area. The extent of soil and nutrient transfer, causing environmental degradation in North eastern India, has been estimated to be about 601 million tones of soil, and 685.8, 99.8, 511.1, 22.6, 14.0, 57.1, and 43.0 thousand tones of N, P, K, Mn, Zn, Ca, and Mg, respectively. Excessive deforestation coupled with shifting cultivation practices have resulted in tremendous soil loss (200 t/ha/yr, poor soil physical health in this region. Studies on soil erodibility characteristics under various land use systems in Northeastern Hill (NEH Region depicted that shifting cultivation had the highest erosion ratio (12.46 and soil loss (30.2–170.2 t/ha/yr, followed by conventional agriculture system (10.42 and 5.10–68.20 t/ha/yr, resp.. The challenge before us is to maintain equilibrium between resources and their use to have a stable ecosystem. Agroforestry systems like agri-horti-silvi-pastoral system performed better over shifting cultivation in terms of improvement in soil organic carbon; SOC (44.8%, mean weight diameter; MWD (29.4%, dispersion ratio (52.9%, soil loss (99.3%, soil erosion ratio (45.9%, and in-situ soil moisture conservation (20.6% under the high rainfall, moderate to steep slopes, and shallow soil depth conditions. Multipurpose trees (MPTs also played an important role on soil rejuvenation. Michelia oblonga is reported to be a better choice as bioameliorant for these soils as continuous leaf litter and root exudates improved soil physical

  17. Genetic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Assam, India: Dominance of Beijing Family and Discovery of Two New Clades Related to CAS1_Delhi and EAI Family Based on Spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Kangjam Rekha; Bhutia, Rinchenla; Bhowmick, Shovonlal; Mukherjee, Kaustab; Mahanta, Jagadish; Narain, Kanwar

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major public health concerns in Assam, a remote state located in the northeastern (NE) region of India. The present study was undertaken to explore the circulating genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in this region. A total of 189 MTBC strains were collected from smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases from different designated microscopy centres (DMC) from various localities of Assam. All MTBC isolates were cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) media and subsequently genotyped using spoligotyping and 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Spoligotyping of MTBC isolates revealed 89 distinct spoligo patterns. The most dominant MTBC strain belonged to Beijing lineage and was represented by 35.45% (n = 67) of total isolates, followed by MTBC strains belonging to Central Asian-Delhi (CAS/Delhi) lineage and East African Indian (EAI5) lineage. In addition, in the present study 43 unknown spoligo patterns were detected. The discriminatory power of spoligotyping was found to be 0.8637 based on Hunter Gaston Discriminatory Index (HGDI). On the other hand, 24-loci MIRU-VNTR typing revealed that out of total 189 MTBC isolates from Assam 185 (97.9%) isolates had unique MIRU-VNTR profiles and 4 isolates grouped into 2 clusters. Phylogenetic analysis of 67 Beijing isolates based on 24-loci MIRU-VNTR typing revealed that Beijing isolates from Assam represent two major groups, each comprising of several subgroups. Neighbour-Joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree analysis based on combined spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTR data of 78 Non-Beijing isolates was carried out for strain lineage identification as implemented by MIRU-VNTRplus database. The important lineages of MTBC identified were CAS/CAS1_Delhi (41.02%, n = 78) and East-African-Indian (EAI, 33.33%). Interestingly, phylogenetic analysis of orphan (23.28%) MTBC spoligotypes revealed that majority of these orphan

  18. Need for optical and low vision services for children in schools for the blind in North India

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    Pal Nikhil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Children admitted in blind schools need low vision assessment for improving functional vision (useful residual vision. Aim: To ascertain the need for spectacles and magnifiers as low vision devices (LVD in children with useful residual vision, attending blind schools. Setting and Design: Cross-sectional study conducted in 13 blind schools in Delhi, North India. Materials and Methods: Of a total of 703 children (less than 16 years of age examined, 133 (18.91% with useful residual vision were refracted and analyzed. High addition plus lenses (range 5-30 diopters were used as spectacle magnifiers for near LVD assessment. "World health organization (WHO/ prevention of blindness (PBL eye examination record for children with blindness and low vision", was used to collect data. SPSS (statistical package for the social science, version 10.0 was used for analysis. Results: Based on the vision of 133 children at initial examination, 70.7% children were blind and 12.0% were severely visually impaired (SVI. 20.3% children improved by at least one WHO category of blindness after refraction. With best correction, 50.4% children were still blind and 13.5% were SVI. Visual acuity in the better eye after refraction in 47 children (35.3%, improved with spectacles. Children with aphakia (17, coloboma (5, refractive error (5 and microphthalmos (4 benefited from spectacles. Of 124 children with low vision but having useful residual vision, 51 (41.1% were able to read N-10 unaided or with distance spectacles and 30 children (22.6% improved to N-10 with spectacle magnifiers and were prescribed the same. Conclusion: Visually impaired children with aphakia and congenital anomalies of the eye benefit from refraction and low vision services.

  19. ROLE OF PLANTS FOUND IN NORTH EAST INDIA AND BANGLADESH IN CONTROLLING POPULATION GROWTH

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    Jhimly Das

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Being part of the Indian subcontinent both the North Eastern region of India and the Bangladesh share a long common cultural, economic and political history. One of the most critical problems of developing countries like India as well as Bangladesh is their enormous increase in human population. Contraceptive Prevalence Rate (CPR of India is 48.3 and that of Bangladesh is 53.8. As the large majority of population of both the countries belong to rural area, the family planning programmes have largely remained unsuccessful because of many factors including lack of availability of contraceptive drugs in rural markets, lack of accessibility of rural people to medical personnel as well as the lack of acceptability of synthetic drugs due to various socio-cultural and religious perceptions prevailing among many ethnic communities. These contributed to a growing interest among researchers in developing contraceptives of natural origin and at present natural herbal contraception have become one of the major focuses of modern contraceptive research. Since time immemorial herbal drugs are being practiced by various rural communities and ethnic tribes in North East India as well as in Bangladesh, and hence the acceptability of herbal contraceptives is expected to be much higher among rural folk. In different parts of North East India and Bangladesh, ethnic communities are using plant based medicinal products till today. This study aims at highlighting the contraceptive property of some plants found in North-Eastern India as well as in Bangladesh.

  20. India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    In this discussion of India attention is directed to the following: the people; geography; history; government; political conditions; the economy; foreign relations (Pakistan and Bangladesh, China, and the Soviet Union); defense; and the relations between the US and India. In 1983 India's population was estimated at 746 million with an annual growth rate of 2.24%. The infant mortality rate was estimated at 116/1000 in 1984 with a life expectancy of 54.9 years. Although India occupies only 2.4% of the world's land area, it supports nearly 15% of the world's population. 2 major ethnic strains predominate in India: the Aryan in the north and the Dravidian in the south, although the lines between them are blurred. India dominates the South Asian subcontinent geographically. The people of India have had a continuous civilization since about 2500 B.C., when the inhabitants of the Indus River Valley developed an urban culture based on commerce, trade, and, to a lesser degree, agriculture. This civilization declined about 1500 B.C. and Aryan tribes originating in central Asia absorbed parts of its culture as they spread out over the South Asian subcontinent. During the next few centuries, India flourished under several successive empires. The 1st British outpost in South Asia was established in 1619 at Surat on the northwestern coast of India. The British gradually expanded their influence until, by the 1850s, they controlled almost the entire area of present-day India. Independence was attained on August 15, 1947, and India became a dominion within the Commonwealth of Nations with Jawaharlal Nehru as prime minister. According to its constitution, India is a "sovereign socialist secular democratic republic." Like the US, India has a federal form of government, but the central government in India has greater power in relation to its states, and government is patterned after the British parliamentary system. The Congress Party has ruled India since independence with the

  1. Current trends of some organochlorinated pesticides in Yamuna River sediments around Delhi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sethi, P.K.; Bhattacharyya, A.K.; Sarkar, A.

    Organochlorinated pesticides viz. DDTs, HCHs, and Cyclodiene compounds have been detected in the sediment samples of Yamuna River around Delhi, India during the three seasons namely pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon. Five sampling sites were...

  2. Groundwater management options in North district of Delhi, India: A groundwater surplus region in over-exploited aquifers

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    Shashank Shekhar

    2015-09-01

    New hydrological insights in the region: Three distinct hydrogeological domains are identified with subtle differences in groundwater occurrence. Insights are obtained in stream–aquifer interaction and baseflow to the Yamuna River is quantified. The salinity enrichment in groundwater has been attributed to water logging in clay rich formations under semi arid condition. The viability of limited dewatering of shallow aquifers and its replenishment by enhanced recharge from surface runoff and flood waters during the monsoon period have been established.

  3. Yearly variation and annual cycle of total column ozone over New Delhi (29°N, 77°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), British Antarctic Survey Station and its effect on night airglow intensity of OH(8, 3) for the period 1979–2005

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Jana; D K Saha; D Sarkar

    2012-12-01

    A critical analysis made on the long-term monthly, seasonal, yearly variation and annual cycle of total column ozone (TCO) concentration at New Delhi (29°N,77°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), a British Antarctic Service Station reveals more decline in yearly mean ozone concentration at Halley Bay than at New Delhi from 1979 to 2005. The nature of variations of monthly mean TCO during the months of August and September was the most identical with that of yearly mean ozone values at New Delhi and Halley Bay, respectively, for the same period. Annual cycles of TCO over these stations are completely different for the above period. The effect of O3 depletion on night airglow emission of OH(8, 3) line at New Delhi and Halley Bay has been studied. Calculations based on chemical kinetics show that the airglow intensity of OH(8, 3) has also been affected due to the depletion of O3 concentration. The yearly variations and annual cycle of intensities of OH(8, 3) line for the above two stations are depicted and compared. It has been shown that the rate of decrease of intensity of OH(8, 3) line was comparatively more at Halley Bay due to dramatic decrease of Antarctic O3 concentration.

  4. Study on knowledge, experiences and barriers to mammography among working women from Delhi

    OpenAIRE

    Khokhar, A.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mammography is not a popular screening tool for deducting breast cancer in India although regular screening is associated with reduced mortality from breast cancer. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to find out knowledge, experiences and barriers to mammography among working women of Delhi. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from October 2012 to March 2013 among working women from Delhi, India. The study was conducted as a part of ongo...

  5. Barriers to disclosure of child maltreatment among school-going adolescent girls of a semi-urban area of Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daral, Shailaja; Khokhar, Anita; Pradhan, Shishir Kumar

    2016-06-14

    The study examines the barriers to disclosure of child maltreatment among adolescent girls. Stratified random sampling was done among classes 7 to 12 of government girls' schools of a semi-urban area of Delhi, and a total of 1060 adolescent girls participated. Almost 33% of victims of physical abuse, 50% of sexual abuse, 30% of emotional abuse, and 40% of neglect did not disclose their experiences to any support group. The most frequent confidante, in almost two-thirds of cases of all forms of abuse was a friend of the study participant. Among the study participants who did not disclose abuse, the most common reason for nondisclosure was a feeling of shame or embarrassment (40%-80% for physical abuse, 55%-80% for sexual abuse, and 55% for emotional abuse). Among the study participants who did not disclose neglect, 70% reported that they did not do so because they had no expectation of help from anyone.

  6. Circulation of Dengue virus-1 (DENV-1 serotype in Delhi, during 2010–11 after Dengue virus-3 (DENV-3 predominance: A single centre hospital-based study

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    Ekta Gupta , Sweta Mohan , Meenu Bajpai , Aashish Choudhary & Gaurav Singh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Delhi, a city in north India, has so far witnessed several reported outbreaks of dengue. Dengue inDelhi from being epidemic is slowly changing towards being endemic and hyper-endemic. Circulating type ofthe virus is also changing over the years. In the absence of an effective vaccine, dengue prevention to a majorextent relies on virological surveillance, and development of effective, locally adapted control programmes. Inthe present study, we tried to identify the between-year non-epidemic serotype of dengue virus circulating inDelhi, during 2010–11.Methods: Acute-phase samples were collected from the patients attending the Institute of Liver & Biliary Sciences,New Delhi, India. Dengue diagnosis was done using WHO case definitions. All the samples were subjected toDengue NS1 Ag ELISA and modified nested RT-PCR.Results: A total of 75 acute-phase samples were received, of which 19 (25.3% were positive for dengue NS1antigen. Dengue RT-PCR was positive in 14.6% (11/75 samples. All the RT-PCR isolates were of DENV-1serotype. No case of concomitant infection with more than one serotype was observed. Median age of involvementwas 23 yr (range10–86. Maximum number of cases were seen in the age group of 21–30 yr. Male to female ratiowas 1.2 : 1. Maximum number of suspected dengue cases (n=79 was seen during September and October.Conclusions: DENV-1 was circulating in Delhi in the year 2010–11 in non-epidemic period following reportedpredominance of DENV-3 and co-circulation of all dengue serotypes in the epidemic years 2003, 2006 and 2007.

  7. Travelling Child Care for New Delhi's "Nomad' Workers

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    Phadke, Sindu

    1974-01-01

    Highlighted is a new UNICEF all-purpose mobile facility called the "Mobile Creche" which provides a variety of social services including schooling, a health center, adult literacy and vocational training, and social and athletic activities for tens of thousands of unskilled laborers who live and work on the construction sites in New Delhi, India.…

  8. Prevalence of reproductive morbidity amongst males in an urban slum of north India

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    Uppal Y

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies assessing the prevalence of reproductive morbidity among males in India have chiefly focused on prevalence of Reproductive Tract Infections/Sexually Transmitted Infections (RTIs/STIs among males attending Sexually Transmitted Disease clinics, blood donors and other selected population groups, with only few focused on the magnitude and the type of reproductive morbidity amongst Indian males at community level. Objective: To estimate prevalence of reproductive morbidity including (RTIs/STIs among males in the age group of 20-50 years residing in an urban slum of Delhi. Methods: Out of 268 males in the targeted age group, selected by systematic random sampling, residing in an urban sum of Delhi, 260 males were subjected to clinical examination and laboratory investigations for diagnosis of reproductive morbidity. Laboratory investigations were done for diagnosis of Hepatitis B and C, Syphilis, Gonorrhoea, Non gonococcal urethritis and urinary tract infection. Results: A total of 90 (33.6% of 268 study subjects reported one or more perceived symptoms of reproductive tract / sexual morbidity in last six months. Overall reproductive morbidity based on clinical and laboratory diagnosis was present in 76 (29.2% study subjects and of this sexually acquired morbidity accounted for 21.2% cases. Hepatitis B was most common (10.3% reproductive morbidity followed by Urinary Tract Infection (5.0%, scabies (3.5% and congenital anomalies (3.5%. Conclusion: High prevalence of reproductive morbidity (29.2% amongst males in an urban slum highlights the need for more studies in different settings. There is a need for developing interventions in terms of early diagnosis and treatment and prevention.

  9. Control of Aedes aegypti Breeding: A Novel Intervention for Prevention and Control of Dengue in an Endemic Zone of Delhi, India

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    Nagpal, B. N.; Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Shamim, Arshad; Vikram, Kumar; Srivastava, Aruna; Tuli, N. R.; Saxena, Rekha; Singh, Himmat; Singh, V. P.; Bhagat, V. N.; Yadav, N. K.; Valecha, Neena

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective The study is based on hypothesis that whether continuous entomological surveillance of Ae. aegypti and simultaneous appropriate interventions in key containers during non-transmission (December–May) months would have any impact on breeding of Aedes and dengue cases during the following transmission months (June–November). The impact of the surveillance and intervention measures undertaken during non-transmission months were assessed by entomological indicators namely container index (CI), house index (HI), pupal index (PI) and breteau index (BI). Methods A total of 28 localities of West Zone of Delhi with persistent dengue endemicity were selected for the study. Out of these localities, 20 were included in study group while other 8 localities were in control group. IEC and various Aedes breeding control activities were carried out in study group in both non-transmission and transmission season whereas control group did not have any such interventions during non-transmission months as per guidelines of MCD. These activities were undertaken by a team of investigators from NIMR and SDMC, Delhi. In control group, investigators from NIMR carried out surveillance activity to monitor the breeding of Aedes mosquito in localities. Results Comparison of baseline data revealed that all indices in control and study group of localities were comparable and statistically non-significant (p>0.05). In both study and control groups, indices were calculated after pooling data on seasonal basis, i.e., transmission and non-transmission months for both years. The test of significance conducted on all the four indices, i.e., HI, PI, CI, and BI, revealed a significant difference (p<0.05) between the study group and control group during transmission and non-transmission months except in HI. Due to consistent intervention measures undertaken in non-transmission months in study group, reduction in CI, HI, BI and PI was observed 63%, 62%, 64% and 99% respectively

  10. Comparative study of reference crop evapotranspiration (ETo by different energy based method with FAO 56 Penman-Monteith method and at New Delhi, India

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    Ram Karan Singh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of FAO 56 Penman-Monteith method for reference evapotranspiration (ETo calculations to get crop water requirement has been recommended globally because it provides good results under wide range of climatic conditions. In absence of reliable data required for this method various other methods viz.FAO 24 Radiation, Priestley-Taylor, Blaney-Criddle, Hargreaves, Turc, Makkink and Pan Evaporation are used commonly. Main objective of this study is to evaluate performance of these seven commonly used energy based methods based on their daily ETo predictions compared to FAO 56 Penman-Monteith method predicted ETo and lysimetric ETc under prevailing climatic conditions of New Delhi. Use of Maize (Zea mays L. crop lysimeter ET along with other meteorological parameters for seventeen carefully selected crop seasons ranging from 1976 to 2006 had done for performance evaluation. Statistical indicators used to evaluate performance were regression coefficient (R2, least root mean square difference (RMSD, mean bias error (MBE and t-statistics.It can be concluded from the overall study that Priestley-Taylor and FAO 24 Blaney-Criddle method can be used for ETo predictions under wide range of climatic conditions when limited data is available or non reliability of data.

  11. Using Spatial Multi-Criteria Analysis and Ranking Tool (SMART in earthquake risk assessment: a case study of Delhi region, India

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    Nishant Sinha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is aimed at earthquake hazard, vulnerability and risk assessment as a case study to demonstrate the applicability of Spatial Multi-Criteria Analysis and Ranking Tool (SMART, which is based on Saaty's multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA technique. The three specific study sites of Delhi were chosen for research as it corresponds to a typical patch of the urban environs, completely engrossed with residential, commercial and industrial units. The earthquake hazard affecting components are established in the form of geographic information system data-set layers including seismic zone, peak ground acceleration (PGA, soil characteristics, liquefaction potential, geological characteristics, land use, proximity to fault and epicentre. The physical vulnerability layers comprising building information, namely number of stories, year-built range, area, occupancy and construction type, derived from remote sensing imagery, were only considered for the current research. SMART was developed for earthquake risk assessment, and weights were derived both at component and its element level. Based on weighted overlay techniques, the earthquake hazard and vulnerability layers were created from which the risk maps were derived through multiplicative analysis. The developed risk maps may prove useful in decision-making process and formulating risk mitigation measures.

  12. Knowledge and perceptions on antibiotic use and resistance among high school students and teachers in New Delhi, India: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwani, Anita; Wattal, Chand; Joshi, P. C.; Holloway, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the perceptions and knowledge of school teachers and students about antibiotic use, resistance, and suggestions for practical interventions for the rational use of antibiotics. Methodology: Five focus group discussions (FGDs) with high school students (Class: 9–11) and five with teachers were conducted in two private and three public schools (one teacher and one student FGD per school) in five municipal wards of Delhi. Qualitative data on antibiotic knowledge, resistance, and behaviors with respect to antibiotics use were collected. There were 4–8 persons per teacher FGD and 15–20 persons per student FGD. FGDs were analyzed using “thematic analyses.” Results: Students had poor knowledge regarding antibiotics and antibiotic resistance, while only some teachers had a basic understanding. Four broad themes needing attention emerged: definition of antibiotic and antibiotic resistance, antibiotic use behavior, doctor–patient relationship, and interventional strategies suggested to curtail the misuse of antibiotics and to spread awareness. In order to tackle these problems, both groups suggested a multipronged approach including robust public awareness campaigns also involving schools, better doctor–patient relationships, and stronger regulations. Conclusions: Although students and teachers exhibited poor knowledge about antibiotic use and resistance, they were keen to learn about these issues. School education programs and public education could be used to shape correct perceptions about antibiotic use among all stakeholders including children. This may help in the containment of antibiotic resistance and thus preservation of antibiotics for future generations. PMID:27756945

  13. Counselling services in prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) in Delhi, India: an assessment through a modified version of UNICEF-PPTCT tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Singh, Bir; Kusuma, Yadlapalli S

    2015-03-01

    The study aims to assess the counselling services provided to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) under the Indian programme of prevention of parent-to-child transmission of HIV (PPTCT). Five hospitals in Delhi providing PMTCT services were randomly selected. A total of 201 post-test counselled women were interviewed using a modified version of the UNICEF-PPTCT evaluation tool. Knowledge about HIV transmission from mother-to-child was low. Post-test counselling mainly helped in increasing the knowledge of HIV transmission; yet 20%-30% of the clients missed this opportunity. Discussion on window period, other sexually transmitted diseases and danger signs of pregnancy were grossly neglected. The PMTCT services during the antenatal period are feasible and agreeable to be provided; however, certain aspects, like lack of privacy, confidentiality of HIV status of the client, counsellor's 'hurried' attitude, communication skills and discriminant behaviour towards HIV-positive clients, and disinterest of clients in the counselling, remain as gaps. These issues may be addressed through refresher training to counsellors with an emphasis on social and behaviour change communication strategies. Addressing attitudinal aspects of the counsellors towards HIV positives is crucial to improve the quality of the services to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

  14. Evaluation of a health education intervention on knowledge and attitudes of food handlers working in a medical college in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Rahul; Lal, Panna; Prakash, S Krishna; Daga, M K; Kishore, Jugal

    2008-01-01

    The present study assessed change in knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported hand-washing practices of 136 food handlers 3 months after providing them health education using posters and interactive sessions using a flip chart. There was a significant change in the proportion of study participants who named food borne or waterborne diseases, including gastroenteritis (79.4% to 91.9%), worm infestation (39.0% to 55.9%), cholera (16.2% to 42.7%), and typhoid (9.6% to 28.7%). Significant increase in knowledge about hand hygiene measures, namely, washing hands before handling food (23.5% to 65.4%) and keeping nails cut and clean (8.1% to 57.4%), was observed. Baseline self-reported hand-washing practices revealed low figures for washing hands after micturition (82.4%) and smoking (52.8%) and consistent use of soap at the workplace (24.3%) and after micturition (14.0%), which improved after health education but not to the desired extent. Findings highlight the importance of providing health education in food and personal hygiene to food handlers and incorporating the same in existing guidelines for food establishments laid down by civic agencies in Delhi and elsewhere.

  15. Prevalence and Determinants of Child Maltreatment among School-Going Adolescent Girls in a Semi-Urban Area of Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daral, Shailaja; Khokhar, Anita; Pradhan, Shishir

    2016-06-01

    The study examines family characteristics that put adolescent girls at increased risk of abuse, mainly physical, sexual and emotional abuse and neglect. Stratified random sampling was done among classes 7th to 12th of government girls' schools of a semi-urban area of Delhi, and a total of 1060 adolescent girls participated. Majority were in mid-adolescence. Approximately 70% study subjects faced at least one form of maltreatment. Physical abuse was faced by 42.6%, sexual abuse by 26.6%, emotional abuse by 37.9% and neglect by 40.1% of study subjects. The most frequent perpetrator of physical and emotional abuse was mother, and of sexual abuse were friends, relatives or neighbours. No or low education of father increased odds of physical and emotional abuse, while odds of physical abuse and neglect were lower if mothers were housewives. Excessive arguments between parents and history of maltreatment in parents increased odds of child maltreatment in study subjects. © The Author [2016]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Knowledge and perceptions on antibiotic use and resistance among high school students and teachers in New Delhi, India: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwani, Anita; Wattal, Chand; Joshi, P C; Holloway, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    To explore the perceptions and knowledge of school teachers and students about antibiotic use, resistance, and suggestions for practical interventions for the rational use of antibiotics. Five focus group discussions (FGDs) with high school students (Class: 9-11) and five with teachers were conducted in two private and three public schools (one teacher and one student FGD per school) in five municipal wards of Delhi. Qualitative data on antibiotic knowledge, resistance, and behaviors with respect to antibiotics use were collected. There were 4-8 persons per teacher FGD and 15-20 persons per student FGD. FGDs were analyzed using "thematic analyses." Students had poor knowledge regarding antibiotics and antibiotic resistance, while only some teachers had a basic understanding. Four broad themes needing attention emerged: definition of antibiotic and antibiotic resistance, antibiotic use behavior, doctor-patient relationship, and interventional strategies suggested to curtail the misuse of antibiotics and to spread awareness. In order to tackle these problems, both groups suggested a multipronged approach including robust public awareness campaigns also involving schools, better doctor-patient relationships, and stronger regulations. Although students and teachers exhibited poor knowledge about antibiotic use and resistance, they were keen to learn about these issues. School education programs and public education could be used to shape correct perceptions about antibiotic use among all stakeholders including children. This may help in the containment of antibiotic resistance and thus preservation of antibiotics for future generations.

  17. Identification of species and genetic variation in Taenia isolates from human and swine of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satyendra K; Prasad, Kashi N; Singh, Aloukick K; Gupta, Kamlesh K; Chauhan, Ranjeet S; Singh, Amrita; Singh, Avinash; Rai, Ravi P; Pati, Binod K

    2016-10-01

    Taenia solium is the major cause of taeniasis and cysticercosis/neurocysticercosis (NCC) in the developing countries including India, but the existence of other Taenia species and genetic variation have not been studied in India. So, we studied the existence of different Taenia species, and sequence variation in Taenia isolates from human (proglottids and cysticerci) and swine (cysticerci) in North India. Amplification of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1) was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. We identified two species of Taenia i.e. T. solium and Taenia asiatica in our isolates. T. solium isolates showed similarity with Asian genotype and nucleotide variations from 0.25 to 1.01 %, whereas T. asiatica displayed nucleotide variations ranged from 0.25 to 0.5 %. These findings displayed the minimal genetic variations in North Indian isolates of T. solium and T. asiatica.

  18. A Tangled Weave: Tracing Outcomes of Education in Rural Women's Lives in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Malini; Mullick, Disha

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on the findings of a research study which traced 56 rural women learners 15 years after they had participated in an empowerment and education programme in North India. It attempts to understand, from the perspectives of women from marginalised communities, the ways in which participating in the programme had been empowering for…

  19. Wildlife conservation in fragmented tropical forests: A case of South Garo Hills, Meghalaya, North East India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashish. Kumar; Bruce G. Marcot; Rohitkumar. Patel

    2017-01-01

    This volume presents findings on, and implications for, wildlife conservation in the tropical forests in Garo Hills of Meghalaya state in the North East India. A companion volume presented the findings on forest fragmentation due to practice of slash and burn agriculture in the region. Both of the volumes summarize work completed over more than a decade on...

  20. School and "Madrasah" Education: Gender and the Strategies of Muslim Young Men in Rural North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Craig; Jeffery, Roger; Jeffery, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the cultural and economic strategies of educated but un/under-employed young Muslim men aged between 20 and 34 in a village in western Uttar Pradesh, north India. Drawing on Connell's gender theory, the paper demonstrates how economic and political forces shape Muslim young men's strategies. The paper distinguishes between…

  1. Maternal Footprints of Southeast Asians in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Kivisild, Toomas; Selvi Rani, Deepa; Singh, Vijay Kumar; Ismail, Thanseem; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Metspalu, Mait; Bhaskar, L.V.K.S.; Reddy, Alla G.; Chandra, Sarat; Pande, Veena; Naidu, B. Prathap; Adarsh, Niharika; Verma, Abhilasha; Jyothi, Inaganti Amara; Mallick, Chandana Basu; Shrivastava, Nidhi; Devasena, Ragala; Kumari, Babita; Singh, Amit Kumar; Dwivedi, Shailendra Kumar Dhar; Singh, Shefali; Rao, Geeta; Gupta, Pranav; Sonvane, Vartika; Kumari, Kavita; Basha, Afsar; Bhargavi, K.R.; Lalremruata, Albert; Gupta, Arvind Kumar; Kaur, Gurukamal; Reddy, K.K.; Rao, A. Papa; Villems, Richard; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Singh, Lalji

    2008-01-01

    We have analyzed 7,137 samples from 125 different caste, tribal and religious groups of India and 99 samples from three populations of Nepal for the length variation in the COII/tRNALys region of mtDNA. Samples showing length variation were subjected to detailed phylogenetic analysis based on HVS-I and informative coding region sequence variation. The overall frequencies of the 9-bp deletion and insertion variants in South Asia were 1.9 and 0.6%, respectively. We have also defined a novel deep-rooting haplogroup M43 and identified the rare haplogroup H14 in Indian populations carrying the 9-bp deletion by complete mtDNA sequencing. Moreover, we redefined haplogroup M6 and dissected it into two well-defined subclades. The presence of haplogroups F1 and B5a in Uttar Pradesh suggests minor maternal contribution from Southeast Asia to Northern India. The occurrence of haplogroup F1 in the Nepalese sample implies that Nepal might have served as a bridge for the flow of eastern lineages to India. The presence of R6 in the Nepalese, on the other hand, suggests that the gene flow between India and Nepal has been reciprocal. PMID:18223312

  2. Education for All Summit in the Nine High-Population Countries (New Delhi, India, December 13-16, 1993). Analysis and Synthesis. Discussion Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This document reviews progress in the nine high-populations countries towards the goal of Education for All (EFA). The nine countries are Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, and Pakistan. Since the Thailand conference in 1990, most countries have shown improvement with primary education increasing by over 40…

  3. Hemoglobin e syndromes: emerging diagnostic challenge in north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anjali; Marwah, Sadhna; Buxi, Gurdeep; Yadav, Rajbala

    2013-03-01

    Hemoglobin E (HbE) is one of the world's most common and important mutations. HbE disorders may be found in heterozygous (AE), homozygous (EE) and compound heterozygous state. It is important to distinguish HbE disorders diagnostically because of marked differences in clinical course among different genotypes. To find out whether RBC indices as obtained from automated cell counter can provide a clue to the diagnosis of HbE disease. This study was carried out in the Department of Clinical Pathology, PGIMER, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi. It included antenatal pregnant females brought for routine check-up as well as referred patients suspected of having hemoglobinopathies. High Performance liquid chromatography was used as a confirmatory test for identification of hemoglobinopathy. Total 20 cases of subtype homozygous HbE (3), HbE trait (12) and Eβ-thalassemia (5) were identified. Statistical analysis was done to find out correlation between levels of HBA2, HBF with RBC indices. (a) There was negative correlation between HbA2/E peak values and RBC indices (Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and Mean corpuscular hemoglobin) among all the three groups taken together. (b) There was positive correlation between HbA2/E and Red cell distribution width (RDW). (c) There was positive correlation between HbF values with MCV. The finding of positive correlation between HbA2/E and RDW may help in differentiating βthal (RDW normal) from HbE/βthal. In a patient with microcytic hypochromic blood picture and increased RDW, diagnosis of HbE/βthal should also be considered along with the more common Iron deficiency anemia. Thus, new insights into the knowledge of these diseases are important because they impart diagnostic challenges to all the experts involved in the treatment of anemic patients.

  4. Immune Response to Dengue Virus Infection in Pediatric Patients in New Delhi, India--Association of Viremia, Inflammatory Mediators and Monocytes with Disease Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Mohit; Kar, Meenakshi; Sethi, Tavpritesh; Kabra, Sushil K; Lodha, Rakesh; Chandele, Anmol; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R

    2016-03-01

    Dengue virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is a causative agent for dengue infection, which manifests with symptoms ranging from mild fever to fatal dengue shock syndrome. The presence of four serotypes, against which immune cross-protection is short-lived and serotype cross-reactive antibodies that might enhance infection, pose a challenge to further investigate the role of virus and immune response in pathogenesis. We evaluated the viral and immunological factors that correlate with severe dengue disease in a cohort of pediatric dengue patients in New Delhi. Severe dengue disease was observed in both primary and secondary infections. Viral load had no association with disease severity but high viral load correlated with prolonged thrombocytopenia and delayed recovery. Severe dengue cases had low Th1 cytokines and a concurrent increase in the inflammatory mediators such as IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. A transient increase in CD14+CD16+ intermediate monocytes was observed early in infection. Sorting of monocytes from dengue patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed that it is the CD14+ cells, but not the CD16+ or the T or B cells, that were infected with dengue virus and were major producers of IL-10. Using the Boruta algorithm, reduced interferon-α levels and enhanced aforementioned pro-inflammatory cytokines were identified as some of the distinctive markers of severe dengue. Furthermore, the reduction in the levels of IL-8 and IL-10 were identified as the most significant markers of recovery from severe disease. Our results provide further insights into the immune response of children to primary and secondary dengue infection and help us to understand the complex interplay between the intrinsic factors in dengue pathogenesis.

  5. Source apportionment and spatial-temporal variations in the metal content of surface dust collected from an industrial area adjoining Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Aditya Kumar; Yadav, Sudesh; Kumar, Pawan; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-15

    Surface dust collected during three different seasons from Faridabad industrial area adjoining Delhi is studied for different metals, their spatial and temporal variations, and sources. Al, Fe, Mn, Ti, Ca and Mg show limited variations and lower abundances compared to Upper Continental Crust (UCC); Fe shows enrichment and seasonal changes. Cd, V, Co, Ba, Ti, Ni, Cu, Cr and Zn show significant spatial and temporal variations, and enrichments compared to UCC indicate their anthropogenic sources. Seasonal variability could be due to: 1) different types of industries, 2) variations in the emissions, 3) very frequent shifting of small scale industry within the region, and 4) changes in the land use pattern. The sampling sites, according to the geo-accumulation index, are: 1) least polluted for Ca, Mg, Al and Ti except for Ti in winter, 2) least to moderately polluted for Ba, Co and V but season specific, and 3) moderately to extremely polluted for other metals. Average pollution load index of 2.67-2.87 indicates consistently high level of pollution at all sites in all sampling seasons. The sites located in the residential areas near small to medium scale unorganized industry are more polluted compared to sites near large industries suggesting that the small scale unorganized industries causes more pollution. Three dominant sources of metals were identified: 1) mixed industrial, 2) crustal, and 3) vehicular, oil and battery related burnings. The third component related to Ba, Pb, Cd, Zn and Cr, further splits into two components in the pre-monsoon and winter samples. Surface dust, enriched in metals, is likely to cause serious danger to public health. There is an urgent need to make a shift from unorganized to formally organized industry to reduce the metal pollution and protect human health and environment as a whole.

  6. Water soluble inorganic species of PM10 and PM2.5 at an urban site of Delhi, India: Seasonal variability and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Mohit; Sharma, A.; Sen, A.; Saxena, Priyanka; Saraswati; Mandal, T. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Sharma, C.

    2017-02-01

    Comprehensive data of 2 years (2013-2014) of water soluble inorganic species (WSIS) in the particulate matter (PM10: mean: 233.0 ± 124.6 μg m- 3 and PM2.5: mean: 108.0 ± 86.5 μg m- 3) have been used to study seasonal effect on the variation of total WSIS concentration, composition variability of inorganic aerosols and extent to which secondary formation of sulfate and nitrate aerosol occurred from their precursor gases. Mean concentrations of total WSIS in PM10 and PM2.5 were 82.12 ± 72.15 μg m- 3 and 54.03 ± 49.22 μg m- 3, respectively during the study period. Concentrations of total WSIS (PM10: 140.11 ± 90.67 μg m- 3; PM2.5: 74.41 ± 47.55 μg m- 3) during winter season was recorded higher than summer, monsoon and spring seasons. Significant correlation (p alkaline species responsible for the neutralization of acidic components in the PM10 samples. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that secondary aerosol, biomass burning and soil driven dust were the possible sources that explained 70% of the total variance. Cluster analysis and Concentration Weighted Trajectory (CWT) analysis for different season depicts the advection of air masses over the continental landmasses of Afghanistan (summer season), northwestern region of Pakistan (summer and winter season), marine region (monsoon season) and adjoining states of Delhi. These air masses from different regions could be the cause of an increase in PM10 and PM2.5 aerosol over the study site.

  7. URBAN SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT OF GUWAHATI CITY IN NORTH-EAST INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Prasanta Kumar Pradhan; C. R. Mohanty; A. K. Swar; Mohapatra, P.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years municipal solid waste (MSW) management has been one of the most environmental concerns for all urban areas of India. Most of the urban centers have neither adequate land nor any facility for MSW disposal. In view of scarcity of lands for making landfill sites, solid wastes can be used for energy recovery resulting in volume reduction, thus requires less area for its disposal. Guwahati is one such city of North-East India, having the potential to recover the energy from solid ...

