WorldWideScience

Sample records for deformable 3d organs

  1. Sparse Representation of Deformable 3D Organs with Spherical Harmonics and Structured Dictionary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a novel algorithm to sparsely represent a deformable surface (SRDS with low dimensionality based on spherical harmonic decomposition (SHD and orthogonal subspace pursuit (OSP. The key idea in SRDS method is to identify the subspaces from a training data set in the transformed spherical harmonic domain and then cluster each deformation into the best-fit subspace for fast and accurate representation. This algorithm is also generalized into applications of organs with both interior and exterior surfaces. To test the feasibility, we first use the computer models to demonstrate that the proposed approach matches the accuracy of complex mathematical modeling techniques and then both ex vivo and in vivo experiments are conducted using 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans for verification in practical settings. All results demonstrated that the proposed algorithm features sparse representation of deformable surfaces with low dimensionality and high accuracy. Specifically, the precision evaluated as maximum error distance between the reconstructed surface and the MRI ground truth is better than 3 mm in real MRI experiments.

  2. 3D geodetic monitoring slope deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Gabriel

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available For plenty of slope failures that can be found in Slovakia is necessary and very important their geodetic monitoring (because of their activity, reactivisations, checks. The paper gives new methodologies for these works, using 3D terrestrial survey technologies for measurements in convenient deformation networks. The design of an optimal type of deformation model for various kinds of landslides and their exact processing with an efficient testing procedure to determine the kinematics of the slope deformations are presented too.

  3. A probabilistic approach using deformable organ models for automatic definition of normal anatomical structures for 3D treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, Daniel; Yu Liyun; Johnson, Valen; McAuliffe, Matthew; Pizer, Stephen; Chaney, Edward

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective : Current clinical methods for defining normal anatomical structures on tomographic images are time consuming and subject to intra- and inter-user variability. With the widespread implementation of 3D RTP, conformal radiotherapy, and dose escalation the implications of imprecise object definition have assumed a much higher level of importance. Object definition and volume-weighted metrics for normal anatomy, such as DVHs and NTCPs, play critical roles in aiming, shaping, and weighting beams. Improvements in object definition, including computer automation, are essential to yield reliable volume-weighted metrics and gains in human efficiency. The purpose of this study was to investigate a probabilistic approach using deformable models to automatically recognize and extract normal anatomy in tomographic images. Materials and Methods: Object models were created from normal organs that were segmented by an interactive method which involved placing a cursor near the center of the object on a slice and clicking a mouse button to initiate computation of structures called cores. Cores describe the skeletal and boundary shape of image objects in a manner that, in 2D, associates a location on the skeleton with the width of the object at that location. A significant advantage of cores is stability against image disturbances such as noise and blur. The model was composed of a relatively small set of extracted points on the skeleton and boundary. The points were carefully chosen to summarize the shape information captured by the cores. Neighborhood relationships between points were represented mathematically by energy functions that penalize, due to warping of the model, the ''goodness'' of match between the model and the image data at any stage during the segmentation process. The model was matched against the image data using a probabilistic approach based on Bayes theorem, which provides a means for computing a posteriori (posterior) probability from 1) a

  4. Simulating 3D deformation using connected polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarigan, J. T.; Jaya, I.; Hardi, S. M.; Zamzami, E. M.

    2018-03-01

    In modern 3D application, interaction between user and the virtual world is one of an important factor to increase the realism. This interaction can be visualized in many forms; one of them is object deformation. There are many ways to simulate object deformation in virtual 3D world; each comes with different level of realism and performance. Our objective is to present a new method to simulate object deformation by using a graph-connected polygon. In this solution, each object contains multiple level of polygons in different level of volume. The proposed solution focusses on performance rather while maintaining the acceptable level of realism. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of our solution and show that this solution is usable in performance sensitive 3D application such as games and virtual reality.

  5. A novel methodology for 3D deformable dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, U J; Taylor, M L; Dunn, L; Kron, T; Smith, R L; Franich, R D

    2012-04-01

    a result of the change in shape of the target between irradiations, even for a relatively simple deformation. Discrepancies of up to 30% of the maximum dose were evident from dose difference maps for three orthogonal planes taken through the isocenter of a stereotactic field. This paper describes the first use of a tissue-equivalent, 3D dose-integrating deformable phantom that yields integrated or redistributed dosimetric information. The proposed methodology readily yields three-dimensional (3D) dosimetric data from radiation delivery to the DEFGEL phantom in deformed and undeformed states. The impacts of deformation on dose distributions were readily seen in the isodose contours and line profiles from the three arrangements. It is demonstrated that the system is potentially capable of reproducibly emulating the physical deformation of an organ, and therefore can be used to evaluate absorbed doses to deformable targets and organs at risk in three dimensions and to validate deformation algorithms applied to dose distributions.

  6. A novel methodology for 3D deformable dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, U. J.; Taylor, M. L.; Dunn, L.; Kron, T.; Smith, R. L.; Franich, R. D.

    2012-01-01

    three dimensions occurring as a result of the change in shape of the target between irradiations, even for a relatively simple deformation. Discrepancies of up to 30% of the maximum dose were evident from dose difference maps for three orthogonal planes taken through the isocenter of a stereotactic field. Conclusions: This paper describes the first use of a tissue-equivalent, 3D dose-integrating deformable phantom that yields integrated or redistributed dosimetric information. The proposed methodology readily yields three-dimensional (3D) dosimetric data from radiation delivery to the DEFGEL phantom in deformed and undeformed states. The impacts of deformation on dose distributions were readily seen in the isodose contours and line profiles from the three arrangements. It is demonstrated that the system is potentially capable of reproducibly emulating the physical deformation of an organ, and therefore can be used to evaluate absorbed doses to deformable targets and organs at risk in three dimensions and to validate deformation algorithms applied to dose distributions.

  7. Modelling Polymer Deformation during 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Claire; Olmsted, Peter

    Three-dimensional printing has the potential to transform manufacturing processes, yet improving the strength of printed parts, to equal that of traditionally-manufactured parts, remains an underlying issue. The fused deposition modelling technique involves melting a thermoplastic, followed by layer-by-layer extrusion to fabricate an object. The key to ensuring strength at the weld between layers is successful inter-diffusion. However, prior to welding, both the extrusion process and the cooling temperature profile can significantly deform the polymer micro-structure and, consequently, how well the polymers are able to ``re-entangle'' across the weld. In particular, polymer alignment in the flow can cause de-bonding of the layers and create defects. We have developed a simple model of the non-isothermal extrusion process to explore the effects that typical printing conditions and material rheology have on the conformation of a polymer melt. In particular, we incorporate both stretch and orientation using the Rolie-Poly constitutive equation to examine the melt structure as it flows through the nozzle, the subsequent alignment with the build plate and the resulting deformation due to the fixed nozzle height, which is typically less than the nozzle radius.

  8. Multi-view and 3D deformable part models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepik, Bojan; Stark, Michael; Gehler, Peter; Schiele, Bernt

    2015-11-01

    As objects are inherently 3D, they have been modeled in 3D in the early days of computer vision. Due to the ambiguities arising from mapping 2D features to 3D models, 3D object representations have been neglected and 2D feature-based models are the predominant paradigm in object detection nowadays. While such models have achieved outstanding bounding box detection performance, they come with limited expressiveness, as they are clearly limited in their capability of reasoning about 3D shape or viewpoints. In this work, we bring the worlds of 3D and 2D object representations closer, by building an object detector which leverages the expressive power of 3D object representations while at the same time can be robustly matched to image evidence. To that end, we gradually extend the successful deformable part model [1] to include viewpoint information and part-level 3D geometry information, resulting in several different models with different level of expressiveness. We end up with a 3D object model, consisting of multiple object parts represented in 3D and a continuous appearance model. We experimentally verify that our models, while providing richer object hypotheses than the 2D object models, provide consistently better joint object localization and viewpoint estimation than the state-of-the-art multi-view and 3D object detectors on various benchmarks (KITTI [2] , 3D object classes [3] , Pascal3D+ [4] , Pascal VOC 2007 [5] , EPFL multi-view cars[6] ).

  9. High resolution, large deformation 3D traction force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennet Toyjanova

    Full Text Available Traction Force Microscopy (TFM is a powerful approach for quantifying cell-material interactions that over the last two decades has contributed significantly to our understanding of cellular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. In addition, recent advances in three-dimensional (3D imaging and traction force analysis (3D TFM have highlighted the significance of the third dimension in influencing various cellular processes. Yet irrespective of dimensionality, almost all TFM approaches have relied on a linear elastic theory framework to calculate cell surface tractions. Here we present a new high resolution 3D TFM algorithm which utilizes a large deformation formulation to quantify cellular displacement fields with unprecedented resolution. The results feature some of the first experimental evidence that cells are indeed capable of exerting large material deformations, which require the formulation of a new theoretical TFM framework to accurately calculate the traction forces. Based on our previous 3D TFM technique, we reformulate our approach to accurately account for large material deformation and quantitatively contrast and compare both linear and large deformation frameworks as a function of the applied cell deformation. Particular attention is paid in estimating the accuracy penalty associated with utilizing a traditional linear elastic approach in the presence of large deformation gradients.

  10. 3D Face modeling using the multi-deformable method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinkyu; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-09-25

    In this paper, we focus on the problem of the accuracy performance of 3D face modeling techniques using corresponding features in multiple views, which is quite sensitive to feature extraction errors. To solve the problem, we adopt a statistical model-based 3D face modeling approach in a mirror system consisting of two mirrors and a camera. The overall procedure of our 3D facial modeling method has two primary steps: 3D facial shape estimation using a multiple 3D face deformable model and texture mapping using seamless cloning that is a type of gradient-domain blending. To evaluate our method's performance, we generate 3D faces of 30 individuals and then carry out two tests: accuracy test and robustness test. Our method shows not only highly accurate 3D face shape results when compared with the ground truth, but also robustness to feature extraction errors. Moreover, 3D face rendering results intuitively show that our method is more robust to feature extraction errors than other 3D face modeling methods. An additional contribution of our method is that a wide range of face textures can be acquired by the mirror system. By using this texture map, we generate realistic 3D face for individuals at the end of the paper.

