WorldWideScience

Sample records for degraded core coolability

  1. Reactor Core Coolability Analysis during Hypothesized Severe Accidents of OPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yongjae; Seo, Seungwon; Kim, Sung Joong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan-Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Assessment of the safety features over the hypothesized severe accidents may be performed experimentally or numerically. Due to the considerable time and expenditures, experimental assessment is implemented only to the limited cases. Therefore numerical assessment has played a major role in revisiting severe accident analysis of the existing or newly designed power plants. Computer codes for the numerical analysis of severe accidents are categorized as the fast running integral code and detailed code. Fast running integral codes are characterized by a well-balanced combination of detailed and simplified models for the simulation of the relevant phenomena within an NPP in the case of a severe accident. MAAP, MELCOR and ASTEC belong to the examples of fast running integral codes. Detailed code is to model as far as possible all relevant phenomena in detail by mechanistic models. The examples of detailed code is SCDAP/RELAP5. Using the MELCOR, Carbajo. investigated sensitivity studies of Station Black Out (SBO) using the MELCOR for Peach Bottom BWR. Park et al. conduct regulatory research of the PWR severe accident. Ahn et al. research sensitivity analysis of the severe accident for APR1400 with MELCOR 1.8.4. Lee et al. investigated RCS depressurization strategy and developed a core coolability map for independent scenarios of Small Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA), SBO, and Total Loss of Feed Water (TLOFW). In this study, three initiating cases were selected, which are SBLOCA without SI, SBO, and TLOFW. The initiating cases exhibit the highest probability of transitioning into core damage according to PSA 1 of OPR 1000. The objective of this study is to investigate the reactor core coolability during hypothesized severe accidents of OPR1000. As a representative indicator, we have employed Jakob number and developed JaCET and JaMCT using the MELCOR simulation. Although the RCS pressures for the respective accident scenarios were different, the JaMCT and Ja

  2. Recent numerical simulations and experiments on coolability of debris beds during severe accidents of light water reactors

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    Starflinger, J., E-mail: joerg.starflinger@ike.uni-stuttgart.de; Buck, M.; Hartmann, A.; Kulenovic, R.; Leininger, S.; Rahman, S.; Rashid, M.

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Investigation on coolability of three-dimensional debris beds has been performed. • Computer code MEWA (Melt Water) is introduced and described briefly. • Validation experiments have been carried out in DEBRIS facility. • Comparison of MEWA simulations and DEBRIS experiments show good agreement. • Example simulation on reactor scale was performed to explain the analysis method. - Abstract: In the course of a severe accident in light water reactors with core degradation, so-called debris beds can be formed inside the reactor pressure vessel or in the reactor cavity. The strategy to analyse the coolability of such debris beds with both experiments and numerical simulations is discussed. The numerical simulations are carried out with MEWA (MElt WAter) code, being developed at the institute for the prediction of the thermal-hydraulic conditions inside a debris bed, including the prediction of dryout heat flux. The simulations show good agreement with experimental data of the DEBRIS experiments.

  3. The coolability limits of a reactor pressure vessel lower head

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    Theofanous, T.G.; Syri, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Configuration II of the ULPU experimental facility is described, and from a comprehensive set of experiments are provided. The facility affords full-scale simulations of the boiling crisis phenomenon on the hemispherical lower head of a reactor pressure vessel submerged in water, and heated internally. Whereas Configuration I experiments (published previously) established the lower limits of coolability under low submergence, pool-boiling conditions, with Configuration II we investigate coolability under conditions more appropriate to practical interest in severe accident management; that is, heat flux shapes (as functions of angular position) representative of a core melt contained by the lower head, full submergence of the reactor pressure vessel, and natural circulation. Critical heat fluxes as a function of the angular position on the lower head are reported and related the observed two-phase flow regimes.

  4. Degraded core analysis for the PWR

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    Gittus, J.H.

    1987-10-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the probability and consequences of degraded core accidents for the PWR. The article is based on a paper which was presented by the author to the Sizewell-B public inquiry. Degraded core accidents are examined with respect to:- the initiating events, safety plant failure, and processes with a bearing on containment failure. Accident types and frequencies are discussed, as well as the dispersion of radionuclides. Accident risks, i.e. individual and societal risks in degraded core accidents are assessed from:- the amount of radionuclides released, the weather, the population distribution, and the accident frequencies. Uncertainties in the assessment of degraded core accidents are also summarized. (U.K.).

  5. Investigation of debris bed formation, spreading and coolability

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    Kudinov, P.; Konovalenko, A.; Grishchenko, D.; Yakush, S.; Basso, S.; Lubchenko, N.; Karbojian, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH. Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    The work is motivated by the severe accident management strategy adopted in Nordic type BWRs. It is assumed that core melt ejected from the vessel will fragment, quench and form a coolable debris bed in a deep water pool below the vessel. In this work we consider phenomena relevant to the debris bed formation and coolability. Several DEFOR-A (Debris Bed Formation - Agglomeration) tests have been carried out with new corium melt material and a melt releasing nozzle mockup. The influence of the melt material, melt superheat, jet free fall height on the (i) faction of agglomerated debris, (ii) particle size distribution, (iii) ablation/plugging of the nozzle mockup has been addressed. Results of the DECOSIM (Debris Coolability Simulator) code validation against available COOLOCE data are presented in the report. The dependence of DHF on system pressure from COOLOCE experiments can be reproduced quite accurately if either the effective particle diameter or debris bed porosity is increased. For a cylindrical debris bed, good agreement is achieved in DECOSIM simulations for the particle diameter 0.89 mm and porosity 0.4. The results obtained are consistent with MEWA simulation where larger particle diameters and porosities were found to be necessary to reproduce the experimental data on DHF. It is instructive to note that results of DHF prediction are in better agreement with POMECO-HT data obtained for the same particles. It is concluded that further clarification of the discrepancies between different experiments and model predictions. In total 13 exploratory tests were carried out in PDS (particulate debris spreading) facility to clarify potential influence of the COOLOCE (VTT) facility heaters and TCs on particle self-leveling process. Results of the preliminary analysis suggest that there is no significant influence of the pins on self-leveling, at least for the air superficial velocities ranging from 0.17 up to 0.52 m/s. Further confirmatory tests might be needed

  6. Nuclear reactor melt arrest and coolability device

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    Theofanous, Theo G.; Dinh, Nam Truc; Wachowiak, Richard M.

    2016-06-14

    Example embodiments provide a Basemat-Internal Melt Arrest and Coolability device (BiMAC) that offers improved spatial and mechanical characteristics for use in damage prevention and risk mitigation in accident scenarios. Example embodiments may include a BiMAC having an inclination of less than 10-degrees from the basemat floor and/or coolant channels of less than 4 inches in diameter, while maintaining minimum safety margins required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  7. Experimental investigation on melt coolability under bottom flooding with and without decay heat simulation

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    Singh, Nitendra [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400094, Maharashtra (India); Kulkarni, Parimal P. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Nayak, Arun K., E-mail: arunths@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The effect of decay heat on melt coolability under bottom flooding was studied. • Decay heat of 0.5 MW/m{sup 3} was simulated. • A single simulant material with same mass and initial temperature was used. • Quenching of melt pool does not depend on decay heat. • Comparison of with and without decay heat experiments has been presented. - Abstract: Investigations on severe accident phenomena help us in understanding the realistic accidental phenomena for the assessment of associated risk. The societal impact of radiological leakage to the environment has demanded further robustness in the line of defence of nuclear safety. Thus, to ensure the cooling and stabilization of corium within reactor containment in case of severe accident scenarios, many new reactors have been envisaged with core catcher. In this regard, corium coolability still remains an unresolved issue in spite of several efforts being taken towards its understanding. After studying the various cooling strategies, it has been demonstrated that melt coolability using bottom flooding of water is one of the most efficient techniques so far. To study the effect of decay heat on melt pool coolability under bottom flooding condition, two experiments have been performed in this paper; one without the decay heat and the other with decay heat. The test section used for carrying out these experiments consisted of two parts viz. lower part for retaining the melt from furnace, water inlet and melt quenching, and upper part for steam expansion and its outlet. The total height of the test section was 1400 mm and was made of 33 mm thick carbon steel. Total six stainless steel nozzles of diameter 12 mm were used for injecting water at the bottom of the melt pool. The lower part was surrounded by 10 radiative heaters to simulate decay heat of 10 kW which corresponds to 0.5 MW/m{sup 3}. The experiments showed that quenching of about 25 l of melt at initial temperature of nearly 1200 °C took only a

  8. Coolability of corium debris under severe accident conditions in light water reactors

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    Rahman, Saidur

    2013-11-15

    result from the various calculations in this work is that there exist significant cooling margins and strong trends to coolability which is achieved due to multidimensional cooling options, especially lateral and bottom ingression of water, established in the core region through an intact rod or bypass region, in the lower head through the wall and in the cavity due to the shape (heap) of the bed. These cooling options together with cooling effects of steam flow through a hot dry zone provide mechanisms to facilitate and support quenching processes. Limits also have been obtained, mainly with significant piling up of particles, cake parts with very low porosities and bed with very small particles. The initial temperature distribution inside the bed has a major influence on the coolability behavior of the bed, no matter if the bed is located in the lower head or in the flooded cavity. Previously, quenching calculations were only possible for given debris configurations starting from assumed initial temperatures. However, assuming the whole bed at a uniform initial temperature strongly misses the real process in which settling of partly solidified melt drops occurs simultaneously with water inflow and quenching. Therefore, in the frame of this work, the MEWA models have been extended i.e. coupled to jet breakup and mixing model (JEMI) to treat the combined process. This improved the capabilities of realistic analysis significantly and showed significant effects on cooling in the calculations. Another important step for the improvement of overall modeling of coolability is undertaken by introducing the porosity formation in liquid melt layers through the supply of water from the bottom (COMET concept) in the MEWA model. The related modeling is implemented for situations where liquid melt arrives un-fragmented at the cavity floor due to incomplete breakup of melt.

  9. PIV Visualization of Bubble Induced Flow Circulation in 2-D Rectangular Pool for Ex-Vessel Debris Bed Coolability

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    Han, Teayang; Kim, Eunho; Park, Hyun Sun; Moriyama, Kiyofumi [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The previous research works demonstrated the debris bed formation on the flooded cavity floor in experiments. Even in the cases the core melt is once solidified, the debris bed can be re-melted due to the decay heat. If the debris bed is not cooled enough by the coolant, the re-melted debris bed will react with the concrete base mat. This situation is called the molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) which threatens the integrity of the containment by generated gases which pressurize the containment. Therefore securing the long term coolability of the debris bed in the cavity is crucial. According to the previous research works, the natural convection driven by the rising bubbles affects the coolability and the formation of the debris bed. Therefore, clarification of the natural convection characteristics in and around the debris bed is important for evaluation of the coolability of the debris bed. In this study, two-phase flow around the debris bed in a 2D slice geometry is visualized by PIV method to obtain the velocity map of the flow. The DAVINCI-PIV was developed to investigate the flow around the debris bed. In order to simulate the boiling phenomena induced by the decay heat of the debris bed, the air was injected separately by the air chamber system which consists of the 14 air-flowmeters. The circulation flow developed by the rising bubbles was visualized by PIV method.

  10. Numerical Analysis of Characteristics of a Particulate Debris Bed Coolability with Single Phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jew-han; Chang, Soon-heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chung-ho; Lee, Yong-bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Designed on the basis of defense-in-depth concept, liquid metal cooled reactor, such as KALIMER-600 is unlikely to undergo the hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA). However in case of accident, there exists a possibility of re-criticality and vessel melting when core melt-down occurs. For this reason, the analysis on the ability of post-accident heat removal (PAHR) should be preceded. As a part of this, single phase flow coolability analysis of the particulate debris bed formed at the top of core catcher has been performed to achieve in-vessel fuel retention. The forming process of particulate debris bed is described and single phase cooling model with numerical results are presented.

  11. Improvement of core degradation model in ISAAC

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    Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, See Darl; Park, Soo Yong

    2004-02-01

    If water inventory in the fuel channels depletes and fuel rods are exposed to steam after uncover in the pressure tube, the decay heat generated from fuel rods is transferred to the pressure tube and to the calandria tube by radiation, and finally to the moderator in the calandria tank by conduction. During this process, the cladding will be heated first and ballooned when the fuel gap internal pressure exceeds the primary system pressure. The pressure tube will be also ballooned and will touch the calandria tube, increasing heat transfer rate to the moderator. Although these situation is not desirable, the fuel channel is expected to maintain its integrity as long as the calandria tube is submerged in the moderator, because the decay heat could be removed to the moderator through radiation and conduction. Therefore, loss of coolant and moderator inside and outside the channel may cause severe core damage including horizontal fuel channel sagging and finally loss of channel integrity. The sagged channels contact with the channels located below and lose their heat transfer area to the moderator. As the accident goes further, the disintegrated fuel channels will be heated up and relocated onto the bottom of the calandria tank. If the temperature of these relocated materials is high enough to attack the calandria tank, the calandria tank would fail and molten material would contact with the calandria vault water. Steam explosion and/or rapid steam generation from this interaction may threaten containment integrity. Though a detailed model is required to simulate the severe accident at CANDU plants, complexity of phenomena itself and inner structures as well as lack of experimental data forces to choose a simple but reasonable model as the first step. ISAAC 1.0 was developed to model the basic physicochemical phenomena during the severe accident progression. At present, ISAAC 2.0 is being developed for accident management guide development and strategy evaluation. In

  12. Coolability of ballooned VVER bundles with pellet relocation

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    Hozer, Z.; Nagy, I.; Windberg, P.; Vimi, A. [AEKI, P.O.box 49, Budapest, H-1525 (Hungary)

    2009-06-15

    During a LOCA incident the high pressure in the fuel rods can lead to clad ballooning and the debris of fuel pellets can fill the enlarged volume. The evaluation of the role of these two effects on the coolability of VVER type fuel bundles was the main objective of the experimental series. The tests were carried out in the modified configuration of the CODEX facility. 19-rod electrically heated VVER type bundle was used. The test section was heated up to 600 deg. C in steam atmosphere and the bundle was quenched from the bottom by cold water. Three series of tests were performed: 1. Reference bundle with fuel rods without ballooning, with uniform power profile. 2. Bundle with 86% blockage rate and with uniform power profile. The blockage rate was reached by superimposing hollow sleeves on all 19 fuel rods. 3. Bundle with 86% blockage rate and with local power peak in the ballooned area. The local power peak was produced by the local reduction the cross section of the internal heater bar inside of the fuel rods. In all three bundle configurations three different cooling water flow-rates were applied. The experimental results confirmed that a VVER bundle with even 86% blockage rate remains coolable after a LOCA event. The ballooned section creates some obstacles for the cooling water during reflood of the bundle, but this effect causes only a short delay in the cooling down of the hot fuel rods. Earlier tests on the coolability of ballooned bundles were performed only with Western type bundles with square fuel lattice. The present test series was the first confirmation of the coolability of VVER type bundles with triangular lattice. The accumulation of fuel pellet debris in the ballooned volume results in a local power peak, which leads to further slowing down of quench front. The first tests indicated that the effect of local power peak was less significant on the delay of cooling down than the effect of ballooning. (authors)

  13. Experimental investigation of the coolability of blocked hexagonal bundles

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    Hózer, Zoltán, E-mail: zoltan.hozer@energia.mta.hu; Nagy, Imre; Kunstár, Mihály; Szabó, Péter; Vér, Nóra; Farkas, Róbert; Trosztel, István; Vimi, András

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Experiments were performed with electrically heated hexagonal fuel bundles. • Coolability of ballooned VVER-440 type bundle was confirmed up to high blockage rate. • Pellet relocation effect causes delay in the cool-down of the bundle. • The bypass line does not prevent the reflood of ballooned fuel rods. - Abstract: The CODEX-COOL experimental series was carried out in order to evaluate the effect of ballooning and pellet relocation in hexagonal bundles on the coolability of fuel rods after a LOCA event. The effects of blockage geometry, coolant flowrate, initial temperature and axial profile were investigated. The experimental results confirmed that a VVER bundle up to 80% blockage rate remains coolable after a LOCA event under design basis conditions. The ballooned section creates some obstacles for the cooling water during reflood of the bundle, but this effect causes only a short delay in the cooling down of the hot fuel rods. The accumulation of fuel pellet debris in the ballooned volume results in a local power peak, which leads to further slowing down of quench front.

  14. Degraded core analysis for the pressurized-water reactor

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    Gittus, J.H.

    1987-02-09

    An analysis of the likelihood and the consequences of 'degraded-core accidents' has been undertaken for the proposed Sizewell B PWR. In such accidents, degradation of the core geometry occurs as a result of overheating. Radionuclides are released and may enter the environment, causing harmful effects. The analysis concludes that degraded-core accidents are highly improbable, the plant having been designed to reduce the frequency of such accidents to a value of order 10/sup -6/ per year. Tbe building containing the reactor would only fail in a small proportion of degraded-core accidents. In the great majority of cases the containment would remain intact and the release of radioactivity to the environment would be small. The risk to individuals have been calculated for both immediate and long term effects. Although the estimates of risk are approximate, studies to investigate the uncertainties, and sensitivities to different assumptions, show that potential errors are small compared with the very large 'margin of safety' between the risks estimated for Sizewell B and those that already exist in society.

  15. In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt

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    Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. The technical treatment in this assessment includes: (a) new data on energy flow from either volumetrically heated pools or non-heated layers on top, boiling and critical heat flux in inverted, curved geometries, emissivity of molten (superheated) samples of steel, and chemical reactivity proof tests, (b) a simple but accurate mathematical formulation that allows prediction of thermal loads by means of convenient hand calculations, (c) a detailed model programmed on the computer to sample input parameters over the uncertainty ranges, and to produce probability distributions of thermal loads and margins for departure from nucleate boiling at each angular position on the lower head, and (d) detailed structural evaluations that demonstrate that departure from nucleate boiling is a necessary and sufficient criterion for failure. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is {open_quotes}physically unreasonable.{close_quotes} Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings.

  16. Numerical model of characteristics of a particulate debris bed coolability with single phase flow

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    Lee, Je Whan

    2008-02-15

    Designed on the basis of defense-in-depth concept, liquid metal cooled fast reactor, such as KALIMER-600 (Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor) is unlikely to undergo the HCDA (hypothetical core disruptive accident). Because of its inherent safety features, most of the incidents of abnormal operation end with reactor trip and no further progression. Under a postulated, very low probable core meltdown scenario without reactor trip, however, there exists a possibility of re-criticality and vessel melting and the status of debris generated plays an important role. For this reason, the analysis on the ability of post-accident heat removal (PAHR) should be preceded. As a part of this, single phase flow coolability analysis of the particulate debris bed formed at the top of core catcher has been performed to achieve in-vessel fuel retention. The analysis is based on the Ergun equation and Macdonald's work that describe the phenomena of flow through a porous media with Hardee and Nilson's study of temperature relationship of the debris beds. The forming process of particulate debris bed is described and single phase cooling model with numerical results are presented. The analysis was conducted in the condition of three cases, inner and inner+middle and whole core meltdown case. It was proved that the inner and inner+middle core meltdown case could be cooled down with single phase flow. The whole core meltdown case will need some other management. Also, parameter sensitivity test was done.

  17. Ex-vessel coolability and energetics of steam explosions in nordic light water reactors - EXCOOLSE project report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.S.; Nayak, A.K.; Hansson, R.C.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Div. of Nuclear Power Safety (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Beyond-the-design-basis accidents, i.e. severe accidents, involve melting of the nuclear reactor core and release of radioactivity. Intensive research has been performed for years to evaluate the consequence of the postulated severe accidents. Severe accidents posed, to the reactor researchers, a most interesting and most difficult set of phenomena to understand, and to predict the consequences, for the various scenarios that could be contemplated. The complexity of the interactions, occurring at such high temperatures ({approx} 2500 deg. C), between different materials, which are changing phases and undergoing chemical reactions, is simply indescribable with the accuracy that one may desire. Thus, it is a wise approach to pursue research on SA phenomena until the remaining uncertainty in the predicted consequence, or the residual risk, can be tolerated. In the PRE-DELI-MELT project at NKS, several critical issues on the core melt loadings in the BWR and PWR reactor containments were identified. Many of Nordic nuclear power plants, particularly in boiling water reactors, adopted the Severe Accident Management Strategy (SAMS) which employed the deep subcooled water pool in lower dry-well. The success of this SAMS largely depends on the issues of steam explosions and formation of debris bed and its coolability. From the suggestions of the PRE-DELI-MELT project, a series of research plan was proposed to investigate the remaining issues specifically on the ex-vessel coolability of corium during severe accidents; (a) ex-vessel coolability of the melt or particulate debris, and (b) energetics and debris characteristics of fuel-coolant interactions endangering the integrity of the reactor containments. (au)

  18. Numerical Model for the Analysis of Coolability of a Particulate Debris Bed with Single Phase flow

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    Cho, C. H.; Jeong, H. Y.; Chang, W. P.; Kwon, Y. M.; Lee, Y. B

    2008-01-15

    Preliminary safety analyses of the KALIMER-600 design have shown that the design has inherent safety characteristics and is capable of accommodating double-fault initiators such as ATWS events without coolant boiling or fuel melting. However, for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor, the evaluation of the safety performance and the determination of containment requirements may be worth due consideration of triple-fault accident sequences of extremely low probability of occurrence that leads to core melting. For any postulated accident sequence which leads to core melting, in-vessel retention of the core debris will be required as a design requirement for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor. Also, proof of the capacity of the debris bed cooling is an essential condition to solve the problem of in-vessel retention of the core debris. Accordingly, Numerical model development for the Analysis of coolability of a particulate debris bed with single phase flow was carried out for in-vessel retention of the core debris.

  19. Revaluation of a Coolability of a Packed Debris Bed with a Single Phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chungho; Suk, S. D.; Jeong, H. Y.; Kwon, Y. M.; Lee, Y. B

    2008-09-15

    Preliminary safety analyses of the KALIMER-600 design have shown that the design has inherent safety characteristics and is capable of accommodating double-fault initiators such as ATWS events without coolant boiling or fuel melting. However, for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor, the evaluation of the safety performance and the determination of containment requirements may be worth due consideration of triple-fault accident sequences of extremely low probability of occurrence that leads to core melting. For any postulated accident sequence which leads to core melting, in-vessel retention of the core debris will be required as a design requirement for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor. Also, proof of the capacity of the debris bed cooling is an essential condition to solve the problem of in-vessel retention of the core debris. Accordingly, evaluation of coolability of a packed debris bed with single phase flow was carried out for proof of the in-vessel retention of the core debris.

  20. Analysis of ex-vessel melt jet breakup and coolability. Part 1: Sensitivity on model parameters and accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr; Hwang, Byoungcheol; Jung, Woo Hyun

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Application of JASMINE code to melt jet breakup and coolability in APR1400 condition. • Coolability indexes for quasi steady state breakup and cooling process. • Typical case in complete breakup/solidification, film boiling quench not reached. • Significant impact of water depth and melt jet size; weak impact of model parameters. - Abstract: The breakup of a melt jet falling in a water pool and the coolability of the melt particles produced by such jet breakup are important phenomena in terms of the mitigation of severe accident consequences in light water reactors, because the molten and relocated core material is the primary heat source that governs the accident progression. We applied a modified version of the fuel–coolant interaction simulation code, JASMINE, developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to a plant scale simulation of melt jet breakup and cooling assuming an ex-vessel condition in the APR1400, a Korean advanced pressurized water reactor. Also, we examined the sensitivity on seven model parameters and five initial/boundary condition variables. The results showed that the melt cooling performance of a 6 m deep water pool in the reactor cavity is enough for removing the initial melt enthalpy for solidification, for a melt jet of 0.2 m initial diameter. The impacts of the model parameters were relatively weak and that of some of the initial/boundary condition variables, namely the water depth and melt jet diameter, were very strong. The present model indicated that a significant fraction of the melt jet is not broken up and forms a continuous melt pool on the containment floor in cases with a large melt jet diameter, 0.5 m, or a shallow water pool depth, ≤3 m.

  1. Crust formation and its effect on the molten pool coolability

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    Park, R.J.; Lee, S.J.; Sim, S.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of the crust formation and its effect on the molten pool coolability have been performed to examine the crust formation process as a function of boundary temperatures as well as to investigate heat transfer characteristics between molten pool and overlying water in order to evaluate coolability of the molten pool. The experimental test results have shown that the surface temperature of the bottom plate is a dominant parameter in the crust formation process of the molten pool. It is also found that the crust thickness of the case with direct coolant injection into the molten pool is greater than that of the case with a heat exchanger. Increasing mass flow rate of direct coolant injection to the molten pool does not affect the temperature of molten pool after the crust has been formed in the molten pool because the crust behaves as a thermal barrier. The Nusselt number between the molten pool and the coolant of the case with no crust formation is greater than that of the case with crust formation. The results of FLOW-3D analyses have shown that the temperature distribution contributes to the crust formation process due to Rayleigh-Benard natural convection flow.

  2. In-vessel coolability and steam explosion in Nordic BWRs

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    Ma, W.; Li, L.; Hansson, R.; Villanueva, W.; Kudinov, P.; Manickam, L.; Tran, C.-T. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2011-05-15

    The objective of this research is to reduce the uncertainty in quantification of steam explosion risk and in-vessel coolability in the Nordic BWR plants which employ cavity flooding as severe accident management (SAM) strategy. To quantify the coolability of debris bed packed with irregular particles, the friction laws of fluid flow in particulate beds packed with non-spherical particles were investigated on the POMECO-FL test facility, and the experimental data suggest that the Ergun equation is applicable if the effective particle diameter of the particles is represented by the equivalent diameter of the particles, which is the product of Sauter mean diameter and shape factor of the particles. One-way coupling analysis between PECM model for melt pool heat transfer and ANSYS thermo-structural mechanics was performed to analyze the vessel creep, and the results revealed two different modes of vessel failure: a 'ballooning' of the vessel bottom and a 'localized creep' concentrated within the vicinity of the top surface of the melt pool. Single-droplet steam explosion experiments were carried out by using oxidic mixture of WO{sub 3}-CaO, and the results show an apparent difference in steam explosion energetics between the eutectic and non-eutectic melts at low melt superheat (100 deg. C). (Author)

  3. In-vessel coolability and steam explosion in Nordic BWRs

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    Ma, W.; Hansson, R.; Li, L.; Kudinov, P.; Cadinu, F.; Tran, C-.T. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-05-15

    The INCOSE project is to reduce the uncertainty in quantification of steam explosion risk and in-vessel coolability in Nordic BWR plants with the cavity flooding as a severe accident management (SAM) measure. During 2009 substantial advances and new insights into physical mechanisms were gained for studies of: (i) in-vessel corium coolability - development of the methodologies to assess the efficiency of the control rod guide tube (CRGT) cooling as a potential SAM measure; (ii) debris bed coolability - characterization of the effective particle diameter of multi-size particles and qualification of friction law for two-phase flow in the beds packed with multi-size particles; and (iii) steam explosion - investigation of the effect of binary oxides mixture's properties on steam explosion. An approach for coupling of ECM/PECM models with RELAP5 was developed to enhance predictive fidelity for melt pool heat transfer. MELCOR was employed to examine the CRGT cooling efficiency by considering an entire accident scenario, and the simulation results show that the nominal flowrate (approx10kg/s) of CRGT cooling is sufficient to maintain the integrity of the vessel in a BWR of 3900 MWth, if the water injection is activated no later than 1 hour after scram. The POMECO-FL experimental data suggest that for a particulate bed packed with multi-size particles, the effective particle diameter can be represented by the area mean diameter of the particles, while at high velocity (Re>7) the effective particle diameter is closer to the length mean diameter. The pressure drop of two-phase flow through the particulate bed can be predicted by Reed's model. The steam explosion experiments performed at high melt superheat (>200oC) using oxidic mixture of WO3-CaO didn't detect an apparent difference in steam explosion energetics and preconditioning between the eutectic and noneutectic melts. This points out that the next step of MISTEE experiment will be conducted at lower

  4. Studies on in-vessel debris coolability in ALPHA program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yu; Yamano, Norihiro; Moriyama, Kiyofumi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    In-vessel debris coolability experiments have been performed in ALPHA Program at JAERI. Aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) produced by a thermite reaction was applied as a debris simulant. Two scoping experiments using approximately 30 kg or 50 kg of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were conducted. In addition to post-test observations, temperature histories of the debris simulant and the lower head experimental vessel were evaluated. Rapid temperature reduction observed on the outer surface of the experimental vessel may imply that water penetration into a gap between the solidified debris and the experimental vessel occurred resulting in an effective cooling of once heated vessel wall. Preliminary measurement of a gap width was made with an ultrasonic device. Signals to show the existence of gaps, ranging from 0.7 mm to 1.4 mm, were detected at several locations.

  5. Experimental investigations on the coolability of prototypical particle beds with respect to reactor safety; Experimentelle Untersuchungen der Kuehlbarkeit prototypischer Schuettungskonfigurationen unter dem Aspekt der Reaktorsicherheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leininger, Simon

    2017-02-22

    In case of a severe accident in a light water reactor, continuous unavailability of cooling water to the reactor core may result in overheating of the fuel elements and finally the loss of core integrity. Under such conditions, a structure of heat-releasing particles of different size and shape may be formed by fragmentation of molten core material in several stages of the accident. The long-term coolability of such beds is of prime im-portance to avoid any damage to the reactor pressure vessel or even a release of fission products to the environment. In the frame of this work, specific experiments were con-ducted under prototypical conditions employing the existing DEBRIS test facility in order to gain further knowledge about the thermohydraulic behavior of such beds. In steady state boiling experiments, the pressure gradients in particle beds were meas-ured both for one- and multi-dimensional cooling water flow conditions and compared with one another in order to assess the flow behavior inside the bed. For these different flow conditions as well as for stratified bed configurations, the maximum removable heat flux densities were determined in the dryout experiments. E. g., it was found that an axial stratification of the permeability can significantly reduce the bed's coolability. For the first time, the quenching behavior of dry, superheated beds was investigated at elevated system pressure up to 0.5 MPa. In these experiments, the effect of system pressure on the coolability was quantified by means of the quenching time (time period to cool down the bed to saturation temperature). The investigated particle beds mainly consisted of non-spherical particles with well-defined geometry (cylinders and screws). It was shown that the effect of the particles geometry on the flow in a particle bed can be best estimated by using an equivalent particle diameter calculated for monodisperse particle beds from the product of the Sauter diameter and a shape factor and for

  6. Analysis of ex-vessel melt jet breakup and coolability. Part 2: Uncertainty analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr; Hwang, Byoungcheol; Jung, Woo Hyun

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Uncertainty analysis for quasi steady state melt jet breakup/cooling in APR1400. • Debris solidification reached in most of cases, film boiling quench never reached. • More than 1% molten pool formation in more than half probability. • Significant importance of accident conditions, weak impacts of model parameters. • Ratio of water depth to melt jet breakup length dominates the molten pool formation. - Abstract: An uncertainty analysis was performed on the molten core jet breakup and cooling by assuming the ex-vessel condition in APR1400, a Korean advanced pressurized water reactor, by probabilistic framework with the Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) and a fuel–coolant interaction (FCI) simulation code, JASMINE, as a physics model. Eight input variables including four model parameters and four initial/boundary condition variables were chosen as uncertainty variables. Three sets of size 100 samples, in total 300 cases of inputs were produced and simulation results were obtained for each of them. Statistics of the output variables as coolability indexes: the ratio of removed heat to the enthalpy for quench and the fraction of molten pool on the floor, indicated that, in the assumed range of conditions, the debris bed is likely to be cooled in average to the solidification point by ∼85% probability; however, it is not cooled to the minimum film boiling temperature, ∼500 K; and, more than 1% of the melt mass is in a molten pool on the floor by ∼65% probability. The importance analysis showed that the ratio of water pool depth and the melt jet breakup length dominates the cooling performance during the melt discharge transient. The uncertainty of initial and boundary condition variables such as the melt jet size and water pool depth is much more important than that of the model parameters.

  7. The Degradation of Beam Quality in Large-Core Optical Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of beam quality in large-core fiber is investigated experimentally. It is found that the output beam quality factor M2 is a compound tanh function of the fiber lengths and misalignment launch results that the beam quality degraded faster.

  8. Ex-vessel coolability and energetics of steam explosions in nordic light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.S.; Dinh, T.N. [Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden)

    2007-04-15

    The report summarizes activities conducted at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology-Sweden (KTH-NPS) within the ExCoolSe project during the year 2005, which is a transition year for the KTH-NPS program. The ExCoolSe project supported by NKS contributes to the severe accident research at KTH-NPS concurrently supported by APRI, HSK and EU SARNET. The main objective in ExCoolSe project is to scrutinize research on risk-significant safety issues related to severe accident management (SAM) strategy adopted for Nordic BWR plants, namely the Ex-vessel Coolability and Energetic Steam explosion. The work aims to pave way toward building a tangible research framework to tackle these long-standing safety issues. Chapter 1 describes the project objectives and work description. Chapter 2 provides a critical assessment of research results obtained from several past programs at KTH. This includes review of key data, insights and implications from POMECO (Porous Media Coolability) program, COMECO (Corium Melt Coolability) program, SIMECO (Study of In-Vessel Melt Coolability) program, and MISTEE (Micro-Interactions in Steam Explosion Experiments) program. Chapter 3 discusses the rationale of the new research program focusing on the SAM issue resolution. The program emphasizes identification and qualification of physics-based limiting mechanisms for both in-vessel phenomena (melt progression and debris coolability in the lower head, vessel failure), and ex-vessel phenomena. Chapter 4 introduces research results from the newly established DEFOR (Debris Formation) program and the ongoing MISTEE program. The focus of DEFOR is fulfill an apparent gap in the contemporary knowledge of severe accidents, namely mechanisms which govern the debris bed formation and bed characteristics. The later control the debris bed coolability. In the MISTEE program, methods for image synchronization and data processing were developed and tested, which enable processing of

  9. Gold Core Mesoporous Organosilica Shell Degradable Nanoparticles for Two-Photon Imaging and Gemcitabine Monophosphate Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Rhamani, Saher

    2017-09-12

    The synthesis of gold core degradable mesoporous organosilica shell nanoparticles is described. The nanopaticles were very efficient for two-photon luminescence imaging of cancer cells and for in vitro gemcitabine monophosphate delivery, allowing promising theranostic applications in the nanomedicine field.

  10. Status Report on Ex-Vessel Coolability and Water Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Robb, K. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Specific to BWR plants, current accident management guidance calls for flooding the drywell to a level of approximately 1.2 m (4 feet) above the drywell floor once vessel breach has been determined. While this action can help to submerge ex-vessel core debris, it can also result in flooding the wetwell and thereby rendering the wetwell vent path unavailable. An alternate strategy is being developed in the industry guidance for responding to the severe accident capable vent Order, EA-13-109. The alternate strategy being proposed would throttle the flooding rate to achieve a stable wetwell water level while preserving the wetwell vent path. The overall objective of this work is to upgrade existing analytical tools (i.e. MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH - which have been used as part of the DOE-sponsored Fukushima accident analyses) in order to provide flexible, analytically capable, and validated models to support the development of water throttling strategies for BWRs that are aimed at keeping ex-vessel core debris covered with water while preserving the wetwell vent path.

  11. Ex-Vessel corium coolability and steam explosion energetics in nordic light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Ma, W.M.; Karbojian, A.; Kudinov, P.; Tran, C.T.; Hansson, C.R. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    This report presents advances and insights from the KTH's study on corium pool heat transfer in the BWR lower head; debris bed formation; steam explosion energetics; thermal hydraulics and coolability in bottom-fed and heterogeneous debris beds. Specifically, for analysis of heat transfer in a BWR lower plenum an advanced threedimensional simulation tool was developed and validated, using a so-called effective convectivity approach and Fluent code platform. An assessment of corium retention and coolability in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower plenum by means of water supplied through the Control Rod Guide Tube (CRGT) cooling system was performed. Simulant material melt experiments were performed in an intermediate temperature range (1300-1600K) on DEFOR test facility to study formation of debris beds in high and low subcooled water pools characteristic of in-vessel and ex-vessel conditions. Results of the DEFOR-E scoping experiments and related analyses strongly suggest that porous beds formed in ex-vessel from a fragmented high-temperature debris is far from homogeneous. Calculation results of bed thermal hydraulics and dryout heat flux with a two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic code give the first basis to evaluate the extent by which macro and micro inhomogeneity can enhance the bed coolability. The development and validation of a model for two-phase natural circulation through a heated porous medium and its application to the coolability analysis of bottom-fed beds enables quantification of the significant effect of dryout heat flux enhancement (by a factor of 80-160%) due to bottom coolant injection. For a qualitative and quantitative understanding of steam explosion, the SHARP system and its image processing methodology were used to characterize the dynamics of a hot liquid (melt) drop fragmentation and the volatile liquid (coolant) vaporization. The experimental results provide a basis to suggest that the melt drop preconditioning is instrumental to

  12. Preparation of hydrogel hollow particles for cell encapsulation by a method of polyester core degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabanel, J-M; Hildgen, P

    2004-06-01

    Implantation of encapsulated cells in particles of less than 1 mm (micro-encapsulation) has been proposed as a cell synthesized bio-molecule delivery system. Encapsulation provides immuno-isolation, protecting foreign cells from host immune system while nutrients, oxygen and therapeutic products can diffuse freely across capsule walls. A new method is described for the synthesis of a new family of hollow microparticles for cell encapsulation. Unlike other micro-encapsulation methods, encapsulation in those devices will take place after capsule synthesis, by micro-injection. The microcapsules were prepared by a three-steps original procedure: first, synthesis of a core particle, followed by coating with a layer of epichlorohydrin cross-linked amylo-pectin gel and, finally, selective degradation of the core particle to create the cavity. Initial experiments make use of amylo-pectin cross-linked with trimetaphosphate as core particle material. However, selective degradation was difficult to achieve. In further essays, polyesters were used successfully for the preparation of core particles. Optimizations were carried out and the permeability and morphology of the hollow particles were investigated. The preliminary results show that the new method has the potential to become a standard procedure to obtain hydrogel hollow particles. Moreover, the permeability study seems to be in accordance with specifications for immuno-isolation.

  13. The radiological consequences of degraded core accidents for the Sizewell PWR The impact of adopting revised frequencies of occurrence

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, G N

    1983-01-01

    The radiological consequences of degraded core accidents postulated for the Sizewell PWR were assessed in an earlier study and the results published in NRPB-R137. Further analyses have since been made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) of degraded core accidents which have led to a revision of their predicted frequencies of occurrence. The implications of these revised frequencies, in terms of the risk to the public from degraded core accidents, are evaluated in this report. Increases, by factors typically within the range of about 1.5 to 7, are predicted in the consequences, compared with those estimated in the earlier study. However, the predicted risk from degraded core accidents, despite these increases, remains exceedingly small.

  14. In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S.; Angelini, S.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Salmassi, T. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is physically unreasonable. Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings. The AP600 is particularly favorable to in-vessel retention. Some ideas to enhance the assessment basis as well as performance in this respect, for applications to larger and/or higher power density reactors are also provided.

  15. In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S.; Angelini, S.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Salmassi, T. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is physically unreasonable. Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings. The AP600 is particularly favorable to in-vessel retention. Some ideas to enhance the assessment basis as well as performance in this respect, for applications to larger and/or higher power density reactors are also provided.

  16. Moisture absorption and mechanical degradation studies of PMI foam cored fiber/epoxy resin sandwich composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explores the result of hygrothermic aging of polymethacrylimide (PMI foam core sandwich composites immersed in different temperature deionized (DI and sea waters. The prepared specimens were tested for moisture up-take behavior and the resulting property degradation in terms of flexural and flat wise compressive strength. The results indicate that the saturated hygroscopic time of specimens immersed in low temperature water and high temperature water is about 480h and 720h, respectively. Due to the presence of ionic in sea water, the specimens immersed in sea water have higher compressive and flexural strength than specimens immersed in DI water.

  17. Analysis of Core Degradation in Fukushima Unit 1 Accident with MELCOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Il; Kim, Tae Woon; Ha, Kwang Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this study, an accident analysis of Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 was performed using MELCOR 1.8.6. The behavior of the initial stage of the accident was focused during 30 hours after the reactor scram, because it was predicted that the vessel failure (severe accident) occurred before 20 hours. A hydrogen explosion also occurred at about 24 hours after the accident, and thus the phenomenon of core degradation before 30 hours was highlighted. Moreover, the effect of the amount of fresh water injection on the core degradation was performed by changing the amount of injection water. It was expected that a large portion of the injection water could not reach the core because of leakage. Thus, core damage was observed according to the amount of water that reached the core. The plant geometries and operating conditions were obtained from TEPCO (Tokyo Electric Power Company) through the OECD/NEA BSAF (Benchmark Study of the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station) Project. An analysis of the Fukushima accident was also performed by Sandia National Laboratories, but several conditions were revised and added in this study. First, the flow rate of the steam into turbine and water into downcomer were considered at the initial stage of accident. The water level followed well the measured data by adding this mechanism. Second, SRV stuck open was included in this calculation. SRV stuck open can occur due to high temperature and frequent operation, and was modeled in calculation. The timing of SRV stuck open was closed to the timing of MSL failure, and thus the depressurization of RPV could have originated from both of MSL failure and SRV stuck open. The effect of injection water was observed, and it was found that the proper water injection can prevent a severe accident at the initial stage of the accident. In conclusion, an analysis of the severe accident occurring in Fukushima Unit 1 was conducted by using MELCOR. The analysis results were consistent with the

  18. Comparison of CORA and MELCOR core degradation simulation and the MELCOR oxidation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Corradini, Michael L., E-mail: corradini@engr.wisc.edu [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Fu, Wen [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Haskin, Troy [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Tian, Wenxi; Zhang, Yapei; Su, Guanghui; Qiu, Suizheng [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Oxidation model of MELCOR is analyzed and the improving suggestion is provided. • MELCOR core degradation calculating results are compared with CORA experiment. • Flow rate of argon and steam, the generating rate of hydrogen is calculated and compared. • Temperature spatial variation and temperature history is calculated and presented. - Abstract: MELCOR is widely used and sufficiently trusted for severe accident analysis. However, the occurrence of Fukushima has increased the focus on severe accident codes and their use. A MELCOR core degradation calculation was conducted at the University of Wisconsin–Madison under the help of Sandia. The calculation results were checked by comparing with a past CORA experiment. MELCOR calculation results included the flow rate of argon and steam, the generation rate of hydrogen. Through this work, the performance of MELCOR COR package was reviewed in detail. This paper compares the hydrogen generation rates predicted by MELCOR to the CORA test data. While agreement is reasonable it could be improved. Additionally, the MELCOR zirconium oxidation model was analyzed.

  19. Generic BWR-4 degraded core in-vessel study. Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-11-01

    Original intent of this project was to produce a phenomenological study of the in-vessel degradation which occurs during the TQUX and TQUV sequences for a generic BWR-4 from the initiation of the FSAR Chapter 15 operational transient through core debris bed formation to the failure of the primary pressure boundary. Bounding calculations were to be performed for the two high pressure and low pressure non-LOCA scenarios to assess the uncertainties in the current state of knowledge regarding the source terms for containment integrity studies. Source terms as such were defined in terms of hydrogen generation, unreacted metal, and coolant inventroy, and in terms of the form, sequencing and mode of dispersal through the primary vessel boundary. Fission product release was not to be considered as part of this study. Premature termination of the project, however, led to the dicontinuation of work on an as is basis. Work on the in-core phase from the point of scram to core debris bed formation was largely completed. A preliminary scoping calculation on the debris bed phase had been initiated. This report documents the status of the study at termination.

  20. Thermohydraulics of LMFBR core catchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turland, B. D.

    Characterization of the likely form of fuel debris after an accident, following interaction with sodium in the primary vessel and mechanisms controlling the location of the debris in the primary system is discussed. Heat transfer from particulate to liquid sodium and the development of models predicting the amount of debris that may be retained in a coolable form on a structure are considered. The evaluation of the coolability of the structure itself in post accident conditions, particularly the cooling provided by natural convection alone is treated. The response of structures at elevated temperatures and under high thermal loads is considered. The potential for vessel failure if significant quantities of debris accumulate at the bottom of the vessel is shown. The performance of a flat plate core catcher, or similar structure with good cooling from underneath is evaluated.

  1. Degraded core accidents for the Sizewell PWR A sensitivity analysis of the radiological consequences

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, G N; Clarke, R H; Ferguson, L; Haywood, S M; Hemming, C R; Jones, J A

    1982-01-01

    The radiological impact of degraded core accidents postulated for the Sizewell PWR was assessed in an earlier study. In this report the sensitivity of the predicted consequences to variation in the values of a number of important parameters is investigated for one of the postulated accidental releases. The parameters subjected to sensitivity analyses are the dose-mortality relationship for bone marrow irradiation, the energy content of the release, the warning time before the release to the environment, and the dry deposition velocity for airborne material. These parameters were identified as among the more important in determining the uncertainty in the results obtained in the initial study. With a few exceptions the predicted consequences were found to be not very sensitive to the parameter values investigated, the range of variation in the consequences for the limiting values of each parameter rarely exceeded a factor of a few and in many cases was considerably less. The conclusions reached are, however, p...

  2. A review of dryout heat fluxes and coolability of particle beds. APRI 4, Stage 2 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, Ilona [VTT Energy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2002-04-01

    fragmentation in a water pool were studied. Significant amount of data with prototypic material tests exists. All of the tests show significant fragmentation in case of deep subcooled pool. An additional observation is that no energetic melt coolant interaction (steam explosion) has been reported for prototypic materials. A set of most relevant data for reactor applications have been chosen. Based on this, a general particle size distribution has been constructed. The average particle size obtained by this way was about 3.5 mm. Information from fragmentation and dryout tests and the Lipinski 0-D correlation have been utilised to assess the debris bed coolability for the Olkiluoto severe accident scenario. The calculation shows that for well-mixed beds with 3.5 mm particles the dryout heat flux would be close to 1 MW/m{sup 2} , well above the estimated heat flux due to decay heat. Stratification of finer particles on top of the bed due to e.g. a steam explosion would reduce the dryout heat flux to 50-200 kW/m{sup 2}. This would be below heat fluxes produced by decay heat in Nordic BWRs. The key uncertainty considering particle bed coolability is due to the particle size distribution and stratification. If the possibility of a thick fine particle layer on top of the bed can be ruled out, the particulate debris bed in Nordic BWRs will be coolable. A rough estimate of melt pool coolability in Nordic BWRs has also been conducted. The MACE and COTELS experimental data have been summarised. Based on the data, the melt pools in the pedestal are slowly coolable. The concrete erosion does not threaten the containment failure margins, except maybe at Forsmark 1 and 2 units. Release of non-condensable gases during MCCI may cause an earlier start of filtered venting in Olkiluoto, Forsmark and Oskarshamn 3 plants.

  3. Experimental studies on the coolability of packed beds. Flooding of hot dry packed beds; Experimentelle Untersuchungen zur Kuehlbarkeit von Schuettbetten. Fluten heisser, trockener Schuettungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leininger, S.; Kulenovic, R.; Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE)

    2013-07-01

    In case of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant meltdown of the reactor core can occur and form a packed bed in the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) after solidification due to contact with water. The removal of after-heat and the long-term coolability is of essential interest. The efficient injection of cooling water into the packed bed has to be assured without endangering the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel. The experiments performed aimed to study the dry-out and the quenching (flooding) of hot dry packed beds. Two different inflow variants, bottom- and top-flooding including the variation of the starting temperature of the packed bed and the injection rate were studied. In case of bottom flooding the quenching time increases with increasing packed bed temperature and decreasing injection rate. In case of top flooding the flow pattern is more complex, in a first phase the water flows preferentially toward the RPV wall, the flow paths conduct the water downwards. The flow resistance of the packed bed increases with increasing bed temperatures. The quenching temperatures increase significantly above average.

  4. Effect of Flow Blockage on the Coolability during Reflood in a 2 × 2 Rod Bundle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kihwan Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the reflood phase of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA in a pressurized-water reactor (PWR, the fuel rods can be ballooned or rearranged owing to an increase in the temperature and internal pressure of the fuel rods. In this study, an experimental study was performed to understand the thermal behavior and effect of the ballooned region on the coolability using a 2 × 2 rod bundle test facility. The electrically heated rod bundle was used and the ballooning shape of the rods was simulated by superimposing hollow sleeves, which have a 90% blockage ratio. Forced reflood tests were performed to examine the transient two-phase heat transfer behavior for different reflood rates and rod powers. The droplet behaviors were also investigated by measuring the velocity and size of droplets near the blockage region. The results showed that the heat transfer was enhanced in the downstream of the blockage region, owing to the reduced flow area of the subchannel, intensification of turbulence, and deposition of the droplet.

