WorldWideScience

Sample records for delayed negative feedback

  1. The role of time delay in adaptive cellular negative feedback systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Schaber, Jörg

    2016-06-07

    Adaptation in cellular systems is often mediated by negative feedbacks, which usually come with certain time delays causing several characteristic response patterns including an overdamped response, damped or sustained oscillations. Here, we analyse generic two-dimensional delay differential equations with delayed negative feedback describing the dynamics of biochemical adaptive signal-response networks. We derive explicit thresholds and boundaries showing how time delay determines characteristic response patterns of these networks. Applying our theoretical analyses to concrete data we show that adaptation to osmotic stress in yeast is optimal in the sense of minimizing adaptation time without causing oscillatory behaviour, i.e., a critically damped response. In addition, our framework demonstrates that a slight increase of time delay in the NF-κB system might induce a switch from damped to sustained oscillatory behaviour. Thus, we demonstrate how delay differential equations can be used to explicitly study the delay in biochemical negative feedback systems. Our analysis also provides insight into how time delay may tune biological signal-response patterns and control the systems behaviour.

  2. Impact of time delays on oscillatory dynamics of interlinked positive and negative feedback loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Tian, Xinyu; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Interlinking a positive feedback loop (PFL) with a negative feedback loop (NFL) constitutes a typical motif in genetic networks, performing various functions in cell signaling. How time delay in feedback regulation affects the dynamics of such systems still remains unclear. Here, we investigate three systems of interlinked PFL and NFL with time delays: a synthetic genetic oscillator, a three-node circuit, and a simplified single-node model. The stability of steady states and the routes to oscillation in the single-node model are analyzed in detail. The amplitude and period of oscillations vary with a pointwise periodicity over a range of time delay. Larger-amplitude oscillations can be induced when the PFL has an appropriately long delay, in comparison with the PFL with no delay or short delay; this conclusion holds true for all the three systems. We unravel the underlying mechanism for the above effects via analytical derivation under a limiting condition. We also develop a stochastic algorithm for simulating a single reaction with two delays and show that robust oscillations can be maintained by the PFL with a properly long delay in the single-node system. This work presents an effective method for constructing robust large-amplitude oscillators and interprets why similar circuit architectures are engaged in timekeeping systems such as circadian clocks.

  3. Effects of delay and noise in a negative feedback regulatory motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palassini, Matteo; Dies, Marta

    2009-03-01

    The small copy number of the molecules involved in gene regulation can induce nontrivial stochastic phenomena such as noise-induced oscillations. An often neglected aspect of regulation dynamics are the delays involved in transcription and translation. Delays introduce analytical and computational complications because the dynamics is non-Markovian. We study the interplay of noise and delays in a negative feedback model of the p53 core regulatory network. Recent experiments have found pronounced oscillations in the concentrations of proteins p53 and Mdm2 in individual cells subjected to DNA damage. Similar oscillations occur in the Hes-1 and NK-kB systems, and in circadian rhythms. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this oscillatory behaviour, such as deterministic limit cycles, with and without delay, or noise-induced excursions in excitable models. We consider a generic delayed Master Equation incorporating the activation of Mdm2 by p53 and the Mdm2-promoted degradation of p53. In the deterministic limit and for large delays, the model shows a Hopf bifurcation. Via exact stochastic simulations, we find strong noise-induced oscillations well outside the limit-cycle region. We propose that this may be a generic mechanism for oscillations in gene regulatory systems.

  4. Vibration Analysis of a Piecewise-Smooth System with Negative Stiffness under Delayed Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal resonance of a delayed piecewise-smooth (DPWS system with negative stiffness under narrow-band random excitation is investigated in aspects of multiscale analysis, design methodology of the controller, and response properties. The amplitude-frequency response and steady-state moments together with the corresponding stability conditions of the controlled stochastic system are derived, in which the degradation case is also under consideration. Then, from the perspective of the equivalent damping, the comparisons of the response characteristics of the controlled system to the uncontrolled system, such as the phenomenon of frequency island, are fulfilled. Furthermore, sensitivity of the system response to feedback gain and time delay is studied and interesting dynamic properties are found. Meanwhile, the classification of the steady-state solution is also discussed. To control the maximum amplitude, the feedback parameters are determined by the frequency response together with stability boundaries which must be utilized to exclude the combinations of the unstable parameters. For the case with small noise intensity, mean-square responses present the similar characteristics to what is discussed in the deterministic case.

  5. Attractivity in a Delayed Three-species Ratio-dependent Predator-prey System without Dominating Instantaneous Negative Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Xu; Lan-sun Chen; M.A.J. Chaplain

    2003-01-01

    A delayed three-species ratio-dependent predator-prey food-chain model without dominating instantaneous negative feedback is investigated. It is shown that the system is permanent under some appropriate conditions, and sufficient conditions are derived for the global attractivity of the positive equilibrium of the system.

  6. Performance characteristics of positive and negative delayed feedback on chaotic dynamics of directly modulated InGaAsP semiconductor lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bindu M Krishna; Manu P John; V M Nandakumaran

    2008-12-01

    The chaotic dynamics of directly modulated semiconductor lasers with delayed optoelectronic feedback is studied numerically. The effects of positive and negative delayed optoelectronic feedback in producing chaotic outputs from such lasers with nonlinear gain reduction in its optimum value range is investigated using bifurcation diagrams. The results are confirmed by calculating the Lyapunov exponents. A negative delayed optoelectronic feedback configuration is found to be more effective in inducing chaotic dynamics to such systems with nonlinear gain reduction factor in the practical value range.

  7. Oscillatory Gene Expression by the microRAN Mediating Delayed Negative Feedback Loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Feng-pan; LU Jin-rui; LIU Zhi-guang

    2013-01-01

    More and more experiments show that microRNAs can regulate gene expression by stimulating degradation of mRNA or repression of translation of mRNA.In this paper,we incorporate the microRNA into a previous mathematical model of gene expression through forming a microRNA-induced silencing complex(RISC).Our findings demonstrate the dynamical behavior of the constructed system.By Hopf theories,we derive the theoretical results of globally asymptotical stability and provide the sufficient conditions for the oscillation of the simple gene regulatory system,and by numerical simulation further demonstrate how the amplitudes against the change of delay in the gene regulatory network.

  8. Positive feedback promotes oscillations in negative feedback loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath Ananthasubramaniam

    Full Text Available A simple three-component negative feedback loop is a recurring motif in biochemical oscillators. This motif oscillates as it has the three necessary ingredients for oscillations: a three-step delay, negative feedback, and nonlinearity in the loop. However, to oscillate, this motif under the common Goodwin formulation requires a high degree of cooperativity (a measure of nonlinearity in the feedback that is biologically "unlikely." Moreover, this recurring negative feedback motif is commonly observed augmented by positive feedback interactions. Here we show that these positive feedback interactions promote oscillation at lower degrees of cooperativity, and we can thus unify several common kinetic mechanisms that facilitate oscillations, such as self-activation and Michaelis-Menten degradation. The positive feedback loops are most beneficial when acting on the shortest lived component, where they function by balancing the lifetimes of the different components. The benefits of multiple positive feedback interactions are cumulative for a majority of situations considered, when benefits are measured by the reduction in the cooperativity required to oscillate. These positive feedback motifs also allow oscillations with longer periods than that determined by the lifetimes of the components alone. We can therefore conjecture that these positive feedback loops have evolved to facilitate oscillations at lower, kinetically achievable, degrees of cooperativity. Finally, we discuss the implications of our conclusions on the mammalian molecular clock, a system modeled extensively based on the three-component negative feedback loop.

  9. ON FEEDBACK CONTROL OF DELAYED CHAOTIC SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽香; 彭海朋; 卢辉斌; 关新平

    2001-01-01

    In this paper two different types of feedback control technique are discussed: the standard feedback control and the time-delay feedback control which have been successfully used in many control systems. In order to understand to what extent the two different types of control technique are useful in delayed chaotic systems, some analytic stabilization conditions for chaos control from the two types of control technique are derived based on Lyapunov stabilization arguments. Similarly, we discuss the tracking problem by applying the time-delay feedback control. Finally, numerical examples are provided.

  10. Anharmonic resonances with recursive delay feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldobin, Denis S., E-mail: Denis.Goldobin@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, UB RAS, Perm 614013 (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-12

    We consider application of time-delayed feedback with infinite recursion for control of anharmonic (nonlinear) oscillators subject to noise. In contrast to the case of a single delay feedback, recursive delay feedback exhibits resonances between feedback and nonlinear harmonics, leading to a resonantly strong or weak oscillation coherence even for a small anharmonicity. Remarkably, these small-anharmonicity induced resonances can be stronger than the harmonic ones. Analytical results are confirmed numerically for van der Pol and van der Pol-Duffing oscillators. -- Highlights: → We construct general theory of noisy limit-cycle oscillators with linear feedback. → We focus on coherence and 'reliability' of oscillators. → For recursive delay feedback control the theory shows importance of anharmonicity. → Anharmonic resonances are studied both numerically and analytically.

  11. Feedback Control of Chaos in Delay Maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss feedback control of a class of delay chaotic maps. Our aim is to drive the chaoticmaps to its initially unstable fixed points by using linear and nonlinear state feedback control. The control is achievedby using small, bounded perturbations. Some numerical simulations are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of theproposed control method.

  12. Enhanced Negative Feedback Responses in Remitted Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzagalli, Diego; Meites, Tiffany M.; Deveney, Christen M; Holmes, Avram J.; Bogdan, Ryan; Steele, Katherine T.; Santesso, Diane L.

    2008-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD)is characterized by hypersensitivity to negative feedback that might involve frontocingulate dysfunction. MDD patients exhibit enhanced electrophysiological responses to negative internal (errors) and external (feedback) cues. Whether this dysfunction extends to remitted depressed (RD) individuals with a history of MDD is currently unknown. To address this issue, we examined the feedback-related negativity in RD and control participants using a probabilistic pun...

  13. Delayed feedback control in quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emary, Clive

    2013-09-28

    Feedback control in quantum transport has been predicted to give rise to several interesting effects, among them quantum state stabilization and the realization of a mesoscopic Maxwell's daemon. These results were derived under the assumption that control operations on the system are affected instantaneously after the measurement of electronic jumps through it. In this contribution, I describe how to include a delay between detection and control operation in the master equation theory of feedback-controlled quantum transport. I investigate the consequences of delay for the state stabilization and Maxwell's daemon schemes. Furthermore, I describe how delay can be used as a tool to probe coherent oscillations of electrons within a transport system and how this formalism can be used to model finite detector bandwidth.

  14. Delayed feedback model of axonal length sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamched, Bhargav R; Bressloff, Paul C

    2015-05-05

    A fundamental question in cell biology is how the sizes of cells and organelles are regulated at various stages of development. Size homeostasis is particularly challenging for neurons, whose axons can extend from hundreds of microns to meters (in humans). Recently, a molecular-motor-based mechanism for axonal length sensing has been proposed, in which axonal length is encoded by the frequency of an oscillating retrograde signal. In this article, we develop a mathematical model of this length-sensing mechanism in which advection-diffusion equations for bidirectional motor transport are coupled to a chemical signaling network. We show that chemical oscillations emerge due to delayed negative feedback via a Hopf bifurcation, resulting in a frequency that is a monotonically decreasing function of axonal length. Knockdown of either kinesin or dynein causes an increase in the oscillation frequency, suggesting that the length-sensing mechanism would produce longer axons, which is consistent with experimental findings. One major prediction of the model is that fluctuations in the transport of molecular motors lead to a reduction in the reliability of the frequency-encoding mechanism for long axons. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhanced Negative Feedback Responses in Remitted Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesso, Diane L.; Steele, Katherine T.; Bogdan, Ryan; Holmes, Avram J.; Deveney, Christen M.; Meites, Tiffany M.; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by hypersensitivity to negative feedback that might involve frontocingulate dysfunction. MDD subjects exhibit enhanced electrophysiological responses to negative internal (errors) and external (feedback) cues. Whether this dysfunction extends to remitted depressed (RD) subjects with a history of MDD is currently unknown. To address this issue, we examined the feedback-related negativity (FRN) in RD and control subjects using a probabilistic punishment learning task. Despite equivalent behavioral performance, RD subjects showed larger FRNs to negative feedback relative to controls; group differences remained after accounting for residual anxiety and depressive symptoms. The present findings suggest that abnormal responses to negative feedback extend to samples at increased risk for depressive episodes in the absence of current symptoms. PMID:18580576

  16. Delayed feedback on tax audits affects compliance and fairness perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogler, C.; Mittone, Luigi; Kirchler, Erich

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we explore the conflicting finding that delayed feedback on tax audits apparently results in higher tax compliance, although delaying feedback is associated with lower perceptions of procedural fairness. In a repeated rounds design the timing of feedback (delayed vs. immediate)

  17. Timing matters: the impact of immediate and delayed feedback on artificial language learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Bertram; Ferdinand, Nicola K; Mecklinger, Axel

    2011-01-01

    In the present experiment, we used event-related potentials (ERP) to investigate the role of immediate and delayed feedback in an artificial grammar learning (AGL) task. Two groups of participants were engaged in classifying non-word strings according to an underlying rule system, not known to the participants. Visual feedback was provided after each classification either immediately or with a short delay of 1 s. Both groups were able to learn the artificial grammar system as indicated by an increase in classification performance. However, the gain in performance was significantly larger for the group receiving immediate feedback as compared to the group receiving delayed feedback. Learning was accompanied by an increase in P300 activity in the ERP for delayed as compared to immediate feedback. Irrespective of feedback delay, both groups exhibited learning related decreases in the feedback-related positivity (FRP) elicited by positive feedback only. The feedback-related negativity (FRN), however, remained constant over the course of learning. These results suggest, first, that delayed feedback is less effective for AGL as task requirements are very demanding, and second, that the FRP elicited by positive prediction errors decreases with learning while the FRN to negative prediction errors is elicited in an all-or-none fashion by negative feedback throughout the entire experiment.

  18. Timing matters: The impact of immediate and delayed feedback on artificial language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram Opitz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present experiment, we used event-related potentials (ERP to investigate the role of immediate and delayed feedback in an artificial grammar learning task. Two groups of participants were engaged in classifying non-word strings according to an underlying rule system, not known to the participants. Visual feedback was provided after each classification either immediately or with a short delay of one second. Both groups were able to learn the artificial grammar system as indicated by an increase in classification performance. However, the gain in performance was significantly larger for the group receiving immediate feedback as compared to the group receiving delayed feedback. Learning was accompanied by an increase in P300 activity in the ERP for delayed as compared to immediate feedback. Irrespective of feedback delay, both groups exhibited learning related decreases in the feedback-related positivity (FRP elicited by positive feedback only. The feedback-related negativity (FRN, however, remained constant over the course of learning. These results suggest, first, that delayed feedback is less effective for artificial grammar learning as task requirements are very demanding, and second, that the FRP elicited by positive prediction errors decreases with learning while the FRN to negative prediction errors is elicited in an all-or-none fashion by negative feedback throughout the entire experiment.

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of neural delayed feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longtin, A.

    1990-01-01

    Neural delayed feedback is a property shared by many circuits in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The evolution of the neural activity in these circuits depends on their present state as well as on their past states, due to finite propagation time of neural activity along the feedback loop. These systems are often seen to undergo a change from a quiescent state characterized by low level fluctuations to an oscillatory state. We discuss the problem of analyzing this transition using techniques from nonlinear dynamics and stochastic processes. Our main goal is to characterize the nonlinearities which enable autonomous oscillations to occur and to uncover the properties of the noise sources these circuits interact with. The concepts are illustrated on the human pupil light reflex (PLR) which has been studied both theoretically and experimentally using this approach. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  20. LHC One-turn Delay Feedback Commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, T; Molendijk, J

    2012-01-01

    The LHC One-Turn delay FeedBack (OTFB) is an FPGA based feedback system part of the LHC cavity controller, which produces gain only around the revolution frequency (frev = 11.245 kHz) harmonics. As such, it helps reduce the transient beam loading and effective cavity impedance. Consequently, it increases the stability margin for Longitudinal Coupled Bunch Instabilities driven by the cavity impedance at the fundamental and allows reliable operation at higher beam currents. The OTFB was commissioned on all sixteen cavities in mid-October 2011 and has been used in operation since. The commissioning procedure and algorithms for setting-up are presented. The resulting improvements in transient beam loading, beam stability, and required klystron power are analyzed. The commissioning of the OTFB reduced the cavity voltage phase modulation from approximately six degrees peak-to-peak to below one degree at 400 MHz with nominal bunch intensity of 1.1e11 protons.

  1. Anomalous feedback and negative domain wall resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ran; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic induction can be regarded as a negative feedback effect, where the motive-force opposes the change of magnetic flux that generates the motive-force. In artificial electromagnetics emerging from spintronics, however, this is not necessarily the case. By studying the current-induced domain wall dynamics in a cylindrical nanowire, we show that the spin motive-force exerting on electrons can either oppose or support the applied current that drives the domain wall. The switching into the anomalous feedback regime occurs when the strength of the dissipative torque β is about twice the value of the Gilbert damping constant α. The anomalous feedback manifests as a negative domain wall resistance, which has an analogy with the water turbine.

  2. H∞ State Feedback Delay-dependent Control for Discrete Systems with Multi-time-delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai-Da Qu

    2005-01-01

    In this paper,H∞ state feedback control with delay information for discrete systems with multi-time-delay is discussed. Making use of linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach, a time-delay-dependent criterion for a discrete system with multi-time-delay to satisfy H∞ performance indices is induced, and then a strategy for H∞ state feedback control with delay values for plant with multi-time-delay is obtained. By solving corresponding LMI, a delay-dependent state feedback controller satisfying H∞ performance indices is designed. Finally, a simulation example demonstrates the validity of the proposed approach.

  3. Neural responses to negative feedback are related to negative emotionality in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesso, Diane L.; Bogdan, Ryan; Birk, Jeffrey L.; Goetz, Elena L.; Holmes, Avram J.

    2012-01-01

    Prior neuroimaging and electrophysiological evidence suggests that potentiated responses in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), particularly the rostral ACC, may contribute to abnormal responses to negative feedback in individuals with elevated negative affect and depressive symptoms. The feedback-related negativity (FRN) represents an electrophysiological index of ACC-related activation in response to performance feedback. The purpose of the present study was to examine the FRN and underlying ACC activation using low resolution electromagnetic tomography source estimation techniques in relation to negative emotionality (a composite index including negative affect and subclinical depressive symptoms). To this end, 29 healthy adults performed a monetary incentive delay task while 128-channel event-related potentials were recorded. We found that enhanced FRNs and increased rostral ACC activation in response to negative—but not positive—feedback was related to greater negative emotionality. These results indicate that individual differences in negative emotionality—a putative risk factor for emotional disorders—modulate ACC-related processes critically implicated in assessing the motivational impact and/or salience of environmental feedback. PMID:21917847

  4. Time-delay feedback control in a delayed dynamical chaos system and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zhi-Yong; Yang Guang; Deng Cun-Bing

    2011-01-01

    The feedback control of a delayed dynamical system, which also includes various chaotic systems with time delays, is investigated. On the basis of stability analysis of a nonautonomons system with delays, some simple yet less conservative criteria are obtained for feedback control in a delayed dynamical system. Finally, the theoretical result is applied to a typical class of chaotic Lorenz system and Chua circuit with delays. Numerical simulations are also given to verify the theoretical results.

  5. Transversality for Cyclic Negative Feedback Systems

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Transversality of stable and unstable manifolds of hyperbolic periodic trajectories is proved for monotone cyclic systems with negative feedback. Such systems in general are not in the category of monotone dynamical systems in the sense of Hirsch. Our main tool utilized in the proofs is the so-called cone of high rank. We further show that stable and unstable manifolds between a hyperbolic equilibrium and a hyperbolic periodic trajectory, or between two hyperbolic equilibria with different di...

  6. Time-delay identification for vibration systems with multiple feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Qiang; Jin, Meng-Shi; Song, Han-Wen; Xu, Jian

    2016-12-01

    An approach for time-delay identification is proposed in multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) linear systems with multiple feedback. The applicability of the approach is discussed in detail. Based on the characteristics of frequency domain in feedback controlled system with multiple time-delays, this paper proposes a time-delay identification approach, which is based on the pseudo impedance function of reference point. Treating feedback time-delays as the "frequencies" of the oscillation curve, the time-delays can be obtained from the "frequencies" of the curve. Numerical simulation is conducted to validate the proposed approach. The application scope of the approach is discussed with regard to different forms of feedback.

  7. Time-delay identification for vibration systems with multiple feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Qiang Sun; Meng-Shi Jin; Han-Wen Song; Jian Xu

    2016-01-01

    An approach for time-delay identification is pro-posed in multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) linear sys-tems with multiple feedback. The applicability of the approach is discussed in detail. Based on the characteris-tics of frequency domain in feedback controlled system with multiple time-delays, this paper proposes a time-delay iden-tification approach, which is based on the pseudo impedance function of reference point. Treating feedback time-delays as the“frequencies”of the oscillation curve, the time-delays can be obtained from the“frequencies”of the curve. Numerical simulation is conducted to validate the proposed approach. The application scope of the approach is discussed with regard to different forms of feedback.

  8. Variable-delay feedback control of unstable steady states in retarded time-delayed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.016209

    2010-01-01

    We study the stability of unstable steady states in scalar retarded time-delayed systems subjected to a variable-delay feedback control. The important aspect of such a control problem is that time-delayed systems are already infinite-dimensional before the delayed feedback control is turned on. When the frequency of the modulation is large compared to the system's dynamics, the analytic approach consists of relating the stability properties of the resulting variable-delay system with those of an analogous distributed delay system. Otherwise, the stability domains are obtained by a numerical integration of the linearized variable-delay system. The analysis shows that the control domains are significantly larger than those in the usual time-delayed feedback control, and that the complexity of the domain structure depends on the form and the frequency of the delay modulation.

  9. Dynamical behaviour of Liu system with time delayed feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Qin; Wang Lin; Ni Qiao

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamical behaviour of the Liu system with time delayed feedback.Two typical situations are considered and the effect of time-delay parameter on the dynamics of the system is discussed.It is shown that the Liu system with time delayed feedback may exhibit interesting and extremely rich dynamical behaviour.The evolution of the dynamics is shown to be complex with varying time-delay parameter.Moreover,the strange attractor like 'wormhole' is detected via numerical simulations.

  10. Stabilizing unstable steady states using multiple delay feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborn, Alexander; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2004-12-31

    Feedback control with different and independent delay times is introduced and shown to be an efficient method for stabilizing fixed points (equilibria) of dynamical systems. In comparison to other delay based chaos control methods multiple delay feedback control is superior for controlling steady states and works also for relatively large delay times (sometimes unavoidable in experiments due to system dead times). To demonstrate this approach for stabilizing unstable fixed points we present numerical simulations of Chua's circuit and a successful experimental application for stabilizing a chaotic frequency doubled Nd-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser.

  11. Effects of Feedback Timing on Second Language Vocabulary Learning: Does Delaying Feedback Increase Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Feedback, or information given to learners regarding their performance, is found to facilitate second language (L2) learning. Research also suggests that the timing of feedback (whether it is provided immediately or after a delay) may affect learning. The purpose of the present study was to identify the optimal feedback timing for L2 vocabulary…

  12. The Effects of Delay of Feedback on a Delayed Concept Formation Transfer Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Marvin L.

    1992-01-01

    Delay and completeness of verbal information feedback were investigated within a transfer of learning paradigm involving concept formation. An experiment with 192 undergraduates indicates that, although delay of feedback (up to 30 seconds) slows speed of learning on the initial task, it has positive effects on the transfer task. (SLD)

  13. Delayed-feedback chimera states: Forced multiclusters and stochastic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, V.; Zakharova, A.; Maistrenko, Y.; Schöll, E.

    2016-07-01

    A nonlinear oscillator model with negative time-delayed feedback is studied numerically under external deterministic and stochastic forcing. It is found that in the unforced system complex partial synchronization patterns like chimera states as well as salt-and-pepper-like solitary states arise on the route from regular dynamics to spatio-temporal chaos. The control of the dynamics by external periodic forcing is demonstrated by numerical simulations. It is shown that one-cluster and multi-cluster chimeras can be achieved by adjusting the external forcing frequency to appropriate resonance conditions. If a stochastic component is superimposed to the deterministic external forcing, chimera states can be induced in a way similar to stochastic resonance, they appear, therefore, in regimes where they do not exist without noise.

  14. Delayed excitatory and inhibitory feedback shape neural information transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacron, Maurice J.; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2017-01-01

    Feedback circuitry with conduction and synaptic delays is ubiquitous in the nervous system. Yet the effects of delayed feedback on sensory processing of natural signals are poorly understood. This study explores the consequences of delayed excitatory and inhibitory feedback inputs on the processing of sensory information. We show, through numerical simulations and theory, that excitatory and inhibitory feedback can alter the firing frequency response of stochastic neurons in opposite ways by creating dynamical resonances, which in turn lead to information resonances (i.e., increased information transfer for specific ranges of input frequencies). The resonances are created at the expense of decreased information transfer in other frequency ranges. Using linear response theory for stochastically firing neurons, we explain how feedback signals shape the neural transfer function for a single neuron as a function of network size. We also find that balanced excitatory and inhibitory feedback can further enhance information tuning while maintaining a constant mean firing rate. Finally, we apply this theory to in vivo experimental data from weakly electric fish in which the feedback loop can be opened. We show that it qualitatively predicts the observed effects of inhibitory feedback. Our study of feedback excitation and inhibition reveals a possible mechanism by which optimal processing may be achieved over selected frequency ranges. PMID:16383655

  15. Time-Delay Systems with Band-Limited Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    used as generators of chaos in applications such as communication, chaos control , and ranging. As an example, such devices are studied as a signal...tions [Lukin, 1997; Myneni, 2001]. Furthermore, time delayed feedback is used in the chaos control scheme known as time-delay autosynchronization

  16. Feedback delays eliminate auditory-motor learning in speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Ludo; Maffett, Derek G

    2015-03-30

    Neurologically healthy individuals use sensory feedback to alter future movements by updating internal models of the effector system and environment. For example, when visual feedback about limb movements or auditory feedback about speech movements is experimentally perturbed, the planning of subsequent movements is adjusted - i.e., sensorimotor adaptation occurs. A separate line of studies has demonstrated that experimentally delaying the sensory consequences of limb movements causes the sensory input to be attributed to external sources rather than to one's own actions. Yet similar feedback delays have remarkably little effect on visuo-motor adaptation (although the rate of learning varies, the amount of adaptation is only moderately affected with delays of 100-200ms, and adaptation still occurs even with a delay as long as 5000ms). Thus, limb motor learning remains largely intact even in conditions where error assignment favors external factors. Here, we show a fundamentally different result for sensorimotor control of speech articulation: auditory-motor adaptation to formant-shifted feedback is completely eliminated with delays of 100ms or more. Thus, for speech motor learning, real-time auditory feedback is critical. This novel finding informs theoretical models of human motor control in general and speech motor control in particular, and it has direct implications for the application of motor learning principles in the habilitation and rehabilitation of individuals with various sensorimotor speech disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Truncated predictor feedback for time-delay systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Bin

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a systematic approach to the design of predictor based controllers for (time-varying) linear systems with either (time-varying) input or state delays. Differently from those traditional predictor based controllers, which are infinite-dimensional static feedback laws and may cause difficulties in their practical implementation, this book develops a truncated predictor feedback (TPF) which involves only finite dimensional static state feedback. Features and topics: A novel approach referred to as truncated predictor feedback for the stabilization of (time-varying) time-delay systems in both the continuous-time setting and the discrete-time setting is built systematically Semi-global and global stabilization problems of linear time-delay systems subject to either magnitude saturation or energy constraints are solved in a systematic manner Both stabilization of a single system and consensus of a group of systems (multi-agent systems) are treated in a unified manner by applying the truncated pre...

  18. Conversion of linear time-invariant time-delay feedback systems into delay-differential equations with commensurate delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Hagiwara, Tomomichi

    2014-08-01

    A new stability analysis method of time-delay systems (TDSs) called the monodromy operator approach has been studied under the assumption that a TDS is represented as a time-delay feedback system consisting of a finite-dimensional linear time-invariant (LTI) system and a pure delay. For applying this approach to TDSs described by delay-differential equations (DDEs), the problem of converting DDEs into representation as time-delay feedback systems has been studied. With regard to such a problem, it was shown that, under discontinuous initial functions, it is natural to define the solutions of DDEs in two different ways, and the above conversion problem was solved for each of these two definitions. More precisely, the solution of a DDE was represented as either the state of the finite-dimensional part of a time-delay feedback system or a part of the output of another time-delay feedback system, depending on which definition of the DDE solution one is talking about. Motivated by the importance in establishing a thorough relationship between time-delay feedback systems and DDEs, this paper discusses the opposite problem of converting time-delay feedback systems into representation as DDEs, including the discussions about the conversion of the initial conditions. We show that the state of (the finite-dimensional part of) a time-delay feedback system can be represented as the solution of a DDE in the sense of one of the two definitions, while its 'essential' output can be represented as that of another DDE in the sense of the other type of definition. Rigorously speaking, however, it is also shown that the latter representation is possible regardless of the initial conditions, while some initial condition could prevent the conversion into the former representation. This study hence establishes that the representation of TDSs as time-delay feedback systems possesses higher ability than that with DDEs, as description methods for LTI TDSs with commensurate delays.

  19. Delay-dependent state feedback robust stabilization for uncertain singular time-delay systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Huanli; Xu Bugong

    2008-01-01

    The problem of robust stabilization for uncertain singular time-delay systems is studied.First,a new delay-dependent asymptotic stability criteria for normal singular time-delay systems is given,which is less conservative.Using this result,the problem of state feedback robust stabilization for uncertain singular time-delay systems is discussed.Finally,two examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the results.

  20. Delayed feedback control of time-delayed chaotic systems: Analytical approach at Hopf bifurcation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasegh, Nastaran [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, PO Box 16315-1355, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: vasegh@eetd.kntu.ac.ir; Sedigh, Ali Khaki [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, PO Box 16315-1355, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-28

    This Letter is concerned with bifurcation and chaos control in scalar delayed differential equations with delay parameter {tau}. By linear stability analysis, the conditions under which a sequence of Hopf bifurcation occurs at the equilibrium points are obtained. The delayed feedback controller is used to stabilize unstable periodic orbits. To find the controller delay, it is chosen such that the Hopf bifurcation remains unchanged. Also, the controller feedback gain is determined such that the corresponding unstable periodic orbit becomes stable. Numerical simulations are used to verify the analytical results.

  1. Swing Damping for Helicopter Slung Load Systems using Delayed Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Morten; la Cour-Harbo, Anders; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2009-01-01

    of swing. The design of the delayed feedback controller is presented as an optimization problem which gives the possibility of an automated design process. Simulations and flight test verifications of the control system on two different autonomous helicopters are presented and it is shown how a significant......This paper presents the design and verification of a swing reducing controller for helicopter slung load systems using intentional delayed feedback. It is intended for augmenting a trajectory tracking helicopter controller and thereby improving the slung load handing capabilities for autonomous...... helicopters. The delayed feedback controller is added to actively reduce oscillations of the slung load by improving the damping of the slung load pendulum modes. Furthermore, it is intended for integration with a feedforward control scheme based on input shaping for concurrent avoidance and dampening...

  2. Predictor feedback for delay systems implementations and approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Karafyllis, Iasson

    2017-01-01

    This monograph bridges the gap between the nonlinear predictor as a concept and as a practical tool, presenting a complete theory of the application of predictor feedback to time-invariant, uncertain systems with constant input delays and/or measurement delays. It supplies several methods for generating the necessary real-time solutions to the systems’ nonlinear differential equations, which the authors refer to as approximate predictors. Predictor feedback for linear time-invariant (LTI) systems is presented in Part I to provide a solid foundation on the necessary concepts, as LTI systems pose fewer technical difficulties than nonlinear systems. Part II extends all of the concepts to nonlinear time-invariant systems. Finally, Part III explores extensions of predictor feedback to systems described by integral delay equations and to discrete-time systems. The book’s core is the design of control and observer algorithms with which global stabilization, guaranteed in the previous literature with idealized (b...

  3. Negative feedback effects on star formation history and cosmic reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lei; Xiang, Shouping; Yuan, Ye-Fei

    2008-01-01

    After considering the effects of negative feedback on the process of star formation, we explore the relationship between star formation process and the associated feedback, by investigating how the mechanical feedback from supernovae(SNe) and radiative feedback from luminous objects regulate the star formation rate and therefore affect the cosmic reionization.Based on our present knowledge of the negative feedback theory and some numerical simulations, we construct an analytic model in the framework of the Lambda cold dark matter model. In certain parameter regions, our model can explain some observational results properly. In large halos(T_vir>10000 K), both mechanical and radiative feedback have a similar behavior: the relative strength of negative feedback reduces as the redshift decreases. In contrast, in small halos (T_vir<10000 K$) that are thought to breed the first stars at early time, the radiative feedback gets stronger when the redshift decreases. And the star formation rate in these small halos...

  4. Stress reduces use of negative feedback in a feedback-based learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Antje; Plessow, Franziska; Goschke, Thomas; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2010-04-01

    In contrast to the well-established effects of stress on learning of declarative material, much less is known about stress effects on reward- or feedback-based learning. Differential effects on positive and negative feedback especially have received little attention. The objective of this study, thus, was to investigate effects of psychosocial stress on feedback-based learning with a particular focus on the use of negative and positive feedback during learning. Participants completed a probabilistic selection task in both a stress and a control condition. The task allowed quantification of how much participants relied on positive and negative feedback during learning. Although stress had no effect on general acquisition of the task, results indicate that participants used negative feedback significantly less during learning after stress compared with the control condition. An enhancing effect of stress on use of positive feedback failed to reach significance. These findings suggest that stress acts differentially on the use of positive and negative feedback during learning.

  5. Control of spatially patterned synchrony with multisite delayed feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Hauptmann, C.; Omelchenko, O.; Popovych, O. V.; Maistrenko, Y.; Tass, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    We present an analytical study describing a method for the control of spatiotemporal patterns of synchrony in networks of coupled oscillators. Delayed feedback applied through a small number of electrodes effectively induces spatiotemporal dynamics at minimal stimulation intensities. Different arrangements of the delays cause different spatial patterns of synchrony, comparable to central pattern generators (CPGs), i.e., interacting clusters of oscillatory neurons producing patterned output, e...

  6. Inducing or suppressing chaos in a double-well Duffing oscillator by time delay feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Zhongkui [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnic University, Xi' an 710072 (China)] e-mail: sunzk205@mail.nwpu.edu.cn; Xu Wei [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnic University, Xi' an 710072 (China)] e-mail: weixu@nwpu.edu.cn; Yang Xiaoli [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnic University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Department of Mathematics, Shaan' xi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Fang Tong [Department of Applied Mechanics, Northwestern Polytechnic University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2006-02-01

    The chaotic behavior of a double-well Duffing oscillator with both delayed displacement and velocity feedbacks under a harmonic excitation is investigated. By means of the Melnikov technique, necessary condition for onset of chaos resulting from homoclinic bifurcation is derived analytically. The analytical results reveal that for negative feedback the presence of time delay lowers the threshold and enlarges the possible chaotic domain in parameter space; while for positive feedback the presence of time delay enhances the threshold and reduces the possible chaotic domain in parameter space, which are further verified numerically through Poincare maps of the original system. Furthermore, the effect of the control gain parameters on the chaotic motion of the original system is studied in detail.

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of a microelectromechanical oscillator with delayed feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leeuwen, R.; Karabacak, D.M.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Venstra, W.J.

    2013-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a nonlinear electromechanical oscillator with delayed feedback. Compared to their linear counterparts, we find that the dynamics is dramatically different. The well-known Barkhausen stability criterion ceases to exist, and two modes of operation emerge: one characterized by

  8. Controlling Beam Halo-Chaos via Time-Delayed Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Jin-Qing; WENG Jia-Qiang; ZHU Lun-Wu; LUO Xiao-Shu

    2004-01-01

    The study of controlling high-current proton beam halo-chaos has become a key concerned issue for many important applications. In this paper, time-delayed feedback control method is proposed for beam halo-chaos. Particle in cell simulation results show that the method is very effective and has some advantages for high-current beam experiments and engineering.

  9. Limit-cycle oscillators subject to a delayed feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erneux, T.; Grasman, J.

    2008-01-01

    The coexistence of two stable limit cycles exhibiting different periods is examined for a nonlinear oscillator subject to a delayed feedback. For the case of a weakly nonlinear oscillator, we discuss the validity of a previously determined phase equation. For the case of a strongly nonlinear oscilla

  10. Directed Current Induced by an Symmetrically ac Force Coexisting with a Time-Delayed Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易述婷; 宋晖; 欧志娥; 艾保全; 熊建文

    2012-01-01

    We study the transport of overdamped Brownian particles in a symmetricaJly periodic potential in the presence of an asymmetrically ac driving force and a time-delayed feedback. It is found that for low frequencies, the average velocity can be negative by changing the driving amplitude, for high frequencies, there exists an optimized driving amplitude at which the average velocity takes its maximum value. Additionally, there is a threshold value of driving amplitude below which no directed transport can be obtained for high frequencies. For the large value of the delay time, the average velocity is independent of the delay time.

  11. Controlling a time-delay system using multiple delay feedback control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Wei; Zhang Yan; Wang Ying-Hai

    2007-01-01

    In this paper multiple delay feedback control (MDFC) with different and independent delay times is shown to be an efficient method for stabilizing fixed points in finite-dimensional dynamical systems. Whether MDFC can be applied to infinite-dimensional systems has been an open question. In this paper we find that for infinite-dimensional systems modelled by delay differential equations, MDFC works well for stabilizing (unstable) steady states in long-, moderate-and short-time delay regions, in particular for the hyperchaotic case.

  12. Adaptive modification of the delayed feedback control algorithm with a continuously varying time delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyragas, V. [Semiconductor Physics Institute, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, A. Gostauto 11, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Pyragas, K. [Semiconductor Physics Institute, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, A. Gostauto 11, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2011-10-24

    We propose a simple adaptive delayed feedback control algorithm for stabilization of unstable periodic orbits with unknown periods. The state dependent time delay is varied continuously towards the period of controlled orbit according to a gradient-descent method realized through three simple ordinary differential equations. We demonstrate the efficiency of the algorithm with the Roessler and Mackey-Glass chaotic systems. The stability of the controlled orbits is proven by computation of the Lyapunov exponents of linearized equations. -- Highlights: → A simple adaptive modification of the delayed feedback control algorithm is proposed. → It enables the control of unstable periodic orbits with unknown periods. → The delay time is varied continuously according to a gradient descend method. → The algorithm is embodied by three simple ordinary differential equations. → The validity of the algorithm is proven by computation of the Lyapunov exponents.

  13. Logistic map with a delayed feedback: Stability of a discrete time-delay control of chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, T; Zebrowski, J J

    2001-01-01

    The logistic map with a delayed feedback is studied as a generic model. The stability of the model and its bifurcation scheme is analyzed as a function of the feedback amplitude and of the delay. Stability analysis is performed semianalytically. A relation between the delay and the periodicity of the orbit, which explains why some terms used in chaos control are ineffective, was found. The consequences for chaos control are discussed. The structure of bifurcations is found to depend strongly on the parity and on the length of the delay. Boundary crisis, the tangent, the Neimark, as well as the period-doubling bifurcations occur in this system. The effective dimension of the model is also discussed.

  14. Chaos control in delayed chaotic systems via sliding mode based delayed feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasegh, Nastaran [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Seyed Khandan Bridge, Shariati St. 16314, P.O. Box 16315-1355, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: vasegh@eetd.kntu.ac.ir; Sedigh, Ali Khaki [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Seyed Khandan Bridge, Shariati St. 16314, P.O. Box 16315-1355, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    This paper investigates chaos control for scalar delayed chaotic systems using sliding mode control strategy. Sliding surface design is based on delayed feedback controller. It is shown that the proposed controller can achieve stability for an arbitrary unstable fixed point (UPF) or unstable periodic orbit (UPO) with arbitrary period. The chaotic system used in this study to illustrate the theoretical concepts is the well known Mackey-Glass model. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the designed nonlinear sliding mode controller.

  15. Autonomous learning by simple dynamical systems with delayed feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluza, Pablo; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2014-09-01

    A general scheme for the construction of dynamical systems able to learn generation of the desired kinds of dynamics through adjustment of their internal structure is proposed. The scheme involves intrinsic time-delayed feedback to steer the dynamics towards the target performance. As an example, a system of coupled phase oscillators, which can, by changing the weights of connections between its elements, evolve to a dynamical state with the prescribed (low or high) synchronization level, is considered and investigated.

  16. A survey on delayed feedback control of chaos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuping TIAN; Jiandong ZHU; Guanrong CHEN

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the basic idea and provides the mathematical formulation of the delayed feedback control (DFC) methodology, which has been widely used in chaos control. Stability analysis including the well-known odd number limitation of the DFC is reviewed. Some new developments in characterizing the limitation of the DFC are presented. Various modified DFC methods, which are developed in order to overcome the odd number limitation, are also described. Finally, some open problems in this research field are discussed.

  17. Neural responses to negative feedback are related to negative emotionality in healthy adults

    OpenAIRE

    Santesso, Diane L.; Bogdan, Ryan; Birk, Jeffrey L.; Goetz, Elena L.; Holmes, Avram J.; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2011-01-01

    Prior neuroimaging and electrophysiological evidence suggests that potentiated responses in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), particularly the rostral ACC, may contribute to abnormal responses to negative feedback in individuals with elevated negative affect and depressive symptoms. The feedback-related negativity (FRN) represents an electrophysiological index of ACC-related activation in response to performance feedback. The purpose of the present study was to examine the FRN and underlyi...

  18. Effects of Informative and Confirmatory Feedback on Brain Activation During Negative Feedback Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Kyoung eWoo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study compared the effects of informative and confirmatory feedback on brain activation during negative feedback processing. For confirmatory feedback trials, participants were informed that they had failed the task, whereas informative feedback trials presented task relevant information along with the notification of their failure. Fourteen male undergraduates performed a series of spatial-perceptual tasks and received feedback while their brain activity was recorded. During confirmatory feedback trials, greater activations in the amygdala, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and the thalamus (including the habenular were observed in response to incorrect responses. These results suggest that confirmatory feedback induces negative emotional reactions to failure. In contrast, informative feedback trials elicited greater activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC when participants experienced failure. Further psychophysiological interaction (PPI analysis revealed a negative coupling between the DLPFC and the amygdala during informative feedback relative to confirmatory feedback trials. These findings suggest that providing task-relevant information could facilitate implicit down-regulation of negative emotions following failure.

  19. Dynamical output feedback stabilization for neutral systems with mixed delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei QIAN; Guo-jiang SHEN; You-xian SUN

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the issue of stabilization for the linear neutral systems with mixed delays.The attention is focused on the design of output feedback controllers which guarantee the asymptotical stability of the closed-loop systems.Based on the model transformation of neutral type,the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional method is employed to establish the delay-dependent stability criterion.Then,through the controller parameterization and some matrix transformation techniques,the desired parameters are determined under the delay-dependent design condition in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs),and the desired controller is explicitly formulated.A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Negative feedbacks in the economy and industrial location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakman, S; Garretsen, H; Gigengack, R; vanMarrewijk, C; Wagenvoort, R

    1996-01-01

    Incorporating regional asymmetry and negative feedbacks (congestion) in a model of economic geography and international trade shows that complete specialization of production at one location is unlikely. We identify an agglomerating force: the home market effect, and two spreading forces,

  1. Deterministic and stochastic control of chimera states in delayed feedback oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenov, V. [Department of Physics, Saratov State University, Astrakhanskaya Str. 83, 410012 Saratov (Russian Federation); Zakharova, A.; Schöll, E. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, TU Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Maistrenko, Y. [Institute of Mathematics and Center for Medical and Biotechnical Research, NAS of Ukraine, Tereschenkivska Str. 3, 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2016-06-08

    Chimera states, characterized by the coexistence of regular and chaotic dynamics, are found in a nonlinear oscillator model with negative time-delayed feedback. The control of these chimera states by external periodic forcing is demonstrated by numerical simulations. Both deterministic and stochastic external periodic forcing are considered. It is shown that multi-cluster chimeras can be achieved by adjusting the external forcing frequency to appropriate resonance conditions. The constructive role of noise in the formation of a chimera states is shown.

  2. Relation between delayed feedback and delay-coupled systems and its application to chaotic lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriano, Miguel C., E-mail: miguel@ifisc.uib-csic.es; Flunkert, Valentin; Fischer, Ingo [Instituto de Física Interdisciplinar y Sistemas Complejos, IFISC (CSIC-UIB), Campus Universitat Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    We present a systematic approach to identify the similarities and differences between a chaotic system with delayed feedback and two mutually delay-coupled systems. We consider the general case in which the coupled systems are either unsynchronized or in a generally synchronized state, in contrast to the mostly studied case of identical synchronization. We construct a new time-series for each of the two coupling schemes, respectively, and present analytic evidence and numerical confirmation that these two constructed time-series are statistically equivalent. From the construction, it then follows that the distribution of time-series segments that are small compared to the overall delay in the system is independent of the value of the delay and of the coupling scheme. By focusing on numerical simulations of delay-coupled chaotic lasers, we present a practical example of our findings.

  3. Seeing ghosts: negative body evaluation predicts overestimation of negative social feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleva, Jessica M; Lange, Wolf-Gero; Jansen, Anita; Martijn, Carolien

    2014-06-01

    The current study investigated whether negative body evaluation predicts women's overestimation of negative social feedback related to their own body (i.e., covariation bias). Sixty-five female university students completed a computer task where photos of their own body, of a control woman's body, and of a neutral object, were followed by nonverbal social feedback (i.e., facial crowds with equal numbers of negative, positive, and neutral faces). Afterward, women estimated the percentage of negative, positive, and neutral social feedback that followed their own body, the control woman's body, and the neutral object. The findings provided evidence for a covariation bias: negative body evaluation predicted higher estimates of negative social feedback for women's own body, but not for the other stimuli. Additionally, the covariation bias was not explained by differences in how women interpreted the social feedback (the facial stimuli). Clinical implications of the covariation bias to body image are discussed.

  4. On X-Channels with Feedback and Delayed CSI

    CERN Document Server

    Tandon, Ravi; Poor, H Vincent; Shamai, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    The sum degrees of freedom (DoF) of the two-user MIMO X-channel is characterized in the presence of output feedback and delayed channel state information (CSI). The number of antennas at each transmitters is assumed to be M and the number of antennas at each of the receivers is assumed to be N. It is shown that the sum DoF of the two-user MIMO X-channel is the same as the sum DoF of a two-user MIMO broadcast channel with 2M transmit antennas, and N antennas at each receiver. Hence, for this symmetric antenna configuration, there is no performance loss in the sum degrees of freedom due to the distributed nature of the transmitters. This result highlights the usefulness of feedback and delayed CSI for the MIMO X-channel. The K-user X-channel with single antenna at each transmitter and each receiver is also studied. In this network, each transmitter has a message intended for each receiver. For this network, it is shown that the sum DoF with partial output feedback alone is at least 2K/(K+1). This lower bound is...

  5. All-optical noninvasive delayed feedback control of semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Schikora, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    The stabilization of unstable states hidden in the dynamics of a system, in particular the control of chaos, has received much attention in the last years. Sylvia Schikora for the first time applies a well-known control method called delayed feedback control entirely in the all-optical domain. A multisection semiconductor laser receives optical feedback from an external Fabry-Perot interferometer. The control signal is a phase-tunable superposition of the laser signal and provokes the laser to operate in an otherwise unstable periodic state with a period equal to the time delay. The control is noninvasive, because the reflected signal tends to zero when the target state is reached.   The work has been awarded the Carl-Ramsauer-Prize 2012.   Contents ·         All-Optical Control Setup ·         Stable States with Resonant Fabry-Perot Feedback ·         Control of an Unstable Stationary State and of Unstable Selfpulsations ·         Controlling Chaos ·         Con...

  6. Investigation of a delayed feedback controller of MEMS resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Masri, Karim M.

    2013-08-04

    Controlling mechanical systems is an important branch of mechanical engineering. Several techniques have been used to control Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonators. In this paper, we study the effect of a delayed feedback controller on stabilizing MEMS resonators. A delayed feedback velocity controller is implemented through modifying the parallel plate electrostatic force used to excite the resonator into motion. A nonlinear single degree of freedom model is used to simulate the resonator response. Long time integration is used first. Then, a finite deference technique to capture periodic motion combined with the Floquet theory is used to capture the stable and unstable periodic responses. We show that applying a suitable positive gain can stabilize the MEMS resonator near or inside the instability dynamic pull in band. We also study the stability of the resonator by tracking its basins of attraction while sweeping the controller gain and the frequency of excitations. For positive delayed gains, we notice significant enhancement in the safe area of the basins of attraction. Copyright © 2013 by ASME.

  7. The effect of negative feedback on noise propagation in transcriptional gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshangi, Sara; Weiss, Ron

    2006-06-01

    This paper analyzes how the delay and repression strength of negative feedback in single-gene and multigene transcriptional networks influences intrinsic noise propagation and oscillatory behavior. We simulate a variety of transcriptional networks using a stochastic model and report two main findings. First, intrinsic noise is not attenuated by the addition of negative or positive feedback to transcriptional cascades. Second, for multigene negative feedback networks, synchrony in oscillations among a cell population can be improved by increasing network depth and tightening the regulation at one of the repression stages. Our long term goal is to understand how the noise characteristics of complex networks can be derived from the properties of modules that are used to compose these networks.

  8. Hopf Bifurcation of a Positive Feedback Delay Differential Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玉明; 黄立宏

    2003-01-01

    Under some minor technical hypotheses, for each T larger than a certain Ts > 0, Krisztin, Walther and Wu showed the existence of a periodic orbit for the positive feedback delay differential equation x(t) =-Tμx(t) +Tf(x(t - 1)), where T and μ are positive constants and f : R→ R satisfies f(0) = 0 and f′ > 0 。Combining this with a unique result of Krisztin and Walther, we know that this periodic orbit is the one branched out from 0 through Hopf bifurcation. Using the normal form theory for delay differential equations, we show the same result underthe condition that f ∈ C3(R,R) is such that f″(0) = 0 and f″′(0) < 0, which is weaker than those of Krisztin and Walther。

  9. Controlling chaos in a nonlinear pendulum using an extended time-delayed feedback control method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza de Paula, Aline [COPPE - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 68503, 21.941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: alinesp@ufrj.br; Savi, Marcelo Amorim [COPPE - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 68503, 21.941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: savi@mecanica.ufrj.br

    2009-12-15

    Chaos control is employed for the stabilization of unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) embedded in chaotic attractors. The extended time-delayed feedback control uses a continuous feedback loop incorporating information from previous states of the system in order to stabilize unstable orbits. This article deals with the chaos control of a nonlinear pendulum employing the extended time-delayed feedback control method. The control law leads to delay-differential equations (DDEs) that contain derivatives that depend on the solution of previous time instants. A fourth-order Runge-Kutta method with linear interpolation on the delayed variables is employed for numerical simulations of the DDEs and its initial function is estimated by a Taylor series expansion. During the learning stage, the UPOs are identified by the close-return method and control parameters are chosen for each desired UPO by defining situations where the largest Lyapunov exponent becomes negative. Analyses of a nonlinear pendulum are carried out by considering signals that are generated by numerical integration of the mathematical model using experimentally identified parameters. Results show the capability of the control procedure to stabilize UPOs of the dynamical system, highlighting some difficulties to achieve the stabilization of the desired orbit.

  10. A Biopsychosocial Model Based on Negative Feedback and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Andrew Carey

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the biopsychosocial model has been a popular topic of discussion for over four decades it has not had the traction in fields of research that might be expected of such an intuitively appealing idea. One reason for this might be the absence of an identified mechanism or a functional architecture that is authentically biopsychosocial. What is needed is a robust mechanism that is equally important to biochemical processes as it is to psychological and social processes. Negative feedback may be the mechanism that is required. Negative feedback has been implicated in the regulation of neurotransmitters as well as important psychological and social processes such as emotional regulation and the relationship between a psychotherapist and a client. Moreover, negative feedback is purported to also govern the activity of all other organisms as well as humans. Perceptual Control Theory (PCT describes the way in which negative feedback establishes control at increasing levels of perceptual complexity. Thus, PCT may be the first biopsychosocial model to be articulated in functional terms. In this paper we outline the working model of PCT and explain how PCT provides an embodied hierarchical neural architecture that utilises negative feedback to control physiological, psychological, and social variables. PCT has major implications for both research and practice and, importantly, provides a guide by which fields of research that are currently separated may be integrated to bring about substantial progress in understanding the way in which the brain alters, and is altered by, its behavioural and environmental context.

  11. Time-delayed quantum coherent Pyragas feedback control of photon squeezing in a degenerate parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Manuel; Hein, Sven M.; Lehnert, Judith; Schöll, Eckehard; Hughes, Stephen; Knorr, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Quantum coherent feedback control is a measurement-free control method fully preserving quantum coherence. In this paper we show how time-delayed quantum coherent feedback can be used to control the degree of squeezing in the output field of a cavity containing a degenerate parametric oscillator. We focus on the specific situation of Pyragas-type feedback control where time-delayed signals are fed back directly into the quantum system. Our results show how time-delayed feedback can enhance or decrease the degree of squeezing as a function of time delay and feedback strength.

  12. Negative Feedback, Linearity and Parameter Invariance in Linear Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luciano da F; Comin, Cesar H

    2016-01-01

    Negative feedback is a powerful approach capable of improving several aspects of a system. In linear electronics, it has been critical for allowing invariance to device properties. Negative feedback is also known to enhance linearity in amplification, which is one of the most important foundations of linear electronics. At the same time, thousands of transistors types have been made available, suggesting that these devices, in addition to their known variability of parameters, have distinguishing properties. The current work reports a systematic approach to quantifying the potential of negative feedback, with respect to bipolar transistors, as a means to providing device invariance and linearity. Several methods, including concepts from multivariate statistics and complex systems, are applied at the theoretical as well as experimental levels, and a number of interesting results are obtained and discussed. For instance, it has been verified that the transistors types indeed have well-defined characteristics wh...