  11. The 3D model: explaining densification and deformation mechanisms by using 3D parameter plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picker, Katharina M

    2004-04-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze very differently deforming materials using 3D parameter plots and consequently to gain deeper insights into the densification and deformation process described with the 3D model in order to define an ideal tableting excipient. The excipients used were dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), sodium chloride (NaCl), microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), xylitol, mannitol, alpha-lactose monohydrate, maltose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC), cellulose acetate (CAC), maize starch, potato starch, pregelatinized starch, and maltodextrine. All of the materials were tableted to graded maximum relative densities (rhorel, max) using an eccentric tableting machine. The data which resulted, namely force, displacement, and time, were analyzed by the application of 3D modeling. Different particle size fractions of DCPD, CAC, and MCC were analyzed in addition. Brittle deforming materials such as DCPD exhibited a completely different 3D parameter plot, with low time plasticity, d, and low pressure plasticity, e, and a strong decrease in omega values when densification increased, in contrast to the plastically deforming MCC, which had much higher d, e, and omega values. e and omega values changed only slightly when densification increased for MCC. NaCl showed less of a decrease in omega values than DCPD did, and the d and e values were between those of MCC and DCPD. The sugar alcohols, xylitol and mannitol, behaved in a similar fashion to sodium chloride. This is also valid for the crystalline sugars, alpha-lactose monohydrate, and maltose. However, the sugars are more brittle than the sugar alcohols. The cellulose derivatives, HPMC, NaCMC, and CAC, are as plastic as MCC, however, their elasticity depends on substitution indicated by lower (more elastic) or higher (less elastic) omega values. The native starches, maize starch and potato starch, are very elastic, and pregelatinized starch and maltodextrine are

  12. 3D printing technology used in severe hip deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Li; Liu, Yan; Ren, Yongfang; Jiang, Li; Li, Yan; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Jie; Jia, Wenxiao; Li, Hui

    2017-09-01

    This study was designed to assess the use of a 3D printing technique in total hip arthroplasty (THA) for severe hip deformities, where new and improved approaches are needed. THAs were performed from January 2015 to December 2016. Bioprosthesis artificial hip joints were used in both conventional and 3D printing hip arthroplasties. A total of 74 patients (57 cases undergoing conventional hip replacements and 17 undergoing 3D printing hip replacements) were followed-up for an average of 24 months. The average age of the patients was 62.7 years. Clinical data between the patients treated with different approaches were compared. Results showed that the time to postoperative weight bearing and the Harris scores of the patients in the 3D printing group were better than those for patients in the conventional hip replacement group. Unfortunately, the postoperative infection and loosening rates were higher in the 3D printing group. However, there were no significant differences in femoral neck anteversion, neck shaft, acetabular or sharp angles between ipsilateral and contralateral sides in the 3D printing group (P>0.05). The femoral neck anteversion angle was significantly different between the two sides in the conventional hip replacement group (P3D printing approach provides a better short-term curative effect that is more consistent with the physiological structure and anatomical characteristics of the patient, and we anticipate that its use will help improve the lives of many patients.

  13. Compensation of deformations in 3D cone beam tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbat, L.; Roux, S.; Roux, S.; Grangeat, P.

    2006-01-01

    In dynamic tomography, the measured objects or organs are no-longer supposed to be static in the scanner during the acquisition but are supposed to move or to be deformed. Our approach is the analytic deformation compensation during the reconstruction. Our work concentrates on 3-dimensional cone beam tomography. We introduce a new large class of deformations preserving the 3-dimensional cone beam geometry. We show that deformations from this class can be analytically compensated. We present numerical experiments on phantoms showing the compensation of these deformations in 3-dimensional cone beam tomography. (authors)

  14. Tissue and Organ 3D Bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zengmin; Jin, Sha; Ye, Kaiming

    2018-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting enables the creation of tissue constructs with heterogeneous compositions and complex architectures. It was initially used for preparing scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. It has recently been adopted to create living tissues, such as cartilage, skin, and heart valve. To facilitate vascularization, hollow channels have been created in the hydrogels by 3D bioprinting. This review discusses the state of the art of the technology, along with a broad range of biomaterials used for 3D bioprinting. It provides an update on recent developments in bioprinting and its applications. 3D bioprinting has profound impacts on biomedical research and industry. It offers a new way to industrialize tissue biofabrication. It has great potential for regenerating tissues and organs to overcome the shortage of organ transplantation.

  15. 3D deformation field throughout the interior of materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Huiqing; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2013-09-01

    This report contains the one-year feasibility study for our three-year LDRD proposal that is aimed to develop an experimental technique to measure the 3D deformation fields inside a material body. In this feasibility study, we first apply Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) algorithm to pre-existing in-situ Xray Computed Tomography (XCT) image sets with pure rigid body translation. The calculated displacement field has very large random errors and low precision that are unacceptable. Then we enhance these tomography images by setting threshold of the intensity of each slice. DVC algorithm is able to obtain accurate deformation fields from these enhanced image sets and the deformation fields are consistent with the global mechanical loading that is applied to the specimen. Through this study, we prove that the internal markers inside the pre-existing tomography images of aluminum alloy can be enhanced and are suitable for DVC to calculate the deformation field throughout the material body.

  16. Multiscale modeling of large deformations in 3-D polycrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jing; Maniatty, Antoinette; Misiolek, Wojciech; Bandar, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    An approach for modeling 3-D polycrystals, linking to the macroscale, is presented. A Potts type model is used to generate a statistically representative grain structures with periodicity to allow scale-linking. The grain structures are compared to experimentally observed grain structures to validate that they are representative. A macroscale model of a compression test is compared against an experimental compression test for an Al-Mg-Si alloy to determine various deformation paths at different locations in the samples. These deformation paths are then applied to the experimental grain structure using a scale-bridging technique. Preliminary results from this work will be presented and discussed

  17. 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean V; Atala, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    Additive manufacturing, otherwise known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, is driving major innovations in many areas, such as engineering, manufacturing, art, education and medicine. Recent advances have enabled 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. Compared with non-biological printing, 3D bioprinting involves additional complexities, such as the choice of materials, cell types, growth and differentiation factors, and technical challenges related to the sensitivities of living cells and the construction of tissues. Addressing these complexities requires the integration of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics and medicine. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Other applications include developing high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology.

  18. 3D Bioprinting for Organ Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haitao; Nowicki, Margaret; Fisher, John P; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-01-01

    Regenerative medicine holds the promise of engineering functional tissues or organs to heal or replace abnormal and necrotic tissues/organs, offering hope for filling the gap between organ shortage and transplantation needs. Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is evolving into an unparalleled biomanufacturing technology due to its high-integration potential for patient-specific designs, precise and rapid manufacturing capabilities with high resolution, and unprecedented versatility. It enables precise control over multiple compositions, spatial distributions, and architectural accuracy/complexity, therefore achieving effective recapitulation of microstructure, architecture, mechanical properties, and biological functions of target tissues and organs. Here we provide an overview of recent advances in 3D bioprinting technology, as well as design concepts of bioinks suitable for the bioprinting process. We focus on the applications of this technology for engineering living organs, focusing more specifically on vasculature, neural networks, the heart and liver. We conclude with current challenges and the technical perspective for further development of 3D organ bioprinting. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. 3D Bioprinting for Organ Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haitao; Nowicki, Margaret; Fisher, John P.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-01-01

    Regenerative medicine holds the promise of engineering functional tissues or organs to heal or replace abnormal and necrotic tissues/organs, offering hope for filling the gap between organ shortage and transplantation needs. Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is evolving into an unparalleled bio-manufacturing technology due to its high-integration potential for patient-specific designs, precise and rapid manufacturing capabilities with high resolution, and unprecedented versatility. It enables precise control over multiple compositions, spatial distributions, and architectural accuracy/complexity, therefore achieving effective recapitulation of microstructure, architecture, mechanical properties, and biological functions of target tissues and organs. Here we provide an overview of recent advances in 3D bioprinting technology, as well as design concepts of bioinks suitable for the bioprinting process. We focus on the applications of this technology for engineering living organs, focusing more specifically on vasculature, neural networks, the heart and liver. We conclude with current challenges and the technical perspective for further development of 3D organ bioprinting. PMID:27995751

  20. Modeling of 3D Aluminum Polycrystals during Large Deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniatty, Antoinette M.; Littlewood, David J.; Lu Jing; Pyle, Devin

    2007-01-01

    An approach for generating, meshing, and modeling 3D polycrystals, with a focus on aluminum alloys, subjected to large deformation processes is presented. A Potts type model is used to generate statistically representative grain structures with periodicity to allow scale-linking. The grain structures are compared to experimentally observed grain structures to validate that they are representative. A procedure for generating a geometric model from the voxel data is developed allowing for adaptive meshing of the generated grain structure. Material behavior is governed by an appropriate crystal, elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model. The elastic-viscoplastic model is implemented in a three-dimensional, finite deformation, mixed, finite element program. In order to handle the large-scale problems of interest, a parallel implementation is utilized. A multiscale procedure is used to link larger scale models of deformation processes to the polycrystal model, where periodic boundary conditions on the fluctuation field are enforced. Finite-element models, of 3D polycrystal grain structures will be presented along with observations made from these simulations

  1. Recent progress in modelling 3D lithospheric deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, B. J. P.; Popov, A.; May, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling 3D lithospheric deformation remains a challenging task, predominantly because the variations in rock types, as well as nonlinearities due to for example plastic deformation result in sharp and very large jumps in effective viscosity contrast. As a result, there are only a limited number of 3D codes available, most of which are using direct solvers which are computationally and memory-wise very demanding. As a result, the resolutions for typical model runs are quite modest, despite the use of hundreds of processors (and using much larger computers is unlikely to bring much improvement in this situation). For this reason we recently developed a new 3D deformation code,called LaMEM: Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model. LaMEM is written on top of PETSc, and as a result it runs on massive parallel machines and we have a large number of iterative solvers available (including geometric and algebraic multigrid methods). As it remains unclear which solver combinations work best under which conditions, we have implemented most currently suggested methods (such as schur complement reduction or Fully coupled iterations). In addition, we can use either a finite element discretization (with Q1P0, stabilized Q1Q1 or Q2P-1 elements) or a staggered finite difference discretization for the same input geometry, which is based on a marker and cell technique). This gives us he flexibility to test various solver methodologies on the same model setup, in terms of accuracy, speed, memory usage etc. Here, we will report on some features of LaMEM, on recent code additions, as well as on some lessons we learned which are important for modelling 3D lithospheric deformation. Specifically we will discuss: 1) How we combine a particle-and-cell method to make it work with both a finite difference and a (lagrangian, eulerian or ALE) finite element formulation, with only minor code modifications code 2) How finite difference and finite element discretizations compare in terms of

