WorldWideScience

Sample records for degenerative neurological disorders

  1. [Nineteen cases of school-aged children with degenerative or metabolic neurological disorders initially presenting with learning difficulty and/or behavior disturbance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honzawa, Shiho; Sugai, Kenji; Akaike, Hiroto; Nakayama, Tojo; Fujikawa, Yoshinao; Komaki, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2012-07-01

    We reported 19 cases of school-aged children. They were initially judged to have learning difficulty or school maladaptation because of attention deficits, hyperactive behaviors or poor school performance, followed by the diagnosis such as degenerative or metabolic neurological diseases. The patients consisted of 4 cases of adrenoleukodystrophy, 5 cases of dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, 3 cases of Sanfilippo syndrome, 3 cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, and each one case of juvenile Gaucher disease, juvenile Huntington disease, juvenile metachromatic leukodystrophy and Leigh disease. They had markedly poor school performance, and/or abnormal behaviors, followed by seizures, character disorders or psychomotor regression. The diagnostic clues included brain CT scan and/or MRI, peculiar facial appearance and notable family histories. When the children were indicated to have learning difficulty or maladjustment to school life, we should make deliberate differential diagnoses before concluding that they have a learning disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Instead they should be recommended to visit child neurologists, when they present with any problems as aforesaid.

  2. Degenerative disorders of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallucci, Massimo; Puglielli, Edoardo; Splendiani, Alessandra [University of L' Aquila, Department of Radiology, L' Aquila (Italy); Pistoia, Francesca; Spacca, Giorgio [S. Salvatore Hospital, Department of Neuroscience, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2005-03-01

    Patients with back pain and degenerative disorders of the spine have a significant impact on health care costs. Some authors estimate that up to 80% of all adults experience back pain at some point in their lives. Disk herniation represents one of the most frequent causes. Nevertheless, other degenerative diseases have to be considered. In this paper, pathology and imaging of degenerative spine diseases will be discussed, starting from pathophysiology of normal age-related changes of the intervertebral disk and vertebral body. (orig.)

  3. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genomics in Neurological Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangchun Han; Jiya Sun; Jiajia Wang; Zhouxian Bai; Fuhai Song; Hongxing Lei

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders comprise a variety of complex diseases in the central nervous system, which can be roughly classified as neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. The basic and translational research of neurological disorders has been hindered by the difficulty in accessing the pathological center (i.e., the brain) in live patients. The rapid advancement of sequencing and array technologies has made it possible to investigate the disease mechanism and biomarkers from a systems perspective. In this review, recent progresses in the discovery of novel risk genes, treatment targets and peripheral biomarkers employing genomic technologies will be dis-cussed. Our major focus will be on two of the most heavily investigated neurological disorders, namely Alzheimer’s disease and autism spectrum disorder.

  5. Cancer--a degenerative disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rew, D A

    1998-10-01

    Cancer is primarily a disease of ageing epithelia, and of ageing individuals. We now possess detailed insights into the changes in cell regulatory genes and DNA repair systems which accumulate with time and which manifest in malignancy. These demonstrate how cancer is frequently characterized by degenerative change in the genotype, from the most subtle base pair mutations to gross aneuploidy, and by deterioration in cell and tissue regulatory control, be it of proliferation, programmed cell death or signalling. Cancer may thus be as much a phenomenon of loss or deterioration of normal genomic control as of the acquisition of new, neoplastic functions. This distinction may be more than semantic, not least because it governs our approach to the search for therapeutic strategies. This essay considers the concept of cancer as a degenerative disease and its implications, and proposes the neologism aldoplasia to describe this phenomenon of cancer biology.

  6. Wikipedia and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C.; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, WM|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/168455706

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popu

  7. Key sleep neurologic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Louis, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sleep disorders are frequent comorbidities in neurologic patients. This review focuses on clinical aspects and prognosis of 3 neurologic sleep disorders: narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED), and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Narcolepsy causes pervasive, enduring excessive daytime sleepiness, adversely affecting patients' daily functioning. RLS/WED is characterized by an uncomfortable urge to move the legs before sleep, often evolving toward augmentation and resulting in daylong bothersome symptoms. RBD causes potentially injurious dream enactment behaviors that often signify future evolution of overt synucleinopathy neurodegeneration in as many as 81% of patients. Timely recognition, referral for polysomnography, and longitudinal follow-up of narcolepsy, RLS/WED, and RBD patients are imperatives for neurologists in providing quality comprehensive patient care. PMID:24605270

  8. Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Vakhnina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common vascular diseases. The brain as target organs in hypertension is damaged more often and earlier. Neurological complications due to hypertension are frequently hyperdiagnosed in Russian neurological practice. Thus, headache, dizziness, impaired recall of recent events, nocturnal sleep disorders, and many other complaints in a hypertensive patient are usually regarded as a manifestation of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. At the same time headaches (tension headache and migraine in hypertensive patients are predominantly primary; headache associated with dramatic marked elevations in blood pressure is encountered in only a small number of patients. The role of cerebrovascular diseases in the development of dizziness in hypertensive patients is also overestimated. The vast majority of cases, patients with this complaint are in fact identified to have benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, Mеniеre’s disease, vestibular neuronitis, or vestibular migraine. Psychogenic disorders or multisensory insufficiency are generally responsible for non-systemic vertigo in hypertensive patients. Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency may cause non-systemic vertigo as a subjective equivalent of postural instability.Cognitive impairments (CIs are the most common and earliest manifestation of cerebrovascular lesion in hypertension. In most cases, CIs in hypertension were vascular and associated with cerebrovascular lesion due to lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis. However, mixed CIs frequently occur when hypertensive patients are also found to have signs of a degenerative disease, most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease.

  9. Connecting Malfunctioning Glial Cells and Brain Degenerative Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalie Kaminsky; Ofer Bihari; Sivan Kanner; Ari Barzilai

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex biological system activated by different types of DNA damage. Mutations in certain components of the DDR machinery can lead to geno-mic instability disorders that culminate in tissue degeneration, premature aging, and various types of cancers. Intriguingly, malfunctioning DDR plays a role in the etiology of late onset brain degener-ative disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s diseases. For many years, brain degenerative disorders were thought to result from aberrant neural death. Here we discuss the evi-dence that supports our novel hypothesis that brain degenerative diseases involve dysfunction of glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes). Impairment in the functionality of glial cells results in pathological neuro-glial interactions that, in turn, generate a‘‘hostile”environment that impairs the functionality of neuronal cells. These events can lead to systematic neural demise on a scale that appears to be proportional to the severity of the neurological deficit.

  10. Vaccination and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  11. [Neurological Disorders and Pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlit, P

    2016-02-01

    Neurological disorders caused by pregnancy and puerperium include the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, the amniotic fluid embolism syndrome (AFES), the postpartum angiopathy due to reversible vasoconstriction syndrome, and the Sheehan syndrome. Hypertension and proteinuria are the hallmarks of preeclampsia, seizures define eclampsia. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets constitute the HELLP syndrome. Vision disturbances including cortical blindness occur in the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). The Sheehan syndrome presents with panhypopituitarism post partum due to apoplexia of the pituitary gland in severe peripartal blood loss leading to longstanding hypotension. Some neurological disorders occur during pregnancy and puerperium with an increased frequency. These include stroke, sinus thrombosis, the restless legs syndrome and peripheral nerve syndromes, especially the carpal tunnel syndrome. Chronic neurologic diseases need an interdisciplinary approach during pregnancy. Some anticonvulsants double the risk of birth defects. The highest risk exists for valproic acid, the lowest for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. For MS interval treatment, glatiramer acetate and interferones seem to be safe during pregnancy. All other drugs should be avoided.

  12. When dialogue fails. Music therapy with elderly with neurological degenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2004-01-01

    When dialogue fails. Music therapy with elderly with neurological degenerative diseases. In persons suffering from neurological degenerative diseases we often see the following symptoms: difficulties in remembering, concentrating, perceiving input, and controlling and timing movements. Normal every...... interaction with others means that psychosocial needs are not met, and this leads to secondary symptoms of the neurological degeneration. Secondary symptoms might be expressed as repetitive behaviour, catastrophic reactions and situationally inappropriate behaviour. In a music therapeutical setting...

  13. Connecting Malfunctioning Glial Cells and Brain Degenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Kaminsky

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The DNA damage response (DDR is a complex biological system activated by different types of DNA damage. Mutations in certain components of the DDR machinery can lead to genomic instability disorders that culminate in tissue degeneration, premature aging, and various types of cancers. Intriguingly, malfunctioning DDR plays a role in the etiology of late onset brain degenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s diseases. For many years, brain degenerative disorders were thought to result from aberrant neural death. Here we discuss the evidence that supports our novel hypothesis that brain degenerative diseases involve dysfunction of glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes. Impairment in the functionality of glial cells results in pathological neuro-glial interactions that, in turn, generate a “hostile” environment that impairs the functionality of neuronal cells. These events can lead to systematic neural demise on a scale that appears to be proportional to the severity of the neurological deficit.

  14. [Sleep disorders in neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotterba, S

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disorders can be diagnosed in approximately 15 % of the population and have been shown to increase with age. The relationship between sleep disorders and neurological disorders, however, is still insufficiently considered in the clinical practice. Sleep disorders can be an early symptom of the disease, such as the presence of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) as an early indicator of neurodegeneration. Sleep disorders have also been shown to be a main symptom of various neurological syndromes, such as in restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) and narcolepsy. The international classification of sleep disorders 2nd edition (ICSD 2) describes the main diagnoses, insomnia, circadian rhythm sleep disorders, sleep-related breathing disorders and hypersomnia but all of these can also appear as symptoms in various neurological diseases. Parasomnias are largely considered a differential diagnosis to nocturnal epilepsy. In this review, the main sleep disorders are described with a particular focus on how they relate to neurological diseases; in particular, how they influence disease-related symptoms and how they affect the course of the disease.

  15. Fatal degenerative neurologic illnesses in men who participated in wild game feasts--Wisconsin, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-02-21

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a fatal neurologic disorder in humans. CJD is one of a group of conditions known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), or prion diseases, that are believed to be caused by abnormally configured, host-encoded prion proteins that accumulate in the central nervous tissue. CJD has an annual incidence of approximately 1 case per million population in the United States and occurs in three forms: sporadic, genetically determined, and acquired by infection. In the latter form, the incubation period is measured typically in years. Recent evidence that prion infection can cross the species barrier between humans and cattle has raised increasing public health concerns about the possible transmission to humans of a TSE among deer and elk known as chronic wasting disease (CWD). During 1993-1999, three men who participated in wild game feasts in northern Wisconsin died of degenerative neurologic illnesses. This report documents the investigation of these deaths, which was initiated in August 2002 and which confirmed the death of only one person from CJD. Although no association between CWD and CJD was found, continued surveillance of both diseases remains important to assess the possible risk for CWD transmission to humans.

  16. When dialogue fails. Music therapy with elderly with neurological degenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2004-01-01

    traces in the brain. Using the same “hello-song” in the beginning of a session - session after session - gives stability. Stability is constancy and familiarity of cues over time (Roberts & Algase 1988), and even people with severe memory deficits are capable of creating new memory traces and of learning......When dialogue fails. Music therapy with elderly with neurological degenerative diseases. In persons suffering from neurological degenerative diseases we often see the following symptoms: difficulties in remembering, concentrating, perceiving input, and controlling and timing movements. Normal every...... degenerative disease like e.g. dementia are often socially isolated because of their failing abilities to communicate. Even if they live in a facility and are surrounded by care staff and peer residents, they might experience the environment as chaotic and the people as non-comprehensible. A missing meaningful...

  17. Functional Disorders in Neurology : Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new

  18. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify propri

  19. Ion Channels in Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravir; Kumar, Dhiraj; Jha, Saurabh Kumar; Jha, Niraj Kumar; Ambasta, Rashmi K

    2016-01-01

    The convergent endeavors of the neuroscientist to establish a link between clinical neurology, genetics, loss of function of an important protein, and channelopathies behind neurological disorders are quite intriguing. Growing evidence reveals the impact of ion channels dysfunctioning in neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs). Many neurological/neuromuscular disorders, viz, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and age-related disorders are caused due to altered function or mutation in ion channels. To maintain cell homeostasis, ion channels are playing a crucial role which is a large transmembrane protein. Further, these channels are important as it determines the membrane potential and playing critically in the secretion of neurotransmitter. Behind NDDs, losses of pathological proteins and defective ion channels have been reported and are found to aggravate the disease symptoms. Moreover, ion channel dysfunctions are eliciting a range of symptoms, including memory loss, movement disabilities, neuromuscular sprains, and strokes. Since the possible mechanistic role played by aberrant ion channels, their receptor and associated factors in neurodegeneration remained elusive; therefore, it is a challenging task for the neuroscientist to implement the therapeutics for targeting NDDs. This chapter reviews the potential role of the ion channels in membrane physiology and brain homeostasis, where ion channels and their associated factors have been characterized with their functional consequences in neurological diseases. Moreover, mechanistic role of perturbed ion channels has been identified in various NDDs, and finally, ion channel modulators have been investigated for their therapeutic intervention in treating common NDDs.

  20. Medical Marijuana in Certain Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treating certain neurological disorders. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the world’s largest association of neurologists ... the table that follows. ©2014 American Academy of Neurology AAN.com Symptoms of MS The studies showed ...

  1. Consensus Paper: Management of Degenerative Cerebellar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, W.; Bastian, A. J.; Boesch, S.; Burciu, R. G.; Celnik, P.; Claaßen, J.; Feil, K.; Kalla, R.; Miyai, I.; Nachbauer, W.; Schöls, L.; Strupp, M.; Synofzik, M.; Teufel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  2. HTLV-1 Associated Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Yasir; Khan, Ishaq Nasib; Farman, Muhammad; Al Karim, Saleh; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Kamal, Muhammad Amjad; Al Ghamdi, Khalid; Harakeh, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus which is endemic to certain regions of the world and infects around 10-20 million people. HTLV-1 is the etiologic agent of Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and HTLV-1 associated neurological disorders including mainly HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/Tropical spastic paraparesis. The involvement of the central nervous diseases occurs among: HTLV-1 infected patients from endemic areas, HIV positive individuals and drug users. The ability of HTLV-1 to cause associated neuropathies starts with the virus crossing the blood brain barrier (BBB), then entering and infecting the cells of the central nervous system. As a consequence, to the viral attack, HTLV-1 infected lymphocytes produce pro-inflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor alpha, Interleukin 1 beta and interleukin 6 which further disrupts the BBB. Different serological tests have been used in the diagnosis of HTLV-1. These include: ELISA, Western Blotting (WB), Immunofluorescence, Particle Agglutination and Polymerase Chain Reaction which is used as a confirmatory test. Danazol, pentoxifylline, azathioprine and vitamin C have been used in the treatment of the HTLV-1 associated neurological disorders. Other antiviral drugs (lamivudine, zidovudine), monoclonal antibodies (Daclizumab) and therapeutic agents (valporic acid, interferons) have also been evaluated. No known drug, so far, has been shown to be efficacious. The aim of this review is to present the complexities of HTLV-1 associated neurological disorders and their current ongoing treatment. In addition to discussing future possible therapeutic strategies, by targeting HTVL-1 viral components and gene/s products, for the treatment of those neurological conditions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. [Neurology of hysteria (conversion disorder)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Hysteria has served as an important driving force in the development of both neurology and psychiatry. Jean Martin Charcot's devotion to mesmerism for treating hysterical patients evoked the invention of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud. Meanwhile, Joseph Babinski took over the challenge to discriminate between organic and hysterical patients from Charcot and found Babinski's sign, the greatest milestone in modern neurological symptomatology. Nowadays, the usage of the term hysteria is avoided. However, new terms and new classifications are complicated and inconsistent between the two representative taxonomies, the DSM-IV and ICD-10. In the ICD-10, even the alternative term conversion disorder, which was becoming familiar to neurologists, has also disappeared as a group name. The diagnosis of hysteria remains important in clinical neurology. Extensive exclusive diagnoses and over investigation, including various imaging studies, should be avoided because they may prolong the disease course and fix their symptoms. Psychological reasons that seem to explain the conversion are not considered reliable. Positive neurological signs suggesting nonorganic etiologies are the most reliable measures for diagnosing hysteria, as Babinski first argued. Hysterical paresis has several characteristics, such as giving-way weakness or peculiar distributions of weakness. Signs to uncover nonorganic paresis utilizing synergy include Hoover's test and the Sonoo abductor test.

  4. Child neurology practice and neurological disorders in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idro, Richard; Newton, Charles; Kiguli, Sarah; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina

    2010-04-01

    Neurological disorders, including neurodevelopmental disorders, have been identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as one of the greatest threats to global public health. It is generally believed that these conditions are more prevalent in the developing than the developed world because of multiple known risk factors such as infections, malnutrition, and limited resources for obstetric and neonatal management. In East Africa, few investigations have been conducted to obtain data on the magnitude and description of neurological disorders among children, and the practice of child neurology is faced with challenges cutting across areas of health personnel, patient diagnosis, management, and rehabilitation. This article reviews the burden, types, and causes of neurological disorders in the East African region. The challenges and successes in the practice of child neurology and recommendations for the future are discussed.

  5. Neuroimaging and genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease and addiction-related degenerative brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussotte, Florence F; Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Leonardo, Cassandra D; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-06-01

    Neuroimaging offers a powerful means to assess the trajectory of brain degeneration in a variety of disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we describe how multi-modal imaging can be used to study the changing brain during the different stages of AD. We integrate findings from a range of studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Neuroimaging reveals how risk genes for degenerative disorders affect the brain, including several recently discovered genetic variants that may disrupt brain connectivity. We review some recent neuroimaging studies of genetic polymorphisms associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Some genetic variants that increase risk for drug addiction may overlap with those associated with degenerative brain disorders. These common associations offer new insight into mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and addictive behaviors, and may offer new leads for treating them before severe and irreversible neurological symptoms appear.

  6. Aphasia, Just a Neurological Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ozdemir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto%u2019s encephalopathy (HE is a rare disorder associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Etiology of HE is not completely understood. High levels of serum antithyroid antibodies are seen in HE. Presentation with otoimmune thyroiditis, cognitive impairment, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms and absence of bacterial or viral enfections are characteristics of HE. HE is a steroid responsive encephalopathy. 60 years old male patient admitted to hospital with forget fulness continuing for 9 months and speech loss starting 2 days ago. Strong positivity of antithyroid antibodies increases the odds for HE. Thyroid function tests showed severe hypothyroidism. Electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging results were compatible with HE. HE is diagnosed with differantial diagnosis and exclusion of other reasons. This uncommon disorder is not recognised enough. High titres of serum antithyroid antiboides are always needed for diagnosis. Correct diagnosis requires awareness of wide range of cognitive and clinical presentations of HE.

  7. Sleep Disorders in Childhood Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Tolaymat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep problems are frequently addressed as a primary or secondary concern during the visit to the pediatric neurology clinic. Sleep disorders can mimic other neurologic diseases (e.g., epilepsy and movement disorders, and this adds challenges to the diagnostic process. Sleep disorders can significantly affect the quality of life and functionality of children in general and those with comorbid neurological diseases in particular. Understanding the pathophysiology of sleep disorders, recognizing the implications of sleep disorder in children with neurologic diseases and behavioral difficulties, and early intervention continue to evolve resulting in better neurocognitive outcomes.

  8. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeesuk

    2014-12-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disorders that affect pediatric patients. It is valuable to think about 'endocrine disorder' as a cause of the neurologic manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of hormonal imbalance can rapidly relieve the neurologic symptoms. Better understanding of the interaction between the endocrine system and the nervous system, combined with the knowledge about the pathophysiology of the neurologic manifestations presented in the endocrine disorders might allow earlier diagnosis and better treatment of the endocrine disorders.

  9. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jeesuk

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disord...

  10. Emotional disorders in neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Allan; Hosker, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Depression, anxiety, emotionalism, irritability, and apathy are common findings in the neurological rehabilitation setting and are associated with poorer outcomes. This chapter outlines the importance of detecting and attending to these disorders. The authors recommend the systematic use of self-report measures, tailored for those with cognitive or motor difficulties, in combination with interview-based assessments where suspicion of the presence of a disorder is aroused. A stepped care scheme for coordinating rehabilitation services is presented which highlights the importance of training all staff to be aware of the possibility of patients presenting with emotional disorders and the need to equip all staff with the skills to make emotional enquiries and to carry out brief interventions where indicated. Interventions should be based upon a combination of watchful waiting and optimization of clinical care followed by evidence-based brief therapies such as problem solving, motivational interviewing, and behavioral activation. Antidepressant prescribing should be reserved for the more severe cases and protocols should involve a system for reviewing and time-limiting prescriptions. This chapter aims to aid those designing services to produce simple and widely understood programs that meet the needs of this inherently heterogeneous client base.

  11. Degenerative spine disorders in the context of clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, Michael [Institut fuer Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Klinikum Aschaffenburg, Am Hasenkopf 1, 63739 Aschaffenburg (Germany) and Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: michael.freund@klinikum-aschaffenburg.de; Sartor, Klaus [Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    Hardly any other structure in the human body is held responsible for so many complaints, pain, and costs as the spine and its degenerative disorders. In the following article, the role of imaging procedures in diagnosing disorders of the spine is presented. Due to the fact that disk herniation represents the most frequent cause for degenerative disorders the anatomy of the intervertebral disk and the pathology of the entities that can cause diseases of the disks are described. In particular, the authors focus on the significance of radiological findings with respect to patient history, subjective symptoms, and objective clinical findings. In addition to presenting the technical procedures and their indications and contraindications also practical tips and tricks in conducting these examinations are presented in this paper.

  12. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications.

  13. Outbreak of neurological disorder associated with Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outbreak of neurological disorder associated with Streptococcus suis in a pig ... Kenya was referred to Department of Veterinary Pathology, Microbiology and ... was a hemolytic S. suis that was isolated from meninges and lungs tissues.

  14. Neurological disorders and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Giovanni; Bordo, Bianca M; Schalling, Renzo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; Di Bella, Camillo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) determines neurologic manifestations in 10% of all CD patients. We describe the most common clinical manifestations as cerebellar ataxia, gluten encephalopathy, multiple sclerosis, peripheral neuropathies, sensorineural hearing loss, epilepsy, headache, depression, cognitive deficiencies and other less described clinical conditions. Our aim is to perform, as more as possible, a review about the most recent update on the topics in international literature. It is important to consider clinical neurological manifestations in celiac patients and to research these conditions also in the follow-up because they may start also one year after the start of gluten free diet (GFD) as peripheral neuropathy. The association with autism is analysed and possible new association with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) are considered.

  15. Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease may initially present as a neurological disorder. Alternatively, celiac disease may be complicated by neurological changes. With impaired nutrient absorption, different deficiency syndromes may occur and these may be manifested clinically with neurological changes. However, in patients with deficiency syndromes, extensive involvement of the small intestine with celiac disease is often evident. There are a number of reports of celiac disease associated with neuropathy, ataxia, dementia and seizure disorder. In these reports, there is no clear relationship with nutrient deficiency and a precise mechanism for the neurological changes has not been defined. A small number of patients have been reported to have responded to vitamin E administration, but most do not. In some, gluten antibodies have also been described, especially in those with ataxia, but a consistent response to a gluten-free diet has not been defined. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with unexplained neurological disorders, including ataxia and dementia. Further studies are needed, however, to determine if a gluten-free diet will lead to improvement in the associated neurological disorder.

  16. Targeting sonic hedgehog signaling in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Tomar, Sunil; Sharma, Diksha; Mahindroo, Neeraj; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2017-03-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling influences neurogenesis and neural patterning during the development of central nervous system. Dysregulation of Shh signaling in brain leads to neurological disorders like autism spectrum disorder, depression, dementia, stroke, Parkinson's diseases, Huntington's disease, locomotor deficit, epilepsy, demyelinating disease, neuropathies as well as brain tumors. The synthesis, processing and transport of Shh ligand as well as the localization of its receptors and signal transduction in the central nervous system has been carefully reviewed. Further, we summarize the regulation of small molecule modulators of Shh pathway with potential in neurological disorders. In conclusion, further studies are warranted to demonstrate the potential of positive and negative regulators of the Shh pathway in neurological disorders.

  17. Nicotine and inflammatory neurological disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Hua PIAO; Denise CAMPAGNOLO; Carlos DAYAO; Ronald J LUKAS; Jie WU; Fu-Dong SHI

    2009-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is a major health risk factor which significantly increases the incidence of diseases including lung cancer and respiratory infections. However, there is increasing evidence that smokers have a lower incidence of some inflamma- tory and neurodegenerative diseases. Nicotine is the main immunosuppressive constituent of cigarette smoke, which inhib-its both the innate and adaptive immune responses. Unlike cigarette smoke, nicotine is not yet considered to be a carcino-gen and may, in fact, have therapeutic potential as a neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agent. This review provides a synopsis summarizing the effects of nicotine on the immune system and its (nicotine) influences on various neurological diseases.

  18. Paraneoplastic Neurological Disorder in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sze Yin; Kongg, Min Han; Yunus, Mohd Razif Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological disorder (PND) is a condition due to immune cross-reactivity between the tumour cells and the normal tissue, whereby the “onconeural” antibodies attack the normal host nervous system. It can present within weeks to months before or after the diagnosis of malignancies. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is associated with paraneoplastic syndrome, for example, dermatomyositis, and rarely with a neurological disorder. We report on a case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with probable PND. Otolaryngologists, oncologists and neurologists need to be aware of this condition in order to make an accurate diagnosis and to provide prompt treatment. PMID:28381934

  19. Glutamine Synthetase: Role in Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Norenberg, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an ATP-dependent enzyme found in most species that synthesizes glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In brain, GS is exclusively located in astrocytes where it serves to maintain the glutamate-glutamine cycle, as well as nitrogen metabolism. Changes in the activity of GS, as well as its gene expression, along with excitotoxicity, have been identified in a number of neurological conditions. The literature describing alterations in the activation and gene expression of GS, as well as its involvement in different neurological disorders, however, is incomplete. This review summarizes changes in GS gene expression/activity and its potential contribution to the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders, including hepatic encephalopathy, ischemia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, and astroglial neoplasms. This review also explores the possibility of targeting GS in the therapy of these conditions.

  20. Neurological disorders and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Giovanni; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Pastorelli, Luca; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Spina, Luisa; Baldini, Vittorio; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-07-21

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur in about one-third of patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and may precede the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms by many years. Neurologic disorders associated with IBD are not frequent, being reported in 3% of patients, but they often represent an important cause of morbidity and a relevant diagnostic issue. In addition, the increasing use of immunosuppressant and biological therapies for IBD may also play a pivotal role in the development of neurological disorders of different type and pathogenesis. Hence, we provide a complete and profound review of the main features of neurological complications associated with IBD, with particular reference to those related to drugs and with a specific focus on their clinical presentation and possible pathophysiological mechanisms.

  1. Meige's Syndrome: Rare Neurological Disorder Presenting as Conversion Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debadatta, Mohapatra; Mishra, Ajay K

    2013-07-01

    Meige's syndrome is a rare neurological syndrome characterized by oromandibular dystonia and blepharospasm. Its pathophysiology is not clearly determined. A 35-year-old female presented to psychiatric department with blepharospasm and oromandibular dystonia with clinical provisional diagnosis of psychiatric disorder (Conversion Disorder). After thorough physical examination including detailed neurological exam and psychiatric evaluation no formal medical or psychiatric diagnosis could be made. The other differential diagnoses of extra pyramidal symptom, tardive dyskinesia, conversion disorder, anxiety disorder were ruled out by formal diagnostic criteria. Consequently with suspicion of Meige's syndrome she was referred to the department of Neurology and the diagnosis was confirmed. Hence, Meige's syndrome could be misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder such as conversion disorder or anxiety disorder because clinical features of Meige's syndrome are highly variable and affected by psychological factors and also can be inhibited voluntarily to some extent.

  2. Comparative Sensitivity of Intraoperative Motor Evoked Potential Monitoring in Predicting Postoperative Neurologic Deficits: Nondegenerative versus Degenerative Myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Aaron J; Safaee, Michael; Chou, Dean; Weinstein, Philip R; Molinaro, Annette M; Clark, John P; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2016-08-01

    Retrospective review. Intraoperative motor evoked potential (MEP) monitoring in spine surgery may assist surgeons in taking corrective measures to prevent neurologic deficits. The efficacy of monitoring MEPs intraoperatively in patients with myelopathy from nondegenerative causes has not been quantified. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of intraoperative MEP monitoring in patients with myelopathy caused by nondegenerative processes to patients with degenerative cervicothoracic spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). We retrospectively reviewed our myelopathy surgical cases during a 1-year period to identify patients with degenerative CSM and CSM of nondegenerative causes and collected data on intraoperative MEP changes and postoperative new deficits. Categorical variables were analyzed by Fisher exact test. Receiver operator curves assessed intraoperative MEP monitoring performance in the two groups. In all, 144 patients were identified: 102 had degenerative CSM and 42 had CSM of nondegenerative causes (24 extra-axial tumors, 12 infectious processes, 5 traumatic fractures, and 1 rheumatoid arthritis). For degenerative CSM, there were 11 intraoperative MEP alerts and 7 new deficits (p sensitivity was 71% and the specificity was 94%. In the nondegenerative group, there were 11 intraoperative MEP alerts and 3 deficits, which was not significant (p > 0.99). The sensitivity (33%) and specificity (74%) were lower. Among patients with degenerative CSM, the model performed well for predicting postoperative deficits (area under the curve [AUC] 0.826), which appeared better than the nondegenerative group, although it did not reach statistical significance (AUC 0.538, p = 0.16). Based on this large retrospective analysis, intraoperative MEP monitoring in surgery for nondegenerative CSM cases appears to be less sensitive to cord injury and less predictive of postoperative deficits when compared with degenerative CSM cases.

  3. Medical Marijuana in Pediatric Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anup D

    2016-03-01

    Marijuana and marijuana-based products have been used to treat medical disease. Recently, derivatives of the plant have been separated or synthesized to treat various neurological disorders, many of them affecting children. Unfortunately, data are sparse in regard to treating children with neurologic illness. Therefore, formal conclusions about the potential efficacy, benefit, and adverse effects for these products cannot be made at this time. Further robust research using strong scientific methodology is desperately needed to formally evaluate the role of these products in children. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Folate deficiency and neurological disorders in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botez, M I

    1976-01-01

    The restless legs syndrome could represent a folate responsive disorder in both patients with acquired-folate deficiency and those with familial symptomatology. Patients with acquired folate-deficiency could be divided into two subgroups. (i) those with minor neurological signs (restless legs syndrome, vibration sense impairment and tactile hypoesthesia in both legs with diminished ankle jerks and a prolonged or assymetrical Achilles-reflex time) and (ii) those with major neurological signs (subacute combined degeneration with or without neuropathies). In some of these patients the classical triad of the malabsorption syndrome is replaced by another triad, constipation, abnormal jejunal biopsy and abnormal d-xylose absorption. A low folic serum acid level could induce minor neuropsychiatric symptoms while an additional low CSF folate could induce major neurological symptoms in spite of the presence of a normal erythrocyte folate level and in the absence of frank anemia. Possible further studies are described.

  5. Stem cell therapy in pediatric neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Torabian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric neurological disorders including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury are defined as a heterogenous group of diseases, of which some are known to be genetic. The two significant features represented for stem cells, leading to distinguish them from other cell types are addressed as below: they can renew themselves besides the ability to differentiate into cells with special function as their potency. Researches about the role of stem cells in repair of damaged tissues in different organs like myocardium, lung, wound healing, and others are developing. In addition, the use of stem cells in the treatment and improving symptoms of neurological diseases such as autism are known. Many epigenetic and immunological studies on effects of stem cells have been performed. The action of stem cells in tissue repair is a need for further studies. The role of these cells in the secretion of hormones and growth factors in the niche, induction of cell division and differentiation in local cells and differentiation of stem cells in damaged tissue is the samples of effects of tissue repair by stem cells.Cognitive disorders, epilepsy, speech and language disorders, primary sensory dysfunction, and behavioral challenges are symptoms of non-neuromotor dysfunction in half of pediatrics with CP. Occupational therapy, oral medications, and orthopedic surgery for supportive and rehabilitative approaches are part of Conventional remedy for cerebral palsy. This paper summarizes the clinical world wide experience about stem cell based therapeutic procedures for pediatric neurological disorders.

  6. Stem Cell Therapy in Pediatric Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Torabian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric neurological disorders including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury are defined as a heterogenous group of diseases, of which some are known to be genetic. The two significant features represented for stem cells, leading to distinguish them from other cell types are addressed as below: they can renew themselves besides the ability to differentiate into cells with special function as their potency. Researches about the role of stem cells in repair of damaged tissues in different organs like myocardium, lung, wound healing, and others are developing. In addition, the use of stem cells in the treatment and improving symptoms of neurological diseases such as autism are known. Many epigenetic and immunological studies on effects of stem cells have been performed. The action of stem cells in tissue repair is a need for further studies. The role of these cells in the secretion of hormones and growth factors in the niche, induction of cell division and differentiation in local cells and differentiation of stem cells in damaged tissue is the samples of effects of tissue repair by stem cells.Cognitive disorders, epilepsy, speech and language disorders, primary sensory dysfunction, and behavioral challenges are symptoms of non-neuromotor dysfunction in half of pediatrics with CP. Occupational therapy, oral medications, and orthopedic surgery for supportive and rehabilitative approaches are part of Conventional remedy for cerebral palsy. This paper summarizes the clinical world wide experience about stem cell based therapeutic procedures for pediatric neurological disorders.

  7. Nanotechnology based diagnostics for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurek, Nicholas S.; Chandra, Sathees B., E-mail: schandra@roosevelt.edu [Department of Biological, Chemical and Physical Sciences, Roosevelt University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Nanotechnology involves probing and manipulating matter at the molecular level. Nanotechnology based molecular diagnostics have the potential to alleviate the suffering caused by many diseases, including neurological disorders, due to the unique properties of nanomaterials. Most neurological illnesses are multifactorial conditions and many of these are also classified as neurobehavioral disorders. Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington disease, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders like Rett syndrome are some examples of neurological disorders that could be better treated, diagnosed, prevented and possibly cured using nanotechnology. In order to improve the quality of life for disease afflicted people, a wide range of nanomaterials that include gold and silica nanoparticles, quantum dots and DNA along with countless other forms of nanotechnology have been investigated regarding their usefulness in advancing molecular diagnostics. Other small scaled materials like viruses and proteins also have potential for use as molecular diagnostic tools. Information obtained from nanotechnology based diagnostics can be stored and manipulated using bioinformatics software. More advanced nanotechnology based diagnostic procedures for the acquisition of even greater proteomic and genomic knowledge can then be developed along with better ways to fight various diseases. Nanotechnology also has numerous applications besides those related to biotechnology and medicine. In this article, we will discuss and analyze many novel nanotechnology based diagnostic techniques at our disposal today. (author)

  8. The ubiquitin-proteasome system in spongiform degenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Brandi R; Li, Lian; Chin, Lih-Shen

    2008-12-01

    Spongiform degeneration is characterized by vacuolation in nervous tissue accompanied by neuronal death and gliosis. Although spongiform degeneration is a hallmark of prion diseases, this pathology is also present in the brains of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, diffuse Lewy body disease, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and Canavan's spongiform leukodystrophy. The shared outcome of spongiform degeneration in these diverse diseases suggests that common cellular mechanisms must underlie the processes of spongiform change and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. Immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissues reveals increased ubiquitin immunoreactivity in and around areas of spongiform change, suggesting the involvement of ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction in the pathogenesis of spongiform neurodegeneration. The link between aberrant ubiquitination and spongiform neurodegeneration has been strengthened by the discovery that a null mutation in the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase mahogunin ring finger-1 (Mgrn1) causes an autosomal recessively inherited form of spongiform neurodegeneration in animals. Recent studies have begun to suggest that abnormal ubiquitination may alter intracellular signaling and cell functions via proteasome-dependent and proteasome-independent mechanisms, leading to spongiform degeneration and neuronal cell death. Further elucidation of the pathogenic pathways involved in spongiform neurodegeneration should facilitate the development of novel rational therapies for treating prion diseases, HIV infection, and other spongiform degenerative disorders.

  9. Microvesicles: novel biomarkers for neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno eBorgiani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Microvesicles (MVs are released by most cell types in physiological conditions, but their number is often increased upon cellular activation or neoplastic transformation. This suggests that their detection may be helpful in pathological conditions to have information on activated cell types and, possibly, on the nature of the activation. This could be of importance in districts and tissues that are not accessible to direct examination, such as the central nervous system (CNS. Increased release of MVs has been described to be associated to the acute or active phase of several neurological disorders. While the subcellular origin of MVs (exosome or ectosomes is never addressed in these studies because of technical limitations, the cell of origin is always identified. Endothelium- or platelet-derived MVs, detected in plasma or serum, are linked to neurological pathologies with a vascular or ischemic pathogenic component, and may represent a very useful marker to support therapeutic choices in stroke. In neuroinflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS, MVs of oligodendroglial or microglial origin have been described in the CSF and may carry, in perspective, additional information on the biological alterations in their cell of origin. Little specific evidence is available in neurodegenerative disorders and, specifically, MVs of neural origin have never been investigated in these pathologies. Few data have been reported for neuroinfection and brain trauma. In brain tumors, despite the limited number of studies performed, results are very promising and potentially close to clinical translation. We here review all currently available data on the detection of MVs in neurological diseases, limiting our search to exclusively human studies. Current literature and our own data indicate that MVs detection may represent a very promising strategy to gain pathogenic information, identify therapeutic targets, and select specific biomarkers for

  10. Use of orthopedic shoes in patients with degenerative disorders of the foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, Michiel J.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Karin; Stewart, Roy E.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To study the actual use of orthopedic shoes by patients with degenerative foot disorders and to identify factors associated with use and nonuse, based on the parameters of the International Organization for Standardization definition of usability: effectiveness, efficiency, satisfaction,

  11. Nicotinic systems in central nervous systems disease: degenerative disorders and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, P A; Kelton, M

    2000-03-01

    Advances in the understanding of the structure, function, and distribution of central nervous system (CNS) nicotinic receptors has provided the impetus for new studies examining the role(s) that these receptors and associated processes may play in CNS functions. Further motivation has come from the realization that such receptors are changed in degenerative neurologic diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Ongoing investigations of the molecular substructure of CNS nicotinic receptors and their pharmacology have begun to open up new possibilities for novel CNS therapeutics with nicotinic agents. Exploiting these possibilities will require understanding of the role(s) that these receptor systems play in human cognitive, behavioral, motor, and sensory functioning. Clues from careful studies of human cognition and behavior are beginning to emerge and will provide direction for studies of potentially therapeutic novel nicotinic agents. Modulation of these receptors with the ultimate goal of producing therapeutic benefits is the goal of these investigations and drug development. This paper will review studies from our laboratory and others that point to the importance of CNS nicotinic mechanisms in normal human cognitive and behavioral functioning as well as their role in disease states. In addition, this paper will examine potential clinical applications of nicotine and/or nicotinic agonists in a variety of CNS disorders with particular emphasis on structural brain disease including: movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Tourette's syndrome, cognitive/behavioral disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and schizophrenia, and other more speculative applications. Important results from early therapeutic studies of nicotine and/or nicotinic agonists in these disease states are presented. For example, recent studies with nicotine and novel nicotinic agonists such as ABT-418 by our group

  12. Complex I deficiencies in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Sergio; De Rasmo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Complex I is the point of entry in the mitochondrial electron transport chain for NADH reducing equivalents, and it behaves as a regulatable pacemaker of respiratory ATP production in human cells. Defects in complex I are associated with several human neurological disorders, including primary mitochondrial diseases, Parkinson disease (PD), and Down syndrome, and understanding the activity and regulation of complex I may reveal aspects of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Complex I is regulated by cyclic AMP (cAMP) and the protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction pathway, and elucidating the role of the cAMP/PKA system in regulating complex I and oxygen free radical production provides new perspectives for devising therapeutic strategies for neurological diseases.

  13. Modelling toxicity induced Neurological disorders in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benin Joseph

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders have become more common and prevalent. Cellular pathology and behavioural symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases although connected are still a mystery to solve with no complete cure available yet. Central pathways in neurodegeneration involves impaired ubiquitin-proteasome machinery, autophagy and mitochondrial oxidative stress. In the case of neurodevlopmental disorders, environmental toxins and genetic factors are main causative agents. We aim to create a toxicity induced zebrafish model of neurological disease focussing on cognition, movement and hyperactivity disorders. Zebra fish embryos at 48 hr post fertilization were treated with different doses of lead, cholesterol and acetyl choline and by 7 days post fertilization pectoral fin movement, swimming behaviour and touch response were compromised in parallel with apoptosis identified in the brain by acridine orange fluorescent staining. A marked window is observed, therefore promising for a drug screening platform. Further characterization of pathology associated protein expression and specific behavioural studies could render this as a simple promising toxic model for preclinical drug screening.

  14. Wilson's disease and other neurological copper disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandmann, Oliver; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Kaler, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    The copper metabolism disorder Wilson's disease was first defined in 1912. Wilson's disease can present with hepatic and neurological deficits, including dystonia and parkinsonism. Early-onset presentations in infancy and late-onset manifestations in adults older than 70 years of age are now well recognised. Direct genetic testing for ATP7B mutations are increasingly available to confirm the clinical diagnosis of Wilson's disease, and results from biochemical and genetic prevalence studies suggest that Wilson's disease might be much more common than previously estimated. Early diagnosis of Wilson's disease is crucial to ensure that patients can be started on adequate treatment, but uncertainty remains about the best possible choice of medication. Furthermore, Wilson's disease needs to be differentiated from other conditions that also present clinically with hepatolenticular degeneration or share biochemical abnormalities with Wilson's disease, such as reduced serum ceruloplasmin concentrations. Disordered copper metabolism is also associated with other neurological conditions, including a subtype of axonal neuropathy due to ATP7A mutations and the late-onset neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

  15. Psychologic theories in functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, A; Ludwig, L; Welch, K

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we review key psychologic theories that have been mooted as possible explanations for the etiology of functional neurologic symptoms, conversion disorder, and hysteria. We cover Freudian psychoanalysis and later object relations and attachment theories, social theories, illness behavior, classic and operant conditioning, social learning theory, self-regulation theory, cognitive-behavioral theories, and mindfulness. Dissociation and modern cognitive neuroscience theories are covered in other chapters in this series and, although of central importance, are omitted from this chapter. Our aim is an overview with the emphasis on breadth of coverage rather than depth.

  16. Protective Effects of Ginseng on Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yi eOng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng (Order: Apiales, Family: Araliaceae, Genus: Panax has been used as a traditional herbal medicine for over 2000 years, and is recorded to have antianxiety, antidepressant and cognition enhancing properties. The protective effect of ginseng on neurological disorders is discussed in this review. Ginseng species and ginsenosides, and their intestinal metabolism and bioavailability are briefly introduced. This is followed by molecular mechanisms of effects of ginseng on the brain, including glutamatergic transmission, monoamine transmission, estrogen signaling, nitric oxide production, the Keap1/Nrf2 adaptive cellular stress pathway, neuronal survival, apoptosis, neural stem cells and neuroregeneration, microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and cerebral microvessels. The molecular mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects of ginseng in Alzheimer’s disease including Aβ formation, tau hyperphosphorylation and oxidative stress, major depression, stroke, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis / experimental allergic encephalitis are then presented. It is hoped that this discussion will stimulate more studies on the use of ginseng in these disorders.

  17. Carriers in Cell-Based Therapies for Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Francisca S. Y.; Chan, Barbara P.; Lo, Amy C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for long-term neuroprotective and neuroregenerative therapies to promote full function recovery of injuries in the human nervous system resulting from trauma, stroke or degenerative diseases. Although cell-based therapies are promising in supporting repair and regeneration, direct introduction to the injury site is plagued by problems such as low transplanted cell survival rate, limited graft integration, immunorejection, and tumor formation. Neural tissue engineering offers an integrative and multifaceted approach to tackle these complex neurological disorders. Synergistic therapeutic effects can be obtained from combining customized biomaterial scaffolds with cell-based therapies. Current scaffold-facilitated cell transplantation strategies aim to achieve structural and functional rescue via offering a three-dimensional permissive and instructive environment for sustainable neuroactive factor production for prolonged periods and/or cell replacement at the target site. In this review, we intend to highlight important considerations in biomaterial selection and to review major biodegradable or non-biodegradable scaffolds used for cell transplantation to the central and peripheral nervous system in preclinical and clinical trials. Expanded knowledge in biomaterial properties and their prolonged interaction with transplanted and host cells have greatly expanded the possibilities for designing suitable carrier systems and the potential of cell therapies in the nervous system. PMID:24933636

  18. Sacroiliac joint motion in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamoto, Yukitaka; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sakaura, Hironobu; Sugiura, Tsuyoshi; Fujimori, Takahito; Matsuo, Yohei; Kashii, Masafumi; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugamoto, Kazuomi

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Usually additional anchors into the ilium are necessary in long fusion to the sacrum for degenerative lumbar spine disorders (DLSDs), especially for adult spine deformity. Although the use of anchors is becoming quite common, surgeons must always keep in mind that the sacroiliac (SI) joint is mobile and they should be aware of the kinematic properties of the SI joint in patients with DLSDs, including adult spinal deformity. No previous study has clarified in vivo kinematic changes in the SI joint with respect to patient age, sex, or parturition status or the presence of DLSDs. The authors conducted a study to clarify the mobility and kinematic characteristics of the SI joint in patients with DLSDs in comparison with healthy volunteers by using in vivo 3D motion analysis with voxel-based registration, a highly accurate, noninvasive method. METHODS Thirteen healthy volunteers (the control group) and 20 patients with DLSDs (the DLSD group) underwent low-dose 3D CT of the lumbar spine and pelvis in 3 positions (neutral, maximal trunk flexion, and maximal trunk extension). SI joint motion was calculated by computer processing of the CT images (voxel-based registration). 3D motion of the SI joint was expressed as both 6 df by Euler angles and translations on the coordinate system and a helical axis of rotation. The correlation between joint motion and the cross-sectional area of the trunk muscles was also investigated. RESULTS SI joint motion during trunk flexion-extension was minute in healthy volunteers. The mean rotation angles during trunk flexion were 0.07° around the x axis, -0.02° around the y axis, and 0.16° around the z axis. The mean rotation angles during trunk extension were 0.38° around the x axis, -0.08° around the y axis, and 0.08° around the z axis. During trunk flexion-extension, the largest amount of motion occurred around the x axis. In patients with DLSDs, the mean rotation angles during trunk flexion were 0.57° around the x axis, 0.01

  19. Isoprenoid Pathway And Neurological And Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar A

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of neuronal degeneration, psychiatric manifestation, immune activation and malignant transformation has been documented in literature, suggesting a central dysfunction in the pathophysiology of these disorders. The isoprenoid pathway may be candidate in this respect, in view of the changes in the concentration of some products of this pathway in many of these disorders, however, no detailed study has been carried out in this respect. In view of this, a study was undertaken on the isoprenoid pathway in some of these disorders - primary generalized epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease (PD, schizophrenia, manic depressive psychosis (MDP, CNS glioma, multiple sclerosis, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPEand a familial group with familial coexistence of schizophrenia, PD, primary generalized epilepsy, malignant neoplasia, rheumatoid arthritis and syndrome-X over three generations. The following parameters were studied in the patients of these disorders as compared to age and sex matched control subjects - ubiquinone dolichol, digoxin, activity of HMG CoA reductase in the plasma and erthyorcyte membrane Na -K--ATpase. Increase in the activity of HMG CoA reductase and in the concentration of plasma digoxin and dolichol was observed in most of these cases. On the other hand, there was decrease in the concentration of plasma ubiquinone. Decrease in the activity of erythrocyte membrane Na-K- ATpase activity for which digoxin is an inhibitor was also observed in all the cases studied. These results indicate an upregulation of the isoprenoid pathway in the neurological and psychiatric disorders studied. The implications of this change is discussed in details.

  20. Accommodation of workers with chronic neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleecker, Margit L; Barnes, Sheryl K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to work is important to those with chronic neurologic disorders (CND) and to the aging workforce. Many signs and symptoms are similar in those with CND and normal aging, but may interfere with the ability to work if not appropriately accommodated. This requires the healthcare provider to recognize the specific features of the CND that interferes with work and how it can be accommodated. Review of the American with Disabilities Act and the subsequent amendment informs the healthcare provider as to what is covered under the law and how the disability can be accommodated. Overall employers want to retain qualified employees and therefore accommodating workers is beneficial to both the employee with CND and the employer.

  1. CT scanning of the brain and lumbar CSF monoamine metabolites in spinocerebellar degenerative disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Hidenao; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Nakanishi, Takao; Kuramoto, Kenmei (Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1984-08-01

    Eight patients with parenchymatous cerebellar degeneration (PCD) group (3 with late cortical cerebellar atrophy and 5 with Holmes' hereditary ataxia), 14 with olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA) group (4 with Shy-Drager syndrome, 6 with OPCA without family history and 4 with Menzel type SCS), 15 with Parkinson's disease and 44 control with other neurological diseases were studied. In all the spinocerebellar degenerative disorders (SCD) cases, CVI values corresponding to the cerebellar atrophy were definitely reduced. On the other hand, PVI values corresponding to the pontine atrophy were only significantly decreased in OPCA group. However, since there were several cases showing only questionable pontine atrophy, it seems difficult to clearly differentiate individual OPCA cases from other SCD cases on CT films alone. Concerning monoamine metabolites in CSF, it was noted that a significant reduction of HVA and total MHPG was found in the OPCA group. Among them, the patients with overt autonomic failure showed the lowest HVA level and the cases of Menzel type of SCD showed a slight reduction of HVA but an unexpected elevation of free MHPG values. The cases of Parkinson's disease showed a definite reduction of HVA. On the other hand, the cases of PCD group showed no significant difference against controls. 5-HIAA levels were not significantly different among the SCD subgroups.

  2. Functional Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Functional Neurological Disorders (Conversion Disorder).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Valerie; Cavanna, Andrea E; Coburn, Kerry; Sampson, Shirlene; Reeve, Alya; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-01-01

    Much is known regarding the physical characteristics, comorbid symptoms, psychological makeup, and neuropsychological performance of patients with functional neurological disorders (FNDs)/conversion disorders. Gross neurostructural deficits do not account for the patients' deficits or symptoms. This review describes the literature focusing on potential neurobiological (i.e. functional neuroanatomic/neurophysiological) findings among individuals with FND, examining neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies of patients with the various forms of motor and sensory FND. In summary, neural networks and neurophysiologic mechanisms may mediate "functional" symptoms, reflecting neurobiological and intrapsychic processes.

  3. 78 FR 77475 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke..., Officer of the Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH, 31 Center...

  4. 78 FR 24221 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... Advisor, Officer of the Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH, 31...

  5. Neurological complications of gastrointestinal disorders. A review of the literature.

    OpenAIRE

    GKAMPETA, Anastasia; Pavlou, Evangelos

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a short review of the literature concerning neurological complications of gastrointestinal disorders. These disorders include the following: inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease), celiac disease, H. Pylori infection, hepatitis C, Wilson's disease, hepatic failure-liver transplantation, gastroenteritis. The most frequent neurological complications are peripheral neuropathy, cerebellar dysfunction, thromboembolism. The exact pathophysiologic mec...

  6. Systems Pharmacology Links GPCRs with Retinal Degenerative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    In most biological systems, second messengers and their key regulatory and effector proteins form links between multiple cellular signaling pathways. Such signaling nodes can integrate the deleterious effects of genetic aberrations, environmental stressors, or both in complex diseases, leading to cell death by various mechanisms. Here we present a systems (network) pharmacology approach that, together with transcriptomics analyses, was used to identify different G protein–coupled receptors that experimentally protected against cellular stress and death caused by linked signaling mechanisms. We describe the application of this concept to degenerative and diabetic retinopathies in appropriate mouse models as an example. Systems pharmacology also provides an attractive framework for devising strategies to combat complex diseases by using (repurposing) US Food and Drug Administration–approved pharmacological agents. PMID:25839098

  7. Measles vaccination in children with neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Kaplina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The data on the current vaccination process and specific antibody in 212 children with pathology of nervous systems in age from 1 year to 6 years old, vaccinated against measles. The comparison group consisted of 36 children without neurological disease. 86 children (40,6% were vaccinated measles – mumps vaccine, and 126 children (59,4% only measles vaccine. Post-vaccination period in 77,8% immunized against measles, was uneventful, layering intercurrent infections was noted in 22,2% of vaccine’s, and demonstrated the development of viral respiratory infections, bronchitis, otitis media and exacerbation of underlying disease. It is shown that the level of specific antibody to measles in children with pathology of nervous systems at 30 days after vaccination was 5,04±0,16 log 2, which did not differ from the comparison group (5,88±0,31 log 2. No significant differences in the level of antibody in a smooth and complicated course of vaccination period were found. Immunization of children with disorders of the nervous system of live vaccines is quite effective and leads to the formation of protective antibody titers in all vaccinated.

  8. Neurofilament dynamics and involvement in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Benoit J; Tibshirani, Michael; Durham, Heather D

    2015-06-01

    Neurons are extremely polarised cells in which the cytoskeleton, composed of microtubules, microfilaments and neurofilaments, plays a crucial role in maintaining structure and function. Neurofilaments, the 10-nm intermediate filaments of neurons, provide structure and mechanoresistance but also provide a scaffolding for the organization of the nucleus and organelles such as mitochondria and ER. Disruption of neurofilament organization and expression or metabolism of neurofilament proteins is characteristic of certain neurological syndromes including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Charcot-Marie-Tooth sensorimotor neuropathies and Giant Axonal Neuropathy. Microfluorometric live imaging techniques have been instrumental in revealing the dynamics of neurofilament assembly and transport and their functions in organizing intracellular organelle networks. The insolubility of neurofilament proteins has limited identifying interactors by conventional biochemical techniques but yeast two-hybrid experiments have revealed new roles for oligomeric, nonfilamentous structures including vesicular trafficking. Although having long half-lives, new evidence points to degradation of subunits by the ubiquitin-proteasome system as a mechanism of normal turnover. Although certain E3-ligases ubiquitinating neurofilament proteins have been identified, the overall process of neurofilament degradation is not well understood. We review these mechanisms of neurofilament homeostasis and abnormalities in motor neuron and peripheral nerve disorders. Much remains to discover about the disruption of processes that leads to their pathological aggregation and accumulation and the relevance to pathogenesis. Understanding these mechanisms is crucial for identifying novel therapeutic strategies.

  9. Control of Abnormal Synchronization in Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr V. Popovych

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the nervous system synchronization processes play an important role, e.g., in the context of information processing and motor control. However, pathological, excessive synchronization may strongly impair brain function and is a hallmark of several neurological disorders. This focused review addresses the question of how an abnormal neuronal synchronization can specifically be counteracted by invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation as, for instance, by deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, or by acoustic stimulation for the treatment of tinnitus. On the example of coordinated reset (CR neuromodulation we illustrate how insights into the dynamics of complex systems contribute to successful model-based approaches, which use methods from synergetics, nonlinear dynamics, and statistical physics, for the development of novel therapies for normalization of brain function and synaptic connectivity. Based on the intrinsic multistability of the neuronal populations induced by spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP,CR neuromodulation utilizes the mutual interdependence between synaptic connectivity and dynamics of the neuronal networks in order to restore more physiological patterns of connectivity via desynchronization of neuronal activity. The very goal is to shift the neuronal population by stimulation from anabnormally coupled and synchronized state to a desynchronized regime with normalized synaptic connectivity, which significantly outlasts the stimulation cessation, so that long-lasting therapeutic effects can be achieved.

  10. When dialogue fails. Music therapy with elderly with neurological degenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2004-01-01

    they can happen, the music therapist must build up a structure for the therapy that compensates for missing cognitive abilities of the client. This is illustrated by the following steps that integrate neuropsychological and psychodynamic theories: 1. Focus attention 2. Regulate arousal level 3. Dialogue 4...... day conversation is building on abilities to remember facts or episodes, to sustain attention, to listen, and to time a response. Without these fundamental cognitive abilities it is difficult to communicate with others – unless the communication is adjusted to the person. Clients with a neurological...... and the ability to understand ‘what is going on’. “You need to have just the right level of activation to perform optimally” (LeDoux 1998, p. 289). Stimulating and sedating effects of music or songs are obtained by musical parameters, such as tempo, rhythm, timbre, volume, pitch, phrasing, dynamic, and timing...

  11. Current concepts on spinal arthrodesis in degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine

    OpenAIRE

    Lykissas, Marios G; Aichmair, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Back pain is a common chronic disorder that represents a large burden for the health care system. There is a broad spectrum of available treatment options for patients suffering from chronic lower back pain in the setting of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, including both conservative and operative approaches. Lumbar arthrodesis techniques can be divided into sub-categories based on the part of the vertebral column that is addressed (anterior vs posterior). Furthermore, one has to ...

  12. Microbiota and Neurological Disorders: A Gut Feeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Walter H; Faller, Douglas V; Harpp, David N; Kanara, Iphigenia; Pernokas, Julie; Powers, Whitney R; Steliou, Kosta

    2016-01-01

    In the past century, noncommunicable diseases have surpassed infectious diseases as the principal cause of sickness and death, worldwide. Trillions of commensal microbes live in and on our body, and constitute the human microbiome. The vast majority of these microorganisms are maternally derived and live in the gut, where they perform functions essential to our health and survival, including: digesting food, activating certain drugs, producing short-chain fatty acids (which help to modulate gene expression by inhibiting the deacetylation of histone proteins), generating anti-inflammatory substances, and playing a fundamental role in the induction, training, and function of our immune system. Among the many roles the microbiome ultimately plays, it mitigates against untoward effects from our exposure to the environment by forming a biotic shield between us and the outside world. The importance of physical activity coupled with a balanced and healthy diet in the maintenance of our well-being has been recognized since antiquity. However, it is only recently that characterization of the host-microbiome intermetabolic and crosstalk pathways has come to the forefront in studying therapeutic design. As reviewed in this report, synthetic biology shows potential in developing microorganisms for correcting pathogenic dysbiosis (gut microbiota-host maladaptation), although this has yet to be proven. However, the development and use of small molecule drugs have a long and successful history in the clinic, with small molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors representing one relevant example already approved to treat cancer and other disorders. Moreover, preclinical research suggests that epigenetic treatment of neurological conditions holds significant promise. With the mouth being an extension of the digestive tract, it presents a readily accessible diagnostic site for the early detection of potential unhealthy pathogens resident in the gut. Taken together, the data outlined

  13. Practical approach to management of respiratory complications in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangera, Zaheer; Panesar, Gurkirat; Makker, Himender

    2012-01-01

    Patients with certain neurological diseases are at increased risk of developing chest infections as well as respiratory failure due to muscular weakness. In particular, patients with certain neuromuscular disorders are at higher risk. These conditions are often associated with sleep disordered breathing. It is important to identify patients at risk of respiratory complications early in the course of their disease, although patients with neuromuscular disorders often present in the acute setting with respiratory involvement. This review of the respiratory complications of neurological disorders, with a particular focus on neuromuscular disorders, explores why this happens and looks at how to recognize, investigate, and manage these patients effectively.

  14. Conversion disorder and mass psychogenic illness in child neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mink, Jonathan W

    2013-11-01

    A common problem faced by neurologists is the existence of disorders that present with neurological symptoms but do not have identifiable neurological bases. Conversion disorder is the most common of these disorders. In some situations, members of a cohesive social group will develop the same or similar symptoms. This review discusses conversion disorder in children, with an emphasis on function movement disorders. It also reviews a recent occurrence of mass psychogenic illness in New York State with discussion of the key features of mass psychogenic illness. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Autism spectrum symptoms in children with neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryland Hilde K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of the present study were to assess symptoms associated with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD in children with neurological disorders as reported by parents and teachers on the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ, as well as the level of agreement between informants for each child. Methods The ASSQ was completed by parents and teachers of the 5781 children (11–13 years who participated in the second wave of the Bergen Child Study (BCS, an on-going longitudinal population-based study. Out of these children, 496 were reported to have a chronic illness, including 99 whom had a neurological disorder. The neurological disorder group included children both with and without intellectual disabilities. Results Children with neurological disorders obtained significantly higher parent and teacher reported ASSQ scores than did non-chronically ill children and those with other chronic illnesses (p Conclusions The ASSQ identifies a high rate of ASD symptoms in children with neurological disorders, and a large number of children screened in the positive range for ASD. Although a firm conclusion awaits further clinical studies, the present results suggest that health care professionals should be aware of potential ASD related problems in children with neurological disorders, and should consider inclusion of the ASSQ or similar screening instruments as part of their routine assessment of this group of children.