  13. Duration reproduction with sensory feedback delay: Differential involvement of perception and action time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eGanzenmüller

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that voluntary action can attract subsequent, delayed feedback events towards the action, and adaptation to the sensorimotor delay can even reverse motor-sensory temporal-order judgments. However, whether and how sensorimotor delay affects duration reproduction is still unclear. To investigate this, we injected an onset- or offset-delay to the sensory feedback signal from a duration reproduction task. We compared duration reproductions within (visual, auditory modality and across audiovisual modalities with feedback signal onset- and offset-delay manipulations. We found that the reproduced duration was lengthened in both visual and auditory feedback signal onset-delay conditions. The lengthening effect was evident immediately, on the first trial with the onset delay. However, when the onset of the feedback signal was prior to the action, the lengthening effect was diminished. In contrast, a shortening effect was found with feedback signal offset-delay, though the effect was weaker and manifested only in the auditory offset-delay condition. These findings indicate that participants tend to mix the onset of action and the feedback signal more when the feedback is delayed, and they heavily rely on motor-stop signals for the duration reproduction. Furthermore, auditory duration was overestimated compared to visual duration in crossmodal feedback conditions, and the overestimation of auditory duration (or the underestimation of visual duration was independent of the delay manipulation.

  14. A Nonlinear Distortion Compensation Method with Adaptive Predistorter and Negative Feed-Back for a Narrow-Band Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yitao; Muta, Osamu; Akaiwa, Yoshihiko

    The adaptive predistorter and the negative feedback system are known as methods to compensate for the nonlinear distortion of a power amplifier. Although the feedback method is a simple technique, its instability impedes the capability of high-feedback gain to achieve a high-compensation effect. On the other hand, the predistorter requires a long time for convergence of the adaptive predistorters. In this paper, we propose a nonlinear distortion compensation method for a narrow-band signal. In this method, an adaptive predistorter and negative feedback are combined. In addition, to shorten the convergence time to minimize nonlinear distortion, a variable step-size (VS) method is also applied to the algorithm to determine the parameters of the adaptive predistorter. Using computer simulations, we show that the proposed scheme achieves both five times faster convergence speed than that of the predistorter and three times higher permissible delay time in the feedback amplifier than that of a negative feedback only amplifier.

  15. Role of Delay of Feedback on Subsequent Pattern Recognition Transfer Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Marvin L.; Lund, Elissa

    1993-01-01

    Two experiments with 100 undergraduates investigated effects of delay of feedback on immediate and delayed transfer tasks involving different pattern recognition strategies. Delay of feedback resulted in greater retention of the concepts underlying construction of the different patterns in all transfer tasks. Results support the Kulhavy-Anderson…

  16. Stability analysis in a car-following model with reaction-time delay and delayed feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yanfei; Xu, Meng

    2016-10-01

    The delayed feedback control in terms of both headway and velocity differences has been proposed to guarantee the stability of a car-following model including the reaction-time delay of drivers. Using Laplace transformation and transfer function, the stable condition is derived and appropriate choices of time delay and feedback gains are designed to stabilize traffic flow. Meanwhile, an upper bound on explicit time delay is determined with respect to the response of desired acceleration. To ensure the string stability, the explicit time delay cannot over its upper bound. Numerical simulations indicate that the proposed control method can restraint traffic congestion and improve control performance.

  17. Feedback-induced glutamate spillover enhances negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroman, Rozan; Kamermans, M.

    2015-01-01

    KEY POINTS: In the retina, horizontal cells feed back negatively to cone photoreceptors. Glutamate released from cones can spill over to neighbouring cones. Here we show that cone glutamate release induced by negative feedback can also spill over to neighbouring cones. This glutamate activates the g

  18. Impact of negative feedback in metabolic noise propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borri, Alessandro; Palumbo, Pasquale; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic biology combines different branches of biology and engineering aimed at designing synthetic biological circuits able to replicate emergent properties useful for the biotechnology industry, human health and environment. The role of negative feedback in noise propagation for a basic enzymatic reaction scheme is investigated. Two feedback control schemes on enzyme expression are considered: one from the final product of the pathway activity, the other from the enzyme accumulation. Both schemes are designed to provide the same steady-state average values of the involved players, in order to evaluate the feedback performances according to the same working mode. Computations are carried out numerically and analytically, the latter allowing to infer information on which model parameter setting leads to a more efficient noise attenuation, according to the chosen scheme. In addition to highlighting the role of the feedback in providing a substantial noise reduction, our investigation concludes that the effect of feedback is enhanced by increasing the promoter sensitivity for both schemes. A further interesting biological insight is that an increase in the promoter sensitivity provides more benefits to the feedback from the product with respect to the feedback from the enzyme, in terms of enlarging the parameter design space.

  19. On the Permanence of a Nonautonomous Nicholson's Blowflies Model with Feedback Control and Delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Wei-ying

    2011-01-01

    A nonautonomous Nicholson's Blowflies model with feedback control and delay is investigated in this paper.We show that for this system,feedback control variable has no influence on the persistent property of the system.

  20. The Permanence in a Single Species Nonautonomous System with Delays and Feedback Control

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    We consider a single species nonautonomous system with delays and feedback control. A general criterion on the permanence for all positive solutions is established. The results show that the feedback control does not influence the permanence of species.

  1. Pitchfork and Hopf bifurcation thresholds in stochastic equations with delayed feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Mathieu; Lépine, Françoise; Viñals, Jorge

    2009-12-01

    The bifurcation diagram of a model stochastic differential equation with delayed feedback is presented. We are motivated by recent research on stochastic effects in models of transcriptional gene regulation. We start from the normal form for a pitchfork bifurcation, and add multiplicative or parametric noise and linear delayed feedback. The latter is sufficient to originate a Hopf bifurcation in that region of parameters in which there is a sufficiently strong negative feedback. We find a sharp bifurcation in parameter space, and define the threshold as the point in which the stationary distribution function p(x) changes from a delta function at the trivial state x=0 to p(x) approximately x(alpha) at small x (with alpha=-1 exactly at threshold). We find that the bifurcation threshold is shifted by fluctuations relative to the deterministic limit by an amount that scales linearly with the noise intensity. Analytic calculations of the bifurcation threshold are also presented in the limit of small delay tau-->0 that compare quite favorably with the numerical solutions even for moderate values of tau .

  2. Experimental study of delayed positive feedback control for a flexible beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Recently, some researches indicate that positive feedback can benefit the control if appropriate time delay is intentionally introduced into control system. However, most work is theoretical one but few are experimental. This paper presents theoretical and experimental studies of delayed positive feedback control technique using a flexible beam as research object. The positive feedback weighting coefficient is designed by using the optimal control method. The available time delay is determined by analyzing ...

  3. Coherence versus reliability of stochastic oscillators with delayed feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldobin, Denis S

    2008-12-01

    For noisy self-sustained oscillators, both reliability, the stability of a response to a noisy driving, and coherence, understood in the sense of constancy of oscillation frequency, are important characteristics. Although both characteristics and techniques for controlling them have received great attention from researchers, owing to their importance for neurons, lasers, clocks, electric generators, etc., these characteristics were previously considered separately. In this paper, a strong quantitative relation between coherence and reliability is revealed for a limit cycle oscillator subject to a weak noisy driving and a linear delayed feedback, a convection control tool. The analytical findings are verified and enriched with a numerical simulation for the Van der Pol-Duffing oscillator.

  4. Output regulation problem for discrete-time linear time-delay systems by output feedback control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yamin YAN; Jie HUANG

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the output regulation problem of discrete linear time-delay systems by output feedback control. We have established some results parallel to those for the output regulation problem of continuous linear time-delay systems.

  5. Delayed feedback control of unstable steady states in fractional-order chaotic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Urumov, Viktor

    2010-01-01

    We study the possibility to stabilize unstable steady states in chaotic fractional-order dynamical systems by the time-delayed feedback method with both constant and time-varying delays. By performing a linear stability analysis in the constant delay case, we establish the parameter ranges for successful stabilization of unstable equilibria in the plane parametrizad by the feedback gain and the time delay. An insight into the control mechanism is gained by analyzing the characteristic equation of the controlled system, showing that the control scheme fails to control unstable equilibria having an odd number of positive real eigenvalues. It is shown numerically that delayed feedback control with a variable time-delay significantly enlarges the stability region of the steady states in comparison to the classical time-delayed feedback scheme with a constant delay.

  6. The effect of process delay on dynamical behaviors in a self-feedback nonlinear oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chenggui; Ma, Jun; Li, Chuan; He, Zhiwei

    2016-10-01

    The delayed feedback loops play a crucial role in the stability of dynamical systems. The effect of process delay in feedback is studied numerically and theoretically in the delayed feedback nonlinear systems including the neural model, periodic system and chaotic oscillator. The process delay is of key importance in determining the evolution of systems, and the rich dynamical phenomena are observed. By introducing a process delay, we find that it can induce bursting electric activities in the neural model. We demonstrate that this novel regime of amplitude death also exists in the parameter space of feedback strength and process delay for the periodic system and chaotic oscillator. Our results extend the effect of process delay in the paper of Zou et al.(2013) where the process delay can eliminate the amplitude death of the coupled nonlinear systems.

  7. Synthesis for robust synchronization of chaotic systems under output feedback control with multiple random delays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Guilin [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Vehicle Body Design and Manufactory, M.O.E, College of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Wang Qingguo [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)]. E-mail: elewqg@nus.edu.sg; Lin Chong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260 (Singapore); Han Xu [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Vehicle Body Design and Manufactory, M.O.E, College of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Li Guangyao [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Vehicle Body Design and Manufactory, M.O.E, College of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China)

    2006-09-15

    Synchronization under output feedback control with multiple random time delays is studied, using the paradigm in nonlinear physics-Chua's circuit. Compared with other synchronization control methods, output feedback control with multiple random delay is superior for a realistic synchronization application to secure communications. Sufficient condition for global stability of delay-dependent synchronization is established based on the LMI technique. Numerical simulations fully support the analytical approach, in spite of the random delays.

  8. Delay signatures in the chaotic intensity output of a quantum dot laser with optical feedback

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    VARGHESE BEJOY; JOHN MANU P; NANDAKUMARAN V M

    2016-05-01

    Delay identification from the chaotic intensity output of a quantum dot laser with optical feedback is done using numerical and information theoretic techniques. Four quantifiers, namely autocorrelation function, delayed mutual information, permutation entropy and permutation statistical complexity, are employed in delay estimation. A detailed comparison of these quantifiers with different feedback rates and delay is undertaken. Permutation entropy and permutation statistical complexity are calculated with different dimensions of symbolic reconstruction to obtain the best results.

  9. Dynamical behaviors in time-delay systems with delayed feedback and digitized coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Chiranjit; Ambika, G.; Banerjee, Soumitro

    2014-12-01

    We consider a network of delay dynamical systems connected in a ring via unidirectional positive feedback with constant delay in coupling. For the specific case of Mackey-Glass systems on the ring topology, we capture the phenomena of amplitude death, isochronous synchronization and phase-flip bifurcation as the relevant parameters are tuned. Using linear stability analysis and master stability function approach, we predict the region of amplitude death and synchronized states respectively in the parameter space and study the nature of transitions between the different states. For a large number of systems in the same dynamical configuration, we observe splay states, mixed splay states and phase locked clusters. We extend the study to the case of digitized coupling and observe that these emergent states still persist. However, the sampling and quantization reduce the regions of amplitude death and induce phase-flip bifurcation.

  10. Seeing ghosts: Negative body evaluation predicts overestimation of negative social feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alleva, J.M.; Lange, W.G.; Jansen, A.T.M.; Martijn, C.

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated whether negative body evaluation predicts women's overestimation of negative social feedback related to their own body (i.e., covariation bias). Sixty-five female university students completed a computer task where photos of their own body, of a control woman's body, a

  11. Seeing ghosts: Negative body evaluation predicts overestimation of negative social feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alleva, J.M.; Lange, W.G.; Jansen, A.T.M.; Martijn, C.

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated whether negative body evaluation predicts women's overestimation of negative social feedback related to their own body (i.e., covariation bias). Sixty-five female university students completed a computer task where photos of their own body, of a control woman's body, a

  12. Seeing ghosts: Negative body evaluation predicts overestimation of negative social feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alleva, J.M.; Lange, W.G.; Jansen, A.T.M.; Martijn, C.

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated whether negative body evaluation predicts women's overestimation of negative social feedback related to their own body (i.e., covariation bias). Sixty-five female university students completed a computer task where photos of their own body, of a control woman's body,

  13. Chaos and Its Impulsive Control in Chua's Oscillator via Time-Delay Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Bin Yu; Hong-Bin Zhang; Zhu-Sheng Kang; Xiao-Feng Liao; Jue-Bang Yu

    2008-01-01

    A novel framework for chaos and its impul sive control in Chua's oscillator via time-delay feedback is presented. The exponential stability of impulsive control Chua's oscillator via time-delay feedback is considered, and some novel conditions are obtained. Then a novel impulsive controller design procedure is proposed. Simulation experiments are provided to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our method finally.

  14. Two-dimensional dissipative rogue waves due to time-delayed feedback in cavity nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlidi, Mustapha; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a way to generate two-dimensional rogue waves in two types of broad area nonlinear optical systems subject to time-delayed feedback: in the generic Lugiato-Lefever model and in the model of a broad-area surface-emitting laser with saturable absorber. The delayed feedback is found to induce a spontaneous formation of rogue waves. In the absence of delayed feedback, spatial pulses are stationary. The rogue waves are exited and controlled by the delay feedback. We characterize their formation by computing the probability distribution of the pulse height. The long-tailed statistical contribution, which is often considered as a signature of the presence of rogue waves, appears for sufficiently strong feedback. The generality of our analysis suggests that the feedback induced instability leading to the spontaneous formation of two-dimensional rogue waves is a universal phenomenon.

  15. Delayed feedback during sensorimotor learning selectively disrupts adaptation but not strategy use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudner, Samuel N; Kethidi, Nikhit; Graeupner, Damaris; Ivry, Richard B; Taylor, Jordan A

    2016-03-01

    In sensorimotor adaptation tasks, feedback delays can cause significant reductions in the rate of learning. This constraint is puzzling given that many skilled behaviors have inherently long delays (e.g., hitting a golf ball). One difference in these task domains is that adaptation is primarily driven by error-based feedback, whereas skilled performance may also rely to a large extent on outcome-based feedback. This difference suggests that error- and outcome-based feedback may engage different learning processes, and these processes may be associated with different temporal constraints. We tested this hypothesis in a visuomotor adaptation task. Error feedback was indicated by the terminal position of a cursor, while outcome feedback was indicated by points. In separate groups of participants, the two feedback signals were presented immediately at the end of the movement, after a delay, or with just the error feedback delayed. Participants learned to counter the rotation in a similar manner regardless of feedback delay. However, the aftereffect, an indicator of implicit motor adaptation, was attenuated with delayed error feedback, consistent with the hypothesis that a different learning process supports performance under delay. We tested this by employing a task that dissociates the contribution of explicit strategies and implicit adaptation. We find that explicit aiming strategies contribute to the majority of the learning curve, regardless of delay; however, implicit learning, measured over the course of learning and by aftereffects, was significantly attenuated with delayed error-based feedback. These experiments offer new insight into the temporal constraints associated with different motor learning processes.

  16. On a new time-delayed feedback control of chaotic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Lixin [Nonlinear Scientific Research Center, Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China)], E-mail: tianlx@ujs.edu.cn; Xu Jun; Sun Mei; Li Xiuming [Nonlinear Scientific Research Center, Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China)

    2009-01-30

    In this paper, using the idea of the successive dislocation feedback method, a new time-delayed feedback control method called the successive dislocation time-delayed feedback control (SDTDFC) is designed. Firstly, the idea of SDTDFC is introduced. Then some analytic sufficient conditions of the chaos control from the SDTDFC approach are derived for stabilization. Finally, some established results are further clarified via a case study of the Lorenz system with the numerical simulations.

  17. Coherently amplified negative feedback loop as a model for NF-kappaB oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jaewook

    2010-03-01

    The cells secrets various signaling molecules as a response to an external signal and modulate its own signaling processes. The precise role of this autocrine and/or paracrine signaling on cell information processing is mostly unknown. We will present the effect of TNF alpha autocrine signaling on NF-kappaB oscillations, using a simplified model of coherently amplified negative feedback loop. We will discuss the bifurcation diagram (i.e., dose-response curve), especially the robustness and the tenability of the period of NF-kappaB oscillations. Finally, we will compare the results from the above model with those from a previous model of time-delayed negative feedback alone.

  18. The dynamics of second-order equations with delayed feedback and a large coefficient of delayed control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashchenko, Sergey A.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamics of second-order equations with nonlinear delayed feedback and a large coefficient of a delayed equation is investigated using asymptotic methods. Based on special methods of quasi-normal forms, a new construction is elaborated for obtaining the main terms of asymptotic expansions of asymptotic residual solutions. It is shown that the dynamical properties of the above equations are determined mostly by the behavior of the solutions of some special families of parabolic boundary value problems. A comparative analysis of the dynamics of equations with the delayed feedback of three types is carried out.

  19. Theory and numerics of vibrational resonance in Duffing oscillators with time-delayed feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarathinam, C; Rajasekar, S; Sanjuán, M A F

    2011-06-01

    The influence of linear time-delayed feedback on vibrational resonance is investigated in underdamped and overdamped Duffing oscillators with double-well and single-well potentials driven by both low frequency and high frequency periodic forces. This task is performed through both theoretical approach and numerical simulation. Theoretically determined values of the amplitude of the high frequency force and the delay time at which resonance occurs are in very good agreement with the numerical simulation. A major consequence of time-delayed feedback is that it gives rise to a periodic or quasiperiodic pattern of vibrational resonance profile with respect to the time-delayed parameter. An appropriate time delay is shown to induce a resonance in an overdamped single-well system which is otherwise not possible. For a range of values of the time-delayed parameters, the response amplitude is found to be larger than in delay-time feedback-free systems.

  20. Fundamental and Subharmonic Resonances of Harmonically Oscillation with Time Delay State Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. EL-Bassiouny

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Time delays occur in many physical systems. In particular, when automatic control is used with structural or mechanical systems, there exists a delay between measurement of the system state and corrective action. The concept of an equivalent damping related to the delay feedback is proposed and the appropriate choice of the feedback gains and the time delay is discussed from the viewpoint of vibration control. We investigate the fundamental resonance and subharmonic resonance of order one-half of a harmonically oscillation under state feedback control with a time delay. By using the multiple scale perturbation technique, the first order approximation of the resonances are derived and the effect of time delay on the resonances is investigated. The fixed points correspond to a periodic motion for the starting system and we show the external excitation-response and frequency-response curves. We analyze the effect of time delay and the other different parameters on these oscillations.

  1. Wigner time delay in photodetachment of negative ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Jose, J.; Kkeifets, A. S.; Manson, S. T.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in studies on Wigner time delay in atomic photoionization using various experimental techniques and theoretical methodologies. In the present work, we report time delay in the photodetachment of negative ions using the relativistic-random-phase approximation (RRPA), which includes relativistic and important correlation effects. Time delay is obtained as energy derivative of phase of the photodetachment complex transition amplitude. We investigate the time delay in the dipole n p --> ɛd channels in the photodetachment of F- and Cl-, and in n f --> ɛg channels in the photodetachment of Tm-. In photodetachment of the negative ions, the photoelectron escapes in the field of the neutral atom and thus does not experience the nuclear Coulomb field; hence the phase is devoid of the Coulomb component. The systems chosen are well suited to examine the sensitivity of the photodetachment time delay to the centrifugal potential. The ions chosen have closed shells, and thus amenable to the RPA. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences, DST (India), and the Australian Research Council.

  2. Response of harmonically and stochastically excited strongly nonlinear oscillators with delayed feedback bang-bang control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-shui FENG; Wei-qiu ZHU

    2009-01-01

    We studied the response of harmonically and stochastically excited strongly nonlinear oscillators with delayed feedback bang-bang control using the stochastic averaging method. First, the time-delayed feedback bang-bang control force is expressed approximately in terms of the system state variables without time delay. Then the averaged Ito stochastic differential equations for the system are derived using the stochastic averaging method. Finally, the response of the system is obtained by solving the Fokker-Plank-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation associated with the averaged Ito equations. A Duffing oscillator with time-delayed feedback bang-bang control under combined harmonic and white noise excitations is taken as an example to illus-trate the proposed method. The analytical results are confirmed by digital simulation. We found that the time delay in feedback bang-bang control will deteriorate the control effectiveness and cause bifurcation of stochastic jump of Duffing oscillator.

  3. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  4. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  5. Autaptic self-feedback-induced synchronization transitions in Newman-Watts neuronal network with time delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Gong, Yubing; Wu, Yanan

    2015-04-01

    Autapse is a special synapse that connects a neuron to itself. In this work, we numerically study the effect of chemical autapse on the synchronization of Newman-Watts Hodgkin-Huxley neuron network with time delays. It is found that the neurons exhibit synchronization transitions as autaptic self-feedback delay is varied, and the phenomenon enhances when autaptic self-feedback strength increases. Moreover, this phenomenon becomes strongest when network time delay or coupling strength is optimal. It is also found that the synchronization transitions by network time delay can be enhanced by autaptic activity and become strongest when autaptic delay is optimal. These results show that autaptic delayed self-feedback activity can intermittently enhance and reduce the synchronization of the neuronal network and hence plays an important role in regulating the synchronization of the neurons. These findings could find potential implications for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  6. Noise Control in Gene Regulatory Networks with Negative Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-07-01

    Genes and proteins regulate cellular functions through complex circuits of biochemical reactions. Fluctuations in the components of these regulatory networks result in noise that invariably corrupts the signal, possibly compromising function. Here, we create a practical formalism based on ideas introduced by Wiener and Kolmogorov (WK) for filtering noise in engineered communications systems to quantitatively assess the extent to which noise can be controlled in biological processes involving negative feedback. Application of the theory, which reproduces the previously proven scaling of the lower bound for noise suppression in terms of the number of signaling events, shows that a tetracycline repressor-based negative-regulatory gene circuit behaves as a WK filter. For the class of Hill-like nonlinear regulatory functions, this type of filter provides the optimal reduction in noise. Our theoretical approach can be readily combined with experimental measurements of response functions in a wide variety of genetic circuits, to elucidate the general principles by which biological networks minimize noise.

  7. A new switching parameter varying optoelectronic delayed feedback model with computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingfeng; Miao, Suoxia; Cheng, Mengfan; Gao, Xiaojing

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a new switching parameter varying optoelectronic delayed feedback model is proposed and analyzed by computer simulation. This model is switching between two parameter varying optoelectronic delayed feedback models based on chaotic pseudorandom sequences. Complexity performance results show that this model has a high complexity compared to the original model. Furthermore, this model can conceal the time delay effectively against the auto-correlation function, delayed mutual information and permutation information analysis methods, and can extent the key space, which greatly improve its security.

  8. Determination of Optimal Control Strength of Delayed Feedback Control Using Time Series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hua-Wei; LU Wei-Ping; WANG Peng-Ye

    2004-01-01

    @@ We study controlling chaos using time-delayed feedback control based on chaotic time series without prior knowl edge of dynamical systems, and determine the optimal control parameters for stabilizing unstable periodic orbits with maximal stability.

  9. Hopf bifurcation control for a class of delay differential systems with discrete-time delayed feedback controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huan; Mao, Xuerong; Li, Wenxue

    2016-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the asymptotical stabilization for a class of unstable delay differential equations. Continuous-time delayed feedback controller (C-TDFC) and discrete-time delayed feedback controller (D-TDFC) are presented and studied, respectively. To our best knowledge, applying Hopf bifurcation theory to delay differential equations with D-TDFC is original and meaningful. The difficulty brought by the introduction of sampling period has been overcome. An effective control range which ensures the asymptotical stability of equilibrium for the system with C-TDFC is obtained. Sequently, another effective control range for the system with D-TDFC is gotten, which approximates the one of C-TDFCS provided that the sampling period is sufficiently small. Meanwhile, efforts are paid to estimate a bound on sampling period. Finally, the theoretical results are applied to a physiological system to illustrate the effectiveness of the two control ranges.

  10. Firing statistics of inhibitory neuron with delayed feedback. I. Output ISI probability density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidybida, A K; Kravchuk, K G

    2013-06-01

    Activity of inhibitory neuron with delayed feedback is considered in the framework of point stochastic processes. The neuron receives excitatory input impulses from a Poisson stream, and inhibitory impulses from the feedback line with a delay. We investigate here, how does the presence of inhibitory feedback affect the output firing statistics. Using binding neuron (BN) as a model, we derive analytically the exact expressions for the output interspike intervals (ISI) probability density, mean output ISI and coefficient of variation as functions of model's parameters for the case of threshold 2. Using the leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model, as well as the BN model with higher thresholds, these statistical quantities are found numerically. In contrast to the previously studied situation of no feedback, the ISI probability densities found here both for BN and LIF neuron become bimodal and have discontinuity of jump type. Nevertheless, the presence of inhibitory delayed feedback was not found to affect substantially the output ISI coefficient of variation. The ISI coefficient of variation found ranges between 0.5 and 1. It is concluded that introduction of delayed inhibitory feedback can radically change neuronal output firing statistics. This statistics is as well distinct from what was found previously (Vidybida and Kravchuk, 2009) by a similar method for excitatory neuron with delayed feedback.

  11. ON THE PERSISTENT PROPERTY OF A DELAYED NON-AUTONOMOUS SCHOENER MODEL WITH FEEDBACK CONTROL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    We study a delayed non-autonomous Schoener model with feedback control, which was proposed by Qiming Liu, Rui Xu and Pinghua Yang [8]. By applying a differential inequality and some analysis technique, we show that under some suitable assumptions, the feedback control variable has no influence on the persistent property of the system. Our result improves the existing ones.

  12. PERMANENCE OF A DISCRETE SINGLE SPECIES SYSTEM WITH DELAYS AND FEEDBACK CONTROL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,a discrete single species system with time delays and feedback control is considered.Sufficient conditions which guarantee the permanence of all positive solutions to this discrete system are obtained.The results show that the feedback control is harmless for the permanence of the species.

  13. Permanence of a Single Species System with Distributed Time Delay and Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Shen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the permanence of a classofsingle species system with distributed time delay and feedback controls. General criteria on permanence are established in this paper. A very important fact is found in our results; that is, the feedback control is harmless to the permanence of species.

  14. Power grid enhanced resilience using proportional and derivative control with delayed feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongmo, Eric Donald; Colet, Pere; Woafo, Paul

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the resilience of an elementary electricity system (machine-generator) under proportional and derivative (PD) control when subject to large perturbations. A particular attention is paid to small power grids, representative of power grid structure in some developing countries. The considered elementary electricity system consists of a consumer (machine), a power plant (generator) and a transmission line. Both Runge-Kutta and Newton methods are used to solve the dynamical equations and the characteristic equations for stability. It is found that the controller increases the resilience of the system. We also show that time delays associated to the feedback loop of the controller have a negative impact on the performance. It is also shown that the asymmetry due to energy demand of different consumers to power plant increases the stability of the system.

  15. Negative Time Delay in Strongly Naked Singularity Lensing

    CERN Document Server

    DeAndrea, Justin P

    2014-01-01

    We model the supermassive galactic center of the Milky Way galaxy as a strongly naked singularity lens described by the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric. This metric has an ordinary mass and a massless scalar charge parameters. For very accurate results, we use Virbhadra-Ellis lens equation for computations. The galactic center serving as gravitational lens gives rise to 4 images: 2 images on the same side as the source and 2 images on the opposite side of the source from the optic axis. We compute positions and time delays of these images for many values of the angular source position. The time delays of primary images decrease with increase in the angular source position and is always negative. The time delays of the other 3 images are negative for small angular source position; however, they increase with an increase in angular source position. Such observations would support strongly naked singularity interpretation of the galactic center and, if ever observed, would disprove the cosmic censorship hypothesis ...

  16. A Simple Negative Interaction in the Positive Transcriptional Feedback of a Single Gene Is Sufficient to Produce Reliable Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró-Bueno, Jesús M.; Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Negative and positive transcriptional feedback loops are present in natural and synthetic genetic oscillators. A single gene with negative transcriptional feedback needs a time delay and sufficiently strong nonlinearity in the transmission of the feedback signal in order to produce biochemical rhythms. A single gene with only positive transcriptional feedback does not produce oscillations. Here, we demonstrate that this single-gene network in conjunction with a simple negative interaction can also easily produce rhythms. We examine a model comprised of two well-differentiated parts. The first is a positive feedback created by a protein that binds to the promoter of its own gene and activates the transcription. The second is a negative interaction in which a repressor molecule prevents this protein from binding to its promoter. A stochastic study shows that the system is robust to noise. A deterministic study identifies that the dynamics of the oscillator are mainly driven by two types of biomolecules: the protein, and the complex formed by the repressor and this protein. The main conclusion of this paper is that a simple and usual negative interaction, such as degradation, sequestration or inhibition, acting on the positive transcriptional feedback of a single gene is a sufficient condition to produce reliable oscillations. One gene is enough and the positive transcriptional feedback signal does not need to activate a second repressor gene. This means that at the genetic level an explicit negative feedback loop is not necessary. The model needs neither cooperative binding reactions nor the formation of protein multimers. Therefore, our findings could help to clarify the design principles of cellular clocks and constitute a new efficient tool for engineering synthetic genetic oscillators. PMID:22205920

  17. Oscillator frequency stability improvement by means of negative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Galliou, Serge; Abbé, Philippe; Komine, Vadim

    2011-11-01

    A novel, simple method is proposed to increase the frequency stability of an oscillator. An additional negative feedback is used in combination with the positive loop of the harmonic oscillator to decrease the phase sensitivity to fluctuations of parameters other than the resonator. The main advantage of the proposed correction approach is that it does not require expensive external elements such as mixers or resonators. The validity of the method is theoretically demonstrated on a Colpitts oscillator using the control system theory approach and numerical simulations, and is experimentally verified with phase noise measurements of an actual oscillator-mockup. It is shown that the medium-term frequency stability can be easily improved by a factor of ten.

  18. Robust H∞ Stabilization of Uncertain Linear Time-Delay System with Delayed/Undelayed State Feedback Controllers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper focuses on the H∞ controller design for linear systems with time-varying delays and norm bounded parameter perturbetions in the system state and control/disturbance. On the existence of delayed/undelayed full state feedback controllers, we present a sufficient condition and give a design method in the form of Riccati equation. The controller can not only stabilize the time-delay system, but also make the H∞ norm of the closed-loop system be less than a given bound. This result practically generalizes the related results in current literature.

  19. Error-resilient low-delay H.264/802.11 transmission via cross-layer coding with feedback channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiew, Tuan-Kiang; Hill, Paul; Ferre, Pierre; Agrafiotis, Dimitris; Chung-How, James T. H.; Nix, Andy; Bull, David R.

    2005-07-01

    We propose a method of providing error resilient H.264 video over 802.11 wireless channels by using a feedback mechanism which does not incur an additional delay typically found in ARQ-type feedback. Our system uses the TCP/IP and UDP/IP protocols, located between the medium access control (MAC) layer of 802.11, and the H.264 video application layer. The UDP protocol is used to transfer time sensitive video data without delay; however, packet losses introduce excessive artifacts which propagate to subsequent frames. Error resilience is achieved by a feedback mechanism-the decoder conveys the packet-loss information as small TCP packets to the video source as negative acknowledgements. By using multiple reference frames, slice-based coding and timely intra-refresh, the encoder makes use of this feedback information to perform subsequent temporal prediction without propagating the error to future frames. We take static measurements of the actual channel and use the packet loss and delay patterns to test our algorithms. Simulations show an improvement of 0.5~5 dB in PSNR over plain UDP-based video transmission. Our method improves the overall quality of service of interactive video transmission over wireless LAN; it can be used as a model for future media-aware wireless network protocol designs.

  20. Single photon delayed feedback: a way to stabilize intrinsic quantum cavity electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmele, Alexander; Kabuss, Julia; Schulze, Franz; Reitzenstein, Stephan; Knorr, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We propose a scheme to control cavity quantum electrodynamics in the single photon limit by delayed feedback. In our approach a single emitter-cavity system, operating in the weak coupling limit, can be driven into the strong coupling-type regime by an external mirror: The external loop produces Rabi oscillations directly connected to the electron-photon coupling strength. As an expansion of typical cavity quantum electrodynamics, we treat the quantum correlation of external and internal light modes dynamically and demonstrate a possible way to implement a fully quantum mechanical time-delayed feedback. Our theoretical approach proposes a way to experimentally feedback control quantum correlations in the single photon limit.

  1. Negative plant soil feedback explaining ring formation in clonal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartenì, Fabrizio; Marasco, Addolorata; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Rietkerk, Max; Giannino, Francesco

    2012-11-21

    Ring shaped patches of clonal plants have been reported in different environments, but the mechanisms underlying such pattern formation are still poorly explained. Water depletion in the inner tussocks zone has been proposed as a possible cause, although ring patterns have been also observed in ecosystems without limiting water conditions. In this work, a spatially explicit model is presented in order to investigate the role of negative plant-soil feedback as an additional explanation for ring formation. The model describes the dynamics of the plant biomass in the presence of toxicity produced by the decomposition of accumulated litter in the soil. Our model qualitatively reproduces the emergence of ring patterns of a single clonal plant species during colonisation of a bare substrate. The model admits two homogeneous stationary solutions representing bare soil and uniform vegetation cover which depend only on the ratio between the biomass death and growth rates. Moreover, differently from other plant spatial patterns models, but in agreement with real field observations of vegetation dynamics, we demonstrated that the pattern dynamics always lead to spatially homogeneous vegetation covers without creation of stable Turing patterns. Analytical results show that ring formation is a function of two main components, the plant specific susceptibility to toxic compounds released in the soil by the accumulated litter and the decay rate of these same compounds, depending on environmental conditions. These components act at the same time and their respective intensities can give rise to the different ring structures observed in nature, ranging from slight reductions of biomass in patch centres, to the appearance of marked rings with bare inner zones, as well as the occurrence of ephemeral waves of plant cover. Our results highlight the potential role of plant-soil negative feedback depending on decomposition processes for the development of transient vegetation patterns.

  2. Adaptive NN backstepping output-feedback control for stochastic nonlinear strict-feedback systems with time-varying delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weisheng; Jiao, Licheng; Li, Jing; Li, Ruihong

    2010-06-01

    For the first time, this paper addresses the problem of adaptive output-feedback control for a class of uncertain stochastic nonlinear strict-feedback systems with time-varying delays using neural networks (NNs). The circle criterion is applied to designing a nonlinear observer, and no linear growth condition is imposed on nonlinear functions depending on system states. Under the assumption that time-varying delays exist in the system output, only an NN is employed to compensate for all unknown nonlinear terms depending on the delayed output, and thus, the proposed control algorithm is more simple even than the existing NN backstepping control schemes for uncertain systems described by ordinary differential equations. Three examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the control scheme proposed in this paper.

  3. Dynamic behavior of time-delayed acceleration feedback controller for active vibration control of flexible structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fang; Chen, Wei-dong; Shao, Min-qiang

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses the design problem of the controller with time-delayed acceleration feedback. On the basis of the reduction method and output state-derivative feedback, a time-delayed acceleration feedback controller is proposed. Stability boundaries of the closed-loop system are determined by using Hurwitz stability criteria. Due to the introduction of time delay into the controller with acceleration feedback, the proposed controller has the feature of not only changing the mass property but also altering the damping property of the controlled system in the sense of equivalent structural modification. With this feature, the closed-loop system has a greater logarithmic decrement than the uncontrolled one, and in turn, the control behavior can be improved. In this connection, the time delay in the acceleration feedback control is a positive factor when satisfying some given conditions and it could be actively utilized. On the ground of the analysis, the developed controller is implemented on a cantilever beam for different controller gain-delay combinations, and the control performance is evaluated with the comparison to that of pure acceleration feedback controller. Simulation and experimental results verify the ability of the controller to attenuate the vibration resulting from the dominant mode.

  4. Information thermodynamics for a multi-feedback process with time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chulan; Um, Jaegon; Park, Hyunggyu

    2017-01-01

    We investigate a measurement-feedback process of repeated operations with time delay. During a finite-time interval, measurement on the system is performed and the feedback protocol derived from the measurement outcome is applied with time delay. This protocol is maintained into the next interval until a new protocol from the next measurement is applied. Unlike a feedback process without delay, both memories associated with previous and present measurement outcomes are involved in the system dynamics, which naturally brings forth a joint system described by a system state and two memory states. The thermodynamic second law provides a lower bound for heat flow into a thermal reservoir by the (3-state) Shannon entropy change of the joint system. However, as the feedback protocol depends on memory states sequentially, we can deduce a tighter bound for heat flow by integrating out irrelevant memory states during dynamics. As a simple example, we consider the so-called cold damping feedback process where the velocity of a particle is measured and a dissipative feedback protocol is applied to decelerate the particle. We confirm that the heat flow is well above the tightest bound. We also examine the long-time limit of this feedback process, which turns out to exhibit an interesting instability transition as well as heating by controlling parameters such as measurement errors, time interval, protocol strength, and time delay length. We discuss the underlying mechanism for instability and heating, which might be unavoidable in reality.

  5. Compensation for time-delayed feedback bang-bang control of quasi-integrable Hamiltonian systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The stochastic averaging method for quasi-integrable Hamiltonian systems with time-delayed feedback bang-bang control is first introduced. Then, two time delay compensation methods, namely the method of changing control force amplitude (CFA) and the method of changing control delay time (CDT), are proposed. The conditions applicable to each compensation method are discussed. Finally, an example is worked out in detail to illustrate the application and effectiveness of the proposed methods and the two compensation methods in combination.

  6. Bubbling effect in the electro-optic delayed feedback oscillator coupled network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingfeng; Lin, Jun; Miao, Suoxia

    2017-03-01

    Synchronization in the optical systems coupled network always suffers from bubbling events. In this paper, we numerically investigate the statistical properties of the synchronization characteristics and bubbling effects in the electro-optic delayed feedback oscillator coupled network with different coupling strength, delay time and gain coefficient. Furthermore, we compare our results with the synchronization properties of semiconductor laser (SL) coupled network, which indicates that the electro-optic delayed feedback oscillator can be better to suppress the bubbling effects in the synchronization of coupled network under the same conditions.

  7. Time-Delayed Feedback Control in a Single-Mode Laser System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effects of time-delayed feedback control in a single-mode laser system is investigated. Using the small time delay approximation, the analytic expression of the stationary probability distribution function of the laser field is obtaincd. The mean, normalized variance and skewness of the steady-state laser intensity are calculated. It is found that the time-delayed feedback control can suppress the intensity fluctuation of the laser system. The numerical simulations are in good agreement with the approximate analytic results.

  8. Comparing the effects of positive and negative feedback in information-integration category learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedberg, Michael; Glass, Brian; Filoteo, J Vincent; Hazeltine, Eliot; Maddox, W Todd

    2017-01-01

    Categorical learning is dependent on feedback. Here, we compare how positive and negative feedback affect information-integration (II) category learning. Ashby and O'Brien (2007) demonstrated that both positive and negative feedback are required to solve II category problems when feedback was not guaranteed on each trial, and reported no differences between positive-only and negative-only feedback in terms of their effectiveness. We followed up on these findings and conducted 3 experiments in which participants completed 2,400 II categorization trials across three days under 1 of 3 conditions: positive feedback only (PFB), negative feedback only (NFB), or both types of feedback (CP; control partial). An adaptive algorithm controlled the amount of feedback given to each group so that feedback was nearly equated. Using different feedback control procedures, Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that participants in the NFB and CP group were able to engage II learning strategies, whereas the PFB group was not. Additionally, the NFB group was able to achieve significantly higher accuracy than the PFB group by Day 3. Experiment 3 revealed that these differences remained even when we equated the information received on feedback trials. Thus, negative feedback appears significantly more effective for learning II category structures. This suggests that the human implicit learning system may be capable of learning in the absence of positive feedback.

  9. Learning monopolies with delayed feedback on price expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akio; Szidarovszky, Ferenc

    2015-11-01

    We call the intercept of the price function with the vertical axis the maximum price and the slope of the price function the marginal price. In this paper it is assumed that a monopolistic firm has full information about the marginal price and its own cost function but is uncertain on the maximum price. However, by repeated interaction with the market, the obtained price observations give a basis for an adaptive learning process of the maximum price. It is also assumed that the price observations have fixed delays, so the learning process can be described by a delayed differential equation. In the cases of one or two delays, the asymptotic behavior of the resulting dynamic process is examined, stability conditions are derived. Three main results are demonstrated in the two delay learning processes. First, it is possible to stabilize the equilibrium which is unstable in the one delay model. Second, complex dynamics involving chaos, which is impossible in the one delay model, can emerge. Third, alternations of stability and instability (i.e., stability switches) occur repeatedly.

  10. Active vibration control for nonlinear vehicle suspension with actuator delay via I/O feedback linearization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jing; Jiang, Zuo; Li, Ya-Li; Li, Wu-Xin

    2014-10-01

    The problem of nonlinear vibration control for active vehicle suspension systems with actuator delay is considered. Through feedback linearization, the open-loop nonlinearity is eliminated by the feedback nonlinear term. Based on the finite spectrum assignment, the quarter-car suspension system with actuator delay is converted into an equivalent delay-free one. The nonlinear control includes a linear feedback term, a feedforward compensator, and a control memory term, which can be derived from a Riccati equation and a Sylvester equation, so that the effects produced by the road disturbances and the actuator delay are compensated, respectively. A predictor is designed to implement the predictive state in the designed control. Moreover, a reduced-order observer is constructed to solve its physical unrealisability problem. The stability proofs for the zero dynamics and the closed-loop system are provided. Numerical simulations illustrate the effectiveness and the simplicity of the designed control.

  11. Effects of time-delayed feedback on the properties of self-sustained oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risau-Gusman, S.

    2016-10-01

    Most self-sustained oscillations in biological systems and in technical applications are based on a feedback loop, and it is usually important to know how they will react when an external oscillatory force is applied. Here we investigate the effects that the introduction of a time delay in the feedback can have in the entrainment properties of self-sustained oscillators. To do this, we derive analytic expressions for the periodic trajectories and their asymptotic stability, for a generic external oscillatory force. This allows us to show that, for large quality factors, the resonance frequency does not depend on the feedback delay. When the external force is harmonic, it is shown that the largest entrainment range does not correspond to the time delay that gives the maximal response of the unforced oscillator. In fact, that delay gives the shortest entrainment range.

  12. H{sup {infinity}} State Feedback Control for Generalized Continuous/Discrete Time Delay System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H.; Lee, S.K.; Park, H.B. [Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Jeung, E.T. [Changwon National University, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-04-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of designing H{sup {infinity}} state feedback controller for the generalized time delay systems with delayed states and control inputs in continuous and discrete time cases, respectively. The generalized time delay system problems are solved on the basis of LMI(linear matrix inequality) technique considering time delays. The sufficient condition for the existence of controller and H{sup {infinity}} state feedback controller design methods are presented. Also, using some changes of variables and Schur complements, the obtained sufficient condition can be rewritten as a LMI form in terms of transformed variables. The proposed controller design method can be extended into the problem of robust H{sup {infinity}} state feedback controller design method easily. (author). 15 refs.

  13. Age-related changes in deterministic learning from positive versus negative performance feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vijver, I.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; de Wit, S.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback-based learning declines with age. Because older adults are generally biased toward positive information ("positivity effect"), learning from positive feedback may be less impaired than learning from negative outcomes. The literature documents mixed results, due possibly to variability

  14. From Positivity to Negativity Bias: Ambiguity Affects the Neurophysiological Signatures of Feedback Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Henning; Schnuerch, Robert; Stahl, Jutta

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies on the neurophysiological underpinnings of feedback processing almost exclusively used low-ambiguity feedback, which does not fully address the diversity of situations in everyday life. We therefore used a pseudo trial-and-error learning task to investigate ERPs of low- versus high-ambiguity feedback. Twenty-eight participants tried to deduce the rule governing visual feedback to their button presses in response to visual stimuli. In the blocked condition, the same two feedback words were presented across several consecutive trials, whereas in the random condition feedback was randomly drawn on each trial from sets of five positive and five negative words. The feedback-related negativity (FRN-D), a frontocentral ERP difference between negative and positive feedback, was significantly larger in the blocked condition, whereas the centroparietal late positive complex indicating controlled attention was enhanced for negative feedback irrespective of condition. Moreover, FRN-D in the blocked condition was due to increased reward positivity (Rew-P) for positive feedback, rather than increased (raw) FRN for negative feedback. Our findings strongly support recent lines of evidence that the FRN-D, one of the most widely studied signatures of reinforcement learning in the human brain, critically depends on feedback discriminability and is primarily driven by the Rew-P. A novel finding concerned larger frontocentral P2 for negative feedback in the random but not the blocked condition. Although Rew-P points to a positivity bias in feedback processing under conditions of low feedback ambiguity, P2 suggests a specific adaptation of information processing in case of highly ambiguous feedback, involving an early negativity bias. Generalizability of the P2 findings was demonstrated in a second experiment using explicit valence categorization of highly emotional positive and negative adjectives.

  15. Optimization of time-delayed feedback control of seismically excited building structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-ping LI; Wei-qiu ZHU; Zu-guang YING

    2008-01-01

    An optimization method for time-delayed feedback control of partially observable linear building structures subjected to seismic excitation is proposed. A time-delayed control problem of partially observable linear building structure under horizontal ground acceleration excitation is formulated and converted into that of completely observable linear structure by using separation principle. The time-delayed control forces are approximately expressed in terms of control forces without time delay. The control system is then governed by Ito stochastic differential equations for the conditional means of system states and then transformed into those for the conditional means of modal energies by using the stochastic averaging method for quasi-Hamiltonian systems. The control law is assumed to be modal velocity feedback control with time delay and the unknown control gains are determined by the modal performance indices. A three-storey building structure is taken as example to illustrate the proposal method and the numerical results are confirmed by using Monte Carlo simulation.

  16. Stability of Nonlinear Systems with Unknown Time-varying Feedback Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunodkar, Apurva A.; Akella, Maruthi R.

    2013-12-01

    This paper considers the problem of stabilizing a class of nonlinear systems with unknown bounded delayed feedback wherein the time-varying delay is 1) piecewise constant 2) continuous with a bounded rate. We also consider application of these results to the stabilization of rigid-body attitude dynamics. In the first case, the time-delay in feedback is modeled specifically as a switch among an arbitrarily large set of unknown constant values with a known strict upper bound. The feedback is a linear function of the delayed states. In the case of linear systems with switched delay feedback, a new sufficiency condition for average dwell time result is presented using a complete type Lyapunov-Krasovskii (L-K) functional approach. Further, the corresponding switched system with nonlinear perturbations is proven to be exponentially stable inside a well characterized region of attraction for an appropriately chosen average dwell time. In the second case, the concept of the complete type L-K functional is extended to a class of nonlinear time-delay systems with unknown time-varying time-delay. This extension ensures stability robustness to time-delay in the control design for all values of time-delay less than the known upper bound. Model-transformation is used in order to partition the nonlinear system into a nominal linear part that is exponentially stable with a bounded perturbation. We obtain sufficient conditions which ensure exponential stability inside a region of attraction estimate. A constructive method to evaluate the sufficient conditions is presented together with comparison with the corresponding constant and piecewise constant delay. Numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical results of this paper.

  17. Stability and Performance of First-Order Linear Time-Delay Feedback Systems: An Eigenvalue Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-An He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear time-delay systems with transcendental characteristic equations have infinitely many eigenvalues which are generally hard to compute completely. However, the spectrum of first-order linear time-delay systems can be analyzed with the Lambert function. This paper studies the stability and state feedback stabilization of first-order linear time-delay system in detail via the Lambert function. The main issues concerned are the rightmost eigenvalue locations, stability robustness with respect to delay time, and the response performance of the closed-loop system. Examples and simulations are presented to illustrate the analysis results.

  18. Waiting for feedback helps if you want to know the answer: the role of curiosity in the delay-of-feedback benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Kellie M; Carpenter, Shana K; Grotenhuis, Courtney; Burianek, Steven

    2014-11-01

    When participants answer a test question and then receive feedback of the correct answer, studies have shown that the feedback is more effective when it is delayed by several seconds rather than provided immediately (e.g., Brackbill & Kappy, Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 55, 14-18, 1962; Schroth, Contemporary Educational Psychology, 17, 78-82, 1992). Despite several demonstrations of this delay-of-feedback benefit, a theoretical explanation for this finding has not yet been developed. The present study tested the hypothesis that brief delays of feedback are beneficial because they encourage anticipation of the upcoming feedback. In Experiment 1, participants answered obscure trivia questions, and before receiving the answer, they rated their curiosity to know the answer. The answer was then provided either immediately or after a 4-s delay. A later final test over the same questions revealed a significant delay-of-feedback benefit, but only for items that had been rated high in curiosity. Experiment 2 replicated this same effect and showed that the delay-of-feedback benefit only occurs when feedback is provided after a variable, unpredictable time duration (either 2, 4, or 8 s) rather than after a constant duration (always 4 s). These findings demonstrate that the delay-of-feedback effect appears to be greatest under conditions in which participants are curious to know the answer and when the answer is provided after an unpredictable time interval.

  19. Winner-take-all selection in a neural system with delayed feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Sebastian F

    2007-01-01

    We consider the effects of temporal delay in a neural feedback system with excitation and inhibition. The topology of our model system reflects the anatomy of the avian isthmic circuitry, a feedback structure found in all classes of vertebrates. We show that the system is capable of performing a `winner-take-all' selection rule for certain combinations of excitatory and inhibitory feedback. In particular, we show that when the time delays are sufficiently large a system with local inhibition and global excitation can function as a `winner-take-all' network and exhibit oscillatory dynamics. We demonstrate how the origin of the oscillations can be attributed to the finite delays through a linear stability analysis.

  20. Multi-objective optimal design of active vibration absorber with delayed feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Rong-Hua; Chen, Long-Xiang; Sun, Jian-Qiao

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a multi-objective optimal design of delayed feedback control of an actively tuned vibration absorber for a stochastically excited linear structure is investigated. The simple cell mapping (SCM) method is used to obtain solutions of the multi-objective optimization problem (MOP). The continuous time approximation (CTA) method is applied to analyze the delayed system. Stability is imposed as a constraint for MOP. Three conflicting objective functions including the peak frequency response, vibration energy of primary structure and control effort are considered. The Pareto set and Pareto front for the optimal feedback control design are presented for two examples. Numerical results have found that the Pareto optimal solutions provide effective delayed feedback control design.

  1. Career Goal Revision in Response to Negative Feedback: Testing a Longitudinal Cross-Lagged Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shi; Creed, Peter A; Hood, Michelle

    2017-02-06

    We tested a model based on goal-setting and self-regulation theories of the cross-lagged relationships among negative career-related feedback, negative affect (career-related stress), and career goal revision (downward goal revision and goal disengagement). Participants were 409 Chinese university/college students (Mage 19 years; 58% female), who completed a survey at 2 time points approximately 6 months apart. Consistent with our hypotheses, negative career-related feedback at T1 was related to more career goal disengagement and greater downward goal revision at T2. Career-related stress partially mediated the relationship between negative career-related feedback and downward goal revision. In addition, there were reverse relationships between negative career-related feedback and career-related stress, and between career-related stress and goal disengagement. These findings highlight important roles for negative career-related feedback and negative affect in young peoples' career goal pursuit. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Delay-dependent H-infinity control for continuous time-delay systems via state feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinchun JIA; Yibo GAO; Jingmei ZHANG; Nanning ZHENG

    2007-01-01

    The delay-dependent H-infinity analysis and H-infinity control problems for continuous time-delay systems are studied. By introducing an equality with some free weighting matrices, an improved criterion of delay-dependent stability with H-infinity performance for such systems is presented, and a criterion of existence and some design methods of delay-dependent H-infinity controller for such systems are proposed in term of a set of matrix inequalities, which is solved efficiently by an iterative algorithm. Further, the corresponding results for the delay-dependent robust H-infinity analysis and robust H-infinity control problems for continuous time-delay uncertain systems are given. Finally, two numerical examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed method by comparing with the other existing results.

  3. Effects of Concurrent and Delayed Visual Feedback on Motor Memory Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dangxiao; Li, Teng; Yang, Gaofeng; Zhang, Yuru

    2017-02-22

    In many domains, it's important to understand the ways in which humans learn and develop new motor skills effectively and efficiently. For example, in dental operations, the ability to apply a weak force with a required tolerance is a fundamental skill to ensure diagnostic and treatment outcome, but acquiring such a skill is a challenge for novices. In this paper, we focus on motor memory for producing normally applied force by a hand-held probe and we compare the effects of two feedback methods on motor memory consolidation. Fourteen participants were randomly assigned to two groups: a Concurrent Group and a Delayed Group. Participants in the Concurrent Group were trained to apply a target force with concurrent visual feedback, while those in the Delayed Group were trained with delayed visual feedback. The task included two phases: a Training/Testing Phase, and a Retention Phase. The results indicated that participants in the Delayed Group obtained more effective learning outcomes and better retention effects. These findings provide a new perspective to explore the relationship between feedback methods and the cognitive process of motor skill learning, and open a new way to train motor skill using more effective methods than the traditional concurrent feedback approaches.

  4. Chaotification of Quasi-zero Stiffness System Via Direct Time-delay Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyong Liu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a chaotification method based on direct time-delay feedback control for a quasi-zero-stiffness isolation system. An analytical function of time-delay feedback control is derived based on differential-geometry control theory. Furthermore, the feasibility and effectiveness of this method was verified by numerical simulations. Numerical simulations show that this method holds the favorable aspects including the advantage of using tiny control gain, the capability of chaotifying across a large range of parametric domain and the high feasibility of the control implement.

  5. Adaptive output feedback control of a class of uncertain nonlinear systems with unknown time delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei

    2012-04-01

    This article studies the adaptive output feedback control problem of a class of uncertain nonlinear systems with unknown time delays. The systems considered are dominated by a triangular system without zero dynamics satisfying linear growth in the unmeasurable states. The novelty of this article is that a universal-type adaptive output feedback controller is presented to time-delay systems, which can globally regulate all the states of the uncertain systems without knowing the growth rate. An illustrative example is provided to show the applicability of the developed control strategy.

  6. Global adaptive output feedback control for a class of nonlinear time-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jun-yong; Zha, Wen-ting

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of global output feedback control for a class of nonlinear time-delay systems. The nonlinearities are dominated by a triangular form satisfying linear growth condition in the unmeasurable states with an unknown growth rate. With a change of coordinates, a linear-like controller is constructed, which avoids the repeated derivatives of the nonlinearities depending on the observer states and the dynamic gain in backstepping approach and therefore, simplifies the design procedure. Using the idea of universal control, we explicitly construct a universal-type adaptive output feedback controller which globally regulates all the states of the nonlinear time-delay systems.

  7. Dynamic Output Feedback Control for Nonlinear Networked Control Systems with Random Packet Dropout and Random Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiqing Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the dynamic output feedback control for nonlinear networked control systems with both random packet dropout and random delay. Random packet dropout and random delay are modeled as two independent random variables. An observer-based dynamic output feedback controller is designed based upon the Lyapunov theory. The quantitative relationship of the dropout rate, transition probability matrix, and nonlinear level is derived by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, an example is presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Adaptive output feedback control for nonlinear time-delay systems using neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weisheng CHEN; Junmin LI

    2006-01-01

    This paper extends the adaptive neural network (NN) control approaches to a class of unknown output feedback nonlinear time-delay systems. An adaptive output feedback NN tracking controller is designed by backstepping technique. NNs are used to approximate unknown functions dependent on time delay. Delay-dependent filters are introduced for state estimation. The domination method is used to deal with the smooth time-delay basis functions. The adaptive bounding technique is employed to estimate the upper bound of the NN approximation errors. Based on LyapunovKrasovskii functional, the semi-global uniform ultimate boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system is proved.The feasibility is investigated by two illustrative simulation examples.