  2. Realistic deformable 3D numeric phantom for transcutaneous ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Fernando Mitsuyama; Moraes, Matheus Cardoso; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi, E-mail: fernando.okara@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2017-01-15

    Introduction: Numerical phantoms are important tools to design, calibrate and evaluate several methods in various image-processing applications, such as echocardiography and mammography. We present a framework for creating ultrasound numerical deformable phantoms based on Finite Element Method (FEM), Linear Isomorphism and Field II. The proposed method considers that the scatterers map is a property of the tissue; therefore, the scatterers should move according to the tissue strain. Methods: First, a volume representing the target tissue is loaded. Second, parameter values, such as Young's Modulus, scatterers density, attenuation and scattering amplitudes are inserted for each different regions of the phantom. Then, other parameters related to the ultrasound equipment, such as ultrasound frequency and number of transducer elements, are also defined in order to perform the ultrasound acquisition using Field II. Third, the size and position of the transducer and the pressures that are applied against the tissue are defined. Subsequently, FEM is executed and deformation is computed. Next, 3D linear isomorphism is performed to displace the scatterers according to the deformation. Finally, Field II is carried out to generate the non-deformed and deformed ultrasound data. Results: The framework is evaluated by comparing strain values obtained the numerical simulation and from the physical phantom from CIRS. The mean difference between both phantoms is lesser than 10%. Conclusion: The acoustic and deformation outcomes are similar to those obtained using a physical phantom. This framework led to a tool, which is available online and free of charges for educational and research purposes. (author)

  3. q-deformation and semidualization in 3D quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majid, S [School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, 327 Mile End Rd, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Schroers, B J [Department of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.majid@qmul.ac.uk, E-mail: bernd@ma.hw.ac.uk

    2009-10-23

    We explore in detail the role in euclidean 3D quantum gravity of quantum Born reciprocity or 'semidualization'. The latter is an algebraic operation defined using quantum group methods that interchanges position and momentum. Using this we are able to clarify the structural relationships between the effective noncommutative geometries that have been discussed in the context of 3D gravity. We show that the spin model based on D(U(su{sub 2})) for quantum gravity without cosmological constant is the semidual of a quantum particle on a 3-sphere, while the bicrossproduct (DSR) model is the semidual of a quantum particle on hyperbolic space. We show further how the different models are all specific limits of q-deformed models with q=e{sup -{Dirac_h}}{sup {radical}}{sup (-{lambda})/m{sub p}}, where m{sub p} is the Planck mass and {lambda} is the cosmological constant, and argue that semidualization interchanges m{sub p} {r_reversible} l{sub c}, where l{sub c} is the cosmological length scale l{sub c}=1/{radical}(|{lambda}|). We investigate the physics of semidualization by studying representation theory. In both the spin model and its semidual we show that irreducible representations have a physical picture as solutions of a respectively noncommutative/curved wave equation. We explain, moreover, that the q-deformed model, at a certain algebraic level, is self-dual under semidualization.

  4. Modelling Polymer Deformation and Welding Behaviour during 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Claire; Olmsted, Peter

    2016-11-01

    3D printing has the potential to transform manufacturing processes, yet improving the strength of printed parts, to equal that of traditionally-manufactured parts, remains an underlying issue. The most common method, fused deposition modelling, involves melting a thermoplastic, followed by layer-by-layer extrusion of the material to fabricate a three-dimensional object. The key to the ensuring strength at the weld between these layers is successful inter-diffusion. However, as the printed layer cools towards the glass transition temperature, the time available for diffusion is limited. In addition, the extrusion process significantly deforms the polymer micro-structure prior to welding and consequently affects how the polymers "re-entangle" across the weld. We have developed a simple model of the non-isothermal printing process to explore the effects that typical printing conditions and amorphous polymer rheology have on the ultimate weld structure. In particular, we incorporate both the stretch and orientation of the polymer using the Rolie-Poly constitutive equation to examine how the melt flows through the nozzle and is deposited onto the build plate. We then address how this deformation relaxes and contributes to the thickness and structure of the weld. National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) and Georgetown University.

  5. Deformable M-Reps for 3D Medical Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizer, Stephen M.; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Joshi, Sarang; Thall, Andrew; Chen, James Z.; Fridman, Yonatan; Fritsch, Daniel S.; Gash, Graham; Glotzer, John M.; Jiroutek, Michael R.; Lu, Conglin; Muller, Keith E.; Tracton, Gregg; Yushkevich, Paul; Chaney, Edward L.

    2013-01-01

    M-reps (formerly called DSLs) are a multiscale medial means for modeling and rendering 3D solid geometry. They are particularly well suited to model anatomic objects and in particular to capture prior geometric information effectively in deformable models segmentation approaches. The representation is based on figural models, which define objects at coarse scale by a hierarchy of figures – each figure generally a slab representing a solid region and its boundary simultaneously. This paper focuses on the use of single figure models to segment objects of relatively simple structure. A single figure is a sheet of medial atoms, which is interpolated from the model formed by a net, i.e., a mesh or chain, of medial atoms (hence the name m-reps), each atom modeling a solid region via not only a position and a width but also a local figural frame giving figural directions and an object angle between opposing, corresponding positions on the boundary implied by the m-rep. The special capability of an m-rep is to provide spatial and orientational correspondence between an object in two different states of deformation. This ability is central to effective measurement of both geometric typicality and geometry to image match, the two terms of the objective function optimized in segmentation by deformable models. The other ability of m-reps central to effective segmentation is their ability to support segmentation at multiple levels of scale, with successively finer precision. Objects modeled by single figures are segmented first by a similarity transform augmented by object elongation, then by adjustment of each medial atom, and finally by displacing a dense sampling of the m-rep implied boundary. While these models and approaches also exist in 2D, we focus on 3D objects. The segmentation of the kidney from CT and the hippocampus from MRI serve as the major examples in this paper. The accuracy of segmentation as compared to manual, slice-by-slice segmentation is reported. PMID

  6. 3D brain mapping using a deformable neuroanatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, G.E.; Rabbitt, R.D.; Miller, M.I.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents two different mathematical methods that can be used separately or in conjunction to accommodate shape variabilities between normal human neuroanatomies. Both methods use a digitized textbook to represent the complex structure of a typical normal neuroanatomy. Probabilistic transformations on the textbook coordinate system are defined to accommodate shape differences between the textbook and images of other normal neuroanatomies. The transformations are constrained to be consistent with the physical properties of deformable elastic solids in the first method and those of viscous fluids in the second. Results presented in this paper demonstrate how a single deformable textbook can be used to accommodate normal shape variability. (Author)

  7. 3D brain mapping using a deformable neuroanatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, G.E.; Rabbitt, R.D.; Miller, M.I. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents two different mathematical methods that can be used separately or in conjunction to accommodate shape variabilities between normal human neuroanatomies. Both methods use a digitized textbook to represent the complex structure of a typical normal neuroanatomy. Probabilistic transformations on the textbook coordinate system are defined to accommodate shape differences between the textbook and images of other normal neuroanatomies. The transformations are constrained to be consistent with the physical properties of deformable elastic solids in the first method and those of viscous fluids in the second. Results presented in this paper demonstrate how a single deformable textbook can be used to accommodate normal shape variability. (Author).

  8. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-01-01

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especial...

  9. 3D Characterization of corneal deformation using ultrasound speckle tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyton Clayson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional (3D mechanical response of the cornea to intraocular pressure (IOP elevation has not been previously reported. In this study, we use an ultrasound speckle tracking technique to measure the 3D displacements and strains within the central 5.5mm of porcine corneas during the whole globe inflation. Inflation tests were performed on dextran-treated corneas (treated with a 10% dextran solution and untreated corneas. The dextran-treated corneas showed an inflation response expected of a thin spherical shell, with through-thickness thinning and in-plane stretch, although the strain magnitudes exhibited a heterogeneous spatial distribution from the central to more peripheral cornea. The untreated eyes demonstrated a response consistent with swelling during experimentation, with through-thickness expansion overriding the inflation response. The average volume ratios obtained in both groups was near 1 confirming general incompressibility, but local regions of volume loss or expansion were observed. These results suggest that biomechanical measurements in 3D provide important new insight to understand the mechanical response of ocular tissues such as the cornea.

  10. Assessment of 3D hydrologic deformation using GRACE and GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, C. S.; Tregoning, P.; Fleming, K.; Burgette, R. J.; Featherstone, W. E.; Awange, J.; Kuhn, M.; Ramillien, G.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrological processes cause variations in gravitational potential and surface deformations, both of which are detectable with ever increasing precision using space geodetic techniques. By comparing the elastic deformation computed from continental water load estimates derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), with three-dimensional surface deformation derived from GPS observations, there is clear potential to better understand global to regional hydrological processes, in addition to acquiring further insight into the systematic error contributions affecting each space geodetic technique. In this study, we compare elastic deformation derived from water load estimates taken from the CNES, CSR, GFZ and JPL time variable GRACE fields. We compare these surface displacements with those derived at a global network of GPS sites that have been homogeneously reprocessed in the GAMIT/GLOBK suite. We extend our comparison to include a series of different GPS solutions, with each solution only subtly different based on the methodology used to down weight the height component in realizing site coordinates on the terrestrial reference frame. Each of the GPS solutions incorporate modeling of atmospheric loading and utilization of the VMF1 and a priori zenith hydrostatic delays derived via ray tracing through ECMWF meteorological fields. The agreement between GRACE and GPS derived deformations is not limited to the vertical component, with excellent agreement in the horizontal component across areas where large hydrologic signals occur over broad spatial scales (with correlation in horizontal components as high as 0.9). Agreement is also observed at smaller scales, including across Europe. These comparisons assist in understanding the magnitude of current error contributions within both space geodetic techniques. With the emergence of homogeneously reprocessed GPS time series spanning the GRACE mission, this technique offers one possible means of

  11. Discrete kinematic modeling of the 3-D deformation of sedimentary basins; Modelisation cinematique discrete de la deformation 3D des bassins sedimentaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornu, T.