  5. Thermal hydraulic parametric investigation of decay heat removal from degraded core of a sodium cooled fast Breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Lokesh [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Kumar Sharma, Anil, E-mail: aksharma@igcar.gov.in [Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, HBNI, Kalpakkam (India); Velusamy, K. [Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, HBNI, Kalpakkam (India)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Decay heat removal from degraded core of a typical SFR is highlighted. • Influence of number of DHXs in operation on PAHR is analyzed. • Investigations on structural integrity of the inner vessel and core catcher. • Feasibility study for retention of a part of debris in upper pool of SFR. - Abstract: Ensuring post accident decay heat removal with high degree of reliability following a Core Disruptive Accident (CDA) is very important in the design of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR). In the recent past, a lot of research has been done towards the design of an in-vessel core catcher below the grid plate to prevent the core debris reaching the main vessel in a pool type SFR. However, during an energetic CDA, the entire core debris is unlikely to reach the core catcher. A significant part of the debris is likely to settle in core periphery between radial shielding subassemblies and the inner vessel. Failure of inner vessel due to the decay heat can lead to core debris reaching the main vessel and threatening its integrity. On the other hand, retention of a part of debris in core periphery can reduce the load on main core catcher. Towards achieving an optimum design of SFR and safety evaluation, it is essential to quantify the amount of heat generating core debris that can be retained safely within the primary vessel. This has been performed by a mathematical simulation comprising solution of 2-D transient form of the governing equations of turbulent sodium flow and heat transfer with Boussinesq approximations. The conjugate conduction-convection model adopted for this purpose is validated against in-house experimental data. Transient evolutions of natural convection in the pools and structural temperatures in critical components have been predicted. It is found that 50% of the core debris can be safely accommodated in the gap between radial shielding subassemblies and inner vessel without exceeding structural temperature limit. It is also

  6. Proteasomes regulate hepatitis B virus replication by degradation of viral core-related proteins in a two-step manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zi-Hua; Yang, Hui-Ying; Gu, Lin; Peng, Xiao-Mou

    2016-10-01

    The cellular proteasomes presumably inhibit the replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) due to degradation of the viral core protein (HBcAg). Common proteasome inhibitors, however, either enhance or inhibit HBV replication. In this study, the exact degradation process of HBcAg and its influences on HBV replication were further studied using bioinformatic analysis, protease digestion assays of recombinant HBcAg, and proteasome inhibitor treatments of HBV-producing cell line HepG2.2.15. Besides HBcAg and hepatitis B e antigen precursor, common hepatitis B core-related antigens (HBcrAgs), the small and the large degradation intermediates of these HBcrAgs (HBcrDIs), were regularly found in cytosol of HepG2.2.15 cells. Further, the results of investigation reveal that the degradation process of cytosolic HBcrAgs in proteasomes consists of two steps: the limited proteolysis into HBcrDIs by the trypsin-like (TL) activity and the complete degradation of HBcrDIs by the chymotrypsin-like (chTL) activity. Concordantly, HBcrAgs and the large HBcrDI or HBcrDIs (including the small HBcrDI) were accumulated when the TL or chTL activity was inhibited, which generally correlated with enhancement and inhibition of HBV replication, respectively. The small HBcrDI inhibited HBV replication by assembling into the nucleocapsids and preventing the victim particles from being mature enough for envelopment. The two-step degradation manner may highlight some new anti-HBV strategies.

  7. Pt@Ag and Pd@Ag core/shell nanoparticles for catalytic degradation of Congo red in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed A; Bakr, Eman A; El-Attar, Heba G

    2018-01-05

    Platinum/silver (Pt@Ag) and palladium/silver (Pd@Ag) core/shell NPs have been synthesized in two steps reaction using the citrate method. The progress of nanoparticle formation was followed by the UV/Vis spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed spherical shaped core/shell nanoparticles with average particle diameter 32.17nm for Pt@Ag and 8.8nm for Pd@Ag. The core/shell NPs were further characterized by FT-IR and XRD. Reductive degradation of the Congo red dye was chosen to demonstrate the excellent catalytic activity of these core/shell nanostructures. The nanocatalysts act as electron mediators for the transfer of electrons from the reducing agent (NaBH4) to the dye molecules. Effect of reaction parameters such as nanocatalyst dose, dye and NaBH4 concentrations on the dye degradation was investigated. A comparison between the catalytic activities of both nanocatalysts was made to realize which of them the best in catalytic performance. Pd@Ag was the higher in catalytic activity over Pt@Ag. Such greater activity is originated from the smaller particle size and larger surface area. Pd@Ag nanocatalyst was catalytically stable through four subsequent reaction runs under the utilized reaction conditions. These findings can thus be considered as possible economical alternative for environmental safety against water pollution by dyes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Preliminary study of degradation from neutron effects of core-structural materials of Thai Research Reactor TRR-1/M1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampornrat, P.; Boonsuwan, P.; Sangkaew, S.; Angwongtrakool, T.

    2017-06-01

    Thai research reactor went first critical in 1962. The reactor was converted in 1977 from an MTR-type with high-enriched uranium fuel to a TRIGA-MARK III type using low-enriched uranium fuel, called TRR-1/M1. Since the TRR-1/M1 has been operated for almost 40 years, degradation of reactor structural materials is expected. In this preliminary study, the potential degradation from neutron effects of core-structural materials, e.g., fuel clad (SS304) and core components (Al6061) were studied. Assessment included calculation of neutron energy, flux and fluence in the reactor core to evaluate displacement rate (dpa) and irradiation effects on the material properties. Results showed maximum displacement rates on SS304 was 5.24×10-8 per cm3·sec and on Al6061 was 1.14×10-8 per cm3·sec. The corresponding maximum displacement levels were ∼17 dpa for SS304, and ∼4 dpa for Al6061. At these levels of displacement, it is possible for the materials to result in tensile strength increasing and ductility reduction. Further inspection on the core-structural materials needs to be conducted to validate the assessment results from this study.

  9. In-Core-Instrumentation Methods for 3-Dimensional Distribution Information of Reactor Core Temperatures and Melt-down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yeong Cheol [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Myoung; Kim, Sung Jun [Woojin Inc., Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The tsunami-induced nuclear accident at Japanese Fukushima power plants in March 2011 has revealed some weaknesses in the severe accident monitoring system. The plant instrumentation did not provide utility, safety experts, and government officials with adequate and reliable information. The information on the reactor core damage and coolability is critical for making decisions correctly as well as in a timely manner during the course of the mitigation of severe accidents. Current Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)s have an In-Core-Instrumentation (ICI) system that measures the temperature distribution of the top surface (i.e. Core Exit Temperatures) of the reactor core mainly to indicate when to begin Severe Accident Mitigation Guidelines (SAMG). This design concept giving only the core exit temperature has limitations in terms of sufficiency as well as availability of the information necessary for diagnosis on the status of the degraded core and the effectiveness of the measures taken as mitigation strategies. The reactor core exit temperatures are not sufficient to support the assessment of the degree of the core damage and the location of the molten core debris and recognition whether the core damage progresses on or it is mitigated. The ICI location being at the top of the reactor core also makes the ICI thermocouples vulnerable to melt-down because the upper part of the reactor core uncovers first, thereby melt down at the early stage of the accident. This means that direct indication of reactor core temperature will be lost and unavailable during the later stages of severe accident. To address the aforementioned weaknesses of the current ICIs, it is necessary to develop a new ICI system that provides information that is more expanded and more reliable for accident mitigation. With the enhanced information available, the SAMG can be prepared in more refined and effective way based on the direct and suitable indication of status of damages and the 3-dimensional

  10. COOLOCE debris bed experiments and simulations investigating the coolability of cylindrical beds with different materials and flow modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasuo, E.; Kinnunen, T.; Holmstroem, S.; Lehtikuusi, T. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland)

    2013-07-15

    The COOLOCE experiments aim at investigating the coolability of debris beds of different geometries, flow modes and materials. A debris bed may be formed of solidified corium as a result of a severe accident in a nuclear power reactor. The COOLOCE-8 test series consisted of experiments with a top-flooded test bed with irregular gravel as the simulant material. The objective was to produce comparison data useful in estimating the effects of different particle materials and the possible effect of the test arrangement on the results. It was found that the dryout heat flux (DHF) measured for the gravel was lower compared to previous experiments with spherical beads, and somewhat lower compared to the early STYX experiments. The difference between the beads and gravel is at least partially explained by the smaller average size of the gravel particles. The COOLOCE-9 test series included scoping experiments examining the effect of subcooling of the water pool in which the debris bed is immersed. The experiments with initially subcooled pool suggest that the subcooling may increase DHF and increase coolability. The aim of the COOLOCE-10 experiments was to investigate the effect of lateral flooding on the DHF a cylindrical test bed. The top of the test cylinder and its sidewall were open to water infiltration. It was found that the DHF is increased compared to a top-flooded cylinder by more than 50%. This suggests that coolability is notably improved. 2D simulations of the top-flooded test beds have been run with the MEWA code. Prior to the simulations, the effective particle diameter for the spherical beads and the irregular gravel was estimated by single-phase pressure loss measurements performed at KTH in Sweden. Parameter variations were done for particle size and porosity used as input in the models. It was found that with the measured effective particle diameter and porosity, the simulation models predict DHF with a relatively good accuracy in the case of spherical

  11. The plant hopper Issus coleoptratus can detoxify phloem sap saponins including the degradation of the terpene core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Himmelsbach

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Issus coleoptratus is a small plant hopper which mainly feeds on the phloem sap from ivy. Although all parts of ivy are poisonous as the plant contains saponins, especially hederasaponins, I. coleoptratus can cope with the poison. In contrast to other animals like the stick insect Carausius morosus which accumulates saponins in its body, I. coleoptratus can degrade and disintegrate not only the saponins but even the genines, i.e. the triterpene core of the substances. This is perhaps made possible by a specialised midgut and/or the salivary glands. When the glands and the gut are dissected and added to saponins in solution, the saponins, including the genines, are degraded ex vivo.

  12. The plant hopper Issus coleoptratus can detoxify phloem sap saponins including the degradation of the terpene core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelsbach, Markus; Weth, Agnes; Böhme, Christine; Schwarz, Martin; Bräunig, Peter; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-02-10

    Issus coleoptratus is a small plant hopper which mainly feeds on the phloem sap from ivy. Although all parts of ivy are poisonous as the plant contains saponins, especially hederasaponins, I. coleoptratus can cope with the poison. In contrast to other animals like the stick insect Carausius morosus which accumulates saponins in its body, I. coleoptratus can degrade and disintegrate not only the saponins but even the genines, i.e. the triterpene core of the substances. This is perhaps made possible by a specialised midgut and/or the salivary glands. When the glands and the gut are dissected and added to saponins in solution, the saponins, including the genines, are degraded ex vivo.

  13. BNL program in support of LWR degraded-core accident analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Two major sources of loading on dry watr reactor containments are steam generatin from core debris water thermal interactions and molten core-concrete interactions. Experiments are in progress at BNL in support of analytical model development related to aspects of the above containment loading mechanisms. The work supports development and evaluation of the CORCON (Muir, 1981) and MARCH (Wooton, 1980) computer codes. Progress in the two programs is described in this paper. 8 figures.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of CdS/CuAl2O4 core-shell: application to photocatalytic eosin degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellal, B.; Trari, M.; Afalfiz, A.

    2015-08-01

    The advantages of the hetero-junction CdS/CuAl2O4 for the photocatalytic eosin degradation are reported. Composite semiconductors are elaborated by co-precipitation of CdS on the spinel CuAl2O4 giving a core-shell structure with a uniform dispersion and intimate contact of the spinel nanoparticles inside the hexagonal CdS. The Mott-Schottky plots ( C -2- V) of both materials show linear behaviors from which flat band potentials are determined. The photoactivity increases with increasing the mass of the sensitizer CdS and the best performance is achieved on CdS/CuAl2O4 (85 %/15 %). The pH has a strong influence on the degradation and the photoactivity peaks at pH 7.78. The dark adsorption eosin is weak (~4 %), hence the change in the eosin concentration is attributed to the photocatalytic process. The degradation follows a zero-order kinetic with a rate constant of 5.2 × 10-8 mol L-1 mn-1 while that of the photolysis is seven times lower (0.75 × 10-8 mol L-1 mn-1).

  15. Integration of nondegradable polystyrene and degradable gelatin in a core-sheath nanofibrous patch for pelvic reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Liangpeng; Li, Qingtao; Jiang, Junzi; You, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zuohua; Zhong, Wen; Huang, Yong; Xing, Malcolm M Q

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a serious health issue affecting many adult women. Complications of POP include pelvic pressure, pelvic pain, and problems in emptying their bowels or bladder. Sometimes, POP may even cause urinary outflow obstruction and lead to bladder or kidney infections. Currently, synthetic and naturally derived materials have been chosen for treatment of POP to reduce the high recurrence rates after surgical interventions. However, existing materials for POP treatment cannot meet the clinical requirements in terms of biocompatibility, mechanics, and minimal risk of rejection. Especially, erosion in synthetic polymers and rapid degradation in natural polymers limit their further applications in clinics. To address these concerns, we report a novel POP replacement using core-sheath polystyrene/gelatin electrospun nanofiber mesh. The outside gelatin sheath provides a hydrophilic surface and implantable integrity between host and guest, while the inner PS core offers the necessary mechanical support. The composite mesh shows graft accommodation in pelvic submucosa after implantation in vivo, as shown in hematoxylin-eosin staining and T helper cell phenotype and macrophage phenotype stainings. Qualitative analysis of inducible nitric oxide synthase, arginase, interferon-γ, and interleukin-10 gene expressions also indicates that the implanted composite mesh switches to accommodation mode 2 weeks postimplantation. Thus, these novel core-sheath polystyrene/gelatin nanofibrous membranes are promising in pelvic reconstruction.

  16. Core-binding factor subunit beta is not required for non-primate lentiviral Vif-mediated APOBEC3 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Youwei; Zhu, Dantong; Wang, Cuihui; Su, Chao; Ma, Jian; Ma, Jianzhang; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-10-01

    Viral infectivity factor (Vif) is required for lentivirus fitness and pathogenicity, except in equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). Vif enhances viral infectivity by a Cullin5-Elongin B/C E3 complex to inactivate the host restriction factor APOBEC3. Core-binding factor subunit beta (CBF-β) is a cell factor that was recently shown to be important for the primate lentiviral Vif function. Non-primate lentiviral Vif also degrades APOBEC3 through the proteasome pathway. However, it is unclear whether CBF-β is required for the non-primate lentiviral Vif function. In this study, we demonstrated that the Vifs of non-primate lentiviruses, including feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV), caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV), and maedi-visna virus (MVV), do not interact with CBF-β. In addition, CBF-β did not promote the stability of FIV, BIV, CAEV, and MVV Vifs. Furthermore, CBF-β silencing or overexpression did not affect non-primate lentiviral Vif-mediated APOBEC3 degradation. Our results suggest that non-primate lentiviral Vif induces APOBEC3 degradation through a different mechanism than primate lentiviral Vif. Importance: The APOBEC3 protein family members are host restriction factors that block retrovirus replication. Vif, an accessory protein of lentivirus, degrades APOBEC3 to rescue viral infectivity by forming Cullin5-Elongin B/C-based E3 complex. CBF-β was proved to be a novel regulator of primate lentiviral Vif function. In this study, we found that CBF-β knockdown or overexpression did not affect FIV Vif's function, which induced polyubiquitination and degradation of APOBEC3 by recruiting the E3 complex in a manner similar to that of HIV-1 Vif. We also showed that other non-primate lentiviral Vifs did not require CBF-β to degrade APOBEC3. CBF-β did not interact with non-primate lentiviral Vifs or promote their stability. These results suggest that a different mechanism exists for the Vif-APOBEC interaction and

  17. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  18. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  19. Hydrocarbon Degradation in Caspian Sea Sediment Cores Subjected to Simulated Petroleum Seepage in a Newly Designed Sediment-Oil-Flow-Through System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Treude

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The microbial community response to petroleum seepage was investigated in a whole round sediment core (16 cm length collected nearby natural hydrocarbon seepage structures in the Caspian Sea, using a newly developed Sediment-Oil-Flow-Through (SOFT system. Distinct redox zones established and migrated vertically in the core during the 190 days-long simulated petroleum seepage. Methanogenic petroleum degradation was indicated by an increase in methane concentration from 8 μM in an untreated core compared to 2300 μM in the lower sulfate-free zone of the SOFT core at the end of the experiment, accompanied by a respective decrease in the δ13C signal of methane from -33.7 to -49.5‰. The involvement of methanogens in petroleum degradation was further confirmed by methane production in enrichment cultures from SOFT sediment after the addition of hexadecane, methylnapthalene, toluene, and ethylbenzene. Petroleum degradation coupled to sulfate reduction was indicated by the increase of integrated sulfate reduction rates from 2.8 SO42-m-2 day-1 in untreated cores to 5.7 mmol SO42-m-2 day-1 in the SOFT core at the end of the experiment, accompanied by a respective accumulation of sulfide from 30 to 447 μM. Volatile hydrocarbons (C2–C6 n-alkanes passed through the methanogenic zone mostly unchanged and were depleted within the sulfate-reducing zone. The amount of heavier n-alkanes (C10–C38 decreased step-wise toward the top of the sediment core and a preferential degradation of shorter (C30 was seen during the seepage. This study illustrates, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time the development of methanogenic petroleum degradation and the succession of benthic microbial processes during petroleum passage in a whole round sediment core.

  20. Core Binding Factor β Protects HIV, Type 1 Accessory Protein Viral Infectivity Factor from MDM2-mediated Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yusuke; Shindo, Keisuke; Nagata, Kayoko; Yoshinaga, Noriyoshi; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-11-25

    HIV, type 1 overcomes host restriction factor apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) proteins by organizing an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex together with viral infectivity factor (Vif) and a host transcription cofactor core binding factor β (CBFβ). CBFβ is essential for Vif to counteract APOBEC3 by enabling the recruitment of cullin 5 to the complex and increasing the steady-state level of Vif protein; however, the mechanisms by which CBFβ up-regulates Vif protein remains unclear. Because we have reported previously that mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) is an E3 ligase for Vif, we hypothesized that CBFβ might protect Vif from MDM2-mediated degradation. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses showed that Vif mutants that do not bind to CBFβ preferentially interact with MDM2 and that overexpression of CBFβ disrupts the interaction between MDM2 and Vif. Knockdown of CBFβ reduced the steady-state level of Vif in MDM2-proficient cells but not in MDM2-null cells. Cycloheximide chase analyses revealed that Vif E88A/W89A, which does not interact with CBFβ, degraded faster than wild-type Vif in MDM2-proficient cells but not in MDM2-null cells, suggesting that Vif stabilization by CBFβ is mainly caused by impairing MDM2-mediated degradation. We identified Vif R93E as a Vif variant that does not bind to MDM2, and the virus with this substitution mutation was more resistant to APOBEC3G than the parental virus. Combinatory substitution of Vif residues required for CBFβ binding and MDM2 binding showed full recovery of Vif steady-state levels, supporting our hypothesis. Our data provide new insights into the mechanism of Vif augmentation by CBFβ.

  1. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to escape from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Juri; Shim, Joo Hee; Tiwari, Indira; Jang, Kyung Lib

    2016-09-28

    The E6-associated protein (E6AP) is a ubiquitin ligase that mediates ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Given the role of HCV core protein as a major component of the viral nucleocapsid, as well as a multifunctional protein involved in viral pathogenesis and hepatocarcinogenesis, HCV has likely evolved a strategy to counteract the host anti-viral defense mechanism of E6AP and maximize its potential to produce infectious virus particles. In the present study, we found that HCV core protein derived from either ectopic expression or HCV infection inhibits E6AP expression via promoter hypermethylation in human hepatocytes. As a result, the potential of E6AP to ubiquitinate and degrade HCV core protein through the ubiquitin-proteasome system was severely impaired, which in turn led to stimulation of virus propagation. The effects of HCV core protein were almost completely abolished when the E6AP level was restored by ectopic expression of E6AP, treatment with a universal DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, 5-Aza-2'dC, or knock-down of DNMT1. In conclusion, HCV core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to protect itself from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation and stimulate virus propagation, providing a potential target for the development of anti-viral drugs against HCV.

  2. A comparison of core degradation phenomena in the CORA, QUENCH, Phébus SFD and Phébus FP experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haste, T., E-mail: tim.haste@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN, BP 3, F-13115 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Steinbrück, M., E-mail: martin.steinbrueck@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Barrachin, M., E-mail: marc.barrachin@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN, BP 3, F-13115 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Luze, O. de, E-mail: olivier.de-luze@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN, BP 3, F-13115 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Grosse, M., E-mail: mirco.grosse@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Stuckert, J., E-mail: juri.stuckert@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The results of the experiments CORA, QUENCH and Phébus SFD/FP are summarised. • All phenomena expected up to melt movement to the lower head are shown consistently. • Separate-effect tests performed at KIT and IRSN aid improve their modelling. • Data from the integral tests help independent validation of new and improved models. • The improved codes will help reduce uncertainties in safety-critical areas for core degradation. - Abstract: Over the past 20 years, integral fuel bundle experiments performed at IRSN Cadarache, France (Phébus-SFD and Phébus FP – fission heated) and at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany (CORA and QUENCH – electrically heated), accompanied by separate-effect tests, have provided a wealth of detailed information on core degradation phenomena that occur under severe accident conditions, relevant to such safety issues as in-vessel retention of the core, recovery of the core by water reflood, hydrogen generation and fission product release. These data form an important basis for development and validation of severe accident analysis codes such as ASTEC (IRSN/GRS, EC) and MELCOR (USNRC/SNL, USA) that are used to assess the safety of current and future reactor designs, so helping to reduce the uncertainty associated with such code predictions. Following the recent end of the Phébus FP project, it is appropriate now to compare the core degradation phenomena observed in these four major experimental series, indicating the main conclusions that have been drawn. This covers subjects such as early phase degradation up to loss of rod-like geometry (all the series), late phase degradation and the link between fission product release and core degradation (Phébus FP), oxidation phenomena (all the series), reflood behaviour (CORA and QUENCH), as well as particular topics such as the effects of control rod material and fuel burn-up on core degradation. It also outlines the separate-effects experiments performed to

  3. Microbial disinfection of water with endotoxin degradation by photocatalysis using Ag@TiO2 core shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Sreeja; K, Vidya Shetty

    2016-09-01

    The studies on photocatalytic disinfection of water contaminated with Escherichia coli using Ag core and TiO2 shell (Ag@TiO2) nanoparticles under UV irradiation showed that these nanoparticles are very efficient in water disinfection both in their free and immobilised form. Complete disinfection of 40 × 10(8) CFU/mL could be achieved in 60 min with 0.4 g/L catalyst loading and in 35 min with 1 g/L catalyst loading. Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles were found to be superior to TiO2 nanoparticles in photocatalytic disinfection of water. Kinetics of disinfection followed Chick's law, and the pseudo-first-order rate constant was 0.0168 min(-1) for a catalyst loading of 0.1 g/L. Disinfection of water and degradation of endotoxins (harmful disinfection residual) occurred simultaneously during photocatalysis thereby making the treated water safe for use. Endotoxin degradation showed a shifting order of kinetics. The rate of photocatalysis with nanoparticles immobilised in cellulose acetate film was marginally lower as compared to that of free nanoparticles. Negligible Ag ion leakage and re-growth of cells post-photo-catalytic treatment of water confirmed that complete disintegration of E. coli occurred during photocatalysis making the treated water safe for use. Therefore, Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles have a potential for large-scale application in drinking water treatment plants and household purification units.

  4. Synthesis and photocatalytic properties of Fe3O4@TiO2 core-shell for degradation of Rhodamine B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufti, Nandang; Munfarriha, Ulfatien; Fuad, Abdulloh; Diantoro, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this research is to synthesis Fe3O4@TiO2 core-shell and used it as photocatalytic for degradation of Rhodamine B. The Fe3O4 nanoparticle core was synthesized by coprecipitation method from the iron sand. The TiO2 shell synthesized using coprecipitation method to capsulated Fe3O4 nanoparticle with vary of Fe3O4 mass. The Fe3O4@TiO2 core-shells were characterized using SEM-EDX, XRD. Photocatalytic activity of Rhodamine B degradation was performed under UV irradiation with variation of time exposure. The efficiency of photodegradation is measured by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The XRD result showed that Fe3O4 nanoparticle is single phase with crystal size of 15.5 nm. The existence of Fe3O4 and anatase of TiO2 phases in the XRD pattern shows that The Fe3O4@TiO2 core-shells are successfully synthesized. While, the TiO2 shell is confirmed by thermal test up to 550 OC for two hours to the samples. Based on SEM characterization, The Fe3O4@TiO2 core-shells are agglomerated with averages diameter sizes of particles between 38.5 nm to 72.8 nm. The concentration of TiO2 decrease with increasing Fe3O4 mass with atomic composition of Fe/Ti elements in Fe3O4@TiO2 core-shells are 0.083, 1.12, and 1.48. Based on photo degradation test of Rhodamine B under UV irradiation, we conclude that the degradation of Rhodamin B is caused by absorbsion and photocatalytic mechanism. For photocatalytic mechanism the efficiency of photodegradation of Rhodamin B increases by increasing TiO2 concentration.

  5. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing

  6. Numerical models for the analysis of thermal behavior and coolability of a particulate debris bed in reactor lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Kwang Il; Kim, Sang Baik; Kim, Byung Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    This report provides three distinctive, but closely related numerical models developed for the analysis of thermal behavior and coolability of a particulate debris bed that is may be formed inside the reactor lower head during severe accident late phases. The first numerical module presented in the report, MELTPRO-DRY, is used to analyze numerically heat-up and melting process of the dry particle bed, downward- and sideward-relocation of the liquid melt under gravity force and capillary force acting among porous particles, and solidification of the liquid melt relocated into colder region. The second module, MELTPROG-WET, is used to simulate numerically the cooling process of the particulate debris bed under the existence of water, which is subjected to two types of numerical models. The first type of WET module utilizes distinctive models that parametrically simulate the water cooling process, that is, quenching region, dryout region, and transition region. The choice of each parametric model depends on temperature gradient between the cooling water and the debris particles. The second type of WET module utilizes two-phase flow model that mechanically simulates the cooling process of the debris bed. For a consistent simulation from the water cooling to the dryout debris bed, on the other hand, the aforementioned two modules, MELTPROG-DRY and MELTPROG-WET, were integrated into a single computer program DBCOOL. Each of computational models was verified through limited applications to a heat-generating particulate bed contained in the rectangular cavity. 22 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  7. Application of Ni-Oxide@TiO2 Core-Shell Structures to Photocatalytic Mixed Dye Degradation, CO Oxidation, and Supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Seungwon Lee; Jisuk Lee; Kyusuk Nam; Weon Gyu Shin; Youngku Sohn

    2016-01-01

    Performing diverse application tests on synthesized metal oxides is critical for identifying suitable application areas based on the material performances. In the present study, Ni-oxide@TiO2 core-shell materials were synthesized and applied to photocatalytic mixed dye (methyl orange + rhodamine + methylene blue) degradation under ultraviolet (UV) and visible lights, CO oxidation, and supercapacitors. Their physicochemical properties were examined by field-emission scanning electron microscop...

  8. ZnS/Ni{sub 2}P core/shell composites: Simple hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and its photocatalytic degradation of pyronine B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shuling, E-mail: shulingliu@aliyun.com [Key Laboratory of Auxiliary Chemistry & Technology for Chemical Industry, Ministry of Education, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710021 (China); College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710021 (China); Ma, Lanbing; Zhang, Hongzhe; Ma, Chenlu [Key Laboratory of Auxiliary Chemistry & Technology for Chemical Industry, Ministry of Education, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710021 (China); College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710021 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • ZnS/Ni{sub 2}P composites have been firstly synthesized via a gentle hydrothermal route. • The composites have been characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. • ZnS/Ni{sub 2}P showed enhanced photocatalytic degradation activity for pyronine B. • The reason for the enhanced photocatalytic activity has been discussed. - Abstract: ZnS/Ni{sub 2}P core/shell composites were successfully synthesized using a hydrothermal method. The composites have been characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM and the corresponding results showed that the composites were composed of the cubic ZnS microspheres, which were made up of ZnS nanoparticles, and Ni{sub 2}P nanoparticles coated on the surfaces of ZnS microspheres. Compared with ZnS microspheres, ZnS/Ni{sub 2}P core/shell composites showed enhanced photocatalytic degradation activity for pyronine B under UV irradiation. This may be related to the effective separation of photogenerated electron–hole pairs in ZnS/Ni{sub 2}P composites which can greatly reduce the chance of their recombination. Furthermore, superoxide ions and hydroxyl radical can be more easily produced through ZnS/Ni{sub 2}P composites, which is also beneficial for the degradation of pyronine B.

  9. OECD 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test plan, Rev. 0 January 31, 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. The first of these two tests, CCI-1, was conducted on December 19, 2003. This test investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two

  10. Application of Ni-Oxide@TiO2 Core-Shell Structures to Photocatalytic Mixed Dye Degradation, CO Oxidation, and Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwon Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Performing diverse application tests on synthesized metal oxides is critical for identifying suitable application areas based on the material performances. In the present study, Ni-oxide@TiO2 core-shell materials were synthesized and applied to photocatalytic mixed dye (methyl orange + rhodamine + methylene blue degradation under ultraviolet (UV and visible lights, CO oxidation, and supercapacitors. Their physicochemical properties were examined by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. It was shown that their performances were highly dependent on the morphology, thermal treatment procedure, and TiO2 overlayer coating.

  11. Analyzing different HPCI operation modes simulated with ATHLET-CD regarding possible core degradation phenomena in Fukushima-Daiichi unit 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratfisch, Christoph; Koch, Marco K. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany). Reactor Simulation and Safety Group

    2017-02-15

    For extented application and analyses of the severe accident code ATHLET-CD, the course of the invessel accident in Unit 3 of Fukushima-Daiichi is simulated in the frame of the research project SUBA as a part of the BMBF sponsored collaborative project WASA-BOSS (Weiterentwicklung und Anwendung von Severe Accident Codes - Bewertung und Optimierung von Stoerfallmassnahmen). Investigations, carried out by TEPCO, had shown that the High-Pressure Coolant Injection system (HPCI) might have stopped earlier than expected. A parameter variation was performed to analyze the impact of the tripped HPCI injection regarding the thermohydraulic behaviour as well as the core degradation phenomena.

  12. Narrow with tunable optical band gap of CdS based core shell nanoparticles: Applications in pollutant degradation and solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugadoss, G., E-mail: murugadoss_g@yahoo.com [Department of Electric Engineering and Computer Science, School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hypogo 671-2280 (Japan); Thangamuthu, R. [Electrochemical Materials Science Division, CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006, Tamilnadu (India); Jayavel, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Technology, Anna University, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India); Rajesh Kumar, M. [Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Annamalai nagar 608 002, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-09-15

    In this work, sulfide-based core–shell heterostructures were successfully synthesized by chemical method. Structural, morphological, chemical composition, optical, and thermal properties of core–shell materials were investigated using different analytical techniques. The thickness of the shell can be tuned by controlling the concentration of respective shell precursors. TEM and HR-TEM analyses show that the particles are spherical in shape with particle size in the range 3–5 nm. Optical studies reveal that the core–shell materials possess strong visible-light photocatalytic activity. Among the four photocatalysts, CdS/SnS showed the best activity towards photo-degradation of methylene blue (MB). Addition of shells to the CdS core has a clear impact on the performance of solar cells. - Highlights: • Sulfide based core shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical method. • Structural, morphological and optical properties were studied. • Strong photocatalytic samples showed week photovoltaic performance.

  13. Synthesis and photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue over p-n junction Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/ZnO core/shell nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Chengjun; Xiao, Xuechun; Chen, Gang; Guan, Hongtao; Wang, Yude, E-mail: ydwang@ynu.edu.cn

    2015-04-01

    One-dimension (1D) Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/ZnO core/shell nanorods (NRs) were synthesized on nickel foil substrate by means of a two-step synthetic strategy. Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NRs were initially fabricated by a facile hydrothermal reaction and then ZnO was coated via a simple thermal decomposition. The results verified that the surface of the p-type Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} core was uniformly assembled by the n-type ZnO nanoparticles with approximate 20 nm thickness. Compared with pristine Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NRs, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/ZnO core/shell NRs was exhibited to have a much higher photocatalytic properties in the decomposition of a model dye compound, methylene blue (MB), under ultraviolet irradiation. As confirmed by Photoluminescence (PL) spectra, the formation of p-n junction heterostructures gives rise to the enhanced photocatalystic performance of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/ZnO core/shell NRs. This study provides a general and effective method in the fabrication of 1D composition NRs with sound heterojunctions that show remarkable enhancement of photocatalytic performance. - Highlights: • 1D Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/ZnO core/shell NRs were synthesized on nickel foil by a two-step synthetic strategy. • The thickness of ZnO coating is determined to be about 20 nm. • Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/ZnO NRs exhibited better photocatalytic performance for MB degradation under UV irradiation. • The formation of p-n junctions confirmed by PL is a critical factor for photocatalytic enhancement. • The working mechanism for Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/ZnO NRs as photocatalyst was proposed.

  14. Preparation, characterization, and application of ZnO@SiO2 core-shell structured catalyst for photocatalytic degradation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galedari, Naghmeh Abuali; Rahmani, Mohammad; Tasbihi, Minoo

    2016-10-24

    In the current study, ZnO@SiO2 core-shell structured catalyst was synthesized for photocatalytic degradation of phenol from aqueous samples. The synthesized catalyst was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-Vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, BET surface area, zeta potential, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The effect of catalyst loading, initial phenol concentration, pH, UV light intensity and weight ratio of ZnO/(SiO2 + ZnO) were studied towards photocatalytic degradation of phenol. Moreover, photocatalytic activities of bare ZnO and ZnO@SiO2 were compared. The results advocated that ZnO@SiO2 catalyst showed high photocatalytic performance for degradation of phenol (96 % after 120 min) at an initial pH of 5.9, catalyst loading of 0.5 g/L and initial phenol concentration of 25 mg/L. Increase in the weight ratio of ZnO/(SiO2 + ZnO) from 0.2 to 0.33 significantly enhanced the photodegradation of phenol from 84 to 94 %. It was also found that photocatalytic activity of ZnO@SiO2 was higher than bare ZnO nanoparticles. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  15. Degradation characteristics of humic acid over iron oxides/Fe{sup 0} core-shell nanoparticles with UVA/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie Yulun [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Hu Chun, E-mail: nyl@sdu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhou Lei; Qu Jiuhui; Wei Qunshan; Wang Dongsheng [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Iron oxides coated on Fe{sup 0} core-shell nanospheres (nIOCI) were synthesized through the reduction of ferrous sulfate aqueous solution by sodium borohydride at ambient atmosphere. The catalyst was highly effective for the degradation of humic acid (HA) in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and UVA at neutral pH. Under deoxygenated conditions in the dark, the generation of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous nIOCI dispersion verified its galvanic cell-like performance, which enhanced the interfacial electron transfer and led to its higher reactivity. By the total organic carbon, the absorbance of UV{sub 254}, FTIR, the molecular weight distribution and the chemical fractional character analysis, the degradation process of HA was shown to proceed by the disappearance of aromaticity, the increase of hydrophilic fraction and aromatic ring openings into CO{sub 2} and small organic acid. The treated HA showed much lower reactivity toward chlorine and the disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation potential was also greatly reduced. Moreover, it was found that the DBP formation potential more depended on the structure of the intermediates of HA degradation than TOC removal.

  16. Degradation characteristics of humic acid over iron oxides/Fe 0 core-shell nanoparticles with UVA/H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yulun; Hu, Chun; Zhou, Lei; Qu, Jiuhui; Wei, Qunshan; Wang, Dongsheng

    2010-01-15

    Iron oxides coated on Fe(0) core-shell nanospheres (nIOCI) were synthesized through the reduction of ferrous sulfate aqueous solution by sodium borohydride at ambient atmosphere. The catalyst was highly effective for the degradation of humic acid (HA) in the presence of H(2)O(2) and UVA at neutral pH. Under deoxygenated conditions in the dark, the generation of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous nIOCI dispersion verified its galvanic cell-like performance, which enhanced the interfacial electron transfer and led to its higher reactivity. By the total organic carbon, the absorbance of UV(254), FTIR, the molecular weight distribution and the chemical fractional character analysis, the degradation process of HA was shown to proceed by the disappearance of aromaticity, the increase of hydrophilic fraction and aromatic ring openings into CO(2) and small organic acid. The treated HA showed much lower reactivity toward chlorine and the disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation potential was also greatly reduced. Moreover, it was found that the DBP formation potential more depended on the structure of the intermediates of HA degradation than TOC removal.

  17. Ice-cored moraine degradation mapped and quantified using an unmanned aerial vehicle: A case study from a polythermal glacier in Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, T. N.; Midgley, N. G.; Cook, S. J.; Graham, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    Ice-cored lateral-frontal moraines are common at the margins of receding high-Arctic valley glaciers, but the preservation potential of these features within the landform record is unclear. Recent climatic amelioration provides an opportunity to study the morphological evolution of these landforms as they de-ice. This is important because high-Arctic glacial landsystems have been used as analogues for formerly glaciated areas in the mid-latitudes. This study uses SfM (Structure-from-Motion) photogrammetry and a combination of archive aerial and UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) derived imagery to investigate the degradation of an ice-cored lateral-frontal moraine at Austre Lovénbreen, Svalbard. Across the study area as a whole, over an 11-year period, the average depth of surface lowering was - 1.75 ± 0.89 m. The frontal sections of the moraine showed low or undetectable rates of change. Spatially variable rates of surface lowering are associated with differences in the quantity of buried ice within the structure of the moraine. Morphological change was dominated by surface lowering, with limited field evidence of degradation via back-wastage. This permits the moraine a greater degree of stability than previously observed at other sites in Svalbard. It is unclear whether the end point will be a fully stabilised ice-cored moraine, in equilibrium with its environment, or an ice-free lateral-frontal moraine complex. Controls on geomorphological change (e.g. topography and climate) and the preservation potential of the lateral-frontal moraine are discussed. The methods used by this research also demonstrate the potential value of SfM photogrammetry and unmanned aerial vehicles for monitoring environmental change and are likely to have wider applications in other geoscientific sub-disciplines.

  18. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg

  19. OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375

  20. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg

  1. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Farmer, Mitchell [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Francis, Matthew W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  2. Radiological consequence assessments of degraded core accident scenarios derived from a generic Level 2 PSA of a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Toshimitsu; Ishikawa, Jun; Tomita, Kenichi; Muramatsu, Ken [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-12-01

    The radiological consequence assessments have been made of postulated core damage accidents with source terms derived from a generic Level 2 PSA of a BWR carried out by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The source terms used were for the five core damage accident sequences with the drywell and wetwell failure cases, the release control case by venting of the containment and the accident termination case by the containment spray. The radiological consequences have been assessed for individual dose, collective dose, individual risk of early health effects and individual risk of late health effects by a probabilistic accident consequence assessment code, OSCAAR developed in JAERI. Following conclusions were obtained for the assumed source terms. In case of the over pressure failures of the primary containment vessel, the early fatalities can be mitigated through the implementation of early countermeasures, and the late cancer fatalities remains small. For the release control and accident termination cases, the individual and collective doses to the public can be reduced without any countermeasures due to the release reduction of the volatile radionuclides such as iodine and cesium. (author)

  3. Defect-mediated of Cu@TiO2 core-shell nanoparticles with oxygen vacancies for photocatalytic degradation 2,4-DCP under visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Zang, Ling; Fan, Xiaoyun; Jia, Hanzhong; Li, Li; Deng, Wenye; Wang, Chuanyi

    2015-12-01

    Cu @TiO2 core-shell nanoparticles with different mass ratios of Cu to TiO2 were facilely synthesized via wet chemical approaches, and were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance. The photocatalytic efficiency of Cu@TiO2 nanoparticles was evaluated by degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol, a typical persistent organic pollutant, under visible light irradiation. The results show that the oxygen vacancy creation obviously enhances the visible-light absorption of TiO2. Meanwhile, the Cu nanoparticle incorporation into the TiO2 can effectively improve charge-separation efficiency of Cu@TiO2 under visible-light irradiation, thereby enhancing the photoactivity.

  4. One-step synthesis, toxicity assessment and degradation in tumoral pH environment of SiO2@Ag core/shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Matteis, Valeria; Rizzello, Loris; Di Bello, Maria Pia; Rinaldi, Rosaria

    2017-06-01

    The unique physicochemical properties of SiO2@Ag core/shell nanoparticles make them a promising tool in nanomedicine, where they are used as nanocarriers for several biomedical applications, including (but not restricted to) cancer treatment. However, a comprehensive estimation of their potential toxicity, as well as their degradation in the tumor microenvironment, has not been extensively addressed yet. We investigated in vitro the viability, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, the DNA damage level, and the nanoparticle uptake on HeLa cells, used as model cancer cells. In addition, we studied the NPs degradation profile at pH 6.5, to mimic the tumor microenvironment, and at the neutral and physiological (pH 7-7.4). Our experiments demonstrate that the silver shell dissolution is promoted under acidic conditions, which could be related to cell death induction. Our evidences demonstrate that SiO2@Ag nanoparticles possess the ability of combining an effective cancer cell treatment (through local silver ions release) together with a possible controlled release of bioactive compounds encapsulated in the silica as future application.

  5. OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg

  6. Degradation of synthetic pollutants in real wastewater using laccase encapsulated in core-shell magnetic copper alginate beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thao Thanh; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Lee, Chung-Seop; Vu, Chi Huong; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Jeon, Jong-Rok

    2016-09-01

    Immobilization of laccase has been highlighted to enhance their stability and reusability in bioremediation. In this study, we provide a novel immobilization technique that is very suitable to real wastewater treatment. A perfect core-shell system composing copper alginate for the immobilization of laccase (Lac-beads) was produced. Additionally, nFe2O3 was incorporated for the bead recycling through magnetic force. The beads were proven to immobilize 85.5% of total laccase treated and also to be structurally stable in water, acetate buffer, and real wastewater. To test the Lac-beads reactivity, triclosan (TCS) and Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) were employed. The Lac-beads showed a high percentage of TCS removal (89.6%) after 8h and RBBR decolonization at a range from 54.2% to 75.8% after 4h. Remarkably, the pollutants removal efficacy of the Lac-beads was significantly maintained in real wastewater with the bead recyclability, whereas that of the corresponding free laccase was severely deteriorated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of operational parameters on the photocatalytic degradation of Congo red organic dye using ZnO-CdS core-shell nano-structure coated on glass by Doctor Blade method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Rahmati, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-02-25

    Photocatalytic degradation of Congo red was investigated using ZnO-CdS core-shell nano-structure coated on glass by Doctor Blade method in aqueous solution under irradiation. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used for the morphological and structural characterization of ZnO-CdS core-shell nanostructures. XRD results showed diffractions of wurtzite zinc oxide core and wurtzite cadmium sulfide shell. FESEM results showed that nanoparticles are nearly hexagonal with an average diameter of about 50 nm. The effect of catalyst loading, UV-light irradiation time and solution pH on photocatalytic degradation of Congo red was studied and optimized values were obtained. Results showed that the employment of efficient photocatalyst and selection of optimal operational parameters may lead to complete decolorization of dye solutions. It was found that ZnO-CdS core-shell nano-structure is more favorable for the degradation of Congo red compare to pure ZnO or pure CdS due to lower electron hole recombination. The results showed that the photocatalytic degradation rate of Congo red is enhanced with increasing the content of ZnO up to ZnO(0.2 M)/CdS(0.075 M) which is reached 88.0% within 100 min irradiation.

  8. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out

  9. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing

  10. Green synthesis of the reduced graphene oxide–CuI quasi-shell–core nanocomposite: A highly efficient and stable solar-light-induced catalyst for organic dye degradation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jiha; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Islam, M. Jahurul [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Institute for Functional Materials, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Bora [Department of Chemistry, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Sang Hoon [Department of Chemistry, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Kyu, E-mail: tkkim@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Institute for Functional Materials, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Green synthesis of RGO–CuI quasi-shell–core nanocomposites without any surfactant. • Promising candidates as solar light active photocatalyst for dye degradation. • Significant improvement of the photocatalytic activity in RGO wrapped composites. • The best photocatalytic activity to RhB has been attained for CuI–RGO (2 mg mL{sup −1}). - Abstract: Surfactant-free, reduced graphene oxide (RGO)–CuI quasi-shell−core nanocomposites were successfully synthesized using ultra-sonication assisted chemical method at room temperature. The morphologies, structures and optical properties of the CuI and CuI–RGO nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Morphological and structural analyses indicated that the CuI–RGO core–shell nanocomposites comprise single-crystalline face-centered cubic phase CuI nanostructures, coated with a thin RGO quasi-shell. Photocatalysis experiments revealed that the as-synthesized CuI–RGO nanocomposites exhibit remarkably enhanced photocatalytic activities and stabilities for photo degradation of Rhodamine-B (RhB) organic dye under simulated solar light irradiation. The photo degradation ability is strongly affected by the concentration of RGO in the nanocomposites; the highest photodegradation rate was obtained at a graphene loading content of 2 mg mL{sup −1} nanocomposite. The remarkable photocatalytic performance of the CuI–RGO nanocomposites mainly originates from their unique adsorption and electron-accepting and electron-transporting properties of RGO. The present work provides a novel green synthetic route to producing CuI–RGO nanocomposites without toxic solvents or reducing agents, thereby providing highly efficient and stable solar light

  11. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Ex-Vessel Prediction: Core Concrete Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Farmer, Mitchell [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Francis, Matthew W [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Lower head failure and corium concrete interaction were predicted to occur at Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1) by several different system-level code analyses, including MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5. Although these codes capture a wide range of accident phenomena, they do not contain detailed models for ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes exist for analysis of ex-vessel melt spreading (e.g., MELTSPREAD) and long-term debris coolability (e.g., CORQUENCH). On this basis, an analysis was carried out to further evaluate ex-vessel behavior for 1F1 using MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH. Best-estimate melt pour conditions predicted by MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5 were used as input. MELTSPREAD was then used to predict the spatially dependent melt conditions and extent of spreading during relocation from the vessel. The results of the MELTSPREAD analysis are reported in a companion paper. This information was used as input for the long-term debris coolability analysis with CORQUENCH.

  12. Fabrication of the novel core-shell MCM-41@mTiO2 composite microspheres with large specific surface area for enhanced photocatalytic degradation of dinitro butyl phenol (DNBP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Na; Wang, Hui-Long; Li, Zhen-Duo; Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Qi, Hui-Ping; Jiang, Wen-Feng

    2016-05-01

    The mesoporous MCM-41@mTiO2 core-shell composite microspheres were synthesized successfully by combining sol-gel and simple hydrothermal treatment. The morphology and microstructure characteristics of the synthesized materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption-desorption measurements, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis/DRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The results indicate that the composite material possesses obvious core/shell structure, a pure mesoporous and well-crystallized TiO2 layer (mTiO2), high specific surface area (316.8 m2/g), large pore volume (0.42 cm3/g) and two different pore sizes (2.6 nm and 11.0 nm). The photocatalytic activity of the novel MCM-41@mTiO2 composite was evaluated by degrading 2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol (DNBP) in aqueous suspension under UV and visible light irradiation. The results were compared with commercial anatase TiO2 and Degussa P25 and the enhanced degradation were obtained with the synthesized MCM-41@mTiO2 composite under the same conditions, which meant that this material can serve as an efficient photocatalyst for the degradation of hazardous organic pollutants in wastewaters.

  13. One dimensional CdS nanowire@TiO2 nanoparticles core-shell as high performance photocatalyst for fast degradation of dye pollutants under visible and sunlight irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabzadeh, Abbas; Salimi, Abdollah

    2016-10-01

    In this study, one-dimensional CdS nanowires@TiO2 nanoparticles core-shell structures (1D CdS NWs@TiO2 NPs) were synthesized by a facile wet chemical-solvothermal method. The different aspects of the properties of CdS NWs@TiO2 NPs were surveyed by using a comprehensive range of characterization techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescence spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and amperometry. The as-prepared nanostructure was applied as an effective photocatalyst for degradation of methyl orange (MO), methylene blue (MB) and rhodamine B (Rh B) under visible and sunlight irradiation. The results indicated significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity of CdS NWs@TiO2 NPs for degradation of MO, MB and Rh B compared to CdS NWs. The enhanced photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the enhanced sunlight absorbance and the efficient charge separation of the formed heterostructure between CdS NWs and TiO2. The results showed that MO, Rh B and MB were almost completely degraded after 2, 2 and 3min of exposure to sunlight, respectively; while under visible light irradiation (3W blue LED lamp) the dyes were decomposed with less half degradation rate. The catalytic activity was retained even after three degradation cycles of organic dyes, demonstrating that the proposed nanocomposite can be effectively used as efficient photocatalyst for removal of environmental pollutions caused by organic dyes under sunlight irradiation and it could be an important addition to the field of wastewater treatment. We hope the present study may open a new window of such 1-D semiconductor nanocomposites to be used as visible light photocatalysts in the promising field of organic dyes degradation.