  16. Bridging neuroanatomy, neuroradiology and neurology: three-dimensional interactive atlas of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, W L; Chua, B C

    2013-06-01

    Understanding brain pathology along with the underlying neuroanatomy and the resulting neurological deficits is of vital importance in medical education and clinical practice. To facilitate and expedite this understanding, we created a three-dimensional (3D) interactive atlas of neurological disorders providing the correspondence between a brain lesion and the resulting disorder(s). The atlas contains a 3D highly parcellated atlas of normal neuroanatomy along with a brain pathology database. Normal neuroanatomy is divided into about 2,300 components, including the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord, arteries, veins, dural sinuses, tracts, cranial nerves (CN), white matter, deep gray nuclei, ventricles, visual system, muscles, glands and cervical vertebrae (C1-C5). The brain pathology database contains 144 focal and distributed synthesized lesions (70 vascular, 36 CN-related, and 38 regional anatomy-related), each lesion labeled with the resulting disorder and associated signs, symptoms, and/or syndromes compiled from materials reported in the literature. The initial view of each lesion was preset in terms of its location and size, surrounding surface and sectional (magnetic resonance) neuroanatomy, and labeling of lesion and neuroanatomy. In addition, a glossary of neurological disorders was compiled and for each disorder materials from textbooks were included to provide neurological description. This atlas of neurological disorders is potentially useful to a wide variety of users ranging from medical students, residents and nurses to general practitioners, neuroanatomists, neuroradiologists and neurologists, as it contains both normal (surface and sectional) brain anatomy and pathology correlated with neurological disorders presented in a visual and interactive way.

  17. DEGRO guidelines for the radiotherapy of non-malignant disorders. Part II: Painful degenerative skeletal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Oliver J. [University Hospitals Erlangen, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Niewald, Marcus [Saarland University Medical School, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Weitmann, Hajo-Dirk [Fulda Hospital, Dept. of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Fulda (Germany); Jacob, Ingrid [Municipal Hospital Traunstein, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Traunstein (Germany); Adamietz, Irenaeus A. [Marien Hospital Herne/Ruhr University Bochum, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Herne (Germany); Schaefer, Ulrich [Lippe Hospital, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Lemgo (Germany); Keilholz, Ludwig [Bayreuth Hospital, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Bayreuth (Germany); Heyd, Reinhard [Center for Radiosurgery, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Muecke, Ralph [Marien Hospital Herne/Ruhr University Bochum, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Herne (Germany); Lippe Hospital, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Lemgo (Germany); Collaboration: German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases (GCG-BD)

    2014-09-20

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the updated DEGRO consensus S2e guideline recommendations for the treatment of benign painful degenerative skeletal disorders with low-dose radiotherapy. This overview reports on the role of low-dose radiotherapy in the treatment of enthesiopathies (shoulder syndrome, trochanteric bursitis, plantar fasciitis, and elbow syndrome) and painful arthrosis (knee, hip, hand, and finger joints). The most relevant aspects of the DEGRO S2e Consensus Guideline Radiation Therapy of Benign Diseases 2014 regarding diagnostics, treatment decision, dose prescription as well as performance of radiotherapy and results are summarized. For all indications mentioned above, retrospective and some prospective analyses have shown remarkable effects in terms of pain relief. Nevertheless, the Level of Evidence (LoE) and the Grade of Recommendation (GR) vary: LoE 1b-4 and GR A-C. Low-dose radiotherapy for painful degenerative skeletal disorders is effective in the majority of the patients and therefore it may be a reasonable therapeutic alternative when simple and non-invasive methods have been used without persistent success. For all discussed entities, single fraction doses of 0.5-1.0 Gy and total doses of 3.0-6.0 Gy/series applied with 2-3 fractions per week are recommended. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassung der Empfehlungen der DEGRO-S2e-Leitlinie zur Niedrigdosis-Radiotherapie von gutartigen schmerzhaften degenerativen Skeletterkrankungen. Die vorliegende Zusammenfassung berichtet ueber die Bedeutung der Niedrigdosis-Radiotherapie in der Behandlung von Enthesiopathien (Schultersyndrom, Ellenbogensyndrom, Bursitis trochanterica, Fasciitis plantaris) und schmerzhaften Arthrosen (Knie-, Hueft, Hand- und Fingergelenksarthrosen). Die wichtigsten Aspekte der aktuellen DEGRO-S2e-Konsensus-Leitlinie Strahlentherapie gutartiger Erkrankungen bezueglich Diagnostik, Therapieentscheidungen, Dosisempfehlungen und Durchfuehrung einer Radiotherapie werden

  18. Cultured cells of the nervous system, including human neurones, in the study of the neuro-degenerative disorder, Alzheimer's disease: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boni, U

    1985-01-01

    Human nervous-system cells in culture are a suitable model for the study of the degenerative changes associated with Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer-diseased brain contains a factor which induces the formation of paired helical filaments (PHF) in cultured cells, similar to that seen in Alzheimer's disease. The excitotoxic amino acids, glutamate and aspartate, induce similar PHE formation in cultured cells. The neurotoxic element aluminium is present in high concentrations in the brain in several human neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. In cultured-cell systems, aluminium interacts with acidic nuclear proteins, decreases steroid binding, produces a form of neurofibrillary degeneration and alters nucleoside metabolism.

  19. Drug treatment of vertigo in neurological disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana I Berisavac; Pavlović, Aleksandra M.; Jasna J. Zidverc Trajković; Čovičković Šternić, Nadežda M; Ljiljana G. Beslać Bumbaširević

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo is a common symptom in everyday clinical practice. The treatment depends on the specific etiology. Vertigo may be secondary to inner ear pathology, or any existing brainstem or cerebellar lesion but may also be psychogenic. Central vertigo is a consequence of a central nervous system lesion. It is often associated with a focal neurological deficit. Peripheral vertigo is secondary to dysfunction of the peripheral vestibular system and is usually characterized by an acute vertigo with l...

  20. Neurological soft signs discriminating mood disorders from first episode schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, MPM; Liddle, PF; Burgerhof, JGM; Knegtering, R; Bosch, RJ

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the specificity of neurological soft signs (NSS) for first episode schizophrenia compared with mood disorders. Method: We assessed NSS in a sample of 60 healthy controls, 191 first episode psychosis patients and 81 mood disorder patients. We used a principle component analy

  1. Hypnosis as therapy for functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeley, Q

    2017-01-01

    Suggestion in hypnosis has been applied to the treatment of functional neurologic symptoms since the earliest descriptions of hypnosis in the 19th century. Suggestion in this sense refers to an intentional communication of beliefs or ideas, whether verbally or nonverbally, to produce subjectively convincing changes in experience and behavior. The recognition of suggestion as a psychologic process with therapeutic applications was closely linked to the derivation of hypnosis from earlier healing practices. Animal magnetism, the immediate precursor of hypnosis, arrived at a psychologic concept of suggestion along with other ideas and practices which were then incorporated into hypnosis. Before then, other forms of magnetism and ritual healing practices such as exorcism involved unintentionally suggestive verbal and nonverbal stimuli. We consider the derivation of hypnosis from these practices not only to illustrate the range of suggestive processes, but also the consistency with which suggestion has been applied to the production and removal of dissociative and functional neurologic symptoms over many centuries. Nineteenth-century practitioners treated functional symptoms with induction of hypnosis per se; imperative suggestions, or commands for specific effects; "medical clairvoyance" in hypnotic trance, in which patients diagnosed their own condition and predicted the time and manner of their recovery; and suggestion without prior hypnosis, known as "fascination" or "psychotherapeutics." Modern treatments largely involve different types of imperative suggestion with or without hypnosis. However, the therapeutic application of suggestion in hypnosis to functional and other symptoms waned in the first half of the 20th century under the separate pressures of behaviorism and psychoanalysis. In recent decades suggestion in hypnosis has been more widely applied to treating functional neurologic symptoms. Suggestion is typically applied within the context of other

  2. B cells as therapeutic targets in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-10-01

    B cells have a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune neurological disorders, not only as precursors of antibody-producing cells, but also as important regulators of the T-cell activation process through their participation in antigen presentation, cytokine production, and formation of ectopic germinal centers in the intermeningeal spaces. Two B-cell trophic factors-BAFF (B-cell-activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand)-and their receptors are strongly upregulated in many immunological disorders of the CNS and PNS, and these molecules contribute to clonal expansion of B cells in situ. The availability of monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins against B-cell surface molecules and trophic factors provides a rational approach to the treatment of autoimmune neurological diseases. This article reviews the role of B cells in autoimmune neurological disorders and summarizes the experience to date with rituximab, a B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibody against CD20, for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, autoimmune neuropathies, neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic neurological disorders, myasthenia gravis, and inflammatory myopathies. It is expected that ongoing controlled trials will establish the efficacy and long-term safety profile of anti-B-cell agents in several autoimmune neurological disorders, as well as exploring the possibility of a safe and synergistic effect with other immunosuppressants or immunomodulators.

  3. Uroflowmetry in neurologically normal children with voiding disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K M; Nielsen, K.K.; Kristensen, E S

    1985-01-01

    of neurological deficits underwent a complete diagnostic program including intravenous urography, voiding cystography and cystoscopy as well as spontaneous uroflowmetry, cystometry-emg and pressure-flow-emg study. The incidence of dyssynergia was 22%. However, neither the flow curve pattern nor single flow...... variables were able to identify children with dyssynergia. Consequently uroflowmetry seems inefficient in the screening for dyssynergia in neurological normal children with voiding disorders in the absence of anatomical bladder outlet obstruction....

  4. Drug treatment of vertigo in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana I Berisavac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo is a common symptom in everyday clinical practice. The treatment depends on the specific etiology. Vertigo may be secondary to inner ear pathology, or any existing brainstem or cerebellar lesion but may also be psychogenic. Central vertigo is a consequence of a central nervous system lesion. It is often associated with a focal neurological deficit. Peripheral vertigo is secondary to dysfunction of the peripheral vestibular system and is usually characterized by an acute vertigo with loss of balance, sensation of spinning in the space or around self, and is exaggerated with changes of the head and body position; no other neurological deficit is present. Some medications may also cause vertigo. Depending on the cause of the vertigo, drugs with different mechanisms of action, physical therapy, psychotherapy, as well as surgery may be used to combat this disabling malady. Symptomatic treatment has a particularly important role, regardless of the etiology of vertigo. We reviewed the current medications recommended for patients with vertigo, their mechanisms of action and their most frequent side effects.

  5. Drug treatment of vertigo in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisavac, Ivana I; Pavlović, Aleksandra M; Trajković, Jasna J Zidverc; Šternić, Nadežda M Čovičković; Bumbaširević, Ljiljana G Beslać

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo is a common symptom in everyday clinical practice. The treatment depends on the specific etiology. Vertigo may be secondary to inner ear pathology, or any existing brainstem or cerebellar lesion but may also be psychogenic. Central vertigo is a consequence of a central nervous system lesion. It is often associated with a focal neurological deficit. Peripheral vertigo is secondary to dysfunction of the peripheral vestibular system and is usually characterized by an acute vertigo with loss of balance, sensation of spinning in the space or around self, and is exaggerated with changes of the head and body position; no other neurological deficit is present. Some medications may also cause vertigo. Depending on the cause of the vertigo, drugs with different mechanisms of action, physical therapy, psychotherapy, as well as surgery may be used to combat this disabling malady. Symptomatic treatment has a particularly important role, regardless of the etiology of vertigo. We reviewed the current medications recommended for patients with vertigo, their mechanisms of action and their most frequent side effects.

  6. Practical approach to management of respiratory complications in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangera Z

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Zaheer Mangera, Kirat Panesar, Himender MakkerRespiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Patients with certain neurological diseases are at increased risk of developing chest infections as well as respiratory failure due to muscular weakness. In particular, patients with certain neuromuscular disorders are at higher risk. These conditions are often associated with sleep disordered breathing. It is important to identify patients at risk of respiratory complications early in the course of their disease, although patients with neuromuscular disorders often present in the acute setting with respiratory involvement. This review of the respiratory complications of neurological disorders, with a particular focus on neuromuscular disorders, explores why this happens and looks at how to recognize, investigate, and manage these patients effectively.Keywords: respiratory failure, respiratory muscle weakness

  7. Herbal Medicines In The Treatment of Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Akhondzadeh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This review will indicate the quality of the evidence supporting the clinical effects of a number of commonly used types of herbal medicines for psychiatric and neurological disorders. Method: We conducted a review of literature to understand the biochemical and evidential bases for the use of herbs in psychiatric and neurological disorders as follow: 1 Alzheimer’s disease, 2 Depression, 3 Anxiety, 4 Insomnia, 5 Substance use disorders, 6 Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, 7 Migraine. Results: Evidences support use of Ginkgo biloba, Huperzine A, Galantamine, Melissa officinalis,and Salvia officinalis for Alzheimer’s disease; St. John’s wort, Lavender, and Saffron for depression; Passionflower, and Kava, for anxiety disorders; Valerian, and English Lavender for sleep disorders; Hypericum for substance related disorders; Ginkgo biloba, and Passionflower for ADHD; and feverfew, and Butterbur root for migraine. The highest level of confidence derives from well-designed, randomized, double blind controlled studies. Conclusion: Herbs may have beneficial effects in variety of psychiatric and neurological disorder; however we must consider their potential side effects and drug-drug interactions.

  8. Therapeutic potential of fluoxetine in neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, Jop P.; Koch, Marcus W.; Heerings, Marco; Heersema, Dorothea J.; De Keyser, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine, which is registered for a variety of psychiatric disorders, has been found to stimulate the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), increase the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF) and the neurotrophic peptide S

  9. Hypocretin/orexin disturbances in neurological disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Baumann, C.R.; Lammers, G.J.; Bassetti, C.L.; Overeem, S.

    2009-01-01

    The hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) system plays a crucial role in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. The strongest evidence for this is the fact that the primary sleep disorder narcolepsy is caused by disrupted hypocretin signaling in humans as well as various animal models. There is a growi

  10. Urea cycle disorders: brain MRI and neurological outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bireley, William R. [University of Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Van Hove, Johan L.K. [University of Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Gallagher, Renata C. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Fenton, Laura Z. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Urea cycle disorders encompass several enzyme deficiencies that can result in cerebral damage, with a wide clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to severe. The goal of this study was to correlate brain MRI abnormalities in urea cycle disorders with clinical neurological sequelae to evaluate whether MRI abnormalities can assist in guiding difficult treatment decisions. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with urea cycle disorders and symptomatic hyperammonemia. Brain MRI images were reviewed for abnormalities that correlated with severity of clinical neurological sequelae. Our case series comprises six urea cycle disorder patients, five with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and one with citrullinemia type 1. The observed trend in distribution of brain MRI abnormalities as the severity of neurological sequelae increased was the peri-insular region first, extending into the frontal, parietal, temporal and, finally, the occipital lobes. There was thalamic restricted diffusion in three children with prolonged hyperammonemia. Prior to death, this site is typically reported to be spared in urea cycle disorders. The pattern and extent of brain MRI abnormalities correlate with clinical neurological outcome in our case series. This suggests that brain MRI abnormalities may assist in determining prognosis and helping clinicians with subsequent treatment decisions. (orig.)

  11. Multiple roles of metalloproteinases in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Hill, Jeff W; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    Once thought to mainly act in brain to remodel the extracellular matrix, the family of metalloproteinases is important in many normal and pathological processes in the nervous system. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are the two major families of metalloproteinases in the brain. MMPs are comprised of several related enzymes that act on extracellular molecules. Normally, they are important in angiogenesis and neurogenesis in development. In neuroinflammatory illnesses, they disrupt the basal lamina and tight junction proteins to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB). ADAMs are important in neuroinflammation through activation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and their action as secretases that modulate the action of receptors on the cell surface. Four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are the main inhibitors of the MMPs and ADAMs. Recently, MMPs were found to affect DNA repair processes by an unexpected intranuclear action. MMPs and ADAMs have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and vascular cognitive impairment. Growing literature on the functions of MMPs and ADAMs in the central nervous system is opening up new and exciting areas of research that may lead to novel approaches to treatment of neurological diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sagittal balance disorders in severe degenerative spine. Can we identify the compensatory mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrey, Cédric; Roussouly, Pierre; Perrin, Gilles; Le Huec, Jean-Charles

    2011-09-01

    Aging of the spine is characterized by facet joints arthritis, degenerative disc disease and atrophy of extensor muscles resulting in a progressive kyphosis. Recent studies confirmed that patients with lumbar degenerative disease were characterized by an anterior sagittal imbalance, a loss of lumbar lordosis and an increase of pelvis tilt. The aim of this paper was thus to describe the different compensatory mechanisms which are observed in the spine, pelvis and/or lower limbs areas for patients with severe degenerative spine. We reviewed all the compensatory mechanisms of sagittal unbalance described in the literature. According to the severity of the imbalance, we could identify three different stages: balanced, balanced with compensatory mechanisms and imbalanced. For the two last stages, the compensatory mechanisms permitted to limit consequences of lumbar kyphosis on the global sagittal alignment. Reduction of thoracic kyphosis, intervertebral hyperextension, retrolisthesis, pelvis backtilt, knee flessum and ankle extension were the main mechanisms described in the literature. The basic concept of these compensatory mechanisms was to extend adjacent segments of the kyphotic spine allowing for compensation of anterior translation of the axis of gravity. To avoid underestimate the severity of the degenerative spine disorder, it thus seems important to recognize the different compensatory mechanisms from the upper part of the trunk to the lower limbs. We propose a three steps algorithm to analyse the balance status and determine the presence or not of these compensatory mechanisms: measurement of pelvis incidence, assessment of global sagittal alignment and analysis of compensatory mechanisms successively in the spine, pelvis and lower limbs areas.

  13. Minor neurological dysfunction in children with autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Marianne; Punt, Marja; De Groot, Erik; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to improve the understanding of brain function in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in relation to minor neurological dysfunctions (MNDs). Method We studied MNDs in 122 children (93 males, 29 females; mean age 8y 1mo, SD 2y 6mo) who, among a total cohort of 7

  14. Minor Neurological Dysfunction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Marianne; Punt, Marja; de Groot, Erik; Minderaa, Ruud B; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to improve the understanding of brain function in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in relation to minor neurological dysfunctions (MNDs). Method: We studied MNDs in 122 children (93 males, 29 females; mean age 8y 1mo, SD 2y 6mo) who, among a total cohort of 705 children (513 males, 192 females; mean age…

  15. Secondary Abnormalities of Neurotransmitters in Infants with Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cazorla, A.; Serrano, M.; Perez-Duenas, B.; Gonzalez, V.; Ormazabal, A.; Pineda, M.; Fernandez-Alvarez, E.; Campistol, J. M. D.; Artuch, R. M. D.

    2007-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential in young children for differentiation and neuronal growth of the developing nervous system. We aimed to identify possible factors related to secondary neurotransmitter abnormalities in pediatric patients with neurological disorders. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and biogenic amine metabolites in 56 infants…

  16. Ravel's neurological illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, R J; Pascuzzi, R M

    1999-01-01

    In the last 10 years of his life, Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) experienced a gradually progressive decline in neurological function. Dr. Alajouanine examined Ravel, noting the presence of aphasia and apraxia with relative preservation of comprehension and memory. The exact diagnosis remains unclear, but the likelihood of a progressive degenerative disorder, such as frontotemporal dementia, is herein discussed.

  17. A study of neurological disorders during pregnancy and puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the clinical profile of patients presenting with primary and secondary neurological disorders during pregnancy and puerperium. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out at the Lady Harding Medical College between February 2004 and January 2005. All patients in pregnancy, postabortal or postpartum period attending to the Lady Harding Medical College between February 2004 and January 2005 and requiring neurological consultation were included in this study. Women with eclampsia were excluded. Results: There were 76 women included in this study (incidence of neurological disorders was 584 per 100,000 deliveries, with 46 cases of primary and 30 of secondary neurological disorders. The former included epilepsy (22, CNS infections (12, cerebrovascular disorders (9 [cerebral venous thrombosis - CVT (5, arterial infarctions (3 and haemorrhage (1], CNS glioma (1, traumatic quadriparesis (1 and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (1. The latter included hepatic encephalopathy [HE] (28, enteric encephalopathy (1 and critical illness polyneuropathy (1. In patients of epilepsy, the seizures had an equitable distribution in the trimesters and post-partum period, were mainly of generalized type (77.27% and were controlled in the majority (90.9%. No fetal congenital malformations were seen. Tubercular meningitis [TBM] (7, pyogenic meningitis (4 and viral encephalitis (1 were the CNS infections encountered and pregnancy outcome was good in most cases. All cases of CVT presented in the postpartum period with fever and neurological signs following home delivery. Outcomes included recovery (2, residual deficits (1, persisting seizures (1 and death (1. HE affected patients mainly during the latter half of pregnancy or the post-partum period and was associated with 64.3% mortality. Death in HE showed correlation with grade of HE ( P =0.007; Glasgow Coma Scale ( P =0.006; Liver span ( P =0.049; bilirubin ( P =0.005 and retained foetus ( P

  18. Correlation of auditory brain stem response and the MRI measurements in neuro-degenerative disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Hidekazu (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate correlations of several MRI measurements of the cranium and brain, functioning as a volume conductor, to the auditory brain stem response (ABR) in neuro-degenerative disorders. The subjects included forty-seven patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and sixteen of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Statistically significant positive correlations were found between I-V and III-V interpeak latencies (IPLs) and the area of cranium and brain in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between I-III and III-V IPLs and the area in the longitudinal section of those with ALS. And, also there were statistically significant correlations between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of brain stem as well as that of the cranium in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of the cerebrum in the longitudinal section of ALS. In conclusion, in the ABR, the IPLs were prolonged and the amplitude of the V wave was decreased while the MRI size of the cranium and brain increased. When the ABR is applied to neuro-degenerative disorders, it might be important to consider not only the conduction of the auditory tracts in the brain stem, but also the correlations of the size of the cranium and brain which act as a volume conductor. (author).

  19. Neurological soft signs in obsessive-compulsive disorder

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    Guz H

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurological soft signs (NSSs are defined as abnormal motor or sensory findings, including involuntary movements, a variety of dispraxia, difficulties in performing rapid alternating movements, difficulties in two-point discrimination, and graphesthesia in a person without a neurological disorder which can be determined as its focus. Aims: to investigate the relationship of NSSs with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Settings and Design: This study was designed in the Psychiatry Polyclinic of Ondokuz Mayis University Hospital. After signing an informed consent form, all the subjects were divided into 2 groups: (1 the patient group and (2 the control group. Material and Methods: Thirty consecutive patients presenting with DSM-IV OCD were included in this study. The control group consisted of 30 healthy subjects without a psychiatric/neurological disorder. All subjects underwent a physical and neurological examination for soft signs (PANESS. Statistical analysis used: The Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical analysis of data. Results: It was seen that graphesthesia, two-point discrimination, and total PANESS scores were significantly higher in the group with OCD than the control group. In other NSSs, there was no significant difference between the patient and control groups. Conclusions: Unlike some studies, in the present study, the difference between the groups in graphesthesia compared to other NSSs was significant. The results of this preliminary study suggest that there is a relationship between NSSs and OCD. We think that NSSs may point to a structural brain abnormality in patients with OCD.

  20. Neurologic disorders associated with weight lifting and bodybuilding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busche, Kevin

    2009-02-01

    Weight lifting and other forms of strength training are becoming more common because of an increased awareness of the need to maintain individual physical fitness. Emergency room data indicate that injuries caused by weight training have become more universal over time, likely because of increased participation rates. Neurologic injuries can result from weight lifting and related practices. Although predominantly peripheral nervous system injuries have been described, central nervous system disease may also occur. This article illustrates the types of neurologic disorders associated with weight lifting.

  1. Disruptive technology disorder: A past, present, and future neurologic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Donald F

    2017-07-25

    Based upon an analysis of 6 major historical technological advances over the last 150 years, a new syndrome, disruptive technology disorder (DTD), is introduced. DTD describes the human health ailments that accompany the implementation of disruptive technologies. Elevator sickness, railway spine, and bicycle face are representative examples. Though the underlying causative disruptive technologies may differ, many neurologic symptoms (headache, dizziness, weakness) are common to multiple DTDs. Born of technology-driven societal change, DTDs manifest as a complex interplay between biological and psychological symptoms. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Spasmodic dysphonia: description of the disease and associated neurologic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coelho, Marina Serrato

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spasmodic dysphonia (SD is a problem that affects speech and vocalization, one of the most devastating disorders of oral communication. It is characterized by vocal quality tensaestrangulada, harshly and / or interspersed with abrupt vocal attack and a great tension in the vocal tract. The etiology of spasmodic dysphonia is unclear. Some authors point to psychogenic causes, neurological or even unknown. Objective: To assess the prevalence of muscular dystonias and other neurological symptoms in patients with ED. Method: A retrospective study of 10 cases with diagnosis of ED for symptoms and neurological disorders associated. Results: There was a significant predominance of the disease in females (9:1. The average age of onset of symptoms was 32 years, ranging between 14 and 60 years. The mean disease duration was 10 years. Among the patients, 87.5% had a diagnosis of disorders of movement made by a neurologist, including orofacial dystonias (50%, essential tremor (50% and spastic paraparesis (12%. Conclusion: The presence of movement disorders followed almost all cases of spasmodic dysphonia. More studies are needed to clarify the pathophysiological basis of disease.

  3. MECHANICAL GAIT TRAINING IN NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS: A REVIEW OF EVIDENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyyappan Manickavasagam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Robotic technologies are becoming more prevalent for treating neurological conditions in clinical settings. We conducted a literature search of original articles to identify all studies that examined the use of robotic devices for restoring walking function in adults with neurological disorders. A search was conducted in MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Google Scholar, CINAHL and EBSCO host from 2005 to 2014. Keywords used were gait, locomotor training, multiple sclerosis, neurological disorders, rehabilitation, robotics, spinal cord injury, stroke, traumatic brain injury and walking. This review analyzed 27 articles that examined the effects of locomotor training with robotic assistance in patients following stroke, spinal cord injury (SCI, multiple sclerosis (MS, traumatic brain injury (TBI, and Parkinson disease (PD. This review supports that locomotor training with robotic assistance is beneficial for improving walking function in individuals following a stroke and SCI. Gait speed and endurance were not found to be significantly different among patients with motor incomplete SCI after a variety of locomotor training approaches. Limited evidence demonstrates that locomotor training with robotic assistance is beneficial in populations of patients with MS, TBI, or PD. We discuss clini¬cal implications and decision making in the area of gait reha¬bilitation for neurological dysfunction.

  4. MicroRNA in central nervous system trauma and degenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nai-Kui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2011-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a novel class of small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by binding to the 3'-untranslated region of target mRNAs leading to their translational inhibition or sometimes degradation. MiRNAs are predicted to control the activity of at least 20-30% of human protein-coding genes. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) including the brain and spinal cord. Although we are currently in the initial stages of understanding how this novel class of gene regulators is involved in neurological biological functions, a growing body of exciting evidence suggests that miRNAs are important regulators of diverse biological processes such as cell differentiation, growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. Moreover, miRNAs are key modulators of both CNS development and plasticity. Some miRNAs have been implicated in several neurological disorders such as traumatic CNS injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, several studies suggested the possibility of miRNA involvement in neurodegeneration. Identifying the roles of miRNAs and their target genes and signaling pathways in neurological disorders will be critical for future research. miRNAs may represent a new layer of regulators for neurobiology and a novel class of therapeutic targets for neurological diseases.

  5. Acupressure for treating neurological disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Sook; Lee, Myeong Soo; Min, Kyungyoon; Lew, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Beom-Joon

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this review is to assess the clinical evidence for or against acupressure as a treatment for neurological disorders. We searched the literature from 12 databases from their inception to July 2010. We included any type of controlled clinical trial (CCT) in which patients with neurological disorders were treated with acupressure. The methodological quality of all clinical trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias analysis. In total, two randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and four CCTs were included. Four studies (one RCT and three CCTs) compared the effects of acupressure with routine care or no treatment in patients with stroke and showed significant effects of acupressure on improving patient function and symptoms. One RCT, which compared acupressure with sham acupressure and no treatment in patients with headache, also showed that acupressure significantly reduced headache severity and pain. However, all trials were open to methodological limitations and a high risk of bias. In conclusion, current evidence showing that acupressure is an effective treatment for improving function and symptoms in patients with stroke is limited. However, the evidence is insufficient to draw conclusions concerning the effects of acupressure on other neurological disorders. More rigorous studies are warranted.

  6. Retromer in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and other neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Scott A; Petsko, Gregory A

    2015-03-01

    Retromer is a protein assembly that has a central role in endosomal trafficking, and retromer dysfunction has been linked to a growing number of neurological disorders. First linked to Alzheimer disease, retromer dysfunction causes a range of pathophysiological consequences that have been shown to contribute to the core pathological features of the disease. Genetic studies have established that retromer dysfunction is also pathogenically linked to Parkinson disease, although the biological mechanisms that mediate this link are only now being elucidated. Most recently, studies have shown that retromer is a tractable target in drug discovery for these and other disorders of the nervous system.

  7. Factors Related to Social Support in Neurological and Mental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenov, Kaloyan; Cabello, Maria; Caballero, Francisco Félix; Cieza, Alarcos; Sabariego, Carla; Raggi, Alberto; Anczewska, Marta; Pitkänen, Tuuli; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Despite the huge body of research on social support, literature has been primarily focused on its beneficial role for both physical and mental health. It is still unclear why people with mental and neurological disorders experience low levels of social support. The main objective of this study was to explore what are the strongest factors related to social support and how do they interact with each other in neuropsychiatric disorders. The study used cross-sectional data from 722 persons suffering from dementia, depression, epilepsy, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, and substance use disorders. Multiple linear regressions showed that disability was the strongest factor for social support. Extraversion and agreeableness were significant personality variables, but when the interaction terms between personality traits and disability were included, disability remained the only significant variable. Moreover, level of disability mediated the relationship between personality (extraversion and agreeableness) and level of social support. Moderation analysis revealed that people that had mental disorders experienced lower levels of support when being highly disabled compared to people with neurological disorders. Unlike previous literature, focused on increasing social support as the origin of improving disability, this study suggested that interventions improving day-to-day functioning or maladaptive personality styles might also have an effect on the way people perceive social support. Future longitudinal research, however, is warranted to explore causality.

  8. Factors Related to Social Support in Neurological and Mental Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaloyan Kamenov

    Full Text Available Despite the huge body of research on social support, literature has been primarily focused on its beneficial role for both physical and mental health. It is still unclear why people with mental and neurological disorders experience low levels of social support. The main objective of this study was to explore what are the strongest factors related to social support and how do they interact with each other in neuropsychiatric disorders. The study used cross-sectional data from 722 persons suffering from dementia, depression, epilepsy, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, and substance use disorders. Multiple linear regressions showed that disability was the strongest factor for social support. Extraversion and agreeableness were significant personality variables, but when the interaction terms between personality traits and disability were included, disability remained the only significant variable. Moreover, level of disability mediated the relationship between personality (extraversion and agreeableness and level of social support. Moderation analysis revealed that people that had mental disorders experienced lower levels of support when being highly disabled compared to people with neurological disorders. Unlike previous literature, focused on increasing social support as the origin of improving disability, this study suggested that interventions improving day-to-day functioning or maladaptive personality styles might also have an effect on the way people perceive social support. Future longitudinal research, however, is warranted to explore causality.

  9. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Neurological Disorders: Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Dominic J; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disorders comprise a large group of heterogeneous diseases ranging from very prevalent diseases such as diabetes mellitus to rare genetic disorders like Canavan Disease. Whether either of these diseases is amendable by gene therapy depends to a large degree on the knowledge of their pathomechanism, availability of the therapeutic gene, vector selection, and availability of suitable animal models. In this book chapter, we review three metabolic disorders of the central nervous system (CNS; Canavan Disease, Niemann-Pick disease and Phenylketonuria) to give examples for primary and secondary metabolic disorders of the brain and the attempts that have been made to use adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy for treatment. Finally, we highlight commonalities and obstacles in the development of gene therapy for metabolic disorders of the CNS exemplified by those three diseases.

  10. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Neurological Disorders: Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Dominic J.; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disorders comprise a large group of heterogeneous diseases ranging from very prevalent diseases such as diabetes mellitus to rare genetic disorders like Canavan Disease. Whether either of these diseases is amendable by gene therapy depends to a large degree on the knowledge of their pathomechanism, availability of the therapeutic gene, vector selection, and availability of suitable animal models. In this book chapter, we review three metabolic disorders of the central nervous system (CNS; Canavan Disease, Niemann–Pick disease and Phenylketonuria) to give examples for primary and secondary metabolic disorders of the brain and the attempts that have been made to use adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy for treatment. Finally, we highlight commonalities and obstacles in the development of gene therapy for metabolic disorders of the CNS exemplified by those three diseases. PMID:26611604

  11. A Heme Oxygenase-1 Transducer Model of Degenerative and Developmental Brain Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyman M. Schipper

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a 32 kDa protein which catalyzes the breakdown of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. The Hmox1 promoter contains numerous consensus sequences that render the gene exquisitely sensitive to induction by diverse pro-oxidant and inflammatory stimuli. In “stressed” astroglia, HO-1 hyperactivity promotes mitochondrial iron sequestration and macroautophagy and may thereby contribute to the pathological iron deposition and bioenergetic failure documented in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and certain neurodevelopmental conditions. Glial HO-1 expression may also impact neuroplasticity and cell survival by modulating brain sterol metabolism and the proteasomal degradation of neurotoxic proteins. The glial HO-1 response may represent a pivotal transducer of noxious environmental and endogenous stressors into patterns of neural damage and repair characteristic of many human degenerative and developmental CNS disorders.

  12. Effectiveness of custom-made orthopaedic shoes in the reduction of foot pain and pressure in patients with degenerative disorders of the foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, M.; van Dijk, H.; Ijzerman, M.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, K.; Groothoff, J.; Lankhurst, G.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Degenerative disorders of the foot often are painful during standing and walking. It is assumed that, because of bone deformity, callus, and deformity of the plantar pads, the plantar pressure distribution changes. Prescription of orthopaedic shoes for patients with degenerative disorder

  13. Zika virus-associated neurological disorders: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Abelardo Q C; Silva, Marcus Tulius T; Araujo, Alexandra P Q C

    2016-08-01

    Zika virus, an arbovirus transmitted by mosquitoes of the Aedes species, is now rapidly disseminating throughout the Americas and the ongoing Brazilian outbreak is the largest Zika virus epidemic so far described. In addition to being associated with a non-specific acute febrile illness, a number of neurological manifestations, mainly microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome, have been associated with infection. These with other rarer neurological conditions suggest that Zika virus, similar to other flaviviruses, is neuropathogenic. The surge of Zika virus-related microcephaly cases in Brazil has received much attention and the role of the virus in this and in other neurological manifestations is growing. Zika virus has been shown to be transmitted perinatally and the virus can be detected in amniotic fluid, placenta and foetus brain tissue. A significant increase in Guillain-Barré syndrome incidence has also been reported during this, as well as in previous outbreaks. More recently, meningoencephalitis and myelitis have also been reported following Zika virus infection. In summary, while preliminary studies have suggested a clear relationship between Zika virus infection and certain neurological conditions, only longitudinal studies in this epidemic, as well as experimental studies either in animal models or in vitro, will help to better understand the role of the virus and the pathogenesis of these disorders.

  14. Questionnaire for usability evaluation of orthopaedic shoes : Construction and reliability in patients with degenerative disorders of the foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, MJA; de Vries, J; Stewart, RE; Groothoff, JW; Lankhorst, GJ

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To develop a self-report questionnaire for patients with degenerative disorders of the foot to evaluate the usability of their orthopaedic shoes, and to assess the reproducibility and responsiveness of the instrument. Design: Development of the Questionnaire for Usability Evaluation of or

  15. Questionnaire for usability evaluation of orthopaedic shoes: construction and reliability in patients with degenerative disorders of the foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, Michiel J.A.; Vries, de Jaap; Stewart, Roy E.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To develop a self-report questionnaire for patients with degenerative disorders of the foot to evaluate the usability of their orthopaedic shoes, and to assess the reproducibility and responsiveness of the instrument. Design: Development of the Questionnaire for Usability Evaluation of or

  16. Nanotechnology Based Treatments for Neurological Disorders from Genetics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas S. Kurek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechology involves the application, analysis and manipulation of nanomaterials. These materials have unique and medically useful properties due to their nanoscale parameters. Nanotechnology based treatments and diagnostics might eventually bring great relief to people suffering from neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disorders. A large variety of nonmaterials such as viruses, carbon nanotubes, gold and silica nanoparticles, nanoshells, quantum dots, genetic material and proteins as well as hordes of other forms of nanotechnology have been researched in order to determine their potential in enhancing disease treatments and diagnostics. Nanotechnology has shown countless applications and might eventually be used in every biotech/health industry. Nevertheless, many nanomaterials may pose some safety risks and whether their benefits overweigh the risk is still being debated. Once the proper ethical and safety protocols are established and enough research is completed, nanotechnology is expected to benefit the mankind enormously. In this article, we will discuss and analyze many ways in which, nanotechnology based treatments and diagnostics will be used to help people with neurological disorders through the methods that we currently have at our disposal. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 12-32

  17. Comorbid diseases at patients with HIV-induced neurological disorders

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    Sholomova E.l.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the structure and frequency of detection of secondary diseases in patients with neurological manifestations of HIV infection. Materials and methods. The study involved 304 patients infected with HIV. Results. The defeat of the nervous system in HIV infection occur encephalopathy, cerebral vascular lesions, meningitis, subacute encephalitis, secondary CNS lesions. The number of CD4-lymphocytes in HIV-infected patients with neurological disorders was significantly lower. Most of them have comorbid diseases. The most commonly diagnosed hepatitis С and B, herpes, cytomegalovirus infection, chlamydia, Candida, toxoplasmosis and tuberculosis, mixed infection. Hepatitis В and С and herpes are the most widely represented in patients with HIV-induced encephalopathy and cerebrovascular form of HIV. The presence of cytomegalovirus infection is correlated with the development of subacute encephalitis. Conclusion. Manifestations of nervous system pathology in HIV polymorphic and correlated with the presence of secondary comorbid pathology. Such conditions are due to underlying disease immunological parameters.

  18. Gait impairment in neurological disorders: a new technological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprini, Roberta; Sale, Patrizio; Foti, Calogero; Fini, Massimo; Franceschini, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Gait recovery is considered one of the main objectives of rehabilitation interventions in neurological disabilities, as restricted movement can significantly reduce an individual's ability to take part in normal activities of daily living. Locomotor training has been shown to improve gait rehabilitation. Studies have recently been published on the use of robots and other devices in patients with gait disabilities, particularly in the rehabilitation of the lower limbs. However, analysis of the recent literature reveals a relative paucity of strong methodological studies. The evidence that is available, while strong, is not yet sufficient to allow definite conclusions to be drawn regarding the efficacy of these devices. From these considerations, it is clear that validated and standardized methods need to be adopted for each of the different systems available. This would help to clarify the indications for and correct use of robotic devices in the different neurological disorders.

  19. Cell therapy for neurological disorders: The elusive goal

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    Prakash N Tandon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The positive outcomes of the transplantation of fetal neural tissue in adult rat models of a variety of neurological disorders, particularly Parkinson's disease, in the 1970s, and its translation to humans in the 1980s, raised great hopes for patients suffering from these incurable disorders. This resulted in a frantic research globally to find more suitable, reliable, and ethically acceptable alternatives. The discovery of adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and more recently, the induced pluripotent cells further raised our expectations. The useful functional recovery in animal models using these cell transplantation techniques coupled with the desperate needs of such patients prompted many surgeons to “jump from the rat-to-man” without scientifically establishing a proof of their utility. Each new development claimed to overcome the limitations, shortcomings, safety, and other technical problems associated with the earlier technique, yet newer difficulties prevented evidence-based acceptance of their clinical use. However, thousands of patients across the globe have received these therapies without a scientifically acceptable proof of their reliability. The present review is an attempt to summarize the current status of cell therapy for neurological disorders.

  20. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in central neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venhovens, J; Meulstee, J; Verhagen, W I M

    2016-01-01

    Several types of acoustic stimulation (i.e. tone bursts or clicks), bone-conducted vibration, forehead taps, and galvanic stimulation elicit myogenic potentials. These can be recorded in cervical and ocular muscles, the so called vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). The cervical VEMP (cVEMP) resembles the vestibulo-collic reflex and the responses can be recorded from the ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid muscle. The ocular VEMP resembles the vestibulo-ocular reflex and can be recorded from extra-ocular muscles by a surface electrode beneath the contralateral infraorbital margin. Initially, the literature concerning VEMPs was limited to peripheral vestibular disorders, however, the field of VEMP testing is rapidly expanding, with an increasing focus on central neurological disorders. The current literature concerning VEMP abnormalities in central neurological disorders is critically reviewed, especially regarding the methodological aspects in relation to quality as well as the clinical interpretation of the VEMP results. Suggestions for further research are proposed as well as some clinically useful indications. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Telerehabilitation, virtual therapists, and acquired neurologic speech and language disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Leora R; van Vuuren, Sarel

    2012-08-01

    Telerehabilitation (telerehab) offers cost-effective services that potentially can improve access to care for those with acquired neurologic communication disorders. However, regulatory issues including licensure, reimbursement, and threats to privacy and confidentiality hinder the routine implementation of telerehab services into the clinical setting. Despite these barriers, rapid technological advances and a growing body of research regarding the use of telerehab applications support its use. This article reviews the evidence related to acquired neurologic speech and language disorders in adults, focusing on studies that have been published since 2000. Research studies have used telerehab systems to assess and treat disorders including dysarthria, apraxia of speech, aphasia, and mild Alzheimer disease. They show that telerehab is a valid and reliable vehicle for delivering speech and language services. The studies represent a progression of technological advances in computing, Internet, and mobile technologies. They range on a continuum from working synchronously (in real-time) with a speech-language pathologist to working asynchronously (offline) with a stand-in virtual therapist. One such system that uses a virtual therapist for the treatment of aphasia, the Web-ORLA™ (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL) system, is described in detail. Future directions for the advancement of telerehab for clinical practice are discussed.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of iron deposition in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brass, Steven D; Chen, Nan-kuei; Mulkern, Robert V; Bakshi, Rohit

    2006-02-01

    Deposition of iron in the brain is proposed to play a role in the pathophysiology of the normal aging process and neurodegenerative diseases. Whereas iron is required for normal neuronal metabolism, excessive levels can contribute to the formation of free radicals, leading to lipid peroxidation and neurotoxicity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool to detect excessive iron in the brain and longitudinally monitor changes in iron levels. Iron deposition is associated with a reduction in the T2 relaxation time, leading to hypointensity on spin-echo and gradient-echo T2-weighted images. The MRI changes associated with iron deposition have been observed both in normal aging and in various chronic neurological diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease. Magnetic resonance imaging metrics providing information about iron concentrations include R2, R2', and R2*. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role of iron and its detection by MRI in various neurological disorders. We will review the basic biochemical properties of iron and its influence on MRI signal. We will also summarize the sensitivity and specificity of MRI techniques in detecting iron. The MRI and pathological findings pertaining to brain iron will be reviewed with respect to normal aging and a variety of neurological disorders. Finally, the biochemistry and pathophysiology surrounding iron, oxidative stress, free radicals, and lipid peroxidation in the brain will be discussed, including therapeutic implications. The potential role of iron deposition and its assessment by MRI provides exciting potential applications to the diagnosis, longitudinal monitoring, and therapeutic development for disorders of the brain.

  3. Stem cells for the treatment of neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2006-06-01

    Many common neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, stroke and multiple sclerosis, are caused by a loss of neurons and glial cells. In recent years, neurons and glia have been generated successfully from stem cells in culture, fuelling efforts to develop stem-cell-based transplantation therapies for human patients. More recently, efforts have been extended to stimulating the formation and preventing the death of neurons and glial cells produced by endogenous stem cells within the adult central nervous system. The next step is to translate these exciting advances from the laboratory into clinically useful therapies.

  4. Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG to discriminate primary degenerative dementia from major depressive disorder (depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deslandes Andréa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG can be a valuable technique to assess electrophysiological changes related to dementia. In patients suspected of having dementia, the EEG is often quite informative. The sensitivity of the EEG to detect correlates of psychiatric disorders has been enhanced by means of quantitative methods of analysis (quantitative EEG. Quantitative features are extracted from, at least, 2 minutes of artifact-free, eyes closed, resting EEG, log-transformed to obtain Gaussianity, age-regressed, and Z-transformed relative to population norms (Neurometrics database. Using a subset of quantitative EEG (qEEG features, forward stepwise discriminant analyses are used to construct classifier functions. Along this vein, the main objective of this experiment is to distinguish profiles of qEEG, which differentiate depressive from demented patients (n = 125. The results showed that demented patients present deviations above the control group in variables associated to slow rhythms: Normed Monopolar Relative Power Theta for Cz and Normed Bipolar Relative Power Theta for Head. On the other hand, the deviation below the control group occurs with the variable associated to alpha rhythm: Normed Monopolar Relative Power Alpha for P3, in dementia. Using this method, the present investigation demonstrated high discriminant accuracy in separating Primary Degenerative Dementia from Major Depressive Disorder (Depression.

  5. Neurological Disorders in a Murine Model of Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Chillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. However, data on the impact of CRF on the cerebral circulatory system are scarce—despite the fact that stroke is the third most common cause of cardiovascular death in people with CRF. In the present study, we examined the impact of CRF on behavior (anxiety, recognition and ischemic stroke severity in a well-defined murine model of CRF. We did not observe any significant increases between CRF mice and non-CRF mice in terms of anxiety. In contrast, CRF mice showed lower levels of anxiety in some tests. Recognition was not impaired (vs. controls after 6 weeks of CRF but was impaired after 10 weeks of CRF. Chronic renal failure enhances the severity of ischemic stroke, as evaluated by the infarct volume size in CRF mice after 34 weeks of CRF. Furthermore, neurological test results in non-CRF mice tended to improve in the days following ischemic stroke, whereas the results in CRF mice tended to worsen. In conclusion, we showed that a murine model of CRF is suitable for evaluating uremic toxicity and the associated neurological disorders. Our data confirm the role of uremic toxicity in the genesis of neurological abnormalities (other than anxiety.

  6. Neurological soft signs in schizophrenia and obsessive compulsive disorder spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumkaya, S; Karadag, F; Oguzhanoglu, N K

    2012-04-01

    Obsessive compulsive symptoms are more frequent in patients with schizophrenia compared to normal population. Patients with obsessive compulsive disorder may also exhibit psychosis-like symptoms. Based on these findings, it has been suggested that there is a spectrum of disorders between OCD and schizophrenia. We compared two OCD groups (with good and poor insight) and two schizophrenia groups (with and without OCD) in this recommended spectrum especially in terms of neurological soft signs (NSSs) associated with sensory integration. The schizophrenia with OCD (schizo-obsessive) group exhibited worse performance than the schizophrenia group (p=0.002) in only graphesthesia tasks. Moreover, schizo-obsessive patients exhibited worse performance compared to OCD patients in terms of graphesthesia (p=0.001) and audiovisual integration (p=0.001). Interestingly, OCD patients with poor insight tended to exhibit graphesthesia deficit in a similar manner to schizo-obsessive patients rather than OCD patients. According to our results, graphesthesia disorder is strongly associated both with OCD and schizophrenia. This suggests that neurodevelopmental disorders that lead to graphesthesia disorder overlap in comorbid OCD and schizophrenia patients.

  7. The classification of conversion disorder (functional neurologic symptom disorder) in ICD and DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, J L; Sharpe, M

    2016-01-01

    The name given to functional neurologic symptoms has evolved over time in the different editions of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), reflecting a gradual move away from an etiologic conception rooted in hysterical conversion to an empiric phenomenologic one, emphasizing the central role of the neurologic examination and testing in demonstrating that the symptoms are incompatible with recognized neurologic disease pathophysiology, or are internally inconsistent. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effectiveness of custom-made orthopaedic shoes in the reduction of foot pain and pressure in patients with degenerative disorders of the foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, M.J.A.; Jannink, M.J.A.; van Dijk, H; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina Gerarda Maria; Groothuis, C.G.M.; Groothoff, J.W.; Lankhorst, G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Degenerative disorders of the foot often are painful during standing and walking. It is assumed that, because of bone deformity, callus, and deformity of the plantar pads, the plantar pressure distribution changes. Prescription of orthopaedic shoes for patients with degenerative

  9. Effectiveness of custom-made orthopaedic shoes in the reduction of foot pain and pressure in patients with degenerative disorders of the foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, M.; van Dijk, H.; Ijzerman, M.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, K.; Groothoff, J.; Lankhurst, G.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Degenerative disorders of the foot often are painful during standing and walking. It is assumed that, because of bone deformity, callus, and deformity of the plantar pads, the plantar pressure distribution changes. Prescription of orthopaedic shoes for patients with degenerative

  10. Mild neurological impairment may indicate a psychomotor endophenotype in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabi, Mohammad; Paast, Negin; Karim, Hamid Reza; Faghfori, Sara; Memari, Amir Hossein

    2016-11-30

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show any neurological soft signs compared to healthy controls. Furthermore we sought to examine the role of common symptoms related to BPD, such as depression, anxiety or impulsivity, in association with neurological soft signs. Thirty patients with borderline personality disorder and thirty hospital-based controls were examined for neurological soft signs. The total score of neurological soft signs in BPD was significantly higher than controls. In terms of subscales, patients had higher scores in Sensory Integration and Motor Coordination and other neurological soft signs compared to control group. Multiple regression analysis showed that the impulsivity score was the best significant predictor of neurological soft signs in BPD. The increase of neurological soft signs in patients with BPD may address a non-focal neurological dysfunction in borderline personality disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Validation of the clinical diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders for the diagnostic subgroup of degenerative joint disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandlmaier, I; Grüner, S; Rudisch, A; Bertram, S; Emshoff, R

    2003-04-01

    Research is needed to assess the validity of the Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (CDC/TMD). The purpose of this study was to test the reliability of the clinical diagnosis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) degenerative joint disease (DJD) as compared with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 'gold standard'. The TMJ DJD group comprised 48 joints in 24 consecutive patients who were assigned a clinical bilateral diagnosis of TMJ DJD. The TMJ non-DJD group consisted of 82 joints in 41 consecutive patients without a TMJ-related diagnosis of TMD. Bilateral sagittal and coronal MR images were obtained subsequently to establish the corresponding diagnosis of degenerative joint changes. An MRI diagnosis of osteoarthrosis (OA) was defined by the presence of flattening, subchondral sclerosis, surface irregularities, and erosion of the condyle or presence of condylar deformities associated with flattening, subchondral sclerosis, surface irregularities, erosion and osteophyte. For the CDC/TMD interpretations, the positive predictive of DJD for OA was 67%, and for the presence of degenerative joint changes 88%. The overall diagnostic agreement for DJD was 44.6% with a corresponding K-value of 0.01. Most of the disagreement was due to false-negative interpretations of asymptomatic joints. The results suggest CDC/TMD to be predictive for degenerative joint changes but insufficient for determination of OA. Patients assigned a clinical TMJ-related diagnosis of DJD may need to be supplemented by evidence from MRI to determine the presence or absence of OA.

  12. Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders in small cell lung carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhall, Mark; Chapman, Caroline; Nibber, Anjan; Waters, Patrick; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Maddison, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and range of paraneoplastic neurologic disorders (PNDs) and neuronal antibodies in small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Methods: Two hundred sixty-four consecutive patients with biopsy-proven SCLC were recruited at the time of tumor diagnosis. All patients underwent full neurologic examination. Serum samples were taken prior to chemotherapy and analyzed for 15 neuronal antibodies. Thirty-eight healthy controls were analyzed in parallel. Results: PNDs were quite prevalent (n = 24, 9.4%), most frequently Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (3.8%), sensory neuronopathy (1.9%), and limbic encephalitis (1.5%). Eighty-seven percent of all patients with PNDs had antibodies to SOX2 (62.5%), HuD (41.7%), or P/Q VGCC (50%), irrespective of their syndrome. Other neuronal antibodies were found at lower frequencies (GABAb receptor [12.5%] and N-type VGCC [20.8%]) or very rarely (GAD65, amphiphysin, Ri, CRMP5, Ma2, Yo, VGKC complex, CASPR2, LGI1, and NMDA receptor [all <5%]). Conclusions: The spectrum of PNDs is broader and the frequency is higher than previously appreciated, and selected antibody tests (SOX2, HuD, VGCC) can help determine the presence of an SCLC. PMID:26109714

  13. Construction of standardized Arabic questionnaires for screening neurological disorders (dementia, stroke, epilepsy, movement disorders, muscle and neuromuscular junction disorders)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Tallawy, Hamdy N; Farghaly, Wafaa MA; Rageh, Tarek A; Saleh, Ahmed O; Mestekawy, Taha AH; Darwish, Manal MM; Abd El Hamed, Mohamed A; Ali, Anwar M; Mahmoud, Doaa M

    2016-01-01

    A screening questionnaire is an important tool for early diagnosis of neurological disorders, and for epidemiological research. This screening instrument must be both feasible and valid. It must be accepted by the community and must be sensitive enough. So, the aim of this study was to prepare different Arabic screening questionnaires for screening different neurological disorders. This study was carried out in three stages. During the first stage, construction of separate questionnaires designed for screening the five major neurological disorders: cerebrovascular stroke, dementias, epilepsy, movement disorders, and muscle and neuromuscular disorders were done. Validation of the screening questionnaires was carried out in the second stage. Finally, questionnaire preparation was done in the third stage. Questions with the accepted sensitivity and specificity in each questionnaire formed the refined separate questionnaires. PMID:27621635

  14. The therapeutic value of yoga in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shri K Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ancient mind and body healing methods of yoga recently sparked fervor in the scientific community as an alternative and complementary means of therapy. Since the World Health Organization officially began promoting yoga in developing countries in 1978, yoga has been cited for its therapeutic potential and has been widely recognized in Western culture. However, as an increasing number of people practice yoga for remedial purposes, researchers raise two important questions: 1 Is yoga a valid complementary management and rehabilitation treatment modality? 2 What conditions show promise of treatment with this intervention?. Objective: This review article uses comprehensive scientific, evidence-based studies to analyze the efficacy of various basic and applied aspects of yoga in disease prevention and health promotion. It specifically intends to expose the effects of yoga in neurological disorders, particularly epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer′s disease, peripheral nervous system disease, and fibromyalgia. Materials and Methods: Information was gathered from various resources including PubMed, Ovid, MD-Consult, USC, and U.C.L.A. libraries. Studies were selected and reviewed on the basis of sample size, control, randomization, double-blinding, and statistical analysis of results. Results: The pratice of yoga and meditation demonstrates statistically encouraging physiological and psychological improvements in the aforementioned neurological disorders. However, there were certain flaws and inadequacies in the study designs employed to evaluate the same. A critical analysis of these studies is presented. Conclusions: With the aim to focus attention on this widespread yet largely unexamined treatment modality, this paper seeks to provide direction and support for further research necessary to validate yoga as an integrative, alternative, and complementary therapy.

  15. Degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis as a systemic disorder characterized by proteoglycan accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jung

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis (DSLD is a debilitating disorder thought to be limited to suspensory ligaments of Peruvian Pasos, Peruvian Paso crosses, Arabians, American Saddlebreds, American Quarter Horses, Thoroughbreds, and some European breeds. It frequently leads to persistent, incurable lameness and need to euthanize affected horses. The pathogenesis remains unclear, though the disease appears to run in families. Treatment and prevention are empirical and supportive, and not effective in halting the progression of the disease. Presently, the presumptive diagnosis of DSLD is obtained from patient signalment and history, clinical examination, and ultrasonographic examination of clinically affected horses, and is confirmed at post mortem examination. Presently, there are no reliable methods of diagnosing DSLD in asymptomatic horses. The goal of this study was to characterize and define the disorder in terms of tissue involvement at the macroscopic and microscopic levels. Results We examined tissues and organs from 28 affected horses (22 Peruvian Pasos, 6 horses of other breeds and from 8 control horses. Histopathological examination revealed the presence of excessive amounts of proteoglycans in the following tissues removed from DSLD-affected horses: suspensory ligaments, superficial and deep digital flexor tendons, patellar and nuchal ligaments, cardiovascular system, and sclerae. Electron microscopy demonstrated changes in diameters of collagen fibrils in the tendon, and in smooth muscle cells of the media of the aorta compatible with increased cell permeability in DSLD-affected cells. Separation of tendon extracts by gel chromatography revealed the presence of additional proteoglycan(s in extracts from affected, but not control extracts. Conclusion This study demonstrates for the first time that DSLD, a disease process previously thought to be limited to the suspensory ligaments of the distal limbs of

  16. Designing and testing scene enhancement algorithms for patients with retina degenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downes Susan M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retina degenerative disorders represent the primary cause of blindness in UK and in the developed world. In particular, Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD and Retina Pigmentosa (RP diseases are of interest to this study. We have therefore created new image processing algorithms for enhancing the visual scenes for them. Methods In this paper we present three novel image enhancement techniques aimed at enhancing the remaining visual information for patients suffering from retina dystrophies. Currently, the only effective way to test novel technology for visual enhancement is to undergo testing on large numbers of patients. To test our techniques, we have therefore built a retinal image processing model and compared the results to data from patient testing. In particular we focus on the ability of our image processing techniques to achieve improved face detection and enhanced edge perception. Results Results from our model are compared to actual data obtained from testing the performance of these algorithms on 27 patients with an average visual acuity of 0.63 and an average contrast sensitivity of 1.22. Results show that Tinted Reduced Outlined Nature (TRON and Edge Overlaying algorithms are most beneficial for dynamic scenes such as motion detection. Image Cartoonization was most beneficial for spatial feature detection such as face detection. Patient's stated that they would most like to see Cartoonized images for use in daily life. Conclusions Results obtained from our retinal model and from patients show that there is potential for these image processing techniques to improve visual function amongst the visually impaired community. In addition our methodology using face detection and efficiency of perceived edges in determining potential benefit derived from different image enhancement algorithms could also prove to be useful in quantitatively assessing algorithms in future studies.

  17. Phonological buffer and selective deficits of grammar, with distinct time onsets, in a patient with a focal degenerative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartsounis, Luke D; Crewes, Hilary

    2007-04-01

    We report a patient with a focal degenerative disorder and very circumscribed neuropsychological deficits, the evolution of which we were able to study over a lengthy period. For years, he presented with only a speech production impediment that clinical observations and experimental studies enabled us to identify as a phonological buffer disorder. Subsequently, he developed agrammatism that appeared to be largely due to his inability to produce pronouns and auxiliary verbs. Remarkably, throughout our studies, even when he was virtually rendered mute, his ability to name objects on demand in writing remained intact. We discuss his case from clinical and theoretical perspectives.

  18. Male sexual dysfunction and infertility associated with neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Krogh-Jespersen, Sheila; Brackett, Nancy L

    2012-01-01

    Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms. Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic...

  19. Specificity of transcranial sonography in parkinson spectrum disorders in comparison to degenerative cognitive syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laučkaitė Kristina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra (SN+, detected by transcranial sonography (TCS, was reported as a characteristic finding in Parkinson's disease (PD, with high diagnostic accuracy values, when compared mainly to healthy controls or essential tremor (ET group. However, some data is accumulating that the SN + could be detected in other neurodegenerative and even in non-neurodegenerative disorders too. Our aim was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of TCS, mainly focusing on the specificity point, when applied to a range of the parkinsonian disorders, and comparing to the degenerative cognitive syndromes. Methods A prospective study was carried out at the Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences from January until September 2011. Initially, a TCS and clinical examination were performed on 258 patients and 76 controls. The General Electric Voluson 730 Expert ultrasound system was used. There were 12.8% of cases excluded with insufficient temporal bones, and 4.3% excluded with an unclear diagnosis. The studied sample consisted of the groups: PD (n = 71, 33.2%, ET (n = 58, 27.1%, PD and ET (n = 10, 4.7%, atypical parkinsonian syndromes (APS (n = 3, 1.4%, hereditary neurodegenerative parkinsonism (HDP (n = 3, 1.4%, secondary parkinsonism (SP (n = 23, 10.8%, mild cognitive impairment (MCI (n = 33, 15.4%, dementia (n = 13, 6.1%, and control (n = 71. Results There were 80.3% of PD patients at stages 1 & 2 according to Hoehn and Yahr. At the cut-off value of 0.20 cm2 of the SN+, the sensitivity for PD was 94.3% and the specificity - 63.3% (ROC analysis, AUC 0.891, in comparison to the rest of the cohort. At the cut-off value of 0.26 cm2, the sensitivity was 90% and the specificity 82.4%. The estimations for the lowest specificity for PD, in comparison to the latter subgroups (at the cut-off values of 0.20 cm2 and 0.26 cm2, respectively were: 0% and 33.3% to APS, 33.3% and 66.7% to HDP, 34.8% and 69.6% to SP, 55

  20. Calcium channelopathies in inherited neurological disorders: relevance to drug screening for acquired channel disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lory, Philippe; Mezghrani, Alexandre

    2010-07-01

    Mutations located in the human genes encoding voltage-gated calcium channels are responsible for a variety of diseases referred to as calcium channelopathies, including familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia type 2, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, childhood absence epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder, all of which are rare inherited forms of common neurological disorders. The genetic basis of these calcium channelopathies provides a unique opportunity to investigate their underlying mechanisms from the molecular to whole-organism levels. Studies of channelopathies provide insight on the relationships between channel structure and function, and reveal diverse and unexpected physiological roles for the channels. Importantly, these studies may also lead to the identification of drugs for the treatment of genetically acquired channel disorders, as well as to novel therapeutic practices. In this feature review, recent findings regarding neurological calcium channelopathies are discussed.