    2001-01-01

    The present work deals with three-dimensional deformation of sedimentary basins. The main goal of the work was to propose new ways to study tectonic deformation and to insert it into basin-modeling environment for hydrocarbon migration applications. To handle the complexity of the deformation, the model uses kinematic laws, a discrete approach, and the construction of a code that allows the greatest diversity in the deformation mechanisms we can take into account. The 3-D-volume deformation is obtained through the calculation of the behavior of the neutral surface of each basin layer. The main idea is to deform the neutral surface of each layer with the help of geometrical laws and to use the result to rebuild the volume deformation of the basin. The constitutive algorithm includes three characteristic features. The first one deals with the mathematical operator we use to describe the flexural-slip mechanism which is a combination of the translation of the neutral surface nodes and the rotation of the vertical edges attached to these nodes. This performs the reversibility that was required for the basin modeling. The second one is about. the use of a discrete approach, which gives a better description of the global deformation and offers to locally control volume evolutions. The knowledge of volume variations can become a powerful tool in structural geology analysis and the perfect complement for a field study. The last one concerns the modularity of the developed code. Indeed, the proposed model uses three main mechanisms of deformation. But the architecture of the code allows the insertion of new mechanisms or a better interaction between them. The model has been validated first with 2-D cases, then with 3-D natural cases. They give good results from a qualitative point of view. They also show the capacity of the model to provide a deformation path that is geologically acceptable, and its ability to control the volume variations of the basin through the

  12. Personalized Development of Human Organs using 3D Printing Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Radenkovic, Dina; Solouk, Atefeh; Seifalian, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is a technique of fabricating physical models from a 3D volumetric digital image. The image is sliced and printed using a specific material into thin layers, and successive layering of the material produces a 3D model. It has already been used for printing surgical models for preoperative planning and in constructing personalized prostheses for patients. The ultimate goal is to achieve the development of functional human organs and tissues, to overcome limitations of o...

  13. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-01-01

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering. PMID:28773924

  14. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering.

  15. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-09-27

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering.

  16. Personalized development of human organs using 3D printing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radenkovic, Dina; Solouk, Atefeh; Seifalian, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    3D printing is a technique of fabricating physical models from a 3D volumetric digital image. The image is sliced and printed using a specific material into thin layers, and successive layering of the material produces a 3D model. It has already been used for printing surgical models for preoperative planning and in constructing personalized prostheses for patients. The ultimate goal is to achieve the development of functional human organs and tissues, to overcome limitations of organ transplantation created by the lack of organ donors and life-long immunosuppression. We hypothesized a precision medicine approach to human organ fabrication using 3D printed technology, in which the digital volumetric data would be collected by imaging of a patient, i.e. CT or MRI images followed by mathematical modeling to create a digital 3D image. Then a suitable biocompatible material, with an optimal resolution for cells seeding and maintenance of cell viability during the printing process, would be printed with a compatible printer type and finally implanted into the patient. Life-saving operations with 3D printed implants were already performed in patients. However, several issues need to be addressed before translational application of 3D printing into clinical medicine. These are vascularization, innervation, and financial cost of 3D printing and safety of biomaterials used for the construct. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Automatic Generation of 3D Caricatures Based on Artistic Deformation Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Lyndsey; Chen, Min; Mora, Benjamin

    2011-06-01

    Caricatures are a form of humorous visual art, usually created by skilled artists for the intention of amusement and entertainment. In this paper, we present a novel approach for automatic generation of digital caricatures from facial photographs, which capture artistic deformation styles from hand-drawn caricatures. We introduced a pseudo stress-strain model to encode the parameters of an artistic deformation style using "virtual" physical and material properties. We have also developed a software system for performing the caricaturistic deformation in 3D which eliminates the undesirable artifacts in 2D caricaturization. We employed a Multilevel Free-Form Deformation (MFFD) technique to optimize a 3D head model reconstructed from an input facial photograph, and for controlling the caricaturistic deformation. Our results demonstrated the effectiveness and usability of the proposed approach, which allows ordinary users to apply the captured and stored deformation styles to a variety of facial photographs.

  18. 3D Printing of Organs-On-Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hee-Gyeong; Lee, Hyungseok; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Organ-on-a-chip engineering aims to create artificial living organs that mimic the complex and physiological responses of real organs, in order to test drugs by precisely manipulating the cells and their microenvironments. To achieve this, the artificial organs should to be microfabricated with an extracellular matrix (ECM) and various types of cells, and should recapitulate morphogenesis, cell differentiation, and functions according to the native organ. A promising strategy is 3D printing, which precisely controls the spatial distribution and layer-by-layer assembly of cells, ECMs, and other biomaterials. Owing to this unique advantage, integration of 3D printing into organ-on-a-chip engineering can facilitate the creation of micro-organs with heterogeneity, a desired 3D cellular arrangement, tissue-specific functions, or even cyclic movement within a microfluidic device. Moreover, fully 3D-printed organs-on-chips more easily incorporate other mechanical and electrical components with the chips, and can be commercialized via automated massive production. Herein, we discuss the recent advances and the potential of 3D cell-printing technology in engineering organs-on-chips, and provides the future perspectives of this technology to establish the highly reliable and useful drug-screening platforms. PMID:28952489

  19. 3D Printing of Organs-On-Chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hee-Gyeong; Lee, Hyungseok; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2017-01-25

    Organ-on-a-chip engineering aims to create artificial living organs that mimic the complex and physiological responses of real organs, in order to test drugs by precisely manipulating the cells and their microenvironments. To achieve this, the artificial organs should to be microfabricated with an extracellular matrix (ECM) and various types of cells, and should recapitulate morphogenesis, cell differentiation, and functions according to the native organ. A promising strategy is 3D printing, which precisely controls the spatial distribution and layer-by-layer assembly of cells, ECMs, and other biomaterials. Owing to this unique advantage, integration of 3D printing into organ-on-a-chip engineering can facilitate the creation of micro-organs with heterogeneity, a desired 3D cellular arrangement, tissue-specific functions, or even cyclic movement within a microfluidic device. Moreover, fully 3D-printed organs-on-chips more easily incorporate other mechanical and electrical components with the chips, and can be commercialized via automated massive production. Herein, we discuss the recent advances and the potential of 3D cell-printing technology in engineering organs-on-chips, and provides the future perspectives of this technology to establish the highly reliable and useful drug-screening platforms.

  20. 3D Printing of Organs-On-Chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Gyeong Yi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ-on-a-chip engineering aims to create artificial living organs that mimic the complex and physiological responses of real organs, in order to test drugs by precisely manipulating the cells and their microenvironments. To achieve this, the artificial organs should to be microfabricated with an extracellular matrix (ECM and various types of cells, and should recapitulate morphogenesis, cell differentiation, and functions according to the native organ. A promising strategy is 3D printing, which precisely controls the spatial distribution and layer-by-layer assembly of cells, ECMs, and other biomaterials. Owing to this unique advantage, integration of 3D printing into organ-on-a-chip engineering can facilitate the creation of micro-organs with heterogeneity, a desired 3D cellular arrangement, tissue-specific functions, or even cyclic movement within a microfluidic device. Moreover, fully 3D-printed organs-on-chips more easily incorporate other mechanical and electrical components with the chips, and can be commercialized via automated massive production. Herein, we discuss the recent advances and the potential of 3D cell-printing technology in engineering organs-on-chips, and provides the future perspectives of this technology to establish the highly reliable and useful drug-screening platforms.

  1. 3D video-based deformation measurement of the pelvis bone under dynamic cyclic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freslier Marie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamic three-dimensional (3D deformation of the pelvic bones is a crucial factor in the successful design and longevity of complex orthopaedic oncological implants. The current solutions are often not very promising for the patient; thus it would be interesting to measure the dynamic 3D-deformation of the whole pelvic bone in order to get a more realistic dataset for a better implant design. Therefore we hypothesis if it would be possible to combine a material testing machine with a 3D video motion capturing system, used in clinical gait analysis, to measure the sub millimetre deformation of a whole pelvis specimen. Method A pelvis specimen was placed in a standing position on a material testing machine. Passive reflective markers, traceable by the 3D video motion capturing system, were fixed to the bony surface of the pelvis specimen. While applying a dynamic sinusoidal load the 3D-movement of the markers was recorded by the cameras and afterwards the 3D-deformation of the pelvis specimen was computed. The accuracy of the 3D-movement of the markers was verified with 3D-displacement curve with a step function using a manual driven 3D micro-motion-stage. Results The resulting accuracy of the measurement system depended on the number of cameras tracking a marker. The noise level for a marker seen by two cameras was during the stationary phase of the calibration procedure ± 0.036 mm, and ± 0.022 mm if tracked by 6 cameras. The detectable 3D-movement performed by the 3D-micro-motion-stage was smaller than the noise level of the 3D-video motion capturing system. Therefore the limiting factor of the setup was the noise level, which resulted in a measurement accuracy for the dynamic test setup of ± 0.036 mm. Conclusion This 3D test setup opens new possibilities in dynamic testing of wide range materials, like anatomical specimens, biomaterials, and its combinations. The resulting 3D-deformation dataset can be used for a better

  2. 3D Bioprinting of Tissue/Organ Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Falguni; Gantelius, Jesper; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2016-04-04

    In vitro tissue/organ models are useful platforms that can facilitate systematic, repetitive, and quantitative investigations of drugs/chemicals. The primary objective when developing tissue/organ models is to reproduce physiologically relevant functions that typically require complex culture systems. Bioprinting offers exciting prospects for constructing 3D tissue/organ models, as it enables the reproducible, automated production of complex living tissues. Bioprinted tissues/organs may prove useful for screening novel compounds or predicting toxicity, as the spatial and chemical complexity inherent to native tissues/organs can be recreated. In this Review, we highlight the importance of developing 3D in vitro tissue/organ models by 3D bioprinting techniques, characterization of these models for evaluating their resemblance to native tissue, and their application in the prioritization of lead candidates, toxicity testing, and as disease/tumor models. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Gelatin-Based Hydrogels for Organ 3D Bioprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D bioprinting is a family of enabling technologies that can be used to manufacture human organs with predefined hierarchical structures, material constituents and physiological functions. The main objective of these technologies is to produce high-throughput and/or customized organ substitutes (or bioartificial organs with heterogeneous cell types or stem cells along with other biomaterials that are able to repair, replace or restore the defect/failure counterparts. Gelatin-based hydrogels, such as gelatin/fibrinogen, gelatin/hyaluronan and gelatin/alginate/fibrinogen, have unique features in organ 3D bioprinting technologies. This article is an overview of the intrinsic/extrinsic properties of the gelatin-based hydrogels in organ 3D bioprinting areas with advanced technologies, theories and principles. The state of the art of the physical/chemical crosslinking methods of the gelatin-based hydrogels being used to overcome the weak mechanical properties is highlighted. A multicellular model made from adipose-derived stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the predefined 3D constructs is emphasized. Multi-nozzle extrusion-based organ 3D bioprinting technologies have the distinguished potential to eventually manufacture implantable bioartificial organs for purposes such as customized organ restoration, high-throughput drug screening and metabolic syndrome model establishment.