  8. Reasons for non-immunization of children in an urban, low income group in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Joseph L; Babbar, Harsh; Yadav, Sangita

    2002-07-01

    A study was undertaken on 500 children under the age of 5 years belonging to a low income group. All were attending the paediatrics outpatient department of a large teaching hospital in New Delhi, India. Only 25% were found to have received complete primary immunization as per the National Immunization Schedule (bacille Calmette-Guérin at birth, three doses of diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus and oral poliovirus vaccine at 6,10 and 14 weeks and measles vaccine at 9 months). The major reasons for non-immunization of the children were: migration to a native village (26.4%); domestic problems (9.6%); the immunization centre was located too far from their home (9.6%); and the child was unwell when the vaccination was due (9%). Twelve per cent of mothers could not give any reason for non-immunization. In addition to the migration of children to rural areas, the other significant finding was an indirect effect of intensive OPV administration as part of polio eradication initiative. The lack of awareness and fear of side effects constituted a small minority of reasons for non-immunization.

  9. Body mass index and waist circumference cut-points in multi-ethnic populations from the UK and India: the ADDITION-Leicester, Jaipur heart watch and New Delhi cross-sectional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodicoat, Danielle H; Gray, Laura J; Henson, Joseph; Webb, David; Guru, Arvind; Misra, Anoop; Gupta, Rajeev; Vikram, Naval; Sattar, Naveed; Davies, Melanie J; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    To derive cut-points for body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) for minority ethnic groups that are risk equivalent based on endogenous glucose levels to cut-points for white Europeans (BMI 30 kg/m2; WC men 102 cm; WC women 88 cm). Cross-sectional data from participants aged 40-75 years: 4,672 white and 1,348 migrant South Asian participants from ADDITION-Leicester (UK) and 985 indigenous South Asians from Jaipur Heart Watch/New Delhi studies (India). Cut-points were derived using fractional polynomial models with fasting and 2-hour glucose as outcomes, and ethnicity, objectively-measured BMI/WC, their interaction and age as covariates. Based on fasting glucose, obesity cut-points were 25 kg/m2 (95% Confidence Interval: 24, 26) for migrant South Asian, and 18 kg/m2 (16, 20) for indigenous South Asian populations. For men, WC cut-points were 90 cm (85, 95) for migrant South Asian, and 87 cm (82, 91) for indigenous South Asian populations. For women, WC cut-points were 77 cm (71, 82) for migrant South Asian, and 54 cm (20, 63) for indigenous South Asian populations. Cut-points based on 2-hour glucose were lower than these. These findings strengthen evidence that health interventions are required at a lower BMI and WC for South Asian individuals. Based on our data and the existing literature, we suggest an obesity threshold of 25 kg/m2 for South Asian individuals, and a very high WC threshold of 90 cm for South Asian men and 77 cm for South Asian women. Further work is required to determine whether lower cut-points are required for indigenous, than migrant, South Asians.

  10. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease : report of 10 cases from North India.

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    Mehndiratta M

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is increasingly being reported over the last three decades as a result of heightened awareness of the disease. Various studies have reported annual incidence of 0.5-1.5 cases of CJD per million of general population. In India, the disease is still under reported. Over the period spanning from 1968-1997, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS, Bangalore recorded 69 cases of CJD from different parts of India in the CJD registry. This paper describes the clinical experience with cases of CJD managed at the Department of Neurology, G.B. Pant Hospital, New Delhi from 1990-1998. In this series, the mean age of the patients was 53.80 (+/- 7.32 years and there were 5 females and 5 males. Myoclonus was present in all the cases and abnormal behaviour with or without other features was the presenting complaint in 7 of the 10 patients, while one patient of CJD had cerebellar ataxia as the presenting feature. One patient with occipital variant of CJD presented with acute onset cortical blindness and myoclonic jerks. One of the patients had acute psychosis precipitated by emotional stress at the onset. Extrapyramidal features were noted in 7 of the 10 patients before death. The mean duration of symptoms from the onset of disease to death was 6.6 (+/- 6.11 months. Classical EEG changes were observed in all the patients, except in one possible case of occipital variant of CJD, where we did not have access to EEG record. Brain biopsy could be undertaken in 3 patients, and in 2 patients the features of subacute spongiform encephalopathy (SSE were noted.

  11. Maternal Footprints of Southeast Asians in North India

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    We have analyzed 7,137 samples from 125 different caste, tribal and religious groups of India and 99 samples from three populations of Nepal for the length variation in the COII/tRNALys region of mtDNA. Samples showing length variation were subjected to detailed phylogenetic analysis based on HVS-I and informative coding region sequence variation. The overall frequencies of the 9-bp deletion and insertion variants in South Asia were 1.9 and 0.6%, respectively. We have also defined a novel dee...

  12. Son Preference in India: Shedding Light on the North-South Gradient

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    Daniela Klaus

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dieser Beitrag liegt nur in englischer Sprache vor. Son preference is widespread in India and deep-rooted in its history. It is a matter of concern because it produces an imbalanced juvenile sex ratio. There are far fewer girls than boys. The figures vary greatly among the Indian states suggesting a major north-south gradient in son preference accompanied by a minor west-east gradient. The aim of this paper is to explain the regional pattern. We provide an application of the value of children-approach according to which the decision to have children is made on the calculus of benefits and costs related to children. In the light of the socioeconomic and sociocultural background in India, we propose that (potential parents’ expectations of benefits and costs are biased in favour of sons. This is suggested, therefore, as the key motivation for the preference for male offspring. However, region-specifics in the level of affluence, the educational level, the mode of production, the meaning and importance of religion, and the kinship regime are assumed to produce stronger son preference in north India compared to south India. This mediation-model is tested using the Indian sub-sample of the international Value of Children-study. Data were collected in Uttar Pradesh (north-central India and Puducherry (south-east India. Mothers aged 16 to 65 were interviewed in 2002 and 2010. Based on 1,173 respondents, a structural equation model was carried out to test the hypothesised composition effects related to the region and the mediating position of sex-specific benefits and costs. Initial findings confirm that the national son preference pattern is more likely to be found among north Indian mothers than south Indian mothers. As assumed, the sex-specific balance of benefits and costs contributes to the explanation of son preference. However, there is little evidence that the benefits and costs mediate between the region-specific socioeconomic and

  13. Genetic population structure of the malaria vector Anopheles baimaii in north-east India using mitochondrial DNA

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    Sarma Devojit K

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles baimaii is a primary vector of human malaria in the forest settings of Southeast Asia including the north-eastern region of India. Here, the genetic population structure and the basic population genetic parameters of An. baimaii in north-east India were estimated using DNA sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase sub unit II (COII gene. Methods Anopheles baimaii were collected from 26 geo-referenced locations across the seven north-east Indian states and the COII gene was sequenced from 176 individuals across these sites. Fifty-seven COII sequences of An. baimaii from six locations in Bangladesh, Myanmar and Thailand from a previous study were added to this dataset. Altogether, 233 sequences were grouped into eight population groups, to facilitate analyses of genetic diversity, population structure and population history. Results A star-shaped median joining haplotype network, unimodal mismatch distribution and significantly negative neutrality tests indicated population expansion in An. baimaii with the start of expansion estimated to be ~0.243 million years before present (MYBP in north-east India. The populations of An. baimaii from north-east India had the highest haplotype and nucleotide diversity with all other populations having a subset of this diversity, likely as the result of range expansion from north-east India. The north-east Indian populations were genetically distinct from those in Bangladesh, Myanmar and Thailand, indicating that mountains, such as the Arakan mountain range between north-east India and Myanmar, are a significant barrier to gene flow. Within north-east India, there was no genetic differentiation among populations with the exception of the Central 2 population in the Barail hills area that was significantly differentiated from other populations. Conclusions The high genetic distinctiveness of the Central 2 population in the Barail hills area of the north-east India should be

  14. Emergence of vanA gene among vancomycin-resistant enterococci in a tertiary care hospital of North - East India

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    Chimanjita Phukan

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Emergence of VRE and presence of vanA in a tertiary care hospital setting in North-East India indicate toward a need for implementing infection control policies and active surveillance.

  15. An investigation on sources of potential minerals found in traditional vegetables of north-east India.

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    Baruah, Ananta Madhab; Borah, Sushanta

    2009-01-01

    The north-eastern region of India is endowed with a great wealth of plant genetic resources. Out of the vast floral diversity of the region, a large number of indigenous plant species and their wild forms constitute the routine vegetables of the inhabitants, which provide sufficient nutrients and medicinal values for the people. They seem to be quite healthy on average, even though the ethnic tribes are ignorant about the concept of balanced diet and healthcare. This paper describes the mineral (calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium and phosphorus) contents and chemical composition in percentages such as carbohydrate, protein, fat, and so forth, found in 15 traditional vegetable species collected from different parts of North-east India. The results of this study contribute to the knowledge on vitamin contents in these vegetables. The amounts of ascorbic acid found in some species were much higher than the amount present in many conventional vegetables.

  16. Women and tobacco: A cross sectional study from North India

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    S Kathirvel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco is a leading risk factor for different types of diseases globally. Tobacco smoking by women is culturally unacceptable in India, but still women smoke tobacco at various times of their life. Aims: The aim was to estimate the prevalence and pattern of tobacco use among women and to study the associated sociodemographic factors. Settings And Design: This cross-sectional study was conducted among women aged 30 years or over in an urban resettlement colony for the migrant population at Chandigarh, India. Methodology: The study included women used tobacco products on one or more days within the past 30 days. Through systematic random sampling, 262 women were studied. As a part of the study 144 bidi smoking women were interviewed using detailed semi-structured questionnaire. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics and hypothesis testing with Chi-squared test and logistic regression were done using SPSS 16.0 version. Results: Overall, the prevalence of tobacco use was 29.4% and that of bidi, zarda and hookah were 19.8%, 8.8%, and 2.7%, respectively. Around 6.2% women used tobacco during pregnancy. Teenage was the most common age of initiation of bidi smoking. Logistic regression analysis showed that the prevalence of tobacco use was high among Hindu unemployed women with no formal education belonged to scheduled caste, and those having grandchildren. Conclusions: This study highlighted high rates of tobacco use and explored both individual and family factors related to tobacco use among women. Affordable, culturally acceptable, sustainable and gender-sensitive individual and community-specific interventions will reduce the prevalence and effects of tobacco use.

  17. Globalisation, Urbanisation and Spatial Inequality in India with special reference to North East India

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    Benjamin L Saitluanga

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation, an increasing international interaction in economic, political and cultural aspects, is a highly uneven set of processes whose impact varies over space, through time, and between social groups. On one hand, as globalisation seems to be an inevitable reality, many developing countries are restructuring their economies to receive and reap the benefits of widening and deepening global economic interactions. On the other hand, there are regions, which are increasingly excluded, and ‘structurally irrelevant’ to the current process of globalisation. Moreover, cities are at the core of development strategy of globalisation. While cities in developed countries are becoming centres of globally integrated organisation of economic activity, cities in developing countries are usually at disadvantage positions due to weak financial bases, low levels of technology as well as lack of infrastructural facilities and institutional factors.The present paper, in the limelight of these contradictions, analyses the differential impacts of economic globalisation in cities and regions of India in general and Northeast India in particular. It is noted that the ushering of globalisation through structural adjustment of the economy during the 1990s has disparate impacts on various cities and regions of the country. The paper also examines the infrastructural constraints of cities of Northeast India as well as the existing institutional arrangements to ‘globalise’ the region through neoliberal reforms and investments. 

  18. Tattoo Practices in North-East India: A Hospital-based Cross-sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Binod Kumar Thakur; Shikha Verma

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tattooing has become increasingly popular, particularly among young people. However, little is known about the tattoo practices in North-East India. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to know the reasons and motivations of tattoo application and tattoo removal in individuals asking for tattoo removal. The secondary objective was to identify the demography, methods and safety of tattoo practices in these tattooed individuals. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based...

  19. Genetic similarity between Taenia solium cysticerci collected from the two distant endemic areas in North and North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monika; Devi, Kangjam Rekha; Sehgal, Rakesh; Narain, Kanwar; Mahanta, Jagadish; Malla, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Taenia solium taeniasis/cysticercosis is a major public health problem in developing countries. This study reports genotypic analysis of T. solium cysticerci collected from two different endemic areas of North (Chandigarh) and North East India (Dibrugarh) by the sequencing of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene. The variation in cox1 sequences of samples collected from these two different geographical regions located at a distance of 2585 km was minimal. Alignment of the nucleotide sequences with different species of Taenia showed the similarity with Asian genotype of T. solium. Among 50 isolates, 6 variant nucleotide positions (0.37% of total length) were detected. These results suggest that population in these geographical areas are homogenous.

  20. Prevalence of household-level food insecurity and its determinants in an urban resettlement colony in north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnakali, Palanivel; Upadhyay, Ravi P; Shokeen, Deepa; Singh, Kavita; Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Arvind K; Goswami, Anil; Yadav, Kapil; Pandav, Chandrakant S

    2014-06-01

    An adequate food intake, in terms of quantity and quality, is a key to healthy life. Malnutrition is the most serious consequence of food insecurity and has a multitude of health and economic implications. India has the world's largest population living in slums, and these have largely been underserved areas. The State of Food Insecurity in the World (2012) estimates that India is home to more than 217 million undernourished people. Various studies have been conducted to assess food insecurity at the global level; however, the literature is limited as far as India is concerned. The present study was conducted with the objective of documenting the prevalence of food insecurity at the household level and the factors determining its existence in an urban slum population of northern India. This cross-sectional study was conducted in an urban resettlement colony of South Delhi, India. A pre-designed, pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire was used for collecting socioeconomic details and information regarding dietary practices. Food insecurity was assessed using Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS). Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the factors associated with food insecurity. A total of 250 women were interviewed through house-to-house survey. Majority of the households were having a nuclear family (61.6%), with mean family-size being 5.5 (SD +/- 2.5) and the mean monthly household income being INR 9,784 (SD +/- 631). Nearly half (53.3%) of the mean monthly household income was spent on food. The study found that a total of 77.2% households were food-insecure, with 49.2% households being mildly food-insecure, 18.8% of the households being moderately food-insecure, and 9.2% of the households being severely food-insecure. Higher education of the women handling food (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.15-0.92; p India needs to adopt urgent measures to combat this problem.

  1. High level of awareness but poor practices regarding dengue fever control: A cross-sectional study from North India

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    Palanivel Chinnakali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Delhi, the capital of India, has suffered many outbreaks of dengue in recent past and despite the obvious magnitude of problem, very scarce evidence exists that documents the knowledge, awareness and practices of the people regarding dengue. Aim: To assess the knowledge and practices related to control of dengue fever and to assess the differences in knowledge and practices based on sex and literacy. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among persons visiting a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi. A systematic sampling procedure was adopted and a pretested questionnaire was used. Results: A total of 215 individuals were interviewed. Majority of the respondents (96.3% had heard about dengue. The important sources of information were television (54.9% and newspaper/magazines (51.7%. Around 89% of the study participants considered dengue as "serious problem." Nearly 86% participants were aware of the spread of dengue by mosquitoes while 73% were aware of one of the correct breeding sites of Aedes mosquito. Mosquito mats/liquidators were used by 61% of respondents, coils by 56% and repellant creams by 22%. Conclusion: The awareness regarding dengue and mosquito control measures was satisfactory to an extent. Programs should focus that this knowledge gets translated into practice.

  2. Extending professional education to health workers at grass root level: An experience from All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

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    K K Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, the opportunities for professional education of the grass root level health workers are grossly inadequate. Capacity building of all categories of health workers is needed for enhancing health outcomes. Objectives: To plan and implement a professional development training program for all categories of allied health workers and to assess its outcomes in terms of knowledge and skills Materials and Method: We planned and organized a ′one week′(15 h training program for 10 categories of allied health workers (1260 working in our hospital. The program included nine generic skills/topics: the prestige of AIIMS, sterilization & infection control, universal precaution, biomedical waste management, public health, life style & healthy nutrition, fire safety, communication skills and office procedure besides subject specific skills. Trainers were drawn from 12 departments. Training methodology included interactive lectures, narratives, demonstrations, videos, PPT slides, and informal discussions with participants. The effectiveness of the program was judged on the basis of participants′ feedback, feedback from the supervisors, and our own observations post training. Results: Feedback from the participants and their supervisors after training was encouraging. The participants described training as a "life time experience". The supervisors reported improvement in confidence, communication skills, and awareness of workers. Conclusion: The success of the program was due to the use of interactive methods, involvement of multidisciplinary team, and commitment from leadership. We recommend that professional education should be linked with career advancement. Academic institutions can play a key role in taking such initiatives.

  3. Twin outbreak of cholera in rural North Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Shuchismita; Parande, Mahantesh V; Parande, Aisha M; Lakkannavar, S L; Rathore, Poonam K; Mantur, B G; Kholkute, Sanjiva D; Roy, Subarna

    2014-09-01

    Successive outbreaks of acute watery diarrhoea occurred in Talikoti and Harnal, located in Bijapur District of the southern Indian s0 tate of Karnataka, in July and August 2012, respectively. These outbreaks were investigated to identify the aetiology and epidemiology. Information was collected from the local population and health centres. Stool and water samples were collected from the admitted patients and their drinking water sources. Standard microbiological and PCR techniques were employed for isolation and characterization of the pathogen. While 101 people (0.38%) were affected in Talikoti, 200 (20.94%) were affected in Harnal which is a small remote village. All age groups were affected but no death occurred. While the outbreak was smaller, longer and apparently spread by person to person contact in Talikoti, it occurred as a single source flash outbreak at Harnal. A single clone of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa biotype El Tor was isolated from the two stool samples obtained from Talikoti and subsequently from three of five stool samples obtained from Harnal indicating village to village spread of the aetiological agent. Striking similarity in antibiotic resistance profiles of these isolates with a particular strain isolated from the city of Belgaum, 250 km away, in 2010, prompted tracking the lineage of the V. cholerae isolates by DNA fingerprinting. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting assay helped confirm the origin of the incriminating strain to Belgaum. Our study reported the first twin outbreak of cholera in two remote areas of Bijapur district, Karnataka, south India. It also indicated the need for immediate preparedness to deal with such emergencies.

  4. Twin outbreak of cholera in rural North Karnataka, India

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    Shuchismita Dey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Successive outbreaks of acute watery diarrhoea occurred in Talikoti and Harnal, located in Bijapur District of the southern Indian s0 tate of Karnataka, in July and August 2012, respectively. These outbreaks were investigated to identify the aetiology and epidemiology. Methods: Information was collected from the local population and health centres. Stool and water samples were collected from the admitted patients and their drinking water sources. Standard microbiological and PCR techniques were employed for isolation and characterization of the pathogen. Results: While 101 people (0.38% were affected in Talikoti, 200 (20.94% were affected in Harnal which is a small remote village. All age groups were affected but no death occurred. While the outbreak was smaller, longer and apparently spread by person to person contact in Talikoti, it occurred as a single source flash outbreak at Harnal. A single clone of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa biotype El Tor was isolated from the two stool samples obtained from Talikoti and subsequently from three of five stool samples obtained from Harnal indicating village to village spread of the aetiological agent. Striking similarity in antibiotic resistance profiles of these isolates with a particular strain isolated from the city of Belgaum, 250 km away, in 2010, prompted tracking the lineage of the V. cholerae isolates by DNA fingerprinting. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD fingerprinting assay helped confirm the origin of the incriminating strain to Belgaum. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study reported the first twin outbreak of cholera in two remote areas of Bijapur district, Karnataka, south India. It also indicated the need for immediate preparedness to deal with such emergencies.

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy in adolescents: a retrospective study from north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Malhotra, Savita; Varma, Sannidhya; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit; Mattoo, Surendra K

    2013-06-01

    There are minimal data on the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in adolescents from India. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical profile and effectiveness of ECT in adolescents (aged 13-18 years). A retrospective chart review was carried out to identify adolescents (aged 13-18 years) who had received ECT during the period 1999-2011. During the study period, 39 such patients received ECT; complete records of 25 patients were available. Details regarding their sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment data were extracted from these records for the present study. During the study period, 658 patients received ECT, of which 39 were aged 18 or younger (5.9%). Schizophrenia (n = 14; 56%) was the commonest diagnosis for which ECT was used in adolescents, followed by depression (n = 3; 12%). Catatonic symptoms (n = 17; 68%) were the most common symptoms among these subjects. Electroconvulsive therapy was considered as a treatment of choice taking the clinical picture account in about three fourths of the patients (n = 19; 76%). The mean (SD) numbers of ECTs administered per patient were 10.1 (4.87) (range, 2-21). The mean (SD) response rate to ECT was 76% (23.3%) (range, 31%-100%). Response rates according to diagnosis were the following: 76.3% for schizophrenia, 87.2% for depression, 81.8% for psychosis (not otherwise specified), and 77.7% for acute and transient psychosis. Response rate in patients with catatonia was 91.6%. Prolonged seizures, nausea and vomiting, and headache were reported in 2 cases each. Electroconvulsive therapy is used less frequently in children and adolescents compared to the older patients. This study shows that ECT is effective in the treatment of severe psychiatric disorders in adolescents and is associated with the same frequency of adverse effects as the adults.

  6. Quantitative estimates of dietary intake with special emphasis on snacking pattern and nutritional status of free living adults in urban slums of Delhi: impact of nutrition transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Archna; Gupta, Vidhu; Ghosh, Arpita; Lock, Karen; Ghosh-Jerath, Suparna

    2015-10-14

    The nutritional landscape of India is experiencing the fallout of urbanization and globalization. The changes are manifest in dietary patterns as well as health outcomes. The study aimed at assessing household dietary intake pattern with special emphasis on snacking pattern, anthropometric and lipid profiles in low socio-economic status households in an urban slum of Delhi. Community based cross-sectional study in 260 households of a purposively selected urban slum in North-East district of Delhi, India. Family dietary surveys including consumption pattern of commercial food products rich in Partially Hydrogenated Vegetable Oils (PHVOs), 24 h dietary recall and assessment of dietary diversity using Household Diet Diversity Scores (HDDS) were done. Assessment of nutritional status using anthropometric and lipid profile on a subsample (n =130) were also conducted. Median energy and fat intake were adequate. Micronutrient intake was found to be inadequate for vitamin A, riboflavin, calcium and folate. PHVO usage was low (<20 % households). Milk (39 %), green leafy vegetables (25 %) and fruits (25 %) intake were below recommendations. Mean HDDS was 7.87. Prevalence of overweight/obesity was high (66.7 %). Lipid profile showed mean HDL-C levels lower than recommendations for females. Community based awareness programs for prevention of non-communicable diseases should incorporate healthy diet and lifestyle practices with emphasis on quantity and quality of nutrient intake. This must be considered as an integral part of chronic disease prevention strategy for underprivileged communities in urban India.

  7. South China connected to north India in Gondwana: sedimentary basin and detrital provenance analyses

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    Yao, W.; Li, Z. X.; Li, W. X.; Li, X. H.; Yang, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The paleoposition of South China during the Ediacaran-Silurian is important for understanding the assembly of Gondwana. We report here the tectonostratigraphic evolution of the Ediacaran-Silurian Nanhua foreland basin in South China, and discuss South China's connection with Gondwana and potential tectonic triggers for both the Wuyi-Yunkai orogeny in South China and the Bhimphedian orogeny in north India. The Nanhua basin was involved in a three-stage evolution, which are: Stage 1 (the Ediacaran-Cambrian) recording the start of tectonic subsidence with turbiditic marine clastic deposition, fed by exotic orogens outboard South China; Stage 2 (the Ordovician to earliest-Silurian) featured by migrating depocentres with dominant shallow marine to deltaic clastic deposition, fed by the local Wuyi-Yunkai orogen; and Stage 3 (the Silurian) showing the arrival of depocentre in the Yangtze Block during the waning stage of the Wuyi-Yunkai orogeny with deltaic deposition in the remanent foreland basin. Detrital zircon analyses of the Ediacaran-Silurian sandstones across the Nanhua basin reveal a prominent age population of 1100-900 Ma (with a peak age at ~980 Ma) and moderate populations of Archean-Paleozoic ages, grossly matching that of crystalline and sedimentary rocks in northern India. Zircon isotopes of the Stage 1 samples suggest three Precambrian episodes of juvenile crustal growth at 3.0 Ga, 2.5 Ga and 1.0 Ga, and a major crustal reworking at 580-500 Ma for the source areas, which are constraint to be northwestern India and its surrounding orogens. Together with other evidence, we propose that South China likely collided with northwestern India during the Gondwana assembly, generated the Bhimphedian orogeny in north India and formed two foreland basins on both the north India and South China sides. Far-field stress of the collision triggered the Ordovician-Silurian Wuyi-Yunkai orogeny in South China. The Stage 2-3 samples in the Nanhua basin of South China were shed

  8. Gene diversity in some Muslim populations of North India.

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    Aarzoo, S Shabana; Afzal, Mohammad

    2005-06-01

    North Indian Muslim populations have historical, linguistic, and socioreligious significance to the Indian subcontinent. Although sociocultural and political dimensions of their demography are well documented, no detailed genetic structure of the populations is available. We have undertaken a survey of the gene frequencies of the ABO, Rh, PTC taste ability, sickling, and G6PD systems for different endogamous groups: Sheikh, Syed, Pathan, Ansari, Saifi, and Hindu Bania. All the groups at most loci showed statistically nonsignificant differences, except for ABO and PTC traits, for which interpopulational differences were seen. Heterozygosity ranged from 0.048 to 0.617 among the Sheikh, 0.149 to 0.599 among the Pathan, 0.105 to 0.585 among the Ansari, 0.25 to 0.869 among the Syed, 0.107 to 0.565 among the Saifi, and 0.100 to 0.492 among the Hindu Bania. The average D(ST) and G(ST) values for the five marker loci were 0.0625 +/- 0.098 and 0.1072 +/- 0.041, respectively. A dendrogram was constructed using the UPGMA clustering method. Our results revealed that the Pathan and the Sheikh form one cluster, the Syed and the Hindu Bania form another cluster, and the two clusters join together (the so-called higher caste); also, the Saifi and the Ansari form a separate cluster (lower caste). The results of the genetic distance analysis are useful for understanding the pattern of genetic relationships between different endogamous groups of Muslims.

  9. Farmer's response to changing climate in North East India

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Utpal Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Diversification of land use in the cultivation of various crops provides an alternative way to moderate the climate risk. By choosing alternative crops that are resilient to various weather parameters, farmers can reduce the crop damage and achieve optimum output from their limited land resources. Apart from other adaptation measures, crop diversity can reflect farmers' response towards changing climate uncertainty. This paper tries to examine the changing climatic condition through spatio-temporal variation of two important weather variables (precipitation and temperature) in the largest North-East Indian state, Assam, since 1950. It is examined by the variation in crop diversification index. We have used (1) Herfindahl Index for measuring degree of diversification and (2) locational quotient for measuring the changes in the regional crop concentration. The results show that, in almost all the districts, crop specialization has been taking place slowly and that happened mostly in the last phase of our study. The hilly and backward districts recorded more diversification but towards lower value crops. It goes against the normal feature of crop diversification where farmers diversify in favour of high value crops. Employing ordinary least squares method and/or Fixed Effect model, irrigation is found to have significant impact on crop diversification; while the flood plain zones and hill zones are found to have better progress in this regard, which has been due to the survival necessity of poor farmers living the zone. Thus crop diversity does not reflect very significant response from the farmers' side towards changing weather factors (except rainfall) though they have significant impact on the productivity of various crops, and thus profitability. The study thus suggests the necessity for rapid and suitable diversification as alternative climate change mitigation in the long run.

  10. White grain mycetoma caused by Scedosporium apiospermum in North India: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Munesh Kumar; Banerjee, Tuhina; Kumar, Dhirendra; Rastogi, Amit; Tilak, Ragini

    2013-12-01

    Mycetoma is chronic granulomatous infection of skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by both bacteria and fungi. We report a case of mycetoma caused by Scedosporium apiospermum in the right foot of a 45-year-old farmer in north India. The patient had a history of trauma in the sole of the right foot followed by discharge of white granules along with proximal progression. Scedosporium apiospermum was identified based on colony characteristics and microscopic features on slide culture. Mycetoma is a progressive disease. Foot is commonly affected in persons who walk barefoot, especially in south India. Untreated mycetoma progress and involve the underlying fasciae and tissues along with bones often resulting in loss of limb. By prompt and reliable diagnosis with corresponding antimicrobial administration, we can prevent further progression and limb disability.

  11. Clinical and microbiologic characteristics of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infections in north and south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggar, Axana; Nerlich, Andreas; Kumar, Rajesh; Abraham, Vinod J; Brahmadathan, Kootallur N; Ray, Pallab; Dhanda, Vanita; Joshua, John Melbin Jose; Mehra, Narinder; Bergmann, Rene; Chhatwal, G Singh; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2012-05-01

    The lack of epidemiologic data on invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infections in many developing countries is concerning, as S. pyogenes infections are commonly endemic in these areas. Here we present the results of the first prospective surveillance study of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infections in India. Fifty-four patients with invasive S. pyogenes infections were prospectively enrolled at two study sites, one in the north and one in the south of India. Sterile-site isolates were collected, and clinical information was documented using a standardized questionnaire. Available acute-phase sera were tested for their ability to inhibit superantigens produced by the patient's own isolate using a cell-based neutralizing assay. The most common clinical presentations were bacteremia without focus (30%), pneumonia (28%), and cellulitis (17%). Only two cases of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and no cases of necrotizing fasciitis were identified. Characterization of the isolates revealed great heterogeneity, with 32 different emm subtypes and 29 different superantigen gene profiles being represented among the 49 sterile-site isolates. Analyses of acute-phase sera showed that only 20% of the cases in the north cohort had superantigen-neutralizing activity in their sera, whereas 50% of the cases from the south site had neutralizing activity. The results demonstrate that there are important differences in both clinical presentation and strain characteristics between invasive S. pyogenes infections in India and invasive S. pyogenes infections in Western countries. The findings underscore the importance of epidemiologic studies on streptococcal infections in India and have direct implications for current vaccine developments.

  12. Pattern of Uveitis in a Referral Eye Clinic in North India

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    Singh Ramandeep

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the pattern of uveitis in a north Indian tertiary eye center. Methods: A retrospective study was done to identify the pattern of uveitis in a uveitis clinic population of a major referral center in north India from January 1996 to June 2001. A standard clinical protocol, the "naming and meshing" approach with tailored laboratory investigations, was used for the final diagnosis. Results: 1233 patients were included in the study; 641 (51.98% were males and 592 (48.01% females ranging in age from 1.5 to 75 years. The anterior uveitis was seen in 607 patients (49.23% followed by posterior uveitis (247 patients, 20.23%, intermediate uveitis (198 patients, 16.06% and panuveitis (181 patients, 14.68%. A specific diagnosis could be established in 602 patients (48.82%. The infective aetiology was seen in 179 patients, of which tuberculosis was the commonest cause in 125 patients followed by toxoplasmosis (21 patients, 11.7%. Non-infectious aetiology was seen in 423 patients, of which ankylosing spondylitis was the commonest cause in 80 patients followed by sepigionous choroidopathy (62 patients, 14.65% . Conclusion: Tuberculosis and toxoplasmosis were the commonest form of infective uveitis, while ankylosing spondylitis and serpiginous choroidopathy were commonly seen as the non-infective causes of uveitis in North India.

  13. Genetic diversity within ITS-1 region of Eimeria species infecting chickens of north India.

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    Kumar, Saroj; Garg, Rajat; Banerjee, P S; Ram, Hira; Kundu, K; Kumar, Sunil; Mandal, M

    2015-12-01

    Coccidiosis, caused by apicomplexan parasites of the genus Eimeria, inflicts severe economic losses to the poultry industry around the globe. In the present study, ITS-1 based species specific nested PCR revealed prevalence of E. acervulina, E. brunetti, E. maxima, E. mitis, E. praecox, E. necatrix and E. tenella in 79.2%, 12.5%, 64.6%, 89.6%, 60.4%, 64.6% and 97.9% poultry farms of north India, respectively. The ITS-1 sequences of different Eimeria spp. from north India were generated and analyzed to establish their phylogenetic relationship. The sequence identity with available sequences ranged from 80 to 100% in E. tenella, 95 to 100% in E. acervulina, 64 to 97% in E. necatrix, 96 to 99% in E. brunetti and 97 to 98% in E. mitis. Only long ITS-1 sequences of E. maxima could be generated in the present study and it had 80-100% identity with published sequences. Two out of the four ITS-1 sequences of E. maxima had mismatches in the published nested primer sequences from Australia, while one sequence of E. necatrix had a mismatch near 3' end of both forward and reverse published nested primer sequences, warranting for the need of designing new set of degenerate primers for these two species of Eimeria. In the phylogenetic tree, all isolates of E. acervulina, E. brunetti, E. mitis, E. tenella and E. necatrix clustered in separate clades with high bootstrap value. E. maxima sequences of north Indian isolates grouped in a long form of E. maxima clade. Complete ITS-1 sequences of E. necatrix and E. mitis are reported for the first time from India. Further studies are required with more number of isolates to verify whether these differences are unique to geographical locations.

  14. Dd-antigen-antibody system in five caste groups in north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, V; Kaur, H

    1991-12-01

    Antigen Dd, a polymorphic antigen found in extracts of certain human dandruff specimens, was investigated in five caste groups of north India. The incidence of antigen Dd-positive type varied from 21.21 per cent in Brahmins to 29.08 per cent in the Jat Sikhs of Punjab. However, a high frequency (45%) was observed in the Sunni Muslims of Kashmir, which differed significantly, when compared with different caste groups of Punjab. Family studies on 44 families indicated its inherited nature, the mode of inheritance being autosomal dominant.

  15. An extensive indoor {sup 222}Rn/{sup 220}Rn monitoring in North-East India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, K.K. [Department of Science and Technology, Embassy of India, 2536 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20008 (United States)]. E-mail: kkdwivedi@yahoo.com; Mishra, R. [Italian National Agency for Environmental Protection and Technical Services (APAT), Via. V. Brancati 48, Rome 00144 (Italy); Tripathy, S.P. [Italian National Agency for Environmental Protection and Technical Services (APAT), Via. V. Brancati 48, Rome 00144 (Italy)

    2005-11-15

    The behaviour of ubiquitous radon (Rn222), thoron (Rn220) and their progeny in the indoor atmosphere generally reflect a complex interplay between a number of processes, the most important of which are radioactive {alpha}-decay, ventilation, attachment to aerosols and deposition on the surfaces. The present work involved a long-term (1997-2000) passive monitoring of Rn222 and Rn220 in the indoor environment of the North-Eastern region of India. This region being a zone of high seismicity, the indoor radon and thoron measurement of the region will provide a better insight and a valuable database for any study related to radon and thoron anomalies.

  16. Evaluation of Critical Infrastructure in the Event of Earthquake: A Case Study of Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    prasad, Suraj

    2016-04-01

    With changing paradigms of disaster preparedness, the safety and security of critical infrastructure in the event of a geo-hazard has become increasingly important. In a developing and densely populated country like India, which is vulnerable to many different geo-hazards, a lack of clear policy directive regarding safety of such infrastructure could be especially damaging both in terms of life and property. The problem is most acute in India's mega cities, where inefficient infrastructure means that facilities like transportation, communication, and electricity generation are obsolete and vulnerable to sudden disruptions. The present study takes the case of the National Capital Territory of Delhi and attempts to examine the critical infrastructures of the city in the event of an earthquake. Delhi lies in a very active seismic zone with various faults in and around the city. The Government of India has classified Delhi in Zone 4 (High Risk Zone) based on past and expected seismic activities in the Indo-Gangetic Plains. With a population of over 20 Million in the Urban Agglomeration of Delhi, any major earthquake in an already overstretched infrastructure could have a devastating impact. This study will test the critical infrastructures of the city in terms of their disaster preparedness and suggest ways and measures to increase the same. Keywords: Geo-hazards, Critical Infrastructure, vulnerable, Earthquakes, Delhi

  17. Tension Among Women in North India: An Idiom of Distress and a Cultural Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Lesley Jo

    2017-03-01

    The existing literature on Indian ethnopsychology has long asserted that somatization is a key aspect of experiences of distress. The study of idioms of distress arose out of work done in India (Nichter in Cult Med Psychiatry 5(4):379-408, 1981), but ironically, little subsequent work has systematically explored idioms of distress in this part of the world. This ethnographic study focused on the term tension (tenśan) and its relation to a cultural syndrome among women in urban North India. This syndrome appears to involve rapid-onset anger, irritation, rumination, and sleeplessness as key symptoms. It is often linked to specific circumstances such as domestic conflict and is associated with the stresses of modern urban life. People who report more symptoms of tension had consistently higher scores on the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist-25 for depression and anxiety. In this cultural context where psychiatric care is highly stigmatized, the language of tension can aid providers of mental healthcare (many of whom, in India, are not psychiatrists or psychologists) to identify and communicate effectively with potential patients whose mental healthcare needs might otherwise go unaddressed.