  1. Organic vs. functional neurological disorders: The role of childhood psychological trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatzias, Thanos; Howard, Ruth; Power, Kevin; Socherel, Florentina; Heath, Craig; Livingstone, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Although the relationship between psychological trauma and medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) is well established, this relationship is less well understood in people with medically unexplained neurological symptoms. In the present study, we set out to compare people with functional neurological disorders, and organic neurological disorders, in terms of childhood and adulthood traumatic events, traumatic stress, emotional dysregulation and symptoms of depression and anxiety. We have hypothesised that those with functional neurological disorders would be more likely to report childhood and adulthood traumatic life events, traumatic symptomatology, emotional dysregulation and symptoms of anxiety and depression, compared to those with organic neurological disorders. Sample consisted of a consecutive series of people with functional neurological disorders and with organic neurological disorders (n=82) recruited from a hospital in Scotland. Participants completed measures of life events, traumatic stress, emotional regulation, anxiety and depression. The two groups were found to significantly differ in relation to all measures, with the MUS group being more likely to report childhood and adulthood life events, more severe emotional dysregulation, traumatic stress and symptoms of anxiety and stress. Logistic regression analysis revealed that exposure to childhood traumatic life events, specifically childhood sexual abuse, and childhood physical neglect, were the only factors which were significantly associated with membership of the medically unexplained neurological symptoms group. Although further research is required to confirm our findings, our results suggest that identifying and addressing the impact of childhood trauma, may alleviate distress and aid recovery from functional neurological disorders.

  2. 76 FR 10040 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special Emphasis Panel, Neural Development and Genetics of Zebrafish. Date: February 25, 2011. Time: 1 p.m. to 5 p...

  3. 78 FR 21615 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special Emphasis Panel; Epilepsy Genetics Review. Date: May 1, 2013. Time: 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Agenda: To...

  4. 76 FR 43333 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special Emphasis Panel, Stem Cells. Date: July 27, 2011. Time: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke...

  5. The clinical potential of influencing Nrf2 signaling in degenerative and immunological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao B

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bifeng Gao, An Doan, Brooks M HybertsonDepartment of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USAAbstract: Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2; encoded in humans by the NFE2L2 gene is a transcription factor that regulates the gene expression of a wide variety of cytoprotective phase II detoxification and antioxidant enzymes through a promoter sequence known as the antioxidant-responsive element (ARE. The ARE is a promoter element found in many cytoprotective genes; therefore, Nrf2 plays a pivotal role in the ARE-driven cellular defense system against environmental stresses. Agents that target the ARE/Nrf2 pathway have been tested in a wide variety of disorders, with at least one new Nrf2-activating drug now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Examination of in vitro and in vivo experimental results, and taking into account recent human clinical trial results, has led to an opinion that Nrf2-activating strategies – which can include drugs, foods, dietary supplements, and exercise – are likely best targeted at disease prevention, disease recurrence prevention, or slowing of disease progression in early stage illnesses; they may also be useful as an interventional strategy. However, this rubric may be viewed even more conservatively in the pathophysiology of cancer. The activation of the Nrf2 pathway has been widely accepted as offering chemoprevention benefit, but it may be unhelpful or even harmful in the setting of established cancers. For example, Nrf2 activation might interfere with chemotherapies or radiotherapies or otherwise give tumor cells additional growth and survival advantages, unless they already possess mutations that fully activate their Nrf2 pathway constitutively. With all this in mind, the ARE/Nrf2 pathway remains of great interest as a possible target for the pharmacological control of degenerative and

  6. Perspectives for computational modeling of cell replacement for neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Aimone

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of anatomically-constrained neural networks has provided significant insights regarding the response of networks to neurological disorders or injury. A logical extension of these models is to incorporate treatment regimens to investigate network responses to intervention. The addition of nascent neurons from stem cell precursors into damaged or diseased tissue has been used as a successful therapeutic tool in recent decades. Interestingly, models have been developed to examine the incorporation of new neurons into intact adult structures, particularly the dentate granule neurons of the hippocampus. These studies suggest that the unique properties of maturing neurons can impact circuit behavior in unanticipated ways. In this perspective, we review the current status of models used to examine damaged CNS structures with particular focus on cortical damage due to stroke. Secondly, we suggest that computational modeling of cell replacement therapies can be made feasible by implementing approaches taken by current models of adult neurogenesis. The development of these models is critical for generating hypotheses regarding transplant therapies and improving outcomes by tailoring transplants to desired effects.

  7. Perspectives for computational modeling of cell replacement for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimone, James B.; Weick, Jason P.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of anatomically-constrained neural networks has provided significant insights regarding the response of networks to neurological disorders or injury. A logical extension of these models is to incorporate treatment regimens to investigate network responses to intervention. The addition of nascent neurons from stem cell precursors into damaged or diseased tissue has been used as a successful therapeutic tool in recent decades. Interestingly, models have been developed to examine the incorporation of new neurons into intact adult structures, particularly the dentate granule neurons of the hippocampus. These studies suggest that the unique properties of maturing neurons, can impact circuit behavior in unanticipated ways. In this perspective, we review the current status of models used to examine damaged CNS structures with particular focus on cortical damage due to stroke. Secondly, we suggest that computational modeling of cell replacement therapies can be made feasible by implementing approaches taken by current models of adult neurogenesis. The development of these models is critical for generating hypotheses regarding transplant therapies and improving outcomes by tailoring transplants to desired effects.

  8. Perspectives for computational modeling of cell replacement for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimone, James B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weick, Jason P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In mathematical modeling of anatomically-constrained neural networks we provide significant insights regarding the response of networks to neurological disorders or injury. Furthermore, a logical extension of these models is to incorporate treatment regimens to investigate network responses to intervention. The addition of nascent neurons from stem cell precursors into damaged or diseased tissue has been used as a successful therapeutic tool in recent decades. Interestingly, models have been developed to examine the incorporation of new neurons into intact adult structures, particularly the dentate granule neurons of the hippocampus. These studies suggest that the unique properties of maturing neurons, can impact circuit behavior in unanticipated ways. In this perspective, we review the current status of models used to examine damaged CNS structures with particular focus on cortical damage due to stroke. Secondly, we suggest that computational modeling of cell replacement therapies can be made feasible by implementing approaches taken by current models of adult neurogenesis. The development of these models is critical for generating hypotheses regarding transplant therapies and improving outcomes by tailoring transplants to desired effects.

  9. RNA Nuclear Export: From Neurological Disorders to Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2017-01-01

    The presence of a nuclear envelope, also known as nuclear membrane, defines the structural framework of all eukaryotic cells by separating the nucleus, which contains the genetic material, from the cytoplasm where the synthesis of proteins takes place. Translation of proteins in Eukaryotes is thus dependent on the active transport of DNA-encoded RNA molecules through pores embedded within the nuclear membrane. Several mechanisms are involved in this process generally referred to as RNA nuclear export or nucleocytoplasmic transport of RNA. The regulated expression of genes requires the nuclear export of protein-coding messenger RNA molecules (mRNAs) as well as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) together with proteins and pre-assembled ribosomal subunits. The nuclear export of mRNAs is intrinsically linked to the co-transcriptional processing of nascent transcripts synthesized by the RNA polymerase II. This functional coupling is essential for the survival of cells allowing for timely nuclear export of fully processed transcripts, which could otherwise cause the translation of abnormal proteins such as the polymeric repeat proteins produced in some neurodegenerative diseases. Alterations of the mRNA nuclear export pathways can also lead to genome instability and to various forms of cancer. This chapter will describe the molecular mechanisms driving the nuclear export of RNAs with a particular emphasis on mRNAs. It will also review their known alterations in neurological disorders and cancer, and the recent opportunities they offer for the potential development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  10. Dynamic regulation of aquaporin-4 water channels in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ying; Tran, Minh; Linninger, Andreas A

    2015-10-01

    Aquaporin-4 water channels play a central role in brain water regulation in neurological disorders. Aquaporin-4 is abundantly expressed at the astroglial endfeet facing the cerebral vasculature and the pial membrane, and both its expression level and subcellular localization significantly influence brain water transport. However, measurements of aquaporin-4 levels in animal models of brain injury often report opposite trends of change at the injury core and the penumbra. Furthermore, aquaporin-4 channels play a beneficial role in brain water clearance in vasogenic edema, but a detrimental role in cytotoxic edema and exacerbate cell swelling. In light of current evidence, we still do not have a complete understanding of the role of aquaporin-4 in brain water transport. In this review, we propose that the regulatory mechanisms of aquaporin-4 at the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels jointly regulate water permeability in the short and long time scale after injury. Furthermore, in order to understand why aquaporin-4 channels play opposing roles in cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, we discuss experimental evidence on the dynamically changing osmotic gradients between blood, extracellular space, and the cytosol during the formation of cytotoxic and vasogenic edema. We conclude with an emerging picture of the distinct osmotic environments in cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, and propose that the directions of aquaporin-4-mediated water clearance in these two types of edema are distinct. The difference in water clearance pathways may provide an explanation for the conflicting observations of the roles of aquaporin-4 in edema resolution.

  11. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nasiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful.

  12. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia): A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Hamid; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Zahed, Arash; Arab, Mostafa; Samouei, Rahele

    2015-05-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia) was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful.

  13. Altered somatosensory profile according to quantitative sensory testing in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders scheduled for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbäck, Yvonne; Tropp, Hans; Enthoven, Paul; Gerdle, Björn; Abbott, Allan; Öberg, Birgitta

    2017-06-17

    Somatosensory profiling in affected and non-affected body regions can strengthen our insight regarding the underlying pain mechanisms, which can be valuable in treatment decision making and to improve outcomes, in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders pre-surgery. The aim was to describe somatosensory profiles in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders, to identify the proportion with altered somatosensory profile, and to analyze demographic characteristics, self-reported function, pain, and health pre- and 3 months post-surgery. In this prospective cohort study in a Spine Clinic, 105 patients scheduled for surgery for spinal stenosis, disc herniation, degenerative disc disease, or spondylolisthesis were consecutively recruited. Exclusion criteria were; indication for acute surgery or previous surgery at the same spinal level or severe grade of pathology. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) and self-reported function, pain, and health was measured pre- and 3 months post-surgery. The somatosensory profile included cold detection threshold, warmth detection threshold, cold pain threshold, heat pain threshold and pressure pain threshold in affected and non-affected body regions. On a group level, the patients' somatosensory profiles were within the 95% confidence interval (CI) from normative reference data means. On an individual level, an altered somatosensory profile was defined as having two or more body regions (including a non-affected region) with QST values outside of normal ranges for reference data. The 23 patients (22%) with altered somatosensory profiles, with mostly loss of function, were older (P = 0.031), more often female (P = 0.005), had higher back and leg pain (P = 0.016, 0.020), lower mental health component summary score (SF-36 MCS) (P = 0.004) and larger pain distribution (P = 0.047), compared to others in the cohort. Post-surgery there was a tendency to worse pain, function and health in the group with

  14. Therapeutic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Keun-A; Lee, Jun-Ho; Suh, Yoo-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has been noted as a novel strategy to various diseases including neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington's disease that have no effective treatment available to date. The adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from adipose tissue, are well known for their pluripotency with the ability to differentiate into various types of cells and immuno-modulatory property. These biological features make ASCs a promising source for regenerative cell therapy in neurological disorders. Here we discuss the recent progress of regenerative therapies in various neurological disorders utilizing ASCs.

  15. What's on Your Mind? Conversation Topics Chosen by People With Degenerative Cognitive-Linguistic Disorders for Communication Boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried-Oken, Melanie; Daniels, Darlene; Ettinger, Olivia; Mooney, Aimee; Noethe, Glory; Rowland, Charity

    2015-05-01

    Conversational topics chosen by a group of adults with degenerative cognitive-linguistic disorders for personalized communication board development were examined. The patient-generated themes commonly selected are presented to guide treatment planning and communication board development. Communication boards were created for 109 adults as part of a larger research project. One autobiographical topic that each participant would enjoy discussing multiple times was represented on each communication board with 16 pictures and word labels. For this review, topics were collapsed into general themes through a consensus process and examined by gender and age. Sixty unique conversational topics were identified from 109 participants and collapsed into 9 general themes: Hobbies, Family, Travel, Work, Home/Places I've Lived, Sports/Fitness, Religion, Animals, and World War II. Age and gender produced variations in themes chosen, though no significance in rank orders was found across groups. Topics selected by adults with degenerative cognitive-linguistic disorders for communication boards resemble common conversational adult themes and do not center around basic needs or medical issues. Differences in gender and age for topic selection tend to be based on traditional roles. These general themes should be used when creating personalized communication boards for those who benefit from conversational aids.

  16. Neurological Diseases, Disorders and Injuries in Canada: Highlights of a National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Garth M; Huggett, Deanna L

    2016-01-01

    The National Population Health Study of Neurological Conditions, a partnership between Neurological Health Charities Canada and the Government of Canada, was the largest study of neurological diseases, disorders, and injuries ever conducted in Canada. Undertaken between 2009 and 2013, the expansive program of research addressed the epidemiology, impacts, health services, and risk factors of 18 neurological conditions and estimated the health outcomes and costs of these conditions in Canada through 2031. This review summarizes highlights from the component projects of the study as presented in the synthesis report, Mapping Connections: An Understanding of Neurological Conditions in Canada. The key findings included new prevalence and incidence estimates, documentation of the diverse and often debilitating effects of neurological conditions, and identification of the utilization, economic costs, and current limitations of related health services. The study findings will support health charities, governments, and other stakeholders to reduce the impact of neurological conditions in Canada.

  17. Stem cells as promising therapeutic options for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jongman; Kim, Han-Soo; Hwang, Dong-Youn

    2013-04-01

    Due to the limitations of pharmacological and other current therapeutic strategies, stem cell therapies have emerged as promising options for treating many incurable neurologic diseases. A variety of stem cells including pluripotent stem cells (i.e., embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells) and multipotent adult stem cells (i.e., fetal brain tissue, neural stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from various sources) have been explored as therapeutic options for treating many neurologic diseases, and it is becoming obvious that each type of stem cell has pros and cons as a source for cell therapy. Wise selection of stem cells with regard to the nature and status of neurologic dysfunctions is required to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. To this aim, the stem cell-mediated therapeutic efforts on four major neurological diseases, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke, will be introduced, and current problems and future directions will be discussed.

  18. PREDICTORS FORMATION OF SOCIAL MALADJUSTMENT IN PATIENTS WITH PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA WITH CONCOMITANT SOMATIC-NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy Semionovici PIDKORYTOV

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the level of stress in patients with paranoid schizophrenia with concomitant somatic-neurological disorders and quality of life as predictors of the formation of their social exclusion. The influence of somatic-neurological pathology for paranoid schizophrenia at different levels of stress.

  19. Neurological Soft Signs in Indian Children with Specific Developmental Disorders of Scholastic Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Raja; Mehta, Manju; Kalra, Veena; Sagar, Rajesh; Mongia, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To compare the occurrence of neurological soft signs (NSS) in children with specific developmental disorders of scholastic skills (SDDSS) and normal children. Methods: 36 cases of SDDSS were compared with 30 control children regarding sociodemographic and clinical variables and neurological soft signs. Results: Children with SDDSS had…

  20. Abnormalities on the Neurological Examination and EEG in Young Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akshoomoff, Natacha; Farid, Nikdokht; Courchesne, Eric; Haas, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the nature and frequency of neurological and EEG abnormalities in 60 young children (ages 2-6 years) with pervasive developmental disorders. A number of standard neurological functions could not be adequately assessed due to the young age of the children and/or limited comprehension and cooperation. The most common neurological…

  1. Neurological associations in auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder: Results from a tertiary hospital in South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepcha, Anjali; Chandran, Reni K.; Alexander, Mathew; Agustine, Ann Mary; Thenmozhi, K.; Balraj, Achamma

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To find out the prevalence and types of neurological abnormalities associated in auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder in a large tertiary referral center. Settings and Design: A prospective clinical study was conducted on all patients diagnosed with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder in the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) and neurology departments during a 17-month period. Patients with neurological abnormalities on history and examination were further assessed by a neurologist to determine the type of disorder present. Results: The frequency of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder was 1.12%. Sixty percent were found to have neurological involvement. This included cerebral palsy in children, peripheral neuropathy (PN), spinocerebellar ataxia, hereditary motor-sensory neuropathy, spastic paresis, and ponto-bulbar palsy. Neurological lesions did not present simultaneously with hearing loss in most patients. Sixty-six percent of patients with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder were born of consanguineous marriages. Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of neurological lesions in auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder which has to be kept in mind while evaluating such patients. Follow-up and counselling regarding the appearance of neuropathies is therefore important in such patients. A hereditary etiology is indicated in a majority of cases of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. PMID:26019414

  2. Neurological associations in auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder: Results from a tertiary hospital in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Lepcha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To find out the prevalence and types of neurological abnormalities associated in auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder in a large tertiary referral center. Settings and Design: A prospective clinical study was conducted on all patients diagnosed with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder in the ear, nose, and throat (ENT and neurology departments during a 17-month period. Patients with neurological abnormalities on history and examination were further assessed by a neurologist to determine the type of disorder present. Results: The frequency of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder was 1.12%. Sixty percent were found to have neurological involvement. This included cerebral palsy in children, peripheral neuropathy (PN, spinocerebellar ataxia, hereditary motor-sensory neuropathy, spastic paresis, and ponto-bulbar palsy. Neurological lesions did not present simultaneously with hearing loss in most patients. Sixty-six percent of patients with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder were born of consanguineous marriages. Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of neurological lesions in auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder which has to be kept in mind while evaluating such patients. Follow-up and counselling regarding the appearance of neuropathies is therefore important in such patients. A hereditary etiology is indicated in a majority of cases of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder.

  3. 77 FR 19024 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special Emphasis Panel; Diversity Research Education in Neuroscience. Date...: National Institutes of Health, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852... Review Branch, Division of Extramural Research, NINDS/ NIH/DHHS/Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Blvd...

  4. Functional disorders in the Neurology section of ICD-11: A landmark opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jon; Hallett, Mark; Carson, Alan; Bergen, Donna; Shakir, Raad

    2014-12-09

    Functional disorders are one of the most common diagnoses in neurologic practice, but this is not reflected in current classification systems. The 11th revision of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) in 2017 offers an opportunity for these disorders to appear within both neurologic and psychiatric categories for the first time. We discuss the rationale for this proposal and highlight the potential benefits for health professionals and patients.

  5. Psychiatry and the Necker Cube. Neurological and Psychological Conceptions of Psychiatric Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rogers

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological and psychological conceptions of psychiatric disorder are in conflict at the present time. This conflict is considered in the context of the history of psychiatry and the philosophy of science. Its practical consequences are considered for the motor disorder of schizophrenia, the cognitive impairment in psychiatric illnesses, the use of the terms organic and functional and the association of neurological disorder with psychotic and neurotic disorders. The conflict is also examined in individual cases and the implications for treatment assessed.

  6. Yoga as an ancillary treatment for neurological and psychiatric disorders: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Hilary B; Katsman, Alina; Sones, Alexander C; Auerbach, Daniel E; Ames, Donna; Rubin, Robert T

    2012-01-01

    Yoga is gaining acceptance as an ancillary medical treatment, but there have been few studies evaluating its therapeutic benefits in neurological and major psychiatric conditions. The authors reviewed the literature in English on the efficacy of yoga for these disorders. Only randomized, controlled trials were included, with the exception of the only study of yoga for bipolar disorder, which was observational. Trials were excluded if yoga was not the central component of the intervention. Of seven randomized, controlled trials of yoga in patients with neurological disorders, six found significant, positive effects. Of 13 randomized, controlled trials of yoga in patients with psychiatric disorders, 10 found significant, positive effects. These results, although encouraging, indicate that additional randomized, controlled studies are needed to critically define the benefits of yoga for both neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  7. Neurological disorders in Iraqi refugees in Jordan: data from the United Nations Refugee Assistance Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J; Carone, Marco; Nyce, Sayre; Ghosn, Jad; Mutuerandu, Timothy; Al-Saedy, Huda; Lowenstein, Daniel H; Burnham, Gilbert

    2012-04-01

    The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) recognizes 43.7 million forcibly displaced persons and asylum seekers due to conflict and persecution worldwide. Neurological disorders have rarely been described in displaced persons but likely pose a significant burden of disease. We describe the disease spectrum and health service utilization of Iraqi refugees and asylum seekers with neurological disorders using an information system developed by the UNHCR. Neurological disorders were actively monitored among the 7,642 UNHCR-registered Iraqi refugees and asylum seekers who received health and humanitarian assistance using a pilot, centralized, database called the Refugee Assistance Information System (RAIS) in the Kingdom of Jordan in 2010. There were 122 neurological diagnoses reported in 1,328 refugees (mean age 41 years, 49% female, 10% disabled, 43% with pending resettlement applications) in 2,659 health visits, accounting for 17% of all refugees who sought health assistance in RAIS. Referral to a neurologist occurred in 178 cases (13.4%). The most frequent ICD-10 neurological diagnoses were dorsalgia (back pain) (29.7% of individuals with neurological disorders), headache (13.1%), and epilepsy (12.6%). Approximately 1 in 20 Iraqi refugees with a neurological diagnosis self-reported a history of torture, which was higher than Iraqi refugees without a history of torture [66/1,328 versus 196/6,314, odds ratio (OR) = 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21-2.18]. Neurological disease affects a high proportion of Iraqi refugees, including victims of torture and the disabled. Refugees require dedicated care for treatment of neurological disease with a focus on pain disorders and epilepsy.

  8. Physiochemical basis of human degenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeliger Harold I.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The onset of human degenerative diseases in humans, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, neurodevelopmental disease and neurodegenerative disease has been shown to be related to exposures to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and others, as well as to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, bisphenol-A and other aromatic lipophilic species. The onset of these diseases has also been related to exposures to transition metal ions. A physiochemical mechanism for the onset of degenerative environmental disease dependent upon exposure to a combination of lipophilic aromatic hydrocarbons and transition metal ions is proposed here. The findings reported here also, for the first time, explain why aromatic hydrocarbons exhibit greater toxicity than aliphatic hydrocarbons of equal carbon numbers.

  9. Mutational consequences of aberrant ion channels in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Ambasta, Rashmi K; Kumar, Pravir

    2014-11-01

    Neurological channelopathies are attributed to aberrant ion channels affecting CNS, PNS, cardiac, and skeletal muscles. To maintain the homeostasis of excitable tissues, functional ion channels are necessary to rely electrical signals, whereas any malfunctioning serves as an intrinsic factor to develop neurological channelopathies. Molecular basis of these disease is studied based on genetic and biophysical approaches, e.g., loci positional cloning, whereas pathogenesis and bio-behavioral analysis revealed the dependency on genetic mutations and inter-current triggering factors. Although electrophysiological studies revealed the possible mechanisms of diseases, analytical study of ion channels remained unsettled and therefore underlying mechanism in channelopathies is necessary for better clinical application. Herein, we demonstrated (i) structural and functional role of various ion channels (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+),Cl(-)), (ii) pathophysiology involved in the onset of their associated channelopathies, and (iii) comparative sequence and phylogenetic analysis of diversified sodium, potassium, calcium, and chloride ion channel subtypes.

  10. Neurological disorder in cattle associated with bovine herpesvirus 4

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    A nested PCR assay was used to diagnose bovine encephalitis through herpesviruses including bovine herpesvirus 5 (BHV-5), bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), Aujeszky's disease virus (SHV-1), and ovine herpesvirus 2 (OHV-2) in 14 fragments of central nervous system (CNS) from cattle that died with neurological signs. In addition, as some samples of bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BHV-4) have been isolated from neural tissue, it was also tested by nested PCR. The cases of encephalitis occurred in isolati...

  11. Exposure to lipophilic chemicals as a cause of neurological impairments, neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zeliger, Harold I.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have associated environmental exposure to chemicals with neurological impairments (NIs) including neuropathies, cognitive, motor and sensory impairments; neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) including autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); neurodegenerative diseases (NDGs) including Alzheimer′s disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The environmental chemicals shown to induce all these diseases include persistent organic pollutan...

  12. Household food insecurity and symptoms of neurologic disorder in Ethiopia: An observational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessema Fasil

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food insecurity (FI has been shown to be associated with poor health both in developing and developed countries. Little is known about the relation between FI and neurological disorder. We assessed the relation between FI and risk for neurologic symptoms in southwest Ethiopia. Methods Data about food security, gender, age, household assets, and self-reported neurologic symptoms were collected from a representative, community-based sample of adults (N = 900 in Jimma Zone, Ethiopia. We calculated univariate statistics and used bivariate chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression models to assess the relation between FI and risk of neurologic symptoms including seizures, extremity weakness, extremity numbness, tremors/ataxia, aphasia, carpal tunnel syndrome, vision dysfunction, and spinal pain. Results In separate multivariate models by outcome and gender, adjusting for age and household socioeconomic status, severe FI was associated with higher odds of seizures, movement abnormalities, carpal tunnel, vision dysfunction, spinal pain, and comorbid disorders among women. Severe FI was associated with higher odds of seizures, extremity numbness, movement abnormalities, difficulty speaking, carpal tunnel, vision dysfunction, and comorbid disorders among men. Conclusion We found that FI was associated with symptoms of neurologic disorder. Given the cross-sectional nature of our study, the directionality of these associations is unclear. Future research should assess causal mechanisms relating FI to neurologic symptoms in sub-Saharan Africa.

  13. MR Imaging and Radiographic Imaging of Degenerative Spine Disorders and Spine Alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbusera, Fabio; Lovi, Alessio; Bassani, Tito; Brayda-Bruno, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Advances in MR imaging technologies, as well as the widening of their availability, boosted their use in the diagnosis of spinal disorders and in the preoperative planning of spine surgeries. However, the most consolidated approach to the assessment of adult patients with spinal disorders is based on the analysis of full standing radiographs (posteroanterior and laterolateral views). In this article, the radiographic spinal and pelvic parameters, which have relevance in the clinical management of adults with spinal disorders, are summarized.

  14. Social correlates of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in China and India: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui G; Shidhaye, Rahul; Charlson, Fiona; Deng, Fei; Lyngdoh, Tanica; Chen, Shengnan; Nanda, Sharmishtha; Lacroix, Kimberly; Baxter, Amanda; Whiteford, Harvey

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the epidemiological profiles of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders provides opportunities for the identification of high-risk population subgroups and for the development of effective country-specific prevention and intervention strategies. Guided by the Conceptual Framework for Action on the Social Determinants of Health by WHO we reviewed the literature to examine the association between a range of social correlates (eg, sex, age, education, income, urbanicity, marital status, and regional differences) and mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in China and India, the most populous countries in the world. We looked for papers on mental, neurological, and substance use disorders with location identifiers and socioeconomic correlates published between 1990 and 2015 and our search found 65 relevant studies from China and 29 from India. Several association patterns between social correlates and mental, neurological, and substance use disorders were not consistent with those reported in high-income countries, including a high concentration of middle-aged men with alcohol use disorders in China and to a lesser extent in India, and a positive association between being married and depression among women in India. Consistent with previous global reports, low education and poverty were associated with higher occurrence of dementia in both China and India, although there is evidence of an interaction between education and income in the risk for dementia in China. Large variations across regions and ethnic groups were consistently documented in China. These unique correlation patterns for mental, neurological, and substance use disorders identified in China and India emphasise the importance of understanding the local social context when planning targeted strategies to reduce the burden of these disorders. High-quality, up-to-date information about the constantly changing pattern of societal factors correlated with mental, neurological

  15. The Spanish Burden of Disease 2010: Neurological, mental and substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Elvira; Garin, Noé; Ferrari, Alize J; Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Olaya, Beatriz; Sànchez-Riera, Lidia; Whiteford, Harvey A; Haro, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    We used data from the Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 to report on the burden of neuropsychiatric disorders in Spain. The summary measure of burden used in the study was the disability-adjusted life-year (DALY), which sums of the years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLLs) and the years lived with disability (YLDs). DALYs were adjusted for comorbidity and estimated with 95% uncertainty intervals. The burden of neuropsychiatric disorders accounted for 18.4% of total all-cause DALYs generated in Spain for 2010. Within this group, the top five leading causes of DALYs were: depressive disorders, Alzheimer's disease, migraine, substance-use disorders, and anxiety disorder, which accounted for 70.9% of all DALYs due to neuropsychiatric disorders. Neurological disorders represented 5.03% of total all cause YLLs, whereas mental and substance-use disorders accounted for 0.8%. Mental and substance-use disorders accounted for 22.4% of total YLDs, with depression being the most disabling disorder. Neurological disorders represented 8.3% of total YLDs. Neuropsychiatric disorders were one of the leading causes of disability in 2010. This finding contributes to our understanding of the burden of neuropsychiatric disorders in the Spanish population and highlights the importance of prioritising neuropsychiatric disorders in the Spanish public health system. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. SUBACUTE SCLEROSING PANENCEPHALITIS: A RARE NEUROLOGICAL DISORDER IN PREGNANCY

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    Minakeshi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis ( SSPE is a rare, chronic progressive demyelinating disease. Incidence of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis has declined after vaccination but annual incidence is quite high and in India its Incidence is 21 per million population. We had a case of term pregnancy with a history of forgetfulness, abnormal behaviour, abnormal movement of body and altered sensorium. Detailed history, neurologic examination, serology ( CSF & serum and MRI brain clinched the diagnosis. Patient under w ent LSCS for fetal distress. She was put on trial of interferon - alpha 2b but she developed superadded infection and died.

  17. The "urban myth" of the association between neurological disorders and vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, R; Panatto, D; Lai, P L; Amicizia, D

    2015-06-10

    In modern society, a potentially serious adverse event attributed to a vaccination is likely to be snapped up by the media, particularly newspapers and television, as it appeals to the emotions of the public. The widespread news of the alleged adverse events of vaccination has helped to create the "urban myth" that vaccines cause serious neurological disorders and has boosted antivaccination associations. This speculation is linked to the fact that the true causes of many neurological diseases are largely unknown. The relationship between vaccinations and the onset of serious neuropsychiatric diseases is certainly one of coincidence rather than causality. This claim results from controlled studies that have excluded the association between vaccines and severe neurological diseases, therefore it can be said, with little risk of error, that the association between modern vaccinations and serious neurological disorders is a true "urban myth".

  18. Current perspectives on deep brain stimulation for severe neurological and psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocabicak E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ersoy Kocabicak,1–3 Yasin Temel,1,2 Anke Höllig,4 Björn Falkenburger,5 Sonny KH Tan2,4 1Department of Neurosurgery, Maastricht University Medical Centre, 2Department of Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands; 3Department of Neurosurgery, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun, Turkey; 4Department of Neurosurgery, 5Department of Neurology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany Abstract: Deep brain stimulation (DBS has become a well-accepted therapy to treat movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. Long-term follow-up studies have demonstrated sustained improvement in motor symptoms and quality of life. DBS offers the opportunity to selectively modulate the targeted brain regions and related networks. Moreover, stimulation can be adjusted according to individual patients’ demands, and stimulation is reversible. This has led to the introduction of DBS as a treatment for further neurological and psychiatric disorders and many clinical studies investigating the efficacy of stimulating various brain regions in order to alleviate severe neurological or psychiatric disorders including epilepsy, major depression, and obsessive–compulsive disorder. In this review, we provide an overview of accepted and experimental indications for DBS therapy and the corresponding anatomical targets. Keywords: deep brain stimulation, movement disorders, neurological disorders, psychiatric disorders, Parkinson’s disease

  19. Efficacy of rehabilitation robotics for walking training in neurological disorders: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Candace Tefertiller, PT, DPT, ATP, NCS; Beth Pharo, PT; Nicholas Evans, MHSc; Patricia Winchester, PT, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Robotic technologies are becoming more prevalent for treating neurological conditions in clinical settings. We conducted a literature search of original articles to identify all studies that examined the use of robotic devices for restoring walking function in adults with neurological disorders. We evaluated and rated each study using either the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or the Downs and Black scale for non-RCTs. We reviewed 30 articles (14 ...

  20. Exploring the role of BCHE in the onset of Diabetes, Obesity and Neurological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Allam Appa; Jyothsna, Gundlapally; Shalini, Pulipati; Kumar, Amit; Bhattacharya, Anupam; Kashyap, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes, Obesity and Neurological disturbances, most often show co-occurrence. There has been an extensive research in this domain, but the exact mechanism underlying the co-occurrence of the three conditions is still an enigma. The current paper is an approach to establish the role of Butyryl cholinesterase (BCHE) in Diabetes, Obesity and Neurological disorders by performing a comparative analysis with Neuroligin (NLGN2) a protein belonging to the same family. BCHE has its role in glucose r...

  1. Male sexual dysfunction and infertility associated with neurological disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikkel Fode; Sheila Krogh-Jespersen; Nancy L Brackett; Dana A Ohl; Charles M Lynne; Jens Sonksen

    2012-01-01

    Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms.Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction,ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities.Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic and retroperitoneal surgery,diabetes,congenital spinal abnormalities,multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury.Erectile dysfunction can be managed by an increasingly invasive range of treatments including medications,injection therapy and the surgical insertion of a penile implant.Retrograde ejaculation is managed by medications to reverse the condition in mild cases and in bladder harvest of semen after ejaculation in more severe cases.Anejaculation might also be managed by medication in mild cases while assisted ejaculatory techniques including penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation are used in more severe cases.If these measures fail,surgical sperm retrieval can be attempted.Ejaculation with penile vibratory stimulation can be done by some spinal cord injured men and their partners at home,followed by in-home insemination if circumstances and sperm quality are adequate.The other options always require assisted reproductive techniques including intrauterine insemination or in vitrofertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection.The method of choice depends largely on the number of motile sperm in the ejaculate.

  2. The bowel and beyond: the enteric nervous system in neurological disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Meenakshi; Gershon, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is large, complex and uniquely able to orchestrate gastrointestinal behaviour independently of the central nervous system (CNS). An intact ENS is essential for life and ENS dysfunction is often linked to digestive disorders. The part the ENS plays in neurological disorders, as a portal or participant, has also become increasingly evident. ENS structure and neurochemistry resemble that of the CNS, therefore pathogenic mechanisms that give rise to CNS disorders ...

  3. Neurological Soft Signs In Psychoses A Comparison Between Schizophrenia & Other Psychotic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahsavand. E. Noroozian. M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is one of the most important and disabling mental disorders in the world. Males and females are equally affected. Diagnosis is a very difficult problem in this disorder. Because the diagnostic systems such as ICD-10 and DSM-IV are mainly subjective, they are not valid and reliable. Essentially, in the future, we will need to more objective criteria in psychiatry especially in diagnosis of schizophrenia. Neurological soft signs are an example of these objective criteria. In this study we evaluated the prevalence of neurological soft signs in schizophrenic patients and compared it with the prevalence of these signs in other psychotic patients (except mood disorders with psychotic features and normal subjects."nMethods: We compared the neurological soft signs (sensory motor integration, motor. Coordination, consequent complex motor acts, primary reflexes, and eye movements in 30 schizophrenic patients, 30 other psychotic patients (other than mood disorders with psychotic features and 30 normal subjects. Diagnosis of schizophrenia and also other psychoses were based on DSM-IN criteria. Normal subjects have been selected form the staff of Roozbeh hospital randomly."nResults: The difference between the means of motor coordination subscale of neurological soft signs in schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders (other than mood disorders with psychotic features were significant (P value < 0.04. There were no significant differences between the means of other subscales of neurological soft signs in two groups of patients."nConclusion: There are some disturbances of motor coordination subscale of neurological soft signs in patients with schizophrenia. It seems that, these disturbances are evidence of involvements of basal ganglia, motor cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. So it may be suggested that motor coordination as a marker can be used in differentiation between the schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders.

  4. Gait variability in people with neurological disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yaejin; Sung, JongHun; An, Ruopeng; Hernandez, Manuel E; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2016-06-01

    There has been growing evidence showing gait variability provides unique information about gait characteristics in neurological disorders. This study systemically reviewed and quantitatively synthesized (via meta-analysis) existing evidence on gait variability in various neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), cerebellar ataxia (CA), Huntington's disease (HD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Keyword search were conducted in PubMed, Web of science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Cochrane Library. Meta-analysis was performed to estimate the pooled effect size for gait variability for each neurological group. Meta-regression was performed to compare gait variability across multiple groups with neurological diseases. Gait variability of 777 patients with AD, ALS, CA, HD, MS, or PD participating in 25 studies was included in meta-analysis. All pathological groups had increased amount of gait variability and loss of fractal structure of gait dynamics compared to healthy controls, and gait variability differentiated distinctive neurological conditions. The HD groups had the highest alterations in gait variability among all pathological groups, whereas the PD, AD and MS groups had the lowest. Interventions that aim to improve gait function in patients with neurological disorders should consider the heterogeneous relationship between gait variability and neurological conditions.

  5. Manipulations of MeCP2 in glutamatergic neurons highlight their contributions to Rett and other neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many postnatal onset neurological disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and intellectual disability are thought to arise largely from disruption of excitatory/inhibitory homeostasis. Although mouse models of Rett syndrome (RTT), a postnatal neurological disorder caused by loss-of-functi...

  6. The role of electromagnetic fields in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Murat; Ozberk, Berra; Deniz, Omur Gulsum; Kaplan, Suleyman

    2016-09-01

    In the modern world, people are exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) as part of their daily lives; the important question is "What is the effect of EMFs on human health?" Most previous studies are epidemiological, and we still do not have concrete evidence of EMF pathophysiology. Several factors may lead to chemical, morphological, and electrical alterations in the nervous system in a direct or indirect way. It is reported that non-ionizing EMFs have effects on animals and cells. The changes they bring about in organic systems may cause oxidative stress, which is essential for the neurophysiological process; it is associated with increased oxidization in species, or a reduction in antioxidant defense systems. Severe oxidative stress can cause imbalances in reactive oxygen species, which may trigger neurodegeneration. This review aims to detail these changes. Special attention is paid to the current data regarding EMFs' effects on neurological disease and associated symptoms, such as headache, sleep disturbances, and fatigue.

  7. Review on Graph Clustering and Subgraph Similarity Based Analysis of Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available How can complex relationships among molecular or clinico-pathological entities of neurological disorders be represented and analyzed? Graphs seem to be the current answer to the question no matter the type of information: molecular data, brain images or neural signals. We review a wide spectrum of graph representation and graph analysis methods and their application in the study of both the genomic level and the phenotypic level of the neurological disorder. We find numerous research works that create, process and analyze graphs formed from one or a few data types to gain an understanding of specific aspects of the neurological disorders. Furthermore, with the increasing number of data of various types becoming available for neurological disorders, we find that integrative analysis approaches that combine several types of data are being recognized as a way to gain a global understanding of the diseases. Although there are still not many integrative analyses of graphs due to the complexity in analysis, multi-layer graph analysis is a promising framework that can incorporate various data types. We describe and discuss the benefits of the multi-layer graph framework for studies of neurological disease.

  8. Experimental evidence for growth factor treatment and function in certain neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, J E

    1993-11-01

    This issue focuses on the potential utilization or involvement of growth factors in Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy. Certainly, the role of growth factors in other neurological disorders associated with stroke, trauma, and neurodegeneration needs to be considered. While there is no direct evidence to indicate that a neurological disorder is associated with the compromised function of a specific growth factor, the use of these molecules as therapeutic agents is justifiable. Undoubtedly, the outcome of current clinical trials will certainly influence future decisions on the use of growth factor therapies.

  9. Effect of Chinese Herbal Medicine on Molecular Imaging of Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Chen, Ting; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2017-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicine has been used to treat a wide variety of neurological disorders including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. However, its mechanism behind the effectiveness remains unclear. Recently, molecular imaging technology has been applied for this purpose, since it can assess the cellular or molecular function in a living subject by using specific imaging probes and/or radioactive tracers, which enable efficient analysis and monitoring the therapeutic response repetitively. This chapter reviews the in vivo functional and metabolic changes after administration of Chinese herbal medicine in various neurological disorders and provides perspectives on the future evaluations of therapeutic response of Chinese herbal medicine. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Stress, childhood trauma, and cognitive functions in functional neurologic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, K.; Rijswijk-Pasman, J.A. van

    2017-01-01

    Conversion disorder (CD) has traditionally been ascribed to psychologic factors such as trauma, stress, or emotional conflict. Although reference to the psychologic origin of CD has been removed from the criteria list in DSM-5, many theories still incorporate CD as originating from adverse events.

  11. Stress, childhood trauma, and cognitive functions in functional neurologic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, K.; Rijswijk-Pasman, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Conversion disorder (CD) has traditionally been ascribed to psychologic factors such as trauma, stress, or emotional conflict. Although reference to the psychologic origin of CD has been removed from the criteria list in DSM-5, many theories still incorporate CD as originating from adverse events. T

  12. Are degenerative rotator cuff disorders a cause of shoulder pain? Comparison of prevalence of degenerative rotator cuff disease to prevalence of nontraumatic shoulder pain through three systematic and critical reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Karl; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Gagey, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    The role of degeneration is not well understood for rotator cuff pain. If age-related degenerative changes would be the cause of symptoms, degeneration would precede or concur with self-reported pain. We performed 3 systematic literature reviews. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence estimates for rotator cuff partial or complete tears (1) in cadavers and (2) in the general population and (3) to estimate the incidence/prevalence of self-reported nontraumatic shoulder pain in the general population in order to compare their respective age-related profiles. We searched PubMed and ScienceDirect, including 2015, for cadaveric studies and transverse and longitudinal studies of the general population reporting the incidence/prevalence of rotator cuff disorders or nontraumatic shoulder pain, or both, according to age. The review process followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Results were interpreted visually. We found 6 cadaveric studies, 2 studies from the general population reporting complete tears, and 10 articles on nontraumatic shoulder pain in the general population that met our criteria. The profiles of degeneration vs. pain were very similar in early years. Although degenerative rotators cuff lesions increased gradually after 50 years, the incidence/prevalence of nontraumatic shoulder pain decreased after 65 years. The profile of age-related degenerative rotator cuff disorders fails to correlate systematically with self-reported nontraumatic shoulder pain, particularly in older age; thus, it appears that degeneration should not be considered the primary source of the pain. Physical activity may play an important role in the production of the pain, a theory that warrants further study. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Neurological soft signs in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Their relationship to executive function and parental neurological soft signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jingbo; Xie, Jingtao; Chen, Gui; Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Suhong

    2015-07-30

    The correlations between neurological soft signs (NSS) in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and their executive function, symptoms of inattention, and hyperactivity-impulsivity and the NSS of their parents remain unclear. This study aimed to examine: (1) the prevalence of NSS in children with ADHD and their parents; (2) the correlation between the NSS of children with ADHD and the NSS of their parents; and (3) the correlation between the NSS of children with ADHD and their executive function and symptoms. NSS were assessed with the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) in 57 children with ADHD (and 80 parents) and 60 healthy children (and 75 parents). Executive function was measured with the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). Children with ADHD and their parents had significantly higher NSS than normal children and their parents, respectively, and the NSS of children with ADHD were correlated more strongly with the NSS of their fathers than their mothers. No correlation was found between NSS and BRIEF executive function, but Disinhibition in children with ADHD was significantly correlated with hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms. Paternal and maternal NSS provided different predictions for child NSS. It may be that NSS are more likely to be genetically transmitted by fathers.

  14. Hypnosis as a model of functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeley, Q

    2017-01-01

    In the 19th century it was recognized that neurologic symptoms could be caused by "morbid ideation" as well as organic lesions. The subsequent observation that hysteric (now called "functional") symptoms could be produced and removed by hypnotic suggestion led Charcot to hypothesize that suggestion mediated the effects of ideas on hysteric symptoms through as yet unknown effects on brain activity. The advent of neuroimaging 100 years later revealed strikingly similar neural correlates in experiments matching functional symptoms with clinical analogs created by suggestion. Integrative models of suggested and functional symptoms regard these alterations in brain function as the endpoint of a broader set of changes in information processing due to suggestion. These accounts consider that suggestions alter experience by mobilizing representations from memory systems, and altering causal attributions, during preconscious processing which alters the content of what is provided to our highly edited subjective version of the world. Hypnosis as a model for functional symptoms draws attention to how radical alterations in experience and behavior can conform to the content of mental representations through effects on cognition and brain function. Experimental study of functional symptoms and their suggested counterparts in hypnosis reveals the distinct and shared processes through which this can occur.

  15. Clinical assessment of social cognitive function in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Julie D; von Hippel, William; Molenberghs, Pascal; Lee, Teresa; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-01-01

    Social cognition broadly refers to the processing of social information in the brain that underlies abilities such as the detection of others' emotions and responding appropriately to these emotions. Social cognitive skills are critical for successful communication and, consequently, mental health and wellbeing. Disturbances of social cognition are early and salient features of many neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders, and often occur after acute brain injury. Its assessment in the clinic is, therefore, of paramount importance. Indeed, the most recent edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) introduced social cognition as one of six core components of neurocognitive function, alongside memory and executive control. Failures of social cognition most often present as poor theory of mind, reduced affective empathy, impaired social perception or abnormal social behaviour. Standard neuropsychological assessments lack the precision and sensitivity needed to adequately inform treatment of these failures. In this Review, we present appropriate methods of assessment for each of the four domains, using an example disorder to illustrate the value of these approaches. We discuss the clinical applications of testing for social cognitive function, and finally suggest a five-step algorithm for the evaluation and treatment of impairments, providing quantitative evidence to guide the selection of social cognitive measures in clinical practice.

  16. Quantitative Evaluation System of Soft Neurological Signs for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Kaneko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Soft neurological signs (SNS are minor neurological abnormalities in motor performance, and are used as one evaluation method for neurodevelopmental delays in children with ADHD. Our aim is to establish a quantitative evaluation system for children with ADHD. We focused on the arm movement called pronation and supination, which is one such soft neurological sign. Thirty three children with ADHD aged 7–11 years (27 males, six females and twenty five adults participants aged 21–29 years old (19 males, six females participated in our experiments. Our results suggested that the pronation and supination function in children with ADHD has a tendency to lag behind that of typically developing children by several years. From these results, our system has a possibility to objectively evaluate the neurodevelopmental delay of children with ADHD.

  17. Primary headache disorder in the emergency department: perspective from a general neurology outpatient clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Gahir, K K; Larner, A J

    2006-01-01

    Over a six month period, 22% of patients with headache seen in general neurology outpatient clinics reported prior attendance at an emergency department because of their headache; 9% of the headache cohort had been admitted to hospital. All had primary headache disorders according to International Headache Society diagnostic criteria. Improved primary care services for headache patients are required to reduce the burden of primary headache disorders seen in emergency departments.

  18. Engaging cognitive circuits to promote motor recovery in degenerative disorders. exercise as a learning modality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakowec Michael W.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exercise and physical activity are fundamental components of a lifestyle essential in maintaining a healthy brain. This is primarily due to the fact that the adult brain maintains a high degree of plasticity and activity is essential for homeostasis throughout life. Plasticity is not lost even in the context of a neurodegenerative disorder, but could be maladaptive thus promoting disease onset and progression. A major breakthrough in treating brain disorders such as Parkinson’s disease is to drive neuroplasticity in a direction to improve motor and cognitive dysfunction. The purpose of this short review is to present the evidence from our laboratories that supports neuroplasticity as a potential therapeutic target in treating brain disorders. We consider that the enhancement of motor recovery in both animal models of dopamine depletion and in patients with Parkinson’s disease is optimized when cognitive circuits are engaged; in other words, the brain is engaged in a learning modality. Therefore, we propose that to be effective in treating Parkinson’s disease, physical therapy must employ both skill-based exercise (to drive specific circuits and aerobic exercise (to drive the expression of molecules required to strengthen synaptic connections components to select those neuronal circuits, such as the corticostriatal pathway, necessary to restore proper motor and cognitive behaviors. In the wide spectrum of different forms of exercise, learning as the fundamental modality likely links interventions used to treat patients with Parkinson’s disease and may be necessary to drive beneficial neuroplasticity resulting in symptomatic improvement and possible disease modification.

  19. Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD detected in neurologic disorders Iraqi children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel A. Kareem

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion In the absence of newborn screening, MSUD is not uncommon in neurologically disorder patients where MSUD was still diagnosed clinically, but delayed. The importance of clinical awareness and accurate biochemical analysis were the key tools for diagnosis and the necessity for a comprehensive national newborn screening program.

  20. A review of the emerging potential therapy for neurological disorders: human embryonic stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Geeta; Dhanda Titus, Jyoti; Shroff, Rhea

    2017-01-01

    The first human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line was developed in the late nineties. hESCs are capable of proliferating indefinitely and differentiate into all the three embryonic germ layers. Further, the differentiation of hESC lines into neural precursor cells and neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes showed their potential in treating several incurable neurological disorders such as spinal cord injury (SCI), cerebral palsy (CP), Parkinson's disease (PD). In this review, we will discuss the global scenario of research and therapeutic use of hESCs in the treatment of neurological disorders. Following this, we will discuss the development of a unique hESC line, how it differs from the other available hESC lines and its use in the treatment of neurological disorders. hESCs were isolated from mixture of neuronal and non-neuronal progenitor cells in their pre progenitor state in a Good Laboratory Practices, Good Tissue Practices and Good Manufacturing Practices compliant laboratory. Blastomere cells have served as a source to derive the hESCs and the xeno-free culture was demonstrated to be more safe and effective in clinical therapeutic application of hESCs. All the patients showed a remarkable improvement in their conditions and no serious adverse events were reported. This study concluded that hESC lines could be scalable and used in the treatment of various neurological disorders such as SCI, CP, and PD.

  1. 78 FR 70310 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... Stroke Special Emphasis Panel; Neuroscience Research Education (R25). Date: December 16, 2013. Time: 2:00... Health, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852 (Telephone Conference Call..., Clinical Research Related to Neurological Disorders; 93.854, Biological Basis Research in the...

  2. Miscellaneous neurologic, cardiac, pulmonary, and metabolic disorders with rheumatic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, J G

    1993-01-01

    Problems both old and new are featured in this year's selection of rheumatologic aspects of miscellaneous diseases. Paralysis of one or more limbs can lead to many musculoskeletal complications, and the approach of Auguste Dejerine-Klumpke in 1918 can be compared with that of the present-day physician. The reappearance of rheumatic fever continues to excite interest. The specificity of the modified Jones criteria has been questioned, as have the benefits of long-term antibiotic prophylaxis following an attack of the disease. Meanwhile, metabolic disorders may be the first diseases to come under novel scrutiny using the techniques of genetic engineering, with outstanding possibilities for advancing both understanding and treatment. Dermatologic diseases other than psoriasis may be associated with arthropathy. Many of these symptom complexes may be variants of the recently described SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) syndrome.

  3. Huntington disease: a single-gene degenerative disorder of the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopoulos, Peggy C

    2016-03-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, neurodegenerative disorder with a primary etiology of striatal pathology. The Huntingtin gene (HTT) has a unique feature of a DNA trinucleotide (triplet) repeat, with repeat length ranging from 10 to 35 in the normal population. Repeat lengths between 36 and 39 cause HD at reduced penetrance (some will get the disease, others won't) and when expanded to 40 or more repeats (mHTT), causes HD at full penetrance (every person with this length or beyond will definitely develop the disease). The symptoms of HD may be motor, cognitive, and psychiatric, and are consistent with the pathophysiology of frontostriatal circuitry malfunction. Expressed ubiquitously and throughout the entire life cycle (development through adulthood), mHTT causes initial dysfunction and eventual death of a specific cell population within the striatum. Although all areas of the brain are eventually affected, the primary pathology of the disease is regionally specific. As a single-gene disorder, HD has the distinction of having the potential of treatment that is aimed directly at the known pathogenic mechanism by gene silencing, providing hope for neuroprotection and ultimately, prevention.

  4. Current Issues in the Neurology and Genetics of Learning-Related Traits and Disorders: Introduction to the Special Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilger, Jeffrey W.

    2001-01-01

    This introductory article briefly describes each of the following eight articles in this special issue on the neurology and genetics of learning related disorders. It notes the greater appreciation of learning disability as a set of complex disorders with broad and intricate neurological bases and of the large individual differences in how these…

  5. Current Issues in the Neurology and Genetics of Learning-Related Traits and Disorders: Introduction to the Special Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilger, Jeffrey W.

    2001-01-01

    This introductory article briefly describes each of the following eight articles in this special issue on the neurology and genetics of learning related disorders. It notes the greater appreciation of learning disability as a set of complex disorders with broad and intricate neurological bases and of the large individual differences in how these…

  6. Practical considerations on the use of rituximab in autoimmune neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidis, Mixalis L.; Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2010-01-01

    Rituximab (Mabthera, Rituxan) is a chimeric human/murine monoclonal antibody against CD-20 surface antigen expressed on B-cells. Rituximab, by causing B-cell depletion, appears to be effective in several autoimmune disorders; it has been approved for rheumatoid arthritis and is a promising new agent in the treatment of several autoimmune neurological disorders. A controlled study in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis has shown that rituximab significantly reduces the number of new MRI lesions and improves clinical outcome; it also showed some promise in a subset of patients with primary progressive MS. The drug is also effective in a number of patients with Devic’s disease, myasthenia gravis, autoimmune neuropathies, and inflammatory myopathies. The apparent effectiveness of rituximab has moved B-cells into the center stage of clinical and laboratory investigation of autoimmune neurological disorders. We review the evidence-based effectiveness of rituximab in neurological disorders based on controlled trials and anecdotal reports, including our own experience, and address the immunobiology of B-cells in autoimmune central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders. In addition, we provide practical guidelines on how best to use this drug in clinical practice and highlight its potential toxicity. PMID:21179602

  7. Practical considerations on the use of rituximab in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidis, Mixalis L; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2010-03-01

    Rituximab (Mabthera, Rituxan) is a chimeric human/murine monoclonal antibody against CD-20 surface antigen expressed on B-cells. Rituximab, by causing B-cell depletion, appears to be effective in several autoimmune disorders; it has been approved for rheumatoid arthritis and is a promising new agent in the treatment of several autoimmune neurological disorders. A controlled study in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis has shown that rituximab significantly reduces the number of new MRI lesions and improves clinical outcome; it also showed some promise in a subset of patients with primary progressive MS. The drug is also effective in a number of patients with Devic's disease, myasthenia gravis, autoimmune neuropathies, and inflammatory myopathies. The apparent effectiveness of rituximab has moved B-cells into the center stage of clinical and laboratory investigation of autoimmune neurological disorders. We review the evidence-based effectiveness of rituximab in neurological disorders based on controlled trials and anecdotal reports, including our own experience, and address the immunobiology of B-cells in autoimmune central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders. In addition, we provide practical guidelines on how best to use this drug in clinical practice and highlight its potential toxicity.

  8. Neuro-archaeology: pre-symptomatic architecture and signature of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-12-01

    During brain development cells divide, differentiate and migrate to their assigned targets to form synapses and active cell assemblies. This sequence is controlled both by genetic programs and environmental factors. Alterations of this sequence by mutations or environmental insults leads to the formation of misconnected circuits endowed with a 'pre-symptomatic signature'. I propose here that early- and late-onset neurological disorders as diverse as infantile epilepsies, mental retardation, dyslexia or, in certain conditions, even Huntington's and Alzheimer's disease might be, in part, born at early developmental stages before symptoms appear. The core of this working hypothesis is that imaging or non-invasive recordings might unravel signatures of disorders to come, thereby permitting earlier diagnosis and potential treatment of neurological disorders.

  9. B cells in the pathophysiology of autoimmune neurological disorders: a credible therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2006-10-01

    There is evidence that B cells are involved in the pathophysiology of many neurological diseases, either in a causative or contributory role, via production of autoantibodies, cytokine secretion, or by acting as antigen-presenting cells leading to T cell activation. Clonal expansion of B cells either in situ or intrathecally and circulating autoantibodies are critical elements in multiple sclerosis (MS), Devic's disease, paraneoplastic central nervous system disorders, stiff-person syndrome, myasthenia gravis, autoimmune demyelinating neuropathies and dermatomyositis. The pathogenic role of B cells and autoantibodies in central and peripheral nervous system disorders, as reviewed here, provides a rationale for investigating whether depletion of B cells with new agents can improve clinical symptomatology and, potentially, restore immune function. Preliminary results from several clinical studies and case reports suggest that B cell depletion may become a viable alternative approach to the treatment of autoimmune neurological disorders.

  10. [Retinal regeneration with iPS cells ‒ Clinical trials for retinal degenerative disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Sunao

    2015-01-01

    Potential for re-programming cells has become widely accepted as a tool for obtaining transplantation materials. There has been great interest in cell-based therapies, including retinal transplants, because there is a reduced risk of immune rejection. Stem cells have the capacity for self-renewal plus the capacity to generate several differentiated cells. They are derived from many sources including human adult-derived induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and have found early application in the context of ocular disease. In results, our established iPS-retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are high-quality RPE cells. iPS cells-derived RPE cells clearly showed polygonal morphology (mostly hexagonal) and contained melanin. Moreover, RPE cells derived from iPS cells had many characteristics of mature RPE cells in vivo, but no characteristics of pluripotent stem cells. Recently, we transplanted RPE cell sheets to treat a patient with wet age-related macular degeneration (September, 2014). In addition, we are now conducting experiments to determine whether allogeneic T cells can recognize iPS-RPE cells from HLA-A, B, DRB1 locus homozygote donors. iPS bank might be useful as allografts in retinal disorders, if the recipient T cells cannot respond to allogeneic RPE cells because of match to some of main HLA antigens.

  11. Diagnosis and Treatment of Neurological and Ischemic Disorders Employing Carbon Nanotube Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P. Komane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research on carbon nanotubes has been conducted due to their excellent physicochemical properties. Based on their outstanding physicochemical properties, carbon nanotubes have the potential to be employed as theranostic tools for neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease including ischemic stroke diagnosis and treatment. Stroke is currently regarded as the third root cause of death and the leading source of immobility around the globe. The development and improvement of efficient and effective procedures for central nervous system disease diagnosis and treatment is necessitated. The main aim of this review is to discuss the application of nanotechnology, specifically carbon nanotubes, to the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders with an emphasis on ischemic stroke. Areas covered include the conventional current diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders, as well as a critical review of the application of carbon nanotubes in the diagnosis and treatment of ischemic stroke, covering areas such as functionalization of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube-based biosensors. A broad perspective on carbon nanotube stimuli-responsiveness, carbon nanotube toxicity, and commercially available carbon nanotubes is provided. Potential future studies employing carbon nanotubes have been discussed, evaluating their extent of advancement in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and ischemic disorders.

  12. The ketogenic diet as a treatment paradigm for diverse neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafstrom, Carl E; Rho, Jong M

    2012-01-01

    Dietary and metabolic therapies have been attempted in a wide variety of neurological diseases, including epilepsy, headache, neurotrauma, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, sleep disorders, brain cancer, autism, pain, and multiple sclerosis. The impetus for using various diets to treat - or at least ameliorate symptoms of - these disorders stems from both a lack of effectiveness of pharmacological therapies, and also the intrinsic appeal of implementing a more "natural" treatment. The enormous spectrum of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the aforementioned diseases would suggest a degree of complexity that cannot be impacted universally by any single dietary treatment. Yet, it is conceivable that alterations in certain dietary constituents could affect the course and impact the outcome of these brain disorders. Further, it is possible that a final common neurometabolic pathway might be influenced by a variety of dietary interventions. The most notable example of a dietary treatment with proven efficacy against a neurological condition is the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) used in patients with medically intractable epilepsy. While the mechanisms through which the KD works remain unclear, there is now compelling evidence that its efficacy is likely related to the normalization of aberrant energy metabolism. The concept that many neurological conditions are linked pathophysiologically to energy dysregulation could well provide a common research and experimental therapeutics platform, from which the course of several neurological diseases could be favorably influenced by dietary means. Here we provide an overview of studies using the KD in a wide panoply of neurologic disorders in which neuroprotection is an essential component.

  13. THE KETOGENIC DIET AS A TREATMENT PARADIGM FOR DIVERSE NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Min Rho

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary and metabolic therapies have been attempted in a wide variety of neurological diseases, including epilepsy, headache, neurotrauma, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, sleep disorders, brain cancer, autism, pain, and multiple sclerosis. The impetus for using various diets to treat – or at least ameliorate symptoms of – these disorders stems from both a lack of effectiveness of pharmacological therapies, and also the intrinsic appeal of implementing a more natural treatment. The enormous spectrum of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the aforementioned diseases would suggest a degree of complexity that cannot be impacted universally by any single dietary treatment. Yet, it is conceivable that alterations in certain dietary constituents could affect the course and impact the outcome of these brain disorders. Further, it is possible that a final common neurometabolic pathway might be influenced by a variety of dietary interventions. The most notable example of a dietary treatment with proven efficacy against a neurological condition is the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD used in patients with medically intractable epilepsy. While the mechanisms through which the KD works remain unclear, there is now compelling evidence that its efficacy is likely related to the normalization of aberrant energy metabolism. The concept that many neurological conditions are linked pathophysiologically to energy dysregulation could well provide a common research and experimental therapeutics platform, from which the course of several neurological diseases could be favorably influenced by dietary means. Here we provide an overview of studies using the KD in a wide panoply of neurologic disorders in which neuroprotection is an essential component.