  4. 3D mechanical stratigraphy of a deformed multi-layer: Linking sedimentary architecture and strain partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawood, Adam J.; Bond, Clare E.

    2018-01-01

    Stratigraphic influence on structural style and strain distribution in deformed sedimentary sequences is well established, in models of 2D mechanical stratigraphy. In this study we attempt to refine existing models of stratigraphic-structure interaction by examining outcrop scale 3D variations in sedimentary architecture and the effects on subsequent deformation. At Monkstone Point, Pembrokeshire, SW Wales, digital mapping and virtual scanline data from a high resolution virtual outcrop have been combined with field observations, sedimentary logs and thin section analysis. Results show that significant variation in strain partitioning is controlled by changes, at a scale of tens of metres, in sedimentary architecture within Upper Carboniferous fluvio-deltaic deposits. Coupled vs uncoupled deformation of the sequence is defined by the composition and lateral continuity of mechanical units and unit interfaces. Where the sedimentary sequence is characterized by gradational changes in composition and grain size, we find that deformation structures are best characterized by patterns of distributed strain. In contrast, distinct compositional changes vertically and in laterally equivalent deposits results in highly partitioned deformation and strain. The mechanical stratigraphy of the study area is inherently 3D in nature, due to lateral and vertical compositional variability. Consideration should be given to 3D variations in mechanical stratigraphy, such as those outlined here, when predicting subsurface deformation in multi-layers.

  5. 3D Miniaturization of Human Organs for Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joseph; Wetzel, Isaac; Dréau, Didier; Cho, Hansang

    2018-01-01

    "Engineered human organs" hold promises for predicting the effectiveness and accuracy of drug responses while reducing cost, time, and failure rates in clinical trials. Multiorgan human models utilize many aspects of currently available technologies including self-organized spherical 3D human organoids, microfabricated 3D human organ chips, and 3D bioprinted human organ constructs to mimic key structural and functional properties of human organs. They enable precise control of multicellular activities, extracellular matrix (ECM) compositions, spatial distributions of cells, architectural organizations of ECM, and environmental cues. Thus, engineered human organs can provide the microstructures and biological functions of target organs and advantageously substitute multiscaled drug-testing platforms including the current in vitro molecular assays, cell platforms, and in vivo models. This review provides an overview of advanced innovative designs based on the three main technologies used for organ construction leading to single and multiorgan systems useable for drug development. Current technological challenges and future perspectives are also discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Holographic interferometric and correlation-based laser speckle metrology for 3D deformations in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekiff, Markus; Kemper, Björn; Kröger, Elke; Denz, Cornelia; Dirksen, Dieter

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical loading of dental restorations and hard tissue is often investigated numerically. For validation and optimization of such simulations, comparisons with measured deformations are essential. We combine digital holographic interferometry and digital speckle photography for the determination of microscopic deformations with a photogrammetric method that is based on digital image correlation of a projected laser speckle pattern. This multimodal workstation allows the simultaneous acquisition of the specimen's macroscopic 3D shape and thus a quantitative comparison of measured deformations with simulation data. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of our system, two applications are presented: the quantitative determination of (1) the deformation of a mandible model due to mechanical loading of an inserted dental implant and of (2) the deformation of a (dental) bridge model under mechanical loading. The results were compared with data from finite element analyses of the investigated applications. The experimental results showed close agreement with those of the simulations.

  7. The Clinical Value of Prenatal 3D Ultrasonic Diagnosis on Fetus Hemivertebra Deformity- A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yanting; Xiang, Guishuang; Liang, Xiaoqiu; Tong, Xiaoqian

    2018-02-01

    The present study is planned to discuss the clinical value of prenatal 3D ultra-sonic diagnosis on fetus hemivertebra deformity through the retrospective analysis of clinical data of fetus hemivertebra deformity. Selected 9 fetus hemivertebra deformity cases, which have been admitted to our hospital during the period from January, 2010 to January, 2016 as study samples, and analyzed their 2D and 3D ultrasonic examination data. 4 cases of the fetus hemivertebra deformity occurred at lumbar vertebra, 3 cases at thoracic vertebra, and 2 cases at thoracolumbar vertebra. There were scoliosis and opened spine bifida (OSB). In 7 cases, there was absence of ribs in fetus. The 2D ultrasonic image showed that: The echo at the center of fetus vertebral arch lesion was blurred or lost. The coronal section showed the deformity of the spine. There was obvious loss of the ossification center. From the cross section, we could see that the vertebral body of the fetus was shrinking and the edges were relatively blurred. The 3D ultrasonic image showed that: the echo at the ossification center of the fetus vertebra was relatively blurred, or even lost. The image also indicated scoliosis deformity of the spine. The vertebral body lesion could be accurately located. 9 cases of fetus hemivertebra deformity have been detected through examination. Labor inductions have been carried out after getting the permission from the family members. The X-ray examination of the fetus after labor induction showed that the diagnosis was correct. Prenatal ultra-sonic examination holds strong potential for the diagnosis of fetus hemivertebra deformity quite early and deserves further clinical evaluation with large sample size.

  8. Marginal deformations of 3d supersymmetric U(N) model and broken higher spin symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikida, Yasuaki [Center for Gravitational Physics, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University,Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Wada, Taiki [Department of Physical Sciences, College of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University,Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2017-03-08

    We examine the marginal deformations of double-trace type in 3d supersymmetric U(N) model with N complex free bosons and fermions. We compute the anomalous dimensions of higher spin currents to the 1/N order but to all orders in the deformation parameters by mainly applying the conformal perturbation theory. The 3d field theory is supposed to be dual to 4d supersymmetric Vasiliev theory, and the marginal deformations are argued to correspond to modifying boundary conditions for bulk scalars and fermions. Thus the modification should break higher spin gauge symmetry and generate the masses of higher spin fields. We provide supports for the dual interpretation by relating bulk computation in terms of Witten diagrams to boundary one in conformal perturbation theory.

  9. Marginal deformations of 3d supersymmetric U(N) model and broken higher spin symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikida, Yasuaki; Wada, Taiki

    2017-01-01

    We examine the marginal deformations of double-trace type in 3d supersymmetric U(N) model with N complex free bosons and fermions. We compute the anomalous dimensions of higher spin currents to the 1/N order but to all orders in the deformation parameters by mainly applying the conformal perturbation theory. The 3d field theory is supposed to be dual to 4d supersymmetric Vasiliev theory, and the marginal deformations are argued to correspond to modifying boundary conditions for bulk scalars and fermions. Thus the modification should break higher spin gauge symmetry and generate the masses of higher spin fields. We provide supports for the dual interpretation by relating bulk computation in terms of Witten diagrams to boundary one in conformal perturbation theory.

  10. External force back-projective composition and globally deformable optimization for 3-D coronary artery reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jian; Cong, Weijian; Fan, Jingfan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian; Chen, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The clinical value of the 3D reconstruction of a coronary artery is important for the diagnosis and intervention of cardiovascular diseases. This work proposes a method based on a deformable model for reconstructing coronary arteries from two monoplane angiographic images acquired from different angles. First, an external force back-projective composition model is developed to determine the external force, for which the force distributions in different views are back-projected to the 3D space and composited in the same coordinate system based on the perspective projection principle of x-ray imaging. The elasticity and bending forces are composited as an internal force to maintain the smoothness of the deformable curve. Second, the deformable curve evolves rapidly toward the true vascular centerlines in 3D space and angiographic images under the combination of internal and external forces. Third, densely matched correspondence among vessel centerlines is constructed using a curve alignment method. The bundle adjustment method is then utilized for the global optimization of the projection parameters and the 3D structures. The proposed method is validated on phantom data and routine angiographic images with consideration for space and re-projection image errors. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method for the reconstruction of coronary arteries from two monoplane angiographic images. The proposed method can achieve a mean space error of 0.564 mm and a mean re-projection error of 0.349 mm. (paper)

  11. 3D Bioprinting for Tissue and Organ Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Yue, Kan; Aleman, Julio; Moghaddam, Kamyar Mollazadeh; Bakht, Syeda Mahwish; Yang, Jingzhou; Jia, Weitao; Dell'Erba, Valeria; Assawes, Pribpandao; Shin, Su Ryon; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Oklu, Rahmi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The field of regenerative medicine has progressed tremendously over the past few decades in its ability to fabricate functional tissue substitutes. Conventional approaches based on scaffolding and microengineering are limited in their capacity of producing tissue constructs with precise biomimetic properties. Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting technology, on the other hand, promises to bridge the divergence between artificially engineered tissue constructs and native tissues. In a sense, 3D bioprinting offers unprecedented versatility to co-deliver cells and biomaterials with precise control over their compositions, spatial distributions, and architectural accuracy, therefore achieving detailed or even personalized recapitulation of the fine shape, structure, and architecture of target tissues and organs. Here we briefly describe recent progresses of 3D bioprinting technology and associated bioinks suitable for the printing process. We then focus on the applications of this technology in fabrication of biomimetic constructs of several representative tissues and organs, including blood vessel, heart, liver, and cartilage. We finally conclude with future challenges in 3D bioprinting as well as potential solutions for further development.

  12. 3D Bioprinting for Tissue and Organ Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Yang, Jingzhou; Jia, Weitao; Dell’Erba, Valeria; Assawes, Pribpandao; Shin, Su Ryon; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Oklu, Rahmi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The field of regenerative medicine has progressed tremendously over the past few decades in its ability to fabricate functional tissue substitutes. Conventional approaches based on scaffolding and microengineering are limited in their capacity of producing tissue constructs with precise biomimetic properties. Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting technology, on the other hand, promises to bridge the divergence between artificially engineered tissue constructs and native tissues. In a sense, 3D bioprinting offers unprecedented versatility to co-deliver cells and biomaterials with precise control over their compositions, spatial distributions, and architectural accuracy, therefore achieving detailed or even personalized recapitulation of the fine shape, structure, and architecture of target tissues and organs. Here we briefly describe recent progresses of 3D bioprinting technology and associated bioinks suitable for the printing process. We then focus on the applications of this technology in fabrication of biomimetic constructs of several representative tissues and organs, including blood vessel, heart, liver, and cartilage. We finally conclude with future challenges in 3D bioprinting as well as potential solutions for further development. PMID:27126775

  13. Uncovering the true nature of deformation microstructures using 3D analysis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, M.; Quadir, M. Z.; Afrin, N.; Xu, W.; Loeb, A.; Soe, B.; McMahon, C.; George, C.; Bassman, L.