  18. Varied presentations of moyamoya disease in a tertiary care hospital of north-east India

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    Papori Borah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Moyamoya disease is a chronic progressive cerebrovascular disorder, characterized by stenosis or occlusion of bilateral internal carotid arteries (ICAs, anterior cerebral arteries (ACAs and middle cerebral arteries (MCAs, accompanied by a collateral network of vessels formed at the base of the brain. Ischemia and intracranial hemorrhage are the common typical manifestations. However moyamoya disease has been associated with atypical presentations like headache, seizures and involuntary movements. Although frequently reported from Asian countries like Japan, China and Korea, only few studies reported on clinical manifestations of moyamoya disease from India. Objectives: To study the varied presentations of moyamoya disease in a tertiary care hospital of north-east India. Material and Methods: Relevant investigations were done to rule out other causes of moyamoya syndrome. Results: We report 6 cases of moyamoya disease with varied presentations from a tertiary care referral government hospital. Case 1, 2 and 6 presented with alternating hemiparesis. Case 3 had amaurosis fugax. Case 4 had history suggestive of ischemic stroke and presented with hemichorea. Case 4 had focal seizure as the only manifestation. Cases 4 and 5 notably had stenosis of posterior cerebral artery (PCA in addition to stenosis of bilateral ICAs, ACAs and MCAs. Conclusion: Owing to its low incidence in India, moyamoya disease is easily overlooked as a possible diagnosis. However, because of its progressive nature, it is imperative to diagnose this disease early and offer surgical treatment to the patients.

  19. Development of an antibody-ELISA for seroprevalence of Trypanosoma evansi in equids of North and North-western regions of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajender; Kumar, Sanjay; Khurana, S K; Yadav, S C

    2013-09-23

    The importance of Trypanosoma evansi as the etiological agent for surra is often overlooked due to difficulty in accurate diagnosis of the disease. In the present study, an antibody-ELISA was developed using whole cell lysate antigen prepared from purified trypanosomes and used for seroprevalence study of T. evansi in equids. A total of 3695 equids were surveyed and blood samples were collected from each animal during September 2009 to August 2011. Out of these, 420 serum samples were found positive for presence of antibodies against T. evansi collected from equids of six agro-climatic zones of North and North-western regions of India comprising eight states viz., Gujarat (36/479), Haryana (11/275), Himachal Pradesh (14/83), Jammu and Kashmir (32/221), Punjab (1/38), Rajasthan (90/1148), Uttarakhand (141/753), and Uttar Pradesh (65/330). The maximum seroprevalence (19.69%) for T. evansi infection was observed in equids of Uttar Pradesh state with an overall seroprevalence of 11.36% in North and North-western regions of India. The results indicated that surra is endemic in equids of North and North-western parts of India.

  20. Role of fine mode aerosols in modulating cloud properties over industrial locations in north India

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    B. Abish

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of aerosols on cloud properties over North India which includes the Indo-Gangetic Plain has been investigated for the years 2000 to 2010. During the years 2004, 2009 and 2010 there has been an abrupt increase in fine mode aerosol optical depth (AOD inducing a sharp decline in cloud effective radius (CER in the month of January. The following monsoon during these years was a failure in the region considered for the study. In the year 2010, a highest AOD value of 0.35 was recorded in the month of January. In accordance with the aerosol indirect effect, this large increase in AOD resulted in a significant reduction in CER. The monsoon season in that year was deficient in the study region even though the rest of the country received above normal rainfall. For the years when CER diminished below 12 microns in the month of May, a delay in the advancement of monsoon towards North India is noted even after a normal or early onset in southern peninsula. Meanwhile, a rapid progression took place when it was 12 microns or above. During non-monsoon months an inverse relationship existed between cloud effective radius and liquid water path and a strong positive association occurred in the monsoon months. Present analysis suggests that the excessive aerosol loading and the associated aerosol indirect effects in the months prior to the monsoon season has an effect on the propagation and onset of the south west monsoon over the region.

  1. Mithun : The pride animal of north-eastern hilly region of India

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    M. G. Shisode

    Full Text Available Mithun, the pride animal called as ‘Cattle of Hilly Region’ of north-eastern hilly region of India and tropical rain forest of China. The animal plays an important role in the day to day socio-economic life of the local tribal population. Mithun (Bos frontalis is a rear species of livestock and is found in the north-eastern region of our country like Arunachal Pradesh (75 per cent of the total population, Nagaland (60 per cent, Manipur (0.8 per cent andMizoram (0.1 per cent having total population 0.25 million according to census 2003 and also very meager in Myanmar, Bhutan, and Bangladesh. The animal has got good potential for production of quality meat, milk and leather. Mithun is the ‘Cattle of Hilly Region’ and is one of the domesticated animals from the North-eastern hilly region and mainly found in tropical rain forest of North-eastern hilly region. Very meager population is found inMyanmar, Bhutan and China. There are four defined mithun strains depending up on the geographical areas namely Arunachal, Nagaland, Manipur and Mizoram strains, respectively. [Vet World 2009; 2(12.000: 480-481

  2. Persistence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae in Delhi & National Capital Region (NCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, S.; Grover, S.S.; Gupta, N.; Roy, R.D.; Khare, S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the introduction of mass immunization, diphtheria continues to play a major role as a potentially lethal infectious disease in many countries. Delay in the specific therapy of diphtheria may result in death and, therefore, accurate diagnosis of diphtheria is imperative. This study was carried out at National Centre for Disease Control (NCDC), Delhi, India, on samples of suspected diphtheria cases referred from various government hospitals of Delhi and neighbouring areas during 2012-2014. Primary identification of Corynebacterium diphtheriae was done by standard culture, staining and biochemical tests followed by toxigenicity testing by Elek's test on samples positive for C. diphtheriae. The results showed persistence of toxigenic C. diphtheriae in our community indicating the possibility of inadequate immunization coverage. PMID:26609038

  3. Persistence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae in Delhi & National Capital Region (NCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, S; Grover, S S; Gupta, N; Roy, R D; Khare, S

    2015-10-01

    Despite the introduction of mass immunization, diphtheria continues to play a major role as a potentially lethal infectious disease in many countries. Delay in the specific therapy of diphtheria may result in death and, therefore, accurate diagnosis of diphtheria is imperative. This study was carried out at National Centre for Disease Control (NCDC), Delhi, India, on samples of suspected diphtheria cases referred from various government hospitals of Delhi and neighbouring areas during 2012-2014. Primary identification of Corynebacterium diphtheriae was done by standard culture, staining and biochemical tests followed by toxigenicity testing by Elek's test on samples positive for C. diphtheriae. The results showed persistence of toxigenic C. diphtheriae in our community indicating the possibility of inadequate immunization coverage.

  4. Maternal and cord blood levels of aldrin and dieldrin in Delhi population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Md; Pathak, Rahul; Tripathi, A K; Ahmed, Rafat S; Guleria, Kiran; Banerjee, B D

    2010-12-01

    Aldrin and dieldrin, structurally similar organochlorine pesticides belong to cyclodiene family and were widely used for agriculture and public health program in India. Although the manufacturing, use and import of aldrin and dieldrin have been banned in India since 2003, these pesticides are still persistent in environment and may be associated with adverse neurological and reproductive effects. The aim of this study is to assess the recent exposure level of aldrin and dieldrin and their placental transfer to fetus in normal healthy full-term pregnant women belonging to north Indian population undergoing normal delivery at Obstetrics and Gynecology department of UCMS and GTB hospital, Delhi. Quantitative analysis of aldrin and dieldrin residues in maternal and cord blood samples were carried out by gas chromatography system equipped with electron capture detector. The results of our study clearly revealed that maternal and cord blood levels of aldrin and dieldrin of pregnant women are age and dietary habit dependent. The aldrin level in maternal blood and dieldrin level in cord blood are higher in women in the age group 25-30 years than in women in age group of 19-24 years. Similarly, aldrin level in maternal blood is significantly higher in women with non-vegetarian dietary habit than in women with vegetarian dietary habit. No significant association is found for maternal and cord blood level. The results of the present study clearly demonstrate prenatal uptake of aldrin and dieldrin and provide recent information on the subsequent transplacental transfer.

  5. MICROBIOLOGICAL PATTERN AND EPIDEMIOLOGIC TRENDS OF FUNGAL KERATITIS IN NORTH INDIA

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    Yusuf Rizvi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Spectrum of fungal keratitis continues to change with geographical location and season. Microbiological and epidemiological data provide guidelines to the treating physician facilitating chances of successful treatment. PURPOSE To report microbiologic and epidemiologic profile of 119 culture-positive cases of fungal keratitis treated at a tertiary centre in North India. SETTINGS AND DESIGN All cases reporting directly or referred to the OPD of Eye Department of Rohilkhand Medical College and Hospital, Bareilly, India, diagnosed and treated as fungal keratitis during a 3-year period between March 2012 and Feb 2015. METHODS Retrospective analysis of clinical and microbiological data of 119 culture-positive cases of fungal keratitis. Demographic features, risk factors, clinical course and laboratory findings were reviewed. RESULTS All patients were residents of 11 adjoining districts of Northern India. Of the 119 patients, 76 (63.8% were males (male: female ratio 1.79:1. 81(68% patients were in young productive age group of 20-45 years. 87 (73% were rural based. Ocular trauma with vegetative material, especially sugarcane leaf or dust falling in eyes were the chief precipitating factors; n = 89 (74.7%. Microbiologically Fusarium was the predominant isolate, 64 cases (53.7%, followed by Aspergillus 34(28.6% and Candida 11(9.2%. 2 cases of Alternaria and Curvularia and solitary cases of Acremonium and Scedosporium were reported. 4 strains remained unidentified. Mode of injury had a causal relation with fungal aetiology. Majority of Fusarium infections were caused by vegetative injuries 39(61%. Of these, 15(23.4% were attributed to sugarcane leaves. Soil/dust fall in eye or Surma application were responsible for bulk of Aspergillus infections; 21(61.7%. Candida infections were sporadic with a higher presenting age (Mean av 51.2 years and a frequent association with topical steroid usage, (8 of 11 cases. Aspergillus infections were predominant

  6. Source attribution and mitigation strategies for air pollution in Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesewetter, Gregor; Purohit, Pallav; Schoepp, Wolfgang; Liu, Jun; Amann, Markus; Bhanarkar, Anil

    2017-04-01

    Indian cities, and the megacity of Delhi in particular, have suffered from high air pollution for years. Recent observations show that ambient concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in Delhi strongly exceed the Indian national ambient air quality standards as well as the World Health Organization's interim target levels. At the same time, India is experiencing strong urbanization, and both Delhi's emissions as well as the exposed population are growing. Therefore the question arises how PM2.5 concentrations will evolve in the future, and how they can be improved efficiently. In the past, typical responses of the Delhi government to high pollution episodes have been restrictions on motorized road traffic, on power plant operations and on construction activities. However, to design sustainable and efficient pollution mitigation measures, the contribution of different source sectors and spatial scales needs to be quantified. Here we combine the established emission calculation scheme of the Greenhouse Gas - Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies (GAINS) model with regional chemistry-transport model simulations (0.5° resolution) as well as local particle dispersion (2 × 2 km resolution) to arrive at a source attribution of ambient PM2.5 in Delhi. Calculated concentrations compare well to observations. We find that roughly 60% of total population-weighted PM2.5 originates from sources outside the national capital territory of Delhi itself. Consequently, mitigation strategies need to involve neighboring states and address the typical sources there. We discuss the likely evolution of ambient concentrations under different scenarios which assume either current emission control legislation, or application of a Clean Air Scenario foreseeing additional regulations in non-industrial sectors which are often overlooked, such as phase-out of solid fuel cookstoves, and road paving. Only in the case where the Clean Air Scenario is applied both in Delhi as well as in

  7. Molecular epidemiology and in-vitro antifungal susceptibility of Aspergillus terreus species complex isolates in Delhi, India: evidence of genetic diversity by amplified fragment length polymorphism and microsatellite typing.

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    Shallu Kathuria

    Full Text Available Aspergillus terreus is emerging as an etiologic agent of invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised individuals in several medical centers in the world. Infections due to A. terreus are of concern due to its resistance to amphotericin B, in vivo and in vitro, resulting in poor response to antifungal therapy and high mortality. Herein we examined a large collection of molecularly characterized, geographically diverse A. terreus isolates (n = 140 from clinical and environmental sources in India for the occurrence of cryptic A. terreus species. The population structure of the Indian A. terreus isolates and their association with those outside India was determined using microsatellite based typing (STR technique and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis (AFLP. Additionally, in vitro antifungal susceptibility of A. terreus isolates was determined against 7 antifungals. Sequence analyses of the calmodulin locus identified the recently described cryptic species A. hortai, comprising 1.4% of Aspergillus section Terrei isolates cultured from cases of aspergilloma and probable invasive aspergillosis not reported previously. All the nine markers used for STR typing of A. terreus species complex proved to be highly polymorphic. The presence of high genetic diversity revealing 75 distinct genotypes among 101 Indian A. terreus isolates was similar to the marked heterogeneity noticed in the 47 global A. terreus population exhibiting 38 unique genotypes mainly among isolates from North America and Europe. Also, AFLP analysis showed distinct banding patterns for genotypically diverse A. terreus isolates. Furthermore, no correlation between a particular genotype and amphotericin B susceptibility was observed. Overall, 8% of the A. terreus isolates exhibited low MICs of amphotericin B. All the echinocandins and azoles (voriconazole, posaconazole and isavuconazole demonstrated high potency against all the isolates. The study emphasizes the need of

  8. Connecting Activists and Journalists: Twitter communication in the aftermath of the 2012 Delhi rape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poell, T.; Rajagopalan, S.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how feminist activists, women's organizations, and journalists in India connected with each other through Twitter following the gang rape incident in New Delhi in December 2012. First, the investigation draws on a set of +15 million tweets specifically focused on rape and gang

  9. Parenting and Adolescent Identity: A Study of Indian Families in New Delhi and Geneva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapru, Saloni

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the ancestral and acculturated cultural meanings in immigrant Indian parenting and adolescent identity using the independence-interdependence dimension as the focus. Forty Indian parents and their adolescents in Delhi, India, and Geneva, Switzerland, were interviewed using open-ended questions and scenarios. Adolescents also…

  10. Connecting Activists and Journalists: Twitter communication in the aftermath of the 2012 Delhi rape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poell, T.; Rajagopalan, S.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how feminist activists, women's organizations, and journalists in India connected with each other through Twitter following the gang rape incident in New Delhi in December 2012. First, the investigation draws on a set of +15 million tweets specifically focused on rape and gang

  11. e-Agriculture Prototype for Knowledge Facilitation among Tribal Farmers of North-East India: Innovations, Impact and Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Saravanan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This case study deals with the implementation methodology, innovations and lessons of the ICT initiative in providing agricultural extension services to the rural tribal farming community of North-East India. Methodology: This study documents the ICT project implementation challenges, impact among farmers and briefly indicates lessons of…

  12. Assessment of radiological protection systems among diagnostic radiology facilities in North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Thokchom Dewan; Jayaraman, T; Arunkumar Sharma, B

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to assess the adequacy level of radiological protection systems available in the diagnostic radiology facilities located in three capital cities of North East (NE) India. It further attempts to understand, using a multi-disciplinary approach, how the safety codes/standards in diagnostic radiology framed by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to achieve adequate radiological protection in facilities, have been perceived, conceptualized, and applied accordingly in these facilities. About 30 diagnostic radiology facilities were randomly selected from three capitals of states in NE India; namely Imphal (Manipur), Shillong (Meghalaya) and Guwahati (Assam). A semi-structured questionnaire developed based on a multi-disciplinary approach was used for this study. It was observed that radiological practices undertaken in these facilities were not exactly in line with safety codes/standards in diagnostic radiology of the AERB and the IAEA. About 50% of the facilities had registered/licensed x-ray equipment with the AERB. More than 80% of the workers did not use radiation protective devices, although these devices were available in the facilities. About 85% of facilities had no institutional risk management system. About 70% of the facilities did not carry out periodic quality assurance testing of their x-ray equipment or surveys of radiation leakage around the x-ray room, and did not display radiation safety indicators in the x-ray rooms. Workers in these facilities exhibited low risk perception about the risks associated with these practices. The majority of diagnostic radiology facilities in NE India did not comply with the radiological safety codes/standards framed by the AERB and IAEA. The study found inadequate levels of radiological protection systems in the majority of facilities. This study suggests a need to establish firm measures that comply with the radiological safety codes/standards of the

  13. Chemical Properties of Groundwater in Bhiloda Taluka Region, North Gujarat, India

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    G. D. Acharya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is one of the most useful water sources. Contamination of such water source is a big problem creating health hazards. In this present study we have collected groundwater samples from different places of Bhiloda taluka of Sabarkantha district (North Gujarat India. These samples have been assessed on the basis of various qualitative parameters. The results of physico-chemical study of water samples from 13 bore wells in Bhiloda taluka are presented. The water quality parameters such as; pH, electrical conductivity (EC, total dissolved salts (TDS, calcium and magnesium, sodium, potassium, carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, sulphate, fluoride, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, residual sodium carbonate (RSC and soluble sodium percentage ( SSP were estimated.

  14. Techniques and criterion of important trees in north-west India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushal, P. [Dr YS Parmar Univ. of Horticulture and Forestry, Solan (India)

    1996-12-31

    The north-western region of India comprises of plains of agrarian economy with fertile deep soils and mountains of the Himalayan ranges. The range of soft and hardwood tree species of commercial and economic value is very large. The planting techniques and the stand establishment criteria are site specific. In the plains Dahlbergia sissoo, Populus sps., Acacia nilotica and Shorea robusta are treated in various forest operations. In the hills Pinus roxburghii, P. wallichiana, P. geradiana, Picea smithiana, Abies pindrow and Cedrus deodara are among some of of the softwoods whereas, Quercus and willows are commercially exploited hardwoods. The paper high-lights the stand establishment prescriptions and their field level implication. The actual cultural and tending operations followed for raising these forest crops have been presented. 4 refs, 3 tabs

  15. Constraints Encountered by the Beneficiaries of Krishi Vigyan Kendra in North Eastern Region of India

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    Dipak Nath

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted among 200 farmers of ten purposively selected Krishi Vigyan Kendras (KVKs in North Eastern region of India. The respondents were interviewed using a questionnaire for identifying the constraints and their suggestions for future improvement of KVK activities. The study revealed that unavailability of labour, unavailability of good quality seed and other inputs, unavailability of information about pest and disease management at right time,(inability to purchase modern agricultural implements and lack of capital were the major constraints. The respondents suggested that timely availability of seed and other inputs, regular and continuous monitoring, linking farmers to financial institutuions for financial support, and more long term practical oriented training programme are important for strengthening KVK activities.

  16. Vegetative and reproductive phenology of a floodplain tree species Barringtonia acutangula from North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Shikhasmita; Nath, Arun Jyoti; Das, Ashesh Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Vegetative and reproductive phenology of Barringtonia acutangula, a floodplain tree species was studied at Chatla floodplain, Assam North East India with the aim to investigate vegetative and reproductive phenology under stressful environment of seasonal submergence and to assess the impact of environmental variables (temperature and precipitation) on tree phenophases. Quantitative assessment was made at 15 day interval for all the phenophases (leaf initiation, leaf-fall, flowering and fruiting) by tagging 40 (forty) trees over aperiod of two years (2012-14).To test seasonal influence on the phenology of Barringtonia acutangula different phenophases were correlated with environmental variables and statistical spearman's rank correlation coefficient was employed. Aridity index was computed that delineate influence of rainfall and temperature together on any phenophases. Leaf initiation showed positively significant correlation with temperature (r(s) = 0.601, p = phenology of B. acutangula and any changes in these variables in future due to climate change, might have profound effect on phenophases of this tree species.

  17. SINE polymorphism reveals distinct strains of Entamoeba histolytica from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shraddha; Banyal, Neha; Singh, Mukul; Mandal, A K; Bhattacharya, Sudha; Paul, Jaishree

    2017-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an intestinal parasite causing significant morbidity and mortality in the developing world. More tools are needed to understand the epidemiology and molecular pathogenesis of amebiasis. Virulence pattern of E. histolytica could be linked with the genotype of a strain. Several loci showing insertion polymorphism of retrotransposable short interspersed nuclear elements EhSINE1 and EhSINE2 have been reported among laboratory strains of E. histolytica. The present study was undertaken to validate this observation in clinical isolates from north India. Our results indicate that the Indian samples show a different propensity of SINE retention or loss at two of the polymorphic loci compared with non-Indian samples. Statistical analysis of different loci revealed Locus 17 of EhSINE1as a potential geographical marker for distinguishing Indian isolates from non Indian isolates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Spatial Correlations of Malaria Incidence Hotspots with Environmental Factors in Assam, North East India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handique, Bijoy K.; Khan, Siraj A.; Dutta, Prafulla; Nath, Manash J.; Qadir, Abdul; Raju, P. L. N.

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is endemic and a major public health problem in north east (NE) region of India and contributes about 8-12 % of India's malaria positives cases. Historical morbidity pattern of malaria in terms of API (Annual Parasite Incidence) in the state of Assam has been used for delineating the malaria incidence hotspots at health sub centre (HSC) level. Strong spatial autocorrelation (p Malaria incidence hot spots in the state could be identified based on General G statistics and tested for statistical significance. Spatial correlation of malaria incidence hotspots with physiographic and climatic parameters across 6 agro-climatic zones of the state reveals the types of land cover pattern and the range of elevation contributing to the malaria outbreaks. Analysis shows that villages under malaria hotspots are having more agricultural land, evergreen/semi-evergreen forests with abundant waterbodies. Statistical and spatial analyses of malaria incidence showed a significant positive correlation with malaria incidence hotspots and the elevation (p malaria hotspots are having average elevation ranging between 17 to 240 MSL. This conforms to the characteristics of two dominant mosquito species in the state Anopheles minimus and An. baimai that prefers the habitat of slow flowing streams in the foot hills and in forest ecosystems respectively.

  19. Comparison of Archean and Phanerozoic granulites: Southern India and North American Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.; Kittleson, Roger C.

    1988-01-01

    Archean granulites at the southern end of the Dharwar craton of India and Phanerozoic granulites in the southern Appalachians of North America share an important characteristic: both show continuous transitions from amphibolite facies rocks to higher grade. This property is highly unusual for granulite terranes, which commonly are bounded by major shears or thrusts. These two terranes thus offer an ideal opportunity to compare petrogenetic models for deep crustal rocks formed in different time periods, which conventional wisdom suggests may have had different thermal profiles. The salient features of the Archean amphibolite-to-granulite transition in southern India have been recently summarized. The observed metamorphic progression reflects increasing temperature and pressure. Conditions for the Phanerozoic amphibolite-to-granulite transition in the southern Appalachians were documented. The following sequence of prograde reactions was observed: kyanite = sillimanite, muscovite = sillimanite + K-feldspar, partial melting of pelites, and hornblende = orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + garnet. The mineral compositions of low-variance assemblages in mafic and intermediate rocks are almost identical for the two granulite facies assemblages. In light of their different fluid regimes and possible mechanisms for heat flow augmentation, it seems surprising that these Archean and Phanerozoic granulite terranes were apparently metamorphosed under such similar conditions of pressure and temperature. Comparison with other terrains containing continuous amphibolite-to-granulite facies transitions will be necessary before this problem can be addressed.

  20. Explanatory models in patients with first episode depression: a study from north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Kumar, Vineet; Chakrabarti, Subho; Hollikatti, Prabhakar; Singh, Pritpal; Tyagi, Shikha; Kulhara, Parmanand; Avasthi, Ajit

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the explanatory models of patients with first episode depression presenting to a tertiary care hospital located in North-western India. One hundred sixty four consecutive patients with diagnosis of first episode depression (except severe depression with psychotic symptoms) according to the International Classification of Diseases-10th Revision (ICD-10) and ≥18 years of age were evaluated for their explanatory models using the causal models section of Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue (EMIC). The most common explanations given were categorized into Karma-deed-heredity category (77.4%), followed by psychological explanations (62.2%), weakness (50%) and social causes (40.2%). Among the various specific causes the commonly reported explanations by at least one-fourth of the sample in decreasing order were: will of god (51.2%), fate/chance (40.9%), weakness of nerves (37.8%), general weakness (34.7%), bad deeds (26.2%), evil eye (24.4%) and family problems (21.9%). There was some influence of sociodemographic features on the explanations given by the patients. From the study, it can be concluded that patients with first episode depression have multiple explanatory models for their symptoms of depression which are slightly different than those reported in previous studies done from other parts of India. Understanding the multiple explanatory models for their symptoms of depression can have important treatment implications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of cigarette smoking and its predictors among school going adolescents of North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durgesh Thakur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cigarettes smoking is a common mode of consuming tobacco in India. This habit usually starts in adolescence and tracks across the life course. Interventions like building decision making skills and resisting negative influences are effective in reducing the initiation and level of tobacco use. Aims and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of adolescent current cigarette smoking behavior and to investigate the individual and social factors, which influence them both to and not to smoke. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was carried out among school going adolescents in Shimla town of North India. After obtaining their written informed consent, a questionnaire was administered. Results: The overall prevalence of current cigarette smoking was 11.8%. The binary logistic regression model revealed that parents′ and peers′ smoking behavior influence adolescent smoking behavior. Individual self-harm tendency also significantly predicted cigarette smoking behavior. Parental active participation in keeping a track of their children′s free time activities predicted to protect adolescents from taking this habit. Conclusion: Our research lends support to the need for intervention on restricting adolescents from taking up this habit and becoming another tobacco industries′ addicted customer. Parents who smoke should quit this habit, which will not only restore their own health, but also protect their children. All parents should be counseled to carefully observe their children′s free time activities.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of Echinococcosis from food producing animals in north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balbir Bagicha; Sharma, Jagdish Kamal; Ghatak, Sandeep; Sharma, Rajnish; Bal, Mandeep Singh; Tuli, Aashuma; Gill, Jatinder Paul Singh

    2012-05-25

    Echinococcosis is an important medical, veterinary and economic concern in India. Ten cysts were randomly selected from each intermediate host species (cattle, buffalo, sheep, goat and pigs). Either the germinal layer (sterile cysts) or protoscoleces (fertile cysts) were collected for molecular characterization. A 434 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase-1 gene was amplified using PCR from each isolate. Ten representative samples (2 from each intermediate host species) were sequenced in both the directions from which readable sequences were obtained from nine for phylogenetic analysis (NCBI, Blast). Phylogenetic analysis of cytochrome oxidase I gene revealed that seven (77.7%) isolates, from cattle (2), pigs (2), buffaloes (1) and goat (2) were clustered with the Indian Buffalo (G3) strain of Echinococcus granulosus, while two (22.2%) isolates from sheep were clustered with the sheep strain (G1) of E. granulosus. Phylogenetic analysis of the cytochrome oxidase-1 gene revealed that the buffalo strain (G3) and common sheep strain (G1) are cycling among livestock in north India and that these strains are highly adapted to cattle, buffalo, sheep, goats and pigs.

  3. Attitude about mental illness of health care providers and community leaders in rural Haryana, North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal Ramesh Salve

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attitude about mental illness determines health seeking of the people. Success of National Mental Health Programme (NMHP is dependent on attitude about mental illness of various stakeholders in the programme. Material & Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was carried out in Ballabgarh block of Faridabad district in Haryana. We aimed to study attitude about mental illness of various stakeholders of health care providers (HCP, community leaders in rural area of Haryana, north India. Study area consisting of five Primary Health Centers (PHCs serving 2,12,000 rural population. All HCP working at PHCs, Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA and community leaders in study area were approached for participation. Hindi version of Opinion about Mental illness Scale for Chinese Community (OMICC was used to study attitude. Results: In total, 467 participants were participated in the study. Of which, HCP, ASHAs and community leaders were 81 (17.4%, 145 (31.0% and 241 (51.6% respectively. Community members reported socially restrictive, pessimistic and stereotyping attitude towards mentally ill person. ASHA and HCP reported stereotyping attitude about person with mental illness. None of the stakeholders reported stigmatizing attitude. Conclusion: Training programme focusing on spectrum of mental illness for HCP and ASHA working in rural area under NMHP programme is needed. Awareness generation of community leaders about bio-medical concept of mental illness is cornerstone of NMHP success in India.

  4. Distribution of Hepatitis B virus genotypes among healthy blood donors in eastern part of North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Kailash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We evaluated the distribution HBV genotypes among non-remunerated healthy blood donors in eastern North India. Materials and Methods: During screening of donated blood, 176 consecutive HBsAg positive, samples comprised the study. HBV-DNA was quantitative detected in 150 samples by PCR. HBV genotype was determined by identifying genotype-specific DNA band using nested PCR. Results: Majorities were of age group 31-40 yrs (65.3%. Males (92.7% outnumbered females (7.3% and were HbeAg-negative HBsAg carriers. Over all, genotype-A was the most prevalent (54% followed by D (21.3%. We did not find genotype-G and H. Districts under study, divided into four zones: Zone-I genotype-A was most common (62.3% followed by D (18.8%; Zone-II genotype-C (41.2% was more frequent followed by D (20.6% and A (17.7%. Zone-III in adjoining Bihar state close to Zone-I, A was more prevalent (81.8% followed by B and C (9.1%. In Zone-IV adjoining Zone- II had genotype-A (100% only. Genotype-D had more sporadic distribution. Genotype-E and F were prevalent in Zone I and II (3/150, 2%. Conclusions: Among blood donors HBV genotype-A followed by D was the most prevalent in eastern North India. Genotype-A had pattern of distribution signifying common focus, while D was more sporadic and C had single large pocket (Zone-II probably common focus but restricting to particular area. Evidences are suggestive of association of HBV genotype in liver dysfunction. An effective treatment and preventive strategies based of genotypes will reduce the disease burden and increase the blood safety.

  5. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorder and alternative medicine therapies among dentists of North India: A descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devanand Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Health professionals especially the dental professional are the frequent targets of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM can be of some help in managing these MSD especially in. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of CAM therapies as a treatment modality for MSD management among dental professionals of north India. Materials and Methods: Registered dentist of North Indian origin, India (n = 3598 were included in the study. The questionnaire was sent to all the dentists which consisted of the demographic profile, MSD in the past year, CAM therapies utilization and opinion about CAM therapies. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 21 and data were presented in tabular and graphic form. Test of significance was done using chi-square statistics with P < 0.05 considered as significant. Results: A response rate of 80% (n = 2879 was obtained, and all complained of MDS in some or the other part of their life. The use of CAM was reported among 70% (n = 2015 of the dentist who suffered from MSD. Other dentists either used conventional treatment or did not use anything. Conclusion: As the name implies, alternative medical systems is a category that extends beyond a single modality and refers to an entire system of theory and practice that developed separately from conventional medicine. CAM should be subject to rigorous scientific inquiry so that interventions that work are systematically distinguished from those that do not. In addition, the use of CAM treatments should be based on evidence of effectiveness and safety as demonstrated in randomized clinical trials.

  6. Urban Air Pollution in India

    OpenAIRE

    Narain, Urvashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the main efforts undertaken to stem the growth of air pollution in Indian cities. We begin by examining trends in air quality across the country. This is followed by a description of the legal and institutional framework and policies for controlling air pollution in India. Next we report on efforts to improve air quality in Delhi. We conclude by describing recent actions to control air pollution in cities other than Delhi.

  7. Radiation accident at Mayapuri scrap market, Delhi, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, A B; Mohanan, Sandeep; Damodaran, Deepak; Soneja, Manish; Jain, Neetu; Mohan, Anant; Vikram, Naval Kishore; Sood, Rita

    2012-10-01

    This article reports the accidental public radiation exposure in a scrap market in Delhi, India, on March 2010. The source, a gamma unit containing Cobalt-60 pencils, was improperly disposed of by a research institution in violation of national regulations for radiation protection and safety of radioactive sources. The unit was sold off to unsuspecting scrap dealers who dismantled the equipment. This event subsequently caused the most severe radiation accident reported in India to date, resulting in seven radiation injuries and one death. The clinical course of five of the patients treated at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences hospital, New Delhi, is summarised in this report. All five patients suffered from the haematological form of the acute radiation syndrome and local cutaneous radiation injury as well. While four patients exposed to doses between 0.6 and 2.8 Gy survived with intensive or supportive treatment, the patient with the highest exposure of 3.1 Gy died due to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ failure on Day 16 after hospitalisation. The incident highlights the current gaps in the knowledge, infrastructure and legislation in handling radioactive materials. Medical institutions need to formulate individualised triage and management guidelines to immediately respond to future public radiological accidents.

  8. Coda Q Attenuation and Source Parameters Analysis in North East India Using Local Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, A. K.; Mohanty, W. K.; Earthquake Seismology

    2010-12-01

    and Arakan-Yuma Zone (BAZ) : Qc= 301 f 0.87, Shillong Plateau Zone (SPZ): Qc=126 fo 0.85. It indicates Northeastern India is seismically active but comparing of all zones in the study region the Shillong Plateau Zone (SPZ): Qc= 126 f 0.85 is seismically most active. Where as the Bengal Alluvium and Arakan-Yuma Zone (BAZ) are less active and out of three the Tibetan Plateau Zone (TPZ)is intermediate active. This study may be useful for the seismic hazard assessment. The estimated seismic moments (Mo), range from 5.98×1020 to 3.88×1023 dyne-cm. The source radii(r) are confined between 152 to 1750 meter, the stress drop ranges between 0.0003×103 bar to 1.04×103 bar, the average radiant energy is 82.57×1018 ergs and the strain drop for the earthquake ranges from 0.00602×10-9 to 2.48×10-9 respectively. The estimated stress drop values for NE India depicts scattered nature of the larger seismic moment value whereas, they show a more systematic nature for smaller seismic moment values. The estimated source parameters are in agreement to previous works in this type of tectonic set up. Key words: Coda wave, Seismic source parameters, Lapse time, single back scattering model, Brune's model, Stress drop and North East India.

  9. Evaluation of official tropical cyclone track forecast over north Indian Ocean issued by India Meteorological Department

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Mohapatra; D P Nayak; R P Sharma; B K Bandyopadhyay

    2013-06-01

    India Meteorological Department (IMD) introduced the objective tropical cyclone (TC) track forecast valid for next 24 hr over the north Indian Ocean (NIO) in 2003. It further extended the validity period up to 72 hr in 2009. Here an attempt is made to evaluate the TC track forecast issued by IMD during 2003–2011 (9 years) by calculating the direct position error (DPE) and skill in track forecast. The accuracy of TC track forecast has been analysed with respect to basin of formation (Bay of Bengal, Arabian Sea and NIO as whole), season of formation (pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons), intensity of TCs (cyclonic storm and severe cyclonic storm or higher intensities) and type of track of TCs (climatological/straight moving and recurving/looping type). The average DPE is about 140, 262 and 386 km and skill is about 27%, 39% and 50%, respectively for 24, 48 and 72 hr forecasts over the NIO as a whole during 2009–2011. Though the DPE is higher and skill is less as compared to those in northwest Pacific and north Atlantic Ocean, the rate of decrease (increase) in DPE (skill) is higher over the NIO in recent years. The DPE (skill) over the NIO has decreased (increased) at the rate of about 7.3 km (3%) per year during 2003–2011 for 24 hr forecasts.

  10. Emerging Trend of Mutation Profile of rpoB Gene in MDR Tuberculosis, North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makadia, Jemil S; Jain, Anju; Patra, Surajeet Kumar; Sherwal, B L; Khanna, Ashwani

    2012-10-01

    The present study was conducted on North Indian population to observe rpoB gene mutation profile in multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This was an observational study. 30 cases of MDR-TB proven by culture and drug sensitivity were selected. DNA sequencing of 81 bp (codon 507-533) long RRDR of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was done to detect the sites of mutation. Out of 30 cases, 24 showed a single mutation in the RRDR region of rpoB gene in which 16 (53.33 %) showed mutation in codon 531(TCG→TTG), 5 cases (16.66 %) showed mutation in codon 526(CAC→TAC), mutation in codon 516(GAC→GTC, AAC) was present in 3 cases (10 %). It was also observed that mutation in more than one codon was present in 4 cases (13.33 %), which included deletion at codon 509(AGC→-GC), mutation at 513(CAA→CTA), 516, 526, 529(CGA→CTA) and 531. No mutation was detected in RRDR in 2 cases (6.66 %). Our finding of 13.33 % cases with multiple sites of mutation in RRDR region is in contrast to earlier studies done in North India which showed single mutation detected in RRDR of rpoB gene that highlights the emerging change in the trend of mutation profile of rpoB gene in rifampicin resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  11. New directions: Air pollution challenges for developing megacities like Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Khare, Mukesh; Harrison, Roy M.; Bloss, William J.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Coe, Hugh; Morawska, Lidia

    2015-12-01

    Most major cities around the world experience periods of elevated air pollution levels, which exceed international health-based air quality standards (Kumar et al., 2013). Although it is a global problem, some of the highest air pollution levels are found in rapidly expanding cities in India and China. The sources, emissions, transformations and broad effects of meteorology on air pollution are reasonably well accounted in air quality control strategies in many developed cities; however these key factors remain poorly constrained in the growing cities of countries with emerging economies. We focus here on Delhi, one of the largest global population centres, which faces particular air pollution challenges, now and in the future.

  12. The "Paradox" of Being Young in New Delhi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørberg, Elizabeth Williams

    This thesis attempts to understand the ways in which popular film is integrated into the everyday lives of urban middle class youth in India. Approaching the study of film through an audience reception approach, I engaged in participant observation and interviews during a fieldwork period in New...... Delhi in order to better understand how a young audience might negotiate the fantasy of filmic images into the reality of their own lives. The two movies, Salaam Namaste and Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna (KANK), provided the platform for discussing sensitive or taboo topics in the interviews as well...... dilemmas incurred as a result of processes of globalization....