  9. State Feedback Consensus for Multi-Agent System with Multiple Time-Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the multi-agent system to achieve a faster consensus with multiple time-delays under a directed asymmetric information exchange topology. We first assume that an agent processes its own state information with self-delay and receives state information from its neighbors with communication delays. Based on state proportion derivative feedback, the improved consensus protocol can accelerate the system to achieve a consensus. A sufficient condition for reaching consensus is then derived based on the Nyquist stability criterion and frequency domain analysis. In addition, a specific form of consensus equilibrium is obtained which is influenced by the initial states of agents, time-delays and state feedback intensity. Finally, simulations are presented to verify the validity of the theoretical results.

  10. Adaptive lag synchronization of uncertain dynamical systems with time delays via simple transmission lag feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gu Wei-Dong; Sun Zhi-Yong; Wu Xiao-Ming; Yu Chang-Bin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present an adaptive scheme to achieve lag synchronization for uncertain dynamical systems with time delays and unknown parameters.In contrast to the nonlinear feedback scheme reported in the previous literature,the proposed controller is a linear one which only involves simple feedback information from the drive system with signal propagation lags.Besides,the unknown parameters can also be identified via the proposed updating laws in spite of the existence of model delays and transmission lags,as long as the linear independence condition between the related function elements is satisfied.Two examples,i.e.,the Mackey-Glass model with single delay and the Lorenz system with multiple delays,are employed to show the effectiveness of this approach.Some robustness issues are also discussed,which shows that the proposed scheme is quite robust in switching and noisy environment.

  11. HOPF BIFURCATION OF AN OSCILLATOR WITH QUADRATIC AND CUBIC NONLINEARITIES AND WITH DELAYED VELOCITY FEEDBACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huailei; WANG Zaihua; HU Haiyan

    2004-01-01

    This paper studies the local dynamics of an SDOF system with quadratic and cubic stiffness terms, and with linear delayed velocity feedback. The analysis indicates that for a sufficiently large velocity feedback gain, the equilibrium of the system may undergo a number of stability switches with an increase of time delay, and then becomes unstable forever. At each critical value of time delay for which the system changes its stability, a generic Hopf bifurcation occurs and a periodic motion emerges in a one-sided neighbourhood of the critical time delay. The method of Fredholm alternative is applied to determine the bifurcating periodic motions and their stability. It stresses on the effect of the system parameters on the stable regions and the amplitudes of the bifurcating periodic solutions.

  12. Dissociation between active and observational learning from positive and negative feedback in Parkinsonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kobza

    Full Text Available Feedback to both actively performed and observed behaviour allows adaptation of future actions. Positive feedback leads to increased activity of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, whereas dopamine neuron activity is decreased following negative feedback. Dopamine level reduction in unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients has been shown to lead to a negative learning bias, i.e. enhanced learning from negative feedback. Recent findings suggest that the neural mechanisms of active and observational learning from feedback might differ, with the striatum playing a less prominent role in observational learning. Therefore, it was hypothesized that unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients would show a negative learning bias only in active but not in observational learning. In a between-group design, 19 Parkinson's Disease patients and 40 healthy controls engaged in either an active or an observational probabilistic feedback-learning task. For both tasks, transfer phases aimed to assess the bias to learn better from positive or negative feedback. As expected, actively learning patients showed a negative learning bias, whereas controls learned better from positive feedback. In contrast, no difference between patients and controls emerged for observational learning, with both groups showing better learning from positive feedback. These findings add to neural models of reinforcement-learning by suggesting that dopamine-modulated input to the striatum plays a minor role in observational learning from feedback. Future research will have to elucidate the specific neural underpinnings of observational learning.

  13. Decentralized Output-Feedback Stabilization of Linear Time-invariant Interconnected Systems with Delays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, D.S. [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-04-01

    We study the decentralized stabilization problem of linear time-invariant large-scale interconnected systems with delays without any system structure. We obtain sufficient stability conditions for interconnected systems which are equivalent to disturbance attenuation of some scaled system. A decentralized output-feedback controller is obtained using standard H{infinity} control theory. The obtained controller is delay-independent. We also obtain an observer for the interconnected system. (author). 9 refs.

  14. A matrix transformation approach to H∞ control via static output feedback for input delay systems

    OpenAIRE

    Du, B; Shu, Z; Lam, J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the static output feedback (SOF) H∞ control for continuous-time linear systems with an unknown input delay from a novel perspective. New equivalent characterizations on the stability and H∞ performance of the closed-loop system are established in terms of nonlinear matrix inequalities with free parametrization matrices. These delay-dependent characterizations possess a special monotonic structure, which leads to linearized iterative computation. The effectiveness and meri...

  15. Observer design and output feedback stabilization for linear singular time-delay systems with unknown inputs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng CUI; Chenghui ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    The design of a functional observer and reduced-order observer with internal delay for linear singular timedelay systems with unknown inputs is discussed.The sufficient conditions of the existence of observers,which are normal linear time-delay systems,and the corresponding design steps are presented via linear matrix inequality(LMI).Moreover,the observer-based feedback stabilizing controller is obtained.Three examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  16. Incomplete state feedback for time delay systems: observer applications in multidelay compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogunnaike, B.A.; Ray, W.H.

    1984-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how a recently developed observer for time delay systems may be used to estimate needed state variables for implementation of multivariable time delay compensation. The general results are illustrated by an example of a multireactor plant in which only one reactor concentration can be measured. The observer worked well in simulation for both multivariable PID control and multidelay compensated PID control and allowed both schemes to function with estimated state variables in the feedback loop. 16 references, 5 figures.

  17. Recovery of systems with a linear filter and nonlinear delay feedback in periodic regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, V I; Prokhorov, M D

    2008-12-01

    We propose a set of methods for the estimation of the parameters of time-delay systems with a linear filter and nonlinear delay feedback performing periodic oscillations. The methods are based on an analysis of the system response to regular external perturbations and are valid only for systems whose dynamics can be perturbed. The efficiency of the methods is illustrated using both numerical and experimental data.

  18. Stabilizing fixed points of time-delay systems close to the Hopf bifurcation using a dynamic delayed feedback control method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaie, B; Motlagh, M R Jahed; Analoui, M [Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorsandi, S [Amirkabir University of Technology, Hafez St., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: brezaie@iust.ac.ir

    2009-10-02

    This paper deals with the problem of Hopf bifurcation control for a class of nonlinear time-delay systems. A dynamic delayed feedback control method is utilized for stabilizing unstable fixed points near Hopf bifurcation. Using a linear stability analysis, we show that under certain conditions of the control parameters, and without changing the operating point of the system, the onset of Hopf bifurcation is delayed. Meanwhile, by applying the center manifold theorem and the normal form theory, we obtain formulas for determining the direction of the Hopf bifurcation and the stability of bifurcating periodic solutions of the closed loop system. Numerical simulations are given to justify the validity of the analytical results for the system controlled by the proposed method.

  19. Negative Plant-Soil Feedback and Positive Species Interaction in a Herbaceous Plant Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonanomi, G.; Rietkerk, M.; Dekker, S.C.; Mazzoleni, S.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that facilitative interaction and negative plant¿soil feedback are driving factors of plant population dynamics and community processes. We studied the intensity and the relative impact of negative feedback on clonal growth and seed germination of Scirpus holoschoenus, a

  20. Negative Plant–Soil Feedback and Positive Species Interaction in a Herbaceous Plant Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonanomi, G.; Rietkerk, M.G.; Dekker, S.C.; Mazzoleni, S.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that facilitative interaction and negative plant–soil feedback are driving factors of plant population dynamics and community processes. We studied the intensity and the relative impact of negative feedback on clonal growth and seed germination of Scirpus holoschoenus, a

  1. Negative Plant–Soil Feedback and Positive Species Interaction in a Herbaceous Plant Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonanomi, G.; Rietkerk, M.G.; Dekker, S.C.; Mazzoleni, S.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that facilitative interaction and negative plant–soil feedback are driving factors of plant population dynamics and community processes. We studied the intensity and the relative impact of negative feedback on clonal growth and seed germination of Scirpus holoschoenus, a ‘r

  2. Negative Plant-Soil Feedback and Positive Species Interaction in a Herbaceous Plant Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonanomi, G.; Rietkerk, M.; Dekker, S.C.; Mazzoleni, S.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that facilitative interaction and negative plant¿soil feedback are driving factors of plant population dynamics and community processes. We studied the intensity and the relative impact of negative feedback on clonal growth and seed germination of Scirpus holoschoenus, a `r

  3. Globally Asymptotic Stability of Stochastic Nonlinear Systems with Time-Varying Delays via Output Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhu Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of globally asymptotic stability for a class of stochastic nonlinear systems with time-varying delays. By the backstepping method and Lyapunov theory, we design a linear output feedback controller recursively based on the observable linearization for a class of stochastic nonlinear systems with time-varying delays to guarantee that the closed-loop system is globally asymptotically stable in probability. In particular, we extend the deterministic nonlinear system to stochastic nonlinear systems with time-varying delays. Finally, an example and its simulations are given to illustrate the theoretical results.

  4. The Impact of Immediate and Delayed Corrective Feedback on Iranian EFL Learners’ Willingness to Communicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Zadkhast

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the impact of immediate and delayed corrective feedback on Iranian EFL learners’ willingness to communicate. To attain the purpose of the study, 45 females intermediate students that were roughly selected according to their previous grades and their assigned  level in language school were chosen to participate in this study. Then they were divided to three equal groups: Experimental group 1(immediate feedback, Experimental group 2 (delayed feedback and control group. In the first session, WTC questionnaire (MacIntyre ,2001 modified by Pourya Baghaei and Ali Dourakhshan was administered to all groups as pretests. In group 1 the students’ errors were corrected by the teacher immediately after committing but in the second group, the students’ errors were written by the teacher and her comments were given to them when they finished their tasks. For the control group, the routine procedure of New Headway intermediate was followed. After about 12 sessions WTC was repeated as posttests. The findings revealed that immediate and delayed corrective feedback have a significant effect on EFL students’ level of WTC. The results, also demonstrated that experimental group 1 (immediate feedback outweighed the other two groups in relation to their WTC. The findings have implication for pedagogy as well as further research.

  5. The response of nonlinear controlled system under an external excitation via time delay state feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Elnaggar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of primary, superharmonic of order five, and subharmonic of order one-three resonances for non-linear s.d.o.f. system with two distinct time-delays under an external excitation is investigated. The method of multiple scales is used to determine two first order ordinary differential equations which describe the modulation of the amplitudes and the phases. Steady-state solutions and their stabilities in each resonance are studied. Numerical results are obtained by using the Software of Mathematica, which presented in a group of figures. The effect of the feedback gains and time-delays on the non-linear response of the system is discussed and it is found that: an appropriate feedback can enhance the control performance. A suitable choice of the feedback gains and time-delays can enlarge the critical force amplitude, and reduce the peak amplitude of the response (or peak amplitude of the free oscillation term for the case of primary resonance (superharmonic resonance. Furthermore, a proper feedback can eliminate saddle-node bifurcation, thereby eliminating jump and hysteresis phenomena taking place in the corresponding uncontrolled system. For subharmonic resonance, an adequate feedback can reduce the regions of subharmonic resonance response.

  6. Non-Markovian spiking statistics of a neuron with delayed feedback in presence of refractoriness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, Kseniia; Vidybida, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Spiking statistics of a self-inhibitory neuron is considered. The neuron receives excitatory input from a Poisson stream and inhibitory impulses through a feedback line with a delay. After triggering, the neuron is in the refractory state for a positive period of time. Recently, [35,6], it was proven for a neuron with delayed feedback and without the refractory state, that the output stream of interspike intervals (ISI) cannot be represented as a Markov process. The refractory state presence, in a sense limits the memory range in the spiking process, which might restore Markov property to the ISI stream. Here we check such a possibility. For this purpose, we calculate the conditional probability density P (tn+1 l tn,...,t1,t0), and prove exactly that it does not reduce to P (tn+1 l tn,...,t1) for any n ⋝0. That means, that activity of the system with refractory state as well cannot be represented as a Markov process of any order. We conclude that it is namely the delayed feedback presence which results in non-Markovian statistics of neuronal firing. As delayed feedback lines are common for any realistic neural network, the non-Markovian statistics of the network activity should be taken into account in processing of experimental data.

  7. Theoretical feasibility of suppressing offensive sports chants by means of delayed feedback of sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, S.J. van; Balken, J.A. van

    2007-01-01

    A novel approach for disrupting offensive chants at sporting events is proposed, based on attacking synchronization between individuals. Since timing is crucial for coordination between chanters, disruption of timing is expected to be effective against undesired chants. Delayed auditory feedback is

  8. PERMANENCE AND GLOBAL STABILITY OF A FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEM WITH DELAYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers a feedback control systems of differential equations with delays. By applying the differential inequality theorem, sufficient conditions for the permanence of the system are obtained. Also, by constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional, a criterion for the global stability of the model is obtained.

  9. Individual Variability in Delayed Auditory Feedback Effects on Speech Fluency and Rate in Normally Fluent Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, HeeCheong; Kraft, Shelly Jo; Zhang, Jingfei; Loucks, Torrey; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed auditory feedback (DAF) is known to induce stuttering-like disfluencies (SLDs) and cause speech rate reductions in normally fluent adults, but the reason for speech disruptions is not fully known, and individual variation has not been well characterized. Studying individual variation in susceptibility to DAF may identify factors…

  10. Positive Periodic Solutions of Cooperative Systems with Delays and Feedback Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tursuneli Niyaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies a class of periodic n species cooperative Lotka-Volterra systems with continuous time delays and feedback controls. Based on the continuation theorem of the coincidence degree theory developed by Gaines and Mawhin, some new sufficient conditions on the existence of positive periodic solutions are established.

  11. Delay Reduction for Instantly Decodable Network Coding in Persistent Channels With Feedback Imperfections

    KAUST Repository

    Douik, Ahmed S.

    2015-11-05

    This paper considers the multicast decoding delay reduction problem for generalized instantly decodable network coding (G-IDNC) over persistent erasure channels with feedback imperfections. The feedback scenario discussed is the most general situation in which the sender does not always receive acknowledgments from the receivers after each transmission and the feedback communications are subject to loss. The decoding delay increment expressions are derived and employed to express the decoding delay reduction problem as a maximum weight clique problem in the G-IDNC graph. This paper provides a theoretical analysis of the expected decoding delay increase at each time instant. Problem formulations in simpler channel and feedback models are shown to be special cases of the proposed generalized formulation. Since finding the optimal solution to the problem is known to be NP-hard, a suboptimal greedy algorithm is designed and compared with blind approaches proposed in the literature. Through extensive simulations, the proposed algorithm is shown to outperform the blind methods in all situations and to achieve significant improvement, particularly for high time-correlated channels.

  12. Adaptation to delayed auditory feedback induces the temporal recalibration effect in both speech perception and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kosuke; Kawabata, Hideaki

    2014-12-01

    We ordinarily speak fluently, even though our perceptions of our own voices are disrupted by various environmental acoustic properties. The underlying mechanism of speech is supposed to monitor the temporal relationship between speech production and the perception of auditory feedback, as suggested by a reduction in speech fluency when the speaker is exposed to delayed auditory feedback (DAF). While many studies have reported that DAF influences speech motor processing, its relationship to the temporal tuning effect on multimodal integration, or temporal recalibration, remains unclear. We investigated whether the temporal aspects of both speech perception and production change due to adaptation to the delay between the motor sensation and the auditory feedback. This is a well-used method of inducing temporal recalibration. Participants continually read texts with specific DAF times in order to adapt to the delay. Then, they judged the simultaneity between the motor sensation and the vocal feedback. We measured the rates of speech with which participants read the texts in both the exposure and re-exposure phases. We found that exposure to DAF changed both the rate of speech and the simultaneity judgment, that is, participants' speech gained fluency. Although we also found that a delay of 200 ms appeared to be most effective in decreasing the rates of speech and shifting the distribution on the simultaneity judgment, there was no correlation between these measurements. These findings suggest that both speech motor production and multimodal perception are adaptive to temporal lag but are processed in distinct ways.

  13. Synthesis of RF Circuits with Negative Time Delay by Using LNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaise Ravelo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A demonstration of the negative time-delay by using active circuit topologies with negative group delay (NGD is described in this paper. This negative time delay is realized with two different topologies operating in base band and modulated frequencies. The first NGD topology is composed of an RL-network in feedback with an RF/microwave amplifier. Knowing the characteristics of the amplifier, a synthesis method of this circuit in function of the desired NGD values and the expected time advance is established. The feasibility of this extraordinary physical effect is illustrated with frequency- and time-domain analyses. It is shown in this paper that by considering an arbitrary waveform signal, output in advance of about 7 ns is observed compared to the corresponding input. It is stated that such an effect is not in contradiction with the causality. The other NGD topology is comprised of a microwave amplifier associated with an RLC-series resonant. The theoretical approach illustrating the functioning of this NGD circuit is established by considering the amplifier S-parameters. Then, synthesis relations enabling to choose the NGD device parameters according to the desired NGD and gain values are also established. To demonstrate the relevance of the theoretic concept, a microwave device exhibiting NGD function of about -1.5 ns at around 1.19 GHz was designed and analyzed. The NGD device investigated in this paper presents advantages on its faculty to exhibit positive transmission gain, the implementation of the bias network and matching in the considered NGD frequency band.

  14. A Theory of Circular Organization and Negative Feedback: Defining Life in a Cybernetic Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokolov, Sergey

    2010-12-01

    All life today incorporates a variety of systems controlled by negative feedback loops and sometimes amplified by positive feedback loops. The first forms of life necessarily also required primitive versions of feedback, yet surprisingly little emphasis has been given to the question of how feedback emerged out of primarily chemical systems. One chemical system has been established that spontaneously develops autocatalytic feedback, the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. In this essay, I discuss the BZ reaction as a possible model for similar reactions that could have occurred under prebiotic Earth conditions. The main point is that the metabolism of contemporary life evolved from primitive homeostatic networks regulated by negative feedback. Because life could not exist in their absence, feedback loops should be included in definitions of life.

  15. Delay-induced transport in a rocking ratchet under feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Sarah A M; Gernert, Robert; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2014-05-01

    Based on the Fokker-Planck equation we investigate the transport of an overdamped colloidal particle in a static, asymmetric periodic potential supplemented by a time-dependent, delayed feedback force, F(fc). For a given time t, F(fc) depends on the status of the system at a previous time t-τ(D), with τ(D) being a delay time, specifically on the delayed mean particle displacement (relative to some "switching position"). For nonzero delay times F(fc)(t) develops nearly regular oscillations, generating a net current in the system. Depending on the switching position, this current is nearly as large or even larger than that in a conventional open-loop rocking ratchet. We also investigate thermodynamic properties of the delayed nonequilibrium system and we suggest an underlying Langevin equation which reproduces the Fokker-Planck results.

  16. Analytical determination of the bifurcation thresholds in stochastic differential equations with delayed feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Mathieu; Drolet, François; Viñals, Jorge

    2010-11-01

    Analytical expressions for pitchfork and Hopf bifurcation thresholds are given for a nonlinear stochastic differential delay equation with feedback. Our results assume that the delay time τ is small compared to other characteristic time scales, not a significant limitation close to the bifurcation line. A pitchfork bifurcation line is found, the location of which depends on the conditional average , where x(t) is the dynamical variable. This conditional probability incorporates the combined effect of fluctuation correlations and delayed feedback. We also find a Hopf bifurcation line which is obtained by a multiple scale expansion around the oscillatory solution near threshold. We solve the Fokker-Planck equation associated with the slowly varying amplitudes and use it to determine the threshold location. In both cases, the predicted bifurcation lines are in excellent agreement with a direct numerical integration of the governing equations. Contrary to the known case involving no delayed feedback, we show that the stochastic bifurcation lines are shifted relative to the deterministic limit and hence that the interaction between fluctuation correlations and delay affect the stability of the solutions of the model equation studied.

  17. Stability and Hopf bifurcation of a nonlinear electromechanical coupling system with time delay feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Zhao, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Zhao-Long; Li, Hai-Bin

    2015-01-01

    The stability and the Hopf bifurcation of a nonlinear electromechanical coupling system with time delay feedback are studied. By considering the energy in the air-gap field of the AC motor, the dynamical equation of the electromechanical coupling transmission system is deduced and a time delay feedback is introduced to control the dynamic behaviors of the system. The characteristic roots and the stable regions of time delay are determined by the direct method, and the relationship between the feedback gain and the length summation of stable regions is analyzed. Choosing the time delay as a bifurcation parameter, we find that the Hopf bifurcation occurs when the time delay passes through a critical value. A formula for determining the direction of the Hopf bifurcation and the stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions is given by using the normal form method and the center manifold theorem. Numerical simulations are also performed, which confirm the analytical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61104040), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. E2012203090), and the University Innovation Team of Hebei Province Leading Talent Cultivation Project, China (Grant No. LJRC013).

  18. Boys, don't cry: Gender and reactions to negative performance feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motro, Daphna; Ellis, Aleksander P J

    2017-02-01

    Our experiment is aimed at understanding how employee reactions to negative feedback are received by the feedback provider and how employee gender may play a role in the process. We focus specifically on the act of crying and, based on role congruity theory, argue that a male employee crying in response to negative performance feedback will be seen as atypical behavior by the feedback provider, which will bias evaluations of the employee on a number of different outcome variables, including performance evaluations, assessments of leadership capability, and written recommendations. That is, we expect an interactive effect between gender and crying on our outcomes, an effect that will be mediated by perceived typicality. We find support for our moderated mediation model in a sample of 169 adults, indicating that men who cry in response to negative performance feedback will experience biased evaluations from the feedback provider. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Overt vs. covert speed cameras in combination with delayed vs. immediate feedback to the offender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, Hadas; Setter, Pe'erly; Norman, Joel

    2015-06-01

    Speeding is a major problem in road safety because it increases both the probability of accidents and the severity of injuries if an accident occurs. Speed cameras are one of the most common speed enforcement tools. Most of the speed cameras around the world are overt, but there is evidence that this can cause a "kangaroo effect" in driving patterns. One suggested alternative to prevent this kangaroo effect is the use of covert cameras. Another issue relevant to the effect of enforcement countermeasures on speeding is the timing of the fine. There is general agreement on the importance of the immediacy of the punishment, however, in the context of speed limit enforcement, implementing such immediate punishment is difficult. An immediate feedback that mediates the delay between the speed violation and getting a ticket is one possible solution. This study examines combinations of concealment and the timing of the fine in operating speed cameras in order to evaluate the most effective one in terms of enforcing speed limits. Using a driving simulator, the driving performance of the following four experimental groups was tested: (1) overt cameras with delayed feedback, (2) overt cameras with immediate feedback, (3) covert cameras with delayed feedback, and (4) covert cameras with immediate feedback. Each of the 58 participants drove in the same scenario on three different days. The results showed that both median speed and speed variance were higher with overt than with covert cameras. Moreover, implementing a covert camera system along with immediate feedback was more conducive to drivers maintaining steady speeds at the permitted levels from the very beginning. Finally, both 'overt cameras' groups exhibit a kangaroo effect throughout the entire experiment. It can be concluded that an implementation strategy consisting of covert speed cameras combined with immediate feedback to the offender is potentially an optimal way to motivate drivers to maintain speeds at the

  20. Learning from Negative Feedback in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder is Attenuated by SSRI Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M. Herzallah

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One barrier to interpreting past studies of cognition and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD has been the failure in many studies to adequately dissociate the effects of MDD from the potential cognitive side effects of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI use. To better understand how remediation of depressive symptoms affects cognitive function in MDD, we evaluated three groups of subjects: medication-naïve patients with MDD, medicated patients with MDD receiving the SSRI paroxetine and healthy control subjects. All were administered a category-learning task that allows for dissociation between learning from positive feedback (reward versus learning from negative feedback (punishment. Healthy subjects learned significantly better from positive feedback than medication-naïve and medicated MDD groups, whose learning accuracy did not differ significantly. In contrast, medicated patients with MDD learned significantly less from negative feedback than medication-naïve patients with MDD and healthy subjects, whose learning accuracy was comparable. A comparison of subject’s relative sensitivity to positive versus negative feedback showed that both the medicated MDD and healthy control groups conform to Kahneman and Tversky’s (1979 Prospect Theory, which expects losses (negative feedback to loom psychologically slightly larger than gains (positive feedback. However, medicated MDD and HC profiles are not similar, which indicates that the state of medicated MDD is not ‘normal’ when compared to HC, but rather balanced with less learning from both positive and negative feedback. On the other hand, medication-naïve patients with MDD violate Prospect Theory by having significantly exaggerated learning from negative feedback. This suggests that SSRI antidepressants impair learning from negative feedback, while having negligible effect on learning from positive feedback. Overall, these findings shed light on the importance of dissociating the

  1. Modeling and Output Feedback Control of Networked Control Systems with Both Time Delays; and Packet Dropouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the problem of modeling and output feedback controller design for a class of discrete-time networked control systems (NCSs with time delays and packet dropouts. A Markovian jumping method is proposed to deal with random time delays and packet dropouts. Different from the previous studies on the issue, the characteristics of networked communication delays and packet dropouts can be truly reflected by the unified model; namely, both sensor-to-controller (S-C and controller-to-actuator (C-A time delays, and packet dropouts are modeled and their history behavior is described by multiple Markov chains. The resulting closed-loop system is described by a new Markovian jump linear system (MJLS with Markov delays model. Based on Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequality (LMI method, sufficient conditions of the stochastic stability and output feedback controller design method for NCSs with random time delays and packet dropouts are presented. A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Temporal recalibration in vocalization induced by adaptation of delayed auditory feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yamamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We ordinarily perceive our voice sound as occurring simultaneously with vocal production, but the sense of simultaneity in vocalization can be easily interrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF. DAF causes normal people to have difficulty speaking fluently but helps people with stuttering to improve speech fluency. However, the underlying temporal mechanism for integrating the motor production of voice and the auditory perception of vocal sound remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the temporal tuning mechanism integrating vocal sensory and voice sounds under DAF with an adaptation technique. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Participants produced a single voice sound repeatedly with specific delay times of DAF (0, 66, 133 ms during three minutes to induce 'Lag Adaptation'. They then judged the simultaneity between motor sensation and vocal sound given feedback. We found that lag adaptation induced a shift in simultaneity responses toward the adapted auditory delays. This indicates that the temporal tuning mechanism in vocalization can be temporally recalibrated after prolonged exposure to delayed vocal sounds. Furthermore, we found that the temporal recalibration in vocalization can be affected by averaging delay times in the adaptation phase. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest vocalization is finely tuned by the temporal recalibration mechanism, which acutely monitors the integration of temporal delays between motor sensation and vocal sound.

  3. Delay reduction in lossy intermittent feedback for generalized instantly decodable network coding

    KAUST Repository

    Douik, Ahmed S.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of lossy intermittent feedback loss events on the multicast decoding delay performance of generalized instantly decodable network coding. These feedback loss events create uncertainty at the sender about the reception statues of different receivers and thus uncertainty to accurately determine subsequent instantly decodable coded packets. To solve this problem, we first identify the different possibilities of uncertain packets at the sender and their probabilities. We then derive the expression of the mean decoding delay. We formulate the Generalized Instantly Decodable Network Coding (G-IDNC) minimum decoding delay problem as a maximum weight clique problem. Since finding the optimal solution is NP-hard, we design a variant of the algorithm employed in [1]. Our algorithm is compared to the two blind graph update proposed in [2] through extensive simulations. Results show that our algorithm outperforms the blind approaches in all the situations and achieves a tolerable degradation, against the perfect feedback, for large feedback loss period. © 2013 IEEE.

  4. Theory of oscillatory firing induced by spatially correlated noise and delayed inhibitory feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Benjamin; Doiron, Brent; Longtin, André

    2005-12-01

    A network of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with global inhibitory feedback and under the influence of spatially correlated noise is studied. We calculate the spectral statistics of the network (power spectrum of the population activity, cross spectrum between spike trains of different neurons) as well as of a single neuron (power spectrum of spike train, cross spectrum between external noise and spike train) within the network. As shown by comparison with numerical simulations, our theory works well for arbitrary network size if the feedback is weak and the amount of external noise does not exceed that of the internal noise. By means of our analytical results we discuss the quality of the correlation-induced oscillation in a large network as a function of the transmission delay and the internal noise intensity. It is shown that the strongest oscillation is obtained in a system with zero internal noise and adiabatically long delay (i.e., the delay period is longer than any other time scale in the system). For a neuron with a strong intrinsic frequency, the oscillation becomes strongly anharmonic in the case of a long delay time. We also discuss briefly the kind of synchrony introduced by the feedback-induced oscillation.

  5. Failure to retreat: Blunted sensitivity to negative feedback supports risky behavior in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Ethan M; Telzer, Eva H

    2017-02-15

    Decision-making processes rarely occur in isolation. Rather, representations are updated constantly based on feedback to past decisions and actions. However, previous research has focused on the reaction to feedback receipt itself, instead of examining how feedback information is integrated into future decisions. In the current study, we examined differential neural sensitivity during risk decisions following positive versus negative feedback in a risk-taking context, and how this differential sensitivity is linked to adolescent risk behavior. Fifty-eight adolescents (ages 13-17 years) completed the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) during an fMRI session and reported on their levels of risk-taking behavior. Results show that reduced medial PFC (mPFC) response following negative versus positive feedback is associated with fewer reductions in task-based risky decisions following negative feedback, as well as increased self-reported risk-taking behavior. These results suggest that reduced neural integration of negative feedback into during future decisions supports risky behavior, perhaps by discounting negative relative to positive feedback information when making subsequent risky decisions.

  6. Comments on multiple oscillatory solutions in systems with time-delay feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Stich

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex Ginzburg-Landau equation subjected to local and global time-delay feedback terms is considered. In particular, multiple oscillatory solutions and their properties are studied. We present novel results regarding the disappearance of limit cycle solutions, derive analytical criteria for frequency degeneration, amplitude degeneration, and frequency extrema. Furthermore, we discuss the influence of the phase shift parameter and show analytically that the stabilization of the steady state and the decay of all oscillations (amplitude death cannot happen for global feedback only. Finally, we explain the onset of traveling wave patterns close to the regime of amplitude death.

  7. Dynamic Output Feedback Passive Control of Uncertain Switched Stochastic Systems with Time-Varying Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimei Jia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the issues of passivity analysis and dynamic output feedback (DOF passive control for uncertain switched stochastic systems with time-varying delay via multiple storage functions (MSFs method. Firstly, based on the MSFs method, a sufficient condition for the existence of the passivity of the underlying system is established in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs. Furthermore, the problem of dynamic output feedback passive control is investigated. Based on the obtained passivity condition, a sufficient condition for the existence of the desired switched passive controller is derived. Finally, a numerical example is presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Memory State Feedback RMPC for Multiple Time-Delayed Uncertain Linear Systems with Input Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wei Qin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the problem of asymptotic stabilization for a class of discrete-time multiple time-delayed uncertain linear systems with input constraints. Then, based on the predictive control principle of receding horizon optimization, a delayed state dependent quadratic function is considered for incorporating MPC problem formulation. By developing a memory state feedback controller, the information of the delayed plant states can be taken into full consideration. The MPC problem is formulated to minimize the upper bound of infinite horizon cost that satisfies the sufficient conditions. Then, based on the Lyapunov-Krasovskii function, a delay-dependent sufficient condition in terms of linear matrix inequality (LMI can be derived to design a robust MPC algorithm. Finally, the digital simulation results prove availability of the proposed method.

  9. The fragility of intergroup relations: divergent effects of delayed audiovisual feedback in intergroup and intragroup interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Adam R; West, Tessa V; Dovidio, John F; Powers, Stacie Renfro; Buck, Ross; Henning, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Intergroup interactions between racial or ethnic majority and minority groups are often stressful for members of both groups; however, the dynamic processes that promote or alleviate tension in intergroup interaction remain poorly understood. Here we identify a behavioral mechanism-response delay-that can uniquely contribute to anxiety and promote disengagement from intergroup contact. Minimally acquainted White, Black, and Latino participants engaged in intergroup or intragroup dyadic conversation either in real time or with a subtle temporal disruption (1-s delay) in audiovisual feedback. Whereas intergroup dyads reported greater anxiety and less interest in contact after engaging in delayed conversation than after engaging in real-time conversation, intragroup dyads reported less anxiety in the delay condition than they did after interacting in real time. These findings have theoretical and practical implications for understanding intergroup communication and social dynamics and for promoting positive intergroup contact.

  10. Global view of Hopf bifurcations of a van der Pol oscillator with delayed state feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents both analytical and numerical studies on the global view of Hopf bifurcations of a van der Pol oscillator with delayed state feedback.Based on a detailed analysis of the stability switches of the trivial equilibrium of the system,the stability charts are given in a parameter space consisting of the time delay and the feedback gains.The center manifold reduc-tion and the normal form method are used to study Hopf bifurcations with respect to the time delay.To gain an insight into the persistence of a Hopf bifurcation as the time delay varies farther away from its critical value,the method of multiple scales is used to obtain the global view of Hopf bifurcations with respect to the time delay.Both the analytical results of Hopf bifurca-tions and global view of those bifurcations are validated via a collocation scheme implemented on DDE-Biftool.The most important discovery in this paper is the well-structured global view of Hopf bifurcations for the system of concern,showing the generality of the persistence of Hopf bifurcations.

  11. Adaptation to Delayed Speech Feedback Induces Temporal Recalibration between Vocal Sensory and Auditory Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yamamoto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We ordinarily perceive our voice sound as occurring simultaneously with vocal production, but the sense of simultaneity in vocalization can be easily interrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF. DAF causes normal people to have difficulty speaking fluently but helps people with stuttering to improve speech fluency. However, the underlying temporal mechanism for integrating the motor production of voice and the auditory perception of vocal sound remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the temporal tuning mechanism integrating vocal sensory and voice sounds under DAF with an adaptation technique. Participants read some sentences with specific delay times of DAF (0, 30, 75, 120 ms during three minutes to induce ‘Lag Adaptation’. After the adaptation, they then judged the simultaneity between motor sensation and vocal sound given feedback in producing simple voice but not speech. We found that speech production with lag adaptation induced a shift in simultaneity responses toward the adapted auditory delays. This indicates that the temporal tuning mechanism in vocalization can be temporally recalibrated after prolonged exposure to delayed vocal sounds. These findings suggest vocalization is finely tuned by the temporal recalibration mechanism, which acutely monitors the integration of temporal delays between motor sensation and vocal sound.

  12. Bifurcation Analysis and Chaos Control in a Modified Finance System with Delayed Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jihua; Zhang, Erli; Liu, Mei

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the effect of delayed feedback on the finance system, which describes the time variation of the interest rate, for establishing the fiscal policy. By local stability analysis, we theoretically prove the existences of Hopf bifurcation and Hopf-zero bifurcation. By using the normal form method and center manifold theory, we determine the stability and direction of a bifurcating periodic solution. Finally, we give some numerical solutions, which indicate that when the delay passes through certain critical values, chaotic oscillation is converted into a stable equilibrium or periodic orbit.

  13. Stabilizability of linear quadratic state feedback for uncertain fuzzy time-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong-Jyue; Lin, Wei-Wei; Wang, Wen-June

    2004-04-01

    This paper investigates the problem of designing a fuzzy state feedback controller to stabilize an uncertain fuzzy system with time-varying delay. Based on Lyapunov criterion and Razumikhin theorem, some sufficient conditions are derived under which the parallel-distributed fuzzy control can stabilize the whole uncertain fuzzy time-delay system asymptotically. By Schur complement, these sufficient conditions can be easily transformed into the problem of LMIs. Furthermore, the tolerable bound of the perturbation is also obtained. A practical example based on the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model is given to illustrate the control design and its effectiveness.

  14. Feedback control of time-delay systems with bounded control and state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dambrine

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the problem of stabilizing linear time-delay systems under state and control linear constraints. For this, necessary and sufficient conditions for a given non-symmetrical polyhedral set to be positively invariant are obtained. Then existence conditions of linear state feedback control law respecting the constraints are established, and a procedure is given in order to calculate such a controller. The paper concerns memoryless controlled systems but the results can be applied to cases of delayed controlled systems. An example is given.

  15. A novel approach to negative feedback in RX front-ends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandi, Luca; Andreani, Pietro; Tired, Tobias

    2006-01-01

    A new approach to negative feedback is proposed and applied to active mixer cells based on Gilbert multiplier. The feedback can be exploited in several ways, and different configurations are derived. A dual-loop topology provides a solution for inductor-less broad-band receiver stages. The nature...

  16. Age-related changes in deterministic learning from positive versus negative performance feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, I. van de; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Wit, S. de

    2015-01-01

    Feedback-based learning declines with age. Because older adults are generally biased toward positive information (“positivity effect”), learning from positive feedback may be less impaired than learning from negative outcomes. The literature documents mixed results, due possibly to variability betwe

  17. Age-related changes in deterministic learning from positive versus negative performance feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vijver, I.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; de Wit, S.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback-based learning declines with age. Because older adults are generally biased toward positive information ("positivity effect"), learning from positive feedback may be less impaired than learning from negative outcomes. The literature documents mixed results, due possibly to variability betwe

  18. Negative time delay of light by a gravitational concave lens

    CERN Document Server

    Nakajima, Koki; Asada, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational lens models, some of which might act as if a concave lens, have been recently investigated by using a static and spherically symmetric modified spacetime metric that depends on the inverse distance to the $n$-th power [Kitamura, Nakajima and Asada, PRD 87, 027501 (2013)]. We reexamine the time delay of light in a gravitational concave lens as well as a gravitational convex one. The frequency shift due to the time delay is also investigated. We show that the sign of the time delay in the lens models is the same as that of the deflection angle of light. The size of the time delay decreases with increase in the parameter $n$. We discuss also possible parameter ranges that are relevant to pulsar timing measurements in our galaxy.

  19. Delayed resonator with acceleration feedback - Complete stability analysis by spectral methods and vibration absorber design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhlídal, Tomáš; Olgac, Nejat; Kučera, Vladimír

    2014-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of active vibration suppression using the concept of delayed resonator (DR) absorber with acceleration feedback. A complete dynamic analysis of DR and its coupling with a single degree of freedom mechanical system are performed. Due to the presence of a delay in the acceleration feedback, the dynamics of the resonator itself, as well as the dynamics of combined system are of ‘neutral' character. On this system, spectral methods are applied to perform a complete stability analysis. Particularly, the method of cluster treatment of characteristic roots is used to determine stability boundaries in the space of the resonator parameters. Based on this analysis, a methodology to select the resonator parameters is proposed in order to guarantee desirable suppression characteristics and to provide safe stability margins. An example case study is included to demonstrate these analytical results.

  20. Robust chaos synchronization based on adaptive fuzzy delayed feedback $\\mathcal{H}_{∞}$ control

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Choon Ki Ahn

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new adaptive $\\mathcal_{∞}$ synchronization strategy, called an adaptive fuzzy delayed feedback $\\mathcal_{∞}$ synchronization (AFDFHS) strategy, for chaotic systems with uncertain parameters and external disturbances. Based on Lyapunov–Krasovskii theory, Takagi–Sugeno (T–S) fuzzy model and adaptive delayed feedback $\\mathcal_{∞}$ control scheme, the AFDFHS controller is presented such that the synchronization error system is asymptotically stable with a guaranteed $\\mathcal_{∞}$ performance. It is shown that the design of the AFDFHS controller with adaptive law can be achieved by solving a linear matrix inequality (LMI), which can be easily facilitated by using some standard numerical packages. An illustrative example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed AFDFHS approach.

  1. Relation between the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm and the method of harmonic oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyragas, Viktoras; Pyragas, Kestutis

    2015-08-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. E 91, 012920 (2015)] Olyaei and Wu have proposed a new chaos control method in which a target periodic orbit is approximated by a system of harmonic oscillators. We consider an application of such a controller to single-input single-output systems in the limit of an infinite number of oscillators. By evaluating the transfer function in this limit, we show that this controller transforms into the known extended time-delayed feedback controller. This finding gives rise to an approximate finite-dimensional theory of the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm, which provides a simple method for estimating the leading Floquet exponents of controlled orbits. Numerical demonstrations are presented for the chaotic Rössler, Duffing, and Lorenz systems as well as the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation.

  2. Analysis of stability of a Power System by using Delay Static State Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindy Paola Amaya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the analysis of stability of a power system modeled as Infinite Bus Connected Generator with delay static state feedback. The model of the power system is described by nonlinear differential- algebraic equations. For controller design, we linealize the nonlinear differential-algebraic model around an operation point to obtain a lineal differential-algebraic model. As of this model obtains the Kronecker -Weierstrass model which designs the controller. To obtain the K gain of the controller outline inequalities matrix lineal (LMI's . Then it makes a study of the maximum delay that it supports in the state feedback. At the end of the article present the results and the conclusions.

  3. Global Practical Tracking by Output Feedback for Nonlinear Systems with Unknown Growth Rate and Time Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuehua

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the further investigation of work of Yan and Liu, 2011, and considers the global practical tracking problem by output feedback for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems with not only unmeasured states dependent growth but also time-varying time delay. Compared with the closely related works, the remarkableness of the paper is that the time-varying time delay and unmeasurable states are permitted in the system nonlinear growth. Motivated by the related tracking results and flexibly using the ideas and techniques of universal control and dead zone, an adaptive output-feedback tracking controller is explicitly designed with the help of a new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, to make the tracking error prescribed arbitrarily small after a finite time while keeping all the closed-loop signals bounded. A numerical example demonstrates the effectiveness of the results. PMID:25276859

  4. Pinning weighted complex networks with heterogeneous delays by a small number of feedback controllers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG LinYing; LIU ZhongXin; CHEN ZengQiang; YUAN ZhuZhi

    2008-01-01

    Weighted complex dynamical networks with heterogeneous delays in both con-tinuous-time and discrete-time domains are controlled by applying local feedback injections to a small fraction of network nodes. Some generic stability criteria en-suring delay-independent stability are derived for such controlled networks in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), which guarantee that by placing a small number of feedback controllers on some nodes the whole network can be pinned to some desired homogenous states. In some particular cases, a single controller can achieve the control objective. It is found that stabilization of such pinned networks is completely determined by the dynamics of the individual uncoupled node, the overall coupling strength, the inner-coupling matrix, and the smallest eigenvalue of the coupling and control matrix. Numerical simulations of a weighted network composing of a 3-dimensional nonlinear system are finally given for illustration and verification.

  5. Time-delayed feedback control optimization for quasi linear systems under random excitations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueping Li; Detain Wei; Weiqiu Zhu

    2009-01-01

    A strategy for time-delayed feedback control optimization of quasi linear systems with random excita-tion is proposed. First, the stochastic averaging method is used to reduce the dimension of the state space and to derive the stationary response of the system. Secondly, the control law is assumed to be velocity feedback control with time delay and the unknown control gains are determined by the performance indices. The response of the controlled system is predicted through solving the Fokker-Plank-Kolmogorov equation associated with the averaged It6 equation. Finally, numerical examples are used to illustrate the proposed con-trol method, and the numerical results are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulation.

  6. Relation between the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm and the method of harmonic oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyragas, Viktoras; Pyragas, Kestutis

    2015-08-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. E 91, 012920 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.012920] Olyaei and Wu have proposed a new chaos control method in which a target periodic orbit is approximated by a system of harmonic oscillators. We consider an application of such a controller to single-input single-output systems in the limit of an infinite number of oscillators. By evaluating the transfer function in this limit, we show that this controller transforms into the known extended time-delayed feedback controller. This finding gives rise to an approximate finite-dimensional theory of the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm, which provides a simple method for estimating the leading Floquet exponents of controlled orbits. Numerical demonstrations are presented for the chaotic Rössler, Duffing, and Lorenz systems as well as the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation.

  7. Noise-induced attractor annihilation in the delayed feedback logistic map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarchik, A.N., E-mail: apisarch@cio.mx [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Loma del Bosque 115, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Centre for Biomedical Technology, Technical University of Madrid, Campus Montegancedo, 28223 Pozuelo de Alarcon, Madrid (Spain); Martínez-Zérega, B.E. [Centro Universitario de los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon 1144, Paseos de la Montaña, Lagos de Moreno, Jalisco 47460 (Mexico)

    2013-12-06

    We study dynamics of the bistable logistic map with delayed feedback, under the influence of white Gaussian noise and periodic modulation applied to the variable. This system may serve as a model to describe population dynamics under finite resources in noisy environment with seasonal fluctuations. While a very small amount of noise has no effect on the global structure of the coexisting attractors in phase space, an intermediate noise totally eliminates one of the attractors. Slow periodic modulation enhances the attractor annihilation.

  8. Noise-Induced Phase Locking and Frequency Mixing in an Optical Bistable System with Delayed Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misono, Masatoshi; Miyakawa, Kenji

    2011-11-01

    The interplay between stochastic resonance (SR) and coherence resonance (CR) is experimentally studied in an optical bistable system with a time-delayed feedback loop. We demonstrate that the phase of the noise-induced motion is locked to that of the periodic input when the ratio of their frequencies is a simple rational number. We also demonstrate that the interplay between SR and CR generates frequency-mixed modes, and that the efficiency of frequency mixing is enhanced by the optimum noise.

  9. Fractal Erosion of the Safe Basin in a Helmholtz Oscillator and Its Control by Linear Delayed Velocity Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Hui-Lin; WEN Yong-Peng

    2011-01-01

    Fractal erosion of the safe basin in a Helmholtz oscillator system is studied. A linear delayed velocity feedback is employed to suppress the fractal erosion. The necessary basin erosion condition of the delayed feedback controlled system is obtained. The evolution of the boundary and area of the safe basin over time delay is also presented. It follows that the delayed velocity feedback can be used as an effective strategy to control fractal erosion of a safe basin.%Fractal erosion of the safe basin in a Helmholtz oscillator system is studied.A linear delayed velocity feedback is employed to suppress the fractal erosion.The necessary basin erosion condition of the delayed feedback controlled system is obtained.The evolution of the boundary and area of the safe basin over time delay is also presented.It follows that the delayed velocity feedback can be used as an effective strategy to control fractal erosion of a safe basin.Since the safe basin was induced to explain the integrity of dynamical systems,studies on safe basins have attracted much attention.[1-6] Leigh and Armin calculated the survival probability of a ferry in random seas by estimating the erosion of the safe basin during the ship rolling motion by using Monte Carlo simulations.[1] Lenci and Rega induced the erosion of a safe basin to explain pull-in phenomenon in micro-electro mechanical systems.[2

  10. Adaptive Neural Control of MIMO Nonstrict-Feedback Nonlinear Systems With Time Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xudong; Yang, Haijiao; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Zhu, Yanzheng

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural output-feedback tracking controller is designed for a class of multiple-input and multiple-output nonstrict-feedback nonlinear systems with time delay. The system coefficient and uncertain functions of our considered systems are both unknown. By employing neural networks to approximate the unknown function entries, and constructing a new input-driven filter, a backstepping design method of tracking controller is developed for the systems under consideration. The proposed controller can guarantee that all the signals in the closed-loop systems are ultimately bounded, and the time-varying target signal can be tracked within a small error as well. The main contributions of this paper lie in that the systems under consideration are more general, and an effective design procedure of output-feedback controller is developed for the considered systems, which is more applicable in practice. Simulation results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  11. Chaos Generation and Synchronization Using Driven TWT amplifiers having delayed feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, P.; Booske, J. H.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Marchewka, C.; Sengele, S.; Koch, S.; Ryskin, N.; Titov, V.

    2004-11-01

    Development of high power sources of chaotic waveforms in the microwave frequency regime is important for communications, noise radar, and other applications. We have demonstrated that driven traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifiers with delayed feedback are excellent sources of chaotic radiation with numerous experimental advantages. The configuration involves a TWT oscillator (using an external feedback loop) which is driven by an external coherent generator. Two types of chaos have been observed in these experiments: a period doubling type and a "loss-of-synchronization" type of chaos. Characterizations have identified single frequency oscillation, self-modulation, and chaos within the parameter space defined by the drive power, drive frequency, and feedback attenuation level. Current investigations are examining synchronization between a pair of driven TWT oscillators.

  12. Negative Feedback for Small Capacitive Touchscreen Interfaces: A Usability Study for Data Entry Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, S P; Esposito, J M

    2012-01-01

    Touchscreen technology has become pervasive in the consumer product arena over the last decade, offering some distinct advantages such as software reconfigurable interfaces and the removal of space consuming mice and keyboards. However, there are significant drawbacks to these devices that have limited their adoption by some users. Most notably, standard touchscreens demand the user's visual attention and require them to look at the input device to avoid pressing the wrong button. This issue is particularly important for mobile, capacitive sensing, nonstylus devices, such as the iPhone where small button sizes can generate high error rates. While previous work has shown the benefits of augmenting such interfaces with audio or vibrotactile feedback, only positive feedback (confirmation of button presses) has been considered. In this paper, we present a simple prototype interface that provides negative vibrotactile feedback. By negative, we mean feedback is generated when an inactive or ambiguous part of the screen, such as the area between two buttons, is touched. First, we present a usability study comparing positive and negative vibrotactile feedback for a benchmark numerical data entry task. The difference in performance is not statistically significant, implying negative feedback provides comparable benefits. Next, based on the experimenter's observations and the users comments, we introduce a multimodal feedback strategy-combining complementary positive audio and negative vibrotactile signals. User tests on a text entry experiment show that, with multimodal feedback, users exhibit a (statistically significant) 24 percent reduction in corrective key presses, as compared to positive audio feedback alone. Exit survey comments indicate that users favor multimodal feedback.

  13. Bifurcation Control of an Electrostatically-Actuated MEMS Actuator with Time-Delay Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The parametric excitation system consisting of a flexible beam and shuttle mass widely exists in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS, which can exhibit rich nonlinear dynamic behaviors. This article aims to theoretically investigate the nonlinear jumping phenomena and bifurcation conditions of a class of electrostatically-driven MEMS actuators with a time-delay feedback controller. Considering the comb structure consisting of a flexible beam and shuttle mass, the partial differential governing equation is obtained with both the linear and cubic nonlinear parametric excitation. Then, the method of multiple scales is introduced to obtain a slow flow that is analyzed for stability and bifurcation. Results show that time-delay feedback can improve resonance frequency and stability of the system. What is more, through a detailed mathematical analysis, the discriminant of Hopf bifurcation is theoretically derived, and appropriate time-delay feedback force can make the branch from the Hopf bifurcation point stable under any driving voltage value. Meanwhile, through global bifurcation analysis and saddle node bifurcation analysis, theoretical expressions about the system parameter space and maximum amplitude of monostable vibration are deduced. It is found that the disappearance of the global bifurcation point means the emergence of monostable vibration. Finally, detailed numerical results confirm the analytical prediction.

  14. Principal resonance response of a stochastic elastic impact oscillator under nonlinear delayed state feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄冬梅; 徐伟; 谢文贤; 韩群

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the principal resonance response of a stochastically driven elastic impact (EI) system with time-delayed cubic velocity feedback is investigated. Firstly, based on the method of multiple scales, the steady-state response and its dynamic stability are analyzed in deterministic and stochastic cases, respectively. It is shown that for the case of the multi-valued response with the frequency island phenomenon, only the smallest amplitude of the steady-state response is stable under a certain time delay, which is different from the case of the traditional frequency response. Then, a design criterion is proposed to suppress the jump phenomenon, which is induced by the saddle-node bifurcation. The effects of the feedback parameters on the steady-state responses, as well as the size, shape, and location of stability regions are studied. Results show that the system responses and the stability boundaries are highly dependent on these parameters. Furthermore, with the purpose of suppressing the amplitude peak and governing the resonance stability, appropriate feedback gain and time delay are derived.

  15. Global stabilisation for a class of uncertain nonlinear time-delay systems by dynamic state and output feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Lin; Qian, Chunjiang

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the design problem of constructing the state and output feedback stabilisation controller for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems subject to time-delay. First, a dynamic linear state feedback control law with an adaptive strategy is developed to globally stabilise the uncertain nonlinear time-delay system under a lower-triangular higher-order growth condition. Then, one more challenging problem of the adaptive output feedback stabilisation is addressed, which can globally stabilise the time-delay system when the unmeasurable states linearly grow with rate functions consisting of higher-order output.

  16. Observer-based output feedback control of discrete-time linear systems with input and output delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we study observer-based output feedback control of discrete-time linear systems with both multiple input and output delays. By generalising our recently developed truncated predictor feedback approach for state feedback stabilisation of discrete-time time-delay systems to the design of observer-based output feedback, two types of observer-based output feedback controllers, one being memory and the other memoryless, are constructed. Both full-order and reduced-order observer-based controllers are established in both the memory and memoryless schemes. It is shown that the separation principle holds for the memory observer-based output feedback controllers, but does not hold for the memoryless ones. We further show that the proposed observer-based output feedback controllers solve both the l2 and l∞ semi-global stabilisation problems. A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  17. Negative plant-soil feedback predicts tree-species relative abundance in a tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Scott A; Schnitzer, Stefan A; Herre, Edward A; Mack, Keenan M L; Valencia, Mariana C; Sanchez, Evelyn I; Bever, James D

    2010-08-05

    The accumulation of species-specific enemies around adults is hypothesized to maintain plant diversity by limiting the recruitment of conspecific seedlings relative to heterospecific seedlings. Although previous studies in forested ecosystems have documented patterns consistent with the process of negative feedback, these studies are unable to address which classes of enemies (for example, pathogens, invertebrates, mammals) exhibit species-specific effects strong enough to generate negative feedback, and whether negative feedback at the level of the individual tree is sufficient to influence community-wide forest composition. Here we use fully reciprocal shade-house and field experiments to test whether the performance of conspecific tree seedlings (relative to heterospecific seedlings) is reduced when grown in the presence of enemies associated with adult trees. Both experiments provide strong evidence for negative plant-soil feedback mediated by soil biota. In contrast, above-ground enemies (mammals, foliar herbivores and foliar pathogens) contributed little to negative feedback observed in the field. In both experiments, we found that tree species that showed stronger negative feedback were less common as adults in the forest community, indicating that susceptibility to soil biota may determine species relative abundance in these tropical forests. Finally, our simulation models confirm that the strength of local negative feedback that we measured is sufficient to produce the observed community-wide patterns in tree-species relative abundance. Our findings indicate that plant-soil feedback is an important mechanism that can maintain species diversity and explain patterns of tree-species relative abundance in tropical forests.