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction (3D EBSD) has emerged as a powerful technique for generating 3D crystallographic information in reasonably large volumes of a microstructure. The technique uses a focused ion beam (FIB) as a high precision serial sectioning device for generating consecutive ion milled surfaces of a material, with each milled surface subsequently mapped by EBSD. The successive EBSD maps are combined using a suitable post-processing method to generate a crystallographic volume of the microstructure. The first part of this paper shows the usefulness of 3D EBSD for understanding the origin of various structural features associated with the plastic deformation of metals. The second part describes a new method for automatically identifying the various types of low and high angle boundaries found in deformed and annealed metals, particularly those associated with grains exhibiting subtle and gradual variations in orientation. We have adapted a 2D image segmentation technique, fast multiscale clustering, to 3D EBSD data using a novel variance function to accommodate quaternion data. This adaptation is capable of segmenting based on subtle and gradual variation as well as on sharp boundaries within the data. We demonstrate the excellent capabilities of this technique with application to 3D EBSD data sets generated from a range of cold rolled and annealed metals described in the paper.

  14. 3D prostate histology image reconstruction: Quantifying the impact of tissue deformation and histology section location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Gibson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Guidelines for localizing prostate cancer on imaging are ideally informed by registered post-prostatectomy histology. 3D histology reconstruction methods can support this by reintroducing 3D spatial information lost during histology processing. The need to register small, high-grade foci drives a need for high accuracy. Accurate 3D reconstruction method design is impacted by the answers to the following central questions of this work. (1 How does prostate tissue deform during histology processing? (2 What spatial misalignment of the tissue sections is induced by microtome cutting? (3 How does the choice of reconstruction model affect histology reconstruction accuracy? Materials and Methods: Histology, paraffin block face and magnetic resonance images were acquired for 18 whole mid-gland tissue slices from six prostates. 7-15 homologous landmarks were identified on each image. Tissue deformation due to histology processing was characterized using the target registration error (TRE after landmark-based registration under four deformation models (rigid, similarity, affine and thin-plate-spline [TPS]. The misalignment of histology sections from the front faces of tissue slices was quantified using manually identified landmarks. The impact of reconstruction models on the TRE after landmark-based reconstruction was measured under eight reconstruction models comprising one of four deformation models with and without constraining histology images to the tissue slice front faces. Results: Isotropic scaling improved the mean TRE by 0.8-1.0 mm (all results reported as 95% confidence intervals, while skew or TPS deformation improved the mean TRE by <0.1 mm. The mean misalignment was 1.1-1.9΀ (angle and 0.9-1.3 mm (depth. Using isotropic scaling, the front face constraint raised the mean TRE by 0.6-0.8 mm. Conclusions: For sub-millimeter accuracy, 3D reconstruction models should not constrain histology images to the tissue slice front faces and

  15. Innovations in 3D printing: a 3D overview from optics to organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Carl; van Langeveld, Mark C; Donoso, Larry A

    2014-02-01

    3D printing is a method of manufacturing in which materials, such as plastic or metal, are deposited onto one another in layers to produce a three dimensional object, such as a pair of eye glasses or other 3D objects. This process contrasts with traditional ink-based printers which produce a two dimensional object (ink on paper). To date, 3D printing has primarily been used in engineering to create engineering prototypes. However, recent advances in printing materials have now enabled 3D printers to make objects that are comparable with traditionally manufactured items. In contrast with conventional printers, 3D printing has the potential to enable mass customisation of goods on a large scale and has relevance in medicine including ophthalmology. 3D printing has already been proved viable in several medical applications including the manufacture of eyeglasses, custom prosthetic devices and dental implants. In this review, we discuss the potential for 3D printing to revolutionise manufacturing in the same way as the printing press revolutionised conventional printing. The applications and limitations of 3D printing are discussed; the production process is demonstrated by producing a set of eyeglass frames from 3D blueprints.

  16. Toward high-speed 3D nonlinear soft tissue deformation simulations using Abaqus software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkaidek, Ashraf; Jasiuk, Iwona

    2015-12-01

    We aim to achieve a fast and accurate three-dimensional (3D) simulation of a porcine liver deformation under a surgical tool pressure using the commercial finite element software Abaqus. The liver geometry is obtained using magnetic resonance imaging, and a nonlinear constitutive law is employed to capture large deformations of the tissue. Effects of implicit versus explicit analysis schemes, element type, and mesh density on computation time are studied. We find that Abaqus explicit and implicit solvers are capable of simulating nonlinear soft tissue deformations accurately using first-order tetrahedral elements in a relatively short time by optimizing the element size. This study provides new insights and guidance on accurate and relatively fast nonlinear soft tissue simulations. Such simulations can provide force feedback during robotic surgery and allow visualization of tissue deformations for surgery planning and training of surgical residents.

  17. Boundary migration in a 3D deformed microstructure inside an opaque sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yubin; Budai, J D; Tischler, Jonathan Z.

    2017-01-01

    How boundaries surrounding recrystallization grains migrate through the 3D network of dislocation boundaries in deformed crystalline materials is unknown and critical for the resulting recrystallized crystalline materials. Using X-ray Laue diffraction microscopy, we show for the first time....... The results show that neither of these two parameters can explain the observed migration behavior. Instead we suggest that the subdivision of the deformed microstructure ahead of the boundary plays the dominant role. The present experimental observations challenge the assumptions of existing recrystallization...

  18. Solid organ fabrication: comparison of decellularization to 3D bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jangwook P; Bhuiyan, Didarul B; Ogle, Brenda M

    2016-01-01

    Solid organ fabrication is an ultimate goal of Regenerative Medicine. Since the introduction of Tissue Engineering in 1993, functional biomaterials, stem cells, tunable microenvironments, and high-resolution imaging technologies have significantly advanced efforts to regenerate in vitro culture or tissue platforms. Relatively simple flat or tubular organs are already in (pre)clinical trials and a few commercial products are in market. The road to more complex, high demand, solid organs including heart, kidney and lung will require substantive technical advancement. Here, we consider two emerging technologies for solid organ fabrication. One is decellularization of cadaveric organs followed by repopulation with terminally differentiated or progenitor cells. The other is 3D bioprinting to deposit cell-laden bio-inks to attain complex tissue architecture. We reviewed the development and evolution of the two technologies and evaluated relative strengths needed to produce solid organs, with special emphasis on the heart and other tissues of the cardiovascular system.

  19. Correlations of Surface Deformation and 3D Flow Field in a Compliant Wall Turbulent Channel Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Cao; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    This study focuses on the correlations between surface deformation and flow features, including velocity, vorticity and pressure, in a turbulent channel flow over a flat, compliant Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wall. The channel centerline velocity is 2.5 m/s, and the friction Reynolds number is 2.3x103. Analysis is based on simultaneous measurements of the time resolved 3D velocity and surface deformation using tomographic PIV and Mach-Zehnder Interferometry. The volumetric pressure distribution is calculated plane by plane by spatially integrating the material acceleration using virtual boundary, omni-directional method. Conditional sampling based on local high/low pressure and deformation events reveals the primary flow structures causing the deformation. High pressure peaks appear at the interface between sweep and ejection, whereas the negative deformations peaks (dent) appear upstream, under the sweeps. The persistent phase lag between flow and deformations are presumably caused by internal damping within the PDMS. Some of the low pressure peaks and strong ejections are located under the head of hairpin vortices, and accordingly, are associated with positive deformation (bump). Others bumps and dents are correlated with some spanwise offset large inclined quasi-streamwise vortices that are not necessarily associated with hairpins. Sponsored by ONR.

  20. The DSR-deformed relativistic symmetries and the relative locality of 3D quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Arzano, Michele; Bianco, Stefano; Buonocore, Riccardo J

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade there were significant advances in the understanding of quantum gravity coupled to point particles in 3D ((2+1)-dimensional) spacetime. Most notably it is emerging that the theory can be effectively described as a theory of free particles on a momentum space with anti-deSitter geometry and with noncommutative spacetime coordinates of the type [x μ , x ν ] = iℏℓε μν ρ x ρ . We here show that the recently proposed relative-locality curved-momentum-space framework is ideally suited for accommodating these structures' characteristics of 3D quantum gravity. Through this we obtain an intuitive characterization of the DSR-deformed Poincaré symmetries of 3D quantum gravity, and find that the associated relative spacetime locality is of the type producing dual-gravity lensing. (paper)

  1. Use of 3D Printed Bone Plate in Novel Technique to Surgically Correct Hallux Valgus Deformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn E.; Dupont, Kenneth M.; Safranski, David L.; Blair, Jeremy; Buratti, Dawn; Zeetser, Vladimir; Callahan, Ryan; Lin, Jason; Gall, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) printing offers many potential advantages in designing and manufacturing plating systems for foot and ankle procedures that involve small, geometrically complex bony anatomy. Here, we describe the design and clinical use of a Ti-6Al-4V ELI bone plate (FastForward™ Bone Tether Plate, MedShape, Inc., Atlanta, GA) manufactured through 3-D printing processes. The plate protects the second metatarsal when tethering suture tape between the first and second metatarsals and is a part of a new procedure that corrects hallux valgus (bunion) deformities without relying on doing an osteotomy or fusion procedure. The surgical technique and two clinical cases describing the use of this procedure with the 3-D printed bone plate are presented within. PMID:28337049

  2. 3D scanning applied in the evaluation of large plastic deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Eduardo Silveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crash test are experimental studies demanded by specialized agencies in order to evaluate the performance of a component (or entire vehicle when subjected to an impact. The results, often highly destructive, produce large deformations in the product. The use of numerical simulation in initial stages of a project is essential to reduce costs. One difficulty in validating numerical results involves the correlation between the level and the deformation mode of the component, since it is a highly nonlinear simulation in which various parameters can affect the results. The main objective of this study was to propose a methodology to correlate the result of crash tests of a fuel tank with the numerical simulations, using an optical 3D scanner. The results are promising, and the methodology implemented would be used for any products that involve large deformations.