  13. Effect of modelling slum populations on influenza spread in Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiangzhuo; Chu, Shuyu; Chungbaek, Youngyun; Khan, Maleq; Kuhlman, Christopher; Marathe, Achla; Mortveit, Henning; Vullikanti, Anil; Xie, Dawen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This research studies the impact of influenza epidemic in the slum and non-slum areas of Delhi, the National Capital Territory of India, by taking proper account of slum demographics and residents’ activities, using a highly resolved social contact network of the 13.8 million residents of Delhi. Methods An SEIR model is used to simulate the spread of influenza on two different synthetic social contact networks of Delhi, one where slums and non-slums are treated the same in terms of their demographics and daily sets of activities and the other, where slum and non-slum regions have different attributes. Results Differences between the epidemic outcomes on the two networks are large. Time-to-peak infection is overestimated by several weeks, and the cumulative infection rate and peak infection rate are underestimated by 10–50%, when slum attributes are ignored. Conclusions Slum populations have a significant effect on influenza transmission in urban areas. Improper specification of slums in large urban regions results in underestimation of infections in the entire population and hence will lead to misguided interventions by policy planners. PMID:27687898

  14. Genetic differentiation and population structure of five ethnic groups of Punjab (North-West India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gagandeep; Talwar, Indu; Sharma, Rubina; Matharoo, Kawaljit; Bhanwer, A J S

    2016-12-01

    The state of Punjab in the North-West part of India has acted as the main passage for all the major human invasions into the Indian subcontinent. It has resulted in the mixing of foreign gene pool into the local populations, which led to an extensive range of genetic diversity and has influenced the genetic structure of populations in Punjab, North-West India. The present study was conducted to examine the genetic structure, relationships, and extent of genetic differentiation in five Indo-European speaking ethnic groups of Punjab. A total of 1021 unrelated samples belonging to Banias, Brahmins, Jat Sikhs, Khatris, and Scheduled castes were analyzed for four human-specific Ins/Del polymorphic loci (ACE, APO, PLAT, and D1) and three restriction fragment length polymorphisms ESR (PvuII), LPL (PvuII), and T2 (MspI) using Polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All the loci were found to be polymorphic among the studied populations. The frequency of the Alu insertion at APO locus was observed to exhibit the highest value (82.6-96.3 %), whereas D1 exhibited the lowest (26.5-45.6 %) among all the ethnic groups. The average heterozygosity among the studied populations ranged from 0.3816 in Banias to 0.4163 in Khatris. The FST values ranged from 0.0418 to 0.0033 for the PLAT and LPL loci, respectively, with an average value being 0.0166. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Banias and Khatris are genetically closest to each other. The Jat Sikhs are genetically close to Brahmins and are distant from the Banias. The Jat Sikhs, Banias, Brahmins, and Khatris are genetically very distant from the Scheduled castes. Overall, Uniform allele frequency distribution patterns, high average heterozygosity values, and a small degree of genetic differentiation in this study suggest a genetic proximity among the selected populations. A low level of genetic differentiation was observed in the studied population groups indicating that genetic drift might have been small or negligible in shaping

  15. Identification of new cytotypes of Valeriana jatamansi Jones, 1970 (Valerianaceae) from North-Western Himalayan region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Savita; Sharma, Tilak Raj; Kapila, Rakesh; Chahota, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Valeriana jatamansi, a medicinally important species of the family Valerianaceae, has been cytologically studied in different geographical areas of North-Western Himalayan region of India. The tetraploid cytotype with chromosome numbers 2n=32 is in conformity with the earlier reports of the species from different parts of the world. An octoploid cytotype (2n=64) makes a new addition for the species on a worldwide basis, whereas the diploid cytotype (2n=16) is new to India have been reported for the first time in India. These cytotypes (2n=16, 32, 64) show significant variations with respect to morphology as well as geographical distribution in the Western Indian Himalayas. Further, anomalous populations have been marked with meiotic abnormalities in the form of cytomixis, chromosomal stickiness, unoriented bivalents, formation of laggards and bridges resulting in abnormal microsporogenesis, and production of heterogeneous-sized fertile pollen grains along with reduced pollen fertility.

  16. Identification of new cytotypes of Valeriana jatamansi Jones, 1970 (Valerianaceae from North-Western Himalayan region of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Rani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Valeriana jatamansi, a medicinally important species of the family Valerianaceae, has been cytologically studied in different geographical areas of North-Western Himalayan region of India. The tetraploid cytotype with chromosome numbers 2n=32 is in conformity with the earlier reports of the species from different parts of the world. An octoploid cytotype (2n=64 makes a new addition for the species on a worldwide basis, whereas the diploid cytotype (2n=16 is new to India have been reported for the first time in India. These cytotypes (2n=16, 32, 64 show significant variations with respect to morphology as well as geographical distribution in the Western Indian Himalayas. Further, anomalous populations have been marked with meiotic abnormalities in the form of cytomixis, chromosomal stickiness, unoriented bivalents, formation of laggards and bridges resulting in abnormal microsporogenesis, and production of heterogeneous-sized fertile pollen grains along with reduced pollen fertility.

  17. Identification of different lineages of measles virus strains circulating in Uttar Pradesh, North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakya Akhalesh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic analysis of measles viruses associated with recent cases and outbreaks has proven to bridge information gaps in routine outbreak investigations and has made a substantial contribution to measles control efforts by helping to identify the transmission pathways of the virus. Materials and methods The present study describes the genetic characterization of wild type measles viruses from Uttar Pradesh, India isolated between January 2008 and January 2011. In the study, 526 suspected measles cases from 15 outbreaks were investigated. Blood samples were collected from suspected measles outbreaks and tested for the presence of measles specific IgM; throat swab and urine samples were collected for virus isolation and RT-PCR. Genotyping of circulating measles viruses in Uttar Pradesh was performed by sequencing a 450-bp region encompassing the nucleoprotein hypervariable region and phylogenetic analysis. Results and conclusion Based on serological results, all the outbreaks were confirmed as measles. Thirty eight strains were obtained. Genetic analysis of circulating measles strains (n = 38 in Uttar Pradesh from 235 cases of laboratory-confirmed cases from 526 suspected measles cases between 2008 and 2011 showed that all viruses responsible for outbreaks were within clade D and all were genotype D8. Analysis of this region showed that it is highly divergent (up to 3.4% divergence in the nucleotide sequence and 4.1% divergence in the amino acid sequence between most distant strains. Considerable genetic heterogeneity was observed in the MV genotype D8 viruses in North India and underscores the need for continued surveillance and in particular increases in vaccination levels to decrease morbidity and mortality attributable to measles.

  18. Maternal tetanus toxoid vaccination and neonatal mortality in rural north India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Preventable neonatal mortality due to tetanus infection remains common. We aimed to examine antenatal vaccination impact in a context of continuing high neonatal mortality in rural northern India. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using the third round of the Indian National Family Health Survey (NFHS 2005-06, mortality of most recent singleton births was analysed in discrete-time logistic model with maternal tetanus vaccination, together with antenatal care utilisation and supplementation with iron and folic acid. 59% of mothers reported receiving antenatal care, 48% reported receiving iron and folic acid supplementation and 68% reported receiving two or more doses of tetanus toxoid (TT vaccination. The odds of all-cause neonatal death were reduced following one or more antenatal dose of TT with odds ratios (OR of 0.46 (95% CI 0.26 to 0.78 after one dose and 0.45 (95% CI 0.31 to 0.66 after two or more doses. Reported utilisation of antenatal care and iron-folic acid supplementation did not influence neonatal mortality. In the statistical model, 16% (95% CI 5% to 27% of neonatal deaths could be attributed to a lack of at least two doses of TT vaccination during pregnancy, representing an estimated 78,632 neonatal deaths in absolute terms. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial gains in newborn survival could be achieved in rural North India through increased coverage of antenatal TT vaccination. The apparent substantial protective effect of a single antenatal dose of TT requires further study. It may reflect greater population vaccination coverage and indicates that health programming should prioritise universal antenatal coverage with at least one dose.

  19. A comparative study of cervical cancer screening methods in a rural community setting of North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Satyanarayana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pap smear testing as a conventional cervical screening approach has limitations for implementation and aided visual cervical testing has varying results in different regions. Aims: The aim of this study is to demonstrate the performance of aided visual cervical screening tests as against conventional Pap smear testing in a rural community setting of North India. Settings and Design: This was a rural community based cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: All 7603 ever married women of age 30-59 years surveyed in a pocket of Dadri Tehsil, Uttar Pradesh, India were targeted for screening by Pap, visual inspection of cervix using acetic acid (VIA and visual inspection of cervix using Lugol′s iodine (VILI methods. Screen positives were referred to colposcopy and confirmation by histology. Statistical Analysis Used: Detection of histological cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN II + and CIN III + assessed separately by sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratio′s and predictive values. Analysis of data was performed by using IBM SPSS statstics software version 16.0. Results: A total of 65.6%(4988/7604 eligible women of 30-59 years age group in the target population were screened. Out of 4988, further analysis was performed on 4148 after excluding those who did not complete all screenings, who lost to follow-up and had missing histology results. Screen positivity rates by Pap (ASCUS and above, VIA and VILI were 2.6%, 9.7% and 13.5% respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of detecting the CIN III+ lesions were 87.5 and 98.8% for Pap, 50.0% and 96.7% for VIA and 50.0% and 95.7% for VILI respectively. Conclusions: VIA screening demonstrated as a feasible primary screening test for detecting high grade CIN and as to perform better when the Pap test is not feasible.

  20. Maternal tetanus toxoid vaccination and neonatal mortality in rural north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek; Pallikadavath, Saseendran; Ogollah, Reuben; Stones, William

    2012-01-01

    Preventable neonatal mortality due to tetanus infection remains common. We aimed to examine antenatal vaccination impact in a context of continuing high neonatal mortality in rural northern India. Using the third round of the Indian National Family Health Survey (NFHS) 2005-06, mortality of most recent singleton births was analysed in discrete-time logistic model with maternal tetanus vaccination, together with antenatal care utilisation and supplementation with iron and folic acid. 59% of mothers reported receiving antenatal care, 48% reported receiving iron and folic acid supplementation and 68% reported receiving two or more doses of tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccination. The odds of all-cause neonatal death were reduced following one or more antenatal dose of TT with odds ratios (OR) of 0.46 (95% CI 0.26 to 0.78) after one dose and 0.45 (95% CI 0.31 to 0.66) after two or more doses. Reported utilisation of antenatal care and iron-folic acid supplementation did not influence neonatal mortality. In the statistical model, 16% (95% CI 5% to 27%) of neonatal deaths could be attributed to a lack of at least two doses of TT vaccination during pregnancy, representing an estimated 78,632 neonatal deaths in absolute terms. Substantial gains in newborn survival could be achieved in rural North India through increased coverage of antenatal TT vaccination. The apparent substantial protective effect of a single antenatal dose of TT requires further study. It may reflect greater population vaccination coverage and indicates that health programming should prioritise universal antenatal coverage with at least one dose.

  1. Complex routes into HIV care for migrant workers: a qualitative study from north India.

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    Rai, Tanvi; Lambert, Helen S; Ward, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Migrant workers are designated a bridge population in the spread of HIV and therefore if infected, should be diagnosed and treated early. This study examined pathways to HIV diagnosis and access to care for rural-to-urban circular migrant workers and partners of migrants in northern India, identifying structural, social and individual level factors that shaped their journeys into care. We conducted a qualitative study using in-depth interviews with HIV-positive men (n = 20) and women (n = 13) with a history of circular migration, recruited from an antiretroviral therapy centre in one district of Uttar Pradesh, north India. Migrants and partners of migrants faced a complex series of obstacles to accessing HIV testing and care. Employment insecurity, lack of entitlement to sick pay or subsidised healthcare at destination and the household's economic reliance on their migration-based livelihood led many men to continue working until they became incapacitated by HIV-related morbidity. During periods of deteriorating health they often exhausted their savings on private treatments focused on symptom management, and sought HIV testing and treatment at a public hospital only following a medical or financial emergency. Wives of migrants had generally been diagnosed following their husbands' diagnosis or death, with access to testing and treatment mediated via family members. For some, a delay in disclosure of husband's HIV status led to delays in their own testing. Diagnosing and treating HIV infection early is important in slowing down the spread of the epidemic and targeting those at greatest risk should be a priority. However, despite targeted campaigns, circumstances associated with migration may prevent migrant workers and their partners from accessing testing and treatment until they become sick. The insecurity of migrant work, the dominance of private healthcare and gender differences in health-seeking behaviour delay early diagnosis and treatment initiation.

  2. Drug resistant Shigella flexneri in & around Dibrugarh, north-east India

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    Reema Nath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Shigella flexneri is the most common species of Shigella causing diarrhoea and dysentery in Asia including India. Multidrug resistance in Shigella species has been reported worldwide and there is rising concern regarding development of fluoroquinolone resistance. This study was undertaken to find out the resistance pattern of Sh. flexneri, the commonest shigella isolated in Dibrugarh, north east India, including detection of fluoroquinolone resistance and extended spectrum beta lactamases. Methods: Stool samples collected from patients of diarrhoea and dysentery were tested for bacterial enteropathogens. Strains of Shigella species were confirmed by biochemical tests. Speciation was done using commercially available polyvalent antiserum. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method against 18 different antibiotics. Extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL detection was done by disc approximation test as well as combination disc method and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of different antibiotics were also measured. Results: Multidrug resistance in Sh. flexneri was found to be common (90.2% and the commonest phenotypic multi-drug resistance profile was ampicillin-tetracycline-co-trimoxazole-nalidixic acid. High resistance to nalidixic acid was detected in 90.3 per cent isolates (MIC >240 μg/ml and ciprofloxacin resistance was seen emerging in this region (11.2%, MIC >4 μg/ml. Present of ESBL was phenotypically confirmed in two cases. Besides the fluoroquinolones, chloramphenicol, piperacillin-tazobactum and the third generation cephalosporins were effective in 87-100 per cent of the isolates. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed high resistance (MIC >240 μg/ml against nalidixic acid in Sh. flexneri isolates. Ciprofloxacin resistance is also emerging in this region. Shigellosis due to ESBL carrying Shigella can become a serious threat to public health. Guidelines for

  3. Anti-glomerular basement membrane disease: Case series from a tertiary center in North India.

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    Prabhakar, D; Rathi, M; Nada, R; Minz, R W; Kumar, V; Kohli, H S; Jha, V; Gupta, K L

    2017-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement (anti-GBM) disease is an uncommon disorder with a bimodal age of presentation. Patients presenting with dialysis-dependent renal failure have poor renal outcomes. There is limited data regarding the clinical presentation and outcomes of anti-GBM disease from India. We conducted this prospective study to analyze the clinical presentation and outcomes of anti-GBM disease at a large tertiary care hospital in North India over 1½ years. Subjects with a biopsy proven anti-GBM disease (light microscopic examination showing crescents and immunofluorescence examination showing linear deposition of IgG) with or without positive anti-GBM antibodies in serum were included in the study and followed-up for at least 12 months. All the patients were treated with steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange. A total of 17 patients (nine males) were included. The mean age at presentation was 39.11 ± 16.58 (range 11-72) years. Twelve patients (70%) presented with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN), 4 (23.5%) presented with Goodpasture syndrome, while 1 (5.8%) had nephritic syndrome, 7 (41%) were hypertensive, and 14 (82.3%) required dialysis at the time of presentation. Four patients (23.5%) had associated anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positivity (anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies in all). Fourteen (87.5%) patients had crescentic glomerulonephritis, while 5 (31.25%) showed necrotizing (n = 4) or granulomatous (n = 1) in the vasculitis. Of 16 patients who received treatment, four (23.25%) achieved complete remission. In this single-center study, the majority of anti-GBM disease patients presented with RPGN and had crescentic glomerulonephritis on biopsy with poor treatment outcome.

  4. Anti-glomerular basement membrane disease: Case series from a tertiary center in North India

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    D Prabhakar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-glomerular basement (anti-GBM disease is an uncommon disorder with a bimodal age of presentation. Patients presenting with dialysis-dependent renal failure have poor renal outcomes. There is limited data regarding the clinical presentation and outcomes of anti-GBM disease from India. We conducted this prospective study to analyze the clinical presentation and outcomes of anti-GBM disease at a large tertiary care hospital in North India over 1½ years. Subjects with a biopsy proven anti-GBM disease (light microscopic examination showing crescents and immunofluorescence examination showing linear deposition of IgG with or without positive anti-GBM antibodies in serum were included in the study and followed-up for at least 12 months. All the patients were treated with steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange. A total of 17 patients (nine males were included. The mean age at presentation was 39.11 ± 16.58 (range 11–72 years. Twelve patients (70% presented with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN, 4 (23.5% presented with Goodpasture syndrome, while 1 (5.8% had nephritic syndrome, 7 (41% were hypertensive, and 14 (82.3% required dialysis at the time of presentation. Four patients (23.5% had associated anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positivity (anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies in all. Fourteen (87.5% patients had crescentic glomerulonephritis, while 5 (31.25% showed necrotizing (n = 4 or granulomatous (n = 1 in the vasculitis. Of 16 patients who received treatment, four (23.25% achieved complete remission. In this single-center study, the majority of anti-GBM disease patients presented with RPGN and had crescentic glomerulonephritis on biopsy with poor treatment outcome.

  5. Declining Groundwater Levels in North India: Understanding Sources of Irrigation Inefficiency

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    O'Keeffe, J.; Buytaert, W.; Mijic, A.; Brozovic, N.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last half century, the green revolution has transformed India from a famine-prone, drought-susceptible country, into the world's third largest grain producer and one of the most intensely irrigated regions on the planet. This is in no small part due to the country's vast water resources along with an increase in tubewells and more advanced abstraction methods. While agricultural intensification has had undeniable benefits, it has, and continues to have a significant impact on water resources. Unless solutions which take into consideration the ever evolving socio-economic, hydrological and climatic conditions are found, India's agricultural future looks bleak.This research examines the irrigation behaviour of farmers, using data collected during field work in the State of Uttar Pradesh within the Ganges Basin of North India. Significant differences in farmer behaviour and irrigation practices are highlighted, not only between State districts but between individual farmers. This includes the volume of irrigation water applied and the price paid, as well as differences in the yields of crops produced. Analyses of results suggest that this is due to a number of factors, particularly the source of irrigation water. Study areas which had access to cheaper, but crucially less reliable, canal water were found to invest in more efficient water saving technologies in order to reduce the overall cost of irrigation during periods where less expensive canal water is not available. As a result, overall water use and irrigation cost is lower and yields are higher despite very similar climatic conditions. While cheap canal water is not an option for all farmers, the results show that the introduction of more efficient water saving technologies, despite the significant capital expenditure is a viable option for many farmers and costs can be recovered in a relatively short space of time. In addition, the reduction of declining water levels mean that water is abstracted from

  6. PATTERNS OF MULTIMORBIDITY AMONG ELDERLY IN AN URBAN AREA OF NORTH INDIA

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    Akriti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Ageing is a natural process. By 2020, the number of people aged 60 years and older will outnumber children younger than 5 years in the entire world. This natural phenomenon of population ageing is rampant in developing countries like India while data and studies regarding health conditions and prevalence of multimorbidity is lacking. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES This cross sectional study was conducted to determine the morbidity pattern and health care seeking behaviour of elderly in North India. SETTINGS AND DESIGN Community based Cross-sectional study in Urban Field Practice Area, Shimlapuri. MATERIALS AND METHODS A Community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Urban field practice area, Shimlapuri under the Department of Community Medicine of Dayanand Medical College and hospital, Ludhiana, Punjab, India from June 2014 to December 2014. The study population comprised of 534 elderlies above 60 years of age, both males and females residing in the area. The subjects were interviewed and examined in accordance with a pre-structured proforma by field workers, medical interns and faculty members. Majority of the morbidity profile was obtained through history. Information on diseases including visual impairment, respiratory diseases, musculoskeletal disorder, acid peptic disease, deafness and stroke were based on history given by the participants. The association of multimorbidity with socio demographic variables was studied. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Percentages and Chi Square Test. RESULTS The mean age of the participants was 66.27 ± 6.26 years. Majority of the subjects belonged to age group of 60-69 years (70%. Morbidity was observed in 99.5% subjects. The most common chronic condition was eye problem (68.5% including visual impairment and refractive error. Hypertension and acid peptic disease were found to be significantly higher among females (p<0.01. A total of 352 study subjects (65.9% were found to be suffering from multimorbidity

  7. Larvicidal activity of few select indigenous plants of North East India against disease vector mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

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    Dohutia, C; Bhattacharyya, D R; Sharma, S K; Mohapatra, P K; Bhattacharjee, K; Gogoi, K; Gogoi, P; Mahanta, J; Prakash, A

    2015-03-01

    Mosquitoes are the vectors of several life threatening diseases like dengue, malaria, Japanese encephalitis and lymphatic filariasis, which are widely present in the north-eastern states of India. Investigations on five local plants of north-east India, selected on the basis of their use by indigenous communities as fish poison, were carried out to study their mosquito larvicidal potential against Anopheles stephensi (malaria vector), Stegomyia aegypti (dengue vector) and Culex quinquefasciatus (lymphatic filariasis vector) mosquitoes. Crude Petroleum ether extracts of the roots of three plants viz. Derris elliptica, Linostoma decandrum and Croton tiglium were found to have remarkable larvicidal activity; D. elliptica extract was the most effective and with LC50 value of 0.307 μg/ml its activity was superior to propoxur, the standard synthetic larvicide. Half-life of larvicidal activity of D. elliptica and L. decandrum extracts ranged from 2-4 days.

  8. Prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome in young women from North India: A Community-based study

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    Harmandeep Gill

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women of reproductive age. Due to the logistics of diagnosis and lack of consensus on the diagnostic criteria, there are very few prevalence studies in the community. This study was aimed to assess the prevalence of PCOS in women 18-25 years of age, conducted in college girls from Lucknow, North India. Materials and Methods: Sample size for the study was calculated as 1052. Girls from 3 different colleges were approached (n = 2150, 1520 (70.7% agreed to participate. They were asked to fill up a questionnaire asking details of menstrual cycle and features of hyperandrogenism. Hirsutism was self-reported. Responses were verified by a trained research assistant. A probable case was defined as a girl with menstrual irregularity (MI or hirsutism (H or both. All the probable cases were invited for detailed examination, hormone estimation, and ovarian ultrasonography. Results: Of the 1520 girls, 200 (13.1% were labeled as probable cases; 175 (87.5% had MI and 25 (12.5% had both MI and H. Of the 200 cases, 75 (37.5% had hormonal evaluation while 11 agreed for ultrasonography. 27 girls had confirmed PCOS. Therefore, if all the 200 girls would have had hormonal evaluation, 56 girls were likely to be confirmed as PCOS, giving a calculated prevalence of 3.7% (95% CI, 2.6-4.4 in this population. The mean age of these PCOS cases was 18.96 ± 1.73 yrs, body mass index was 21.72 ± 5.48 Kg/m 2 , and waist hip ratio was 0.81 ± 0.08. Only 12% girls had a body mass index ≥ 27.5 Kg/m 2 , but 44% had waist hip ratio > 0.81, again highlighting that despite low BMI, Indians have more abdominal obesity. Conclusion: Calculated prevalence of PCOS in women between the ages of 18-25 years from Lucknow, north India, is 3.7%. Majority of these girls were lean but have abdominal obesity.

  9. Tobacco use among students in the eight North-eastern states of India

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    Sinha D

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES : To obtain baseline information about prevalence of tobacco use among school children in eight states in the North-eastern part of India. MATERIAL AND METHODS : A two-stage probability sample of students in grades 8-10 corresponding to 13 to 15 years of age was selected in each state and surveyed through an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire. RESULTS : Among the sampled schools, the school response rate was 100% in all states except Tripura (92% and Meghalaya (96%. Among the eligible students, over 80% participated in the survey. Among the respondents, the proportion of boys ranged between 50% to 55%. Ever tobacco users ranged from 75.3% (Mizoram to 40.1% (Assam. Over 65% of users reported initiation at 10 years of age or earlier in all states except Mizoram (23.1%. The range of current tobacco use (any product was 63% (Nagaland to 36.1% (Assam. Current smokeless tobacco use ranged from 49.9% (Nagaland to 25.3% (Assam. Mizoram reported the highest current smoking (34.5%, mainly cigarette and Assam reported the lowest (19.7%, again mainly cigarette. Current smoking among girls (8.3% to 28.2% was also quite high. Over half of current cigarette smokers (53.2% to 96.3% and a high proportion of current smokeless tobacco users (38.5% to 80.8% reported feeling like having tobacco first thing in the morning. Only about 20% of students reported having been taught in school about the dangers of tobacco use, except in Mizoram (around 50%. Tobacco use by parents and close friends was positively associated with students′ current tobacco use. CONCLUSIONS : Tobacco use including smoking was very high, even among girls, in all eight states in the North-eastern part of India. Signs of tobacco dependency were already visible in these students, more among those who smoked. In general schools did not educate students about the hazards of tobacco use.

  10. Burden among caregivers of children living with human immunodeficiency virus in North India

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    Ramesh Chand Chauhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to wider access to and free antiretroviral therapy (ART program, the number of children dying due to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS-related causes has declined and the nature and duration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/AIDS caregiving has also dramatically altered. The care of children living with HIV/AIDS (CLHA places a significant additional burden on the caregivers. Aims: This study was conducted to assess the perceived burden among caregivers of children living with HIV in North India. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study among 156 CLHA-caregiver dyads in North India was conducted from June 2010 to May 2011. Data were collected by using a pretested structured interview schedule. The caregiver burden was measured with a 36-item scale adapted from Burden Assessment Schedule of Schizophrenia Research Foundation (BASS. Child characteristics, caregiver characteristics, caregiving burden, the knowledge of caregivers, and issues related to health care, nutrition, education, and psychological aspects were studied. Results: Caregivers had a mean age of 35.9 ± 10.2 years. Women accounted for over three-fourth (76.9% of the caregivers. Nearly two-third of them (65.4% reported as living with HIV. The mean caregiver burden score was 68.7 ± 2.9. A majority of the caregivers reported either low or moderate burden. Standardized percentage score was high in the domains of physical and mental health, external support, patients′ behavior, and caregivers′ strategy and seemed to be comparatively less in the other domains such as support of the patient and taking responsibility. Conclusions: Caring of children is a universal practice but there is a need of special care for children living with HIV. The majority of caregivers who were usually the mothers perceived the burden and need to be assisted in caring for the child. Stigma and discrimination with HIV infection further increased the burden as

  11. Genetic analysis of river, swamp and hybrid buffaloes of north-east India throw new light on phylogeography of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

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    Mishra, B P; Dubey, P K; Prakash, B; Kathiravan, P; Goyal, S; Sadana, D K; Das, G C; Goswami, R N; Bhasin, V; Joshi, B K; Kataria, R S

    2015-12-01

    This study analysed buffaloes from north-east India and compared their nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variations with buffaloes of mainland India, China, Mediterranean and South-East Asia. Microsatellite genotypes of 338 buffaloes including 210 from six north-east Indian buffalo populations and three mainland Indian breeds were analysed to evaluate their genetic structure and evolutionary relationships. Phylogenetic analysis and multidimensional scaling plot of pairwise FST revealed the clustering of all swamp-type buffaloes of north-east India with Lower Assamese (significantly hybrid type) buffaloes in one plane and all the mainland river buffaloes in another plane while the upper Assamese buffaloes being distinct from both these clusters. Analysis of mtDNA D-loop region of 530-bp length was performed on 345 sequences belonging to 23 buffalo populations from various geographical regions to establish the phylogeography of Indian water buffalo. The swamp buffaloes of north-east India clustered with both the lineages of Chinese swamp buffalo. Multidimensional scaling display of pairwise FST derived from mitochondrial DNA data showed clustering of upper Assamese, Chilika and Mediterranean buffaloes distinctly from all the other Indian buffalo populations. Median-joining network analysis further confirmed the distinctness and ancestral nature of these buffaloes. The study revealed north-east region of India forming part of the wider hybrid zone of water buffalo that may probably extend from north-east India to South-East Asia.

  12. Prevalence and severity of acute viral hepatitis and fulminant hepatitis during pregnancy: A prospective study from north india

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    Beniwal M; Kumar A; Kar P; Jilani N; Sharma J

    2003-01-01

    The present study aimed to find out the prevalence and severity of acute viral hepatitis and fulminant hepatitis during pregnancy in North India. The study was conducted on 97 consecutive pregnant patients in third trimester with acute viral hepatitis (AVH) or fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). The patients were evaluated on the basis of history, examination, liver function profile and serological markers for hepatitis A,B,C and E viruses. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) was the causative agent in 47.4...

  13. A descriptive study on evaluation of bio-medical waste management in a tertiary care public hospital of North India

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    Kumar, Rajiv; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Aggarwal, Arun Kumar; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper management of Biomedical waste (BMW) generated in a healthcare facility is one of the most important functions of a healthcare worker (HCW) as its improper management not only poses risk to human beings and environment, but may also invite legal action against HCW as well as hospital administration. This study was carried out to evaluate quality of BMW management in 1100-bedded hospital attached to a tertiary care public institute in North India. Methods A checklist, includi...

  14. Spectrum of clinical disease in a series of 135 hospitalised HIV-infected patients from north India

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    Sharma SK

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Literature on the spectrum of opportunistic disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients from developing countries is sparse. The objective of this study was to document the spectrum and determine the frequency of various opportunistic infections (OIs and non-infectious opportunistic diseases, in hospitalised HIV-infected patients from north India. Methods One hundred and thirty five consecutive, HIV-infected patients (age 34 ± 10 years, females 17% admitted to a tertiary care hospital in north India, for the evaluation and management of an OI or HIV-related disorder between January 2000 and July 2003, were studied. Results Fever (71% and weight loss (65% were the commonest presenting symptoms. Heterosexual transmission was the commonest mode of HIV-acquisition. Tuberculosis (TB was the commonest OI (71% followed by candidiasis (39.3%, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP (7.4%, cryptococcal meningitis and cerebral toxoplasmosis (3.7% each. Most of the cases of TB were disseminated (64%. Apart from other well-recognised OIs, two patients had visceral leishmaniasis. Two cases of HIV-associated lymphoma were encountered. CD4+ cell counts were done in 109 patients. Majority of the patients (82.6% had CD4+ counts Conclusions A wide spectrum of disease, including both OIs and non-infectious opportunistic diseases, is seen in hospitalised HIV-infected patients from north India. Tuberculosis remains the most common OI and is the commonest cause of death in these patients.

  15. A failure of the Red Pierrot Talicada nyseus Guérin-Méneville, 1843 (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae butterfly to colonize Delhi area

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    Rajiv K. Singh Bais

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Red Pierrot Talicada nyseus Guérin-Méneville, 1843 is a butterfly of the semi-arid plains. Its historical distribution range includes Sri Lanka, southern India, northeastern India and Myanmar. It was recently reported from a few places in northern India far away from its known range boundaries in India. Dehradun, Kumaon Himalaya, Delhi and Kalatop are the places from where it has been reported in the recent past. Talicada nyseus nyseus appeared in the Delhi area in 2008, survived and bred for more than a year and then suddenly disappeared in the summer of 2009. The appearance of T.n. nyseus in Dehradun has been linked to the introduction of Kalanchoe ornamental plants in the newly developed residential areas. This paper examines the likely reasons for its disappearance from the Delhi area.

  16. Liquefaction record of the great 1934 earthquake predecessors from the north Bihar alluvial plains of India

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    Rajendran, C. P.; John, Biju; Rajendran, Kusala; Sanwal, Jaishri

    2016-07-01

    The great 1934 Himalayan earthquake of moment magnitude (Mw) 8.1 generated a large zone of ground failure and liquefaction in north Bihar, India, in addition to the earthquakes of 1833 (Mw ~7.7) and 1988 (Mw 6.7) that have also impacted this region. Here, we present the results of paleoliquefaction investigations from four sites in the plains of north Bihar and one in eastern Uttar Pradesh. The liquefaction features generated by successive earthquakes were dated at AD 829-971, 886-1090, 907-1181, 1130-1376, 1112-1572, 1492-1672, 1733-1839, and 1814-1854. One of the liquefaction events dated at AD 829-971, 886-1090, and 907-1181 may correlate with the great earthquake of AD ~1100, recognized in an earlier study from the sections across the frontal thrust in central eastern Nepal. Two late medieval liquefaction episodes of AD 1130-1376 and 1492-1672 were also exposed in our sites. The sedimentary sections also revealed sandblows that can be attributed to the 1833 earthquake, a lesser magnitude event compared to the 1934. Liquefactions triggered by the 1934 and 1988 earthquakes were evident within the topmost level in some sections. The available data lead us to conjecture that a series of temporally close spaced earthquakes of both strong and large types, not including the infrequent great earthquakes like the 1934, have affected the Bihar Plains during the last 1500 years with a combined recurrence interval of 124 ± 63 years.

  17. Phytoplankton community of Lake Baskandi anua, Cachar District, Assam, North East India – An ecological study

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    Devi M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity, relative abundance and dominance of phytoplankton community of the Lake Baskandi anua, an oxbow lake of Assam, North east India were studied during December 2009 to November 2010. Chlorophyll content and biomass of phytoplankton along with physico-chemical properties of water of the lake were also estimated. The lake is covered with Hydrilla and other macrophytes like Eichhornia, Trapa, Altrnenthera, Polygonum, Ludwizia sp., etc. Seasonal fluctuations of 41 genera of phytoplankton, belonging to 5 groups (Chlorophyceae, Cyanobacteria, Bacillariophyceae, Euglenophyceae and Dinophyceae were encountered in the lake. Chlorophyceae was found to be highest in winter, Cyanobacteria and Euglena in monsoon and Bacillariophyceae in pre monsoon. According to Engelmann’s scale, Spirogyra indica was found eudominant followed by 10 dominant, 24 subdominant and 20 recedent species. Chlorophyll- a content of phytoplankton varied from 14.18 to 33.89 μg·L-1, during the study period. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA revealed significant seasonal variation in physico-chemical properties of water like Water temperature, pH, Conductivity, Dissolved oxygen, Free CO2, Total alkalinity, Calcium, Chloride, Nitrate and Ammonia. Relationship between phytoplankton group assemblage and environmental variables were explored by the ordination method CCA (Canonical Correspondence Analysis.

  18. Phytoplankton community and limnology of Chatla floodplain wetland of Barak valley, Assam, North-East India

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    Sultana Laskar H.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton diversity was investigated over a period of two years (2006 to 2008 in Chatla floodplain wetland in Barak valley, Assam, North-East India. Site 1 and site 2 are two inlets and site 3 is a lentic system associated with vegetation cover of Calamus tenuis and Baringtonia acutangula. The floodplain has a unique hydrology because of the presence of different types of habitats (inlets, fisheries, beels and outlets which maintains a network among the floodplains, rivers and streams. Phytoplankton community composition, density and diversity were studied in relation to environmental variables. All the variables were estimated by following standard methods. Phytoplankton was collected by plankton net and quantitative estimation was made by using Sedgwick Rafter counting cell. Phytoplankton community comprised 53 taxa represented by Chlorophyceae (31, Cyanophyceae (11, Bacillariophyceae (7, Euglenophyceae (1 and Dinophyceae (3. Phytoplankton taxa was dominated by Volvox sp., Nostoc sp., Eunotia sp., Navicula sp., Euglena spp. and density was found highest in site 3 and lowest in site 1. Shannon diversity index (H′ for phytoplankton community varied between 2.4 to 2.65 indicating fairly high species diversity. The varying magnitude of correlationship among environmental variables and phytoplankton species density as shown by Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA indicated that some of the environmental variables (water temperature, transparency, rainfall, nitrate and ammonia are the driving factors for governing the phytoplankton species assemblages in Chatla floodplain wetland. Fluctuation of phytoplankton density and community composition in different habitats indicated various niche apportionment as well as anthropogenic influences.

  19. Five year retrospective survival analysis of triple negative breast cancer in North-West India

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    B Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In our institute, about 10% of total cancer is female breast cancer. This analysis was performed to check triple negativity among these patients with their survival strength up to 5 years in relation to different age groups, stage and chemotherapy protocols. Materials and Methods: 208 immunohistochemistry proved triple negative breast cancer patients registered and treated until 2008 were retrospectively selected for the study. Overall survival up to 5 years was observed on the basis of stage, different age groups and chemotherapy regimens. All patients had undergone surgery, conventional external beam radiation therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. The survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The majority of patients (41% were in the age group 21-30 years. Stage IV was seen in 18% of the patients at diagnosis and mainly in 21-40 years age group. Only 3% of females were >70 years age and were of Stage I and II. Overall 5 year survival in Stage I in Cyclophosphamide, Adriamycin/Epirubicin, 5-Flurouracil group was 37.5% as compared with Docetaxel/Paclitaxel, Epirubicin group 93% (P < 0.0001. Conclusion: Triple negativity in North-West India is about 11.8%. We observed it in younger patients mainly with highly aggressive behaviors. Taxane based chemotherapy gives better result as compared with anthracycline based regimens in all stages.