  14. Green synthesis of the reduced graphene oxide-CuI quasi-shell-core nanocomposite: A highly efficient and stable solar-light-induced catalyst for organic dye degradation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiha; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Islam, M. Jahurul; Seo, Bora; Joo, Sang Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2015-12-01

    Surfactant-free, reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-CuI quasi-shell-core nanocomposites were successfully synthesized using ultra-sonication assisted chemical method at room temperature. The morphologies, structures and optical properties of the CuI and CuI-RGO nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Morphological and structural analyses indicated that the CuI-RGO core-shell nanocomposites comprise single-crystalline face-centered cubic phase CuI nanostructures, coated with a thin RGO quasi-shell. Photocatalysis experiments revealed that the as-synthesized CuI-RGO nanocomposites exhibit remarkably enhanced photocatalytic activities and stabilities for photo degradation of Rhodamine-B (RhB) organic dye under simulated solar light irradiation. The photo degradation ability is strongly affected by the concentration of RGO in the nanocomposites; the highest photodegradation rate was obtained at a graphene loading content of 2 mg mL-1 nanocomposite. The remarkable photocatalytic performance of the CuI-RGO nanocomposites mainly originates from their unique adsorption and electron-accepting and electron-transporting properties of RGO. The present work provides a novel green synthetic route to producing CuI-RGO nanocomposites without toxic solvents or reducing agents, thereby providing highly efficient and stable solar light-induced RGO-CuI quasi-shell-core nanocomposites for organic dye photo degradation in water.

  15. Photocatalytic degradation of phenol using Ag core-TiO2 shell (Ag@TiO2) nanoparticles under UV light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shet, Amruta; Shetty K, Vidya

    2016-10-01

    Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by one pot synthesis method with postcalcination. These nanoparticles were tested for their photocatalytic efficacies in degradation of phenol both in free and immobilized forms under UV light irradiation through batch experiments. Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles were found to be the effective photocatalysts for degradation of phenol. The effects of factors such as pH, initial phenol concentration, and catalyst loading on phenol degradation were evaluated, and these factors were found to influence the process efficiency. The optimum values of these factors were determined to maximize the phenol degradation. The efficacy of the nanoparticles immobilized on cellulose acetate film was inferior to that of free nanoparticles in UV photocatalysis due to light penetration problem and diffusional limitations. The performance of fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor operated under batch with recycle mode was evaluated for UV photocatalysis with immobilized Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles. In the fluidized bed reactor, the percentage degradation of phenol was found to increase with the increase in catalyst loading.

  16. Fabrication of the novel core-shell MCM-41@mTiO{sub 2} composite microspheres with large specific surface area for enhanced photocatalytic degradation of dinitro butyl phenol (DNBP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Xiao-Na; Wang, Hui-Long, E-mail: hlwang@dlut.edu.cn; Li, Zhen-Duo; Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Qi, Hui-Ping; Jiang, Wen-Feng

    2016-05-30

    Graphical abstract: The mesoporous MCM-41@mTiO{sub 2} composite microspheres with core/shell structure, well-crystallized mesoporous TiO{sub 2} layer, high specific surface, large pore volume and excellent photocatalytic activity were synthesized by combining sol-gel and simple hydrothermal treatment. - Highlights: • The mesoporous MCM-41@mTiO{sub 2} composite was synthesized successfully. • The composite was facilely prepared by combining sol-gel and hydrothermal method. • The composite exhibited high photocatalytic degradation activity for DNBP. • The composite photocatalyst has excellent reproducibility. - Abstract: The mesoporous MCM-41@mTiO{sub 2} core-shell composite microspheres were synthesized successfully by combining sol-gel and simple hydrothermal treatment. The morphology and microstructure characteristics of the synthesized materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption measurements, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV–vis/DRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The results indicate that the composite material possesses obvious core/shell structure, a pure mesoporous and well-crystallized TiO{sub 2} layer (mTiO{sub 2}), high specific surface area (316.8 m{sup 2}/g), large pore volume (0.42 cm{sup 3}/g) and two different pore sizes (2.6 nm and 11.0 nm). The photocatalytic activity of the novel MCM-41@mTiO{sub 2} composite was evaluated by degrading 2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol (DNBP) in aqueous suspension under UV and visible light irradiation. The results were compared with commercial anatase TiO{sub 2} and Degussa P25 and the enhanced degradation were obtained with the synthesized MCM-41@mTiO{sub 2} composite under the same conditions, which meant that this material can serve as an efficient photocatalyst for the degradation of hazardous organic pollutants in wastewaters.

  17. High-value utilization of egg shell to synthesize Silver and Gold-Silver core shell nanoparticles and their application for the degradation of hazardous dyes from aqueous phase-A green approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Tanur; Ahmaruzzaman, M

    2015-09-01

    The common household material, egg shell of Anas platyrhynchos is utilized for the synthesis of Silver and Gold-Silver core shell nanoparticles using greener, environment friendly and economic way. The egg shell extracts were acting as a stabilizing and reducing agents. This method avoids the use of external reducing and stabilizing agents, templates and solvents. The effects of various reaction parameters, such as reaction temperature, concentration in the formation of nanoparticles have also been investigated. The compositional abundance of gelatin may be envisaged for the effective reductive as well as stabilizing potency. The mechanisms for the formation of NPs have also been presented. The synthesized Ag NPs formed were predominantly spherical in nature with an average size of particles in the range of 6-26 nm. While, Au-Ag core shell nanoparticles formed were spherical and oval shaped, within a narrow size spectrum of 9-18 nm. Both the Ag NPs Au-and Ag core shell nanoparticles showed characteristic Bragg's reflection planes of fcc structure and surface plasmon resonance at 430 nm and 365 nm, respectively. The NPs were utilized for the removal of toxic and hazardous dyes, such as Rose Bengal, Methyl Violet 6 B and Methylene Blue from aqueous phase. Approximately 98.2%, 98.4% and 97% degradations of Rose Bengal, Methyl Violet 6 B, and Methylene Blue were observed with Ag NPs, while the percentage degradation of these dyes was 97.3%, 97.6% and 96% with Au-Ag NPs, respectively. Therefore, the present study has opened up an innovative way for synthesizing Ag NPs and Au-Ag bimetallic nanostructures of different morphologies and sizes involving the utilization of egg shell extract. The high efficiency of the NPs as photocatalysts has opened a promising application for the removal of hazardous dyes from the industrial effluents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential requirements for HIV-1 Vif-mediated APOBEC3G degradation and RUNX1-mediated transcription by core binding factor beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Zhao, Ke; Rui, Yajuan; Li, Peng; Zhou, Xiaohong; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2013-02-01

    Core binding factor beta (CBFβ), a transcription regulator through RUNX binding, was recently reported critical for Vif function. Here, we mapped the primary functional domain important for Vif function to amino acids 15 to 126 of CBFβ. We also revealed that different lengths and regions are required for CBFβ to assist Vif or RUNX. The important interaction domains that are uniquely required for Vif but not RUNX function represent novel targets for the development of HIV inhibitors.

  19. Synthesis of ZnO@γ-Fe2O3 core-shell nanocomposites by a facile thermal decomposition approach and their application in photocatalytic degradation of congo red

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sudheer Kumar; Jeevanandam, P.

    2016-07-01

    ZnO@γ-Fe2O3 core-shell nanocomposites were synthesized by a facile thermal decomposition approach. ZnO nanorods were first synthesized by calcination of zinc acetate at 300 °C, in air. γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were then deposited on the surface of ZnO nanorods by the thermal decomposition of iron acetylacetonate at 200 °C in diphenyl ether. The structure, composition, optical and magnetic properties of the nanocomposites were studied using an array of techniques. XRD results suggest the presence of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and ZnO, and FE-SEM images indicate formation of shell of iron oxide on the ZnO nanorods. Transmission electron microscopy studies clearly show that ZnO possesses rod morphology (length = 1.1 ± 0.1 μm, diameter = 40.1 ± 7 nm) and TEM images of the ZnO@γ-Fe2O3 nanocomposites show uniform shell of γ-Fe2O3 coated on the ZnO nanorods and thickness of the γ-Fe2O3 shell varies from 10 to 20 nm. Diffuse reflectance spectra of ZnO@γ-Fe2O3 nanocomposites reveal extended optical absorption in the visible range (400-600 nm) and photoluminescence spectra indicate that the ZnO@γ-Fe2O3 nanocomposites exhibit enhanced defect emission. The ZnO@γ-Fe2O3 core-shell nanocomposites show superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature. The core-shell nanocomposites exhibit enhanced visible-light driven photocatalytic degradation of congo red in an aqueous solution as compared to pure ZnO nanorods and γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The enhanced photocatalytic activity is attributed to good visible-light absorption and effective charge separation at the interface of ZnO@γ-Fe2O3 core-shell nanocomposites.

  20. Thermal radiation modeling inside a degraded reactor core in presence of steam and water droplets; Modelisation du rayonnement thermique dans un coeur de reacteur nucleaire degrade en presence de vapeur et de gouttes d'eau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chahlafi, Miloud

    2011-01-19

    This work aims at modelling thermal radiation in a nuclear reactor, in the course of a severe accident leading to its degradation. Because the reactor coolant is water, radiative heat transfer occurs in presence of steam and water droplets. The 3D geometry of a fuel bundle with 21 damaged rods has been characterized from {gamma}-tomography images. The degradation of the rods has been simulated in the experimental small-scale facility PHEBUS. The homogenized radiative properties of the considered configurations with a transparent fluid phase have been completely characterized by both the extinction cumulated distribution function G{sub ext} and the scattering phase functions p. G{sub ext} strongly differs from the exponential function associated with the Beer law and p strongly depends on both the incidence and the scattering directions. By using the radiative transfer equation generalized for non Beerian porous media by Taine et al. the radiative conductivity tensor has been first determined with a transparent fluid phase, by a numerical perturbation method. Only the diagonal radial and axial components of this tensor are not equal to zero. They have been fitted by a simple law only depending on the porosity, the specific area and the wall absorptivity. In a second step, a radiative transfer equation based on three temperatures is established. This model takes into account a semi transparent fluid phase by coupling the radiative properties of fluid and solid phases. The radiative properties of water steam and droplets are calculated respectively with the CK approach and Mie theory, in typical thermal hydraulics conditions of reactor accidents. The radiative fluxes verify the Fourier law and are characterized by radiative coupled conductivity tensors associated with the temperatures of each phase. The radiative powers exchanged between phases per unit volume are also calculated from this model. (author)

  1. Phosphate Shifted Oxygen Reduction Pathway on Fe@Fe2O3 Core-Shell Nanowires for Enhanced Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Aerobic 4-Chlorophenol Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yi; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2017-07-18

    Phosphate ions widely exist in the environment. Previous studies revealed that the adsorption of phosphate ions on nanoscale zerovalent iron would generate a passivating oxide shell to block reactive sites and thus decrease the direct pollutant reduction reactivity of zerovalent iron. Given that molecular oxygen activation process is different from direct pollutant reduction with nanoscale zerovalent iron, it is still unclear how phosphate ions will affect molecular oxygen activation and reactive oxygen species generation with nanoscale zerovalent iron. In this study, we systematically studied the effect of phosphate ions on molecular oxygen activation with Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires, a special nanoscale zerovalent iron, taking advantages of rotating ring disk electrochemical analysis. It was interesting to find that the oxygen reduction pathway on Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires was gradually shifted from a four-electron reduction pathway to a sequential one-electron reduction one, along with increasing the phosphate ions concentration from 0 to 10 mmol·L(-1). This oxygen reduction pathway change greatly enhanced the molecular oxygen activation and reactive oxygen species generation performances of Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires, and thus increased their aerobic 4-chlorophenol degradation rate by 10 times. These findings shed insight into the possible roles of widely existed phosphate ions in molecular oxygen activation and organic pollutants degradation with nanoscale zerovalent iron.

  2. Severe accident research in the core degradation area: An example of effective international cooperation between the European Union (EU) and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) by the International Science and Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottomley, D., E-mail: paul.bottomley@ec.europa.eu [ITU Institut fuer Transurane, PO box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Stuckert, J.; Hofmann, P. [KIT Campus Nord, Hermann-von-Helmholtz Pl. 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Tocheny, L. [ISTC Krasnoproletarskaya 32-34, PO Box 20, 127473 Moscow (Russian Federation); Hugon, M. [European Commission DG - Research and Tech. Development, Sq. de Meeus, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium); Journeau, C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, F13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Clement, B. [IRSN PSN-RES/SAG Cadarache, BP3 F13115, St Paul lez Durance (France); Weber, S. [GRS Muenchen, Thermal Hydraulics Div., Garching 85748,Germany (Germany); Guentay, S. [PSI NES/LTH OHSA C11, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Hozer, Z. [AEKI Fuel Department, P.O. Box 49, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary); Herranz, L. [CIEMAT, Energy -Nuclear Fission Division, Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Schumm, A. [EDF - R and D, SINETICS, Avenue du General de Gaulle 1, Clamart 92140 (France); Oriolo, F. [Pisa University, Ing. Mecc. Nucl. Prod., Largo Lazarino 2, Pisa 56126 (Italy); Altstadt, E. [HZDR Structural Matls, Rossendorf, Postfach 51 01 19, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Krause, M. [AECL - Reactor Safety, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada K0J 1J0 (Canada); Fischer, M. [AREVA NP GMBH, Dept. PEPA-G, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Khabensky, V.B. [Alexandrov Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Bechta, S.V. [Kungliga Tekniska Hoegskolan (KTH), AlbaNova University Centre, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Veshchunov, M.S. [Nuclear Safety Institute (IBRAE), Russian Academy of Sciences, 52 B. Tulskaya, Moscow 115191 (Russian Federation); Palagin, A.V. [KIT Campus Nord, Hermann-von-Helmholtz Pl. 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); and others

    2012-11-15

    temperature; (2) Reactor Core Degradation; a modelling project simulating the fuel rod degradation and loss of geometry from IBRAE, Moscow; (3) METCOR projects from NITI, St. Petersburg on the interaction of core melt with reactor vessel steel; (4) INVECOR project, NNE Kurchatov City, Kazakhstan; this is a large-scale facility to examine the vessel steel retention of 60 kg corium during the decay heat; and finally, (5) CORPHAD and PRECOS projects, NITI, St. Petersburg undertook a systematic examination of refractory ceramics relevant to in-vessel and ex-vessel coria, particularly examining poorly characterised, limited data or experimentally difficult systems.

  3. Degradation and Leaching of Carbofuran and Dimethoate in Terrestrial Soil-Core Microcosm%克百威、乐果在陆生微宇宙土芯中的降解和淋溶研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程燕; 周军英; 续卫利; 叶凤娇; 单正军

    2012-01-01

    Degradation and Leaching of Carbofuran and Dimethoate in Terrestrial Soil-Core Microcosm were studied. And results showed that: During the experiment, the contents of the two pesticides in different layers of Haian high sandy soil and Changzhou paddy soil were always following this: 0 ~10 〉10 ~30 〉30-60cm; When simulating precipitation two hours after application, the concentrations of the two pesticides in leaching water samples were high; Dimethoate concentrations in leaching water samples reduced more rapidly and could not be detected in 14d leaching water samples, while Carbofuran could still be seized in 14d leaching water samples; The test results could be perfectly interpreted by the physic-chemical properties, the degradation characteristics of the test pesticides and the physic-chemical properties of the test soil. The study could not only provide reference for the scientific use of these two pesticides, but also provide reference for the developing and applying of the terrestrial Soil-Core Microcosm.%通过陆生微宇宙土芯淋溶试验研究克百威、乐果在常州水稻土和海安高砂土2种土壤中的降解和淋溶特性。结果表明:在整个实验周期,克百威、乐果在高砂土、水稻土不同土层中的含量依次为0~10〉10-30〉30~60cm;施药后2h淋溶,2种农药在水样中的检出浓度均较高:就2种农药对比而言,乐果在淋溶水样中浓度降低较为迅速,14d时淋溶水样中就未检出。而克百威在14d时仍有检出。受试农药的理化性质、降解特性及受试土壤的理化性等因素能很好地诠释试验结果。研究一方面可为这2种农药的科学使用提供参考,另一方面.为陆生微宇宙系统的开发、应用提供借鉴。

  4. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  5. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in...

  6. ASTEC adaptation for PHWR limited core damage accident analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, P., E-mail: pmajum@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Reactor Safety Division, Mumbai 400085 (India); Chatterjee, B.; Lele, H.G. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Reactor Safety Division, Mumbai 400085 (India); Guillard, G.; Fichot, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES/SAG, Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2014-06-01

    Under limited core damage accidents (LCDAs) of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), coolable geometry of the channel might be retained thanks to the presence of moderator heat sink. Indeed, the pressure tube is amenable to creep deformation at high temperature due to internal pressure and fuel bundles weight. Partial or complete circumferential contact between pressure tube and calandria tube aids heat dissipation to the moderator. A new module has been developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) for simulating this phenomenon which is specific to horizontal-type of reactors. It requires additional calculation of pressure tube sagging/ballooning and temperature field in the circumferential direction. The module is well validated with available experimental results concerning pressure tube deformation and the associated heat transfer in the area of contact. It is then used in analysing typical LCDAs scenarios in Indian PHWR under low and medium internal pressure conditions. This module is implemented in the ASTEC IRSN-GRS severe accident code version under development and will thus be available in the next major version V2.1.

  7. Development of severe accident analysis code - A study on the molten core-concrete interaction under severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chang Hyun; Lee, Byung Chul; Huh, Chang Wook; Kim, Doh Young; Kim, Ju Yeul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the phenomena of the molten core/concrete interaction during the hypothetical severe accident, and to develop the model for heat transfer and physical phenomena in MCCIs. The contents of this study are analysis of mechanism in MCCIs and assessment of heat transfer models, evaluation of model in CORCON code and verification in CORCON using SWISS and SURC Experiments, and 1000 MWe PWR reactor cavity coolability, and establishment a model for prediction of the crust formation and temperature of melt-pool. The properties and flow condition of melt pool covering with the conditions of severe accident are used to evaluate the heat transfer coefficients in each reviewed model. Also, the scope and limitation of each model for application is assessed. A phenomenological analysis is performed with MELCOR 1.8.2 and MELCOR 1.8.3 And its results is compared with corresponding experimental reports of SWISS and SURC experiments. And the calculation is performed to assess the 1000 MWe PWR reactor cavity coolability. To improve the heat transfer model between melt-pool and overlying coolant and analyze the phase change of melt-pool, 2 dimensional governing equations are established using the enthalpy method and computational program is accomplished in this study. The benchmarking calculation is performed and its results are compared to the experiment which has not considered effects of the coolant boiling and the gas injection. Ultimately, the model shall be developed for considering the gas injection effect and coolant boiling effect. 66 refs., 10 tabs., 29 refs. (author)

  8. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  9. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  10. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  11. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  12. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  13. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  14. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  15. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    extensions. Combined with the fact that the language definition does not provide a formal semantics, it is an arduous task to work formally with the language (e.g. to give an implementation). In this paper we identify a core subset of the language, called Core BPEL, which has fewer and simpler constructs......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...... formally with WS-BPEL, as one, without loss of generality, need only consider the much simpler Core BPEL. This report may also be viewed as an addendum to the WS-BPEL standard specification, which clarifies the WS-BPEL syntax and presents the essential elements of the language in a more concise way...

  16. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    extensions. Combined with the fact that the language definition does not provide a formal semantics, it is an arduous task to work formally with the language (e.g. to give an implementation). In this paper we identify a core subset of the language, called Core BPEL, which has fewer and simpler constructs......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...... formally with WS-BPEL, as one, without loss of generality, need only consider the much simpler Core BPEL. This report may also be viewed as an addendum to the WS-BPEL standard specification, which clarifies the WS-BPEL syntax and presents the essential elements of the language in a more concise way...

  17. Core benefits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keith, Brian W

    2010-01-01

    This SPEC Kit explores the core employment benefits of retirement, and life, health, and other insurance -benefits that are typically decided by the parent institution and often have significant governmental regulation...

  18. “Cu核-Cu2O壳”粒子可见光催化降解酚类废水的研究%Photocatalytic degradation of phenolic poilutants by using visible light responsive “Cu core-Cu2O shell” catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁伟夏; 何星存; 张良军; 钟彤; 陆志发

    2012-01-01

    The article is concerned about our research findings in photocatalytic degradation of phenolic pollutants by using visible light responsive " Cu core-Cu2O shell " catalyst micron-sized " Cu core-Cu2O shell" catalyst. The photo-catalysts we have used are prepared by reducing CuSO4 to "Cu core-Cu2O shell" catalyst characterized by X-ray diffraction ( XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). For our research purpose, we have investigated photo-catalytic degradation of phenolic compounds in aqueous solution under the visible light. The results of our experiments show that the new catalyst under way was highly responsive under the visible light. The so-called "Cu core-Cu2O shell" type catalyst was found to involve a few factors, such as the reaction time, the quantity of catalyst, the initial concentration of p-nitrophenol, the solution of pH and the different kinds of sources light, of which may affect the photocatalytic and degradative properties. The optimum conditions as we found can be stated as follows: the initial concentration of p-nitrophenol-40 mg- L'; the quantity of catalyst-2 g* L1; the solution of pH is equal to 3 to 11 while the visible light resource is irradiating during 120 min in the optimal perspective moment. All the above said conditions permitted, the degradation rate of p-nitrophenol is expected to reach 95% . However, it is the UV-visible absorption spectra that substantiated the result of degradation. In addition, the TOC studies indicate that the main part of p-nitrophenol has been mineralized into CO2 and H2O. When the industrial phenol sewage was used to examine the photoactivity, we have found that the degradation of industrial phenol sewage is likely to take place under either sunlight or metal halide light at a similar rate (about 90%). Compared with other similar photocatalysts, it would be more significant to note the photocatalytic activity of "Cu core-Cu2O shell" particles. Besides, we have also studied the kinetics of

  19. Polysaccharide Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Bruce A.; Svensson, Birte; Collins, Michelle E.; Rastall, Robert A.

    An overview of current and potential enzymes used to degrade polysaccharides is presented. Such depolymerases are comprised of glycoside hydrolases, glycosyl transferases, phosphorylases and lyases, and their classification, active sites and action patterns are discussed. Additionally, the mechanisms that these enzymes use to cleave glycosidic linkages is reviewed as are inhibitors of depolymerase activity; reagents which react with amino acid residues, glycoside derivatives, transition state inhibitors and proteinaceous inhibitors. The characterization of various enzymes of microbial, animal or plant origin has led to their widespread use in the production of important oligosaccharides which can be incorporated into food stuffs. Sources of polysaccharides of particular interest in this chapter are those from plants and include inulin, dextran, xylan and pectin, as their hydrolysis products are purported to be functional foods in the context of gastrointestinal health. An alternative use of degraded polysaccharides is in the treatment of disease. The possibility exists to treat bacterial exopolysaccharide with lyases from bacteriophage to produce oligosaccharides exhibiting bioactive sequences. Although this area is currently in its infancy the knowledge is available to investigate further.

  20. Experimental simulation of fragmentation and stratification of core debris on the core catcher of a fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Dipin S.; Vignesh, R. [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Sudha, A. Jasmin, E-mail: jasmin@igcar.gov.in [Safety Engineering Division, Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India); Pushpavanam, S.; Sundararajan, T. [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P. [Safety Engineering Division, Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Fragmentation of two simultaneous metals jets in a bulk coolant analysed. • Particle size from experiments compared with theoretical analysis. • Jet breakup modes explained using dimensionless numbers. • Settling aspects of aluminium and lead debris on collector plate studied. • Results analysed in light of core debris settling on core catcher in a FBR. - Abstract: The complex and coupled phenomena of two simultaneous molten metal jets fragmenting inside a quiescent liquid pool and settling on a collector plate are experimentally analysed in the context of safety analysis of a fast breeder reactor (FBR) in the post accident heat removal phase. Following a hypothetical core melt down accident in a FBR, a major portion of molten nuclear fuel and clad/structural material which are collectively termed as ‘corium’ undergoes fragmentation in the bulk coolant sodium in the lower plenum of the reactor main vessel and settles on the core catcher plate. The coolability of this decay heat generating debris bed is dependent on the particle size distribution and its layering i.e., stratification. Experiments have been conducted with two immiscible molten metals of different densities poured inside a coolant medium to understand their fragmentation behaviour and to assess the possibility of formation of a stratified debris bed. Molten aluminium and lead have been used as simulants in place of molten stainless steel and nuclear fuel to facilitate easy handling. This paper summarizes the major findings from these experiments. The fragmentation of the two molten metals are explained in the light of relevant dimensionless numbers such as Reynolds number and Weber Number. The mass median diameter of the fragmented debris is predicted from nonlinear stability analysis of slender jets for lead jet and using Rayleigh's classical theory of jet breakup for aluminium jet. The agreement of the predicted values with the experimental results is good. These

  1. Core Java

    CERN Document Server

    Horstmann, Cay S

    2013-01-01

    Fully updated to reflect Java SE 7 language changes, Core Java™, Volume I—Fundamentals, Ninth Edition, is the definitive guide to the Java platform. Designed for serious programmers, this reliable, unbiased, no-nonsense tutorial illuminates key Java language and library features with thoroughly tested code examples. As in previous editions, all code is easy to understand, reflects modern best practices, and is specifically designed to help jumpstart your projects. Volume I quickly brings you up-to-speed on Java SE 7 core language enhancements, including the diamond operator, improved resource handling, and catching of multiple exceptions. All of the code examples have been updated to reflect these enhancements, and complete descriptions of new SE 7 features are integrated with insightful explanations of fundamental Java concepts.

  2. Core-shell microparticles for protein sequestration and controlled release of a protein-laden core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Torri E; Philbrick, Brandon D; Temenoff, Johnna S

    2016-12-21

    Development of multifunctional biomaterials that sequester, isolate, and redeliver cell-secreted proteins at a specific timepoint may be required to achieve the level of temporal control needed to more fully regulate tissue regeneration and repair. In response, we fabricated core-shell heparin-poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG) microparticles (MPs) with a degradable PEG-based shell that can temporally control delivery of protein-laden heparin MPs. Core-shell MPs were fabricated via a re-emulsification technique and the number of heparin MPs per PEG-based shell could be tuned by varying the mass of heparin MPs in the precursor PEG phase. When heparin MPs were loaded with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and then encapsulated into core-shell MPs, degradable core-shell MPs initiated similar C2C12 cell alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as the soluble control, while non-degradable core-shell MPs initiated a significantly lower response (85+19% vs. 9.0+4.8% of the soluble control, respectively). Similarly, when degradable core-shell MPs were formed and then loaded with BMP-2, they induced a ∼7-fold higher C2C12 ALP activity than the soluble control. As C2C12 ALP activity was enhanced by BMP-2, these studies indicated that degradable core-shell MPs were able to deliver a bioactive, BMP-2-laden heparin MP core. Overall, these dynamic core-shell MPs have the potential to sequester, isolate, and then redeliver proteins attached to a heparin core to initiate a cell response, which could be of great benefit to tissue regeneration applications requiring tight temporal control over protein presentation.

  3. 大芯径光谱传光光纤焦比退化特性研究%Focal Ratio Degradation of Large Core Spectrum Light-transmitting Optical Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王森; 朱冰

    2011-01-01

    Ray tracing was used to analyze the Focal Ratio Degradation (FRD) properties of fibers, which is caused by the light transmitting in the fibers with offset and bending when we set the fibers and observe stars in astronomy. We analyzed and calculated the conditions of the fibers used in the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopy Telescope (LAMOST) according to the parameters of the fiber cables used in the LAMOST. These works provide useful reference in this project. According to the analysis and computation, the designed aim error of fibers should be less than 32 μm at least.The least bending radii is 300 mm when the fibers are installed for observation in the LAMOST projection.%针对天文光谱观测系统使用的传光光纤在布放和观测过程中因弯曲和入射中心未对准光纤中心而导致的焦比退化效应,采用光学追迹方法进行了分析计算.根据我国大天区面积多目标光纤光谱望远镜(LAMOST)工程中实际使用的光纤光缆的参数,分析并计算了所用传光光纤的使用条件,为工程应用提供参考.根据分析计算的结果,在LAMOST工程中光纤对准误差设计值为不大于32 μm的条件下,LAMOST工程中光纤光缆施工安装及观测使用过程中最小弯曲半径应限制在不小于300 mm.

  4. Dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuesong; Fan, Zhongwei; Shi, Zhaohui; Ma, Yunfeng; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-25

    In this work, dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers (AR-HCFs) are numerically demonstrated, based on our knowledge, for the first time. Two fiber structures are proposed. One is a composite of two single-core nested nodeless AR-HCFs, exhibiting low confinement loss and a circular mode profile in each core. The other has a relatively simple structure, with a whole elliptical outer jacket, presenting a uniform and wide transmission band. The modal couplings of the dual-core AR-HCFs rely on a unique mechanism that transfers power through the air. The core separation and the gap between the two cores influence the modal coupling strength. With proper designs, both of the dual-core fibers can have low phase birefringence and short modal coupling lengths of several centimeters.

  5. PEM fuel cell degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. While significant progress has been made in understanding degradation mechanisms and improving materials, further improvements in durability are required to meet commercialization targets. Catalyst and electrode durability remains a primary degradation mode, with much work reported on understanding how the catalyst and electrode structure degrades. Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) are used to rapidly evaluate component degradation, however the results are sometimes easy, and other times difficult to correlate. Tests that were developed to accelerate degradation of single components are shown to also affect other component's degradation modes. Non-ideal examples of this include ASTs examining catalyst degradation performances losses due to catalyst degradation do not always well correlate with catalyst surface area and also lead to losses in mass transport.

  6. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  7. Degradation of microbial polyesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P

    2004-08-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), one of the largest groups of thermoplastic polyesters are receiving much attention as biodegradable substitutes for non-degradable plastics. Poly(D-3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is the most ubiquitous and most intensively studied PHA. Microorganisms degrading these polyesters are widely distributed in various environments. Although various PHB-degrading microorganisms and PHB depolymerases have been studied and characterized, there are still many groups of microorganisms and enzymes with varying properties awaiting various applications. Distributions of PHB-degrading microorganisms, factors affecting the biodegradability of PHB, and microbial and enzymatic degradation of PHB are discussed in this review. We also propose an application of a new isolated, thermophilic PHB-degrading microorganism, Streptomyces strain MG, for producing pure monomers of PHA and useful chemicals, including D-3-hydroxycarboxylic acids such as D-3-hydroxybutyric acid, by enzymatic degradation of PHB.

  8. Chemical state of tellurium in a degraded LWR core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, S.; Tanabe, T.

    1988-06-01

    Changes of the chemical state of tellurium in the heatup stage of a severe fuel damage accident are estimated thermodynamically. According to equilibrium calculations with the SOLGASMIX-PV code, tellurium exists as cesium telluride, as the element or possibly as PdTe during normal operation. In the heatup stage of an accident, elemental tellurium is absorbed in the Zircaloy cladding by formation of ZrTe x ( x = 1-2). Cesium telluride does not react with Zr even under the low oxygen potentials favoring the {Zr}/{UO 2} reaction. Tellurium is also absorbed in oxygen-stabilized alpha-zirconium. The stability of Cs 2Te in the steam/hydrogen atmosphere is discussed.

  9. 磁性Fe3O4/ZnO核壳材料的制备及降解四环素类抗生素%Synthesis of Magnetic Fe3O4/ZnO Core-shell Materials and Its Degradability on Tetracycline Antibiotic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶林静; 关卫省; 宋优男; 杨莉

    2013-01-01

    利用共沉淀及退火处理两步法,合成了具有核壳结构的磁性Fe3O4/ZnO纳米材料.采用X射线衍射仪、红外光谱仪、透射电子显微镜及振动样品磁强计(VSM)等技术对材料的组分、形貌及磁力性质进行表征,并以氙灯为光源,以四环素(TC)、强力霉素(DC)和盐酸土霉素(OTC)3种四环素类抗生素为降解目标,模拟测试样品在日光下的光催化活性,并通过改变Zn2+浓度,调节包覆结构从而得到最佳光催化效果.研究表明,ZnO包覆在Fe3O4表面并随Zn2+浓度增大逐渐形成尺寸在100 nm的锥形结构,当Zn2+浓度为0.5 mol/L时,样品对TC、DC和OTC的降解率最大,分别为85%、78%和64%.基于以上的研究显示,合成的磁性Fe3O4/ZnO核壳材料可应用去除水中抗生素,是一种具有高催化活性且能回收利用的新型复合光催化剂.%Magnetic Fe3O4/ZnO core-shell nano-materials were successfully prepared by using a two-step procedure with coprecipitation and annealing treatment.The material composition,morphology and magnetic properties were examined and verified by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD),infrared spectroscopy (IR),transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM).The photocatalytic degradation activity of the compound in the sunlight was evaluated by xenon lamp irradiating on tetracycline (TC),doxycycline(DC) and oxytetracycline (OTC),three tetracycline antibiotics,and the best performance of photocatalytic degradation activity was tailored by the concentration of zinc precursor.The results show that ZnO coated on the surface of Fe3O4 gradually forms 100 nm conical structure with increasing Zn2+ concentration.When Zn2+ concentration is 0.5 mol/L,the max degradation rate of TC,DC and OTC antibiotics is 85%,78% and 64%,respectively.On the basis of the above points,the synthesized magnetic Fe3O4/ZnO coreshell materials can be used for water antibiotics removal,and it will be a new composite

  10. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    . Bioaugmentation i.e. addition of specific degrader organisms, has been suggested as an environmentally friendly and economically competitive strategy for cleaning polluted sites. Several organisms have been isolated, capable of degrading different compounds. However the capacity to degrade the desired compound...... SRS2, Variovorax SRS16 and Arthrobacter globiformis D47. The degradation capacity of each strain individually as well as two- and three-member consortia was studied in a sand column set up. Glass beads were added to the set up to create a dry patch, separating the organisms and the diuron-spiked sand...

  11. Fault Tolerance Mechanism in Chip Many-Core Processors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lei; HAN Yinhe; LI Huawei; LI Xiaowei

    2007-01-01

    As semiconductor technology advances, there will be billions of transistors on a single chip. Chip many-core processors are emerging to take advantage of these greater transistor densities to deliver greater performance. Effective fault tolerance techniques are essential to improve the yield of such complex chips. In this paper, a core-level redundancy scheme called N+M is proposed to improve N-core processors'yield by providing M spare cores. In such architecture, topology is an important factor because it greatly affects the processors'performance. The concept of logical topology and a topology reconfiguration problem are introduced, which is able to transparently provide target topology with lowest performance degradation as the presence of faulty cores on-chip. A row rippling and column stealing (RRCS) algorithm is also proposed. Results show that PRCS can give solutions with average 13.8% degradation with negligible computing time.

  12. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  13. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  14. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  15. Batteries: Imaging degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearing, Paul R.

    2016-11-01

    The degradation and failure of Li-ion batteries is strongly associated with electrode microstructure change upon (de)lithiation. Now, an operando X-ray tomography approach is shown to correlate changes in the microstructure of electrodes to cell performance, and thereby predict degradation pathways.

  16. Syntrophy in Methanogenic Degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worm, P.; Müller, N.; Plugge, C.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Schink, B.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter deals with microbial communities of bacteria and archaea that closely cooperate in methanogenic degradation and perform metabolic functions in this community that neither one of them could carry out alone. The methanogenic degradation of fatty acids, alcohols, most aromatic compounds, a

  17. Rate of NDF degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Koukolová, V; Lund, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Degradation profiles for NDF were estimated for 83 samples of grass/grass-clover, 27 samples of cereal whole crop and 14 samples of maize whole crop.......Degradation profiles for NDF were estimated for 83 samples of grass/grass-clover, 27 samples of cereal whole crop and 14 samples of maize whole crop....

  18. Comodules over semiperfect corings

    CERN Document Server

    Caenepeel, S

    2011-01-01

    We discuss when the Rat functor associated to a coring satisfying the left $\\alpha$-condition is exact. We study the category of comodules over a semiperfect coring. We characterize semiperfect corings over artinian rings and over qF-rings.

  19. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  20. Intermittent degradation and schizotypy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Roché

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent degradation refers to transient detrimental disruptions in task performance. This phenomenon has been repeatedly observed in the performance data of patients with schizophrenia. Whether intermittent degradation is a feature of the liability for schizophrenia (i.e., schizotypy is an open question. Further, the specificity of intermittent degradation to schizotypy has yet to be investigated. To address these questions, 92 undergraduate participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing schizotypy and psychological state variables (e.g., anxiety, depression, and their reaction times were recorded as they did so. Intermittent degradation was defined as the number of times a subject’s reaction time for questionnaire items met or exceeded three standard deviations from his or her mean reaction time after controlling for each item’s information processing load. Intermittent degradation scores were correlated with questionnaire scores. Our results indicate that intermittent degradation is associated with total scores on measures of positive and disorganized schizotypy, but unrelated to total scores on measures of negative schizotypy and psychological state variables. Intermittent degradation is interpreted as potentially derivative of schizotypy and a candidate endophenotypic marker worthy of continued research.

  1. Silk structure and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Song, Yu-wei; Jin, Li; Wang, Zhi-jian; Pu, De-yong; Lin, Shao-qiang; Zhou, Chan; You, Hua-jian; Ma, Yan; Li, Jin-min; Yang, Li; Sung, K L Paul; Zhang, Yao-guang

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the structure of silk and its degradation properties, we have monitored the structure of silk using scanning electron microscopy and frozen sections. Raw silk and degummed raw silk were immersed in four types of degradation solutions for 156 d to observe their degradation properties. The subcutaneous implants in rats were removed after 7, 14, 56, 84, 129, and 145 d for frozen sectioning and subsequent staining with hematoxylin and eosin (H.E.), DAPI, Beta-actin and Collagen I immunofluorescence staining. The in vitro weight loss ratio of raw silk and degummed raw silk in water, PBS, DMEM and DMEM containing 10% FBS (F-DMEM) were, respectively, 14%/11%, 12.5%/12.9%, 11.1%/14.3%, 8.8%/11.6%. Silk began to degrade after 7 d subcutaneous implantation and after 145 d non-degraded silk was still observed. These findings suggest the immunogenicity of fibroin and sericin had no essential difference. In the process of in vitro degradation of silk, the role of the enzyme is not significant. The in vivo degradation of silk is related to phagocytotic activity and fibroblasts may be involved in this process to secrete collagen. This study also shows the developing process of cocoons and raw silk.

  2. SPECIFIC DEGRADATION OF WATERSHEDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Boubacar KANE; Pierre Y.JULIEN

    2007-01-01

    An extensive database of reservoir sedimentation surveys throughout continental United States is compiled and analyzed to determine specific degradation SD relationships as function of mean annual rainfall R, drainage area A, and watershed slope S. The database contains 1463 field measurements and specific degradation relationships are defined as function of A, R and S. Weak trends and significant variability in the data are noticeable. Specific degradation measurements are log normally distributed with respect to R, A, and S and 95% confidence intervals are determined accordingly. The accuracy of the predictions does not significantly increase as more independent variables are added to the regression analyses.

  3. Banded transformer cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  4. Laser-coolable polyatomic molecules with heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Isaev, T A; Eliav, E

    2016-01-01

    Recently a number of diatomic and polyatomics molecules has been identified as a prospective systems for Doppler cooling. Polyatomic molecules with heavy nuclei present great interest for search for new physics outside of Standard Model and a large variety of other applications including cold chemistry, quantum informatics etc. Herein we propose radium monohydroxide molecule (RaOH) which is on the one hand amenable for Doppler cooling and on the other hand has considerable potential for searching for $\\cal P$-odd and $\\cal P,T$-odd effects.

  5. Thraustochytrid protists degrade hydrocarbons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raikar, M.T.; Raghukumar, S.; Vani, V.; David, J.J.; Chandramohan, D.

    Although thraustochytrid protists are known to be of widespread occurrence in the sea, their hydrocarbon-degrading abilities have never been investigated. We isolated thraustochytrids from coastal waters and sediments of Goa coast by enriching MPN...

  6. How do polymers degrade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Suping

    2011-03-01

    Materials derived from agricultural products such as cellulose, starch, polylactide, etc. are more sustainable and environmentally benign than those derived from petroleum. However, applications of these polymers are limited by their processing properties, chemical and thermal stabilities. For example, polyethylene terephthalate fabrics last for many years under normal use conditions, but polylactide fabrics cannot due to chemical degradation. There are two primary mechanisms through which these polymers degrade: via hydrolysis and via oxidation. Both of these two mechanisms are related to combined factors such as monomer chemistry, chain configuration, chain mobility, crystallinity, and permeation to water and oxygen, and product geometry. In this talk, we will discuss how these materials degrade and how the degradation depends on these factors under application conditions. Both experimental studies and mathematical modeling will be presented.

  7. Degradation of implant materials

    CERN Document Server

    Eliaz, Noam

    2012-01-01

    This book surveys the degradation of implant materials, reviewing in detail such failure mechanisms as corrosion, fatigue and wear, along with monitoring techniques. Surveys common implant biomaterials, as well as procedures for implant retrieval and analysis.

  8. Environmental degradation in biocomposites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    John, Maya J

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available molecular chain scission, surface oxidation, and breakdown of molecules to form active radicals. The main degradation processes occurring by weathering includes photoradiation, thermal degradation, photooxidation, and hydrolysis [22,23]. The effect... which exhibits transitions from glassy stage to a rubbery stage at its glass transition temperature. ● Weathering Composites commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications are subjected to varying conditions of sunlight, rain, moisture...

  9. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  10. Polyanhydride degradation and erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpferich, A; Tessmar, J

    2002-10-16

    It was the intention of this paper to give a survey on the degradation and erosion of polyanhydrides. Due to the multitude of polymers that have been synthesized in this class of material in recent years, it was not possible to discuss all polyanhydrides that have gained in significance based on their application. It was rather the intention to provide a broad picture on polyanhydride degradation and erosion based on the knowledge that we have from those polymers that have been intensively investigated. To reach this goal this review contains several sections. First, the foundation for an understanding of the nomenclature are laid by defining degradation and erosion which was deemed necessary because many different definitions exist in the current literature. Next, the properties of major classes of anhydrides are reviewed and the impact of geometry on degradation and erosion is discussed. A complicated issue is the control of drug release from degradable polymers. Therefore, the aspect of erosion-controlled release and drug stability inside polyanhydrides are discussed. Towards the end of the paper models are briefly reviewed that describe the erosion of polyanhydrides. Empirical models as well as Monte-Carlo-based approaches are described. Finally it is outlined how theoretical models can help to answer the question why polyanhydrides are surface eroding. A look at the microstructure and the results from these models lead to the conclusion that polyanhydrides are surface eroding due to their fast degradation. However they switch to bulk erosion once the device dimensions drop below a critical limit.

  11. MELTSPREAD-1 calculations of the transient spreading of core materials in the KNGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yong Mann; Park, Soo Yong

    1999-03-01

    Major purpose of the report is to predict whether or not the melt will spread to cover the full floor area under severe accident conditions in KNGR (Korea Next Generation Reactor) cavity and to determine the local distribution of spread material depth as well as concrete attack upon the cavity floor. For this analysis, MELTSPREAD-1 computer code developed at ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) is first applied domestically. This code was originally developed to model the discharge of corium from the vessel and its spreading on the floor of a prototypical BWR Mark 1 containment, but is known to have the flexibility of LWR application via user-specified nodalization scheme. The analysis methodology in this report is assessed to be valid by independent ABB-CE review [ABB-CE 1988]. For the conservative analysis of melt spreading and erosion characteristics, a medium LOCA (loss of coolant accident) as the typical in-vessel low pressure accident, with 100% core mass release into the wet cavity is chosen as the basic sequence. For specified conditions of release from the failed reactor vessel lower head, the core materials are calculated to spread within a very short time and cover the full accessible cavity floor area. The spreading profiles are shown as a scene view according to time with detailed predictions of the extent of local melting-induced erosion of the concrete floor. The MELTSPREAD-1 results are important to the assessment of melt coolability following the transients spreading phase, and the results of the basic LOCA sequence can serve as the bounding calculation in the melt spreading and ablation for the KNGR cavity. In addition to this, sensitivity studies are made for important factors and crust formation and heat transfer models together with initial cavity condition and initial corium mass/temperature are appeared to be significant for the results. For the last, both MELTSPREAD-1 code input deck and calculation note used for the sequence analysis are

  12. DDE remediation and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John E; Ou, Li-Tse; All-Agely, Abid

    2008-01-01

    DDT and its metabolites, DDD and DDE, have been shown to be recalcitrant to degradation. The parent compound, DDT, was used extensively worldwide starting in 1939 and was banned in the United States in 1973. The daughter compound, DDE, may result from aerobic degradation, abiotic dehydrochlorination, or photochemical decomposition. DDE has also occurred as a contaminant in commercial-grade DDT. The p,p'-DDE isomer is more biologically active than the o,p-DDE, with a reported half-life of -5.7 years. However, when DDT was repeatedly applied to the soil, the DDE concentration may remain unchanged for more than 20 yr. Remediation of DDE-contaminated soil and water may be done by several techniques. Phytoremediation involves translocating DDT, DDD, and DDE from the soil into the plant, although some aquatic species (duckweed > elodea > parrot feather) can transform DDT into predominantly DDD with some DDE being formed. Of all the plants that can uptake DDE, Cucurbita pepo has been the most extensively studied, with translocation values approaching "hyperaccumulation" levels. Soil moisture, temperature, and plant density have all been documented as important factors in the uptake of DDE by Cucurbita pepo. Uptake may also be influenced positively by amendments such as biosurfactants, mycorrhizal inoculants, and low molecular weight organic acids (e.g., citric and oxalic acids). DDE microbial degradation by dehalogenases, dioxygenases, and hydrolases occurs under the proper conditions. Although several aerobic degradation pathways have been proposed, none has been fully verified. Very few aerobic pure cultures are capable of fully degrading DDE to CO2. Cometabolism of DDE by Pseudomonas sp., Alicaligens sp., and Terrabacter sp. grown on biphenyl has been reported; however, not all bacterial species that produce biphenyl dioxygenase degraded DDE. Arsenic and copper inhibit DDE degradation by aerobic microorganisms. Similarly, metal chelates such as EDTA inhibit the

  13. Debating land degradation: strategy development for Bolivian mountain valleys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessler, A.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2010-01-01

    A debate on response strategies to rural poverty and land degradation has relevance for the core business of this journal. Based on extensive fieldwork in the mountain valleys of Chuquisaca, Bolivia, this paper discusses farming and migration in the region, and elaborates on the required components

  14. Debating land degradation: strategy development for Bolivian mountain valleys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessler, A.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2010-01-01

    A debate on response strategies to rural poverty and land degradation has relevance for the core business of this journal. Based on extensive fieldwork in the mountain valleys of Chuquisaca, Bolivia, this paper discusses farming and migration in the region, and elaborates on the required components

  15. The core paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  16. K-core inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander L. Wolman

    2011-01-01

    K-core inflation is a new class of underlying inflation measures. The two most popular measures of underlying inflation are core inflation and trimmed mean inflation. The former removes fixed categories of goods and services (food and energy) from the inflation calculation, and the latter removes fixed percentiles of the weighted distribution of price changes. In contrast, k-core inflation specifies a size of relative price change to be removed from the inflation calculation. Thus, the catego...

  17. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal

  18. Microbial degradation of herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baljinder; Singh, Kashmir

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides remain the most effective, efficient and economical way to control weeds; and its market continues to grow even with the plethora of generic products. With the development of herbicide-tolerant crops, use of herbicides is increasing around the world that has resulted in severe contamination of the environment. The strategies are now being developed to clean these substances in an economical and eco-friendly manner. In this review, an attempt has been made to pool all the available literature on the biodegradation of key herbicides, clodinafop propargyl, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, atrazine, metolachlor, diuron, glyphosate, imazapyr, pendimethalin and paraquat under the following objectives: (1) to highlight the general characteristic and mode of action, (2) to enlist toxicity in animals, (3) to pool microorganisms capable of degrading herbicides, (4) to discuss the assessment of herbicides degradation by efficient microbes, (5) to highlight biodegradation pathways, (6) to discuss the molecular basis of degradation, (7) to enlist the products of herbicides under degradation process, (8) to highlight the factors effecting biodegradation of herbicides and (9) to discuss the future aspects of herbicides degradation. This review may be useful in developing safer and economic microbiological methods for cleanup of soil and water contaminated with such compounds.