  14. Key sleep neurologic disorders: Narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease, and REM sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Louis, Erik K

    2014-02-01

    Sleep disorders are frequent comorbidities in neurologic patients. This review focuses on clinical aspects and prognosis of 3 neurologic sleep disorders: narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED), and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Narcolepsy causes pervasive, enduring excessive daytime sleepiness, adversely affecting patients' daily functioning. RLS/WED is characterized by an uncomfortable urge to move the legs before sleep, often evolving toward augmentation and resulting in daylong bothersome symptoms. RBD causes potentially injurious dream enactment behaviors that often signify future evolution of overt synucleinopathy neurodegeneration in as many as 81% of patients. Timely recognition, referral for polysomnography, and longitudinal follow-up of narcolepsy, RLS/WED, and RBD patients are imperatives for neurologists in providing quality comprehensive patient care.

  15. [Degenerative adult scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, C L; Obil-Chavarría, C A; Zárate-Kalfópulos, B; Rosales-Olivares, L M; Alpizar-Aguirre, A; Reyes-Sánchez, A A

    2015-01-01

    Adult scoliosis is a complex three-dimensional rotational deformity of the spine, resulting from the progressive degeneration of the vertebral elements in middle age, in a previously straight spine; a Cobb angle greater than 10° in the coronal plane, which also alters the sagittal and axial planes. It originates an asymmetrical degenerative disc and facet joint, creating asymmetrical loads and subsequently deformity. The main symptom is axial, radicular pain and neurological deficit. Conservative treatment includes drugs and physical therapy. The epidural injections and facet for selectively blocking nerve roots improves short-term pain. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients with intractable pain, radiculopathy and/ or neurological deficits. There is no consensus for surgical indications, however, it must have a clear understanding of the symptoms and clinical signs. The goal of surgery is to decompress neural elements with restoration, modification of the three-dimensional shape deformity and stabilize the coronal and sagittal balance.

  16. Quantitative Evaluation of the Use of Actigraphy for Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Pan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative and objective evaluation of disease severity and/or drug effect is necessary in clinical practice. Wearable accelerometers such as an actigraph enable long-term recording of a patient’s movement during activities and they can be used for quantitative assessment of symptoms due to various diseases. We reviewed some applications of actigraphy with analytical methods that are sufficiently sensitive and reliable to determine the severity of diseases and disorders such as motor and nonmotor disorders like Parkinson’s disease, sleep disorders, depression, behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD for vascular dementia (VD, seasonal affective disorder (SAD, and stroke, as well as the effects of drugs used to treat them. We believe it is possible to develop analytical methods to assess more neurological or psychopathic disorders using actigraphy records.

  17. Dysregulation of neurogenesis by neuroinflammation: key differences in neurodevelopmental and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lir-Wan Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic neurogenesis is the process of generating neurons, the functional units of the brain. Because of its sensitivity to adverse intrauterine environment such as infection, dysregulation of this process has emerged as a key mechanism underlying many neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Adult neurogenesis, although is restricted to a few neurogenic niches, plays pivotal roles in brain plasticity and repair. Increasing evidence suggests that impairments in adult neurogenesis are involved in major neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. A hallmark feature of these brain disorders is neuroinflammation, which can either promote or inhibit neurogenesis depending upon the context of brain microenvironment. In this review paper, we present evidence from both experimental and human studies to show a complex picture of relationship between these two events, and discussed potential factors contributing to different or even opposing actions of neuroinflammation on neurogenesis in neurodevelopmental and neurological disorders.

  18. Novel OPA1 missense mutation in a family with optic atrophy and severe widespread neurological disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskova, Petra; Ulmanova, Olga; Tesina, Petr; Melsova, Hana; Diblik, Pavel; Hansikova, Hana; Tesarova, Marketa; Votruba, Marcela

    2013-05-01

    To identify the underlying molecular genetic cause in a Czech family with optic atrophy, deafness, ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, polyneuropathy and ataxia transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Ophthalmological and neurological examination followed by molecular genetic analyses. Seven family members were clinically affected. There was a variable but progressive visual, hearing and neurological disability across the family as a whole. The majority of subjects presented with impairment of visual function and a variable degree of ptosis and/or ophthalmoplegia from the first to the third decade of life. Deafness, neuropathy and ataxia appeared later, in the third and fourth decade. Migraine, tachycardia, intention tremor, nystagmus and cervical dystonia were observed in isolated individuals. A significant overall feature was the high level of neurological disability leading to 3 of 4 members being unable to walk or stand unaided before the age of 60 years. A novel missense mutation c.1345A>C (p.Thr449Pro) in OPA1 segregating with the disease phenotype over three generations was detected. In silico analysis supported pathogenicity of the identified sequence variant. Our work expands the spectrum of mutation in OPA1, which may lead to severe multisystem neurological disorder. The molecular genetic cause of dominant optic atrophy in the Czech population is reported for the first time. We propose that regular cardiac follow-up in patients diagnosed with dominant optic atrophy and widespread neurological disease should be considered. © 2013 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  19. The global burden of mental, neurological and substance use disorders: an analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey A Whiteford

    Full Text Available The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010, estimated that a substantial proportion of the world's disease burden came from mental, neurological and substance use disorders. In this paper, we used GBD 2010 data to investigate time, year, region and age specific trends in burden due to mental, neurological and substance use disorders.For each disorder, prevalence data were assembled from systematic literature reviews. DisMod-MR, a Bayesian meta-regression tool, was used to model prevalence by country, region, age, sex and year. Prevalence data were combined with disability weights derived from survey data to estimate years lived with disability (YLDs. Years lost to premature mortality (YLLs were estimated by multiplying deaths occurring as a result of a given disorder by the reference standard life expectancy at the age death occurred. Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs were computed as the sum of YLDs and YLLs.In 2010, mental, neurological and substance use disorders accounted for 10.4% of global DALYs, 2.3% of global YLLs and, 28.5% of global YLDs, making them the leading cause of YLDs. Mental disorders accounted for the largest proportion of DALYs (56.7%, followed by neurological disorders (28.6% and substance use disorders (14.7%. DALYs peaked in early adulthood for mental and substance use disorders but were more consistent across age for neurological disorders. Females accounted for more DALYs in all mental and neurological disorders, except for mental disorders occurring in childhood, schizophrenia, substance use disorders, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy where males accounted for more DALYs. Overall DALYs were highest in Eastern Europe/Central Asia and lowest in East Asia/the Pacific.Mental, neurological and substance use disorders contribute to a significant proportion of disease burden. Health systems can respond by implementing established, cost effective interventions, or by supporting the research necessary to develop

  20. Dextromethorphan: An update on its utility for neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Linda; Thomas, Kelan L; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Cavendish, John Z; Crowe, Molly S; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2016-03-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM) is a commonly used antitussive and is currently the only FDA-approved pharmaceutical treatment for pseudobulbar affect. Its safety profile and diverse pharmacologic actions in the central nervous system have stimulated new interest for repurposing it. Numerous preclinical investigations and many open-label or blinded clinical studies have demonstrated its beneficial effects across a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, the optimal dose and safety of chronic dosing are not fully known. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical effects of DM and its putative mechanisms of action, focusing on depression, stroke, traumatic brain injury, seizure, pain, methotrexate neurotoxicity, Parkinson's disease and autism. Moreover, we offer suggestions for future research with DM to advance the treatment for these and other neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  1. Architects of the genome: CHD dysfunction in cancer, developmental disorders and neurological syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wangzhi; Mills, Alea A

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is vital to normal cells, and its deregulation contributes to a spectrum of human ailments. An emerging concept is that aberrant chromatin regulation culminates in gene expression programs that set the stage for the seemingly diverse pathologies of cancer, developmental disorders and neurological syndromes. However, the mechanisms responsible for such common etiology have been elusive. Recent evidence has implicated lesions affecting chromatin-remodeling proteins in cancer, developmental disorders and neurological syndromes, suggesting a common source for these different pathologies. Here, we focus on the chromodomain helicase DNA binding chromatin-remodeling family and the recent evidence for its deregulation in diverse pathological conditions, providing a new perspective on the underlying mechanisms and their implications for these prevalent human diseases.

  2. Guidelines for uniform reporting of body fluid biomarker studies in neurologic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnanapavan, Sharmilee; Hegen, Harald; Khalil, Michael

    2014-01-01

    of studies. This guideline by the BioMS-eu consortium is aimed at setting a standard for the reporting of future body fluid biomarker research studies in neurologic disorders. We anticipate that following these guidelines will help to accelerate the selection of biomarkers for clinical development.......OBJECTIVE: The aim of these guidelines is to make the process of reporting body fluid biomarker studies in neurologic disorders more uniform and transparent, in line with existing standards for reporting research in other biomedical areas. Although biomarkers have been around for decades......-point uniform reporting format ranging from introduction, materials and methods, through to results and discussion. Each item is discussed in detail in the guidance report. CONCLUSIONS: To enhance the future development of body fluid biomarkers, it will be important to standardize the reporting...

  3. Neurological Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    13.1 Neurophysiology 2006115 Regional modulation of primary motor cortex after peripheral nerve injury: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study CAO Ge - jun (高歌军 ), et al. Dept Radiol, Huashan Hosp Shanghai 200040. Natl Med J China 2005 ;85(25) : 1752 -1756. Objective:To map dynamic changes of primary motor cortex after total brachial plexus traction injury by using functional magnetic resonance imaging, and to explore underlying probable mechanisms. Methods:Five patients with total traumatic root avulsions of the brachial plexus underwent varied kinds of nerve transfer to restore partial-

  4. NEUROLOGICAL DISORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    13.1 Neuroanatomy, Neurophysiology and Neuropathology2007131 Study on decision-making alternation after bilateral nucleus accumbens ablation in drug addicts. HOU Yuan-zheng(侯远征),et al. Dept Neurosurg, Instit Funct Neurosurg, Instit Funct Cerebullar Dis, Tangdu Hosp, 4th Milit Med Univ, Xi′an 710038. Chin J Nerv Ment Dis 2006;32(6)494-497. Objective To explore decision-making alternation after bilateral nucleus accumbens ablation in drug addicts and analyse the reason.

  5. NEUROLOGICAL DISORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    16.1 Intoxication and drug related disease2003140 The neuromuscular transmission effects induced by pralidoxime chloride on rats with acute iso-carbophos poisoning.JU Zhichang(琚志昌),et al. Instil Nutr Food Hyg, Beijing Center Dis Prev & Contr, Bei-

  6. NEUROLOGICAL DISORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    2006276 Investigation of cognitive function in epilepsy and the independent risk factors. CHEN Ziyi (陈子怡) , et al. Dept Neurol, 1st Affili Hosp, Sun Yat - sen Univ,Guangzhou 510080. Chin J Nerv Ment Dis 2006;32 (2):146-149. Objectives: To evaluate the cognitive function of patients with epilepsy and to explore the effect of the related factors of epilepsy on cognition in China. Methods: 60

  7. Neurological Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2011380 Influence of plasma matrix metalloproteinase-7 levels and genetic polymorphism of-181A/G on the stability of carotid plaque. HU Xiaofei(胡曉飛),et al.Dept Neurol,Taizhou Hosp,Wenzhou Med Coll,Taizhou 317000. Abstract:Objective To explore the influence of plasma matrix metalloproteinase-7(MMP-7) levels and genetic polymorphism of MMP-7-181A/G on the stability of carotid plaque.Methods According to carotid ultrasound examination,503 patients with carotid atherosclerotic lesions were

  8. Neurological Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008563 Skin nerve biopsy in the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy. QIAN Min(钱敏),et al.Dept Neurol,PUMC & CAMS,Beijing 100730. Chin J Neurol 2008;41(10):666-669. Objective To find out a reference range of epidermal nerve fiber density in normal humans and compare the concordance between clinical features,electrophysiology and the results of skin biopsy.

  9. Neurological Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009113 The application of ABCD2 Score in evaluation of the prognosis in transient ischemic attack. BI Qi(毕齐), et al. Dept Neurol, Beijing Anzhen Hosp, Capital Med Univ, Beijing 100029. Chin J Intern Med 2009;48(3):213-215. Objective To assess the incidence, types and risk factors of atherothromhotic events (AT) within 7 days after transient ischemic attack (TIA) with ABCD2 Score in Chinese patients.

  10. NEUROLOGICAL DISORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    13.1 Infection2003374 The relationship between dexamethasone and expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor and its receptor gene in experimental bacterial meningitis. LILing(李玲), et al. Dept Neurol, Children’ s Hosp, Sch Med Zhejiang Univ, Hangzhou 310003. Chin J Infect Dis2003;21(2):128-131

  11. NEUROLOGICAL DISORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    13.1 Neuropathology2004138 Experimental study of astrocytic swelling in rats and evaluation with CT perfusion imaging and his-topathology. LIANG Chenyang (梁晨阳), et al. Beijing Neurosurg Instit, Beijing 100050. Chin J Radiol 2003; 37 (10): 872-876.

  12. NEUROLOGICAL DISORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    2004534 Inhibitory effects of siRNA targeting epidermal growth factor receptor on proliferation and invasion of human glioblastoma cells. KANG Chun-sheng (康春生), et al. Dept Neurosurg, Tianjin Med Univ General Hosp, Tianjin 300052. Natl Med J China 2004;84(18):1503-1508.

  13. Neurological Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    14.1 Neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuropathology2007260 Functional magnetic resonance imaging of whole brain related to motor preparation and execution. WANG Meihao(王美豪), et al. Dept Radiol ,1st Affili Hosp, Wenzhou Med Coll , Wenzhou 325000. Natl Med J China 2007;87(14):971-974. Objective To investigate the roles the different functional activation areas in whole human brain related to movement play during motor preparation ( CUE ) and execution ( GO ). Methods Eventrelated functional MRI technique was used on 12 righthanded healthy subjects to record the brain activation in a manner of delayed sequential finger movement. Activation maps and timesignal intensity curves were generated. Results Bilateral anterior parts of supplementary motor area ( PreSMA), bilateral posterior parietal cortex ( PPC), and bilateral anterior premotor cortex (PMC) were strongly activated during the preparation period, while bilateral SMA proper, and contralateral primary motor cortex (MI) were strongly activated during the execution period, Cerebellar cortex was activated during both periods. The timesignal intensity curves based on single voxel indicated that abovementioned brain areas were activated during both periods to different degrees; however, the characteristics of distribution in every area were different. Conclusion The brain areas related to movement are activated differently during preparation period and execution period, areas close to M1 participate in the motor execution process mainly, and the areas away from MI are concerned with motor preparation process chiefly.

  14. NEUROLOGICAL DISORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    15.1 Neuropathology2004286 Preliminary result of effects of autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation on progressive multiple sclerosis. DONG Huiqing (董会卿), et al. Dept Neurol, Xuanwu Hosp, Capital U-niv Med Sci, Beijing 100053. Chin J Neurol 2004; 37(1):11-14.

  15. Neuro-archaeology: pre-symptomatic architecture and signature of neurological disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    International audience; During brain development cells divide, differentiate and migrate to their assigned targets to form synapses and active cell assemblies. This sequence is controlled both by genetic programs and environmental factors. Alterations of this sequence by mutations or environmental insults leads to the formation of misconnected circuits endowed with a 'pre-symptomatic signature'. I propose here that early- and late-onset neurological disorders as diverse as infantile epilepsie...

  16. EFhd2, a Protein Linked to Alzheimer's Disease and Other Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Irving E

    2016-01-01

    EFhd2 is a conserved calcium binding protein linked to different neurological disorders and types of cancer. Although, EFhd2 is more abundant in neurons, it is also found in other cell types. The physiological function of this novel protein is still unclear, but it has been shown in vitro to play a role in calcium signaling, apoptosis, actin cytoskeleton, and regulation of synapse formation. Recently, EFhd2 was shown to promote cell motility by modulating the activity of Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA. Although, EFhd2's role in promoting cell invasion and metastasis is of great interest in cancer biology, this review focusses on the evidence that links EFhd2 to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurological disorders. Altered expression of EFhd2 has been documented in AD, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and schizophrenia, indicating that Efhd2 gene expression is regulated in response to neuropathological processes. However, the specific role that EFhd2 plays in the pathophysiology of neurological disorders is still poorly understood. Recent studies demonstrated that EFhd2 has structural characteristics similar to amyloid proteins found in neurological disorders. Moreover, EFhd2 co-aggregates and interacts with known neuropathological proteins, such as tau, C9orf72, and Lrrk2. These results suggest that EFhd2 may play an important role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the understanding of EFhd2's role in health and disease could lead to decipher molecular mechanisms that become activated in response to neuronal stress and degeneration.

  17. Psychiatric and neurological disorders in late adolescence and risk of convictions for violent crime in men

    OpenAIRE

    Moberg, Tomas; Stenbacka, Marlene; Tengström, Anders; Jönsson, Erik G; Nordström, Peter; Jokinen, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between mental illness and violent crime is complex because of the involvement of many other confounding risk factors. In the present study, we analysed psychiatric and neurological disorders in relation to the risk of convictions for violent crime, taking into account early behavioural and socio-economic risk factors. Methods The study population consisted of 49,398 Swedish men, who were thoroughly assessed at conscription for compulsory military service during th...

  18. Acupuncture for neurological disorders in the Cochrane reviews:Characteristics of included reviews and studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deren Wang; Weimin Yang; Ming Liu

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize Cochrane reviews of acupuncture for neurological disorders, and characteristics of included reviews and studies.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online search of the Cochrane Library (Issue 7 of 12, July 2010) was performed with the key word "acupuncture" and systematic evaluations for acupuncture for neurological disorders were screened.STUDY SELECTION: Systematic reviews on acupuncture in the treatment of neurological disorders were included, and the characteristics of these reviews were analyzed based on methods recommended by the Cochrane collaboration.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Basic characteristics, methodological quality, main reasons for excluding trials, results and conclusions of Cochrane reviews were assessed.RESULTS: A total of 18 Cochrane systematic reviews were included, including 13 completed reviews and five research protocols. The 13 completed reviews involved 111 randomized controlled trials, including 43 trials (38.7%) conducted in China, 47 trials (42.3%) using sham-acupuncture or placebo as control, 15 trials (13.5%) with relatively high quality, 91 trials (81.9%) reporting data on follow-up. Primary outcomes used in the Cochrane reviews were reported by 65 trials (58.6%), and adverse events were reported in 11 trials (9.9%). Two hundred and eighty three trials were excluded. Two reviews on headache suggested that acupuncture is a valuable non-drug treatment for patients with chronic or recurrent headache, and has better curative effects on migraine compared with preventative drug treatment. CONCLUSION: Of the Cochrane reviews on acupuncture in the treatment of neurological disorders, two reviews evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture in treating headaches drew positive conculsions, while other reviews did not obtain positive conclusions due to a small sample size or low methodological quality. The methodological quality of acupuncture trials needs further improvement.

  19. Evaluation of robot-assisted gait training using integrated biofeedback in neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Oliver; Waser, Marco; Stammler, Lukas; Schuster, Corina

    2012-04-01

    Neurological disorders lead to walking disabilities, which are often treated using robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) devices such as the driven gait-orthosis Lokomat. A novel integrated biofeedback system was developed to facilitate therapeutically desirable activities during walking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility to detect changes during RAGT by using this novel biofeedback approach in a clinical setting for patients with central neurological disorders. 84 subjects (50 men and 34 women, mean age of 58 ± 13 years) were followed over 8 RAGT sessions. Outcome measures were biofeedback values as weighted averages of torques measured in the joint drives and independent parameters such as guidance force, walking speed, patient coefficient, session duration, time between sessions and total treatment time. Joint segmented analysis showed significant trends for decreasing hip flexion activity (p ≤.003) and increasing knee extension activity (p ≤.001) during RAGT sessions with an intercorrelation of r=-.43 (p ≤.001). Further associations among independent variables were not statistically significant. This is the first study that evaluates the Lokomat integrated biofeedback system in different neurological disorders in a clinical setting. Results suggest that this novel biofeedback approach used in this study is not able to detect progress during RAGT. These findings should be taken into account when refining existing or developing new biofeedback strategies in RAGT relating to appropriate systems to evaluate progress and support therapist feedback in clinical settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Neurological disorders and therapeutics targeted to surmount the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwar JR

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jagat R Kanwar, Bhasker Sriramoju, Rupinder K KanwarNanomedicine Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research, Centre for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Biosciences, Institute for Frontier Materials (IFM, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: We are now in an aging population, so neurological disorders, particularly the neurodegenerative diseases, are becoming more prevalent in society. As per the epidemiological studies, Europe alone suffers 35% of the burden, indicating an alarming rate of disease progression. Further, treatment for these disorders is a challenging area due to the presence of the tightly regulated blood–brain barrier and its unique ability to protect the brain from xenobiotics. Conventional therapeutics, although effective, remain critically below levels of optimum therapeutic efficacy. Hence, methods to overcome the blood–brain barrier are currently a focus of research. Nanotechnological applications are gaining paramount importance in addressing this question, and yielding some promising results. This review addresses the pathophysiology of the more common neurological disorders and novel drug candidates, along with targeted nanoparticle applications for brain delivery.Keywords: blood–brain barrier, neurological diseases, brain delivery, targeted nanoparticles

  1. An ion channel chip for diagnosis and prognosis of autoimmune neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Franck C; Mazzuca, Michel; Larroque, Marie-Madeleine; Rogemond, Veronique; Honnorat, Jerome; Lesage, Florian

    2013-12-01

    Autoantibodies directed against ion channels and ionotropic receptors are associated with neuromuscular and neurological disorders. Their detection has proven to be useful for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of these autoimmune syndromes. We have designed an ion channel chip for the systematic and rapid screening of antibodies directed against tens of different ion channels. The chip has been validated by confirming the presence of autoantibodies in patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Such a chip will be useful for the diagnosis of already documented disorders, but also to identify new targets of autoimmunity and classification of the corresponding diseases. The article presents some promising patents on the Ion Channel Chip.

  2. Semantic Pattern Analysis for Verbal Fluency Based Assessment of Neurological Disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Ainsworth, Keela C [ORNL; Brown, Tyler C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present preliminary results of semantic pattern analysis of verbal fluency tests used for assessing cognitive psychological and neuropsychological disorders. We posit that recent advances in semantic reasoning and artificial intelligence can be combined to create a standardized computer-aided diagnosis tool to automatically evaluate and interpret verbal fluency tests. Towards that goal, we derive novel semantic similarity (phonetic, phonemic and conceptual) metrics and present the predictive capability of these metrics on a de-identified dataset of participants with and without neurological disorders.

  3. GAD65 epitope mapping and search for novel autoantibodies in GAD-associated neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouka, P; Alexopoulos, H; Akrivou, S; Trohatou, O; Politis, P K; Dalakas, M C

    2015-04-15

    Antibodies against Glutamic-acid-decarboxylase (GAD65) are seen in various CNS excitability disorders including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia, encephalitis and epilepsy. To explore pathogenicity, we examined whether distinct epitope specificities or other co-existing antibodies may account for each disorder. The epitope recognized by all 27 tested patients, irrespective of clinical phenotype, corresponded to the catalytic core of GAD. No autoantibodies against known GABAergic antigens were found. In a screen for novel specificities using live hippocampal neurons, three epilepsy patients, but no other, were positive. We conclude that no GAD-specific epitope defines any neurological syndrome but other antibody specificities may account for certain phenotypes.

  4. The core competencies for mental, neurological, and substance use disorder care in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Pamela Y; Musisi, Seggane; Frehywot, Seble; Patel, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study points to a changing landscape in which non-communicable diseases, such as mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders, account for an increasing proportion of premature mortality and disability globally. Despite evidence of the need for care, a remarkable deficit of providers for MNS disorder service delivery persists in sub-Saharan Africa. This critical workforce can be developed from a range of non-specialist and specialist health workers who have access to evidence-based interventions, whose roles, and the associated tasks, are articulated and clearly delineated, and who are equipped to master and maintain the competencies associated with providing MNS disorder care. In 2012, the Neuroscience Forum of the Institute of Medicine convened a meeting of key stakeholders in Kampala, Uganda, to discuss a set of candidate core competencies for the delivery of mental health and neurological care, focusing specifically on depression, psychosis, epilepsy, and alcohol use disorders. This article discusses the candidate core competencies for non-specialist health workers and the complexities of implementing core competencies in low- and middle-income country settings. Sub-Saharan Africa, however, has the potential to implement novel training initiatives through university networks and through structured processes that engage ministries of health. Finally, we outline challenges associated with implementing competencies in order to sustain a workforce capable of delivering quality services for people with MNS disorders.

  5. Involuntary emotional expression disorder - new/old disease in psychiatry and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presecki, Paola; Mimica, Ninoslav

    2007-09-01

    Involuntary emotional expression disorder (IEED) is underrecognized by clinicians, misdiagnosed as depression or bipolar disorder and undertreated, because clinicians are unfamiliar with the disorder. An important clinical consideration for IEED is that of distinguishing mood from affect. IEED describes a syndrome of relatively stereotypical episodes of uncontrollable crying and/or laughing, resulting from lesions of multiple types, in multiple brain regions, without an apparent stimulus to trigger such responses. This syndrome is common among a number of neurological diseases like patients with a stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI), patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), as well as dementias such as Alzheimer;s disease (AD), and motor disorders such as Parkinson;s disease (PD). The neuropathological cause and neurochemistry of the disorder remains unclear. There is general agreement that IEED is the result of an injury to the neurological pathways that control the expression of emotions. Adequate treatment can reduce the frequency and improve the quality of life of patients and caregivers.

  6. The core competencies for mental, neurological, and substance use disorder care in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Y. Collins

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study points to a changing landscape in which non-communicable diseases, such as mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS disorders, account for an increasing proportion of premature mortality and disability globally. Despite evidence of the need for care, a remarkable deficit of providers for MNS disorder service delivery persists in sub-Saharan Africa. This critical workforce can be developed from a range of non-specialist and specialist health workers who have access to evidence-based interventions, whose roles, and the associated tasks, are articulated and clearly delineated, and who are equipped to master and maintain the competencies associated with providing MNS disorder care. In 2012, the Neuroscience Forum of the Institute of Medicine convened a meeting of key stakeholders in Kampala, Uganda, to discuss a set of candidate core competencies for the delivery of mental health and neurological care, focusing specifically on depression, psychosis, epilepsy, and alcohol use disorders. This article discusses the candidate core competencies for non-specialist health workers and the complexities of implementing core competencies in low- and middle-income country settings. Sub-Saharan Africa, however, has the potential to implement novel training initiatives through university networks and through structured processes that engage ministries of health. Finally, we outline challenges associated with implementing competencies in order to sustain a workforce capable of delivering quality services for people with MNS disorders.

  7. Incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Yang, Dalong; Wang, Tao; Liu, Sen; Yang, Sidong; Ding, Wenyuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to explore incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease (ASD) following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disorders, and hope to provide references in decision making and surgical planning for both spinal surgeon and surgically treated patients. By retrieving the medical records from January 2011 to December 2013 in our hospital, 237 patients were retrospectively reviewed. According to the occurrence of ASD at follow up, patients were divided into 2 groups: ASD and N-ASD group. To investigate risk values for the occurrence of ASD, 3 categorized factors were analyzed statistically: Patient characteristics: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), bone mineral density (BMD), duration. Surgical variables: surgical strategy, number of fusion level, surgery segment, surgery time, blood loss, intraoperative superior facet joint violation. Radiographic parameters: preoperative lumbar lordosis, preoperative angular motion at adjacent segment, preoperative adjacent segment disc degeneration, preoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration. Postoperative ASD was developed in 15 of 237 patients (6.3%) at final follow up. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups in patient characteristics of age, sex composition, BMD, duration, while the BMI was higher in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. There was no difference in surgical variables of surgical strategy, number of fusion level, surgery segment, surgery time, blood loss, while intraoperative superior facet joint violation was more common in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. There was no difference in radiographic parameters of preoperative lumbar lordosis, preoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration, while preoperative adjacent segment disc degeneration were more severe in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. The Logistic regression analysis revealed that, BMI >25 kg/m2, preoperative disc degeneration, and superior

  8. Incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Yang, Dalong; Wang, Tao; Liu, Sen; Yang, Sidong; Ding, Wenyuan

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease (ASD) following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disorders, and hope to provide references in decision making and surgical planning for both spinal surgeon and surgically treated patients.By retrieving the medical records from January 2011 to December 2013 in our hospital, 237 patients were retrospectively reviewed. According to the occurrence of ASD at follow up, patients were divided into 2 groups: ASD and N-ASD group. To investigate risk values for the occurrence of ASD, 3 categorized factors were analyzed statistically: Patient characteristics: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), bone mineral density (BMD), duration. Surgical variables: surgical strategy, number of fusion level, surgery segment, surgery time, blood loss, intraoperative superior facet joint violation. Radiographic parameters: preoperative lumbar lordosis, preoperative angular motion at adjacent segment, preoperative adjacent segment disc degeneration, preoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration.Postoperative ASD was developed in 15 of 237 patients (6.3%) at final follow up. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups in patient characteristics of age, sex composition, BMD, duration, while the BMI was higher in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. There was no difference in surgical variables of surgical strategy, number of fusion level, surgery segment, surgery time, blood loss, while intraoperative superior facet joint violation was more common in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. There was no difference in radiographic parameters of preoperative lumbar lordosis, preoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration, while preoperative adjacent segment disc degeneration were more severe in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. The Logistic regression analysis revealed that, BMI >25 kg/m, preoperative disc degeneration, and superior facet joint

  9. Aerobic exercise to improve cognitive function in adults with neurological disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Michelle N; Smith, Ashleigh E; Mackintosh, Shylie F

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate whether aerobic exercise improves cognition in adults diagnosed with neurologic disorders. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, EMBASE, PEDro, AMED, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, ERIC, and Google Scholar, with the last search performed in December 2010. We included controlled clinical trials and randomized controlled trials with adults diagnosed with a neurologic disorder. Studies were included if they compared a control group with a group involved in an aerobic exercise program to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and if they measured cognition as an outcome. Two reviewers independently extracted data and methodologic quality of the included trials. From the 67 trials reviewed, a total of 7 trials, involving 249 participants, were included. Two trials compared the effectiveness of yoga and aerobic exercise in adults with multiple sclerosis. Two trials evaluated the effect of exercise on patients with dementia, and 2 trials evaluated the effectiveness of exercise to improve cognition after traumatic brain injury. One trial studied the effect of a cycling program in people with chronic stroke. Lack of commonality between measures of cognition limited meta-analyses. Results from individual studies show that aerobic exercise improved cognition in people with dementia, improved attention and cognitive flexibility in patients with traumatic brain injury, improved choice reaction time in people with multiple sclerosis, and enhanced motor learning in people with chronic stroke. There is limited evidence to support the use of aerobic exercise to improve cognition in adults with neurologic disorders. Of the 67 studies retrieved, less than half included cognition as an outcome, and few studies continued the aerobic exercise program long enough to be considered effective. Further studies investigating the effect of aerobic exercise interventions on cognition in people with neurologic conditions are required. Copyright

  10. A decade from discovery to therapy: Lingo-1, the dark horse in neurological and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jessica L; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca

    2015-09-01

    Leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin domain-containing protein (Lingo-1) is a potent negative regulator of neuron and oligodendrocyte survival, neurite extension, axon regeneration, oligodendrocyte differentiation, axonal myelination and functional recovery; all processes highly implicated in numerous brain-related functions. Although playing a major role in developmental brain functions, the potential application of Lingo-1 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of neurological disorders has so far been under-estimated. A number of preclinical studies have shown that various methods of antagonizing Lingo-1 results in neuronal and oligodendroglial survival, axonal growth and remyelination; however to date literature has only detailed applications of Lingo-1 targeted therapeutics with a focus primarily on myelination disorders such as multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury; omitting important information regarding Lingo-1 signaling co-factors. Here, we provide for the first time a complete and thorough review of the implications of Lingo-1 signaling in a wide range of neurological and psychiatric disorders, and critically examine its potential as a novel therapeutic target for these disorders.

  11. Zinc in Gut-Brain Interaction in Autism and Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Guillermo; Stark, Peter; Socha, Michael; Sauer, Ann Katrin; Hagmeyer, Simone; Grabrucker, Andreas M.

    2015-01-01

    A growing amount of research indicates that abnormalities in the gastrointestinal (GI) system during development might be a common factor in multiple neurological disorders and might be responsible for some of the shared comorbidities seen among these diseases. For example, many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have symptoms associated with GI disorders. Maternal zinc status may be an important factor given the multifaceted effect of zinc on gut development and morphology in the offspring. Zinc status influences and is influenced by multiple factors and an interdependence of prenatal and early life stress, immune system abnormalities, impaired GI functions, and zinc deficiency can be hypothesized. In line with this, systemic inflammatory events and prenatal stress have been reported to increase the risk for ASD. Thus, here, we will review the current literature on the role of zinc in gut formation, a possible link between gut and brain development in ASD and other neurological disorders with shared comorbidities, and tie in possible effects on the immune system. Based on these data, we present a novel model outlining how alterations in the maternal zinc status might pathologically impact the offspring leading to impairments in brain functions later in life. PMID:25878905

  12. Coraco- or Costoclavicular Paraosteoarthropathies in Patients with Severe Central Neurological Disorders

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    Lacout, A.; Mompoint, D.; Perrier, Y.; Vallee, C.A.; Carlier, R.Y. (Service de Radiologie, Hopital Raymond Poincare, Garches (France))

    2008-03-15

    Background: Paraosteoarthropathy (POA) is a frequent disabling orthopedic complication after severe central neurological impairment. The hip is the most frequently affected joint (32.1%) followed by the elbow and the shoulder (25%). Purpose: To evaluate coraco- and costoclavicular paraosteoarthropathy in patients with severe central neurological disorders. Material and Methods: We report a series of five consecutive patients with severe central neurological disorders who developed a POA of the clavicular region (coracoclavicular or costoclavicular POA). Every patient underwent a clinical, radiological, and computed tomographic (CT) examination of the shoulder region. Results: Four patients had a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI), and one an acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). They developed POA of the clavicular region, although not around the glenohumeral joint. The patients complained of shoulder pain and of moderate limitation of movements. Radiological and CT examinations showed the presence of a bony formation in the coracoclavicular space in four cases and extending from the clavicle to the first rib around the costoclavicular joint in one case. Conclusion: In patients with severe brain lesions suffering from shoulder pain and moderate limitation of joint movements, POAs of the clavicular region are rare but should be considered

  13. On the personal facets of quality of life in chronic neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovagnoli, Anna R; Martins da Silva, Antonio; Federico, Antonio; Cornelio, Ferdinando

    2009-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is an important clinical endpoint, but it remarkably varies in patients with similar neurological conditions. This study explored the role of spirituality (i.e., the complex of personal transcendence, connectedness, purpose, and values) in determining QOL in chronic neurological disorders.~Seventy-two patients with epilepsy, brain tumours or ischemic or immune-mediate brain damage compiled inventories for QOL (WHOQOL 100), spirituality (Spiritual, Religious and Personal Beliefs, WHOSRPB), depression (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI), anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, STAI), and cognitive self-efficacy (Multiple Ability Self-Report Questionnaire, MASQ) and underwent neuropsychological testing. With respect to 45 healthy controls, the patients reported worse QOL, with no difference between the four patient subgroups. Factor analyses of the WHOSRPB, STAI, and BDI scores and of the MASQ and neuropsychological test scores yielded four (Personal Meaning, Inner Energy, Awe and Openness, Mood) and three factors (Control Functions, Cognition, Memory), respectively. Mood, Cognition, Inner Energy, schooling, and subjective health status correlated with the WHOQOL scores, but at regression analysis only Mood and Inner Energy predicted QOL. This suggests that spirituality, as a personal dimension distinct from mood, contributes to determine QOL. A multidimensional assessment of QOL, including personal facets, may explain differences between patients with chronic neurological disorders.

  14. Exploring the role of BCHE in the onset of Diabetes, Obesity and Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Allam Appa; Jyothsna, Gundlapally; Shalini, Pulipati; Kumar, Amit; Bhattacharya, Anupam; Kashyap, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes, Obesity and Neurological disturbances, most often show co-occurrence. There has been an extensive research in this domain, but the exact mechanism underlying the co-occurrence of the three conditions is still an enigma. The current paper is an approach to establish the role of Butyryl cholinesterase (BCHE) in Diabetes, Obesity and Neurological disorders by performing a comparative analysis with Neuroligin (NLGN2) a protein belonging to the same family. BCHE has its role in glucose regulation, Lipid metabolism and nerve signaling. Emphasis is laid on BCHE's diverse functions whose impediment affects the above mentioned metabolic pathways. Insilco techniques were employed to analyze the sequence, structural and functional similarities of the two proteins. A point mutation is focused which is common to both BCHE and Neuroligin. The mutation occurs at the homologous position in both the proteins making them deficient. This affects the three metabolic pathways leading to the respective disorders. The work describes the pathway that describes the role of BCHE in the onset of obesity mediated diabetes. The pathway further explains the association between Diabetes, Obesity and neurological disturbances.

  15. Patients receiving lithium therapy have a reduced prevalence of neurological and cardiovascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, James M; Fieve, Ronald R

    2016-11-03

    A variety of evidence from laboratory and animal studies suggests that lithium has neurotrophic and cytoprotective properties, and may ameliorate or prevent some disease states. We investigated whether such a protective effect can be observed in human psychiatric patients receiving lithium therapy. We carried out a retrospective chart review of 1028 adult psychiatric male and female outpatients attending four lithium clinics in metropolitan New York City. Patients were divided into two groups based on lithium usage, and the prevalence of neurological and cardiovascular disorders was compared. The main outcome measures were the occurrence in the two patient groups of a variety of neurological disorders and myocardial infarction. Odds ratios were calculated to assess the risk of having a disorder for patients receiving lithium compared to patients not receiving lithium: for seizures, the odds ratio was 0.097; for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the odds ratio was 0.112; for dementia not otherwise specified, the odds ratio was 0.112; and for myocardial infarction, the odds ratio was 0.30. Logistical regression analysis showed that lithium treatment is a significant negative predictive factor in the prevalence of each of these disease states, when age, duration of clinic attendance, and use of anti-psychotic medications are taken into account. Our results show that patients receiving regular lithium treatment have a reduced prevalence of some neurological disorders and myocardial infarctions. One possible explanation of these results is that a protective effect of lithium observed in laboratory and animal studies may also be present in human patients receiving regular lithium therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Facial palsy, a disorder belonging to influential neurological dynasty: Review of literature

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    Ujwala R Newadkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial paralysis is one of the common problem leading to facial deformation. Bell′s palsy (BP is defined as a lower motor neuron palsy of acute onset and idiopathic origin. BP is regarded as a benign common neurological disorder of unknown cause. It has an acute onset and is almost always a mononeuritis. The facial nerve is a mixed cranial nerve with a predominant motor component, which supplies all muscles concerned with unilateral facial expression. Knowledge of its course is vital for anatomic localization and clinical correlation. BP accounts for approximately 72% of facial palsies. Almost a century later, the management and etiology of BP is still a subject of controversy. Here, we present a review of literature on this neurologically significant entity.

  17. CT and MR findings of neurological disorders associated with pregnancy and childbirth

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    Kim, Jee Young; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Bum Soo; Hahn, Seong Tae [College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    The onset of pregnancy may predispose women to a variety of neurological diseases due to changes in their hemodynamics, hormonal effects, and complications associated with childbirth. The spectrum of neurological disorders associated with pregnancy and childbirth include hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhaging, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) (secondary to eclampsia), Wernicke encephalopathy, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, Sheehan's syndrome, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (secondary to pulmonary amniotic fluid embolism), multifocal infarctions, and extra-potine myelinolysis. The recognition of the various imaging findings of these diseases, along with the clinical presentations should aid in their early diagnosis and prompt treatment. The purpose of this pictorial assay is to describe the characteristic CT and MR findings of these diseases with a literature review to explain the mechanisms and clinical symptoms.

  18. Psychiatric and neurological disorders in late adolescence and risk of convictions for violent crime in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Tomas; Stenbacka, Marlene; Tengström, Anders; Jönsson, Erik G; Nordström, Peter; Jokinen, Jussi

    2015-11-23

    The relationship between mental illness and violent crime is complex because of the involvement of many other confounding risk factors. In the present study, we analysed psychiatric and neurological disorders in relation to the risk of convictions for violent crime, taking into account early behavioural and socio-economic risk factors. The study population consisted of 49,398 Swedish men, who were thoroughly assessed at conscription for compulsory military service during the years 1969-1970 and followed in national crime registers up to 2006. Five diagnostic groups were analysed: anxiety-depression/neuroses, personality disorders, substance-related disorders, mental retardation and neurological conditions. In addition, eight confounders measured at conscription and based on the literature on violence risk assessment, were added to the analyses. The relative risks of convictions for violent crime during 35 years after conscription were examined in relation to psychiatric diagnoses and other risk factors at conscription, as measured by odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) from bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. In the bivariate analyses there was a significant association between receiving a psychiatric diagnosis at conscription and a future conviction for violent crime (OR = 3.83, 95 % CI = 3.47-4.22), whereas no significant association between neurological conditions and future violent crime (OR = 1.03, 95 % CI = 0.48-2.21) was found. In the fully adjusted multivariate logistic regression model, mental retardation had the strongest association with future violent crime (OR = 3.60, 95 % CI = 2.73-4.75), followed by substance-related disorders (OR = 2.81, 95 % CI = 2.18-3.62), personality disorders (OR = 2.66, 95 % CI = 2.21-3.19) and anxiety-depression (OR = 1.29, 95 % CI = 1.07-1.55). Among the other risk factors, early behavioural problem had the strongest association with

  19. Using deep learning to investigate the neuroimaging correlates of psychiatric and neurological disorders: Methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sandra; Pinaya, Walter H L; Mechelli, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Deep learning (DL) is a family of machine learning methods that has gained considerable attention in the scientific community, breaking benchmark records in areas such as speech and visual recognition. DL differs from conventional machine learning methods by virtue of its ability to learn the optimal representation from the raw data through consecutive nonlinear transformations, achieving increasingly higher levels of abstraction and complexity. Given its ability to detect abstract and complex patterns, DL has been applied in neuroimaging studies of psychiatric and neurological disorders, which are characterised by subtle and diffuse alterations. Here we introduce the underlying concepts of DL and review studies that have used this approach to classify brain-based disorders. The results of these studies indicate that DL could be a powerful tool in the current search for biomarkers of psychiatric and neurologic disease. We conclude our review by discussing the main promises and challenges of using DL to elucidate brain-based disorders, as well as possible directions for future research.

  20. Hippotherapy acute impact on heart rate variability non-linear dynamics in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabiddu, Ramona; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Trimer, Renata; Trimer, Vitor; Ricci, Paula Angélica; Italiano Monteiro, Clara; Camargo Magalhães Maniglia, Marcela; Silva Pereira, Ana Maria; Rodrigues das Chagas, Gustavo; Carvalho, Eliane Maria

    2016-05-15

    Neurological disorders are associated with autonomic dysfunction. Hippotherapy (HT) is a therapy treatment strategy that utilizes a horse in an interdisciplinary approach for the physical and mental rehabilitation of people with physical, mental and/or psychological disabilities. However, no studies have been carried out which evaluated the effects of HT on the autonomic control in these patients. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of a single HT session on cardiovascular autonomic control by time domain and non-linear analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). The HRV signal was recorded continuously in twelve children affected by neurological disorders during a HT session, consisting in a 10-minute sitting position rest (P1), a 15-minute preparatory phase sitting on the horse (P2), a 15-minute HT session (P3) and a final 10-minute sitting position recovery (P4). Time domain and non-linear HRV indices, including Sample Entropy (SampEn), Lempel-Ziv Complexity (LZC) and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), were calculated for each treatment phase. We observed that SampEn increased during P3 (SampEn=0.56±0.10) with respect to P1 (SampEn=0.40±0.14, p<0.05), while DFA decreased during P3 (DFA=1.10±0.10) with respect to P1 (DFA=1.26±0.14, p<0.05). A significant SDRR increase (p<0.05) was observed during the recovery period P4 (SDRR=50±30ms) with respect to the HT session period P3 (SDRR=30±10ms). Our results suggest that HT might benefit children with disabilities attributable to neurological disorders by eliciting an acute autonomic response during the therapy and during the recovery period.

  1. Medicinal plants used for neurological and mental disorders in Navarra and their validation from official sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, María Isabel; Cavero, Rita Yolanda

    2015-07-01

    This paper provides important ethnopharmacological information on plants used in neurological and mental disorders in Navarra. Information was collected using semi-structured ethnobotanical interviews with 667 informants in 265 locations. In order to confirm the pharmacological validation of the uses claimed by the informants, monographs from Official International Agencies (ESCOP, Commission E, WHO and EMA) were reviewed. A literature review was conducted focusing on the plants that were widely used but had no published monograph. A total of 172 pharmaceutical uses were reported, for 46 plants and 26 families, mainly represented by Lamiaceae (15%), Asteraceae (13%), Rosaceae and Rutaceae (7%, each one), and Clusiaceae, Malvaceae, Papaveraceae and Urticaceae (4%, each one). The most frequently used parts were inflorescence (39%), flowered aerial parts (16%), and aerial parts (13%), followed by inflorescence bract (8%) and leaves (7%). Nine out of 46 plants (20%) and 81 of 172 uses (47%), have already been pharmacologically validated. The remaining 37 plants (of total 46, 80%) have been reported for neurological and mental disorders and need to be screened through standard pharmacological and clinical procedures for their activities. The most used species are Chamaemelum nobile (L.) All., Jasonia glutinosa (L.) DC., and Santolina chamaecyparissus L. ssp. squarrosa (DC.) Nyman, in all cases the administration as infusion. Data indicate a high degree of plants knowledge in Navarra regarding neurological and mental disorders. The present study constitutes a good basis for further phytochemical and pharmacological research of C. nobile, J. glutinosa and S. chamaecyparissus, which could be of interest in the design of new inexpensive, effective and safe drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Use of Pluripotent Stem Cell for Personalized Cell Therapies against Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Yeong Ha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there are a number of weaknesses for clinical use, pluripotent stem cells are valuable sources for patient-specific cell therapies against various diseases. Backed-up by a huge number of basic researches, neuronal differentiation mechanism is well established and pluripotent stem cell therapies against neurological disorders are getting closer to clinical application. However, there are increasing needs for standardization of the sourcing pluripotent stem cells by establishing stem cell registries and banking. Global harmonization will accelerate practical use of personalized therapies using pluripotent stem cells.

  3. Synaptopathies: synaptic dysfunction in neurological disorders - A review from students to students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepeta, Katarzyna; Lourenco, Mychael V; Schweitzer, Barbara C; Martino Adami, Pamela V; Banerjee, Priyanjalee; Catuara-Solarz, Silvina; de La Fuente Revenga, Mario; Guillem, Alain Marc; Haidar, Mouna; Ijomone, Omamuyovwi M; Nadorp, Bettina; Qi, Lin; Perera, Nirma D; Refsgaard, Louise K; Reid, Kimberley M; Sabbar, Mariam; Sahoo, Arghyadip; Schaefer, Natascha; Sheean, Rebecca K; Suska, Anna; Verma, Rajkumar; Vicidomini, Cinzia; Wright, Dean; Zhang, Xing-Ding; Seidenbecher, Constanze

    2016-09-01

    Synapses are essential components of neurons and allow information to travel coordinately throughout the nervous system to adjust behavior to environmental stimuli and to control body functions, memories, and emotions. Thus, optimal synaptic communication is required for proper brain physiology, and slight perturbations of synapse function can lead to brain disorders. In fact, increasing evidence has demonstrated the relevance of synapse dysfunction as a major determinant of many neurological diseases. This notion has led to the concept of synaptopathies as brain diseases with synapse defects as shared pathogenic features. In this review, which was initiated at the 13th International Society for Neurochemistry Advanced School, we discuss basic concepts of synapse structure and function, and provide a critical view of how aberrant synapse physiology may contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders (autism, Down syndrome, startle disease, and epilepsy) as well as neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimer and Parkinson disease). We finally discuss the appropriateness and potential implications of gathering synapse diseases under a single term. Understanding common causes and intrinsic differences in disease-associated synaptic dysfunction could offer novel clues toward synapse-based therapeutic intervention for neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. In this Review, which was initiated at the 13th International Society for Neurochemistry (ISN) Advanced School, we discuss basic concepts of synapse structure and function, and provide a critical view of how aberrant synapse physiology may contribute to neurodevelopmental (autism, Down syndrome, startle disease, and epilepsy) as well as neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases), gathered together under the term of synaptopathies. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on page 783.

  4. Conversion Disorder, Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder, and Chronic Pain: Comorbidity, Assessment, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Patricia; Deptula, Andrew; Yuan, Derek Y

    2017-06-01

    This paper examines the overlap of conversion disorder with chronic pain conditions, describes ways to assess for conversion disorder, and provides an overview of evidence-based treatments for conversion disorder and chronic pain, with a focus on conversion symptoms. Conversion disorder is a significant problem that warrants further study, given that there are not many well-established guidelines. Accurate and timely assessment should help move treatment in a more fruitful direction and avoid unnecessary medical interventions. Advances in neuroimaging may also help further our understanding of conversion disorder. Creating a supportive environment and a collaborative treatment relationship and improving understanding of conversion symptoms appear to help individuals diagnosed with conversion disorder engage in appropriate treatments. Novel uses of earlier treatments, such as hypnosis and psychodynamic approaches, could potentially be beneficial and require a more vigorous and systematic study. There are treatments that produce significant improvements in functioning and reduction of physical symptoms from conversion disorder even for very severe cases. Hypnotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and inpatient multidisciplinary treatment with intensive physiotherapy for severe cases have the most evidence to support reduction of symptoms. Components of treatment for conversion disorder overlap with treatments for chronic pain and can be used together to produce therapeutic effects for both conditions. Treatment needs to be tailored for each individual's specific symptoms.

  5. [Conversion disorder: from DSM IV to DSM 5 or from a psychiatric to a neurological diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, M; Willems, M H A

    2015-01-01

    According to one of the diagnostic criteria of the dsm iv for conversion disorder there has to be a temporal relationship between psychological factors and the onset, or the worsening, of the symptoms. This criterion has been omitted in the dsm-5. Another criterion, namely that the symptoms are not produced intentionally, has also been abandoned. A new recommendation is that therapists should look for neurological symptoms that support the diagnosis. To investigate whether studies support the changes in the criteria. We searched literature using PubMed. When the symptoms first appear, trauma or stress in 37% of patients is of a physical rather than a psychological nature. Different forms of stress were found in equal proportions (20%) in patients with or without conversion disorder. There are no specific stressors, except possibly in patients with dysphonia. The percentages of childhood abuse vary widely, namely from 0 to 85%. The characteristic phenomenon of 'la belle indifference' occurs in only 3% of patients with conversion disorder versus only 2% of controls. Most of the 'positive' clinical tests for partial paralysis and sensory and gait disorders are highly specific. There are no reliable tests for distinguishing conversion disorder from simulation. The changes of the criteria are supported by recent studies.

  6. Frontiers in therapeutic development of allopregnanolone for Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W. Irwin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Allopregnanolone (Allo, a neurosteroid, has emerged as a promising promoter of endogenous regeneration in brain. In a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, Allo induced neurogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, white matter generation and cholesterol homeostasis while simultaneously reducing β-amyloid and neuroinflammatory burden. Allo activates signaling pathways and gene expression required for regeneration of neural stem cells and their differentiation into neurons. In parallel, Allo activates systems to sustain cholesterol homeostasis and reduce β-amyloid generation. To advance Allo into studies for chronic human neurological conditions, we examined translational and clinical parameters: dose, regimen, route, formulation, outcome measures, and safety regulations. A treatment regimen of once per week at sub-sedative doses of Allo was optimal for regeneration and reduction in Alzheimer’s pathology. This regimen had a high safety profile following chronic exposure in aged normal and Alzheimer’s mice. Formulation of Allo for multiple routes of administration has been developed for both preclinical and clinical testing. Preclinical evidence for therapeutic efficacy of Allo spans multiple neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, Niemann-Pick, diabetic neuropathy, status epilepticus, and traumatic brain injury. To successfully translate Allo as a therapeutic for multiple neurological disorders, it will be necessary to tailor dose and regimen to the targeted therapeutic mechanisms and disease etiology. Treatment paradigms conducted in accelerated disease models in young animals have a low probability of successful translation to chronic diseases in adult and aged humans. Gender, genetic risks, stage and burden of disease are critical determinants of efficacy. This review focuses on recent advances in development of Allo for Alzheimer’s disease that have the potential to accelerate therapeutic translation for

  7. Stiff Person syndrome and other anti-GAD-associated neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayalu, Praveen; Teener, James W

    2012-11-01

    Antibodies directed against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) are present in many patients with stiff person syndrome and increasingly found in patients with other symptoms indicative of central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction, such as ataxia. The classic clinical features of stiff person syndrome include muscular stiffness with superimposed painful muscular spasms. Gait is often impaired. Other CNS disorders associated with GAD antibodies include progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), limbic encephalitis, and even epilepsy. Glutamic acid decarboxylase is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter. Presumably, antibodies directed against GAD impair GABA production, but the precise pathogenic mechanism of GAD-antibody-related neurologic disorders is uncertain. Many patients respond to treatment with immunomodulating therapy. Symptomatic treatment with agents that enhance GABA activity, such as benzodiazepines and baclofen, is also helpful for many patients.

  8. Exposure to lipophilic chemicals as a cause of neurological impairments, neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeliger, Harold I

    2013-09-01

    Many studies have associated environmental exposure to chemicals with neurological impairments (NIs) including neuropathies, cognitive, motor and sensory impairments; neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) including autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); neurodegenerative diseases (NDGs) including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The environmental chemicals shown to induce all these diseases include persistent organic pollutants (POPs), the plastic exudates bisphenol A and phthalates, low molecular weight hydrocarbons (LMWHCs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). It is reported here that though these chemicals differ widely in their chemical properties, reactivities and known points of attack in humans, a common link does exist between them. All are lipophilic species found in serum and they promote the sequential absorption of otherwise non-absorbed toxic hydrophilic species causing these diseases.

  9. Door-to-door survey of major neurological disorders (project in Al Quseir City, Red Sea Governorate, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Tallawy HN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hamdy NA El Tallawy,1 Wafaa MA Farghaly,1 Tarek A Rageh,1 Ghaydaa A Shehata,1 Reda Badry,1 Nabil A Metwally,2 Esam A El Moselhy,2 Mahmoud Hassan,2 Mohamed A Sayed,3 Ahmed A Waris,1 Yaser Hamed,2 Islam Shaaban,2 Mohamed A Hamed,1 Mahmoud Raafat Kandil11Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt; 2Department of Neurology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University (Assiut branch, Assiut, Egypt; 3Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, EgyptAbstract: A door-to-door survey, including every household, was conducted for all inhabitants of Al Quseir City (33,283, Red Sea Governorate, Egypt by three specialists of neurology as well as nine senior staff members of neurology and 15 female social workers to assess the epidemiology of major neurological disorders. Over six phases, from July 1, 2009 to January 31, 2012, screening of all eligible people in the population was carried out, by which case ascertainment of all major neurological disorders included in the study was done according to the accepted definitions and diagnostic criteria of the World Health Organization. The order of frequency of prevalence of the studied neurological disorders was dementia (3.83% for those aged > 60 years, migraine (2.8% for those aged > 8 years, stroke (6.2/1000 for those aged > 20 years, epilepsy (5.5/1000, Parkinson’s disease (452.1/100,000 for those aged > 40 years, cerebral palsy (3.6/1000 among children 37 years, chorea (21.03/100,000, athetosis (15/100,000, and multiple sclerosis (13.74/100,000. The incidence rates of stroke, epilepsy, and Bell’s palsy were 181/100,000, 48/100,000, and 98.9/100,000 per year, respectively.Keywords: prevalence, incidence, neurological disorders

  10. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor in neurosteroid biosynthesis, neuropathology and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, V; Lecanu, L; Brown, R C; Han, Z; Yao, Z-X

    2006-01-01

    The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is a mitochondrial protein expressed at high levels in steroid synthesizing tissues, including the glial cells of the brain. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor binds cholesterol with high affinity and is a key element of the cholesterol mitochondrial import machinery responsible for supplying the substrate cholesterol to the first steroidogenic enzyme, thus initiating and maintaining neurosteroid biosynthesis. Neurosteroid formation and metabolism of steroid intermediates are critical components of normal brain function. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor also binds with high affinity various classes of compounds. Upon ligand activation peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor-dependent cholesterol transport into mitochondria is accelerated leading in increased formation of neuroactive steroids. These steroids, such as allopregnanolone, have been shown to be involved in various neurological disorders, such as anxiety and mood disorders. Thus, peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor drug ligand-induced neuroactive steroid formation offers a means to regulate brain dysfunction. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor basal expression is upregulated in a number of neuropathologies, including gliomas and neurodegenerative disorders, as well as in various forms of brain injury and inflammation. In Alzheimer's disease pathology neurosteroid biosynthesis is altered and a decrease in the intermediate 22R-hydroxycholesterol levels is observed. This steroid was found to exert neuroprotective properties against beta-amyloid neurotoxicity. Based on this observation, a stable spirostenol derivative showing to display neuroprotective properties was identified, suggesting that compounds developed based on critical intermediates of neurosteroid biosynthesis could offer novel means for neuroprotection. In conclusion, changes in peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor and neurosteroid levels are part of the phenotype seen in

  11. Neurological, psychological, and cognitive disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative and replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Silvia; Mecarelli, Oriano; Pulitano, Patrizia; Romanello, Roberto; Davi, Leonardo; Zarabla, Alessia; Mariotti, Amalia; Carta, Maria; Tasso, Giorgia; Poli, Luca; Mitterhofer, Anna Paola; Testorio, Massimo; Frassetti, Nicla; Aceto, Paola; Galani, Alessandro; Lai, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a highly prevalent condition in the world. Neurological, psychological, and cognitive disorders, related to CKD, could contribute to the morbidity, mortality, and poor quality of life of these patients. The aim of this study was to assess the neurological, psychological, and cognitive imbalance in patients with CKD on conservative and replacement therapy. Seventy-four clinically stable patients affected by CKD on conservative therapy, replacement therapy (hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD)), or with kidney transplantation (KT) and 25 healthy controls (HC), matched for age and sex were enrolled. Clinical, laboratory, and instrumental examinations, as renal function, inflammation and mineral metabolism indexes, electroencephalogram (EEG), psychological (MMPI-2, Sat P), and cognitive tests (neuropsychological tests, NPZ5) were carried out. The results showed a significant differences in the absolute and relative power of delta band and relative power of theta band of EEG (P = 0.008, P 2D3) (P 2D3, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), phosphorus, and cynical and hysterical personality, are correlated with higher relative power of delta (P = 0.016) and theta band (P = 0.016). Moreover, all NPZ5 scores showed a significant difference between the means of nephropathic patients and the means of the HC, and a positive correlation with eGFR, serum nitrogen, CRP, iPTH, and vitamin D. In CKD patients, simple and noninvasive instruments, as EEG, and cognitive-psychological tests, should be performed and careful and constant monitoring of renal risk factors, probably involved in neuropsychological complications (inflammation, disorders of mineral metabolism, electrolyte disorders, etc.), should be carried out. Early identification and adequate therapy of neuropsychological, and cognitive disorders, might enable a better quality of life and a major compliance with a probable reduction in the healthcare costs. PMID

  12. Prevalence nutritional disorders among patients hospitalised for stroke and discopathy in the neurology department

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    Regina Sierżantowicz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutritional disorders pose a huge health problem worldwide. In Poland, symptoms of malnutrition are found on admission to hospital in approximately 30% of patients. Among neurological disorders that predispose to malnutrition, brain injuries are the most frequent. The disease leads to difficulties with self-care, disorientation, reduced intellectual capacity, and dysphagia. Acute spinal pain syndromes affect weight loss because of persistent severe pain, and frequent dizziness and headaches accompanying cervical discopathy. Aim of the research: To assess the degree of malnutrition in patients with stroke and discopathy hospitalised in the neurology ward. Material and methods : The study group consisted of 141 patients, including 90 with stroke and 51 with discopathy, hospitalised in the neurology ward. Research material was collected based on medical records and a proprietary questionnaire. Body mass index (BMI was calculated and assessed for each patient on admission and after hospitalisation. Results and conclusions: The study sample consisted of a similar group of women (49% and men (51% aged from 30 to over 70 years. Ischaemic stroke was diagnosed more often in women (66.2%, whereas discopathy was more common in men (43.4%. The differences in BMI present on admission and after hospitalisation in men and women indicated a falling tendency. A slightly greater drop in BMI was found in women after hospital stay (from 24.1 to 23.3 kg/m 2 . The lowest BMI on admission was observed in students and pensioners. Long-term hospitalisation significantly affected weight reduction – the longer the patients were hospitalised, the lower their BMI was. Preliminary assessment of the nutrition status on admission to a hospital ward and customising individual diets may help reduce the effects of malnutrition.