  20. A MORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF HUMAN THYROID GLAND IN THE POPULATION OF NORTH - EASTERN REGION OF INDIA

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    Debabani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Due to the high incidence of thyroid disorders in the North - Eastern population of India a study was undertaken in Guwahati Medical College to see the age related changes in the morphology of the gland in the ca davers of this region. AIM : The study was done to compare the dimensions of the thyroid gland in this population with different studies around the world to see if it can throw any light why thyroid disorders are more common in this population and help clin icians to deal better. MATERIALS AND METHOD : The specimens were divided into three groups according to their ages. Twenty (21 specimens (both male and female were taken from each age group. Statistical analysis was done by paired t - test and t was taken a s significant if the value of t was greater than 2.18. SUMMARY : A study of all together of 63 specimen were taken up to see if any morphological differences in dimension exists in various age groups viz. pediatrics , adults and elderly and co relate with fi ndings of previous workers and was statistically analyzed. CONCLUSION : The study showed that there was no morphological difference of this population with that of previous studies done in other parts of the world. Perhaps a histological study in molecular level will throw more light why this stratum of population is so vulnerable to thyroid disorders.

  1. Thermal performance study and evaluation of comfort temperatures in vernacular buildings of North-East India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Manoj Kumar; Atreya, S.K. [Instrument Design and Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Mahapatra, Sadhan [Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India)

    2010-02-15

    Solar passive techniques are being used in vernacular buildings throughout the world. Researchers have done extensive study on thermal performance of vernacular buildings in the different parts of the world. Vernacular architecture of North-Eastern India represents the principle of climate-responsive architecture, which still lacks experimental validation and quantitative analysis. Thermal comfort not only makes the occupants comfortable but also governs energy consumption in the building. Detailed field studies on thermal performances of typical traditional vernacular dwellings in different bioclimatic zones have been undertaken. This field study includes detailed survey of 150 vernacular dwellings, field tests and thermal sensation vote of 300 occupants on ASHRAE thermal sensation scale. Field test includes measurement of temperature, humidity, illumination level and building design parameters. Thermal performances of these vernacular dwellings were evaluated for winter, pre-summer, summer/monsoon and pre-winter months of the year 2008. This evaluation is based on 'adaptive approach', which is the outcome of the field studies and is now part of ASHRAE standard 55/2004 for predicting comfortable temperature of naturally ventilated buildings. This study also tried to find out the range of comfort temperature in these vernacular buildings for different season of the year. It has been found that these vernacular dwellings perform quite satisfactorily except in the winter months and the occupants feel comfortable in a wider range of temperature. (author)

  2. Metabolic syndrome among substance dependent men: A study from north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Kumar Mattoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Substance abuse, alcohol in particular, is associated with increased risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome (MS. The relationship between the substance abuse and MS is complex and the literature is sparse. Objectives: The present research was aimed to study the prevalence and predictors of MS among outpatients with substance dependence. Materials and Methods: Patients with substance dependence were recruited from a deaddiction center in North India, who attended outpatient clinic from 1 st January, 2010-31 st December, 2010. MS was assessed using International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria. Results: Out of 250 subjects, 34 (13.6% of the subjects met the IDF criteria for MS and highest being in alcohol group (21.6%. The commonest abnormality was increased triglycerides (TG; 54% and increased waist circumference (36.8%. Age, body weight, body mass index, and obesity were significant predictor of MS. Conclusion: MS was highest in subjects with alcohol dependence with the commonest abnormality of TG and blood pressure. Hence, routine screening is advisable in this population to address emerging MS.

  3. Perceptions of zoonotic and animal diseases in the Van Gujjar community of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alice; Thrusfield, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Humans living in and around forest areas are at increased risk of zoonotic disease transmission. The transhumant Van Gujjars of North India are one such population, but there is an absence of health data, including evidence of zoonotic diseases, in this community. Pastoral communities can have a wide breadth of knowledge of livestock diseases, but not necessarily of human diseases. This study investigated the perceptions that the Van Gujjars have specifically of zoonotic diseases, using participatory epidemiological methods, including semi-structured interviews, ranking, proportional piling, transect walks and direct observation, triangulated by informal interviews with local veterinarians. The community did not have a wide appreciation of zoonotic diseases, apart from rabies and potentially zoonotic skin diseases. In contrast, animal diseases were of much greater concern to the community; the locally-named surra (trypanosomiasis), ajar, khuriya (foot-and-mouth disease), dakhutra, gheru, taku, and 'blood in urine' (possibly babesiosis), being of most concern. A participatory epidemiological approach was found to be an effective method of data collection and analysis; and the findings suggest that access to health services, particularly veterinary health services, should be improved for Van Gujjars.

  4. A tangled weave: Tracing outcomes of education in rural women's lives in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Malini; Mullick, Disha

    2015-06-01

    This paper is based on the findings of a research study which traced 56 rural women learners 15 years after they had participated in an empowerment and education programme in North India. It attempts to understand, from the perspectives of women from marginalised communities, the ways in which participating in the programme had been empowering for them, or not. While most of the women were indeed able to transform several areas in their lives, this study illustrates that empowering outcomes cannot be assumed or articulated in categorical terms and that bringing about change requires the negotiation of power at various levels. The women's narratives stand in contrast to the prevalent discourses around women's literacy and empowerment, which highlight the importance of literacy only in terms of its positive impact on attaining development goals. Despite the vigorously discussed de-politicisation of the concept of empowerment, the authors show in this paper that empowerment, when informed by a critical feminist understanding, continues to provide a useful framework to analyse women's experiences related to education, as a process enabling women to understand and negotiate structures of power - which are neither static nor wholly dominating - and to find spaces to exercise agency. There are few longitudinal studies which trace the long-term impact of educational programmes on adult women, and most studies are in the nature of impact assessments of programmes. Through this paper the authors argue for the need to analyse the complexities around the relationship between women's education and empowerment.

  5. Functional status and its predictor among elderly population in a hilly state of North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Functional status can be conceptualized as an individual′s ability to manage activities related to personal self-care and self-maintenance. Functional status assessment is fundamental aspect of geriatric examination. This assessment helps clinicians and policymakers to design and implement interventions that help elderly to live safely and independently. Aims and Objectives: The primary aim was to assess the prevalence of limitation in activities of daily living (ADL and instrumental ADL (IADL among elderly population. The secondary aim was to identify the factors that predict IADL limitation among them. Materials and Methods: A total of 400 community dwelling elderly persons residing in Shimla hills of North India were interviewed using valid and reliable functional assessment scales namely Katz ADL and Lawton and Brody IADL. Statistical procedures for the analyses included descriptive statistics and logistic regression. Results: The prevalence of ADL and IADL activity limitation was 5.5% (22/400 and 21.8% (87/400, respectively. The results of logistic regression analysis revealed that advancing age (70 years and above, poor self-rated health and ailments namely musculoskeletal problems and cataract significantly predict functional limitation. Conclusions and Recommendation: Elderly having musculoskeletal problems should be provided with rehabilitative support in the community settings. Cataract surgeries patients should be identified and operated upon so as to improve visual functioning and thus their functional ability. Further, cities, towns, and rural areas should be made age-friendly.

  6. The spectrum of leukodystrophies in children: Experience at a tertiary care centre from North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheffali Gulati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to retrospectively collect and then describe the clinico-radiographical profile of confirmed cases of leukodystrophy who presented over a 5-year period to a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India. Materials and Methods: The case records of 80 confirmed cases of leukodystrophy were reviewed and the cases have been described in terms of their clinical presentation and neuroimaging findings. Results: The cases have been grouped into five categories: Hypomyelinating, demyelinating, disorders with vacuolization, cystic, and miscellaneous. The commonest leukodystrophies are megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD, and metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD. A notable proportion of hypomyelinating disorders were uncharacterized. Conclusions: Leukodystrophies at this point of time have no definite cure. They have a progressively downhill clinical course. Early diagnosis is imperative for appropriate genetic counseling. A simplified approach to diagnose common leukodystrophies has also been provided. It is important to develop a registry, which can provide valuable epidemiological data to prioritize research in this field, which has many unanswered questions.

  7. The neuroleptic malignant syndrome: A report of 14 cases from North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagariya A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare, life-threatening but potentially treatable condition. This study was performed to investigate the clinical spectrum, antecedent events and outcome of NMS patients admitted in the Neurology department of a large teaching hospital of North India. Fourteen cases of NMS were taken after a thorough search during a three-year period (May 2000 to April 2003. The Incidence of NMS was 1.40/ 1000 patients treated with neuroleptics and mortality rate was 14.28%. Amongst the neuroleptics Haloperidol (parenteral was implicated as a most common drug for NMS in 57% of patients. An association with coexisting precipitating illness was clearly recorded in 71.4% patients. All the recorded patients of NMS received 500-700 mg CPZ equivalent/day of neuroleptics. NMS as an indiosyncratic phenomenon was noticed in 28% patients. 85.7% responded to dopaminergic drugs along with supportive treatment and showed partial or complete recovery within 7-14 days. In those with partial recovery residual deficits included Parkinsonian features, depression and diaphoresis in a small percentage of patients.

  8. Contrasting REE Signatures on Manganese Ores of Iron Ore Group in North Orissa, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The distribution pattern of Rare Earth Elements (REE) in three categories of manganese ores viz.stratiform, stratabound-replacement, and detrital of Precambrian Iron Ore Group from north Orissa, India was reported.These categories of Mn-ore differed in their major and trace chemistry and exhibited contrasting REE signature.The stratiform ores were relatively enriched in REE content (697 μg·g-1) and their normalized pattern showed both positive Ce and Eu anomalies, whereas the stratabound-replacement types were comparatively depleted in REE content (211 μg·g-1) and showed negative Ce and flat Eu signatures.The detrital categories showed mixed REE pattern.The data plotted in different discrimination diagrams revealed a mixed volcaniclastic and chemogenic source of material for stratiform categories, and LREE (Light Rare Earth Elements) and HREE (Heavy Rare Earth Elements) are contributed by such sources, respectively.In contrast, the stratabound ore bodies were developed during the remobilization of stratiform ores, and associated Mn-containing rocks under supergene condition followed by the redeposition of circulating mineralized colloidal solutions in structurally favorable zones.During this process, some of the constituents were found only in very low concentration within stratabound ores, and this is attributed to their poor leachability/mobility.The detrital ores did not exhibit any significant characteristic in respect of REE as their development was via a complex combination of processes involving weathering, fragmentation, recementation, and burial under soil cover.

  9. Rh phenotype, allele and haplotype frequencies among 51,857 blood donors in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makroo, Raj; Gupta, Richa; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Rosamma, Nakamatathil L

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to provide information on the frequencies of Rh antigens, alleles, phenotypes, and haplotypes from our region in India and to compare them with those from other races. This observational study was conducted on blood donors from March 2009 to August 2011 using a fully automated system for Rh typing of blood cells. The data were collected and calculations done to determine the antigen, phenotypes, allele and haplotype frequencies. The chi square test was used for comparisons between the results of our study and those of other studies. A total of 51,857 donors were included in this study. The most common Rh antigen found was "e". DCCee was the most prevalent phenotype in our study with the phenotype distribution being significantly different between our study and other studies from different regions of the world. We have determined the prevalence of Rh antigens and Rh phenotypes in the North Indian blood donor population and derived the allele and haplotype frequencies in the same population. The Rh blood group distribution in this population was different from that in other populations.

  10. Profile of Skin Disorders in Unreached Hilly Areas of North India

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    Deepak Dimri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pattern of skin morbidity in an area depends on climate, geography, socioeconomic status, nutrition, genetics, and habits of the community. Objective. The objective of the present study was to describe the morbidity profile of patients attending dermatology outpatient department in a tertiary care centre of Garhwal hills, North India. Methodology. This is a record based study carried out using the morbidity registers. Patient details, diagnosis, and treatment provided by physicians were documented in the morbidity register. ICD coding was done to categorize the patients. Results. The total number of new episodes of illnesses treated in the skin outpatient department during 2009–2014 was 47465. Adults (>18 years constituted about 80.9%. Among adults, about 59.9% were males. Overall the infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue were the most common (32.6% followed by the disorders of skin appendages (19.8%, and dermatitis and eczema (18.8%. Of the total patients 16.9% were affected by dermatitis and 16.7% by acne. Psoriasis, urticaria, melasma, and vitiligo were present in 3.4%, 3.4%, 3.6%, and 3.3% patients, respectively. Conclusion. This knowledge will help in planning appropriate range services to meet the patients’ needs and help in training of health staff to meet these needs.

  11. Occupational hazard exposure and general health profile of welders in rural Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Chauhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Welding is a common industrial process associated with various health hazards. The aspect of duration of hazard exposure among welders at their workplace has been studied to limited extent in India. Objective: To assess the duration of occupational hazard exposure and its association with symptoms among the welders. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted amongst 106 welders in North Delhi. Data was collected using a questionnaire containing items to assess the socio-demographic profile, their medical history and individual hazard exposure. Results: Majority of them were involved in skilled/semi-skilled job (n = 99; 93%. The predominant nature of work for majority was manual. More than half reported their work to be physically hard (n = 56; 53%, involves much lifting of weight (n = 61; 57%, and is dangerous (n = 59; 56%. Dust/smoke followed by noise was reported to be most common hazards at the workplace by them. Most of them were suffering from eye related symptoms (n = 63; 59% followed by skin conditions (n = 28; 26%. Skin diseases were reported to be significantly common among group of welders who were exposed to dust and radiation for ≥4 hours in a day (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Nearly half of the welders found their job to be dangerous and were being exposed to at least one hazardous substance at their workplace. Majority of them complained of eye symptoms. There is a need for health and safety training of this economically productive group.

  12. Occupational hazard exposure and general health profile of welders in rural Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Anuradha; Anand, Tanu; Kishore, Jugal; Danielsen, Tor Erik; Ingle, Gopal Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Welding is a common industrial process associated with various health hazards. The aspect of duration of hazard exposure among welders at their workplace has been studied to limited extent in India. Objective: To assess the duration of occupational hazard exposure and its association with symptoms among the welders. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted amongst 106 welders in North Delhi. Data was collected using a questionnaire containing items to assess the socio-demographic profile, their medical history and individual hazard exposure. Results: Majority of them were involved in skilled/semi-skilled job (n = 99; 93%). The predominant nature of work for majority was manual. More than half reported their work to be physically hard (n = 56; 53%), involves much lifting of weight (n = 61; 57%), and is dangerous (n = 59; 56%). Dust/smoke followed by noise was reported to be most common hazards at the workplace by them. Most of them were suffering from eye related symptoms (n = 63; 59%) followed by skin conditions (n = 28; 26%). Skin diseases were reported to be significantly common among group of welders who were exposed to dust and radiation for ≥4 hours in a day (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Nearly half of the welders found their job to be dangerous and were being exposed to at least one hazardous substance at their workplace. Majority of them complained of eye symptoms. There is a need for health and safety training of this economically productive group. PMID:25006312

  13. Restoration of mangroves along the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Untawale, A.G.

    of various measures taken by the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India. New Delhi, conservation and management policies were initiated between 1985-1995. During this period it was observed, with remote sensing techniques, that vast...

  14. Beneficial role of D allele in controlling ACE levels: a study among Brahmins of north India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SHOBHA KUMARI; NIDHI SHARMA; SUNIL THAKUR; PRAKASH R. MONDAL; KKALLUR N. SARASWATHY

    2016-06-01

    India being a country with vast diversity is expected to have different dietary and life style patterns which in turn may lead topopulation-specific environmental risk factors. Further, the interaction of these risk factors with the genetic makeup of pop-ulation makes it either susceptible or resistant to cardiovascular disease. One such candidate gene is angiotensin convertingenzyme (ACE) for various cardiovascular mechanisms. ACE is the key enzyme of the renin angiotensin aldosterone systempathway which maintains homeostasis blood pressure in the body and any variation in the levels is reported to be associatedwith various complex diseases. The DD genotype is found to increase ACE levels, which is associated with cardiovasculardiseases and decrease in ACE levels are associated with kidney diseases. The aim of this study was to understand the distribu-tion of ACE I/D polymorphism and ACE levels among Brahmins of National Capital Region (NCR) north India, with respectto age and sex ratio distribution. In this study, 136 subjects of which 50 males and 86 females, who were unrelated up to firstcousin, aged 25 to70 years were studied.ACEgene was found to be polymorphic with high frequency of heterozygote (ID)followed by II and DD genotypes. The studied population was found to be in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium with respect toACE I/D polymorphism (P =0.55). I allele frequency was found to be higher (0.560) than the D allele (0.44). The medianlevel of ACE was found to be 65.96 ng/mL (48.12–86.24) which is towards lower side of the normal range. ACE levels werefound to be increased among individual having either of the homozygotes that is II or DD and higher frequency of heterozy-gote (ID) is indicative of advantage in the population by maintaining lower ACE levels. The limitation of the present study islow sample size, however, the merit is that the subjects belonged to a Mendalian population with a common gene pool

  15. Epidemiological study of magnesium status and risk of hypertension in a rural population of north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R B; Rastogi, V; Niaz, M A; Sharma, J P; Raghuvanshi, R; Moshira, M

    1996-10-01

    This cross-sectional survey was conducted in two randomly selected villages in Moradabad in North India to demonstrate the association of magnesium status with hypertension in relation to socioeconomic status (SES) in a rural population. There were 1769 subjects (894 males, 875 females) between 25 and 64 years of age, randomly selected and divided into social classes 1-4 depending upon various sociological attributes. The survey methods were a validated questionnaire, blood pressure measurements by mercury manometer, and blood analysis for serum magnesium. Social class 1 and 2 were associated with a greater prevalence of hypertension. The overall prevalence of hypertension diagnosed by JNC-V criteria (> 140/90 mm Hg) was 17.7 per cent (n = 313) and the prevalence was comparable in both sexes and increased with age. Among social class 1 and 2 subjects, there was a higher prevalence of obesity and sedentary lifestyle, a lower intake of dietary magnesium, and a lower serum magnesium compared to social class 3. Logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age showed that SES has a positive relation with hypertension (odds ratio 1.08 men, 1.07 women, P < 0.05), body mass index (odds ratio 1.14 men, 1.13 women, P < 0.01), and sedentary lifestyle (odds ratio 1.38 men, 1.32 women, P < 0.05) in both sexes, and with salt intake in women (odds ratio 1.28, P < 0.05). The odds ratio indicated that a higher intake of magnesium (odds ratio 1.14 men, 1.17 women, P < 0.05) and a higher serum magnesium (odds ratio 1.12 men, 1.15 women, P < 0.05) were associated with a lower risk of hypertension. The findings suggest that social class 1 and 2 subjects in some rural populations of India have a higher prevalence of hypertension and dietary intake of magnesium, and serum magnesium levels were inversely associated with the risk of hypertension.

  16. Assessment of pollutants and gaseous emissions in sewer network in NCT of Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswale, P; Rao, N N; Karthik, M; Dhodapkar, R; Patkar, G; Nandy, T

    2012-04-01

    The NCT of Delhi in India handles domestic sewage through a long sewerage networks. The network is into eight divisions. The aim of the present study is to arrive at a correlation between sewage quality and gas emissions in the sewer network of various divisions. This will aid in forewarning the sewer workers about the safety precautions. The health effects due to toxic sewer gases exposure and assessment of hazardous conditions and hazard potential are discussed. The study areas were broadly classified as residential, commercial, industrial and mix (combination of residential & commercial) for comparison. Sewage samples were collected from 1020 sites and analyzed for 10 different physicochemical parameters. The analytical data revealed wide variation in the chemical composition of sewage flowing at various sewerage network sites. Based on comparison with the regulatory standard for discharge in sewers, 89 sites with higher values of BOD and sulphate were marked as critical sites. Subsequently, the concentrations of CH4 and H2S in sewer emissions were determined for the 89 critical sites through onsite monitoring. Samples from 22 sites had significantly higher concentration of CH4 than the LEL and those from 40 sites showed concentrations higher than the LFL. On the other hand, samples from 38 locations showed significantly high H2S concentration, more than permissible limit of 10 ppm. The sewer workers in North East, North West and West region of the metropolis were exposed to hazards from excessive CH4 and H2S emissions, whereas those under South and South West regions were more vulnerable to H2S related risks. The sewer network under North, Central and South poses relatively less hazard with regard to gaseous emissions.

  17. Locality Record of Leptobrachium smithi Matsui, Nabhitabhata & Panha, 1999 (Anura: Megophryidae on the north bank of Brahmaputra river in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Dutta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Leptobrachium Tschudi, 1838 is currently represented by 32 species all over the world distributed throughout mainland and insular Asia with two species so far from India. Leptobrachium smithi is known from Rani-Gharbhanga Landscape, Borduar-Mayang Landscape, Barail Range and Barak Valley all from south of River Brahmaputra. We herein report additional distribution records of Leptobrachium smithi from Ultapani Reserve Forest, Shankarghala and Mathanguri of Manas National Park on the north bank of the River Brahmaputra. The report from Ultapani, Shankarghala and Mathanguri is an extension of range of species by around 100 to 176 km north. Mineralogic and stratigraphic data of Brahmaputra basin indicates that the Brahmaputra River has changed position several times during the Holocene. The presence of the species on the north bank across the river barrier may be attributed to the positional changes of the river and due to lateral shifting of the river.

  18. Touring the Demolished Slum? Slum Tourism in the Face of Delhi's Gentrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Tore Elias Harsløf Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    slum tourism, the article attempts to answer this question by analyzing the case of the NGO, Salaam Baalak Trust. This NGO conducted slum tours for tourists from the global North in the interstitial spaces around New Delhi Railway Station until 2010, when the slum they used as an example of their work...

  19. Fission track studies on some minerals and water of the north-east India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Thoudam Nandababu

    The present work is aimed at the geochronological investigations of the minerals of some granitic rocks and estimation of uranium contents in minerals, rocks and water of some parts of the North-East India with the help of fission track (FT) technique. The study includes FT dating of minerals from granites of four different plutons and from pegmatites of two different regions of Meghalaya, annealing studies of the minerals including the correction of the observed mineral ages and calculation of the cooling and uplift rates of the rocks. Precision on the errors of the mineral ages has also been studied in detail in the present work. The experiment was carried out at the Research laboratories of the Physics and the Geology Departments, Gauhati University, Assam, India during 1981-1984. Experimental results show four different age groups of the minerals which would reflect meaningful geological events in the history of these rocks. Sphenes of the Nartiang and Dawki granites record the highest FT ages ~ 1120 m.y. which may be linked with a major plutonic event. Muscovites of the Nartiang and Jowai pegmatites measure ages ~ 690 m.y. which may correspond to the time of emplacements of these pegmatites. Apatites of the Nartiang granites show FT ages ~ 470 m.y. which falls within the period of Indian Ocean cycle event. But, apatites of the Jowai, Pynursla and Dawki granites record the youngest ages ~ 90 m.y. which lies within the period of extrusion of cretaceous lavas (Sylhet traps). Apatite age of the Nartiang granite and muscovite ages of the Nartiang and Jowai pegmatites were corrected to ~ 510 m.y., ~ 743 m.y. and ~ 741 m.y. respectively by applying the plateau method of age correction. However, insignificant corrections were found in the sphene ages of the Nartiang and Dawki granites and apatite ages of the Jowai and Dawki granites. An interesting finding of the present work is the wide discrepancy between the apatite ages ~ 90 m.y. (Cretaceous) of Jowai, Pynursla

  20. Knowledge and practice of Accredited Social Health Activists for maternal healthcare delivery in Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Charu; Kishore, Jugal; Sharma, Shantanu; Nayak, Harsavsardhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The role of community health workers in healthcare delivery system is considered inevitable to meet the goal of universal healthcare provision. The study was planned to assess the knowledge and practices for maternal health care delivery among Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA) workers in North-East district of Delhi, India. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in North-East district of Delhi among 55 ASHA workers after taking written informed consent. Data were collected using a pretested semi-structured questionnaire consisted of items on sociodemographic profile of ASHA workers, knowledge, and practices about maternal health. The data was analyzed by using SPSS software version 17. Qualitative data were expressed in percentages and quantitative data were expressed in mean ± standard deviation (SD). Results: Mean age (±SD) of ASHAs was 31.84 ± 7.2 years. Most of the ASHAs workers were aware of their role in provision of maternal health services. Most of the ASHAs workers were aware of their work of bringing mothers for antenatal check-up (94.5%), counseling for family planning (96.4%), and accompanying them for hospital for delivery (89.1%). 87% of ASHAs knew that iron tablets have to be taken for minimum 100 days during pregnancy. 51 (92.7%) ASHAs reported that they used to maintain antenatal register. Some problems reported by ASHAs while working in community were shortage of staff at health center (16.4%), no transportation facility available (14.5%), no money for emergency, and opposition from local dais (12.7% each). Conclusion: Present study showed that ASHAs knowledge is good but their practices are poor due to number of problems faced by them which need to be addressed through skill based training in terms of good communication and problem solving. Monitoring should be made an integral part of ASHA working in the field to ensure that knowledge is converted into practices as well. PMID:26288774

  1. A study of factors impacting on the tobacco use patterns and tobacco-related behavior among the lower middle and lower classes in a resettlement colony of Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Bhasker

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the factors impacting on the tobacco use patterns and tobacco related behavior among lower middle and lower classes in a resettlement colony in Delhi. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the year 2011, between the months of March and October. It was done as a community based, cross sectional, house to house survey in a resettlement colony in South Delhi, involving interviews with present tobacco users as per a structured interview guide wherein majority of the questions were closed ended and a few open ended questions. Results: Study enrolled 1698 subjects in all with males constituting 90.8% of the sample while women constituted 8.7%. Median age of the study subjects was 37 years while the mean age was 40 yrs. 87 percent of the respondents were educated to less than or equal to higher secondary level. Some of the other salient findings of the study are as under. Overall, both smoked and smokeless forms of tobacco were found to be almost equally used in the community. While 14% of the males consumed both the smoked and non-smoked forms of tobacco, similar percentage among women was only 1%. Age seemed to be an important determinant of the form of tobacco used. After controlling for literacy levels, it was found that variation in the consumption of different forms of smoked tobacco was statistically significant (P = .001 across different age categories. While cigarette smoking was commoner among the younger age groups, beedis were more popular among the older respondents. However, smokeless tobacco was the most commonly used form of tobacco among the youth. Age and income levels came out as two important determinants of the intensity of smoking. While there was a statistically significant increase in the intensity of smoking with increasing age (P = .001; there was statistically significant decline in the intensity of smoking (P = .001 with rise in income levels. However, there was no statistically significant

  2. Area Handbook Series. India: A Country Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Congress (Congress) founded 1892 .............. India Councils Act 1905 ............ Partition of Bengal by Lord Curzon, viceroy 1906 .............. All...reversal of partition of Bengal; transfer of imperial capital to New Delhi from Calcutta 1916 .............. Lucknow Pact between Congress and League...Gandhi holds talks with Mohammad Ali Jinnah 1945 ............ Labour government in Britain announces intention ofearly independence in India 1946

  3. Spatio - Temporal Variation of Aerosol and its relation to vegetation cover over mega-city New Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Alok; Pravesh Kumar, Ram; Berwal, Shivesh; Kumar, Krishan; Kumar, Ritesh

    2016-07-01

    MODerate resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) on board NASA's Terra and Aqua satellite Level 2 Aerosol optical depth (AOD) data is used for aerosol study and LISS III sensor on board Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) Satellite procured from the National Remote Sensing Center (NRSC), Hyderabad, India was used for vegetation cover estimation over New Delhi and its surrounding regions. Lowest AOD was found in the spring and winter season where highest AOD in summer months. Different dates representing different seasons LISS III imageries were used for generation of land-cover maps for vegetation study. The land cover maps reveal that most of the surrounding areas of Delhi are covered with vegetation in the month of March. By the month of May-June herbs are cut or dry from most of the region surrounding Delhi and the land cover in the surrounding areas changes to bare soil. During the rainy season (July to September) the vegetation cover over Delhi and the surrounding areas increases significantly. In November - December there is dispersed vegetation cover over New Delhi and its surrounding regions depending upon the age of the newly sown crop and ornamental plants. We found that, there is statistically significant negative correlation between AOD and Vegetation in every season over New Delhi.

  4. Wildlife Mortality on National Highway 72 and 74 Across Rajaji National Park, North India

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    Ritesh JOSHI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the road impact on resident wildlife is one of the important aspects of future conservation planning and of management related actions. Expanding a motor road network in and around protected habitats is considered to be a major threat that can cause the extinction of endangered species. We assessed vertebrate fauna mortality on two inter–state national highways: No. 72 (Haridwar–Dehradun and 74 (Haridwar–Bijnor and an ancillary road running across the Rajaji National Park and Haridwar Conservation area, North India. Field data on wildlife mortality was collected from June 2009 to May 2011. A total of 352 individuals of 39 species (3 amphibians, 9 reptiles, 18 mammals and 9 avian species were found dead on the national highways 72 & 74 and Haridwar–Chilla–Rishikesh motor road, which is running in between Rajaji National Park. Among all the mortalities, avian species were the most affected accounting for 38%, followed by mammals (27%. During Maha–Kumbh 2010, road accidents increased. It was an event that caused tremendous disturbance in animal migratory corridors and in drinking sites. The evaluation of vehicle traffic pressure on national highways revealed that ±14100 and ±9900 vehicles had been moving across these highways every day. In addition to that, expanding the motor roads network and increasing vehicle traffic pressure is disrupting ecological connectivity and impeding the movement of wild animals. In addition, wildlife mortality rate was observed to be increasing. Further studies are needed to understand the ecological impacts of increasing vehicle traffic on various national highways and roads and on animal behavioral responses, in order to take proper conservation actions

  5. Extremity vascular trauma in civilian population: a seven-year review from North India.

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    Menakuru, Somasekhar R; Behera, Arunanshu; Jindal, Ravul; Kaman, Lileswar; Doley, Rudraprasad; Venkatesan, Rajarajan

    2005-03-01

    This is a retrospective study of the experience with extremity vascular trauma at a tertiary level referral centre in North India where the majority of the population lives in villages and the incidence of high-speed automobile accidents and civilian violence is low. The aim was to study the aetiology, pattern of injuries and the mortality and morbidity rates due to vascular trauma in our population. Data relating to 148 patients presenting with vascular trauma requiring surgical intervention other than amputation between January 1996 and December 2002 were collected retrospectively. There were 132 males and 16 females with a mean age of 39 years presenting to the casualty with a median delay of 9.3 h after injury. Blunt trauma accounted for 84% of the injuries with extremities involved in 88%. The brachial artery was the most common artery injured with the femoral next most common. Repair without graft interposition was done in 74% and autogenous vein grafts were used in 23% of cases. Comparison of our results with those that would have been obtained, had the recommendations of Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) been followed, showed that this scoring system had low sensitivity and specificity for prediction of salvageability of limbs. Eight percent patients died due to associated visceral organ injuries. Complications occurred in 32% patients and amputation was required in 6% of patients after an initial surgical repair mainly due to inadequate functional recovery. Eighty-eight percent of the survivors with salvaged limbs were able to achieve full functional recovery. Judicious selection and appropriate intervention can result in satisfactory limb salvage with good functional outcomes even with delayed presentations.

  6. Immunogenetic association and thyroid autoantibodies in juvenile autoimmune thyroiditis in North India.

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    Kanga, U; Tandon, N; Marwaha, R K; Khanna, R; Bhattacharya, B; Singh, S; Kumar, N; Mehra, N K

    2006-05-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) encompass a number of conditions that have in common cellular and humoral responses targeting the thyroid gland. Interactions between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers are thought to initiate an autoimmune response to thyroid antigens leading to disease manifestation. Commencement of the disease in childhood leads to the presumption that genetics may have an important role in the causation of the disease. The present study was aimed at evaluating the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) encoded susceptibility to develop juvenile autoimmune thyroiditis (JAT) in patients from North India. We studied 48 consecutive patients of JAT along with 176 first-degree relatives for their thyroid function (FT4, TSH) and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody status (AbTPO). HLA studies were carried out using serology for HLA-class I antigens and DNA analysis of HLA-class II alleles. The data were compared with a cohort of 308 ethnically matched healthy individuals. We observed overt hypothyroidism in 50% and AbTPO positivity in 70.8% of the index cases. Among the first-degree relatives, goitre was observed in 51.7%, thyroid dysfunction in 28.4% and AbTPO in 29.5% of individuals. Of the 37 relatives who underwent fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), 60% had evidence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT). A strong positive association of HLA-DRB1*1404 was observed with the JAT (35.4%vs. 10.4%, chi2 = 19.8, Pc = 0.0001). We also observed a higher (72%, P = 0.03) paternal transmission of HLA-DRB1*1404 to affected offspring in comparison to unaffected offspring. HLA-DRB1*03 was also increased among JAT patients but did not reach statistical significance. These studies point towards an important role of immune modifying genes, such as HLA, in influencing susceptibility to juvenile-onset AITD.

  7. Metabolic evaluation in first-time renal stone formers in north India: A single center study

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    Akhil Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of stone recurrence in first-time stone formers (FTSF varies from 26% to 53%. There is no consensus regarding metabolic evaluation in these individuals. We evaluated the metabolic abnormalities in first-time renal stone forming patients in North India. Thirty-nine patients, (29 males and 10 females with mean age 39.3 ± 12.9 years who presented with nephrolithiasis for the first time were evaluated. We evaluated the calcium homeostasis [serum corrected total calcium, phosphorous, creatinine, alkaline phosphatase, albumin, parathormone (iPTH, 25-hydroxy cholecalciferol (25(OHD 3 , 1-25 di-hydroxy cholecalciferol (1,25(OH 2 D 3 ] and performed the calcium load test also. Two 24-h urine collections were taken for citrate, oxalate, calcium and uric acid. Ammonium chloride loading test for diagnosis of distal renal tubular acidosis was performed in all patients. For each of the diagnostic categories, descriptive statistics were computed for all biochemical variables. A two-tailed P-value <0.05 was regarded as significant. Metabolic abnormalities were detected in 92.3% of the patients (n = 39 studied. Of them, almost 60% had two or more metabolic abnormalities. The most common metabolic abnormality was hypo-citraturia (82%, followed by hyper-oxaluria (56% and hyper-calciuria (41%. Five percent of the patients had incomplete renal tubular acidosis, signifying the importance of the ammonium chloride loading test in patients with renal stones. None of the study patients were detected to have primary hyperparathyroidism. In three patients, the etiology could not be detected. Our findings suggest that an underlying disorder is present in majority of first-time renal stone formers. Intervention with appropriate treatment can prevent recurrences. Hence, comprehensive metabolic evaluation is recommended in all FTSF.

  8. Epidemiology of road traffic accident deaths in children in Chandigarh zone of North West India

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    Dalbir Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The fatalities from Road Traffic Accidents (RTA constitute a major cause of unnatural deaths among children in Chandigarh zone of North West India. The epidemiology of RTA related deaths in this age group is lacking in our country. This retrospective study (1974–2013 included children (⩽18 years who became victims of RTA and subsequently died during the course of treatment. The postmortem and hospital records of the victims were used to collect the epidemiological data regarding age, sex, area of residence, etc. These deaths constituted 9.4% of total road accident deaths reported at this hospital. Out of a total of 709 RTA deaths in children, about 16% were reported in the block year of 1974–78 and this proportion decreased to 9.4% during the block year of 1984–88 and has remained almost constant since then. The maximum number of victims belonged to the states of Haryana (36% and Punjab (34%. A higher number of deaths were observed in rural population (60%. Most of the fatalities occurred between 12–4 pm (29.9% and pedestrians (47.8% were found to be the most commonly affected. The most common affected was the 16–18 year age group (35.3%. Injury to head and neck region (81.4% was responsible for a majority of deaths. The study concluded that the RTA remains an important cause of unnatural deaths in children. The static proportion of these deaths over the past three decades signifies that the road safety policies have been ineffective in preventing causalities and need further improvements.

  9. Multidimensional health status of HIV-infected outpatients at a tertiary care center in north India

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    Wig Naveet

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Quality of life (QOL scores inform researchers acquainted with such tools about patients′ perception of various domains of their health. The scores provide a useful denominator for clinical trials, especially in chronic diseases with therapeutic side effects, such as HIV. However, in clinical settings, there is a felt need of description of problems commonly perceived by patients. Aim : This study describes the multidimensional health-related issues of HIV-positive patients. Settings and Design : Cross-sectional design with convenient sampling was used to recruit 138 HIV-positive patients at the outpatient section of the Department of Medicine of a tertiary care hospital in north India. Materials and Methods : A structured questionnaire was used to collect information about health-related problems. Identified problems were assessed using a Likert scale for severity. Results : Out of the 20 assessed problems, the patients reported positive for an average of 12.01 ± 3.78 problems. The most prevalent problems were those related to emotions (98.6%, lack of energy (96.4%, and health perception (92.0%. The most distressing problems were ′feeling that health was not good′ (77.5% and ′health was bad′ (75.4%. The number of problems reported was significantly related to weight loss ( P = 0.006 and clinical category ( P = 0.023. A significant correlation was observed between weight loss and problems in social activities ( P < 0.001, pain ( P < 0.001; clinical class ( P < 0.001; tuberculosis, and problems in job and household work ( P = 0.002.Conclusion : Many patients have significant problems in dimensions other than physical. A physician′s awareness about these problems is important for a holistic patient management.