  19. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments. DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  20. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments.DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  1. Motor degradation prediction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor`s duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures.

  2. Antifoam degradation testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL); Zamecnik, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL); Newell, D. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL)

    2015-08-20

    This report describes the results of testing to quantify the degradation products resulting from the dilution and storage of Antifoam 747. Antifoam degradation is of concern to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) due to flammable decomposition products in the vapor phase of the Chemical Process Cell vessels, as well as the collection of flammable and organic species in the offgas condensate. The discovery that hexamethyldisiloxane is formed from the antifoam decomposition was the basis for a Potential Inadequacy in the Safety Analysis declaration by the DWPF.

  3. Photovoltaic Degradation Risk: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01

    The ability to accurately predict power delivery over the course of time is of vital importance to the growth of the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Important cost drivers include the efficiency with which sunlight is converted into power, how this relationship changes over time, and the uncertainty in this prediction. An accurate quantification of power decline over time, also known as degradation rate, is essential to all stakeholders - utility companies, integrators, investors, and researchers alike. In this paper we use a statistical approach based on historical data to quantify degradation rates, discern trends and quantify risks related to measurement uncertainties, number of measurements and methodologies.

  4. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  5. Making an Ice Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  6. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  7. Iowa Core Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  8. Mercury's core evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  9. Perspectives for DNA studies on polar ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders J.; Willerslev, E.

    2002-01-01

    Recently amplifiable ancient DNA was obtained from a Greenland ice core. The DNA revealed a diversity of fungi, plants, algae and protists and has thereby expanded the range of detectable organic material in fossil glacier ice. The results suggest that ancient DNA can be obtained from other ice...... cores as well. Here, we present some future perspectives for DNA studies on polar ice cores in regard to molecular ecology, DNA damage and degradation, anabiosis and antibiotic resistance genes. Finally, we address some of the methodological problems connected to ancient DNA research....

  10. Polyester-Based, Biodegradable Core-Multishell Nanocarriers for the Transport of Hydrophobic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina A. Walker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A water-soluble, core-multishell (CMS nanocarrier based on a new hyperbranched polyester core building block was synthesized and characterized towards drug transport and degradation of the nanocarrier. The hydrophobic drug dexamethasone was encapsulated and the enzyme-mediated biodegradability was investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The new CMS nanocarrier can transport one molecule of dexamethasone and degrades within five days at a skin temperature of 32 °C to biocompatible fragments.

  11. Mars' core and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D J

    2001-07-12

    The detection of strongly magnetized ancient crust on Mars is one of the most surprising outcomes of recent Mars exploration, and provides important insight about the history and nature of the martian core. The iron-rich core probably formed during the hot accretion of Mars approximately 4.5 billion years ago and subsequently cooled at a rate dictated by the overlying mantle. A core dynamo operated much like Earth's current dynamo, but was probably limited in duration to several hundred million years. The early demise of the dynamo could have arisen through a change in the cooling rate of the mantle, or even a switch in convective style that led to mantle heating. Presently, Mars probably has a liquid, conductive outer core and might have a solid inner core like Earth.

  12. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    could potentially improve bioremediation of BAM. An important prerequisite for bioaugmentation is the potential to produce the degrader strain at large quantities within reasonable time. The aim of manuscript II, was to optimize the growth medium for Aminobacter MSH1 and to elucidate optimal growth...

  13. The t-core of an s-core

    OpenAIRE

    Fayers, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We consider the $t$-core of an $s$-core partition, when $s$ and $t$ are coprime positive integers. Olsson has shown that the $t$-core of an $s$-core is again an $s$-core, and we examine certain actions of the affine symmetric group on $s$-cores which preserve the $t$-core of an $s$-core. Along the way, we give a new proof of Olsson's result. We also give a new proof of a result of Vandehey, showing that there is a simultaneous $s$- and $t$-core which contains all others.

  14. The t-core of an s-core

    OpenAIRE

    Fayers, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We consider the $t$-core of an $s$-core partition, when $s$ and $t$ are coprime positive integers. Olsson has shown that the $t$-core of an $s$-core is again an $s$-core, and we examine certain actions of the affine symmetric group on $s$-cores which preserve the $t$-core of an $s$-core. Along the way, we give a new proof of Olsson's result. We also give a new proof of a result of Vandehey, showing that there is a simultaneous $s$- and $t$-core which contains all others.

  15. Korrelasjon mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core

    OpenAIRE

    Berg-Olsen, Andrea Marie; Fugelsøy, Eivor; Maurstad, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med studien var å se hvilke korrelasjon det er mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Testingen bestod av tre hoveddeler hvor vi testet core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Innenfor core styrke og utholdende styrke i core ble tre ulike tester utført. Ved måling av core stabilitet ble det gjennomført kun en test. I core styrke ble isometrisk abdominal fleksjon, isometrisk rygg ekstensjon og isometrisk lateral fleksjon testet. Sit-ups p...

  16. Korrelasjon mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core

    OpenAIRE

    Berg-Olsen, Andrea Marie; Fugelsøy, Eivor; Maurstad, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med studien var å se hvilke korrelasjon det er mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Testingen bestod av tre hoveddeler hvor vi testet core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Innenfor core styrke og utholdende styrke i core ble tre ulike tester utført. Ved måling av core stabilitet ble det gjennomført kun en test. I core styrke ble isometrisk abdominal fleksjon, isometrisk rygg ekstensjon og isometrisk lateral fleksjon testet. Sit-ups p...

  17. Earth's inner core: Innermost inner core or hemispherical variations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Deuss, A.; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of Earth's deep inner core has important implications for core evolution, since it is thought to be related to the early stages of core formation. Previous studies have suggested that there exists an innermost inner core with distinct anisotropy relative to the rest of the inner core.

  18. Earth's inner core: Innermost inner core or hemispherical variations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Deuss, A.; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of Earth's deep inner core has important implications for core evolution, since it is thought to be related to the early stages of core formation. Previous studies have suggested that there exists an innermost inner core with distinct anisotropy relative to the rest of the inner core.

  19. Detection of pump degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W. [and others

    1995-08-01

    This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented.

  20. Nanocomposite plasmonic fluorescence emitters with core/shell configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Xiaoyu; Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting Shan

    2010-07-16

    This paper is focused on the optical properties of nanocomposite plasmonic emitters with core/shell configurations, where a fluorescence emitter is located inside a metal nanoshell. Systematic theoretical investigations are presented for the influence of material type, core radius, shell thickness, and excitation wavelength on the internal optical intensity, radiative quantum yield, and fluorescence enhancement of the nanocomposite emitter. It is our conclusion that: (i) an optimal ratio between the core radius and shell thickness is required to maximize the absorption rate of fluorescence emitters, and (ii) a large core radius is desired to minimize the non-radiative damping and avoid significant quantum yield degradation of light emitters. Several experimental approaches to synthesize these nanocomposite emitters are also discussed. Furthermore, our theoretical results are successfully used to explain several reported experimental observations and should prove useful for designing ultra-bright core/shell nanocomposite emitters.

  1. Nanocomposite plasmonic fluorescence emitters with core/shell configurations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting Shan; Miao, Xiaoyu

    2010-06-01

    This paper is focused on the optical properties of nanocomposite plasmonic emitters with core/shell configurations, where a fluorescence emitter is located inside a metal nanoshell. Systematic theoretical investigations are presented for the influence of material type, core radius, shell thickness, and excitation wavelength on the internal optical intensity, radiative quantum yield, and fluorescence enhancement of the nanocomposite emitter. It is our conclusion that: (i) an optimal ratio between the core radius and shell thickness is required to maximize the absorption rate of fluorescence emitters, and (ii) a large core radius is desired to minimize the non-radiative damping and avoid significant quantum yield degradation of light emitters. Several experimental approaches to synthesize these nanocomposite emitters are also discussed. Furthermore, our theoretical results are successfully used to explain several reported experimental observations and should prove useful for designing ultra-bright core/shell nanocomposite emitters.

  2. On the Degradation Mechanism of Low-Voltage Underground Cable with Poly(Vinyl Chloride) Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawancy, H. M.; Hassan, M.

    2016-06-01

    A study has been undertaken to determine the degradation mechanism leading to localized short-circuit failures of an underground low-voltage cable with PVC insulation. It is shown that that the insulation of outer sheath and conductor cores has been cracked by thermal degradation involving dehydrochlorination, oxidation, and loss of plasticizers leading to current leakage between the cores. Most evidence points out that overheating due to poor connection of copper wires as well as a chemically active soil has caused the observed degradation.

  3. Tailored Core Shell Cathode Powders for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, Scott [NexTech Materials, Ltd.,Lewis Center, OH (United States)

    2015-03-23

    In this Phase I SBIR project, a “core-shell” composite cathode approach was evaluated for improving SOFC performance and reducing degradation of lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode materials, following previous successful demonstrations of infiltration approaches for achieving the same goals. The intent was to establish core-shell cathode powders that enabled high performance to be obtained with “drop-in” process capability for SOFC manufacturing (i.e., rather than adding an infiltration step to the SOFC manufacturing process). Milling, precipitation and hetero-coagulation methods were evaluated for making core-shell composite cathode powders comprised of coarse LSCF “core” particles and nanoscale “shell” particles of lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) or praseodymium strontium manganite (PSM). Precipitation and hetero-coagulation methods were successful for obtaining the targeted core-shell morphology, although perfect coverage of the LSCF core particles by the LSM and PSM particles was not obtained. Electrochemical characterization of core-shell cathode powders and conventional (baseline) cathode powders was performed via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) half-cell measurements and single-cell SOFC testing. Reliable EIS testing methods were established, which enabled comparative area-specific resistance measurements to be obtained. A single-cell SOFC testing approach also was established that enabled cathode resistance to be separated from overall cell resistance, and for cathode degradation to be separated from overall cell degradation. The results of these EIS and SOFC tests conclusively determined that the core-shell cathode powders resulted in significant lowering of performance, compared to the baseline cathodes. Based on the results of this project, it was concluded that the core-shell cathode approach did not warrant further investigation.

  4. IGCSE core mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wall, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Give your core level students the support and framework they require to get their best grades with this book dedicated to the core level content of the revised syllabus and written specifically to ensure a more appropriate pace. This title has been written for Core content of the revised Cambridge IGCSE Mathematics (0580) syllabus for first teaching from 2013. ? Gives students the practice they require to deepen their understanding through plenty of practice questions. ? Consolidates learning with unique digital resources on the CD, included free with every book. We are working with Cambridge

  5. Core shroud corner joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  6. Biospecimen Core Resource - TCGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Biospecimen Core Resource centralized laboratory reviews and processes blood and tissue samples and their associated data using optimized standard operating procedures for the entire TCGA Research Network.

  7. NICHD Zebrafish Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The core[HTML_REMOVED]s goal is to help researchers of any expertise perform zebrafish experiments aimed at illuminating basic biology and human disease mechanisms,...

  8. iPSC Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) Core was created in 2011 to accelerate stem cell research in the NHLBI by providing investigators consultation, technical...

  9. Reference: -300CORE [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -300CORE Forde BG, Heyworth A, Pywell J, Kreis M Nucleotide sequence of a B1 hordein gene and the identifica...tion of possible upstream regulatory elements in endosperm storage protein genes fr

  10. INTEGRAL core programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    1997-01-01

    The International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission is described with emphasis on the INTEGRAL core program. The progress made in the planning activities for the core program is reported on. The INTEGRAL mission has a nominal lifetime of two years with a five year extension option. The observing time will be divided between the core program (between 30 and 35 percent during the first two years) and general observations. The core program consists of three main elements: the deep survey of the Galactic plane in the central radian of the Galaxy; frequent scans of the Galactic plane in the search for transient sources, and pointed observations of several selected sources. The allocation of the observation time is detailed and the sensitivities of the observations are outlined.

  11. Focusing on Core Business

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    China is regulating state-owned enterprises that are investing outside of their core business realms, concerned that poor investment decisions could lead to loss of state-owned assets, but some doubt the effect of the new regulation

  12. Organizing Core Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    Civil servants conduct the work which makes welfare states functions on an everyday bases: Police men police, school teachers teach, and tax inspectors inspect. Focus in this paper is on the core tasks of tax inspectors. The paper argues that their core task of securing the collection of revenue...... has remained much the same within the last 10 years. However, how the core task has been organized has changed considerable under the influence of various “organizing devices”. The paper focusses on how organizing devices such as risk assessment, output-focus, effect orientation, and treatment...... projects influence the organization of core tasks within the tax administration. The paper shows that the organizational transformations based on the use of these devices have had consequences both for the overall collection of revenue and for the employees’ feeling of “making a difference”. All in all...

  13. Endocytic collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Ingvarsen, Signe;

    2012-01-01

    it crucially important to understand both the collagen synthesis and turnover mechanisms in this condition. Here we show that the endocytic collagen receptor, uPARAP/Endo180, is a major determinant in governing the balance between collagen deposition and degradation. Cirrhotic human livers displayed a marked......Fibrosis of the liver and its end-stage, cirrhosis, represent major health problems worldwide. In these fibrotic conditions, activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells display a net deposition of collagen. This collagen deposition is a major factor leading to liver dysfunction, thus making...... up-regulation of uPARAP/Endo180 in activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells located close to the collagen deposits. In a hepatic stellate cell line, uPARAP/Endo180 was shown to be active in, and required for, the uptake and intracellular degradation of collagen. To evaluate the functional...

  14. Nylon separators. [thermal degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.

    1977-01-01

    A nylon separator was placed in a flooded condition in K0H solution and heated at various high temperatures ranging from 60 C to 110 C. The weight decrease was measured and the molecular weight and decomposition product were analyzed to determine: (1) the effect of K0H concentration on the hydrolysis rate; (2) the effect of K0H concentration on nylon degradation; (3) the activation energy at different K0H concentrations; and (4) the effect of oxygen on nylon degradation. The nylon hydrolysis rate is shown to increase as K0H concentration is decreased 34%, giving a maximum rate at about 16%. Separator hydrolysis is confirmed by molecular weight decrease in age of the batteries, and the reaction of nylon with molecular oxygen is probably negligible, compared to hydrolysis. The extrapolated rate value from the high temperature experiment correlates well with experimental values at 35 degrees.

  15. TALSPEAK Solvent Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh R. Martin; Bruce J. Mincher

    2009-09-01

    Understanding the radiolytic degradation behavior of organic molecules involved in new or existing schemes for the recycle of used nuclear fuels is of significant interest for sustaining a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Here we have conducted several lines of investigation to begin understanding the effects of radiolysis on the aqueous phase of the TALSPEAK process for the separation of the trivalent lanthanides from the trivalent actinides. Using the 60-Co irradiator at the INL, we have begun to quantify the effects of radiation on the aqueous phase complexants used in this separation technique, and how this will affect the actinide lanthanide separation factor. In addition we have started to develop methodologies for stable product identification, a key element in determining the degradation pathways. We have also introduced a methodology to investigate the effects of alpha radiolysis that has previously received limited attention.

  16. Development tendencies of moulding and core sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw M. Dobosz1

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Further development of the technology for making moulding and core sands will be strictly limited by tough requirements due to protection of the natural environment. These tendencies are becoming more and more tense, so that we will reach a point when even processes, that from technological point of view fulfill high requirements of the foundry industry, must be replaced by more ecologically-friendly solutions. Hence, technologies using synthetic resins as binding materials will be limited. This paper presents some predictable development tendencies of moulding and core sands. The increasing role of inorganic substances will be noticed, including silicate binders with significantly improved properties, such as improved knock-out property or higher reclamation strength. Other interesting solutions might also be moulding sands bonded by geo-polymers and phosphate binders or salts and also binders based on degradable biopolymers. These tendencies and the usefulness of these binders are put forward in this paper.

  17. Detection of pump degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casada, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous special vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Pump head and flow rate are also monitored, per code requirements. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition; advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed.

  18. Biogeochemical Cycles in Degraded Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Eric A.; Vieira, Ima Celia G.; ReisdeCarvalho, Claudio Jose; DeanedeAbreuSa, Tatiana; deSouzaMoutinho, Paulo R.; Figueiredo, Ricardo O.; Stone, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to define and describe the types of landscapes that fall under the broad category of "degraded lands" and to study biogeochemical cycles across this range of degradation found in secondary forests. We define degraded land as that which has lost part of its capacity of renovation of a productive ecosystem, either in the context of agroecosystems or as native communities of vegetation. This definition of degradation permits evaluation of biogeochemical constraints to future land uses.

  19. Pexophagy: The Selective Degradation of Peroxisomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Till

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes are single-membrane-bounded organelles present in the majority of eukaryotic cells. Despite the existence of great diversity among different species, cell types, and under different environmental conditions, peroxisomes contain enzymes involved in β-oxidation of fatty acids and the generation, as well as detoxification, of hydrogen peroxide. The exigency of all eukaryotic cells to quickly adapt to different environmental factors requires the ability to precisely and efficiently control peroxisome number and functionality. Peroxisome homeostasis is achieved by the counterbalance between organelle biogenesis and degradation. The selective degradation of superfluous or damaged peroxisomes is facilitated by several tightly regulated pathways. The most prominent peroxisome degradation system uses components of the general autophagy core machinery and is therefore referred to as “pexophagy.” In this paper we focus on recent developments in pexophagy and provide an overview of current knowledge and future challenges in the field. We compare different modes of pexophagy and mention shared and distinct features of pexophagy in yeast model systems, mammalian cells, and other organisms.

  20. Proteasomal degradation of TRIM5alpha during retrovirus restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher James Rold

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The host protein TRIM5alpha inhibits retroviral infection at an early post-penetration stage by targeting the incoming viral capsid. While the detailed mechanism of restriction remains unclear, recent studies have implicated the activity of cellular proteasomes in the restriction of retroviral reverse transcription imposed by TRIM5alpha. Here, we show that TRIM5alpha is rapidly degraded upon encounter of a restriction-susceptible retroviral core. Inoculation of TRIM5alpha-expressing human 293T cells with a saturating level of HIV-1 particles resulted in accelerated degradation of the HIV-1-restrictive rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha protein but not the nonrestrictive human TRIM5alpha protein. Exposure of cells to HIV-1 also destabilized the owl monkey restriction factor TRIMCyp; this was prevented by addition of the inhibitor cyclosporin A and was not observed with an HIV-1 virus containing a mutation in the capsid protein that relieves restriction by TRIMCyp IVHIV. Likewise, human TRIM5alpha was rapidly degraded upon encounter of the restriction-sensitive N-tropic murine leukemia virus (N-MLV but not the unrestricted B-MLV. Pretreatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors prevented the HIV-1-induced loss of both rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha and TRIMCyp proteins. We also detected degradation of endogenous TRIM5alpha in rhesus macaque cells following HIV-1 infection. We conclude that engagement of a restriction-sensitive retrovirus core results in TRIM5alpha degradation by a proteasome-dependent mechanism.

  1. Proteasomal degradation of TRIM5alpha during retrovirus restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher James Rold

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The host protein TRIM5alpha inhibits retroviral infection at an early post-penetration stage by targeting the incoming viral capsid. While the detailed mechanism of restriction remains unclear, recent studies have implicated the activity of cellular proteasomes in the restriction of retroviral reverse transcription imposed by TRIM5alpha. Here, we show that TRIM5alpha is rapidly degraded upon encounter of a restriction-susceptible retroviral core. Inoculation of TRIM5alpha-expressing human 293T cells with a saturating level of HIV-1 particles resulted in accelerated degradation of the HIV-1-restrictive rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha protein but not the nonrestrictive human TRIM5alpha protein. Exposure of cells to HIV-1 also destabilized the owl monkey restriction factor TRIMCyp; this was prevented by addition of the inhibitor cyclosporin A and was not observed with an HIV-1 virus containing a mutation in the capsid protein that relieves restriction by TRIMCyp IVHIV. Likewise, human TRIM5alpha was rapidly degraded upon encounter of the restriction-sensitive N-tropic murine leukemia virus (N-MLV but not the unrestricted B-MLV. Pretreatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors prevented the HIV-1-induced loss of both rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha and TRIMCyp proteins. We also detected degradation of endogenous TRIM5alpha in rhesus macaque cells following HIV-1 infection. We conclude that engagement of a restriction-sensitive retrovirus core results in TRIM5alpha degradation by a proteasome-dependent mechanism.

  2. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: tangdq@sdu.edu.cn [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250033 (China); Ji, Chunyan, E-mail: jichunyan@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  3. Ordered bulk degradation via autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Jörn; Kristensen, Anders Riis; Andersen, Jens S

    2008-01-01

    at proteasomal and lysosomal degradation ample cross-talk between the two degradation pathways became evident. Degradation via autophagy appeared to be ordered and regulated at the protein complex/organelle level. This raises several important questions such as: can macroautophagy itself be specific and what...

  4. Materials Degradation and Detection (MD2): Deep Dive Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Henager, Charles H.; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2013-02-01

    An effort is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a fundamental and general framework to foster the science and technology needed to support real-time monitoring of early degradation in materials used in the production of nuclear power. The development of such a capability would represent a timely solution to the mounting issues operators face with materials degradation in nuclear power plants. The envisioned framework consists of three primary and interconnected “thrust” areas including 1) microstructural science, 2) behavior assessment, and 3) monitoring and predictive capabilities. A brief state-of-the-art assessment for each of these core technology areas is discussed in the paper.

  5. Packing in protein cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, J. C.; Clark, A. H.; Regan, L.; O'Hern, C. S.

    2017-07-01

    Proteins are biological polymers that underlie all cellular functions. The first high-resolution protein structures were determined by x-ray crystallography in the 1960s. Since then, there has been continued interest in understanding and predicting protein structure and stability. It is well-established that a large contribution to protein stability originates from the sequestration from solvent of hydrophobic residues in the protein core. How are such hydrophobic residues arranged in the core; how can one best model the packing of these residues, and are residues loosely packed with multiple allowed side chain conformations or densely packed with a single allowed side chain conformation? Here we show that to properly model the packing of residues in protein cores it is essential that amino acids are represented by appropriately calibrated atom sizes, and that hydrogen atoms are explicitly included. We show that protein cores possess a packing fraction of φ ≈ 0.56 , which is significantly less than the typically quoted value of 0.74 obtained using the extended atom representation. We also compare the results for the packing of amino acids in protein cores to results obtained for jammed packings from discrete element simulations of spheres, elongated particles, and composite particles with bumpy surfaces. We show that amino acids in protein cores pack as densely as disordered jammed packings of particles with similar values for the aspect ratio and bumpiness as found for amino acids. Knowing the structural properties of protein cores is of both fundamental and practical importance. Practically, it enables the assessment of changes in the structure and stability of proteins arising from amino acid mutations (such as those identified as a result of the massive human genome sequencing efforts) and the design of new folded, stable proteins and protein-protein interactions with tunable specificity and affinity.

  6. Further HTGR core support structure reliability studies. Interim report No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platus, D.L.

    1976-01-13

    Results of a continuing effort to investigate high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) core support structure reliability are described. Graphite material and core support structure component physical, mechanical and strength properties required for the reliability analysis are identified. Also described are experimental and associated analytical techniques for determining the required properties, a procedure for determining number of tests required, properties that might be monitored by special surveillance of the core support structure to improve reliability predictions, and recommendations for further studies. Emphasis in the study is directed towards developing a basic understanding of graphite failure and strength degradation mechanisms; and validating analytical methods for predicting strength and strength degradation from basic material properties.

  7. Statistical modeling for degradation data

    CERN Document Server

    Lio, Yuhlong; Ng, Hon; Tsai, Tzong-Ru

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the statistical aspects of the analysis of degradation data. In recent years, degradation data analysis has come to play an increasingly important role in different disciplines such as reliability, public health sciences, and finance. For example, information on products’ reliability can be obtained by analyzing degradation data. In addition, statistical modeling and inference techniques have been developed on the basis of different degradation measures. The book brings together experts engaged in statistical modeling and inference, presenting and discussing important recent advances in degradation data analysis and related applications. The topics covered are timely and have considerable potential to impact both statistics and reliability engineering.

  8. Bacterial degradation of detergent compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnow, R A; Harrison, A P

    1972-10-01

    A survey for surfactant degradation among aerobic bacteria has been undertaken. Tests have been made in peptone medium where such a degradation, if it occurs, will be gratuitous. Tallow-alkyl-sulfate, alkyl-ethoxylate-sulfate, and linear-alkyl-benzene-sulfonate were used. Forty-five strains of 34 species in 19 genera degrade one or more of these detergent compounds. With some species, the surfactant inhibits degradation without inhibiting growth, whereas with one species slight degradation took place even at a toxic concentration of surfactant.

  9. Organic matter degradation in Chilean sediments - following nature's own degradation experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langerhuus, Alice Thoft; Niggemann, Jutta; Lomstein, Bente Aagaard

    .000 year old sediments. Since the microbial activity in the deep sediments is very low, it is still not possible to measure it directly. Following nature’s own experiment back in time will provide us with new insights about the microbial activity in the deeply buried sediments. Poster presentation Session...... in length, respectively. The objective of this study was to assess the degradability of the organic matter from the sediment surface to the deep sediments. This was done by analysing amino acids (both L- and D-isomers) and amino sugars in the sediment cores, covering a timescale of 15.000 years. Diagenetic...

  10. Inner core structure behind the PKP core phase triplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Nienke A.; Deuss, Arwen; Paulssen, Hanneke; Waszek, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the Earth's inner core is not well known between depths of ∼100–200 km beneath the inner core boundary. This is a result of the PKP core phase triplication and the existence of strong precursors to PKP phases, which hinder the measurement of inner core compressional PKIKP waves at e

  11. Inner core structure behind the PKP core phase triplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Nienke A.; Deuss, Arwen; Paulssen, Hanneke; Waszek, Lauren

    The structure of the Earth's inner core is not well known between depths of ∼100–200 km beneath the inner core boundary. This is a result of the PKP core phase triplication and the existence of strong precursors to PKP phases, which hinder the measurement of inner core compressional PKIKP waves at

  12. Pressure Core Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  13. Degradation of copepod fecal pellets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Louise K.; Iversen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Copepod fecal pellets are often degraded at high rates within the upper part of the water column. However, the identity of the degraders and the processes governing the degradation remain unresolved. To identify the pellet degraders we collected water from Oresund (Denmark) approximately every...... second month from July 2004 to July 2005. These water samples were divided into 5 fractions (pellet degradation rate and species composition of the plankton from triplicate incubations of each fraction and a known, added...... amount of fecal pellets. The total degradation rate of pellets by the natural plankton community of Oresund followed the phytoplankton biomass, with maximum degradation rate during the spring bloom (2.5 +/- 0.49 d(-1)) and minimum (0.52 +/- 0.14 d(-1)) during late winter. Total pellet removal rate ranged...

  14. Photothermal degradation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Key reaction intermediates of photooxidation identified and characterized by laser flash Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy were discussed. Effects of temperature and ultraviolet intensity were studied in order to develop meaningful accelerated testing procedures for encapsulant evaluation. In a program to study the failure of Tedlar/ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA)/stainless steel modules, failure modes similar to those observed outdoors in real-time conditions were simulated in accelerated testing. An experimental technique was developed to quantitatively assess the extent of degradation.

  15. Self-Healing Many-Core Architecture: Analysis and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More pronounced aging effects, more frequent early-life failures, and incomplete testing and verification processes due to time-to-market pressure in new fabrication technologies impose reliability challenges on forthcoming systems. A promising solution to these reliability challenges is self-test and self-reconfiguration with no or limited external control. In this work a scalable self-test mechanism for periodic online testing of many-core processor has been proposed. This test mechanism facilitates autonomous detection and omission of faulty cores and makes graceful degradation of the many-core architecture possible. Several test components are incorporated in the many-core architecture that distribute test stimuli, suspend normal operation of individual processing cores, apply test, and detect faulty cores. Test is performed concurrently with the system normal operation without any noticeable downtime at the application level. Experimental results show that the proposed test architecture is extensively scalable in terms of hardware overhead and performance overhead that makes it applicable to many-cores with more than a thousand processing cores.

  16. Analysis of the core genome and pangenome of Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lázaro; Segura, Ana; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L

    2016-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida are strict aerobes that proliferate in a range of temperate niches and are of interest for environmental applications due to their capacity to degrade pollutants and ability to promote plant growth. Furthermore solvent-tolerant strains are useful for biosynthesis of added-value chemicals. We present a comprehensive comparative analysis of nine strains and the first characterization of the Pseudomonas putida pangenome. The core genome of P. putida comprises approximately 3386 genes. The most abundant genes within the core genome are those that encode nutrient transporters. Other conserved genes include those for central carbon metabolism through the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, the pentose phosphate cycle, arginine and proline metabolism, and pathways for degradation of aromatic chemicals. Genes that encode transporters, enzymes and regulators for amino acid metabolism (synthesis and degradation) are all part of the core genome, as well as various electron transporters, which enable aerobic metabolism under different oxygen regimes. Within the core genome are 30 genes for flagella biosynthesis and 12 key genes for biofilm formation. Pseudomonas putida strains share 85% of the coding regions with Pseudomonas aeruginosa; however, in P. putida, virulence factors such as exotoxins and type III secretion systems are absent.

  17. GREEN CORE HOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NECULAI Oana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Green Core House is a construction concept with low environmental impact, having as main central element a greenhouse. The greenhouse has the innovative role to use the biomass energy provided by plants to save energy. Although it is the central piece, the greenhouse is not the most innovative part of the Green Core House, but the whole building ensemble because it integrates many other sustainable systems as "waste purification systems", "transparent photovoltaic panels" or "double skin façades".

  18. Rat myocardial protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, J H; Hopkins, B E

    1981-07-01

    1. Myocardial protein degradation rates were determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated left hemi-atria in vitro. 2. After two 20 min preincubations the rate of tyrosine release from hemi-atria was constant for 4 h. 3. Skeletal muscle protein degradation was determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated hemi-diaphragm (Fulks, Li & Goldberg, 1975). 4. Insulin (10(-7) M) inhibited tyrosine release from hemi-atria and hemi-diaphragm to a similar extent. A 48 h fast increased tyrosine release rate from hemi-diaphragm and decreased tyrosine release rate from hemi-atria. Hemi-diaphragm tyrosine release was inhibited by 15 mmol/l D-glucose but a variety of concentrations of D-glucose (0, 5, 15 mmol/l) had no effect on tyrosine release from hemi-atria. Five times the normal plasma levels of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine and valine had no effect on tyrosine release from either hemi-atria or hemi-diaphragm.

  19. Degradability of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1992-09-01

    The degradation of dental ceramics generally occurs because of mechanical forces or chemical attack. The possible physiological side-effects of ceramics are their tendency to abrade opposing dental structures, the emission of radiation from radioactive components, the roughening of their surfaces by chemical attack with a corresponding increase in plaque retention, and the release of potentially unsafe concentrations of elements as a result of abrasion and dissolution. The chemical durability of dental ceramics is excellent. With the exception of the excessive exposure to acidulated fluoride, ammonium bifluoride, or hydrofluoric acid, there is little risk of surface degradation of virtually all current dental ceramics. Extensive exposure to acidulated fluoride is a possible problem for individuals with head and/or neck cancer who have received large doses of radiation. Such fluoride treatment is necessary to minimize tooth demineralization when saliva flow rates have been reduced because of radiation exposure to salivary glands. Porcelain surface stains are also lost occasionally when abraded by prophylaxis pastes and/or acidulated fluoride. In each case, the solutes are usually not ingested. Further research that uses standardized testing procedures is needed on the chemical durability of dental ceramics. Accelerated durability tests are desirable to minimize the time required for such measurements. The influence of chemical durability on surface roughness and the subsequent effect of roughness on wear of the ceramic restorations as well as of opposing structures should also be explored on a standardized basis.

  20. Investigation of EAS cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaulov, S. B.; Beyl, P. F.; Beysembaev, R. U.; Beysembaeva, E. A.; Bezshapov, S. P.; Borisov, A. S.; Cherdyntceva, K. V.; Chernyavsky, M. M.; Chubenko, A. P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Denisova, V. G.; Erlykin, A. D.; Kabanova, N. V.; Kanevskaya, E. A.; Kotelnikov, K. A.; Morozov, A. E.; Mukhamedshin, R. A.; Nam, R. A.; Nesterova, N. M.; Nikolskaya, N. M.; Pavluchenko, V. P.; Piskal, V. V.; Puchkov, V. S.; Pyatovsky, S. E.; Ryabov, V. A.; Sadykov, T. Kh.; Schepetov, A. L.; Smirnova, M. D.; Stepanov, A. V.; Uryson, A. V.; Vavilov, Yu. N.; Vildanov, N. G.; Vildanova, L. I.; Zayarnaya, I. S.; Zhanceitova, J. K.; Zhukov, V. V.

    2017-06-01

    The development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascade models in air in the late forties have shown informational content of the study of cores of extensive air showers (EAS). These investigations were the main goal in different experiments which were carried out over many years by a variety of methods. Outcomes of such investigations obtained in the HADRON experiment using an X-ray emulsion chamber (XREC) as a core detector are considered. The Ne spectrum of EAS associated with γ-ray families, spectra of γ-rays (hadrons) in EAS cores and the Ne dependence of the muon number, ⟨Nμ⟩, in EAS with γ-ray families are obtained for the first time at energies of 1015-1017 eV with this method. A number of new effects were observed, namely, an abnormal scaling violation in hadron spectra which are fundamentally different from model predictions, an excess of muon number in EAS associated with γ-ray families, and the penetrating component in EAS cores. It is supposed that the abnormal behavior of γ-ray spectra and Ne dependence of the muon number are explained by the emergence of a penetrating component in the 1st PCR spectrum `knee' range. Nuclear and astrophysical explanations of the origin of the penetrating component are discussed. The necessity of considering the contribution of a single close cosmic-ray source to explain the PCR spectrum in the knee range is noted.

  1. Some Core Contested Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  2. Looking for Core Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Margie

    2010-01-01

    People who view themselves as leaders, not just managers or teachers, are innovators who focus on clarifying core values and aligning all aspects of the organization with these values to grow their vision. A vision for an organization can't be just one person's idea. Visions grow by involving people in activities that help them name and create…

  3. Nucleosome Core Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  4. Investigation of EAS cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaulov S.B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascade models in air in the late forties have shown informational content of the study of cores of extensive air showers (EAS. These investigations were the main goal in different experiments which were carried out over many years by a variety of methods. Outcomes of such investigations obtained in the HADRON experiment using an X-ray emulsion chamber (XREC as a core detector are considered. The Ne spectrum of EAS associated with γ-ray families, spectra of γ-rays (hadrons in EAS cores and the Ne dependence of the muon number, ⟨Nμ⟩, in EAS with γ-ray families are obtained for the first time at energies of 1015–1017 eV with this method. A number of new effects were observed, namely, an abnormal scaling violation in hadron spectra which are fundamentally different from model predictions, an excess of muon number in EAS associated with γ-ray families, and the penetrating component in EAS cores. It is supposed that the abnormal behavior of γ-ray spectra and Ne dependence of the muon number are explained by the emergence of a penetrating component in the 1st PCR spectrum ‘knee’ range. Nuclear and astrophysical explanations of the origin of the penetrating component are discussed. The necessity of considering the contribution of a single close cosmic-ray source to explain the PCR spectrum in the knee range is noted.

  5. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  6. The Earth's Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  7. Some Core Contested Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  8. Languages for Dublin Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Focusing on languages for the Dublin Core, examines the experience of some related ways to seek semantic interoperability through simplicity: planned languages, interlingua constructs, and pidgins. Also defines the conceptual and organizational problem of maintaining a metadata standard in multiple languages. (AEF)

  9. Core calculations of JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In material testing reactors like the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) of 50 MW in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of irradiated samples show complex distributions. It is necessary to assess the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of an irradiation field by carrying out the nuclear calculation of the core for every operation cycle. In order to advance core calculation, in the JMTR, the application of MCNP to the assessment of core reactivity and neutron flux and spectra has been investigated. In this study, in order to reduce the time for calculation and variance, the comparison of the results of the calculations by the use of K code and fixed source and the use of Weight Window were investigated. As to the calculation method, the modeling of the total JMTR core, the conditions for calculation and the adopted variance reduction technique are explained. The results of calculation are shown. Significant difference was not observed in the results of neutron flux calculations according to the difference of the modeling of fuel region in the calculations by K code and fixed source. The method of assessing the results of neutron flux calculation is described. (K.I.)

  10. The core and cosmopolitans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlander, Linus; Frederiksen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Users often interact and help each other solve problems in communities, but few scholars have explored how these relationships provide opportunities to innovate. We analyze the extent to which people positioned within the core of a community as well as people that are cosmopolitans positioned...

  11. Schumpeter's core works revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    2012-01-01

    This paper organises Schumpeter’s core books in three groups: the programmatic duology,the evolutionaryeconomic duology,and the socioeconomic synthesis. By analysing these groups and their interconnections from the viewpoint of modern evolutionaryeconomics,the paper summarises resolved problems...

  12. Adult educators' core competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or “core...

  13. Adult educators' core competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or “core...

  14. Resorbable composites with bioresorbable glass fibers for load-bearing applications. In vitro degradation and degradation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Timo J; Tuominen, Jukka U; Hiekkanen, Elina

    2013-01-01

    An in vitro degradation study of three bioresorbable glass fiber-reinforced poly(l-lactide-co-dl-lactide) (PLDLA) composites was carried out in simulated body fluid (SBF), to simulate body conditions, and deionized water, to evaluate the nature of the degradation products. The changes in mechanical and chemical properties were systematically characterized over 52 weeks dissolution time to determine the degradation mechanism and investigate strength retention by the bioresorbable glass fiber-reinforced PLDLA composite. The degradation mechanism was found to be a combination of surface and bulk erosion and does not follow the typical core-accelerated degradation mechanism of poly(α-hydroxyacids). Strength retention by bioresorbable glass fiber-reinforced PLDLA composites can be tailored by changing the oxide composition of the glass fibers, but the structure-property relationship of the glass fibers has to be understood and controlled so that the phenomenon of ion leaching can be utilized to control the degradation rate. Therefore, these high performance composites are likely to open up several new possibilities for utilizing resorbable materials in clinical applications which could not be realized in the past.

  15. Identification of chlorinated solvents degradation zones in clay till by high resolution chemical, microbial and compound specific isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ida; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Bælum, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in clay till was investigated at a contaminated site (Vadsby, Denmark) by high resolution sampling of intact cores combined with groundwater sampling. Over decades of contamination, bioactive zones with degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,...

  16. Thermal battery degradation mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missert, Nancy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brunke, Lyle Brent [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to investigate the effect of accelerated aging on LiSi based anodes in simulated MC3816 batteries. DRIFTS spectra showed that the oxygen, carbonate, hydroxide and sulfur content of the anodes changes with aging times and temperatures, but not in a monotonic fashion that could be correlated to phase evolution. Bands associated with sulfur species were only observed in anodes taken from batteries aged in wet environments, providing further evidence for a reaction pathway facilitated by H2S transport from the cathode, through the separator, to the anode. Loss of battery capacity with accelerated aging in wet environments was correlated to loss of FeS2 in the catholyte pellets, suggesting that the major contribution to battery performance degradation results from loss of active cathode material.

  17. DEGRADATION OF SHAPE MEMORY EFFECT

    OpenAIRE

    VanderMeer, R.

    1982-01-01

    An important parameter for deciding whether or not a SME alloy is suitable for practical applications is the magnitude of the strain reversa1 accompanying martensite reversion. This research is concerned with elucidating metallurgical factors that cause degradation of this heat-activated recovery strain, ER. After explaining what is meant by degradation, two manifestations of degradation recently identified in near-monotectoid uranium-niobium alloys will be described. The first was associated...

  18. Techniques for Enabling Highly Efficient Message Passing on Many-Core Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Min; Balaji, Pavan; Ishikawa, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Many-core architecture provides a massively parallel environment with dozens of cores and hundreds of hardware threads. Scientific application programmers are increasingly looking at ways to utilize such large numbers of lightweight cores for various programming models. Efficiently executing these models on massively parallel many-core environments is not easy, however and performance may be degraded in various ways. The first author's doctoral research focuses on exploiting the capabilities of many-core architectures on widely used MPI implementations. While application programmers have studied several approaches to achieve better parallelism and resource sharing, many of those approaches still face communication problems that degrade performance. In the thesis, we investigate the characteristics of MPI on such massively threaded architectures and propose two efficient strategies -- a multi-threaded MPI approach and a process-based asynchronous model -- to optimize MPI communication for modern scientific applications.

  19. A photothermally responsive nanoprobe for bioimaging based on Edman degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Zhantong; Zhang, Huimin; Lang, Lixin; Ma, Ying; He, Qianjun; Lu, Nan; Huang, Peng; Liu, Yijing; Song, Jibin; Liu, Zhibo; Gao, Shi; Ma, Qingjie; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-05-01

    A new type of photothermally responsive nanoprobe based on Edman degradation has been synthesized and characterized. Under irradiation by an 808 nm laser, the heat generated by the gold nanorod core breaks the thiocarbamide structure and releases the fluorescent dye Cy5.5 with increased near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence under mild acidic conditions. This RGD modified nanoprobe is capable of fluorescence imaging of ανβ3 over-expressing U87MG cells in vitro and in vivo. This Edman degradation-based nanoprobe provides a novel strategy to design activatable probes for biomedical imaging and drug/gene delivery.A new type of photothermally responsive nanoprobe based on Edman degradation has been synthesized and characterized. Under irradiation by an 808 nm laser, the heat generated by the gold nanorod core breaks the thiocarbamide structure and releases the fluorescent dye Cy5.5 with increased near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence under mild acidic conditions. This RGD modified nanoprobe is capable of fluorescence imaging of ανβ3 over-expressing U87MG cells in vitro and in vivo. This Edman degradation-based nanoprobe provides a novel strategy to design activatable probes for biomedical imaging and drug/gene delivery. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: HPLC, MS and 1H NMR spectrum. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01400c

  20. Transcellular degradation of axonal mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Chung-ha O; Kim, Keun-Young; Bushong, Eric A; Mills, Elizabeth A; Boassa, Daniela; Shih, Tiffany; Kinebuchi, Mira; Phan, Sebastien; Zhou, Yi; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A; Nguyen, Judy V; Jin, Yunju; Ellisman, Mark H; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas

    2014-07-01

    It is generally accepted that healthy cells degrade their own mitochondria. Here, we report that retinal ganglion cell axons of WT mice shed mitochondria at the optic nerve head (ONH), and that these mitochondria are internalized and degraded by adjacent astrocytes. EM demonstrates that mitochondria are shed through formation of large protrusions that originate from otherwise healthy axons. A virally introduced tandem fluorophore protein reporter of acidified mitochondria reveals that acidified axonal mitochondria originating from the retinal ganglion cell are associated with lysosomes within columns of astrocytes in the ONH. According to this reporter, a greater proportion of retinal ganglion cell mitochondria are degraded at the ONH than in the ganglion cell soma. Consistently, analyses of degrading DNA reveal extensive mtDNA degradation within the optic nerve astrocytes, some of which comes from retinal ganglion cell axons. Together, these results demonstrate that surprisingly large proportions of retinal ganglion cell axonal mitochondria are normally degraded by the astrocytes of the ONH. This transcellular degradation of mitochondria, or transmitophagy, likely occurs elsewhere in the CNS, because structurally similar accumulations of degrading mitochondria are also found along neurites in superficial layers of the cerebral cortex. Thus, the general assumption that neurons or other cells necessarily degrade their own mitochondria should be reconsidered.

  1. Aerobic degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, D.H. [Dept. of Environmental Microbiology, German Research Center for Biotechnology, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    The microbial degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been extensively studied in recent years. The genetic organization of biphenyl catabolic genes has been elucidated in various groups of microorganisms, their structures have been analyzed with respect to their evolutionary relationships, and new information on mobile elements has become available. Key enzymes, specifically biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenases, have been intensively characterized, structure/sequence relationships have been determined and enzymes optimized for PCB transformation. However, due to the complex metabolic network responsible for PCB degradation, optimizing degradation by single bacterial species is necessarily limited. As PCBs are usually not mineralized by biphenyl-degrading organisms, and cometabolism can result in the formation of toxic metabolites, the degradation of chlorobenzoates has received special attention. A broad set of bacterial strategies to degrade chlorobenzoates has recently been elucidated, including new pathways for the degradation of chlorocatechols as central intermediates of various chloroaromatic catabolic pathways. To optimize PCB degradation in the environment beyond these metabolic limitations, enhancing degradation in the rhizosphere has been suggested, in addition to the application of surfactants to overcome bioavailability barriers. However, further research is necessary to understand the complex interactions between soil/sediment, pollutant, surfactant and microorganisms in different environments. (orig.)

  2. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  3. Contribution of ethylamine degrading bacteria to atrazine degradation in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel; Crowley, David E

    2006-11-01

    Bacterial communities that cooperatively degrade atrazine commonly consist of diverse species in which the genes for atrazine dechlorination and dealkylation are variously distributed among different species. Normally, the first step in degradation of atrazine involves dechlorination mediated by atzA, followed by stepwise dealkylation to yield either N-ethylammelide or N-isopropylammelide. As the liberated alkylamine moieties are constituents of many organic molecules other than atrazine, it is possible that a large number of alkylamine-degrading bacteria other than those previously described might contribute to this key step in atrazine degradation. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated 82 bacterial strains from soil by plating soil water extracts on agar media with ethylamine as a sole carbon source. Among the relatively large number of isolates, only 3 were able to degrade N-ethylammelide, and in each case were shown to carry the atzB gene and atzC genes. The isolates, identified as Rhizobium leguminosarum, Flavobacterium sp., and Arthrobacter sp., were all readily substituted into an atrazine-degrading consortium to carry out N-ethylammelide degradation. The distribution of these genes among many different species in the soil microbial population suggests that these genes are highly mobile and over time may lead to generation of various atrazine-degrading consortia.

  4. Research of Isolation and Degradation Conditions of Petroleum Degrading Marine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangrui, Guo

    2017-01-01

    A novel petroleum-degrading microbial strain was isolated from sediment samples in estuary of Bohai Sea estuary beaches. The strain was primarily identified as Alcanivorax sp. and named Alcanivorax sp. H34. Effect of PH values, temperature, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations on degradation of H34 were investigated. The paraffinic components average degradation rate of H34 ungrowth cells under optimized conditions was studied. The results showed that the optimal growth conditions of H34 are were temperature of 30°C, initial PH of 7.0, nitrogen concentration of 3g/L, phosphorus concentration of 3g/L, and paraffinic components average degradation rates of H34 ungrowth cells was 41.6%, while total degradation rate was 45.5%.

  5. HSC90 is required for nascent hepatitis C virus core protein stability in yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Naoko; Inayoshi, Yasutaka; Satoh, Naoko; Fukuda, Takashi; Iwai, Kenta; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Kohara, Michinori; Kataoka, Kazuhiro; Shimamoto, Akira; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Nomoto, Akio; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2012-07-30

    Hepatitis C virus core protein (Core) contributes to HCV pathogenicity. Here, we demonstrate that Core impairs growth in budding yeast. We identify HSP90 inhibitors as compounds that reduce intracellular Core protein level and restore yeast growth. Our results suggest that HSC90 (Hsc82) may function in the protection of the nascent Core polypeptide against degradation in yeast and the C-terminal region of Core corresponding to the organelle-interaction domain was responsible for Hsc82-dependent stability. The yeast system may be utilized to select compounds that can direct the C-terminal region to reduce the stability of Core protein. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. USGS Core Research Center (CRC) Collection of Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Core Research Center (CRC) was established in 1974 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to preserve valuable rock cores for use by scientists and educators from...

  7. Ice Cores of the National Ice Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. National Ice Core Laboratory (NICL) is a facility for storing, curating, and studying ice cores recovered from the polar regions of the world. It provides...

  8. Core Outlet Temperature Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2008-07-28

    It is a known fact that the power conversion plant efficiency increases with elevation of the heat addition temperature. The higher efficiency means better utilization of the available resources such that higher output in terms of electricity production can be achieved for the same size and power of the reactor core or, alternatively, a lower power core could be used to produce the same electrical output. Since any nuclear power plant, such as the Advanced Burner Reactor, is ultimately built to produce electricity, a higher electrical output is always desirable. However, the benefits of the higher efficiency and electricity production usually come at a price. Both the benefits and the disadvantages of higher reactor outlet temperatures are analyzed in this work.