  18. Bifurcation analysis of a semiconductor laser with saturable absorber and delayed optical feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Terrien, Soizic; Broderick, Neil G R

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor lasers exhibit a wealth of dynamics, from emission of a constant beam of light, to periodic oscillations and excitability. Self-pulsing regimes, where the laser periodically releases a short pulse of light, are particularly interesting for many applications, from material science to telecommunications. Self-pulsing regimes need to produce pulses very regularly and, as such, they are also known to be particularly sensitive to perturbations, such as noise or light injection. We investigate the effect of delayed optical feedback on the dynamics of a self-pulsing semiconductor laser with saturable absorber (SLSA). More precisely, we consider the Yamada model with delay -- a system of three delay-differential equations (DDEs) for two slow and one fast variable -- which has been shown to reproduce accurately self-pulsing features as observed in SLSA experimentally. This model is also of broader interest because it is quite closely related to mathematical models of other self-pulsing systems, such as e...

  19. Adaptive Output-feedback Regulation for Nonlinear Delayed Systems Using Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A novel adaptive neural network (NN) output-feedback regulation algorithm for a class of nonlinear time-varying time-delay systems is proposed. Both the designed observer and controller are independent of time delay. Different from the existing results,where the upper bounding functions of time-delay terms are assumed to be known, we only use an NN to compensate for all unknown upper bounding functions without that assumption. The proposed design method is proved to be able to guarantee semi-global uniform ultimate boundedness of all the signals in the closed system, and the system output is proved to converge to a small neighborhood of the origin. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the control scheme.

  20. Evaluating feedback time delay during perturbed and unperturbed balance in handstand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenkinsop, Glen M; Pain, Matthew T G; Hiley, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Feedback delays in balance are often assessed using muscle activity onset latencies in response to discrete perturbations. The purpose of the study was to calculate EMG latencies in perturbed handstand, and determine if delays are different to unperturbed handstand. Twelve national level gymnasts completed 12 perturbed and 10 unperturbed (five eyes open and five closed) handstands. Forearm EMG latencies during perturbed handstands were assessed against delay estimates calculated via: cross correlations of wrist torque and COM displacement, a proportional and derivative model of wrist torque and COM displacement and velocity (PD model), and a PD model incorporating a passive stiffness component (PS-PD model). Delays from the PD model (161±14ms) and PS-PD model (188±14ms) were in agreement with EMG latencies (165±14ms). Cross correlations of COM displacement and wrist torque provided unrealistically low estimates (5±9ms). Delays were significantly lower during perturbed (188±14ms) compared to unperturbed handstand (eyes open: 207±12ms; eyes closed: 220±19ms). Significant differences in delays and model parameters between perturbed and unperturbed handstand support the view that balance measures in perturbed testing should not be generalised to unperturbed balance.

  1. Experimental investigation on nonlinear dynamics of 1550 nm VCSEL simultaneously subject to orthogonal optical injection and negative optoelectronic feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tao; Xia, Guang-Qiong; Chen, Jian-Jun; Tang, Xi; Lin, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Xin; Huang, Shou-Wen; Wu, Zheng-Mao

    2017-04-01

    Nonlinear dynamic characteristics of a 1550 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (1550 nm VCSEL) simultaneously subject to orthogonal optical injection and negative optoelectronic feedback are experimentally investigated. The results show that, under suitable orthogonal optical injection the VCSEL can exhibit rich nonlinear dynamic behaviors such as stable state (S), period-one (P1), period-two (P2), chaos (CO), stable injection locking (SIL) and polarization switching (PS). After further introducing negative optoelectronic feedback with a certain feedback delay time, the dynamic distribution of the orthogonal optical injection 1550 nm VCSEL is significantly affected, and some new phenomena including three-frequency quasiperiodic (Q3) state can be observed. With the increase of optoelectronic feedback strength, the S and SIL regions typically are shrank, while the quasiperiodic (QP) and CO regions are enlarged.

  2. Incentives for Delay-Constrained Data Query and Feedback in Mobile Opportunistic Crowdsensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose effective data collection schemes that stimulate cooperation between selfish users in mobile opportunistic crowdsensing. A query issuer generates a query and requests replies within a given delay budget. When a data provider receives the query for the first time from an intermediate user, the former replies to it and authorizes the latter as the owner of the reply. Different data providers can reply to the same query. When a user that owns a reply meets the query issuer that generates the query, it requests the query issuer to pay credits. The query issuer pays credits and provides feedback to the data provider, which gives the reply. When a user that carries a feedback meets the data provider, the data provider pays credits to the user in order to adjust its claimed expertise. Queries, replies and feedbacks can be traded between mobile users. We propose an effective mechanism to define rewards for queries, replies and feedbacks. We formulate the bargain process as a two-person cooperative game, whose solution is found by using the Nash theorem. To improve the credit circulation, we design an online auction process, in which the wealthy user can buy replies and feedbacks from the starving one using credits. We have carried out extensive simulations based on real-world traces to evaluate the proposed schemes.

  3. Incentives for Delay-Constrained Data Query and Feedback in Mobile Opportunistic Crowdsensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Fan; Wang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose effective data collection schemes that stimulate cooperation between selfish users in mobile opportunistic crowdsensing. A query issuer generates a query and requests replies within a given delay budget. When a data provider receives the query for the first time from an intermediate user, the former replies to it and authorizes the latter as the owner of the reply. Different data providers can reply to the same query. When a user that owns a reply meets the query issuer that generates the query, it requests the query issuer to pay credits. The query issuer pays credits and provides feedback to the data provider, which gives the reply. When a user that carries a feedback meets the data provider, the data provider pays credits to the user in order to adjust its claimed expertise. Queries, replies and feedbacks can be traded between mobile users. We propose an effective mechanism to define rewards for queries, replies and feedbacks. We formulate the bargain process as a two-person cooperative game, whose solution is found by using the Nash theorem. To improve the credit circulation, we design an online auction process, in which the wealthy user can buy replies and feedbacks from the starving one using credits. We have carried out extensive simulations based on real-world traces to evaluate the proposed schemes. PMID:27455261

  4. Positive and negative feedback learning and associated dopamine and serotonin transporter binding after methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyarova, Alexandra; O'Dell, Steve J; Marshall, John F; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2014-09-01

    Learning from mistakes and prospectively adjusting behavior in response to reward feedback is an important facet of performance monitoring. Dopamine (DA) pathways play an important role in feedback learning and a growing literature has also emerged on the importance of serotonin (5HT) in reward learning, particularly during punishment or reward omission (negative feedback). Cognitive impairments resulting from psychostimulant exposure may arise from altered patterns in feedback learning, which in turn may be modulated by DA and 5HT transmission. We analyzed long-term, off-drug changes in learning from positive and negative feedback and associated striatal DA transporter (DAT) and frontocortical 5HT transporter (SERT) binding in rats pretreated with methamphetamine (mAMPH). Specifically, we assessed the reversal phase of pairwise visual discrimination learning in rats receiving single dose- (mAMPHsingle) vs. escalating-dose exposure (mAMPHescal). Using fine-grained trial-by-trial analyses, we found increased sensitivity to and reliance on positive feedback in mAMPH-pretreated animals, with the mAMPHsingle group showing more pronounced use of this type of feedback. In contrast, overall negative feedback sensitivity was not altered following any mAMPH treatment. In addition to validating the enduring effects of mAMPH on early reversal learning, we found more consecutive error commissions before the first correct response in mAMPH-pretreated rats. This behavioral rigidity was negatively correlated with subregional frontocortical SERT whereas positive feedback sensitivity negatively correlated with striatal DAT binding. These results provide new evidence for the overlapping, yet dissociable roles of DA and 5HT systems in overcoming perseveration and in learning new reward rules.

  5. Stereotype threat engenders neural attentional bias toward negative feedback to undermine performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Chad E; Leitner, Jordan B

    2014-10-01

    Stereotype threat, a situational pressure individuals experience when they fear confirming a negative group stereotype, engenders a cascade of physiological stress responses, negative appraisals, and performance monitoring processes that tax working memory resources necessary for optimal performance. Less is known, however, about how stereotype threat biases attentional processing in response to performance feedback, and how such attentional biases may undermine performance. Women received feedback on math problems in stereotype threatening compared to stereotype-neutral contexts while continuous EEG activity was recorded. Findings revealed that stereotype threatened women elicited larger midline P100 ERPs, increased phase locking between anterior cingulate cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (two regions integral for attentional processes), and increased power in left fusiform gyrus in response to negative feedback compared to positive feedback and women in stereotype-neutral contexts. Increased power in left fusiform gyrus in response to negative feedback predicted underperformance on the math task among stereotype threatened women only. Women in stereotype-neutral contexts exhibited the opposite trend. Findings suggest that in stereotype threatening contexts, neural networks integral for attention and working memory are biased toward negative, stereotype confirming feedback at very early speeds of information processing. This bias, in turn, plays a role in undermining performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Negative consequences of positive feedbacks in US wildfire management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Calkin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades wildfire activity, damage, and management cost within the US have increased substantially. These increases have been associated with a number of factors including climate change and fuel accumulation due to a century of active fire suppression. The increased fire activity has occurred during a time of significant ex-urban development of the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI along with increased demand on water resources originating on forested landscapes. These increased demands have put substantial pressure on federal agencies charged with wildfire management to continue and expand the century old policy of aggressive wildfire suppression. However, aggressive wildfire suppression is one of the major factors that drive the increased extent, intensity, and damage associated with the small number of large wildfires that are unable to be suppressed. In this paper we discuss the positive feedback loops that lead to demands for increasing suppression response while simultaneously increasing wildfire risk in the future. Despite a wealth of scientific research that demonstrates the limitations of the current management paradigm pressure to maintain the existing system are well entrenched and driven by the existing social systems that have evolved under our current management practice. Interestingly, US federal wildland fire policy provides considerable discretion for managers to pursue a range of management objectives; however, societal expectations and existing management incentive structures result in policy implementation that is straining the resilience of fire adapted ecosystems and the communities that reside in and adjacent to them.

  7. Negative consequences of positive feedbacks in US wildfire management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David E Calkin; MattheWP Thompson; Mark A Finney

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades wildfire activity, damage, and management cost within the US have increased substantially. These increases have been associated with a number of factors including climate change and fuel accumulation due to a century of active fire suppression. The increased fire activity has occurred during a time of significant ex-urban development of the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) along with increased demand on water resources originating on forested landscapes. These increased demands have put substantial pressure on federal agencies charged with wildfire management to continue and expand the century old policy of aggressive wildfire suppression. However, aggressive wildfire suppression is one of the major factors that drive the increased extent, intensity, and damage associated with the small number of large wildfires that are unable to be suppressed. In this paper we discuss the positive feedback loops that lead to demands for increasing suppression response while simultaneously increasing wildfire risk in the future. Despite a wealth of scientific research that demonstrates the limitations of the current management paradigm pressure to maintain the existing system are well entrenched and driven by the existing social systems that have evolved under our current management practice. Interestingly, US federal wildland fire policy provides considerable discretion for managers to pursue a range of management objectives;however, societal expectations and existing management incentive structures result in policy implementation that is straining the resilience of fire adapted ecosystems and the communities that reside in and adjacent to them.

  8. The feedback-related negativity reflects the binary evaluation of good versus bad outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajcak, Greg; Moser, Jason S; Holroyd, Clay B; Simons, Robert F

    2006-02-01

    Electrophysiological studies have utilized event-related brain potentials to study neural processes related to the evaluation of environmental feedback. In particular, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) has been shown to reflect the evaluation of monetary losses and negative performance feedback. Two experiments were conducted to examine whether or not the FRN is sensitive to the magnitude of negative feedback. In both experiments, participants performed simple gambling tasks in which they could receive a range of potential outcomes on each trial. Relative to feedback indicating monetary gain, feedback indicating non-rewards was associated with a FRN in both experiments; however, the magnitude of the FRN did not demonstrate sensitivity to the magnitude of non-reward in either experiment. These data suggest that the FRN reflects the early appraisal of feedback based on a binary classification of good versus bad outcomes. These data are discussed in terms of contemporary theories of the FRN, as well as appraisal processes implicated in emotional processing.

  9. Learning from negative feedback in patients with major depressive disorder is attenuated by SSRI antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzallah, Mohammad M; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Natsheh, Joman Y; Abdellatif, Salam M; Taha, Mohamad B; Tayem, Yasin I; Sehwail, Mahmud A; Amleh, Ivona; Petrides, Georgios; Myers, Catherine E; Gluck, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    One barrier to interpreting past studies of cognition and major depressive disorder (MDD) has been the failure in many studies to adequately dissociate the effects of MDD from the potential cognitive side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) use. To better understand how remediation of depressive symptoms affects cognitive function in MDD, we evaluated three groups of subjects: medication-naïve patients with MDD, medicated patients with MDD receiving the SSRI paroxetine, and healthy control (HC) subjects. All were administered a category-learning task that allows for dissociation between learning from positive feedback (reward) vs. learning from negative feedback (punishment). Healthy subjects learned significantly better from positive feedback than medication-naïve and medicated MDD groups, whose learning accuracy did not differ significantly. In contrast, medicated patients with MDD learned significantly less from negative feedback than medication-naïve patients with MDD and healthy subjects, whose learning accuracy was comparable. A comparison of subject's relative sensitivity to positive vs. negative feedback showed that both the medicated MDD and HC groups conform to Kahneman and Tversky's (1979) Prospect Theory, which expects losses (negative feedback) to loom psychologically slightly larger than gains (positive feedback). However, medicated MDD and HC profiles are not similar, which indicates that the state of medicated MDD is not "normal" when compared to HC, but rather balanced with less learning from both positive and negative feedback. On the other hand, medication-naïve patients with MDD violate Prospect Theory by having significantly exaggerated learning from negative feedback. This suggests that SSRI antidepressants impair learning from negative feedback, while having negligible effect on learning from positive feedback. Overall, these findings shed light on the importance of dissociating the cognitive consequences of MDD

  10. Controlling traffic jams on a two-lane road using delayed-feedback signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang ZHENG; Shi-quan ZHONG; Shou-feng MA

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses mainly on the stability analysis of two-lane traffic flow with lateral friction,which may be caused by irregular driving behavior or poorly visible road markings,and also attempts to reveal the formation mechanism of traffic jams.Firstly,a two-lane optimal velocity (OV) model without control signals is proposed and its stability condition is obtained from the viewpoint of control theory.Then delayed-feedback control signals composed of distance headway information from both lanes are added to each vehicle and a vehicular control system is designed to suppress the traffic jams.Lane change behaviors are also incorporated into the two-lane OV model and the corresponding information about distance headway and feedback signals is revised.Finally,the results of numerical experiments are shown to verify that when the stability condition is not met,the position disturbances and resulting lane change behaviors do indeed deteriorate traffic performance and cause serious traffic jams.However,once the proper delayed-feedback control signals are implemented,the traffic jams can be suppressed efficiently.

  11. Negative feedback enables fast and flexible collective decision-making in ants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Grüter

    Full Text Available Positive feedback plays a major role in the emergence of many collective animal behaviours. In many ants pheromone trails recruit and direct nestmate foragers to food sources. The strong positive feedback caused by trail pheromones allows fast collective responses but can compromise flexibility. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that when the environment changes, colonies are often unable to reallocate their foragers to a more rewarding food source. Here we show both experimentally, using colonies of Lasius niger, and with an agent-based simulation model, that negative feedback caused by crowding at feeding sites allows ant colonies to maintain foraging flexibility even with strong recruitment to food sources. In a constant environment, negative feedback prevents the frequently found bias towards one feeder (symmetry breaking and leads to equal distribution of foragers. In a changing environment, negative feedback allows a colony to quickly reallocate the majority of its foragers to a superior food patch that becomes available when foraging at an inferior patch is already well underway. The model confirms these experimental findings and shows that the ability of colonies to switch to a superior food source does not require the decay of trail pheromones. Our results help to resolve inconsistencies between collective foraging patterns seen in laboratory studies and observations in the wild, and show that the simultaneous action of negative and positive feedback is important for efficient foraging in mass-recruiting insect colonies.

  12. Negative feedback enables fast and flexible collective decision-making in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüter, Christoph; Schürch, Roger; Czaczkes, Tomer J; Taylor, Keeley; Durance, Thomas; Jones, Sam M; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2012-01-01

    Positive feedback plays a major role in the emergence of many collective animal behaviours. In many ants pheromone trails recruit and direct nestmate foragers to food sources. The strong positive feedback caused by trail pheromones allows fast collective responses but can compromise flexibility. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that when the environment changes, colonies are often unable to reallocate their foragers to a more rewarding food source. Here we show both experimentally, using colonies of Lasius niger, and with an agent-based simulation model, that negative feedback caused by crowding at feeding sites allows ant colonies to maintain foraging flexibility even with strong recruitment to food sources. In a constant environment, negative feedback prevents the frequently found bias towards one feeder (symmetry breaking) and leads to equal distribution of foragers. In a changing environment, negative feedback allows a colony to quickly reallocate the majority of its foragers to a superior food patch that becomes available when foraging at an inferior patch is already well underway. The model confirms these experimental findings and shows that the ability of colonies to switch to a superior food source does not require the decay of trail pheromones. Our results help to resolve inconsistencies between collective foraging patterns seen in laboratory studies and observations in the wild, and show that the simultaneous action of negative and positive feedback is important for efficient foraging in mass-recruiting insect colonies.

  13. Identification and characterization of systems with delayed feedback; 1, Theory and tools

    CERN Document Server

    Bünner, M J; Giaquinta, A; Hegger, R; Kantz, H; Meucci, R; Politi, A; Bünner, Martin J.; Ciofini, Marco; Giaquinta, Antonino; Hegger, Rainer; Kantz, Holger; Meucci, Riccardo; Politi, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    High-dimensional chaos displayed by multi-component systems with a single time-delayed feedback is shown to be accessible to time series analysis of a scalar variable only. The mapping of the original dynamics onto scalar time-delay systems defined on sufficiently high dimensional spaces is thoroughly discussed. The dimension of the ``embedding'' space turns out to be independent of the delay time and thus of the dimensionality of the attractor dynamics. As a consequence, the procedure described in the present paper turns out to be definitely advantageous with respect to the standard ``embedding'' technique in the case of high-dimensional chaos, when the latter is practically unapplicable. The mapping is not exact when delayed maps are used to reproduce the dynamics of time-continuous systems, but the errors can be kept under control. In this context, the approximation of delay-differential equations is discussed with reference to different classes of maps. Appropriate tools to estimate the a priori unknown d...

  14. Permanence of a Nicholson’s Blowflies Model with Feedback Control and Multiple Time-varying Delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-ying; SHI Chun-ling

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the dynamic behaviors for a class of Nicholson’s blowflies model with multiple time-varying delay and feedback control. By using the dierential inequality theory, a set of sucient conditions are obtained to ensure the permanence of the system. Our result shows that feedback control variables have no influence on the permanence of the system.

  15. Stimulus-locked responses of two phase oscillators coupled with delayed feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachkovskyi, Valerii; Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Tass, Peter A.

    2006-06-01

    For a system of two phase oscillators coupled with delayed self-feedback we study the impact of pulsatile stimulation administered to both oscillators. This system models the dynamics of two coupled phase-locked loops (PLLs) with a finite internal delay within each loop. The delayed self-feedback leads to a rich variety of dynamical regimes, ranging from phase-locked and periodically modulated synchronized states to chaotic phase synchronization and desynchronization. Remarkably, for large coupling strength the two PLLs are completely desynchronized. We study stimulus-locked responses emerging in the different dynamical regimes. Simple phase resets may be followed by a response clustering, which is intimately connected with long poststimulus resynchronization. Intriguingly, a maximal perturbation (i.e., maximal response clustering and maximal resynchronization time) occurs, if the system gets trapped at a stable manifold of an unstable saddle fixed point due to appropriately calibrated stimulus. Also, single stimuli with suitable parameters can shift the system from a stable synchronized state to a stable desynchronized state or vice versa. Our result show that appropriately calibrated single pulse stimuli may cause pronounced transient and/or long-lasting changes of the oscillators’ dynamics. Pulse stimulation may, hence, constitute an effective approach for the control of coupled oscillators, which might be relevant to both physical and medical applications.

  16. Adaptive Neural Control of Pure-Feedback Nonlinear Time-Delay Systems via Dynamic Surface Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min Wang; Xiaoping Liu; Peng Shi

    2011-12-01

    This paper is concerned with robust stabilization problem for a class of nonaffine pure-feedback systems with unknown time-delay functions and perturbed uncertainties. Novel continuous packaged functions are introduced in advance to remove unknown nonlinear terms deduced from perturbed uncertainties and unknown time-delay functions, which avoids the functions with control law to be approximated by radial basis function (RBF) neural networks. This technique combining implicit function and mean value theorems overcomes the difficulty in controlling the nonaffine pure-feedback systems. Dynamic surface control (DSC) is used to avoid "the explosion of complexity" in the backstepping design. Design difficulties from unknown time-delay functions are overcome using the function separation technique, the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals, and the desirable property of hyperbolic tangent functions. RBF neural networks are employed to approximate desired virtual controls and desired practical control. Under the proposed adaptive neural DSC, the number of adaptive parameters required is reduced significantly, and semiglobal uniform ultimate boundedness of all of the signals in the closed-loop system is guaranteed. Simulation studies are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed design scheme.

  17. Stimulus-locked responses of two phase oscillators coupled with delayed feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachkovskyi, Valerii; Popovych, Oleksandr V; Tass, Peter A

    2006-06-01

    For a system of two phase oscillators coupled with delayed self-feedback we study the impact of pulsatile stimulation administered to both oscillators. This system models the dynamics of two coupled phase-locked loops (PLLs) with a finite internal delay within each loop. The delayed self-feedback leads to a rich variety of dynamical regimes, ranging from phase-locked and periodically modulated synchronized states to chaotic phase synchronization and desynchronization. Remarkably, for large coupling strength the two PLLs are completely desynchronized. We study stimulus-locked responses emerging in the different dynamical regimes. Simple phase resets may be followed by a response clustering, which is intimately connected with long poststimulus resynchronization. Intriguingly, a maximal perturbation (i.e., maximal response clustering and maximal resynchronization time) occurs, if the system gets trapped at a stable manifold of an unstable saddle fixed point due to appropriately calibrated stimulus. Also, single stimuli with suitable parameters can shift the system from a stable synchronized state to a stable desynchronized state or vice versa. Our result show that appropriately calibrated single pulse stimuli may cause pronounced transient and/or long-lasting changes of the oscillators' dynamics. Pulse stimulation may, hence, constitute an effective approach for the control of coupled oscillators, which might be relevant to both physical and medical applications.

  18. Ultrasensitive Negative Feedback Control: A Natural Approach for the Design of Synthetic Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montefusco, Francesco; Akman, Ozgur E.; Soyer, Orkun S.; Bates, Declan G.

    2016-01-01

    Many of the most important potential applications of Synthetic Biology will require the ability to design and implement high performance feedback control systems that can accurately regulate the dynamics of multiple molecular species within the cell. Here, we argue that the use of design strategies based on combining ultrasensitive response dynamics with negative feedback represents a natural approach to this problem that fully exploits the strongly nonlinear nature of cellular information processing. We propose that such feedback mechanisms can explain the adaptive responses observed in one of the most widely studied biomolecular feedback systems—the yeast osmoregulatory response network. Based on our analysis of such system, we identify strong links with a well-known branch of mathematical systems theory from the field of Control Engineering, known as Sliding Mode Control. These insights allow us to develop design guidelines that can inform the construction of feedback controllers for synthetic biological systems. PMID:27537373

  19. Controlling a negative loaded hydraulic cylinder using pressure feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.R.; Andersen, T.O.

    2010-01-01

    the high pass filtered pressure gradient equal tozero is introduced. It yields lead compensation with a markedly improved performance. The sizing of the filter is described taking into account the bandwidth of the directional control valve. The suggested control scheme is implemented and examined......This paper is concerned with the inherent oscillatory nature of pressure compensated velocity control of a hydraulic cylinder subjected to a negative load and suspended by means of an over-center valve. Initially, a linearized stability analysis of such a hydraulic circuit is carried out clearly...... showing that without extra measures such a system will be unstable in a substantial part of the cylinder stroke. The stability criterion is expressed in hard quantities: Cylinder volumes, cylinder area ratio and overcenter valve pilot area ratio. A pressure feed back scheme that has as target to maintain...

  20. Adaptive Output Feedback Sliding Mode Control for Complex Interconnected Time-Delay Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Van Huynh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend the decentralized output feedback sliding mode control (SMC scheme to stabilize a class of complex interconnected time-delay systems. First, sufficient conditions in terms of linear matrix inequalities are derived such that the equivalent reduced-order system in the sliding mode is asymptotically stable. Second, based on a new lemma, a decentralized adaptive sliding mode controller is designed to guarantee the finite time reachability of the system states by using output feedback only. The advantage of the proposed method is that two major assumptions, which are required in most existing SMC approaches, are both released. These assumptions are (1 disturbances are bounded by a known function of outputs and (2 the sliding matrix satisfies a matrix equation that guarantees the sliding mode. Finally, a numerical example is used to demonstrate the efficacy of the method.

  1. The Effects of Constant Time Delay and Instructive Feedback on the Acquisition of English and Spanish Sight Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelman, Michelle; Vail, Cynthia O.; Lieberman-Betz, Rebecca G.

    2014-01-01

    The authors of this study evaluated the acquisition of instructive feedback information presented to four kindergarten children with mild delays taught in dyads using a constant time delay (CTD) procedure. They also assessed the learning of observational (dyadic partner) information within this instructional arrangement. A multiple probe design…

  2. Decentralized H∞ state feedback control for large-scale interconnected uncertain systems with multiple delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宁; 桂卫华; 谢永芳

    2004-01-01

    Decentralized H∞ control was studied for a class of interconnected uncertain systems with multiple delays in the state and control and time varying but norm-bounded parametric uncertainties. A sufficient condition which makes the closed--loop system decentralized asymptotically stable with H∞ performance was derived based on Lyapunov stability theorem. This condition is expressed as the solvability problem of linear matrix inequalities. The method overcomes the limitations of the existing algebraic Riccati equation method. Finally, a numerical example was given to demonstrate the design procedure for the decentralized H∞ state feedback controller.

  3. Shape, smoothness and invariant stratification of an attracting set for delayed monotone positive feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Krisztin, Tibor; Wu, Jianhong

    1998-01-01

    This book contains recent results about the global dynamics defined by a class of delay differential equations which model basic feedback mechanisms and arise in a variety of applications such as neural networks. The authors describe in detail the geometric structure of a fundamental invariant set, which in special cases is the global attractor, and the asymptotic behavior of solution curves on it. The approach makes use of advanced tools which in recent years have been developed for the investigation of infinite-dimensional dynamical systems: local invariant manifolds and inclination lemmas f

  4. Adaptive neural control for a class of perturbed strict-feedback nonlinear time-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Chen, Bing; Shi, Peng

    2008-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive neural control scheme for a class of perturbed strict-feedback nonlinear time-delay systems with unknown virtual control coefficients. Based on the radial basis function neural network online approximation capability, an adaptive neural controller is presented by combining the backstepping approach and Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals. The proposed controller guarantees the semiglobal boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system and contains minimal learning parameters. Finally, three simulation examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed scheme.

  5. Theoretical and experimental aspects of chaos control by time-delayed feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Wolfram; Benner, Hartmut; Reibold, Ekkehard

    2003-03-01

    We review recent developments for the control of chaos by time-delayed feedback methods. While such methods are easily applied even in quite complex experimental context the theoretical analysis yields infinite-dimensional differential-difference systems which are hard to tackle. The essential ideas for a general theoretical approach are sketched and the results are compared to electronic circuits and to high power ferromagnetic resonance experiments. Our results show that the control performance can be understood on the basis of experimentally accessible quantities without resort to any model for the internal dynamics.

  6. Delayed Feedback Control of Bao Chaotic System Based on Hopf Bifurcation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Khellat

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with bifurcation and chaos control in a new chaotic system recently introduced by Bao et al [9]. First a condition that the system has a Hopf bifurcation is derived. Then by applying delayed feedback controller, the chaotic system is forced to have a stable periodic orbit extracting from chaotic attractor. This is done by making Hopf bifurcation value of the open loop and the closed loop systems identical. Also by suitable tuning of the controller parameters, unstable equilibrium points become stable. Numerical simulations verify the results.

  7. Self-Injection-Locked Magnetron as an Active Ring Resonator Side Coupled to a Waveguide With a Delayed Feedback Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliokh, Y. P.; Krasik, Y. E.; Felsteiner, J.

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical analysis and numerical simulations of the magnetron operation with a feedback loop were performed assuming that the delay of the electromagnetic wave propagating in the loop is constant whereas the phase of the complex feedback reflection coefficient is varied. Results of simulations showed that by a proper adjustment of values of the time delay and phase of reflection coefficient that determines phase matching between the waves in the resonator and feedback loop, one can increase the magnetron's output power significantly without any other additional measures.

  8. Self-injection-locked magnetron as an active ring resonator side coupled to a waveguide with a delayed feedback loop

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Y P; Felsteiner, J

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical analysis and numerical simulations of the magnetron operation with a feedback loop were performed assuming that the delay of the electromagnetic wave propagating in the loop is constant whereas the phase of the complex feedback reflection coefficient is varied. Results of simulations showed that by a proper adjustment of values of the time delay and phase of reflection coefficient that determines phase matching between the waves in the resonator and feedback loop, one can increase the magnetron's output power significantly without any other additional measures.

  9. Decentralized adaptive fuzzy output feedback control of nonlinear interconnected systems with time-varying delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Chen, Zuwen; Song, Aiguo

    2017-01-01

    A robust adaptive output-feedback control scheme based on K-filters is proposed for a class of nonlinear interconnected time-varying delay systems with immeasurable states. It is difficult to design the controller due to the existence of the immeasurable states and the time-delay couplings among interconnected subsystems. This difficulty is overcome by use of the fuzzy system, the K-filters and the appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional. Based on Lyapunov theory, the closed-loop control system is proved to be semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded (SGUUB), and the output tracking error converges to a neighborhood of zero. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  10. Internet based gripper teleoperation with random time delay by using haptic feedback and SEMG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaonong; Song, Aiguo; Zhang, Huatao; Ji, Peng

    2016-10-01

    Random time delay may cause instability in the internet based teleoperation system. Transparency and intuitiveness are also very important for operator to control the system to accurately perform the desired action, especially for the gripper teleoperation system. This paper presents a new grip force control method of gripper teleoperation system with haptic feedback. The system employs the SEMG signal as the control parameter in order to enhance the intuitive control experience for operator. In order to eliminate the impacts on the system stability caused by random time delay, a non-time based teleoperation method is applied to the control process. Besides, neural network and designed fuzzy logic controller is also utilized to improve this control method. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by experiment results.

  11. Adaptive Fuzzy Control of Strict-Feedback Nonlinear Time-Delay Systems With Unmodeled Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shen; Shi, Peng; Yang, Hongyan

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, an approximated-based adaptive fuzzy control approach with only one adaptive parameter is presented for a class of single input single output strict-feedback nonlinear systems in order to deal with phenomena like nonlinear uncertainties, unmodeled dynamics, dynamic disturbances, and unknown time delays. Lyapunov-Krasovskii function approach is employed to compensate the unknown time delays in the design procedure. By combining the advances of the hyperbolic tangent function with adaptive fuzzy backstepping technique, the proposed controller guarantees the semi-globally uniformly ultimately boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system from the mean square point of view. Two simulation examples are finally provided to show the superior effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  12. Stability of PID-Controlled Linear Time-Delay Feedback Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Martelli, Gianpasquale

    2008-01-01

    The stability of feedback systems consisting of linear time-delay plants and PID controllers has been investigated for many years by means of several methods, of which the Nyquist criterion, a generalization of the Hermite-Biehler Theorem, and the root location method are well known. The main purpose of these researches is to determine the range of controller parameters that allow stability. Explicit and complete expressions of the boundaries of these regions and computation procedures with a finite number of steps are now available only for first-order plants, provided with one time delay. In this note, the same results, based on Pontryagin's studies, are presented for arbitrary-order plants.

  13. Desynchronization in an ensemble of globally coupled chaotic bursting neuronal oscillators by dynamic delayed feedback control

    CERN Document Server

    Che, Yanqiu; Li, Ruixue; Li, Huiyan; Han, Chunxiao; Wang, Jiang; Wei, Xile

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a dynamic delayed feedback control approach for desynchronization of chaotic-bursting synchronous activities in an ensemble of globally coupled neuronal oscillators. We demonstrate that the difference signal between an ensemble's mean field and its time delayed state, filtered and fed back to the ensemble, can suppress the self-synchronization in the ensemble. These individual units are decoupled and stabilized at the desired desynchronized states while the stimulation signal reduces to the noise level. The effectiveness of the method is illustrated by examples of two different populations of globally coupled chaotic-bursting neurons. The proposed method has potential for mild, effective and demand-controlled therapy of neurological diseases characterized by pathological synchronization.

  14. Anticontrol of chaos in continuous-time systems via time-delay feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Fan; Chen, Guanrong; Yu, Xinghuo

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, a systematic design approach based on time-delay feedback is developed for anticontrol of chaos in a continuous-time system. This anticontrol method can drive a finite-dimensional, continuous-time, autonomous system from nonchaotic to chaotic, and can also enhance the existing chaos of an originally chaotic system. Asymptotic analysis is used to establish an approximate relationship between a time-delay differential equation and a discrete map. Anticontrol of chaos is then accomplished based on this relationship and the differential-geometry control theory. Several examples are given to verify the effectiveness of the methodology and to illustrate the systematic design procedure. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Correlation times in stochastic equations with delayed feedback and multiplicative noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Mathieu; Berbert, Juliana Militão; Viñals, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    We obtain the characteristic correlation time associated with a model stochastic differential equation that includes the normal form of a pitchfork bifurcation and delayed feedback. In particular, the validity of the common assumption of statistical independence between the state at time t and that at t-τ, where τ is the delay time, is examined. We find that the correlation time diverges at the model's bifurcation line, thus signaling a sharp bifurcation threshold, and the failure of statistical independence near threshold. We determine the correlation time both by numerical integration of the governing equation, and analytically in the limit of small τ. The correlation time T diverges as T~a(-1), where a is the control parameter so that a=0 is the bifurcation threshold. The small-τ expansion correctly predicts the location of the bifurcation threshold, but there are systematic deviations in the magnitude of the correlation time.

  16. Robust H∞ control for uncertain systems with heterogeneous time-varying delays via static output feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun-Wei; Zeng Cai-Bin

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of robust H∞ control for a novel class of uncertain linear continuous-time systems with heterogeneous time-varying state/input delays and norm-bounded parameter uncertainties.The objective is to design a static output feedback controller such that the closed-loop system is asymptotically stable while satisfying a prescribed H∞ performance level for all admissible uncertainties.By constructing an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasvskii functional,a delay-dependent stability criterion of the closed-loop system is presented with the help of the Jensen integral inequality.From the derived criterion,the solutions to the problem are formulated in terms of linear matrix inequalities and hence are tractable numerically.A simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design method.

  17. Exponential synchronization of general chaotic delayed neural networks via hybrid feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the exponential synchronization problem of some chaotic delayed neural networks based on the proposed general neural network model, which is the interconnection of a linear delayed dynamic system and a bounded static nonlinear operator, and covers several well-known neural networks, such as Hopfield neural networks, cellular neural networks (CNNs), bidirectional associative memory (BAM) networks, recurrent multilayer perceptrons (RMLPs). By virtue of LyapunovKrasovskii stability theory and linear matrix inequality (LMI) technique, some exponential synchronization criteria are derived.Using the drive-response concept, hybrid feedback controllers are designed to synchronize two identical chaotic neural networks based on those synchronization criteria. Finally, detailed comparisons with existing results are made and numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the established synchronization laws.

  18. False negative fecal occult blood tests due to delayed sample return in colorectal cancer screening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, L.G.M. van; Rijn, A.F. van; Oijen, M.G.H. van; Fockens, P.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Dekker, E.

    2009-01-01

    Delayed return of immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) samples to a laboratory might cause false negatives because of hemoglobin degradation. Quantitative iFOBT's became increasingly more accepted in colorectal cancer screening. Therefore, we studied the effects of delay between sampling a

  19. The Effects of Anticipated Negative Feedback on Psychological States Among Narcissists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Matsuo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although narcissism has long been researched in relation to anger, previous research examined narcissistic anger toward negative feedback that had already occurred. In this study, we investigated the effects of anticipation of evaluation (present vs. absent and negative feedback (present vs. absent, using a creativity task paradigm, on state anger scores among 231 U.S. undergraduates (76% White, 60% women. We also measured undergraduates’ narcissistic tendencies and impressions of the creativity task. Multiple regression analyses revealed a significant interaction between narcissism and negative feedback on total anger scores, with narcissists responding with more anger than non-narcissists in the condition of negative feedback. We also found a significant two-way interaction between narcissism and anticipation of evaluation on total enjoyment scores. Anticipation of feedback inhibited narcissist-prone individuals from enjoying the task in the anticipation condition, but this pattern was not present in the no-anticipation condition. Implications and recommendations to better understand the nature of narcissism are discussed.

  20. OSCILLATION FOR NEUTRAL DELAY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION WITH POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE COEFFICIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new oscillating result is established for the first order neutral delay differential equation with positive and negative coefficients, which improves and generalizes several results in the literatures.

  1. Frequent Oscillatory Behavior of Delay Partial Difference Equations with Positive and Negative Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu LiHua

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with a class of nonlinear delay partial difference equations with positive and negative coefficients, which also contains forcing terms. By making use of frequency measures, some new oscillatory criteria are established.

  2. Memory delay and haptic feedback influence the dissociation of tactile cues for perception and action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarpanah Jazi, Shirin; Hosang, Stephanie; Heath, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    The somatosensory processing model (SPM) asserts that dissociable cortical processing streams mediate tactile perceptions and actions via relative and absolute cues, respectively (Dijkerman and de Haan, 2007). Accordingly, we sought to determine whether the introduction of a memory delay and/or physically touching a target object (i.e., haptic feedback) differentially influences the cues supporting tactile perceptions and actions. Participants used their right hand to manually estimate (i.e., perceptual task) or grasp (i.e., action task) differently sized objects placed on the palm of their left limb in conditions wherein the target object was available for the duration of the response (i.e., closed-loop condition), or was removed prior to response cuing (i.e., memory-guided condition). As well, trials were performed in conditions wherein the physical object was available (i.e., haptic feedback) or unavailable (i.e., no haptic feedback) to touch. Notably, we computed just-noticeable-difference (JND) scores to determine whether the aforementioned tasks and conditions adhered to - or violated - the relative properties of Weber's law. JNDs for manual estimations adhered to Weber's law across each condition - a finding supporting the SPM's contention that an immutable and relative percept supports tactile perceptions. In turn, JNDs for grasping violated Weber's law only when haptic feedback was available. Such a finding indicates that haptic feedback supports the absolute calibration between a tactile defined object and the required motor output. What is more, our study highlights that multiple somatosensory cues (i.e., tactile and haptic) support goal-directed grasping.

  3. Punishment sensitivity modulates the processing of negative feedback but not error-induced learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin eUnger

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that individual differences in punishment and reward sensitivity are associated with functional alterations in neural systems underlying error and feedback processing. In particular, individuals highly sensitive to punishment have been found to be characterized by larger midfrontal error signals as reflected in the error negativity (Ne/ERN and the FRN (feedback-related negativity. By contrast, reward sensitivity has been shown to relate to the error positivity (Pe. Given that Ne/ERN, FRN, and Pe have been functionally linked to flexible behavioral adaptation, the aim of the present research was to examine how these electrophysiological reflections of error and feedback processing vary as a function of punishment and reward sensitivity during reinforcement learning. We applied a probabilistic learning task that involved three different conditions of feedback validity (100%, 80%, and 50%. In contrast to prior studies using response competition tasks, we did not find reliable correlations between punishment sensitivity and the Ne/ERN. Instead, higher punishment sensitivity predicted larger FRN amplitudes, irrespective of feedback validity. Moreover, higher reward sensitivity was associated with a larger Pe. However, only reward sensitivity was related to better overall learning performance and higher post-error accuracy, whereas highly punishment sensitive participants showed impaired learning performance, suggesting that larger negative feedback-related error signals were not beneficial for learning or even reflected maladaptive information processing in these individuals. Thus, although our findings indicate that individual differences in reward and punishment sensitivity are related to electrophysiological correlates of error and feedback processing, we found less evidence for influences of these personality characteristics on the relation between performance monitoring and feedback-based learning.

  4. Nonlinear resonance in Duffing oscillator with fixed and integrative time-delayed feedbacks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Ravichandran; V Chinnathambi; S Rajasekar

    2012-03-01

    We study the nonlinear resonance, one of the fundamental phenomena in nonlinear oscillators, in a damped and periodically-driven Duffing oscillator with two types of time-delayed feedbacks, namely, fixed and integrative. Particularly, we analyse the effect of the time-delay parameter and the strength of the time-delayed feedback. Applying the perturbation theory we obtain a nonlinear equation for the amplitude of the periodic response of the system. For a range of values of and , the response amplitude is found to be higher than that of the system in the absence of delayed feedback. The response amplitude is periodic on the parameter with period 2 / where is the angular frequency of the external periodic force. We show the occurrence of multiple branches of the response amplitude curve with and without hysteresis.

  5. Dynamic Behaviors of a Discrete Lotka-Volterra Competition System with Infinite Delays and Single Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonautonomous discrete two-species Lotka-Volterra competition system with infinite delays and single feedback control is considered in this paper. By applying the discrete comparison theorem, a set of sufficient conditions which guarantee the permanence of the system is obtained. Also, by constructing some suitable discrete Lyapunov functionals, some sufficient conditions for the global attractivity and extinction of the system are obtained. It is shown that if the the discrete Lotka-Volterra competitive system with infinite delays and without feedback control is permanent, then, by choosing some suitable feedback control variable, the permanent species will be driven to extinction. That is, the feedback control variable, which represents the biological control or some harvesting procedure, is the unstable factor of the system. Such a finding overturns the previous scholars’ recognition on feedback control variables.

  6. Flat-response spin-exchange relaxation free atomic magnetometer under negative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Joon; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Moon, Han Seb; Kim, Kiwoong

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate that the use of negative feedback extends the detection bandwidth of an atomic magnetometer in a spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) regime. A flat-frequency response from zero to 190 Hz was achieved, which is nearly a three-fold enhancement while maintaining sensitivity, 3 fT/Hz1/2 at 100 Hz. With the extension of the bandwidth, the linear correlation between measured signals and a magne-tocardiographic field synthesized for comparison was increased from 0.21 to 0.74. This result supports the feasibility of measuring weak biomagnetic signals containing multiple frequency components using a SERF atomic magnetometer under negative feedback.

  7. Negative plant-soil feedbacks increase with plant abundance, and are unchanged by competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, John L; Laney Smith, Alyssa; Ortega, Yvette K; Pearson, Dean E; Callaway, Ragan M

    2016-08-01

    Plant-soil feedbacks and interspecific competition are ubiquitous interactions that strongly influence the performance of plants. Yet few studies have examined whether the strength of these interactions corresponds with the abundance of plant species in the field, or whether feedbacks and competition interact in ways that either ameliorate or exacerbate their effects in isolation. We sampled soil from two intermountain grassland communities where we also measured the relative abundance of plant species. In greenhouse experiments, we quantified the direction and magnitude of plant-soil feedbacks for 10 target species that spanned a range of abundances in the field. In soil from both sites, plant-soil feedbacks were mostly negative, with more abundant species suffering greater negative feedbacks than rare species. In contrast, the average response to competition for each species was unrelated with its abundance in the field. We also determined how competitive response varied among our target species when plants competed in live vs. sterile soil. Interspecific competition reduced plant size, but the strength of this negative effect was unchanged by plant-soil feedbacks. Finally, when plants competed interspecifically, we asked how conspecific-trained, heterospecific-trained, and sterile soil influenced the competitive responses of our target species and how this varied depending on whether target species were abundant or rare in the field. Here, we found that both abundant and rare species were not as harmed by competition when they grew in heterospecific-trained soil compared to when they grew in conspecific-cultured soil. Abundant species were also not as harmed by competition when growing in sterile vs. conspecific-trained soil, but this was not the case for rare species. Our results suggest that abundant plants accrue species-specific soil pathogens to a greater extent than rare species. Thus, negative feedbacks may be critical for preventing abundant species from

  8. RESPONSE OF PARAMETRICALLY EXCITED DUFFING-VAN DER POL OSCILLATOR WITH DELAYED FEEDBACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin-ye; CHEN Yu-shu; WU Zhi-qiang; SONG Tao

    2006-01-01

    The dynamical behaviour of a parametrically excited Duffing-van der Pol oscillator under linear-plus-nonlinear state feedback control with a time delay is concerned.By means of the method of averaging together with truncation of Taylor expansions, two slow-flow equations on the amplitude and phase of response were derived for the case of principal parametric resonance. It is shown that the stability condition for the trivial solution is only associated with the linear terms in the original systems besides the amplitude and frequency of parametric excitation. And the trivial solution can be stabilized by appreciate choice of gains and time delay in feedback control. Different from the case of the trivial solution, the stability condition for nontrivial solutions is also associated with nonlinear terms besides linear terms in the original system. It is demonstrated that nontrivial steady state responses may lose their stability by saddle-node (SN) or Hopf bifurcation (HB) as parameters vary. The simulations, obtained by numerically integrating the original system, are in good agreement with the analytical results.

  9. Resonances of a nonlinear SDOF system with time-delay in linear feedback control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bassiouny, A F [Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Benha University, Benha 13518 (Egypt); El-kholy, S [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shebin El-kom (Egypt)], E-mail: atef_elbassiouny@yahoo.com

    2010-01-15

    The primary and subharmonic resonances of a nonlinear single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system under feedback control with a time delay have been studied by means of an asymptotic perturbation technique. Both external (forcing) and parametric excitations have been included. By means of the averaging method and multiple scales method, two slow-flow equations for the amplitude and phase of the primary and subharmonic resonances and all other parameters are obtained, respectively. The steady state solutions (fixed points) for the original system are investigated. The stability of the fixed points is examined by using the variational method. The effect of the feedback gains, time-delay, the coefficient of cubic term, the coefficients of external and parametric excitations on the steady state responses are investigated and the results are presented as plots of the steady state response amplitude versus the detuning parameter. The results obtained by the two methods are in excellent agreement. There exist saddle node bifurcations for the case of primary resonance and the solutions lose stability for the case of resonance subharmonic.

  10. Bifurcation analysis of a delay reaction-diffusion malware propagation model with feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linhe; Zhao, Hongyong; Wang, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    With the rapid development of network information technology, information networks security has become a very critical issue in our work and daily life. This paper attempts to develop a delay reaction-diffusion model with a state feedback controller to describe the process of malware propagation in mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSNs). By analyzing the stability and Hopf bifurcation, we show that the state feedback method can successfully be used to control unstable steady states or periodic oscillations. Moreover, formulas for determining the properties of the bifurcating periodic oscillations are derived by applying the normal form method and center manifold theorem. Finally, we conduct extensive simulations on large-scale MWSNs to evaluate the proposed model. Numerical evidences show that the linear term of the controller is enough to delay the onset of the Hopf bifurcation and the properties of the bifurcation can be regulated to achieve some desirable behaviors by choosing the appropriate higher terms of the controller. Furthermore, we obtain that the spatial-temporal dynamic characteristics of malware propagation are closely related to the rate constant for nodes leaving the infective class for recovered class and the mobile behavior of nodes.

  11. Age-related changes in deterministic learning from positive versus negative performance feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vijver, Irene; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; de Wit, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    Feedback-based learning declines with age. Because older adults are generally biased toward positive information ("positivity effect"), learning from positive feedback may be less impaired than learning from negative outcomes. The literature documents mixed results, due possibly to variability between studies in task design. In the current series of studies, we investigated the influence of feedback valence on reinforcement learning in young and older adults. We used nonprobabilistic learning tasks, to more systematically study the effects of feedback magnitude, learning of stimulus-response (S-R) versus stimulus-outcome (S-O) associations, and working-memory capacity. In most experiments, older adults benefitted more from positive than negative feedback, but only with large feedback magnitudes. Positivity effects were pronounced for S-O learning, whereas S-R learning correlated with working-memory capacity in both age groups. These results underline the context dependence of positivity effects in learning and suggest that older adults focus on high gains when these are informative for behavior.

  12. How to not get stuck-negative feedback due to crowding maintains flexibility in ant foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaczkes, Tomer J

    2014-11-07

    Ant foraging is an important model system in the study of adaptive complex systems. Many ants use trail pheromones to recruit nestmates to resources. Differential recruitment depending on resource quality coupled with positive feedback allows ant colonies to make rapid and accurate collective decisions about how best to allocate their work-force. However, ant colonies can become trapped in sub-optimal foraging decisions if recruitment to a poor resource becomes too strong before a better resource is discovered. Genetic algorithms and Ant Colony Optimisation heuristics can also suffer from being trapped in such local optima. Recently, two negative feedback effects were described, in which an increase in crowding (crowding negative feedback-CNF) or trail pheromones (pheromone negative feedback-PNF) caused a decrease in subsequent pheromone deposition. Using agent based simulations with realistic parameters I test whether these negative feedback effects can prevent simulated ant colonies from becoming trapped in sub-optimal foraging decisions. Colonies are presented with two food sources of different qualities, and these qualities switch part way through the experiment. When either no negative feedback effects are implemented or only PNF is implemented colonies are completely unable to refocus their foraging effort to the high quality feeder. However, when CNF alone is implemented at a realistic level 97% of colonies successfully refocus their foraging effort. This ability to refocus colony foraging efforts is due to the strong reduction of pheromone deposition caused by CNF. This suggests that CNF is an important behaviour enabling ant colonies to maintain foraging flexibility. However, CNF comes at a slight cost to colonies when making their initial foraging decision. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stochastic thermodynamics of Langevin systems under time-delayed feedback control: Second-law-like inequalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinberg, M L; Munakata, T; Tarjus, G

    2015-04-01

    Response lags are generic to almost any physical system and often play a crucial role in the feedback loops present in artificial nanodevices and biological molecular machines. In this paper, we perform a comprehensive study of small stochastic systems governed by an underdamped Langevin equation and driven out of equilibrium by a time-delayed continuous feedback control. In their normal operating regime, these systems settle in a nonequilibrium steady state in which work is permanently extracted from the surrounding heat bath. By using the Fokker-Planck representation of the dynamics, we derive a set of second-law-like inequalities that provide bounds to the rate of extracted work. These inequalities involve additional contributions characterizing the reduction of entropy production due to the continuous measurement process. We also show that the non-Markovian nature of the dynamics requires a modification of the basic relation linking dissipation to the breaking of time-reversal symmetry at the level of trajectories. The modified relation includes a contribution arising from the acausal character of the reverse process. This, in turn, leads to another second-law-like inequality. We illustrate the general formalism with a detailed analytical and numerical study of a harmonic oscillator driven by a linear feedback, which describes actual experimental setups.

  14. The Negative Testing and Negative Generation Effects Are Eliminated by Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Although retrieval often enhances subsequent memory (the testing effect), a negative testing effect has recently been documented in which prior retrieval harms later recall compared with restudying. The negative testing effect was predicated on the negative generation effect and the item-specific-relational framework. The present experiments…

  15. Response of the Duffing-Van der Pol Oscillator under Position Feedback Control with Two Time Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinye Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dynamics of Duffing-van der Pol oscillators under linear-plus-nonlinear position feedback control with two time delays is studied analytically and numerically. By the averaging method, together with truncation of Taylor expansions for those terms with time delay, the slow-flow equations are obtained from which the trivial and nontrivial solutions can be found. It is shown that the trivial solution can be stabilized by appropriate gain and time delay in linear feedback although it loses its stability via Hopf bifurcation and results in periodic solution for uncontrolled systems. And the stability of the trivial solution is independent of nonlinear feedback. Different from the case of the trivial solution, the stability of nontrivial solutions is also associated with nonlinear feedback besides linear feedback. Non-trivial solutions may lose their stability via saddle-node or Hopf bifurcation and the resulting response of the system may be quasi-periodic or chaotic. The feedback gains and time delays have great effects on the amplitude of the periodic solutions and their bifurcation control. The simulations, obtained by numerically integrating the original system, are in good agreement with the analytical results.

  16. Studies on effects of feedback delay on the convergence performance of adaptive time-domain equalizers for fiber dispersive channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qun; Xu, Bo; Qiu, Kun

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive time-domain equalizer (TDE) is an important module for digital optical coherent receivers. From an implementation perspective, we analyze and compare in detail the effects of error signal feedback delay on the convergence performance of TDE using either least-mean square (LMS) or constant modulus algorithm (CMA). For this purpose, a simplified theoretical model is proposed based on which iterative equations on the mean value and the variance of the tap coefficient are derived with or without error signal feedback delay for both LMS- and CMA-based methods for the first time. The analytical results show that decreased step size has to be used for TDE to converge and a slower convergence speed cannot be avoided as the feedback delay increases. Compared with the data-aided LMS-based method, the CMA-based method has a slower convergence speed and larger variation after convergence. Similar results are confirmed using numerical simulations for fiber dispersive channels. As the step size increases, a feedback delay of 20 clock cycles might cause the TDE to diverge. Compared with the CMA-based method, the LMS-based method has a higher tolerance on the feedback delay and allows a larger step size for a faster convergence speed.

  17. Feedback-related negativity codes outcome valence, but not outcome expectancy, during reversal learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borries, A.K.L. von; Verkes, R.J.; Bulten, B.H.; Cools, R.; Bruijn, E.R. de

    2013-01-01

    Optimal behavior depends on the ability to assess the predictive value of events and to adjust behavior accordingly. Outcome processing can be studied by using its electrophysiological signatures-that is, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300. A prominent reinforcement-learning model pr

  18. Removal of Negative Feedback Enhances WCST Performance for Individuals with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Jaclyn; Stokes, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Negative feedback was explored as a potential mechanism that may exacerbate perseverative behaviours in individuals with Asperger's syndrome (AS). The current study compared 50 individuals with AS and 50 typically developing (TD) individuals for their abilities to successfully complete the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST) in the presence or…

  19. Feedback-related negativity codes outcome valence, but not outcome expectancy, during reversal learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borries, A.K.L. von; Verkes, R.J.; Bulten, B.H.; Cools, R.