  10. Carbon allocation, sequestration and carbon dioxide mitigation under plantation forests of north western Himalaya, India

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    Bandana Devi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The organic carbon and soils of the world comprise bulk of the terrestrial carbon and serve as amajorsink and source of atmospheric carbon. Increasing atmospheric concentrations of green house gases may be mitigated by increasing carbon sequestration in vegetation and soil. The study attempted to estimate biomass production and carbon sequestration potential of different plantation ecosystems in north western Himalaya, India. Biomass, carbon density of biomass, soil, detritus, carbon sequestration and CO2 mitigation potential were studied underdifferent plantation forest ecosystems comprising of eight different tree species viz. Quercus leucotrichophora, Pinus roxburghii, Acacia catechu, Acacia mollissima, Albizia procera, Alnus nitida, Eucalyptus tereticornis and Ulmus villosa. Above (185.57 ą 48.99 tha-1 and below ground (42.47 ą 10.38 tha-1 biomass was maximum in Ulmus villosa. The vegetation carbon density was maxium in Albizia procera (118.37 ą 1.49 tha-1 and minimum (36.50 ą 9.87 tha-1 in Acacia catechu. Soil carbon density was maximum (219.86ą 10.34 tha-1 in Alnus nitida, and minimum (170.83ą 20.60 tha-1in Pinus roxburghii. Detritus was higher in Pinus roxburghii (6.79 ą 2.0 tha-1. Carbon sequestration (7.91ą 3.4 tha-1 and CO2 mitigation potential (29.09 ą 12.78 tha-1 was maximum in Ulmus villosa. Pearson correlation matrix revealed significant positive relationship of ecosystem carbon with plantation biomass, soil carbon and CO2 mitigation potential. With the emerging threat of climate change, such assessment of forest and soil carbon inventory would allow to devise best land management and policy decisions forsustainable management of fragile hilly ecosystem. 

  11. Profile of angle closure in a tertiary care center in north India

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    Ichhpujani Parul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the demographic and clinical profile of the types of primary angle closure patients presenting at a tertiary care center in North India. Materials and Methods: Clinic records of patients diagnosed as primary angle closure were reviewed. International Society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology (ISGEO classification scheme was used to categorize patients. Demographic and clinical data including prior management was collected and analyzed. Main Outcome measures were age, sex, symptomatology, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, intraocular pressure (IOP, gonioscopy, optic disc assessment and visual field defects. Logistic regression model and receiver operating curve (ROC were calculated for predictors of type of glaucoma. Results: Eight hundred and fourteen patients (1603 eyes; males: 380, females: 434 were diagnosed to have various subtypes of angle closure. Mean (±SD age at presentation was significantly higher for males (57.57 ± 11.62 years as compared to females (53.64 ± 10.67 years ( P < 0001. Primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG was most frequently diagnosed subtype (49.38% followed by Primary angle closure (PAC (39.68% and Primary angle closure suspect (PACS (10.93% respectively. The three subtypes differed significantly among their mean IOP (on ANOVA, F = 14.04; P < 0001 using Greenhouse-Geisser correction. Univariate analysis was done to find significant predictors for the outcome of PACG. Logistic regression model and ROC containing the significant predictors yielded a very high AUC of 0.93 with strong discriminatory ability for PACG. Conclusion: In our hospital-based study, the significant predictors for the outcome of PACG included male gender, diminution of vision, the presence of pain and worsening grades of BCVA. Nearly half of PACG presented with advanced disease. In spite of one-third of the patients being diagnosed as angle closure prior to referral, only 8.34% had iridotomy (laser or surgical

  12. Profile of nicotine use among alcohol dependent patients visiting a tertiary care center in north India

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    Rizwana Quraishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of tobacco among alcohol dependent population is quite frequent. This co-morbidity increases the risk for various diseases. Understanding the pattern of tobacco use with co-morbid alcohol use may help in planning appropriate prevention/treatment strategies. The study aimed at examining the profile and pattern of nicotine use among alcohol dependent patients visiting a tertiary care treatment center in North India. Materials and Methods: Male patients fulfilling diagnostics and statistical manual of mental disorder fourth edition, criteria for nicotine and alcohol diagnostics and statistical dependence, attending the out-patient department of the tertiary care treatment center were recruited after obtaining informed consent. The socio-demographic profile, drug use history, nicotine associated health problems and general health problem were recorded. Motivation to stop tobacco use was assessed qualitatively using the direct questions about their interest and intentions to quit. Results: A total of 150 subjects were included in the study. The mean age of the study sample was 37.6 ± 10.44 years. Tobacco was reported as the gateway drug in 90% of the cases. Exclusive bidi use reported in 42% of the subjects. Mean duration of bidi and co-morbid alcohol use was higher than cigarette or smokeless tobacco use. Self-reported health problems associated with nicotine use and general health was reported by 41% and 39% of the subjects. Unsuccessful past quit attempts was present in 85% cases. More than 90% of subjects remained interested in quitting the tobacco use. An increased liver enzyme (aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transferase were observed in 43, 32 and 47% of the cases. Conclusion: The results suggest the nicotine and alcohol dependent patients represent a separate population requiring higher attention from the treating physician.

  13. Occlusal Traits of Primary Dentition among Pre-School Children of Mehsana District, North Gujarat, India

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    Gordhanbhai Patel, Dhvani; Ranadheer, Eraveni; Kalgudi, Jayasudha; Santokì, Jaysukh; Chaudhary, Shaila

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Aesthetic and functional problems in the dentofacial complex among children are often attributed to the disturbances in the dentofacial growth and development. This can be recognized during routine dental visits. This study pursued to assess the occlusion of the primary dentition in three to five-year-old children. Aim To study the occlusal traits of the primary dentition in a group of three to five-year-old North Gujarat children of Mehsana district and the variation in their occlusion relative to age and gender in the same group. Materials and Methods The study was a cross-sectional survey based on clinical examination and photographic evaluation of the primary dentition, 383 preschool children aged three to five years who were randomly selected from preschools in Mehsana district, Gujarat, India, using a multistage sampling technique. The study group was evaluated for the several occlusal parameters that include primary molar relation based on Baume classification and canine relation, overjet, overbite were assessed using Foster and Hamilton criteria. Chi-square test was performed to carry out statistical analysis. The p-value<0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results Out of 383 participants, 55.35% had flush terminal plane; 43.34% mesial step molar relationship and 1.31% distal step molar relationship, 63.2% had straight profile, 95.8% had Class I canine relationship, 71.3% primate spaces, 56.7% physiologic spaces. Flush terminal plane was common at three years while, mesial step at four to five years, and Class I canine relationship was prevalent in both age groups. Flush terminal plane was more common in female participants than the males. Amongst other occlusal characteristics, increased overbite and open bite were prevalent. Conclusion It was found that the flush terminal plane molar relationship, straight profile, Class I canine relationship, primate spacing, increased overbite and open bite predominated. PMID:28274054

  14. Seasonal heterogeneity in aerosol types over Dibrugarh-North-Eastern India

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    Pathak, Binita; Bhuyan, Pradip Kumar; Gogoi, Mukunda; Bhuyan, Kalyan

    2012-02-01

    Columnar aerosol properties retrieved from Multi-Wavelength solar Radiometer (MWR) measurements during the period 2001-2010 over Dibrugarh (27.3°N, 94.6°E, 111 m amsl), North-Eastern India are analyzed to identify the types of aerosols in the atmospheric column. Highest Aerosol optical depth (AOD) characterizes the pre-monsoon (March-May), while lowest AOD has been observed during the post-monsoon (Oct-Nov) season. The Ångström exponent (α) indicates predominance of fine aerosols during post-monsoon and winter (Dec-Feb) and dominance of coarse mode in pre-monsoon and monsoon (June-Sept). NOAA HYSPLIT back trajectory analysis suggests that the seasonal heterogeneity in aerosol characteristics can be attributed to the varying contribution from different source regions. Using the relationship between AOD 500 and α, the aerosols can be classified into five main types viz. continental average (CA), marine continental average (MCA), urban/industrial and biomass burning (UB) and desert dust (DD) while the remaining cases are considered as unidentified or mixed type (MT). These aerosol types exhibit seasonal heterogeneity in their contribution depending upon variability in sources. In winter, local production contributes to observed appreciable CA aerosol type, while highest percentage of UB type is attributed to both local and transported aerosols. On the other hand, transported UB and DD types play a significant role in the pre-monsoon season. Post-monsoon season is indicative of background continental average aerosol condition with a significant contribution from CA and MCA aerosols. Monsoon aerosols couldn't be distinguished properly due to different particle growth processes like humidification, hygroscopic growth etc. and hence MT aerosol type is predominant in this season. This is the first ever attempt to classify aerosols over this environment.

  15. Association of FTO and IRX3 genetic variants to obesity risk in north India.

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    Srivastava, Apurva; Mittal, Balraj; Prakash, Jai; Srivastava, Pranjal; Srivastava, Nimisha; Srivastava, Neena

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is an increasingly important health problem worldwide as well as in developing countries like India. Recent genetic studies suggest that obesity associated FTO and IRX3 are functionally linked and many effects due to genetic variants in FTO gene act through IRX3. To evaluate the association of FTO and IRX3 genetic variants towards obesity risk. North Indian individuals categorised as non-obese (BMI obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) were selected. FTO rs8050136, rs1421085, rs9939609, rs17817449 and IRX3 rs3751723 were genotyped by means of validated Taqman® allelic discrimination to evaluate their association with obesity by means of single locus logistic regression by SPSS ver. 19 and multi-locus linkage and haplotype analysis by SNPStats and gene-gene interaction with Generalised Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (GMDR) ver.6. In single locus analysis, FTO rs8050136 CA (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 2.4 (1.7-3.4) and AA (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 3.1 (1.9-5.2); FTO rs1421085 TA (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 2.1 (1.4-3.0) and AA (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 3.0 (1.8-5.0); FTO rs9939609 TC (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 2.1 (1.5-3.1) and CC (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 4.2 (2.5-7.3) along with TG (p = 0.001; OR (95% CI) = 2.1 (1.3-3.2) and GG (p = 0.021; OR (95% CI) = 3.8 (1.2-11.8) genotypes of FTO rs17817449 with GT (p = 0.0001; OR (95% CI) = 2.1 (1.5-3.1) and TT (p = 0.012; OR (95% CI) = 3.3 (1.8-3.6) genotypes of IRX3 rs3751723 were significantly associated with obesity. In multi-locus analysis, SNPs of FTO and IRX3 were in strong linkage disequilibrium and in haplotype and GMDR analysis the SNPs were significantly associated with obesity risk (p genetic variants of both FTO and IRX3 genes are in high linkage disequilibrium (LD) and are associated with obesity risk in North Indians.

  16. Chikungunya Infection in India: Results of a Prospective Hospital Based Multi-Centric Study

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    Ray, Pratima; Ratagiri, Vinod H.; Kabra, Sushil K.; Lodha, Rakesh; Sharma, Sumit; Sharma, B. S.; Kalaivani, Mani; Wig, Naveet

    2012-01-01

    Background Chikungunya (CHIKV) has recently seen a re-emergence in India with high morbidity. However, the epidemiology and disease burden remain largely undetermined. A prospective multi-centric study was conducted to evaluate clinical, epidemiological and virological features of chikugunya infection in patients with acute febrile illness from various geographical regions of India. Methods and Findings A total of 540 patients with fever of up to 7days duration were enrolled at Karnataka Institute of Medical Sciences (KIMS), Karnataka (South); Sawai Man Singh Medical College (SMS) Rajasthan (West), and All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) New Delhi (North) from June 2008 to May 2009. Serum specimens were screened for chikungunya infection concurrently through RT-PCR and serology (IgM). Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Bioedit and Mega2 programs. Chikungunya infection was detected in 25.37% patients by RT-PCR and/or IgM-ELISA. Highest cases were detected in south (49.36%) followed by west (16.28%) and north (0.56%) India. A difference in proportion of positives by RT-PCR/ELISA with regard to duration of fever was observed (pchikungunya confirmed cases (pchikungunya in high frequencies and severe morbidity in south and west India but rare in north. The study emphasizes the need for continuous surveillance for disease burden using multiple diagnostic tests and also warrants the need for an appropriate molecular diagnostic for early detection of chikungunya virus. PMID:22363413

  17. Late Acheulean hominins at the Marine Isotope Stage 6/5e transition in north-central India

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    Haslam, Michael; Roberts, Richard G.; Shipton, Ceri; Pal, J. N.; Fenwick, Jacqueline L.; Ditchfield, Peter; Boivin, Nicole; Dubey, A. K.; Gupta, M. C.; Petraglia, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Single-grain optically stimulated luminescence dating was applied to Late Quaternary sediments at two sites in the Middle Son Valley, Madhya Pradesh, India. Designated Bamburi 1 and Patpara, these sites contain Late Acheulean stone tool assemblages, which we associate with non-modern hominins. Age determinations of 140-120 ka place the formation of these sites at around the Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 6-5 transition, placing them among the youngest Acheulean sites in the world. We present here the geochronology and sedimentological setting of these sites, and consider potential implications of Late Pleistocene archaic habitation in north-central India for the initial dispersal of modern humans across South Asia.

  18. Modeling and forecasting rainfall patterns of southwest monsoons in North-East India as a SARIMA process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimha Murthy, K. V.; Saravana, R.; Vijaya Kumar, K.

    2017-02-01

    Weather forecasting is an important issue in the field of meteorology all over the world. The pattern and amount of rainfall are the essential factors that affect agricultural systems. India experiences the precious Southwest monsoon season for four months from June to September. The present paper describes an empirical study for modeling and forecasting the time series of Southwest monsoon rainfall patterns in the North-East India. The Box-Jenkins Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA) methodology has been adopted for model identification, diagnostic checking and forecasting for this region. The study has shown that the SARIMA (0, 1, 1) (1, 0, 1)4 model is appropriate for analyzing and forecasting the future rainfall patterns. The Analysis of Means (ANOM) is a useful alternative to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) for comparing the group of treatments to study the variations and critical comparisons of rainfall patterns in different months of the season.

  19. COMPARATIVE ACCOUNT ON GC-MS ANALYSIS OF MENTHA ARVENSIS L. CORN MINT FROM THREE DIFFERENT LOCATIONS OF NORTH INDIA

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    SHARMA VIVEK1*, SHARMA NISHA1, SINGH HARBANS 1, SRIVASTAVA K. DEVENDRA1, PATHANIA VIJAYLATA2, SINGH BIKRAM2, GUPTA C. RAGHBIR1

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil analysis of Mentha arvensis L. (Corn Mint has been done for the first time from three locations of NorthIndia. The extraction yields for the essential oils of three locations of M. arvensis were: 0.38% for sample M-1 collectedfrom Fatehpur (415m, 0.31% for sample M-2 from Dhameta (435m and 0.36% for sample MP from Patiala (250m. Theoils were analyzed by GC-MS, the components of oil were identified by comparing their retention indices and mass spectrafragmentation patterns with those stored on the MS-computer library and also from the published literatures. The majorconstituents reported from essential oils of M. arvensis were: L-Menthone, Menthol, Isomenthone, Eucalyptol, Piperitoneoxide, Carvone, dl-Limonene, trans-Dihydrocarvone, Germacrene-D, etc. from all three samples collected from Punjab andHimachal Pradesh of Northern India.

  20. Site-specific Microzonation Study in Delhi Metropolitan City by 2-D Modelling of SH and P-SV Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, Imtiyaz A.; Vaccari, F.; Panza, G. F.

    Delhi - the capital of India lies on a severe earthquake hazard threat not only from local earthquakes but also from Himalayan events just 200-250 km apart. The seismic ground motion in a part of Delhi City is computed with a hybrid technique based on the modal summation and the finite-difference scheme for site-specific strong ground motion modelling. Complete realistic SH and #E5/E5#-SV wave seismograms are computed along two geological cross sections, (1) north-south, from Inter State Bus Terminal (ISBT) to Sewanagar and (2) east-west, from Tilak Bridge to Punjabi Bagh. Two real earthquake sources of July 15, 1720 (MMI=IX, M=7.4) and August 27, 1960 (M=6.0) have been used in modelling. The response spectra ratio (RSR), i.e. the response spectra computed from the signals synthesized along the laterally varying section and normalized by the response spectra computed from the corresponding signals, synthesized for the bedrock reference regional model, have been determined. As expected, the sedimentary cover causes an increase of the signal amplitude, particularly in the radial and transverse components. To further check the site-effects, we reversed the source location to the other side of the cross section and recomputed the site amplifications. There are only a few sites where a large amplification is invariant with respect to the two source locations considered. The RSR ranges between 5 to 10 in the frequency range from 2.8 to 3.7 Hz for the radial and transverse components of motion along the NS cross section. Along the EW cross section RSR varies between 3.5 to 7.5 in the frequency range from 3.5 to 4.1 Hz. The amplification of the vertical component is considerable at high frequency (>4 Hz.) whereas it is negligible in lower frequency range.

  1. Knowledge and Awareness of the Tuberculosis in Tuberculosis Patients at a Tertiary Care Centre in North West Rajasthan, India

    OpenAIRE

    Vinod Kumar Jangid; Neeraj Kumar Agrawal; Gulab Singh Yadav; Shubham Pandey; Brij B Mathur

    2016-01-01

    "Introduction- The awareness and knowledge about TB vary in different geographical locations and a relationship exists between knowledge and prevention of disease. Hence we planned to con-duct the study to assess it in TB patients in North West Rajasthan, India. Method- A cross sectional, questionnaire based epidemiological study was conducted in 510 TB patients of age group 16-78 years for 9 months from April 2010 to January 2011 in the Department of TB and Chest, S.P. Medical College, ...

  2. Centro de conferencias en Nueva Delhi

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    Sarwal, S.

    1963-12-01

    Full Text Available Vigyan Bhavan, in New Delhi, is a centre specially built to hold in it national and international meetings and congresses. The north, east and west faces of the building follow closely the traditional local Indian style. The main frontage, to the south, has a simple but fine Buddhist arch in green marble and wide steps leading to it in white marble. This centre consists of three distinct, but well integrated, buildings. The main facilities of this project are: an auditorium with seating accommodation for 706 delegates, a public gallery, and two meeting rooms for 20 people each, on the first floor. A separate section houses 5 committee rooms, two rooms for other group meetings, and a cafeteria, on the lower floor. The offices and other administrative services have been placed in the east wing, which is three storeys high, and is separated from the rest of the centre by a paved patio. The peculiar beauty of this project and the surrounding landscape's picturesque charm induce a sense of relaxation that is indeed conducive to the better success of international meetings.El Vigyan Bhavan, de Nueva Delhi, constituye un Centro especialmente construido para la celebración de conferencias nacionales e internacionales. Sus alzados norte, este y oeste fueron concebidos siguiendo el estilo tradicional indio, y muestran interesantes efectos de claro-oscuro. La fachada principal —sur— presenta un sencillo pero distinguido arco budista en mármol verde, y una escalinata realizada con mármol blanco. Este conjunto está constituido por tres cuerpos diferenciados, pero conectado con fáciles comunicaciones. Como dependencias importantes del Centro figuran: un auditorio con capacidad para 706 delegados sentados, una galería para el público y dos salas de reunión para 20 personas en el primer piso. El cuerpo posterior del edificio, aislado del auditorio por un patio, contiene cinco salas de juntas y dos salas para comisiones; en la planta baja hay una

  3. Breast and cervical cancer risk in India: An update

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    Smita Asthana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast and cervical cancers are two major cancers among Indian women. Analysis of trends would help in planning and organization of programs for control of these cancers. Objective: The objective of the following study is to compute risk of breast and cervical cancers using updated data from different cancer registries of India and study of its trends. Materials and Methods: Data on incidence rates of breast and cervical cancers were obtained from six major cancer registries of India for the years 1982-2008 and from the recently initiated cancer registries, North Eastern Registries of India with a total of 21 registries. Annual percent change in incidence and risk in terms of one in number of women likely to develop cancer was estimated for both the cancers in various registries. Results: The annual percentage change in incidence ranged from 0.46 to 2.56 and −1.14 to −3.4 for breast and cervical cancers respectively. Trends were significant for both cancers in the registries of Chennai, Bangalore, Mumbai and Delhi except Barshi and Bhopal. North East region showed decrease in risk for breast and cervical cancers whereas increasing trend was observed in Imphal (West and for cervical cancer in Silchar. Conclusion: North Eastern region recorded decline in the incidence of breast cancer which is contrary to the observation in other registries, which showed increase in breast cancer and decline in cervical cancer incidences.

  4. Designing Citizens in Transnational India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Lilly Christine

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the politics of design practice in urban India through an ethnography of a Delhi-based design and innovation studio. The dissertation focuses on the ideological continuities between the profession of design and middle class Indian citizenship post-liberalization, twinning arts of governance through the shaping of the…

  5. Tattoo practices in north-east India: A hospital-based cross-sectional study

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    Binod Kumar Thakur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tattooing has become increasingly popular, particularly among young people. However, little is known about the tattoo practices in North-East India. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to know the reasons and motivations of tattoo application and tattoo removal in individuals asking for tattoo removal. The secondary objective was to identify the demography, methods and safety of tattoo practices in these tattooed individuals. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 212 consecutive individuals seeking tattoo removal. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for intergroup comparisons. Results: There were 178 (84% males and 34 (16% females. The mean ± standard deviation (SD age of individuals seeking tattoo removal was 21.8 ± 4 years. The mean ± SD age of doing tattoo was 15.8 ± 3 years. Most individuals possessed an amateur tattoo (94.3%, 4.2% a professional one and 1.4% had a combination. Sewing needle was the most common instrument used for making tattoos in 51.4%. The individuals made their tattoos in an unsterile manner in 49.1%. The most common reason for doing tattoo was for fashion in 87.7%. The participants wanted tattoo removal to qualify for jobs, especially in armed forces in 49.5% and due to regret in 21.7%. Black was the most preferred colour in 37.3% followed by green in 28.3%. The fabric ink was the choice of ink in maximum number of individuals, i.e. 93.9%. Limitations: It was a hospital-based study done only on individuals seeking tattoo removal. It needs caution to generalise the findings in population. In addition, there may be recall bias in the participants. Conclusion: The tattoo was done mostly below 18 years of age in a crude unsterile way. The individuals had poor risk perceptions about various infections and complications of tattooing. There is an urgent need to caution and educate the youngsters and school-going children about safe

  6. Emergence of antimicrobial resistance and virulence factors among the unusual species of enterococci, from North India

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    Banerjee Tuhina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several enterococcal species are increasingly being reported from clinical infections, besides the major species. Aim: This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of unusual enterococcal species and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, virulence factors, and molecular characterization. Study Design and Settings: The study was conducted in Department of Microbiology and associated Tertiary Care University Hospital in North India. Materials and Methods: Enterococcal isolates were collected for a period of 2 years from clinical specimens. Identification and elaborate phenotypic characterization was done biochemically. All the isolates were tested by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method and breakpoint minimum inhibitory concentration for susceptibility against standard antibiotics. Screening for vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE, high-level aminoglycoside resistance was done on brain heart infusion agar incorporated with 6 μg/ml vancomycin, 500 μg/ml gentamicin, and 2000 μg/ml streptomycin, respectively. VRE isolates were tested for the presence of vanA, vanB, and vanC genes and high-level gentamicin resistant (HLGR isolates for aac-6′- aph-2′ gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Hemolysin and gelatinase production, hemagglutination and biofilm formation were detected along with asa1, gelE, esp, hyl, and cylA genes by multiplex PCR. Results: Of 403 enterococci, 93 (23.07% isolates were identified as unusual species and atypical variants. Resistance of 52.68%, 46.23%, 44.08%, and 6.45% for ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, high strength gentamicin, and vancomycin, respectively were noted. Presence of vanC gene in Enterococcus gallinarum and Enterococcus casseliflavus isolates and vanA gene in Enterococcus durans and Enterococcus hirae and aac-6′- aph-2′′ gene was found in 33.14% (14/41 of the HLGR isolates. The most frequent virulence factor was biofilm production. Only a few isolates harbored asa1 (2, gelE (9

  7. Smoking behaviour among young doctors of a tertiary care hospital in North India

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    Muneer A. Bhat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco use is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced. There are more than one billion smokers in the world. Almost half of the worlds children breathe air polluted by tobacco. Aim of current study was to study the smoking trends among young doctors in a tertiary care institute in north India. Methods: A descriptive observational cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted among 250 doctors of a tertiary care Hospital in Jammu and Kashmir (Sheri Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, SKIMS during the two months of February-March, 2014. The predesigned tool adopted during data collection was a questionnaire that was developed at the institute with the assistance from the faculty members and other experts. Results: Among 250 participants, (20% were smokers; among smokers, (76% were regular smokers and (24% were occasional smokers. Majority of smokers were in the age group of 21-30 years (80% and started smoking between 11-20 years (70%. All of them were male (100%. No significant difference was observed among urban and rural students. Among smokers, majority (60% was in the practice of smoking for last 6 months to 1 year and 26% smoked for <6 months; and (14% smoked for more than 5 years .It was found more than half of the responding (60% students used to smoke 5-9 cigarettes per day; 14% is <5 and 26% consumed 10 or more per day .Among smokers, peer pressure was found in 80% cases. ( and #967;2 = 107, P <0.001. Among smokers, almost 20% had other addiction and among non-smokers only 5% had .Effect of parental smoking was significantly higher in smokers than non-smoker ( and #967;2 = 66.2, P <0.001 .It was seen that peer pressure was the most important risk factor (60% of initiation of smoking habit followed by parental influence (20%. Majority (78.4% had no intention to quit in the next 6 months. Lack of Incentive (36.36% and Addiction (27.27% were the main reasons for not quitting. Conclusion: We

  8. Tattoo Practices in North-East India: A Hospital-based Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Binod Kumar; Verma, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Tattooing has become increasingly popular, particularly among young people. However, little is known about the tattoo practices in North-East India. The primary objective of this study was to know the reasons and motivations of tattoo application and tattoo removal in individuals asking for tattoo removal. The secondary objective was to identify the demography, methods and safety of tattoo practices in these tattooed individuals. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 212 consecutive individuals seeking tattoo removal. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for intergroup comparisons. There were 178 (84%) males and 34 (16%) females. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of individuals seeking tattoo removal was 21.8 ± 4 years. The mean ± SD age of doing tattoo was 15.8 ± 3 years. Most individuals possessed an amateur tattoo (94.3%), 4.2% a professional one and 1.4% had a combination. Sewing needle was the most common instrument used for making tattoos in 51.4%. The individuals made their tattoos in an unsterile manner in 49.1%. The most common reason for doing tattoo was for fashion in 87.7%. The participants wanted tattoo removal to qualify for jobs, especially in armed forces in 49.5% and due to regret in 21.7%. Black was the most preferred colour in 37.3% followed by green in 28.3%. The fabric ink was the choice of ink in maximum number of individuals, i.e. 93.9%. It was a hospital-based study done only on individuals seeking tattoo removal. It needs caution to generalise the findings in population. In addition, there may be recall bias in the participants. The tattoo was done mostly below 18 years of age in a crude unsterile way. The individuals had poor risk perceptions about various infections and complications of tattooing. There is an urgent need to caution and educate the youngsters and school-going children about safe tattooing and consequences of tattooing.

  9. A STUDY ON CARDIAC MYXOMA OF POPULATION IN NORTH EAST INDIA

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    Jyoti Prasad Kalita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cardiac myxomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors. A high degree of suspicion is required for diagnosing myxomas clinically and often leads to grave consequence if missed. Though surgical resection is the definitive treatment, but if not treated with the right surgical technique recurrence occurs. OBJECTIVES To describe clinical presentations, age and sex distribution, anatomical location and morbidity, mortality and recurrence rate following surgery of patients of North Eastern part of India who have presented in our Cardiothoracic Unit with cardiac myxomas. METHOD All consecutive patients over a period of 5 years who underwent surgical excision of cardiac myxoma at our Cardiothoracic Unit and histologically proven as cardiac myxoma were included in this study. Data were collected from the operation data base and the patient records. Echocardiography was the the diagnostic tool in all cases. The historical longitudinal study was performed. All patients underwent operation soon after the diagnosis of a myxoma was made. Complete tumour excision were done in all cases. All cases were followed up for a mean period of 32 months. RESULTS Of total 28 patients who underwent surgery for cardiac tumor over that period, 25(89.25% patients had histologically proven cardiac myxomas. Their age ranged from 15 to 55 years with a mean of 35 years. Majority patients were female (n-16, 64%. Most of the patients had clinical presentations similar to obstructive mitral valve. A small group of patients presented with embolic and constitutional symptoms. All patients underwent operation via right atrial approach. Left atrium (n-20, 80% is the commonest location followed by the right atrium (n-3, 12%. One patient had myxoma originating from tricuspid valve annulus, one from right ventricle and another one patient had mitral valve annulus origin. There was no death after surgery or recurrence was noted after mean 32 moths of follow-up. DISCUSSION

  10. Tattoo Practices in North-East India: A Hospital-based Cross-sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Binod Kumar; Verma, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tattooing has become increasingly popular, particularly among young people. However, little is known about the tattoo practices in North-East India. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to know the reasons and motivations of tattoo application and tattoo removal in individuals asking for tattoo removal. The secondary objective was to identify the demography, methods and safety of tattoo practices in these tattooed individuals. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 212 consecutive individuals seeking tattoo removal. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for intergroup comparisons. Results: There were 178 (84%) males and 34 (16%) females. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of individuals seeking tattoo removal was 21.8 ± 4 years. The mean ± SD age of doing tattoo was 15.8 ± 3 years. Most individuals possessed an amateur tattoo (94.3%), 4.2% a professional one and 1.4% had a combination. Sewing needle was the most common instrument used for making tattoos in 51.4%. The individuals made their tattoos in an unsterile manner in 49.1%. The most common reason for doing tattoo was for fashion in 87.7%. The participants wanted tattoo removal to qualify for jobs, especially in armed forces in 49.5% and due to regret in 21.7%. Black was the most preferred colour in 37.3% followed by green in 28.3%. The fabric ink was the choice of ink in maximum number of individuals, i.e. 93.9%. Limitations: It was a hospital-based study done only on individuals seeking tattoo removal. It needs caution to generalise the findings in population. In addition, there may be recall bias in the participants. Conclusion: The tattoo was done mostly below 18 years of age in a crude unsterile way. The individuals had poor risk perceptions about various infections and complications of tattooing. There is an urgent need to caution and educate the youngsters and school-going children about safe tattooing and

  11. Association between body mass index and risk of breast cancer among females of north India

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, breast cancer is most common cancer among women. In India and other developing countries, breast carcinoma ranks second only to cervical carcinoma among women. Although studies have been done globally, to find association between BMI and breast cancer, very few studies in India document any such association. Purpose: To find out the association between BMI and breast cancer. Materials and Methods: A Case-control study was done from August 2009 - July 2010 in the wards o...

  12. A Review of the Little Known Ethnic Religious Art and Culture of Arunachal Pradesh, North-East India

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    Bina Gandhi Deori

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arunachal Pradesh, the north-easternmost state of India is a mountainous terrain inhabited by a number of ethnic communities. Due to its geographical isolation, it is still cut off from mainstream India and has limited interaction with the rest of India. There are as many as 26 major tribes and several hundred sub-tribes. They have their own distinct culture, tradition and religious belief system. Some of the ethnic communities namely, Apatani, Nyishi, Galo, Tagin, Tangsa, Wancho, Mishmi etc. have their indigenous religious practices with well-defined belief system but due to limited research there is a paucity of data which fails to present a clear picture of the culture and tradition of the ethnic communities of the region. In many ways, their indigenous religion plays an important role in influencing the peoples’ arts and culture. This paper is an attempt to review the ethnic religious art and culture of the people of Arunachal Pradesh in an effort to highlight and preserve their ethnic cultural identity.

  13. Molecular characterization of hepatitis A virus strains in a tertiary care health set up in north western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mini Pritam; Majumdar, Manasi; Thapa, Babu Ram; Gupta, Puneet Kumar; Khurana, Jasmine; Budhathoki, Bimal; Ratho, Radha Kanta

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis A virus usually causes acute viral hepatitis (AVH) in the paediatric age group with a recent shift in age distribution and disease manifestations like acute liver failure (ALF). This has been attributed to mutations in 5'non-translated region (5'NTR) which affects the viral multiplication. The present study was aimed to carry out the molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of hepatitis A virus strains circulating in north western India. Serum samples from in patients and those attending out patient department of Pediatric Gastroenterology in a tertiary care hospital in north India during 2007-2011 with clinically suspected AVH were tested for anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) IgM antibodies. Acute phase serum samples were subjected to nested PCR targeting the 5'NTR region followed by sequencing of the representative strains. A total of 1334 samples were tested, 290 (21.7%) were positive for anti-HAV IgM antibody. Of these, 78 serum samples (hepatitis A still a disease of children with III A as a circulating genotype in this region. The mutations at 5'NTR region warrant further analysis as these affect the structure of internal ribosomal entry site which is important for viral replication.

  14. A study on sexually transmitted diseases in patients in a STD clinic in a district hospital in North India

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    Neerja Puri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs are a global health problem of great magnitude. The pattern of STDs differs from country to country and from region to region. The increased risk of the transmission of HIV is known to be associated with the presence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs and despite the presence of the National STD Control Program in India the number of people with STDs remains high. Aim: The aim of our study was to study the profile of patients in a STD clinic in North India and to study various sexually transmitted infections in both male and female patients. Material and Methods: A prospective study of the patients attending STD clinic in a district hospital in North India from December 2009 to December 2012 was done. A total of 2700 patients attending the STDclinic in three years from December 2009 to December 2012 were taken up for the study. Results: The commonest sexually transmitted infection in males was herpes genitalis (30% followed by 20% cases of genital warts. 10% patients had gonorrhoea, genital molluscum contagiosum, syphilis and genital scabies each and 5% patients had nongonococcal urethritis. Only 5% of the total patients had chancroid, donovanosis and LGV. The commonest sexually transmitted infection in females was vaginal discharge seen in 40% patients, lower abdominal pain in 20% patients, herpes genitalis in 15% patients followed by 20% cases of genital warts and syphilis each. Genital molluscum contagiosum was seen in 5% patients only. Conclusions: The treatment of STD’s is important as both non-ulcerative and ulcerative STDs increase the susceptibility to or transmissibility of HIV infection and as such, an increase in STD prevalence as revealed by clinic attendance in this study was bound to facilitate the spread of HIV/AIDS. Perhaps it is high time health planners adopted a more aggressive and result oriented HIV/AIDS/STD awareness campaign strategy.

  15. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Aromatic and Quality Rice (Oryza sativa L. Landraces from North-Eastern India.

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    Somnath Roy

    Full Text Available The North-eastern (NE India, comprising of Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura, possess diverse array of locally adapted non-Basmati aromatic germplasm. The germplasm collections from this region could serve as valuable resources in breeding for abiotic stress tolerance, grain yield and cooking/eating quality. To utilize such collections, however, breeders need information about the extent and distribution of genetic diversity present within collections. In this study, we report the result of population genetic analysis of 107 aromatic and quality rice accessions collected from different parts of NE India, as well as classified these accessions in the context of a set of structured global rice cultivars. A total of 322 alleles were amplified by 40 simple sequence repeat (SSR markers with an average of 8.03 alleles per locus. Average gene diversity was 0.67. Population structure analysis revealed that NE Indian aromatic rice can be subdivided into three genetically distinct population clusters: P1, joha rice accessions from Assam, tai rices from Mizoram and those from Sikkim; P2, aromatic rice accessions from Nagaland; and P3, chakhao rice germplasm from Manipur [corrected]. Pair-wise FST between three groups varied from 0.223 (P1 vs P2 to 0.453 (P2 vs P3. With reference to the global classification of rice cultivars, two major groups (Indica and Japonica were identified in NE Indian germplasm. The aromatic accessions from Assam, Manipur and Sikkim were assigned to the Indica group, while the accessions from Nagaland exhibited close association with Japonica. The tai accessions of Mizoram along with few chakhao accessions collected from the hill districts of Manipur were identified as admixed. The results highlight the importance of regional genetic studies for understanding diversification of aromatic rice in India. The data also suggest that there is scope for exploiting the genetic diversity of

  16. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Aromatic and Quality Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Landraces from North-Eastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawkhlieng, Bandapkuper; Misra, A. K.; Pattanayak, A.; Harish, G. D.; Singh, S. K.; Ngachan, S. V.; Bansal, K. C.