  9. Geomagnetism of earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Instrumentation, analytical methods, and research goals for understanding the behavior and source of geophysical magnetism are reviewed. Magsat, launched in 1979, collected global magnetometer data and identified the main terrestrial magnetic fields. The data has been treated by representing the curl-free field in terms of a scalar potential which is decomposed into a truncated series of spherical harmonics. Solutions to the Laplace equation then extend the field upward or downward from the measurement level through intervening spaces with no source. Further research is necessary on the interaction between harmonics of various spatial scales. Attempts are also being made to analytically model the main field and its secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Work is also being done on characterizing the core structure, composition, thermodynamics, energetics, and formation, as well as designing a new Magsat or a tethered satellite to be flown on the Shuttle.

  10. Geomagnetism of earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Instrumentation, analytical methods, and research goals for understanding the behavior and source of geophysical magnetism are reviewed. Magsat, launched in 1979, collected global magnetometer data and identified the main terrestrial magnetic fields. The data has been treated by representing the curl-free field in terms of a scalar potential which is decomposed into a truncated series of spherical harmonics. Solutions to the Laplace equation then extend the field upward or downward from the measurement level through intervening spaces with no source. Further research is necessary on the interaction between harmonics of various spatial scales. Attempts are also being made to analytically model the main field and its secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Work is also being done on characterizing the core structure, composition, thermodynamics, energetics, and formation, as well as designing a new Magsat or a tethered satellite to be flown on the Shuttle.

  11. Dynamics of core accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2013-02-01

    We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M⊕ embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the `Piecewise Parabolic Method' with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolution on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either `locally isothermal' or `locally isentropic') and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling however, as defined by locally isothermal or

  12. DSNF AND OTHER WASTE FORM DEGRADATION ABSTRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. CUNNANE

    2004-11-19

    Several hundred distinct types of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) may potentially be disposed in the Yucca Mountain repository. These fuel types represent many more types than can be viably individually examined for their effect on the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Additionally, for most of these fuel types, there is no known direct experimental test data for the degradation and dissolution of the waste form in repository groundwaters. The approach used in the TSPA-LA model is, therefore, to assess available information on each of 11 groups of DSNF, and to identify a model that can be used in the TSPA-LA model without differentiating between individual codisposal waste packages containing different DSNF types. The purpose of this report is to examine the available data and information concerning the dissolution kinetics of DSNF matrices for the purpose of abstracting a degradation model suitable for use in describing degradation of the DSNF inventory in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application. The data and information and associated degradation models were examined for the following types of DSNF: Group 1--Naval spent nuclear fuel; Group 2--Plutonium/uranium alloy (Fermi 1 SNF); Group 3--Plutonium/uranium carbide (Fast Flux Test Facility-Test Fuel Assembly SNF); Group 4--Mixed oxide and plutonium oxide (Fast Flux Test Facility-Demonstration Fuel Assembly/Fast Flux Test Facility-Test Demonstration Fuel Assembly SNF); Group 5--Thorium/uranium carbide (Fort St. Vrain SNF); Group 6--Thorium/uranium oxide (Shippingport light water breeder reactor SNF); Group 7--Uranium metal (N Reactor SNF); Group 8--Uranium oxide (Three Mile Island-2 core debris); Group 9--Aluminum-based SNF (Foreign Research Reactor SNF); Group 10--Miscellaneous Fuel; and Group 11--Uranium-zirconium hydride (Training Research Isotopes-General Atomics SNF). The analyses contained in this document provide an &apos

  13. Some core contested concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  14. Parkin promotes proteasomal degradation of misregulated BAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Zeynep; Funk, Kathrin; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Todt, Franziska; Zerbes, Ralf M; Oelgeklaus, Aline; Tanaka, Atsushi; van der Laan, Martin; Edlich, Frank

    2017-09-01

    The pro-apoptotic BCL-2 protein BAX commits human cells to apoptosis by permeabilizing the outer mitochondrial membrane. BAX activation has been suggested to require the separation of helix α5 from α6 - the 'latch' from the 'core' domain - among other conformational changes. Here, we show that conformational changes in this region impair BAX translocation to the mitochondria and retrotranslocation back into the cytosol, and therefore BAX inhibition, but not activation. Redirecting misregulated BAX to the mitochondria revealed an alternative mechanism of BAX inhibition. The E3 ligase parkin, which is known to trigger mitochondria-specific autophagy, ubiquitylates BAX K128 and targets the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 protein for proteasomal degradation. Retrotranslocation-deficient BAX is completely degraded in a parkin-dependent manner. Although only a minor pool of endogenous BAX escapes retrotranslocation into the cytosol, parkin-dependent targeting of misregulated BAX on the mitochondria provides substantial protection against BAX apoptotic activity. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Degraded PMR-15 Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Luis C.

    2000-01-01

    Thermo-oxidative aging produces a nonuniform degradation state in PMR-15 resin. A surface layer, usually attributed to oxidative degradation, forms. This surface layer has different properties from the inner material. A set of material tests was designed to separate the properties of the oxidized surface layer from the properties of interior material. Test specimens were aged at 316 C in either air or nitrogen, for durations of up to 800 hr. The thickness of the oxidized surface layer in air aged specimens, and the shrinkage and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of nitrogen aged specimens were measured directly. The nitrogen-aged specimens were assumed to have the same properties as the interior material in the air-aged specimens. Four-point-bend tests were performed to determine modulus of both the oxidized surface layer and the interior material. Bimaterial strip specimens consisting of oxidized surface material and unoxidized interior material were constructed and used to determine surface layer shrinkage and CTE. Results confirm that the surface layer and core materials have substantially different properties.

  16. Central core disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungbluth Heinz

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Central core disease (CCD is an inherited neuromuscular disorder characterised by central cores on muscle biopsy and clinical features of a congenital myopathy. Prevalence is unknown but the condition is probably more common than other congenital myopathies. CCD typically presents in infancy with hypotonia and motor developmental delay and is characterized by predominantly proximal weakness pronounced in the hip girdle; orthopaedic complications are common and malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS is a frequent complication. CCD and MHS are allelic conditions both due to (predominantly dominant mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1 gene, encoding the principal skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel (RyR1. Altered excitability and/or changes in calcium homeostasis within muscle cells due to mutation-induced conformational changes of the RyR protein are considered the main pathogenetic mechanism(s. The diagnosis of CCD is based on the presence of suggestive clinical features and central cores on muscle biopsy; muscle MRI may show a characteristic pattern of selective muscle involvement and aid the diagnosis in cases with equivocal histopathological findings. Mutational analysis of the RYR1 gene may provide genetic confirmation of the diagnosis. Management is mainly supportive and has to anticipate susceptibility to potentially life-threatening reactions to general anaesthesia. Further evaluation of the underlying molecular mechanisms may provide the basis for future rational pharmacological treatment. In the majority of patients, weakness is static or only slowly progressive, with a favourable long-term outcome.

  17. Core-seis: a code for LMFBR core seismic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chellapandi, P.; Ravi, R.; Chetal, S.C.; Bhoje, S.B. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Reactor Group

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with a computer code CORE-SEIS specially developed for seismic analysis of LMFBR core configurations. For demonstrating the prediction capability of the code, results are presented for one of the MONJU reactor core mock ups which deals with a cluster of 37 subassemblies kept in water. (author). 3 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Core Exercises: Why You Should Strengthen Your Core Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Fitness You know core exercises are good for you — but do you include core exercises in your fitness routine? Here's why ... 18, 2014 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/core-exercises/art-20044751 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  19. ASSAYING OF AUTOPHAGIC PROTEIN DEGRADATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Bauvy; A.J. Meijer; P. Codogno

    2009-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a three-step process: (1) autophagosomes form and mature, (2) the autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes, and (3) the autophagic cargo is degraded in the lysosomes. It is this lysosomal degradation of the autophagic cargo that constitutes the autophagic flux. As in the case of metaboli

  20. MOSFET Degradation Under RF Stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasse, G.T.; Kuper, F.G.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    We report on the degradation of MOS transistors under RF stress. Hot-carrier degradation, negative-bias temperature instability, and gate dielectric breakdown are investigated. The findings are compared to established voltage- and field-driven models. The experimental results indicate that the

  1. Degradation of carbofuran by ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneethi, S; Joseph, Kurian

    2009-04-01

    Degradation of commercial grade carbofuran (2, 3 dihydro-2, 2-dimethyl-7 benzo furanyl-N-methyl carbamate) in aqueous solution by ozone oxidation was investigated using bench scale experiments. The degradation rate was strongly influenced by the ozone dosage, pH, initial concentration of carbofuran and contact time of ozonation. Carbofuran solution of 200ppm concentration was degraded by 79% within 10 minutes consuming 87 mg of ozone at pH 4. The associated TOC reduction was observed to be 53%. Ammonium (20 mg/L) and nitrate (30 mg/L) ions were detected in the effluent as degradation products of ozonation. The results support the effectiveness of ozonation for degradation of organic pesticides such as carbofuran.

  2. Enzymatic degradation of endomorphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Anna; Staniszewska, Renata; Gach, Katarzyna; Fichna, Jakub

    2008-11-01

    Centrally acting plant opiates, such as morphine, are the most frequently used analgesics for the relief of severe pain, even though their undesired side effects are serious limitation to their usefulness. The search for new therapeutics that could replace morphine has been mainly focused on the development of peptide analogs or peptidomimetics with high selectivity for one receptor type and high bioavailability, that is good blood-brain barrier permeability and enzymatic stability. Drugs, in order to be effective, must be able to reach the target tissue and to remain metabolically stable to produce the desired effects. The study of naturally occurring peptides provides a rational and powerful approach in the design of peptide therapeutics. Endogenous opioid peptides, endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2, are two potent and highly selective mu-opioid receptor agonists, discovered only a decade ago, which display potent analgesic activity. However, extensive studies on the possible use of endomorphins as analgesics instead of morphine met with failure due to their instability. This review deals with the recent investigations that allowed determine degradation pathways of endomorphins in vitro and in vivo and propose modifications that will lead to more stable analogs.

  3. Bacterial degradation of aminopyrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecher, H; Blecher, R; Wegst, W; Eberspaecher, J; Lingens, F

    1981-11-01

    1. Four strains of bacteria growing with aminopyrine as sole source of carbon were isolated from soil and were identified as strains of Phenylobacterium immobilis. 2. Strain M13 and strain E, the type species of Phenylobacterium immobilis (DSM 1986), which had been isolated by enrichment with chloridazon (5-amino-4-chloro-2-phenyl-2H-pyridazin-3-one) were used to investigate the bacterial degradation of aminopyrine. 3. Three metabolites were isolated and identified as: 4-(dimethylamino)-1,2-dihydro-1,5-dimethyl-2-(2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxy-4,6-cyc lohexadien-1-yl)-3H-pyrazol-3-one, 4-(dimethylamino)-1,2-dihydro-1,5-dimethyl-2-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)-3H-pyrazol-3 -one and 4-(dimethylamino)-1,2-dihydro-1,5-dimethyl-3H-pyrazol-3-one. 4. An enzyme extract from cells of strain m13 was shown to further metabolize the catechol derivative of aminopyrine, with the formation of 2-pyrone-6-carboxylic acid. 5. Results indicate that the benzene ring of aminopyrine is the principal site of microbial metabolism.

  4. ICF Core Sets for stroke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Szilvia Geyh; Alarcos Cieza; Jan Schouten; Hugh Dickson; Peter Frommelt; Zaliha Omar; Nenad Kostanjsek; Haim Ring; Gerold Stucki

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To report on the results of the consensus process integrating evidence from preliminary studies to develop the first version of the Comprehensive ICF Core Set and the Brief ICF Core Set for stroke. Methods...

  5. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  6. On core stability and extendability

    OpenAIRE

    Shellshear, Evan

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates conditions under which the core of a TU cooperative game is stable. In particular the author extends the idea of extendability to find new conditions under which the core is stable. It is also shown that these new conditions are not necessary for core stability.

  7. Dual-core Itanium Processor

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Intel’s first dual-core Itanium processor, code-named "Montecito" is a major release of Intel's Itanium 2 Processor Family, which implements the Intel Itanium architecture on a dual-core processor with two cores per die (integrated circuit). Itanium 2 is much more powerful than its predecessor. It has lower power consumption and thermal dissipation.

  8. On core stability and extendability

    OpenAIRE

    Shellshear, Evan

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates conditions under which the core of a TU cooperative game is stable. In particular the author extends the idea of extendability to find new conditions under which the core is stable. It is also shown that these new conditions are not necessary for core stability.

  9. Photoassisted Fenton degradation of polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hui-Min; Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Lei, Ngai-Yu; Yu, Lei; Kong, Karen Hoi-Kuan; Yu, Han-Qing; Lau, Tai-Chu; Lam, Michael H W

    2011-01-15

    Fenton and photoassisted Fenton degradation of ordinary hydrophobic cross-linked polystyrene microspheres and sulfonated polystyrene beads (DOWEX 50WX8) have been attempted. While the Fenton process was not able to degrade these polystyrene materials, photoassisted Fenton reaction (mediated by broad-band UV irradiation from a 250 W Hg(Xe) light source) was found to be efficient in mineralizing cross-linked sulfonated polystyrene materials. The optimal loadings of the Fe(III) catalyst and the H(2)O(2) oxidant for such a photoassisted Fenton degradation were found to be 42 μmol-Fe(III) and 14.1 mmol-H(2)O(2) per gram of the sulfonated polystyrene material. The initial pH for the degradation was set at pH 2.0. This photoassisted Fenton degradation process was also able to mineralize commonly encountered polystyrene wastes. After a simple sulfonation pretreatment, a mineralization efficiency of >99% (by net polymer weight) was achieved within 250 min. The mechanism of this advanced oxidative degradation process was investigated. Sulfonate groups introduced to the surface of the treated polystyrene polymer chains were capable of rapidly binding the cationic Fe(III) catalyst, probably via a cation-exchange mechanism. Such a sorption of the photoassisted Fenton catalyst was crucial to the heterogeneous degradation process.

  10. Winning Cores in Parity Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Steen

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the novel notion of winning cores in parity games and develop a deterministic polynomial-time under-approximation algorithm for solving parity games based on winning core approximation. Underlying this algorithm are a number properties about winning cores which are interesting...... in their own right. In particular, we show that the winning core and the winning region for a player in a parity game are equivalently empty. Moreover, the winning core contains all fatal attractors but is not necessarily a dominion itself. Experimental results are very positive both with respect to quality...

  11. Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alinger, Matthew

    2013-09-30

    This final report summarizes the progress made during the October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2013 period under Cooperative Agreement DE-NT0004109 for the U. S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled “Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes”. The primary objective of this program is to develop a performance degradation mitigation path for high performing, cost-effective solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Strategies to mitigate performance degradation are developed and implemented. In addition, thermal spray manufacturing of SOFCs is explored. Combined, this work establishes a basis for cost-effective SOFC cells.

  12. Models of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  13. Seismic Fragility Analysis of a Degraded Condensate Storage Tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y-S.; Kim, M.K.; Choi, I-K.

    2011-05-16

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Brookhaven National Laboratory are conducting a collaborative research project to develop seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). One of the goals of this collaboration endeavor is to develop seismic fragility analysis methods that consider the potential effects of age-related degradation of structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The essential part of this collaboration is aimed at achieving a better understanding of the effects of aging on the performance of SSCs and ultimately on the safety of NPPs. A recent search of the degradation occurrences of structures and passive components (SPCs) showed that the rate of aging related degradation in NPPs was not significantly large but increasing, as the plants get older. The slow but increasing rate of degradation of SPCs can potentially affect the safety of the older plants and become an important factor in decision making in the current trend of extending the operating license period of the plants (e.g., in the U.S. from 40 years to 60 years, and even potentially to 80 years). The condition and performance of major aged NPP structures such as the containment contributes to the life span of a plant. A frequent misconception of such low degradation rate of SPCs is that such degradation may not pose significant risk to plant safety. However, under low probability high consequence initiating events, such as large earthquakes, SPCs that have slowly degraded over many years could potentially affect plant safety and these effects need to be better understood. As part of the KAERI-BNL collaboration, a condensate storage tank (CST) was analyzed to estimate its seismic fragility capacities under various postulated degradation scenarios. CSTs were shown to have a significant impact on the seismic core damage frequency of a nuclear power plant. The seismic fragility capacity of the CST was developed

  14. Ecosystemic approaches to land degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puigdefabregas, J.; Barrio, G. del; Hill, J.

    2009-07-01

    Land degradation is recognized as the main outcome of desertification. However available procedures for its assessment are still unsatisfactory because are often too costly for surveying large areas and rely on specific components of the degradation process without being able to integrate them in a unique process. One of the objectives of De Survey project is designing and implementing operational procedures for desertification surveillance, including land degradation. A strategic report was compiled and reproduced here for selecting the most appropriate approaches to the project conditions. The report focuses on using attributes of ecosystem maturity as a natural way to integrate the different drivers of land degradation in simple indices. The review surveys different families of attributes concerned with water and energy fluxes through the ecosystem, its capacity to sustain biomass and net primary productivity, and its capacity to structure the space. Finally, some conclusions are presented about the choice criteria of the different approaches in the framne of operational applications. (Author) 20 refs.

  15. Plant biomass degradation by fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P

    2014-11-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the topic is highly relevant in the field of plant pathogenic fungi as they degrade plant biomass to either gain access to the plant or as carbon source, resulting in significant crop losses. Finally, fungi are the main degraders of plant biomass in nature and as such have an essential role in the global carbon cycle and ecology in general. In this review we provide a global view on the development of this research topic in saprobic ascomycetes and basidiomycetes and in plant pathogenic fungi and link this to the other papers of this special issue on plant biomass degradation by fungi. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bacterial isolates degrading aliphatic polycarbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, T; Hosoya, H; Tokiwa, Y

    1998-04-15

    Bacteria that degrade an aliphatic polycarbonate, poly(hexamethylene carbonate), were isolated from river water in Ibaraki. Prefecture, Japan, after enrichment in liquid medium containing poly(hexamethylene carbonate) suspensions as carbon source, and dilution to single cells. Four of the strains, 35L, WFF52, 61A and 61B2, degraded poly(hexamethylene carbonate) on agar plate containing suspended poly(hexamethylene carbonate). Degradation of poly(hexamethylene carbonate) was confirmed by gel permeation chromatography. Besides poly(hexamethylene carbonate), the strains were found to degrade poly(tetramethylene carbonate). The strains were characterized morphologically, physiologically, and by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Strains 35L and WFF52 were tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. and Variovorax sp., respectively, while strains 61A and 61B2 constitute an unidentified branch within the beta subclass of the Proteobacteria.

  17. Chitin Degradation In Marine Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Sara; Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chitin is the most abundant polymer in the marine environment and the second most abundant in nature. Chitin does not accumulate on the ocean floor, because of microbial breakdown. Chitin degrading bacteria could have potential in the utilization of chitin as a renewable carbon...... and nitrogen source in the fermentation industry.Methods: Here, whole genome sequenced marine bacteria were screened for chitin degradation using phenotypic and in silico analyses.Results: The in silico analyses revealed the presence of three to nine chitinases in each strain, however the number of chitinases...... chitin regulatory system.Conclusions: This study has provided insight into the ecology of chitin degradation in marine bacteria. It also served as a basis for choosing a more efficient chitin degrading production strain e.g. for the use of chitin waste for large-scale fermentations....

  18. Mathematical modelling of paper degradation in books

    OpenAIRE

    Nimmo, A J

    2015-01-01

    Paper cannot be prevented from degrading and does not necessarily degrade uniformly across its volume. It has been established that as paper degrades, VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) are produced. This body of work studies paper degradation with respect to the role VOCs play. The thesis investigates how a VOC a ecting the paper's acidity can in turn a ect the degradation rate and through modelling the VOC concentration pro le, the degradation pro le is found. To create the model from a chem...

  19. Comparison of the behaviour of two core designs for ASTRID in case of severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, F., E-mail: frederic.bertrand@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DER, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Marie, N.; Prulhière, G.; Lecerf, J. [CEA, DEN, DER, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Seiler, J.M. [CEA, DEN, DTN, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Low void worth CFV and SFRv2 cores are compared for ASTRID pre-conceptual design. • Severe accident behaviour is assessed with a simplified calculation approach and tools. • Mitigation to limit reactivity inserted by core compaction is easier for CFV than for SFRv2 core. • When facing arbitrary reactivity ramps, CFV core would lead to lower energy release than SFRv2 core. • Time scale for core degradation is one order of magnitude larger for CFV than for SFRv2. - Abstract: The present paper is dedicated to the studies carried out during the first stage of the pre-conceptual design of the French demonstrator of fourth generation SFR reactors (ASTRID) in order to compare the behaviour of two envisaged core concepts under severe accident transients. Among the two studied core concepts, whose powers are 1500 MWth, the first one is a classical homogeneous core (called SFRv2) with large pin diameter whose the sodium overall voiding reactivity effect is 5 $. The second concept is an axially heterogeneous core (called CFV) whose global void reactivity effect is negative (−1.2 $ at the end of cycle at the equilibrium). The comparison of the cores relies on two typical accident families: a reactivity insertion (unprotected transient overpower, UTOP) and an overall loss of core cooling (unprotected loss of flow, ULOF). In the first part of the comparison, the primary phase of an UTOP is studied in order to assess typical features of the transient behaviour: power and reactivity evolutions, material heating and melting/vaporization and mechanical energy release due to fuel vapor expansion. The second part of the comparison deals with the calculation of the reactivity potential for degraded states (molten pools) representative of the secondary phase of a mild UTOP and of a strong UTOP (strong or mild qualifies the reactivity ramp inserted). According to the reactivity potential, the amount of fuel to extract from the core and the amount of absorber

  20. Working session 1: Tubing degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharshafdjian, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Turluer, G. [IPSN, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    1997-02-01

    A general introductory overview of the purpose of the group and the general subject area of SG tubing degradation was given by the facilitator. The purpose of the session was described as to {open_quotes}develop conclusions and proposals on regulatory and technical needs required to deal with the issues of SG tubing degradation.{close_quotes} Types, locations and characteristics of tubing degradation in steam generators were briefly reviewed. The well-known synergistic effects of materials, environment, and stress and strain/strain rate, subsequently referred to by the acronym {open_quotes}MESS{close_quotes} by some of the group members, were noted. The element of time (i.e., evolution of these variables with time) was emphasized. It was also suggested that the group might want to consider the related topics of inspection capabilities, operational variables, degradation remedies, and validity of test data, and some background information in these areas was provided. The presentation given by Peter Millet during the Plenary Session was reviewed; Specifically, the chemical aspects and the degradation from the secondary side of the steam generator were noted. The main issues discussed during the October 1995 EPRI meeting on secondary side corrosion were reported, and a listing of the potential SG tube degradations was provided and discussed.

  1. Sonolytic degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张光明; 华天星; 常爱敏

    2004-01-01

    The sonolytic degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl was investigated. Mass spectroscopy was used to detect the products of sonolytic degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl. The results show that the products of sonolytic degradation, such as biphenyl, ethyl benzene, diethylbiphenyl, dibutylbiphenyl, phenol, propylphenol and di-tert-butyl phenol are produced by thermolysis and hydroxyl free radical reactions, in which biphenyl counts for almost 40%(mole fraction) of the mother compound and others are at trace level. Rapid accumulation of chloride ion shows quick dechlorination, and 78% organic chlorine is converted into chloride ion. Free radical scavengers, bicarbonate and carbonate, decrease the reaction rate of sonolytic degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl significantly, and the pseudo 1st order rate constant of sonolytic degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl decreases linearly with the natural logarithm of the concentration of the added free radical scavenger, showing that the pyrolysis and hydroxyl free radical reaction are the two major pathways for the sonolytic degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl, in which the hydroxyl radical concentration is estimated to be 1 × 10 10mol/L.

  2. Complex coacervate core micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voets, Ilja K; de Keizer, Arie; Cohen Stuart, Martien A

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of the literature on the co-assembly of neutral-ionic block, graft, and random copolymers with oppositely charged species in aqueous solution. Oppositely charged species include synthetic (co)polymers of various architectures, biopolymers - such as proteins, enzymes and DNA - multivalent ions, metallic nanoparticles, low molecular weight surfactants, polyelectrolyte block copolymer micelles, metallo-supramolecular polymers, equilibrium polymers, etcetera. The resultant structures are termed complex coacervate core/polyion complex/block ionomer complex/interpolyelectrolyte complex micelles (or vesicles); i.e., in short C3Ms (or C3Vs) and PIC, BIC or IPEC micelles (and vesicles). Formation, structure, dynamics, properties, and function will be discussed. We focus on experimental work; theory and modelling will not be discussed. Recent developments in applications and micelles with heterogeneous coronas are emphasized.

  3. Understanding core conductor fabrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, D E, E-mail: deswenson@affinity-esd.com [Affinity Static Control Consulting, LLC 2609 Quanah Drive, Round Rock, Texas, 78681 (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ESD Association standard test method ANSI/ESD STM2.1 - Garments (STM2.1), provides electrical resistance test procedures that are applicable for materials and garments that have surface conductive or surface dissipative properties. As has been reported in other papers over the past several years{sup 1} fabrics are now used in many industries for electrostatic control purposes that do not have surface conductive properties and therefore cannot be evaluated using the procedures in STM2.1{sup 2}. A study was conducted to compare surface conductive fabrics with samples of core conductor fibre based fabrics in order to determine differences and similarities with regards to various electrostatic properties. This work will be used to establish a new work item proposal within WG-2, Garments, in the ESD Association Standards Committee in the USA.

  4. Caldicellulosiruptor Core and Pangenomes Reveal Determinants for

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumer-Schuette, Sara E. [North Carolina State University; Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; Zurawski, Jeffrey V [North Carolina State University; Ozdemir, Inci [North Carolina State University; Ma, Qin [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Yin, Yanbin [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Xu, Ying [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kataeva, Irena [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Poole, Farris [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Elkins, James G [ORNL; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Cottingham, Robert W [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Kelly, Robert M [North Carolina State University

    2012-01-01

    Extremely thermophilic bacteria of the genus Caldicellulosiruptor utilize carbohydrate components of plant cell walls, including cellulose and hemicellulose, facilitated by a diverse set of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). From a biofuel perspective, this capability is crucial for deconstruction of plant biomass into fermentable sugars. While all species from the genus grow on xylan and acidpretreated switchgrass, growth on crystalline cellulose is variable. The basis for this variability was examined using microbiological, genomic, and proteomic analyses of eight globally diverse Caldicellulosiruptor species. The open Caldicellulosiruptor pangenome (4,009 open reading frames [ORFs]) encodes 106 GHs, representing 43 GH families, but only 26 GHs from 17 families are included in the core (noncellulosic) genome (1,543 ORFs). Differentiating the strongly cellulolytic Caldicellulosiruptor species from the others is a specific genomic locus that encodes multidomain cellulases from GH families 9 and 48, which are associated with cellulose-binding modules. This locus also encodes a novel adhesin associated with type IV pili, which was identified in the exoproteome bound to crystalline cellulose. Taking into account the core genomes, pangenomes, and individual genomes, the ancestral Caldicellulosiruptor was likely cellulolytic and evolved, in some cases, into species that lost the ability to degrade crystalline cellulose while maintaining the capacity to hydrolyze amorphous cellulose and hemicellulose.

  5. Growth outside the core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully.

  6. Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Dan [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

  7. Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60,???

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2008-04-01

    Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the key issue with materials aging and cable/piping as the top concerns for plant reliability. Materials degradation within a nuclear power plant is very complex. There are many different types of materials within the reactor itself: over 25 different metal alloys can be found with can be found within the primary and secondary systems, not to mention the concrete containment vessel, instrumentation and control, and other support facilities. When this diverse set of materials is placed in the complex and harsh environment coupled with load, degradation over an extended life is indeed quite complicated. To address this issue, the USNRC has developed a Progressive Materials Degradation Approach (NUREG/CR-6923). This approach is intended to develop a foundation for appropriate actions to keep materials degradation from adversely impacting component integrity and safety and identify materials and locations where degradation can reasonably be expected in the future. Clearly, materials degradation will impact reactor reliability, availability, and potentially, safe operation. Routine surveillance and component replacement can mitigate these factors, although failures still occur. With reactor life extensions to 60 years or beyond or power uprates, many components must tolerate the reactor environment for even longer times. This may increase

  8. Redox regulation of insulin degradation by insulin-degrading enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal M Cordes

    Full Text Available Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is a thiol sensitive peptidase that degrades insulin and amyloid β, and has been linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease. We examined the thiol sensitivity of IDE using S-nitrosoglutathione, reduced glutathione, and oxidized glutathione to distinguish the effects of nitric oxide from that of the redox state. The in vitro activity of IDE was studied using either partially purified cytosolic enzyme from male Sprague-Dawley rats, or purified rat recombinant enzyme. We confirm that nitric oxide inhibits the degrading activity of IDE, and that it affects proteasome activity through this interaction with IDE, but does not affect the proteasome directly. Oxidized glutathione inhibits IDE through glutathionylation, which was reversible by dithiothreitol but not by ascorbic acid. Reduced glutathione had no effect on IDE, but reacted with partially degraded insulin to disrupt its disulfide bonds and accelerate its breakdown to trichloroacetic acid soluble fragments. Our results demonstrate the sensitivity of insulin degradation by IDE to the redox environment and suggest another mechanism by which the cell's oxidation state may contribute to the development of, and the link between, type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Photovoltaic failure and degradation modes: PV failure and degradation modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Dirk C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden Colorado 80401 USA; Silverman, Timothy J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden Colorado 80401 USA; Wohlgemuth, John H. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden Colorado 80401 USA; Kurtz, Sarah R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden Colorado 80401 USA; VanSant, Kaitlyn T. [Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street Golden Colorado 8040 USA

    2017-01-30

    The extensive photovoltaic field reliability literature was analyzed and reviewed. Future work is prioritized based upon information assembled from recent installations, and inconsistencies in degradation mode identification are discussed to help guide future publication on this subject. Reported failure rates of photovoltaic modules fall mostly in the range of other consumer products; however, the long expected useful life of modules may not allow for direct comparison. In general, degradation percentages are reported to decrease appreciably in newer installations that are deployed after the year 2000. However, these trends may be convoluted with varying manufacturing and installation quality world-wide. Modules in hot and humid climates show considerably higher degradation modes than those in desert and moderate climates, which warrants further investigation. Delamination and diode/j-box issues are also more frequent in hot and humid climates than in other climates. The highest concerns of systems installed in the last 10 years appear to be hot spots followed by internal circuitry discoloration. Encapsulant discoloration was the most common degradation mode, particularly in older systems. In newer systems, encapsulant discoloration appears in hotter climates, but to a lesser degree. Thin-film degradation modes are dominated by glass breakage and absorber corrosion, although the breadth of information for thin-film modules is much smaller than for x-Si.

  10. Advances in core drilling technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, G.

    Some notable technical advances in drill design were reported at the meeting, held in Canada August 30-September 1, 1982, at the University of Calgary. Chief amongst these was a battery powered, computer assisted electromechanical core drill which has recently been used by the Danes in Greenland to continuously core to the base of the ice sheet at 2038 m. This is the deepest coring operation so far on the Greenland ice sheet. (The record for deep glacier drilling is held by the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory for the continuous coring through 2164 m of ice to bedrock at Byrd Station, Antarctica, in 1968). In early 1982, a current Soviet core drilling operation was reported to be at a depth of 2000 m at Vostok station, Antarctica, where the total ice thickness is about 4000 m; the goal of core drilling the entire ice thickness there could be achieved before the end of 1983.

  11. Biodegradability of degradable plastic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agamuthu, P; Faizura, Putri Nadzrul

    2005-04-01

    Plastic waste constitutes the third largest waste volume in Malaysian municipal solid waste (MSW), next to putrescible waste and paper. The plastic component in MSW from Kuala Lumpur averages 24% (by weight), whereas the national mean is about 15%. The 144 waste dumps in the country receive about 95% of the MSW, including plastic waste. The useful life of the landfills is fast diminishing as the plastic waste stays un-degraded for more than 50 years. In this study the compostability of polyethylene and pro-oxidant additive-based environmentally degradable plastics (EDP) was investigated. Linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) samples exposed hydrolytically or oxidatively at 60 degrees C showed that the abiotic degradation path was oxidative rather than hydrolytic. There was a weight loss of 8% and the plastic has been oxidized as shown by the additional carbonyl group exhibited in the Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) Spectrum. Oxidation rate seemed to be influenced by the amount of pro-oxidant additive, the chemical structure and morphology of the plastic samples, and the surface area. Composting studies during a 45-day experiment showed that the percentage elongation (reduction) was 20% for McD samples [high-density polyethylene, (HDPE) with 3% additive] and LL samples (LLDPE with 7% additive) and 18% reduction for totally degradable plastic (TDP) samples (HDPE with 3% additive). Lastly, microbial experiments using Pseudomonas aeroginosa on carbon-free media with degradable plastic samples as the sole carbon source, showed confirmatory results. A positive bacterial growth and a weight loss of 2.2% for degraded polyethylene samples were evident to show that the degradable plastic is biodegradable.

  12. Core TuLiP

    OpenAIRE

    Czenko, M.R.; Etalle, Sandro

    2007-01-01

    We propose CoreTuLiP - the core of a trust management language based on Logic Programming. CoreTuLiP is based on a subset of moded logic programming, but enjoys the features of TM languages such as RT; in particular clauses are issued by different authorities and stored in a distributed manner. We present a lookup and inference algorithm which we prove to be correct and complete w.r.t. the declarative semantics. CoreTuLiP enjoys uniform syntax and the well-established semantics and is express...

  13. Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The UCLA-DOE Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Facility provides the UCLA biochemistry community with easy access to sophisticated instrumentation for a wide variety...

  14. Waves in the core and mechanical core-mantle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    the motions in the direction parallel to the Earth'srotation axis. This property accounts for the signicance of the core-mantle topography.In addition, the stiening of the uid in the direction parallel to the rotation axis gives riseto a magnetic diusion layer attached to the core-mantle boundary, which would...

  15. Characterizing the Core via K-Core Covers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez, S.M.; Borm, P.E.M.; Estevez, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  16. Characterizing the Core via K-Core Covers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez, S.M.; Borm, P.E.M.; Estevez, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  17. Compendium of photovoltaic degradation rates: Photovoltaic degradation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Dirk C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Kurtz, Sarah R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; VanSant, Kaitlyn [Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street Golden CO 8040 USA; Newmiller, Jeff [DNV GL, 2420 Camino Ramon, Suite 300 San Ramon CA 95483 USA

    2016-02-07

    Published data on photovoltaic (PV) degradation measurements were aggregated and re-examined. The subject has seen an increased interest in recent years resulting in more than 11 000 degradation rates in almost 200 studies from 40 different countries. As studies have grown in number and size, we found an impact from sampling bias attributable to size and accuracy. Because of the correlational nature of this study we examined the data in several ways to minimize this bias. We found median degradation for x-Si technologies in the 0.5-0.6%/year range with the mean in the 0.8-0.9%/year range. Hetero-interface technology (HIT) and microcrystalline silicon (..mu..c-Si) technologies, although not as plentiful, exhibit degradation around 1%/year and resemble thin-film products more closely than x-Si. Several studies showing low degradation for copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) have emerged. Higher degradation for cadmium telluride (CdTe) has been reported, but these findings could reflect a convolution of less accurate studies and longer stabilization periods for some products. Significant deviations for beginning-of-life measurements with respect to nameplate rating have been documented over the last 35 years. Therefore, degradation rates that use nameplate rating as reference may be significantly impacted. Studies that used nameplate rating as reference but used solar simulators showed less variation than similar studies using outdoor measurements, even when accounting for different climates. This could be associated with confounding effects of measurement uncertainty and soiling that take place outdoors. Hotter climates and mounting configurations that lead to sustained higher temperatures may lead to higher degradation in some, but not all, products. Wear-out non-linearities for the worst performing modules have been documented in a few select studies that took multiple measurements of an ensemble of modules during the lifetime of the system. However, the majority

  18. Hydrocarbon degradation by antarctic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanagh, J.A.E.; Nichols, P.D.; McMeekin, T.A.; Franzmann, P.D. [Univ. of Tasmania (Australia)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Bacterial cultures obtained from sediment samples collected during a trial oil spill experiment conducted at Airport beach, Eastern Antarctica were selectively enriched for n-alkane-degrading and phenanthrenedegrading bacteria. Samples were collected from a control site and sites treated with different hydrocarbon mixtures - Special Antarctic blend (SAB), BP-Visco and orange roughy oils. One set of replicate sites was also treated with water from Organic Lake which had previously been shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. No viable bacteria were obtained from samples collected from sites treated with orange roughy oil. Extensive degradation of n-alkanes by enrichment cultures obtained from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco occurred at both 25{degrees}C and 10{degrees}C. Extensive degradation of phenanthrene also occurred in enrichment cultures from these sites grown at 25{degrees}C. Concurrent increases of polar lipid in these cultures were also observed. The presence of 1,4-naphthaquinone and 1-naphthol during the growth of the cultures on phenanthrene is unusual and warrants further investigation of the mechanism of phenanthrene-degradation by these Antarctic bacteria.

  19. Relativistic frozen core potential scheme with relaxation of core electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yuya; Seino, Junji; Hayami, Masao; Nakai, Hiromi

    2016-10-01

    This letter proposes a relaxation scheme for core electrons based on the frozen core potential method at the infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess level, called FCP-CR. The core electrons are self-consistently relaxed using frozen molecular valence potentials after the valence SCF calculation is performed. The efficiency of FCP-CR is confirmed by calculations of gold clusters. Furthermore, FCP-CR reproduces the results of the all-electron method for the energies of coinage metal dimers and the core ionization energies and core level shifts of vinyl acetate and three tungsten complexes at the Hartree-Fock and/or symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction levels.

  20. Thermo-mechanical interaction effects in foam cored sandwich panels-correlation between High-order models and Finite element analysis results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palleti, Hara Naga Krishna Teja; Santiuste, Carlos; Thomsen, Ole Thybo;

    2010-01-01

    Thermo-mechanical interaction effects including thermal material degradation in polymer foam cored sandwich structures is investigated using the commercial Finite Element Analysis (FEA) package ABAQUS/Standard. Sandwich panels with different boundary conditions in the form of simply supported...

  1. Adult educators' core competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  2. Core of Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. C.P.Chandgude

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Advancement in computing facilities marks back from 1960’s with introduction of mainframes. Each of the computing has one or the other issues, so keeping this in mind cloud computing was introduced. Cloud computing has its roots in older technologies such as hardware virtualization, distributed computing, internet technologies, and autonomic computing. Cloud computing can be described with two models, one is service model and second is deployment model. While providing several services, cloud management’s primary role is resource provisioning. While there are several such benefits of cloud computing, there are challenges in adopting public clouds because of dependency on infrastructure that is shared by many enterprises. In this paper, we present core knowledge of cloud computing, highlighting its key concepts, deployment models, service models, benefits as well as security issues related to cloud data. The aim of this paper is to provide a better understanding of the cloud computing and to identify important research directions in this field

  3. Clad Degradation - FEPs Screening Arguments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Siegmann

    2004-03-17

    The purpose of this report is to document the screening of the cladding degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF). This report also addresses the effect of some FEPs on both the cladding and the CSNF, DSNF, and HLW waste forms where it was considered appropriate to address the effects on both materials together. This report summarizes the work of others to screen clad degradation FEPs in a manner consistent with, and used in, the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This document was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA'' (BSC 2004a [DIRS 167796]).

  4. Radiation degradation of silk protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pewlong, W.; Sudatis, B. [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand); Takeshita, Hidefumi; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Silk fibroin fiber from the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori was irradiated using an electron beam accelerator to investigate the application of the radiation degradation technique as a means to solubilize fibroin. The irradiation caused a significant degradation of the fiber. The tensile strength of fibroin fiber irradiated up to 2500 kGy decreased rapidly with increasing dose. The presence of oxygen in the irradiation atmosphere enhanced degradation of the tensile strength. The solubilization of irradiated fibroin fiber was evaluated using the following three kinds of solutions: a calcium chloride solution(CaCl{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH/H{sub 2}O=1:2:8 in mole ratio), a hydrochloric acid (0.5 N) and a distilled water. Dissolution of fibroin fiber into these solutions was significantly enhanced by irradiation. Especially, an appreciable amount of water soluble proteins was extracted by a distilled water. (author)

  5. Photocatalytic degradation investigation of dicofol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of dicofol was investigated on TiO2 nano particles(TiO2-NPs)under UV light irradiation.It was shown that dicofol could be completely degraded into inorganic chloride ion under the condition of 0.25 mg/mL TiO2-NPs,2 h irradiation of 400 W high pressure mercury lamp with a wavelength of 365 nm and air at a rate of 100 mL/min.The effects of the experimental conditions,including the amount of TiO2-NPs,irradiation time and the intensity of light,were studied.The apparent photodegradation rate constant was 0.167/min under the optimal condition.The photocatalytic degradation mechanism of dicofol was also discussed.

  6. Operationalizing measurement of forest degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dons, Klaus; Smith-Hall, Carsten; Meilby, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of forest degradation in monitoring and reporting as well as in historic baselines is among the most challenging tasks in national REDD+ strategies. However, a recently introduced option is to base monitoring systems on subnational conditions such as prevalent degradation activities....... In Tanzania, charcoal production is considered a major cause of forest degradation, but is challenging to quantify due to sub-canopy biomass loss, remote production sites and illegal trade. We studied two charcoal production sites in dry Miombo woodland representing open woodland conditions near human...... settlements and remote forest with nearly closed canopies. Supervised classification and adaptive thresholding were applied on a pansharpened QuickBird (QB) image to detect kiln burn marks (KBMs). Supervised classification showed reasonable detection accuracy in the remote forest site only, while adaptive...

  7. Module Degradation Mechanisms Studied by a Multi-Scale Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Steve; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Hacke, Peter; Harvey, Steven P.; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Gerber, Andreas; Guthrey, Harvey; Moutinho, Helio; Albin, David; To, Bobby; Tynan, Jerry; Moseley, John; Aguiar, Jeffery; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Waddle, John; Nardone, Marco

    2016-11-21

    A key pathway to meeting the Department of Energy SunShot 2020 goals is to reduce financing costs by improving investor confidence through improved photovoltaic (PV) module reliability. A comprehensive approach to further understand and improve PV reliability includes characterization techniques and modeling from module to atomic scale. Imaging techniques, which include photoluminescence, electroluminescence, and lock-in thermography, are used to locate localized defects responsible for module degradation. Small area samples containing such defects are prepared using coring techniques and are then suitable and available for microscopic study and specific defect modeling and analysis.

  8. Microbial diversity in degraded and non-degraded petroleum samples and comparison across oil reservoirs at local and global scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Garcia, Isabel Natalia; Dellagnezze, Bruna M; Santos, Viviane P; Chaves B, Michel R; Capilla, Ramsés; Santos Neto, Eugenio V; Gray, Neil; Oliveira, Valeria M

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms have shown their ability to colonize extreme environments including deep subsurface petroleum reservoirs. Physicochemical parameters may vary greatly among petroleum reservoirs worldwide and so do the microbial communities inhabiting these different environments. The present work aimed at the characterization of the microbiota in biodegraded and non-degraded petroleum samples from three Brazilian reservoirs and the comparison of microbial community diversity across oil reservoirs at local and global scales using 16S rRNA clone libraries. The analysis of 620 16S rRNA bacterial and archaeal sequences obtained from Brazilian oil samples revealed 42 bacterial OTUs and 21 archaeal OTUs. The bacterial community from the degraded oil was more diverse than the non-degraded samples. Non-degraded oil samples were overwhelmingly dominated by gammaproteobacterial sequences with a predominance of the genera Marinobacter and Marinobacterium. Comparisons of microbial diversity among oil reservoirs worldwide suggested an apparent correlation of prokaryotic communities with reservoir temperature and depth and no influence of geographic distance among reservoirs. The detailed analysis of the phylogenetic diversity across reservoirs allowed us to define a core microbiome encompassing three bacterial classes (Gammaproteobacteria, Clostridia, and Bacteroidia) and one archaeal class (Methanomicrobia) ubiquitous in petroleum reservoirs and presumably owning the abilities to sustain life in these environments.

  9. Experiments on the dryout behavior of stratified debris beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leininger, Simon; Kulenovic, Rudi; Laurien, Eckart [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE)

    2015-10-15

    In case of a severe accident with loss of coolant and core meltdown a particle bed (debris) can be formed. The removal of decay heat from the debris bed is of prime importance for the bed's long-term coolability to guarantee the integrity of the RPV. In contrast to previous experiments, the focus is on stratified beds. The experiments have pointed out that the bed's coolability is significantly affected.

  10. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F W Giacobbe

    2003-03-01

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly different from a more typical Chandrasekhar mass limit approach. This technique produced a maximum stellar iron core mass value of 2.69 × 1030 kg (1.35 solar masses). This mass value is very near to the typical mass values found for neutron stars in a recent survey of actual neutron star masses. Although slightly lower and higher neutron star masses may also be found, lower mass neutron stars are believed to be formed as a result of enhanced iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large stars. And, higher mass neutron stars are likely to be formed as a result of fallback or accretion of additional matter after an initial collapse event involving an iron core having a mass no greater than 2.69 × 1030 kg.

  11. The INTEGRAL Core Observing Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, C; Gehrels, N.; Lund, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.

    1999-01-01

    The Core Programme of the INTEGRAL mission is defined as the portion of the scientific programme covering the guaranteed time observations for the INTEGRAL Science Working Team. This paper describes the current status of the Core Programme preparations and summarizes the key elements of the observing programme.

  12. The INTEGRAL Core Observing Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, C.; Gehrels, N.; Lund, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The Core Programme of the INTEGRAL mission is defined as the portion of the scientific programme covering the guaranteed time observations for the INTEGRAL Science Working Team. This paper describes the current status of the Core Programme preparations and summarizes the key elements...

  13. Complicated Politics to the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinn, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    People dislike the Common Core for several different reasons, and so it is important to disaggregate the sources of opposition and to assess and then to dispel some of the myths that have built up around it. It also is important to understand the unusual political alliances that have emerged in opposition to Common Core implementation and how they…

  14. Common Core: Victory Is Yours!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Jennifer L. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to implement the Common Core State Standards in the classroom. She presents examples and activities that will leave teachers feeling "rosy" about tackling the new standards. She breaks down important benchmarks and shows how other teachers are doing the Core--and loving it!

  15. The INTEGRAL Core Observing Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, C.; Gehrels, N.; Lund, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The Core Programme of the INTEGRAL mission is defined as the portion of the scientific programme covering the guaranteed time observations for the INTEGRAL Science Working Team. This paper describes the current status of the Core Programme preparations and summarizes the key elements...

  16. Complicated Politics to the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinn, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    People dislike the Common Core for several different reasons, and so it is important to disaggregate the sources of opposition and to assess and then to dispel some of the myths that have built up around it. It also is important to understand the unusual political alliances that have emerged in opposition to Common Core implementation and how they…

  17. The Science of Battery Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, John P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; El Gabaly Marquez, Farid [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; McCarty, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Sugar, Joshua Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Talin, Alec A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Fenton, Kyle R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Power Sources Design and Development; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Power Sources Design and Development; Harris, Charles Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanosystems Synthesis/Analysis; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanosystems Synthesis/Analysis; Hayden, Carl C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Chemistry Dept.; Kliewer, Christopher Jesse [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Chemistry Dept.; Hudak, Nicholas S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Power Sources Research and Development; Leung, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure Physics; McDaniel, Anthony H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Hydrogen and Combustion Technology; Tenney, Craig M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Chemical and Biological Systems; Zavadil, Kevin R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Lab.