    2013-01-01

    Optimal behavior depends on the ability to assess the predictive value of events and to adjust behavior accordingly. Outcome processing can be studied by using its electrophysiological signatures--that is, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300. A prominent reinforcement-learning model p

  20. Evaluating the negative or valuing the positive? Neural mechanisms supporting feedback-based learning across development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijvenvoorde, A.C.K.; Zanolie, K.; Rombouts, S.A.R.B.; Raijmakers, M.E.J.; Crone, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Howchildren learn from positive and negative performance feedback lies at the foundation of successful learning and is therefore of great importance for educational practice. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural developmental changes related to

  1. Early Detection of Online Auction Opportunistic Sellers through the Use of Negative-Positive Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Apparently fraud is a growth industry. The monetary losses from Internet fraud have increased every year since first officially reported by the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) in 2000. Prior research studies and third-party reports of fraud show rates substantially higher than eBay's reported negative feedback rate of less than 1%. The…

  2. Changes in Intrinsic Motivation as a Function of Negative Feedback and Threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deci, Edward L.; Cascio, Wayne F.

    Recent studies have demonstrated that external rewards can affect intrinsic motivation to perform an activity. Money tends to decrease intrinsic motivation, whereas positive verbal reinforcements tend to increase intrinsic motivation. This paper presents evidence that negative feedback and threats of punishment also decrease intrinsic motivation.…

  3. Analysis of a dc bus system with a nonlinear constant power load and its delayed feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Keiji; Sugitani, Yoshiki; Hara, Naoyuki

    2014-02-01

    This paper tackles a destabilizing problem of a direct-current (dc) bus system with constant power loads, which can be considered a fundamental problem of dc power grid networks. The present paper clarifies scenarios of the destabilization and applies the well-known delayed-feedback control to the stabilization of the destabilized bus system on the basis of nonlinear science. Further, we propose a systematic procedure for designing the delayed feedback controller. This controller can converge the bus voltage exactly on an unstable operating point without accurate information and can track it using tiny control energy even when a system parameter, such as the power consumption of the load, is slowly varied. These features demonstrate that delayed feedback control can be considered a strong candidate for solving the destabilizing problem.

  4. Guaranteed Cost Control for Exponential Synchronization of Cellular Neural Networks with Mixed Time-Varying Delays via Hybrid Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Botmart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of guaranteed cost control for exponential synchronization of cellular neural networks with interval nondifferentiable and distributed time-varying delays via hybrid feedback control is considered. The interval time-varying delay function is not necessary to be differentiable. Based on the construction of improved Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals is combined with Leibniz-Newton's formula and the technique of dealing with some integral terms. New delay-dependent sufficient conditions for the exponential synchronization of the error systems with memoryless hybrid feedback control are first established in terms of LMIs without introducing any free-weighting matrices. The optimal guaranteed cost control with linear error hybrid feedback is turned into the solvable problem of a set of LMIs. A numerical example is also given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. On asymptotic stabilisation of a chain of integrators with nonlinearity and an uncertain input delay by output feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ho-Lim

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we provide an output feedback solution over one given by Choi and Lim [Systems & Control Letters, 59(6), 374-379 (2010)] under more generalised system set-up. More specifically, we consider a stabilisation problem of a chain of integrators that has nonlinearity and an uncertain delay in the input by output feedback. The nonlinearity is classified into four types. Then, we propose a memoryless output feedback controller which contains a gain-scaling factor to adjust controller gains depending on the given nonlinearity type. Our stability analysis shows that the controlled system has unique stabilisation result associated with each type of nonlinearity. Our result provides a new aspect to the stabilisation problem of nonlinear time-delay systems and broadens the existing control results of time-delay systems. Two examples are given for illustration.

  6. Feedback-related negativity in children with two subtypes of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Gong

    Full Text Available The current model of ADHD suggests abnormal reward and punishment sensitivity, although differences in ADHD subgroups are unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effect of feedback valence (reward or punishment and punishment magnitude (small or large on Feedback-Related Negativity (FRN and Late Positive Potential (LPP in two subtypes of ADHD (ADHD-C and ADHD-I compared to typically developing children (TD during a children's gambling task.Children with ADHD-C (n = 16, children with ADHD-I (n = 15 and typically developing children (n = 15 performed a children's gambling task under three feedback conditions: large losses, small losses and gains. FRN and LPP components in brain potentials were recorded and analyzed.In TD children and children with ADHD-C, large loss feedback evoked more negative FRN amplitudes than small loss feedback, suggesting that brain sensitivity to the punishment and its magnitude is not impaired in children with ADHD-C. In contrast to these two groups, the FRN effect was absent in children with ADHD-I. The LPP amplitudes were larger in children with ADHD-C in comparison with those with ADHD-I, regardless of feedback valence and magnitude.Children with ADHD-C exhibit intact brain sensitivity to punishment similar to TD children. In contrast, children with ADHD-I are significantly impaired in neural sensitivity to the feedback stimuli and in particular, to punishment, compared to TD and ADHD-C children. Thus, FRN, rather than LPP, is a reliable index of the difference in reward and punishment sensitivity across different ADHD-subcategories.

  7. Ultra-high-frequency piecewise-linear chaos using delayed feedback loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Seth D.; Rontani, Damien; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2012-12-01

    We report on an ultra-high-frequency (>1 GHz), piecewise-linear chaotic system designed from low-cost, commercially available electronic components. The system is composed of two electronic time-delayed feedback loops: A primary analog loop with a variable gain that produces multi-mode oscillations centered around 2 GHz and a secondary loop that switches the variable gain between two different values by means of a digital-like signal. We demonstrate experimentally and numerically that such an approach allows for the simultaneous generation of analog and digital chaos, where the digital chaos can be used to partition the system's attractor, forming the foundation for a symbolic dynamics with potential applications in noise-resilient communications and radar.

  8. Noise-induced standing waves in oscillatory systems with time-delayed feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Stich, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In oscillatory reaction-diffusion systems, time-delay feedback can lead to the instability of uniform oscillations with respect to formation of standing waves. Here, we investigate how the presence of additive, Gaussian white noise can induce the appearance of standing waves. Combining analytical solutions of the model with spatio-temporal simulations, we find that noise can promote standing waves in regimes where the deterministic uniform oscillatory modes are stabilized. As the deterministic phase boundary is approached, the spatio-temporal correlations become stronger, such that even small noise can induce standing waves in this parameter regime. With larger noise strengths, standing waves could be induced at finite distances from the (deterministic) phase boundary. The overall dynamics is defined through the interplay of noisy forcing with the inherent reaction-diffusion dynamics.

  9. Chaotic millimeter wave generation in a helical-waveguide gyro-TWT with delayed feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Rozental, R. M.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of chaotic millimeter wave generation in broadband helical-waveguide gyrotron travelling wave tubes (gyro-TWTs) by introducing external delayed feedback. It is shown that for the realization of "developed" chaos the amplitude characteristic of the amplifier should have the maximum slope in the overdrive regime upon saturation. This can be achieved by proper choosing of cyclotron resonance detuning. According to the time-domain averaged model and 3D particle-in-cell simulations with the parameters of the experimentally realized 35 GHz gyro-TWT, the power of chaotic generation can achieve 50 kW for an electron mean efficiency of about 7% and a spectrum width of 3-4 GHz.

  10. Adaptive feedback synchronisation of complex dynamical network with discrete-time communications and delayed nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Ding, Yongsheng; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Kuangrong

    2016-08-01

    This paper considered the synchronisation of continuous complex dynamical networks with discrete-time communications and delayed nodes. The nodes in the dynamical networks act in the continuous manner, while the communications between nodes are discrete-time; that is, they communicate with others only at discrete time instants. The communication intervals in communication period can be uncertain and variable. By using a piecewise Lyapunov-Krasovskii function to govern the characteristics of the discrete communication instants, we investigate the adaptive feedback synchronisation and a criterion is derived to guarantee the existence of the desired controllers. The globally exponential synchronisation can be achieved by the controllers under the updating laws. Finally, two numerical examples including globally coupled network and nearest-neighbour coupled networks are presented to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  11. Coupled map car-following model and its delayed-feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, K; Kokame, H; Hirata, K

    1999-10-01

    This paper proposes a coupled map car-following traffic model, which describes a dynamical behavior of a group of road vehicles running in a single lane without overtaking. This model consists of a lead vehicle and following vehicles, which have a piecewise linear optimal velocity function. When the lead-vehicle speed is varied, we can observe a traffic jam in the group of the vehicles. We derive a condition under which the traffic jam never occurs in our model. Furthermore, in order to suppress the traffic jam, for each vehicle we use a dynamic version of decentralized delayed-feedback control proposed in [Konishi, Hirai, and Kokame, Phys. Rev. E 58, 3055 (1998)], and provide a systematic procedure for designing the controller.

  12. Delay-feedback control strategy for reducing CO2 emission of traffic flow system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Dong; Zhu, Wen-Xing

    2015-06-01

    To study the signal control strategy for reducing traffic emission theoretically, we first presented a kind of discrete traffic flow model with relative speed term based on traditional coupled map car-following model. In the model, the relative speed difference between two successive running cars is incorporated into following vehicle's acceleration running equation. Then we analyzed its stability condition with discrete control system stability theory. Third, we designed a delay-feedback controller to suppress traffic jam and decrease traffic emission based on modern controller theory. Last, numerical simulations are made to support our theoretical results, including the comparison of models' stability analysis, the influence of model type and signal control on CO2 emissions. The results show that the temporal behavior of our model is superior to other models, and the traffic signal controller has good effect on traffic jam suppression and traffic CO2 emission, which fully supports the theoretical conclusions.

  13. Synchronous and stochastic oscillations in a nonautonomous transistor oscillator with delayed feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal'Ianov, E. V.

    1986-11-01

    The stimulation by an external signal of stochastic self-excited oscillations in a nonautonomous transistor oscillator with delayed feedback is investigated experimentally, with a focus on the case of parametric pumping, where the frequency of the external signal is close to the interval between the natural frequencies of the system. The experimental technique and apparatus are similar to those employed by Kal'ianov and Starkov (1985), and the results are presented graphically. Phenomena observed include both (1) enrichment of the oscillation spectrum by excitation of additional, asynchronously interacting modes until a transition to chaos occurs; and (2) parametric suppression of oscillations at certain modes, with phase locking of the mode oscillations and the establishment of synchronous oscillations (i.e., destochastization).

  14. Visible light induced ocular delayed bioluminescence as a possible origin of negative afterimage

    CERN Document Server

    Bokkon, I; Wang, C; Dai, J; Salari, V; Grass, F; Antal, I

    2011-01-01

    The delayed luminescence of biological tissues is an ultraweak reemission of absorbed photons after exposure to external monochromatic or white light illumination. Recently, Wang, B\\'okkon, Dai and Antal (Brain Res. 2011) presented the first experimental proof of the existence of spontaneous ultraweak biophoton emission and visible light induced delayed ultraweak photon emission from in vitro freshly isolated rat's whole eye, lens, vitreous humor and retina. Here, we suggest that the photobiophysical source of negative afterimage can also occur within the eye by delayed bioluminescent photons. In other words, when we stare at a colored (or white) image for few seconds, external photons can induce excited electronic states within different parts of the eye that is followed by a delayed reemission of absorbed photons for several seconds. Finally, these reemitted photons can be absorbed by nonbleached photoreceptors that produce a negative afterimage. Although this suggests the photobiophysical source of negativ...

  15. Nonlinear systems dynamics in cardiovascular physiology: The heart rate delay map and lower body negative pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, John C.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary study of the applicability of nonlinear dynamic systems analysis techniques to low body negative pressure (LBNP) studies. In particular, the applicability of the heart rate delay map is investigated. It is suggested that the heart rate delay map has potential as a supplemental tool in the assessment of subject performance in LBNP tests and possibly in the determination of susceptibility to cardiovascular deconditioning with spaceflight.

  16. Firing statistics of inhibitory neuron with delayed feedback. II: Non-Markovian behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, K G; Vidybida, A K

    2013-06-01

    The instantaneous state of a neural network consists of both the degree of excitation of each neuron the network is composed of and positions of impulses in communication lines between the neurons. In neurophysiological experiments, the neuronal firing moments are registered, but not the state of communication lines. But future spiking moments depend essentially on the past positions of impulses in the lines. This suggests, that the sequence of intervals between firing moments (inter-spike intervals, ISIs) in the network could be non-Markovian. In this paper, we address this question for a simplest possible neural "net", namely, a single inhibitory neuron with delayed feedback. The neuron receives excitatory input from the driving Poisson stream and inhibitory impulses from its own output through the feedback line. We obtain analytic expressions for conditional probability density P(tn+1|tn, …, t1, t0), which gives the probability to get an output ISI of duration tn+1 provided the previous (n+1) output ISIs had durations tn, …, t1, t0. It is proven exactly, that P(tn+1|tn, …, t1, t0) does not reduce to P(tn+1|tn, …, t1) for any n≥0. This means that the output ISIs stream cannot be represented as a Markov chain of any finite order.

  17. Fast photonic information processing using semiconductor lasers with delayed optical feedback: role of phase dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguimdo, Romain Modeste; Verschaffelt, Guy; Danckaert, Jan; Van der Sande, Guy

    2014-04-01

    Semiconductor lasers subject to delayed optical feedback have recently shown great potential in solving computationally hard tasks. By optically implementing a neuro-inspired computational scheme, called reservoir computing, based on the transient response to optical data injection, high processing speeds have been demonstrated. While previous efforts have focused on signal bandwidths limited by the semiconductor laser's relaxation oscillation frequency, we demonstrate numerically that the much faster phase response makes significantly higher processing speeds attainable. Moreover, this also leads to shorter external cavity lengths facilitating future on-chip implementations. We numerically benchmark our system on a chaotic time-series prediction task considering two different feedback configurations. The results show that a prediction error below 4% can be obtained when the data is processed at 0.25 GSamples/s. In addition, our insight into the phase dynamics of optical injection in a semiconductor laser also provides a clear understanding of the system performance at different pump current levels, even below solitary laser threshold. Considering spontaneous emission noise and noise in the readout layer, we obtain good prediction performance at fast processing speeds for realistic values of the noise strength.

  18. Broadcast Channels with Delayed Finite-Rate Feedback: Predict or Observe?

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jiaming; Jafar, Syed A

    2011-01-01

    Most multiuser precoding techniques require accurate transmitter channel state information (CSIT) to maintain orthogonality between the users. Such techniques have proven quite fragile in time-varying channels because the CSIT is inherently imperfect due to estimation and feedback delay, as well quantization noise. An alternative approach recently proposed by Maddah-Ali and Tse (MAT) allows for significant multiplexing gain in the multi-input single-output (MISO) broadcast channel (BC) even with transmit CSIT that is completely stale, i.e. uncorrelated with the current channel state. With $K$ users, their scheme claims to lose only a $\\log(K)$ factor relative to the full $K$ degrees of freedom (DoF) attainable in the MISO BC with perfect CSIT for large $K$. However, their result does not consider the cost of the feedback, which is potentially very large in high mobility (short channel coherence time). In this paper, we more closely examine the MAT scheme and compare its DoF gain to single user transmission (w...

  19. Delayed Feedback Control of 2D Roll-Cell by Pulsed Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawara, Kakuji

    1998-11-01

    Experimental study and numerical experiments were conducted to examine applicability of Pyragas' delayed feedback(DFB) control theory for active control of fluid flow. Although many attempts of turbulence active control have been made, most of those experimental studies experience "out of control" state in the case of using larger feedback gain. In the present study, we assume this "out of control" state as Chaos, and apply chaos control theory to prevent the flow field from falling into "out of control" state. Experiments were carried out for low Reynolds number oil flow in a rectangle thin container, whose aspect ratio is 6:1:0.5. Two pulsed jets were used as actuator in order to keep the circulation of the flow in container constant. Fluid flow was observed using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technology and the flow state was estimated by moving least square (MLS) method. As a result, we found that Pyragas control was effective to prevent chaos for active control fo fluid flow. Numerical simulations were also carried out by using the coupled map lattice(CML). CML is known as a simple model with the essential feature of spatio-temporal chaos. DFB control was applied for CML to examine possibility of active control of turbulence. Simulating results show that the present method can stabilize the whole system of CML.

  20. Time-delay signatures in multi-transverse mode VCSELs subject to double-cavity polarization-rotated optical feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Khurram, Aliza; Hong, Yanhua

    2016-10-01

    Time delay (TD) signatures are studied experimentally in orthogonal polarizations and in individual transverse modes respectively in a VCSEL operating with three transverse modes. Different types of concealment of the TD signatures are observed when the polarization of feedback is rotated through large angles. Effects of feedback strength and external cavity length on the TD signatures are investigated. Weak feedback leads to better concealment of the TD signatures in the dominant polarization. When the round-trip time difference between the two external cavities is close to a half of the relaxation oscillation period, the TD signatures are minimized.

  1. Effect of feedback on delaying deterioration in quality of compressions during 2 minutes of continuous chest compressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias S; Hjortrup, Peter Buhl; Wulff, Nille B

    2012-01-01

    delays deterioration of quality of compressions. METHODS: Participants attending a national one-day conference on cardiac arrest and CPR in Denmark were randomized to perform single-rescuer BLS with (n = 26) or without verbal and visual feedback (n = 28) on a manikin using a ZOLL AED plus. Data were...... was the proportion of delivered compressions within target rate compared over a 2-minute period within the groups and between the groups. Performance variables for 30-second intervals were analyzed and compared. RESULTS: 24 (92%) and 23 (82%) had CPR experience in the group with and without feedback respectively. 14...... (54%) were CPR instructors in the feedback group and 18 (64%) in the group without feedback. Data from 26 and 28 participants were analyzed respectively. Although median values for proportion of delivered compressions within target depth were higher in the feedback group (0-30s: 54.0%; 30-60s: 88...

  2. On utilizing delayed feedback for active-multimode vibration control of cantilever beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazza, Khaled A.; Nayfeh, Ali H.; Daqaq, Mohammed F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a single-input single-output multimode delayed-feedback control methodology to mitigate the free vibrations of a flexible cantilever beam. For the purpose of controller design and stability analysis, we consider a reduced-order model consisting of the first n vibration modes. The temporal variation of these modes is represented by a set of nonlinearly coupled ordinary-differential equations that capture the evolving dynamics of the beam. Considering a linearized version of these equations, we derive a set of analytical conditions that are solved numerically to assess the stability of the closed-loop system. To verify these conditions, we characterize the stability boundaries using the first two vibration modes and compare them to damping contours obtained by long-time integration of the full nonlinear equations of motion. Simulations show excellent agreement between both approaches. We analyze the effect of the size and location of the piezoelectric patch and the location of the sensor on the stability of the response. We show that the stability boundaries are highly dependent on these parameters. Finally, we implement the controller on a cantilever beam for different controller gain-delay combinations and assess the performance using time histories of the beam response. Numerical simulations clearly demonstrate the controller ability to mitigate vibrations emanating from multiple modes simultaneously.

  3. The anti-waggle dance: use of the stop signal as negative feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parry Macdonald Kietzman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous activities within honey bee (Apis mellifera L. colonies rely on feedback loops for organization at the group level. Classic examples of these self-organizing behaviors occur during foraging and swarm nest site selection. The waggle dance provides positive feedback, promoting foraging at a specific location or increased scouting at a potential nest site. Rather less well known than the waggle dance, the stop signal, a short vibration often delivered while butting against a dancing bee, is currently best understood as a counter to the waggle dance, offering negative feedback towards the advertised foraging location or nest site. When the stop signal is received by a waggle dancer she is more likely to terminate her dance early and retire from the dance floor. Bees that experienced danger or overcrowding at a food source are more likely to perform the stop signal upon their return to the colony, resulting in an inhibition of foraging at that location. During a swarm’s nest site selection process, scout bees that visited a different site than the one being advertised are more likely to stop-signal the waggle dancer than are scouts that had visited the same site. Over time, the scout bees build recruitment to a single site until a quorum is reached and the swarm can move to it. The balance between the positive feedback from the waggle dance and the negative feedback from the stop signal allows for a more sensitive adjustment of response from the colony as a unit. Many of the processes associated with the feedback loops organizing a honey bee colony’s activities are in striking parallel to other systems, such as intercellular interactions involved in motor neuron function.

  4. To choose or to avoid: age differences in learning from positive and negative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, Ben; Kray, Jutta

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether older adults learn more from bad than good choices than younger adults and whether this is reflected in the error-related negativity (ERN). We applied a feedback-based learning task with two learning conditions. In the positive learning condition, participants could learn to choose responses that lead to monetary gains, whereas in the negative learning condition, they could learn to avoid responses that lead to monetary losses. To test the stability of learning preferences, the task involved a reversal phase in which stimulus-response assignments were inverted. Negative learners were defined as individuals that performed better in the negative than in the positive learning condition (and vice versa for positive learners). The behavioral data showed strong individual differences in learning from positive and negative outcomes that persisted throughout the reversal phase and were more pronounced for older than younger adults. Older negative learners showed a stronger tendency to avoid negative outcomes than younger negative learners. However, contrary to younger adults, this negative learning bias was not associated with a larger ERN, suggesting that avoidance learning in older negative learners might be decoupled from error processing. Furthermore, older adults showed learning impairments compared to younger adults. The ERP analyses suggest that these impairments reflect deficits in the ability to build up relational representations of ambiguous outcomes.

  5. Evolution of gene network activity by tuning the strength of negative-feedback regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weilin; Liu, Ping; Xue, Yuan; Acar, Murat

    2015-02-11

    Despite the examples of protein evolution via mutations in coding sequences, we have very limited understanding on gene network evolution via changes in cis-regulatory elements. Using the galactose network as a model, here we show how the regulatory promoters of the network contribute to the evolved network activity between two yeast species. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we combinatorially replace all regulatory network promoters by their counterparts from Saccharomyces paradoxus, measure the resulting network inducibility profiles, and model the results. Lowering relative strength of GAL80-mediated negative feedback by replacing GAL80 promoter is necessary and sufficient to have high network inducibility levels as in S. paradoxus. This is achieved by increasing OFF-to-ON phenotypic switching rates. Competitions performed among strains with or without the GAL80 promoter replacement show strong relationships between network inducibility and fitness. Our results support the hypothesis that gene network activity can evolve by optimizing the strength of negative-feedback regulation.

  6. Prospect theory does not describe the feedback-related negativity value function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambrook, Thomas D; Roser, Matthew; Goslin, Jeremy

    2012-12-01

    Humans handle uncertainty poorly. Prospect theory accounts for this with a value function in which possible losses are overweighted compared to possible gains, and the marginal utility of rewards decreases with size. fMRI studies have explored the neural basis of this value function. A separate body of research claims that prediction errors are calculated by midbrain dopamine neurons. We investigated whether the prospect theoretic effects shown in behavioral and fMRI studies were present in midbrain prediction error coding by using the feedback-related negativity, an ERP component believed to reflect midbrain prediction errors. Participants' stated satisfaction with outcomes followed prospect theory but their feedback-related negativity did not, instead showing no effect of marginal utility and greater sensitivity to potential gains than losses.

  7. Spatio-temporal dynamcis of a cell signal cascade with negative feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya Bernal, Jose Luis; Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo

    2014-03-01

    We studied the spatio-temporal dynamics of a system of reactio-diffusion equations that models a cell signal transduction pathway with six cycles and negative feedback. The basic cycle consists of the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of two antagonic proteins. We found two regimes of saturation of the enzimatic reaction in the kinetic parameters space and determined the conditions for the signal propagation in the steady state. The trajectories for which transduction occurs are defined in terms of the ratio of the enzimatic activities. We found that in spite of the negative feedback the cell signal cascade behaves as an amplifier and produces phosphoprotein concentration gradients within the cell. This model behaves also as a noise filter and as a switch. Supported by DGAPA-UNAM Contract IN118410-3.

  8. Near infrared single photon avalanche detector with negative feedback and self quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linga, Krishna; Yevtukhov, Yuriy; Liang, Bing

    2009-08-01

    We present the design and development of a negative feedback devices using the internal discrete amplifier approach used for the development of a single photon avalanche photodetector in the near infrared wavelength region. This new family of photodetectors with negative feedback, requiring no quenching mechanism using Internal Discrete Amplification (IDA) mechanism for the realization of very high gain and low excess noise factor in the visible and near infrared spectral regions, operates in the non-gated mode under a constant bias voltage. The demonstrated device performance far exceeds any available solid state Photodetectors in the near infrared wavelength range. The measured devices have Gain > 2×105, Excess noise factor Lidar, free space optical communication, 3D imaging, industrial and scientific instrumentation, night vision, quantum cryptography, and other military, defence and aerospace applications.

  9. Stability and Feedback Design of a Class of Time-Delay Systems with Discontinuity: Functional Differential Inclusion-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiangyan; Shen, Tielong

    To analyze and synthesize time-delay systems with discontinuity, the framework of differential inclusion in the sense of Filippov is extended to functional differential inclusion. Based on the extension, the concept of Filippov solution is introduced for the time-delay systems with discontinuity at first, and then it is shown that both the Lyapunov stability and the LaSalle invariance principle results can be extended to such kind of systems. Moreover, by using the proposed analysis tools, a stabilization feedback design approach is proposed for a class of nonlinear time-delay systems with discontinuity. Simulation results of numerical examples are given to demonstrate the proposed control approaches.

  10. Negative feedback loops leading to nitrate homeostasis and oscillatory nitrate assimilation in plants and fungi.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yongshun

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate is an important nutrient for plants and fungi. For plants it has been shown that cytosolic nitrate levels are under homeostatic control. Here we describe two networks that can obtain robust, i.e. perturbation independent, homeostatic behavior in cytosolic nitrate concentration. One of the networks, a member in the family of outflow controllers, is based on a negative feedback loop containing a nitrate-induced activation of a controller molecule which removes nitrate. In plants this co...

  11. The Effect of Online Gaming, Cognition and Feedback Type in Facilitating Delayed Achievement of Different Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Brian; Dwyer, Francis

    2005-01-01

    Online and computer-based instructional gaming is becoming a viable instructional strategy at all levels of education. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of (a) gaming, (b) gaming plus embedded questions, and (c) gaming plus questions plus feedback on delayed retention of different types of educational objectives for students…

  12. Stabilization of a semilinear wave equation with variable coefficients and a delay term in the boundary feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the uniform stabilization of a semilinear wave equation with variable coefficients and a delay term in the boundary feedback. The Riemannian geometry method is applied to prove the exponential stability of the system by introducing an equivalent energy function.

  13. Note on the Persistent Property of a Discrete Lotka-Volterra Competitive System with Delays and Feedback Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Xiangzeng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonautonomous -species discrete Lotka-Volterra competitive system with delays and feedback controls is considered in this work. Sufficient conditions on the coefficients are given to guarantee that all the species are permanent. It is shown that these conditions are weaker than those of Liao et al. 2008.

  14. Time-Delay Signature of Chaotic Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers with Polarization-Rotated Optical Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Shui-Ying; PAN Wei; YAN Lian-Shan; LUO Bin; ZOU Xi-Hua; JIANG Ning; WEN Kun-Hua

    2011-01-01

    To quantitatively evaluate the time-delay (TD) signatures of chaotic signals generated by vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with polarization-rotated optical feedback (PROF), we propose four cases of resolution coefficients R based on correlation functions. The resolution coefficient characteristics for the x-polarization (XP) mode, y-polarization (YP) mode and the total output are considered. The dependences of R on the feedback strength and feedback delay are discussed and compared carefully. The two-dimensional maps of R show that the TD signatures for the single polarization mode (I.e., XP or YP mode) are much more difficult to retrieve than those for the total output in the entire parameter space. Thus, by using single polarization mode as a chaotic carrier, the TD signatures are extremely difficult to be identified, which contributes a lot in the security-enhanced VCSELs-based chaotic optical communication systems.

  15. Decentralised adaptive output feedback stabilisation for stochastic time-delay systems via LaSalle-Yoshizawa-type theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Ticao; Xu, Shengyuan; Lu, Junwei; Wei, Yunliang; Zou, Yun

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the decentralised output feedback stabilisation problem for a class of large-scale stochastic time-delay nonlinear systems. A general theorem is firstly given to guarantee the global existence and uniqueness of the solution for stochastic time-delay systems. In addition, a stochastic version of the well-known LaSalle-Yoshizawa theorem with time-varying delay is initially proposed for the controller design and stability analysis. Then, for a class of large-scale stochastic systems with time-varying delays, totally decentralised adaptive delay-dependent controllers are designed by using K-filter and backstepping approach. Via LaSalle-Yoshizawa-type theorem and constructing a general Lyapunov function, it is shown that all signals in the closed-loop system are bounded almost surely and the solution is almost surely asymptotically stable. Finally, a simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the results of this paper.

  16. General Purpose Digital Signal Processing VME-Module for 1-Turn Delay Feedback Systems of the CERN Accelerator Chain

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, V

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the LHC project and the modifications of the SPS as its injector, the concept has been developed of a global digital signal processing unit (DSPU) that implements in numerical form the architecture of low-level RF systems. Since 2002 a Digital Notch Filter with programmable delay for the SPS Transverse Damper has been fully operational with fixed target and LHC-type beams circulating in the SPS. The approach, using an FPGA as core for the low-level system, is very flexible and allows the upgrade of the signal processing by modification of the original firmware. The development for the LHC 1-Turn delay Feedback has benefited from the same methodology and similar technology. The achieved performances of the LHC 1-Turn delay Feedback are compared with project requirements. The project flow for the recent LHC 1-T Feedback allows synergy with several other applications. The CERN PS Transverse Damper DSPU, with automatic delay compensation adapting the loop delay to the time of flight of the par...

  17. The feedback-related negativity reflects ‘more or less’ prediction error in appetitive and aversive conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjun eYu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Humans make predictions and use feedback to update their subsequent predictions. The feedback-related negativity (FRN has been found to be sensitive to negative feedback as well as negative prediction error, such that the FRN is larger for outcomes that are worse than expected. The present study examined prediction errors in both appetitive and aversive conditions. We found that the FRN was more negative for reward omission versus wins and for loss omission versus losses, suggesting that the FRN might classify outcomes in a more-or-less than expected fashion rather than in the better-or-worse than expected dimension. Our findings challenge the previous notion that the FRN only encodes negative feedback and ‘worse than expected’ negative prediction error.

  18. Exponential synchronization of discontinuous neural networks with time-varying mixed delays via state feedback and impulsive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinsong; Cao, Jinde; Ho, Daniel W C

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates drive-response synchronization for a class of neural networks with time-varying discrete and distributed delays (mixed delays) as well as discontinuous activations. Strict mathematical proof shows the global existence of Filippov solutions to neural networks with discontinuous activation functions and the mixed delays. State feedback controller and impulsive controller are designed respectively to guarantee global exponential synchronization of the neural networks. By using Lyapunov function and new analysis techniques, several new synchronization criteria are obtained. Moreover, lower bound on the convergence rate is explicitly estimated when state feedback controller is utilized. Results of this paper are new and some existing ones are extended and improved. Finally, numerical simulations are given to verify the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  19. Negative feedback regulation of Wnt4 signaling by EAF1 and EAF2/U19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyang Wan

    Full Text Available Previous studies indicated that EAF (ELL-associated factor family members, EAF1 and EAF2/U19, play a role in cancer and embryogenesis. For example, EAF2/U19 may serve as a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer. At the same time, EAF2/U19 is a downstream factor in the non-canonical Wnt 4 signaling pathway required for eye development in Xenopus laevis, and along with EAF1, contributes to convergence and extension movements in zebrafish embryos through Wnt maintenance. Here, we used zebrafish embryos and mammalian cells to show that both EAF1 and EAF2/U19 were up-regulated by Wnt4 (Wnt4a. Furthermore, we found that EAF1 and EAF2/U19 suppressed Wnt4 expression by directly binding to the Wnt4 promoter as seen in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. These findings indicate that an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop occurs between Wnt4 and the EAF family, which is conserved between zebrafish and mammalian. The rescue experiments in zebrafish embryos showed that early embryonic development required the maintenance of the appropriate levels of Wnt4a through the feedback loop. Others have demonstrated that the tumor suppressors p63, p73 and WT1 positively regulate Wnt4 expression while p21 has the opposite effect, suggesting that maintenance of appropriate Wnt4 expression may also be critical for adult tissue homeostasis and prevention against tumor initiation. Thus, the auto-regulatory negative feedback loop that controls expression of Wnt4 and EAF proteins may play an important role in both embryonic development and tumor suppression. Our findings provide the first convincing line of evidence that EAF and Wnt4 form an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop in vivo.

  20. Adaptive fuzzy output-feedback controller design for nonlinear time-delay systems with unknown control direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Chang-Chun; Wang, Qing-Guo; Guan, Xin-Ping

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the robust-control problem is investigated for a class of uncertain nonlinear time-delay systems via dynamic output-feedback approach. The considered system is in the strict-feedback form with unknown control direction. A full-order observer is constructed with the gains computed via linear matrix inequality at first. Then, with the bounds of uncertain functions known, we design the dynamic output-feedback controller such that the closed-loop system is asymptotically stable. Furthermore, when the bound functions of uncertainties are not available, the adaptive fuzzy-logic system is employed to approximate the uncertain function, and the corresponding output-feedback controller is designed. It is shown that the resulting closed-loop system is stable in the sense of semiglobal uniform ultimate boundedness. Finally, simulations are done to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the obtained theoretical results.

  1. Negative feedback in ants: crowding results in less trail pheromone deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaczkes, Tomer J; Grüter, Christoph; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2013-04-06

    Crowding in human transport networks reduces efficiency. Efficiency can be increased by appropriate control mechanisms, which are often imposed externally. Ant colonies also have distribution networks to feeding sites outside the nest and can experience crowding. However, ants do not have external controllers or leaders. Here, we report a self-organized negative feedback mechanism, based on local information, which downregulates the production of recruitment signals in crowded parts of a network by Lasius niger ants. We controlled crowding by manipulating trail width and the number of ants on a trail, and observed a 5.6-fold reduction in the number of ants depositing trail pheromone from least to most crowded conditions. We also simulated crowding by placing glass beads covered in nest-mate cuticular hydrocarbons on the trail. After 10 bead encounters over 20 cm, forager ants were 45 per cent less likely to deposit pheromone. The mechanism of negative feedback reported here is unusual in that it acts by downregulating the production of a positive feedback signal, rather than by direct inhibition or the production of an inhibitory signal.

  2. Negative feedback in ants: crowding results in less trail pheromone deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaczkes, Tomer J.; Grüter, Christoph; Ratnieks, Francis L. W.

    2013-01-01

    Crowding in human transport networks reduces efficiency. Efficiency can be increased by appropriate control mechanisms, which are often imposed externally. Ant colonies also have distribution networks to feeding sites outside the nest and can experience crowding. However, ants do not have external controllers or leaders. Here, we report a self-organized negative feedback mechanism, based on local information, which downregulates the production of recruitment signals in crowded parts of a network by Lasius niger ants. We controlled crowding by manipulating trail width and the number of ants on a trail, and observed a 5.6-fold reduction in the number of ants depositing trail pheromone from least to most crowded conditions. We also simulated crowding by placing glass beads covered in nest-mate cuticular hydrocarbons on the trail. After 10 bead encounters over 20 cm, forager ants were 45 per cent less likely to deposit pheromone. The mechanism of negative feedback reported here is unusual in that it acts by downregulating the production of a positive feedback signal, rather than by direct inhibition or the production of an inhibitory signal. PMID:23365196

  3. Examination of a perceived cost model of employees' negative feedback-seeking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kuo-Ming; Pan, Su-Ying; Cheng, Jen-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The present study extends the feedback-seeking behavior literature by investigating how supervisor-related antecedents (i.e., supervisors' expert power, reflected appraisals of supervisors, and supervisors' emotional intelligence) influence subordinates' negative feedback-seeking behavior (NFSB) through different cost/value perceptions (i.e., expectancy value, self-presentation cost, and ego cost). Using data collected from 216 supervisor-subordinate dyads from various industries in Taiwan, we employ structural equation modeling analysis to test our hypotheses. The results show that expectancy value mediates the relationship between supervisor expert power and subordinates' NFSB. Moreover, self-presentation cost mediates the relationship between reflected appraisals of supervisors' and subordinates' NFSB. Theoretical and practical implications of this study are also discussed.

  4. Dynamic Analysis of a High-Static-Low-Dynamic-Stiffness Vibration Isolator with Time-Delayed Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the time-delayed cubic velocity feedback control strategy to improve the isolation performance of High-Static-Low-Dynamic-Stiffness (HSLDS vibration isolator. Firstly, the primary resonance of the controlled HSLDS vibration isolator is obtained by using multiple scales method. The equivalent damping ratio and equivalent resonance frequency are defined to study the effects of feedback gain and time delay on the primary resonance. The jump phenomenon analysis of the controlled system without and with time delay is investigated by using Sylvester resultant method and optimization method, respectively. The stability analysis of the controlled system is also considered. Then, the 1/3 subharmonic resonance of the controlled system is studied by using multiple scales method. The effects of feedback gain and time delay on the 1/3 subharmonic resonance are also presented. Finally, force transmissibility is proposed to evaluate the performance of the controlled system and compared with an equivalent linear passive vibration isolator. The results show that the vibration amplitude of the controlled system around the resonance frequency region decreases and the isolation frequency band is larger compared to the equivalent one. A better isolation performance in the high frequency band can be achieved compared to the passive HSLDS vibration isolator.

  5. A computational model clarifies the roles of positive and negative feedback loops in the Drosophila circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junwei; Zhou, Tianshou

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies showed that a single negative feedback structure should be sufficient for robust circadian oscillations. It is thus pertinent to ask why current cellular clock models almost universally have interlocked negative feedback loop (NFL) and positive feedback loop (PFL). Here, we propose a molecular model that reflects the essential features of the Drosophila circadian clock to clarify the different roles of negative and positive feedback loops. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can simulate circadian oscillations in constant darkness, entrainment by light-dark cycles, as well as phenotypes of per and clk mutants. Moreover, sustained oscillations persist when the PFL is removed, implying the crucial role of NFL for rhythm generation. Through parameter sensitivity analysis, it is revealed that incorporation of PFL increases the robustness of the system to regulatory processes in PFL itself. Such reduced models can aid understanding of the design principles of circadian clocks in Drosophila and other organisms with complex transcriptional feedback structures.

  6. Effect of feedback on delaying deterioration in quality of compressions during 2 minutes of continuous chest compressions: a randomized manikin study investigating performance with and without feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyngeraa Tobias

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good quality basic life support (BLS improves outcome following cardiac arrest. As BLS performance deteriorates over time we performed a parallel group, superiority study to investigate the effect of feedback on quality of chest compression with the hypothesis that feedback delays deterioration of quality of compressions. Methods Participants attending a national one-day conference on cardiac arrest and CPR in Denmark were randomized to perform single-rescuer BLS with (n = 26 or without verbal and visual feedback (n = 28 on a manikin using a ZOLL AED plus. Data were analyzed using Rescuenet Code Review. Blinding of participants was not possible, but allocation concealment was performed. Primary outcome was the proportion of delivered compressions within target depth compared over a 2-minute period within the groups and between the groups. Secondary outcome was the proportion of delivered compressions within target rate compared over a 2-minute period within the groups and between the groups. Performance variables for 30-second intervals were analyzed and compared. Results 24 (92% and 23 (82% had CPR experience in the group with and without feedback respectively. 14 (54% were CPR instructors in the feedback group and 18 (64% in the group without feedback. Data from 26 and 28 participants were analyzed respectively. Although median values for proportion of delivered compressions within target depth were higher in the feedback group (0-30 s: 54.0%; 30-60 s: 88.0%; 60-90 s: 72.6%; 90-120 s: 87.0%, no significant difference was found when compared to without feedback (0-30 s: 19.6%; 30-60 s: 33.1%; 60-90 s: 44.5%; 90-120 s: 32.7% and no significant deteriorations over time were found within the groups. In the feedback group a significant improvement was found in the proportion of delivered compressions below target depth when the subsequent intervals were compared to the first 30 seconds (0-30 s: 3.9%; 30-60 s: 0.0%; 60-90 s: 0

  7. Further results on global state feedback stabilization of high-order nonlinear systems with time-varying delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fangzheng; Wu, Yuqiang

    2015-03-01

    This paper considers the problem of global stabilization by state feedback for a class of high-order nonlinear systems with time-varying delays. Comparing with the existing relevant literature, the systems under investigation allow more uncertainties, to which the existing control methods are inapplicable. By introducing sign function and necessarily modifying the method of adding a power integrator, a state feedback controller is successfully constructed to preserve the equilibrium at the origin and guarantee the global asymptotic stability of the resulting closed-loop system. Finally, two simulation examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  8. Finite-time robust stabilization of uncertain delayed neural networks with discontinuous activations via delayed feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leimin; Shen, Yi; Sheng, Yin

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the finite-time robust stabilization of delayed neural networks (DNNs) in the presence of discontinuous activations and parameter uncertainties. By using the nonsmooth analysis and control theory, a delayed controller is designed to realize the finite-time robust stabilization of DNNs with discontinuous activations and parameter uncertainties, and the upper bound of the settling time functional for stabilization is estimated. Finally, two examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  9. Optimism and positive and negative feelings in parents of young children with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz-Nelson, E; McIntyre, L L

    2017-07-01

    Parents' positive and negative feelings about their young children influence both parenting behaviour and child problem behaviour. Research has not previously examined factors that contribute to positive and negative feelings in parents of young children with developmental delay (DD). The present study sought to examine whether optimism, a known protective factor for parents of children with DD, was predictive of positive and negative feelings for these parents. Data were collected from 119 parents of preschool-aged children with developmental delay. Two separate hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted to determine if optimism significantly predicted positive feelings and negative feelings and whether optimism moderated relations between parenting stress and parent feelings. Increased optimism was found to predict increased positive feelings and decreased negative feelings after controlling for child problem behaviour and parenting stress. In addition, optimism was found to moderate the relation between parenting stress and positive feelings. Results suggest that optimism may impact how parents perceive their children with DD. Future research should examine how positive and negative feelings impact positive parenting behaviour and the trajectory of problem behaviour specifically for children with DD. © 2017 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Acute stress modulates feedback processing in men and women: differential effects on the feedback-related negativity and theta and beta power.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Banis

    Full Text Available Sex-specific prevalence rates in mental and physical disorders may be partly explained by sex differences in physiological stress responses. Neural networks that might be involved are those underlying feedback processing. Aim of the present EEG study was to investigate whether acute stress alters feedback processing, and whether stress effects differ between men and women. Male and female participants performed a gambling task, in a control and a stress condition. Stress was induced by exposing participants to a noise stressor. Brain activity was analyzed using both event-related potential and time-frequency analyses, measuring the feedback-related negativity (FRN and feedback-related changes in theta and beta oscillatory power, respectively. While the FRN and feedback-related theta power were similarly affected by stress induction in both sexes, feedback-related beta power depended on the combination of stress induction condition and sex. FRN amplitude and theta power increases were smaller in the stress relative to the control condition in both sexes, demonstrating that acute noise stress impairs performance monitoring irrespective of sex. However, in the stress but not in the control condition, early lower beta-band power increases were larger for men than women, indicating that stress effects on feedback processing are partly sex-dependent. Our findings suggest that sex-specific effects on feedback processing may comprise a factor underlying sex-specific stress responses.

  11. Control of Halo-Chaos in Beam Transport Network via Neural Network Adaptation with Time-Delayed Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Jin-Qing; LUO Xiao-Shu; HUANG Guo-Xian

    2006-01-01

    Subject of the halo-chaos control in beam transport networks (channels) has become a key concerned issue for many important applications of high-current proton beam since 1990'. In this paper, the magnetic field adaptive control based on the neuralnetwork with time-delayed feedback is proposed for suppressing beam halo-chaos in the beam transport network with periodic focusing channels. The envelope radius of high-current proton beam is controlled to reach the matched beam radius by suitably selecting the control structure and parameter of the neural network, adjusting the delayed-time and control coefficient of the neural network.

  12. Novel Sinorhizobium meliloti quorum sensing positive and negative regulatory feedback mechanisms respond to phosphate availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Matthew; Meyer, Stefan; Becker, Anke

    2009-12-01

    The Sin quorum sensing system of Sinorhizobium meliloti depends upon at least three genes, sinR, sinI and expR, and N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signals to regulate multiple processes in its free-living state in the rhizosphere and in the development towards symbiosis with its plant host. In this study, we have characterized novel mechanisms of transcription control through which the system regulates itself. At low AHL levels a positive feedback loop activates expression of sinI (AHL synthase), resulting in amplification of AHL levels. At high AHL levels, expression of sinI is reduced by a negative feedback loop. These feedback mechanisms are mediated by the LuxR-type regulators ExpR and SinR. Expression of sinR and expR is regulated by ExpR in the presence of AHLs. A novel ExpR binding site in the promoter of sinR is responsible for the reduction of expression of this gene. In addition, expression of sinR, upon which sinI expression is dependent, is induced by phoB during growth under phosphate-limiting conditions. This indicates that this response ensures quorum sensing in phosphate-restricted growth.

  13. Global negative vegetation feedback to climate warming responses of leaf litter decomposition rates in cold biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Johannes H C; van Bodegom, Peter M; Aerts, Rien; Callaghan, Terry V; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Alatalo, Juha; Chapin, F Stuart; Gerdol, Renato; Gudmundsson, Jon; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan; Hartley, Anne E; Hik, David S; Hofgaard, Annika; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg S; Karlsson, Staffan; Klein, Julia A; Laundre, Jim; Magnusson, Borgthor; Michelsen, Anders; Molau, Ulf; Onipchenko, Vladimir G; Quested, Helen M; Sandvik, Sylvi M; Schmidt, Inger K; Shaver, Gus R; Solheim, Bjørn; Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A; Stenström, Anna; Tolvanen, Anne; Totland, Ørjan; Wada, Naoya; Welker, Jeffrey M; Zhao, Xinquan

    2007-07-01

    Whether climate change will turn cold biomes from large long-term carbon sinks into sources is hotly debated because of the great potential for ecosystem-mediated feedbacks to global climate. Critical are the direction, magnitude and generality of climate responses of plant litter decomposition. Here, we present the first quantitative analysis of the major climate-change-related drivers of litter decomposition rates in cold northern biomes worldwide. Leaf litters collected from the predominant species in 33 global change manipulation experiments in circum-arctic-alpine ecosystems were incubated simultaneously in two contrasting arctic life zones. We demonstrate that longer-term, large-scale changes to leaf litter decomposition will be driven primarily by both direct warming effects and concomitant shifts in plant growth form composition, with a much smaller role for changes in litter quality within species. Specifically, the ongoing warming-induced expansion of shrubs with recalcitrant leaf litter across cold biomes would constitute a negative feedback to global warming. Depending on the strength of other (previously reported) positive feedbacks of shrub expansion on soil carbon turnover, this may partly counteract direct warming enhancement of litter decomposition.

  14. Capital injections with negative surplus and delays:models and analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo JIN; George YIN

    2014-01-01

    This work develops a new model to deal with the scenario that some companies can still run business even the surplus falls below zero temporarily. With such a scenario in mind, we allow the surplus process to continue in this negative-surplus period, during which capital injections will be ordered to assist in the stabilization of financial structure, until the financial status becomes severe enough to file bankruptcy. The capital injections will be modeled as impulse controls. By introducing the capital injections with time delays, optimal dividend payment and capital injection policies are considered. Using the dynamic programming approach, the value function obeys a quasi-variational inequality. With delays in capital injections, the company will be exposed to the risk of bankruptcy during the delay period. In addition, the optimal dividend payment and capital injection strategies should balance the expected cost of the possible capital injections and the time value of the delay periods. This gives rise to a stochastic control problem with mixed singular and delayed impulse controls. Under general assumptions, the lower capital injection barrier is determined, where bankruptcy occurs. The closed-form solution to the value function and corresponding optimal policies are obtained.

  15. Robust Output Feedback Control for Active Seat Suspension Systems with Actuator Time Delay Using µ-Synthesis Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Gudarzi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a robust output feedback optimal H&infin control synthesis for a class of uncertain seat suspension systems with actuator saturation and an uncertain actuator time delay. A vertical vibration model of human body is added in order to make the modeling of seat suspension systems more accurate. A dynamic controller is considered by using of two measurable states of the model, by real sensors, as output feedback. Moreover, uncertain actuator time delay is considered to guarantee robust performance of the closed-loop system. The controller is derived by using D-K iteration algorithm for constrained systems with norm-bounded uncertainties. The corresponding closed-loop system is asymptotically stable with a guaranteed H&infin performance. Finally, a design example is presented to show the performance and robustness of the developed theoretical results.

  16. Outage probability of dual-hop partial relay selection with feedback delay in the presence of interference

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Qahtani, Fawaz S.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the outage performance of a dual-hop relaying systems with partial relay selection and feedback delay. The analysis considers the case of Rayleigh fading channels when the relaying station as well as the destination undergo mutually independent interfering signals. Particularly, we derive the cumulative distribution function (c.d.f.) of a new type of random variable involving sum of multiple independent exponential random variables, based on which, we present closed-form expressions for the exact outage probability of a fixed amplify-and-forward (AF) and decode-and-forward (DF) relaying protocols. Numerical results are provided to illustrate the joint effect of the delayed feedback and co-channel interference on the outage probability. © 2011 IEEE.

  17. The Effect of Feedback Delay and Feedback Type on Perceptual Category Learning: The Limits of Multiple Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, John C.; Newell, Ben R.; Kalish, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence that learning rule-based (RB) and information-integration (II) category structures can be dissociated across different experimental variables has been used to support the view that such learning is supported by multiple learning systems. Across 4 experiments, we examined the effects of 2 variables, the delay between response and feedback…

  18. Note on the Persistence of a Nonautonomous Lotka-Volterra Competitive System with Infinite Delay and Feedback Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunling Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a nonautonomous Lotka-Volterra competitive system with infinite delay and feedback controls. We establish a series of criteria under which a part of n-species of the systems is driven to extinction while the remaining part of the species is persistent. Particularly, as a special case, a series of new sufficient conditions on the persistence for all species of system are obtained. Several examples together with their numerical simulations show the feasibility of our main results.

  19. Rolling bearing fault diagnosis based on time-delayed feedback monostable stochastic resonance and adaptive minimum entropy deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jimeng; Li, Ming; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2017-08-01

    Rolling bearings are the key components in the modern machinery, and tough operation environments often make them prone to failure. However, due to the influence of the transmission path and background noise, the useful feature information relevant to the bearing fault contained in the vibration signals is weak, which makes it difficult to identify the fault symptom of rolling bearings in time. Therefore, the paper proposes a novel weak signal detection method based on time-delayed feedback monostable stochastic resonance (TFMSR) system and adaptive minimum entropy deconvolution (MED) to realize the fault diagnosis of rolling bearings. The MED method is employed to preprocess the vibration signals, which can deconvolve the effect of transmission path and clarify the defect-induced impulses. And a modified power spectrum kurtosis (MPSK) index is constructed to realize the adaptive selection of filter length in the MED algorithm. By introducing the time-delayed feedback item in to an over-damped monostable system, the TFMSR method can effectively utilize the historical information of input signal to enhance the periodicity of SR output, which is beneficial to the detection of periodic signal. Furthermore, the influence of time delay and feedback intensity on the SR phenomenon is analyzed, and by selecting appropriate time delay, feedback intensity and re-scaling ratio with genetic algorithm, the SR can be produced to realize the resonance detection of weak signal. The combination of the adaptive MED (AMED) method and TFMSR method is conducive to extracting the feature information from strong background noise and realizing the fault diagnosis of rolling bearings. Finally, some experiments and engineering application are performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed AMED-TFMSR method in comparison with a traditional bistable SR method.

  20. Frequency-domain criterion for the chaos synchronization of time-delay power systems under linear feedback control

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qian Lin; Xiaofeng Wu; Yun Chen

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the global synchronization of non-autonomous, time-delay, chaotic power systems via linear state-error feedback control. The frequency domain criterion and the LMI criterion are proposed and applied to design the coupling matrix. Some algebraic criteria via a single-variable linear coupling are derived and formulated in simple algebraic inequalities. The effectiveness of the new criteria is illustrated with numerical examples.

  1. The Effect of Positive and Negative Feedback on Risk-Taking across Different Contexts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel B Losecaat Vermeer

    Full Text Available Preferences for risky choices have often been shown to be unstable and context-dependent. Though people generally avoid gambles with mixed outcomes, a phenomenon often attributed to loss aversion, contextual factors can impact this dramatically. For example, people typically prefer risky options after a financial loss, while generally choosing safer options after a monetary gain. However, it is unclear what exactly contributes to these preference shifts as a function of prior outcomes, as these gain/loss outcomes are usually confounded with participant performance, and therefore it is unclear whether these effects are driven purely by the monetary gains or losses, or rather by success or failure at the actual task. Here, we experimentally separated the effects of monetary gains/losses from performance success/failure prior to a standard risky choice. Participants performed a task in which they experienced contextual effects: 1 monetary gain or loss based directly on performance, 2 monetary gain or loss that was randomly awarded and was, crucially, independent from performance, and 3 success or failure feedback based on performance, but without any monetary incentive. Immediately following these positive/negative contexts, participants were presented with a gain-loss gamble that they had to decide to either play or pass. We found that risk preferences for identical sets of gambles were biased by positive and negative contexts containing monetary gains and losses, but not by contexts containing performance feedback. This data suggests that the observed framing effects are driven by aversion for monetary losses and not simply by the positive or negative valence of the context, or by potential moods resulting from positive or negative contexts. These results highlight the specific context dependence of risk preferences.

  2. Plant-soil feedbacks promote negative frequency dependence in the coexistence of two aridland grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Y Anny; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2016-07-27

    Understanding the mechanisms of species coexistence is key to predicting patterns of species diversity. Historically, the ecological paradigm has been that species coexist by partitioning resources: as a species increases in abundance, self-limitation kicks in, because species-specific resources decline. However, determining coexistence mechanisms has been a particular puzzle for sedentary organisms with high overlap in their resource requirements, such as plants. Recent evidence suggests that plant-associated microbes could generate the stabilizing self-limitation (negative frequency dependence) that is required for species coexistence. Here, we test the key assumption that plant-microbe feedbacks cause such self-limitation. We used competition experiments and modelling to evaluate how two common groups of soil microbes (rhizospheric microbes and biological soil crusts) influenced the self-limitation of two competing desert grass species. Negative feedbacks between the dominant plant competitor and its rhizospheric microbes magnified self-limitation, whereas beneficial interactions between both plant species and biological soil crusts partly counteracted this stabilizing effect. Plant-microbe interactions have received relatively little attention as drivers of vegetation dynamics in dry land ecosystems. Our results suggest that microbial mechanisms can contribute to patterns of plant coexistence in arid grasslands.

  3. Positive and negative feedbacks among Amazon land uses, drought, and fire: the drought of 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepstad, D.; Brando, P.; Soares-Filho, B.; Balch, J.; Moutinho, P.