    2015-01-01

    The North-eastern (NE) India, comprising of Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura, possess diverse array of locally adapted non-Basmati aromatic germplasm. The germplasm collections from this region could serve as valuable resources in breeding for abiotic stress tolerance, grain yield and cooking/eating quality. To utilize such collections, however, breeders need information about the extent and distribution of genetic diversity present within collections. In this study, we report the result of population genetic analysis of 107 aromatic and quality rice accessions collected from different parts of NE India, as well as classified these accessions in the context of a set of structured global rice cultivars. A total of 322 alleles were amplified by 40 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with an average of 8.03 alleles per locus. Average gene diversity was 0.67. Population structure analysis revealed that NE Indian aromatic rice can be subdivided into three genetically distinct population clusters: P1, joha rice accessions from Assam, tai rices from Mizoram and those from Sikkim; P2, chakhao rice germplasm from Manipur; and P3, aromatic rice accessions from Nagaland. Pair-wise FST between three groups varied from 0.223 (P1 vs P2) to 0.453 (P2 vs P3). With reference to the global classification of rice cultivars, two major groups (Indica and Japonica) were identified in NE Indian germplasm. The aromatic accessions from Assam, Manipur and Sikkim were assigned to the Indica group, while the accessions from Nagaland exhibited close association with Japonica. The tai accessions of Mizoram along with few chakhao accessions collected from the hill districts of Manipur were identified as admixed. The results highlight the importance of regional genetic studies for understanding diversification of aromatic rice in India. The data also suggest that there is scope for exploiting the genetic diversity of aromatic and quality rice

  17. Sewage-Borne Ammonium at a River Bank Filtration Site in Central Delhi, India: Simplified Flow and Reactive Transport Modeling to Support Decision-Making about Water Management Strategies

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    Maike Groeschke

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the Indian metropolis of Delhi, the Yamuna River is highly influenced by sewage water, which has led to elevated ammonium (NH4+ concentrations up to 20 mg/L in the river water during 2012–2013. Large drinking water production wells located in the alluvial aquifer draw high shares of bank filtrate. Due to the infiltrating river water, the raw water NH4+ concentrations in some wells exceed the threshold value of 0.5 mg/L ammonia-N of the Indian drinking water specifications, making the water unfit for human consumption without prior treatment. However, to meet the city’s growing water demand, it might be advantageous to consider the long-term use of the well field. This requires the development of an adapted post-treatment unit in concert with an adjusted well field management. To better understand the groundwater dynamics and contamination and decontamination times at the well field, a theoretical modeling study has been conducted. The results of 2D numerical modeling reveal that the groundwater flux beneath the river is negligible because of the aquifer and river geometry, indicating that infiltrating river water is not diluted by the ambient groundwater. Increasing the water abstraction in the wells closest to the river would result in a larger share of bank filtrate and a decreasing groundwater table decline. Simplified 1D reactive transport models set up for a distance of 500 m (transect from the riverbank to the first production well showed that the NH4+ contamination will prevail for the coming decades. Different lithological units of the aquifer (sand and kankar—a sediment containing calcareous nodules have a strong influence on the respective contamination and decontamination periods, as the retardation of NH4+ is higher in the kankar than in the sand layer. Although this simplified approach does not allow for a quantification of processes, it can support decision-making about a possible future use of the well field and point to

  18. Transport and land-use policies in Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Geetam

    2003-01-01

    Current transportation policies in mega-cities worldwide lead to major threats to health through traffic injuries, air pollution, noise, reduction in physical activities, and adverse impact on urban quality of life. In addition, a large section of the population in cities in low-income countries has to live in informal-sector, substandard housing. Many transportation policies fail to take enough account of their impacts on poverty and social exclusion, and they neglect the access and transportation demands of the more economically disadvantaged groups of society, who rely mostly on public transportation, walking, and cycling. Delhi, the capital city of India, is an interesting case because failure to consider the broad spectrum of health effects that may result from transport and land-use policies and investments has resulted in decisions that penalize the least affluent groups of the population and make it more difficult for them to get to jobs, education, health care, amenities, and services.

  19. Book Review: Pavarala, Vinod and Malik, Kanchan K., Other Voices. The Struggle for Community Radio in India, 2007, London/New Delhi/Thousand Oaks, CA, Sage Publications, ISBN 978-0-761-93602-2

    OpenAIRE

    Stiernstedt, Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    Community radio broadcasts fill the air in countries around the world, and in many places, not least in the so-called developing countries, it has played a significant role in development and in social- , as well as media, change. Southern Asia, however, has long lacked community radio, even though some stumbling attempts have been made in, for example Nepal, Indonesia and most recently in Bangladesh, just to mention a few. The same goes for India, which did not have community radio until Nov...

  20. Cost-effective electric vehicle charging infrastructure siting for Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Gopal, Anand R.; Harris, Andrew; Jacobson, Arne

    2016-06-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) represent a substantial opportunity for governments to reduce emissions of both air pollutants and greenhouse gases. The Government of India has set a goal of deploying 6-7 million hybrid and PEVs on Indian roads by the year 2020. The uptake of PEVs will depend on, among other factors like high cost, how effectively range anxiety is mitigated through the deployment of adequate electric vehicle charging stations (EVCS) throughout a region. The Indian Government therefore views EVCS deployment as a central part of their electric mobility mission. The plug-in electric vehicle infrastructure (PEVI) model—an agent-based simulation modeling platform—was used to explore the cost-effective siting of EVCS throughout the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi, India. At 1% penetration in the passenger car fleet, or ˜10 000 battery electric vehicles (BEVs), charging services can be provided to drivers for an investment of 4.4 M (or 440/BEV) by siting 2764 chargers throughout the NCT of Delhi with an emphasis on the more densely populated and frequented regions of the city. The majority of chargers sited by this analysis were low power, Level 1 chargers, which have the added benefit of being simpler to deploy than higher power alternatives. The amount of public infrastructure needed depends on the access that drivers have to EVCS at home, with 83% more charging capacity required to provide the same level of service to a population of drivers without home chargers compared to a scenario with home chargers. Results also depend on the battery capacity of the BEVs adopted, with approximately 60% more charging capacity needed to achieve the same level of service when vehicles are assumed to have 57 km versus 96 km of range.

  1. A therapy to live by: public health, the self and nationalism in the practice of a north Indian yoga society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, J S

    1997-06-01

    In this article I focus on the relationship between concepts of self and health in modern North India. Drawing on field research in a popular yoga society, I argue that yoga therapy, as practiced by the Bharatiya Yog Sansthan of Delhi, provides a reconceptualization of what can be meant by public health. Using studies that challenge both the essentialist and epistemological facticity of the self, I show how the discourse and practice of yoga is implicated in, and derived from, a complex search for self definition in terms of health; health which is conceived of as a public regimen that seeks to reconnect that which modernity has broken apart: mind and body.

  2. Molecular characterization of peste-des-petits ruminants virus (PPRV) isolated from an outbreak in the Indo-Bangladesh border of Tripura state of North-East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuchelvan, Dhanavelu; De, Ankan; Debnath, Bikas; Choudhary, Dheeraj; Venkatesan, Gnanavel; Rajak, Kaushal Kishore; Sudhakar, Shashi Bhusan; Himadri, Divakar; Pandey, Awadh Bihari; Parida, Satya

    2014-12-05

    Peste-des-petits- ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious and devastating disease of goats and sheep. Although India is endemic for PPR, Tripura, a state in North East India has never been reported confirmed PPR outbreaks. Recently, an outbreak of PPR occurred in non-descript goats at the Sabroom town of Tripura state in North-East India in June, 2013. The causative agent, PPR virus (PPRV) was confirmed by sandwich ELISA, virus isolation and N gene based RT-PCR and sequencing. The sequence and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the involvement of lineage IV PPR virus in the outbreak. The outbreak viruses from Tripura state were clustered mainly with circulating viruses from Bangladesh, India, China, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Dubai and Kurdistan. However, the nucleotide sequence homology ranged from 99.2 to 99.6% with the PPR strains circulating in Bangladesh during 2011 and 2012 whereas 95.5-98% homology has been observed with the viruses from India and other countries. These findings suggest the transboundary circulation of PPR virus between India and Bangladesh border, which warrant immediate vaccination across the international border to create an immune belt.

  3. Cost of providing inpatient burn care in a tertiary, teaching, hospital of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Rajeev B; Goswami, Prasenjit

    2013-06-01

    There is an extreme paucity of studies examining cost of burn care in the developing world when over 85% of burns take place in low and middle income countries. Modern burn care is perceived as an expensive, resource intensive endeavour, requiring specialized equipment, personnel and facilities to provide optimum care. If 'burn burden' of low and middle income countries (LMICs) is to be tackled deftly then besides prevention and education we need to have burn centres where 'reasonable' burn care can be delivered in face of resource constraints. This manuscript calculates the cost of providing inpatient burn management at a large, high volume, tertiary burn care facility of North India by estimating all cost drivers. In this one year study (1st February to 31st January 2012), in a 50 bedded burn unit, demographic parameters like age, gender, burn aetiology, % TBSA burns, duration of hospital stay and mortality were recorded for all patients. Cost drivers included in estimation were all medications and consumables, dressing material, investigations, blood products, dietary costs, and salaries of all personnel. Capital costs, utility costs and maintenance expenditure were excluded. The burn unit is constrained to provide conservative management, by and large, and is serviced by a large team of doctors and nurses. Entire treatment cost is borne by the hospital for all patients. 797 patients (208 60% BSA burns. 258/797 patients died (32.37%). Of these deaths 16, 68 and 174 patients were from 0 to 30%, 31 to 60% and >60% BSA groups, respectively. The mean length of hospitalization for all admissions was 7.86 days (ranging from 1 to 62 days) and for survivors it was 8.9 days. There were 299 operations carried out in the dedicated burns theatre. The total expenditure for the study period was Indian Rupees (Rs) 46,488,067 or US$ 845,237. At 1 US$=Rs 55 it makes the cost per patient to be US$ 1060.5. Almost 70% of cost of burn management resulted from salaries, followed by

  4. People and development: With special reference to the tribal peoples of north-east India

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    Varte, I.Z.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Northeast India is comprised of seven states peopled by tribes and communities majority of which are culturally and ethnically different from the rest of India. After India’s independence from the British in 1947, the Government- both at the state and central level has been implementing several development programmes in the region on poverty alleviation, employment, infrastructure, education, agriculture etc apparently to positively transform peoples’ lives in the region. However, inspite of these initiatives, several decades of intensive development programmes and strategies has somehow seen more failures than success. While development should have brought a positive change in peoples’ lives, it has instead become more and more conflict sensitive resulting in intense and often fatal socioeconomic, socio-political and socio-environmental disasters between and among communities in Northeast India. Why is this happening, how did it happen and how can this problem be solved are the questions being asked. The main aim of this paper is therefore to briefly try and see the essence and ethics underlying development along with the need for it as perceived by many, its impact on the societal cohesion of the people of Northeast India and the urgent need for a shift in the current development paradigm

  5. Groundwater arsenic contamination in Manipur, one of the seven North-Eastern Hill states of India: a future danger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborti, Dipankar; Singh, E. Jayantakumar; Das, Bhaskar; Shah, Babar Ali; Hossain, M. Amir; Nayak, Bishwajit; Ahamed, Sad; Singh, N. Rajmuhon

    2008-11-01

    Manipur State, with a population of 2.29 million, is one of the seven North-Eastern Hill states in India, and is severely affected by groundwater arsenic contamination. Manipur has nine districts out of which four are in Manipur Valley where 59% of the people live on 10% of the land. These four districts are all arsenic contaminated. We analysed water samples from 628 tubewells for arsenic out of an expected total 2,014 tubewells in the Manipur Valley. Analyzed samples, 63.3%, contained >10 μg/l of arsenic, 23.2% between 10 and 50 μg/l, and 40% >50 μg/l. The percentages of contaminated wells above 10 and 50 μg/l are higher than in other arsenic affected states and countries of the Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra (GMB) Plain. Unlike on the GMB plains, in Manipur there is no systematic relation between arsenic concentration and the depth of tubewells. The source of arsenic in GMB Plain is sediments derived from the Himalaya and surrounding mountains. North-Eastern Hill states were formed at late phase of Himalaya orogeny, and so it will be found in the future that groundwater arsenic contamination in the valleys of other North-Eastern Hill states. Arsenic contaminated aquifers in Manipur Valley are mainly located within the Newer Alluvium. In Manipur, the high rainfall and abundant surface water resources can be exploited to avoid repeating the mass arsenic poisoning that has occurred on the GMB plains.

  6. New Discovery of Coral Rubbings in the North-Western Gulf of Kachchh, Gujarat, Western India-GIS Based Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Sesh Serebiah; M. Rajkumar; SUN Jun; B. A. Venmathi Maran; A. Saravanakumar; G. A. Thivakaran

    2011-01-01

    The Gulf of Kachchh in western India, with its arid climate, large semi-diurnal tidal amplitudes, negative water balance and near-pristine water quality, is being extensively developed as oil importing bases for economic reasons in connection with its proximity to the oil exporting countries of the Middle East. Besides, new coral robbings were sighted in Jakhau, north-western Gulf of Kachchh. Dredging in Mandvi of the north Gulf covering 3.5 km2 revealed a similar assortment of live corals with their associated flora and fauna. These pioneering observations demonstrate that there exist live corals of young polyps-colony of Favia sp. belonging to the family Faviidae in the north-western Gulf of Kachchh. The environmental parameters there were carefully recorded as: surface water temperature (℃) varying from 29 to 31.8, salinity (ppt), pH, dissolved oxygen (mgL-l)and total suspended solids (mgL-1) in the ranges of 37- 43.5, 7.7- 8.45, 5.4 - 6.8 and 11- 31, respectively.

  7. A new genus and species Mangalaus krishianusandhanus (Acari: Eriophyidae) from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalaus ikrishianusandhanus n. gen., n. sp., (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea), collected from erineum on the underside of leaves of Cordia dichotoma (Boraginaceae) is described and illustrated from specimens collected at the Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI) in New Delhi, India....

  8. Frequency of β-thalassemia trait and other hemoglobinopathies in northern and western India

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    Madan Nishi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : India is an ethnically diverse country with an approximate population of 1.2 billion. The frequency of beta-thalassemia trait (βTT has variously been reported from < 1% to 17% and an average of 3.3%. Most of these studies have been carried out on small population groups and some have been based on hospital-based patients. There is also a variation in the prevalence of hemoglobinopathies in different regions and population groups in the country. A high frequency of Hb D has been reported from the North in the Punjabi population, Hb E in the eastern region of India and Hb S is mainly reported from populations of tribal origin from different parts of the country. Objectives: To study the gene frequency of βTT and other hemoglobinopathies in three regions East (Kolkata, West (Mumbai and North (Delhi in larghe population group (schoolchildren for a more accurate assessment of gene frequency for planning of control programmes for haemoglobinopathies. Materials and Methods: This study included 5408 children from 11 schools in Delhi, 5682 from 75 schools in Mumbai and 957 schoolchildren from Kolkata who were screened for βTT and haemoglobinopathies. These included 5684 children from 75 schools in Mumbai and 5408 children from 11 schools in Delhi. Children were 11-18 years of age of both sexes. The final report is, however, only on 11090 schoolchildren from Mumbai and Delhi as data from Kolkata was restricted both in numbers and objectives and could not be included for comparison. Results: The overall gene frequency of βTT in Mumbai and Delhi was 4.05% being 2.68% and 5.47% in children of the two cities respectively. In Mumbai, the gene frequency was evenly distributed. Majority of the children with βTT from Mumbai were from Marathi (38.9% and Gujarati (25% speaking groups. Gene frequency was> 5% in Bhatias, Khatris, Lohanas and Schedule Castes. In Delhi, a higher incidence was observed in schoolchildren of North and West Delhi (5

  9. Forecasts using Box-Jenkins models for the ambient air quality data of Delhi City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pragati; Chandra, Avinash; Kaushik, S C

    2009-10-01

    The monthly maximum of the 24-h average time-series data of ambient air quality-sulphur dioxide (SO(2)), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration monitored at the six National Ambient Air Quality Monitoring (NAAQM) stations in Delhi, was analysed using Box-Jenkins modelling approach (Box et al. 1994). Univariate linear stochastic models were developed to examine the degree of prediction possible for situations where only the past record of pollutant data are available. In all, 18 models were developed, three for each station for each of the respective pollutant. The model evaluation statistics suggest that considerably satisfactory real-time forecasts of pollution concentrations can be generated using the Box-Jenkins approach. The developed models can be used to provide short-term, real-time forecasts of extreme air pollution concentrations for the Air Quality Control Region (AQCR) of Delhi City, India.

  10. Case Report of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma of Uterine Cervix Treated at a Semiurban Cancer Centre in North India

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    Vibhor Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoma of the uterine cervix is very rare. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL involving the uterine cervix treated at a newly commissioned semiurban cancer centre in north India in 2015. Data for this study was obtained from the hospital electronic medical records and the patient’s case file. We also reviewed published case reports of uterine and cervical lymphoma involving forty-one patients. We treated a case of stage IV DLBCL cervix with six cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone and intrathecal methotrexate followed by consolidation with radiotherapy. The patient showed complete response to chemotherapy. We conclude that, in advanced stage lymphoma involving uterus and cervix, combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is effective in short term.

  11. In Vitro Free Radical Scavenging Activity of a Wild Edible Mushroom, Sparassis crispa (Wulf. Fr., from North Western Himalayas, India

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    Madhavi Joshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of methanolic extract of Sparassis crispa collected from North Western Himalayan region of India were analyzed. Phenolic content 11.14±0.08 mg tannic acid equivalent per g of the extract and flavonoids 1.96±04 mg catechin equivalent per g of the extract were recorded to be the major antioxidant components in this wild edible mushroom. Significant antioxidant efficiency on inhibition of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH was observed when compared to standard antioxidant like L-ascorbic acid. IC50 value of the extract was 2.11 mg/mL. The findings suggest S. crispa as an easily accessible source of natural antioxidants.

  12. Case Report of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma of Uterine Cervix Treated at a Semiurban Cancer Centre in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Epari

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoma of the uterine cervix is very rare. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) involving the uterine cervix treated at a newly commissioned semiurban cancer centre in north India in 2015. Data for this study was obtained from the hospital electronic medical records and the patient's case file. We also reviewed published case reports of uterine and cervical lymphoma involving forty-one patients. We treated a case of stage IV DLBCL cervix with six cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone) and intrathecal methotrexate followed by consolidation with radiotherapy. The patient showed complete response to chemotherapy. We conclude that, in advanced stage lymphoma involving uterus and cervix, combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is effective in short term. PMID:27597906

  13. Heavy metals accumulation in crab and shrimps from Pulicat lake, north Chennai coastal region, southeast coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batvari, B Prabhu Dass; Sivakumar, S; Shanthi, K; Lee, Kui-Jae; Oh, Byung-Taek; Krishnamoorthy, R R; Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of heavy metals such as lead (Pb), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), and chromium (Cr) was examined in crab (Scylla serrata) and shrimps (Penaeus semisulcatus, Penaeus indicus, and Penaeus monodon) collected from Pulicat lake that receives effluents from industries located in north Chennai, southeast coast of India. The results showed limited difference between crab and prawns as well as significant variations between the organs. Pb is the highly accumulated metal in both crab and shrimps, except P. monodon. The highest metal concentration was mostly found in the liver followed by other organs. The concentration of metals in edible parts (muscle) was within the permissible level and safe for consumption. However, the results of the study clearly indicate the biomagnification of metals in Pulicat lake.

  14. Estimation of stature from the foot and its segments in a sub-adult female population of North India

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    Krishan Kewal

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing personal identity is one of the main concerns in forensic investigations. Estimation of stature forms a basic domain of the investigation process in unknown and co-mingled human remains in forensic anthropology case work. The objective of the present study was to set up standards for estimation of stature from the foot and its segments in a sub-adult female population. Methods The sample for the study constituted 149 young females from the Northern part of India. The participants were aged between 13 and 18 years. Besides stature, seven anthropometric measurements that included length of the foot from each toe (T1, T2, T3, T4, and T5 respectively, foot breadth at ball (BBAL and foot breadth at heel (BHEL were measured on both feet in each participant using standard methods and techniques. Results The results indicated that statistically significant differences (p p-value Conclusions The present study concluded that foot measurements have a strong relationship with stature in the sub-adult female population of North India. Hence, the stature of an individual can be successfully estimated from the foot and its segments using different regression models derived in the study. The regression models derived in the study may be applied successfully for the estimation of stature in sub-adult females, whenever foot remains are brought for forensic examination. Stepwise multiple regression models tend to estimate stature more accurately than linear regression models in female sub-adults.

  15. Crustal seismic anisotropy beneath Shillong plateau - Assam valley in North East India: Shear-wave splitting analysis using local earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Antara; Baruah, Santanu; Piccinini, Davide; Saikia, Sowrav; Phukan, Manoj K.; Chetia, Monisha; Kayal, J. R.

    2017-10-01

    We present crustal anisotropy estimates constrained by shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis using local earthquakes in the Shillong plateau and Assam valley area, North East India (NE India) region. Splitting parameters are determined using an automated cross-correlation (CC) method. We located 330 earthquakes recorded by 17 broadband seismic stations during 2001-2014 in the study area. Out of these 330 events, seismograms of 163 events are selected for the SWS analysis. Relatively small average delay times (0.039-0.084 s) indicate existence of moderate crack density in the crust below the study area. It is found that fast polarization directions vary from station to station depending on the regional stress system as well as geological conditions. The spatial pattern of crustal anisotropy in the area is controlled mostly by tectonic movement of the Indian plate towards NE. Presence of several E-W and N-S trending active faults in the area also play an important role on the observed pattern of crustal anisotropy.

  16. Amniotic membrane transplant with superficial keratectomy in superficial corneal degenerations: Efficacy in a rural population of north India

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    Rao Aparna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the applicability and efficacy of superficial keratectomy with transplantation of preserved amniotic membrane in superficial corneal degenerations in a rural population of Northern India in terms of visual improvement and surface regularization. Settings: Peripheral referral center in rural north India. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective non-comparative interventional case series where 24 eyes of 20 farmers from peripheral rural areas (M:F = 19:1 with visually significant superficial degenerative disorders (15 eyes with climatic droplet keratopathy one of which was associated with Salzmann nodular degeneration and nine eyes with band-shaped keratopathy were subjected to amniotic membrane transplantation (single or multiple layer combined with superficial keratectomy. Subjective and objective outcomes after surgery were evaluated and analyzed and statistical significance of the outcomes in various disorders was evaluated. Results: Eighty-eight per cent (21 eyes had symptomatic relief from distressing preoperative symptoms while postoperative visual improvement by two or more lines was achieved in 23 eyes (96% over a mean follow-up period of 26.8 ± 10.2 months. The surface irregularity present preoperatively was relieved in 23 cases while postoperative decline of vision with visually significant scarring was seen in one case (4%, which was labeled as failure. Conclusions: Amniotic membrane transplant with superficial keratectomy helped achieve subjective comfort, visual rehabilitation and clinical regularization of the corneal surface in superficial corneal degenerations during the mean followup of 26.8 ± 10.2 months in rural setups.

  17. Demographic and clinical profile of substance abusing women seeking treatment at a de-addiction center in north India

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    Naresh Nebhinani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the recent decades increasing number of women have been seeking deaddiction services. Despite that the report data is very limited from India. Objectives: The present research aimed to study the demographic and clinical profile of women seeking deaddiction treatment at a tertiary care center in North India. Materials and Methods: Retrospective structured chart review of 100 women substance abusers seeking treatment at a deaddiction center between September 1978 and December 2011. Results: A typical case was of 36.3 years age, married (65%, urban (61%, nuclear family (59% based housewife (56%, with good to fair social support (69%. The commonest substance of abuse was tobacco (60%, followed by opioids (27%, alcohol (15%, and benzodiazepines (13%. The common reasons for initiation of substance use were to alleviate frustration or stress (49% and curiosity (37%. Family history of drug dependence (43%, comorbidity (25%, and impairments in health (74%, family (57%, and social domains (56% were common. Only a third of the sample paid one or more follow visit, and of those 58% were abstinent at the last follow-up. Significant predictors identified were being non-Hindu and higher educational years for abstinent status at follow-up. Conclusion: The common substances of abuse were tobacco, opioids, and alcohol and benzodiazepines; and family history of drug abuse and comorbidity were common. The follow-up and outcome were generally poor. This profile gives us some clues to address a hidden health problem of the community.

  18. Association analysis of PPARγ (p.Pro12Ala) polymorphism with type 2 diabetic retinopathy in patients from north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Navdeep; Vanita, Vanita

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the association of PPARγ (p.Pro12Ala) polymorphism with type 2 diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients from north India. In this case-control association study a total of 1325 subjects (717 DR patients and 608 individuals with confirmed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) without retinopathy taken as controls (CDR)), were recruited. Genotyping for PPARγ (p.Pro12Ala) polymorphism was performed by Taqman SNP Genotyping Assays using Real time PCR. Statistically significant differences were observed between the two analyzed groups in the duration of diabetes and random blood glucose levels (p = 0.000 and p = 0.011, respectively). However, genotype and allele frequency distribution of PPARγ (p.Pro12Ala) polymorphism did not differ significantly between DR and CDR groups (p = 0.507 and 0.625, respectively). These findings suggest no significant association of p.Pro12Ala polymorphism with retinopathy in tested type 2 diabetic retinopathy patients as compared to T2DM individuals take as controls. To our knowledge, this is the first report of association analysis of p.Pro12Ala polymorphism in PPARγ in DR patients from India.

  19. Bacteriological profile and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of neonatal septicaemia in a rural tertiary care hospital in North India

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    S Thakur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is not much published literature on neonatal septicemia available for the Sub-Himalayan region of North India. Hence, we undertook this study to find out the bacteriological profile and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of neonatal septicemia in the neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Material and Methods: Blood cultures were performed for all clinically suspected neonatal septicemia cases for 1-year. Identification of all pathogenic isolates was followed by antibiotic sensitivity testing. Results: We did blood cultures for 450 neonates and 42% were culture positive. Early onset sepsis were 92 (49% and 96 (51% were late onset sepsis. Gram-positive isolates were 60% and 40% were Gram-negative. Staphylococcus aureus (40%, coagulase negative Staphylococcus species (16%, non-fermenter group of organisms (NFGOs (15%, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (10% were the main isolates. Nasal cannula 101 (54%, birth asphyxia 91 (48%, and prematurity 73 (38% were the prominent risk factors associated with septicemia. Gram-positive organisms were highly resistant to penicillin (87% whereas Gram-negative isolates showed high resistance to third generation cephalosporins (53–89% and aminoglycosides (50–67%. The S. aureus isolates were methicillin-resistant in 41% whereas extended spectrum beta lactamase production was seen in 48% Gram-negative isolates.Conclusion: Our study highlights the recent emergence of Gram-positive organisms as predominant cause of neonatal septicemia in this part of Sub-Himalayan region, along with the review of literature which shows similar results from North India and rest of the world too. Though Gram-negative bacteria still remain the main cause of mortality in neonatal septicemia, we want to dispel the common notion among practitioners that they are the predominant isolates in neonatal septicemia.

  20. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in pre- and post-menopausal women: A prospective study from apex institute of North India

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    Sandeep Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The metabolic syndrome (MS (syndrome X, insulin resistance syndrome is a constellation of metabolic abnormalities and a complex predisease state that predicts future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Menopausal transition and postmenopausal state are considered as a vulnerable period for developing MS, and this increased risk has been attributed to decreasing estrogen levels with an increasing risk of insulin resistance following menopause. Aims and Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of MS and its components in pre- and post-menopausal women from North India. Methodology: This is a cross-sectional study of 350 women in the age group of 45-55 years attending gynecology clinic in a tertiary center of North India. Details of sociodemographic data, menopausal history, reproductive, and medical profile were obtained. Then, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI, and blood pressure were recorded. A venous blood sample was collected for fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. MS was defined according to the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results: The mean age was 49.09 ± 2.2 years in premenopausal and 49.54 ± 2.8 years in postmenopausal women. The prevalence of MS in the study group was 62.6%. Occurrence of MS was higher in older and obese women. Abnormal waist circumference was the most prevalent component (87% of MS and in terms of odd ratio, correlation was highest for BMI followed by total cholesterol and waist-hip ratio. Conclusion: We should target obesity and deranged lipid profile by bringing out changes in lifestyle and dietary habits to decrease the higher prevalence of MS and the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  1. A rare case of human immunodeficiency virus associated bilateral facial nerve palsy in North India

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    Sanjay Gupta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV cases are on the increase in India and worldwide, so are its various complications. Neurological complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. They can occur at any stage of the disease and can affect any level of the central or peripheral nervous systems. In the literature, several cases of HIV-associated facial paralysis have been reported; however, bilateral facial palsy is rarely reported

  2. A rare case of human immunodeficiency virus associated bilateral facial nerve palsy in North India

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Gupta; Jitendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cases are on the increase in India and worldwide, so are its various complications. Neurological complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. They can occur at any stage of the disease and can affect any level of the central or peripheral nervous systems. In the literature, several cases of HIV-associated facial paralysis have been reported; however, bilateral facial palsy is rarely reported

  3. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: A rare case report from North India

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    Sumir Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS is a rare ciliopathic human autosomal-recessive disorder, affecting multiple organ systems. Less than 15 cases have been reported from India. The authors present a classical case of BBS presenting to dermatology outpatient with hypogonadism and features such as marked central obesity, retinal dystrophy, polydactyly, structural renal abnormalities and mental retardation, along with a brief review of the literature. This case exemplifies the need for multidisciplinary management in such cases.

  4. Pattern of uveitis in North East India: A tertiary eye care center study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipankar; Bhattacharjee, Harsha; Bhattacharyya, Pankaj Kumar; Jain, Lokesh; Panicker, M J; Das, Kalyan; Deka, Akshay C

    2009-01-01

    We conducted an institutional-based retrospective study on 308 uveitic patients and analyzed the pattern of uveitis in Northeastern India. Anterior uveitis was the most common type (47.07%) followed by posterior (29.87%), intermediate (12.98%) and panuveitis (10.06%). Toxoplasmosis (40.21%) had the highest incidence among posterior uveitis cases. Harada's form of Vogt Koyanagi Harada's disease is a frequent occurrence in this subset of the population. PMID:19237790

  5. How can power discourses be changed? : Contrasting the ‘daughter deficit’ policy of the Delhi government with Gandhi and King’s transformational reframing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Sinha (Manisha); D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSocial policy impact is partly determined by how policy is articulated and advocated, including which values are highlighted and how. We examine the influence of policy framing and reframing on outcomes, with particular reference to policies of the Delhi state government in India that ta

  6. Numerical Modeling of Oil Spill Movement along North-West Coast of India Using GNOME

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    R Remyalekshmi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available India is located at a very strategic point with respect to the international commercial sea routes with a large amount of crude oil traffic. Hence, the risk of oil spill occurring in the Indian waters is considerably high. In the present paper, forecasting the movement of a possible crude oil spill of 10,000 barrels at a location of latitude 21° 41′ 48.53′ N and longitude 66° 46′ 41.45″ E, intersection point of two ship routes from Kandla port and Bombay port (Kandla port of India to Yanbu port of Saudi Arabia and Bombay port of India to Ras Tanura port of Saudi Arabia has been carried out using GNOME (General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment model developed by Hazardous Materials Response Division (HAZMAT of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office of Response and Restoration (NOAA OR&R of United States government. The governing equations for horizontal diffusion, evaporation, dissolution, dispersion etc, adopted by GNOME have been presented in the paper. The simulation is carried out for month of September 2011. It is found that the spill possibly takes 10 hours to reach Gujarat coast and 15 hours to reach Maharashtra coast. With this available knowledge, appropriate mitigation measures may be adopted before spill reaches the shores.

  7. Bio-social Predictors of Low Birth Weight- A Prospective study at a Tertiary care Hospital of North Karnataka, India

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    DP Paneru

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low Birth Weight is a multi-factorial problem of health and social concern Worldwide. India accounts for 40 percent of Low birth weight (LBW babies of the developing World and more than half of those in Asia. Despite the multitude of services rendered to improve maternal health care, LBW remains a public health problem in India. Objective: To determine bio-social predictors of low birth weight amongst the institutional births in North Karnataka, India. METHODS: A prospective hospital based study was conducted in Belgaum district of north Karnataka during July 2012-March 2013. A total of 426 pregnant women registered within 20 weeks of gestation during July–September 2013; eventually delivered in the same hospital were included in the study. Birth weight was measured by a digital weighing scale of 100 gram accuracy. Data were collected through individual interviews using pretested questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS (16.0 Version. Descriptive statistics and multivariate regression were applied. P value < 0.05 considered significant. RESULTS: Mean age of subjects was 23.2254±3.09 years. About 96.7% were literates. Mean age at first pregnancy was 21.37±2.70 years. Low birth weight was observed amongst 22.5% new born (Mean weight: 2089.58±268.31gm. Almost 10.0% were preterm births. Paternal education and occupation, socio-economic status, religion, maternal blood group and gestation age at delivery were found to be the independent and significant bio-social factors predicting the low birth weight. About 68.0% variations in the birth weight were explained by these predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Low paternal education and occupation (farmers/laborers, low socio-economic status, maternal blood group (A is protective and prematurity were found to be independent bio-social predicators of LBW. Programme targeting paternal education may be useful and study of biological plausibility associated with the maternal blood group is recommended.

  8. Cost of Delivering Health Care Services in Public Sector Primary and Community Health Centres in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditi; Verma, Ramesh; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Kumar, Dinesh; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background With the commitment of the national government to provide universal healthcare at cheap and affordable prices in India, public healthcare services are being strengthened in India. However, there is dearth of cost data for provision of health services through public system like primary & community health centres. In this study, we aim to bridge this gap in evidence by assessing the total annual and per capita cost of delivering the package of health services at PHC and CHC level. Secondly, we determined the per capita cost of delivering specific health services like cost per antenatal care visit, per institutional delivery, per outpatient consultation, per bed-day hospitalization etc. Methods We undertook economic costing of fourteen public health facilities (seven PHCs and CHCs each) in three North-Indian states viz., Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and Punjab. Bottom-up costing method was adopted for collection of data on all resources spent on delivery of health services in selected health facilities. Analysis was undertaken using a health system perspective. The joint costs like human resource, capital, and equipment were apportioned as per the time value spent on a particular service. Capital costs were discounted and annualized over the estimated life of the item. Mean annual costs and unit costs were estimated along with their 95% confidence intervals using bootstrap methodology. Results The overall annual cost of delivering services through public sector primary and community health facilities in three states of north India were INR 8.8 million (95% CI: 7,365,630–10,294,065) and INR 26.9 million (95% CI: 22,225,159.3–32,290,099.6), respectively. Human resources accounted for more than 50% of the overall costs at both the level of PHCs and CHCs. Per capita per year costs for provision of complete package of preventive, curative and promotive services at PHC and CHC were INR 170.8 (95% CI: 131.6–208.3) and INR162.1 (95% CI: 112–219

  9. Coral microatoll as geodetic tool in North Andaman and Little Andaman, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Som; Vijay Shivgotra; Ashim Saha

    2009-04-01

    Coral microatolls were examined from North Andaman and Little Andaman to understand the relative sea level change due to vertical tectonic deformation above the subduction interface.The highest level of survival of coral microatoll before the 26 December,2004 earthquake at eastern coast of North Andaman has been determined by Global Ocean Tide Model.The present position of recently dead flat top microatoll with preserved internal structure at the eastern coast of North Andaman mainland indicates 31.21 cm uplift due to the 26 December,2004 earthquake.Comparatively old cup shaped microatoll at the eastern fringe of North Andaman group of islands and highly bioeroded fossil microatolls at the intertidal zone of Little Andaman bear the signature of permanent vertical deformation in the past.

  10. Local and regional interactions between air quality and climate in New Delhi- A sector based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrapu, Pallavi

    Deteriorating air quality is one of the major problems faced worldwide and in particular in Asia. The world's most polluted megacities are located in Asia highlighting the urgent need for efforts to improve the air quality. New Delhi (India), one of the world's most polluted cities, was the host of the Common Wealth Games during the period of 4-14 October 2010. This high profile event provided a good opportunity to accelerate efforts to improve air quality. Computational advances now allow air quality forecast models to fully couple the meteorology with chemical constituents within a unified modeling system that allows two-way interactions. The WRF-Chem model is used to simulate air quality in New Delhi. The thesis focuses on evaluating air quality and meteorology feedbacks. Four nested domains ranging from South Asia, Northern India, NCR Delhi and Delhi city at 45km, 15km, 5km and 1.67km resolution for a period of 20 day (26th Sep--15th Oct, 2010) are used in the study. The predicted mean surface concentrations of various pollutants show similar spatial distributions with peak values in the middle of the domain reflecting the traffic and population patterns in the city. Along with these activities, construction dust and industrial emissions contribute to high levels of criteria pollutants. The study evaluates the WRF-Chem capabilities using a new emission inventory developed over Delhi at a fine resolution of 1.67km and evaluating the results with observational data from 11 monitoring sties placed at various Game venues. The contribution of emission sectors including transportation, power, industry, and domestic to pollutant concentrations at targeted regions are studied and the results show that transportation and domestic sector are the major contributors to the pollution levels in Delhi, followed by industry. Apart from these sectors, emissions outside of Delhi contribute 20-50% to surface concentrations depending on the species. This indicates that pollution

  11. A study of HIV-concordant and -discordant couples attending voluntary counselling and testing services at a tertiary care center in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Bhanu; Bhalla, Preena; Rawat, Deepti; Kishore, Jugal

    2015-01-01

    A large number of Indian couples are exposed to the risk of heterosexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. The present records-based study was undertaken at the voluntary counselling and testing facility of a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India to determine HIV prevalence among Indian couples; to assess the magnitude of seroconcordance and discordance among HIV-affected couples; and to compare the concordant and discordant partnerships for sociodemographic determinants and cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) counts. Of the 1309 couples included in the study, 249 (19%) were HIV-affected, and of them 113 (45.4%) were concordantly and 136 (54.6%) discordantly affected by HIV. Males were the HIV-infected partners in 72% of the serodiscordant partnerships analyzed. Seroconcordance was significantly associated with the occupation status of being a housewife (P = 0.009). The contribution of discordant partnerships to the burden of HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is significant, warranting novel couple-targeted counselling strategies and preventive measures, including safe sexual behavior and possibly preexposure HIV prophylaxis of the uninfected partner.