    2015-01-01

    This report documents work that was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, Science of Battery Degradation. The focus of this work was on the creation of new experimental and theoretical approaches to understand atomistic mechanisms of degradation in battery electrodes that result in loss of electrical energy storage capacity. Several unique approaches were developed during the course of the project, including the invention of a technique based on ultramicrotoming to cross-section commercial scale battery electrodes, the demonstration of scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe lithium transport mechanisms within Li-ion battery electrodes, the creation of in-situ liquid cells to observe electrochemical reactions in real-time using both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and STXM, the creation of an in-situ optical cell utilizing Raman spectroscopy and the application of the cell for analyzing redox flow batteries, the invention of an approach for performing ab initio simulation of electrochemical reactions under potential control and its application for the study of electrolyte degradation, and the development of an electrochemical entropy technique combined with x-ray based structural measurements for understanding origins of battery degradation. These approaches led to a number of scientific discoveries. Using STXM we learned that lithium iron phosphate battery cathodes display unexpected behavior during lithiation wherein lithium transport is controlled by nucleation of a lithiated phase, leading to high heterogeneity in lithium content at each particle and a surprising invariance of local current density with the overall electrode charging current. We discovered using in-situ transmission electron microscopy that there is a size limit to lithiation of silicon anode particles above which particle fracture controls electrode degradation. From electrochemical entropy measurements, we discovered that entropy

  18. The Science of Battery Degradation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, John P; Fenton, Kyle R [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; El Gabaly Marquez, Farid; Harris, Charles Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Hayden, Carl C.; Hudak, Nicholas [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Kliewer, Christopher Jesse; Leung, Kevin [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Sugar, Joshua Daniel; Talin, Albert Alec; Tenney, Craig M [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Zavadil, Kevin R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

    2015-01-01

    This report documents work that was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, Science of Battery Degradation. The focus of this work was on the creation of new experimental and theoretical approaches to understand atomistic mechanisms of degradation in battery electrodes that result in loss of electrical energy storage capacity. Several unique approaches were developed during the course of the project, including the invention of a technique based on ultramicrotoming to cross-section commercial scale battery electrodes, the demonstration of scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe lithium transport mechanisms within Li-ion battery electrodes, the creation of in-situ liquid cells to observe electrochemical reactions in real-time using both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and STXM, the creation of an in-situ optical cell utilizing Raman spectroscopy and the application of the cell for analyzing redox flow batteries, the invention of an approach for performing ab initio simulation of electrochemical reactions under potential control and its application for the study of electrolyte degradation, and the development of an electrochemical entropy technique combined with x-ray based structural measurements for understanding origins of battery degradation. These approaches led to a number of scientific discoveries. Using STXM we learned that lithium iron phosphate battery cathodes display unexpected behavior during lithiation wherein lithium transport is controlled by nucleation of a lithiated phase, leading to high heterogeneity in lithium content at each particle and a surprising invariance of local current density with the overall electrode charging current. We discovered using in-situ transmission electron microscopy that there is a size limit to lithiation of silicon anode particles above which particle fracture controls electrode degradation. From electrochemical entropy measurements, we discovered that entropy

  19. Bacterial degradation of fungicide captan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megadi, Veena B; Tallur, Preeti N; Mulla, Sikandar I; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2010-12-22

    The phthalimide fungicide captan has been widely used to control plant pathogenic fungi. A strain of Bacillus circulans utilized the fungicide captan as sole source of carbon and energy. The organism degraded captan by a pathway involving its initial hydrolysis to yield cis-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalimide, a compound without fungicidal activity. The formation of this compound was confirmed by HPLC, IR, NMR, and mass spectral analysis. The results also revealed that cis-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalimide was further degraded to o-phthalic acid by a protocatechuate pathway. These findings indicated that there was a complete mineralization of fungicide captan by B. circulans.

  20. Core body temperature in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikens, Marc J; Gorbach, Alexander M; Eden, Henry S; Savastano, David M; Chen, Kong Y; Skarulis, Monica C; Yanovski, Jack A

    2011-05-01

    A lower core body temperature set point has been suggested to be a factor that could potentially predispose humans to develop obesity. We tested the hypothesis that obese individuals have lower core temperatures than those in normal-weight individuals. In study 1, nonobese [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) temperature-sensing capsules, and we measured core temperatures continuously for 24 h. In study 2, normal-weight (BMI of 18-25) and obese subjects swallowed temperature-sensing capsules to measure core temperatures continuously for ≥48 h and kept activity logs. We constructed daily, 24-h core temperature profiles for analysis. Mean (±SE) daily core body temperature did not differ significantly between the 35 nonobese and 46 obese subjects (36.92 ± 0.03°C compared with 36.89 ± 0.03°C; P = 0.44). Core temperature 24-h profiles did not differ significantly between 11 normal-weight and 19 obese subjects (P = 0.274). Women had a mean core body temperature ≈0.23°C greater than that of men (36.99 ± 0.03°C compared with 36.76 ± 0.03°C; P body temperature. It may be necessary to study individuals with function-altering mutations in core temperature-regulating genes to determine whether differences in the core body temperature set point affect the regulation of human body weight. These trials were registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00428987 and NCT00266500.

  1. COSIS: COre State Indication System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J. Y.; Lee, K. B.; Koo, B. S.; Lee, W. K.; Lee, C. C; Zee, S. Q

    2006-02-15

    COSIS (COre State Indication System) which implemented in the SMART research reactor plays a role to supply the core state parameters or graphs for the operator to recognize the core state effectively. The followings are the main functions of COSIS. (1) Validity Check for the Process Signals and Determination of the COSIS Inputs (SIGVAL) (2) Coolant Flow Rate Calculation (FLOW) (3) Core Thermal Power Calculation (COREPOW) (4) In-core 3-Dimensional Power Distribution Calculation and Peaking Parameters Generation (POWER3D) (5) Azimuthal Tilt Calculation (AZITILT). This report describes the methodology of COSIS which produces the core state parameters using the process and detector signals. In the SIGVAL module, COSIS checks most signals except for the CEA position and determines the input signals. In the FLOW module, the corelation coefficient between the RPM signal and coolant flow is updated from the energy balance at the steam generator, and the coolant flow rate is calculated using the RPM signal. In the COREPOW module, the secondary calorimetric power, the primary {delta}T power and the ex-core power are calculated, and the final core thermal power and biased core power are determined. In the POWER3D module, the 3-dimensional power distribution is calculated using the in-core detector signal, and the 3-D peaking factor, 2-D radial peaking factor, axial offset, maximum linear power density are produced. In the AZITILT module, the arithmetic averaged and vector averaged azimuthal tilts are calculated, and the final tilt is determined. The COSIS performance test of the COSIS is performed for the temperature compensation method, the COREPOW and the POWER3D modules. The test for the temperature compensation method is performed for the temperature variations of the linear, parabolic, exponential, sine function. The test shows that the implemented temperature compensation method works soundly. The COREPOW test is performed by varying the core power from the initial

  2. Epistemology and ontology in core ontologies: FOLaw and LRI-Core, two core ontologies for law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukers, J.A.P.J.; Hoekstra, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    For more than a decade constructing ontologies for legal domains, we, at the Leibniz Center for Law, felt really the need to develop a core ontology for law that would enable us to re-use the common denominator of the various legal domains. In this paper we present two core ontologies for law. The

  3. Plant biomass degradation by fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the

  4. Polymeric Materials - introduction and degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    1999-01-01

    These notes support the polymer part of the courses 91742 and 91762 (Materials and Corrosion/degradation of materials) taught in IFAKthey contain a short introduction on group contribution methods for estimating properties of polymers, polymer thermodynamics, viscoelasticity models as well...

  5. Methods of degrading napalm B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Richard L.; Vass, Arpad

    1995-01-01

    Methods of degrading napalm and/or trinitrotoluene involve contacting the waste with specific intra-amoebic isolates of ATCC 40908 and/or dispersants derived therefrom. Useful isolates include is deposited as ATCC 77529, NAP-1 deposited as ATCC 77526 and 13 deposited as ATCC 77527.

  6. Photothermal degradation studies of encapsulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The reliability physics program at JPL is outlined. The overall objectives and approaches are given in the program. The objectives, approaches and conclusions are given for two specific parts of the programs. These two parts are mechanistic studies of photothermal degradation and performance characteristics of materials with respect to photothermal stresses.

  7. Photoelectrocatalytic degradation of Rose Bengal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui-ling; ZHOU Ding; LI Xiang-zhong; YUE Ping-tao

    2003-01-01

    An innovative photoelectrode, TiO2/Ti mesh electrode, was prepared by galvanostaticanodisation. The morphology and the crystalline texture of the TiO2 film on mesh electrode were examined by scanning electronic microscopy and Raman spectroscopy respectively. The examination results indicated that the structure and properties of the film depended on anodisation rate, and the anatase was the dominant component under the controlled experimental conditions. Degradation of Rose Bengal(RB) in photocatalytic(PC) and photoelectrocatalytic(PEC) reaction was investigated, the results demonstrated that electric biasing could improve the efficiency of photocatalytic reaction. The measurement results of TOC in photoelectrocatalytic degradation showed that the mineralisation of RB was complete relatively. The comparison between the degradation efficiency of RB in PEC process and that in aqueous TiO2 dispersion was conducted. The results showed that the apparent first-order rate constant of RB degradation in PEC process was larger than that in aqueous dispersion with 0.1%-0.3% TiO2 powder, but was smaller than that in aqueous dispersion with 1.0% TiO2.

  8. Environmental Degradation of Solar Reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    Report presents results of study of atmospheric degradation of large solar reflectors for power generators. Three general types of reflective surfaces investigated. Report also describes computer buildup and removal (by rain and dew) of contamination from reflectors. Data used to determine effects of soil buildup and best method and frequency of washing at various geographic locations.

  9. Abiotic degradation of antibiotic ionophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohn, Pernille; Bak, Søren A; Björklund, Erland

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolytic and photolytic degradation were investigated for the ionophore antibiotics lasalocid, monensin, salinomycin, and narasin. The hydrolysis study was carried out by dissolving the ionophores in solutions of pH 4, 7, and 9, followed by incubation at three temperatures of 6, 22, and 28 °C f...... because they absorb light of environmentally irrelevant wavelengths....

  10. Polymeric Materials - introduction and degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    1999-01-01

    These notes support the polymer part of the courses 91742 and 91762 (Materials and Corrosion/degradation of materials) taught in IFAKthey contain a short introduction on group contribution methods for estimating properties of polymers, polymer thermodynamics, viscoelasticity models as well...

  11. Plant biomass degradation by fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the

  12. Multi-Core Cache Hierarchies

    CERN Document Server

    Balasubramonian, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    A key determinant of overall system performance and power dissipation is the cache hierarchy since access to off-chip memory consumes many more cycles and energy than on-chip accesses. In addition, multi-core processors are expected to place ever higher bandwidth demands on the memory system. All these issues make it important to avoid off-chip memory access by improving the efficiency of the on-chip cache. Future multi-core processors will have many large cache banks connected by a network and shared by many cores. Hence, many important problems must be solved: cache resources must be allocat

  13. Degradation in steam of 60 cm-long B4C control rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, C.; Drouan, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the framework of nuclear reactor core meltdown accident studies, the degradation of boron carbide control rod segments exposed to argon/steam atmospheres was investigated up to about 2000 °C in IRSN laboratories. The sequence of the phenomena involved in the degradation has been found to take place as expected. Nevertheless, the ZrO2 oxide layer formed on the outer surface of the guide tube was very protective, significantly delaying and limiting the guide tube failure and therefore the boron carbide pellet oxidation. Contrary to what was expected, the presence of the control rod decreases the hydrogen release instead of increasing it by additional oxidation of boron compounds. Boron contents up to 20 wt.% were measured in metallic mixtures formed during degradation. It was observed that these metallic melts are able to attack the surrounding fuel rods, which could have consequences on fuel degradation and fission product release kinetics during severe accidents.

  14. Characterizing Facesheet/Core Disbonding in Honeycomb Core Sandwich Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Martin; Ratcliffe, James G.; Adams, Daniel O.; Krueger, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation into facesheet core disbonding in carbon fiber reinforced plastic/Nomex honeycomb sandwich structures using a Single Cantilever Beam test. Specimens with three, six and twelve-ply facesheets were tested. Specimens with different honeycomb cores consisting of four different cell sizes were also tested, in addition to specimens with three different widths. Three different data reduction methods were employed for computing apparent fracture toughness values from the test data, namely an area method, a compliance calibration technique and a modified beam theory method. The compliance calibration and modified beam theory approaches yielded comparable apparent fracture toughness values, which were generally lower than those computed using the area method. Disbonding in the three-ply facesheet specimens took place at the facesheet/core interface and yielded the lowest apparent fracture toughness values. Disbonding in the six and twelve-ply facesheet specimens took place within the core, near to the facesheet/core interface. Specimen width was not found to have a significant effect on apparent fracture toughness. The amount of scatter in the apparent fracture toughness data was found to increase with honeycomb core cell size.

  15. Introduction to the Core Curriculum in GIS

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This short narrative introduces the Core Curriculum in GIS and provides a historical overview of the Core Curriculum Project, including the later Core Curriculum in GIScience and Core Curriculum for Technical Programs. Appended to this description is an original pamphlet advertising the Core Curriculum in GIS.

  16. Assessing Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marches in 1987. Assessment in the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). It is widely recognized that sophisticated computing technologies are becoming a key element in today's classroom instructional techniques. Regardless, the Professor must be held responsible for creating an instructional environment in which the technology actually supplements learning outcomes of the students. Almost all academic disciplines have found a niche for computer-based instruction in their respective professional domain. In many cases, it is viewed as an essential and integral part of the educational process. Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology

  17. Viral Evolution Core | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon F. Keele, Ph.D. PI/Senior Principal Investigator, Retroviral Evolution Section Head, Viral Evolution Core Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Frederick, MD 21702-1201 Tel: 301-846-173

  18. Lunar Core Drive Tubes Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Contains a brief summary and high resolution imagery from various lunar rock and core drive tubes collected from the Apollo and Luna missions to the moon.

  19. Pressurized-water reactor internals aging degradation study. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luk, K.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of a Phase I study on the effects of aging degradations on pr internals. Primary stressers for internals an generated by the primary coolant flow in the they include unsteady hydrodynamic forces and pump-generated pressure pulsations. Other stressors are applied loads, manufacturing processes, impurities in the coolant and exposures to fast neutron fluxes. A survey of reported aging-related failure information indicates that fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and mechanical wear are the three major aging-related degradation mechanisms for PWR internals. Significant reported failures include thermal shield flow-induced vibration problems, SCC in guide tube support pins and core support structure bolts, fatigue-induced core baffle water-jet impingement problems and excess wear in flux thimbles. Many of the reported problems have been resolved by accepted engineering practices. Uncertainties remain in the assessment of long-term neutron irradiation effects and environmental factors in high-cycle fatigue failures. Reactor internals are examined by visual inspections and the technique is access limited. Improved inspection methods, especially one with an early failure detection capability, can enhance the safety and efficiency of reactor operations.

  20. Core promoter recognition complex changes accompany liver development

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Alessio, Joseph A.; Ng, Raymond; Willenbring, Holger; Tjian, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of several key developmental transitions have brought into question the long held view of the basal transcriptional apparatus as ubiquitous and invariant. In an effort to better understand the role of core promoter recognition and coactivator complex switching in cellular differentiation, we have examined changes in transcription factor IID (TFIID) and cofactor required for Sp1 activation/Mediator during mouse liver development. Here we show that the differentiation of fetal liver progenitors to adult hepatocytes involves a wholesale depletion of canonical cofactor required for Sp1 activation/Mediator and TFIID complexes at both the RNA and protein level, and that this alteration likely involves silencing of transcription factor promoters as well as protein degradation. It will be intriguing for future studies to determine if a novel and as yet unknown core promoter recognition complex takes the place of TFIID in adult hepatocytes and to uncover the mechanisms that down-regulate TFIID during this critical developmental transition. PMID:21368148

  1. All Metal Iron Core For A Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Gates, C. Jun, I. Zatz, A. Zolfaghari

    2010-06-02

    A novel concept for incorporating a iron core transformer within a axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device with a high neutron flux is described. This design enables conceptual design of low aspect ratio devices which employ standard transformer-driven plasma startup by using all-metal high resistance separators between the toroidal field windings. This design avoids the inherent problems of a multiturn air core transformer which will inevitably suffer from strong neutron bombardment and hence lose the integrity of its insulation, both through long term material degradation and short term neutron- induced conductivity.. A full 3-dimensional model of the concept has been developed within the MAXWELL program and the resultant loop voltage calculated. The utility of the result is found to be dependent on the resistivity of the high resistance separators. Useful loop voltage time histories have been obtained using achievable resistivities.

  2. Viscosity of the earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the viscosity of the core at the boundary of the inner and outer core. It is assumed that this boundary is a melting transition and the viscosity limits of the Andrade (1934,1952) hypothesis (3.7 to 18.5 cp) are adopted. The corresponding kinematic viscosities are such that the precessional system explored by Malkus (1968) would be unstable. Whether it would be sufficiently unstable to overcome a severely subadiabatic temperature gradient cannot be determined.

  3. Nanoporous polymer liquid core waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Ndoni, Sokol

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate liquid core waveguides defined by UV to enable selective water infiltration in nanoporous polymers, creating an effective refractive index shift Δn=0.13. The mode confinement and propagation loss in these waveguides are presented.......We demonstrate liquid core waveguides defined by UV to enable selective water infiltration in nanoporous polymers, creating an effective refractive index shift Δn=0.13. The mode confinement and propagation loss in these waveguides are presented....

  4. Learner intuitions about energy degradation

    CERN Document Server

    Daane, Abigail R; Vokos, Stamatis

    2013-01-01

    A primary learning goal for energy in K-12 science instruction is that energy cannot be created or destroyed. However, learners' everyday ideas about energy often involve energy being "used up" or "wasted." In physics, the concept of energy degradation can connect those everyday ideas to the principle of energy conservation. Learners' spontaneous discussions of aspects of energy degradation and the second law of thermodynamics include ideas concerning the inaccessibility, usefulness and dispersion of energy. These ideas have motivated us to introduce new learning goals into our K-12 teacher professional development courses. We identify alignments between these learning goals and learners' informal ideas and discuss instructional implications created by these alignments. Our aim is to create stronger ties between formal physics knowledge and sociopolitical issues by making these learning goals a priority in our professional development.

  5. Radiation degradation of silk protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachiraporn Pewlong; Boonya Sudatis [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand); Takeshita, Hidefumi; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-09-01

    Silk fibroin fiber from the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori was irradiated in the dose range up to 2500 kGy using an electron beam accelerator to apply the radiation degradation technique as a means to solubilize fibroin. The tensile strength of irradiated fibroin fiber decreased with increasing dose and the presence of oxygen in the irradiation atmosphere enhanced the degradation. The solubilization of irradiated fibroin fiber was evaluated using the following three kinds of solutions: calcium chloride solution (CaCl{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH/H{sub 2}O = 1 : 2 : 8 in mole ratio), hydrochloric acid (0.5N) and distilled water. Dissolution of fibroin fiber into these solutions was significantly enhanced by irradiation. Especially, an appreciable amount of water-soluble protein was extracted by distilled water. (author)

  6. Microstructural degradation in compound tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salonen, J.; Auerkari, P. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In order to quantify microstructural degradation at high temperatures, samples of SA 210 / AISI 304 L compound tube material were annealed in the temperature range 540-720 deg C for 1 to 1 000 hours. The hardness of the annealed material was measured and the micro structure of the samples was investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Microstructural degradation was characterised by the carbide structure in the ferritic-pearlitic base material and by the depth of decarburised and carburised zones of the compound tube interface. The observed changes were quantified in terms of their time and temperature dependence and diffusion coefficients of the process. The results can be used in estimating the extent of thermal exposure of high-temperature components after long-term service or after incidences of overheating. (orig.) (4 refs.)

  7. Silicon Nanophotonics for Many-Core On-Chip Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Moustafa

    Number of cores in many-core architectures are scaling to unprecedented levels requiring ever increasing communication capacity. Traditionally, architects follow the path of higher throughput at the expense of latency. This trend has evolved into being problematic for performance in many-core architectures. Moreover, the trends of power consumption is increasing with system scaling mandating nontraditional solutions. Nanophotonics can address these problems, offering benefits in the three frontiers of many-core processor design: Latency, bandwidth, and power. Nanophotonics leverage circuit-switching flow control allowing low latency; in addition, the power consumption of optical links is significantly lower compared to their electrical counterparts at intermediate and long links. Finally, through wave division multiplexing, we can keep the high bandwidth trends without sacrificing the throughput. This thesis focuses on realizing nanophotonics for communication in many-core architectures at different design levels considering reliability challenges that our fabrication and measurements reveal. First, we study how to design on-chip networks for low latency, low power, and high bandwidth by exploiting the full potential of nanophotonics. The design process considers device level limitations and capabilities on one hand, and system level demands in terms of power and performance on the other hand. The design involves the choice of devices, designing the optical link, the topology, the arbitration technique, and the routing mechanism. Next, we address the problem of reliability in on-chip networks. Reliability not only degrades performance but can block communication. Hence, we propose a reliability-aware design flow and present a reliability management technique based on this flow to address reliability in the system. In the proposed flow reliability is modeled and analyzed for at the device, architecture, and system level. Our reliability management technique is

  8. Structural degradation of Thar lignite using MW1 fungal isolate: optimization studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Rizwan; Ghauri, Muhammad A.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Orem, William H.; SanFilipo, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Biological degradation of low-rank coals, particularly degradation mediated by fungi, can play an important role in helping us to utilize neglected lignite resources for both fuel and non-fuel applications. Fungal degradation of low-rank coals has already been investigated for the extraction of soil-conditioning agents and the substrates, which could be subjected to subsequent processing for the generation of alternative fuel options, like methane. However, to achieve an efficient degradation process, the fungal isolates must originate from an appropriate coal environment and the degradation process must be optimized. With this in mind, a representative sample from the Thar coalfield (the largest lignite resource of Pakistan) was treated with a fungal strain, MW1, which was previously isolated from a drilled core coal sample. The treatment caused the liberation of organic fractions from the structural matrix of coal. Fungal degradation was optimized, and it showed significant release of organics, with 0.1% glucose concentration and 1% coal loading ratio after an incubation time of 7 days. Analytical investigations revealed the release of complex organic moieties, pertaining to polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and it also helped in predicting structural units present within structure of coal. Such isolates, with enhanced degradation capabilities, can definitely help in exploiting the chemical-feedstock-status of coal.

  9. Zero net livelihood degradation - the quest for a multidimensional protocol to combat desertification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easdale, Marcos H.

    2016-04-01

    The concept of Zero Net Land Degradation was recently proposed as the basis for a future protocol for the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification to reduce global dryland degradation. It aims at reducing the rate of land degradation and increasing the rate of restoration of already degraded land. Whereas there is recognition of the socio-economic contexts that underlie degradation processes, there is a narrow focus on land and soil as the end core that needs to be protected. In particular, there is an essential human dimension to the sustainability of drylands that should be adequately tackled. In order to provide a wider perspective of the zero net degradation in drylands, I suggest considering the different livelihoods of rural households as a framework that encompasses the multidimensional perspective of desertification as a complex social-ecological problem. The scientific community must develop and apply the zero net livelihood degradation as an enhanced protocol to combat desertification that should foster sustainable livelihood outcomes rather than only sustainable land practices or soil management.

  10. Susceptibility of synthetic long-chain alkylbenzenes to degradation in reducing marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eganhouse, Robert P.; Pontolillo, James

    2008-01-01

    Long-chain alkylbenzenes (LCABs) synthesized for production of alkylbenzene sulfonate surfactants have been used as molecular markers of anthropogenic waste for 25 years. Synthetic LCABs comprise two classes, the tetrapropylene-based alkylbenzenes (TABs) and the linear alkylbenzenes (LABs). LABs supplanted TABs in the mid-1960s because of improved biodegradability of their sulfonated analogs. Use of LCABs for molecular stratigraphy depends on their preservation in sediments over decadal time scales. Most laboratory and field studies suggest that LABs degrade rapidly under aerobic conditions but are resistant to degradation when oxygen is absent. However, recent work indicates that LABs may not be as persistent under reducing conditions as previously thought. To assess the potential for degradation of LCABs in reducing sediments, box cores collected in 1992 and 2003 near a submarine wastewater outfall system were analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The TABs were effectively preserved; differences between whole-core inventories were within analytical error. By contrast, whole-core inventories of the LABs decreased by about 50-60% during the same time interval. Based on direct comparison of chemical inventories in coeval core sections, LAB transformation rates are estimated at 0.07 ±. 0.01 yr-1. These results indicate that caution should be exercised when using synthetic LCABs for reconstruction of depositional records.

  11. PEM Degradation Investigation Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Stevenson; Lee H Spangler

    2010-10-18

    This project conducted fundamental studies of PEM MEA degradation. Insights gained from these studies were disseminated to assist MEA manufacturers in understanding degradation mechanisms and work towards DOE 2010 fuel cell durability targets.

  12. Assessment of Land Degradation and Soil Conservation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of Land Degradation and Soil Conservation Management Practices ... Journal of Environmental Extension ... chemical and biological perspectives: The farmers are aware of the effects of land degradation on crop production.

  13. Experimental studies on urea degradation in seawater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajendran, A.; Joseph, T.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    The rate of urea degradation in seawater was studied under various conditions and the kinetics of urea degradation was evaluated. Urea decomposition experiments showed that the rates and quantity of ammonium oxidation were slower in the relatively...

  14. Crystallization in Earth's Core after High-Temperature Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, K.; Morard, G.; Hernlund, J. W.; Helffrich, G. R.; Ozawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent core formation models based on the metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements suggest that the Earth's core was formed by metal segregation at high pressure and high temperature in a deep magma ocean. It is also thought that the simultaneous solubility of silicon and oxygen in liquid iron are strongly enhanced at high pressure and high temperature, such that at the end of accretion the core was rich in both silicon and oxygen. Here we performed crystallization experiments on the Fe-Si binary and Fe-Si-O ternary systems up to core pressure in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The starting material for the latter was a homogeneous mixture of fine-grain Fe-Si and SiO2 (sustain without extreme degrees of secular cooling. However, even for modest degrees of joint Si-O incorporation into the early core, the buoyancy released by crystallization of SiO2 is sufficient to overcome thermal stratification and sustain the geodynamo.

  15. A comparison of organophosphate degradation genes and bioremediation applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rupa; Iken, Brian; Damania, Ashish

    2013-12-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) form the bulk of pesticides that are currently in use around the world accounting for more than 30% of the world market. They also form the core for many nerve-based warfare agents including sarin and soman. The widespread use and the resultant build-up of OP pesticides and chemical nerve agents has led to the development of major health problems due to their extremely toxic interaction with any biological system that encounters them. Growing concern over the accumulation of OP compounds in our food products, in the soils from which they are harvested and in wastewater run-off has fuelled a growing interest in microbial biotechnology that provides cheap, efficient OP detoxification to supplement expensive chemical methods. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge of OP pesticide and chemical agent degradation and attempt to clarify confusion over identification and nomenclature of two major families of OP-degrading enzymes through a comparison of their structure and function. The isolation, characterization, utilization and manipulation of the major detoxifying enzymes and the molecular basis of degradation of OP pesticides and chemical nerve agents are discussed as well as the achievements and technological advancements made towards the bioremediation of such compounds.

  16. Fungal degradation of coal as a pretreatment for methane production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Rizwan; Ghauri, Muhammad A.; SanFilipo, John R.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Orem, William H.; Tatu, Calin A.; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Akhtar, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    Coal conversion technologies can help in taking advantage of huge low rank coal reserves by converting those into alternative fuels like methane. In this regard, fungal degradation of coal can serve as a pretreatment step in order to make coal a suitable substrate for biological beneficiation. A fungal isolate MW1, identified as Penicillium chrysogenum on the basis of fungal ITS sequences, was isolated from a core sample of coal, taken from a well drilled by the US. Geological Survey in Montana, USA. The low rank coal samples, from major coal fields of Pakistan, were treated with MW1 for 7 days in the presence of 0.1% ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source and 0.1% glucose as a supplemental carbon source. Liquid extracts were analyzed through Excitation–Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMS) to obtain qualitative estimates of solubilized coal; these analyses indicated the release of complex organic functionalities. In addition, GC–MS analysis of these extracts confirmed the presence of single ring aromatics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aromatic nitrogen compounds and aliphatics. Subsequently, the released organics were subjected to a bioassay for the generation of methane which conferred the potential application of fungal degradation as pretreatment. Additionally, fungal-mediated degradation was also prospected for extracting some other chemical entities like humic acids from brown coals with high huminite content especially from Thar, the largest lignite reserve of Pakistan.

  17. Flow accelerated organic coating degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qixin

    Applying organic coatings is a common and the most cost effective way to protect metallic objects and structures from corrosion. Water entry into coating-metal interface is usually the main cause for the deterioration of organic coatings, which leads to coating delamination and underfilm corrosion. Recently, flowing fluids over sample surface have received attention due to their capability to accelerate material degradation. A plethora of works has focused on the flow induced metal corrosion, while few studies have investigated the flow accelerated organic coating degradation. Flowing fluids above coating surface affect corrosion by enhancing the water transport and abrading the surface due to fluid shear. Hence, it is of great importance to understand the influence of flowing fluids on the degradation of corrosion protective organic coatings. In this study, a pigmented marine coating and several clear coatings were exposed to the laminar flow and stationary immersion. The laminar flow was pressure driven and confined in a flow channel. A 3.5 wt% sodium chloride solution and pure water was employed as the working fluid with a variety of flow rates. The corrosion protective properties of organic coatings were monitored inline by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurement. Equivalent circuit models were employed to interpret the EIS spectra. The time evolution of coating resistance and capacitance obtained from the model was studied to demonstrate the coating degradation. Thickness, gloss, and other topography characterizations were conducted to facilitate the assessment of the corrosion. The working fluids were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) and conductivity measurement. The influence of flow rate, fluid shear, fluid composition, and other effects in the coating degradation were investigated. We conclude that flowing fluid on the coating surface accelerates the transport of water, oxygen, and ions into the coating, as

  18. Synthesis, structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ch. Venkata; Shim, Jaesool; Cho, Migyung

    2017-04-01

    CdS, ZnS and CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via two-step synthesis method. The as-prepared CdS, ZnS and CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles were used to study the structural, morphological, and optical properties by PXRD, TEM, HRTEM, UV-vis spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption, FT-IR, PL and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The XRD pattern confirms the crystal structure of the prepared ZnS, CdS, and CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles. The crystallinity of the as-prepared samples is confirmed by PXRD, TEM and HRTEM analysis. The BET analysis showed that the CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles had larger surface area and pore diameter than CdS and ZnS. The Raman and FT-IR spectra confirm the fundamental vibrational modes of CdS and ZnS respectively. Compared to pure CdS and ZnS, CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles exhibited higher photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methyl orange (MO). The enhancement of photocatalytic activity in the CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles is due to the interface actions between CdS and ZnS, which greatly reduces the recombination of photogenerated electrons-holes pair. The proposed mechanism for degradation of MO dye is discussed in detail.

  19. Evolution of core connectivity in MgB 2 wires and tapes during PIT processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilin, V.; Dul'kin, E.; Yashchin, E.; Galstyan, E.; Lapides, Y.; Tsindlekht, M.; Felner, I.; Roth, M.

    2004-05-01

    Critical current density, Jc, ac susceptibility, χ, and the core microhardness in Ni/MgB 2 wires and tapes were measured in as-deformed state at the various stages of the powder-in-tube process. We found that during a drawing process Jc reached a peak at some strain value, followed by rather steep degradation down to zero level with further strain growth. It was shown that the data of electrical and magnetic measurements correlated with the core microhardness during the deformation processes. χ vs. T measurements showed that Jc degradation was resulted from the deterioration of a core connectivity, that was confirmed by microhardness measurements. It was revealed that rolling the as-drawn wires restored a core connectivity and thus caused drastic Jc, growth. This effect was explained by differences in powder flow between drawing and rolling processes. XRD examination of MgB 2 cores showed that rolling the Ni/MgB 2 tapes resulted in gradual growth of the core c-axis texturing with the tape thickness reduction, though texture degree remained relatively low (21% at maximum).

  20. Contribution to modeling of the reflooding of a severely damaged reactor core using PRELUDE experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachrata, A.; Fichot, F.; Repetto, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, Cadarache (France); Quintard, M. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Fleurot, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, Cadarache (France)

    2012-07-01

    In case of accident at a nuclear power plant, water sources may not be available for a long period of time and the core heats up due to the residual power. The reflooding (injection of water into core) may be applied if the availability of safety injection is recovered during accident. If the injection becomes available only in the late phase of accident, water will enter a core configuration that will differ significantly from original rod-bundle geometry. Any attempt to inject water after significant core degradation can lead to further fragmentation of core material. The fragmentation of fuel rods may result in the formation of a 'debris bed'. The typical particle size in a debris bed might reach few millimeters (characteristic length-scale: 1 to 5 mm), i.e., a high permeability porous medium. The French 'Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire' is developing experimental programs (PEARL and PRELUDE) and simulation tools (ICARE-CATHARE and ASTEC) to study and optimize the severe accident management strategy and to assess the probabilities to stop the progress of in-vessel core degradation. It is shown that the quench front exhibits either a ID behaviour or a 2D one, depending on injection rate or bed characteristics. The PRELUDE experiment covers a rather large range of variation of parameters, for which the developed model appears to be quite predictive. (authors)

  1. Nylon biodegradation by lignin-degrading fungi.

    OpenAIRE

    Deguchi, T; Kakezawa, M; Nishida, T

    1997-01-01

    The biodegradation of nylon by lignin-degrading fungi was investigated. The fungus IZU-154 significantly degraded nylon-66 membrane under ligninolytic conditions. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed that four end groups, CHO, NHCHO, CH3, and CONH2, were formed in the biodegraded nylon-66 membranes, suggesting that nylon-66 was degraded oxidatively.

  2. Applications and extensions of degradation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, F.; Subudhi, M.; Samanta, P.K. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Vesely, W.E. (Science Applications International Corp., Columbus, OH (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Component degradation modeling being developed to understand the aging process can have many applications with potential advantages. Previous work has focused on developing the basic concepts and mathematical development of a simple degradation model. Using this simple model, times of degradations and failures occurrences were analyzed for standby components to detect indications of aging and to infer the effectiveness of maintenance in preventing age-related degradations from transforming to failures. Degradation modeling approaches can have broader applications in aging studies and in this paper, we discuss some of the extensions and applications of degradation modeling. The application and extension of degradation modeling approaches, presented in this paper, cover two aspects: (1) application to a continuously operating component, and (2) extension of the approach to analyze degradation-failure rate relationship. The application of the modeling approach to a continuously operating component (namely, air compressors) shows the usefulness of this approach in studying aging effects and the role of maintenance in this type component. In this case, aging effects in air compressors are demonstrated by the increase in both the degradation and failure rate and the faster increase in the failure rate compared to the degradation rate shows the ineffectiveness of the existing maintenance practices. Degradation-failure rate relationship was analyzed using data from residual heat removal system pumps. A simple linear model with a time-lag between these two parameters was studied. The application in this case showed a time-lag of 2 years for degradations to affect failure occurrences. 2 refs.

  3. Applications and extensions of degradation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, F.; Subudhi, M.; Samanta, P.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Vesely, W.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Component degradation modeling being developed to understand the aging process can have many applications with potential advantages. Previous work has focused on developing the basic concepts and mathematical development of a simple degradation model. Using this simple model, times of degradations and failures occurrences were analyzed for standby components to detect indications of aging and to infer the effectiveness of maintenance in preventing age-related degradations from transforming to failures. Degradation modeling approaches can have broader applications in aging studies and in this paper, we discuss some of the extensions and applications of degradation modeling. The application and extension of degradation modeling approaches, presented in this paper, cover two aspects: (1) application to a continuously operating component, and (2) extension of the approach to analyze degradation-failure rate relationship. The application of the modeling approach to a continuously operating component (namely, air compressors) shows the usefulness of this approach in studying aging effects and the role of maintenance in this type component. In this case, aging effects in air compressors are demonstrated by the increase in both the degradation and failure rate and the faster increase in the failure rate compared to the degradation rate shows the ineffectiveness of the existing maintenance practices. Degradation-failure rate relationship was analyzed using data from residual heat removal system pumps. A simple linear model with a time-lag between these two parameters was studied. The application in this case showed a time-lag of 2 years for degradations to affect failure occurrences. 2 refs.

  4. Degradation analysis of thin film photovoltaic modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radue, C., E-mail: chantelle.radue@nmmu.ac.z [Department of Physics, PO Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Dyk, E.E. van [Department of Physics, PO Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2009-12-01

    Five thin film photovoltaic modules were deployed outdoors under open circuit conditions after a thorough indoor evaluation. Two technology types were investigated: amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Two 14 W a-Si:H modules, labelled Si-1 and Si-2, were investigated. Both exhibited degradation, initially due to the well-known light-induced degradation described by Staebler and Wronski [Applied Physics Letters 31 (4) (1977) 292], and thereafter due to other degradation modes such as cell degradation. The various degradation modes contributing to the degradation of the a-Si:H modules will be discussed. The initial maximum power output (P{sub MAX}) of Si-1 was 9.92 W, with the initial light-induced degradation for Si-1 approx30% and a total degradation of approx42%. For Si-2 the initial P{sub MAX} was 7.93 W, with initial light-induced degradation of approx10% and a total degradation of approx17%. Three CIGS modules were investigated: two 20 W modules labelled CIGS-1 and CIGS-2, and a 40 W module labelled CIGS-3. CIGS-2 exhibited stable performance while CIGS-1 and CIGS-3 exhibited degradation. CIGS is known to be stable over long periods of time, and thus the possible reasons for the degradation of the two modules are discussed.

  5. Holocene biomass burning recorded in polar and low-latitude ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrwald, N. M.; Zennaro, P.; Zangrando, R.; Gabrielli, P.; Thompson, L. G.; Gambaro, A.; Barbante, C.

    2011-12-01

    Ice cores contain specific molecular markers including levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-D-glucopyranose) and other pyrochemical evidence that provides much-needed information on the role of fire in regions with no existing data of past fire activity. Levoglucosan is a cellulose combustion product produced at burning temperatures of 300°C or greater. We first trace fire emissions from a boreal forest source in the Canadian Shield through transport and deposition at Summit, Greenland. Atmospheric and surface samples suggest that levoglucosan in snow can record biomass burning events up to 1000s of kilometers away. Levoglucosan does degrade by interacting with hydroxyl radicals in the atmosphere, but it is emitted in large quantities, allowing the use as a biomass burning tracer. These quantified atmospheric biomass burning emissions and associated parallel oxalate and levoglucosan peaks in snow pit samples validates levoglucosan as a proxy for past biomass burning in snow records and by extension in ice cores. The temporal and spatial resolution of chemical markers in ice cores matches the core in which they are measured. The longest temporal resolution extends back approximately eight glacial cycles in the EPICA Dome C ice core, but many ice cores provide high-resolution Holocene records. The spatial resolution of chemical markers in ice cores depends on the core location where low-latitude ice cores primarily reflect regional climate parameters, and polar ice cores integrate hemispheric signals. Here, we compare levoglucosan flux measured during the late Holocene in the Kilimanjaro (3°04.6'S; 37°21.2'E, 5893 masl) and NEEM, Greenland (77°27' N; 51°3'W, 2454 masl) ice cores. We contrast the Holocene results with levoglucosan flux across the past 600,000 years in the EPICA Dome C (75°06'S, 123°21'E, 3233 masl) ice core.

  6. Core formation in silicate bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  7. A Study of the Speedups and Competitiveness of FPGA Soft Processor Cores using Dynamic Hardware/Software Partitioning

    CERN Document Server

    Lysecky, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) provide designers with the ability to quickly create hardware circuits. Increases in FPGA configurable logic capacity and decreasing FPGA costs have enabled designers to more readily incorporate FPGAs in their designs. FPGA vendors have begun providing configurable soft processor cores that can be synthesized onto their FPGA products. While FPGAs with soft processor cores provide designers with increased flexibility, such processors typically have degraded performance and energy consumption compared to hard-core processors. Previously, we proposed warp processing, a technique capable of optimizing a software application by dynamically and transparently re-implementing critical software kernels as custom circuits in on-chip configurable logic. In this paper, we study the potential of a MicroBlaze soft-core based warp processing system to eliminate the performance and energy overhead of a soft-core processor compared to a hard-core processor. We demonstrate that the soft-c...

  8. Viscosity of Earth's Outer Core

    CERN Document Server

    Smylie, D E

    2007-01-01

    A viscosity profile across the entire fluid outer core is found by interpolating between measured boundary values, using a differential form of the Arrhenius law governing pressure and temperature dependence. The discovery that both the retrograde and prograde free core nutations are in free decay (Palmer and Smylie, 2005) allows direct measures of viscosity at the top of the outer core, while the reduction in the rotational splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of the inner core allows it to be measured at the bottom. We find 2,371 plus/minus 1,530 Pa.s at the top and 1.247 plus/minus 0.035 x 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom. Following Brazhkin (1998) and Brazhkin and Lyapin (2000) who get 10^2 Pa.s at the top, 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom, by an Arrhenius extrapolation of laboratory experiments, we use a differential form of the Arrhenius law to interpolate along the melting temperature curve to find a viscosity profile across the outer core. We find the variation to be closely log-linear between the meas...

  9. Boiling-Water Reactor internals aging degradation study. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luk, K.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of an aging assessment study for boiling water reactor (BWR) internals. Major stressors for BWR internals are related to unsteady hydrodynamic forces generated by the primary coolant flow in the reactor vessel. Welding and cold-working, dissolved oxygen and impurities in the coolant, applied loads and exposures to fast neutron fluxes are other important stressors. Based on results of a component failure information survey, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fatigue are identified as the two major aging-related degradation mechanisms for BWR internals. Significant reported failures include SCC in jet-pump holddown beams, in-core neutron flux monitor dry tubes and core spray spargers. Fatigue failures were detected in feedwater spargers. The implementation of a plant Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) program is considered as a promising method for controlling SCC problems in BWR. More operating data are needed to evaluate its effectiveness for internal components. Long-term fast neutron irradiation effects and high-cycle fatigue in a corrosive environment are uncertainty factors in the aging assessment process. BWR internals are examined by visual inspections and the method is access limited. The presence of a large water gap and an absence of ex-core neutron flux monitors may handicap the use of advanced inspection methods, such as neutron noise vibration measurements, for BWR.

  10. Au@Co0.4S core-shell nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and evaluation of photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warjri, Wandibahun; Negi, Devendra P. S.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, Au@Co0.4S core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared core-shell nanoparticles was evaluated by studying the degradation of methyl orange (MO) spectrophotometerically under visible light irradiation. Under optimum experimental conditions, 68.9% of the dye was degraded during 50 min of irradiation. Control experiments showed negligible degradation of MO in the absence of the photocatalyst under visible light irradiation. A good correlation was obtained between the concentration of the dye adsorbed on the surface of the Au@Co0.4S core-shell nanoparticles and its degradation efficiency. The as-prepared nanoparticles showed good recyclability for the degradation of MO. The mechanistic studies suggested that the valence band holes of the Co0.4S nanoparticles were scavenged by the MO molecules resulting in the degradation of the dye.

  11. Free-radical-induced oxidative and reductive degradation of fluoroquinolone pharmaceuticals: kinetic studies and degradation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoke, Hanoz; Song, Weihua; Cooper, William J; Greaves, John; Miller, George E

    2009-07-09

    Fluoroquinolones, as a class of broad-spectrum antibiotics, have been detected in both surface and ground waters, and advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs) are currently in development to remove these and other pharmaceuticals from wastewater because currently utilized treatment methods have proven to be ineffective. This article reports the reaction kinetics of six common fluoroquinolones with hydroxyl radicals and hydrated electrons, which are the major reactive species involved in AO/RPs. The bimolecular reaction rate constants (M(-1) s(-1)) for orbifloxacin, flumequine, marbofloxacin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, and the model compound, 6-fluoro-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-3-quinoline carboxylic acid, with *OH are (6.94 +/- 0.08) x 10(9), (8.26 +/- 0.28) x 10(9), (9.03 +/- 0.39) x 10(9), (6.15 +/- 0.11) x 10(9), (7.95 +/- 0.23) x 10(9), (7.65 +/- 0.20) x 10(9), and with e(aq)(-), (2.25 +/- 0.02) x 10(10), (1.83 +/- 0.01) x 10(10), (2.41 +/- 0.02) x 10(10), (1.68 +/- 0.02) x 10(10), (1.89 +/- 0.02) x 10(10), and (1.49 +/- 0.01) x 10(10). These rate constants are related to the functional groups attached to the quinolone core, particularly the steric hindrance of the piperazine ring, making it possible to obtain a preliminary estimate of the *OH rate constant of an arbitrary fluoroquinolone by observing the ring constituents. In addition, the products of gamma-irradiation degradation of fluoroquinolones were analyzed by LC-MS to elucidate the probable pathways of AO/RPs degradation. Results indicate that preliminary degradation pathways include hydroxyl radical attack on the aromatic ring with subsequent hydroxylation, the substitution of a fluorine atom with a hydroxyl group, and the removal of the piperazine-derived side chain.

  12. Simulation of the core degradation phase of the Fukushima accidents using the ASTEC code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville, H., E-mail: herve.bonneville@irsn.fr; Luciani, A.

    2014-06-01

    The French Institute for Nuclear Safety and Radioprotection (IRSN) attempts to simulate the Fukushima accidents using the ASTEC integral code. This paper summarizes the main results of the simulations conducted before the beginning of the OECD/NEA/CSNI Benchmark Study of the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (BSAF) project. The first analysis carried out concerned the unit 2 transient. Results were considered as satisfactory being quite consistent with measures reported by TEPCO and similar computations performed with MELCOR or MAAP. Knowledge gained from PWR practice and different lectures available in the open literature for BWR provided valuable technical elements to explain observations or to validate assumptions. Leakage model from the containment up to the refuelling bay through the head flange seal was very efficient to retrieve pressure evolution inside the dry well. Extension of the model to reactor number 3 gave also results quite consistent with what similar codes computed. However for both reactors some figures characteristic of the transient as hydrogen production are liable to vary a lot if models for bottom and top nozzles are added which has not been done in reference computation due to present lack of data. Uncertainties with simulation of accident on reactor number 1 are rather large due to the scarcity of data. Further, as the measurement points were quasi absent for most of the first 24 h there is no reference to compare to simulation results. Bottom vessel head failure is predicted but due to the high number of penetrations the mechanical failure models developed for PWR may not be so relevant for BWR.

  13. SMART core protection system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. K.; Park, H. Y.; Koo, I. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, H. S.; Kim, J. S.; Son, C. H. [Samchang Enterprise Co., Ltd., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    SMART COre Protection System(SCOPS) is designed with real-tims Digital Signal Processor(DSP) board and Network Interface Card(NIC) board. SCOPS has a Control Rod POSition (CRPOS) software module while Core Protection Calculator System(CPCS) consists of Core Protection Calculators(CPCs) and Control Element Assembly(CEA) Calculators(CEACs) in the commercial nuclear plant. It's not necessary to have a independent cabinets for SCOPS because SCOPS is physically very small. Then SCOPS is designed to share the cabinets with Plant Protection System(PPS) of SMART. Therefor it's very easy to maintain the system because CRPOS module is used instead of the computer with operating system.

  14. Atmospheric Methane in Ice Cores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The reconstruction of air trapped in ice cores provides us the most direct information about atmospheric CH4 variations in the past history. Ice core records from the "Three Poles (Antarctica, Greenland and Tibetan Plateau)" reveal the detailed fluctuations of atmospheric CH4 concentration with time and are allowed to quantify the CH4 differences among latitudes. These data are indispensably in the farther study of the relationship between greenhouse gases and climatic change, and of the past changes in terrestrial CH4 emissions. Ice cores reconstruction indicates that atmospheric CH4 concentration has increased quickly since industrialization, and the present day's level of atmospheric CH4 (1800 ppbv) is unprecedented during the past Glacial-Interglacial climate cycles.

  15. Distributed k-Core Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Montresor, Alberto; Miorandi, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Among the novel metrics used to study the relative importance of nodes in complex networks, k-core decomposition has found a number of applications in areas as diverse as sociology, proteinomics, graph visualization, and distributed system analysis and design. This paper proposes new distributed algorithms for the computation of the k-core decomposition of a network, with the purpose of (i) enabling the run-time computation of k-cores in "live" distributed systems and (ii) allowing the decomposition, over a set of connected machines, of very large graphs, that cannot be hosted in a single machine. Lower bounds on the algorithms complexity are given, and an exhaustive experimental analysis on real-world graphs is provided.

  16. Single gene retrieval from thermally degraded DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lianwen Zhang; Lianwen Zhang

    2005-12-01

    To simulate single gene retrieval from ancient DNA, several related factors have been investigated. By monitoring a 889 bp polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product and genomic DNA degradation, we find that heat and oxygen (especially heat) are both crucial factors influencing DNA degradation. The heat influence, mainly represented by temperature and heating time, affects the DNA degradation via DNA depurination followed by cleavage of nearby phosphodiesters. The heating time influence is temperature-dependent. By reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and 1,3-diphenyl-isobenzofuran (DPBF) bleaching experiments the influence of oxygen on DNA thermal degradation was shown to occur via a singlet oxygen pathway. A comparative study of the thermal degradation of cellular DNA and isolated DNA showed that cellular lipids can aggravate DNA thermal degradation. These results confirm the possibility of gene amplification from thermally degraded DNA. They can be used to evaluate the feasibility of the retrieval of single gene from ancient remains.