    2006-12-01

    Climate, rural economies, and ecosystems are connected in the Amazon basin through complex interactions with important implications for greenhouse gas fluxes, biodiversity, and the well-being of rural people. In the historically severe drought of 2005, drought-induced tree mortality and fire-dependent land uses (cattle ranching, swidden agriculture) favored forest fire as it increased the likelihood of further drought. Regions with fire-sensitive investments in the landscape, including improved cattle forage, agroforestry systems, and forest management, were also regions of high investments in the prevention of accidental fire, and experienced low levels of forest fire, in a negative feedback cycle. Some areas of agroindustrial production(cultivated soy) also experienced low forest fire occurrence because of the low flammability of crop fields. The combination of drought- and fire-induced carbon emissions can approach one billion tons in years of severe drought. The negative feedbacks between some types of land use and forest fire could substantially reduce these emissions in the short term.

  4. The effect of negative feedback on tension and subsequent performance: the main and interactive effects of goal content and conscientiousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianci, Anna M; Klein, Howard J; Seijts, Gerard H

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to examine the interplay of goal content, conscientiousness, and tension on performance following negative feedback. Undergraduate students were assigned either a learning or performance goal and then were provided with false feedback indicating very poor performance on the task they performed. After assessing tension, participants performed the task again with the same learning or performance goal. A mediated moderation model was tested, and results were supportive of our hypotheses. Specifically, individuals assigned a learning goal experienced less tension and performed better following negative feedback than individuals assigned a performance goal. Individuals high in conscientiousness experienced greater tension than individuals low in conscientiousness. Conscientiousness and goal content interacted in relating to both tension and performance, with tension as a mediator, such that high conscientiousness amplified the detrimental effect of a performance goal on tension following negative feedback leading to lower performance. High conscientiousness facilitated performance for participants with a learning goal.

  5. Rotation Modes Stability Analysis and Phase Compensation for Magnetically Suspended Flywheel Systems with Cross Feedback Controller and Time Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Ren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the effects of time delay on the stability of the rotation modes for the magnetically suspended flywheel (MSFW with strong gyroscopic effects. A multi-input multioutput system is converted into a single-input single-output control system with complex coefficient by variable reconstruction, and the stability equivalence of the systems before and after variable reconstruction is proven. For the rotation modes, the stability limits and corresponding vibration frequencies are found as a function of nondimensional magnetic stiffness and damping and nondimensional parameters of rotor speed and time delay. Additionally, the relationship between cross feedback control system stability and time delay is investigated. And an effective phase compensation method based on cross-channel is further presented. Simulation and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the correctness of the stability analysis method and the superiority of the phase compensation strategy.

  6. Exponential Admissibility and Dynamic Output Feedback Control of Switched Singular Systems with Interval Time-Varying Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Lin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the problems of exponential admissibility and dynamic output feedback (DOF control for a class of continuous-time switched singular systems with interval time-varying delay. A full-order, dynamic, synchronously switched DOF controller is considered. First, by using the average dwell time approach, a delay-range-dependent exponential admissibility criterion for the unforced switched singular time-delay system is established in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs. Then, based on this criterion, a sufficient condition on the existence of a desired DOF controller, which guarantees that the closed-loop system is regular, impulse free and exponentially stable, is proposed by employing the LMI technique. Finally, some illustrative examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  7. Delayed, but not immediate, feedback after multiple-choice questions increases performance on a subsequent short-answer, but not multiple-choice, exam: evidence for the dual-process theory of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Neha; Glass, Arnold Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments, two performed in the laboratory and one embedded in a college psychology lecture course, investigated the effects of immediate versus delayed feedback following a multiple-choice exam on subsequent short answer and multiple-choice exams. Performance on the subsequent multiple-choice exam was not affected by the timing of the feedback on the prior exam; however, performance on the subsequent short answer exam was better following delayed than following immediate feedback. This was true regardless of the order in which immediate versus delayed feedback was given. Furthermore, delayed feedback only had a greater effect than immediate feedback on subsequent short answer performance following correct, confident responses on the prior exam. These results indicate that delayed feedback cues a student's prior response and increases subsequent recollection of that response. The practical implication is that delayed feedback is better than immediate feedback during academic testing.

  8. Non-fragile multi-objective static output feedback control of vehicle active suspension with time-delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yongsu; Zhao, Dingxuan; Yang, Bin; Han, Chenghao; Han, Kyongwon

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents an approach to design a delay-dependent non-fragile H∞/L2-L∞ static output feedback (SOF) controller for active suspension with input time-delay. The control problem of quarter-car active suspension with actuator time-delay is formulated to a H∞/L2-L∞ control problem. By employing a delay-dependent Lyapunov function, new existence conditions of delay-dependent non-fragile SOF H∞ controller and L2-L∞ controller are derived, respectively, in terms of the feasibility of bilinear matrix inequalities (BMIs). Then, a procedure based on linear matrix inequality optimisation and a hybrid algorithm of the particle swarm optimisation and differential evolution is used to solve an optimisation problem with BMI constraints. Design and simulation results of non-fragile H∞/L2-L∞ controller for active suspension show that the designed controller not only can achieve the optimal performance and stability of the closed-loop system in spite of the existence of the actuator time-delay, but also has significantly improved the non-fragility characteristics over controller perturbations.

  9. Elevated atmospheric CO2 negatively impacts photosynthesis through radiative forcing and physiology-mediated climate feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Ciais, Philippe; Welp, Lisa; Li, Wenyu; Xin, Qinchuan

    2017-02-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 affects photosynthesis involving directly increasing leaf carboxylation rates, stomatal closure, and climatic effects. The direct effects are generally thought to be positive leading to increased photosynthesis, while its climatic effects can be regionally positive or negative. These effects are usually considered to be independent from each other, but they are in fact coupled through interactions between land surface exchanges of gases and heat and the physical climate system. In particular, stomatal closure reduces evapotranspiration and increases sensible heat emissions from ecosystems, leading to decreased atmospheric moisture and precipitation and local warming. We use a coupled earth system model to attribute the influence of the increase in CO2 on gross primary productivity (GPP) during the period of 1930-2011. In our model, CO2 radiative effects cause climate change that has only a negligible effect on global GPP (a reduction of 0.9 ± 2% during the last 80 years) because of opposite responses between tropical and northern biomes. On the other hand, CO2 physiological effects on GPP are both positive, by increased carboxylation rates and water use efficiency (7.1 ± 0.48% increase), and negative, by vegetation-climate feedback reducing precipitation, as a consequence of decreased transpiration and increased sensible heat in areas without water limitation (2.7 ± 1.76% reduction).When considering the coupled atmosphere-vegetation system, negative climate feedback on photosynthesis and plant growth due to the current level of CO2 opposes 29-38% of the gains from direct fertilization effects.

  10. A negative feedback loop mediated by STAT3 limits human Th17 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Harriet A; Anderson, Amy E; Young, David A; Isaacs, John D; Hilkens, Catharien M U

    2014-08-01

    The transcription factor STAT3 is critically required for the differentiation of Th17 cells, a T cell subset involved in various chronic inflammatory diseases. In this article, we report that STAT3 also drives a negative-feedback loop that limits the formation of IL-17-producing T cells within a memory population. By activating human memory CD4(+)CD45RO(+) T cells at a high density (HiD) or a low density (LoD) in the presence of the pro-Th17 cytokines IL-1β, IL-23, and TGF-β, we observed that the numbers of Th17 cells were significantly higher under LoD conditions. Assessment of STAT3 phosphorylation revealed a more rapid and stronger STAT3 activation in HiD cells than in LoD cells. Transient inhibition of active STAT3 in HiD cultures significantly enhanced Th17 cell numbers. Expression of the STAT3-regulated ectonucleotidase CD39, which catalyzes ATP hydrolysis, was higher in HiD, than in LoD, cell cultures. Interestingly, inhibition of CD39 ectonucleotidase activity enhanced Th17 responses under HiD conditions. Conversely, blocking the ATP receptor P2X7 reduced Th17 responses in LoD cultures. These data suggest that STAT3 negatively regulates Th17 cells by limiting the availability of ATP. This negative-feedback loop may provide a safety mechanism to limit tissue damage by Th17 cells during chronic inflammation. Furthermore, our results have relevance for the design of novel immunotherapeutics that target the STAT3-signaling pathway, because inhibition of this pathway may enhance, rather than suppress, memory Th17 responses.

  11. Tracking with asymptotic sliding mode and adaptive input delay effect compensation of nonlinearly perturbed delayed systems applied to traffic feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkin, Boris; Haddad, Jack; Shtessel, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    Asymptotical sliding mode-model reference adaptive control design for a class of systems with parametric uncertainty, unknown nonlinear perturbation and external disturbance, and with known input and state delays is proposed. To overcome the difficulty to directly predict the plant state under uncertainties, a control design is based on a developed decomposition procedure, where a 'generalised error' in conjunction with auxiliary linear dynamic blocks with adjustable gains is introduced and the sliding variable is formed on the basis of this error. The effect of such a decomposition is to pull the input delay out of first step of the design procedure. As a result, similarly to the classical Smith predictor, the adaptive control architecture based only on the lumped-delays, i.e. without conventional in such cases difficult-implemented distributed-delay blocks. Two new adaptive control schemes are proposed. A linearisation-based control design is constructed for feedback control of an urban traffic region model with uncertain dynamics. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed adaptive control method.

  12. SIRT1 is regulated by a PPARγ–SIRT1 negative feedback loop associated with senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rui; Niu, Jing; McNutt, Michael A.; Wang, Pan; Tong, Tanjun

    2010-01-01

    Human Silent Information Regulator Type 1 (SIRT1) is an NAD+-dependent deacetylase protein which is an intermediary of cellular metabolism in gene silencing and aging. SIRT1 has been extensively investigated and shown to delay senescence; however, less is known about the regulation of SIRT1 during aging. In this study, we show that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), which is a ligand-regulated modular nuclear receptor that governs adipocyte differentiation and inhibits cellular proliferation, inhibits SIRT1 expression at the transcriptional level. Moreover, both PPARγ and SIRT1 can bind the SIRT1 promoter. PPARγ directly interacts with SIRT1 and inhibits SIRT1 activity, forming a negative feedback and self-regulation loop. In addition, our data show that acetylation of PPARγ increased with increasing cell passage number. We propose that PPARγ is subject to regulation by acetylation and deacetylation via p300 and SIRT1 in cellular senescence. These results demonstrate a mutual regulation between PPARγ and SIRT1 and identify a new posttranslational modification that affects cellular senescence. PMID:20660480

  13. Coordination of Double Strand Break Repair and Meiotic Progression in Yeast by a Mek1- Ndt80 Negative Feedback Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prugar, Evelyn; Burnett, Cameron; Chen, Xiangyu; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2017-03-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes are physically connected by crossovers and sister chromatid cohesion. Interhomolog crossovers are generated by the highly regulated repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs). The meiosis-specific kinase, Mek1, is critical for this regulation. Mek1 down-regulates the mitotic recombinase Rad51, indirectly promoting interhomolog strand invasion by the meiosis-specific recombinase, Dmc1. Mek1 also promotes the formation of crossovers that are distributed throughout the genome by interference and is the effector kinase for a meiosis-specific checkpoint that delays entry into Meiosis I until DSBs have been repaired. The target of this checkpoint is a meiosis-specific transcription factor, Ndt80, which is necessary to express the polo-like kinase, CDC5, and the cyclin, CLB1, thereby allowing completion of recombination and meiotic progression. This work shows that Mek1 and Ndt80 negatively feedback on each other such that when DSB levels are high, Ndt80 is inactive due to high levels of Mek1 activity. As DSBs are repaired, chromosomes synapse and Mek1 activity is reduced below a threshold that allows activation of Ndt80. Ndt80 transcription of CDC5 results in degradation of Red1, a meiosis-specific protein required for Mek1 activation, thereby abolishing Mek1 activity completely. Elimination of Mek1 kinase activity allows Rad51-mediated repair of any remaining DSBs. In this way, cells do not enter Meiosis I until recombination is complete and all DSBs are repaired.

  14. Gain compensated symmetric loaded transmission line exhibiting bidirectional negative group delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Greg E.; Kandic, Miodrag

    2012-12-01

    A one-dimensional medium capable of bidirectional lossless negative group delay electromagnetic wave propagation is described. The medium is implemented as a microwave circuit comprising two symmetric resonator-loaded transmission lines, with active gain compensation and coupled through power combiners. We experimentally demonstrate the circuit is conditionally stable and is capable of lossless transmission of a finite bandwidth pulse in both directions. A measured group delay of -600 ps with a gain of 1.12 dB in both directions is achieved for a Gaussian pulse with a bandwidth of 14 MHz modulated at a frequency of 280 MHz (NGD-bandwidth-product of 0.0084). This circuit demonstrates the possibility of constructing a one-dimensional spatial void.

  15. Adolescents' comments in social media : Why do adolescents receive negative feedback and who is most at risk?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutamanis, Maria; Vossen, Helen G M; Valkenburg, Patti M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Receiving negative peer feedback in social media may have negative consequences for adolescents' psychosocial development and well-being. Therefore, the first aim of this study was to investigate online behavior (i.e., online social exploration, risky online self-presentation) that predicts

  16. Adolescents’ comments in social media: why do adolescents receive negative feedback and who is most at risk?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutamanis, M.; Vossen, H.G.M.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Receiving negative peer feedback in social media may have negative consequences for adolescents’ psychosocial development and well-being. Therefore, the first aim of this study was to investigate online behavior (i.e., online social exploration, risky online self-presentation) that predicts receivin

  17. The effects of the personality traits and positive and negative feedback on the perceived self-efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smederevac-Stokić Snežana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to determine the relation between the self-efficacy, feedback and personality traits. The participants were 114 psychology students attending their first and third year from the University of Novi Sad. In the first part of the research, all subjects completed The NEO-PI-R (Costa and McCrae, 1992.. In the second phase the subjects were asked to create a short measurement scale. Before and after this task, as well as after the given feedback, the students completed The Self-efficacy Questionnaire (Terry, 1995. The feedback was the criterion to divide subjects into three groups: the first group received the positive, the second negative, and third group received no feedback. Criteria variables in the MANCOVA (repeated measures were the estimated success, difficulty and ability to perform the task in the three stages of measurement. Predictor variables were the type of the feedback and the personality traits, as covariates. The results suggest that before feedback, the impact of traits on the self-efficacy was significant. But after received feedback, self-efficacy was related to the type of received feedback only. These results showed that self-efficacy was significantly influenced both by personality traits and feedback context.

  18. Negative feedback, beliefs and personal goals in prediction of dysfunctional emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Boris

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT demonstrates good results in evaluation therapy researches. However, some of its basic concepts, as well as theory as a whole itself, did not receive satisfactory empirical support so far, in comparison to other cognitive models (Beck, Lazarus etc.. Quasiexperimental study was designed to test the role that (1 negative feedback (A and (2 irrational beliefs (B both play in formation of dysfunctional negative emotions, in the context of significant personal goals (in our case value of potential award - G. ABC theoretical model received limited support: statistically significant three-times interaction A x B x G was found in predicting general negative emotional state, as well as anger. In contrast with that, ANOVA showed only main effect of irrational beliefs (as continuous variable to be significant in predicting emotions of anxiety and depression. Findings are discussed in the context of REBT theory of emotions, as well as their possible practical applications. Limitations of the study were also mentioned. .

  19. Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Barbara K

    2004-12-01

    The emergency department provides a rich environment for diverse patient encounters, rapid clinical decision making, and opportunities to hone procedural skills. Well-prepared faculty can utilize this environment to teach residents and medical students and gain institutional recognition for their incomparable role and teamwork. Giving effective feedback is an essential skill for all teaching faculty. Feedback is ongoing appraisal of performance based on direct observation aimed at changing or sustaining a behavior. Tips from the literature and the author's experience are reviewed to provide formats for feedback, review of objectives, and elements of professionalism and how to deal with poorly performing students. Although the following examples pertain to medical student education, these techniques are applicable to the education of all adult learners, including residents and colleagues. Specific examples of redirection and reflection are offered, and pitfalls are reviewed. Suggestions for streamlining verbal and written feedback and obtaining feedback from others in a fast-paced environment are given. Ideas for further individual and group faculty development are presented.

  20. Experimental Comparison of two Active Vibration Control Approaches: Velocity Feedback and Negative Capacitance Shunt Damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Benjamin; Schiller, Noah

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a direct, experimental comparison between two established active vibration control techniques. Active vibration control methods, many of which rely upon piezoelectric patches as actuators and/or sensors, have been widely studied, showing many advantages over passive techniques. However, few direct comparisons between different active vibration control methods have been made to determine the performance benefit of one method over another. For the comparison here, the first control method, velocity feedback, is implemented using four accelerometers that act as sensors along with an analog control circuit which drives a piezoelectric actuator. The second method, negative capacitance shunt damping, consists of a basic analog circuit which utilizes a single piezoelectric patch as both a sensor and actuator. Both of these control methods are implemented individually using the same piezoelectric actuator attached to a clamped Plexiglas window. To assess the performance of each control method, the spatially averaged velocity of the window is compared to an uncontrolled response.

  1. Messenger RNA Fluctuations and Regulatory RNAs Shape the Dynamics of Negative Feedback Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, María Rodríguez; Tlusty, Tsvi; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Furman, Itay; 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.031924

    2010-01-01

    Single cell experiments of simple regulatory networks can markedly differ from cell population experiments. Such differences arise from stochastic events in individual cells that are averaged out in cell populations. For instance, while individual cells may show sustained oscillations in the concentrations of some proteins, such oscillations may appear damped in the population average. In this paper we investigate the role of RNA stochastic fluctuations as a leading force to produce a sustained excitatory behavior at the single cell level. Opposed to some previous models, we build a fully stochastic model of a negative feedback loop that explicitly takes into account the RNA stochastic dynamics. We find that messenger RNA random fluctuations can be amplified during translation and produce sustained pulses of protein expression. Motivated by the recent appreciation of the importance of non--coding regulatory RNAs in post--transcription regulation, we also consider the possibility that a regulatory RNA transcri...

  2. Anti-Swing Control of Gantry and Tower Cranes Using Fuzzy and Time-Delayed Feedback with Friction Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Omar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We designed a feedback controller to automate crane operations by controlling the load position and its swing. First, a PD tracking controller is designed to follow a prescribed trajectory. Then, another controller is added to the control loop to damp the load swing. The anti-swing controller is designed based on two techniques: a time-delayed feedback of the load swing angle and an anti-swing fuzzy logic controller (FLC. The rules of the FLC are generated by mapping the performance of the time-delayed feedback controller. The same mapping method used for generating the rules can be applied to mimic the performance of an expert operator. The control algorithms were designed for gantry cranes and then extended to tower cranes by considering the coupling between the translational and rotational motions. Experimental results show that the controller is effective in reducing load oscillations and transferring the load in a reasonable time. To experimentally validate the theory, we had to compensate for friction. To this end, we estimated the friction and then applied a control action to cancel it. The friction force was estimated by assuming a mathematical model and then estimating the model coefficients using an off-line identification technique, the method of least squares (LS.

  3. Thyroid hormone exerts negative feedback on hypothalamic type 4 melanocortin receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decherf, Stéphanie; Seugnet, Isabelle; Kouidhi, Soumaya; Lopez-Juarez, Alejandra; Clerget-Froidevaux, Marie-Stéphanie; Demeneix, Barbara A

    2010-03-01

    The type 4 melanocortin receptor MC4R, a key relay in leptin signaling, links central energy control to peripheral reserve status. MC4R activation in different brain areas reduces food intake and increases energy expenditure. Mice lacking Mc4r are obese. Mc4r is expressed by hypothalamic paraventricular Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) neurons and increases energy usage through activation of Trh and production of the thyroid hormone tri-iodothyronine (T(3)). These facts led us to test the hypothesis that energy homeostasis should require negative feedback by T(3) on Mc4r expression. Quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization showed hyperthyroidism reduces Mc4r mRNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus. Comparative in silico analysis of Mc4r regulatory regions revealed two evolutionarily conserved potential negative thyroid hormone-response elements (nTREs). In vivo ChIP assays on mouse hypothalamus demonstrated association of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) with a region spanning one nTRE. Further, in vivo gene reporter assays revealed dose-dependent T(3) repression of transcription from the Mc4r promoter in mouse hypothalamus, in parallel with T(3)-dependent Trh repression. Mutagenesis of the nTREs in the Mc4r promoter demonstrated direct regulation by T(3), consolidating the ChIP results. In vivo shRNA knockdown, TR over-expression approaches and use of mutant mice lacking specific TRs showed that both TRalpha and TRbeta contribute to Mc4r regulation. T(3) repression of Mc4r transcription ensures that the energy-saving effects of T(3) feedback on Trh are not overridden by MC4R activation of Trh. Thus parallel repression by T(3) on hypothalamic Mc4r and Trh contributes to energy homeostasis.

  4. Smart conjugated polymer nanocarrier for healthy weight loss by negative feedback regulation of lipase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhu, Sha; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Pei-Jian; Yao, Xi-Kuang; Qian, Cheng-Gen; Zhang, Can; Jiang, Xi-Qun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution.Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution

  5. Negative feedback regulation of Homer 1a on norepinephrine-dependent cardiac hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarello, Carmelina; Bortoloso, Elena; Carpi, Andrea; Furlan, Sandra; Volpe, Pompeo, E-mail: pompeo.volpe@unipd.it

    2013-07-15

    Homers are scaffolding proteins that modulate diverse cell functions being able to assemble signalling complexes. In this study, the presence, sub-cellular distribution and function of Homer 1 was investigated. Homer 1a and Homer 1b/c are constitutively expressed in cardiac muscle of both mouse and rat and in HL-1 cells, a cardiac cell line. As judged by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, Homer 1a displays sarcomeric and peri-nuclear localization. In cardiomyocytes and cultured HL-1 cells, the hypertrophic agonist norepinephrine (NE) induces α{sub 1}-adrenergic specific Homer 1a over-expression, with a two-to-three-fold increase within 1 h, and no up-regulation of Homer 1b/c, as judged by Western blot and qPCR. In HL-1 cells, plasmid-driven over-expression of Homer 1a partially antagonizes activation of ERK phosphorylation and ANF up-regulation, two well-established, early markers of hypertrophy. At the morphometric level, NE-induced increase of cell size is likewise and partially counteracted by exogenous Homer 1a. Under the same experimental conditions, Homer 1b/c does not have any effect on ANF up-regulation nor on cell hypertrophy. Thus, Homer 1a up-regulation is associated to early stages of cardiac hypertrophy and appears to play a negative feedback regulation on molecular transducers of hypertrophy. -- Highlights: • Homer 1a is constitutively expressed in cardiac tissue. • In HL-1 cells, norepinephrine activates signaling pathways leading to hypertrophy. • Homer 1a up-regulation is an early event of norepinephrine-induced hypertrophy. • Homer 1a plays a negative feedback regulation modulating pathological hypertrophy. • Over-expression of Homer 1a per se does not induce hypertrophy.

  6. An evolutionarily conserved negative feedback mechanism in the Hippo pathway reflects functional difference between LATS1 and LATS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gun-Soo; Oh, Hyangyee; Kim, Minchul; Kim, Tackhoon; Johnson, Randy L; Irvine, Kenneth D; Lim, Dae-Sik

    2016-04-26

    The Hippo pathway represses YAP oncoprotein activity through phosphorylation by LATS kinases. Although variety of upstream components has been found to participate in the Hippo pathway, the existence and function of negative feedback has remained uncertain. We found that activated YAP, together with TEAD transcription factors, directly induces transcription of LATS2, but not LATS1, to form a negative feedback loop. We also observed increased mRNA levels of Hippo upstream components upon YAP activation. To reveal the physiological role of this negative feedback regulation, we deleted Lats2 or Lats1 in the liver-specific Sav1-knockout mouse model which develops a YAP-induced tumor. Additional deletion of Lats2 severely enhanced YAP-induced tumorigenic phenotypes in a liver specific Sav1 knock-out mouse model while additional deletion of Lats1 mildly affected the phenotype. Only Sav1 and Lats2 double knock-down cells formed larger colonies in soft agar assay, thereby recapitulating accelerated tumorigenesis seen in vivo. Importantly, this negative feedback is evolutionarily conserved, as Drosophila Yorkie (YAP ortholog) induces transcription of Warts (LATS2 ortholog) with Scalloped (TEAD ortholog). Collectively, we demonstrated the existence and function of an evolutionarily conserved negative feedback mechanism in the Hippo pathway, as well as the functional difference between LATS1 and LATS2 in regulation of YAP.

  7. Emergence of resonant mode-locking via delayed feedback in quantum dot semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tykalewicz, B; Goulding, D; Hegarty, S P; Huyet, G; Erneux, T; Kelleher, B; Viktorov, E A

    2016-02-22

    With conventional semiconductor lasers undergoing external optical feedback, a chaotic output is typically observed even for moderate levels of the feedback strength. In this paper we examine single mode quantum dot lasers under strong optical feedback conditions and show that an entirely new dynamical regime is found consisting of spontaneous mode-locking via a resonance between the relaxation oscillation frequency and the external cavity repetition rate. Experimental observations are supported by detailed numerical simulations of rate equations appropriate for this laser type. The phenomenon constitutes an entirely new mode-locking mechanism in semiconductor lasers.

  8. Feedback Control Variables Have No Influence on the Permanence of a Discrete n-Species Schoener Competition System with Time Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Su

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a discrete n-species Schoener competition system with time delays and feedback controls. By using difference inequality theory, a set of conditions which guarantee the permanence of system is obtained. The results indicate that feedback control variables have no influence on the persistent property of the system. Numerical simulations show the feasibility of our results.

  9. Constant Delivery Delay Protocol Sequences for the Collision Channel Without Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Salaun, Lou; Shue Chen, Chung; Chen, Yi; Shing Wong, Wing

    2016-01-01

    International audience; We consider a collision channel model without feedback based on a time-slotted communication channel shared by K users. In this model, packets transmitted in the same time slot collide with each other and are unrecoverable. Each user accesses the channel according to an internal periodical pattern called protocol sequence. Due to the lack of feedback, users cannot synchronize their protocol sequences, leading to unavoidable collisions and varying throughput. Protocol s...

  10. Reduced-order observer-based output feedback control of nonlinear time-delay systems with prescribed performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Changchun; Zhang, Liuliu; Guan, Xinping

    2016-04-01

    This paper studies the problem of output feedback control for a class of nonlinear time-delay systems with prescribed performance. The system is in the form of triangular structure with unmodelled dynamics. First, we introduce a reduced-order observer to provide the estimate of the unmeasured states. Then, by setting a new condition with the performance function, we design the state transformation with prescribed performance control. By employing backstepping method, we construct the output feedback controller. It is proved that the resulting closed-loop system is asymptotically stable and both transient and steady-state performance of the output are preserved with the changing supply function idea. Finally, a simulation example is conducted to show the effectiveness of the main results.

  11. Non-fragile H∞ dynamic output feedback control for uncertain Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with time-varying delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-Juan; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2016-09-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the problem of non-fragile H∞ dynamic output feedback control for a class of uncertain Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with time-varying state delay. Based on a new type of Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional without ignoring any subtle integral terms in the derivatives, a less conservative dynamic output feedback controller with additive gain variations is designed, which guarantees that the closed-loop fuzzy system is asymptotically stable and satisfies a prescribed H∞-performance level. Furthermore, the obtained parameter-dependent conditions are given in terms of solution to a set of linear matrix inequalities, which improve some existing relevant results. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and merits of the proposed method.

  12. Delayed coupling to feedback inhibition during a critical period for the integration of adult-born granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temprana, Silvio G; Mongiat, Lucas A; Yang, Sung M; Trinchero, Mariela F; Alvarez, Diego D; Kropff, Emilio; Giacomini, Damiana; Beltramone, Natalia; Lanuza, Guillermo M; Schinder, Alejandro F

    2015-01-07

    Developing granule cells (GCs) of the adult dentate gyrus undergo a critical period of enhanced activity and synaptic plasticity before becoming mature. The impact of developing GCs on the activity of preexisting dentate circuits remains unknown. Here we combine optogenetics, acute slice electrophysiology, and in vivo chemogenetics to activate GCs at different stages of maturation to study the recruitment of local target networks. We show that immature (4-week-old) GCs can efficiently drive distal CA3 targets but poorly activate proximal interneurons responsible for feedback inhibition (FBI). As new GCs transition toward maturity, they reliably recruit GABAergic feedback loops that restrict spiking of neighbor GCs, a mechanism that would promote sparse coding. Such inhibitory loop impinges only weakly in new cohorts of young GCs. A computational model reveals that the delayed coupling of new GCs to FBI could be crucial to achieve a fine-grain representation of novel inputs in the dentate gyrus.

  13. Stochastic thermodynamics of Langevin systems under time-delayed feedback control. II. Nonequilibrium steady-state fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinberg, M. L.; Tarjus, G.; Munakata, T.

    2017-02-01

    This paper is the second in a series devoted to the study of Langevin systems subjected to a continuous time-delayed feedback control. The goal of our previous paper [Phys. Rev. E 91, 042114 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.042114] was to derive second-law-like inequalities that provide bounds to the average extracted work. Here we study stochastic fluctuations of time-integrated observables such as the heat exchanged with the environment, the extracted work, or the (apparent) entropy production. We use a path-integral formalism and focus on the long-time behavior in the stationary cooling regime, stressing the role of rare events. This is illustrated by a detailed analytical and numerical study of a Langevin harmonic oscillator driven by a linear feedback.

  14. Asynchronous H∞ Dynamic Output Feedback Control of Switched Time-Delay Systems with Sensor Nonlinearity and Missing Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwei Wen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The H∞ dynamic output feedback control problem for a class of discrete-time switched time-delay systems under asynchronous switching is investigated in this paper. Sensor nonlinearity and missing measurements are considered when collecting output knowledge of the system. Firstly, when there exists asynchronous switching between the switching modes and the candidate controllers, new results on the regional stability and l2 gain analysis for the underlying system are given by allowing the Lyapunov-like function (LLF to increase with a random probability. Then, a mean square stabilizing output feedback controller and a switching law subject to average dwell time (ADT are obtained with a given disturbance attenuation level. Moreover, the mean square domain of attraction could be estimated by a convex combination of a set of ellipsoids, the number of which depends on the number of switching modes. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Negative feedback regulation of auxin signaling by ATHB8/ACL5-BUD2 transcription module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baima, Simona; Forte, Valentina; Possenti, Marco; Peñalosa, Andrés; Leoni, Guido; Salvi, Sergio; Felici, Barbara; Ruberti, Ida; Morelli, Giorgio

    2014-06-01

    The role of auxin as main regulator of vascular differentiation is well established, and a direct correlation between the rate of xylem differentiation and the amount of auxin reaching the (pro)cambial cells has been proposed. It has been suggested that thermospermine produced by ACAULIS5 (ACL5) and bushy and dwarf2 (BUD2) is one of the factors downstream to auxin contributing to the regulation of this process in Arabidopsis. Here, we provide an in-depth characterization of the mechanism through which ACL5 modulates xylem differentiation. We show that an increased level of ACL5 slows down xylem differentiation by negatively affecting the expression of homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) III and key auxin signaling genes. This mechanism involves the positive regulation of thermospermine biosynthesis by the HD-ZIP III protein Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox8 tightly controlling the expression of ACL5 and BUD2. In addition, we show that the HD-ZIP III protein REVOLUTA contributes to the increased leaf vascularization and long hypocotyl phenotype of acl5 likely by a direct regulation of auxin signaling genes such as like auxin resistant2 (LAX2) and LAX3. We propose that proper formation and differentiation of xylem depend on a balance between positive and negative feedback loops operating through HD-ZIP III genes.

  16. Parametrically Excited Oscillations of Second-Order Functional Differential Equations and Application to Duffing Equations with Time Delay Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervan Pašić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study oscillatory behaviour of a large class of second-order functional differential equations with three freedom real nonnegative parameters. According to a new oscillation criterion, we show that if at least one of these three parameters is large enough, then the main equation must be oscillatory. As an application, we study a class of Duffing type quasilinear equations with nonlinear time delayed feedback and their oscillations excited by the control gain parameter or amplitude of forcing term. Finally, some open questions and comments are given for the purpose of further study on this topic.

  17. Memory State-Feedback Stabilization for a Class of Time-Delay Systems with a Type of Adaptive Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stabilization of a class of systems with time delay is studied using adaptive control. With the help of the “error to error” technique and the separated “descriptor form” technique, the memory state-feedback controller is designed. The adaptive controller designed can guarantee asymptotical stability of the closed-loop system via a suitable Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional. Some sufficient conditions are derived for the stabilization together with the linear matrix inequality (LMI design approach. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed control design methodology is demonstrated in numerical simulations.

  18. Finite-time H∞ control for a class of discrete-time switched time-delay systems with quantized feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Haiyu; Yu, Li; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Wen-An

    2012-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the finite-time quantized H∞ control problem for a class of discrete-time switched time-delay systems with time-varying exogenous disturbances. By using the sector bound approach and the average dwell time method, sufficient conditions are derived for the switched system to be finite-time bounded and ensure a prescribed H∞ disturbance attenuation level, and a mode-dependent quantized state feedback controller is designed by solving an optimization problem. Two illustrative examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical results.

  19. A recursive delayed output-feedback control to stabilize chaotic systems using linear-in-parameter neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadmellat, Peyman; Nikravesh, S. Kamaleddin Yadavar

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a recursive delayed output-feedback control strategy is considered for stabilizing unstable periodic orbit of unknown nonlinear chaotic systems. An unknown nonlinearity is directly estimated by a linear-in-parameter neural network which is then used in an observer structure. An on-line modified back propagation algorithm with e-modification is used to update the weights of the network. The globally uniformly ultimately boundedness of overall closed-loop system response is analytically ensured using Razumikhin lemma. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed observer-based controller, a set of simulations is performed on a Rossler system in comparison with several previous methods.

  20. The Feedback Control Strategy of the Takagi-Sugeno Fuzzy Car-Following Model with Two Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Zhai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the driver’s sensing the headway and velocity the different time-varying delays exist, respectively, and the sensitivity of drivers changes with headway and speed. Introducing the fuzzy control theory, a new fuzzy car-following model with two delays is presented, and the feedback control strategy of the new fuzzy car-following model is studied. Based on the Lyapunov function theory and linear matrix inequality (LMI approach, the sufficient condition that the existence of the fuzzy controller is given making the closed-loop system is asymptotic, stable; namely, traffic congestion phenomenon can effectively be suppressed, and the controller gain matrix can be obtained via solving linear matrix inequality. Finally, the simulation examples verify that the method which suppresses traffic congestion and reduces fuel consumption and exhaust emissions is effective.

  1. Decentralized Output Feedback Adaptive NN Tracking Control for Time-Delay Stochastic Nonlinear Systems With Prescribed Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Changchun; Zhang, Liuliu; Guan, Xinping

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the dynamic output feedback tracking control problem for stochastic interconnected time-delay systems with the prescribed performance. The subsystems are in the form of triangular structure. First, we design a reduced-order observer independent of time delay to estimate the unmeasured state variables online instead of the traditional full-order observer. Then, a new state transformation is proposed in consideration of the prescribed performance requirement. Using neural network to approximate the composite unknown nonlinear function, the corresponding decentralized output tracking controller is designed. It is strictly proved that the resulting closed-loop system is stable in probability in the sense of uniformly ultimately boundedness and that both transient-state and steady-state performances are preserved. Finally, a simulation example is given, and the result shows the effectiveness of the proposed control design method.

  2. Adaptive neural tracking control of a class of MIMO pure-feedback time-delay nonlinear systems with input saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Yue, Dong; Yuan, Deming

    2016-11-01

    Considering interconnections among subsystems, we propose an adaptive neural tracking control scheme for a class of multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) non-affine pure-feedback time-delay nonlinear systems with input saturation. Neural networks (NNs) are employed to approximate unknown functions in the design procedure, and the separation technology is introduced here to tackle the problem induced from unknown time-delay items. The adaptive neural tracking control scheme is constructed by combining Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals, NNs, the auxiliary system, the implicit function theory and the mean value theorem along with the dynamic surface control technique. Also, it is proven that the strategy guarantees tracking errors converge to a small neighbourhood around the origin by appropriate choice of design parameters and all signals in the closed-loop system uniformly ultimately bounded. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  3. Bifurcation structure of cavity soliton dynamics in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a saturable absorber and time-delayed feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelte, Christian; Panajotov, Krassimir; Tlidi, Mustapha; Gurevich, Svetlana V.

    2017-08-01

    We consider a wide-aperture surface-emitting laser with a saturable absorber section subjected to time-delayed feedback. We adopt the mean-field approach assuming a single longitudinal mode operation of the solitary vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). We investigate cavity soliton dynamics under the effect of time-delayed feedback in a self-imaging configuration where diffraction in the external cavity is negligible. Using bifurcation analysis, direct numerical simulations, and numerical path-continuation methods, we identify the possible bifurcations and map them in a plane of feedback parameters. We show that for both the homogeneous and localized stationary lasing solutions in one spatial dimension, the time-delayed feedback induces complex spatiotemporal dynamics, in particular a period doubling route to chaos, quasiperiodic oscillations, and multistability of the stationary solutions.

  4. Unified stabilizing controller synthesis approach for discrete-time intelligent systems with time delays by dynamic output feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU MeiQin

    2007-01-01

    A novel model, termed the standard neural network model (SNNM), is advanced to describe some delayed (or non-delayed) discrete-time intelligent systems composed of neural networks and Takagi and Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy models. The SNNM is composed of a discrete-time linear dynamic system and a bounded static nonlinear operator. Based on the global asymptotic stability analysis of the SNNMs, linear and nonlinear dynamic output feedback controllers are designed for the SNNMs to stabilize the closed-loop systems, respectively. The control design equations are shown to be a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) which can be easily solved by various convex optimization algorithms to determine the control signals. Most neural-network-based (or fuzzy) discrete-time intelligent systems with time delays or without time delays can be transformed into the SNNMs for controller synthesis in a unified way. Three application examples show that the SNNMs not only make controller synthesis of neural-network-based (or fuzzy) discrete-time intelligent systems much easier, but also provide a new approach to the synthesis of the controllers for the other type of nonlinear systems.

  5. Stability result of the Timoshenko system with delay and boundary feedback

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2012-01-06

    Our interest in this paper is to analyse the asymptotic behaviour of a Timoshenko beam system together with two boundary controls, with delay terms in the first and second equation. Assuming the weights of the delay are small enough, we show that the system is well-posed using the semigroup theory. Furthermore, we introduce a Lyapunov functional that gives the exponential decay of the total energy. © 2012 The author.

  6. The effect and design of time delay in feedback control for a nonlinear isolation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiuting; Xu, Jian; Fu, Jiangsong

    2017-03-01

    The optimum value of time delay of active control used in a nonlinear isolation system for different types of external excitation is studied in this paper. Based on the mathematical model of the nonlinear isolator with time-delayed active control, the stability, response and displacement transmissibility of the system are analyzed to obtain the standards for appropriate values of time delay and control strengths. The effects of nonlinearity and time delay on the stability and vibration response are discussed in details. For impact excitation and random excitation, the optimal value of time delay is obtained based on the vibration dissipation time via eigenvalues analysis, while for harmonic excitation, the optimal values are determined based on multiple vibration properties including natural frequency, amplitude death region and effective isolation region by the Averaging Method. This paper establishes the relationship between the parameters and vibration properties of a nonlinear isolation system which provides the guidance for optimizing time-delayed active control for different types of excitation in engineering practices.

  7. MK3 controls Polycomb target gene expression via negative feedback on ERK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prickaerts Peggy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-environment interactions are mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Polycomb Group proteins constitute part of an epigenetic cellular transcriptional memory system that is subject to dynamic modulation during differentiation. Molecular insight in processes that control dynamic chromatin association and dissociation of Polycomb repressive complexes during and beyond development is limited. We recently showed that MK3 interacts with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1. The functional relevance of this interaction, however, remained poorly understood. MK3 is activated downstream of mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (M/SAPKs, all of which fulfill crucial roles during development. We here use activation of the immediate-early response gene ATF3, a bona fide PRC1 target gene, as a model to study how MK3 and its effector kinases MAPK/ERK and SAPK/P38 are involved in regulation of PRC1-dependent ATF3 transcription. Results Our current data show that mitogenic signaling through ERK, P38 and MK3 regulates ATF3 expression by PRC1/chromatin dissociation and epigenetic modulation. Mitogenic stimulation results in transient P38-dependent H3S28 phosphorylation and ERK-driven PRC1/chromatin dissociation at PRC1 targets. H3S28 phosphorylation by itself appears not sufficient to induce PRC1/chromatin dissociation, nor ATF3 transcription, as inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling blocks BMI1/chromatin dissociation and ATF3 expression, despite induced H3S28 phosphorylation. In addition, we establish that concomitant loss of local H3K27me3 promoter marking is not required for ATF3 activation. We identify pERK as a novel signaling-induced binding partner of PRC1, and provide evidence that MK3 controls ATF3 expression in cultured cells via negative regulatory feedback on M/SAPKs. Dramatically increased ectopic wing vein formation in the absence of Drosophila MK in a Drosophila ERK gain-of-function wing vein patterning model, supports the

  8. Dopaminergic medication modulates learning from feedback and error-related negativity in Parkinson’s disease: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Volpato

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine systems mediate key aspects of reward learning. Parkinson’s disease (PD represents a valuable model to study reward mechanisms because both the disease process and the anti-Parkinson medications influence dopamine neurotransmission. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether the level of levodopa differently modulates learning from positive and negative feedback and its electrophysiological correlate, the error related negativity (ERN, in PD. Ten PD patients and ten healthy participants performed a two-stage reinforcement learning task. In the Learning Phase they had to learn the correct stimulus within a stimulus pair on the basis of a probabilistic positive or negative feedback. Three sets of stimulus pairs were used. In the Testing Phase the participants were tested with novel combinations of the stimuli previously experienced to evaluate whether they learned more from positive or negative feedback. PD patients performed the task both ON- and OFF-levodopa in two separate sessions while they remained on stable therapy with dopamine agonists. The electroencephalogram was recorded during the task. PD patients were less accurate in negative than positive learning both OFF- and ON-levodopa. In the OFF-levodopa state they were less accurate than controls in negative learning. PD patients had a smaller ERN amplitude OFF- than ON-levodopa only in negative learning. In the OFF-levodopa state they had a smaller ERN amplitude than controls in negative learning. We hypothesize that high tonic dopaminergic stimulation due to the dopamine agonist medication, combined to the low level of phasic dopamine due to the OFF-levodopa state, could prevent phasic dopamine dips indicated by the ERN needed for learning from negative feedback.

  9. A computational model clarifies the roles of positive and negative feedback loops in the Drosophila circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Junwei, E-mail: wangjunweilj@yahoo.com.c [Cisco School of Informatics, Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhou Tianshou [School of Mathematics and Computational Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2010-06-14

    Previous studies showed that a single negative feedback structure should be sufficient for robust circadian oscillations. It is thus pertinent to ask why current cellular clock models almost universally have interlocked negative feedback loop (NFL) and positive feedback loop (PFL). Here, we propose a molecular model that reflects the essential features of the Drosophila circadian clock to clarify the different roles of negative and positive feedback loops. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can simulate circadian oscillations in constant darkness, entrainment by light-dark cycles, as well as phenotypes of per{sup 01} and clk{sup Jrk} mutants. Moreover, sustained oscillations persist when the PFL is removed, implying the crucial role of NFL for rhythm generation. Through parameter sensitivity analysis, it is revealed that incorporation of PFL increases the robustness of the system to regulatory processes in PFL itself. Such reduced models can aid understanding of the design principles of circadian clocks in Drosophila and other organisms with complex transcriptional feedback structures.

  10. Resonances of a nonlinear single-degree-of-freedom system with time delay in linear feedback control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bassiouny, Atef F. [Mathematics Dept., Benha Univ., Benha (Egypt); El-Kholy, Salah [Dept. of Mathematics, Menoufia Univ., Shebin El-kom (Egypt)

    2010-05-15

    The primary and subharmonic resonances of a nonlinear single-degree-of-freedom system under feedback control with a time delay are studied by means of an asymptotic perturbation technique. Both external (forcing) and parametric excitations are included. By means of the averaging method and multiple scales method, two slow-flow equations for the amplitude and phase of the primary and subharmonic resonances and all other parameters are obtained. The steady state (fixed points) corresponding to a periodic motion of the starting system is investigated and frequency-response curves are shown. The stability of the fixed points is examined using the variational method. The effect of the feedback gains, the time-delay, the coefficient of cubic term, and the coefficients of external and parametric excitations on the steady-state responses are investigated and the results are presented as plots of the steady-state response amplitude versus the detuning parameter. The results obtained by two methods are in excellent agreement. (orig.)

  11. Semiconductor ring lasers with delayed optical feedback: low-frequency fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Sande, Guy; Mashal, Lilia; Nguimdo, Romain Modeste; Cornelles-Soriano, Miguel C.; Danckaert, Jan; Verschaffelt, Guy

    2014-05-01

    Semiconductor lasers subject to external feedback are known to exhibit a wide variety of dynamical regimes desired for some applications such as chaos cryptography, random bit generation, and reservoir computing. Low-frequency fluctuations is one of the most frequently encountered regimes. It is characterized by a fast drop in laser intensity followed by a gradual recovery. The duration of this recovery process is irregular and of the order of hundred nanoseconds. The average time between dropouts is much larger than the laser system characteristic time-scales. Semiconductor ring lasers are currently the focus of a rapidly thriving research activity due to their unique feature of directional bistability. They can be employed in systems for all-optical switching, gating, wavelength-conversion functions, and all-optical memories. Semiconductor ring lasers do not require cleaved facets or gratings for optical feedback and are thus particularly suited for monolithic integration. We experimentally and numerically address the issue of low-frequency fluctuations considering a semiconductor ring laser in a feedback configuration where only one directional mode is re-injected into the same directional mode, a so-called single self-feedback. We have observed that the system is very sensitive to the feedback strength and the injection current. In particular, the power dropouts are more regular when the pump current is increased and become less frequent when the feedback strength is increased. In addition, we find two different recovery processes after the power dropouts of the low-frequency fluctuations. The recovery can either occur via pulses or in a stepwise manner. Since low-frequency fluctuations are not specific to semiconductor ring lasers, we expect these recovery processes to appear also in VCSELs and edge-emitting lasers under similar feedback conditions. The numerical simulations also capture these different behaviors, where the representation in the phase space of

  12. Negative X-ray reverberation time delays from MCG-6-30-15 and Mrk 766

    CERN Document Server

    Emmanoulopoulos, D; Papadakis, I E

    2011-01-01

    We present an X-ray time lag analysis, as a function of Fourier frequency, for MCG-6-30-15 and Mrk 766 using long term XMM-Newton light curves in the 0.5-1.5 keV and the 2-4 keV energy bands, together with some physical modelling of the corresponding time lag spectra. Both the time lag spectra of MCG-6-30-15 and Mrk 766 show negative values (i.e. soft band variations lag behind the corresponding hard band variations) at high frequencies, around 0.001 Hz, similar to those previously observed from 1H 0707-495. The remarkable morphological resemblance between the time lag spectra of MCG-6-30-15 and Mrk 766 indicate that the physical processes responsible for the observed soft time delays is very similar in the two sources, favouring a reflection scenario from material situated very nearby to the central black hole.

  13. The interplay between feedback-related negativity and individual differences in altruistic punishment: An EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothes, Hendrik; Enge, Sören; Strobel, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    To date, the interplay betwexen neurophysiological and individual difference factors in altruistic punishment has been little understood. To examine this issue, 45 individuals participated in a Dictator Game with punishment option while the feedback-related negativity (FRN) was derived from the electroencephalogram (EEG). Unlike previous EEG studies on the Dictator Game, we introduced a third party condition to study the effect of fairness norm violations in addition to employing a first person perspective. For the first time, we also examined the role of individual differences, specifically fairness concerns, positive/negative affectivity, and altruism/empathy as well as recipients' financial situation during altruistic punishment. The main results show that FRN amplitudes were more pronounced for unfair than for fair assignments in both the first person and third party perspectives. These findings suggest that FRN amplitudes are sensitive to fairness norm violations and play a crucial role in the recipients' evaluation of dictator assignments. With respect to individual difference factors, recipients' current financial situation affected the FRN fairness effect in the first person perspective, indicating that when being directly affected by the assignments, more affluent participants experienced stronger violations of expectations in altruistic punishment decisions. Regarding individual differences in trait empathy, in the third party condition FRN amplitudes were more pronounced for those who scored lower in empathy. This may suggest empathy as another motive in third party punishment. Independent of the perspective taken, higher positive affect was associated with more punishment behavior, suggesting that positive emotions may play an important role in restoring violated fairness norms.

  14. Urocortin3 mediates somatostatin-dependent negative feedback control of insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meulen, Talitha; Donaldson, Cynthia J; Cáceres, Elena; Hunter, Anna E; Cowing-Zitron, Christopher; Pound, Lynley D; Adams, Michael W; Zembrzycki, Andreas; Grove, Kevin L; Huising, Mark O

    2015-07-01

    The peptide hormone urocortin3 (Ucn3) is abundantly expressed by mature beta cells, yet its physiological role is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Ucn3 is stored and co-released with insulin and potentiates glucose-stimulated somatostatin secretion via cognate receptors on delta cells. Further, we found that islets lacking endogenous Ucn3 have fewer delta cells, reduced somatostatin content, impaired somatostatin secretion, and exaggerated insulin release, and that these defects are rectified by treatment with synthetic Ucn3 in vitro. Our observations indicate that the paracrine actions of Ucn3 activate a negative feedback loop that promotes somatostatin release to ensure the timely reduction of insulin secretion upon normalization of plasma glucose. Moreover, Ucn3 is markedly depleted from beta cells in mouse and macaque models of diabetes and in human diabetic islets. This suggests that Ucn3 is a key contributor to stable glycemic control, whose reduction during diabetes aggravates glycemic volatility and contributes to the pathophysiology of this disease.

  15. Messenger RNA fluctuations and regulatory RNAs shape the dynamics of a negative feedback loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Martínez, María; Soriano, Jordi; Tlusty, Tsvi; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Furman, Itay

    2010-03-01

    Single-cell experiments of simple regulatory networks can markedly differ from cell population experiments. Such differences arise from stochastic events in individual cells that are averaged out in cell populations. For instance, while individual cells may show sustained oscillations in the concentrations of some proteins, such oscillations may appear damped in the population average. In this paper we investigate the role of RNA stochastic fluctuations as a leading force to produce a sustained excitatory behavior at the single-cell level. As opposed to some previous models, we build a fully stochastic model of a negative feedback loop that explicitly takes into account the RNA stochastic dynamics. We find that messenger RNA random fluctuations can be amplified during translation and produce sustained pulses of protein expression. Motivated by the recent appreciation of the importance of noncoding regulatory RNAs in post-transcription regulation, we also consider the possibility that a regulatory RNA transcript could bind to the messenger RNA and repress translation. Our findings show that the regulatory transcript helps reducing gene expression variability both at the single-cell level and at the cell population level.

  16. Negative feedback from CaSR signaling to aquaporin-2 sensitizes vasopressin to extracellular Ca2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Marianna; Tamma, Grazia; Di Mise, Annarita; Russo, Annamaria; Centrone, Mariangela; Svelto, Maria; Calamita, Giuseppe; Valenti, Giovanna

    2015-07-01

    We previously described that high luminal Ca(2+) in the renal collecting duct attenuates short-term vasopressin-induced aquaporin-2 (AQP2) trafficking through activation of the Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR). Here, we evaluated AQP2 phosphorylation and permeability, in both renal HEK-293 cells and in the dissected inner medullary collecting duct, in response to specific activation of CaSR with NPS-R568. In CaSR-transfected cells, CaSR activation drastically reduced the basal levels of AQP2 phosphorylation at S256 (AQP2-pS256), thus having an opposite effect to vasopressin action. When forskolin stimulation was performed in the presence of NPS-R568, the increase in AQP2-pS256 and in the osmotic water permeability were prevented. In the freshly isolated inner mouse medullar collecting duct, stimulation with forskolin in the presence of NPS-R568 prevented the increase in AQP2-pS256 and osmotic water permeability. Our data demonstrate that the activation of CaSR in the collecting duct prevents the cAMP-dependent increase in AQP2-pS256 and water permeability, counteracting the short-term vasopressin response. By extension, our results suggest the attractive concept that CaSR expressed in distinct nephron segments exerts a negative feedback on hormones acting through cAMP, conferring high sensitivity of hormone to extracellular Ca(2+). © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Who Deserves My Trust? Cue-Elicited Feedback Negativity Tracks Reputation Learning in Repeated Social Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Diandian; Meng, Liang; Ma, Qingguo

    2017-01-01

    Trust and trustworthiness contribute to reciprocal behavior and social relationship development. To make better decisions, people need to evaluate others’ trustworthiness. They often assess this kind of reputation by learning through repeated social interactions. The present event-related potential (ERP) study explored the reputation learning process in a repeated trust game where subjects made multi-round decisions of investment to different partners. We found that subjects gradually learned to discriminate trustworthy partners from untrustworthy ones based on how often their partners reciprocated the investment, which was indicated by their own investment decisions. Besides, electrophysiological data showed that the faces of the untrustworthy partners induced larger feedback negativity (FN) amplitude than those of the trustworthy partners, but only in the late phase of the game. The ERP results corresponded with the behavioral pattern and revealed that the learned trustworthiness differentiation was coded by the cue-elicited FN component. Consistent with previous research, our findings suggest that the anterior cue-elicited FN reflects the reputation appraisal and tracks the reputation learning process in social interactions. PMID:28663727

  18. Chronic Psychosocial Stress and Negative Feedback Inhibition: Enhanced Hippocampal Glucocorticoid Signaling despite Lower Cytoplasmic GR Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füchsl, Andrea M; Reber, Stefan O

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC), a pre-clinically validated mouse model for chronic psychosocial stress, results in increased basal and acute stress-induced plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels. We assessed CSC effects on hippocampal glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and FK506 binding protein (FKBP51) expression, acute heterotypic stressor-induced GR translocation, as well as GC effects on gene expression and cell viability in isolated hippocampal cells. CSC mice showed decreased GR mRNA and cytoplasmic protein levels compared with single-housed control (SHC) mice. Basal and acute stress-induced nuclear GR protein expression were comparable between CSC and SHC mice, as were MR and FKBP51 mRNA and/or cytoplasmic protein levels. In vitro the effect of corticosterone (CORT) on hippocampal cell viability and gene transcription was more pronounced in CSC versus SHC mice. In summary, CSC mice show an, if at all, increased hippocampal GC signaling capacity despite lower cytoplasmic GR protein expression, making negative feedback deficits in the hippocampus unlikely to contribute to the increased ACTH drive following CSC.