  13. Video Analysis of Human Gait and Posture to Determine Neurological Disorders

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    Ivan Lee

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the application of digital image processing techniques to the detection of neurological disorder. Visual information extracted from the postures and movements of a human gait cycle can be used by an experienced neurologist to determine the mental health of the person. However, the current visual assessment of diagnosing neurological disorder is based very much on subjective observation, and hence the accuracy of diagnosis heavily relies on experience. Other diagnostic techniques employed involve the use of imaging systems which can only be operated under highly constructed environment. A prototype has been developed in this work that is able to capture the subject's gait on video in a relatively simple setup, and from which to process the selected frames of the gait in a computer. Based on the static visual features such as swing distances and joint angles of human limbs, the system identifies patients with Parkinsonism from the test subjects. To our knowledge, it is the first time swing distances are utilized and identified as an effective means for characterizing human gait. The experimental results have shown a promising potential in medical application to assist the clinicians in diagnosing Parkinsonism.

  14. Stress, Attitude and Marital Relationships of Mothers of children with Chronic Neurological Disorders in Southern Nigeria

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    Festus Abasiubong

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Neurological disorders (NDs occur commonly in children in our environment. Increasingly, the poor knowledge of these conditions among parents results in negative attitude with stress and disruption in interpersonal relationships. The objective of this study was to assess the level of stress and quality of marital relationships among mothers of children with NDs. METHOD: Between January and December 2008, 126 mothers of children with NDs at the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric clinic, University of Uyo Teaching Hospital were assessed for perceived stress, attitude and quality of marital relationships using PSQ and GRIMS Questionnaires. This was compared with mothers of normal children. RESULTS: There were prevalent negative attitudes among respondents in both groups; only 15 (13.2% mothers with NDs and 6 (5.3% controls attributed causes to medical conditions; 10 (7.9% against 26 (22.8% wished the child had died. Stress was high in mothers aged below 30 and 50 years and above; with tertiary education and in those who were self–employed (p<0.001. Quality of marital relationship was poorer in subjects than controls (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Mothers of children with neurological disorders have increased stress resulting in poor interpersonal relationships. Education is important to improve parental knowledge and enhance family cohesion. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 413-420

  15. Neonatal neurological disorders involving the brainstem: neurosonographic approaches through the squamous suture and the foramen magnum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Yi-Fang [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, Tainan (Taiwan); Chen, Cheng-Yu [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (Taiwan); Lin, Yuh-Jey [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Tainan (Taiwan); Chang, Ying-Chao [Kaohsiung Chang Gung Children Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung (Taiwan); Huang, Chao-Ching [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Tainan (Taiwan); National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Institute of Molecular Medicine, Tainan (Taiwan)

    2005-09-01

    Brainstem damage which often indicates a critical condition is usually underestimated by trans-anterior-fontanel neurosonography (NS) owing to the far-field limitations. Instead, NS alternately scanning through the squamous suture of the temporal bones and the foramen magnum could provide a better visualization of the brainstem structures. The NS characteristics of brainstem lesions caused by various neonatal neurological disorders, such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), metabolic encephalopathy, birth trauma and bacterial meningoencephalitis, can be depicted at the acute stage. An echogenic change in the midbrain was found in patients with HIE or metabolic encephalopathy. In addition to the echogenic change, bilateral transtentorial temporal lobe herniation distorting the contour of the midbrain was observed in a patient with group B streptococcus meningoencephalitis, whereas echogenic changes at the level of the pons and/or the medulla oblongata, mainly localized in the dorsal part, could be observed in newborns with severe HIE, maple syrup urine disease or birth trauma. In this pictorial assay, we demonstrate the feasibility of NS imaging in evaluating the entire brainstem structure of critically ill neonates in the near field and illustrate the characteristic features of brainstem involvement in various neonatal neurological disorders along with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging correlation. (orig.)

  16. Blockade of N-acetylaspartylglutamate peptidases: a novel protective strategy for brain injuries and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chunlong; Luo, Qizhong; Jiang, Jiyao

    2014-12-01

    The peptide neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is reported to suppress glutamate release mainly through selective activation of presynaptic Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 3 (mGluR3). Therefore, strategies of inhibition of NAAG peptidases and subsequent NAAG hydrolysis to elevate levels of NAAG could reduce glutamate release under pathological conditions and be neuroprotective by attenuating excitotoxic cell injury. A series of potent inhibitors of NAAG peptidases has been synthesized and demonstrated efficacy in experimental models of ischemic-hypoxic brain injury, traumatic brain injury, inflammatory pain, diabetic neuropathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and phencyclidine-induced schizophrenia-like behaviors. The excessive glutamatergic transmission has been implicated in all of these neurological disorders. Thus, blockade of NAAG peptidases may augment an endogenous protective mechanism and afford neuroprotection in the brain. This review aims to summarize and provide insight into the current understanding of the novel neuroprotective strategy based on limiting glutamate excitotoxicity for a wide variety of brain injuries and neurological disorders.

  17. ASSESSMENT OF POSTURAL INSTABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH A NEUROLOGICAL DISORDER USING A TRI-AXIAL ACCELEROMETER

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    Lenka Hanakova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Current techniques for quantifying human postural stability during quiet standing have several limitations. The main problem is that only two movement variables are evaluated, though a better description of complex three-dimensional (3-D movements can be provided with the use of three variables. A single tri-axial accelerometer placed on the trunk was used to measure 3-D data.We are able to evaluate 3-D movements using a method based on the volume of confidence ellipsoid (VE of the set of points obtained by plotting three accelerations against each other. Our method was used to identify and evaluate pathological balance control. In this study, measurements were made of patients with progressive cerebellar ataxia, and also control measurements of healthy subjects, and a statistical analysis was performed. The results show that the VEs of the neurological disorder patients are significantly larger than the VEs of the healthy subjects. It can be seen that the quantitative method based on VE is very sensitive for identifying changes in stability, and that it is able to distinguish between neurological disorder patients and healthy subjects.

  18. Lost in Translation: Defects in Transfer RNA Modifications and Neurological Disorders

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    Andrea Bednářová

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are key molecules participating in protein synthesis. To augment their functionality they undergo extensive post-transcriptional modifications and, as such, are subject to regulation at multiple levels including transcription, transcript processing, localization and ribonucleoside base modification. Post-transcriptional enzyme-catalyzed modification of tRNA occurs at a number of base and sugar positions and influences specific anticodon–codon interactions and regulates translation, its efficiency and fidelity. This phenomenon of nucleoside modification is most remarkable and results in a rich structural diversity of tRNA of which over 100 modified nucleosides have been characterized. Most often these hypermodified nucleosides are found in the wobble position of tRNAs, where they play a direct role in codon recognition as well as in maintaining translational efficiency and fidelity, etc. Several recent studies have pointed to a link between defects in tRNA modifications and human diseases including neurological disorders. Therefore, defects in tRNA modifications in humans need intensive characterization at the enzymatic and mechanistic level in order to pave the way to understand how lack of such modifications are associated with neurological disorders with the ultimate goal of gaining insights into therapeutic interventions.

  19. The bowel and beyond: the enteric nervous system in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Meenakshi; Gershon, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is large, complex and uniquely able to orchestrate gastrointestinal behaviour independently of the central nervous system (CNS). An intact ENS is essential for life and ENS dysfunction is often linked to digestive disorders. The part the ENS plays in neurological disorders, as a portal or participant, has also become increasingly evident. ENS structure and neurochemistry resemble that of the CNS, therefore pathogenic mechanisms that give rise to CNS disorders might also lead to ENS dysfunction, and nerves that interconnect the ENS and CNS can be conduits for disease spread. We review evidence for ENS dysfunction in the aetiopathogenesis of autism spectrum disorder, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease. Animal models suggest that common pathophysiological mechanisms account for the frequency of gastrointestinal comorbidity in these conditions. Moreover, the neurotropic pathogen, varicella zoster virus (VZV), unexpectedly establishes latency in enteric and other autonomic neurons that do not innervate skin. VZV reactivation in these neurons produces no rash and is therefore a clandestine cause of gastrointestinal disease, meningitis and strokes. The gut-brain alliance has raised consciousness as a contributor to health, but a gut-brain axis that contributes to disease merits equal attention.

  20. Assessment of speech in neurological disorders: Development of a Swahili screening test

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    Nick Miller

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessments for acquired motor-speech disorders that look at movements of the articulators would appear at first glance to be universal. This may be true for the most basic non-speech aspects of movement. We argue that assessments for speech motor control must be attuned to language-specific variables to be fully valid. We describe the rationale for, and development of a motor-speech-disorder screening test for Swahili speakers which includes impairment measures as well as measures of intelligibility and speech-voice naturalness. We further describe its initial validation in terms of content validity, feasibility of administration and scoring without requirements for lengthy training and technical expertise and application to groups of people with and without Parkinson’s disease in Tanzania. Results indicate that the protocol is ready to use in so far as it is acceptable to users (clinicians, patients, is feasible to use, shows good interrater reliability, and is capable of differentiating performance in healthy speakers and those whose speech is disordered. We highlight needs for further development, including issues around training, development of local norms for healthy speakers and for speakers with a variety of neurological disturbances, and extension of the tool to cover culturally valid assessment of impact of communication disorders.

  1. Epidemiology of neurological disorders in India: review of background, prevalence and incidence of epilepsy, stroke, Parkinson's disease and tremors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourie-Devi, M

    2014-01-01

    Growth and development of neuroepidemiology in India during the last four decades has been documented highlighting the historical milestones. The prevalence rates of the spectrum of neurological disorders from different regions of the country ranged from 967-4,070 with a mean of 2394 per 100,000 population, providing a rough estimate of over 30 million people with neurological disorders (excluding neuroinfections and traumatic injuries). Prevalence and incidence rates of common disorders including epilepsy, stroke, Parkinson's disease and tremors determined through population-based surveys show considerable variation across different regions of the country. The need for a standardized screening questionnaire, uniform methodology for case ascertainment and diagnosis is an essential requiste for generating robust national data on neurological disorders. Higher rates of prevalence of neurological disorders in rural areas, 6-8 million people with epilepsy and high case fatality rates of stroke (27-42%) call for urgent strategies to establish outreach neurology services to cater to remote and rural areas, develop National Epilepsy Control Program and establish stroke units at different levels of health care pyramid.

  2. Clinical Utility and Lifespan Profiling of Neurological Soft Signs in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Raymond C K; Xie, Weizhen; Geng, Fu-lei; Wang, Ya; Lui, Simon S Y; Wang, Chuan-yue; Yu, Xin; Cheung, Eric F C; Rosenthal, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSSs) bear the promise for early detection of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Nonetheless, the sensitivity and specificity of NSSs in the psychosis continuum remains a topic of controversy. It is also unknown how NSSs reveal neurodevelopmental abnormality in schizophrenia. We investigated the effect sizes of NSSs in differentiating individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders from individuals with other psychiatric conditions and from covariate-matched healthy subjects. We also investigated the partitioned age-related variations of NSSs in both schizophrenia and healthy individuals. NSSs were assessed by the abridged version of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) in 3105 participants, consisting of healthy individuals (n=1577), unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients (n= 155), individuals with schizotypal personality disorder (n= 256), schizophrenia patients (n= 738), and other psychiatric patients (n= 379). Exact matching and propensity score matching procedures were performed to control for covariates. Multiple regression was used to partition age-related variations. Individuals along the schizophrenia continuum showed elevated levels of NSSs, with moderate effect sizes, in contrast to other psychiatric patients who had minimal NSSs, as well as matched healthy controls. Furthermore, the age-and-NSS relationship in schizophrenia patients was represented by a flat but overall elevated pattern, in contrast to a U-shaped pattern in healthy individuals. In sum, NSSs capture a moderate portion of psychosis proneness with reasonable specificity. Lifespan profiling reveals an abnormal developmental trajectory of NSSs in schizophrenia patients, which supports the endophenotype hypothesis of NSSs by associating it with the neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia.

  3. Beyond Neural Cubism: Promoting a Multidimensional View of Brain Disorders by Enhancing the Integration of Neurology and Psychiatry in Education

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Cubism was an influential early 20th century art movement characterized by angular, disjointed imagery. The two-dimensional appearance of Cubist figures and objects is created through juxtaposition of angles. The authors posit that the constrained perspectives found in Cubism may also be found in the clinical classification of brain disorders. Neurological disorders are often separated from psychiatric disorders as if they stem from different organ systems. Maintaining two isolated clinical d...

  4. Bilateral neurological deficits following unilateral minimally invasive TLIF: A review of four patients

    OpenAIRE

    Nixon, Alexander T.; Smith, Zachary A.; Lawton, Cort D.; Albert P. Wong; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Antoun Koht; Fessler, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) is commonly used for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disorders. The rate of postoperative neurological deficits is traditionally low. New neurological postoperative complications may be underreported. We report our infrequent rate of MI-TLIF procedures complicated by postoperative weakness. Methods: A database of 340 patients was evaluated, all of whom underwent MI-TLIF procedures performed between...

  5. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Information Page Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Information Page What research is being done? The ...

  6. Degenerative myelopathy in dogs

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    Nikolovski Goran

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the chronic progressive disorders of the spinal cord in dogs is the degenerative myelopathy (DM. The most predisposed age in dog is 5 to 14 years, while rarely noted in younger, there is no gender predisposition. This disorder most commonly appears in dogs of the German shepherd breed, but it can appear in other breeds too. The main changes about this disease are degeneration of the myelin, especially in the thoracic-lumbar segments of the spinal cord and the dorsal nerve roots. The progression of the disease is slow and can last months to years. Undoubtedly, diagnosis is made by examinations of the CSF and establishing elevated level of protein segments.

  7. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Hitting the Bull's-Eye for Neurological Disorders

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    Zhao Zhong Chong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and its associated cell signaling pathways have garnered significant attention for their roles in cell biology and oncology. Interestingly,the explosion of information in this field has linked mTOR to neurological diseases with promising initial studies. mTOR, a 289 kDa serine/threonine protein kinase, plays an important role in cell growth and proliferation and is activated through phosphorylation in response to growth factors, mitogens and hormones. Growth factors, amino acids, cellular nutrients and oxygen deficiency can downregulate mTOR activity. The function of mTOR signaling is mediated primarily through two mTOR complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 initiates cap-dependent protein translation, a rate-limiting step of protein synthesis, through the phosphorylation of the targets eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1 and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K. In contrast, mTORC2 regulates development of the cytoskeleton and also controls cell survival. Although closely tied to tumorigenesis, mTOR and the downstream signaling pathways are significantly involved in the central nervous system (CNS with synaptic plasticity, memory retention, neuroendocrine regulation associated with food intake and puberty and modulation of neuronal repair following injury. The signaling pathways of mTOR also are believed to be a significant component in a number of neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and Huntington disease, tuberous sclerosis, neurofibromatosis, fragile X syndrome, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury and ischemic stroke. Here we describe the role of mTOR in the CNS and illustrate the potential for new strategies directed against neurological disorders.

  8. Accelerating discovery for complex neurological and behavioral disorders through systems genetics and integrative genomics in the laboratory mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubier, Jason A; Chesler, Elissa J

    2012-04-01

    Recent advances in systems genetics and integrative functional genomics have greatly improved the study of complex neurological and behavioral traits. The methods developed for the integrated characterization of new, high-resolution mouse genetic reference populations and systems genetics enable behavioral geneticists an unprecedented opportunity to address questions of the molecular basis of neurological and psychiatric disorders and their comorbidities. Integrative genomics augment these strategies by enabling rapid informatics-assisted candidate gene prioritization, cross-species translation, and mechanistic comparison across related disorders from a wealth of existing data in mouse and other model organisms. Ultimately, through these complementary approaches, finding the mechanisms and sources of genetic variation underlying complex neurobehavioral disease related traits is becoming tractable. Furthermore, these methods enable categorization of neurobehavioral disorders through their underlying biological basis. Together, these model organism-based approaches can lead to a refinement of diagnostic categories and targeted treatment of neurological and psychiatric disease.

  9. The use of ketogenic diet in special situations: expanding use in intractable epilepsy and other neurologic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The ketogenic diet has been widely used and proved to be effective for intractable epilepsy. Although the mechanisms underlying its anti-epileptic effects remain to be proven, there are increasing experimental evidences for its neuroprotective effects along with many researches about expanding use of the diet in other neurologic disorders. The first success was reported in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome, in which the diet served as an alternative metabolic source. Many neurologic disorders share some of the common pathologic mechanisms such as mitochondrial dysfunction, altered neurotransmitter function and synaptic transmission, or abnormal regulation of reactive oxygen species, and the role of the ketogenic diet has been postulated in these mechanisms. In this article, we introduce an overview about the expanding use and emerging trials of the ketogenic diet in various neurologic disorders excluding intractable epilepsy and provide explanations of the mechanisms in that usage. PMID:23049588

  10. Zika virus infection, transmission, associated neurological disorders and birth abnormalities: A review of progress in research, priorities and knowledge gaps

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    Yitades Gebre

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization declared that the cluster of microcephaly cases and other neurological disorders constitute public health emergency of international concern. Furthermore, few studies demonstrated that there was an increased evidence of causal relationship of Zika virus (ZIKAV infection and microcephaly, birth abnormalities and neurological disorders such as Guillain–Barré syndrome. ZIKAV transmission occurs mainly by the bite of infected mosquitos (Aedes species, but there are also reports that infections could occur via the placenta, breast milk, saliva, blood transfusion and sex. This article reviews the global efforts, progress in scientific research to understand the pathogenesis of ZIKAV infection & disease, clinical presentations, congenital transmission and autoimmune neurological disorders. The paper further explores the knowledge gaps, future priority research agenda for strategic response including vector control and prevention. We conducted a systematic literature review to synthesise available evidence on ZIKAV infection and its vector and host interaction from electronic databases.

  11. Effectiveness of Music Therapy as an aid to Neurorestoration of children with severe neurological disorders

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    Maria L Bringas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was a two-armed parallel group design aimed at testing real world effectiveness of a music therapy (MT intervention for children with severe neurological disorders. The control group received only the standard neurorestoration program and the experimental group received an additional MT Auditory Attention plus Communication (ACC protocol just before the usual occupational and speech therapy. Multivariate Item Response Theory (MIRT identified a neuropsychological status-latent variable manifested in all children and which exhibited highly significant changes only in the experimental group. Changes in brain plasticity also occurred in the experimental group, as evidenced using a Mismatch Event Related paradigm which revealed significant post intervention positive responses in the latency range between 308 and 400 ms in frontal regions. LORETA EEG source analysis identified prefrontal and midcingulate regions as differentially activated by the MT in the experimental group. Taken together, our results showing improved attention and communication as well as changes in brain plasticity in children with severe neurological impairments, highlight/comfort the importance of MT for the rehabilitation of patients across a wide range of dysfunctions.

  12. Identifying Homogeneous Subgroups in Neurological Disorders: Unbiased Recursive Partitioning in Cervical Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanadini, Lorenzo G; Steeves, John D; Hothorn, Torsten; Abel, Rainer; Maier, Doris; Schubert, Martin; Weidner, Norbert; Rupp, Rüdiger; Curt, Armin

    2014-07-01

    Background The reliable stratification of homogeneous subgroups and the prediction of future clinical outcomes within heterogeneous neurological disorders is a particularly challenging task. Nonetheless, it is essential for the implementation of targeted care and effective therapeutic interventions. Objective This study was designed to assess the value of a recently developed regression tool from the family of unbiased recursive partitioning methods in comparison to established statistical approaches (eg, linear and logistic regression) for predicting clinical endpoints and for prospective patients' stratification for clinical trials. Methods A retrospective, longitudinal analysis of prospectively collected neurological data from the European Multicenter study about Spinal Cord Injury (EMSCI) network was undertaken on C4-C6 cervical sensorimotor complete subjects. Predictors were based on a broad set of early (homogeneous subgroups. The partitioning is carried out in a data-driven manner, independently from a priori decisions or predefined thresholds. Conclusion Unbiased recursive partitioning techniques may improve prediction of future clinical endpoints and the planning of future SCI clinical trials by providing easily implementable, data-driven rationales for early patient stratification based on simple decision rules and clinical read-outs.

  13. Childhood developmental disorders: an academic and clinical convergence point for psychiatry, neurology, psychology and pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Allan L

    2009-01-01

    Significant advances in understanding brain development and behavior have not been accompanied by revisions of traditional academic structure. Disciplinary isolation and a lack of meaningful interdisciplinary opportunities are persistent barriers in academic medicine. To enhance clinical practice, research, and training for the next generation, academic centers will need to take bold steps that challenge traditional departmental boundaries. Such change is not only desirable but, in fact, necessary to bring about a truly innovative and more effective approach to treating disorders of the developing brain. I focus on developmental disorders as a convergence point for transcending traditional academic boundaries. First, the current taxonomy of developmental disorders is described with emphasis on how current diagnostic systems inadvertently hinder research progress. Second, I describe the clinical features of autism, a phenomenologically defined condition, and Rett and fragile X syndromes, neurogenetic diseases that are risk factors for autism. Finally, I describe how the fields of psychiatry, psychology, neurology, and pediatrics now have an unprecedented opportunity to promote an interdisciplinary approach to training, research, and clinical practice and, thus, advance a deeper understanding of developmental disorders. Research focused on autism is increasingly demonstrating the heterogeneity of individuals diagnosed by DSM criteria. This heterogeneity hinders the ability of investigators to replicate research results as well as progress towards more effective, etiology-specific interventions. In contrast, fragile X and Rett syndromes are 'real' diseases for which advances in research are rapidly accelerating towards more disease-specific human treatment trials. A major paradigm shift is required to improve our ability to diagnose and treat individuals with developmental disorders. This paradigm shift must take place at all levels - training, research and clinical

  14. The GABA excitatory/inhibitory shift in brain maturation and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Khalilov, Ilgam; Kahle, Kristopher T; Cherubini, Enrico

    2012-10-01

    Ionic currents and the network-driven patterns they generate differ in immature and adult neurons: The developing brain is not a "small adult brain." One of the most investigated examples is the developmentally regulated shift of actions of the transmitter GABA that inhibit adult neurons but excite immature ones because of an initially higher intracellular chloride concentration [Cl(-)](i), leading to depolarizing and often excitatory actions of GABA instead of hyperpolarizing and inhibitory actions. The levels of [Cl(-)](i) are also highly labile, being readily altered transiently or persistently by enhanced episodes of activity in relation to synaptic plasticity or a variety of pathological conditions, including seizures and brain insults. Among the plethora of channels, transporters, and other devices involved in controlling [Cl(-)](i), two have emerged as playing a particularly important role: the chloride importer NKCC1 and the chloride exporter KCC2. Here, the authors stress the importance of determining how [Cl(-)](i) is dynamically regulated and how this affects brain operation in health and disease. In a clinical perspective, agents that control [Cl(-)](i) and reinstate inhibitory actions of GABA open novel therapeutic perspectives in many neurological disorders, including infantile epilepsies, autism spectrum disorders, and other developmental disorders.

  15. Accuracy of WISC-III and WAIS-IV short forms in patients with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ool, Jans S; Hurks, Petra P M; Snoeijen-Schouwenaars, Francesca M; Tan, In Y; Schelhaas, Helenius J; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Hendriksen, Jos G M

    2017-02-02

    The assessment of intellectual abilities is intensive, time-consuming, and might be considered burdensome for patients. We examined psychometric qualities of short forms (SFs) of the Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children (WISC-third edition) and for adults (WAIS-fourth edition), in children (n = 986; Mage = 10.9) and adults (n = 324; Mage = 40.9) with neurological disorders. SF estimates were compared with Full Scale IQ (FSIQ), obtained by a complete administration, for the entire sample and for the subgroups FSIQ < 80 and FSIQ ≥ 80. The FSIQ was correctly identified within ± 7 points in 86% of children and 87% of adults. There were, however, some differences regarding the optimal SF subtest combination between subgroups. Although clinical inferences should not be made, SFs may be useful in research settings to obtain a global estimate of intelligence, and in clinical settings to screen periodically for possible intellectual deterioration.

  16. Immunology of stiff person syndrome and other GAD-associated neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, Harry; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2013-11-01

    Antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of GABA, are associated with an array of distinct, mostly autoimmune, neurological conditions. In all associated syndromes, namely stiff person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia, epilepsy, limbic encephalitis or abnormal eye movements, anti-GAD antibodies are detected at high titers and play a fundamental role in diagnosis, but do not correlate with disease severity, diversity of symptomatology or response to therapies. Despite considerable efforts, including in vitro (enzymatic assays) and in vivo (animal models) systems, the pathogenicity of anti-GAD antibodies has not been unequivocally proven for any specific condition. The search for the responsible autoantigen has revealed a few other antigenic targets, particularly for SPS, localized in the pre- or post-synaptic inhibitory neuronal synapses. Cumulative clinical and laboratory evidence indicates that anti-GAD and related antibodies define a novel group of syndromes, collectively known as 'hyperexcitability disorders'.

  17. Neurological, psychological, and cognitive disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative and replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Silvia; Mecarelli, Oriano; Pulitano, Patrizia; Romanello, Roberto; Davi, Leonardo; Zarabla, Alessia; Mariotti, Amalia; Carta, Maria; Tasso, Giorgia; Poli, Luca; Mitterhofer, Anna Paola; Testorio, Massimo; Frassetti, Nicla; Aceto, Paola; Galani, Alessandro; Lai, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a highly prevalent condition in the world. Neurological, psychological, and cognitive disorders, related to CKD, could contribute to the morbidity, mortality, and poor quality of life of these patients. The aim of this study was to assess the neurological, psychological, and cognitive imbalance in patients with CKD on conservative and replacement therapy.Seventy-four clinically stable patients affected by CKD on conservative therapy, replacement therapy (hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD)), or with kidney transplantation (KT) and 25 healthy controls (HC), matched for age and sex were enrolled. Clinical, laboratory, and instrumental examinations, as renal function, inflammation and mineral metabolism indexes, electroencephalogram (EEG), psychological (MMPI-2, Sat P), and cognitive tests (neuropsychological tests, NPZ5) were carried out.The results showed a significant differences in the absolute and relative power of delta band and relative power of theta band of EEG (P = 0.008, P therapy, and Grade 2-3 in KT patients. The scales of MMPI-2 hysteria and paranoia, are significantly correlated with creatinine, eGFR, serum nitrogen, CRP, 1,25-(OH)2D3, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), phosphorus, and cynical and hysterical personality, are correlated with higher relative power of delta (P = 0.016) and theta band (P = 0.016). Moreover, all NPZ5 scores showed a significant difference between the means of nephropathic patients and the means of the HC, and a positive correlation with eGFR, serum nitrogen, CRP, iPTH, and vitamin D.In CKD patients, simple and noninvasive instruments, as EEG, and cognitive-psychological tests, should be performed and careful and constant monitoring of renal risk factors, probably involved in neuropsychological complications (inflammation, disorders of mineral metabolism, electrolyte disorders, etc.), should be carried out. Early identification and adequate therapy of neuropsychological

  18. Analysis of the influence of various factors on the course of neurological disorders in children with spinal cord injury

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    Алексей Георгиевич Баиндурашвили

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The study of the influence of various factors on the course of recovery of neurological disorders in children with spinal cord injuries is an important and relevant problem. The main causes of thoracic and lumbar injuries of the spine in children are road accidents and catatraumas. Anatomical and physiological features of the spine and spinal cord in children have a significant influence on the nature of spinal cord injury, clinical manifestations of the injury, and method of treatment. The degree of spinal canal deformity at the level of the damaged segment is directly proportional to the severity of the neurological disorder. The time between injury to when surgery is performed will strongly influence the nature and course of recovery of motor functions. Aim. To assess the influence of different factors in pediatric patients with complicated injuries of the spine at the thoracic and thoracolumbar levels on the recovery of neurological disorders. Materials and methods. The analysis of results of the surgical treatment of 36 children (24 boys and 12 girls aged 3-17 years with damage to the spine and spinal cord in the thoracic spine and thoracolumbar junction, accompanied with neurological deficit in the form of central or peripheral paresis and paralysis, was performed. All patients underwent surgical intervention depending on the type and extent of damage. Clinical methods (i.e., detailed neurological examination as well as X-ray, CT, and MRI were used as diagnostic methods. Results. The study revealed that the most severe damage concerning neurological disorders in children with spinal cord injury occurs in the thoracic spine. The extent of neurological changes depends not only on the level of damage to the spinal column but also on the magnitude of spinal canal stenosis. Surgery performed in the first hours of the injury leads to a more rapid and full recovery of the neurological deficit. Conclusion. Therefore, this study found

  19. Measurement, evaluation, and assessment of peripheral neurological disorders caused by hand-transmitted vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    Regular exposure to hand-transmitted vibration can result in symptoms and signs of peripheral vascular, neurological and other disorders collectively known as the hand-arm vibration syndrome. The measurement of the effects of hand-transmitted vibration involves converting the evidence of disorder (symptoms and signs) into information that can be stored. Evaluation requires the use of scales on which to indicate the severity of the various symptoms and signs. Assessment involves a judgement of severity relative to a criterion, usually for a specific purpose (e.g. to decide on removal from work or compensation). The measurement and evaluation of symptoms and signs is necessary when monitoring patient health and when performing epidemiological studies for research. The assessment of the severity of the hand-arm vibration syndrome is currently performed with staging systems, but the criteria are not clear and not related to defined methods for measuring or evaluating the symptoms and signs. Recognizing that similar symptoms can occur without injury from occupational exposures to hand-transmitted vibration, this paper attempts to define significant peripheral neurological symptoms caused by hand-transmitted vibration (i.e. 'unusual symptoms') and how these symptoms and related signs may be measured. Scales for evaluating the symptoms (e.g. their extent) and the related signs (e.g. their probability relative to the probability of the sign being present in persons not exposed to vibration) are defined. A method of relating unusual symptoms to both the signs of disorder and the pattern of vibration exposure is illustrated. Assessments of severity will vary according to the reasons for assessing the health effects of vibration, and will depend on local practice and convenience, but a way of combining evaluations of symptoms and signs is demonstrated in a staging system. Although inherently complex, the methods may assist the collection of data required to improve

  20. Next generation sequencing for molecular diagnosis of neurological disorders using ataxias as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Andrea H; Kwasniewska, Alexandra C; Lise, Stefano; Parolin Schnekenberg, Ricardo; Becker, Esther B E; Bera, Katarzyna D; Shanks, Morag E; Gregory, Lorna; Buck, David; Zameel Cader, M; Talbot, Kevin; de Silva, Rajith; Fletcher, Nicholas; Hastings, Rob; Jayawant, Sandeep; Morrison, Patrick J; Worth, Paul; Taylor, Malcolm; Tolmie, John; O'Regan, Mary; Valentine, Ruth; Packham, Emily; Evans, Julie; Seller, Anneke; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2013-10-01

    Many neurological conditions are caused by immensely heterogeneous gene mutations. The diagnostic process is often long and complex with most patients undergoing multiple invasive and costly investigations without ever reaching a conclusive molecular diagnosis. The advent of massively parallel, next-generation sequencing promises to revolutionize genetic testing and shorten the 'diagnostic odyssey' for many of these patients. We performed a pilot study using heterogeneous ataxias as a model neurogenetic disorder to assess the introduction of next-generation sequencing into clinical practice. We captured 58 known human ataxia genes followed by Illumina Next-Generation Sequencing in 50 highly heterogeneous patients with ataxia who had been extensively investigated and were refractory to diagnosis. All cases had been tested for spinocerebellar ataxia 1-3, 6, 7 and Friedrich's ataxia and had multiple other biochemical, genetic and invasive tests. In those cases where we identified the genetic mutation, we determined the time to diagnosis. Pathogenicity was assessed using a bioinformatics pipeline and novel variants were validated using functional experiments. The overall detection rate in our heterogeneous cohort was 18% and varied from 8.3% in those with an adult onset progressive disorder to 40% in those with a childhood or adolescent onset progressive disorder. The highest detection rate was in those with an adolescent onset and a family history (75%). The majority of cases with detectable mutations had a childhood onset but most are now adults, reflecting the long delay in diagnosis. The delays were primarily related to lack of easily available clinical testing, but other factors included the presence of atypical phenotypes and the use of indirect testing. In the cases where we made an eventual diagnosis, the delay was 3-35 years (mean 18.1 years). Alignment and coverage metrics indicated that the capture and sequencing was highly efficient and the consumable cost

  1. Peripheral degenerative joint diseases

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    Nilzio Antonio da Silva

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, is the most commonrheumatic disorder mainly in a geriatric population. Manifestationsare pain, stiffness and functional loss in the affected joint.According to etiology it is classifi ed as primary (or idiopathicand secondary. Some risk factors for disease development aregenetics, race, age, sex, obesity, occupational activities andarticular biomechanics. Pathogenesis is the same for any cause orlocalization, being catabolic alterations, with synthesis, inhibitionand reparing intent of the cartilage matrix. Metalloproteinases andcytokines (IL-1,IL-6,TNF-α actions promote infl ammatory reactionand cartilage degradation. Pain, the most important symptom,does not correlate with radiologic fi ndings. Peripheral osteoarthritisoccurs predominantly in the knee, hip and hand. Diagnosis is basedon clinical features, laboratorial tests and radiological changes.Rheumatological associations’ guidelines for treatment includenon-pharmacologic (education, physiotherapy, assistive devices,and pharmacologic (analgesics, anti-infl ammatory drugs therapyand surgery. Arthroplasty seems to work better than medicines, butshould be used if other treatments have failed.

  2. Common data elements for clinical research in mitochondrial disease: a National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karaa, A.; Rahman, S.; Lombes, A.; Yu-Wai-Man, P.; Sheikh, M.K.; Alai-Hansen, S.; Cohen, B.H.; Dimmock, D.; Emrick, L.; Falk, M.J.; McCormack, S.; Mirsky, D.; Moore, T.; Parikh, S.; Shoffner, J.; Taivassalo, T.; Tarnopolsky, M.; Tein, I.; Odenkirchen, J.C.; Goldstein, A.; Koene, S.; Smeitink, J.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The common data elements (CDE) project was developed by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) to provide clinical researchers with tools to improve data quality and allow for harmonization of data collected in different research studies. CDEs have been

  3. An Overview of Multiple Sclerosis: Medical, Psychosocial, and Vocational Aspects of a Chronic and Unpredictable Neurological Disorder

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    Rumrill, Phillip D., Jr.; Roessler, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an overview of multiple sclerosis (MS), one of the most common neurological disorders in the western hemisphere. Medical and psychosocial aspects of the disease such as causes and risk factors, diagnosis, incidence and prevalence, symptoms, courses, and treatment are described. Existing research regarding the employment…

  4. Autistic Traits, ADHD Symptoms, Neurological Soft Signs and Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

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    Manouilenko, Irina; Pagani, Marco; Stone-Elander, Sharon; Odh, Richard; Brolin, Fredrik; Hatherly, Robert; Jacobsson, Hans; Larsson, Stig A.; Bejerot, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The resting regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) patterns related to co-occurring symptoms such as inattention, hyperactivity, neurological soft signs and motor problems have not yet been disclosed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this study thirteen adults with ASD and ten matched neurotypical controls underwent PET. The scores of rating…

  5. Development of clinical guidelines for the prescription of orthoses in patients with neurological disorders in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, J. M.; Geertzen, J. H. B.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop guidelines for the prescription of ankle-foot, knee, wrist-hand and elbow orthoses for patients with neurological disorders. The study is part of a more comprehensive study focusing on the development of clinical guidelines for the prescription of these ort

  6. Differential diagnosis between dementia and psychiatric disorders: Diagnostic criteria and supplementary exams Recommendations of the Scientific Department of Cognitive Neurology and Aging of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology

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    Cássio M.C. Bottino

    Full Text Available Abstract In 2005, the Scientific Department of Cognitive Neurology and Aging of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology published recommendations for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease These recommendations were updated following a review of evidence retrieved from national and international studies held on PUBMED, SCIELO and LILACS medical databases. The main aims of this review article are as follows: 1 to present the evidence found on Brazilian (LILACS, SCIELO and International (MEDLINE databases from articles published up to May 2011, on the differential diagnosis of these psychiatric disorders and dementia, with special focus on Dementia due to Alzheimer's and vascular dementia, including a review of supplementary exams which may facilitate the diagnostic process; and 2 to propose recommendations for use by clinicians and researchers involved in diagnosing patients with dementia. Differential diagnosis between dementia and other neuropsychiatric disorders should always include assessments for depression, delirium, and use of psychoactive substances, as well as investigate the use of benzodiazepines, anti-epileptics and pattern of alcohol consumption.

  7. Cingulo-insular structural alterations associated with psychogenic symptoms, childhood abuse and PTSD in functional neurological disorders.

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    Perez, David L; Matin, Nassim; Barsky, Arthur; Costumero-Ramos, Victor; Makaretz, Sara J; Young, Sigrid S; Sepulcre, Jorge; LaFrance, W Curt; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2017-06-01

    Adverse early-life events are predisposing factors for functional neurological disorder (FND) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cingulo-insular regions are implicated in the biology of both conditions and are sites of stress-mediated neuroplasticity. We hypothesised that functional neurological symptoms and the magnitude of childhood abuse would be associated with overlapping anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insular volumetric reductions, and that FND and PTSD symptoms would map onto distinct cingulo-insular areas. This within-group voxel-based morphometry study probes volumetric associations with self-report measures of functional neurological symptoms, adverse life events and PTSD symptoms in 23 mixed-gender FND patients. Separate secondary analyses were also performed in the subset of 18 women with FND to account for gender-specific effects. Across the entire cohort, there were no statistically significant volumetric associations with self-report measures of functional neurological symptom severity or childhood abuse. In women with FND, however, parallel inverse associations were observed between left anterior insular volume and functional neurological symptoms as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 and the Screening for Somatoform Symptoms Conversion Disorder subscale. Similar inverse relationships were also appreciated between childhood abuse burden and left anterior insular volume. Across all subjects, PTSD symptom severity was inversely associated with dorsal ACC volume, and the magnitude of lifetime adverse events was inversely associated with left hippocampal volume. This study reveals distinct cingulo-insular alterations for FND and PTSD symptoms and may advance our understanding of FND. Potential biological convergence between stress-related neuroplasticity, functional neurological symptoms and reduced insular volume was identified. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017

  8. A United Nations General Assembly Special Session for mental, neurological, and substance use disorders: the time has come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Judith K; Bornemann, Thomas H; Burkey, Matthew; Chehil, Sonia; Chen, Lenis; Copeland, John R M; Eaton, William W; Ganju, Vijay; Hayward, Erin; Hock, Rebecca S; Kidwai, Rubeena; Kolappa, Kavitha; Lee, Patrick T; Minas, Harry; Or, Flora; Raviola, Giuseppe J; Saraceno, Benedetto; Patel, Vikram

    2012-01-01

    Mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders are leading causes of the global burden of disease and profoundly impact the social and economic well-being of individuals and communities. The majority of people affected by MNS disorders globally do not have access to evidence-based interventions and many experience discrimination and abuses of their human rights. A United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) is needed to focus global attention on MNS disorders as a core development issue requiring commitments to improve access to care, promote human rights, and strengthen the evidence on effective prevention and treatment.

  9. Decoding Crucial LncRNAs Implicated in Neurogenesis and Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayana, R; Singh, Shailja; Pati, Soumya

    2017-04-15

    Unraveling transcriptional heterogeneity and the labyrinthine nature of neurodevelopment can probe insights into neuropsychiatric disorders. It is noteworthy that adult neurogenesis is restricted to the subventricular and subgranular zones of the brain. Recent studies suggest long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) as an avant-garde class of regulators implicated in neurodevelopment. But, paucity exists in the knowledge regarding lncRNAs in neurogenesis and their associations with neurodevelopmental defects. To address this, we extensively reviewed the existing literature databases as well as performed relevant in-silico analysis. We utilized Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) differential search module and generated a catalogue of ∼30,000 transcripts specific to the neurogenic zones, including coding and non-coding transcripts. To explore the existing lncRNAs reported in neurogenesis, we performed extensive literature mining and identified 392 lncRNAs. These degenerate lncRNAs were mapped onto the ABA transcript list leading to detection of 20 lncRNAs specific to neurogenic zones (Dentate gyrus/Lateral ventricle), among which 10 showed associations to several neurodevelopmental disorders following in-silico mapping onto brain disease databases like Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, AutDB, and lncRNADisease. Notably, using ABA correlation module, we could establish lncRNA-to-mRNA coexpression networks for the above 10 candidate lncRNAs. Finally, pathway prediction revealed physical, biochemical, or regulatory interactions for nine lncRNAs. In addition, ABA differential search also revealed 54 novel significant lncRNAs from the null set (∼30,000). Conclusively, this review represents an updated catalogue of lncRNAs in neurogenesis and neurological diseases, and overviews the field of OMICs-based data analysis for understanding lncRNome-based regulation in neurodevelopment.

  10. Neurologic abnormalities in mouse models of the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and mucolipidosis III γ.

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    Rachel A Idol

    Full Text Available UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase is an α2β2γ2 hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the mannose 6-phosphate targeting signal on lysosomal hydrolases. Mutations in the α/β subunit precursor gene cause the severe lysosomal storage disorder mucolipidosis II (ML II or the more moderate mucolipidosis III alpha/beta (ML III α/β, while mutations in the γ subunit gene cause the mildest disorder, mucolipidosis III gamma (ML III γ. Here we report neurologic consequences of mouse models of ML II and ML III γ. The ML II mice have a total loss of acid hydrolase phosphorylation, which results in depletion of acid hydrolases in mesenchymal-derived cells. The ML III γ mice retain partial phosphorylation. However, in both cases, total brain extracts have normal or near normal activity of many acid hydrolases reflecting mannose 6-phosphate-independent lysosomal targeting pathways. While behavioral deficits occur in both models, the onset of these changes occurs sooner and the severity is greater in the ML II mice. The ML II mice undergo progressive neurodegeneration with neuronal loss, astrocytosis, microgliosis and Purkinje cell depletion which was evident at 4 months whereas ML III γ mice have only mild to moderate astrocytosis and microgliosis at 12 months. Both models accumulate the ganglioside GM2, but only ML II mice accumulate fucosylated glycans. We conclude that in spite of active mannose 6-phosphate-independent targeting pathways in the brain, there are cell types that require at least partial phosphorylation function to avoid lysosomal dysfunction and the associated neurodegeneration and behavioral impairments.

  11. Etiological beliefs of patients with neurological disorders attending a tertiary care center: A cross-sectional study

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    Bhupender Kumar Bajaj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The understanding and management of neurological disorders is undergoing revolutionary changes over the last three decades in the background of ever increasing advances in medical technologies, diagnostic techniques, therapeutic processes and, molecular and genetic medicine. The fruits of these advances can reach patients only if the psychosocial hurdles in their delivery are identified, acknowledged and addressed. Aim: To explore the beliefs and practices of patients with neurological disorders in a tertiary care center in the eastern Nepal. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients attending neurology/medicine outpatient for neurological disorders were interviewed about their beliefs regarding the triggering factors, causation and treatment-seeking behavior particularly from traditional healers. Result: Of the 100 patients (49 males, 51 females recruited in the study, 51% expressed having ′no idea′ about their illness. Only 20% patients gave medically congruent explanation for their illness. Psychological factors were attributed as triggering factors by 16% of patients, of which two-thirds were females. Chance, destiny and ′jadu tona′ topped the list of triggering factors. Forty-four percent patients had sought help of traditional faith healers (′Dhami Jhakri′ before seeking medical help. Traditional faith healers were approached by patients irrespective of their educational background. Fifty-nine percent of patients who first sought traditional faith healers, believed in ′jadu-tona′. Of those interviewed, 16% were planning to go to a faith healer in near future. Conclusion: The beliefs of patients with neurological disorders frequently do not conform to current medical opinion. There is need for greater communication and education of patients by their treating physicians.

  12. Identification of neuron-related genes for cell therapy of neurological disorders by network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li-Ning; Song, Xiao-Qing; Wei, Hui-Ping; Yin, Hai-Feng

    Bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) differentiated into neurons have been widely proposed for use in cell therapy of many neurological disorders. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this differentiation. We screened differentially expressed genes between immature neural tissues and untreated BMSCs to identify the genes responsible for neuronal differentiation from BMSCs. GSE68243 gene microarray data of rat BMSCs and GSE18860 gene microarray data of rat neurons were received from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Transcriptome Analysis Console software showed that 1248 genes were up-regulated and 1273 were down-regulated in neurons compared with BMSCs. Gene Ontology functional enrichment, protein-protein interaction networks, functional modules, and hub genes were analyzed using DAVID, STRING 10, BiNGO tool, and Network Analyzer software, revealing that nine hub genes, Nrcam, Sema3a, Mapk8, Dlg4, Slit1, Creb1, Ntrk2, Cntn2, and Pax6, may play a pivotal role in neuronal differentiation from BMSCs. Seven genes, Dcx, Nrcam, sema3a, Cntn2, Slit1, Ephb1, and Pax6, were shown to be hub nodes within the neuronal development network, while six genes, Fgf2, Tgfβ1, Vegfa, Serpine1, Il6, and Stat1, appeared to play an important role in suppressing neuronal differentiation. However, additional studies are required to confirm these results.

  13. [The application of stem cells for research and treatment of neurological disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinsson, Olafur A; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Petersen, Petur Henry

    2008-02-01

    It has long been a common view that neurons in the human central nervous system were not capable of self renewal. But in the mid-1990s scientists discovered that certain areas of the human brain do have the ability generate new neurons, at least under certain circumstances. It was subsecuently confirmed that the human central nervous system contains stem cells similar to the cells which originally give rise to the central nervous sysem during fetal development. The possible use of stem cells in the treatment of various neurological disorders, holds great promise. However, much research needs to be carried out before stem cell therapy can be moved from the bench to the bedside. Now researchers are pursuing two fundamental strategies to exploit the possible application of stem cells. One is to cultivate stem cells in vitro and to design the right differentiation profile of cells suitable for implantation. The other strategy relies on studying endogenous signals that could stimulate the patient s own stem cells and repair mechanisms. Here we give an overview of neural stem cells and their possible future use in the treatment of neural diseases such as Parkinson s disease, motor neuron disease and spinal cord injury.

  14. [Before you diagnose a patient with a conversion disorder, perform a thorough general medical and neurological examination. Case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełczyk, Tomasz; Pawełczyk, Agnieszka; Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta

    2012-01-01

    Dissociative and conversion disorders are classified together according to ICD-10 as states that are not confirmed by the presence of somatic diseases, which they suggest. According to the DSM-IV, both disorders are classified separately. Conversion disorders are a group of psychiatric disorders whose symptoms mimic the presence of malfunction or loss of motor or sensory function, whereas the nature and dynamics of the observed symptoms is not fully explained by the results of objective assessments and consultations, nor is the direct effect of a psychoactive substance. Impaired mental integration of different functions which normally interact simultaneously in the perception of reality and inner experience of the individual is found in dissociative disorders. The article describes the case of 25-year old man, in whom after initial suspicion of myasthenia gravis and its exclusion, a diagnosis of conversion disorder was made on the basis of the clinical picture and treatment with an SSRI antidepressant and individual psychotherapy were recommended. No improvement in mental and neurological status after six month therapy resulted in an in-depth diagnostics in a clinical setting and diagnosis of brain stem tumor (aastrocytoma fibrillare). (a) Neuroimaging is a source of important clinical data and in many cases should constitute an inherent element of a psychiatric diagnosis. (b) Diagnosis of conversion (dissociative) disorders requires a precise differential diagnosis, excluding the somatic causes of observed neurological ailments. (c) A late diagnosis of neurological or somatic causes of symptoms which arouse a suspicion of conversion (dissociative) disorders may make a radical treatment impossible or may considerably aggravate the remote prognosis and quality of the patients' life.

  15. Low back pain and degenerative disc disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandrić Slavica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Various clinical conditions can cause low back pain, and in most cases it is of a degenerative origin. Degenerative disc disease is a common condition which affects young to middle-aged men and women equally. Changes in the mechanical properties of the disc lead to degenerative arthritis in the intervertebral joints, osteophytes, and narrowing the intervertebral foramen or the spinal canal. Pathophysiology. Degenerative cascade, described by Kirkaldy-Willis, is the widely accepted pathophysiologic model describing the degenerative process as it affects the lumbar spine in 3 phases. Diagnosis. There are two forms of low back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease: a lumbalgia and b lumbar radiculopathy. Limitation of movement, problems with balance, pain, loss of reflexes in the extremities, muscle weakness, loss of sensation or other signs of neurological damage can be found on physical examination. For accurate diagnosis, it is often necessary to combine clinical examination and sophisticated technology. Treatment. Coservative treatment consists of rest, physical therapy, pharmacological therapy and injection therapy. Physical rehabilitation with active patient participation is a key approach to treatment of patients with discogenic pain. Physical therapy, occupational therapy and kinesitherapy are important for improving muscle strength, endurance, and flexibility. Disc surgery is performed if surgical intervention is required. .

  16. Mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in people living with HIV/AIDS in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibanda, Dixon; Benjamin, Laura; Weiss, Helen A; Abas, Melanie

    2014-09-01

    Depression, alcohol use disorders (AUD), and neurocognitive disorders are the 3 most prevalent mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in people living with HIV infection in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Importantly, they have an impact on everyday functions and on HIV outcomes. Many LMICs have validated tools to screen for and diagnose depression and AUD in the general population that can be used among people living with HIV infection. Current screening and diagnostic methods for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in the era of antiretroviral therapy are suboptimal and require further research. In our view, 2 research priorities are most critical. One is the development of an integrated screening approach for depression, AUD, and neurocognitive disorders that can be used by nonspecialists in LMICs. Second, research is needed on interventions for depression and AUD that also target behavior change, as these could impact on adherence to antiretroviral therapy and improve mental symptoms. Mentorship and fellowship schemes at an individual and institutional level need to be further supported to build capacity and provide platforms for research on HIV and mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in LMICs.

  17. [Neuropediatrics: epidemiological features and etiologies at the Dakar neurology service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, M; Sene-Diouf, F; Diop, A G; Ndao, A K; Ndiaye, M M; Ndiaye, I P

    1999-01-01

    Child neurology is a relatively young speciality of neurosciences which is at the frontier of Neurology and Paediatrics. Its development has been impulsed by the diagnosis techniques such as Neurobiology, Genetics, Neuroimaging and pedo-psychology. We conducted a retrospective survey among the in-patients from January 1980 to December 1997 in the service of Neurology of the University Hospital. Have been included children ranged from 0 to 15 years old without any racial, sexual or origin distinctive. In Neurology Department, children of 0 to 15 years old represent 10.06% of the in-patients received from 1980 to 1997. The mortality rate was 9.23%. The diseases are dominated by epilepsy and infantile encephalopathies with 31.02%, infectious diseases with 19.36% represented by tuberculosis, other bacterial, viral and parasitical etiologies, tumors with 10.36%, vascular pathology and degenerative disorders.

  18. [Multiple system atrophy and Alzheimer's disease: a case report of a rare association of two neuro-degenerative disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, R; Bourdain, F; Matej, R

    2007-12-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disorder typically characterised by cerebellar dysfunction, parkinsonism, pyramidal signs and dysautonomy. Cognitive impairement is usually limited to a moderate subcortical dysexecutive syndrom. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman suffering from MSA who progressively developed severe dementia. Neuropathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of definite MSA and also showed histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. This association is extremely rare in the literature. Our observation confirmes that franc dementia in MSA should prompt a search for another associated cause and underlines the usefulness of neuropathological verifications in atypical clinical pictures.

  19. Computerized Functional Reach Test to Measure Balance Stability in Elderly Patients With Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scena, Silvio; Steindler, Roberto; Ceci, Moira; Zuccaro, Stefano Maria; Carmeli, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Background The ability to maintain static and dynamic balance is a prerequisite for safe walking and for obtaining functional mobility. For this reason, a reliable and valid means of screening for risk of falls is needed. The functional reach test (FRT) is used in many countries, yet it does not provide some kinematic parameters such as shoulder or pelvic girdles translation. The purpose was to analyze video records measuring of distance, velocity, time length, arm direction and girdles translation while doing FRT. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted where the above variables were correlated to the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) for mental status and the Tinetti balance assessment test, which have been validated, in order to computerize the FRT (cFRT) for elderly patients with neurological disorders. Eighty patients were tested and 54 were eligible to serve as experimental group. The patients underwent the MMSE, the Tinetti test and the FRT. LAB view software was used to record the FRT performances and to process the videos. The control group consisted of 51 healthy subjects who had been previously tested. Results The experimental group was not able to perform the tests as well as the healthy control subjects. The video camera provided valuable kinematic results such as bending down while performing the forward reach test. Conclusions Instead of manual measurement, we proposed to use a cheap with fair resolution web camera to accurately estimate the FRT. The kinematic parameters were correlated with Tinetti and MMSE scores. The performance values established in this study indicate that the cFRT is a reliable and valid assessment, which provides more accurate data than “manual” test about functional reach. PMID:27635176

  20. Antidepressants for the treatment of depression in neurological disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Annabel; Rayner, Lauren; Okon-Rocha, Ewa; Evans, Alison; Valsraj, Koravangattu; Higginson, Irene J; Hotopf, Matthew

    2011-08-01

    Despite the high prevalence of depression in people with neurological disorders, no previous study has sought to summarise existing evidence on the use of antidepressants in this population. A systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken to determine whether antidepressants are more effective than placebo in the treatment of depression in neurological disorders, and whether any benefit is associated with improvement in function. Embase, Pubmed, Psycinfo and Cochrane trial registers were searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the efficacy of antidepressant and placebo in the treatment of depression in adults with a neurological disorder. 20 RCTs were included in the review, including patients with Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, brain injury, epilepsy and stroke. Outcomes were analysed at four time points: 4-5 weeks, 6-8 weeks, 9-18 weeks and >18 weeks. The primary outcome was response to treatment at 6-8 weeks. The evidence favoured the use of antidepressants over placebo at all time points although pooled results were not statistically significant at all time points. At 6-8 weeks, antidepressant treatment was associated with a greater than twofold odds of remission (OR 2.23; 95% CI 1.54 to 3.23; number needed to treat=7). Fewer data were available for quality of life, and functional and cognitive outcomes, and there was little evidence of improvement with antidepressant treatment. Antidepressants are effective for the treatment of depression in patients with neurological disorders but the evidence for the efficacy of antidepressants in improving quality of life, and functional and cognitive outcomes is inconclusive.

  1. The significance of a crossed extensor hallucis response in neurologic disorders: a comparison with the Babinski sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindfelt, B; Rosén, I; Hanko, J

    1976-04-01

    The significance of a crossed extensor hallucis response on active flexion of the hip was analysed in various neurological disorders. It is concluded that this sign, not formerly described, is a pathological reflex or synkinesia. In the cooperative patient the crossed extensor response is a more sensitive indicator of a minor disturbance within the cortico-spinal motor pathways than the Babinski sign. With lesions above the foramen magnum a crossed extensor hallucis response is observed more frequently than the Babinski sign.

  2. The Positron Emission Tomography Ligand DAA1106 Binds With High Affinity to Activated Microglia in Human Neurological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Chronic microglial activation is an important component of many neurological disorders, and imaging activated microglia in vivo will enable the detection and improved treatment of neuroinflammation. 1-(2-Chlorphenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline-carbox-amide (PK11195), a peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand, has been used to image neuroinflammation, but the extent to which PK11195 binding distinguishes activated microglia and reactive astrocytes is unclear. Moreover, PK1119...

  3. An Evaluation of Educational Neurological Eye Movement Disorder Videos Posted on Internet Video Sharing Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Simon J

    2016-03-01

    Internet video sharing sites allow the free dissemination of educational material. This study investigated the quality and educational content of videos of eye movement disorders posted on such sites. Educational neurological eye movement videos were identified by entering the titles of the eye movement abnormality into the search boxes of the video sharing sites. Also, suggested links were followed from each video. The number of views, likes, and dislikes for each video were recorded. The videos were then rated for their picture and sound quality. Their educational value was assessed according to whether the video included a description of the eye movement abnormality, the anatomical location of the lesion (if appropriate), and the underlying diagnosis. Three hundred fifty-four of these videos were found on YouTube and Vimeo. There was a mean of 6,443 views per video (range, 1-195,957). One hundred nineteen (33.6%) had no form of commentary about the eye movement disorder shown apart from the title. Forty-seven (13.3%) contained errors in the title or in the text. Eighty (22.6%) had excellent educational value by describing the eye movement abnormality, the anatomical location of the lesion, and the underlying diagnosis. Of these, 30 also had good picture and sound quality. The videos with excellent educational value had a mean of 9.84 "likes" per video compared with 2.37 for those videos without a commentary (P educational value with good picture and sound quality had a mean of 10.23 "likes" per video (P = 0.004 vs videos with no commentary). There was no significant difference in the mean number of "dislikes" between those videos that had no commentary or which contained errors and those with excellent educational value. There are a large number of eye movement videos freely available on these sites; however, due to the lack of peer review, a significant number have poor educational value due to having no commentary or containing errors. The number of "likes

  4. Using next-generation sequencing as a genetic diagnostic tool in rare autosomal recessive neurologic Mendelian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao; Wang, Jun-Ling; Tang, Bei-Sha; Sun, Zhan-Fang; Shi, Yu-Ting; Shen, Lu; Lei, Li-Fang; Wei, Xiao-Ming; Xiao, Jing-Jing; Hu, Zheng-Mao; Pan, Qian; Xia, Kun; Zhang, Qing-Yan; Dai, Mei-Zhi; Liu, Yu; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Jiang, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing was used to investigate 9 rare Chinese pedigrees with rare autosomal recessive neurologic Mendelian disorders. Five probands with ataxia-telangectasia and 1 proband with chorea-acanthocytosis were analyzed by targeted gene sequencing. Whole-exome sequencing was used to investigate 3 affected individuals with Joubert syndrome, nemaline myopathy, or spastic ataxia Charlevoix-Saguenay type. A list of known and novel candidate variants was identified for each causative gene. All variants were genetically verified by Sanger sequencing or quantitative polymerase chain reaction with the strategy of disease segregation in related pedigrees and healthy controls. The advantages of using next-generation sequencing to diagnose rare autosomal recessive neurologic Mendelian disorders characterized by genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity are demonstrated. A genetic diagnostic strategy combining the use of targeted gene sequencing and whole-exome sequencing with the aid of next-generation sequencing platforms has shown great promise for improving the diagnosis of neurologic Mendelian disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Beyond neural cubism: promoting a multidimensional view of brain disorders by enhancing the integration of neurology and psychiatry in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joseph J; Williams, Nolan R; George, Mark S

    2015-05-01

    Cubism was an influential early-20th-century art movement characterized by angular, disjointed imagery. The two-dimensional appearance of Cubist figures and objects is created through juxtaposition of angles. The authors posit that the constrained perspectives found in Cubism may also be found in the clinical classification of brain disorders. Neurological disorders are often separated from psychiatric disorders as if they stemmed from different organ systems. Maintaining two isolated clinical disciplines fractionalizes the brain in the same way that Pablo Picasso fractionalized figures and objects in his Cubist art. This Neural Cubism perpetuates a clinical divide that does not reflect the scope and depth of neuroscience. All brain disorders are complex and multidimensional, with aberrant circuitry and resultant psychopharmacology manifesting as altered behavior, affect, mood, or cognition. Trainees should receive a multidimensional education based on modern neuroscience, not a partial education based on clinical precedent. The authors briefly outline the rationale for increasing the integration of neurology and psychiatry and discuss a nested model with which clinical neuroscientists (neurologists and psychiatrists) can approach and treat brain disorders.

  6. Diagnosis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Its Behavioral, Neurological, and Genetic Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Kathryn L.; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common developmental disorder often associated with other developmental disorders including speech, language, and reading disorders. Here, we review the principal features of ADHD and current diagnostic standards for the disorder. We outline the ADHD subtypes, which are based upon the dimensions…

  7. Utility of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for the Study and Treatment of Genetic Diseases: Focus on Childhood Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Serena; Kurian, Manju A

    2016-01-01

    The study of neurological disorders often presents with significant challenges due to the inaccessibility of human neuronal cells for further investigation. Advances in cellular reprogramming techniques, have however provided a new source of human cells for laboratory-based research. Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can now be robustly differentiated into specific neural subtypes, including dopaminergic, inhibitory GABAergic, motorneurons and cortical neurons. These neurons can then be utilized for in vitro studies to elucidate molecular causes underpinning neurological disease. Although human iPSC-derived neuronal models are increasingly regarded as a useful tool in cell biology, there are a number of limitations, including the relatively early, fetal stage of differentiated cells and the mainly two dimensional, simple nature of the in vitro system. Furthermore, clonal variation is a well-described phenomenon in iPSC lines. In order to account for this, robust baseline data from multiple control lines is necessary to determine whether a particular gene defect leads to a specific cellular phenotype. Over the last few years patient-derived neural cells have proven very useful in addressing several mechanistic questions related to central nervous system diseases, including early-onset neurological disorders of childhood. Many studies report the clinical utility of human-derived neural cells for testing known drugs with repurposing potential, novel compounds and gene therapies, which then can be translated to clinical reality. iPSCs derived neural cells, therefore provide great promise and potential to gain insight into, and treat early-onset neurological disorders.