  12. A study of HIV-concordant and -discordant couples attending voluntary counselling and testing services at a tertiary care center in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Mehra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of Indian couples are exposed to the risk of heterosexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transmission. The present records-based study was undertaken at the voluntary counselling and testing facility of a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India to determine HIV prevalence among Indian couples; to assess the magnitude of seroconcordance and discordance among HIV-affected couples; and to compare the concordant and discordant partnerships for sociodemographic determinants and cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4 counts. Of the 1309 couples included in the study, 249 (19% were HIV-affected, and of them 113 (45.4% were concordantly and 136 (54.6% discordantly affected by HIV. Males were the HIV-infected partners in 72% of the serodiscordant partnerships analyzed. Seroconcordance was significantly associated with the occupation status of being a housewife (P = 0.009. The contribution of discordant partnerships to the burden of HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS is significant, warranting novel couple-targeted counselling strategies and preventive measures, including safe sexual behavior and possibly preexposure HIV prophylaxis of the uninfected partner.

  13. Effect of Almond Supplementation on Glycemia and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Asian Indians in North India with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A 24–Week Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Seema; Pandey, Ravindra M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) statistics have reached menacing proportions in India. Appropriate dietary intervention, as part of healthy lifestyle, is imperative to curb further spread of this disease. Objectives: This pre–post intervention study was conducted in New Delhi, India, to investigate the effects of daily consumption of almonds for 24 weeks in T2D subjects, specifically on measures of glycemia and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Methods and Study Design: In this study, the 24-week intervention period was preceded by a control diet and exercise run-in period of 3 weeks. Raw almonds (20% of energy intake) were provided to the patients for consumption along with diet and physical activity counseling. Patients were assessed for anthropometry, blood pressure, measures of glycemia (fasting blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin), lipids [total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, lipoprotein(a)], surrogate marker of atherosclerosis (Pulse wave velocity), and marker of inflammation (high sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP]) at baseline and after the intervention period. Results: Statistically significant improvement in mean values for various parameters post intervention was as follows: waist circumference (P < 0.03), waist-to-height ratio (P < 0.005), TC (P < 0.002), serum triglycerides (P < 0.004), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P < 0.01), glycosylated hemoglobin (P < 0.04), and hs-CRP (P < 0.01). A trend toward improvement in pulse wave velocity (P < 0.06) was also observed. Conclusion: The study findings illustrate that incorporation of almonds in a well-balanced healthy diet leads to multiple beneficial effects on glycemic and CVDs risk factors in Asian Indian patients with T2D. PMID:28051354

  14. Early detection of multi-drug resistance and common mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Delhi using GenoType MTBDRplus assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Singhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There is scarcity of prevalence data of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB data and common mutations responsible in North India. This study aimed to detect MDR-TB among MDR-TB suspects from Delhi and mutation patterns using GenoType MTBDRplus assay. Materials and Methods: All MDR suspects in five districts of New Delhi were referred to the laboratory from 1 st October 2011 to 31 st December 2012 as per criterion defined by Programmatic Management of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (PMDT. GenoType MTBDRplus assay was performed on 2182 samples or cultures and mutations in the rpoB gene for rifampicin (RIF and katG and inhA genes for isoniazid (INH were analyzed. Results: A total of 366 (16.8% MDR-TB cases were diagnosed. MDR rate was found to be 32%, 16.6% and 10.2% during criterion A, B and C respectively. The most common mutation detected for RIF was S531L (59.0% and for INH was S315T1 (88.3%. Mutations S531L and S315T1 occurred significantly higher in MDR strains as compared to RIF mono-resistant and INH mono-resistant strains, respectively. Average laboratory turn-around time (TAT for dispatch of result to districts for test conducted on samples was 4.4 days. Conclusion: GenoType MTBDRplus is a useful assay for rapid detection of MDR-TB. The common mutations for RIF and INH were similar to those seen in other regions. However, mutations determining MDR strains and mono-resistant strains differed significantly for both RIF and INH.

  15. Beyond a state-centric approach to urban informality: Interactions between Delhi's middle class and the informal service sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Seth

    2017-03-01

    This article presents original research on relations between middle-class residents and informal-sector workers in Delhi, India. It shows how middle-class associations used their consumption preferences as well as relationships with local authorities to legitimize the work of street hawkers and waste workers. These findings suggest that the toleration of informality can be traced to governance regimes comprised of both state and non-state powerbrokers.

  16. Climatology and trends of summer high temperature days in India during 1969–2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Jaswal; P C S Rao; Virendra Singh

    2015-02-01

    Based on the daily maximum air temperature data from 176 stations in India from 1969 to 2013, the climatological distribution of the number of days with high temperature (HT) defined as days with maximum temperature higher than 37°C during summer season (March–June) are studied. With a focus on the regional variability and long-term trends, the impacts of HT days are examined by dividing the country into six geographical regions (North, West, North-central, East, South-central and South). Although the long-term (1969–2013) climatological numbers of HT days display well-defined spatial patterns, there is clear change in climatological mean and coefficient of variation of HT days in a recent period (1991–2013). The long period trends indicate increase in summer HT days by 3%, 5%, and 18% in north, west, and south regions, respectively and decrease by 4% and 9% in north-central and east regions respectively. However, spatial variations in HT days exist across different regions in the country. The data analysis shows that 2010 was the warmest summer year and 2013 was the coolest summer year in India. Comparison of spatial distributions of trends in HT days for 1969–1990 and 1991–2013 periods reveal that there is an abrupt increase in the number of HT days over north, west and north-central regions of India probably from mid 1990s. A steep increase in summer HT days in highly populated cities of Mumbai, New Delhi, Chennai, Jaipur, and Visakhapatnam is noticed during the recent period of 1991–2013. The summer HT days over southern India indicate significant positive correlation with Nino 3.4 index for three months’ running mean (December–January–February, January–March, February–April, March–May and April–June).

  17. Climatology and trends of summer high temperature days in India during 1969-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaswal, A. K.; Rao, P. C. S.; Singh, Virendra

    2015-02-01

    Based on the daily maximum air temperature data from 176 stations in India from 1969 to 2013, the climatological distribution of the number of days with high temperature (HT) defined as days with maximum temperature higher than 37°C during summer season (March-June) are studied. With a focus on the regional variability and long-term trends, the impacts of HT days are examined by dividing the country into six geographical regions (North, West, North-central, East, South-central and South). Although the long-term (1969-2013) climatological numbers of HT days display well-defined spatial patterns, there is clear change in climatological mean and coefficient of variation of HT days in a recent period (1991-2013). The long period trends indicate increase in summer HT days by 3%, 5%, and 18% in north, west, and south regions, respectively and decrease by 4% and 9% in north-central and east regions respectively. However, spatial variations in HT days exist across different regions in the country. The data analysis shows that 2010 was the warmest summer year and 2013 was the coolest summer year in India. Comparison of spatial distributions of trends in HT days for 1969-1990 and 1991-2013 periods reveal that there is an abrupt increase in the number of HT days over north, west and north-central regions of India probably from mid 1990s. A steep increase in summer HT days in highly populated cities of Mumbai, New Delhi, Chennai, Jaipur, and Visakhapatnam is noticed during the recent period of 1991-2013. The summer HT days over southern India indicate significant positive correlation with Nino 3.4 index for three months' running mean (December-January-February, January-March, February-April, March-May and April-June).

  18. Identification of suitable housing system for dairy cattle in North East Zone of Tamil Nadu, India, with respect to microclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, T.; Suraj, P. T.; Yasotha, A.; Phukon, Jayashree

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To identify the suitable roofing pattern for dairy cattle in North East Zone of Tamil Nadu, India, based on micro climatic conditions. Materials and Methods: Initially, survey was conducted to identify and categorize the major housing patterns existing in the region for further detailed investigation. In total, 30 farmers/farms consisting of five housing types with six replicates were selected. Temperature and temperature humidity index (THI) were recorded using the maximum-minimum thermometer and digital thermo-hygrometers. The study was conducted for 1 year covering four seasons namely South West monsoon (June-August), North East monsoon (September-November), cold season (December-February), and summer season (April-May). The data were statistically analyzed using statistical package SPSS 17. Results: Animal shelters with cement sheets recorded the highest temperature (26.71±1.13°C) and THI (77.23±1.76) at 8.00 am, whereas the lowest temperature (24.83±1.17°C) and THI (74.54±1.72) were recorded in the thatched shed. There was significant difference (p<0.01) in temperature and THI at 8.00 am during South West monsoon and North East monsoon seasons between the housing types. During cold and summer seasons, there was no significant difference (p≥0.05) in the environmental variables among various shelter systems. Conclusion: Thatched housing is found to be the suitable one with respect to the climatic variables, followed by tile roof and metal roof. The cement sheet roofed housing is found to be the most unsuitable one in the region for dairy cattle.

  19. Clinical Profile and Outcome in Children of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever in North India

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    Deepak Bhat

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The number of dengue fever (DF/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF cases reported in India has risen in recent years. This study was undertaken to evaluate clinical profile and outcome of children admitted with DHF/dengue shock syndrome (DSS, in the 2006 DHF epidemic in Ludhiana, Punjab. Methods: Eighty one children with dengue hemorrhagic fever were hospitalized in the Pediatric Department of Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, India. All patients were diagnosed, managed and monitored according to a standard protocol. Findings: Children between 10-15 years were most commonly afflicted (59%. Infants were the least affected sub-group (3.7%. Ninety two percent of all children were of DHF and 8% cases presented in DSS. The common symptoms seen were fever (91%, vomiting (41%, poor intake (21%, abdominal pain (16% and significant bleeding (15%. Hepatomegaly was present in 60% of cases. 85% of cases had petechiae alone, 15% had evidence of significant bleeding manifestation. Gastrointestinal bleeding was the commonest observed bleeding. The complications seen were liver dysfunction (14.8%, coagulopathy (3.7%, renal dysfunction (3.7%, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (2.4% and disseminated intravascular coagulation (1.2%. Mortality in the study was 3.7%. Refractory shock and coagulopathy were seen in all cases with poor outcome. Conclusion: Increased awareness, better transport facilities and case management according to the WHO guidelines, is needed to further reduce mortality of DHF/DSS cases.

  20. Profile of home-based caregivers of bedridden patients in North India

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    Puneet Bains

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caregiving to bedridden patients in India is set to become a major problem in future. Objective: To ascertain the profile of caregivers for the adult bedridden patients in Chandigarh, India. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 100 purposively selected bedridden people. The Katz Index of the activities of daily living was used to ascertain their degree of disability. Patients and families were interviewed about the patterns of care provision. Results: The mean age of subjects was 69 years. A majority (68% of them lived in joint families. All of them required assistance in bathing, dressing, toileting, and transfer. In 54% of the cases someone was hired to look after the subjects. A majority of the caregivers (82% were family members. All caregivers were untrained. In 35% of the cases unqualified practitioners were consulted, while in 59% of the cases government hospitals were consulted. Most patients (78 were given medicines on time. Complications like urinary tract infection (39% and pressure ulcers (54% were reported; 57% of the patients reported satisfaction with the care provided. Conclusion: The main source of caregivers for the bedridden was the family. Bedridden people had high rates of medical complications. There is a need for formal training for the caregivers.

  1. Association between body mass index and risk of breast cancer among females of north India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahavir; Jangra, Babita

    2013-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, breast cancer is most common cancer among women. In India and other developing countries, breast carcinoma ranks second only to cervical carcinoma among women. Although studies have been done globally, to find association between BMI and breast cancer, very few studies in India document any such association. Purpose: To find out the association between BMI and breast cancer. Materials and Methods: A Case-control study was done from August 2009 - July 2010 in the wards of General Surgery and Oncosurgery at Pt.B.D.Sharma, PGIMS Rohtak, Haryana. A total of 128 histopathologically confirmed new cases of breast cancer during the study period were taken as cases. Equal number of controls was selected by simple random sampling. Controls were matched for age with range of ±2 years. Subjects were interviewed using a pretested questionnaire after obtaining written informed consent. Data were analyzed by applying appropriate statistical tests using SPSS version 17. Results: Age group of the cases was 25 - 78 years, while that of the controls was 24 - 79 years. Proportion of cases and controls living in rural areas were more than those living in urban areas. A significant association of breast cancer cases was found with high BMI and high fat intake Conclusion: Obesity and high fat intake are the significant risk factors, which are modifiable. So women should be encouraged to take care of all these factors. Maximum cases presented in late stages so public awareness of this fatal disease must be developed. PMID:24455581

  2. Risk factors and prevalence of dental fluorosis and dental caries in school children of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaka, Kavita; Ravindra, Khaiwal; Mor, Suman; Gauba, Krishan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of dental fluorosis, dental caries, and associated risk factors in the school children of district Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab, India, using a cross-sectional study design. Oral health status of children aged between 8 and 15 years was assessed using World Health Organization (WHO) 2013 criteria. Dental fluorosis was assessed using Dean's index, and dental caries were recorded using decayed, missing, filled/decayed, extracted, filled (DMF/def) indices. Four hundred school children were examined, of which 207 were in the 8-11-year-old group and 193 were in the 12-15-year-old group. The overall prevalence of dental fluorosis was 4.1%, which might be linked to a high concentration of fluoride in drinking water at certain locations of rural Punjab. The prevalence of dental caries was 36.5% with a mean DMF score of 0.3 and def score of 0.6. Risk factors for dental caries include oral hygiene behavior and sugar consumption patterns. The study highlights the need to increase awareness about the oral health and hygiene among the school children in India.

  3. PREVALENCE OF HEPATITIS B INFECTION IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL, NORTH EAST REGION OF INDIA

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    Arun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: HBV Virus is one of the major health problems in India. Hepato cellular carcinoma due to HBV infection is 5th most frequent cancer in world wide. About 30% population has serological evidence of current or past infection with HBV. In the natural history of HBV infection, the most important event is HBeAg, Seroconversion is characterized by loss of HBeAg and development of antibody against HBeAg. AIMS: The aim of the study was to determine sero prevalence of hepatitis B infection among different age, sex groups and to understand the risk factors that define the development of HBsAg. DESIGN - The study design was based on clinical evaluation and serological testing. METHODS: The study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology of a tertiary care hospital, G.B. Panth Hospital. Agartala, West Tripura during the period over 5 years, 2001 – 2005.In this retrospective study, total 21, 121 numbers of patients serum were examined by ELISA method to detect the Hepatitis B surface antigen in different categories of patient as a marker of infection. out of 21, 121 patients, 1044 number of cases were seropositive showing the prevalence rate 4.94% in compared with hepatitis B virus infection in India is 4%. Details clinical history, age, sex, risk factors were recorded carefully. -

  4. Association between body mass index and risk of breast cancer among females of north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahavir Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide, breast cancer is most common cancer among women. In India and other developing countries, breast carcinoma ranks second only to cervical carcinoma among women. Although studies have been done globally, to find association between BMI and breast cancer, very few studies in India document any such association. Purpose: To find out the association between BMI and breast cancer. Materials and Methods: A Case-control study was done from August 2009 - July 2010 in the wards of General Surgery and Oncosurgery at Pt.B.D.Sharma, PGIMS Rohtak, Haryana. A total of 128 histopathologically confirmed new cases of breast cancer during the study period were taken as cases. Equal number of controls was selected by simple random sampling. Controls were matched for age with range of ±2 years. Subjects were interviewed using a pretested questionnaire after obtaining written informed consent. Data were analyzed by applying appropriate statistical tests using SPSS version 17. Results: Age group of the cases was 25 - 78 years, while that of the controls was 24 - 79 years. Proportion of cases and controls living in rural areas were more than those living in urban areas. A significant association of breast cancer cases was found with high BMI and high fat intake Conclusion: Obesity and high fat intake are the significant risk factors, which are modifiable. So women should be encouraged to take care of all these factors. Maximum cases presented in late stages so public awareness of this fatal disease must be developed.

  5. An Investigation of Aerosol Size Distribution Properties at Dibrugarh: North-Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukunda Madhab Gogoi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Columnaraerosol size distributions, retrieved from spectral AOD (aerosol optical depth esti mates over a northeastern location of India (Dibrugarh are, ingeneral, bimodal with the occurrence of primary (broad mode at 0.04 - 0.17 m and the secondary mode at 0.88 - 1.29 m. The physical parameters of size distributions representing the microphysical properties of aerosols show distinct sea sonal variations with the highest value of the effec tiveradii (~ 0.55 m during pre-mon soon (March to May season which, along with the highest value of AOD (~ 0.46 ¡__n0.09 during the same season, is attributed to the maxi mum abundance of coarsepa ticles. Examining the re sults in the light of the HYSPLIT back tra jectory analy sis and the peruliar to pogr phy of northeast India allowing advection only from the Indo-Gangetic plains or Bay-of-Ben gal, it appears that the strong presence of the coarse mode aerosols are associated with either mineral dust or marine aerosol components or both.

  6. JPRS Report, Near East & South Asia, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    India’s socialist democracy. The Congress Party elim- the Hindu religion to the Vedics and fundamentalists. inated the landlord system while this system is...Religious ceremonies take place and talks [Text] New Delhi, 16 August: In a significant statement, about temple-mosque problems and astrology are ram- the

  7. A life crisis and its management a case study from north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleiderer, B

    1985-10-01

    The behaviour of so called traditional patients has been the topic of anthropological research for the last thirty years. Myths have been and constructed and rejected, one being that patients with chronic and less incapacitating illness see rather traditional healers than allopathic medical treatment. The case study with which we are concerned in this paper is the illness of a young girl who is the age in which she is expected to accept a marriage contract. Since she is obviously not willing to do she adopts an illness behaviour which enables her to postpone all role expectations of her age group. She performs a behaviour which is socially accepted and guarantees all the support from her family which she needs and requires. The paper investigates the causes, reason and development of her spirit possession and relates it to the cultural grammar of the patient's group of reference. The data of this case study were obtained at a Muslim shrine in Gujarat, India.

  8. Channa aurantipectoralis, a new species of snakehead from Mizoram, north-eastern India (Teleostei: Channidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalhlimpuia, Denis Van; Lalronunga, Samuel; Lalramliana, Lalramliana

    2016-08-04

    Channa aurantipectoralis, a new species of snakehead of the C. gachua species group, is described from Karnaphuli drainage of Mizoram, India. The species is immediately distinguished from all other snakehead species by its unique coloration in life, specifically its brightly-coloured orange pectoral fins, which lack any spots or stripes; and by the presence of a dark V-shaped blotch on the dorsal surface of the head. It can be further distinguished from all other species of the genus by the combination of the following characters: presence of pelvic fins, a large scale on the ventral surface of the lower jaw, 51-64 lateral-line scales, 34-37 dorsal-fin rays, 23-25 anal-fin rays, 13-14 pectoral-fin rays, 5½-6½ /1/ 7½-8½ transverse scale rows, and the absence of scales on the gular region.

  9. A comparison of palmar dermatoglyphics in two ethnic Indian populations of north Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Jaydip; Kanchan, Tanuj; Mondal, Nitish

    2011-01-01

    Dermatoglyphic print comparisons can be utilized to establish personal identification in forensic cases. The northern part of the state of West Bengal, India, is the home to many ethnic populations. Two such populations are the Rajbanshi and the Mech. Palm prints were collected from 192 adult Rajbanshi (105 men and 87 women) and 100 adult Mech (50 men and 50 women) individuals for print comparison using the standard ink and roll print method. The dermatoglyphic variables studied were mainline formulae, termination of mainline, positional variation of axial triradii, and true pattern of hypothenar and thenar configuration area. There were differences between the Rajbanshi and Mech individuals with respect to these dermatoglyphic variables. The uses of these variables appear to be limited only to ethnic identification, not personal identification. The present investigation further highlights the racial affinity, sex, and bilateral differences among Rajbanshi individuals using dermatoglyphic palmar variables.

  10. Improving Access to Institutional Delivery through Janani Shishu Suraksha Karyakram: Evidence from Rural Haryana, North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salve, Harshal R; Charlette, Lena; Kankaria, Ankita; Rai, Sanjay K; Krishnan, Anand; Kant, Shashi

    2017-01-01

    In India, Janani Shishu Suraksha Karyakaram (JSSK) was launched in the year 2011 to assure cashless institutional delivery to pregnant women, including free transport and diet. To assess the impact of JSSK on institutional delivery. A record review was done at the primary health care facility in Faridabad district of Haryana from August 2010 to March 2013. Focus group discussion/ informal interviews were carried out to get an insight about various factors determining use / non-use of health facilities for delivery. Institutional delivery increased by almost 2.7 times (197 Vs 537) after launch of JSSK (p < 0.001). For institutional deliveries, the most important facilitator as well as barrier was identified as ambulance service under JSSK and pressure by elders in the family respectively. JSSK scheme had a positive impact on institutional deliveries. It should be supported with targeted intervention designed to facilitate appropriate decision-making at family level in order to address barriers to institutional delivery.

  11. Paederia foetida - a promising ethno-medicinal tribal plant of north-eastern India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silpi Chanda; Indira P. Sarethy; Biplab De; Kuldeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    The northeastern region of India constitutes one of the biodi-versity hotspots of the world. The ethnic groups inhabiting this region practice their distinctive traditional knowledge systems using biodiver-sity for food, shelter and healthcare. Among the less-studied plants, Paederia foetida has been used by various ethnic tribes as food and medicine. Many of its therapeutic properties relate to the gastrointestinal system and suggest its potential utility for gastrointestinal ailments. This is a review of the ethnobotanical uses, phytochemistry and therapeutic properties of P. foetida compiled from various reports. P. foetida is promising as a remedy for life-style related conditions, especially treat-ment of ulcers. Its utility highlights the need for proper evaluation of tribal plants as medicines and the species could be considered for devel-opment of new drugs.

  12. Toxocara canis, Trichinella spiralis and Taenia solium helminthozoonoses: seroprevalence among selected populations in north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B B; Sharma, R; Gill, J P S

    2015-09-01

    Helminthozoonoses are being considered as a research priority in India and many other tropical and subtropical countries. Taenia solium and Trichinella spiralis are emerging public health and food safety issues in the country and the developing world. The asymptomatic Ta. solium carriers act as important risk for neurocysticercosis, leading to adult onset epilepsy in the country. Human toxocariasis is another common zoonosis which occurs due to larvae of Toxocara canis or T. cati. The current study was planned to obtain baseline seropositivity data for Ta. solium, To. canis and Tr. spiralis antibodies among selected populations in Punjab province of northern India. In the present study, 122 human subjects belonging to selected occupations viz. farmers and veterinary practitioners were screened using the RIDASCREEN(®) Ta. solium IgG, RIDASCREEN(®) Toxocara IgG and RIDASCREEN(®) Trichinella IgG enzyme immunoassays for the qualitative determination of IgG antibodies against Ta. solium, Tr. spiralis and To. canis, respectively in human serum. The seropositivity of To. canis, Tr. spiralis and Ta. solium infections were found to be 22.13, 5.73 and 11.47 %, respectively in human serum samples. The relative risk of being infected for To. canis, Tr. spiralis and Ta. solium infections was found to be 1.91 (95 % CI 0.786-4.669), 2.61 (95 % CI 0.3258-20.94) and 1.596 (95 % CI 0.427-5.3893) times high respectively in farmers when compared to veterinary practitioners. The present study indicates that exposure to To. canis and Ta. solium is not uncommon among farmers and veterinary practitioners in this part of the country. These results provided evidence of Tr. spiralis among selected human populations in the country and demand more research related to trichinellosis in their respective animal and human hosts.

  13. Treatment-seeking for febrile illness in north-east India: an epidemiological study in the malaria endemic zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahanta Jagadish

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper studies the determinants of utilization of health care services, especially for treatment of febrile illness in the malaria endemic area of north-east India. Methods An area served by two districts of Upper Assam representing people living in malaria endemic area was selected for household survey. A sample of 1,989 households, in which at least one member of household suffered from febrile illness during last three months and received treatment from health service providers, were selected randomly and interviewed by using the structured questionnaire. The individual characteristics of patients including social indicators, area of residence and distance of health service centers has been used to discriminate or group the patients with respect to their initial and final choice of service providers. Results Of 1,989 surveyed households, initial choice of treatment-seeking for febrile illness was self-medication (17.8%, traditional healer (Vaidya(39.2%, government (29.3% and private (13.7% health services. Multinomial logistic regression (MLR analysis exhibits the influence of occupation, area of residence and ethnicity on choice of health service providers. The traditional system of medicine was commonly used by the people living in remote areas compared with towns. As all the febrile cases finally received treatment either from government or private health service providers, the odds (Multivariate Rate Ratio was almost three-times higher in favour of government services for lower households income people compared to private. Conclusion The study indicates the popular use of self-medication and traditional system especially in remote areas, which may be the main cause of delay in diagnosis of malaria. The malaria training given to the paramedical staff to assist the health care delivery needs to be intensified and expanded in north-east India. The people who are economically poor and living in remote areas mainly

  14. Tracking Seed Fates of Tropical Tree Species: Evidence for Seed Caching in a Tropical Forest in North-East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Swati; Datta, Aparajita

    2015-01-01

    Rodents affect the post-dispersal fate of seeds by acting either as on-site seed predators or as secondary dispersers when they scatter-hoard seeds. The tropical forests of north-east India harbour a high diversity of little-studied terrestrial murid and hystricid rodents. We examined the role played by these rodents in determining the seed fates of tropical evergreen tree species in a forest site in north-east India. We selected ten tree species (3 mammal-dispersed and 7 bird-dispersed) that varied in seed size and followed the fates of 10,777 tagged seeds. We used camera traps to determine the identity of rodent visitors, visitation rates and their seed-handling behavior. Seeds of all tree species were handled by at least one rodent taxon. Overall rates of seed removal (44.5%) were much higher than direct on-site seed predation (9.9%), but seed-handling behavior differed between the terrestrial rodent groups: two species of murid rodents removed and cached seeds, and two species of porcupines were on-site seed predators. In addition, a true cricket, Brachytrupes sp., cached seeds of three species underground. We found 309 caches formed by the rodents and the cricket; most were single-seeded (79%) and seeds were moved up to 19 m. Over 40% of seeds were re-cached from primary cache locations, while about 12% germinated in the primary caches. Seed removal rates varied widely amongst tree species, from 3% in Beilschmiedia assamica to 97% in Actinodaphne obovata. Seed predation was observed in nine species. Chisocheton cumingianus (57%) and Prunus ceylanica (25%) had moderate levels of seed predation while the remaining species had less than 10% seed predation. We hypothesized that seed traits that provide information on resource quantity would influence rodent choice of a seed, while traits that determine resource accessibility would influence whether seeds are removed or eaten. Removal rates significantly decreased (p seed size. Removal rates were significantly

  15. Tracking Seed Fates of Tropical Tree Species: Evidence for Seed Caching in a Tropical Forest in North-East India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Swati; Datta, Aparajita

    2015-01-01

    Rodents affect the post-dispersal fate of seeds by acting either as on-site seed predators or as secondary dispersers when they scatter-hoard seeds. The tropical forests of north-east India harbour a high diversity of little-studied terrestrial murid and hystricid rodents. We examined the role played by these rodents in determining the seed fates of tropical evergreen tree species in a forest site in north-east India. We selected ten tree species (3 mammal-dispersed and 7 bird-dispersed) that varied in seed size and followed the fates of 10,777 tagged seeds. We used camera traps to determine the identity of rodent visitors, visitation rates and their seed-handling behavior. Seeds of all tree species were handled by at least one rodent taxon. Overall rates of seed removal (44.5%) were much higher than direct on-site seed predation (9.9%), but seed-handling behavior differed between the terrestrial rodent groups: two species of murid rodents removed and cached seeds, and two species of porcupines were on-site seed predators. In addition, a true cricket, Brachytrupes sp., cached seeds of three species underground. We found 309 caches formed by the rodents and the cricket; most were single-seeded (79%) and seeds were moved up to 19 m. Over 40% of seeds were re-cached from primary cache locations, while about 12% germinated in the primary caches. Seed removal rates varied widely amongst tree species, from 3% in Beilschmiedia assamica to 97% in Actinodaphne obovata. Seed predation was observed in nine species. Chisocheton cumingianus (57%) and Prunus ceylanica (25%) had moderate levels of seed predation while the remaining species had less than 10% seed predation. We hypothesized that seed traits that provide information on resource quantity would influence rodent choice of a seed, while traits that determine resource accessibility would influence whether seeds are removed or eaten. Removal rates significantly decreased (p seed size. Removal rates were significantly

  16. Prevalence and risk factors for vitamin C deficiency in north and south India: a two centre population based study in people aged 60 years and over.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravilla D Ravindran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies from the UK and North America have reported vitamin C deficiency in around 1 in 5 men and 1 in 9 women in low income groups. There are few data on vitamin C deficiency in resource poor countries. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of vitamin C deficiency in India. DESIGN: We carried out a population-based cross-sectional survey in two areas of north and south India. Randomly sampled clusters were enumerated to identify people aged 60 and over. Participants (75% response rate were interviewed for tobacco, alcohol, cooking fuel use, 24 hour diet recall and underwent anthropometry and blood collection. Vitamin C was measured using an enzyme-based assay in plasma stabilized with metaphosphoric acid. We categorised vitamin C status as deficient (28 µmol/L. We investigated factors associated with vitamin C deficiency using multivariable Poisson regression. RESULTS: The age, sex and season standardized prevalence of vitamin C deficiency was 73.9% (95% confidence Interval, CI 70.4,77.5 in 2668 people in north India and 45.7% (95% CI 42.5,48.9 in 2970 from south India. Only 10.8% in the north and 25.9% in the south met the criteria for adequate levels. Vitamin C deficiency varied by season, and was more prevalent in men, with increasing age, users of tobacco and biomass fuels, in those with anthropometric indicators of poor nutrition and with lower intakes of dietary vitamin C. CONCLUSIONS: In poor communities, such as in our study, consideration needs to be given to measures to improve the consumption of vitamin C rich foods and to discourage the use of tobacco.

  17. A comparative evaluation of oral hygiene practices, oral health status, and behavior between graduate and post-graduate dentists of North India: An epidemiological survey

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Maan Surinder; Tuli, Aaswin Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was carried out to compare oral hygiene practices, oral health status and behavior of graduate and postgraduate dentists of North India. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out among 727 dentists (446 graduate i.e., Group A and 281 post graduate i.e., Group B) through an online questionnaire. The questionnaire covered oral hygiene regimen, adverse oral habits, information regarding dental visits and dental treatment. Results: Results showed less than ade...

  18. Subclinical hypothyroidism in the first trimester of pregnancy in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jubbin Jagan Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subclinical hypothyroidism based on population and trimester specific cut-offs is reported to complicate 1-2% of all pregnancies. Using the recent Endocrine Society guidelines of 2.5 mIU/L of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone as the upper level of normal in the first trimester the reported prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism is much higher. Recent publications have also emphasized that there is considerable racial variation in the prevalence of thyroid disorders in pregnancy. Among published literature North Indian women appear to have the highest rates of subclinical hypothyroidism in the first trimester of pregnancy. More widespread use of universal screening and trimester specific ranges in pregnancy for thyroid hormonal assays will lead to a large number of North Indian women requiring treatment for thyroid disorders in pregnancy.

  19. Dilip Roy at Itsun Heavy Industries India Pvt. Ltd. (IHIIPL)

    OpenAIRE

    Margie Parikh

    2008-01-01

    Dilip Roy is a country head at Itsun Heavy Industry (India) Pvt. Ltd. (IHIIPL) in Delhi, India. It is a wholly owned subsidiary of Itsun China, a leading private sector construction equipment company. Dilip graduated as a mechanical engineer with reputed National Science Talent Search Scholarship, started his career as a Graduate Trainee Engineer and became a Vice President in another company before he joined IHIIPL as a country head. Hu, the representative of Itsun China in India was explori...

  20. Estimation of S-wave site response in and around Delhi region from weak motion data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Nath; P Sengupta; S K Srivastav; S N Bhattacharya; R S Dattatrayam; R Prakash; H V Gupta

    2003-09-01

    Site response in and around Delhi is studied using digital seismograms recorded by a thirteen-station VSAT-based 24-bit digital Delhi telemetry network of the India Meteorological Department. Nine local (l ≥ 2.3) and nine regional (l ≥ 3.9) earthquakes are selected for the estimation of site amplification factor using the classical standard spectral ratio for regional events (Ridge Delhi Observatory being the reference station), normalized standard spectral ratio for local events, horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio or receiver function and the generalized inversion techniques in the frequency range of 0.5 to 7.5 Hz. Site response curves at all the thirteen stations exhibit station to station variation of the site amplification factor reflecting the changes in geologic/geotectonic/soil conditions. A comparison of the site response values obtained by the generalized inversion with those computed using receiver function technique shows a large scatter even though the pattern of the curves remain more or less similar. However, the site effects computed by generalized inversion and standard spectral ratio exhibit a good 1:1 correspondence. The peaks yielded by all the methods have been observed to occur at the same frequencies. It is evident that the softer fluvial deposits of the newer alluvium of the east Yamuna sector show steeper site amplification gradient at lower frequencies, while the greater Delhi experiences moderate site amplification. The variation of site response corroborates the abrupt changes in intensity from one location to another due to local site condition.

  1. Emergency contraception: Knowledge and attitude toward its use among medical students of a medical college in North-West India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajiv Kumar; Raina, Sunil Kumar; Verma, Aruna Kumari; Shora, Tejali

    2016-01-01

    Context: Emergency contraception (EC) is use of drug or device to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse. Unlike other regular methods of contraception which are taken prior to the sexual act, EC is used after the unprotected sex. Aim: To assess the knowledge and attitude toward use of emergency contraceptives among medical students. Setting and Design: A cross-sectional questionnaire based study was conducted among all the medical students in the Government Medical College in North-West India. Subjects and Methods: A questionnaire seeking information on knowledge and attitude of undergraduate medical students was administered over a period of 4 weeks in the month of February and March 2014. Statistical Analysis: The data were entered in MS excel and expressed using percentages. Chi-square test was used as a test of statistical significance. Results: About 61.6% (247/401) of the participants were aware about the timing of use of EC. Audio visual media (76.6%; 307/401) was the most common source of information for of these medical students. Conclusions: The lack of appropriate in-depth knowledge of EC among future health care professional should alarm the medical teaching system as EC is the only method that can be used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex or contraceptive accident. PMID:27413353

  2. Acute leukemia / myelodysplastic syndrome as a sequelae of carcinoma breast: A report of five cases from north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia Prateek

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A second malignant neoplasm has been found to be more frequent than might be expected from the general population rates. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia are dreaded long-term complications of five cases of hematological malignancies following treatment for successful breast cancer therapy (therapeutic drugs or radiotherapy. We encountered carcinoma from north India over a 7-year period from 1999 to 2005. The patients presented 2-5 years after treatment of breast carcinoma. Three patients underwent surgery and received chemoradiotherapy. One patient received chemotherapy after surgery. One patient underwent only surgery and after 3 years presented with acute myeloid leukemia and bone marrow metastasis of carcinoma of the breast. At the time of presentation, all the patients had either bicytopenia or pancytopenia. A close follow-up with complete blood cell counts of the patients who previously had carcinoma of the breast is suggested for early detection of hematological abnormalities. However, the poor prognosis, limited financial resources and poor health insurance coverage results in few patients and their family members opting for treatment.

  3. Radon Monitoring in Soil Gas and Ground Water for Earthquake Prediction Studies in North West Himalayas, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surinder Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous monitoring of soil gas radon at Sarol and the daily monitoring of radon concentration in water at Banikhet is carried out in Chamba valley of North West Himalayas, India ¡§a well known seismic zone¡¨ to study the correlation of radon anomalies in relation to seismic activities of the region. Radon monitoring in soil gas was carried out by using Barasol probe manufactured by Algade France and the radon content in water was recorded using RAD7 radon monitoring system of Durridge Company, USA. The effect of meteorological parameters viz. temperature and pressure on soil gas radon emission has been studied. Correlation coefficient has been calculated between radon in soil gas, soil temperature and soil pressure. The radon anomalies observed in the region have been correlated with the seismic events in the magnitude range 2.2 to 5.0 recorded by Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology Dehradun in NW Himalayan. Empirical equations between earthquake magnitude, epicentral distance and precursor time were examined, and respective constants were determined.

  4. Outbreak of Salmonella Typhi enteric fever in sub-urban area of North India: a public health perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Nidhi; Bansal, Neha; Gupta, Varsha; Chander, Jagdish

    2013-02-01

    Outbreaks of enteric fever are a major health concern not only due to significant human morbidity and mortality but also fear of spread of multidrug resistant strains. We report an outbreak of enteric fever caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi in a suburban area, in city Chandigarh of North India. Twenty-seven strains of S. typhi were isolated from blood cultures over a period of two weeks with 18 of these 27 patients residing in the same area. Maximum cases were in the age group 5-14 years (10 patients, 55.5%) while 4 (22.2%) cases were children under 5 years. All the s