  19. A Negative Feedback Between Anthropogenic Ozone Pollution and Enhanced Ocean Emissions of Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Lopez, A.; Prados-Roman, C.; Cuevas, C.; Fernandez, R.; Lamarque, J. F.; Kinnison, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    Naturally emitted from the oceans, iodine compounds efficiently destroy atmospheric ozone and reduce its positive radiative forcing effects in the troposphere. Emissions of inorganic iodine have been experimentally shown to depend on the deposition to the oceans of tropospheric ozone, whose concentrations have significantly increased since 1850 as a result of human activities. A chemistry-climate model is used to quantify the current ocean emissions of inorganic iodine and assess the impact that the anthropogenic increase of tropospheric ozone has had on the natural cycle of iodine in the marine environment since pre-industrial times. Results included in this communication indicate that the human-driven enhancement of tropospheric ozone has doubled the oceanic inorganic iodine emissions following the reaction of ozone with iodide at the sea surface. The consequent build-up of atmospheric iodine, with maximum enhancements of up to 70% with respect to preindustrial times in continental pollution outflow regions, has in turn accelerated the ozone chemical loss over the oceans with strong spatial patterns. We suggest that this ocean-atmosphere interaction represents a negative geochemical feedback loop by which current ocean emissions of iodine act as a natural buffer for ozone pollution and its radiative forcing in the global marine environment.

  20. Negative Feedback Effect of Microwave Irradiation in the Microwave—assisted Hydrothermal Synthesis of Bi2S3 Nanorods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶秀成; 邵名望

    2002-01-01

    The microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Bi2S3 nanorods was reported.The result showed that microwave irradiation can help to produce Bi2S3 nanorods in very short time.There is a negative feedback effcet which increases the degree of crystallinity in the reaction.

  1. Negative Feedback Effect of Microwave Irradiation in the Microwave-assisted Hydrothermal Synthesis of Bi2S3 Nanorods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO,Xiu-Cheng(陶秀成); SHAO,Ming-Wang(邵名望)

    2002-01-01

    The microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Bi2S3 nanorods was reported. The result showed that microwave irradiation can help to produce Bi2S3 nanorods in very short time.There is a negative feedback effect which increases the degree of crystallinity in the reaction.

  2. Feedback-related negativity is enhanced in adolescence during a gambling task with and without probabilistic reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Velázquez, Eduardo S; Ramos-Loyo, Julieta; González-Garrido, Andrés A; Sequeira, Henrique

    2015-01-21

    Feedback-related negativity (FRN) is a negative deflection that appears around 250 ms after the gain or loss of feedback to chosen alternatives in a gambling task in frontocentral regions following outcomes. Few studies have reported FRN enhancement in adolescents compared with adults in a gambling task without probabilistic reinforcement learning, despite the fact that learning from positive or negative consequences is crucial for decision-making during adolescence. Therefore, the aim of the present research was to identify differences in FRN amplitude and latency between adolescents and adults on a gambling task with favorable and unfavorable probabilistic reinforcement learning conditions, in addition to a nonlearning condition with monetary gains and losses. Higher rate scores of high-magnitude choices during the final 30 trials compared with the first 30 trials were observed during the favorable condition, whereas lower rates were observed during the unfavorable condition in both groups. Higher FRN amplitude in all conditions and longer latency in the nonlearning condition were observed in adolescents compared with adults and in relation to losses. Results indicate that both the adolescents and the adults improved their performance in relation to positive and negative feedback. However, the FRN findings suggest an increased sensitivity to external feedback to losses in adolescents compared with adults, irrespective of the presence or absence of probabilistic reinforcement learning. These results reflect processing differences on the neural monitoring system and provide new perspectives on the dynamic development of an adolescent's brain.

  3. Inhibitory and toxic effects of extracellular self-DNA in litter : A mechanism for negative plant-soil feedbacks?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzoleni, Stefano; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; Chiusano, Maria Luisa; Termolino, Pasquale; Mingo, Antonio; Senatore, Mauro; Giannino, Francesco; Cartenì, Fabrizio; Rietkerk, Max; Lanzotti, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Plant-soil negative feedback (NF) is recognized as an important factor affecting plant communities. The objectives of this work were to assess the effects of litter phytotoxicity and autotoxicity on root proliferation, and to test the hypothesis that DNA is a driver of litter autotoxicity and plant-

  4. Robust Output Feedback Control for Uncertain Discrete Systems with Time Delays%不确定时滞离散系统的鲁棒输出反馈控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘碧玉; 桂卫华

    2005-01-01

    Based on design of an observer, the issue of dynamic output feedback control is studied for uncertain discrete systems with delays. A comparison theorem is given for nonlinear uncertain discrete systems with multiple time delays. Based on the comparison theorem with some inequalities,some delay-independent sufficient conditions for the robust stabilization of the systems are presented by means of output feedback.

  5. Output-feedback adaptive neural control for stochastic nonlinear time-varying delay systems with unknown control directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tieshan; Li, Zifu; Wang, Dan; Chen, C L Philip

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an adaptive output-feedback neural network (NN) control scheme for a class of stochastic nonlinear time-varying delay systems with unknown control directions. To make the controller design feasible, the unknown control coefficients are grouped together and the original system is transformed into a new system using a linear state transformation technique. Then, the Nussbaum function technique is incorporated into the backstepping recursive design technique to solve the problem of unknown control directions. Furthermore, under the assumption that the time-varying delays exist in the system output, only one NN is employed to compensate for all unknown nonlinear terms depending on the delayed output. Moreover, by estimating the maximum of NN parameters instead of the parameters themselves, the NN parameters to be estimated are greatly decreased and the online learning time is also dramatically decreased. It is shown that all the signals of the closed-loop system are bounded in probability. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is demonstrated by the simulation results.

  6. Clustering and negative feedback by endocytosis in planar cell polarity signaling is modulated by ubiquitinylation of prickle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Bomsoo; Pierre-Louis, Gandhy; Sagner, Andreas; Eaton, Suzanne; Axelrod, Jeffrey D

    2015-05-01

    The core components of the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling system, including both transmembrane and peripheral membrane associated proteins, form asymmetric complexes that bridge apical intercellular junctions. While these can assemble in either orientation, coordinated cell polarization requires the enrichment of complexes of a given orientation at specific junctions. This might occur by both positive and negative feedback between oppositely oriented complexes, and requires the peripheral membrane associated PCP components. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying feedback are not understood. We find that the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex Cullin1(Cul1)/SkpA/Supernumerary limbs(Slimb) regulates the stability of one of the peripheral membrane components, Prickle (Pk). Excess Pk disrupts PCP feedback and prevents asymmetry. We show that Pk participates in negative feedback by mediating internalization of PCP complexes containing the transmembrane components Van Gogh (Vang) and Flamingo (Fmi), and that internalization is activated by oppositely oriented complexes within clusters. Pk also participates in positive feedback through an unknown mechanism promoting clustering. Our results therefore identify a molecular mechanism underlying generation of asymmetry in PCP signaling.

  7. Estimating the Lyapunov spectrum of time delay feedback systems from scalar time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegger, R

    1999-08-01

    On the basis of a recently developed method for modeling time delay systems, we propose a procedure to estimate the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents from a scalar time series. It turns out that the spectrum is approximated very well and allows for good estimates of the Lyapunov dimension even if the sampling rate of the time series is so low that the infinite dimensional tangent space is spanned quite sparsely.

  8. Negative feedback governs gonadotrope frequency-decoding of gonadotropin releasing hormone pulse-frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Lim

    Full Text Available The synthesis of the gonadotropin subunits is directed by pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH from the hypothalamus, with the frequency of GnRH pulses governing the differential expression of the common alpha-subunit, luteinizing hormone beta-subunit (LHbeta and follicle-stimulating hormone beta-subunit (FSHbeta. Three mitogen-activated protein kinases, (MAPKs, ERK1/2, JNK and p38, contribute uniquely and combinatorially to the expression of each of these subunit genes. In this study, using both experimental and computational methods, we found that dual specificity phosphatase regulation of the activity of the three MAPKs through negative feedback is required, and forms the basis for decoding the frequency of pulsatile GnRH. A fourth MAPK, ERK5, was shown also to be activated by GnRH. ERK5 was found to stimulate FSHbeta promoter activity and to increase FSHbeta mRNA levels, as well as enhancing its preference for low GnRH pulse frequencies. The latter is achieved through boosting the ultrasensitive behavior of FSHbeta gene expression by increasing the number of MAPK dependencies, and through modulating the feedforward effects of JNK activation on the GnRH receptor (GnRH-R. Our findings contribute to understanding the role of changing GnRH pulse-frequency in controlling transcription of the pituitary gonadotropins, which comprises a crucial aspect in regulating reproduction. Pulsatile stimuli and oscillating signals are integral to many biological processes, and elucidation of the mechanisms through which the pulsatility is decoded explains how the same stimulant can lead to various outcomes in a single cell.

  9. Methylglyoxal in cells elicits a negative feedback loop entailing transglutaminase 2 and glyoxalase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Yen Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glyoxalase 1 (GlxI is the key enzyme that converts the highly reactive α-oxo-aldehydes into the corresponding α-hydroxy acids using l-glutathione as a cofactor. In our preliminary data, GlxI was identified as a substrate of transglutaminase 2 (TG2, a ubiquitous enzyme with multiple functions. According to the catalytic properties of TG2, protein cross-linking, polyamine conjugation, and/or deamidation are potential post-translational modifications. In this article, we have demonstrated that TG2 catalyzes either polyamine conjugation or deamidation to GlxI depending on the presence of polyamines or not. Deamidation leads to activation of GlxI while polyamine conjugation results in activation of GlxI as well as stabilization of GlxI against denaturation treatment. In cultured HeLa cells, methylglyoxal challenge causes increase in intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and calcium leading to TG2 activation and subsequent transamidation and activation of GlxI. The inhibition of TG2 significantly weakens the cell resistance to the methylglyoxal challenge. Thus, GlxI is a novel substrate of TG2 and is activated by TG2 in vitro and in cellulo. Exposure to methylglyoxal elicits a negative feedback loop entailing ROS, calcium, TG2 and GlxI, thus leading to attenuation of the increase in the methylglyoxal level. The results imply that cancer cells highly express TG2 or GlxI can endure the oxidative stress derived from higher glycolytic flux and may gain extra growth advantage from the aerobic glycolysis.

  10. The stress-buffering effect of acute exercise: Evidence for HPA axis negative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschucke, Elisabeth; Renneberg, Babette; Dimeo, Fernando; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Ströhle, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    According to the cross-stressor adaptation hypothesis, physically trained individuals show lower physiological and psychological responses to stressors other than exercise, e.g. psychosocial stress. Reduced stress reactivity may constitute a mechanism of action for the beneficial effects of exercise in maintaining mental health. With regard to neural and psychoneuroendocrine stress responses, the acute stress-buffering effects of exercise have not been investigated yet. A sample of highly trained (HT) and sedentary (SED) young men was randomized to either exercise on a treadmill at moderate intensity (60-70% VO2max; AER) for 30 min, or to perform 30 min of "placebo" exercise (PLAC). 90 min later, an fMRI experiment was conducted using an adapted version of the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST). The subjective and psychoneuroendocrine (cortisol and α-amylase) changes induced by the exercise intervention and the MIST were assessed, as well as neural activations during the MIST. Finally, associations between the different stress responses were analysed. Participants of the AER group showed a significantly reduced cortisol response to the MIST, which was inversely related to the previous exercise-induced α-amylase and cortisol fluctuations. With regard to the sustained BOLD signal, we found higher bilateral hippocampus (Hipp) activity and lower prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity in the AER group. Participants with a higher aerobic fitness showed lower cortisol responses to the MIST. As the Hipp and PFC are brain structures prominently involved in the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, these findings indicate that the acute stress-buffering effect of exercise relies on negative feedback mechanisms. Positive affective changes after exercise appear as important moderators largely accounting for the effects related to physical fitness.

  11. The apparent paradox of the negative and positive feedback control system on gonadotropin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, S S; Lein, A

    1976-12-01

    The separate and interactive effects of estradiol (E2) and luteinizing hormone-releasing factor (LRF) on the dynamics of LH storage and release were studied. Measurements were made of the serum gonadotropin responses to submaximal doses of LRF, given as brief pulses or infused over an extended period to normal women at various stages of the follicular phase of their menstrual cycles and to hypogonadal women with and without estrogen treatment. The two-pool concept of pituitary gonadotropin was verified; the dynamic responses of the two pools to the inputs of LRF and E2 were investigated and related to pituitary properties of sensitivity and reserve. Our results indicate that LRF appears to serve as a primary drive on the gonadotrophs, stimulating gonadotropin synthesis and storage (second pool), as well as release (first). E2 for the most part, amplifies the action of LRF except that it impedes LRF-induced release of gonadotropin. E2 augments the second pool activity (reserve) preferentially, and the relative activity of the first pool appears to be influenced by the E2-dependent self-priming effect of LRF. The interactions of the various elements of the system, when combined, provide a U-shaped curve to describe the over-all capacity of the gonadotrophs as a function of a broad range of E2 inputs. Negative and possitive feedback of E2 are revealed to operate by different mechanisms and to represent different segments of a single U-shaped curve rather than paradoxically disparate actions.

  12. Phasic Firing and Coincidence Detection by Subthreshold Negative Feedback: Divisive or Subtractive or, Better, Both

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Gemma; Meng, Xiangying; Rinzel, John

    2017-01-01

    Phasic neurons typically fire only for a fast-rising input, say at the onset of a step current, but not for steady or slow inputs, a property associated with type III excitability. Phasic neurons can show extraordinary temporal precision for phase locking and coincidence detection. Exemplars are found in the auditory brain stem where precise timing is used in sound localization. Phasicness at the cellular level arises from a dynamic, voltage-gated, negative feedback that can be recruited subthreshold, preventing the neuron from reaching spike threshold if the voltage does not rise fast enough. We consider two mechanisms for phasicness: a low threshold potassium current (subtractive mechanism) and a sodium current with subthreshold inactivation (divisive mechanism). We develop and analyze three reduced models with either divisive or subtractive mechanisms or both to gain insight into the dynamical mechanisms for the potentially high temporal precision of type III-excitable neurons. We compare their firing properties and performance for a range of stimuli. The models have characteristic non-monotonic input-output relations, firing rate vs. input intensity, for either stochastic current injection or Poisson-timed excitatory synaptic conductance trains. We assess performance according to precision of phase-locking and coincidence detection by the models' responses to repetitive packets of unitary excitatory synaptic inputs with more or less temporal coherence. We find that each mechanism contributes features but best performance is attained if both are present. The subtractive mechanism confers extraordinary precision for phase locking and coincidence detection but only within a restricted parameter range when the divisive mechanism of sodium inactivation is inoperative. The divisive mechanism guarantees robustness of phasic properties, without compromising excitability, although with somewhat less precision. Finally, we demonstrate that brief transient inhibition if

  13. The Arcuate Nucleus: A Site of Fast Negative Feedback for Corticosterone Secretion in Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Escobar, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Variations in circulating corticosterone (Cort) are driven by the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), mainly via the sympathetic autonomic nervous system (ANS) directly stimulating Cort release from the adrenal gland and via corticotropin-releasing hormone targeting the adenohypophysis to release adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Cort feeds back through glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Here we show in male Wistar rats that PVN neurons projecting to the adrenal gland do not express GRs, leaving the question of how the ANS in the PVN gets information about circulating Cort levels to control the adrenal. Since the arcuate nucleus (ARC) shows a less restrictive blood–brain barrier, expresses GRs, and projects to the PVN, we investigated whether the ARC can detect and produce fast adjustments of circulating Cort. In low Cort conditions (morning), local microdialysis in the ARC with type I GR antagonist produced a fast and sustained increase of Cort. This was not observed with a type II antagonist. At the circadian peak levels of Cort (afternoon), a type II GR antagonist, but not a type I antagonist, increased Cort levels but not ACTH levels. Antagonist infusions in the PVN did not modify circulating Cort levels, demonstrating the specificity of the ARC to give Cort negative feedback. Furthermore, type I and II GR agonists in the ARC prevented the increase of Cort after stress, demonstrating the role of the ARC as sensor to modulate Cort release. Our findings show that the ARC may be essential to sense blood levels of Cort and adapt Cort secretion depending on such conditions as stress or time of day. PMID:28275717

  14. Negative feedback governs gonadotrope frequency-decoding of gonadotropin releasing hormone pulse-frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Stefan; Pnueli, Lilach; Tan, Jing Hui; Naor, Zvi; Rajagopal, Gunaretnam; Melamed, Philippa

    2009-09-29

    The synthesis of the gonadotropin subunits is directed by pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus, with the frequency of GnRH pulses governing the differential expression of the common alpha-subunit, luteinizing hormone beta-subunit (LHbeta) and follicle-stimulating hormone beta-subunit (FSHbeta). Three mitogen-activated protein kinases, (MAPKs), ERK1/2, JNK and p38, contribute uniquely and combinatorially to the expression of each of these subunit genes. In this study, using both experimental and computational methods, we found that dual specificity phosphatase regulation of the activity of the three MAPKs through negative feedback is required, and forms the basis for decoding the frequency of pulsatile GnRH. A fourth MAPK, ERK5, was shown also to be activated by GnRH. ERK5 was found to stimulate FSHbeta promoter activity and to increase FSHbeta mRNA levels, as well as enhancing its preference for low GnRH pulse frequencies. The latter is achieved through boosting the ultrasensitive behavior of FSHbeta gene expression by increasing the number of MAPK dependencies, and through modulating the feedforward effects of JNK activation on the GnRH receptor (GnRH-R). Our findings contribute to understanding the role of changing GnRH pulse-frequency in controlling transcription of the pituitary gonadotropins, which comprises a crucial aspect in regulating reproduction. Pulsatile stimuli and oscillating signals are integral to many biological processes, and elucidation of the mechanisms through which the pulsatility is decoded explains how the same stimulant can lead to various outcomes in a single cell.

  15. Effects of spike-triggered negative feedback on receptive-field properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Samengo, Inés

    2015-04-01

    Sensory neurons are often described in terms of a receptive field, that is, a linear kernel through which stimuli are filtered before they are further processed. If information transmission is assumed to proceed in a feedforward cascade, the receptive field may be interpreted as the external stimulus' profile maximizing neuronal output. The nervous system, however, contains many feedback loops, and sensory neurons filter more currents than the ones representing the transduced external stimulus. Some of the additional currents are generated by the output activity of the neuron itself, and therefore constitute feedback signals. By means of a time-frequency analysis of the input/output transformation, here we show how feedback modifies the receptive field. The model is applicable to various types of feedback processes, from spike-triggered intrinsic conductances to inhibitory synaptic inputs from nearby neurons. We distinguish between the intrinsic receptive field (filtering all input currents) and the effective receptive field (filtering only external stimuli). Whereas the intrinsic receptive field summarizes the biophysical properties of the neuron associated to subthreshold integration and spike generation, only the effective receptive field can be interpreted as the external stimulus' profile maximizing neuronal output. We demonstrate that spike-triggered feedback shifts low-pass filtering towards band-pass processing, transforming integrator neurons into resonators. For strong feedback, a sharp resonance in the spectral neuronal selectivity may appear. Our results provide a unified framework to interpret a collection of previous experimental studies where specific feedback mechanisms were shown to modify the filtering properties of neurons.

  16. Optimizing the dynamics of a two-cell DC-DC buck converter by time delayed feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feki, M.; El Aroudi, A.; Robert, B. G. M.; Martínez-Salamero, L.

    2011-11-01

    A study of the dynamical behavior of a two-cell DC-DC buck converter under a digital time delayed feedback control (TDFC) is presented. Various numerical simulations and dynamical aspects of this system are illustrated in the time domain and in the parameter space. Without TDFC, the system may present many undesirable behaviors such as sub-harmonics and chaotic oscillations. TDFC is able to widen the stability range of the system. Optimum values of parameters giving rise to fast response while maintaining stable periodic behavior are given in closed form. However, it is detected that in a certain region of the parameter space, the stabilized periodic orbit may coexist with a chaotic attractor. Boundary between basins of attraction are obtained by means of numerical simulations.

  17. Noise amplification by chaotic dynamics in a delayed feedback laser system and its application to nondeterministic random bit generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunada, Satoshi; Harayama, Takahisa; Davis, Peter; Tsuzuki, Ken; Arai, Ken-Ichi; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki; Uchida, Atsushi

    2012-12-01

    We present an experimental method for directly observing the amplification of microscopic intrinsic noise in a high-dimensional chaotic laser system, a laser with delayed feedback. In the experiment, the chaotic laser system is repeatedly switched from a stable lasing state to a chaotic state, and the time evolution of an ensemble of chaotic states starting from the same initial state is measured. It is experimentally demonstrated that intrinsic noises amplified by the chaotic dynamics are transformed into macroscopic fluctuating signals, and the probability density of the output light intensity actually converges to a natural invariant probability density in a strongly chaotic regime. Moreover, with the experimental method, we discuss the application of the chaotic laser systems to physical random bit generators. It is experimentally shown that the convergence to the invariant density plays an important role in nondeterministic random bit generation, which could be desirable for future ultimate secure communication systems.

  18. Congestion phenomenon analysis and delayed-feedback control in a modified coupled map traffic flow model containing the velocity difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ya-Ling; Shi, Zhong-Ke; Cao, Jin-Liang

    2015-06-01

    Based on the coupled map car-following model which was presented by Konishi et al. (1999), a modified coupled map car-following model is proposed. Specifically, the velocity difference between two successive vehicles is included in the model. The stability condition is given for the change of the speed of the preceding vehicle on the base of the control theory. We derive a condition under which the traffic jam never occurs in our model. Furthermore, in order to suppress traffic jams, we use static and dynamic version of decentralized delayed-feedback control for each vehicle, respectively, and provide a systematic procedure for designing the controller. In addition, the controller of each vehicle does not include any other vehicle information in real traffic flows.

  19. A general non-equilibrium framework for the parameterization of positive and negative feedbacks in atmospheric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    For any identifiable system, regardless of its complexity or scale, evolution can be treated as a spontaneous thermodynamic response to a local convergence of down-gradient material flows. In climate studies, examples of identifiable systems might include cloud cover or the global incidence of temperatures warmer than a certain threshold. Here it is shown how the time-dependent evolution of such systems is constrained by positive and negative feedbacks that fall into a few mathematically distinct modes. In general, evolution depends on the time integral of past flows and the current availability of material and energetic resources. More specifically, negative feedbacks arise from the depletion or predation of the material and potential energy reservoirs that supply the system. Positive feedbacks are due to either new reservoir "discovery" or system expansion into existing reservoirs. When positive feedbacks dominate, the time dependent response of system growth falls into a few clearly identifiable behaviors that include a law of diminishing returns, logistic behavior, and, if reservoirs are expanding very rapidly, unstable super-exponential or explosive growth. For open systems (e.g. radiative flows in our atmosphere) that have a resolved sink as well as a source, oscillatory behavior emerges and can be characterized in terms of a slightly modified form of the predator-prey equations commonly employed in ecology. The perturbation formulation of these equations is equivalent to a damped simple harmonic oscillator. Specific examples of non-equilibrium positive and negative feedback response can be described for the sudden development of rain and the oscillatory evolution of open-celled stratocumulus cloud decks.

  20. Integrating temporal difference methods and self-organizing neural networks for reinforcement learning with delayed evaluative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A H; Lu, N; Xiao, D

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents a neural architecture for learning category nodes encoding mappings across multimodal patterns involving sensory inputs, actions, and rewards. By integrating adaptive resonance theory (ART) and temporal difference (TD) methods, the proposed neural model, called TD fusion architecture for learning, cognition, and navigation (TD-FALCON), enables an autonomous agent to adapt and function in a dynamic environment with immediate as well as delayed evaluative feedback (reinforcement) signals. TD-FALCON learns the value functions of the state-action space estimated through on-policy and off-policy TD learning methods, specifically state-action-reward-state-action (SARSA) and Q-learning. The learned value functions are then used to determine the optimal actions based on an action selection policy. We have developed TD-FALCON systems using various TD learning strategies and compared their performance in terms of task completion, learning speed, as well as time and space efficiency. Experiments based on a minefield navigation task have shown that TD-FALCON systems are able to learn effectively with both immediate and delayed reinforcement and achieve a stable performance in a pace much faster than those of standard gradient-descent-based reinforcement learning systems.

  1. State-feedback ℋ∞ control for stochastic time-delay nonlinear systems with state and disturbance-dependent noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiping; Shi, Yang

    2012-10-01

    This article focuses on the state-feedback ℋ∞ control problem for the stochastic nonlinear systems with state and disturbance-dependent noise and time-varying state delays. Based on the maxmin optimisation approach, both the delay-independent and the delay-dependent Hamilton-Jacobi-inequalities (HJIs) are developed for synthesising the state-feedback ℋ∞ controller for a general type of stochastic nonlinear systems. It is shown that the resulting control system achieves stochastic stability in probability and the prescribed disturbance attenuation level. For a class of stochastic affine nonlinear systems, the delay-independent as well as delay-dependent matrix-valued inequalities are proposed; the resulting control system satisfies global asymptotic stability in the mean-square sense and the required disturbance attenuation level. By modelling the nonlinearities as uncertainties in corresponding stochastic time-delay systems, the sufficient conditions in terms of a linear matrix inequality (LMI) and a bilinear matrix inequality (BMI) are derived to facilitate the design of the state-feedback ℋ∞ controller. Finally, two numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  2. Two different modes of oscillation in a gene transcription regulatory network with interlinked positive and negative feedback loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Rajesh

    2016-12-01

    We study the oscillatory behavior of a gene regulatory network with interlinked positive and negative feedback loop. The frequency and amplitude are two important properties of oscillation. The studied network produces two different modes of oscillation. In one mode (mode-I), frequency of oscillation remains constant over a wide range of amplitude and in the other mode (mode-II) the amplitude of oscillation remains constant over a wide range of frequency. Our study reproduces both features of oscillations in a single gene regulatory network and shows that the negative plus positive feedback loops in gene regulatory network offer additional advantage. We identified the key parameters/variables responsible for different modes of oscillation. The network is flexible in switching between different modes by choosing appropriately the required parameters/variables.

  3. Delayed mirror visual feedback presented using a novel mirror therapy system enhances cortical activation in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Min; Li, Ping-Chia; Fan, Shih-Chen

    2015-07-11

    Mirror visual feedback (MVF) generated in mirror therapy (MT) with a physical mirror promotes the recovery of hemiparetic limbs in patients with stroke, but is limited in that it cannot provide an asymmetric mode for bimanual coordination training. Here, we developed a novel MT system that can manipulate the MVF to resolve this issue. The aims of this pilot study were to examine the feasibility of delayed MVF on MT and to establish its effects on cortical activation in order to understand how it can be used for clinical applications in the future. Three conditions (no MVF, MVF, and 2-s delayed MVF) presented via our digital MT system were evaluated for their time-course effects on cortical activity by event-related desynchronization (ERD) of mu rhythm electroencephalography (EEG) during button presses in 18 healthy adults. Phasic ERD areas, defined as the areas of the relative ERD curve that were below the reference level and within -2-0 s (P0), 0-2 s (P1), and 2-4 s (P2) of the button press, were used. The overall (P0 to P2) and phasic ERD areas were higher when MVF was provided compared to when MVF was not provided for all EEG channels (C3, Cz, and C4). Phasic ERD areas in the P2 phase only increased during the delayed-MVF condition. Significant enhancement of cortical activation in the mirror neuron system and an increase in attention to the unseen limb may play major roles in the response to MVF during MT. In comparison to the no MVF condition, the higher phasic ERD areas that were observed during the P1 phase in the delayed-MVF condition indicate that the image of the still hand may have enhanced the cortical activation that occurred in response to the button press. This study is the first to achieve delayed MVF for upper-limb MT. Our approach confirms previous findings regarding the effects of MVF on cortical activation and contributes additional evidence supporting the use of this method in the future for upper-limb motor training in patients with stroke.

  4. Immediate or delayed feedback on rewards in Pay-As-You-Drive Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksterhuis, Chris; Lewis Evans, Ben; de Waard, Dick; Tucha, Oliver; Brookhuis, Karel

    2014-01-01

    In normal, everyday driving, behaving safely in traffic usually remains unrewarded whereas consequences for unsafe behaviours are rarely negative and can actually often be positive. The strength of Pay-As-You-Drive insurance is its potential to correct this major issue with driving by rewarding safe

  5. CaV3.2 Channels and the Induction of Negative Feedback in Cerebral Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harraz, Osama F.; Abd El-Rahman, Rasha R.; Bigdely-Shamloo, Kamran; Wilson, Sean M.; Brett, Suzanne E.; Romero, Monica; Gonzales, Albert L.; Earley, Scott; Vigmond, Edward J.; Nygren, Anders; Menon, Bijoy K.; Mufti, Rania E.; Watson, Tim; Starreveld, Yves; Furstenhaupt, Tobias; Muellerleile, Philip R.; Kurjiaka, David T.; Kyle, Barry D.; Braun, Andrew P.; Welsh, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale T-type (CaV3.1/CaV3.2) Ca2+ channels are expressed in rat cerebral arterial smooth muscle. Although present, their functional significance remains uncertain with findings pointing to a variety of roles. Objective This study tested whether CaV3.2 channels mediate a negative feedback response by triggering Ca2+ sparks, discrete events that initiate arterial hyperpolarization by activating large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels. Methods and Results Micromolar Ni2+, an agent that selectively blocks CaV3.2 but not CaV1.2/CaV3.1, was first shown to depolarize/constrict pressurized rat cerebral arteries; no effect was observed in CaV3.2−/− arteries. Structural analysis using 3-dimensional tomography, immunolabeling, and a proximity ligation assay next revealed the existence of microdomains in cerebral arterial smooth muscle which comprised sarcoplasmic reticulum and caveolae. Within these discrete structures, CaV3.2 and ryanodine receptor resided in close apposition to one another. Computational modeling revealed that Ca2+ influx through CaV3.2 could repetitively activate ryanodine receptor, inducing discrete Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release events in a voltage-dependent manner. In keeping with theoretical observations, rapid Ca2+ imaging and perforated patch clamp electrophysiology demonstrated that Ni2+ suppressed Ca2+ sparks and consequently spontaneous transient outward K+ currents, large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel mediated events. Additional functional work on pressurized arteries noted that paxilline, a large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel inhibitor, elicited arterial constriction equivalent, and not additive, to Ni2+. Key experiments on human cerebral arteries indicate that CaV3.2 is present and drives a comparable response to moderate constriction. Conclusions These findings indicate for the first time that CaV3.2 channels localize to discrete microdomains and drive ryanodine receptor–mediated Ca2+ sparks, enabling large

  6. The Effects of Positive and Negative Feedback on Maximal Voluntary Contraction Level of the Biceps Brachii Muscle: Moderating Roles of Gender and Conscientiousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıkabak, Murat; Yaman, Çetin; Tok, Serdar; Binboga, Erdal

    2016-11-02

    We investigated the effect of positive and negative feedback on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the biceps brachii muscle and explored the mediating effects of gender and conscientiousness. During elbow flexion, MVCs were measured in positive, negative, and no-feedback conditions. Participants were divided into high- and low-conscientiousness groups based on the median split of their scores on Tatar's five-factor personality inventory. Considering all participants 46 college student athletes (21 female, 28 male), positive feedback led to a greater MVC percentage change (-5.76%) than did negative feedback (2.2%). MVC percentage change in the positive feedback condition differed significantly by gender, but the negative feedback condition did not. Thus, positive feedback increased female athletes' MVC level by 3.49%, but decreased male athletes' MVC level by 15.6%. For conscientiousness, MVC percentage change in the positive feedback condition did not differ according to high and low conscientiousness. However, conscientiousness interacted with gender in the positive feedback condition, increasing MVC in high-conscientiousness female athletes and decreasing MVC in low-conscientiousness female athletes. Positive feedback decreased MVC in both high- and low-conscientiousness male athletes.

  7. Leader-member exchange and member performance: a new look at individual-level negative feedback-seeking behavior and team-level empowerment climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ziguang; Lam, Wing; Zhong, Jian An

    2007-01-01

    From a basis in social exchange theory, the authors investigated whether, and how, negative feedback-seeking behavior and a team empowerment climate affect the relationship between leader-member exchange (LMX) and member performance. Results showed that subordinates' negative feedback-seeking behavior mediated the relationship between LMX and both objective and subjective in-role performance. In addition, the level of a team's empowerment climate was positively related to subordinates' own sense of empowerment, which in turn negatively moderated the effects of LMX on negative feedback-seeking behavior.

  8. A negative-feedback loop regulating ERK1/2 activation and mediated by RasGPR2 phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jinqi [Departments of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Cook, Aaron A.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang [Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Sondek, John, E-mail: sondek@med.unc.edu [Departments of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2016-05-20

    The dynamic regulation of ERK1 and -2 (ERK1/2) is required for precise signal transduction controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. However, the underlying mechanisms regulating the activation of ERK1/2 are not completely understood. In this study, we show that phosphorylation of RasGRP2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), inhibits its ability to activate the small GTPase Rap1 that ultimately leads to decreased activation of ERK1/2 in cells. ERK2 phosphorylates RasGRP2 at Ser394 located in the linker region implicated in its autoinhibition. These studies identify RasGRP2 as a novel substrate of ERK1/2 and define a negative-feedback loop that regulates the BRaf–MEK–ERK signaling cascade. This negative-feedback loop determines the amplitude and duration of active ERK1/2. -- Highlights: •ERK2 phosphorylates the guanine nucleotide exchange factor RasGRP2 at Ser394. •Phosphorylated RasGRP2 has decreased capacity to active Rap1b in vitro and in cells. •Phosphorylation of RasGRP2 by ERK1/2 introduces a negative-feedback loop into the BRaf-MEK-ERK pathway.

  9. Enhancing a slow and weak optomechanical nonlinearity with delayed quantum feedback to implement a CPHASE gate

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhaoyou

    2016-01-01

    We show that the effective optical nonlinearity of a cavity optomechanical system can be used to implement quantum gates between propagating photons. By using quantum feedback, we can enhance a slow and small optical nonlinearity to generate a large nonlinear phase shift between two spatially separated temporal modes of a propagating electromagnetic field. This allows us to implement a CPHASE gate between the two modes. After presenting a semiclassical derivation of the operation of the gate, we verify the result by a full simulation of the state of the quantum field in the waveguide coupled to a cavity. To efficiently solve the Schr\\"odinger equation of the full system, we develop a matrix product state approach that keeps track of the entangled full quantum state of the coupled system. These simulations verify the operation of the gate in the weak coupling regime where the semiclassical approximation is valid. In addition, we observe a major reduction in gate fidelity as we approach the vacuum strong coupli...

  10. Positive or negative? The impact of X-ray feedback on the formation of direct collapse black hole seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, John A.; Johansson, Peter H.; Wise, John H.

    2016-09-01

    A nearby source of Lyman-Werner (LW) photons is thought to be a central component in dissociating H2 and allowing for the formation of a direct collapse black hole seed. Nearby sources are also expected to produce copious amounts of hydrogen ionizing photons and X-ray photons. We study here the feedback effects of the X-ray photons by including a spectrum due to high-mass X-ray binaries on top of a galaxy with a stellar spectrum. We explicitly trace photon packages emerging from the nearby source and track the radiative and chemical effects of the multifrequency source (Ephoton = 0.76 eV → 7500 eV). We find that X-rays have a strongly negative feedback effect, compared to a stellar only source, when the radiative source is placed at a separation greater than ≳ 1 kpc. The X-rays heat the low and medium density gas in the envelope surrounding the collapsing halo suppressing the mass inflow. The result is a smaller enclosed mass compared to the stellar only case. However, for separations of ≲ 1 kpc, the feedback effects of the X-rays becomes somewhat neutral. The enhanced LW intensity at close separations dissociates more H2 and this gas is heated due to stellar photons alone, the addition of X-rays is then not significant. This distance dependence of X-ray feedback suggests that a Goldilocks zone exists close to a forming galaxy where X-ray photons have a much smaller negative feedback effect and ideal conditions exist for creating massive black hole seeds.

  11. Influences of State and Trait Affect on Behavior, Feedback-Related Negativity, and P3b in the Ultimatum Game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korbinian Riepl

    Full Text Available The present study investigates how different emotions can alter social bargaining behavior. An important paradigm to study social bargaining is the Ultimatum Game. There, a proposer gets a pot of money and has to offer part of it to a responder. If the responder accepts, both players get the money as proposed by the proposer. If he rejects, none of the players gets anything. Rational choice models would predict that responders accept all offers above 0. However, evidence shows that responders typically reject a large proportion of all unfair offers. We analyzed participants' behavior when they played the Ultimatum Game as responders and simultaneously collected electroencephalogram data in order to quantify the feedback-related negativity and P3b components. We induced state affect (momentarily emotions unrelated to the task via short movie clips and measured trait affect (longer-lasting emotional dispositions via questionnaires. State happiness led to increased acceptance rates of very unfair offers. Regarding neurophysiology, we found that unfair offers elicited larger feedback-related negativity amplitudes than fair offers. Additionally, an interaction of state and trait affect occurred: high trait negative affect (subsuming a variety of aversive mood states led to increased feedback-related negativity amplitudes when participants were in an angry mood, but not if they currently experienced fear or happiness. We discuss that increased rumination might be responsible for this result, which might not occur, however, when people experience happiness or fear. Apart from that, we found that fair offers elicited larger P3b components than unfair offers, which might reflect increased pleasure in response to fair offers. Moreover, high trait negative affect was associated with decreased P3b amplitudes, potentially reflecting decreased motivation to engage in activities. We discuss implications of our results in the light of theories and research on

  12. Influences of State and Trait Affect on Behavior, Feedback-Related Negativity, and P3b in the Ultimatum Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riepl, Korbinian; Mussel, Patrick; Osinsky, Roman; Hewig, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates how different emotions can alter social bargaining behavior. An important paradigm to study social bargaining is the Ultimatum Game. There, a proposer gets a pot of money and has to offer part of it to a responder. If the responder accepts, both players get the money as proposed by the proposer. If he rejects, none of the players gets anything. Rational choice models would predict that responders accept all offers above 0. However, evidence shows that responders typically reject a large proportion of all unfair offers. We analyzed participants' behavior when they played the Ultimatum Game as responders and simultaneously collected electroencephalogram data in order to quantify the feedback-related negativity and P3b components. We induced state affect (momentarily emotions unrelated to the task) via short movie clips and measured trait affect (longer-lasting emotional dispositions) via questionnaires. State happiness led to increased acceptance rates of very unfair offers. Regarding neurophysiology, we found that unfair offers elicited larger feedback-related negativity amplitudes than fair offers. Additionally, an interaction of state and trait affect occurred: high trait negative affect (subsuming a variety of aversive mood states) led to increased feedback-related negativity amplitudes when participants were in an angry mood, but not if they currently experienced fear or happiness. We discuss that increased rumination might be responsible for this result, which might not occur, however, when people experience happiness or fear. Apart from that, we found that fair offers elicited larger P3b components than unfair offers, which might reflect increased pleasure in response to fair offers. Moreover, high trait negative affect was associated with decreased P3b amplitudes, potentially reflecting decreased motivation to engage in activities. We discuss implications of our results in the light of theories and research on depression and

  13. Development of a low noise induction magnetic sensor using magnetic flux negative feedback in the time domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X G; Shang, X L; Lin, J

    2016-05-01

    Time-domain electromagnetic system can implement great depth detection. As for the electromagnetic system, the receiver utilized an air coil sensor, and the matching mode of the sensor employed the resistance matching method. By using the resistance matching method, the vibration of the coil in the time domain can be effectively controlled. However, the noise of the sensor, especially the noise at the resonance frequency, will be increased as well. In this paper, a novel design of a low noise induction coil sensor is proposed, and the experimental data and noise characteristics are provided. The sensor is designed based on the principle that the amplified voltage will be converted to current under the influence of the feedback resistance of the coil. The feedback loop around the induction coil exerts a magnetic field and sends the negative feedback signal to the sensor. The paper analyses the influence of the closed magnetic feedback loop on both the bandwidth and the noise of the sensor. The signal-to-noise ratio is improved dramatically.

  14. The near-miss effect in slot-machine gambling: modulation of feedback-related negativity by subjective value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qiuling; Wang, Yang; Qu, Chen

    2011-12-21

    Near-miss plays an important role in the development of gambling addictions. In this study, we measured the neural correlates of the process by which near-miss outcomes are evaluated in simplified, static, slot-machine gambling using event-related potentials. Analysis of event-related potentials revealed that the size of FRN (feedback-related negativity) for a near miss is between the full miss and the win. These results suggest that participants distinguish among near misses, full misses, and wins during the early evaluation phase. The subjective value and objective value of outcome were assessed separately to discuss FRN on outcome evaluation. It is suggested that FRN is mediated not only by the objective value of outcomes but also by the subjective value of feedback.

  15. Depression-related difficulties disengaging from negative faces are associated with sustained attention to negative feedback during social evaluation and predict stress recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Nuria; De Raedt, Rudi

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to clarify: 1) the presence of depression-related attention bias related to a social stressor, 2) its association with depression-related attention biases as measured under standard conditions, and 3) their association with impaired stress recovery in depression. A sample of 39 participants reporting a broad range of depression levels completed a standard eye-tracking paradigm in which they had to engage/disengage their gaze with/from emotional faces. Participants then underwent a stress induction (i.e., giving a speech), in which their eye movements to false emotional feedback were measured, and stress reactivity and recovery were assessed. Depression level was associated with longer times to engage/disengage attention with/from negative faces under standard conditions and with sustained attention to negative feedback during the speech. These depression-related biases were associated and mediated the association between depression level and self-reported stress recovery, predicting lower recovery from stress after giving the speech. PMID:28362826

  16. Nonlinearity arising from noncooperative transcription factor binding enhances negative feedback and promotes genetic oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Lengyel, Iván M; Oates, Andrew C; Morelli, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    We study the effects of multiple binding sites in the promoter of a genetic oscillator. We evaluate the regulatory function of a promoter with multiple binding sites in the absence of cooperative binding, and consider different hypotheses for how the number of bound repressors affects transcription rate. Effective Hill exponents of the resulting regulatory functions reveal an increase in the nonlinearity of the feedback with the number of binding sites. We identify optimal configurations that maximize the nonlinearity of the feedback. We use a generic model of a biochemical oscillator to show that this increased nonlinearity is reflected in enhanced oscillations, with larger amplitudes over wider oscillatory ranges. Although the study is motivated by genetic oscillations in the zebrafish segmentation clock, our findings may reveal a general principle for gene regulation.

  17. Blowin' in the wind: both `negative' and `positive' feedback in an obscured high-z Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Cresci, G; Brusa, M; Marconi, A; Perna, M; Mannucci, F; Piconcelli, E; Maiolino, R; Feruglio, C; Fiore, F; Bongiorno, A; Lanzuisi, G; Merloni, A; Schramm, M; Silverman, J D; Civano, F

    2014-01-01

    Quasar feedback in the form of powerful outflows is invoked as a key mechanism to quench star formation in galaxies, preventing massive galaxies to over-grow and producing the red colors of ellipticals. On the other hand, some models are also requiring `positive' AGN feedback, inducing star formation in the host galaxy through enhanced gas pressure in the interstellar medium. However, finding observational evidence of the effects of both types of feedback is still one of the main challenges of extragalactic astronomy, as few observations of energetic and extended radiatively-driven winds are available. Here we present SINFONI near infrared integral field spectroscopy of XID2028, an obscured, radio-quiet z=1.59 QSO detected in the XMM-COSMOS survey, in which we clearly resolve a fast (1500 km/s) and extended (up to 13 kpc from the black hole) outflow in the [OIII] lines emitting gas, whose large velocity and outflow rate are not sustainable by star formation only. The narrow component of Ha emission and the re...

  18. Negative feedback circuit for toll like receptor-8 activation in human embryonic Kidney 293 using outer membrane vesicle delivered bi-specific siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Anurag; Gupta, Birendra Prasad; Das Manandhar, Krishna; Mishra, Shravan Kumar; Saiju, Hari Krishna; Shrestha, Rajendra Maan; Mishra, Nawneet; Sharma, Shishir

    2015-07-23

    TLR8 assists in antiviral approach by producing Type 1 INF via MyD88 dependent IRF7 pathway. However, over expression of INFα/β molecule poses threat by developing tolerance in chronic infection cases and enhancing inflammatory response. Here we report a bi-specific siRNA based complex which differentially activates and silences the TLR8 and MYD88 respectively in a negatively regulated fashion. Outer membrane vesicle from Escherichia coli used for siRNA delivery was observed more efficient when attached with invasive protein Ail along with OmpA (Pmembrane vesicle, thus facilitating the escape of siRNA complex to the host cytoplasm in order to silence MyD88 transcript (P<0.001). We investigated the activation of TLR8 by bi-specific si-RNA for the production of INFβ. In the same setting we showed that bi-specific si-RNA was able to silence MyD88 transcript in a delayed manner. For the cases of auto immune disease and inflammation where over activation of endosomal TLRs poses serious threat, bi specific siRNA could be used as negative feedback controlled system.

  19. 基于神经网络补偿的非线性时滞系统时滞正反馈控制%Time-delay Positive Feedback Control for Nonlinear Time-delay Systems with Neural Network Compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    那靖; 任雪梅; 黄鸿

    2008-01-01

    A new adaptive time-delay positive feedback con-troller (ATPFC) is presented for a class of nonlinear time-delay systems. The proposed control scheme consists of a neural networks-based identification and a time-delay positive feedback controller. Two high-order neural networks (HONN) incorpo-rated with a special dynamic identification model are employed to identify the nonlinear system. Based on the identified model,local linearization compensation is used to deal with the un-known nonlinearity of the system. A time-delay-free inverse model of the linearized system and a desired reference model are utilized to constitute the feedback controller, which can lead the system output to track the trajectory of a reference model.Rigorous stability analysis for both the identification and the tracking error of the closcd-loop control system is provided by means of Lyapunov stability criterion. Simulation results are in-cluded to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  20. Limitation of immune tolerance-inducing thymic epithelial cell development by Spi-B-mediated negative feedback regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Nobuko; Shinzawa, Miho; Miyauchi, Maki; Yanai, Hiromi; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Shimo, Yusuke; Ohshima, Daisuke; Matsuo, Koichi; Sasaki, Izumi; Hoshino, Katsuaki; Wu, Guoying; Yagi, Shintaro; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Akiyama, Taishin

    2014-11-17

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) expressing the autoimmune regulator AIRE and various tissue-specific antigens (TSAs) are critical for preventing the onset of autoimmunity and may attenuate tumor immunity. However, molecular mechanisms controlling mTEC development remain elusive. Here, we describe the roles of the transcription factor Spi-B in mTEC development. Spi-B is rapidly up-regulated by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) cytokine signaling, which triggers mTEC differentiation, and in turn up-regulates CD80, CD86, some TSAs, and the natural inhibitor of RANKL signaling, osteoprotegerin (OPG). Spi-B-mediated OPG expression limits mTEC development in neonates but not in embryos, suggesting developmental stage-specific negative feedback regulation. OPG-mediated negative regulation attenuates cellularity of thymic regulatory T cells and tumor development in vivo. Hence, these data suggest that this negative RANKL-Spi-B-OPG feedback mechanism finely tunes mTEC development and function and may optimize the trade-off between prevention of autoimmunity and induction of antitumor immunity.

  1. Arctic shelf flooding: a negative feedback on climate warming during terminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschek, Michael; Renssen, Hans

    2013-04-01

    heat release and surface warming during the entire year. Our analysis exhibits a surprising connection between increased sea-ice export through Fram Strait and changes in atmospheric winds that result from modifications in the atmospheric circulation, that are forced by changes in differential heating over the East Siberian Shelf and the Nordic Seas. This atmospheric teleconnection clearly shows that regional changes can affect hemispheric changes. In a first comparison with available sea-ice proxy reconstructions our results do not disagree, but show the necessity of increased temporal and spatial coverage of proxy reconstructions for future investigations. Our results indicate that shelf flooding had a significant impact on the climate during the early Holocene, namely reducing sea-ice cover and affecting atmospheric circulation. During terminations this can be considered to be a negative feedback on the progress of the termination, as a shelf area becomes flooded, sea-ice production and extent are likely to increase and reduce high latitude intake of orbitally-forced insolation, slowing down the warming trend. This can be the cause of observed cold reversals during warming phases in the continuous transformation of a glacial to an interglacial climate. This implies that shelf flooding should be taken into account when studying the climate dynamics during all glacial terminations. References Bauch, H.; Mueller-Lupp, T.; Taldenkova, E.; Spielhagen, R.; Kassens, H.; Grootes, P.; Thiede, J.; Heinemeier, J. & Petryashov, V. Chronology of the Holocene transgression at the North Siberian margin, Global and Planetary Change, 2001, 31, 125 - 139 Rigor, I. & Colony, R., Sea-ice production and transport of pollutants in the Laptev Sea, 1979-1993, Science of The Total Environment, Environmental Radioactivity in the Arctic, 1997, 202, 89-110 Tamura, T. & Ohshima, K. I., Mapping of sea ice production in the Arctic coastal polynyas, J. Geophys. Res., AGU, 2011, 116, C07030-

  2. FY 14 interim report : Evaluation of treatments to mitigate negative plant-soil feedbacks and improve reconstruction seeding success at Kulm Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Interim report for fiscal year 2014 on the research "Evaluation of treatments to mitigate negative plant-soil feedbacks and improve reconstruction seeding success at...

  3. Microwave oscillator with reduced phase noise by negative feedback incorporating microwave signals with suppressed carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, G. J.; Saunders, J.

    1989-01-01

    Oscillator configurations which reduce the effect of 1/f noise sources for both direct feedback and stabilized local oscillator (STALO) circuits are developed and analyzed. By appropriate use of carrier suppression, a small signal is generated which suffers no loss of loop phase information or signal-to-noise ratio. This small signal can be amplified without degradation by multiplicative amplifier noise, and can be detected without saturation of the detector. Together with recent advances in microwave resonator Qs, these circuit improvements will make possible lower phase noise than can be presently achieved without the use of cryogenic devices.

  4. Fast negative feedback enables mammalian auditory nerve fibers to encode a wide dynamic range of sound intensities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ospeck

    Full Text Available Mammalian auditory nerve fibers (ANF are remarkable for being able to encode a 40 dB, or hundred fold, range of sound pressure levels into their firing rate. Most of the fibers are very sensitive and raise their quiescent spike rate by a small amount for a faint sound at auditory threshold. Then as the sound intensity is increased, they slowly increase their spike rate, with some fibers going up as high as ∼300 Hz. In this way mammals are able to combine sensitivity and wide dynamic range. They are also able to discern sounds embedded within background noise. ANF receive efferent feedback, which suggests that the fibers are readjusted according to the background noise in order to maximize the information content of their auditory spike trains. Inner hair cells activate currents in the unmyelinated distal dendrites of ANF where sound intensity is rate-coded into action potentials. We model this spike generator compartment as an attenuator that employs fast negative feedback. Input current induces rapid and proportional leak currents. This way ANF are able to have a linear frequency to input current (f-I curve that has a wide dynamic range. The ANF spike generator remains very sensitive to threshold currents, but efferent feedback is able to lower its gain in response to noise.

  5. Oscillation for equations with positive and negative coefficients and with distributed delay I: General results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Berezansky

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available We study a scalar delay differential equation with a bounded distributed delay, $$ dot{x}(t+ int_{h(t}^t x(s,d_s R(t,s - int_{g(t}^t x(s,d_s T(t,s=0, $$ where $R(t,s$, $T(t,s$ are nonnegative nondecreasing in $s$ for any $t$, $$ R(t,h(t=T(t,g(t=0, quad R(t,s geq T(t,s. $$ We establish a connection between non-oscillation of this differential equation and the corresponding differential inequalities, and between positiveness of the fundamental function and the existence of a nonnegative solution for a nonlinear integral inequality that constructed explicitly. We also present comparison theorems, and explicit non-oscillation and oscillation results. In a separate publication (part II, we will consider applications of this theory to differential equations with several concentrated delays, integrodifferential, and mixed equations.

  6. Observational evidence that positive and negative AGN feedback depends on galaxy mass and jet power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfountzou, E.; Stevens, J. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Wilner, D.; Elvis, M.; Page, M. J.; Trichas, M.; Smith, D. J. B.

    2017-10-01

    Several studies support the existence of a link between the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and star formation activity. Radio jets have been argued to be an ideal mechanism for direct interaction between the AGN and the host galaxy. A drawback of previous surveys of AGN is that they are fundamentally limited by the degeneracy between redshift and luminosity in flux-density limited samples. To overcome this limitation, we present far-infrared Herschel observations of 74 radio-loud quasars (RLQs), 72 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) and 27 radio galaxies (RGs), selected at 0.9 correlation with the bolometric luminosity for all AGN sub-samples, (2) the RLQs show an SFR excess of about a factor of 1.4 compared to the RQQs, matched in terms of black hole mass and bolometric luminosity, suggesting that either positive radio-jet feedback or radio AGN triggering is linked to star formation triggering, and (3) RGs have lower SFRs by a factor of 2.5 than the RLQ sub-sample with the same BH mass and bolometric luminosity. We suggest that there is some jet power threshold at which radio-jet feedback switches from enhancing star formation (by compressing gas) to suppressing it (by ejecting gas). This threshold depends on both galaxy mass and jet power.

  7. The Negative Effects of Positive Reinforcement in Teaching Children with Developmental Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biederman, Gerald B.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study compared the performance of 12 children (ages 4 to 10) with developmental delay, each trained in 2 tasks, one through interactive modeling (with or without verbal reinforcement) and the other through passive modeling. Results showed that passive modeling produced better rated performance than interactive modeling and that verbal…

  8. miR-486 sustains NF-κB activity by disrupting multiple NF-κB-negative feedback loops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Libing Song; Chuyong Lin; Hui Gong; Chanjuan Wang; Liping Liu; Jueheng Wu; Sha Tao

    2013-01-01

    Deubiquitinases,such as CYLD,A20 and Cezanne,have emerged as important negative regulators that balance the strength and the duration of NF-κB signaling through feedback mechanisms.However,how these serial feedback loops are simultaneously disrupted in cancers,which commonly exhibit constitutively activated NF-κB,remains puzzling.Herein,we report that miR-486 directly suppresses NF-κB-negative regulators,CYLD and Cezanne,as well as multiple A20 activity regulators,including ITCH,TNIP-1,TNIP-2 and TNIP-3,resulting in promotion of ubiquitin conjugations in NF-κB signaling and sustained NF-κB activity.Furthermore,we demonstrate that upregulation of miR-486 promotes glioma aggressiveness both in vitro and in vivo through activation of NF-κB signaling pathway.Importantly,miR-486 levels in primary gliomas significantly correlate with NF-κB activation status.These findings uncover a novel mechanism for constitutive NF-κB activation in gliomas and support a functionally and clinically relevant epigenetic mechanism in cancer progression.