  8. Inertial Sensors to Assess Gait Quality in Patients with Neurological Disorders: A Systematic Review of Technical and Analytical Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliénor Vienne

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gait disorders are major causes of falls in patients with neurological diseases. Understanding these disorders allows prevention and better insights into underlying diseases. InertiaLocoGraphy (ILG –the quantification of gait by using inertial measurement units (IMUs –shows great potential to address this public health challenge, but protocols vary widely and normative values of gait parameters are still unavailable. This systematic review critically compares ILG protocols, questions features extracted from inertial signals and proposes a semeiological analysis of clinimetric characteristics for use in neurological clinical routine. For this systematic review, PubMed, Cochrane and EMBASE were searched for articles assessing gait quality by using IMUs that were published from January 1, 2014 to August 31, 2016. ILG was used to assess gait in a wide range of neurological disorders – including Parkinson disease, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer disease, cerebral palsy, and cerebellar atrophy – as well as in the faller or frail older population and in people presenting rheumatological pathologies. However, results have not yet been driving changes in clinical practice. One reason could be that studies mainly aimed at comparing pathological gait to healthy gait, but there is stronger need for semiological descriptions of gait perturbation, severity or prognostic assessment. Furthermore, protocols used to assess gait using IMUs are too many. Likely, outcomes are highly heterogeneous and difficult to compare across large panels of studies. Therefore, homogenization is needed to foster the use of ILG to assess gait quality in neurological routine practice. The pros and cons of each protocol are emphasized so that a compromise can be reached. As well, analysis of seven complementary clinical criteria (springiness, sturdiness, smoothness, steadiness, stability, symmetry, synchronization is advocated.

  9. Diagnosis and Treatment of Neurological Disorders by Millimeter-Wave Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Peter H.; Pikov, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, millimeter waves are being employed for telecomm, radar, and imaging applications. To date in the U.S, however, very few investigations on the impact of this radiation on biological systems at the cellular level have been undertaken. In the beginning, to examine the impact of millimeter waves on cellular processes, researchers discovered that cell membrane depolarization may be triggered by low levels of integrated power at these high frequencies. Such a situation could be used to advantage in the direct stimulation of neuronal cells for applications in neuroprosthetics and diagnosing or treating neurological disorders. An experimental system was set up to directly monitor cell response on exposure to continuous-wave, fixed-frequency, millimeter-wave radiation at low and modest power levels (0.1 to 100 safe exposure standards) between 50 and 100 GHz. Two immortalized cell lines derived from lung and neuronal tissue were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) that locates on the inside of the cell membrane lipid bi-layer. Oxonol dye was added to the cell medium. When membrane depolarization occurs, the oxonal bound to the outer wall of the lipid bi-layer can penetrate close to the inner wall where the GFP resides. Under fluorescent excitation (488 nm), the normally green GFP (520 nm) optical signal quenches and gives rise to a red output when the oxonol comes close enough to the GFP to excite a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with an output at 620 nm. The presence of a strong FRET signature upon exposures of 30 seconds to 2 minutes at 5-10 milliwatts per square centimeter RF power at 50 GHz, followed by a return to the normal 520-nm GFP signal after a few minutes indicating repolarization of the membrane, indicates that low levels of RF energy may be able to trigger non-destructive membrane depolarization without direct cell contact. Such a mechanism could be used to stimulate neuronal cells in the cortex without the need for

  10. Treatment Patterns among Children and Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder with or without Psychiatric or Neurologic Comorbidities in Sweden: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sikirica, Vanja; Gustafsson, Per A; Makin, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common psychiatric disorder in children/adolescents and occurs frequently with psychiatric/neurologic comorbidities. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of psychiatric/neurologic comorbidities on pharmacotherapy patterns among patients with ADHD in Sweden. Methods A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted using medical records from a regional database in Sweden. Patients aged 6?17?years, with ?1 prescriptio...

  11. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  12. Peptide Regulation of Cofilin Activity in the CNS: A Novel Therapeutic Approach for Treatment of Multiple Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Alisa E; Bamburg, James R

    2017-02-19

    Cofilin is a ubiquitous protein which cooperates with many other actin-binding proteins in regulating actin dynamics. Cofilin has essential functions in nervous system development including neuritogenesis, neurite elongation, growth cone pathfinding, dendritic spine formation, and the regulation of neurotransmission and spine function, components of synaptic plasticity essential for learning and memory. Cofilin's phosphoregulation is a downstream target of many transmembrane signaling processes, and its misregulation in neurons has been linked in rodent models to many different neurodegenerative and neurological disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD), aggression due to neonatal isolation, autism, manic/bipolar disorder, and sleep deprivation. Cognitive and behavioral deficits of these rodent models have been largely abrogated by modulation of cofilin activity using viral-mediated, genetic, and/or small molecule or peptide therapeutic approaches. Neuropathic pain in rats from sciatic nerve compression has also been reduced by modulating the cofilin pathway within neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. Neuroinflammation, which occurs following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion, but which also accompanies many other neurodegenerative syndromes, is markedly reduced by peptides targeting specific chemokine receptors, which also modulate cofilin activity. Thus, peptide therapeutics offer potential for cost-effective treatment of a wide variety of neurological disorders. Here we discuss some recent results from rodent models using therapeutic peptides with a surprising ability to cross the rodent blood brain barrier and alter cofilin activity in brain. We also offer suggestions as to how neuronal-specific cofilin regulation might be achieved.

  13. Sociodemographic influences on immunization of children with chronic neurological disorders in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Okoro

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Children with obvious neurological deficits whose mothers have low educational attainment are at risk of low immunization coverage. It is recommended that healthcare workers should assess the immunization status of children with CND at every opportunity. Female education and empowerment should be encouraged as a means of enhancing the immunization coverage of these children.

  14. Teaching Neurophysiology, Neuropharmacology, and Experimental Design Using Animal Models of Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsink, Maarten C.; Dukers, Danny F.

    2009-01-01

    Animal models have been widely used for studying the physiology and pharmacology of psychiatric and neurological diseases. The concepts of face, construct, and predictive validity are used as indicators to estimate the extent to which the animal model mimics the disease. Currently, we used these three concepts to design a theoretical assignment to…

  15. 76 FR 69747 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institutes of Health, Neuroscience Center, 6001.../NIH/DHHS/Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Blvd., Suite 3208, MSC 9529, Bethesda, MD 20892, (301... Special Emphasis Panel; NINDS Research Education Programs for Residents and Fellows in Neurology...

  16. 38 CFR 4.124a - Schedule of ratings-neurological conditions and convulsive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... perform previously learned motor activities, despite normal motor function). 2 Motor activity mildly...-psychotic organic psychiatric disturbance (psychotic, psychoneurotic or personality disorder) if diagnosed... psychotic or psychroneurotic disorder will be rated under the appropriate diagnostic code. The personality...

  17. Tourette's Disorder: Genetic Update, Neurological Correlates, and Evidence-Based Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, LeAdelle

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an update of the search for genetic markers related to Tourette's Disorder. The probable neurophysiology of the disorder is reviewed. Frequently prescribed medications are related to the probable biological bases of the disorder. Behavioral interventions and assessment tools are examined. It is concluded that evidence based…

  18. Specific protein profile in cerebrospinal fluid from HIV-1-positive cART-treated patients affected by neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Valentina; Delbue, Serena; Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Tavazzi, Eleonora; Del Savio, Rossella; Crovella, Sergio; Marchioni, Enrico; Ferrante, Pasquale; Comar, Manola

    2012-10-01

    Cytokines/chemokines are involved in the immune response of infections, including HIV-1. We defined the profile of 48 cytokines/chemokines in cerebrospinal fluid from 18 cART patients with chronic HIV-1 infection by Luminex technology. Nine patients were affected with leukoencephalopathies: five with John Cunningham virus (JCV) + progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and four with JCV-not determined leukoencephalopathy (NDLE). In addition, nine HIV-1-positive patients with no neurological signs (NND) and five HIV-1-negative patients affected with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) were enrolled. Ten cytokines (IL-15, IL-3, IL-16, IL-18, CTACK, GRO1, SCF, MCP-1, MIF, SDF) were highly expressed in HIV-1-positive patients while IL-1Ra and IL-17 were present at a lower level. In addition, the levels of IL-17, IL-9, FGF-basic, MIP-1β, and MCP-1 were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in patients with neurological diseases (PML, NDLE, ADEM) with respect to NND. Focusing the attention to the cytokine profile in JCV + PML patients with respect to JCV-NDLE patients, only TNF-β was significantly downregulated (p < 0.05) in JCV + PML patients. This pilot study emphasized the role of immunoregulation in HIV-1-related neurological disorders during cART treatment.

  19. Next-gen sequencing identifies non-coding variation disrupting miRNA-binding sites in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanna, P; Chen, X S; Ho, J; Gajewski, D; Smith, S D; Gialluisi, A; Francks, C; Fisher, S E; Newbury, D F; Vernes, S C

    2017-03-14

    Understanding the genetic factors underlying neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders is a major challenge given their prevalence and potential severity for quality of life. While large-scale genomic screens have made major advances in this area, for many disorders the genetic underpinnings are complex and poorly understood. To date the field has focused predominantly on protein coding variation, but given the importance of tightly controlled gene expression for normal brain development and disorder, variation that affects non-coding regulatory regions of the genome is likely to play an important role in these phenotypes. Herein we show the importance of 3 prime untranslated region (3'UTR) non-coding regulatory variants across neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. We devised a pipeline for identifying and functionally validating putatively pathogenic variants from next generation sequencing (NGS) data. We applied this pipeline to a cohort of children with severe specific language impairment (SLI) and identified a functional, SLI-associated variant affecting gene regulation in cells and post-mortem human brain. This variant and the affected gene (ARHGEF39) represent new putative risk factors for SLI. Furthermore, we identified 3'UTR regulatory variants across autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder NGS cohorts demonstrating their impact on neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Our findings show the importance of investigating non-coding regulatory variants when determining risk factors contributing to neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. In the future, integration of such regulatory variation with protein coding changes will be essential for uncovering the genetic causes of complex neurological disorders and the fundamental mechanisms underlying health and disease.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 14 March 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.30.

  20. Neurological disorder in two moose calves ( Alces alces L. naturally infected with Elaphostrongylus alces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareta Steen

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Two months old moose calves exhibiting neurological signs were videotaped, killed and necropsied. The parasite Elaphostrongylus alces (Steen et al 1989 was found epidurally along the meninges of the spinal cord, and in the muscle faciae of the thoracic and lumbar regions. Progressive inflammatory processes were present in the epineurium, perineurium and endoneurium. Accumulations of inflammatory cells, eosinophils, lymfocytes and macrophages, were found around eggs and larvae and frequently, around regional blood wessels. The neurological disturbances in the moose calves were pronounced, with locomotive abnormalities and ataxia. They showed weakness in the hindquarters, with uncoordinated and swaying movements of the hind legs. In addition, one of the calves was lame on the left forelimb. The muscles of the leg were visibly atrophic. The lesions produced by E. alces at the lumbar nerve roots and in the cauda equina are suggested to be the cause of the clinical signs observed.

  1. Bedside screening to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with neurological disorders: an updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertscher, Berit; Speyer, Renée; Palmieri, Maria; Plant, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent comorbidity in neurological patients and presents a serious health threat, which may le to outcomes of aspiration pneumonia ranging from hospitalization to death. Therefore, an early identification of risk followed by an accurate diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia is fundamental. This systematic review provides an update of currently available bedside screenings to identify oropharyngeal dysphagia in neurological patients. An electronic search was carried out in the databases PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsychInfo (formerly PsychLit), and all hits from 2008 up to December 2012 were included in the review. Only studies with sufficient methodological quality were considered, after which the psychometric characteristics of the screening tools were determined. Two relevant bedside screenings were identified, with a minimum sensitivity and specificity of ≥70 and ≥60 %, respectively.

  2. Mapping of brain function with positron emission tomography for pathophysiological analysis of neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nariai, Tadashi [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). Graduate School

    2001-02-01

    The role of PET is discussed mainly through author's clinical experience in patients with brain lesions from the view of mapping of brain function. Procedure for PET concept in clinical practice is summarized. PET using tracers like [{sup 15}O]water and [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose for mapping of the function has been used in combination with MRI, MEG (magnetoencephalography), SPECT and other imaging means for morphological identification. Actual those images before and after surgery are presented in cases of epilepsy, moyamoya disease, stegnosis of cervical artery, arteriovenous malformation and oligodendroglioma. Images of [{sup 11}C]flumazenil in epilepsies are also presented to show the neurological dysfunctions. PET evaluation of neurological functions is concluded to become more important in parallel with the advancement of therapeutics. (K.H.)

  3. Systems biological approach on neurological disorders: a novel molecular connectivity to aging and psychiatric diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Winkins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems biological approach of molecular connectivity map has reached to a great interest to understand the gene functional similarities between the diseases. In this study, we developed a computational framework to build molecular connectivity maps by integrating mutated and differentially expressed genes of neurological and psychiatric diseases to determine its relationship with aging. Results The systematic large-scale analyses of 124 human diseases create three classes of molecular connectivity maps. First, molecular interaction of disease protein network generates 3632 proteins with 6172 interactions, which determines the common genes/proteins between diseases. Second, Disease-disease network includes 4845 positively scored disease-disease relationships. The comparison of these disease-disease pairs with Medical Subject Headings (MeSH classification tree suggests 25% of the disease-disease pairs were in same disease area. The remaining can be a novel disease-disease relationship based on gene/protein similarity. Inclusion of aging genes set showed 79 neurological and 20 psychiatric diseases have the strong association with aging. Third and lastly, a curated disease biomarker network was created by relating the proteins/genes in specific disease contexts, such analysis showed 73 markers for 24 diseases. Further, the overall quality of the results was achieved by a series of statistical methods, to avoid insignificant data in biological networks. Conclusions This study improves the understanding of the complex interactions that occur between neurological and psychiatric diseases with aging, which lead to determine the diagnostic markers. Also, the disease-disease association results could be helpful to determine the symptom relationships between neurological and psychiatric diseases. Together, our study presents many research opportunities in post-genomic biomarkers development.

  4. Integral Characterization of Defective BDNF/TrkB Signalling in Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders Leads the Way to New Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda, Gonzalo S.; Díaz-Guerra, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    Enhancement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling has great potential in therapy for neurological and psychiatric disorders. This neurotrophin not only attenuates cell death but also promotes neuronal plasticity and function. However, an important challenge to this approach is the persistence of aberrant neurotrophic signalling due to a defective function of the BDNF high-affinity receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), or downstream effectors. Such changes have been already described in several disorders, but their importance as pathological mechanisms has been frequently underestimated. This review highlights the relevance of an integrative characterization of aberrant BDNF/TrkB pathways for the rational design of therapies that by combining BDNF and TrkB targets could efficiently promote neurotrophic signalling. PMID:28134845

  5. What have we learned about the kallikrein-kinin and renin-angiotensin systems in neurological disorders?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria; da; Graa; Naffah-Mazzacoratti; Telma; Luciana; Furtado; Gouveia; Priscila; Santos; Rodrigues; Simōes; Sandra; Regina; Perosa

    2014-01-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system(KKS) is an intricate endogenous pathway involved in several physiological and pathological cascades in the brain. Due to the pathological effects of kinins in blood vessels and tissues, their formation and degradation are tightly controlled. Their components have been related to several central nervous system diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and others. Bradykinin and its receptors(B1R and B2R) may have a role in the pathophysiology of certain central nervous system diseases. It has been suggested that kinin B1R is up-regulated in pathological conditions and has a neurodegenerative pattern, while kinin B2R is constitutive and can act as a neuroprotective factor in many neurological conditions. The renin angiotensin system(RAS) is an important blood pressure regulator and controls both sodium and water intake. AngⅡ is a potent vasoconstrictor molecule and angiotensin converting enzyme is the major enzyme responsible for its release. AngⅡ acts mainly on the AT1 receptor, with involvement in several systemic and neurological disorders. Brain RAS has been associated with physiological pathways, but is also associated with brain disorders. This review describes topics relating to the involvement of both systems in several forms of brain dysfunction and indicates components of the KKS and RAS that have been used as targets in several pharmacological approaches.

  6. Molecular understanding of aluminum-induced topological changes in (CCG)12 triplet repeats: relevance to neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latha, Kallur Siddaramaiah; Anitha, Suram; Rao, Kosagi Sharaf Jagannatha; Viswamitra, Mysore Ananthamurthy

    2002-10-09

    Recent studies have shown that gene mutations are involved in the pathology of neurological disorders. CCG repeats cause genetic instability and are localized at the 5' end of the non-coding regions of the FMR1 gene in fragile X syndrome. Our studies for the first time showed that aluminum (Al) levels were elevated in the serum samples of fragile X syndrome and also provide evidence for the interaction of aluminum with (CCG)12-repeats. Circular dichroism spectroscopic studies of (CCG)12 indicated B-DNA conformation and in the presence of Al (10(-5) M) CCG repeats attained Z-DNA conformation. Further spectroscopic studies, which included melting profiles, ethidium bromide binding patterns and interaction of Z-DNA specific polyclonal antibodies confirmed the Z-conformation in (CCG)12-repeats in the presence of Al (10(-5) M). It is interesting to mention that Al-induced Z-conformation is stable even after the total removal of Al from CCG by desferoximine, a chelating drug. This is the first report to proof the role of Al in modulating the DNA (CCG repeats) topology and this information provides a clue about the possible involvement of Al at a molecular level in neurological/neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Therapeutic utility of Phosphodiesterase type I inhibitors in neurological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Esteves Medina

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal plasticity is an essential property of the brain that is impaired in different neurological conditions. Phosphodiesterase type 1 (PDE1 inhibitors can enhance levels of the second messengers cAMP/cGMP leading to the expression of neuronal plasticity-related genes, neurotrophic factors and neuroprotective molecules. These neuronal plasticity enhancement properties make PDE1 inhibitors good candidates as therapeutic agents in many neurological conditions. However, the lack of specificity of the drugs currently available poses a challenge to the systematic evaluation of the beneficial effect of these agents. The development of more specific drugs may pave the way for the use of PDE1 inhibitors as therapeutic agents in cases of neurodevelopmental conditions such as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and in degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

  8. Epidemiology of neurological disorders in India: Review of background, prevalence and incidence of epilepsy, stroke, Parkinson′s disease and tremors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Gourie-Devi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth and development of neuroepidemiology in India during the last four decades has been documented highlighting the historical milestones. The prevalence rates of the spectrum of neurological disorders from different regions of the country ranged from 967-4,070 with a mean of 2394 per 100000 population, providing a rough estimate of over 30 million people with neurological disorders (excluding neuroinfections and traumatic injuries. Prevalence and incidence rates of common disorders including epilepsy, stroke, Parkinson′s disease and tremors determined through population-based surveys show considerable variation across different regions of the country. The need for a standardized screening questionnaire, uniform methodology for case ascertainment and diagnosis is an essential requiste for generating robust national data on neurological disorders. Higher rates of prevalence of neurological disorders in rural areas, 6-8 million people with epilepsy and high case fatality rates of stroke (27-42% call for urgent strategies to establish outreach neurology services to cater to remote and rural areas, develop National Epilepsy Control Program and establish stroke units at different levels of health care pyramid.

  9. Synaptic Interactome Mining Reveals p140Cap as a New Hub for PSD Proteins Involved in Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, Annalisa; Sorokina, Oksana; Adrait, Annie; Angelini, Costanza; Russo, Isabella; Morellato, Alessandro; Matteoli, Michela; Menna, Elisabetta; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; McLean, Colin; Armstrong, J. Douglas; Ala, Ugo; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Brusco, Alfredo; Couté, Yohann; De Rubeis, Silvia; Turco, Emilia; Defilippi, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Altered synaptic function has been associated with neurological and psychiatric conditions including intellectual disability, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Amongst the recently discovered synaptic proteins is p140Cap, an adaptor that localizes at dendritic spines and regulates their maturation and physiology. We recently showed that p140Cap knockout mice have cognitive deficits, impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), and immature, filopodia-like dendritic spines. Only a few p140Cap interacting proteins have been identified in the brain and the molecular complexes and pathways underlying p140Cap synaptic function are largely unknown. Here, we isolated and characterized the p140Cap synaptic interactome by co-immunoprecipitation from crude mouse synaptosomes, followed by mass spectrometry-based proteomics. We identified 351 p140Cap interactors and found that they cluster to sub complexes mostly located in the postsynaptic density (PSD). p140Cap interactors converge on key synaptic processes, including transmission across chemical synapses, actin cytoskeleton remodeling and cell-cell junction organization. Gene co-expression data further support convergent functions: the p140Cap interactors are tightly co-expressed with each other and with p140Cap. Importantly, the p140Cap interactome and its co-expression network show strong enrichment in genes associated with schizophrenia, autism, bipolar disorder, intellectual disability and epilepsy, supporting synaptic dysfunction as a shared biological feature in brain diseases. Overall, our data provide novel insights into the molecular organization of the synapse and indicate that p140Cap acts as a hub for postsynaptic complexes relevant to psychiatric and neurological disorders. PMID:28713243

  10. Nose-to-brain drug delivery by nanoparticles in the treatment of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wei-Yi; Shalini, Suku-Maran; Costantino, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Many potential drugs for the treatment of neurological diseases are unable to reach the brain in sufficient enough concentrations to be therapeutic because of the blood brain barrier. On the other hand, direct delivery of drugs to the brain provides the possibility of a greater therapeutic-toxic ratio than with systemic drug delivery. The use of intranasal delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain provides a means of bypassing the blood brain barrier in a non-invasive manner. In this respect, nanosized drug carriers were shown to enhance the delivery of drugs to CNS compared to equivalent drug solution formulations. Neurological conditions that have been studied in animal models that could benefit from nose-to-brain delivery of nanotherapeutics include pain, epilepsy, neurodegenerative disease and infectious diseases. The delivery of drugs to the brain via the nose-to-brain route holds great promise, on the basis of preclinical research by means of drug delivery systems such as polymeric nanoparticles and clinical data related to intranasal delivery to CNS of large molecular weight biologics administered in solution, but safety issues about toxicity on nasal mucosa, Np transport into the brain, delivery only to specific brain regions and variability in the adsorbed dose still represent research topics that need to be considered, with a view of clinical translation of these delivery systems.

  11. Conversion disorder: from DSM IV to DSM 5 or from a psychiatric to a neurological diagnosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vermeulen, M; Willems, M H A

    2015-01-01

    According to one of the diagnostic criteria of the dsm iv for conversion disorder there has to be a temporal relationship between psychological factors and the onset, or the worsening, of the symptoms...

  12. Manic depressive psychosis and schizophrenia are neurological disorders at the extremes of CNS maturation and nutritional disorders associated with a deficit in marine fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, L F

    2001-12-01

    The maturational theory of brain development comprises manic depressive psychosis and schizophrenia. It holds that the disorders are part of human diversity in growth and maturation, which explains their ubiquity, shared susceptibility genes and multifactorial inheritance. Rate of maturation and age at puberty are the genotype; the disorders are localized at the extremes with normality in between. This is based on the association between onset of puberty and the final regressive event, with pruning of 40% of excitatory synapses leaving the inhibitory ones fairly unchanged. This makes excitability, a fundamental property of nervous tissue, a distinguishing factor: the earlier puberty, the greater excitability--the later puberty, the greater deficit. Biological treatment supports deviation from the norm: neuroleptics are convulsant; antidepressives are anti-epiletogenic. There is an association between onset of puberty and body-build: early maturers are pyknic broad-built, late ones linearly leptosomic. This discrepancy is similar to that in the two disorders, supporting the theory that body-build is the phenotype. Standard of living is the environmental factor, which affects pubertal age and shifts the panorama of mental illness accordingly. Unnatural death has increased with antipsychotics. Other treatment is needed. PUFA deficit has been observed in RBC in both disorders and striking improvements with addition of minor amounts of PUFA. This supports that dietary deficit might cause psychotic development and that prevention is possible. Other neurological disorders also profit from PUFA, underlining a general deficit in the diet.

  13. Zika virus infection, transmission, associated neurological disorders and birth abnormalities:A review of progress in research, priorities and knowledge gaps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yitades Gebre; Nikkiah Forbes; Teshome Gebre

    2016-01-01

    On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization declared that the cluster of microcephaly cases and other neurological disorders constitute public health emergency of international concern. Furthermore, few studies demonstrated that there was an increased evidence of causal relationship of Zika virus (ZIKAV) infection and micro-cephaly, birth abnormalities and neurological disorders such as Guillain–Barr ´e syndrome. ZIKAV transmission occurs mainly by the bite of infected mosquitos (Aedes species), but there are also reports that infections could occur via the placenta, breast milk, saliva, blood transfusion and sex. This article reviews the global efforts, progress in scientific research to understand the pathogenesis of ZIKAV infection & disease, clinical pre-sentations, congenital transmission and autoimmune neurological disorders. The paper further explores the knowledge gaps, future priority research agenda for strategic response including vector control and prevention. We conducted a systematic literature review to synthesise available evidence on ZIKAV infection and its vector and host interaction from electronic databases.

  14. Neurological disorder associated with pestivirus infection in sheep in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pescador Caroline Argenta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-month-old lamb showing signs of severe neurological disease characterized by muscular tremors, hypermetria, and motor incoordination was submitted to the Veterinary Pathology Laboratory - Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. At necropsy, the major findings were a marked reduction of the size of the cerebellum and bilateral dilatation of the lateral ventricles. Microscopically, areas of cellular disorganization in the cerebellar cortex, reduction of the granular layer of cerebellum associated with decreased density of cells, and the presence of large cytoplasmic vacuoles in the molecular layer were observed. Neurons of the gray matter of the brain and macrophages of the mesenteric lymph nodes stained positively by the immunohistochemistry test using the monoclonal antibody 15C5 against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus. Taken together, those results are consistent with a pestivirus infection, either Border Disease Virus (BDV or BVDV.

  15. Development of a Kinect-based exergaming system for motor rehabilitation in neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estepa, A.; Sponton Piriz, S.; Albornoz, E.; Martínez, C.

    2016-04-01

    The development of videogames for physical therapy, known as exergames, has gained much interest in the last years. In this work, a sytem for rehabilitation and clinical evaluation of neurological patients is presented. The Microsoft Kinect device is used to track the full body of patients, and three games were developed to exercise and assess different aspects of balance and gait rehabilitation. The system provides visual feedback by means of an avatar that follows the movements of the patients, and sound and visual stimuli for giving orders during the experience. Also, the system includes a database and management tools for further analysis and monitoring of therapies. The results obtained show, on the one side, a great reception and interest of patients to use the system. On the other side, the specialists considered very useful the data collected and the quantitative analysis provided by the system, which was then adopted for the clinical routine.

  16. Potential of robots as next-generation technology for clinical assessment of neurological disorders and upper-limb therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H. Scott, PhD

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Robotic technologies have profoundly affected the identification of fundamental properties of brain function. This success is attributable to robots being able to control the position of or forces applied to limbs, and their inherent ability to easily, objectively, and reliably quantify sensorimotor behavior. Our general hypothesis is that these same attributes make robotic technologies ideal for clinically assessing sensory, motor, and cognitive impairments in stroke and other neurologi-cal disorders. Further, they provide opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies. The present opinionated review describes how robotic technologies combined with virtual/augmented reality systems can support a broad range of behavioral tasks to objectively quantify brain function. This information could potentially be used to provide more accurate diagnostic and prognostic information than is available from current clinical assessment techniques. The review also highlights the potential benefits of robots to provide upper-limb therapy. Although the capital cost of these technologies is substantial, it pales in comparison with the potential cost reductions to the overall healthcare system that improved assessment and therapeutic interventions offer.

  17. Genetic dys-regulation of astrocytic glutamate transporter EAAT2 and its implications in neurological disorders and manganese toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook Y

    2015-02-01

    Astrocytic glutamate transporters, the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) 2 and EAAT1 (glutamate transporter 1 and glutamate aspartate transporter in rodents, respectively), are the main transporters for maintaining optimal glutamate levels in the synaptic clefts by taking up more than 90% of glutamate from extracellular space thus preventing excitotoxic neuronal death. Reduced expression and function of these transporters, especially EAAT2, has been reported in numerous neurological disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and epilepsy. The mechanism of down-regulation of EAAT2 in these diseases has yet to be fully established. Genetic as well as transcriptional dys-regulation of these transporters by various modes, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms and epigenetics, resulting in impairment of their functions, might play an important role in the etiology of neurological diseases. Consequently, there has been an extensive effort to identify molecular targets for enhancement of EAAT2 expression as a potential therapeutic approach. Several pharmacological agents increase expression of EAAT2 via nuclear factor κB and cAMP response element binding protein at the transcriptional level. However, the negative regulatory mechanisms of EAAT2 have yet to be identified. Recent studies, including those from our laboratory, suggest that the transcriptional factor yin yang 1 plays a critical role in the repressive effects of various neurotoxins, such as manganese (Mn), on EAAT2 expression. In this review, we will focus on transcriptional epigenetics and translational regulation of EAAT2.

  18. Genetic dys-regulation of astrocytic glutamate transporter EAAT2 and its implications in neurological disorders and manganese toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic glutamate transporters, the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) 2 and EAAT1 [glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in rodents, respectively], are the main transporters for maintaining optimal glutamate levels in the synaptic clefts by taking up more than 90% of glutamate from extracellular space thus preventing excitotoxic neuronal death. Reduced expression and function of these transporters, especially EAAT2, has been reported in numerous neurological disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia and epilepsy. The mechanism of down-regulation of EAAT2 in these diseases has yet to be fully established. Genetic as well as transcriptional dys-regulation of these transporters by various modes, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and epigenetics, resulting in impairment of their functions, might play an important role in the etiology of neurological diseases. Consequently, there has been an extensive effort to identify molecular targets for enhancement of EAAT2 expression as a potential therapeutic approach. Several pharmacological agents increase expression of EAAT2 via NF-κB and CREB at the transcriptional level. However, the negative regulatory mechanisms of EAAT2 have yet to be identified. Recent studies, including those from our laboratory, suggest that the transcriptional factor yin yang 1 (YY1) plays a critical role in the repressive effects of various neurotoxins, such as manganese (Mn), on EAAT2 expression. In this review, we will focus on transcriptional epigenetics, and translational regulation of EAAT2. PMID:25064045

  19. When neurological symptoms are not what they appear: the challenge of caring for patients with conversion disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penman, M F

    1993-09-01

    Conversion Disorders involve the psychogenic loss or disturbance of sensory, motor or other physical functions in a manner suggestive of neurologic or other somatic disease but without any actual finding of the latter. These problems are subconscious, with patients not being able to control their symptoms. Jean-Marie Charcot, in the 19th century, was fascinated with this disorder and his work, followed by that of Sigmund Freud, laid the foundation for our modern concept of Conversion Disorder. Multiple Sclerosis, with its fluctuating and unpredictable symptoms has frequently been erroneously diagnosed in these cases. The often bizarre, flamboyant presentations, while interesting, pose many difficult and complex management problems. This paper will describe three of the more severe and disabled examples of this condition seen in the London Multiple Sclerosis Clinic and an attempt will be made to uncover common patient characteristics. Current thoughts regarding the management of these patients will be outlined, the emphasis being on helping neuroscience nurses develop an approach which is informed, positive and compassionate.

  20. Role of histaminergic system in blood-brain barrier dysfunction associated with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos-Cabrera, Ivette; Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has been associated with several acute and chronic brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy. This represents a critical situation because damaged integrity of the BBB is related to the influx of immune mediators, plasma proteins and other outside elements from blood to the central nervous system (CNS) that may trigger a cascade of events that leads to neuroinflammation. In this review, evidence that mast cells and the release of factors such as histamine play an important role in the neuroinflammatory process associated with brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy is presented.

  1. Central Nervous System-Peripheral Immune System Dialogue in Neurological Disorders: Possible Application of Neuroimmunology in Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Sun; Park, Min-Jung; Kwon, Min-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Previous concepts of immune-privileged sites obscured the role of peripheral immune cells in neurological disorders and excluded the consideration of the potential benefits of immunotherapy. Recently, however, numerous studies have demonstrated that the blood-brain barrier in the central nervous system is an educational barrier rather than an absolute barrier to peripheral immune cells. Emerging knowledge of immune-privileged sites suggests that peripheral immune cells can infiltrate these sites via educative gates and that crosstalk can occur between infiltrating immune cells and the central nervous system parenchyma. This concept can be expanded to the testis, which has long been considered an immune-privileged site, and to neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Thus, we propose that the relationship between peripheral immune cells, the brain, and the urologic system should be considered as an additional possible mechanism in urologic diseases, and that immunotherapy might be an alternative therapeutic strategy in treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

  2. Hemolytic anemia following high dose intravenous immunoglobulin in patients with chronic neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, L H; Christiansen, Ingelise; Harbo, T

    2014-01-01

    High dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established treatment for various neuromuscular disorders. Recently, cases of hemolytic anemia following IVIG have been observed. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of anemia and hemolysis after IVIG and its relationship...

  3. The role of placebo in the diagnosis and treatment of functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelfanger, K S

    2017-01-01

    Placebo therapy can produce meaningful, clinical relief for a variety of conditions. While placebos are not without their ethically fraught history, they continue to be used, largely covertly, even today. Because the prognosis for psychogenic disorders is often poor and recovery may be highly dependent on the patient's belief in the diagnosis and treatment regimen, some physicians find placebo therapy for psychogenic disorders compelling, but also particularly contentious. Yet placebos also have a long tradition of being used for provocative diagnosis (wherein placebo is used to elicit and/or terminate the symptoms as a way of diagnosing symptoms as "psychogenic"). In this chapter we discuss cases describing placebo as therapy for psychogenic disorders and the challenges related to embedded Cartesian beliefs in Western medicine. The legitimate ethical reservations against placebo therapy, in general, have been related to assumptions about their "inertness" and a requirement for deception, both which are being refuted by emerging data. In this chapter, we also re-evaluate the concerns associated with placebo therapy for psychogenic disorders by asking, "Are we harming patients by withholding placebo treatment?"

  4. IVIg in other autoimmune neurological disorders: current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos

    2008-07-01

    A number of autoimmune disorders have been identified in which IVIg treatment may be beneficial. Evidence for the use of IVIg in inflammatory myopathies comes from controlled trials in dermatomyositis (DM) and sporadic-inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). In DM, muscle strength was increased and neuromuscular scores and skin rashes improved. Results for s-IBM have not been as encouraging as those observed for DM. Subsequently, IVIg should be recommended as a second-line therapy in DM and used for life-threatening dysphagia in s-IBM. Using an animal model of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG), studies also indicate that IVIg can significantly improve clinical symptoms and affect pathogenic idiotypic antibodies. In human MG, studies indicate that IVIg exhibited equal efficacy compared to plasmapheresis. IVIg can therefore be recommended for use in an MG crisis or in lieu of plasmapheresis. The role of IVIg in the chronic management of MG has not been studied. IVIg has also been investigated in autoimmune CNS disorders. In a controlled study in patients with stiff person syndrome IVIg was effective, with improvements in the distribution of stiffness index and heightened sensitivity scores. For neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, post-polio syndrome, pain, fibrosis, and autoimmune sleep disorders, some early promising results for the use of IVIg are emerging, but remain to be fully investigated. In conclusion, IVIg appears to be an effective treatment for a number of autoimmune disorders, however, optimal dosing and pharmacogenetic studies are necessary.

  5. The pharmacology of neurotrophic treatment with Cerebrolysin: brain protection and repair to counteract pathologies of acute and chronic neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masliah, E; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2012-04-01

    Neurotrophic factors are considered as part of the therapeutic strategy for neurological disorders like dementia, stroke and traumatic brain injury. Cerebrolysin is a neuropeptide preparation which mimics the action of endogenous neurotrophic factors on brain protection and repair. In dementia models, Cerebrolysin decreases β-amyloid deposition and microtubule-associated protein tau phosphorylation by regulating glycogen synthase kinase-3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity, increases synaptic density and restores neuronal cytoarchitecture. These effects protect integrity of the neuronal circuits and thus result in improved cognitive and behavioral performance. Furthermore, Cerebrolysin enhances neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, the basis for neuronal replacement therapy in neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental studies in stroke animal models have shown that Cerebrolysin stabilizes the structural integrity of cells by inhibition of calpain and reduces the number of apoptotic cells after ischemic lesion. Cerebrolysin induces restorative processes, decreases infarct volume and edema formation and promotes functional recovery. Stroke-induced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone was also promoted by Cerebrolysin, thus supporting the brain's self-repair after stroke. Both, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury conditions stimulate the expression of natural neurotrophic factors to promote repair and regeneration processes -axonal regeneration, neuronal plasticity and neurogenesis- that is considered to be crucial for the future recovery. Neuroprotective effects of Cerebrolysin on experimentally induced traumatic spinal cord injury have shown that Cerebrolysin prevents apoptosis of lesioned motoneurons and promotes functional recovery. This section summarizes the most relevant data on the pharmacology of Cerebrolysin obtained from in vitro assays (biochemical and cell cultures) and in vivo animal models of acute and chronic neurological disorders.

  6. Comparison of the influence of two interbody fusion surgeries on postoperative neurologic recovery in patients with lumbar degenerative disease%两种椎间融合手术对腰椎退变性疾病术后神经功能恢复的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明明; 侯岩珂; 王禹增

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the influence of TLIF and PLIF on postoperative neurologic recovery in patients with lumbar degenerative disease .Methods 224 patients with lumbar degenerative disease were divided into the TLIF group (n=98) and the PLIF group (n=126) ,then the clinical results ,postoperative neurological injury and JOA score 3 months postoper‐ative were contrasted between the two groups .Results There was no significantly difference in the effective rate(TLIF group 90.8% and PLIF group 89.7% ) between the two groups(P> 0.05);the incidence of postoperative neurologic injury in the TLIF group was 5.1% ,significantly lower than 19.8% in the PLIF group(P0.05) ,but significantly improved 1week after the surgery in the two groups(P 0.05).Conclusion TLIF and PLIF have good results in patients with lumbar degenerative diseases ,al‐though different surgical methods ,but there is no significant difference between the long‐term postoperative recovery of neuro‐logical function ,and therefore should be closely combined with the patient's condition to select the appropriate surgical ap‐proach.%目的:探讨椎间孔入路腰椎融合术(TLIF)与后路椎间融合术(PLIF)在腰椎退行性疾病治疗中对患者术后神经功能恢复的影响。方法224例腰椎退行性疾病患者根据手术方式分为TLIF组(n=98)及PLIF组(n=126),对比2组临床效果、术后神经功能损伤及术后3个月时神经功能JOA评分。结果2组有效率(TLIF组90.8%,PLIF组89.7%)比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);TLIF组术后神经根损伤发生率5.1%,显著低于PLIF组的19.8%(P<0.01);2组术前JOA评分比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),术后均显著增高(P<0.01),术后1周TLIF组显著高于PLIF组(P<0.01),术后3个月2组比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论 TLIF与PLIF在腰椎退行性疾病的外科治疗中均具有良好效果,虽然手术方式

  7. X-ray diagnosis of post-traumatic degenerative-dystrophic lesions of the vertebrae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, V.P. (Omskij Meditsinskij Inst. (USSR))

    Immediate and long-term consequences of the spinal injury have been studied in 221 patients aged 13 to 70 years, applying clinical and radiological methods. Various degenerative-dystrophic alterations have been frequently found at the level of the damaged spinal segment and included cartilaginous knots and discal hernia and fibrosis, local spondylosis and spondylarthrosis, osteochondrosis, calcification of the disk and ligamentous apparatus. These pathologic changes infrequently cause patients' complaints and neurological disturbances. The degenerative-dystrophic processes in the spine, following an acute injury manifest no specific features, except for some peculiarities of the traumatic cartilaginous knot (greater size and depth, partial hanging of the obturating plate over the knot bed). The type and gravity of the fracture, the degree of static-dynamic disorders of the vertebral column and, to some extent, the patient's age most significantly determine the development of the degenerative-dystrophic processes in the damaged spinal segment. Post-traumatic clinicofunctional examination of the spine has been proved important.

  8. 'Lumbar Degenerative Kyphosis' Is Not Byword for Degenerative Sagittal Imbalance: Time to Replace a Misconception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee; Jang, Jee-Soo; Kim, Sung-Min; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Jung-Kil

    2017-03-01

    Lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK) is a subgroup of the flat-back syndrome and is most commonly caused by unique life styles, such as a prolonged crouched posture during agricultural work and performing activities of daily living on the floor. Unfortunately, LDK has been used as a byword for degenerative sagittal imbalance, and this sometimes causes confusion. The aim of this review was to evaluate the exact territory of LDK, and to introduce another appropriate term for degenerative sagittal deformity. Unlike what its name suggests, LDK does not only include sagittal balance disorder of the lumbar spine and kyphosis, but also sagittal balance disorder of the whole spine and little lordosis of the lumbar spine. Moreover, this disease is closely related to the occupation of female farmers and an outdated Asian life style. These reasons necessitate a change in the nomenclature of this disorder to prevent misunderstanding. We suggest the name "primary degenerative sagittal imbalance" (PDSI), which encompasses degenerative sagittal misalignments of unknown origin in the whole spine in older-age patients, and is associated with back muscle wasting. LDK may be regarded as a subgroup of PDSI related to an occupation in agriculture. Conservative treatments such as exercise and physiotherapy are recommended as first-line treatments for patients with PDSI, and surgical treatment is considered only if conservative treatments failed. The measurement of spinopelvic parameters for sagittal balance is important prior to deformity corrective surgery. LDK can be considered a subtype of PDSI that is more likely to occur in female farmers, and hence the use of LDK as a global term for all degenerative sagittal imbalance disorders is better avoided. To avoid confusion, we recommend PDSI as a newer, more accurate diagnostic term instead of LDK.

  9. Validation of the Persian version of the dysphagia handicap index in patients with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar-Bafrooei, Ebrahim; Bakhtiary, Jalal; Khatoonabadi, Ahmad Reza; Fatehi, Farzad; Maroufizadeh, Saman; Fathali, Mojtaba

    2016-07-06

    Dysphagia as a common condition affecting many aspects of the patient's life. The Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI) is a reliable self-reported questionnaire developed specifically to measure the impact of dysphagia on the patient's quality of life. The aim of this study was to translate the questionnaire to Persian and to measure its validity and reliability in patients with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia. A formal forward-backward translation of DHI was performed based on the guidelines for the cross-cultural adaptation of self-report measures. A total of 57 patients with neurogenic dysphagia who were referred to the neurology clinics of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, participated in this study. Internal consistency reliability of the DHI was examined using Cronbach's alpha, and test-retest reliability of the scale was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The internal consistency of the Persian DHI (P-DHI) was considered to be good; Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the total P-DHI was 0.88. The test-retest reliability for the total and three subscales of the P-DHI ranged from 0.95 to 0.98 using ICC. The P-DHI demonstrated a good reliability, and it can be a valid instrument for evaluating the dysphagia effects on quality of life among Persian language population.

  10. Astrocyte differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells: new tools for neurological disorder research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abinaya Chandrasekaran

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes have a central role in brain development and function, and so have gained increasing attention over the past two decades. Consequently, our knowledge about their origin, differentiation and function has increased significantly, with new research showing that astrocytes cultured alone or co-cultured with neurons have the potential to improve our understanding of various central nervous system (CNS diseases, such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease or Alexander disease. The generation of astrocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs opens up a new area for studying neurologic diseases in vitro; these models could be exploited to identify and validate potential drugs by detecting adverse effects in the early stages of drug development. However, as it is now known that a range of astrocyte populations exist in the brain, it will be important in vitro to develop standardized protocols for the in vitro generation of astrocyte subsets with defined maturity status and phenotypic properties. This will then open new possibilities for co-cultures with neurons and the generation of neural organoids for research purposes. The aim of this review article is to compare and summarize the currently available protocols and their strategies to generate human astrocytes from PSCs. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of human-induced PSCs derived astrocytes in disease modeling.

  11. Apotemnophilia, body integrity identity disorder or xenomelia? Psychiatric and neurologic etiologies face each other

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedda A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Anna Sedda,1,2 Gabriella Bottini1,21Department of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, 2Cognitive Neuropsychology Laboratory, Niguarda Ca’ Granda Hospital, Milan, ItalyAbstract: This review summarizes the available studies of a rare condition in which ­individuals seek the amputation of a healthy limb or desire to be paraplegic. Since 1977, case reports and group studies have been produced, trying to understand the cause of this unusual desire. The main etiological hypotheses are presented, from the psychological/psychiatric to the most recent neurologic explanation. The paradigms adopted and the clinical features are compared across studies and analyzed in detail. Finally, future directions and ethical implications are discussed. A proposal is made to adopt a multidisciplinary approach that comprises state-of-the-art technologies and a variety of theoretical models, including both body representation and psychological and sexual components.Keywords: BIID, limb amputation, somatoparaphrenia, body representation, body ownership

  12. Brain disease, connectivity, plasticity and cognitive therapy: A neurological view of mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubrini, G; Martín-Montes, A; Díez-Ascaso, O; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2017-04-25

    Our conception of the mind-brain relationship has evolved from the traditional idea of dualism to current evidence that mental functions result from brain activity. This paradigm shift, combined with recent advances in neuroimaging, has led to a novel definition of brain functioning in terms of structural and functional connectivity. The purpose of this literature review is to describe the relationship between connectivity, brain lesions, cerebral plasticity, and functional recovery. Assuming that brain function results from the organisation of the entire brain in networks, brain dysfunction would be a consequence of altered brain network connectivity. According to this approach, cognitive and behavioural impairment following brain damage result from disrupted functional organisation of brain networks. However, the dynamic and versatile nature of these circuits makes recovering brain function possible. Cerebral plasticity allows for functional reorganisation leading to recovery, whether spontaneous or resulting from cognitive therapy, after brain disease. Current knowledge of brain connectivity and cerebral plasticity provides new insights into normal brain functioning, the mechanisms of brain damage, and functional recovery, which in turn serve as the foundations of cognitive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Grey matter abnormalities in children and adolescents with functional neurological symptom disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasia Kozlowska

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The SMA, STG, and DMPFC are known to be involved in the perception of emotion and the modulation of motor responses. These larger volumes may reflect the early expression of an experience-dependent plasticity process associated with increased vigilance to others' emotional states and enhanced motor readiness to organize self-protectively in the context of the long-standing relational stress that is characteristic of this disorder.

  14. Synaptopathies: synaptic dysfunction in neurological disorders – A review from students to students

    OpenAIRE

    Lepeta, Katarzyna; Lourenco, Mychael V.; Schweitzer, Barbara C.; Martino Adami, Pamela V.; Banerjee, Priyanjalee; Catuara‐Solarz, Silvina; de la Fuente Revenga, Mario; Guillem, Alain Marc; Haidar, Mouna; Ijomone, Omamuyovwi M; Nadorp, Bettina; Qi, Lin; Perera, Nirma D.; Refsgaard, Louise K.; Reid, Kimberley M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Synapses are essential components of neurons and allow information to travel coordinately throughout the nervous system to adjust behavior to environmental stimuli and to control body functions, memories, and emotions. Thus, optimal synaptic communication is required for proper brain physiology, and slight perturbations of synapse function can lead to brain disorders. In fact, increasing evidence has demonstrated the relevance of synapse dysfunction as a major determinant of many neu...

  15. Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease: Crossroads between Neurology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Bugalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-motor symptoms contribute significantly to Parkinson’s disease (PD related disability. Impulse control disorders (ICDs have been recently added to the behavioural spectrum of PD-related non-motor symptoms. Such behaviours are characterized by an inappropriate drive to conduct repetitive behaviours that are usually socially inadequate or result in harmful consequences. Parkinson disease impulse control disorders (PD-ICDs have raised significant interest in the scientific and medical community, not only because of their incapacitating nature, but also because they may represent a valid model of ICDs beyond PD and a means to study the physiology of drive, impulse control and compulsive actions in the normal brain. In this review, we discuss some unresolved issues regarding PD-ICDs, including the association with psychiatric co-morbidities such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and with dopamine related side effects, such as hallucinations and dyskinesias; the relationship with executive cognitive dysfunction; and the neural underpinnings of ICDs in PD. We also discuss the contribution of neuroscience studies based on animal-models towards a mechanistic explanation of the development of PD-ICDs, specifically regarding corticostriatal control of goal directed and habitual actions.

  16. Inertial Sensor-Based Robust Gait Analysis in Non-Hospital Settings for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Tunca

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The gold standards for gait analysis are instrumented walkways and marker-based motion capture systems, which require costly infrastructure and are only available in hospitals and specialized gait clinics. Even though the completeness and the accuracy of these systems are unquestionable, a mobile and pervasive gait analysis alternative suitable for non-hospital settings is a clinical necessity. Using inertial sensors for gait analysis has been well explored in the literature with promising results. However, the majority of the existing work does not consider realistic conditions where data collection and sensor placement imperfections are imminent. Moreover, some of the underlying assumptions of the existing work are not compatible with pathological gait, decreasing the accuracy. To overcome these challenges, we propose a foot-mounted inertial sensor-based gait analysis system that extends the well-established zero-velocity update and Kalman filtering methodology. Our system copes with various cases of data collection difficulties and relaxes some of the assumptions invalid for pathological gait (e.g., the assumption of observing a heel strike during a gait cycle. The system is able to extract a rich set of standard gait metrics, including stride length, cadence, cycle time, stance time, swing time, stance ratio, speed, maximum/minimum clearance and turning rate. We validated the spatio-temporal accuracy of the proposed system by comparing the stride length and swing time output with an IR depth-camera-based reference system on a dataset comprised of 22 subjects. Furthermore, to highlight the clinical applicability of the system, we present a clinical discussion of the extracted metrics on a disjoint dataset of 17 subjects with various neurological conditions.

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury Induces Genome-Wide Transcriptomic, Methylomic, and Network Perturbations in Brain and Blood Predicting Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingying Meng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the traumatic brain injury (TBI pathology, particularly concussive injury, is a serious obstacle for diagnosis, treatment, and long-term prognosis. Here we utilize modern systems biology in a rodent model of concussive injury to gain a thorough view of the impact of TBI on fundamental aspects of gene regulation, which have the potential to drive or alter the course of the TBI pathology. TBI perturbed epigenomic programming, transcriptional activities (expression level and alternative splicing, and the organization of genes in networks centered around genes such as Anax2, Ogn, and Fmod. Transcriptomic signatures in the hippocampus are involved in neuronal signaling, metabolism, inflammation, and blood function, and they overlap with those in leukocytes from peripheral blood. The homology between genomic signatures from blood and brain elicited by TBI provides proof of concept information for development of biomarkers of TBI based on composite genomic patterns. By intersecting with human genome-wide association studies, many TBI signature genes and network regulators identified in our rodent model were causally associated with brain disorders with relevant link to TBI. The overall results show that concussive brain injury reprograms genes which could lead to predisposition to neurological and psychiatric disorders, and that genomic information from peripheral leukocytes has the potential to predict TBI pathogenesis in the brain.

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury Induces Genome-Wide Transcriptomic, Methylomic, and Network Perturbations in Brain and Blood Predicting Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingying; Zhuang, Yumei; Ying, Zhe; Agrawal, Rahul; Yang, Xia; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    The complexity of the traumatic brain injury (TBI) pathology, particularly concussive injury, is a serious obstacle for diagnosis, treatment, and long-term prognosis. Here we utilize modern systems biology in a rodent model of concussive injury to gain a thorough view of the impact of TBI on fundamental aspects of gene regulation, which have the potential to drive or alter the course of the TBI pathology. TBI perturbed epigenomic programming, transcriptional activities (expression level and alternative splicing), and the organization of genes in networks centered around genes such as Anax2, Ogn, and Fmod. Transcriptomic signatures in the hippocampus are involved in neuronal signaling, metabolism, inflammation, and blood function, and they overlap with those in leukocytes from peripheral blood. The homology between genomic signatures from blood and brain elicited by TBI provides proof of concept information for development of biomarkers of TBI based on composite genomic patterns. By intersecting with human genome-wide association studies, many TBI signature genes and network regulators identified in our rodent model were causally associated with brain disorders with relevant link to TBI. The overall results show that concussive brain injury reprograms genes which could lead to predisposition to neurological and psychiatric disorders, and that genomic information from peripheral leukocytes has the potential to predict TBI pathogenesis in the brain.

  19. Barriers to diagnosis of a rare neurological disorder in China--lived experiences of Rett syndrome families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Faye; Downs, Jenny; Li, Jianghong; Bao, Xin-Hua; Leonard, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a rare neurological disorder affecting girls and usually caused by a mutation on the MECP2 gene. It is estimated that approximately 1,000 girls are born every year in China with Rett syndrome but far fewer have received a diagnosis. Fourteen of 74 Chinese families known to the International Rett Syndrome Phenotype Database participated in this qualitative study. Telephone interviews were conducted in Mandarin to explore pathways to a diagnosis of Rett syndrome in China and associated barriers. Families consulted multiple clinical centers and eventually received a diagnosis at a centrally located hospital. Over the course of this pathway, families encountered lack of knowledge and diagnostic expertise for Rett syndrome at local levels and a heavily over-burdened hospital system. There was a paucity of information available to guide management of this rare disorder after the diagnosis had been received. Our study suggests that the frustrations experienced by families could in part be addressed by the provision of information, education, and training related to Rett syndrome for clinicians, additional resources to allow clinicians to request genetic testing for confirmation of the clinical diagnosis and for information and support services for families.

  20. Addressing the burden of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders: key messages from Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram; Chisholm, Dan; Parikh, Rachana; Charlson, Fiona J; Degenhardt, Louisa; Dua, Tarun; Ferrari, Alize J; Hyman, Steve; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Levin, Carol; Lund, Crick; Medina Mora, María Elena; Petersen, Inge; Scott, James; Shidhaye, Rahul; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Thornicroft, Graham; Whiteford, Harvey

    2016-04-16

    The burden of mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders increased by 41% between 1990 and 2010 and now accounts for one in every 10 lost years of health globally. This sobering statistic does not take into account the substantial excess mortality associated with these disorders or the social and economic consequences of MNS disorders on affected persons, their caregivers, and society. A wide variety of effective interventions, including drugs, psychological treatments, and social interventions, can prevent and treat MNS disorders. At the population-level platform of service delivery, best practices include legislative measures to restrict access to means of self-harm or suicide and to reduce the availability of and demand for alcohol. At the community-level platform, best practices include life-skills training in schools to build social and emotional competencies. At the health-care-level platform, we identify three delivery channels. Two of these delivery channels are especially relevant from a public health perspective: self-management (eg, web-based psychological therapy for depression and anxiety disorders) and primary care and community outreach (eg, non-specialist health worker delivering psychological and pharmacological management of selected disorders). The third delivery channel, hospital care, which includes specialist services for MNS disorders and first-level hospitals providing other types of services (such as general medicine, HIV, or paediatric care), play an important part for a smaller proportion of cases with severe, refractory, or emergency presentations and for the integration of mental health care in other health-care channels, respectively. The costs of providing a significantly scaled up package of specified cost-effective interventions for prioritised MNS disorders in low-income and lower-middle-income countries is estimated at US$3-4 per head of population per year. Since a substantial proportion of MNS disorders run a

  1. Republished: Addressing the burden of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders: key messages from Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS disorders increased by 41% between 1990 and 2010 and now accounts for one in every 10 lost years of health globally. This sobering statistic does not take into account the substantial excess mortality associated with these disorders or the social and economic consequences of MNS disorders on affected persons, their caregivers, and society. A wide variety of effective interventions, including drugs, psychological treatments, and social interventions, can prevent and treat MNS disorders. At the population-level platform of service delivery, best practices include legislative measures to restrict access to means of self-harm or suicide and to reduce the availability of and demand for alcohol. At the community-level platform, best practices include life-skills training in schools to build social and emotional competencies. At the health-care-level platform, we identify three delivery channels. Two of these delivery channels are especially relevant from a public health perspective: self-management (eg, web-based psychological therapy for depression and anxiety disorders and primary care and community outreach (eg, non-specialist health worker delivering psychological and pharmacological management of selected disorders. The third delivery channel, hospital care, which includes specialist services for MNS disorders and first-level hospitals providing other types of services (such as general medicine, HIV, or paediatric care, play an important part for a smaller proportion of cases with severe, refractory, or emergency presentations and for the integration of mental health care in other health-care channels, respectively. The costs of providing a significantly scaled up package of specified cost-effective interventions for prioritised MNS disorders in low-income and lower-middle-income countries is estimated at US$3-4 per head of population per year. Since a substantial proportion of MNS

  2. Quality of clinical trials for selected priority mental and neurological disorders in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulugeta A

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anwar Mulugeta,1 Girmay Medhin,2 Getnet Yimer,1 Rahimush Jemal,3 Abebaw Fekadu,4,5 1Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, 2Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, 3Department of Pharmacy, Tikur Anbesa Hospital, 4Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; 5Department of Psychological Medicine, Centre for Affective Disorders, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, UK Background: There is a developing consensus on the effectiveness of various interventions for mental disorders in low- and middle-income countries, and it has been proposed that the main task is to scale up these interventions. In this context, we aimed to review the quality and extent of intervention trials for selected priority mental and neurological disorders in sub-Saharan Africa.Methods: Medline and African Journals Online databases were used for searching relevant articles. Both randomized and nonrandomized clinical trials for the treatment of schizophrenia, depression, maternal depression, bipolar disorder, and epilepsy/seizure disorders that involve pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and physical therapy were included. An extensive list of search terms that identified locations, disorders, interventions, and study types were employed. The qualities of the trials were appraised using the single-component quality assessment of the consolidated standards of reporting trials (CONSORT statement and the Jadad scale.Results: From 1,136 studies identified, only 34 trials that fulfilled inclusion criteria were used for quality analysis. Most studies were clinical trials of treatments for epilepsy and were conducted after 2006. In terms of region, the majority of studies were conducted in South Africa (22 of the 34 studies. Approximately half of the trials (53% were conducted in single center and the majority

  3. /sup 123/I-amphetamine-SPECT in the diagnosis of neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Kreiten, K.; Hartmann, A.; Friedrich, G.; Linck, H.A.; Winkler, C.

    1985-03-01

    In contrast to conventional brain scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate, SPECT with /sup 123/I-IMP enables visualization of the brain tissue itself. The relevance of this imaging technique was evaluated in 54 patients with cerebral disorders. SPECT of the brain was performed with a rotating gamma camera. In 6 of 24 epileptic patients, SPECT revealed foci consistent with EEG-findings which were, however, not detected by CCT. In 4 of 25 patients with cerebrovascular disease, hypoperfused areas were detected by SPECT despite negative results obtained with CCT. In 50% (10/20) of the patients with cerebrovascular disease, SPECT showed a greater functional extent of the lesions than CCT. In 3 patients with migraine and normal CCT, regional perfusion disturbancers were found. SPECT with /sup 123/I-labeled amphetamines, therefore, enables diagnosis of functional perfusion disorders and metabolic disturbances that are not revealed by CCT. In addition, SPECT can be used to exactly demonstrate the functional extent of lesions detected by CCT.

  4. A Darwinian approach to Huntington's disease: subtle health benefits of a neurological disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskenazi, Benjamin R; Wilson-Rich, Noah S; Starks, Philip T

    2007-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that, unlike most autosomal dominant disorders, is not being selected against. One explanation for the maintenance of the mutant HD allele is that it is transparent to natural selection because disease symptoms typically occur subsequent to an individual's peak reproductive years. While true, this observation does not explain the population-level increase in HD. The increase in HD is at least partly the result of enhanced fitness: HD+ individuals have more offspring than unaffected relatives. This phenomenon has previously been explained as the result of elevated promiscuity of HD+ individuals. For this to be true, disease symptoms must be expressed during the otherwise asymptomatic peak reproductive years and promiscuity must increase offspring production; however, neither prediction is supported by data. Instead, new data suggest that the mutant HD allele bestows health benefits on its carriers. HD+ individuals show elevated levels of the tumor suppressor protein p53 and experience significantly less cancer than unaffected siblings. We hypothesize that the mutant HD allele elevates carriers' immune activity and thus HD+ individuals are, on average, healthier than HD- individuals during reproductive years. As health and reproductive output are positively related, data suggest a counterintuitive relationship: health benefits may lead to an increased prevalence of Huntington's disease.