  3. 3D Printing of Personalized Organs and Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Kaiming

    2015-03-01

    Authors: Kaiming Ye and Sha Jin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science, Binghamton University, State University of New York, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000 Abstract: Creation of highly organized multicellular constructs, including tissues and organs or organoids, will revolutionize tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The development of these technologies will enable the production of individualized organs or tissues for patient-tailored organ transplantation or cell-based therapy. For instance, a patient with damaged myocardial tissues due to an ischemic event can receive a myocardial transplant generated using the patient's own induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Likewise, a type-1 diabetic patient can be treated with lab-generated islets to restore his or her physiological insulin secretion capability. These lab-produced, high order tissues or organs can also serve as disease models for pathophysiological study and drug screening. The remarkable advances in stem cell biology, tissue engineering, microfabrication, and materials science in the last decade suggest the feasibility of generating these tissues and organoids in the laboratory. Nevertheless, major challenges still exist. One of the critical challenges that we still face today is the difficulty in constructing or fabricating multicellular assemblies that recapitulate in vivo microenvironments essential for controlling cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, maturation and assembly into a biologically functional tissue or organoid structure. These challenges can be addressed through developing 3D organ and tissue printing which enables organizing and assembling cells into desired tissue and organ structures. We have shown that human pluripotent stem cells differentiated in 3D environments are mature and possess high degree of biological function necessary for them to function in vivo.

  4. A New 3D Printing Strategy by Harnessing Deformation, Instability, and Fracture of Viscoelastic Inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuk, Hyunwoo; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2018-02-01

    Direct ink writing (DIW) has demonstrated great potential as a multimaterial multifunctional fabrication method in areas as diverse as electronics, structural materials, tissue engineering, and soft robotics. During DIW, viscoelastic inks are extruded out of a 3D printer's nozzle as printed fibers, which are deposited into patterns when the nozzle moves. Hence, the resolution of printed fibers is commonly limited by the nozzle's diameter, and the printed pattern is limited by the motion paths. These limits have severely hampered innovations and applications of DIW 3D printing. Here, a new strategy to exceed the limits of DIW 3D printing by harnessing deformation, instability, and fracture of viscoelastic inks is reported. It is shown that a single nozzle can print fibers with resolution much finer than the nozzle diameter by stretching the extruded ink, and print various thickened or curved patterns with straight nozzle motions by accumulating the ink. A quantitative phase diagram is constructed to rationally select parameters for the new strategy. Further, applications including structures with tunable stiffening, 3D structures with gradient and programmable swelling properties, all printed with a single nozzle are demonstrated. The current work demonstrates that the mechanics of inks plays a critical role in developing 3D printing technology. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. 3D Tensorial Elastodynamics for Isotropic Media on Vertically Deformed Meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shragge, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Solutions of the 3D elastodynamic wave equation are sometimes required in industrial and academic applications of elastic reverse-time migration (E-RTM) and full waveform inversion (E-FWI) that involve vertically deformed meshes. Examples include incorporating irregular free-surface topography and handling internal boundaries (e.g., water bottom) directly into the computational meshes. In 3D E-RTM and E-FWI applications, the number of forward modeling simulations can number in the tens of thousands (per iteration), which necessitates the development of stable, accurate and efficient 3D elastodynamics solvers. For topographic scenarios, most finite-difference solution approaches use a change-of-variable strategy that has a number of associated computational challenges, including difficulties in handling of the free-surface boundary condition. In this study, I follow a tensorial approach and use a generalized family of analytic transforms to develop a set of analytic equations for 3D elastodynamics that directly incorporates vertical grid deformations. Importantly, this analytic approach allows for the specification of an analytic free-surface boundary condition appropriate for vertically deformed meshes. These equations are both straightforward and efficient to solve using a velocity-stress formulation with finite-difference (MFD) operators implemented on a fully staggered grid. Moreover, I demonstrate that the use of mimetic finite difference (MFD) methods allows stable, accurate, and efficient numerical solutions to be simulated for typical topographic scenarios. Examples demonstrate that high-quality elastic wavefields can be generated for topographic surfaces exhibiting significant topographic relief.

  6. 3D Retro-Deformation of the Rotliegend of the `Tight Gas' Area, NGB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, D. C.; Krawczyk, C.; Oncken, O.; Baunack, C.; Gaupp, R.; Littke, R.; Schubarth-Engelschall, J.; Schwarzer, D.; Solms, M.; Trappe, H.

    2003-04-01

    We have constructed a detailed three-dimensional, geometrical model of the Rotliegend `Tight-Gas' reservoir (10 × 20 km^2) of the North German Basin (NGB) from 3D seismic and borehole data. From this data we have compiled an incremental tectonic history of the area, and retro-deformed faults within the model in time and 3D space. The Top Rotliegend surface lies at depths between 4490 m and 4910 m. We recognise three fault generations in the Rotliegend strata: 1) A NW--SE striking strike-slip fault. 2) N--S striking, dip-slip faults. 3) NE--SW striking faults with late and minor displacements. Vertical throw on all the faults is less than 150 m, but the strike-slip fault is characterized by rapid changes in fault throw along strike, whereas the dip-slip faults are composed of one or more segments which have coalesced over time. We envisage that 1) and 2) faults developed coevally in a transtensive setting. We perform 3D geometrical retro-deformation (i.e. reconstruction of the faulted blocks to the undeformed state) using the inclined-shear method. In this method, the hanging-wall is displaced upon the fault surface along a distinct movement vector, which is determined by the previous tectonic model. Morphology (i.e. curvature) of the fault causes passive deformation of the hanging-wall, which is accommodated by shear along a 3D vector. We present detailed fault analysis, and maps of the quantities and directions of the strain within the Rotliegend strata due to fault movement.

  7. Table of 3D organ model IDs and organ names (PART-OF Tree) - BodyParts3D | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us BodyParts3D Table of 3D organ model IDs and organ names (PART-OF Tree) Data detail Data name Table of 3D org...an model IDs and organ names (PART-OF Tree) DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00837-002 Description of ...data contents List of downloadable 3D organ models in a tab-delimited text file format, describing the correspondence between 3D org...an model IDs and organ names available in PART-OF Tree. D...atabase Site Policy | Contact Us Table of 3D organ model IDs and organ names (PART-OF Tree) - BodyParts3D | LSDB Archive ...

  8. Should Society Encourage The Development Of 3D Printing Particularly 3D Bioprinting Of Tissues And Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaviana Pavlovich

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available My aim is to discover moral and ethical sides of 3D printing which is a new technology and paradoxically a new phenomenon of the twenty-first century. Particularly 3D bioprinted organs and tissues is a controversial issue because this technological advancement may be viewed by society as a servant or it can even potentially become its master. For example in the health care system doctors may change their attitude to patients by using 3D bioprinted organs and tissues whenever it is needed also taking away responsibility from patients. Thus there can be great social and psychological consequences from 3D bioprinting in a long term. Furthermore Pete Basiliere an analyst in a worlds leading information technology research company suggests that 3D printing can also bring economic consequences resulting in the loss of at least 100 billion in intellectual property theft per year by 2018 globally. By analysing the economic psychological and social impact of the 3D printing technologies I want to research whether anyone is going be responsible for the 3D printing production and who is going to give a right to 3D bioprint.

  9. Quantification of local matrix deformations and mechanical properties during capillary morphogenesis in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniazeva, Ekaterina; Weidling, John W; Singh, Rahul; Botvinick, Elliot L; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Putnam, Andrew J

    2012-04-01

    Reciprocal mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are thought to play important instructive roles in branching morphogenesis. However, most studies to date have failed to characterize these interactions on a length scale relevant to cells, especially in three-dimensional (3D) matrices. Here we utilized two complementary methods, spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) and laser optical tweezers-based active microrheology (AMR), to quantify endothelial cell (EC)-mediated deformations of individual ECM elements and the local ECM mechanical properties, respectively, during the process of capillary morphogenesis in a 3D cell culture model. In experiments in which the ECM density was systematically varied, STICS revealed that the rate at which ECs deformed individual ECM fibers on the microscale positively correlated with capillary sprouting on the macroscale. ECs expressing constitutively active V14-RhoA displaced individual matrix fibers at significantly faster rates and displayed enhanced capillary sprouting relative to wild-type cells, while those expressing dominant-negative N19-RhoA behaved in an opposite fashion. In parallel, AMR revealed a local stiffening of the ECM proximal to the tips of sprouting ECs. By quantifying the dynamic physical properties of the cell-ECM interface in both space and time, we identified a correlation linking ECM deformation rates and local ECM stiffening at the microscale with capillary morphogenesis at the macroscale. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  10. Deformable segmentation of 3D MR prostate images via distributed discriminative dictionary and ensemble learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yanrong; Shao, Yeqin; Gao, Yaozong; Price, True; Oto, Aytekin; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    different patches of the prostate surface and trained to adaptively capture the appearance in different prostate zones, thus achieving better local tissue differentiation. For each local region, multiple classifiers are trained based on the randomly selected samples and finally assembled by a specific fusion method. In addition to this nonparametric appearance model, a prostate shape model is learned from the shape statistics using a novel approach, sparse shape composition, which can model nonGaussian distributions of shape variation and regularize the 3D mesh deformation by constraining it within the observed shape subspace. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on two datasets consisting of T2-weighted MR prostate images. For the first (internal) dataset, the classification effectiveness of the authors' improved dictionary learning has been validated by comparing it with three other variants of traditional dictionary learning methods. The experimental results show that the authors' method yields a Dice Ratio of 89.1% compared to the manual segmentation, which is more accurate than the three state-of-the-art MR prostate segmentation methods under comparison. For the second dataset, the MICCAI 2012 challenge dataset, the authors' proposed method yields a Dice Ratio of 87.4%, which also achieves better segmentation accuracy than other methods under comparison. Conclusions: A new magnetic resonance image prostate segmentation method is proposed based on the combination of deformable model and dictionary learning methods, which achieves more accurate segmentation performance on prostate T2 MR images

  11. Deformable segmentation of 3D MR prostate images via distributed discriminative dictionary and ensemble learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanrong; Gao, Yaozong; Shao, Yeqin; Price, True; Oto, Aytekin; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    patches of the prostate surface and trained to adaptively capture the appearance in different prostate zones, thus achieving better local tissue differentiation. For each local region, multiple classifiers are trained based on the randomly selected samples and finally assembled by a specific fusion method. In addition to this nonparametric appearance model, a prostate shape model is learned from the shape statistics using a novel approach, sparse shape composition, which can model nonGaussian distributions of shape variation and regularize the 3D mesh deformation by constraining it within the observed shape subspace. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on two datasets consisting of T2-weighted MR prostate images. For the first (internal) dataset, the classification effectiveness of the authors' improved dictionary learning has been validated by comparing it with three other variants of traditional dictionary learning methods. The experimental results show that the authors' method yields a Dice Ratio of 89.1% compared to the manual segmentation, which is more accurate than the three state-of-the-art MR prostate segmentation methods under comparison. For the second dataset, the MICCAI 2012 challenge dataset, the authors' proposed method yields a Dice Ratio of 87.4%, which also achieves better segmentation accuracy than other methods under comparison. Conclusions: A new magnetic resonance image prostate segmentation method is proposed based on the combination of deformable model and dictionary learning methods, which achieves more accurate segmentation performance on prostate T2 MR images. PMID:24989402