  17. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-03-22

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

  18. Serological studies on chloridazon-degrading bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layh, G; Böhm, R; Eberspächer, J; Lingens, F

    1983-01-01

    Agglutination tests and immunofluorescence tests with antisera against four strains of chloridazon-degrading bacteria revealed the serological uniformity of a group of 22 chloridazon-degrading bacterial strains. No serological relationship could be found between chloridazon-degrading bacteria and representatives of other Gram-negative bacteria. This was demonstrated by agglutination tests, including testing of the antiserum against Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and by immunofluorescence tests, including testing of the sera against Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter strains. The tests were performed with 31 representatives of different Gram-negative bacteria, and with 22 strains of chloridazon-degrading bacteria as antigens. Differences in the extent of agglutination reactions and antibody titres among chloridazon-degrading bacterial strains together with cross-adsorption xperiments, suggest a rough classification of chloridazon-degrading bacteria into two subgroups. On the basis of immunofluorescence data, a linkage-map was worked out to represent serological relationships in the group of chloridazon-degrading strains.

  19. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  20. Degradation of Victoria Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sharon A.; Grant, John A.; Cohen, Barbara A.; Golombek, Mathew P.; Geissler, Paul E.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Parker, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    The $\\sim$750 m diameter and $\\sim$75 m deep Victoria crater in Meridiani Planum, Mars, presents evidence for significant degradation including a low, serrated, raised rim characterized by alternating alcoves and promontories, a surrounding low relief annulus, and a floor partially covered by dunes. The amount and processes of degradation responsible for the modified appearance of Victoria crater were evaluated using images obtained in situ by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in concert with a digital elevation model created using orbital HiRISE images. Opportunity traversed along the north and northwest rim and annulus, but sufficiently characterized features visible in the DEM to enable detailed measurements of rim relief, ejecta thickness, and wall slopes around the entire degraded, primary impact structure. Victoria retains a 5 m raised rim consisting of 1-2 m of uplifted rocks overlain by 3 m of ejecta at the rim crest. The rim is $\\sim$120 to 220 m wide and is surrounded by a dark annulus reaching an average of 590 m beyond the raised rim. Comparison between observed morphology and that expected for pristine craters 500 to 750 m across indicate the original, pristine crater was close to 600 m in diameter. Hence, the crater has been erosionally widened by approximately 150 m and infilled by about 50 m of sediments. Eolian processes are responsible for modification at Victoria, but lesser contributions from mass wasting or other processes cannot be ruled out. Erosion by prevailing winds is most significant along the exposed rim and upper walls and accounts for $\\sim$50 m widening across a WNW-ESE diameter. The volume of material eroded from the crater walls and rim is $\\sim$20% less than the volume of sediments partially filling the crater, indicating eolian infilling from sources outside the crater over time. The annulus formed when $\\sim$1 m deflation of the ejecta created a lag of more resistant hematite spherules that trapped darker, regional

  1. Starch-degrading polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Van V; Marletta, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Polysaccharide degradation by hydrolytic enzymes glycoside hydrolases (GHs) is well known. More recently, polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs, also known as lytic PMOs or LPMOs) were found to oxidatively degrade various polysaccharides via a copper-dependent hydroxylation. PMOs were previously thought to be either GHs or carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), and have been re-classified in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZY) database as auxiliary activity (AA) families. These enzymes include cellulose-active fungal PMOs (AA9, formerly GH61), chitin- and cellulose-active bacterial PMOs (AA10, formerly CBM33), and chitin-active fungal PMOs (AA11). These PMOs significantly boost the activity of GHs under industrially relevant conditions, and thus have great potential in the biomass-based biofuel industry. PMOs that act on starch are the latest PMOs discovered (AA13), which has expanded our perspectives in PMOs studies and starch degradation. Starch-active PMOs have many common structural features and biochemical properties of the PMO superfamily, yet differ from other PMO families in several important aspects. These differences likely correlate, at least in part, to the differences in primary and higher order structures of starch and cellulose, and chitin. In this review we will discuss the discovery, structural features, biochemical and biophysical properties, and possible biological functions of starch-active PMOs, as well as their potential application in the biofuel, food, and other starch-based industries. Important questions regarding various aspects of starch-active PMOs and possible economical driving force for their future studies will also be highlighted.

  2. Identifying ELIXIR Core Data Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durinx, Christine; McEntyre, Jo; Appel, Ron; Apweiler, Rolf; Barlow, Mary; Blomberg, Niklas; Cook, Chuck; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Kim, Jee-Hyub; Lopez, Rodrigo; Redaschi, Nicole; Stockinger, Heinz; Teixeira, Daniel; Valencia, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The core mission of ELIXIR is to build a stable and sustainable infrastructure for biological information across Europe. At the heart of this are the data resources, tools and services that ELIXIR offers to the life-sciences community, providing stable and sustainable access to biological data. ELIXIR aims to ensure that these resources are available long-term and that the life-cycles of these resources are managed such that they support the scientific needs of the life-sciences, including biological research. ELIXIR Core Data Resources are defined as a set of European data resources that are of fundamental importance to the wider life-science community and the long-term preservation of biological data. They are complete collections of generic value to life-science, are considered an authority in their field with respect to one or more characteristics, and show high levels of scientific quality and service. Thus, ELIXIR Core Data Resources are of wide applicability and usage. This paper describes the structures, governance and processes that support the identification and evaluation of ELIXIR Core Data Resources. It identifies key indicators which reflect the essence of the definition of an ELIXIR Core Data Resource and support the promotion of excellence in resource development and operation. It describes the specific indicators in more detail and explains their application within ELIXIR's sustainability strategy and science policy actions, and in capacity building, life-cycle management and technical actions. The identification process is currently being implemented and tested for the first time. The findings and outcome will be evaluated by the ELIXIR Scientific Advisory Board in March 2017. Establishing the portfolio of ELIXIR Core Data Resources and ELIXIR Services is a key priority for ELIXIR and publicly marks the transition towards a cohesive infrastructure.

  3. Earth's core and the geodynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffett

    2000-06-16

    Earth's magnetic field is generated by fluid motion in the liquid iron core. Details of how this occurs are now emerging from numerical simulations that achieve a self-sustaining magnetic field. Early results predict a dominant dipole field outside the core, and some models even reproduce magnetic reversals. The simulations also show how different patterns of flow can produce similar external fields. Efforts to distinguish between the various possibilities appeal to observations of the time-dependent behavior of the field. Important constraints will come from geological records of the magnetic field in the past.

  4. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynmcal hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypothes pass the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale change. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at lentgh-scale l/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy- overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magneto-geostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core- mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order l20 years is pseudo-scale-invarient. Magnetic spectra of other

  5. Core competencies in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, José Manuel; Casademont, Jordi; Conthe, Pedro; Pinilla, Blanca; Pujol, Ramón; García-Alegría, Javier

    2012-06-01

    The working group on Competencies of Internal Medicine from the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) proposes a series of core competencies that we consider should be common to all European internal medicine specialists. The competencies include aspects related to patient care, clinical knowledge, technical skills, communication skills, professionalism, cost-awareness in medical care and academic activities. The proposal could be used as a working document for the Internal Medicine core curriculum in the context of the educational framework of medical specialties in Europe.

  6. Core Task and Organizational Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikkelsø, Signe

    2015-01-01

    of core objects such as ‘task’ and ‘coordination,’ contemporary organization studies emphasize, much like other social science disciplines, broader topics such as ‘network,’ ‘identity,’ and ‘change.’ The paper argues that this altered focus and vocabulary is accompanied by a diminished ability to specify...... and intervene into the practical reality of organizations. It further argues that a discipline's core objects are not anachronisms to be discarded with, but crucial for specifying reality in ways that have proven practically relevant and still are....

  7. Producing gapped-ferrite transformer cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    Improved manufacturing techniques make reproducible gaps and minimize cracking. Molded, unfired transformer cores are cut with thin saw and then fired. Hardened semicircular core sections are bonded together, placed in aluminum core box, and fluidized-coated. After winding is run over box, core is potted. Economical method significantly reduces number of rejects.

  8. Multi-core Architectures and Streaming Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Gerard J.M.; Kokkeler, André B.J.; Wolkotte, Pascal T.; Burgwal, van de Marcel D.; Mandoiu, I.; Kennings, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we focus on algorithms and reconfigurable multi-core architectures for streaming digital signal processing (DSP) applications. The multi-core concept has a number of advantages: (1) depending on the requirements more or fewer cores can be switched on/off, (2) the multi-core structure f

  9. Core Stability Training for Injury Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Context: Enhancing core stability through exercise is common to musculoskeletal injury prevention programs. Definitive evidence demonstrating an association between core instability and injury is lacking; however, multifaceted prevention programs including core stabilization exercises appear to be effective at reducing lower extremity injury rates. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched for epidemiologic, biomechanic, and clinical studies of core stability for injury prevention (keywords: ...

  10. Visual Feedback for Rover-based Coring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Paul; Helmick, Daniel; Bajracharya, Max

    2008-01-01

    Technology for coring from a low-mass rover has been developed to enable core sample acquisition where a planetary rover experiences moderate slip during the coring operation. A new stereo vision technique, Absolute Motion Visual Odometry, is used to measure rover slip during coring and the slip is accommodated through corresponding arm pose updating. Coring rate is controlled by feedback of themeasured force of the coring tool against the environment. Test results in the JPL Marsyard show for the first time that coring from a low-mass rover with slip is feasible.

  11. Establishing the Structural Integrity of Core-Shell Nanoparticles against Elemental Migration using Luminescent Lanthanide Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Peng, Dengfeng; Chen, Xian; Qiao, Xvsheng; Fan, Xianping; Wang, Feng

    2015-10-19

    Core-shell structured nanoparticles are increasingly used to host luminescent lanthanide ions but the structural integrity of these nanoparticles still lacks sufficient understanding. Herein, we present a new approach to detect the diffusion of dopant ions in core-shell nanostructures using luminescent lanthanide probes whose emission profile and luminescence lifetime are sensitive to the chemical environment. We show that dopant ions in solution-synthesized core-shell nanoparticles are firmly confined in the designed locations. However, annealing at certain temperatures (greater than circa 350 °C) promotes diffusion of the dopant ions and leads to degradation of the integrity of the nanoparticles. These insights into core-shell nanostructures should enhance our ability to understand and use lanthanide-doped luminescent nanoparticles.

  12. Does Wyoming's Core Area Policy Protect Winter Habitats for Greater Sage-Grouse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kurt T.; Beck, Jeffrey L.; Pratt, Aaron C.

    2016-10-01

    Conservation reserves established to protect important habitat for wildlife species are used world-wide as a wildlife conservation measure. Effective reserves must adequately protect year-round habitats to maintain wildlife populations. Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Area policy was established to protect breeding habitats for greater sage-grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus). Protecting only one important seasonal habitat could result in loss or degradation of other important habitats and potential declines in local populations. The purpose of our study was to identify the timing of winter habitat use, the extent which individuals breeding in Core Areas used winter habitats, and develop resource selection functions to assess effectiveness of Core Areas in conserving sage-grouse winter habitats in portions of 5 Core Areas in central and north-central Wyoming during winters 2011-2015. We found that use of winter habitats occured over a longer period than current Core Area winter timing stipulations and a substantial amount of winter habitat outside of Core Areas was used by individuals that bred in Core Areas, particularly in smaller Core Areas. Resource selection functions for each study area indicated that sage-grouse were selecting habitats in response to landscapes dominated by big sagebrush and flatter topography similar to other research on sage-grouse winter habitat selection. The substantial portion of sage-grouse locations and predicted probability of selection during winter outside small Core Areas illustrate that winter requirements for sage-grouse are not adequately met by existing Core Areas. Consequently, further considerations for identifying and managing important winter sage-grouse habitats under Wyoming's Core Area Policy are warranted.

  13. Does Wyoming's Core Area Policy Protect Winter Habitats for Greater Sage-Grouse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kurt T; Beck, Jeffrey L; Pratt, Aaron C

    2016-10-01

    Conservation reserves established to protect important habitat for wildlife species are used world-wide as a wildlife conservation measure. Effective reserves must adequately protect year-round habitats to maintain wildlife populations. Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Area policy was established to protect breeding habitats for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). Protecting only one important seasonal habitat could result in loss or degradation of other important habitats and potential declines in local populations. The purpose of our study was to identify the timing of winter habitat use, the extent which individuals breeding in Core Areas used winter habitats, and develop resource selection functions to assess effectiveness of Core Areas in conserving sage-grouse winter habitats in portions of 5 Core Areas in central and north-central Wyoming during winters 2011-2015. We found that use of winter habitats occured over a longer period than current Core Area winter timing stipulations and a substantial amount of winter habitat outside of Core Areas was used by individuals that bred in Core Areas, particularly in smaller Core Areas. Resource selection functions for each study area indicated that sage-grouse were selecting habitats in response to landscapes dominated by big sagebrush and flatter topography similar to other research on sage-grouse winter habitat selection. The substantial portion of sage-grouse locations and predicted probability of selection during winter outside small Core Areas illustrate that winter requirements for sage-grouse are not adequately met by existing Core Areas. Consequently, further considerations for identifying and managing important winter sage-grouse habitats under Wyoming's Core Area Policy are warranted.

  14. Environmental Degradation: Causes and Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Tyagi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The subject of environmental economics is at the forefront of the green debate: the environment can no longer be viewed as an entity separate from the economy. Environmental degradation is of many types and have many consequences. To address this challenge a number of studies have been conducted in both developing and developed countries applying different methods to capture health benefits from improved environmental quality. Minimizing exposure to environmental risk factors by enhancing air quality and access to improved sources of drinking and bathing water, sanitation and clean energy is found to be associated with significant health benefits and can contribute significantly to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals of environmental sustainability, health and development. In this paper, I describe the national and global causes and consequences of environmental degradation and social injustice. This paper provides a review of the literature on studies associated with reduced environmental risk and in particular focusing on reduced air pollution, enhanced water quality and climate change mitigation.

  15. Commensal ocular bacteria degrade mucins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M; Harris, A; Lumb, R; Powell, K

    2002-12-01

    Antimicrobial activity in tears prevents infection while maintaining a commensal bacterial population. The relation between mucin and commensal bacteria was assessed to determine whether commensals possess mucinolytic activity, how degradation depends on mucin integrity, and whether mucins affect bacterial replication. Bacteria were sampled from healthy eyes and contact lenses from asymptomatic wearers. Intracellular mucins were extracted and purified from cadaver conjunctivas, and surface mucins from extended wear contact lenses. After exposure to bacteria, changes in mucin hydrodynamic volume (proteolytic cleavage) and subunit charge (oligosaccharide degradation) were assayed by size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography. The effect of mucin on bacterial replication was followed for up to 24 hours from the end of incubation with purified ocular mucins. Ocular bacteria decreased the hydrodynamic volume of intracellular and contact lens adherent mucins, irrespective of glycosylation density. A decrease in mucin sialylation was observed after exposure to commensal bacteria. Subunit charge distributions were generally shifted to lesser negative charge, consistent with loss of charged epitopes. Subunits with high negative charge, observed after digesting lightly adhering contact lens mucins with bacteria, suggest preferential cleavage sites in the mucin molecule. The presence of purified ocular mucin in the medium inhibited bacterial growth. Bacteria in the healthy ocular surface possess mucinolytic activity on both intact and surface processed mucins, targeted to discrete sites in the mucin molecule. Inhibition of bacterial growth by ocular mucins can be seen as part of the mucosal control of microbiota.

  16. Early detection of materials degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyendorf, Norbert

    2017-02-01

    Lightweight components for transportation and aerospace applications are designed for an estimated lifecycle, taking expected mechanical and environmental loads into account. The main reason for catastrophic failure of components within the expected lifecycle are material inhomogeneities, like pores and inclusions as origin for fatigue cracks, that have not been detected by NDE. However, material degradation by designed or unexpected loading conditions or environmental impacts can accelerate the crack initiation or growth. Conventional NDE methods are usually able to detect cracks that are formed at the end of the degradation process, but methods for early detection of fatigue, creep, and corrosion are still a matter of research. For conventional materials ultrasonic, electromagnetic, or thermographic methods have been demonstrated as promising. Other approaches are focused to surface damage by using optical methods or characterization of the residual surface stresses that can significantly affect the creation of fatigue cracks. For conventional metallic materials, material models for nucleation and propagation of damage have been successfully applied for several years. Material microstructure/property relations are well established and the effect of loading conditions on the component life can be simulated. For advanced materials, for example carbon matrix composites or ceramic matrix composites, the processes of nucleation and propagation of damage is still not fully understood. For these materials NDE methods can not only be used for the periodic inspections, but can significantly contribute to the material scientific knowledge to understand and model the behavior of composite materials.

  17. Degradation of Acenaphthene by Ozone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the oxidation of acenaphthene (Ace), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) with a saturated C-C bond by ozone and to characterize the intermediate products of ozonation. Methods Ozone was generated from filtered dry oxygen by an ozone generator and continually bubbled into a reactor containing 1g/L Ace dissolved in an acetonitrile/water solvent mixture (90/10, v/v) at a rate of 0.5 mg/s. HPLC was used to analyze the Ace concentration. Total organic carbon (TOC) was used to measure the amount of water soluble organic compounds. GC-MS was used to identify the ozonized products. Oxygen uptake rate (OUR) of activated sludge was used to characterize the biodegradability of ozonized products. Results During the ozonation process, Ace was degraded, new organic compounds were produced and these intermediate products were difficult mineralize by ozone, with increasing TOC of soluble organics. The ozonized products were degraded by activated sludge more easily than Ace. Conclusion Ozonation decomposes the Ace and improves its biodegradability. The ozonation combined with biological treatment is probably an efficient and economical way to mineralize acenaphthene in wastewater.

  18. Core Competence Development : paradigm and practical implementations

    OpenAIRE

    Koay, Ze Wei; E.Markov, Denis

    2011-01-01

    The theory of core competence has drawn a large amount of attention in the academic field as well as of practitioners in the corporate world. Theory asserts that long-term value creation and competitiveness of the corporation relies on full-scale exploitation and timely development of company Core Competences; business strategies should be built around the core competencies of a firm. Identification and exploitation of Core Competences as well as essential elements comprising Core Competences...

  19. Fuzzy Cores and Fuzzy Balancedness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gulick, G.; Norde, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    We study the relation between the fuzzy core and balancedness for fuzzy games. For regular games, this relation has been studied by Bondareva (1963) and Shapley (1967). First, we gain insight in this relation when we analyse situations where the fuzzy game is continuous. Our main result shows that a

  20. Competition for cores in remanufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulmus, Serra Caner; Zhu, Stuart X.; Teunter, Ruud

    2014-01-01

    We study competition between an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and an independently operating remanufacturer (IO). Different from the existing literature, the OEM and IO compete not only for selling their products but also for collecting returned products (cores) through their acquisition pri

  1. One Health Core Competency Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting "One Health" approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  2. Fuzzy Cores and Fuzzy Balancedness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gulick, G.; Norde, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    We study the relation between the fuzzy core and balancedness for fuzzy games. For regular games, this relation has been studied by Bondareva (1963) and Shapley (1967). First, we gain insight in this relation when we analyse situations where the fuzzy game is continuous. Our main result shows that

  3. Common Core: Solve Math Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Erich

    2012-01-01

    The new common core standards for mathematics demand that students (and teachers!) exhibit deeper conceptual understanding. That's music to the ears of education professor John Tapper, who says teachers have overemphasized teaching procedures--and getting right answers. In his new book, "Solving for Why," he makes a powerful case for moving beyond…

  4. Reference: GT1CORE [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GT1CORE Green PJ, Yong M-H, Cuozzo M, Kano-Murakami Y, Silverstein P, Chua N-H Binding site require...ments for pea nuclear protein factor GT-1 correlate with sequences required for light-depend

  5. One Health Core Competency Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting “One Health” approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  6. Stability of Molten Core Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INL’s LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

  7. One Health Core Competency Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Frankson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting ‘One Health’ approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education as they describe the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  8. Earth rotation and core topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Bradford H.; Clayton, Robert W.; Spieth, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Geodynamics program has as one of its missions highly accurate monitoring of polar motion, including changes in length of day (LOD). These observations place fundamental constraints on processes occurring in the atmosphere, in the mantle, and in the core of the planet. Short-timescale (t less than or approx 1 yr) variations in LOD are mainly the result of interaction between the atmosphere and the solid earth, while variations in LOD on decade timescales result from the exchange of angular momentum between the mantle and the fluid core. One mechanism for this exchange of angular momentum is through topographic coupling between pressure variations associated with flow in the core interacting with topography at the core-mantel boundary (CMB). Work done under another NASA grant addressing the origin of long-wavelength geoid anomalies as well as evidence from seismology, resulted in several models of CMB topography. The purpose of work supported by NAG5-819 was to study further the problem of CMB topography, using geodesy, fluid mechanics, geomagnetics, and seismology. This is a final report.

  9. CopperCore Service Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogten, Hubert; Martens, Harrie; Nadolski, Rob; Tattersall, Colin; van Rosmalen, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    In an e-learning environment there is a need to integrate various e-learning services like assessment services, collaboration services, learning design services and communication services. In this article we present the design and implementation of a generic integrative service framework, called CopperCore Service Integration (CCSI). We will…

  10. Core shift effect in blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, A.; Mohan, P.; Gupta, Alok C.; Mangalam, A.; Volvach, A. E.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Gu, M. F.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tornikoski, M.; Volvach, L. N.

    2017-07-01

    We studied the pc-scale core shift effect using radio light curves for three blazars, S5 0716+714, 3C 279 and BL Lacertae, which were monitored at five frequencies (ν) between 4.8 and 36.8 GHz using the University of Michigan Radio Astronomical Observatory (UMRAO), the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CrAO) and Metsähovi Radio Observatory for over 40 yr. Flares were Gaussian fitted to derive time delays between observed frequencies for each flare (Δt), peak amplitude (A) and their half width. Using A ∝ να, we infer α in the range of -16.67-2.41 and using Δ t ∝ ν ^{1/k_r}, we infer kr ∼ 1, employed in the context of equipartition between magnetic and kinetic energy density for parameter estimation. From the estimated core position offset (Ωrν) and the core radius (rcore), we infer that opacity model may not be valid in all cases. The mean magnetic field strengths at 1 pc (B1) and at the core (Bcore) are in agreement with previous estimates. We apply the magnetically arrested disc model to estimate black hole spins in the range of 0.15-0.9 for these blazars, indicating that the model is consistent with expected accretion mode in such sources. The power-law-shaped power spectral density has slopes -1.3 to -2.3 and is interpreted in terms of multiple shocks or magnetic instabilities.

  11. Microbial Enzymatic Degradation of Biodegradable Plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohi; Bano, Kulsoom; Kuddus, Mohammed; Zaheer, Mohammed R; Zia, Qamar; Khan, Mohammed F; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Gupta, Anamika; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2017-01-01

    The renewable feedstock derived biodegradable plastics are important in various industries such as packaging, agricultural, paper coating, garbage bags and biomedical implants. The increasing water and waste pollution due to the available decomposition methods of plastic degradation have led to the emergence of biodegradable plastics and biological degradation with microbial (bacteria and fungi) extracellular enzymes. The microbes utilize biodegradable polymers as the substrate under starvation and in unavailability of microbial nutrients. Microbial enzymatic degradation is suitable from bioremediation point of view as no waste accumulation occurs. It is important to understand the microbial interaction and mechanism involved in the enzymatic degradation of biodegradable plastics under the influence of several environmental factors such as applied pH, thermo-stability, substrate molecular weight and/or complexity. To study the surface erosion of polymer film is another approach for hydrolytic degradation characteristion. The degradation of biopolymer is associated with the production of low molecular weight monomer and generation of carbon dioxide, methane and water molecule. This review reported the degradation study of various existing biodegradable plastics along with the potent degrading microbes (bacteria and fungi). Patents available on plastic biodegradation with biotechnological significance is also summarized in this paper. This paper assesses that new disposal technique should be adopted for the degradation of polymers and further research is required for the economical production of biodegradable plastics along with their enzymatic degradation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Poly(lactide)-containing multifunctional nanoparticles: Synthesis, domain-selective degradation and therapeutic applicability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, Sandani

    Construction of nanoassemblies from degradable components is desired for packaging and controlled release of active therapeutics, and eventual biodegradability in vivo. In this study, shell crosslinked micelles composed of biodegradable poly(lactide) (PLA) core were prepared by the self-assembly of an amphiphilic diblock copolymer synthesized by a combination of ring opening polymerization (ROP) and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Enzymatic degradation of the PLA cores of the nanoparticles was achieved upon the addition of proteinase K (PK). Kinetic analyses and comparison of the properties of the nanomaterials as a function of degradation extent will be discussed. Building upon our findings from selective-excavation of the PLA core, enzyme- and redox-responsive nanoparticles were constructed for the encapsulation and stimuli-responsive release of an antitumor drug. This potent chemotherapeutic, otherwise poorly soluble in water was dispersed into aqueous solution by the supramolecular co-assembly with an amphiphilic block copolymer, and the release from within the core of these nanoparticles were gated by crosslinking the hydrophilic shell region with a reduction-responsive crosslinker. Enzyme- and reduction-triggered release behavior of the antitumor drug was demonstrated along with their remarkably high in vitro efficacy. As cationic nanoparticles are a promising class of transfection agents for nucleic acid delivery, in the next part of the study, synthetic methodologies were developed for the conversion of the negatively-charged shell of the enzymatically-degradable shell crosslinked micelles to positively-charged cationic nanoparticles for the complexation of nucleic acids. These degradable cationic nanoparticles were found to efficiently deliver and transfect plasmid DNA in vitro. The hydrolysis of the PLA core and crosslinkers of the nanocarriers may provide a mechanism for their programmed disassembly within

  13. Magnectic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynamical hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth s core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypotheses pass the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth s core, this yields a JGR-PI, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale change.In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at length- scale l/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy- overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magneto- geostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core-mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core- source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order 120 years is pseudo-scale-invariant. Magnetic spectra of other planets may differ; however, if a transition to non

  14. Localized degradation of foreign DNA strands in cells: Only excising the first nucleotide of 5' region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Shen, Wei; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Liang, Haojun

    2017-09-15

    Intracellular delivery of foreign DNA probes sharply increases the efficiency of various biodetection protocols. Spherical nucleic acid (SNA) conjugate is a new type of probe that consists of a dense oligonucleotide shell attached typically to a gold nanoparticle core. They are widely used as novel labels for in vitro biodetection and intracellular assay. However, the degradation of foreign DNA still remains a challenge that can cause significant signal leakage (false positive signal). Hence, the site and behavior of intracellular degradation need to be investigated. Herein, we discover a localized degradation behavior that only excises the first nucleotide of 5' terminal from a DNA strand, whereas the residual portion of this strand is unbroken in MCF-7 cell. This novel degradation action totally differs from previous opinion that foreign DNA strand would be digested into tiny fragments or even individual nucleotides in cellular environment. On the basis of these findings, we propose a simple and effective way to avoid degradation-caused false positive that one can bypass the degradable site and choose a secure region to label fluorophore along the DNA stand, when using DNA probes for intracellular biodetection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Interleaved Core Assignment for Bidirectional Transmission in Multi-Core Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Feihong; Morioka, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    We study interleaved core assignment for bidirectional transmission in multi-core fibers. By combining it with heterogeneous core structure in an 18-core fiber, the transmission distance is extended by 10 times compared to homogeneous core structure with unidirectional transmission, achieving...

  16. Interleaved Core Assignment for Bidirectional Transmission in Multi-Core Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We study interleaved core assignment for bidirectional transmission in multi-core fibers. By combining it with heterogeneous core structure in an 18-core fiber, the transmission distance is extended by 10 times compared to homogeneous core structure with unidirectional transmission, achieving a total capacity of 1 Pb/s per direction.

  17. Interleaved Core Assignment for Bidirectional Transmission in Multi-Core Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Feihong; Morioka, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    We study interleaved core assignment for bidirectional transmission in multi-core fibers. By combining it with heterogeneous core structure in an 18-core fiber, the transmission distance is extended by 10 times compared to homogeneous core structure with unidirectional transmission, achieving a t...

  18. Ametryne degradation by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Debora Cristina de; Mori, Manoel Nunes; Duarte, Celina Lopes [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: deboracandrade@globo.com; mnmori@ipen.br; clduarte@ipen.br; Melo, Rita Paiva [Technological and Nuclear Institute (ITN), Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: ritamelo@itn.pt

    2007-07-01

    Ametryne may be released to the environment during its manufacture, transport, storage, formulation and use as selective herbicide for the control of annual broadleaf and grass weeds. It is applied as an aqueous suspension for preemergence or post-directed applications on crops. Depending on the pesticide formulation and type of application, ametryne residues may be detectable in water, soil and on the surfaces for months or years. The herbicide used to this study was Ametryne (commercial name, Gesapax 500), commonly used on field crops and on corn and commercialized since 1975. Ametryne was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC Shimadzu 17A), after extraction with hexane/dichloromethane (1:1 v/v) solution. The calibration curve was obtained with a regression coefficient of 0.9871. In addition, the relative standard deviation was lower than 10%. The radiation-processing yield was evaluated by the destruction G-value (Gd) (Eq. 1), that is defined by the number of destroyed molecules by absorption of 100 eV of energy from ionizing radiation. Different concentrations of the herbicide (11.4 mol L{sup -1}; 22.7 mol L{sup -1}; 34.1 mol L{sup -1} and 45.5 mol L{sup -1}) were irradiated at the AECL 'Gammacell 220' {sup 60}Co source, with 1 kGy, 3 kGy, 6 kGy, 9 kGy, 12 kGy, 15 kGy and 30 kGy absorbed doses. After irradiation processing, the ametryne highest reduction rate occurs at low doses of radiation: at 6 kGy more than 85-90% of all ametryne compounds were removed. Two products of incomplete degradation of ametryne were identified as s-triazyne isomers. However, further work is needed in order to fully understand the ametryne degradation mechanisms the degradation yield of ametryne depends on its initial concentration and the process seems to be more efficient at higher concentrations. (author)

  19. Effect of ZnO core electrodeposition conditions on electrochemical and photocatalytic properties of polypyrrole-graphene oxide shelled nanoarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruna, A.; Shao, Q.; Kamruzzaman, M.; Li, Y. Y.; Zapien, J. A.; Pullini, D.; Busquets Mataix, D.; Ruotolo, A.

    2017-01-01

    Novel hybrid core-shell nanoarchitectures were fabricated by a simple two-step electrochemical approach: first ZnO nanorod core was electrodeposited from Zn(NO3)2 solution; further, the core nanoarray was coated with a shell based on polypyrrole hybridized with graphene oxide by electropolymerization. The properties of the core/shell nanoarchitectures were studied as a function of the core properties induced by electrodeposition parameters. The ZnO nanostructures showed improved crystallinity and c-axis preferred orientation with increasing cathodic deposition potential while the increased deposition duration resulted in a morphology transition from nanorod to pyramidal shape. The electrochemical activity of the core/shell arrays was found to increase with the deposition potential of ZnO core but decreased when morphology changed from nanorod to pyramid shape. The photocatalytic results showed improved activity for the core/hybrid shell nanoarrays with respect to ZnO and ZnO/PPy ones. The degradation rate for methylene blue decreased with prolonged deposition duration of the core. The obtained results highlight the importance of electrochemical tuning of ZnO-based core/shell nanoarrays for improved performance in electrochemical and photocatalytic applications.

  20. Bacteria-mediated bisphenol A degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Yin, Kun; Chen, Lingxin

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important monomer in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, food cans, and other daily used chemicals. Daily and worldwide usage of BPA and BPA-contained products led to its ubiquitous distribution in water, sediment/soil, and atmosphere. Moreover, BPA has been identified as an environmental endocrine disruptor for its estrogenic and genotoxic activity. Thus, BPA contamination in the environment is an increasingly worldwide concern, and methods to efficiently remove BPA from the environment are urgently recommended. Although many factors affect the fate of BPA in the environment, BPA degradation is mainly depended on the metabolism of bacteria. Many BPA-degrading bacteria have been identified from water, sediment/soil, and wastewater treatment plants. Metabolic pathways of BPA degradation in specific bacterial strains were proposed, based on the metabolic intermediates detected during the degradation process. In this review, the BPA-degrading bacteria were summarized, and the (proposed) BPA degradation pathway mediated by bacteria were referred.

  1. Nanoparticles from Degradation of Biodegradable Plastic Mulch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Markus; Sintim, Henry; Bary, Andy; English, Marie; Schaefer, Sean

    2017-04-01

    Plastic mulch films are commonly used in crop production. They provide multiple benefits, including control of weeds and insects, increase of soil and air temperature, reduction of evaporation, and prevention of soil erosion. The use of plastic mulch film in agriculture has great potential to increase food production and security. Plastic mulch films must be retrieved and disposed after usage. Biodegradable plastic mulch films, who can be tilled into the soil after usage offer great benefits as alternative to conventional polyethylene plastic. However, it has to be shown that the degradation of these mulches is complete and no micro- and nanoparticles are released during degradation. We conducted a field experiment with biodegradable mulches and tested mulch degradation. Mulch was removed from the field after the growing season and composted to facilitate degradation. We found that micro- and nanoparticles were released during degradation of the mulch films in compost. This raises concerns about degradation in soils as well.

  2. Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaazaa, Hala E.; Abdelrahman, Maha M.; Ali, Nouruddin W.; Magdy, Maimana A.; Abdelkawy, M.

    2014-11-01

    A spectrophotometric kinetic study of Niclosamide alkaline degradation as a function of drug concentration, alkaline concentration and temperature has been established utilizing double divisor-ratio spectra spectrophotometric method. The developed method allowed determination of Niclosamide in presence of its alkaline degradation products; namely; 2-chloro-4-nitro aniline (DEG I) and 5-chloro salicylic acid (DEG II) with characterization of its degradation mechanism. It was found that degradation kinetic of Niclosamide followed pseudo-first order under the established experimental conditions with a degradation rate constant (k) of 0.0829 mol/h and half life (t1/2) of 8.35 h. The overall degradation rate constant as a function of the temperature under the given conditions obeyed Arrhenius equation where the activation energy was calculated to be 3.41 kcal/mol.

  3. Y-Irradiation Degradation of Methamidophos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Renbang; BAO Huaying; XIA Lingyun

    2009-01-01

    The irradiation degradation of methamidophos in aqueous solutions by 60Co-γ rays was investigated.The effects of absorbed doses,saturated gas,and the additive of H2O2 on the degradation were also studied.The results showed that the increased with the increase of the irradiation dosage.At certain irradiation dosage,methamidophos could be degraded completely.The degradation rate of methamidophos in the solution saturated with oxygen was higher than those saturated with other gases,which reached 100% when the absorbed dose was 8 kGy.H2O2 degraded methamidophos slowly when it was used alone,but could accelerate the degradation obviously when it was used with irradiation together.

  4. Recovering of images degraded by atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guang; Feng, Huajun; Xu, Zhihai; Li, Qi; Chen, Yueting

    2017-08-01

    Remote sensing images are seriously degraded by multiple scattering and bad weather. Through the analysis of the radiative transfer procedure in atmosphere, an image atmospheric degradation model considering the influence of atmospheric absorption multiple scattering and non-uniform distribution is proposed in this paper. Based on the proposed model, a novel recovering method is presented to eliminate atmospheric degradation. Mean-shift image segmentation and block-wise deconvolution are used to reduce time cost, retaining a good result. The recovering results indicate that the proposed method can significantly remove atmospheric degradation and effectively improve contrast compared with other removal methods. The results also illustrate that our method is suitable for various degraded remote sensing, including images with large field of view (FOV), images taken in side-glance situations, image degraded by atmospheric non-uniform distribution and images with various forms of clouds.

  5. Cores to the rescue: how old cores enable new science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, E.; Noren, A. J.; Brady, K.

    2016-12-01

    The value of archiving scientific specimens and collections for the purpose of enabling further research using new analytical techniques, resolving conflicting results, or repurposing them for entirely new research, is often discussed in abstract terms. We all agree that samples with adequate metadata ought to be archived systematically for easy access, for a long time and stored under optimal conditions. And yet, as storage space fills, there is a temptation to cull the collection, or when a researcher retires, to discard the collection unless the researcher manages to make his or her own arrangement for the collection to be accessioned elsewhere. Nobody has done anything with these samples in over 20 years! Who would want them? It turns out that plenty of us do want them, if we know how to find them and if they have sufficient metadata to assess past work and suitability for new analyses. The LacCore collection holds over 33 km of core from >6700 sites in diverse geographic locations worldwide with samples collected as early as 1950s. From these materials, there are many examples to illustrate the scientific value of archiving geologic samples. One example that benefitted Ito personally were cores from Lakes Mirabad and Zeribar, Iran, acquired in 1963 by Herb Wright and his associates. Several doctoral and postdoctoral students generated and published paleoecological reconstructions based on cladocerans, diatoms, pollen or plant macrofossils, mostly between 1963 and 1967. The cores were resampled in 1990s by a student being jointly advised by Wright and Ito for oxygen isotope analysis of endogenic calcite. The results were profitably compared with pollen and the results published in 2001 and 2006. From 1979 until very recently, visiting Iran for fieldwork was not pallowed for US scientists. Other examples will be given to further illustrate the power of archived samples to advance science.

  6. Hydrologic characterization of four cores from the Geysers Coring Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persoff, Peter; Hulen, Jeffrey B.

    1996-01-24

    Results of hydrologic tests conducted on four representative core plugs from Geysers Coring Project drill hole SB-15-D have been related to detailed mineralogic and textural characterization of the plugs to yield new information about permeability, porosity, and capillary-pressure characteristics of the uppermost Geysers steam reservoir and its immediately overlying caprock. The core plugs are all fine- to medium-grained, Franciscan-assemblage (late Mesozoic) metagraywacke with sparse Franciscan metamorphic quartz-calcite veins and late Cenozoic, hydrothermal quartz-calcite-pyrite veins. The matrices of three plugs from the caprock are rich in metamorphic mixed-layer illite/smectite and disseminated hydrothermal pyrite; the reservoir plug instead contains abundant illite and only minor pyrite. The reservoir plug and one caprock plug are sparsely disrupted by latest-stage, unmineralized microfractures which both follow and crosscut veinlets but which could be artifacts. Porosities of the plugs, measured by Boyles-law gas expansion, range between 1.9 and 2.5%. Gas permeability and Klinkenberg slip factor were calculated from gas-pressure-pulse-decay measurements using a specially designed permeameter with small (2 mL) reservoirs. Matrix permeabilities in the range 10-21 m² ( = 1 nanodarcy) were measured for two plugs that included mineral-filled veins but no unfilled microfractures. Greater permeabilities were measured on plugs that contained microfractures; at 500 psi net confining pressure, an effective aperture of 1.6 µm was estimated for one plug. Capillary pressure curves were determined for three cores by measuring saturation as weight gain of plugs equilibrated with atmospheres in which the relative humidity was controlled by saturated brines.

  7. Microbial degradation of pyridine using Pseudomonas sp. and isolation of plasmid responsible for degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, S Venkata; Sistla, Srinivas; Guru, R Kumar; Prasad, K Krishna; Kumar, C Suresh; Ramakrishna, S V; Sarma, P N

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas (PI2) capable of degrading pyridine was isolated from the mixed population of the activated sludge unit which was being used for treating complex effluents, the strain was characterized. Aerobic degradation of pyridine was studied with the isolated strain and the growth parameters were evaluated. Pyridine degradation was further conformed by chromatography (HPLC) analysis. The process parameters like biomass growth and dissolved oxygen consumption were monitored during pyridine degradation. In order to conform with the plasmid capability to degrade pyridine, the requisite plasmid was isolated and transferred to DH 5alpha Escherichia coli. The subsequent biodegradation studies revealed the ability of the transformed plasmid capability to degrade the pyridine.

  8. ENHANCEMENT OF RESISTANCE TO OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION OF NATURAL RUBBER THROUGH LATEX DEGRADATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    A fully characterised natural rubber latex was subjected to mechanical degradation by stirring at intervals. The resistance to oxidative degradation of the different samples were studied by measuring the Plasticity retention indices (PRI).The results show that there is an enhancement of the PRI from 57% for the undegraded rubber to 79% for the one-hour degraded sample. Further degradation resulted in decrease of PRI as time of degradation increased. Therefore, the one-hour degraded sample is a special rubber with high oxidation resistance which is of great importance in engineering.

  9. Hydrologic characterization of four cores from the Geysers Coring Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persoff, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Hulen, J.B. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Earth Sciences and Resources Institute

    1996-01-01

    Results of hydrologic tests on 4 representative core plugs from Geysers Coring Project drill hole SB-15-D were related to mineralogy and texture. Permeability measurements were made on 3 plugs from caprock and one plug from the steam reservoir. Late-stage microfractures present in 2 of the plugs contributed to greater permeability, but the values for the 2 other plugs indicate a typical matrix permeability of 1 to 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}m{sup 2}. Klinkenberg slip factor b for these plugs is generally consistent with the inverse relation between slip factor and permeability observed by Jones (1972) for plugs of much more permeable material. The caprock and reservoir samples are nearly identical metagraywackes with slight mineralogical differences which appear to have little effect on hydrology. The late stage microfractures are suspected of being artifacts. The capillary pressure curves for 3 cores are fit by power-law relations which can be used to estimate relative permeability curves for the matrix rocks.

  10. CELLULOSE DEGRADATION BY OXIDATIVE ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  11. Permafrost degradation in West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels Nielsen; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Important aspects of civil engineering in West Greenland relate to the presence of permafrost and mapping of the annual and future changes in the active layer due to the ongoing climatically changes in the Arctic. The Arctic Technology Centre (ARTEK) has worked more than 10 years on this topic......, Kangerlussuaq, Sisimiut and Nuuk. They are situated in continuous, discontinuous and sporadic permafrost zones. We will show examples of detoriation of permafrost related to present local scale climate observations and large scale climate and permafrost simulations modeled numerically with the GIPL model driven...... by HIRHAM climate projections for Greenland up to 2075. The engineering modelling is based on a risk assessment methodology based on a flow diagram which classify the risk of permafrost degradation causing settlement and stability problems for buildings and infrastructures based on relatively simple...

  12. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing X. Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms.

  13. The Degraded Poisson Wiretap Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Laourine, Amine

    2010-01-01

    Providing security guarantees for wireless communication is critically important for today's applications. While previous work in this area has concentrated on radio frequency (RF) channels, providing security guarantees for RF channels is inherently difficult because they are prone to rapid variations due small scale fading. Wireless optical communication, on the other hand, is inherently more secure than RF communication due to the intrinsic aspects of the signal propagation in the optical and near-optical frequency range. In this paper, secure communication over wireless optical links is examined by studying the secrecy capacity of a direct detection system. For the degraded Poisson wiretap channel, a closed-form expression of the secrecy capacity is given. A complete characterization of the general rate-equivocation region is also presented. For achievability, an optimal code is explicitly constructed by using the structured code designed by Wyner for the Poisson channel. The converse is proved in two dif...

  14. Oils degradation in agricultural machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating of oils condition in agricultural machinery is very important. With monitoring and evaluating we can prevent technical and economic losses. In this paper there were monitored the liquid lubricants taken from mobile thresher New Holland CX 860. Chemical and viscosity degradation of the lubricants were evaluated. Temperature dependence dynamic viscosity was observed in the range of temperature from −10 °C to 80 °C (for all oils. Considerable temperature dependence dynamic viscosity was found and demonstrated in case of all samples, which is in accordance with theoretical assumptions and literature data. Mathematical models were developed and tested. Temperature dependence dynamic viscosity was modeled using a polynomial 6th degree. The proposed models can be used for prediction of flow behavior of oils.

  15. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjani, Sunita J

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants are recalcitrant compounds and are classified as priority pollutants. Cleaning up of these pollutants from environment is a real world problem. Bioremediation has become a major method employed in restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environments that makes use of natural microbial biodegradation activity. Petroleum hydrocarbons utilizing microorganisms are ubiquitously distributed in environment. They naturally biodegrade pollutants and thereby remove them from the environment. Removal of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants from environment by applying oleophilic microorganisms (individual isolate/consortium of microorganisms) is ecofriendly and economic. Microbial biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants employs the enzyme catalytic activities of microorganisms to enhance the rate of pollutants degradation. This article provides an overview about bioremediation for petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants. It also includes explanation about hydrocarbon metabolism in microorganisms with a special focus on new insights obtained during past couple of years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Soil physical land degradation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    According to the European Soil Framework Directive (2006) soil compaction is besides water and wind erosion one of the main physical reasons and threats of soil degradation. It is estimated, that 32% of the subsoils in Europe are highly degraded and 18% moderately vulnerable to compaction. The problem is not limited to crop land or forest areas (especially because of non-site adjusted harvesting machines) but is also prevalent in rangelands and grassland, and even in so called natural non-disturbed systems. The main reasons for an intense increase in compacted agricultural or forested regions are the still increasing masses of the machines as well the increased frequency of wheeling under non favorable site conditions. Shear and vibration induced soil deformation enhances the deterioration of soil properties especially if the soil water content is very high and the internal soil strength very low. The same is true for animal trampling in combination with overgrazing of moist to wet pastures which subsequently causes a denser (i.e. reduced proportion of coarse pores with smaller continuity) but still structured soil horizons and will finally end in a compacted platy structure. In combination with high water content and shearing due to trampling therefore results in a complete muddy homogeneous soil with no structure at all. (Krümmelbein et al. 2013) Site managements of arable, forestry or horticulture soils requires a sufficiently rigid pore system which guarantees water, gas and heat exchange, nutrient transport and adsorption as well as an optimal rootability in order to avoid subsoil compaction. Such pore system also guarantees a sufficient microbial activity and composition in order to also decompose the plant etc. debris. It is therefore essential that well structured horizons dominate in soils with at best subangular blocky structure or in the top A- horizons a crumbly structure due to biological activity. In contrast defines the formation of a platy

  17. Cellulose degradation by oxidative enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  18. Controlled enzyme catalyzed heteropolysaccharide degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Louise Enggaard

    The work presented in this PhD thesis has provided a better understanding of the enzyme kinetics and quantitative phenomena of the hydrolysis of xylan substrates by selected pure enzyme preparations. Furthermore, the options for producing specific substituted xylooligosaccharides from selected...... substrates by specific xylanase treatment have been examined. The kinetics of the enzymatic degradation of water-extractable wheat arabinoxylan (WE-AX) during designed treatments with selected monocomponent enzymes was investigated by monitoring the release of xylose and arabinose. The results of different...... between -xylosidase and the α-L-arabinofuranosidases on the xylose release were low as compared to the effect of xylanase addition with β-xylosidase, which increased the xylose release by ~25 times in 30 minutes. At equimolar addition levels of the four enzymes, the xylanase activity was thus rate...

  19. Logging-while-coring method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, David S.; Myers, Gregory J.

    2007-11-13

    A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

  20. Synthesis of Core-Shell @@ Microspheres and Their Application as Recyclable Photocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication of core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 microspheres through a wet-chemical approach. The Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 microspheres possess both ferromagnetic and photocatalytic properties. The TiO2 nanoparticles on the surfaces of microspheres can degrade organic dyes under the illumination of UV light. Furthermore, the microspheres are easily separated from the solution after the photocatalytic process due to the ferromagnetic Fe3O4 core. The photocatalysts can be recycled for further use with slightly lower photocatalytic efficiency.

  1. Synthesis of Core-Shell @ @ Microspheres and Their Application as Recyclable Photocatalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenghua Wang; Ling Shen; Shiyu Zhu

    2012-01-01

    We report the fabrication of core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 microspheres through a wet-chemical approach. The Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 microspheres possess both ferromagnetic and photocatalytic properties. The TiO2 nanoparticles on the surfaces of microspheres can degrade organic dyes under the illumination of UV light. Furthermore, the microspheres are easily separated from the solution after the photocatalytic process due to the ferromagnetic Fe3O4 core. The photocatalysts can be recycled for further us...

  2. Light induced degradation of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, T.; Förster, S.; Schneider, T.; Maiberg, M.; Widdra, W.; Scheer, R.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate light-induced degradation of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) layers by means of time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements. Illumination in the range of minutes with 1 sun white light equivalent leads to a strong reduction of the carrier lifetime as determined by TRPL. Ambient storage in the dark, however, does not cause degradation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the CIGSe surface reveals a light induced enhancement of Na 1s and O 1s core-level emission. The position of the O 1s peak at 531.6 eV is related to a Na-O-CIGSe bonding complex. The light-induced degradation of the CIGSe layer finally translates into inferior open circuit voltages due to the dominance of interface recombination in completed solar cell devices. This study has implications for laboratory research and may need to be regarded in CIGSe module production.