  5. Pacific paradigms of environmentally-induced neurological disorders: Clinical, epidemiological and molecular perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garruto, R.M. (Laboratory of Central Nervous System Studies, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (Unites States))

    During the past quarter century biomedical scientists have begun to recognize the unique opportunities for studying disease etiology and mechanisms of pathogenesis in non-Western anthropological populations with focal, endemic diseases. The systematic search for etiological factors and mechanisms of pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders is perhaps nowhere better exemplified than in the western Pacific. During the past three decades, the opportunistic and multidisciplinary study of hyperendemic foci of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia which occur in different cultures, in different ecological zones and among genetically divergent populations have served as natural models that have had a major impact on our thinking and enhanced our understanding of these and other neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease and the process of early neuronal aging. Our cross-disciplinary approach to these intriguing neurobiological problems and the accumulated epidemiological, genetic, cellular and molecular evidence strongly implicates environmental factors in their causation, specifically the role of aluminum and its interaction with calcium in neuronal degeneration. As a direct consequence of our studies in these Pacific populations, we have undertaken the long-term development of experimental models of neuronal degeneration, in an attempt to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which these toxicants affect the central nervous system. Our experimental studies have resulted in the establishment of an aluminum-induced chronic myelopathy in rabbits and the development of neurofilamentous lesions after low-dose aluminum administration in cell culture.

  6. Combining Non-pharmacological Treatments with Pharmacotherapies for Neurological Disorders: a Unique Interface of the Brain, Drug-Device and Intellectual Property

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorz eBulaj

    2014-01-01

    Mobile medical applications (mHealth), music, and video games are being developed and tested for their ability to improve pharmacotherapy outcomes and medication adherence. Pleiotropic mechanism of music and gamification engages an intrinsic motivation and the brain reward system, supporting therapies in patients with neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, depression, anxiety, or neurodegenerative disorders. Based on accumulating results from clinical trials, an innovative combin...

  7. Magnesium/calcium related neurological disorders in the ALS focus of the Kii Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Masayuki; Yoshida, Munehito; Tamaki, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Yasunori; Minamide, Akihito; Ota, Kiichiro [Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan); Sasajima, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Current epidemiological surveys in the Western Pacific area and Kii Peninsula have suggested that low calcium(Ca), magnesium(Mg) and high aluminum(Al) and manganese(Mn) in river, soil and drinking water may be implicated in the pathogenetic process of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS) and Parkinsonism-dementia(PD). The condition of unbalanced minerals was experimentally mimicked in this study using rats. Male Wistar rats, weighing 200 g, were maintained for 90 days on the following diets: (A) standard diet, (B) low Ca diet, (C) low Ca-Mg diet, (D) low Ca-Mg diet with high Al. In the groups maintained on unbalanced mineral diets, Ca and Mg contents of the bones were lower than standard diet. On the other hand, Ca content of CNS showed higher values in the unbalanced diet groups than those in the standard diet group. This was determined by neutron activation analysis(NAA) at KUR. Also, Ca content in soft tissues of rats given unbalanced mineral diets was higher than those on standard diet. Mg content of soft tissues and spinal cord of rats was markedly lower in the low Ca-Mg plus high Al diet group than the other three groups as determined by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry(ICP). Six Kii cases with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS) also showed higher Ca and lower Mg contents in the CNS tissues than those of neurologically normal controls. The calcification of the spinal ligaments(CSL) has been reported in only 120 cases in the world and 28 cases of CSL in the Kii Peninsula have been found in the same foci as ALS. We analyzed Mg content of 7 spinal bones and 10 ligaments of the CSL and Ca content of 5 spinal bones compared with controls. The CSL showed lower values of Mg contents in bones and ligaments compared to controls. The Ca content in bones of CSL was significantly lower than that of controls. This suggests that the environmental factor may contribute to the pathogenesis of CSL due to low Ca and Mg intake as well as for ALS. (J.P.N.)

  8. Reliability and Validity of the Assessment of Neurological Soft-Signs in Children with and without Attention-Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Peik; Svedin, Carl Goran; Ericsson, Ingegerd; Linden, Christian; Karlsson, Magnus K.; Thernlund, Gunilla

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To study the value and reliability of an examination of neurological soft-signs, often used in Sweden, in the assessment of children with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), by examining children with and without ADHD, as diagnosed by an experienced clinician using the DSM-III-R. Method: We have examined interrater reliability…

  9. Degenerative cerebellar diseases and differential diagnoses; Degenerative Kleinhirnerkrankungen und Differenzialdiagnosen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reith, W.; Roumia, S.; Dietrich, P. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Cerebellar syndromes result in distinct clinical symptoms, such as ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria, intention tremor and eye movement disorders. In addition to the medical history and clinical examination, imaging is particularly important to differentiate other diseases, such as hydrocephalus and multi-infarct dementia from degenerative cerebellar diseases. Degenerative diseases with cerebellar involvement include Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy as well as other diseases including spinocerebellar ataxia. In addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging investigations are also helpful for the differentiation. Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted sequences can sometimes show a signal increase in the pons as a sign of degeneration of pontine neurons and transverse fibers in the basilar part of the pons. The imaging is particularly necessary to exclude other diseases, such as normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), multi-infarct dementia and cerebellar lesions. (orig.) [German] Klinisch imponieren Kleinhirnsyndrome durch Ataxie, Dysarthrie, Dysmetrie, Intentionstremor und Augenbewegungsstoerungen. Neben der Anamnese und klinischen Untersuchung ist die Bildgebung v. a. wichtig um andere Erkrankungen wie Hydrozephalus und Multiinfarktdemenz von degenerativen Kleinhirnerkrankungen zu differenzieren. Zu den degenerativen Erkrankungen mit Kleinhirnbeteiligung gehoeren der Morbus Parkinson, die Multisystematrophie sowie weitere Erkrankungen einschliesslich der spinozerebellaeren Ataxien. Neben der MRT sind auch nuklearmedizinische Untersuchungen zur Differenzierung hilfreich. Axiale Fluid-attenuated-inversion-recovery(FLAIR)- und T2-gewichtete Sequenzen koennen mitunter eine Signalsteigerung im Pons als Ausdruck einer Degeneration der pontinen Neuronen und transversalen Bahnen im Brueckenfuss zeigen. Die Bildgebung ist aber v. a. notwendig, um andere Erkrankungen wie Normaldruckhydrozephalus

  10. The promises and pitfalls of applying computational models to neurological and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Christoph; Fletcher, Paul C

    2016-10-01

    Computational models have become an integral part of basic neuroscience and have facilitated some of the major advances in the field. More recently, such models have also been applied to the understanding of disruptions in brain function. In this review, using examples and a simple analogy, we discuss the potential for computational models to inform our understanding of brain function and dysfunction. We argue that they may provide, in unprecedented detail, an understanding of the neurobiological and mental basis of brain disorders and that such insights will be key to progress in diagnosis and treatment. However, there are also potential problems attending this approach. We highlight these and identify simple principles that should always govern the use of computational models in clinical neuroscience, noting especially the importance of a clear specification of a model's purpose and of the mapping between mathematical concepts and reality.

  11. Insights into the Pathology of the α2-Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in Neurological Disorders; Lessons from Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Toke J; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    A functional Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase consists of a catalytic α subunit and a regulatory β subunit. Four α isoforms of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase are found in mammals, each with a unique expression pattern and catalytic activity. The α2 isoform, encoded by the ATP1A2 gene, is primarily found in the central nervous system (CNS) and in heart-, skeletal- and smooth muscle tissues. In the CNS, the α2 isoform is mainly expressed in glial cells. In particular, the α2 isoform is found in astrocytes, important for astrocytic K(+) clearance and, consequently, the indirect uptake of neurotransmitters. Both processes are essential for proper brain activity, and autosomal dominantly mutations in the ATP1A2 gene cause the neurological disorder Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2). FHM2 is a severe subtype of migraine with aura including temporary numbness or weakness, and affecting only one side of the body. FHM2 patients often suffer from neurological comorbidities such as seizures, sensory disturbances, cognitive impairment, and psychiatric manifestations. The functional consequences of FHM2 disease mutations leads to a partial or complete loss of function of pump activity; however, a clear phenotype-genotype correlation has yet to be elucidated. Gene-modified mouse models targeting the Atp1a2 gene have proved instrumental in the understanding of the pathology of FHM2. Several Atp1a2 knockout (KO) mice targeting different exons have been reported. Homozygous Atp1a2 KO mice die shortly after birth due to respiratory malfunction resulting from abnormal Cl(-) homeostasis in brainstem neurons. Heterozygous KO mice are viable, but display altered behavior and neurological deficits such as altered spatial learning, decreased motor activity and enhanced fear/anxiety compared to wild type mice. FHM2 knock-in (KI) mouse models carrying the human in vivo disease mutations W887R and G301R have also been reported. Both models display altered cortical spreading depression (CSD) and point

  12. INSIGHTS INTO THE PATHOLOGY OF THE α2-Na+/K+-ATPase IN NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS; LESSONS FROM ANIMAL MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toke Jost Isaksen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A functional Na+/K+-ATPase consists of a catalytic α subunit and a regulatory β subunit. Four α isoforms of the Na+/K+-ATPase are found in mammals, each with a unique expression pattern and catalytic activity. The α2 isoform, encoded by the ATP1A2 gene, is primarily found in the central nervous system (CNS and in heart-, skeletal- and smooth muscle tissues. In the CNS, the α2 isoform is mainly expressed in neuroglial cells. In particular, the α2 isoform is found in astrocytes, and is important for astrocytic K+ clearance and, consequently, the indirect uptake of neurotransmitters. Both processes are essential for proper brain activity, and autosomal dominantly mutations in the ATP1A2 gene cause the neurological disorder Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2. FHM2 is a severe subtype of migraine with aura that involving temporary numbness or weakness, and affecting only one side of the body. FHM2 patients often suffer from neurological comorbidities such as seizures, sensory disturbances, cognitive impairment and psychiatric manifestations. The functional consequences of FHM2 disease mutations leads to a partial or complete loss of function of pump activity; however a clear phenotype-genotype correlation has yet to be elucidated. Gene-modified mouse models targeting the Atp1a2 gene have proved instrumental in the understanding of the pathology of FHM2. Several Atp1a2 knockout (KO mice targeting different exons have been reported. Homozygous Atp1a2 KO mice die shortly after birth due to respiratory malfunction resulting from abnormal Cl- homeostasis in brainstem neurons. Heterozygous KO mice are viable, but display altered behavior and neurological deficits such as altered spatial learning, decreased motor activity and enhanced fear/anxiety compared to wild type mice. FHM2 knock-in (KI mouse models carrying the human in vivo disease mutations W887R and G301R have also been reported. Both models display altered cortical spreading

  13. Neurologic and neuromuscular functional disorders of the pharynx and esophagus; Neurologisch bedingte und neuromuskulaere Funktionsstoerungen des Pharynx und Oesophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuttge-Hannig, A. [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie, Muenchen (Germany); Hannig, C. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    Neurologic swallowing disorders are an increasing diagnostic problem in our overaged population. Undiagnosed chronic aspiration pneumonia is the cause of death in 20-40% of all inhabitants of nursing homes. In neurologic diseases of the pharynx, the physiologic interaction of pharyngeal contraction, closure of the pharynx, and esophageal motility are frequently disturbed. This may be due to cortical, bulbar, or cerebellar brain damage of ischemic or traumatic origin. Furthermore diseases or peripheral nerves, muscles, and synapses cause disturbances. The most life-threatening complication of these disturbances is tracheal aspiration, which requires an iso-osmolar contrast medium for imaging studies that cause no or minimal pulmonary problems. Utilizing fast dynamic documentation we can analyze the swallowing act in 35 images within the passage time of 0.7 s. This requires digital frame sequences from 15-50 images/s, which can be provided by DSI or videofluoroscopy. Neurologic and neuromuscular patterns are demonstrated with and without tracheal aspiration. The differentiation of aspiration in a so-called pre-, intra-, and postdeglutitive form is possible. We distinguish four grades of severity of aspiration, which is also of great clinical impact for the differential rehabilitation therapy. The efficiency of the rehabilitation protocol can be assessed by the dynamic swallowing studies. (orig.) [German] Neurologische Schluckstoerungen stellen mit zunehmender Ueberalterung der Bevoelkerung ein wachsendes diagnostisches Problem dar. 20-40% aller Alter- und Pflegeheiminsassen versterben an einer nicht erkannten aspirationsbedingten Pneumonie. Gerade bei den neurologischen Erkrankungen des Pharynx und der Speiseroehre ist die physiologische Interaktion zwischen Pharynxkontraktion, Larynxschluss und oesophagealer Motilitaet haeufig gestoert. Hierbei koennen sowohl kortikale, bulbaere sowie zerebellaere Hirnschaeden ischaemischer oder traumatischer Genese, Erkrankungen

  14. Incidence and clinical importance of chronic reactive periostal new formations of bone in the cervical region in patients with varying neurological symptomatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trattnig, S.; Fruehwald, F.; Schwaighofer, B.; Huebsch, P.; Reisner, T.; Binder, H.

    1989-02-01

    81 patients classed into three groups with clinical evidence of neurological symptoms and posttraumatic pain of the cervical spine and the incidence of degenerative disorders were studied noninvasively via CT scanning. In about half of the patients with nerve-root symptomatology as well as with signs of involvement of long tracts, narrowing of the foramen intervertebrale, respectively of the spinal tract, was seen, attributable to degenerative osseous apposition with excellent clinical segmental and (according to radicular symptoms) side correlation. In contrast to these results the group of patients with posttraumatic clinical symptoms showed almost 50% less preexisting degenerative disorders of the cervical spine. Hypertrophic changes of the processus articulares with narrowing of the spinal canal occurred in 14% and were therefore of minor clinical significance. (orig./GDG).

  15. The role of nanotechnology and nano and micro-electronics in monitoring and control of cardiovascular diseases and neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadan, Vijay K.

    2007-04-01

    Nanotechnology has been broadly defined as the one for not only the creation of functional materials and devices as well as systems through control of matter at the scale of 1-100 nm, but also the exploitation of novel properties and phenomena at the same scale. Growing needs in the point-of-care (POC) that is an increasing market for improving patient's quality of life, are driving the development of nanotechnologies for diagnosis and treatment of various life threatening diseases. This paper addresses the recent development of nanodiagnostic sensors and nanotherapeutic devices with functionalized carbon nanotube and/or nanowire on a flexible organic thin film electronics to monitor and control of the three leading diseases namely 1) neurodegenerative diseases, 2) cardiovascular diseases, and 3) diabetes and metabolic diseases. The sensors developed include implantable and biocompatible devices, light weight wearable devices in wrist-watches, hats, shoes and clothes. The nanotherapeutics devices include nanobased drug delivery system. Many of these sensors are integrated with the wireless systems for the remote physiological monitoring. The author's research team has also developed a wireless neural probe using nanowires and nanotubes for monitoring and control of Parkinson's disease. Light weight and compact EEG, EOG and EMG monitoring system in a hat developed is capable of monitoring real time epileptic patients and patients with neurological and movement disorders using the Internet and cellular network. Physicians could be able to monitor these signals in realtime using portable computers or cell phones and will give early warning signal if these signals cross a pre-determined threshold level. In addition the potential impact of nanotechnology for applications in medicine is that, the devices can be designed to interact with cells and tissues at the molecular level, which allows high degree of functionality. Devices engineered at nanometer scale imply a

  16. Cardiotrophin-like cytokine factor 1 (CLCF1) and neuropoietin (NP) signalling and their roles in development, adulthood, cancer and degenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Natalie A

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in cardiotrophin-like cytokine factor (CLCF1) and the related cytokine to which it binds, cytokine receptor-like factor 1 (CRLF1), are associated with Crisponi/cold induced sweating syndromes, and lead to early neonatal death in mice due to a suckling defect. These cytokines are members of the IL-6 superfamily, and form a range of composite cytokines that signal through gp130 bound either to the ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor (CNTFR) or a complex that involves the IL-27 p28 subunit. This review describes current knowledge of the signalling complexes formed by these cytokines, and explores their described and suggested roles in the neural, haematopoietic, skeletal, renal, immune and respiratory systems during development and adulthood, and in degenerative diseases and cancer.

  17. Haematology and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Steven; Cohen, Hannah; Losseff, Nick

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to update the reader on advances in the understanding of haematological conditions that may arise in neurological practice. Thrombophilia, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, sickle cell and clonal disorders associated with neuropathy are discussed. PMID:17369588

  18. A Single-Use, In Vitro Biosensor for the Detection of T-Tau Protein, A Biomarker of Neuro-Degenerative Disorders, in PBS and Human Serum Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yifan; Molazemhosseini, Alireza; Liu, Chung Chiun

    2017-02-19

    A single-use, in vitro biosensor for the detection of T-Tau protein in phosphate-buffer saline (PBS) and undiluted human serum was designed, manufactured, and tested. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) served as the transduction mechanism. This biosensor consisted of three electrodes: working, counter, and reference electrodes fabricated on a PET sheet. Both working and counter electrodes were thin gold film, 10 nm in thickness. Laser ablation technique was used to define the size and structure of the biosensor. The biosensor was produced using cost-effective roll-to-roll process. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were employed to covalently immobilize the anti-T-Tau (T-Tau antibody) on the gold working electrode. A carbodiimide conjugation approach using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linked anti-T-Tau to the carboxylic groups on one end of the MPA. A T-Tau protein ladder with six isoforms was used in this study. The anti-T-Tau concentration used was 500,000 pg/mL. The T-Tau protein concentration ranged from 1000 pg/mL to 100,000 pg/mL. DPV measurements showed excellent responses, with a good calibration curve. Thus, a practical tool for simple detection of T-Tau protein, a biomarker of neuro-degenerative disorders, has been successfully developed. This tool could also be extended to detect other biomarkers for neuro-degenerative disorders, such as P-Tau protein and β-amyloid 42.

  19. GABAB receptor trafficking and interacting proteins: targets for the development of highly specific therapeutic strategies to treat neurological disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benke, Dietmar

    2013-12-01

    GABAB receptors mediate slow inhibitory neurotransmission throughout the central nervous system thereby controlling the excitability of neurons. They have been implicated in numerous neurological disorders making them an attractive drug target. However, due to considerable side effects, the agonist baclofen is so far the only drug on the market targeting GABAB receptors, primarily for the treatment of spasticity. Because GABAB receptors are involved in a variety of brain functions it is rather unlikely to avoid unwanted effects with systemically administered drugs directly addressing ligand binding sites of the receptor. To minimize side effects, it would be desirable to target only those receptors involved in a given pathological state. This commentary discusses the idea that restoring impaired GABAB receptor function in diseased neurons by interfering with receptor-protein interactions may be an approach to specifically target only those receptors involved in the pathological state. Two recently discovered mechanisms that down-regulate the level of functional GABAB receptors most likely contribute to cerebral ischemia and neuropathic pain, respectively. In both mechanisms, small interfering peptides disrupting protein-protein interactions may offer a highly specific means to restore normal receptor function selectively at the site of malfunction. If restored functional GABAB receptor expression in these diseases has beneficial effects, this may serve as a starting point for the development of a highly specific therapeutic interventions. Such an approach is expected to minimize side effects because it promises to leave those GABAB receptors unaffected which are not involved in the dysfunction.

  20. Antidepressants in Parkinson's disease. Recommendations by the movement disorder study group of the Neurological Association of Madrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, E; Mata, M; López-Manzanares, L; Kurtis, M; Eimil, M; Martínez-Castrillo, J C; Navas, I; Posada, I J; Prieto, C; Ruíz-Huete, C; Vela, L; Venegas, B

    2016-03-19

    Although antidepressants are widely used in Parkinson's disease (PD), few well-designed studies to support their efficacy have been conducted. These clinical guidelines are based on a review of the literature and the results of an AMN movement disorder study group survey. Evidence suggests that nortriptyline, venlafaxine, paroxetine, and citalopram may be useful in treating depression in PD, although studies on paroxetine and citalopram yield conflicting results. In clinical practice, however, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are usually considered the treatment of choice. Duloxetine may be an alternative to venlafaxine, although the evidence for this is less, and venlafaxine plus mirtazapine may be useful in drug-resistant cases. Furthermore, citalopram may be indicated for the treatment of anxiety, atomoxetine for hypersomnia, trazodone and mirtazapine for insomnia and psychosis, and bupropion for apathy. In general, antidepressants are well tolerated in PD. However, clinicians should consider the anticholinergic effect of tricyclic antidepressants, the impact of serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors on blood pressure, the extrapyramidal effects of antidepressants, and any potential interactions between monoamine oxidase B inhibitors and other antidepressants. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Neurological channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2010-01-01

    Inherited ion channel mutations can affect the entire nervous system. Many cause paroxysmal disturbances of brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or skeletal muscle function, with normal neurological development and function in between attacks. To fully understand how mutations of ion channel genes cause disease, we need to know the normal location and function of the channel subunit, consequences of the mutation for biogenesis and biophysical properties, and possible compensatory changes in other channels that contribute to cell or circuit excitability. Animal models of monogenic channelopathies increasingly help our understanding. An important challenge for the future is to determine how more subtle derangements of ion channel function, which arise from the interaction of genetic and environmental influences, contribute to common paroxysmal disorders, including idiopathic epilepsy and migraine, that share features with rare monogenic channelopathies.

  2. [Depression and neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piber, D; Hinkelmann, K; Gold, S M; Heesen, C; Spitzer, C; Endres, M; Otte, C

    2012-11-01

    In many neurological diseases a depressive syndrome is a characteristic sign of the primary disease or is an important comorbidity. Post-stroke depression, for example, is a common and relevant complication following ischemic brain infarction. Approximately 4 out of every 10 stroke patients develop depressive disorders in the course of the disease which have a disadvantageous effect on the course and the prognosis. On the other hand depression is also a risk factor for certain neurological diseases as was recently demonstrated in a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies which revealed a much higher stroke risk for depressive patients. Furthermore, depression plays an important role in other neurological diseases with respect to the course and quality of life, such as Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. This article gives a review of the most important epidemiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of depressive disorders as a comorbidity of neurological diseases and as a risk factor for neurological diseases.

  3. Transplantation of Fetal Stem Cells: a New Horizon for Treat¬ment of Degenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh RAZI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of the current study was to present an overview of different types of stem-cells and their application for treatment different degenerative disorders with specific focus on ongoing clinical trials. Methods: For the purpose of the current narrative review article, a comprehensive search was carried out on the existing literature in Google Scholar, PubMed and Scopus using the keywords: stem-cell (fetal and mesenchymal, regenerative. Relevant articles published from 1957 to 2013 are extracted and presented. Results: During the past decades, different types of stem-cells (including adult and fetal have been used for treatment of a wide range of immunologic (Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, Di George syndrome, neurologic (Parkinson’s disease, Huntington Chorea, Cerebral Palsy, musculoskeletal (ALS, and cardiovascular diseases (heart failure and cardiomyopathies as well as chronic and acute ulcers, and diabetes. Conclusion: The results of our study demonstrated that during the past decades, stem-cell technology has been applied for treatment of a wide range of degenerative disorders with considerable success. The current ongoing clinical trials clearly demonstrate a great potential and a promising future for the technology in terms of offering curative treatment for a wide range of hitherto-incurable diseases. Keywords: Stem cell, Transplantation, Treatment, Review Article 

  4. Falls in degenerative cerebellar ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Steijns, Janneke A G; Munneke, Marten; Kremer, Berry P H; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2005-01-01

    We retrospectively and prospectively assessed the frequency and characteristics of falls in patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxias. The results show that falls occur very frequently in patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxias and that these falls are serious and often lead to injuries or

  5. Degenerative disease of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, Massimo; Limbucci, Nicola; Paonessa, Amalia; Splendiani, Alessandra

    2007-02-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine is a definition that includes a wide spectrum of degenerative abnormalities. Degeneration involves bony structures and the intervertebral disk, although many aspects of spine degeneration are strictly linked because the main common pathogenic factor is identified in chronic overload. During life the spine undergoes continuous changes as a response to physiologic axial load. These age-related changes are similar to pathologic degenerative changes and are a common asymptomatic finding in adults and elderly persons. A mild degree of degenerative changes is paraphysiologic and should be considered pathologic only if abnormalities determine symptoms. Imaging allows complete evaluation of static and dynamic factors related to degenerative disease of the spine and is useful in diagnosing the different aspects of spine degeneration.

  6. Fish oil and mental health: the role of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in cognitive development and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assisi, Alessandro; Banzi, Rita; Buonocore, Carmela; Capasso, Filippo; Di Muzio, Valeria; Michelacci, Francesca; Renzo, Danila; Tafuri, Giovanni; Trotta, Francesco; Vitocolonna, Maria; Garattini, Silvio

    2006-11-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have indicated that consumption of more n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce the risk for a variety of diseases, including cardiovascular, neurological and immunological disorders, diabetes and cancer. This article focuses on the role of marine n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in brain functions, including the development of the central nervous system and neurological disorders. An overview of the major animal studies and clinical trials is provided here, focusing on fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy and infancy, and prevention and management of Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, depression and attention deficit hyperactive disorder. Although an optimal balance in n-3/n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio is important for proper neurodevelopment and cognitive functions, results from randomized controlled trials are controversial and do not confirm any useful effect of supplementation on development of preterm and term infants. The relationship between fatty acid status and mental disorders is confirmed by reduced levels of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes of patients with central nervous system disorders. Nevertheless, there are very little data supporting the use of fish oil in those patients. The only way to verify whether n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are a potential therapeutic option in the management and prevention of mental disorders is to conduct a large definitive randomized controlled trials similar to those required for the licensing of any new pharmacological treatment.

  7. 1188例具有神经影像资料的门诊老年人神经疾病病因分析%The etiology of neurological disorders in 1188 elder patients with neuroimaging at geriatric outpatient clinic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱明伟; 吴卫平; 陈穗惠; 刘淼; 王鲁宁; 何耀; 谭纪萍; 聂永慧; 李珂

    2014-01-01

    .09%),sleep disorders (6.73 %) and psychological diseases (6.65 %).Spinal degenerative diseases accompanied by neurological symptoms also accounted for 10.52%.Less common causes in those patients were benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (3.96%),headache and neck pain (3.28%),cranial nerve diseases (2.78%) and intracranial tumors (2.61%).Constituent ratios of mild cognitive impairment and dementia in different age groups were associated with aging,and the same was observed with Parkinson disease.Conclusion The common neurological disorders in the geriatric outpatients are cerebrovascular disease and neurodegenerative diseases including different type of dementia and Parkinson disease.Those disorders should be focused for the prevention and treatment of the nervous system diseases in the elderly.

  8. Indications and prospects of neural transplantation for chronic neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadori, Marta; Denaro, Luca; D'Avella, Domenico; Cozzi, Emanuele

    2016-10-01

    The replacement of damaged cells in the central nervous system (CNS) affected by degenerative disorders represents an attractive therapeutic strategy. The advent of stem cell technology may offer the possibility of generating a large number of renewable, specifically differentiated cells to potentially cure large cohorts of patients. In this review, we discuss current knowledge and issues involved in neural cell transplantation. The most important preclinical and clinical results of cellular transplantation applied to Parkinson's, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be summarized. Cellular transplantation is emerging as a possible therapy for a variety of incurable neurological disorders. The disorders that will primarily take advantage from neural stem cell grafting are those involving a well defined cell population in a restricted area of the CNS. Several clinical trials have been initiated to assess safety and efficacy of different stem cell-derived products, and promising results have been obtained for disorders such as Parkinson's disease. However, several scientific questions remain unanswered. Among these, the impact of the immunological interaction between host and graft in the particular environment of the CNS still requires additional investigations. Several chronic neurological disorders appear to be amenable to cell regenerative therapies. However, safety, efficacy and immunological issues will need to be carefully evaluated beforehand.

  9. Peroxisomal disorders in neurology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R.J.A.; Heymans, H.S.A.; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Barth, P.G.; Bosch, H. van den; Tager, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Although peroxisomes were initially believed to play only a minor role in mammalian metabolism, it is now clear that they catalyse essential reactions in a number of different metabolic pathways and thus play an indispensable role in intermediary metabolism. The metabolic pathways in which peroxisom

  10. Intravenous route of cell delivery for treatment of neurological disorders: a meta-analysis of preclinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowski, Miroslaw; Walczak, Piotr; Date, Isao

    2010-01-01

    The last decade has been marked by a growing interest in an employment of intravenous cell delivery for treatment of neurological disorders. Numerous preclinical experimental studies have reported functional benefits, and have recently been followed by clinical trials. Some early clinical studies have indicated only modest positive effects, suggesting that the optimal conditions have not been defined yet. Thus, the evaluation of factors that influence outcomes, on the level of the whole population of preclinical studies by advanced statistical analysis, is warranted. PubMed search was conducted from the inception through 2006, and 60 preclinical studies were found and subjected to analysis. Categorical and continuous independent variables (IVs) were extracted. Three distinct outcomes of interest were selected as dependent variables (DVs) and named treatment effects: morphological, behavioral, and molecular, respectively. Mean outcomes, standard deviations (SDs), and animal numbers were retrieved and calculated by individual comparisons of experimental and control groups, based on the Hedges g formula, and were expressed as effect sizes (ESs) and variances. Publication bias and homogeneity were evaluated. The mainspring analyses were performed under a random effect model using Proc Mixed (SAS, version 9.2). A significant heterogeneity and publication bias were found. The ES pooling revealed large treatment effects. Univariate and multivariate meta-regression revealed that cell-related variables explained most of the heterogeneity. Cells retrieved from established lines and genetic modification of cells warrants the highest efficiency, in a dose-dependent manner. The stratified analysis of molecular effect measures revealed that apoptosis inhibition is the strongest brain tissue-positive change induced by cell therapy.

  11. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Palliative care in neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provinciali, Leandro; Tarquini, Daniela; De Falco, Fabrizio A; Carlini, Giulia; Zappia, Mario; Toni, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care in neurology is characterized by the need of taking into account some distinguishing features which supplement and often differ from the general palliative approach to cancer or to severe organ failures. Such position is emphasized by a new concept of palliative assistance which is not limited to the "end of life" stage, as it was the traditional one, but is applied along the entire course of progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions. There are various reasons accounting for a differentiation of palliative care in neurology and for the development of specific expertise; the long duration of the advanced stages of many neurological diseases and the distinguishing features of some clinical problems (cognitive disorders, psychic disorders, etc.), in addition to the deterioration of some general aspects (nutrition, etc.), make the general criteria adopted for cancer, severe respiratory, hepatic or renal failures and heart failure inadequate. The neurological diseases which could benefit from the development of a specific palliative approach are dementia, cerebrovascular diseases, movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases, severe traumatic brain injury, brain cancers and multiple sclerosis, as well as less frequent conditions. The growing literature on palliative care in neurology provides evidence of the neurological community's increasing interest in taking care of the advanced and terminal stages of nervous system diseases, thus encouraging research, training and updating in such direction. This document aims to underline the specific neurological requirements concerning the palliative assistance.

  13. Non-specialist health worker interventions for the care of mental, neurological and substance-abuse disorders in low- and middle-income countries.

    OpenAIRE

    van Ginneken, N; Tharyan, P; Lewin, S.; Rao, GN; Meera, S; Pian, J; Chandrashekar, S; Patel, V

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many people with mental, neurological and substance-use disorders (MNS) do not receive health care. Non-specialist health workers (NSHWs) and other professionals with health roles (OPHRs) are a key strategy for closing the treatment gap. OBJECTIVES To assess the effect of NSHWs and OPHRs delivering MNS interventions in primary and community health care in low- and middle-income countries. SEARCH METHODS We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (inclu...

  14. SENILE DEGENERATIVE CHANGES IN ADULT LUMBAR SPINE! - A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garjesh Singh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP is a common presenting complaint affecting mostly middle aged and older person and traditionally considered as ageing process, but now-a-days large number of younger people are also affected by this debilitating chronic disorder. The cause of early onset of degenerative spine disease is multifactorial, but genetical predisposition plays very important role. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To find out association between genetic predisposition and degenerative spine disease in adult patients and to assess the pattern of MRI findings of various degenerative diseases in lumbo-sacral spine. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The present cross-sectional study had been performed among 100 selected patients in 1yr period, who presented with chief complaint of chronic low back pain. After taking detailed clinical and professional history, MRI of lumbosacral spine had been performed. Total 100 patients were divided in two groups on the basis of genetical predisposition. Prevalence and spectrum of degenerative changes were compared between both groups. RESULTS: Hundred patients of 20 to 35-year age had been selected with mean age of 27yr. Out of 100 patients; 47 were male and 53 were female. The most common degenerative findings were desiccation of disc (95% followed by disc bulge, herniation, spinal canal stenosis, ligamentum flavum hypertrophy, facet joint hypertrophy and modic changes. L4-L5 and L5- S1 were the most commonly involved spinal levels for any degenerative pathology. CONCLUSION: Good association is seen between early onset of degenerative spine disease and genetical predisposition in patients who have history of similar type degenerative spine disease in one or more first degree relatives in comparison to those patients who do not have any genetical predisposition. So it can be concluded that heredity play important role in early onset of degenerative spine disease in adults.

  15. Continuation of medically necessary platelet aggregation inhibitors - acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel - during surgery for spinal degenerative disorders: Results in 100 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akhavan-Sigari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients undergoing spinal surgery while under anticoagulation therapy are at risk of developing bleeding complications, even though lower incidences have been reported for joint arthroplasty surgery. There is a gap in the medical literature examining the incidence of postoperative spinal bleeding in patients who were under anticoagulation medication at the time of surgery. Methods: We prospectively followed a consecutive cohort of 100 patients (58 male, 42 female undergoing spinal surgery. The average patient age was 48.7 years and the minimum follow up time was 12 months. Diagnosis was lumbar spinal stenosis in 20, herniated lumbar discs in 63, degenerative cervical disc disease in 3, and cervical disc herniation in 14 cases. In our study, platelet aggregation inhibitors (clopidogrel and/or acetylsalicylic acid were given for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular thrombotic events, to reduce risk of stroke in patients who have had transient ischemia of the brain or acute coronary syndrome, and as secondary prevention of atherosclerotic events (fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI. A cessation of anticoagulants (acetylsalicylic acid or clopidogrel in our patients in the peri- and postoperative period was contraindicated. Results: Sixty-three patients were on both clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid and 37 on acetylsalicylic acid only. None of the patients suffered any postoperative bleeding complication. Three patients suffered postoperative wound dehiscence and one patient had an infection that required reoperation. Conclusion: The question of whether preoperative platelet aggregation inhibitors must be stopped before elective spinal surgery has never been answered in the literature. In our prospective series, we have found no increase in the risk of postoperative spinal bleeding with the use of clopidogrel or acetylsalicylic acid. This finding suggests that spine surgery can be done without stopping

  16. P2X7 Receptors as a Transducer in the Co-Occurrence of Neurological/Psychiatric and Cardiovascular Disorders: A Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D. Skaper

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Over-stimulation of the purinergic P2X7 receptor may bring about cellular dysfunction and injury in settings of neurodegeneration, chronic inflammation, as well as in psychiatric and cardiovascular diseases. Here we speculate how P2X7 receptor over-activation may lead to the co-occurrence of neurological and psychiatric disorders with cardiovascular disorders. Presentation. We hypothesize that proinflammatory cytokines, in particular interleukin-1, are key players in the pathophysiology of neurological, psychiatric, and cardiovascular diseases. Critically, this premise is based on a role for the P2X7 receptor in triggering a rise in these cytokines. Given the broad distribution of P2X7 receptors in nervous, immune, and vascular tissue cells, this receptor is proposed as central in linking the nervous, immune, and cardiovascular systems. Testing. Investigate, retrospectively, whether a bidirectional link can be established between illnesses with a proinflammatory component (e.g., inflammatory and chronic neuropathic pain and cardiovascular disease, for example, hypertension, and whether patients treated with anti-inflammatory drugs have a lower incidence of disease complications. Positive outcome would indicate a prospective study to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of P2X7 receptor antagonists. Implications. It should be stressed that sufficient direct evidence does not exist at present supporting our hypothesis. However, a positive outcome would encourage the further development of P2X7 receptor antagonists and their application to limit the co-occurrence of neurological, psychiatric, and cardiovascular disorders.

  17. Neurology is psychiatry--and vice versa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Adam

    2014-06-01

    This paper explores the relationship between neurology and psychiatry. It marshals evidence that disorders of the brain typically have neurological and psychological-cognitive, affective, behavioural-manifestations, while disorders of the psyche are based in the brain. Given the inseparability of neurological and psychiatric disorders, their disease classifications should eventually fuse, and joint initiatives in training, service and research should be strongly encouraged.

  18. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Neck Disability Index and Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale for patients with neck pain due to degenerative and discopathic disorders. Psychometric properties of the Polish versions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glowacki Maciej

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even though there are several region-specific functional outcome questionnaires measuring neck disorders that have been developed in English-speaking countries, no Polish version has ever been validated. The purpose of our study was to translate, culturally adapt and validate the Neck Disability Index (NDI and Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale (CDS for Polish-speaking patients with neck pain. Methods The translation was carried out according to the International Quality of Life Association (IQOLA Project. Sixty patients were treated due to degenerative and discopathic disorders in the cervical spine filled out the NDI-PL and the CDS-PL. The pain level was evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale. The mean age of the assessed group was 47.1 years (SD 8.9. We used Cronbach's alpha to assess internal consistency. We assessed the test-retest reliability using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rS was used to determine dependency between quantitative characteristics. The Mann-Whitney test was applied to determine dependency between quantitative and qualitative characteristics. Results The Cronbach's alpha values were excellent for the NDI-PL in the test and in the retest (0.84, 0.85, respectively, and for the CDS-PL (0.90 in the test and in the retest. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients were excellent for the CDS-PL and NDI-PL and equalled 0.93 (95% CI from 0.89 to 0.95 and 0.87 (95% CI from 0.80 to 0.92, respectively The concurrent validity was good in the test and in the retest (rs = 0.42 p Conclusions The present versions of the NDI-PL and CDS-PL, the first to be published in Polish, have proven to be reliable and valid for patients with degenerative changes in the cervical spine. The NDI-PL and CDS-PL have excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and good concurrent validity. The adapted questionnaires showed a strong inter-correlation both

  19. Chapter 30: historical aspects of the major neurological vitamin deficiency disorders: the water-soluble B vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2010-01-01

    This historical review addresses major neurological disorders associated with deficiencies of water-soluble B vitamins: beriberi, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, pellagra, neural tube defects, and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord. Beriberi: Beriberi was known for millennia in Asia, but was not described by a European until the 17th century when Brontius in the Dutch East Indies reported the progressive sensorimotor polyneuropathy. The prevalence of beriberi increased greatly in Asia with a change in the milling process for rice in the late 19th century. In the 1880s, Takaki demonstrated the benefits of dietary modification in sailors, and later instituted dietary reforms in the Japanese Navy, which largely eradicated beriberi from the Japanese Navy by 1887. In 1889 Eijkman in Java serendipitously identified dietary factors as a major contributor to "chicken polyneuritis," which he took to be an animal model for beriberi; the polyneuritis could be cured or prevented by feeding the chickens either unpolished rice or rice polishings. By 1901, Grijns, while continuing studies of beriberi in Java, suggested a dietary deficiency explanation for beriberi after systematically eliminating deficiencies of known dietary components and excluding a toxic effect. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: In the late 1870s, Wernicke identified a clinicopathological condition with ophthalmoparesis, nystagmus, ataxia, and encephalopathy, associated with punctate hemorrhages symmetrically arranged in the grey matter around the third and fourth ventricles and the aqueduct of Sylvius. In the late 1880s, Korsakoff described a spectrum of cognitive disorders, including a confabulatory amnestic state following an agitated delirium, occurring in conjunction with peripheral polyneuropathy. Beginning around 1900, investigators recognized the close relationship between Korsakoff's psychosis, delirium tremens, and Wernicke's encephalopathy, but not until several decades later were Wernicke

  20. Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwankong, N.

    2007-01-01

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLS) is now recognized as a significant cause of caudal lumbar pain and pelvic limb lameness in dogs. The condition includes lumbosacral intervertebral disc degeneration and protrusion, spondylosis deformans, sclerosis of the vertebral end plates, osteoarthrosis of

  1. Rotary deformity in degenerative spondylolisthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Gwon; Kim, Jeong; Kho, Hyen Sim; Yun, Sung Su; Oh, Jae Hee; Byen, Ju Nam; Kim, Young Chul [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    We studied to determine whether the degenerative spondylolisthesis has rotary deformity in addition to forward displacement. We have made analysis of difference of rotary deformity between the 31 study groups of symptomatic degenerative spondylolisthesis and 31 control groups without any symptom, statistically. We also reviewed CT findings in 15 study groups. The mean rotary deformity in study groups was 6.1 degree(the standard deviation is 5.20), and the mean rotary deformity in control groups was 2.52 degree(the standard deviation is 2.16)(p < 0.01). The rotary deformity can be accompanied with degenerative spondylolisthesis. We may consider the rotary deformity as a cause of symptomatic degenerative spondylolisthesis in case that any other cause is not detected.

  2. The Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in People with Neurological Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Mackay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the effect of aerobic exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in people with neurological disorders. Data Sources. Six electronic databases (CINAHL, PubMed, Cochrane, PsycINFO, SportDiscus, and Web of Science were searched until the end of December 2016. Study Selection. Experimental or observational studies of people with neurological disorders who undertook an exercise intervention with BDNF as an outcome measure. The search strategy yielded 984 articles. Data Extraction. Study data were independently extracted from each article. Methodological quality of studies was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro scale. A meta-analysis was planned based on the assessment of predetermined criteria. Data Synthesis. Eleven articles were included. Studies employed either a program of aerobic exercise, a single bout of aerobic exercise, or both. A meta-analysis of studies comparing a program of aerobic exercise against usual care/nil therapy showed a large effect (SMD: 0.84, 95% CI 0.47–1.20, p<0.001 in favour of aerobic exercise to increase levels of BDNF. Findings for a single bout of aerobic exercise were mixed. Quality of studies was low (PEDro average score 4.3/10. Conclusions. A program of aerobic exercise may contribute to increased levels of BDNF in neurological populations.

  3. How music training enhances working memory: a cerebrocerebellar blending mechanism that can lead equally to scientific discovery and therapeutic efficacy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervert, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Following in the vein of studies that concluded that music training resulted in plastic changes in Einstein's cerebral cortex, controlled research has shown that music training (1) enhances central executive attentional processes in working memory, and (2) has also been shown to be of significant therapeutic value in neurological disorders. Within this framework of music training-induced enhancement of central executive attentional processes, the purpose of this article is to argue that: (1) The foundational basis of the central executive begins in infancy as attentional control during the establishment of working memory, (2) In accordance with Akshoomoff, Courchesne and Townsend's and Leggio and Molinari's cerebellar sequence detection and prediction models, the rigors of volitional control demands of music training can enhance voluntary manipulation of information in thought and movement, (3) The music training-enhanced blending of cerebellar internal models in working memory as can be experienced as intuition in scientific discovery (as Einstein often indicated) or, equally, as moments of therapeutic advancement toward goals in the development of voluntary control in neurological disorders, and (4) The blending of internal models as in (3) thus provides a mechanism by which music training enhances central executive processes in working memory that can lead to scientific discovery and improved therapeutic outcomes in neurological disorders. Within the framework of Leggio and Molinari's cerebellar sequence detection model, it is determined that intuitive steps forward that occur in both scientific discovery and during therapy in those with neurological disorders operate according to the same mechanism of adaptive error-driven blending of cerebellar internal models. It is concluded that the entire framework of the central executive structure of working memory is a product of the cerebrocerebellar system which can, through the learning of internal models

  4. Skipping Posterior Dynamic Transpedicular Stabilization for Distant Segment Degenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgehan Solmaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To date, there is still no consensus on the treatment of spinal degenerative disease. Current surgical techniques to manage painful spinal disorders are imperfect. In this paper, we aimed to evaluate the prospective results of posterior transpedicular dynamic stabilization, a novel surgical approach that skips the segments that do not produce pain. This technique has been proven biomechanically and radiologically in spinal degenerative diseases. Methods. A prospective study of 18 patients averaging 54.94 years of age with distant spinal segment degenerative disease. Indications consisted of degenerative disc disease (57%, herniated nucleus pulposus (50%, spinal stenosis (14.28%, degenerative spondylolisthesis (14.28%, and foraminal stenosis (7.1%. The Oswestry Low-Back Pain Disability Questionnaire and visual analog scale (VAS for pain were recorded preoperatively and at the third and twelfth postoperative months. Results. Both the Oswestry and VAS scores showed significant improvement postoperatively (P<0.05. We observed complications in one patient who had spinal epidural hematoma. Conclusion. We recommend skipping posterior transpedicular dynamic stabilization for surgical treatment of distant segment spinal degenerative disease.

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans as an experimental tool for the study of complex neurological diseases: Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahorro, Fernando; Ruiz-Rubio, Manuel

    2011-12-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has a very well-defined and genetically tractable nervous system which offers an effective model to explore basic mechanistic pathways that might be underpin complex human neurological diseases. Here, the role C. elegans is playing in understanding two neurodegenerative conditions, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and a complex neurological condition, autism, is used as an exemplar of the utility of this model system. C. elegans is an imperfect model of Parkinson's disease because it lacks orthologues of the human disease-related genes PARK1 and LRRK2 which are linked to the autosomal dominant form of this disease. Despite this fact, the nematode is a good model because it allows transgenic expression of these human genes and the study of the impact on dopaminergic neurons in several genetic backgrounds and environmental conditions. For AD, C. elegans has orthologues of the amyloid precursor protein and both human presenilins, PS1 and PS2. In addition, many of the neurotoxic properties linked with Aβ amyloid and tau peptides can be studied in the nematode. Autism spectrum disorder is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by impairments in human social interaction, difficulties in communication, and restrictive and repetitive behaviours. Establishing C. elegans as a model for this complex behavioural disorder is difficult; however, abnormalities in neuronal synaptic communication are implicated in the aetiology of the disorder. Numerous studies have associated autism with mutations in several genes involved in excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the mammalian brain, including neuroligin, neurexin and shank, for which there are C. elegans orthologues. Thus, several molecular pathways and behavioural phenotypes in C. elegans have been related to autism. In general, the nematode offers a series of advantages that combined with knowledge from other animal models and human research, provides a powerful

  6. Combined detection of depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients using the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy and the World Health Organization well-being index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Pilebæk; Amiri, Moshgan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To validate the Danish version of the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E), and compare it with the World Health Organization index for psychological well-being (WHO-5) as screening tests for depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients. METHODS: Epilepsy...... there are 17% false positives. CONCLUSION: NDDI-E in Danish is valid and slightly better than WHO-5 in the detection of depression in epilepsy patients. WHO-5 is valid for the detection of anxiety disorders. Combined use of NDDI-E and WHO-5 is recommended, since 95% of all epilepsy patients with depression and....../or anxiety disorder are identified with only a modest number of false positives....

  7. Iatrogenic neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposato, Luciano A; Fustinoni, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic disease is one of the most frequent causes of hospital admissions and constitutes a growing public health problem. The most common type of iatrogenic neurologic disease is pharmacologic, and the central and peripheral nervous systems are particularly vulnerable. Despite this, iatrogenic disease is generally overlooked as a differential diagnosis among neurologic patients. The clinical picture of pharmacologically mediated iatrogenic neurologic disease can range from mild to fatal. Common and uncommon forms of drug toxicity are comprehensively addressed in this chapter. While the majority of neurologic adverse effects are listed and referenced in the tables, the most relevant issues are further discussed in the text.

  8. Factors predictive of abnormal results for computed tomography of the head in horses affected by neurologic disorders: 57 cases (2001-2007).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogaro-Robinson, Cristina; Lacombe, Véronique A; Reed, Stephen M; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2009-07-15

    To determine neurologic indications associated with abnormal results for computed tomography (CT) imaging of the head of horses affected by neurologic disorders. Retrospective case series. 57 horses. Signalment, history, clinical abnormalities, and clinicopathologic findings were obtained from medical records of horses examined because of neurologic disorders, and precontrast and postcontrast CT images of the head were reviewed. Data were analyzed by use of univariate and multivariate logistic regression. For a horse with abnormal mentation, odds of having abnormal results for CT imaging of the head was 30 times (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.36 to 374.63) the odds for a similar horse without abnormal mentation. For a horse with cranial nerve deficits, odds of having abnormal results for CT imaging of the head was 11 times (95% CI, 1.00 to 127.96) the odds for a similar horse without cranial nerve deficits. For a horse with seizure-like activity, odds of having abnormal results for CT imaging of the head was 0.05 times (95% CI, 0 to 0.90) the odds for a similar horse without seizures. These results suggested that alterations in consciousness and cranial nerve deficits were strong predictors of abnormal CT findings for the head of affected horses. Thus, CT can be a useful complementary diagnostic test in horses with these neurologic deficits. In contrast, alternative diagnostic tests (eg, electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging) should be considered in horses with seizure-like activity that do not have head trauma or cranial nerve deficits.

  9. Perioperative Management of Neurological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet Singh Dhallu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative care of the patients with neurological diseases can be challenging. Most important consideration is the management and understanding of pathophysiology of these disorders and evaluation of new neurological changes that occur perioperatively. Perioperative generally refers to 3 phases of surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. We have tried to address few commonly encountered neurological conditions in clinical practice, such as delirium, stroke, epilepsy, myasthenia gravis, and Parkinson disease. In this article, we emphasize on early diagnosis and management strategies of neurological disorders in the perioperative period to minimize morbidity and mortality of patients.

  10. ‘Lumbar Degenerative Kyphosis’ Is Not Byword for Degenerative Sagittal Imbalance: Time to Replace a Misconception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee; Jang, Jee-Soo; Kim, Sung-Min; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Jung-Kil

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK) is a subgroup of the flat-back syndrome and is most commonly caused by unique life styles, such as a prolonged crouched posture during agricultural work and performing activities of daily living on the floor. Unfortunately, LDK has been used as a byword for degenerative sagittal imbalance, and this sometimes causes confusion. The aim of this review was to evaluate the exact territory of LDK, and to introduce another appropriate term for degenerative sagittal deformity. Unlike what its name suggests, LDK does not only include sagittal balance disorder of the lumbar spine and kyphosis, but also sagittal balance disorder of the whole spine and little lordosis of the lumbar spine. Moreover, this disease is closely related to the occupation of female farmers and an outdated Asian life style. These reasons necessitate a change in the nomenclature of this disorder to prevent misunderstanding. We suggest the name “primary degenerative sagittal imbalance” (PDSI), which encompasses degenerative sagittal misalignments of unknown origin in the whole spine in older-age patients, and is associated with back muscle wasting. LDK may be regarded as a subgroup of PDSI related to an occupation in agriculture. Conservative treatments such as exercise and physiotherapy are recommended as first-line treatments for patients with PDSI, and surgical treatment is considered only if conservative treatments failed. The measurement of spinopelvic parameters for sagittal balance is important prior to deformity corrective surgery. LDK can be considered a subtype of PDSI that is more likely to occur in female farmers, and hence the use of LDK as a global term for all degenerative sagittal imbalance disorders is better avoided. To avoid confusion, we recommend PDSI as a newer, more accurate diagnostic term instead of LDK. PMID:28264231

  11. New biomechanical model for clinical evaluation of the upper extremity motion in subjects with neurological disorders: an application case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobo-Prat, Joan; Font-Llagunes, Josep M.; Gómez-Pérez, Cristina; Medina-Casanovas, Josep; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa M.

    2014-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury and acquired brain injury commonly imply a reduction in the upper extremity function which complicates, or even constrains, the performance of basic activities of daily living. Neurological rehabilitation in specialised hospitals is a common treatment for patients with ne

  12. Spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spinal disorders: a systematic review of the literature on treatment, neurological status and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerveld, L A; Verlaan, J J; Oner, F C

    2009-02-01

    The ankylosed spine is prone to fracture after minor trauma due to its changed biomechanical properties. Although many case reports and small series have been published on patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) suffering spine fractures, solid data on clinical outcome are rare. In advanced diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), ossification of spinal ligaments also leads to ankylosis. The prevalence of AS is stable, but since DISH may become more widespread due to its association with age, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, a systematic review of the literature was conducted to increase the current knowledge on treatment, neurological status and complications of patients with preexisting ankylosed spines sustaining spinal trauma. A literature search was performed to obtain all relevant articles concerning the outcome of patients with AS or DISH admitted with spinal fractures. Predefined parameters were extracted from the papers and pooled to study the effect of treatment on neurological status and complications. Ninety-three articles were included, representing 345 AS patients and 55 DISH patients. Most fractures were localized in the cervical spine and resulted from low energy impact. Delayed diagnosis often occurred due to patient and doctor related factors. On admission 67.2% of the AS patients and 40.0% of the DISH patients demonstrated neurologic deficits, while secondary neurological deterioration occurred frequently. Surgical or nonoperative treatment did not alter the neurological prospective for most patients. The complication rate was 51.1% in AS patients and 32.7% in DISH patients. The overall mortality within 3 months after injury was 17.7% in AS and 20.0% in DISH. This review suggests that the clinical outcome of patients with fractures in previously ankylosed spines, due to AS or DISH, is considerably worse compared to the general trauma population. Considering the potential increase in prevalence of DISH cases, this condition may

  13. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system.

  14. Prefronto–cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation improves visuospatial memory, executive functions, and neurological soft signs in patients with euthymic bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minichino A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Amedeo Minichino, Francesco Saverio Bersani, Laura Bernabei, Francesco Spagnoli, Lucilla Vergnani, Alessandra Corrado, Ines Taddei, Massimo Biondi, Roberto Delle Chiaie Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Objective: The aim of the study was to improve neuropsychological functioning of euthymic patients with bipolar disorder (BD using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS applied to cerebellar and prefrontal cortices.Methods: Twenty-five BD outpatients underwent prefrontal (anodal and cerebellar (cathodal tDCS for 3 consecutive weeks. All participants were assessed through the Rey Complex Figure Test delay and copy and the Neurological Examination Scale at baseline and after therapy with tDCS.Results: After tDCS treatment, patients showed significant improvements in visuospatial memory tasks. Patients with worse baseline cognitive performances also showed a significant improvement in executive functioning tasks. Neurological Examination Scale total score and motor coordination subscale significantly improved.Conclusion: Prefrontal-excitatory and cerebellar-inhibitory stimulations in euthymic BD patients may lead to better neurocognitive performances. This improvement could result from the modulation of prefronto–thalamic–cerebellar circuit activity pattern, which can be disrupted in BD. Keywords: cerebellum, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, neuropsychology, cognition 

  15. Generation of Cholinergic and Dopaminergic Interneurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Relevant Tool for In Vitro Modeling of Neurological Disorders Pathology and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ochalek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cellular and molecular bases of neurological diseases have been studied for decades; however, the underlying mechanisms are not yet fully elucidated. Compared with other disorders, diseases of the nervous system have been very difficult to study mainly due to the inaccessibility of the human brain and live neurons in vivo or in vitro and difficulties in examination of human postmortem brain tissue. Despite the availability of various genetically engineered animal models, these systems are still not adequate enough due to species variation and differences in genetic background. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs reprogrammed from patient somatic cells possess the potential to differentiate into any cell type, including neural progenitor cells and postmitotic neurons; thus, they open a new area to in vitro modeling of neurological diseases and their potential treatment. Currently, many protocols for generation of various neuronal subtypes are being developed; however, most of them still require further optimization. Here, we highlight accomplishments made in the generation of dopaminergic and cholinergic neurons, the two subtypes most affected in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and indirectly affected in Huntington’s disease. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of hiPSC-derived neurons in the modeling and treatment of neurological diseases related to dopaminergic and cholinergic system dysfunction.

  16. Arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, J B; Juhl, C B; Roos, E M;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine benefits and harms of arthroscopic knee surgery involving partial meniscectomy, debridement, or both for middle aged or older patients with knee pain and degenerative knee disease. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain and physical function....... RESULTS: The search identified nine trials assessing the benefits of knee arthroscopic surgery in middle aged and older patients with knee pain and degenerative knee disease. The main analysis, combining the primary endpoints of the individual trials from three to 24 months postoperatively, showed a small...... included symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (4.13 (95% confidence interval 1.78 to 9.60) events per 1000 procedures), pulmonary embolism, infection, and death. CONCLUSIONS: The small inconsequential benefit seen from interventions that include arthroscopy for the degenerative knee is limited in time...

  17. NEUROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF BIPOLAR AFFECTIVE DISORDERS : A FOCUS ON TARDIVE DYSKINESIA AND SOFT NEUROLOGICAL SIGNS IN RELATION TO SERUM DOPAMINE BETA HYDROXYLASE ACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Utpal; Basu, S.; Khastgir, U.; Kumar, Unnati; Chandrasekaran, R.; Gangadhar, B.N.; Sagar, Rajesh; Bapna, J.S.; Channabasavanna, S.M.; Moore, P. Brain; Ferrier, I. Nicol

    1998-01-01

    In this study, the prognostic determinants were investigated involving bipolar patients classified into two groups-one with favourable course and outcome, and the other with clearly unfavourable prognosis, based on certain recommended criteria, with intermediate prognosis were excluded. As compared to the poor prognosis group, the good prognosis group had lower social dysfunctions, lower ratings on psychopathotogy fewer indicators of neurodysfunction in form of neurological soft signs (NSS) and tardive dyskinesia (TD). The poor prognosis group was characterized by: (i) older age at onset; (ii) more manic than depressive episodes (5:1) and (HI) lower levels of serum dopamine-β-hydroxylase activity (DBH). The association between poor prognosis bipolar disorder having neuroleptic intolerance (TD and NSS) with low serum DBH, suggests that it is genetically governed. Further research in this direction seems in order, particularly the follow up of first episode manic disorders. PMID:21494474

  18. Prevalence and Distribution of Neurological Disease in a Neurology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uche

    Epilepsy was the commonest neurological diagnosis in the clinic, followed by stroke. Conclusion: ... Disorder. %. 1. Blackouts. 12.5. Epilepsy. 10.4. Vasovagal attacks. 2.1. 2. Headache. 12.5 ... paediatric neurology clinic at Enugu. 3. However ...

  19. Degenerative spinal disease in large felids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmstetter, C; Munson, L; Ramsay, E C

    2000-03-01

    Degenerative spinal disorders, including intervertebral disc disease and spondylosis, seldom occur in domestic cats. In contrast, a retrospective study of 13 lions (Panthera leo), 16 tigers (Panthera tigris), 4 leopards (Panthera pardis), 1 snow leopard (Panthera uncia), and 3 jaguars (Panthera onca) from the Knoxville Zoo that died or were euthanatized from 1976 to 1996 indicated that degenerative spinal disease is an important problem in large nondomestic felids. The medical record, radiographic data, and the necropsy report of each animal were examined for evidence of intervertebral disc disease or spondylosis. Eight (three lions, four tigers, and one leopard) animals were diagnosed with degenerative spinal disease. Clinical signs included progressively decreased activity, moderate to severe rear limb muscle atrophy, chronic intermittent rear limb paresis, and ataxia. The age at onset of clinical signs was 10-19 yr (median = 18 yr). Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column was useful in assessing the severity of spinal lesions, and results were correlated with necropsy findings. Lesions were frequently multifocal, included intervertebral disc mineralization or herniation with collapsed intervertebral disc spaces, and were most common in the lumbar area but also involved cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Marked spondylosis was present in the cats with intervertebral disc disease, presumably subsequent to vertebral instability. Six of the animals' spinal cords were examined histologically, and five had acute or chronic damage to the spinal cord secondary to disc protrusion. Spinal disease should be suspected in geriatric large felids with decreased appetite or activity. Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column is the most useful method to assess the type and severity of spinal lesions.

  20. Treatment Patterns among Children and Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder with or without Psychiatric or Neurologic Comorbidities in Sweden: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikirica, Vanja; Gustafsson, Per A; Makin, Charles

    2017-06-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common psychiatric disorder in children/adolescents and occurs frequently with psychiatric/neurologic comorbidities. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of psychiatric/neurologic comorbidities on pharmacotherapy patterns among patients with ADHD in Sweden. A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted using medical records from a regional database in Sweden. Patients aged 6-17 years, with ≥1 prescription for ADHD medication between July 1, 2007 and June 30, 2009, and continuously active in the database for ≥12 months before and after their prescription index date were selected. Patients were categorized as ADHD alone (ADHD-only) or with comorbidities (ADHD-comorbid). Between-group differences were analyzed before and after adjusting for potentially confounding variables. Data on 1794 patients (1083 ADHD-only; 711 ADHD-comorbid) were analyzed. Among newly treated patients, 21.7% augmented their index therapy (ADHD-only, 20.5%; ADHD-comorbid, 24.4%; p = 0.23). After adjustment, ADHD-only patients were less likely (p = 0.002) to augment versus ADHD-comorbid patients [odds ratio = 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27, 0.73]. ADHD-comorbid patients received more prescriptions versus ADHD-only patients (mean 13.1 vs 10.0; p ADHD-only patients had fewer outpatient visits (p ADHD-comorbid patients (visits: β = -0.21, 95% CI -0.28, -0.13; referrals: β = -0.25, 95% CI -0.33, -0.18). Patients with ADHD with comorbidities had more hospitalizations, physician visits, and medication prescriptions during 12 months' follow-up than did those with ADHD alone. ADHD therapy augmentation was prevalent among children/adolescents with ADHD, even among those without psychiatric/neurologic comorbidities.