  9. The Context Matters: Outcome Probability and Expectation Mismatch Modulate the Feedback Negativity When Self-Evaluation of Response Correctness Is Possible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leue, Anja; Cano Rodilla, Carmen; Beauducel, André

    2015-01-01

    Individuals typically evaluate whether their performance and the obtained feedback match. Previous research has shown that feedback negativity (FN) depends on outcome probability and feedback valence. It is, however, less clear to what extent previous effects of outcome probability on FN depend on self-evaluations of response correctness. Therefore, we investigated the effects of outcome probability on FN amplitude in a simple go/no-go task that allowed for the self-evaluation of response correctness. We also investigated effects of performance incompatibility and feedback valence. In a sample of N = 22 participants, outcome probability was manipulated by means of precues, feedback valence by means of monetary feedback, and performance incompatibility by means of feedback that induced a match versus mismatch with individuals' performance. We found that the 100% outcome probability condition induced a more negative FN following no-loss than the 50% outcome probability condition. The FN following loss was more negative in the 50% compared to the 100% outcome probability condition. Performance-incompatible loss resulted in a more negative FN than performance-compatible loss. Our results indicate that the self-evaluation of the correctness of responses should be taken into account when the effects of outcome probability and expectation mismatch on FN are investigated. PMID:26783525

  10. The Context Matters: Outcome Probability and Expectation Mismatch Modulate the Feedback Negativity When Self-Evaluation of Response Correctness Is Possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leue, Anja; Cano Rodilla, Carmen; Beauducel, André

    2015-01-01

    Individuals typically evaluate whether their performance and the obtained feedback match. Previous research has shown that feedback negativity (FN) depends on outcome probability and feedback valence. It is, however, less clear to what extent previous effects of outcome probability on FN depend on self-evaluations of response correctness. Therefore, we investigated the effects of outcome probability on FN amplitude in a simple go/no-go task that allowed for the self-evaluation of response correctness. We also investigated effects of performance incompatibility and feedback valence. In a sample of N = 22 participants, outcome probability was manipulated by means of precues, feedback valence by means of monetary feedback, and performance incompatibility by means of feedback that induced a match versus mismatch with individuals' performance. We found that the 100% outcome probability condition induced a more negative FN following no-loss than the 50% outcome probability condition. The FN following loss was more negative in the 50% compared to the 100% outcome probability condition. Performance-incompatible loss resulted in a more negative FN than performance-compatible loss. Our results indicate that the self-evaluation of the correctness of responses should be taken into account when the effects of outcome probability and expectation mismatch on FN are investigated.

  11. Free Running Single Photon Detection based on a negative feedback InGaAs APD

    CERN Document Server

    Lunghi, Tommaso; Guinnard, Olivier; Houlmann, Raphael; Jiang, Xudong; Itzler, Mark A; Zbinden, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    InGaAs/InP-based semiconductor avalanche photodiode are usually employed for single-photon counting at telecom wavelength. However they are affected by afterpulsing which limits the diode performance. Recently, Princeton Lightwave has commercialised a diode integrating monolithically a feedback resistor. This solution effectively quenches the avalanche and drastically reduces afterpulsing. Here, we report the development and characterization of a detector module based on this diode, implementing an active hold-off circuit which further reduces the afterpulsing and notably improves the detector performances. We demonstrate free-running operation with 600 Hz dark count rate at 10% detection efficiency. We also improved the standard double-window technique for the afterpulsing characterization. Our algorithm implemented by a FPGA allows to put the APD in a well-defined initial condition and to measure the impact of the higher order afterpulses.

  12. Existence and global asymptotic stability of positive periodic solutions of a Lotka-Volterra type competition systems with delays and feedback controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh Tuan Trinh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The existence of positive periodic solutions of a periodic Lotka-Volterra type competition system with delays and feedback controls is studied by applying the continuation theorem of coincidence degree theory. By contracting a suitable Liapunov functional, a set of sufficient conditions for the global asymptotic stability of the positive periodic solution of the system is given. A counterexample is given to show that the result on the existence of positive periodic solution in [4] is incorrect.

  13. Effects of quantum noise on the nonlinear dynamics of a semiconductor laser subject to two spectrally filtered, time-delayed optical feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suelzer, Joseph S.; Prasad, Awadhesh; Ghosh, Rupamanjari; Vemuri, Gautam

    2016-07-01

    We report on a theoretical and computational investigation of the complex dynamics that arise in a semiconductor laser that is subject to two external, time-delayed, filtered optical feedbacks with special attention to the effect of quantum noise. In particular, we focus on the dynamics of the instantaneous optical frequency (wavelength) and its behavior for a wide range of feedback strengths and filter parameters. In the case of two intermediate filter bandwidths, the most significant results are that in the presence of noise, the feedback strengths required for the onset of chaos in a period doubling route are higher than in the absence of noise. We find that the inclusion of noise changes the dominant frequency of the wavelength oscillations, and that certain attractors do not survive in the presence of noise for a range of filter parameters. The results are interpreted by use of a combination of phase portraits, rf spectra, and first return maps.

  14. Experimental demonstration of change of dynamical properties of a passively mode-locked semiconductor laser subject to dual optical feedback by dual full delay-range tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, O; Jaurigue, L; Drzewietzki, L; Lüdge, K; Breuer, S

    2016-06-27

    In this contribution we experimentally demonstrate the change and improvement of dynamical properties of a passively mode-locked semiconductor laser subject to optical feedback from two external cavities by coupling the feedback pulses back into the gain segment. Hereby, we tune the full delay-phase of the pulse-to-pulse period of both external cavities separately and demonstrate the change of the repetition rate, timing jitter, multi-pulse formation and side-band suppression for the first time for such a dual feedback configuration. In addition, we thereby confirm modeling predictions by achieving both a good qualitative and quantitative agreement of experimental and simulated results. Our findings suggest a path towards the realization of side-band free all-optical photonic oscillators based on mode-locked lasers.

  15. Delay in post-ovariectomy estrogen replacement negates estrogen-induced augmentation of post-exercise muscle satellite cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Gary; Iqbal, Sobia; Hubbard, Andrew; Hamilton, Victoria; Bombardier, Eric; Tiidus, Peter M

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the effects of a delay in post-ovariectomy replacement of 17β-estradiol (estrogen) on the post-exercise proliferation of muscle satellite cells. Nine-week-old, ovariectomized, female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 64) were distributed among 8 groups based on estrogen status (0.25 mg estrogen pellet or sham), exercise status (90 min run at 17 m·min(-1) and a grade of -13.5° or unexercised), and estrogen replacement ("proximal", estrogen replacement within 2 weeks; or "delayed", estrogen replacement at 11 weeks following ovariectomy). Significant increases in satellite cells were found in the soleus and white gastrocnemius muscle (immunofluorescent colocalization of nuclei with Pax7) 72 h following eccentric exercise (p exercised groups. Proximal E2 replacement resulted in a further augmentation of muscle satellite cells in exercised rats (p estrogen replacement group. Expression of PI3K was unaltered and phosphorylation of Akt relative to total Akt increased following estrogen supplementation and exercise. Exercise alone did not alter the expression levels of Akt. An 11 week delay in post-ovariectomy estrogen replacement negated the augmenting influence seen with proximal (2 week delay) post-ovariectomy estrogen replacement on post-exercise muscle satellite cell proliferation. This effect appears to be independent of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway.

  16. Energy analysis reveals the negative effect of delays in passive movement mirror therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orand, Abbas; Miyasaka, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Yutaka; Tanino, Genichi; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Wavelet transform energy analyses of the mean and standard error of the electromyogram (EMG) and electroencephalogram (EEG) of eight subjects were investigated in passive movement mirror therapies with no delay (in-phase) and with delay (out-of-phase) situations in two frequency bands of 7.81-15.62 and 15.62-31.25 Hz. It was found that the energy levels of EEG at electrode C4 in the in-phase situation were lower than those in out-of-phase situations, while the energy levels of flexor and extensor forearm muscle groups were larger. With two exceptions, this pattern could be seen in all other subjects. The difference between the in-phase (D0) and out-of-phase situations (D025 and D05) for the frequency range of 15.62-31.25 Hz was found to be significant at a significance level of 0.05 (paired t-test analysis). The respective elevation and decline of EEG and EGM with regard to the increase of the delay may indicate the necessity for synchronization of passive movement and mirror therapy.

  17. mTORC1 Is a Local, Postsynaptic Voltage Sensor Regulated by Positive and Negative Feedback Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farr Niere

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 serves as a regulator of mRNA translation. Recent studies suggest that mTORC1 may also serve as a local, voltage sensor in the postsynaptic region of neurons. Considering biochemical, bioinformatics and imaging data, we hypothesize that the activity state of mTORC1 dynamically regulates local membrane potential by promoting and repressing protein synthesis of select mRNAs. Our hypothesis suggests that mTORC1 uses positive and negative feedback pathways, in a branch-specific manner, to maintain neuronal excitability within an optimal range. In some dendritic branches, mTORC1 activity oscillates between the “On” and “Off” states. We define this as negative feedback. In contrast, positive feedback is defined as the pathway that leads to a prolonged depolarized or hyperpolarized resting membrane potential, whereby mTORC1 activity is constitutively on or off, respectively. We propose that inactivation of mTORC1 increases the expression of voltage-gated potassium alpha (Kv1.1 and 1.2 and beta (Kvβ2 subunits, ensuring that the membrane resets to its resting membrane potential after experiencing increased synaptic activity. In turn, reduced mTORC1 activity increases the protein expression of syntaxin-1A and promotes the surface expression of the ionotropic glutamate receptor N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-type subunit 1 (GluN1 that facilitates increased calcium entry to turn mTORC1 back on. Under conditions such as learning and memory, mTORC1 activity is required to be high for longer periods of time. Thus, the arm of the pathway that promotes syntaxin-1A and Kv1 protein synthesis will be repressed. Moreover, dendritic branches that have low mTORC1 activity with increased Kv expression would balance dendrites with constitutively high mTORC1 activity, allowing for the neuron to maintain its overall activity level within an ideal operating range. Finally, such a model suggests that

  18. Negative Feedbacks by Isoprenoids on a Mevalonate Kinase Expressed in the Corpora Allata of Mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik Nyati

    Full Text Available Juvenile hormones (JH regulate development and reproductive maturation in insects. JHs are synthesized through the mevalonate pathway (MVAP, an ancient metabolic pathway present in the three domains of life. Mevalonate kinase (MVK is a key enzyme in the MVAP. MVK catalyzes the synthesis of phosphomevalonate (PM by transferring the γ-phosphoryl group from ATP to the C5 hydroxyl oxygen of mevalonic acid (MA. Despite the importance of MVKs, these enzymes have been poorly characterized in insects.We functionally characterized an Aedes aegypti MVK (AaMVK expressed in the corpora allata (CA of the mosquito. AaMVK displayed its activity in the presence of metal cofactors. Different nucleotides were used by AaMVK as phosphoryl donors. In the presence of Mg(2+, the enzyme has higher affinity for MA than ATP. The activity of AaMVK was regulated by feedback inhibition from long-chain isoprenoids, such as geranyl diphosphate (GPP and farnesyl diphosphate (FPP.AaMVK exhibited efficient inhibition by GPP and FPP (Ki less than 1 μM, and none by isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP and dimethyl allyl pyrophosphate (DPPM. These results suggest that GPP and FPP might act as physiological inhibitors in the synthesis of isoprenoids in the CA of mosquitoes. Changing MVK activity can alter the flux of precursors and therefore regulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis.

  19. Impact of Feedback Channel Delay over Joint User Scheduling Scheme and Separated Random User Scheduling Scheme in LTE-A System with Carrier Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-A, the signal quality in a wireless channel is estimated based on the channel quality measurements. The measurement results are used to select suitable modulation and coding scheme for each transmission, feedback, and processing delay, which can cause a mismatch between channel quality information (CQI and current channel state at the base station. However, prospect delays in the reception of such CQI may lead to a system performance degradation. This study analyzes the impact of CQI feedback delay on joint user scheduling (JUS scheme and separated random user scheduling (SRUS scheme in LTE-A system over carrier aggregation. The analysis will be compared with the system having delayed channel and perfect knowledge at different deployment scenario. We will study the throughput performance of both scheduling schemes with different deployment scenario, and then recommend the suitable deployment scenario to keep the desired QoS for a specific number of users. Results show that, in main beam directed at sector boundaries and diverse coverage, JUS scheme performs better than SRUS, which can justify the intensive use of user equipment power and extra control signaling overhead.

  20. The effect of force feedback delay on stiffness perception and grip force modulation during tool-mediated interaction with elastic force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leib, Raz; Karniel, Amir; Nisky, Ilana

    2015-05-01

    During interaction with objects, we form an internal representation of their mechanical properties. This representation is used for perception and for guiding actions, such as in precision grip, where grip force is modulated with the predicted load forces. In this study, we explored the relationship between grip force adjustment and perception of stiffness during interaction with linear elastic force fields. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants probed pairs of virtual force fields while grasping a force sensor that was attached to a haptic device. For each pair, they were asked which field had higher level of stiffness. In half of the pairs, the force feedback of one of the fields was delayed. Participants underestimated the stiffness of the delayed field relatively to the nondelayed, but their grip force characteristics were similar in both conditions. We analyzed the magnitude of the grip force and the lag between the grip force and the load force in the exploratory probing movements within each trial. Right before answering which force field had higher level of stiffness, both magnitude and lag were similar between delayed and nondelayed force fields. These results suggest that an accurate internal representation of environment stiffness and time delay was used for adjusting the grip force. However, this representation did not help in eliminating the bias in stiffness perception. We argue that during performance of a perceptual task that is based on proprioceptive feedback, separate neural mechanisms are responsible for perception and action-related computations in the brain.

  1. REVEILLE8 and PSEUDO-REPONSE REGULATOR5 Form a Negative Feedback Loop within the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Reetika; Jones, Matthew A.; Schwartz, Jacob; Salemi, Michelle R.; Phinney, Brett S.; Harmer, Stacey L.

    2011-01-01

    Circadian rhythms provide organisms with an adaptive advantage, allowing them to regulate physiological and developmental events so that they occur at the most appropriate time of day. In plants, as in other eukaryotes, multiple transcriptional feedback loops are central to clock function. In one such feedback loop, the Myb-like transcription factors CCA1 and LHY directly repress expression of the pseudoresponse regulator TOC1 by binding to an evening element (EE) in the TOC1 promoter. Another key regulatory circuit involves CCA1 and LHY and the TOC1 homologs PRR5, PRR7, and PRR9. Purification of EE–binding proteins from plant extracts followed by mass spectrometry led to the identification of RVE8, a homolog of CCA1 and LHY. Similar to these well-known clock genes, expression of RVE8 is circadian-regulated with a dawn phase of expression, and RVE8 binds specifically to the EE. However, whereas cca1 and lhy mutants have short period phenotypes and overexpression of either gene causes arrhythmia, rve8 mutants have long-period and RVE8-OX plants have short-period phenotypes. Light input to the clock is normal in rve8, but temperature compensation (a hallmark of circadian rhythms) is perturbed. RVE8 binds to the promoters of both TOC1 and PRR5 in the subjective afternoon, but surprisingly only PRR5 expression is perturbed by overexpression of RVE8. Together, our data indicate that RVE8 promotes expression of a subset of EE–containing clock genes towards the end of the subjective day and forms a negative feedback loop with PRR5. Thus RVE8 and its homologs CCA1 and LHY function close to the circadian oscillator but act via distinct molecular mechanisms. PMID:21483796

  2. REVEILLE8 and PSEUDO-REPONSE REGULATOR5 form a negative feedback loop within the Arabidopsis circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetika Rawat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms provide organisms with an adaptive advantage, allowing them to regulate physiological and developmental events so that they occur at the most appropriate time of day. In plants, as in other eukaryotes, multiple transcriptional feedback loops are central to clock function. In one such feedback loop, the Myb-like transcription factors CCA1 and LHY directly repress expression of the pseudoresponse regulator TOC1 by binding to an evening element (EE in the TOC1 promoter. Another key regulatory circuit involves CCA1 and LHY and the TOC1 homologs PRR5, PRR7, and PRR9. Purification of EE-binding proteins from plant extracts followed by mass spectrometry led to the identification of RVE8, a homolog of CCA1 and LHY. Similar to these well-known clock genes, expression of RVE8 is circadian-regulated with a dawn phase of expression, and RVE8 binds specifically to the EE. However, whereas cca1 and lhy mutants have short period phenotypes and overexpression of either gene causes arrhythmia, rve8 mutants have long-period and RVE8-OX plants have short-period phenotypes. Light input to the clock is normal in rve8, but temperature compensation (a hallmark of circadian rhythms is perturbed. RVE8 binds to the promoters of both TOC1 and PRR5 in the subjective afternoon, but surprisingly only PRR5 expression is perturbed by overexpression of RVE8. Together, our data indicate that RVE8 promotes expression of a subset of EE-containing clock genes towards the end of the subjective day and forms a negative feedback loop with PRR5. Thus RVE8 and its homologs CCA1 and LHY function close to the circadian oscillator but act via distinct molecular mechanisms.

  3. High diatom production and export in stratified waters - A potential negative feedback to global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Alan E. S.; Villareal, Tracy A.

    2013-12-01

    It is widely held that increased stratification and reduced vertical mixing in the ocean driven by global warming will promote the replacement of diatoms by smaller phytoplankton and lead to an overall decrease in productivity and carbon export. Here we present contrary evidence from a synergy of modern observations and palaeo-records that reveal high diatom production and export from stratified waters. Diatom adaptations to stratified waters include the ability to grow in low light conditions in deep chlorophyll maxima; vertical migrations between nutricline depths and the surface, and symbioses with N2-fixing cyanobacteria in diatom-diazotroph associations (DDA). These strategies foster the maintenance of seed populations that may then exploit mixing events induced by storms or eddies, but may also inherently promote blooms. Recent oceanographic observations in the subtropical gyres, at increasingly high temporal and spatial resolutions, have monitored short-lived but often substantial blooms and export of stratified-adapted diatoms including rhizosolenids and the diazotroph-associated Hemiaulus hauckii. Aggregate formation by such diatoms is common and promotes rapid settling thereby minimizing water column remineralization and optimizing carbon flux. Convergence zones associated with oceanic fronts or mesoscale features may also generate substantial flux of stratified-adapted diatom species. Conventional oceanographic observing strategies and sampling techniques under-represent such activity due to the lack of adequate capability to sample the large sized diatoms and colonies involved, the subsurface location of many of these blooms, their common development in thin global warming. However, the key genera involved in such potential feedbacks are underrepresented in both laboratory and field studies and are poorly represented in models. Our findings suggest that a reappraisal is necessary of the way diatoms are represented as plankton functional types (PFTs) in

  4. Model of Calcium Oscillations Due to Negative Feedback in Olfactory Cilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reidl, Juergen; Borowski, Peter; Sensse, Anke;

    2006-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Ca oscillations in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons. The underlying mechanism is based on direct negative regulation of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels by calcium/calmodulin and does not require any autocatalysis such as calcium-induced calcium release....... The model is in quantitative agreement with available experimental data, both with respect to oscillations and to fast adaptation. We give predictions for the ranges of parameters in which oscillations should be observable. Relevance of the model to calcium oscillations in other systems is discussed....

  5. The effectiveness of attachment based intervention using video feedback method on decreasing negative representations and separation anxiety of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    parisa sadat Seyedmousavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: With regard to the importance of attachment in developing separation anxiety, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of attachment based intervention via video feedback on decreasing negative representations and separation anxiety problems in preschool children. Materials and Method: The research method was semi experimental with pretest-posttest and follow up. For this, 21 mother-child dyads (11 dyads in experimental and 10 dyads in control group were selected from 2 child counseling centers based on including criteria. The experimental group received 8 to 10 individual attachment based intervention sessions and the control group received the other relation based intervention for comparison of their effectiveness. The participants were assessed using maternal behavior Q-SORT, MacArthur story stems and child psychopathological symptoms inventory in pretest, post-test and 3 months interval follow up. Results: The findings revealed the effectiveness of attachment-based intervention on increasing maternal sensitivity, decreasing negative representations of child and also separation anxiety symptoms in children of experimental group. The mean scores of experimental group in comparison to witness group have significantly decreased in all variables. Conclusion: Considering this results, it seems attachment-based intervention could increas maternal sensitivity and this change with decreasing negative representation of child via recovering interactions have a positive effect on decreasing separation anxiety problems of children.

  6. Periodic solutions of piecewise affine gene network models with non uniform decay rates: the case of a negative feedback loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farcot, Etienne; Gouzé, Jean-Luc

    2009-12-01

    This paper concerns periodic solutions of a class of equations that model gene regulatory networks. Unlike the vast majority of previous studies, it is not assumed that all decay rates are identical. To handle this more general situation, we rely on monotonicity properties of these systems. Under an alternative assumption, it is shown that a classical fixed point theorem for monotone, concave operators can be applied to these systems. The required assumption is expressed in geometrical terms as an alignment condition on so-called focal points. As an application, we show the existence and uniqueness of a stable periodic orbit for negative feedback loop systems in dimension 3 or more, and of a unique stable equilibrium point in dimension 2. This extends a theorem of Snoussi, which showed the existence of these orbits only.

  7. miR-340 and ZEB1 negative feedback loop regulates TGF-β- mediated breast cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ye-Gong; Wang, Jie; Mao, Jie-Fei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xin; Cao, Xu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs act as key regulators in carcinogenesis and progression in various cancers. In present study, we explored the role of miR-340 in the breast cancer progression. Our results showed that overexpression of miR-340 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion, whereas depletion of miR-340 promotes breast cancer progression. Molecularly, ZEB1 was identified as a target gene of miR-340 and miR-340 suppressed the expression of ZEB1 by directly binding to the 3′-UTR of ZEB1. Furthermore, ZEB1 transcriptionally suppresses miR-340 expression. The negative feedback loop regulated TGF-β-mediated breast cancer progression. In conclusion, our data suggested that miR-340 acted as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer progression. PMID:27036021

  8. Therapy of acute and delayed spinal infections after spinal surgery treated with negative pressure wound therapy in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Zwolak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43- 87 years were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30. The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy.

  9. The Application of Predictor Feedback in Designing a Preview Controller for Discrete-Time Systems with Input Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fucheng Liao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for designing a type one servomechanism for a discrete-time linear system with input delay subject to a previewable desired output and a nonmeasurable constant disturbance. The tracking problem of a delay system is transformed into a regulation problem of a delay-free system via constructing an augmented error system and a variable substitution. A controller is obtained with delay compensation and preview compensation based on preview control theory and the predictor method. When the state vector is not directly measurable, a full-dimensional observer is offered. The effectiveness of the design method is demonstrated by numerical simulations.

  10. State Feedback Stabilzation for a Class of Time-delay Nonlinear Systems%一类非线性时滞系统的状态反馈镇定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宪福; 程兆林

    2005-01-01

    The problem of global stabilization by state feedback for a class of time-delay nonlinear system is considered. By constructing the appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals (LKF) and using the backstepping design, a linear state feedback controller making the closed-loop system globally asymptotically stable is constructed.

  11. FGF signaling enhances a sonic hedgehog negative feedback loop at the initiation of spinal cord ventral patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Aixa V; Espeso-Gil, Sergio; Ocaña, Inmaculada; Nieto-Lopez, Francisco; Calleja, Elena; Bovolenta, Paola; Lewandoski, Mark; Diez Del Corral, Ruth

    2016-09-01

    A prevalent developmental mechanism for the assignment of cell identities is the production of spatiotemporal concentration gradients of extracellular signaling molecules that are interpreted by the responding cells. One of such signaling systems is the Shh gradient that controls neuronal subtype identity in the ventral spinal cord. Using loss and gain of function approaches in chick and mouse embryos, we show here that the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathway is required to restrict the domains of ventral gene expression as neuroepithelial cells become exposed to Shh during caudal extension of the embryo. FGF signaling activates the expression of the Shh receptor and negative pathway regulator Patched 2 (Ptch2) and therefore can enhance a negative feedback loop that restrains the activity of the pathway. Thus, we identify one of the mechanisms by which FGF signaling acts as a modulator of the onset of Shh signaling activity in the context of coordination of ventral patterning and caudal axis extension. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 956-971, 2016.

  12. Effect of State Feedback Coupling and System Delays on the Transient Performance of Stand-Alone VSI with LC Output Filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Federico, de Bosio; de Sousa Ribeiro, Luiz Antonio; Freijedo Fernandez, Francisco Daniel

    2016-01-01

    provided. A proportional resonant voltage controller is designed according to Nyquist criterion taking into account application requirements. For this purpose, a mathematical expression based on root locus analysis is proposed to find the minimum value of the fundamental resonant gain. Experimental tests...... on the state feedback decoupling path in order to compensate for system delays. Practical implementation issues are discussed with reference to both the decoupling techniques. A design methodology for the voltage loop, that considers the closed loop transfer functions developed for the inner loop, is also...... performed in accordance to UPS standards verify the theoretical analysis....

  13. 非相称多时奇异系统的有记忆状态反馈控制%Memory State Feedback Control for Singular Systems with Multiple Internal Incommensurate Constant Point Delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋朝辉; 桂卫华; 谢永芳; 阳春华

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of delay-dependent stabilization for singular linear continuous-time systems with multiple internal incommensurate constant point delays (SLCS-MIID) is investigated. The condition when a singular system subject to point delays is regular independent of time delays is given and it can be easily tested with numerical or algebraic methods. Based on the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional approach and the descriptor integral-inequality lemma, a sufficient condition for delay-dependent stability is obtained. The main idea is to design multiple memory state feedback control laws such that the resulting closed-loop system is regular independently of time delays, impulse free, and asymptotically stable via solving some strict linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) problem. An explicit expression for the desired memory state feedback control law is also given. Finally, a numerical example illustrates effectiveness and availability for the proposed method.

  14. 一个正反馈时滞微分方程的Hopf分支%Hopf Bifurcation of a Positive Feedback Delay Differential Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玉明; 黄立宏

    2003-01-01

    Under some minor technical hypotheses, for each τ larger than a certain τs > 0, Krisztin, Walther and Wu showed the existence of a periodic orbit for the positive feedback delay differential equation x(t) = -τμx(t) + τf(x(t - 1)), where τ and μ are positive constants and f: R → R satisfies f(0) = 0 and f′> 0.Combining this with a unique result of Krisztin and Walther, we know that this periodic orbit is the one branched out from 0 through Hopf bifurcation. Using the normal form theory for delay differential equations, we show the same result under the condition that f ∈ C3(R, R) is such that f"(0) = 0 and f′"(0) < 0, which is weaker than those of Krisztin and Walther.

  15. Finite-time H∞ control for discrete-time switched singular time-delay systems subject to actuator saturation via static output feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuechao; Fu, Lei

    2016-10-01

    This study employs the multiple Lyapunov-like function method and the average dwell-time concept of switching signal to investigate the finite-time H∞ static output-feedback (SOF) control problem for a class of discrete-time switched singular time-delay systems subject to actuator saturation. First, sufficient conditions are presented to guarantee the discrete-time switched singular time-delay system regular, causal and finite-time boundedness. Meanwhile, sufficient conditions are presented to ensure the H∞ disturbance attenuation level, and the design method of H∞ SOF controller is developed by solving matrix inequalities optimisation problem without any decompositions of system matrices and equivalent transformation. Finally, the effectiveness and merit of the theoretical results are shown through some numerical examples and several vivid illustrations.

  16. Germline genetic variants disturbing the Let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop alter breast cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao-Xiang Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that let-7 can repress the post-transcriptional translation of LIN28, and LIN28 in turn could block the maturation of let-7, forming a double-negative feedback loop. In this study, we investigated the effect of germline genetic variants on regulation of the homeostasis of the let-7/LIN28 loop and breast cancer risk. We initially demonstrated that the T/C variants of rs3811463, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP located near the let-7 binding site in LIN28, could lead to differential regulation of LIN28 by let-7. Specifically, the C allele of rs3811463 weakened let-7-induced repression of LIN28 mRNA, resulting in increased production of LIN28 protein, which could in turn down-regulate the level of mature let-7. This effect was then validated at the tissue level in that the normal breast tissue of individuals with the rs3811463-TC genotype expressed significantly lower levels of let-7 and higher levels of LIN28 protein than those individuals with the rs3811463-TT genotype. Because previous in vitro and ex vivo experiments have consistently suggested that LIN28 could promote cellular transformation, we then systematically evaluated the relationship between rs3811463 as well as other common LIN28 SNPs and the risk of breast cancer in a stepwise manner. The first hospital-based association study (n = 2,300 demonstrated that two SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer risk, one of which was rs3811463, while the other was rs6697410. The C allele of the rs3811463 SNP corresponded to an increased risk of breast cancer with an odds ratio (OR of 1.25 (P = 0.0091, which was successfully replicated in a second independent study (n = 1,156 with community-based controls. The combined P-value of the two studies was 8.0 × 10⁻⁵. Taken together, our study demonstrates that host genetic variants could disturb the regulation of the let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop and alter breast cancer risk.

  17. Germline genetic variants disturbing the Let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop alter breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ao-Xiang; Yu, Ke-Da; Fan, Lei; Li, Ji-Yu; Yang, Chen; Huang, A-Ji; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that let-7 can repress the post-transcriptional translation of LIN28, and LIN28 in turn could block the maturation of let-7, forming a double-negative feedback loop. In this study, we investigated the effect of germline genetic variants on regulation of the homeostasis of the let-7/LIN28 loop and breast cancer risk. We initially demonstrated that the T/C variants of rs3811463, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located near the let-7 binding site in LIN28, could lead to differential regulation of LIN28 by let-7. Specifically, the C allele of rs3811463 weakened let-7-induced repression of LIN28 mRNA, resulting in increased production of LIN28 protein, which could in turn down-regulate the level of mature let-7. This effect was then validated at the tissue level in that the normal breast tissue of individuals with the rs3811463-TC genotype expressed significantly lower levels of let-7 and higher levels of LIN28 protein than those individuals with the rs3811463-TT genotype. Because previous in vitro and ex vivo experiments have consistently suggested that LIN28 could promote cellular transformation, we then systematically evaluated the relationship between rs3811463 as well as other common LIN28 SNPs and the risk of breast cancer in a stepwise manner. The first hospital-based association study (n = 2,300) demonstrated that two SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer risk, one of which was rs3811463, while the other was rs6697410. The C allele of the rs3811463 SNP corresponded to an increased risk of breast cancer with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.25 (P = 0.0091), which was successfully replicated in a second independent study (n = 1,156) with community-based controls. The combined P-value of the two studies was 8.0 × 10⁻⁵. Taken together, our study demonstrates that host genetic variants could disturb the regulation of the let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop and alter breast cancer risk.

  18. The positive side of a negative reference: the delay between linguistic processing and common ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noveck, Ira; Rivera, Natalia; Jaume-Guazzini, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Interlocutors converge on names to refer to entities. For example, a speaker might refer to a novel looking object as the jellyfish and, once identified, the listener will too. The hypothesized mechanism behind such referential precedents is a subject of debate. The common ground view claims that listeners register the object as well as the identity of the speaker who coined the label. The linguistic view claims that, once established, precedents are treated by listeners like any other linguistic unit, i.e. without needing to keep track of the speaker. To test predictions from each account, we used visual-world eyetracking, which allows observations in real time, during a standard referential communication task. Participants had to select objects based on instructions from two speakers. In the critical condition, listeners sought an object with a negative reference such as not the jellyfish. We aimed to determine the extent to which listeners rely on the linguistic input, common ground or both. We found that initial interpretations were based on linguistic processing only and that common ground considerations do emerge but only after 1000 ms. Our findings support the idea that—at least temporally—linguistic processing can be isolated from common ground.

  19. General relativistic modelling of the negative reverberation X-ray time delays in AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Emmanoulopoulos, D; Dovciak, M; McHardy, I M

    2014-01-01

    We present the first systematic physical modelling of the time-lag spectra between the soft (0.3-1 keV) and the hard (1.5-4 keV) X-ray energy bands, as a function of Fourier frequency, in a sample of 12 active galactic nuclei which have been observed by XMM-Newton. We concentrate particularly on the negative X-ray time-lags (typically seen above $10^{-4}$ Hz) i.e. soft band variations lag the hard band variations, and we assume that they are produced by reprocessing and reflection by the accretion disc within a lamp-post X-ray source geometry. We also assume that the response of the accretion disc, in the soft X-ray bands, is adequately described by the response in the neutral iron line (Fe k$\\alpha$) at 6.4 keV for which we use fully general relativistic ray-tracing simulations to determine its time evolution. These response functions, and thus the corresponding time-lag spectra, yield much more realistic results than the commonly-used, but erroneous, top-hat models. Additionally we parametrize the positive ...

  20. Phytochrome Signaling in Green Arabidopsis Seedlings: Impact Assessment of a Mutually Negative phyB-PIF Feedback Loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pablo Leivar; Elena Monte; Megan M. Cohn; Peter H. Quail

    2012-01-01

    The reversibly red (R)/far-red (FR)-Iight-responsive phytoch rome (phy) photosensory system initiates both the deetiolation process in dark-germinated seedlings upon first exposure to light,and the shade-avoidance process in fully deetiolated seedlings upon exposure to vegetational shade.The intracellular signaling pathway from the light-activated photoreceptor conformer (Pfr) to the transcriptional network that drives these responses involves direct,physical interaction of Pfr with a small subfamily of bHLH transcription factors,termed Phy-lnteracting Factors (PIFs),which induces rapid PIF proteolytic degradation.In addition,there is evidence of further complexity in light-grown seedlings,whereby phyB-PIF interaction reciprocally induces phyB degradation,in a mutually-negative,feedback-loop configuration.Here,to assess the relative contributions of these antagonistic activities to the net phenotypic readout in light-grown seedlings,we have examined the magnitude of the light- and simulated-shade-induced responses of a pentuple phyBpif1pif3pif4pif5 (phyBpifq) mutant and various multiple pif-mutant combinations.The data (1) reaffirm that phyB is the predominant,if not exclusive,photoreceptor imposing the inhibition of hypocotyl elongation in deetiolating seedlings in response to prolonged continuous R irradiation and (2) show that the PIF quartet (PIF1,PIF3,PIF4,and PIF5) retain and exert a dual capacity to modulate hypocotyl elongation under these conditions,by concomitantly promoting cell elongation through intrinsic transcriptional-regulatory activity,and reducing phyB-inhibitory capacity through feedback-loop-induced phyB degradation.In shade-exposed seedlings,immunoblot analysis shows that the shade-imposed reduction in Pfr levels induces increases in the abundance of PIF3,and mutant analysis indicates that PIF3 acts,in conjunction with PIF4 and PIF5,to promote the known shade-induced acceleration of hypocotyl elongation.Conversely,although the quadruple pifq

  1. General relativistic modelling of the negative reverberation X-ray time delays in AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Papadakis, I. E.; Dovčiak, M.; McHardy, I. M.

    2014-04-01

    We present the first systematic physical modelling of the time-lag spectra between the soft (0.3-1 keV) and the hard (1.5-4 keV) X-ray energy bands, as a function of Fourier frequency, in a sample of 12 active galactic nuclei which have been observed by XMM-Newton. We concentrate particularly on the negative X-ray time-lags (typically seen above 10-4 Hz), i.e. soft-band variations lag the hard-band variations, and we assume that they are produced by reprocessing and reflection by the accretion disc within a lamp-post X-ray source geometry. We also assume that the response of the accretion disc, in the soft X-ray bands, is adequately described by the response in the neutral Fe Kα line at 6.4 keV for which we use fully general relativistic ray-tracing simulations to determine its time evolution. These response functions, and thus the corresponding time-lag spectra, yield much more realistic results than the commonly used, but erroneous, top-hat models. Additionally, we parametrize the positive part of the time-lag spectra (typically seen below 10-4 Hz) by a power law. We find that the best-fitting black hole (BH) masses, M, agree quite well with those derived by other methods, thus providing us with a new tool for BH mass determination. We find no evidence for any correlation between M and the BH spin parameter, α, the viewing angle, θ, or the height of the X-ray source above the disc, h. Also on average, the X-ray source lies only around 3.7 gravitational radii above the accretion disc and θ is distributed uniformly between 20° and 60°. Finally, there is a tentative indication that the distribution of α may be bimodal above and below 0.62.

  2. Negative feedback avalanche diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzler, Mark Allen (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A single-photon avalanche detector is disclosed that is operable at wavelengths greater than 1000 nm and at operating speeds greater than 10 MHz. The single-photon avalanche detector comprises a thin-film resistor and avalanche photodiode that are monolithically integrated such that little or no additional capacitance is associated with the addition of the resistor.

  3. Inhibition of Wnt signaling by Wise (Sostdc1) and negative feedback from Shh controls tooth number and patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Youngwook; Sanderson, Brian W; Klein, Ophir D; Krumlauf, Robb

    2010-10-01

    Mice carrying mutations in Wise (Sostdc1) display defects in many aspects of tooth development, including tooth number, size and cusp pattern. To understand the basis of these defects, we have investigated the pathways modulated by Wise in tooth development. We present evidence that, in tooth development, Wise suppresses survival of the diastema or incisor vestigial buds by serving as an inhibitor of Lrp5- and Lrp6-dependent Wnt signaling. Reducing the dosage of the Wnt co-receptor genes Lrp5 and Lrp6 rescues the Wise-null tooth phenotypes. Inactivation of Wise leads to elevated Wnt signaling and, as a consequence, vestigial tooth buds in the normally toothless diastema region display increased proliferation and continuous development to form supernumerary teeth. Conversely, gain-of-function studies show that ectopic Wise reduces Wnt signaling and tooth number. Our analyses demonstrate that the Fgf and Shh pathways are major downstream targets of Wise-regulated Wnt signaling. Furthermore, our experiments revealed that Shh acts as a negative-feedback regulator of Wnt signaling and thus determines the fate of the vestigial buds and later tooth patterning. These data provide insight into the mechanisms that control Wnt signaling in tooth development and into how crosstalk among signaling pathways controls tooth number and morphogenesis.

  4. The timing of upper-layer neurogenesis is conferred by sequential derepression and negative feedback from deep-layer neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Kenichi; Kumamoto, Takuma; Hanashima, Carina

    2014-09-24

    The prevailing view of upper-layer (UL) neurogenesis in the cerebral cortex is that progenitor cells undergo successive rounds of asymmetric cell division that restrict the competence and production of UL neurons later in development. However, the recent discovery of UL fate-committed early progenitors raises an alternative perspective concerning their ontogeny. To investigate the emergence of UL progenitors, we manipulated the timing and extent of cortical neurogenesis in vivo in mice. We demonstrated that UL competence is tightly linked to deep-layer (DL) neurogenesis and that this sequence is determined primarily through derepression of Fezf2 by Foxg1 within a closed transcriptional cascade. We further demonstrated that the sequential acquisition of UL competence requires negative feedback, which is propagated from postmitotic DL neurons. Thus, neocortical progenitors integrate intrinsic and extrinsic cues to generate UL neurons through a system that controls the sequence of DL and UL neurogenesis and to scale the production of intracortical projection neurons based on the availability of their subcortical projection neuron counterparts during cortical development and evolution.

  5. Low noise InGaAs/InP single-photon negative feedback avalanche diodes: characterization and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boso, Gianluca; Korzh, Boris; Lunghi, Tommaso; Zbinden, Hugo

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, many applications have been proposed that require detection of light signals in the near-infrared range with single-photon sensitivity and time resolution down to few hundreds of picoseconds. InGaAs/InP singlephoton avalanche diodes (SPADs) are a viable choice for these tasks thanks to their compactness and ease-of-use. Unfortunately, their performance is traditionally limited by high dark count rates (DCRs) and afterpulsing effects. However, a recent demonstration of negative feedback avalanche diodes (NFADs), operating in the free-running regime, achieved a DCR down to 1 cps at 10 % photon detection efficiency (PDE) at telecom wavelengths. Here we present our recent results on the characterization of NFAD detectors for temperatures down to approximately 150 K. A FPGA controlled test-bench facilitates the acquisition of all the parameters of interest like PDE, DCR, afterpulsing probability etc. We also demonstrate the performance of the detector in different applications: In particular, with low-temperature NFADs, we achieved high secret key rates with quantum key distribution over fiber links between 100-300 km. But low noise InGaAs/InP SPADs will certainly find applications in yet unexplored fields like photodynamic therapy, near infrared diffuse optical spectroscopy and many more. For example with a large area detector, we made time-resolved measurements of singlet-oxygen luminescence from a standard Rose Bengal dye in aqueous solution.

  6. Pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein PHLDB3 supports cancer growth via a negative feedback loop involving p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tengfei; Zhou, Xiang; Cao, Bo; Liao, Peng; Liu, Hongbing; Chen, Yun; Park, Hee-Won; Zeng, Shelya X.; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 transactivates the expression of its target genes to exert its functions. Here, we identify a pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein (PHLDB3)-encoding gene as a p53 target. PHLDB3 overexpression increases proliferation and restrains apoptosis of wild-type p53-harboring cancer cells by reducing p53 protein levels. PHLDB3 binds to MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog) and facilitates MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of p53. Knockdown of PHLDB3 more efficiently inhibits the growth of mouse xenograft tumours derived from human colon cancer HCT116 cells that contain wild type p53 compared with p53-deficient HCT116 cells, and also sensitizes tumour cells to doxorubicin and 5-Fluorouracil. Analysis of cancer genomic databases reveals that PHLDB3 is amplified and/or highly expressed in numerous human cancers. Altogether, these results demonstrate that PHLDB3 promotes tumour growth by inactivating p53 in a negative feedback fashion and suggest PHLDB3 as a potential therapeutic target in various human cancers. PMID:28008906

  7. Genetic polymorphisms in circadian negative feedback regulation genes predict overall survival and response to chemotherapy in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Falin; Qiao, Qing; Wang, Nan; Ji, Gang; Zhao, Huadong; He, Li; Wang, Haichao; Bao, Guoqiang

    2016-03-01

    Circadian negative feedback loop (CNFL) genes play important roles in cancer development and progression. To evaluate the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CNFL genes on the survival of GC patients, 13 functional SNPs from 5 CNFL genes were genotyped in a cohort of 1030 resected GC patients (704 in the training set, 326 in the validation set) to explore the association of SNPs with overall survival (OS). Among the 13 SNPs, three SNPs (rs1056560 in CRY1, rs3027178 in PER1 and rs228729 in PER3) were significantly associated with OS of GC in the training set, and verified in the validation set and pooled analysis. Furthermore, a dose-dependent cumulative effect of these SNPs on GC survival was observed, and survival tree analysis showed higher order interactions between these SNPs. In addition, protective effect conferred by adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) on GC was observed in patients with variant alleles (TG/GG) of rs1056560, but not in those with homozygous wild (TT) genotype. Functional assay suggested rs1056560 genotypes significantly affect CRY1 expression in cancer cells. Our study presents that SNPs in the CNFL genes may be associated with GC prognosis, and provides the guidance in selecting potential GC patients most likely responsive to ACT.

  8. Active vibration control of structure by Active Mass Damper and Multi-Modal Negative Acceleration Feedback control algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Don-Ho; Shin, Ji-Hwan; Lee, HyunWook; Kim, Seoug-Ki; Kwak, Moon K.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an Active Mass Damper (AMD) consisting of an AC servo motor, a movable mass connected to the AC servo motor by a ball-screw mechanism, and an accelerometer as a sensor for vibration measurement were considered. Considering the capability of the AC servo motor which can follow the desired displacement accurately, the Negative Acceleration Feedback (NAF) control algorithm which uses the acceleration signal directly and produces the desired displacement for the active mass was proposed. The effectiveness of the NAF control was proved theoretically using a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system. It was found that the stability condition for the NAF control is static and it can effectively increase the damping of the target natural mode without causing instability in the low frequency region. Based on the theoretical results of the SDOF system, the Multi-Modal NAF (MMNAF) control is proposed to suppress the many natural modes of multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems using a single AMD. It was proved both theoretically and experimentally that the MMNAF control can suppress vibrations of the MDOF system.

  9. Dysregulation of SOCS-Mediated Negative Feedback of Cytokine Signaling in Carcinogenesis and Its Significance in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Wen-wen; Liu, Pengpeng; Yu, Wenwen; Liu, Ting; Yu, Jinpu

    2017-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are major negative feedback regulators of cytokine signaling mediated by the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling pathway. In particular, SOCS1 and SOCS3 are strong inhibitors of JAKs and can play pivotal roles in the development and progression of cancers. The abnormal expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 in cancer cells is associated with the dysregulation of cell growth, migration, and death induced by multiple cytokines and hormones in human carcinomas. In addition, the mechanisms involved in SOCS1- and SOCS3-regulated abnormal development and activation of immune cells in carcinogenesis, including T cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, are still unclear. Therefore, this study aims to further discuss the molecules and signal pathways regulating the expression and function of SOCS1 and SOCS3 in various types of cancers and elucidate the feasibility and efficiency of SOCS-based target therapeutic strategy in anticancer treatment. PMID:28228755

  10. Be kind to your eating disorder patients: the impact of positive and negative feedback on the explicit and implicit self-esteem of female patients with eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderlinden, J.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Slagmolen, C.; Wigboldus, D.; Pieters, G.; Probst, M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lack of self-esteem may play an important role in the development of eating disorders (ED). This study investigated the differential impact of positive and negative feedback on implicit and explicit self-esteem in women with an ED (N=25) as compared to women without an ED (N=29). METHOD:

  11. Be kind to your eating disorder patients: The impact of positive and negative feedback on the explicit and implicit self-esteem of female patients with eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, J. van der; Kamphuis, J.H.; Slagmolen, C.J.J.; Wigboldus, D.H.J.; Pieters, G.; Probst, M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lack of self-esteem may play an important role in the development of eating disorders (ED). This study investigated the differential impact of positive and negative feedback on implicit and explicit self-esteem in women with an ED (N=25) as compared to women without an ED (N=29). METHOD:

  12. Baseline EEG theta/beta ratio and punishment sensitivity as biomarkers for feedback-related negativity (FRN) and risk-taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massar, S.A.A.; Rossi, V.; Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Kenemans, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Feedback-related negativity (FRN) is associated with reinforcement learning and punishment sensitivity. Furthermore, reinforcement learning proficiency can be predicted from pre-task baseline EEG theta/beta ratio. In this study it was examined whether there was a relation between baseline

  13. Hear You Later Alligator: How delayed auditory feedback affects non-musically trained people’s strumming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Veirum; Knoche, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    of an actuated guitar to a metronome at 60bpm and 120bpm. The long DAF matched a subdivision of the overall tempo. We compared their performance using two different input devices with feedback before or on activation. While 250ms DAF hardly affected musically trained participants, non-musically trained...

  14. GLOBAL ASYMPTOTIC STABILITY IN N-SPECIES NONAUTONOMOUS LOTKA-VOLTERRA COMPETITIVE SYSTEMS WITH DELAYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Rui(徐瑞); Chen Lansun(陈兰荪); M.A.J. Chaplain

    2003-01-01

    A delayed n-species nonautonomous Lotka-Volterra type competitive systemwithout dominating instantaneous negative feedback is investigated. By means of a suitableLyapunov functional, sufficient conditions are derived for the global asymptotic stability ofthe positive solutions of the system. As a corollary, it is shown that the global asymptoticstability of the positive solution is maintained provided that the delayed negative feedbacksdominate other interspecific interaction effects with delays and the delays are sufficientlysmall.

  15. Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder, but Not Panic Anxiety Disorder, Are Associated with Higher Sensitivity to Learning from Negative Feedback: Behavioral and Computational Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdour, Hussain Y; Abushalbaq, Oday M; Mughrabi, Ibrahim T; Imam, Aya F; Gluck, Mark A; Herzallah, Mohammad M; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and panic anxiety disorder (PAD), are a group of common psychiatric conditions. They are characterized by excessive worrying, uneasiness, and fear of future events, such that they affect social and occupational functioning. Anxiety disorders can alter behavior and cognition as well, yet little is known about the particular domains they affect. In this study, we tested the cognitive correlates of medication-free patients with GAD, SAD, and PAD, along with matched healthy participants using a probabilistic category-learning task that allows the dissociation between positive and negative feedback learning. We also fitted all participants' data to a Q-learning model and various actor-critic models that examine learning rate parameters from positive and negative feedback to investigate effects of valence vs. action on performance. SAD and GAD patients were more sensitive to negative feedback than either PAD patients or healthy participants. PAD, SAD, and GAD patients did not differ in positive-feedback learning compared to healthy participants. We found that Q-learning models provide the simplest fit of the data in comparison to other models. However, computational analysis revealed that groups did not differ in terms of learning rate or exploration values. These findings argue that (a) not all anxiety spectrum disorders share similar cognitive correlates, but are rather different in ways that do not link them to the hallmark of anxiety (higher sensitivity to negative feedback); and (b) perception of negative consequences is the core feature of GAD and SAD, but not PAD. Further research is needed to examine the similarities and differences between anxiety spectrum disorders in other cognitive domains and potential implementation of behavioral therapy to remediate cognitive deficits.

  16. Negative feedback adjustment challenges reconstruction study from tree rings: A study case of response of Populus euphratica to river discontinuous flow and ecological water conveyance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hongbo; Zhang, Pei; Guo, Bin; Xu, Hailiang; Ye, Mao; Deng, Xiaoya

    2017-01-01

    Drought stress changes the relationship between the growth of tree rings and variations in ambient temperature. However, it is not clear how the growth of trees changes in response to drought of varying intensities, especially in arid areas. Therefore, Tree rings were studied for 6years in Populus euphratica to assess the impacts of abrupt changes in environment on tree rings using the theories and methods in dendrohydrology, ecology and phytophysiology. The width of tree rings increased by 8.7% after ecological water conveyance downstream of Tarim River compared to that when the river water had been cut off. However, during intermediate drought, as the depth of the groundwater increases, the downward trend in the tree rings was reversed because of changes in the physiology of the tree. Therefore, the growth of tree rings shows a negative feedback to intermediate drought stress, an observation that challenges the homogenization theory of tree ring reconstruction based on the traditional methods. Owing to the time lag, the cumulative effect and the negative feedback between the growth of tree rings and drought stress, the reconstruction of past environment by studying the patterns of tree rings is often inaccurate. Our research sets out to verify the hypothesis that intermediate drought stress results in a negative feedback adjustment and thus to answers two scientific questions: (1) How does the negative feedback adjustment promote the growth of tree rings as a result of intermediate drought stress? (2) How does the negative feedback adjustment lower the accuracy with which the past is reconstructed based on tree rings? This research not only enriches the connotations of intermediate disturbance hypothesis and reconstruction theory of tree rings, but also provides a scientific basis for the conservation of desert riparian forests worldwide.

  17. FRET imaging and statistical signal processing reveal positive and negative feedback loops regulating the morphology of randomly migrating HT-1080 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunida, Katsuyuki; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2012-05-15

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological processes. Rho GTPases (Rac1, Cdc42, RhoA) and phosphatidylinositols have been extensively studied in directional cell migration. However, it remains unclear how Rho GTPases and phosphatidylinositols regulate random cell migration in space and time. We have attempted to address this issue using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging and statistical signal processing. First, we acquired time-lapse images of random migration of HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells expressing FRET biosensors of Rho GTPases and phosphatidyl inositols. We developed an image-processing algorithm to extract FRET values and velocities at the leading edge of migrating cells. Auto- and cross-correlation analysis suggested the involvement of feedback regulations among Rac1, phosphatidyl inositols and membrane protrusions. To verify the feedback regulations, we employed an acute inhibition of the signaling pathway with pharmaceutical inhibitors. The inhibition of actin polymerization decreased Rac1 activity, indicating the presence of positive feedback from actin polymerization to Rac1. Furthermore, treatment with PI3-kinase inhibitor induced an adaptation of Rac1 activity, i.e. a transient reduction of Rac1 activity followed by recovery to the basal level. In silico modeling that reproduced the adaptation predicted the existence of a negative feedback loop from Rac1 to actin polymerization. Finally, we identified MLCK as the probable controlling factor in the negative feedback. These findings quantitatively demonstrate positive and negative feedback loops that involve actin, Rac1 and MLCK, and account for the ordered patterns of membrane dynamics observed in randomly migrating cells.

  18. Adaptive Fuzzy Output-Feedback Method Applied to Fin Control for Time-Delay Ship Roll Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Bai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ship roll stabilization by fin control system is considered in this paper. Assuming that angular velocity in roll cannot be measured, an adaptive fuzzy output-feedback control is investigated. The fuzzy logic system is used to approximate the uncertain term of the controlled system, and a fuzzy state observer is designed to estimate the unmeasured states. By utilizing the fuzzy state observer and combining the adaptive backstepping technique with adaptive fuzzy control design, an observer-based adaptive fuzzy output-feedback control approach is developed. It is proved that the proposed control approach can guarantee that all the signals in the closed-loop system are semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded (SGUUB, and the control strategy is effective to decrease the roll motion. Simulation results are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  19. The sensitivity of Turing self-organization to biological feedback delays: 2D models of fish pigmentation

    KAUST Repository

    Gaffney, E. A.

    2013-10-01

    © The authors 2013. Turing morphogen models have been extensively explored in the context of large-scale self-organization in multicellular biological systems. However, reconciling the detailed biology of morphogen dynamics, while accounting for time delays associated with gene expression, reveals aberrant behaviours that are not consistent with early developmental self-organization, especially the requirement for exquisite temporal control. Attempts to reconcile the interpretation of Turing\\'s ideas with an increasing understanding of the mechanisms driving zebrafish pigmentation suggests that one should reconsider Turing\\'s model in terms of pigment cells rather than morphogens (Nakamasu et al., 2009, PNAS, 106, 8429-8434; Yamaguchi et al., 2007, PNAS, 104, 4790-4793). Here the dynamics of pigment cells is subject to response delays implicit in the cell cycle and apoptosis. Hence we explore simulations of fish skin patterning, focussing on the dynamical influence of gene expression delays in morphogen-based Turing models and response delays for cell-based Turing models. We find that reconciling the mechanisms driving the behaviour of Turing systems with observations of fish skin patterning remains a fundamental challenge.

  20. The sensitivity of Turing self-organization to biological feedback delays: 2D models of fish pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, E A; Lee, S Seirin

    2015-03-01

    Turing morphogen models have been extensively explored in the context of large-scale self-organization in multicellular biological systems. However, reconciling the detailed biology of morphogen dynamics, while accounting for time delays associated with gene expression, reveals aberrant behaviours that are not consistent with early developmental self-organization, especially the requirement for exquisite temporal control. Attempts to reconcile the interpretation of Turing's ideas with an increasing understanding of the mechanisms driving zebrafish pigmentation suggests that one should reconsider Turing's model in terms of pigment cells rather than morphogens (Nakamasu et al., 2009, PNAS, 106: , 8429-8434; Yamaguchi et al., 2007, PNAS, 104: , 4790-4793). Here the dynamics of pigment cells is subject to response delays implicit in the cell cycle and apoptosis. Hence we explore simulations of fish skin patterning, focussing on the dynamical influence of gene expression delays in morphogen-based Turing models and response delays for cell-based Turing models. We find that reconciling the mechanisms driving the behaviour of Turing systems with observations of fish skin patterning remains a fundamental challenge. © The Authors 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.