  3. Degradable magnesium-based implant materials with anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiuming; Li, Kun; Han, Zengsheng; Wang, Erde; Xu, Zhigang; Liu, Riping; Tian, Yongjun

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare a new biodegradable Mg-based biomaterial, which provides good mechanical integrity in combination with anti-inflammatory function during the degradation process. The silver element was used, because it improved the mechanical properties as an effective grain refiner and it is also treated as a potential anti-inflammatory core. The new degradable Mg-Zn-Ag biomaterial was prepared by zone solidification technology and extrusion. The mechanical properties were mostly enhanced by fine grain strengthening. In addition, the alloys exhibited good cytocompatibility. The anti-inflammatory function of degradation products was identified by both interleukin-1α and nitric oxide modes. The anti-inflammatory impact was significantly associated with the concentration of silver ion. It was demonstrated that Mg-Zn-Ag system was a potential metallic stent with anti-inflammatory function, which can reduce the long-term dependence of anti-inflammatory drug after coronary stent implantation.

  4. Conceptual study of advanced PWR core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, Keung Ku; Joo, Hyung Kuk; Kim, Young Il; Noh, Jae Man; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Kim, Taek Kyum; Yoo, Yon Jong

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this project is for developing and verifying the core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies for core analyses. From the study of the sate-of-art of foreign advanced reactor cores, we developed core concepts such as soluble boron free, high convertible and enhanced safety core loaded semi-tight lattice hexagonal fuel assemblies. To analyze this hexagonal core, we have developed and verified some neutronic and T/H analysis methodologies. HELIOS code was adopted as the assembly code and HEXFEM code was developed for hexagonal core analysis. Based on experimental data in hexagonal lattices and the COBRA-IV-I code, we developed a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for hexagonal lattices. Using the core analysis code systems developed in this project, we designed a 600 MWe core and studied the feasibility of the core concepts. Two additional scopes were performed in this project : study on the operational strategies of soluble boron free core and conceptual design of large scale passive core. By using the axial BP zoning concept and suitable design of control rods, this project showed that it was possible to design a soluble boron free core in 600 MWe PWR. The results of large scale core design showed that passive concepts and daily load follow operation could be practiced. (author). 15 refs., 52 tabs., 101 figs.

  5. Monopoly quality degradation in cable television

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Gregory S; Shum, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Using an empirical framework derived from models of nonlinear pricing, we estimate the degree of quality degradation in cable television markets. We find lower bounds on quality degradation ranging from 11% to 45% of observed service qualities. Furthermore, cable operators in markets with local regulatory oversight tend to offer significantly higher quality products, and engage in less quality degradation. While prices are also higher in markets with local regulatory oversight, we find that c...

  6. Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, Rodney L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baker, Andrew M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lujan, Roger W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Langlois, David Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papadia, D. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Weber, Adam Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kusoglu, Ahmet [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shi, Shouwnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); More, K. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Grot, Steve [Ion Power, New Castle, DE (United States)

    2015-08-03

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. By investigating cell component degradation modes and defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions, new materials can be designed to improve durability. To achieve a deeper understanding of PEM fuel cell durability and component degradation mechanisms, we utilize a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with significant experience investigating these phenomena.

  7. Thermal degradation of organo-soluble polyimides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄俐研; 史燚; 金熹高

    1999-01-01

    The thermal degradation behavior of two organo-soluble polyimides was investigated by high resolution pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The pyrolyzates of the polymers at various temperatures were identified and characterized quantitatively. The relationship between the polymer structure and pyrolyzate distribution was discussed. The kinetic parameters of the thermal degradation were calculated based on thermogravimetric measurements. Finally, the thermal degradation mechanism for the polymers was suggested.

  8. CLAD DEGRADATION - FEPS SCREENING ARGUMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Schreiner

    2004-10-21

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the screening of the clad degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This report also addresses the effect of certain FEPs on both the cladding and the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and defense high-level waste (DHLW) waste forms, as appropriate to address the effects on multiple materials and both components (FEPs 2.1.09.09.0A, 2.1.09.11.0A, 2.1.11.05.0A, 2.1.12.02.0A, and 2.1.12.03.0A). These FEPs are expected to affect the repository performance during the postclosure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. Table 1-1 provides the list of cladding FEPs, including their screening decisions (include or exclude). The primary purpose of this report is to identify and document the analysis, screening decision, and TSPA-LA disposition (for included FEPs) or screening argument (for excluded FEPs) for these FEPs related to clad degradation. In some cases, where a FEP covers multiple technical areas and is shared with other FEP reports, this report may provide only a partial technical basis for the screening of the FEP. The full technical basis for shared FEPs is addressed collectively by the sharing FEP reports. The screening decisions and associated TSPA-LA dispositions or screening arguments from all of the FEP reports are cataloged in a project-specific FEPs database.

  9. Exploration of the core metabolism of symbiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Cecilia Coimbra; Cottret, Ludovic; Kielbassa, Janice; Charles, Hubert; Gautier, Christian; Ribeiro de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza; Lacroix, Vincent; Sagot, Marie-France

    2012-08-31

    A large number of genome-scale metabolic networks is now available for many organisms, mostly bacteria. Previous works on minimal gene sets, when analysing host-dependent bacteria, found small common sets of metabolic genes. When such analyses are restricted to bacteria with similar lifestyles, larger portions of metabolism are expected to be shared and their composition is worth investigating. Here we report a comparative analysis of the small molecule metabolism of symbiotic bacteria, exploring common and variable portions as well as the contribution of different lifestyle groups to the reduction of a common set of metabolic capabilities. We found no reaction shared by all the bacteria analysed. Disregarding those with the smallest genomes, we still do not find a reaction core, however we did find a core of biochemical capabilities. While obligate intracellular symbionts have no core of reactions within their group, extracellular and cell-associated symbionts do have a small core composed of disconnected fragments. In agreement with previous findings in Escherichia coli, their cores are enriched in biosynthetic processes whereas the variable metabolisms have similar ratios of biosynthetic and degradation reactions. Conversely, the variable metabolism of obligate intracellular symbionts is enriched in anabolism. Even when removing the symbionts with the most reduced genomes, there is no core of reactions common to the analysed symbiotic bacteria. The main reason is the very high specialisation of obligate intracellular symbionts, however, host-dependence alone is not an explanation for such absence. The composition of the metabolism of cell-associated and extracellular bacteria shows that while they have similar needs in terms of the building blocks of their cells, they have to adapt to very distinct environments. On the other hand, in obligate intracellular bacteria, catabolism has largely disappeared, whereas synthetic routes appear to have been selected for

  10. On-Orbit Degradation of Solar Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenMoussa, A.; Gissot, S.; Schühle, U.; Del Zanna, G.; Auchère, F.; Mekaoui, S.; Jones, A. R.; Walton, D.; Eyles, C. J.; Thuillier, G.; Seaton, D.; Dammasch, I. E.; Cessateur, G.; Meftah, M.; Andretta, V.; Berghmans, D.; Bewsher, D.; Bolsée, D.; Bradley, L.; Brown, D. S.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Dewitte, S.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Dominique, M.; Eparvier, F. G.; Foujols, T.; Gillotay, D.; Giordanengo, B.; Halain, J. P.; Hock, R. A.; Irbah, A.; Jeppesen, C.; Judge, D. L.; Kretzschmar, M.; McMullin, D. R.; Nicula, B.; Schmutz, W.; Ucker, G.; Wieman, S.; Woodraska, D.; Woods, T. N.

    2013-11-01

    We present the lessons learned about the degradation observed in several space solar missions, based on contributions at the Workshop about On-Orbit Degradation of Solar and Space Weather Instruments that took place at the Solar Terrestrial Centre of Excellence (Royal Observatory of Belgium) in Brussels on 3 May 2012. The aim of this workshop was to open discussions related to the degradation observed in Sun-observing instruments exposed to the effects of the space environment. This article summarizes the various lessons learned and offers recommendations to reduce or correct expected degradation with the goal of increasing the useful lifespan of future and ongoing space missions.

  11. On-Orbit Degradation of Solar Instruments

    CERN Document Server

    BenMoussa, A; Schühle, U; Del Zanna, G; Auchère, F; Mekaoui, S; Jones, A R; Walton, D; Eyles, C J; Thuillier, G; Seaton, D; Dammasch, I E; Cessateur, G; Meftah, M; Andretta, V; Berghmans, D; Bewsher, D; Bolsée, D; Bradley, L; Brown, D S; Chamberlin, P C; Dewitte, S; Didkovsky, L V; Dominique, M; Eparvier, F G; Foujols, T; Gillotay, D; Giordanengo, B; Halain, J -P; Hock, R A; Irbah, A; Jeppesen, C; Judge, D L; Kretzschmar, M; McMullin, D R; Nicula, B; Schmutz, W; Ucker, G; Wieman, S; Woodraska, D; Woods, T N; 10.1007/s11207-013-0290-z

    2013-01-01

    We present the lessons learned about the degradation observed in several space solar missions, based on contributions at the Workshop about On-Orbit Degradation of Solar and Space Weather Instruments that took place at the Solar Terrestrial Centre of Excellence (Royal Observatory of Belgium) in Brussels on 3 May 2012. The aim of this workshop was to open discussions related to the degradation observed in Sun-observing instruments exposed to the effects of the space environment. This article summarizes the various lessons learned and offers recommendations to reduce or correct expected degradation with the goal of increasing the useful lifespan of future and ongoing space missions.

  12. Antimisting kerosene: Low temperature degradation and blending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavrouian, A.; Parikh, P.; Sarohia, V.

    1988-01-01

    The inline filtration characteristics of freshly blended and degraded antimisting fuels (AMK) at low temperature are examined. A needle valve degrader was modified to include partial recirculation of degraded fuel and heat addition in the bypass loop. A pressure drop across the needle valve of up to 4,000 psi was used. The pressure drop across a 325 mesh filter screen placed inline with the degrader and directly downstream of the needle valve was measured as a function of time for different values of pressure drop across the needle valve. A volume flux of 1 gpm/sq in was employed based on the frontal area of the screen. It was found that, at ambient temperatures, freshly blended AMK fuel could be degraded using a single pass degradation at 4,000 psi pressure drop across the needle valve to give acceptable filterability performance. At fuel temperatures below -20 C, degradation becomes increasingly difficult and a single pass technique results in unacceptable filtration performance. Recirculation of a fraction of the degraded fuel and heat addition in the bypass loop improved low temperature degradation performance. The problem is addressed of blending the AMK additive with Jet A at various base fuel temperatures.

  13. Handbook of environmental degradation of materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kutz, Myer

    2012-01-01

    Divided into sections which deal with analysis, types of degradation, protection and surface engineering respectively, the reader is introduced to the wide variety of environmental effects and what...

  14. Simulating Degradation Data for Prognostic Algorithm Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — PHM08 Challenge Dataset is now publicly available at the NASA Prognostics Respository + Download INTRODUCTION - WHY SIMULATE DEGRADATION DATA? Of various challenges...

  15. Photovoltaic Degradation Rates -- An Analytical Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01

    As photovoltaic penetration of the power grid increases, accurate predictions of return on investment require accurate prediction of decreased power output over time. Degradation rates must be known in order to predict power delivery. This article reviews degradation rates of flat-plate terrestrial modules and systems reported in published literature from field testing throughout the last 40 years. Nearly 2000 degradation rates, measured on individual modules or entire systems, have been assembled from the literature, showing a median value of 0.5%/year. The review consists of three parts: a brief historical outline, an analytical summary of degradation rates, and a detailed bibliography partitioned by technology.

  16. Whole Core Transport Calculation Methodology for a Hexagonal Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J. Y.; Kim, K. S.; Lee, C. C.; Zee, S. Q.; Joo, H. G

    2007-07-15

    This report discusses the hexagonal module implemented to the DeCART code and the performance of them. The implemented hexagonal module includes the hexagonal ray tracing and the CMFD acceleration modules. The performance of the implemented hexagonal module is examined for 4 tests of: (1) CMFD acceleration test, (2) the accuracy test of the hexagonal module, (3) the performance test for 2-D NGNP problem and (4) the applicability test for 3-D NGNP problem. The features of the implemented hexagonal modules are: (1) The Modular ray tracing scheme based on a hexagonal assembly and a path linking scheme between the modular rays. (2) Segment generation based on the structure unit. (3) Cell ray approximation: This feature is developed to reduce the memory required to store the segment information. (4) Modified cycle ray scheme that begins the ray tracing at a given surface and finishes if the reflected ray meets the starting surface. This feature is developed to reduce the memory required for the angular flux at the core boundary. (5) Fixed assembly geometry. The pin geometry of the single pin per assembly problem is different from that of the multi-pin problem. The core geometry of a single assembly problem is also different from that of the multi-assembly problem. (6) CMFD module based on unstructured cell. This feature is to deal with the irregular gap cells that are positioned at the assembly boundaries. The examination results of the 4 tests can be summarized as: (1) The CMFD acceleration test shows that the CMFD module speedups about greater than 200 for the core problem. (2) The accuracy test shows that the hexagonal MOC module produces an accurate solution of less than 60 pcm of eigenvalue and less than 2 % of local pin power errors. (3) The performance test for 2-D NGNP problem shows that the implemented hexagonal module works soundly and produces a reasonable solution by cooperating with the existing DeCART library and the other modules. (4) The applicability

  17. Divergent Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Asymmetrical-Core-Fucosylated and Core-Unmodified N-Glycans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Tiehai; Huang, Min; Liu, Lin; Wang, Shuo; Moremen, Kelley W; Boons, Geert-Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/088245489

    2016-01-01

    A divergent chemoenzymaytic approach for the preparation of core-fucosylated and core-unmodified asymmetrical N-glycans from a common advances precursor is described. An undecasaccharide was synthesized by sequential chemical glycosylations of an orthogonally protected core fucosylated

  18. Sediments at the top of Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffett, B A; Garnero, E J; Jeanloz, R

    2000-11-17

    Unusual physical properties at the core-mantle boundary have been inferred from seismic and geodetic observations in recent years. We show how both types of observations can be explained by a layer of silicate sediments, which accumulate at the top of the core as Earth cools. Compaction of the sediments expels most of the liquid iron but leaves behind a small amount of core material, which is entrained in mantle convection and may account for the isotopic signatures of core material in some hot spot plumes. Extraction of light elements from the liquid core also enhances the vigor of convection in the core and may increase the power available to the geodynamo.

  19. Core and Lumbopelvic Stabilization in Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Carlos E

    2016-02-01

    Core muscles provide stability that allows generation of force and motion in the lower extremities, as well as distributing impact forces and allowing controlled and efficient body movements. Imbalances or deficiencies in the core muscles can result in increased fatigue, decreased endurance, and injury in runners. Core strengthening should incorporate the intrinsic needs of the core for flexibility, strength, balance, and endurance, and the function of the core in relation to its role in extremity function and dysfunction. Specific exercises are effective in strengthening the core muscles.

  20. Accelerator driven sub-critical core

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Peter M; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-03-17

    Systems and methods for operating an accelerator driven sub-critical core. In one embodiment, a fission power generator includes a sub-critical core and a plurality of proton beam generators. Each of the proton beam generators is configured to concurrently provide a proton beam into a different area of the sub-critical core. Each proton beam scatters neutrons within the sub-critical core. The plurality of proton beam generators provides aggregate power to the sub-critical core, via the proton beams, to scatter neutrons sufficient to initiate fission in the sub-critical core.

  1. Using fragmentation to assess degradation of forest edges in Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Aurélie C; Aguilar-Amuchastegui, Naikoa; Hostert, Patrick; Bastin, Jean-François

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that fragmentation is an increasing threat to global forests, which has major impacts on biodiversity and the important ecosystem services provided by forested landscapes. Several tools have been developed to evaluate global patterns of fragmentation, which have potential applications for REDD+. We study how canopy height and above ground biomass (AGB) change across several categories of forest edges determined by fragmentation analysis. We use Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) as an example. An analysis of variance of different edge widths and airborne estimated canopy height found that canopy heights were significantly different in forest edges at a distance of 100 m from the nonforest edge. Biomass was significantly different between fragmentation classes at an edge distance of 300 m. Core forest types were found to have significantly higher canopy height and greater AGB than forest edges and patches, where height and biomass decrease significantly as the level of fragmentation increases. A change analysis shows that deforestation and degradation are increasing over time and biomass loss associated with degradation account for at least one quarter of total loss. We estimate that about 80 % of primary forests are intact, which decreases 3.5 % over the 15 year study period, as primary forest is either deforested or transitioned to forest edge. While the carbon loss per hectare is lower than that of deforestation, degradation potentially affects up to three times more area than deforestation alone. When defining forest degradation by decreased biomass without any loss in forest area, assessing transitions of core forest to edges over time can contribute an important element to REDD+MRV systems. The estimation of changes between different forest fragmentation types and their associated biomass loss can provide an estimate of degradation carbon emission factors. Forest degradation and emissions due to fragmentation are often

  2. Microfluidic synthesis of Ag@Cu2O core-shell nanoparticles with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Sha; Yang, Mei; Chen, Huihui; Ren, Mingyue; Chen, Guangwen

    2017-01-15

    A microfluidic-based method for the continuous synthesis of Ag@Cu2O core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) has been developed. It only took 32s to obtain Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs, indicating a high efficiency of this microfluidic-based method. Triangular Ag nanoprisms were employed as the cores for the overgrowth of Cu2O through the reduction of Cu(OH)4(2-) with ascorbic acid. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, HAADF-STEM, EDX, HRTEM, UV-vis spectra and N2 adsorption-desorption. The characterization results revealed that the as-synthesized Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs exhibited a well-defined core-shell nanostructure with a polycrystalline shell, which was composed of numbers of Cu2O domains epitaxially growing on the triangular Ag nanoprism. It was concluded that the synthesis parameters such as the molar ratio of trisodium citrate to AgNO3, H2O2 to AgNO3, NaOH to CuSO4, ascorbic acid to CuSO4 and AgNO3 to CuSO4 had significant effect on the synthesis of Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs. Moreover, Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs exhibited superior catalytic activity in comparison with pristine Cu2O NPs towards the visible light-driven degradation of methyl orange. This enhanced photocatalytic activity of Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs was attributed to the larger BET surface area and improved charge separation efficiency. The trapping experiment indicated that holes and superoxide anion radicals were the major reactive species in the photodegradation of methyl orange over Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs. In addition, Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs showed no obvious deactivation in the cyclic test.

  3. L183, a Quiescent Core?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Some observed results of NH3 (1, 1) and (2, 2) line emission in the starless dark cloud L183 are reported. Our observation suggests that the dense core of L183 has a size of ~ 0.16pc ×0.1pc with a mass of ~ 12M⊙. A velocity gradient of 4km s-1pc-1 from the north to the south was detected. The velocity shift corresponds to a central mass of ~ 5M⊙. If it is caused by rotation, the mass would be much less than the value above. This suggests that there may be more mass in the envelope of L183 than in the central region. The analysis of our data and the evidence in the literature about L183 indicate that it may be undergoing a process of collapsing to form a low-mass binary dense core.

  4. CORE CULTURE IN LANGUAGE LEARNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jane Orton

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the essential role of culture in the creation of meaning of language-inuse, showing it to be the source of both the contextual shaping of a particular text and the fundamental core of beliefs and values from which contemporary contextual features derive. As a result of this essential relationship, it is argued, modern language learners need to master the cultural system as well as the linguistic system of their new language if they are to be able to use it competently in real life, as mo st intend today. Samples of texts are examined to show how the meanings of both context and core culture are naturally embedded in ordinary language and suggestions are provided for how these might be successfully brought to students' attention and mastery in a classroom.

  5. Beyond core knowledge: Natural geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelke, Elizabeth; Lee, Sang Ah; Izard, Véronique

    2010-01-01

    For many centuries, philosophers and scientists have pondered the origins and nature of human intuitions about the properties of points, lines, and figures on the Euclidean plane, with most hypothesizing that a system of Euclidean concepts either is innate or is assembled by general learning processes. Recent research from cognitive and developmental psychology, cognitive anthropology, animal cognition, and cognitive neuroscience suggests a different view. Knowledge of geometry may be founded on at least two distinct, evolutionarily ancient, core cognitive systems for representing the shapes of large-scale, navigable surface layouts and of small-scale, movable forms and objects. Each of these systems applies to some but not all perceptible arrays and captures some but not all of the three fundamental Euclidean relationships of distance (or length), angle, and direction (or sense). Like natural number (Carey, 2009), Euclidean geometry may be constructed through the productive combination of representations from these core systems, through the use of uniquely human symbolic systems. PMID:20625445

  6. Continuous Chemistry in Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid

    originating from volcanic eruptions, crucial for cross-dating ice cores and relevant for climate interpretations. The method includes a heat bath to minimize the acidifying effect of CO2 both from the laboratory and from the ice itself. While for acidic ice the method finds similar concentrations of H......Ice cores provide high resolution records of past climate and environment. In recent years the use of continuous flow analysis (CFA) systems has increased the measurement throughput, while simultaneously decreasing the risk of contaminating the ice samples. CFA measurements of high temporal...... resolution increase our knowledge on fast climate variations and cover a wide range of proxies informing on a variety of components such as atmospheric transport, volcanic eruptions, forest fires and many more. New CFA methods for the determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) and pH are presented...

  7. Composite Structure with Origami Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-19

    preparation). Hence, we are able to produce foldcores in any given shape. Mechanical behaviour of sandwich shells with foldcores Equipped with the...being pressed in order to invert the tube inside out. For a tube with circular section, this particular mode of failure has been proven to consume the...to design the most suitable folded core structure for given applications. Gattas J M and You Z, The Behaviour of Curved-Crease Foldcores under

  8. Hollow-core grating fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillé, R.; Tajalli, P.; Roy, P.; Ahmadi-kandjani, S.; Kucharski, S.; Ortyl, E.

    2012-02-01

    We propose a new type of hollow-core fiber where the propagation is ensured by a photoinduced self-pattern acting as a surface relief grating (SRG). The SRG is written by launching a suitable laser beam with proper polarization in a capillary glass fiber with the inner surface previously coated with an azopolymer thin film. Such a grating acts as a wavelength/angle dependant reflective mirror and enhances the confinement and the propagation of the light.

  9. Understanding Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, A

    2004-01-01

    I summarize, in the form of an extended abstract, the ongoing efforts at the University of Arizona (and in collaboration) to understand core-collapse supernovae theoretically. Included are short discussions of 1D (SESAME) and 2D (VULCAN/2D) codes and results, as well as discussions of the possible role of rotation. Highlighted are recent developments in multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics and the essential physics of the neutrino-driven mechanism.

  10. Finding your next core business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Chris

    2007-04-01

    How do you know when your core needs to change? And how do you determine what should replace it? From an in-depth study of 25 companies, the author, a strategy consultant, has discovered that it's possible to measure the vitality of a business's core. If it needs reinvention, he says, the best course is to mine hidden assets. Some of the 25 companies were in deep crisis when they began the process of redefining themselves. But, says Zook, management teams can learn to recognize early signs of erosion. He offers five diagnostic questions with which to evaluate the customers, key sources of differentiation, profit pools, capabilities, and organizational culture of your core business. The next step is strategic regeneration. In four-fifths of the companies Zook examined, a hidden asset was the centerpiece of the new strategy. He provides a map for identifying the hidden assets in your midst, which tend to fall into three categories: undervalued business platforms, untapped insights into customers, and underexploited capabilities. The Swedish company Dometic, for example, was manufacturing small absorption refrigerators for boats and RVs when it discovered a hidden asset: its understanding of, and access to, customers in the RV market. The company took advantage of a boom in that market to refocus on complete systems for live-in vehicles. The Danish company Novozymes, which produced relatively low-tech commodity enzymes such as those used in detergents, realized that its underutilized biochemical capability in genetic and protein engineering was a hidden asset and successfully refocused on creating bioengineered specialty enzymes. Your next core business is not likely to announce itself with fanfare. Use the author's tools to conduct an internal audit of possibilities and pinpoint your new focus.

  11. Rich-cores in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Athen

    2014-01-01

    A core is said to be a group of central and densely connected nodes which governs the overall behavior of a network. Profiling this meso--scale structure currently relies on a limited number of methods which are often complex, and have scalability issues when dealing with very large networks. As a result, we are yet to fully understand its impact on network properties and dynamics. Here we introduce a simple method to profile this structure by combining the concepts of core/periphery and rich-club. The key challenge in addressing such association of the two concepts is to establish a way to define the membership of the core. The notion of a "rich-club" describes nodes which are essentially the hub of a network, as they play a dominating role in structural and functional properties. Interestingly, the definition of a rich-club naturally emphasizes high degree nodes and divides a network into two subgroups. Our approach theoretically couples the underlying principle of a rich-club with the escape time of a rand...

  12. Grain alignment in starless cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T. J.; Bagley, M. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Krejny, M. [Cree Inc., 4600 Silicon Dr., Durham, NC (United States); Andersson, B.-G. [SOFIA Science Center, USRA, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Bastien, P., E-mail: tjj@astro.umn.edu [Centre de recherche en astrophysique du Québec and Départment de Physique, Université de Montréal, Montréal (Canada)

    2015-01-01

    We present near-IR polarimetry data of background stars shining through a selection of starless cores taken in the K band, probing visual extinctions up to A{sub V}∼48. We find that P{sub K}/τ{sub K} continues to decline with increasing A{sub V} with a power law slope of roughly −0.5. Examination of published submillimeter (submm) polarimetry of starless cores suggests that by A{sub V}≳20 the slope for P versus τ becomes ∼−1, indicating no grain alignment at greater optical depths. Combining these two data sets, we find good evidence that, in the absence of a central illuminating source, the dust grains in dense molecular cloud cores with no internal radiation source cease to become aligned with the local magnetic field at optical depths greater than A{sub V}∼20. A simple model relating the alignment efficiency to the optical depth into the cloud reproduces the observations well.

  13. Helium in Earth's early core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhifd, M. A.; Jephcoat, Andrew P.; Heber, Veronika S.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2013-11-01

    The observed escape of the primordial helium isotope, 3He, from the Earth's interior indicates that primordial helium survived the energetic process of planetary accretion and has been trapped within the Earth to the present day. Two distinct reservoirs in the Earth's interior have been invoked to account for variations in the 3He/4He ratio observed at the surface in ocean basalts: a conventional depleted mantle source and a deep, still enigmatic, source that must have been isolated from processing throughout Earth history. The Earth's iron-based core has not been considered a potential helium source because partitioning of helium into metal liquid has been assumed to be negligible. Here we determine helium partitioning in experiments between molten silicates and iron-rich metal liquids at conditions up to 16GPa and 3,000K. Analyses of the samples by ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry yield metal-silicate helium partition coefficients that range between 4.7×10-3 and 1.7×10-2 and suggest that significant quantities of helium may reside in the core. Based on estimated concentrations of primordial helium, we conclude that the early core could have incorporated enough helium to supply deep-rooted plumes enriched in 3He throughout the age of the Earth.

  14. Core shifts in blazar jets

    CERN Document Server

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A; Pjanka, Patryk; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of core shift in jets, which is the dependence of the position of the jet radio core on the frequency. We derive a new method to measure the jet magnetic field based on both the value of the shift and the observed flux, which compliments the standard method assuming equipartition. Using both methods, we re-analyse the blazar sample of Zamaninasab et al. We find that equipartition is satisfied only if the jet opening angle in the radio core region is close to the values found observationally, $\\simeq$0.1--0.2 divided by the bulk Lorentz factor, $\\Gamma_{\\rm j}$. Larger values, e.g., $1/\\Gamma_{\\rm j}$, would imply very strong departures from equipartition. A small jet opening angle implies in turn the magnetization parameter of $\\ll 1$. We determine the jet magnetic flux taking this effect into account. We find that the average jet magnetic flux is compatible with the model of jet formation due to black-hole spin energy extraction and accretion being magnetically arrested. We calculate the ...

  15. Accelerated propor tional degradation hazards-odds model in accelerated degradation test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tingting Huang; Zhizhong Li

    2015-01-01

    An accelerated proportional degradation hazards-odds model is proposed. It is a non-parametric model and thus has path-free and distribution-free properties, avoiding the errors caused by faulty assumptions of degradation paths or distribution of degra-dation measurements. It is established based on a link function which combines the degradation cumulative hazard rate function and the degradation odds function through a transformation pa-rameter, and this makes the accelerated proportional degradation hazards model and the accelerated proportional degradation odds model special cases of it. Hypothesis tests are discussed, and the proposed model is applicable when some model assumptions are satisfied. This model is utilized to estimate the reliability of minia-ture bulbs under low stress levels based on the degradation data obtained under high stress levels to validate the effectiveness of this model.

  16. Core stability training for injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxel Bliven, Kellie C; Anderson, Barton E

    2013-11-01

    Enhancing core stability through exercise is common to musculoskeletal injury prevention programs. Definitive evidence demonstrating an association between core instability and injury is lacking; however, multifaceted prevention programs including core stabilization exercises appear to be effective at reducing lower extremity injury rates. PUBMED WAS SEARCHED FOR EPIDEMIOLOGIC, BIOMECHANIC, AND CLINICAL STUDIES OF CORE STABILITY FOR INJURY PREVENTION (KEYWORDS: "core OR trunk" AND "training OR prevention OR exercise OR rehabilitation" AND "risk OR prevalence") published between January 1980 and October 2012. Articles with relevance to core stability risk factors, assessment, and training were reviewed. Relevant sources from articles were also retrieved and reviewed. Stabilizer, mobilizer, and load transfer core muscles assist in understanding injury risk, assessing core muscle function, and developing injury prevention programs. Moderate evidence of alterations in core muscle recruitment and injury risk exists. Assessment tools to identify deficits in volitional muscle contraction, isometric muscle endurance, stabilization, and movement patterns are available. Exercise programs to improve core stability should focus on muscle activation, neuromuscular control, static stabilization, and dynamic stability. Core stabilization relies on instantaneous integration among passive, active, and neural control subsystems. Core muscles are often categorized functionally on the basis of stabilizing or mobilizing roles. Neuromuscular control is critical in coordinating this complex system for dynamic stabilization. Comprehensive assessment and training require a multifaceted approach to address core muscle strength, endurance, and recruitment requirements for functional demands associated with daily activities, exercise, and sport.

  17. Mechanisms of humic substances degradation by fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hadar, Y.; Grinhut, T.

    2012-04-01

    Humic substances (HS) are formed by secondary synthesis reactions (humification) during the decay process and transformation of biomolecules originating from plants and other dead organisms. In nature, HS are extremely resistant to biological degradation. Thus, these substances are major components in the C cycle and in the biosphere and therefore, the understanding of the process leading to their formation and transformation and degradation is vital. Fungi active in the decomposition process of HS include mainly ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that are common in the upper layer of forest and grassland soils. Many basidiomycetes belong to the white-rot fungi (WRF) and litter-decomposing fungi (LDF). These fungi are considered to be the most efficient lignin degraders due to their nonspecific oxidizing enzymes: manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and laccase. Although bacteria dominate compost and participate in the turnover of HS, their ability to degrade stable macromolecules such as lignin and HS is limited. The overall objectives of this research were to corroborate biodegradation processes of HS by WRF. The specific objectives were: (i) To isolate, identify and characterize HS degrading WRF from biosolids (BS) compost; (ii) To study the biodegradation process of three types of HS, which differ in their structure, by WRF isolated from BS compost; and (iii) To investigate the mechanisms of HA degradation by WRF using two main approaches: (a) Study the physical and chemical analyses of the organic compounds obtained from direct fungal degradation of HA as well as elucidation of the relevant enzymatic reactions; and (b) Study the enzymatic and biochemical mechanisms involved during HA degradation. In order to study the capability of fungi to degrade HS, seventy fungal strains were isolated from biosolids (BS) compost. Two of the most active fungal species were identified based on rDNA sequences and designated Trametes sp. M23 and Phanerochaetesp., Y6

  18. Criterion of Magnetic Saturation and Simulation of Nonlinear Magnetization for a Linear Multi-core Pulse Transformer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾正中; 蒯斌; 孙凤举; 丛培天; 邱爱慈

    2002-01-01

    The linear multi-core pulse transformer is an important primary driving source usedin pulsed power apparatus for the production of dense plasma owing to its compact, relatively low-cost and easy-to-handle characteristics. The evaluation of the magnetic saturation of the transformer cores is essential to the transformer design, because the energy transfer efficiency of the transformer will degrade significantly after magnetic saturation. This work proposes analytical formulas of the criterion of magnetic saturation for the cores when the transformer drives practical loads. Furthermore, an electric circuit model based on a dependent source treatment for simulating the electric behavior of the cores related to their nonlinear magnetization is developed using the initial magnetization curve of the cores. The numerical simulation with the model is used to evaluate the validity of the criterion. Both the criterion and the model are found to be in agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Facile synthesis of highly efficient one-dimensional plasmonic photocatalysts through Ag@Cu₂O core-shell heteronanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jinyan; Li, Zhen; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Shanqing; Wang, Lianzhou; Dou, Shixue

    2014-09-24

    A novel class of one-dimensional (1D) plasmonic Ag@Cu2O core-shell heteronanowires have been synthesized at room temperature for photocatalysis application. The morphology, size, crystal structure and composition of the products were investigated by XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, and UV-vis instruments. It was found the reaction time and the amount of Ag nanowires play crucial roles in the formation of well-defined 1D Ag@Cu2O core-shell heteronanowires. The resultant 1D Ag@Cu2O NWs exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity toward degradation of organic contaminants than Ag@Cu2O core-shell nanoparticles or pure Cu2O nanospheres under solar light irradiation. The drastic enhancement in photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the surface plasmon resonance and the electron sink effect of the Ag NW cores, and the unique 1D core-shell nanostructure.

  20. Aflatoxin B₁ degradation by a Pseudomonas strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangare, Lancine; Zhao, Yueju; Folly, Yawa Minnie Elodie; Chang, Jinghua; Li, Jinhan; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yang

    2014-10-23

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), one of the most potent naturally occurring mutagens and carcinogens, causes significant threats to the food industry and animal production. In this study, 25 bacteria isolates were collected from grain kernels and soils displaying AFB1 reduction activity. Based on its degradation effectiveness, isolate N17-1 was selected for further characterization and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa N17-1 could degrade AFB₁, AFB₂ and AFM₁ by 82.8%, 46.8% and 31.9% after incubation in Nutrient Broth (NB) medium at 37 °C for 72 h, respectively. The culture supernatant of isolate N17-1 degraded AFB₁ effectively, whereas the viable cells and intra cell extracts were far less effective. Factors influencing AFB1 degradation by the culture supernatant were investigated. Maximum degradation was observed at 55 °C. Ions Mn²⁺ and Cu²⁺ were activators for AFB1 degradation, however, ions Mg²⁺, Li⁺, Zn²⁺, Se²⁺, Fe³⁺ were strong inhibitors. Treatments with proteinase K and proteinase K plus SDS significantly reduced the degradation activity of the culture supernatant. No degradation products were observed based on preliminary LC-QTOF/MS analysis, indicating AFB₁ was metabolized to degradation products with chemical properties different from that of AFB₁. The results indicated that the degradation of AFB₁ by P. aeruginosa N17-1 was enzymatic and could have a great potential in industrial applications. This is the first report indicating that the isolate of P. aeruginosa possesses the ability to degrade aflatoxin.

  1. Biochar degradation in different soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilske, B.; Bai, M.; Eckhardt, C.; Kammann, C.; Kraft, P.; Bach, M.; Frede, H.-G.; Breuer, L.

    2012-04-01

    Current expectations in biochar products (BC) are numerous, e.g., including improved soil fertility & plant growth, support to combat desertification, and an increase in the carbon sequestration of soils. Costs for biochar production & application must be covered by a positive budget of benefits, which may crucially depend on the residence time (or half life T1/2, yr) of BC in soils. The objective of the present study was to assess the biodegradation rates of BC in different soils by means of a cost-efficient and standardized laboratory method. Investigated BC were from the source material of the C4 plant Miscanthus, and converted via (1) pyrolysis (pyrBC) and (2) hydrothermal carbonization (htcBC). The high-labelling of the educt allowed the quantification of degradation by measurement of the 13CO2 efflux. The pyrBC and htcBC were mixed with four different agricultural soils ranging in texture from sand to loam and in soil organic carbon (SOC) from 0.63% to 2.53%. Four samples of each BC-soil combination (1% BC wt/wt in a 300-g sample mixture) and soil-only reference were incubated in 1-L glass bottles at 40% water holding capacity and 25° C. Biodegradation of BC was monitored weekly over a period of 7 months using an automated open-dynamic chamber system. The system couples the batch of samples to microprocessor- controlled valves, by which flushing is provided for the batch, while individual samples are consecutively connected through to a wavelength scan cavity ring down spectrometer (WS-CRDS). Net 13CO2 efflux from BC was obtained by subtracting the 13CO2 efflux from "soil-only" samples. T1/2 was calculated based on the ln(k)-based algorithm recently suggested by Zimmerman et al. (2010). Results show an orders-of-magnitude larger T1/2 of BC in poor sandy soil than in SOC-richer soils (T1/2 up to 106 yrs) but not a statistically clear trend of biodegradability along the four-point SOC gradient. This was similar in both BC types, although T1/2 was generally

  2. CORE SHAPES AND ORIENTATIONS OF CORE-SÉRSIC GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dullo, Bililign T.; Graham, Alister W., E-mail: Bdullo@astro.swin.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2015-01-01

    The inner and outer shapes and orientations of core-Sérsic galaxies may hold important clues to their formation and evolution. We have therefore measured the central and outer ellipticities and position angles for a sample of 24 core-Sérsic galaxies using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images and data. By selecting galaxies with core-Sérsic break radii R{sub b} —a measure of the size of their partially depleted core—that are ≳ 0.''2, we find that the ellipticities and position angles are quite robust against HST seeing. For the bulk of the galaxies, there is a good agreement between the ellipticities and position angles at the break radii and the average outer ellipticities and position angles determined over R {sub e}/2 < R < R {sub e}, where R {sub e} is the spheroids' effective half light radius. However there are some interesting differences. We find a median ''inner'' ellipticity at R{sub b} of ε{sub med} = 0.13 ± 0.01, rounder than the median ellipticity of the ''outer'' regions ε{sub med} = 0.20 ± 0.01, which is thought to reflect the influence of the central supermassive black hole at small radii. In addition, for the first time we find a trend, albeit weak (2σ significance), such that galaxies with larger (stellar deficit-to-supermassive black hole) mass ratios—thought to be a measure of the number of major dry merger events—tend to have rounder inner and outer isophotes, suggesting a connection between the galaxy shapes and their merger histories. We show that this finding is not simply reflecting the well known result that more luminous galaxies are rounder, but it is no doubt related.

  3. Optimized Cellular Core for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Patz Materials and Technologies has developed, produced and tested, as part of the Phase-I SBIR, a new form of composite cellular core material, named Interply Core,...

  4. Scaling Turbo Boost to a 1000 cores

    CERN Document Server

    S, Ananth Narayan; Fedorova, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    The Intel Core i7 processor code named Nehalem provides a feature named Turbo Boost which opportunistically varies the frequencies of the processor's cores. The frequency of a core is determined by core temperature, the number of active cores, the estimated power consumption, the estimated current consumption, and operating system frequency scaling requests. For a chip multi-processor(CMP) that has a small number of physical cores and a small set of performance states, deciding the Turbo Boost frequency to use on a given core might not be difficult. However, we do not know the complexity of this decision making process in the context of a large number of cores, scaling to the 100s, as predicted by researchers in the field.

  5. Investigating the translation of Earth's inner core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Elizabeth A; Cormier, Vernon F; Geballe, Zachary M;

    2012-01-01

    The Earth’s inner core provides unique insights into processes that are occurring deep within our Earth today, as well as processes that occurred in the past. The seismic structure of the inner core is complex, and is dominated by anisotropic and isotropic differences between the Eastern...... and Western ‘hemispheres’ of the inner core. Recent geodynamical models suggest that this hemispherical dichotomy can be explained by a fast translation of the inner core. In these models one side of the inner core is freezing, while the other side is melting, leading to the development of different seismic...... properties on either side of the inner core. A simple translating model of the inner core, however, does not seem to easily explain all of the seismically observed features, including the innermost inner core; the observed sharp lateral gradient in seismic properties between the two hemispheres...

  6. High Efficiency Solar Furnace Core Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — It is proposed to develop a high efficiency solar furnace core that greatly lessens the heat losses from the furnace core, either greatly reducing the amount of...

  7. Comparative secretome analysis suggests low plant cell wall degrading capacity in Frankia symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normand Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frankia sp. strains, the nitrogen-fixing facultative endosymbionts of actinorhizal plants, have long been proposed to secrete hydrolytic enzymes such as cellulases, pectinases, and proteases that may contribute to plant root penetration and formation of symbiotic root nodules. These or other secreted proteins might logically be involved in the as yet unknown molecular interactions between Frankia and their host plants. We compared the genome-based secretomes of three Frankia strains representing diverse host specificities. Signal peptide detection algorithms were used to predict the individual secretomes of each strain, and the set of secreted proteins shared among the strains, termed the core Frankia secretome. Proteins in the core secretome may be involved in the actinorhizal symbiosis. Results The Frankia genomes have conserved Sec (general secretory and Tat (twin arginine translocase secretion systems. The potential secretome of each Frankia strain comprised 4–5% of the total proteome, a lower percentage than that found in the genomes of other actinobacteria, legume endosymbionts, and plant pathogens. Hydrolytic enzymes made up only a small fraction of the total number of predicted secreted proteins in each strain. Surprisingly, polysaccharide-degrading enzymes were few in number, especially in strain CcI3, with more esterolytic, lipolytic and proteolytic enzymes having signal peptides. A total of 161 orthologous proteins belong to the core Frankia secretome. Of these, 52 also lack homologs in closely related actinobacteria, and are termed "Frankia-specific." The genes encoding these conserved secreted proteins are often clustered near secretion machinery genes. Conclusion The predicted secretomes of Frankia sp. are relatively small and include few hydrolases, which could reflect adaptation to a symbiotic lifestyle. There are no well-conserved secreted polysaccharide-degrading enzymes present in all three Frankia

  8. Formation of Core-Shell Particles by Interfacial Radical Polymerization Initiated by a Glucose Oxidase-Mediated Redox System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Raveesh; Tibbitt, Mark W; Anseth, Kristi S; Bowman, Christopher N

    2013-03-12

    polymeric shell formed by this technique is also demonstrated to be self-supporting following core degradation. This behavior is accomplished by fabricating the particle core hydrogel from monomers possessing degradable groups that can be irreversibly cleaved by light exposure following shell formation. When the coated particle was exposed to light, the shell remained intact while the core degraded as evidenced by a dramatic change in diffusion coefficient of fluorescent beads immobilized within the core.

  9. Geodiversity and land degradation in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Őrsi, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Geodiversity represents a variety of natural values, but they are threatened by a series of anthropogenic activities and land degradation processes. Their effect depends on the intensity of the processes and the sensitivity of the area in question. As a consequence of land degradation processes not only biodiversity but also geodiversity can be damaged and deteriorated. The appearance of the natural landscape changes and natural processes may not have a decisive role in landscape development any more. Some of the damages are irreversible because fundamental changes happen in the landscape, or the processes having created the original forms are no longer in operation. Small scale land degradation processes may be reversible if nature is still capable of reproducing the original state. The most important land degradation processes are desertification and soil erosion. Mining, waste disposal, urbanisation and construction activities, agriculture, inaccurate forest and water management, tourism, unsuitable land use can also lead to severe land degradation problems. The objective of the paper is to show Hungarian examples to all land degradation processes that threaten geodiversity. The results will be shown on a series of maps showing land degradation processes endangering geodiversity in Hungary. A detailed analysis of smaller study sites will be provided to show the effects of certain land degradation processes on landform development and on the changes of geodiversity. This research is supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA), project Nr. 10875.

  10. Degradation mechanisms in organic photovoltaic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossiord, N.; Kroon, J.M.; Andriessen, H.A.J.M.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    In the present review, the main degradation mechanisms occurring in the different layer stacking (i.e. photoactive layer, electrode, encapsulation film, interconnection) of polymeric organic solar cells and modules are discussed. Bulk and interfacial, as well as chemical and physical degradation

  11. Degradation mechanisms in organic photovoltaic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossiord, N.; Kroon, J.M.; Andriessen, H.A.J.M.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    In the present review, the main degradation mechanisms occurring in the different layer stacking (i.e. photoactive layer, electrode, encapsulation film, interconnection) of polymeric organic solar cells and modules are discussed. Bulk and interfacial, as well as chemical and physical degradation mec

  12. 1 Evaluating Biophysical Attributes of Environmentally Degraded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    evaluated using LANDSAT ETM data and GIS. Satellite remote ... were dominant on high mountains, steep slopes and depressions, while degraded shrublands and scrublands were prominent on ... quality of life, government and non- ..... Relationships among Environmentally Degraded .... On the other hand, the other.

  13. Pt/C Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zana, Alessandro

    This thesis investigates the degradation behavior of Pt/C catalysts under simulated automotive conditions. By using the “tool box” synthesis method the Pt loading has been changed from low to high Pt loadings, therefore permitting to study the role of Pt on the degradation of high surface area (H...

  14. Environmental Degradation of High Temperature Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    A study was performed to assess the effect of galvanic corrosion phenomena on the strength of graphite/bismaleimide( BMI ) composites . The results...indicate that degradation occurred in BMI composites galvanically coupled to aluminum alloys. The mechanism responsible for the degradation involves

  15. Photolytic degradation of decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Shejun; Nie, Xin; Tian, Mi; Luo, Xiaojun; An, Taicheng; Mai, Bixian

    2012-10-01

    The photolytic degradation of decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), an alternative flame retardant to decabromodiphenyl ether, was investigated in a variety of matrixes (n-hexane, tetrahydrofuran, methanol/water, humic acid/water, and silica gel) by irradiation under ultraviolet light and in n-hexane under natural light. Photolytic degradation of DBDPE occurs in all the matrixes investigated within the irradiation period (n-hexane (t(1/2)=16.6 min)>humic acid/water (30silica gel (t(1/2)=75.9 min)>methanol/water (t(1/2)>240 min). The reaction in tetrahydrofuran, n-hexane, and silica gel matrixes can be described by the pseudo first order kinetics. Nevertheless, the matrixes have little effect on the degradation product distributions of DBDPE. A numbers of debrominated intermediates were identified. The degradation involves the initial formation of nona-BDPEs and the subsequent decomposition of these congeners to lower brominated congeners (octa- and hepta-BDPEs) within the irradiation time. To our knowledge, the present work is the first attempt to investigate the photolytic degradation kinetics and the identification of intermediates, as well as the degradation mechanism, during the degradation of DBDPE. Further research is needed to understand the photolytic degradation pattern of DBDPE in the natural environment.

  16. Genetic engineering of sulfur-degrading Sulfolobus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, N.W.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the proposed research is to first establish a plasmid-mediated genetic transformation system for the sulfur degrading Sulfolobus, and then to clone and overexpress the genes encoding the organic-sulfur-degrading enzymes from Sulfolobus- as well as from other microorganisms, to develop a Sulfolobus-based microbial process for the removal of both organic and inorganic sulfur from coal.

  17. Ensemble LUT classification for degraded document enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obafemi-Ajayi, Tayo; Agam, Gady; Frieder, Ophir

    2008-01-01

    The fast evolution of scanning and computing technologies have led to the creation of large collections of scanned paper documents. Examples of such collections include historical collections, legal depositories, medical archives, and business archives. Moreover, in many situations such as legal litigation and security investigations scanned collections are being used to facilitate systematic exploration of the data. It is almost always the case that scanned documents suffer from some form of degradation. Large degradations make documents hard to read and substantially deteriorate the performance of automated document processing systems. Enhancement of degraded document images is normally performed assuming global degradation models. When the degradation is large, global degradation models do not perform well. In contrast, we propose to estimate local degradation models and use them in enhancing degraded document images. Using a semi-automated enhancement system we have labeled a subset of the Frieder diaries collection.1 This labeled subset was then used to train an ensemble classifier. The component classifiers are based on lookup tables (LUT) in conjunction with the approximated nearest neighbor algorithm. The resulting algorithm is highly effcient. Experimental evaluation results are provided using the Frieder diaries collection.1

  18. Microbial Degradation of Indole and Its Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Indole and its derivatives, including 3-methylindole and 4-chloroindole, are environmental pollutants that are present worldwide. Microbial degradation of indole and its derivatives can occur in several aerobic and anaerobic pathways; these pathways involve different known and characterized genes. In this minireview, we summarize and explain the microbial degradation of indole, indole-3-acetic acid, 4-chloroindole, and methylindole.

  19. Pt/C Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zana, Alessandro

    This thesis investigates the degradation behavior of Pt/C catalysts under simulated automotive conditions. By using the “tool box” synthesis method the Pt loading has been changed from low to high Pt loadings, therefore permitting to study the role of Pt on the degradation of high surface area (H...

  20. Photo-degradation of imidazolium ionic liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Katoh, Ryuzi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of imidazolium ionic liquid, [bmim+][TFSA-] and iodide solution of [bmim+][TFSA-] by UV-laser irradiation has been studied through ground-state absorption and transient absorption spectroscopy. We found that excited state [bmim+]* undergoes degradation efficiently. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.