  1. CNS penetration of intrathecal-lumbar idursulfase in the monkey, dog and mouse: implications for neurological outcomes of lysosomal storage disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calias, Pericles; Papisov, Mikhail; Pan, Jing; Savioli, Nancy; Belov, Vasily; Huang, Yan; Lotterhand, Jason; Alessandrini, Mary; Liu, Nan; Fischman, Alan J; Powell, Jan L; Heartlein, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS) disorders is the lack of convenient and effective methods for delivering biological agents to the brain. Mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome) is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S). I2S is a large, highly glycosylated enzyme. Intravenous administration is not likely to be an effective therapy for disease-related neurological outcomes that require enzyme access to the brain cells, in particular neurons and oligodendrocytes. We demonstrate that intracerebroventricular and lumbar intrathecal administration of recombinant I2S in dogs and nonhuman primates resulted in widespread enzyme distribution in the brain parenchyma, including remarkable deposition in the lysosomes of both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Lumbar intrathecal administration also resulted in enzyme delivery to the spinal cord, whereas little enzyme was detected there after intraventricular administration. Mucopolysaccharidosis II model is available in mice. Lumbar administration of recombinant I2S to enzyme deficient animals reduced the storage of glycosaminoglycans in both superficial and deep brain tissues, with concurrent morphological improvements. The observed patterns of enzyme transport from cerebrospinal fluid to the CNS tissues and the resultant biological activity (a) warrant further investigation of intrathecal delivery of I2S via lumbar catheter as an experimental treatment for the neurological symptoms of Hunter syndrome and (b) may have broader implications for CNS treatment with biopharmaceuticals.

  2. CNS penetration of intrathecal-lumbar idursulfase in the monkey, dog and mouse: implications for neurological outcomes of lysosomal storage disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pericles Calias

    Full Text Available A major challenge for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS disorders is the lack of convenient and effective methods for delivering biological agents to the brain. Mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S. I2S is a large, highly glycosylated enzyme. Intravenous administration is not likely to be an effective therapy for disease-related neurological outcomes that require enzyme access to the brain cells, in particular neurons and oligodendrocytes. We demonstrate that intracerebroventricular and lumbar intrathecal administration of recombinant I2S in dogs and nonhuman primates resulted in widespread enzyme distribution in the brain parenchyma, including remarkable deposition in the lysosomes of both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Lumbar intrathecal administration also resulted in enzyme delivery to the spinal cord, whereas little enzyme was detected there after intraventricular administration. Mucopolysaccharidosis II model is available in mice. Lumbar administration of recombinant I2S to enzyme deficient animals reduced the storage of glycosaminoglycans in both superficial and deep brain tissues, with concurrent morphological improvements. The observed patterns of enzyme transport from cerebrospinal fluid to the CNS tissues and the resultant biological activity (a warrant further investigation of intrathecal delivery of I2S via lumbar catheter as an experimental treatment for the neurological symptoms of Hunter syndrome and (b may have broader implications for CNS treatment with biopharmaceuticals.

  3. The degenerative spine: pattern recognition and guidelines to image interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizel, P M; Van Hoyweghen, A J L; Bali, A; Van Goethem, J; Van Den Hauwe, L

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine, in the form of intervertebral disc degeneration and bony growth, causing osteophytes and impinging upon the spinal canal and neural foramina, is the most frequent disorder affecting the spine. In this chapter we first discuss briefly the indications for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging in suspected degenerative spine disease. We then describe changes of disc height, signal intensity, and disc contour with aging and repeated microtrauma, as well as the imaging techniques most appropriate to image them. A grading system for lumbar disc changes is provided. Stenosis of the canal and neural foramina is reviewed next, concluding with a description of degenerative changes affecting the vertebral endplates and bone marrow.

  4. Cell therapy: the final frontier for treatment of neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Susmita; Singh, Gurbind; Sreejith, Sailaja; Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Husin, Juani Mazmin; Datta, Indrani; Pal, Rajarshi; Das, Anjan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are devastating because they cause increasing loss of cognitive and physical functions and affect an estimated 1 billion individuals worldwide. Unfortunately, no drugs are currently available to halt their progression, except a few that are largely inadequate. This mandates the search of new treatments for these progressively degenerative diseases. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have been successfully isolated, propagated, and characterized from the adult brains of mammals, including humans. The confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain via NSCs opens up fresh avenues for treating neurological problems. The proof-of-concept studies demonstrating the neural differentiation capacity of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo have raised widespread enthusiasm toward cell-based interventions. It is anticipated that cell-based neurogenic drugs may reverse or compensate for deficits associated with neurological diseases. The increasing interest of the private sector in using human stem cells in therapeutics is evidenced by launching of several collaborative clinical research activities between Pharma giants and research institutions or small start-up companies. In this review, we discuss the major developments that have taken place in this field to position stem cells as a prospective candidate drug for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  5. [Neurology and literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2010-10-01

    Literature complements medical literature in the academic and clinical development of neurologists. The present article explores the contributions of writers of fiction on neurology. Literary works of fiction with particular reference to neurology. A symbiosis between writers of fiction and doctors has been well recognised. From Shakespeare to Cervantes by way of Dickens and Cela to writer - physicians such as Anton Chekhov or António Lobo Antunes have contributed through their medically informed literature to the better understanding of neurology. Some writers like Dostoevsky, Machado de Assis and Margiad Evans have written about their own experiences with disease thus bringing new insights to medicine. Furthermore, some neurological disorders have been largely based on literary descriptions. For instance, Dostoevsky's epilepsy has been retrospectively analysed by famous neurologists including Freud, Alajouanine or Gastaut, whilst his writings and biography have prompted others like Waxman and Geschwind to describe typical behavioural changes in temporal lobe epilepsy, finding their source of inspiration in Dostoevsky. Likewise, Cirignotta et al have named an unusual type of seizure after the Russian novelist. Inspired by Lewis Carroll, Todd introduced the term Alice in Wonderland Syndrome to refer to visual distortions generally associated with migraine. Writers of fiction offer a humanised perception of disease by contributing new insights into the clinical history, informing about the subjective experience of the illness and helping to eradicate the stigma associated to neurological disorders.

  6. An unusual splice defect in the mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2 is associated with degenerative axonopathy in Tyrolean Grey cattle.

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    Cord Drögemüller

    Full Text Available Tyrolean Grey cattle represent a local breed with a population size of ∼5000 registered cows. In 2003, a previously unknown neurological disorder was recognized in Tyrolean Grey cattle. The clinical signs of the disorder are similar to those of bovine progressive degenerative myeloencephalopathy (weaver syndrome in Brown Swiss cattle but occur much earlier in life. The neuropathological investigation of an affected calf showed axonal degeneration in the central nervous system (CNS and femoral nerve. The pedigrees of the affected calves suggested a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance. We localized the responsible mutation to a 1.9 Mb interval on chromosome 16 by genome-wide association and haplotype mapping. The MFN2 gene located in this interval encodes mitofusin 2, a mitochondrial membrane protein. A heritable human axonal neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-2A2 (CMT2A2, is caused by MFN2 mutations. Therefore, we considered MFN2 a positional and functional candidate gene and performed mutation analysis in affected and control Tyrolean Grey cattle. We did not find any non-synonymous variants. However, we identified a perfectly associated silent SNP in the coding region of exon 20 of the MFN2 gene. This SNP is located within a putative exonic splice enhancer (ESE and the variant allele leads to partial retention of the entire intron 19 and a premature stop codon in the aberrant MFN2 transcript. Thus we have identified a highly unusual splicing defect, where an exonic single base exchange leads to the retention of the preceding intron. This splicing defect represents a potential explanation for the observed degenerative axonopathy. Marker assisted selection can now be used to eliminate degenerative axonopathy from Tyrolean Grey cattle.

  7. Autism Spectrum Disorders in Africa: Current Challenges in Identification, Assessment, and Treatment: A Report on the International Child Neurology Association Meeting on ASD in Africa, Ghana, April 3-5, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruparelia, Kavita; Abubakar, Amina; Badoe, Eben; Bakare, Muideen; Visser, Karren; Chugani, Diane C; Chugani, Harry T; Donald, Kirsten A; Wilmshurst, Jo M; Shih, Andy; Skuse, David; Newton, Charles R

    2016-07-01

    Prevalence of autism spectrum disorders has increased over recent years, however, little is known about the identification and management of autism spectrum disorder in Africa. This report summarizes a workshop on autism spectrum disorder in Africa under the auspices of the International Child Neurology Association and the African Child Neurology Association through guided presentations and working group reports, focusing on identification, diagnosis, management, and community support. A total of 47 delegates participated from 14 African countries. Although there was a huge variability in services across the countries represented, numbers of specialists assessing and managing autism spectrum disorder was small relative to populations served. Strategies were proposed to improve identification, diagnosis, management and support delivery for individuals with autism spectrum disorder across Africa in these culturally diverse, low-resource settings. Emphasis on raising public awareness through community engagement and improving access to information and training in autism spectrum disorder. Special considerations for the cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic factors within Africa are discussed.

  8. Episodic neurological channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Devon P; Ptácek, Louis J

    2010-10-21

    Inherited episodic neurological disorders are often due to mutations in ion channels or their interacting proteins, termed channelopathies. There are a wide variety of such disorders, from those causing paralysis, to extreme pain, to ataxia. A common theme in these is alteration of action potential properties or synaptic transmission and a resulting increased propensity of the resulting tissue to enter into or stay in an altered excitability state. Manifestations of these disorders are triggered by an array of precipitants, all of which stress the particular affected tissue in some way and aid in propelling its activity into an aberrant state. Study of these disorders has aided in the understanding of disease risk factors and elucidated the cause of clinically related sporadic disorders. The findings from study of these disorders will aid in the diagnosis and efficient targeted treatment of affected patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Neurological manifestations of tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, M M; Vdovin, A V; Chichanovskaia, L V

    2001-01-01

    One hundred and forty-four new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis were examined. The examination revealed the following neurological syndromes: vegetovascular dystonia, disseminated cerebral microsymptoms, focal lesion of the brain, sensory polyneuropathy. The presence of positive specific basophilic degranulation reactions and intracutaneous tuberculin test suggests that the body shows allergic reactions in response to Mycobacteria tuberculosis. And since connective tissue that presents in the vessels and tunics in the nervous system is involved into a pathological process in allergy, neurological disorders are always secondary in tuberculosis and due to the primary vascular wall lesion that following the type of secondary allergic vasculitis.

  10. Adult degenerative and senile degenerative hyperostosis triangularis ilii

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    Nebel, G.; Hering, L.; Lingg, G.

    1981-10-01

    A randomised study of 2000 patients (1000 males, 1000 females) revealed two forms of the triangular hyperostosis of the ilium in female patients. The hyperostosis triangularis ilii, HTI, is also known as osteitis condensans. One form of HTI concerning women under the age of 50 is called the adult generative HTI, the other beyond the age of 50 senile degenerative HTI. These two forms are not evident in male patients. The 3.05% incidence of HTI in adults appeared to be higher than presumed till now. The sex incidence male/female of 1:1.6 diverges considerably from preceding investigations. Histomorphological studies of two autopsies of cases of senile degenerative HTI revealed no signs of inflammation. Statistical correlations of HTI with other chronic diseases of the pelvis and hip could doubtlessly and generally be established only for osteoarthrosis of the sacro-iliac joints in females beyond the age of 50 and in males as a matter of principle.

  11. [History of the Department of Neurology at the University of Buenos Aires (1887-2007)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegri, Ricardo F; Bartoloni, Leonardo; Sica, Roberto E

    2016-07-01

    In 1887, only five years after Jean-Martin Charcot was awarded the Head of Neurology at "La Salpetrière" in Paris, José María Ramos Mejía became the first professor of Neurology in South America, at the School of Medicine of the University of Buenos Aires. Ramos Mejía convoked three assistants, the neuropathologist Christofredo Jakob, the clinician José A. Esteves and José Ingenieros. Hence it followed that Neurology in Argentina took a stand based on a clinical neurology-neuropathology approach (1941-1987) followed by a clinical-semiological attitude, finally inserting itself within the modern times (1987-present) by creating subspecialties. Throughout its history, Argentina has made remarkable contributions to Neurology, such as the diagnosis and pathogenesis of the nervous system involvement occurring in some regional endemic disorders -for instance, Chagas' disease-, the clinical approach to the diagnosis of dementias, and the pathogenesis of extrapyramidal illnesses and other primary degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, mainly amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. On the other hand, in recent years globalization allowed neurologists to participate in international cooperative projects, favoring a swifter development in the practice of this discipline.

  12. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  13. Posatirelin for the treatment of degenerative and vascular dementia: results of explanatory and pragmatic efficacy analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarrini, G; Stefanini, G; Addolorato, G; Foschi, F; Ricci, C; Bertolotti, P; Voltolini, G; Bonavita, E; Bertoncelli, R; Renzi, G; Bianchini, G; Bonaiuto, S; Giannandrea, E; Cavassini, G; Mazzini, V; Chioma, V; Marzara, G; D'Addetta, G; Totaro, G; Dalmonte, E; Tassini, D; Giungi, F; De Nitto, C; Di Fazio, G; Tessitore, A; Guadagnino, M; Tessitore, E; Spina, P; Luppi, M; Bignamini, A; Peracino, L; Fiorentino, M; Beun-Garbe, D; Poli, A; Ambrosoli, L; Girardello, R

    1998-01-01

    In order to confirm the efficacy and safety of posatirelin (L-pyro-2-aminoadipyl-L-leucyl-L-prolinamide), a synthetic peptide having cholinergic, catecholaminergic and neurotrophic activities, a multicentre, double-blind, controlled study versus placebo was planned in elderly patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, according to National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke/Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCDS-ADRDA) and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/Association Internationale pour la Recherche et l'Enseignement en Neurosciences (NINDS-AIREN) criteria, respectively. The trial consisted of a 2-week run-in phase with placebo administered once a day orally, followed by a double-blind period of 3 months, with posatirelin or placebo administered once a day intramuscularly. Efficacy was assessed using the Gottfries-Bråne-Steen (GBS) Rating Scale (primary variable) and the Rey Memory Test (secondary variable). Laboratory tests, vital signs and adverse events were monitored. A total of 360 patients were randomized, the intent-to-treat sample (ITT) being made up of 357 patients and the per protocol sample (PP) of 260 patients. Both pragmatic and explanatory analyses showed significant differences between treatment groups in the GBS Rating Scale and the Rey Memory Test, with no difference in the two types of dementia. No difference between treatments was observed in safety variables, the incidence of adverse events in the posatirelin group being 7.3%. The study confirms previous results showing that treatment with posatirelin can improve cognitive and functional abilities of patients suffering from degenerative or vascular dementia.

  14. Exame de paciente com doença neurológica Patient examination with neurologic disorders

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    Adalmir Morterá Dantas

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A neurologia oftalmológica e otológica tem se desenvolvido nos últimos anos até constituir uma extensa disciplina especializada. Dispomos na atualidade de importantes manuais sobre a mesma, os quais têm, ante tudo, o caráter de obras de consulta; em troca, se faz sentir, sem dúvida, a necessidade de descrições compreendidas que destaquem o mais essencial e definitivamente adquirido da bibliografia, quase inabarcável, em relação aos domínios desta especialidade; assim, temos demonstrados os repetidos desejos de alunos, solicitando a publicação de nossas conferências para pós-graduados sobre esta matéria. Fizemos uma exposição resumida da neurologia com interesse neurooftalmológico para que os estudantes desta matéria possam se interessar sobre a mesma.Lately, the ophthalmologic and otological neurology has been developed into a broad and specialized subject. Currently, we have important manuals on this issue, which above all have the purpose of a work for research. However, undoubtedly one can feel the necessity for comprehended descriptions that will highlight what is most essential and definitely taken from the biography, almost inaccessible, regarding the realm of such specialty; thus, the repeated wishes of the students asking for the publication of our lectures for the post-graduates on this matter have been demonstrated. We have included a summary of the neurology with neuro-ophthalmologic interest aiming at drawing the students' attention on this subject.

  15. Quantification of cystatin C in cerebrospinal fluid from various neurological disorders and correlation with G73A polymorphism in CST3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto-Watanabe, Yukiko; Watanabe, Mitsunori; Jackson, Mandy; Akimoto, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Kazuhiro; Yasujima, Minoru; Wakasaya, Yasuhito; Matsubara, Etsuro; Kawarabayashi, Takeshi; Harigaya, Yasuo; Lyndon, Alastair R; Shoji, Mikio

    2010-11-18

    Cystatin C (CC) is a cysteine protease inhibitor abundantly expressed in the central nervous system. Bunina bodies, small eosinophilic intraneuronal inclusions, are stain positive for CC and are the most specific histological hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In this study, employing a latex turbidimetric immunoassay, levels of CC in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were quantified in 130 age-matched individuals with either a neurological disorder [ALS, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), tauopathy (TP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP)] or no known neurological condition (normal control, NC). The CC level in CSF was found to be correlated with the age during the investigation but not the protein concentration. There was no difference in CC levels between NC and ALS or CIDP cases, whereas CC levels were significantly lower in MSA compared with NC. Of the 130 cases, 96 were genotyped, and G/A or A/A polymorphism at +73 within the CST3 gene was found in 28 individuals. The CC level was significantly lower in the combined group of G/A and A/A genotypes compared with G/G. The present data demonstrate that the level of CC in CSF should not be considered as a biomarker of ALS, but there is a correlation between CC levels and the CST3 genotype.

  16. Effect of the functional caregivers Plan implementation on the anxiety and quality of life for the family caregivers of dependent people with neurological disorders

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    Ruth Molina Fuillerat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In January 2005 the Andalusian Health Service Improvement Plan prepared: Caring for the Caregiver include actions to be taken to promote equity, to recognize and facilitate the work of family carers. From our perspective of formal caregivers, it seems necessary to consider not only themselves need care patients with the disease, but also makes it mandatory caring individuals usually relatives, facilitators of the provision of care. In the Unit of Neurology, the daily observation of these family situations, has guided and network relationship between the two formal and informal systems of care, and we have tried the approach of the caregivers as clients to treat them as co-participants the experience of caring. Hypothesis: The Implementation of Functional Plan caregiver positive impact on hospitalization decreased anxiety and improved quality of life of caregivers of a dependent patient. Overall objective: To determine the effect of applying functional caregiver Plan on anxiety and quality of life of family caregivers of dependent people with neurological disorders. Study Design: Experimental study of the clinical trial such an intervention group and a control group randomly assigned.

  17. Challenges for the pharmacological treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders: Implications of the Ca(2+)/cAMP intracellular signalling interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergantin, Leandro Bueno; Caricati-Neto, Afonso

    2016-10-01

    In 2013, we discovered that the entitled "calcium paradox" phenomenon, which means a paradoxical sympathetic hyperactivity produced by l-type Ca(2+) channel blockers (CCBs), used in antihypertensive therapy, is due to interaction between the intracellular signalling pathways mediated by Ca(2+) and cAMP (Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction). In 2015, we proposed that the pharmacological manipulation of this interaction could be a new therapeutic strategy for increasing neurotransmission in psychiatric disorders, and producing neuroprotection in the neurodegenerative diseases. Besides the paradoxical sympathetic hyperactivity produced by CCBs, several clinical studies have been demonstrating pleiotropic effects of CCBs, including neuroprotective effects. CCBs genuinely exhibit cognitive-enhancing abilities and reduce the risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson´s disease and others. The molecular mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects remain under debate. Our recent discovery that the "calcium paradox" phenomenon is due to Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction may provide new insights for the pharmacological treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including enhancement of current therapies mainly by reducing adverse effects, and improving effectiveness of modern medicines. Whether Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction is involved in CCBs pleiotropic effects also deserves special attention. Then, the pharmacological manipulation of the Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction could be a more efficient therapeutic strategy for increasing neurotransmission in psychiatric disorders, and producing neuroprotection in the neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, in this review we summarize the current knowledge of this field, making new directions and future perspectives.

  18. Negative association between a history of obstetric complications and the number of neurological soft signs in first-episode schizophrenic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boks, Marco P M; Selten, Jean-Paul; Leask, Stuart; Castelein, Stynke; van den Bosch, Robert J

    2007-01-15

    We examined the relationship between a history of obstetric complications (OCs) and the number of neurological soft signs (NSS) in a group of 132 patients experiencing their first episode of psychosis. We measured NSS by means of a comprehensive standardized assessment and gained information on a selection of nine OCs from the patient's mother. Contrary to our expectations we found significantly more NSS in the group of patients without a history of OCs. This effect was independent of medication in the group of patients with a schizophrenic disorder, but not in the entire group. It is possible that the patients with a history of OCs carry fewer genes for schizophrenia (and NSS) and 'needed' the OCs to develop schizophrenia.

  19. Detection of neuron specific enolase concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with neurological disorders by means of a sensitive enzyme immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermuyten, K; Lowenthal, A; Karcher, D

    1990-02-28

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of neuron specific enolase (NSE) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was developed. The sensitivity of the ELISA was less than 1 microgram/ml. This sensitivity is comparable with radioimmunoassays which have the disadvantage that radiolabelled products are used. The developed assay was used to measure cerebrospinal fluid neuron specific enolase (CSF-NSE) levels in 1178 patients with neurological disorders to establish its potential usefulness and clinical application. CSF-NSE levels in this group of patients were independent of sex and no correlation with age was found. CSF-NSE was significantly increased in Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, meningeal hemorrhage, thrombosis, Guillain-Barré syndrome and in schizophrenia.

  20. Toxoplasmosis and Polygenic Disease Susceptibility Genes: Extensive Toxoplasma gondii Host/Pathogen Interactome Enrichment in Nine Psychiatric or Neurological Disorders

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    C. J. Carter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is not only implicated in schizophrenia and related disorders, but also in Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, cancer, cardiac myopathies, and autoimmune disorders. During its life cycle, the pathogen interacts with ~3000 host genes or proteins. Susceptibility genes for multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, childhood obesity, Parkinson's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (multiple sclerosis, and autism (, but not anorexia or chronic fatigue are highly enriched in the human arm of this interactome and 18 (ADHD to 33% (MS of the susceptibility genes relate to it. The signalling pathways involved in the susceptibility gene/interactome overlaps are relatively specific and relevant to each disease suggesting a means whereby susceptibility genes could orient the attentions of a single pathogen towards disruption of the specific pathways that together contribute (positively or negatively to the endophenotypes of different diseases. Conditional protein knockdown, orchestrated by T. gondii proteins or antibodies binding to those of the host (pathogen derived autoimmunity and metabolite exchange, may contribute to this disruption. Susceptibility genes may thus be related to the causes and influencers of disease, rather than (and as well as to the disease itself.

  1. Motor Proficiency and Emotional/Behavioural Disturbance in Autism and Asperger's Disorder: Another Piece of the Neurological Puzzle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Nicole; McGinley, Jennifer; Tonge, Bruce; Bradshaw, John; Saunders, Kerryn; Murphy, Anna; Rinehart, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The relationship of motor proficiency with emotional/behavioural disturbance, autistic symptoms and communication disturbance was investigated in children diagnosed with autism and Asperger's disorder (AD). The Movement Assessment Battery for Children was used as a measure of motor impairment, and the Developmental Behavioural Checklist was used…

  2. P2X7受体与神经系统疾病%P2X7 receptor and neurological disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾雯; 童煜; 毛萌

    2011-01-01

    As a subtype of P2X receptors, the ATP-gated ion channels, P2X7 receptor has important and unique physiological functions. P2X7 receptor mediates the influx of Ca2+ and Na+ as well as the release of proinflammatory cytokines. P2X7 receptor may be involved in the pathophysiology of neurological disorders, such as neurodegeneration, chronic inflammation, pain and depression, through their abilities to regulate the release of neurotransmitters, the activation of glia cells, inflammation reaction and the neuronal cell death. This review is focused on the role of P2X7 receptor in neurological disorders.%P2X受体是配体门控离子通道型受体,其亚型P2X7受体具有独特且重要的生理功能.P2X7受体(purinergic recepter p2x,ligand-gated ion channel,7)的活化可引起钠离子和钙离子内流、促炎细胞因子释放、胶质细胞活化、炎症反应以及参与调控神经递质释放、神经细胞存活等.P2X7受体与多种神经系统病变密切相关,如神经退行性变,慢性炎症,疼痛,抑郁症等.本文就P2X7受体与神经系统疾病做一综述.

  3. Validation of the Persian version of ‎the dysphagia handicap index in ‎patients with neurological disorders

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    Ebrahim Barzegar-Bafrooei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dysphagia as a common condition affecting many aspects of the patient’s life. The Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI is a reliable self-reported questionnaire developed specifically to measure the impact of dysphagia on the patient’s quality of life. The aim of this study was to translate the questionnaire to Persian and to measure its validity and reliability in patients with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia.Methods: A formal forward-backward translation of DHI was performed based on the guidelines for the cross-cultural adaptation of self-report measures. A total of 57 patients with neurogenic dysphagia who were referred to the neurology clinics of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, participated in this study. Internal consistency reliability of the DHI was examined using Cronbach’s alpha, and test-retest reliability of the scale was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC.Results: The internal consistency of the Persian DHI (P-DHI was considered to be good; Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the total P-DHI was 0.88. The test-retest reliability for the total and three subscales of the P-DHI ranged from 0.95 to 0.98 using ICC.Conclusion: The P-DHI demonstrated a good reliability, and it can be a valid instrument for evaluating the dysphagia effects on quality of life among Persian language population.

  4. Coxsackievirus A16 induced neurological disorders in young gerbils which could serve as a new animal model for vaccine evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Sheng; Li, Ya-jing; Xia, Yong; Xu, Fang; Wang, Wei-wei; Yang, Zhang-Nv; Lu, Hang-Jing; Chen, Zhi-Ping; Miao, Zi-Ping; Liang, Wei-Feng; Xu, Zhi-Yao; Dong, Hong-Jun; Qiu, Dan-Hong; Zhu, Zhi-Yong; van der Veen, Stijn; Qian, Jie; Zhou, Bin; Yao, Ping-Ping; Zhu, Han-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) is one of the major pathogens associated with human hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in the Asia-pacific region. Although CA16 infections are generally mild, severe neurological manifestations or even death has been reported. Studies on CA16 pathogenesis and vaccine development are severely hampered because the small animal models that are currently available show major limitations. In this study, gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) were investigated for their suitability as an animal model to study CA16 pathogenesis and vaccine development. Our results showed that gerbils up to the age of 21 days were fully susceptible to CA16 and all died within five days post-infection. CA16 showed a tropism towards the skeletal muscle, spinal cord and brainstem of gerbils, and severe lesions, including necrosis, were observed. In addition, an inactivated CA16 whole-virus vaccine administrated to gerbils was able to provide full protection to the gerbils against lethal doses of CA16 strains. These results demonstrate that gerbils are a suitable animal model to study CA16 infection and vaccine development. PMID:27667023

  5. Visual mismatch negativity (vMMN): A review and meta-analysis of studies in psychiatric and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremláček, Jan; Kreegipuu, Kairi; Tales, Andrea; Astikainen, Piia; Põldver, Nele; Näätänen, Risto; Stefanics, Gábor

    2016-07-01

    The visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) response is an event-related potential (ERP) component, which is automatically elicited by events that violate predictions based on prior events. VMMN experiments use visual stimulus repetition to induce predictions, and vMMN is obtained by subtracting the response to rare unpredicted stimuli from those to frequent stimuli. One increasingly popular interpretation of the mismatch response postulates that vMMN, similar to its auditory counterpart (aMMN), represents a prediction error response generated by cortical mechanisms forming probabilistic representations of sensory signals. Here we discuss the physiological and theoretical basis of vMMN and review thirty-three studies from the emerging field of its clinical applications, presenting a meta-analysis of findings in schizophrenia, mood disorders, substance abuse, neurodegenerative disorders, developmental disorders, deafness, panic disorder and hypertension. Furthermore, we include reports on aging and maturation as they bear upon many clinically relevant conditions. Surveying the literature we found that vMMN is altered in several clinical populations which is in line with aMMN findings. An important potential advantage of vMMN however is that it allows the investigation of deficits in predictive processing in cognitive domains which rely primarily on visual information; a principal sensory modality and thus of vital importance in environmental information processing and response, and a modality which arguably may be more sensitive to some pathological changes. However, due to the relative infancy of research in vMMN compared to aMMN in clinical populations its potential for clinical application is not yet fully appreciated. The aim of this review and meta-analysis therefore is to present, in a detailed systematic manner, the findings from clinically-based vMMN studies, to discuss their potential impact and application, to raise awareness of this measure and to improve our

  6. Global Expression Studies of Schizophrenic Brain: A Meta-Analysis Study Linking Neurological Immune System with Psychological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Sajjad; Kamal, Mohammad A; Iqbal, Zafar; Ansari, Shakeel A; Rasool, Mahmood; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H; Damanhouri, Gazi; Mirza, Zeenat

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia, a psychological disorder with enormous societal impact, is a result of abnormalities in gene expression and dysregulation of the immune response in the brain. Few studies have been conducted to understand its etiology, however, the exact molecular mechanism largely remains unknown, though some poorly understood theories abound. Present meta-study links the role of central nervous system, immunological system and psychological disorders by using global expression approach and pathway analysis. We retrieved genome-wide mRNA expression data and clinico-pathological information from five independent studies of schizophrenic patients from Gene Expression Omnibus database. We continued further with three studies having common platform. Our result showed a total of 527 differentially expressed genes of which 314 are up regulated and 213 are down regulated. After adjusting the sources of variation, we carried out pathway and gene ontology analysis, and observed alteration of 14-3-3-mediated signaling, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor signaling, role of nuclear factor of activated T-cells in regulation of the immune response, G beta gamma signaling, dopamine- and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein of relative molecular mass 32,000 feedback in cAMP signaling, complement system, axonal guidance signaling, dendritic cell maturation, cAMP response element-binding protein signaling in neurons and interleukin-1 signaling pathways and networks. Conclusively, our global gene expression pathway and gene set enrichment analysis studies suggest disruption of many common pathways and processes, which links schizophrenia to immune and central nervous system. Present meta-study links the role of central nervous system, immunological system and psychological disorders by using global expression approach and pathway analysis.

  7. Stem-cell therapy for neurologic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of research on stem cell therapy for various diseases, an important need was felt in the field of neurological diseases. While congenital lesion may not be amenable to stem cell therapy completely, there is a scope of partial improvement in the lesions and halt in further progression. Neuro degenerative lesions like Parkinson′s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown improvement with stem cell therapy. This article reviews the available literature and summarizes the current evidence in the various neurologic diseases amenable to stem cell therapy, the plausible mechanism of action, ethical concerns with insights into the future of stem cell therapy.

  8. Combining non-pharmacological treatments with pharmacotherapies for neurological disorders: a unique interface of the brain, drug-device, and intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Mobile medical applications (mHealth), music, and video games are being developed and tested for their ability to improve pharmacotherapy outcomes and medication adherence. Pleiotropic mechanism of music and gamification engages an intrinsic motivation and the brain reward system, supporting therapies in patients with neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, depression, anxiety, or neurodegenerative disorders. Based on accumulating results from clinical trials, an innovative combination treatment of epilepsy seizures, comorbidities, and the medication non-adherence can be designed, consisting of antiepileptic drugs and disease self-management software delivering clinically beneficial music. Since creative elements and art expressed in games, music, and software are copyrighted, therefore clinical and regulatory challenges in developing copyrighted, drug-device therapies may be offset by a value proposition of the exclusivity due to the patent-independent protection, which can last for over 70 years. Taken together, development of copyrighted non-pharmacological treatments (e-therapies), and their combinations with pharmacotherapies, offer incentives to chronically ill patients and outcome-driven health care industries.

  9. Combining Non-pharmacological Treatments with Pharmacotherapies for Neurological Disorders: a Unique Interface of the Brain, Drug-Device and Intellectual Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz eBulaj

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile medical applications (mHealth, music and video games are being developed and tested for their ability to improve pharmacotherapy outcomes and medication adherence. Pleiotropic mechanism of music and gamification engage an intrinsic motivation and the brain reward system, supporting therapies in patients with neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, depression, anxiety, or neurodegenerative disorders. Based on accumulating results from clinical trials, an innovative combination treatment of epilepsy seizures, comorbidities and the medication non-adherence can be designed, consisting of antiepileptic drugs and disease self-management software delivering clinically beneficial music. Since creative elements and art expressed in games, music and software are copyrighted, therefore clinical and regulatory challenges in developing copyrighted, drug-device therapies may be offset by a value proposition of the exclusivity due to the patent-independent protection which can last for over 70 years. Taken together, development of copyrighted non-pharmacological treatments (e-therapies, and their combinations with pharmacotherapies, offers incentives to chronically-ill patients and outcome-driven health care industries.

  10. Bilateral neurological deficits following unilateral minimally invasive TLIF: A review of four patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander T Nixon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF is commonly used for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disorders. The rate of postoperative neurological deficits is traditionally low. New neurological postoperative complications may be underreported. We report our infrequent rate of MI-TLIF procedures complicated by postoperative weakness. Methods: A database of 340 patients was evaluated, all of whom underwent MI-TLIF procedures performed between January 2002 and June 2012 by the senior author. We identified four cases (1.2% whose postoperative course was complicated with bilateral lower extremity weakness. We retrospectively reviewed their past medical history, operative time, estimated blood loss, length of hospital stay, changes in intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, and pre- and postoperative neurological exams. Results: The average age of the four patients was 65.5 years(range: 62-75 years, average body mass index (BMI was 25.1 (range: 24.1-26.6, and there were three females and one male. All patients had preoperative degenerative spondylolisthesis (either grade I or grade II. All patients were placed on a Wilson frame during surgery and underwent unilateral left-sided MI-TLIF. Three out of the four patients had a past medical history significant for abdominal or pelvic surgery and one patient had factor V Leiden deficiency syndrome. Conclusions: The rate of new neurological deficits following an MI-TLIF procedure is low, as documented in this study where the rate was 1.2%. Nonetheless, acknowledgement and open discussion of this serious complication is important for surgeon education. Of interest, the specific etiology or pathophysiology behind these complications remains relatively unknown (e.g. direct neural injury, traction injury, hypoperfusion, positioning complication, and others despite there being some similarities between the patients and their perioperative courses.

  11. [Neurological diseases and nutrition -- what can we do?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamási, Péter

    2014-12-21

    Neurological diseases and nutrition are in complex relationship. In the first part of this review the nutritional consequences of acute neurological diseases is presented, with special emphasis on traumatic injuries of the nervous system and stroke. Nutritional therapy of these patients is described in detail. In addition, chronic, degenerative neurological pathological conditions are also discussed, including nutritional consequences and possibilities of therapy. Some ethical and legal issues are also considered. The second part of this review article describes neurological consequences of nutritional problems, both deficits of macro- and micronutrients and toxic effects.

  12. Arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Juhl, C B; Roos, E M

    2015-01-01

    . DATA SOURCES: Systematic searches for benefits and harms were carried out in Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) up to August 2014. Only studies published in 2000 or later were included for harms. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR SELECTING...... included symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (4.13 (95% confidence interval 1.78 to 9.60) events per 1000 procedures), pulmonary embolism, infection, and death. CONCLUSIONS: The small inconsequential benefit seen from interventions that include arthroscopy for the degenerative knee is limited in time...

  13. The neurological disease ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark; Cox, Alexander P; Chaudhry, Naveed; Ng, Marcus; Sule, Donat; Duncan, William; Ray, Patrick; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Smith, Barry; Ruttenberg, Alan; Szigeti, Kinga; Diehl, Alexander D

    2013-12-06

    We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms 'disease', 'diagnosis', 'disease course', and 'disorder'. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. ND seeks to provide a formal foundation for the representation of clinical and research data

  14. Neurological soft signs and cognitive functions: Amongst euthymic bipolar I disorder cases, non-affected first degree relatives and healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Srikant; Bhatia, Triptish; Mazumdar, Sati; Deshpande, Smita N.

    2016-01-01

    Both neurological soft signs (NSS) and cognitive deficits are present among euthymic bipolar patients. NSS could be related to neurocognitive performance, but this is not explored thoroughly. Healthy relatives of patients may also suffer from similar deficits. This study compared NSS and cognitive functions in euthymic Bipolar I Disorder (BPI) cases to their non-affected first degree relatives and healthy controls. We also investigated the association between NSS and cognitive functions in these three groups. NSS were assessed in three groups using Neurological Evaluation Scale-revised (NES-r). Eight cognitive domains were assessed in 31 euthymic BPI cases, their 30 non-affected first degree relatives and 30 healthy controls using Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (CNB). Euthymic BPI patients had significantly more NSS than non-affected first degree relatives on 5/7 tests (p-value ranges from 0.042 to p = 0.0001) and healthy controls on all tests (p-value from 0.042 to <0.0001). Non-affected first degree relatives and controls did not have any significant difference. BPI participants performed worse than their non-affected first degree relatives on one neurocognitive domain of CNB (spatial memory accuracy, p = 0.03) and healthy controls on four domains (spatial memory accuracy (p = 0.04), abstraction and mental flexibility efficiency (p = 0.04), spatial memory efficiency (p = 0.04), and emotion efficiency (p = 0.04). Non-affected relatives and healthy controls were similar on neurocognitive domains. Accuracy and efficiency indices of some specific cognitive domains were negatively associated with AV rating and tap copying NSS ratings. PMID:27520894

  15. Increasing pharmacological knowledge about human neurological and psychiatric disorders through functional neuroimaging and its application in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Pradeep J; Phan, K Luan; Harmer, Catherine J; Mehta, Mitul A; Bullmore, Edward T

    2014-02-01

    Functional imaging methods such as fMRI have been widely used to gain greater understanding of brain circuitry abnormalities in CNS disorders and their underlying neurochemical basis. Findings suggest that: (1) drugs with known clinical efficacy have consistent effects on disease relevant brain circuitry, (2) brain activation changes at baseline or early drug effects on brain activity can predict long-term efficacy; and (3) fMRI together with pharmacological challenges could serve as experimental models of disease phenotypes and be used for screening novel drugs. Together, these observations suggest that drug related modulation of disease relevant brain circuitry may serve as a promising biomarker/method for use in drug discovery to demonstrate target engagement, differential efficacy, dose-response relationships, and prediction of clinically relevant changes.

  16. Spinal dural ossification causing neurological signs in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antila, Johanna M; Jeserevics, Janis; Rakauskas, Mindaugas; Anttila, Marjukka; Cizinauskas, Sigitas

    2013-06-19

    A six-year-old Ragdoll cat underwent examination due to a six-month history of slowly progressive gait abnormalities. The cat presented with an ambulatory tetraparesis with a neurological examination indicating a C1-T2 myelopathy. Radiographs of the spine showed a radiopaque irregular line ventrally in the vertebral canal dorsal to vertebral bodies C3-C5. In this area, magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural extramedullary/extradural lesion compressing the spinal cord. The spinal cord was surgically decompressed. The cause of the spinal cord compression was dural ossification, a diagnosis confirmed by histopathological examination of the surgically dissected sample of dura mater. The cat gradually improved after the procedure and was ambulating better than prior to the surgery. The cat's locomotion later worsened again due to ossified plaques in the dura causing spinal cord compression on the same cervical area as before. Oral prednisolone treatment provided temporary remission. Ten months after surgery, the cat was euthanized due to severe worsening of gait abnormalities, non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Necropsy confirmed spinal cord compression and secondary degenerative changes in the spinal cord on cervical and lumbar areas caused by dural ossification. To our knowledge, this is the first report of spinal dural ossification in a cat. The reported cat showed neurological signs associated with these dural changes. Dural ossification should be considered in the differential diagnosis of compressive spinal cord disorders in cats.

  17. [Dysexecutive syndromes and degenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, B; Czernecki, V; Dubois, B

    2004-04-01

    A dysexecutive syndrome is observed not only in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, but also in subcortical degenerative diseases, and even in Alzheimer's disease whose lesions predominate in temporoparietal associative areas. The association between a dysexecutive syndrome and various cerebral localisations may be explained by the fact that cognitive and behavioral organisation recruits anatomofunctional frontostriatal and frontoparietal circuits. Both animal experimentation and human clinical observation argue in favour of a functional continuity and complementarity among these loops. The prefrontal cortex would be particularly needed in new situations, to inhibit old programs of action not adapted to the present context and to elaborate new ones; the basal ganglia would be rather required by the repetition of the situation to progressively transform the new program in routine. If we refer to Shallice model, we can hypothesize that optimal executive functions require the preservation not only of the Supervisory Attentional System, mainly dependent on the prefrontal cortex, but also of the Contention Scheduling, recruiting the basal ganglia, and of the Schemas of Action, represented in parietal and premotor areas. Therefore, the neuropsychological assessment of patients with degenerative diseases contributes to the understanding of the anatomofunctional architecture of executive functions.

  18. SLEEP DISORDERS IN NEUROLOGICAL PRACTICE: A ROLE OF MELATONIN IN THERAPY FOR PRIMARY SLEEP AND AWAKENING DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Fedorova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sleep and awakening disorders are almost obligate manifestations of Parkinson’s disease. Primary sleep and awakening disorders in Parkinson’sdisease are associated with the degeneration of serotoninergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus and cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine nucleus. Impaired awakening maintenance with the development of hypersomnia may result from neuron degeneration in the locus coeruleus or pedunculopontine nucleus. A certain role may be played by the pathological basal ganglionic pulsation caused by striatal dopamine deficiency, which goes to both the thalamic reticular nucleus and pedunculopontine nucleus, as well as by dysfunction of the mesocortical dopaminergic pathways involved in sleep-wake cycle regulation. Synthetic melatonin (Melaxen is one of the effective medications for the treatment of sleep disorders in Parkinson’s disease. The drug normalizes circadian rhythms and has a hypnotic effect although it is in the usual sense not a soporific agent. Melaxen has a minimum of side effects and is well tolerated by patients from different age groups.

  19. SLEEP DISORDERS IN NEUROLOGICAL PRACTICE: A ROLE OF MELATONIN IN THERAPY FOR PRIMARY SLEEP AND AWAKENING DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Fedorova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep and awakening disorders are almost obligate manifestations of Parkinson’s disease. Primary sleep and awakening disorders in Parkinson’sdisease are associated with the degeneration of serotoninergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus and cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine nucleus. Impaired awakening maintenance with the development of hypersomnia may result from neuron degeneration in the locus coeruleus or pedunculopontine nucleus. A certain role may be played by the pathological basal ganglionic pulsation caused by striatal dopamine deficiency, which goes to both the thalamic reticular nucleus and pedunculopontine nucleus, as well as by dysfunction of the mesocortical dopaminergic pathways involved in sleep-wake cycle regulation. Synthetic melatonin (Melaxen is one of the effective medications for the treatment of sleep disorders in Parkinson’s disease. The drug normalizes circadian rhythms and has a hypnotic effect although it is in the usual sense not a soporific agent. Melaxen has a minimum of side effects and is well tolerated by patients from different age groups.

  20. Neurological legal disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders with a prolonged course, either remediable or otherwise are being seen increasingly in clinical practice and many such patients are young and are part of some organization or other wherein their services are needed if they were healthy and fit. The neurologists who are on the panel of these organizations are asked to certify whether these subjects are fit to work or how long they should be given leave. These certificates may be produced in the court of law and may be subjected to verification by another neurologist or a medical board. At present there are no standard guidelines in our country to effect such certification unlike in orthopedic specialty or in ophthalmology. The following is a beginning, based on which the neurologist can certify the neurological disability of such subjects and convey the same meaning to all neurologists across the country.

  1. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: an X-linked neurologic disorder of myelin metabolism with a novel mutation in the gene encoding proteolipid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencic, S; Abuelo, D; Ambler, M; Hudson, L D

    1989-01-01

    The nosology of the inborn errors of myelin metabolism has been stymied by the lack of molecular genetic analysis. Historically, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease has encompassed a host of neurologic disorders that present with a deficit of myelin, the membrane elaborated by glial cells that encircles and successively enwraps axons. We describe here a Pelizaeus-Merzbacher pedigree of the classical type, with X-linked inheritance, a typical clinical progression, and a pathologic loss of myelinating cells and myelin in the central nervous system. To discriminate variants of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease, a set of oligonucleotide primers was constructed to polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) amplify and sequence the gene encoding proteolipid protein (PLP), a structural protein that comprises half of the protein of the myelin sheath. The PLP gene in one of two affected males and the carrier mother of this family exhibited a single base difference in the more than 2 kb of the PLP gene sequenced, a C----T transition that would create a serine substitution for proline at the carboxy end of the protein. Our results delineate the clinical features of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease, define the possible molecular pathology of this dysmyelinating disorder, and address the molecular classification of inborn errors of myelin metabolism. Patients with the classical form (type I) and the more severely affected, connatal variant of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (type II) would be predicted to display mutation at the PLP locus. The other variants (types III-VI), which have sometimes been categorized as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease, may represent mutations in genes encoding other structural myelin proteins or proteins critical to myelination. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2773936

  2. Disruption of a PEX1-PEX6 interaction is the most common cause of the neurologic disorders Zellweger syndrome, neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, and infantile Refsum disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisbrecht, B V; Collins, C S; Reuber, B E; Gould, S J

    1998-07-21

    Peroxisomal matrix protein import requires the action of two AAA ATPases, PEX1 and PEX6. Mutations in either the PEX1 or PEX6 gene are the most common cause of the lethal neurologic disorders Zellweger syndrome, neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, and infantile Refsum disease and account for disease in 80% of all such patients. We report here that overexpression of PEX6 can suppress the phenotypes of certain PEX1-deficient cells, that overexpression of PEX1 can suppress the phenotypes of certain PEX6-deficient cells, and that these instances of suppression are allele-specific and require partial activity of the mutated gene. In addition to genetic evidence for interaction between PEX1 and PEX6, we find that the PEX1 and PEX6 proteins interact in the yeast two-hybrid assay and physically associate with one another in vitro. We previously identified a missense mutation in PEX1, G843D, which attenuates PEX1 function and is the most common cause of these diseases, present in one-third of all such patients. The G843D mutation attenuates the interaction between PEX1 and PEX6 in both the two-hybrid system and in vitro and appears to be suppressed by overexpression of PEX6. We conclude that PEX1 and PEX6 form a complex of central importance to peroxisome biogenesis and that mutations affecting this complex constitute the most common cause of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum of diseases.

  3. Mechanisms of action of anti-seizure drugs and the anticonvulsant screening program of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Roger J; Kupferberg, Harvey J; Hessie, Bettie Jean

    2015-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of the Anticonvulsant Screening Program (ASP) of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) in identifying new anti-seizure drugs with new mechanisms of action (MOA). The ASP does not itself identify the nature of the MOA, but on further basic investigation, many of these drugs prove eventually to have a wide variety of new and novel MOA. Data were tabulated from multiple sources, including the ASP and the literature. Since it was established in 1975, the ASP has contributed to the identification of at least 9 new anti-seizure drugs. The effectiveness of the program was evaluated by ascertaining the number of MOA of the anti-seizure drugs discovered by the ASP screening techniques. Considering the MOA of drugs marketed after 1975 - and the MOA of investigational compounds not yet marketed - the ASP has contributed to the identification of anti-seizure drugs that possess 16 distinctly different MOA. The ever-evolving screening approach of the ASP has many characteristics of a final common pathway for anti-seizure drug discovery.

  4. Hyponatremia in neurological diseases in ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lath Rahul

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia is the commonest electrolyte disturbance encountered in the neurological and neurosurgical intensive care units. It can present with signs and symptoms mimicking a neurological disease and can worsen the existing neurological deficits. Hyponatremia in neurological disorders is usually of the hypo-osmolar type caused either due to the Syndrome of Inappropriate Secretion of Anti Diuretic Hormone (SIADH or Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome (CSWS. It is important to distinguish between these two disorders, as the treatment of the two differ to a large extent. In SIADH, the fluid intake is restricted, whereas in CSWS the treatment involves fluid and salt replacement.

  5. Regenerative Medicine for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hyuk Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The annual meeting of the American Society for Neural Therapy and Repair (ASNTR has always introduced us to top-notch and up-to-date approaches for regenerative medicine related to neuroscience, ranging from stem cell–based therapy to novel drugs. The 16th ASNTR meeting focused on a variety of different topics, including the unknown pathogenesis or mechanisms of specific neurodegenerative diseases, stem cell biology, and development of novel alternative medicines or devices. Newly developed stem cells, such as amniotic epithelial stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as well-known traditional stem cells, such as neural, embryonic, bone marrow mesenchymal, and human umbilical cord blood–derived stem cells, were reported. A number of commercialized stem cells were also covered at this meeting. Fetal neural tissues, such as ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and Schwann cells, were investigated for neurodegenerative diseases or spinal cord injury. A number of studies focused on novel methods for drug monitoring or graft tracking, and combination therapy with stem cells and medicine, such as cytokines or trophic factors. Finally, the National Institutes of Health guidelines for human stem cell research, clinical trials of commercialized stem cells without larger animal testing, and prohibition of medical tourism were big controversial issues that led to heated discussion.

  6. Neurology as career option among postgraduate medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namit B Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the context of inadequacy of neurology workforce in India, it is important to understand factors that post-graduate medical students consider for and against choosing neurology as their career option. Understanding these factors will help in planning strategies to encourage students to pursue a career in neurology. At present, there is a paucity of studies addressing this issue in India. Aims and Objectives: (1 To analyze factors, which post-graduate students consider for and against choosing neurology as a career specialty. (2 To access the level and quality of neurology exposure in the current MBBS and MD curricula. Materials and Methods: Statewide questionnaire based study was conducted in the state of Maharashtra for students eligible to take DM neurology entrance examination (MD Medicine and MD Pediatrics. Results: In this survey, 243 students were enrolled. Factors bringing students to neurology were - intellectual challenge and logical reasoning (72%, inspired by role model teachers (63%, better quality-of-life (51% and scope for independent practice without expensive infrastructure (48%. Factors preventing students from taking neurology were - perception that most neurological diseases are degenerative (78%, neurology is mainly an academic specialty (40%, neurophobia (43% and lack of procedures (57%. Inadequate exposure and resultant lack of self-confidence were common (31%, 70-80%. 84% of the students felt the need for a short term certification course in neurology after MD. Conclusions: To attract more students to neurology, "role model" teachers of neurology could interact and teach students extensively. Neurologists′ efforts to shed their diagnostician′s image and to shift their focus to therapeutics will help change the image of neurology. Out-patient neurology clinics should be incorporated early in the student′s career. Procedures attract students; hence, they should be made conversant with procedures and

  7. Role of a redox-based methylation switch in mRNA life cycle (pre- and post-transcriptional maturation) and protein turnover: implications in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Malav S; Deth, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic scaling in response to neuronal stimulus or activation, and due to changes in cellular niche, is an important phenomenon for memory consolidation, retrieval, and other similar cognitive functions (Turrigiano and Nelson, 2004). Neurological disorders and cognitive disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia, dementia, etc., are strongly correlated to alterations in protein expression (both synaptic and cytoplasmic; Cajigas et al., 2010). This correlation suggests that efficient temporal regulation of synaptic protein expression is important for synaptic plasticity. In addition, equilibrium between mRNA processing, protein translation, and protein turnover is a critical sensor/trigger for recording synaptic information, normal cognition, and behavior (Cajigas et al., 2010). Thus a regulatory switch, which controls the lifespan, maturation, and processing of mRNA, might influence cognition and adaptive behavior. Here, we propose a two part novel hypothesis that methylation might act as this suggested coordinating switch to critically regulate mRNA maturation at (1) the pre-transcription level, by regulating precursor-RNA processing into mRNA, via other non-coding RNAs and their influence on splicing phenomenon, and (2) the post-transcription level by modulating the regulatory functions of ribonucleoproteins and RNA binding proteins in mRNA translation, dendritic translocation as well as protein synthesis and synaptic turnover. DNA methylation changes are well recognized and highly correlated to gene expression levels as well as, learning and memory; however, RNA methylation changes are recently characterized and yet their functional implications are not established. This review article provides some insight on the intriguing consequences of changes in methylation levels on mRNA life-cycle. We also suggest that, since methylation is under the control of glutathione anti-oxidant levels (Lertratanangkoon et al., 1997), the redox status of

  8. Role of a redox-based methylation switch in mRNA life cycle ( pre- & post- transcriptional maturation and protein turnover : Implications in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MALAV SUCHIN TRIVEDI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic synaptic scaling in response to neuronal stimulus or activation, as well as due to changes in cellular niche, is an important phenomenon for memory consolidation, retrieval, and other similar cognitive functions. Neurological disorders and cognitive disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia, dementia etc., are strongly correlated to alterations in protein expression (both synaptic and cytoplasmic. This correlation suggests that efficient temporal regulation of synaptic protein expression is important for synaptic plasticity. In addition, equilibrium between mRNA processing, protein translation and protein turnover is a critical sensor/trigger for recording synaptic information, normal cognition and behavior. Thus a regulatory switch, controlling the lifespan, maturation and processing of mRNA, might influence cognition and adaptive behavior. Here, we propose a two part novel hypothesis that methylation might act as this suggested coordinating switch to critically regulate mRNA maturation at 1.The pre-transcription level, by regulating precursor-RNA (pre-RNA processing into mRNA, via other non-coding RNAs and their influence on splicing phenomenon, and 2. the post-transcription level by modulating the regulatory functions of ribonucleoproteins (RNP and RNA binding proteins (RNABP in mRNA translation, dendritic translocation as well as protein synthesis and synaptic turnover. DNA methylation changes are well recognized and highly correlated to gene expression levels as well as, learning and memory; however, RNA methylation changes are recently characterized and yet their functional implications are not established. This review article provides some insight on the intriguing consequences of changes in methylation levels on mRNA life-cycle. We also suggest that, since methylation is under the control of glutathione antioxidant levels, the redox status of neurons might be the central regulatory switch for methylation

  9. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  10. Diagnostic Specificity and Neuroanatomical Validity of Neurological Abnormalities in First-Episode Psychoses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keshavan, Matcheri S; Sanders, Richard D; Sweeney, John A; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A; Goldstein, Gerald; Pettegrew, Jay W; Schooler, Nina R

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Neurological abnormalities are frequently seen in patients with first-episode psychotic disorders but are generally considered to be diagnostically nonspecific, neurologically nonlocalizing, and, hence, "soft...

  11. Stereotypic behaviors in degenerative dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prioni, S; Fetoni, V; Barocco, F; Redaelli, V; Falcone, C; Soliveri, P; Tagliavini, F; Scaglioni, A; Caffarra, P; Concari, L; Gardini, S; Girotti, F

    2012-11-01

    Stereotypies are simple or complex involuntary/unvoluntary behaviors, common in fronto-temporal dementia (FTD), but not studied in other types of degenerative dementias. The aim was to investigate stereotypy frequency and type in patients with FTD, Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD) in a multicenter observational study; and to investigate the relation of stereotypies to cognitive, behavioral and motor impairment. One hundred fifty-five consecutive outpatients (45 AD, 40 FTD, 35 PSP and 35 PDD) were studied in four hospitals in northern Italy. Stereotypies were examined by the five-domain Stereotypy Rating Inventory. Cognition was examined by the Mini Mental State and Frontal Assessment Battery, neuropsychiatric symptoms by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and motor impairment and invalidity by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III, and activities of daily living. Stereotypies were present in all groups. FTD and PDD had the greatest frequency of one-domain stereotypies; FTD also had the greatest frequency of two-or-more domain stereotypies; movement stereotypies were the most common stereotypies in all groups. AD patients had fewer stereotypies than the other groups. Stereotypies are not exclusive to FTD, but are also fairly common in PSP and PDD, though less so in AD. Stereotypies may be underpinned by dysfunctional striato-frontal circuits, known to be damaged in PSP and PDD, as well as FTD.

  12. Perinatal exposure to lead (Pb) promotes Tau phosphorylation in the rat brain in a GSK-3β and CDK5 dependent manner: Relevance to neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąssowska, Magdalena; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Moczydłowska, Joanna; Tarnowski, Maciej; Pilutin, Anna; Gutowska, Izabela; Strużyńska, Lidia; Chlubek, Dariusz; Adamczyk, Agata

    2016-03-10

    Hyperphosphorylation of Tau is involved in the pathomechanism of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's diseases as well as Autism. Epidemiological data suggest the significance of early life exposure to lead (Pb) in etiology of disorders affecting brain function. However, the precise mechanisms by which Pb exerts neurotoxic effects are not fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of perinatal exposure to low dose of Pb on the Tau pathology in the developing rat brain. Furthermore, the involvement of two major Tau-kinases: glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in Pb-induced Tau modification was evaluated. Pregnant female rats were divided into control and Pb-treated group. The control animals were maintained on drinking water while females from the Pb-treated group received 0.1% lead acetate (PbAc) in drinking water, starting from the first day of gestation until weaning of the offspring. During the feeding of pups, mothers from the Pb-treated group were still receiving PbAc. Pups of both groups were weaned at postnatal day 21 and then until postnatal day 28 received only drinking water. 28-day old pups were sacrificed and Tau mRNA and protein level as well as Tau phosphorylation were analyzed in forebrain cortex (FC), cerebellum (C) and hippocampus (H). Concomitantly, we examined the effect of Pb exposure on GSK-3β and CDK5 activation. Our data revealed that pre- and neonatal exposure to Pb (concentration of Pb in whole blood below 10μg/dL, considered safe for humans) caused significant increase in the phosphorylation of Tau at Ser396 and Ser199/202 with parallel rise in the level of total Tau protein in FC and C. Tau hyperphosphorylation in Pb-treated animals was accompanied by elevated activity of GSK-3β and CDK5. Western blot analysis revealed activation of GSK-3β in FC and C as well as CDK5 in C, via increased phosphorylation of Tyr-216 and calpain-dependent p25

  13. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive; Luciano de Paola; Renato Puppi Munhoz

    2014-01-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  14. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  15. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  16. Dynamic stabilization for degenerative spondylolisthesis and lumbar spinal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtonari, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Nobuharu; Suwa, Katsuyasu; Ota, Taisei; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar interbody fusion is a widely accepted surgical procedure for patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and lumbar spinal instability in the active age group. However, in elderly patients, it is often questionable whether it is truly necessary to construct rigid fixation for a short period of time. In recent years, we have been occasionally performing posterior dynamic stabilization in elderly patients with such lumbar disorders. Posterior dynamic stabilization was performed in 12 patients (6 women, 70.9 ± 5.6 years old at the time of operation) with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis in whom % slip was less than 20% or instability associated with lumbar disc herniation between March 2011 and March 2013. Movement occurs through the connector linked to the pedicle screw. In practice, 9 pairs of D connector system where the rod moves in the perpendicular direction alone and 8 pairs of Dynamic connector system where the connector linked to the pedicle screw rotates in the sagittal direction were installed. The observation period was 77-479 days, and the mean recovery rate of lumbar Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was 65.6 ± 20.8%. There was progression of slippage due to slight loosening in a case with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, but this did not lead to exacerbation of the symptoms. Although follow-up was short, there were no symptomatic adjacent vertebral and disc disorders during this period. Posterior dynamic stabilization may diminish the development of adjacent vertebral or disc disorders due to lumbar interbody fusion, especially in elderly patients, and it may be a useful procedure that facilitates decompression and ensures a certain degree of spinal stabilization.

  17. GUIDELINES FOR TREATMENT OF DEGENERATIVE LUMBAR SPONDYLOLISTHESIS

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    CARMEN YOSSALETH BRICEÑO-GONZÁLEZ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To determine the standard of treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis in its different clinical presentations in UMAE Dr. Victorio de la Fuente Narváez. Methods: Six cases found in the literature were presented to 36 experts in spine surgery, along with treatment options, to thereby obtain a standard prescription for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. Analytical observational cross-sectional descriptive study. Results: It was found that the treatment of choice in cases of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis with axial symptoms is conservative. The surgical treatment of choice for both stable and unstable patients with radiculopathy and/or claudication is decompression + posterolateral graft + transpedicular instrumentation + discectomy (graft. Conclusions: We managed to define the degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis treatment guidelines in our unit, which can serve as a basis for the development of a clinical practice guide.

  18. neurological practIce analysis in neurosciences design general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA MEDICAL JOURNAL VOLUME 63 5 FEBRUARY 1983 neurological. •. practIce ... One was an analy- sis of neurological disorders in patients admitted to a university hospital, with an ... Alcohol and drug abuse, anxiety, depression ...

  19. ?Lumbar Degenerative Kyphosis? Is Not Byword for Degenerative Sagittal Imbalance: Time to Replace a Misconception

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee; Jang, Jee-Soo; Kim, Sung-Min; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Jung-Kil

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK) is a subgroup of the flat-back syndrome and is most commonly caused by unique life styles, such as a prolonged crouched posture during agricultural work and performing activities of daily living on the floor. Unfortunately, LDK has been used as a byword for degenerative sagittal imbalance, and this sometimes causes confusion. The aim of this review was to evaluate the exact territory of LDK, and to introduce another appropriate term for degenerative sagittal...

  20. Stem Cell Transplantation in Neurological Diseases

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    M. Ozlem Herguner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurological diseases are characterized by loss of cells in response to an injury or a progressive insult. In recent years, neurons and glia have been generated successfully from stem cells in cultures, fuelling efforts to develop stem-cell-based transplantation therapies for human neurological diseases, such as Parkinson disease, stroke or neuromuscular disorders. In this review, the potential of various cell therapies in childhood neurological diseases are discussed.