  12. Deformable segmentation of 3D MR prostate images via distributed discriminative dictionary and ensemble learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanrong; Gao, Yaozong; Shao, Yeqin; Price, True; Oto, Aytekin; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-07-01

    prostate surface and trained to adaptively capture the appearance in different prostate zones, thus achieving better local tissue differentiation. For each local region, multiple classifiers are trained based on the randomly selected samples and finally assembled by a specific fusion method. In addition to this nonparametric appearance model, a prostate shape model is learned from the shape statistics using a novel approach, sparse shape composition, which can model nonGaussian distributions of shape variation and regularize the 3D mesh deformation by constraining it within the observed shape subspace. The proposed method has been evaluated on two datasets consisting of T2-weighted MR prostate images. For the first (internal) dataset, the classification effectiveness of the authors' improved dictionary learning has been validated by comparing it with three other variants of traditional dictionary learning methods. The experimental results show that the authors' method yields a Dice Ratio of 89.1% compared to the manual segmentation, which is more accurate than the three state-of-the-art MR prostate segmentation methods under comparison. For the second dataset, the MICCAI 2012 challenge dataset, the authors' proposed method yields a Dice Ratio of 87.4%, which also achieves better segmentation accuracy than other methods under comparison. A new magnetic resonance image prostate segmentation method is proposed based on the combination of deformable model and dictionary learning methods, which achieves more accurate segmentation performance on prostate T2 MR images.

  13. Deformable segmentation of 3D MR prostate images via distributed discriminative dictionary and ensemble learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yanrong; Shao, Yeqin [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Gao, Yaozong; Price, True [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Oto, Aytekin [Department of Radiology, Section of Urology, University of Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Shen, Dinggang, E-mail: dgshen@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    different patches of the prostate surface and trained to adaptively capture the appearance in different prostate zones, thus achieving better local tissue differentiation. For each local region, multiple classifiers are trained based on the randomly selected samples and finally assembled by a specific fusion method. In addition to this nonparametric appearance model, a prostate shape model is learned from the shape statistics using a novel approach, sparse shape composition, which can model nonGaussian distributions of shape variation and regularize the 3D mesh deformation by constraining it within the observed shape subspace. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on two datasets consisting of T2-weighted MR prostate images. For the first (internal) dataset, the classification effectiveness of the authors' improved dictionary learning has been validated by comparing it with three other variants of traditional dictionary learning methods. The experimental results show that the authors' method yields a Dice Ratio of 89.1% compared to the manual segmentation, which is more accurate than the three state-of-the-art MR prostate segmentation methods under comparison. For the second dataset, the MICCAI 2012 challenge dataset, the authors' proposed method yields a Dice Ratio of 87.4%, which also achieves better segmentation accuracy than other methods under comparison. Conclusions: A new magnetic resonance image prostate segmentation method is proposed based on the combination of deformable model and dictionary learning methods, which achieves more accurate segmentation performance on prostate T2 MR images.

  14. 3D-2D Deformable Image Registration Using Feature-Based Nonuniform Meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zichun; Guo, Xiaohu; Cai, Yiqi; Yang, Yin; Wang, Jing; Jia, Xun; Mao, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    By using prior information of planning CT images and feature-based nonuniform meshes, this paper demonstrates that volumetric images can be efficiently registered with a very small portion of 2D projection images of a Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scan. After a density field is computed based on the extracted feature edges from planning CT images, nonuniform tetrahedral meshes will be automatically generated to better characterize the image features according to the density field; that is, finer meshes are generated for features. The displacement vector fields (DVFs) are specified at the mesh vertices to drive the deformation of original CT images. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the deformed anatomy are generated and compared with corresponding 2D projections. DVFs are optimized to minimize the objective function including differences between DRRs and projections and the regularity. To further accelerate the above 3D-2D registration, a procedure to obtain good initial deformations by deforming the volume surface to match 2D body boundary on projections has been developed. This complete method is evaluated quantitatively by using several digital phantoms and data from head and neck cancer patients. The feature-based nonuniform meshing method leads to better results than either uniform orthogonal grid or uniform tetrahedral meshes.

  15. 3D-2D Deformable Image Registration Using Feature-Based Nonuniform Meshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zichun Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By using prior information of planning CT images and feature-based nonuniform meshes, this paper demonstrates that volumetric images can be efficiently registered with a very small portion of 2D projection images of a Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT scan. After a density field is computed based on the extracted feature edges from planning CT images, nonuniform tetrahedral meshes will be automatically generated to better characterize the image features according to the density field; that is, finer meshes are generated for features. The displacement vector fields (DVFs are specified at the mesh vertices to drive the deformation of original CT images. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs of the deformed anatomy are generated and compared with corresponding 2D projections. DVFs are optimized to minimize the objective function including differences between DRRs and projections and the regularity. To further accelerate the above 3D-2D registration, a procedure to obtain good initial deformations by deforming the volume surface to match 2D body boundary on projections has been developed. This complete method is evaluated quantitatively by using several digital phantoms and data from head and neck cancer patients. The feature-based nonuniform meshing method leads to better results than either uniform orthogonal grid or uniform tetrahedral meshes.

  16. Repeatability of a 3D multi-segment foot model protocol in presence of foot deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Kevin; Staes, Filip; Bruyninckx, Herman; Busschots, Ellen; Matricali, Giovanni A; Spaepen, Pieter; Meyer, Christophe; Desloovere, Kaat

    2012-07-01

    Repeatability studies on 3D multi-segment foot models (3DMFMs) have mainly considered healthy participants which contrasts with the widespread application of these models to evaluate foot pathologies. The current study aimed at establishing the repeatability of the 3DMFM described by Leardini et al. in presence of foot deformities. Foot kinematics of eight adult participants were analyzed using a repeated-measures design including two therapists with different levels of experience. The inter-trial variability was higher compared to the kinematics of healthy subjects. Consideration of relative angles resulted in the lowest inter-session variability. The absolute 3D rotations between the Sha-Cal and Cal-Met seem to have the lowest variability in both therapists. A general trend towards higher σ(sess)/σ(trial) ratios was observed when the midfoot was involved. The current study indicates that not only relative 3D rotations and planar angles can be measured consistently in patients, also a number of absolute parameters can be consistently measured serving as basis for the decision making process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reconstructing 3D Face Model with Associated Expression Deformation from a Single Face Image via Constructing a Low-Dimensional Expression Deformation Manifold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Fan; Lai, Shang-Hong

    2011-10-01

    Facial expression modeling is central to facial expression recognition and expression synthesis for facial animation. In this work, we propose a manifold-based 3D face reconstruction approach to estimating the 3D face model and the associated expression deformation from a single face image. With the proposed robust weighted feature map (RWF), we can obtain the dense correspondences between 3D face models and build a nonlinear 3D expression manifold from a large set of 3D facial expression models. Then a Gaussian mixture model in this manifold is learned to represent the distribution of expression deformation. By combining the merits of morphable neutral face model and the low-dimensional expression manifold, a novel algorithm is developed to reconstruct the 3D face geometry as well as the facial deformation from a single face image in an energy minimization framework. Experimental results on simulated and real images are shown to validate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed algorithm.

  18. Deformation of a 3D granular media caused by fluid invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbe, M. J.; Juanes, R.

    2016-12-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media plays a fundamental role in many natural and engineered subsurface processes. The interplay between fluid flow, medium deformation and fracture is essential in geoscience problems as disparate as fracking for unconventional hydrocarbon production, conduit formation and methane venting from lake and ocean sediments, and desiccation cracks in soil. Several experimental and computational studies have shown that the competition between capillary and friction forces can lead to different regimes of deformation, from frictional fingering to hydro-capillary fracturing (Sandnes et al., Nat. Comm. 2011, Holtzman et al., PRL 2012). Most of these investigations have focused, however, on 2D or quasi-2D systems. Here, we develop an experimental set-up that allows us to observe two-phase flow in a fully 3D granular bed and measure the fluid pressure while controlling the level of confining stress. We use an index matching technique to directly visualize the injection of a liquid in a granular media saturated with another, immiscible liquid. We extract the deformation the whole granular bulk as well as at the particle level. Our results show the existence of different regimes of invasion patterns depending on key dimensionless groups that control the system.

  19. Adaptive compensation of aberrations in ultrafast 3D microscopy using a deformable mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Leah R.; Albert, O.; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Vdovin, Gleb V.; Mourou, Gerard A.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2000-05-01

    3D imaging using a multiphoton scanning confocal microscope is ultimately limited by aberrations of the system. We describe a system to adaptively compensate the aberrations with a deformable mirror. We have increased the transverse scanning range of the microscope by three with compensation of off-axis aberrations.We have also significantly increased the longitudinal scanning depth with compensation of spherical aberrations from the penetration into the sample. Our correction is based on a genetic algorithm that uses second harmonic or two-photon fluorescence signal excited by femtosecond pulses from the sample as the enhancement parameter. This allows us to globally optimize the wavefront without a wavefront measurement. To improve the speed of the optimization we use Zernike polynomials as the basis for correction. Corrections can be stored in a database for look-up with future samples.

  20. Computed Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and is carried with the macro-flow of the weld metal. By using CT images, a 3-dimensional (3D) image of the lead flow pattern can be reconstructed. CT imaging was found to be a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  1. Softworms: the design and control of non-pneumatic, 3D-printed, deformable robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umedachi, T; Vikas, V; Trimmer, B A

    2016-03-10

    Robots that can easily interact with humans and move through natural environments are becoming increasingly essential as assistive devices in the home, office and hospital. These machines need to be safe, effective, and easy to control. One strategy towards accomplishing these goals is to build the robots using soft and flexible materials to make them much more approachable and less likely to damage their environment. A major challenge is that comparatively little is known about how best to design, fabricate and control deformable machines. Here we describe the design, fabrication and control of a novel soft robotic platform (Softworms) as a modular device for research, education and public outreach. These robots are inspired by recent neuromechanical studies of crawling and climbing by larval moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera, caterpillars). Unlike most soft robots currently under development, the Softworms do not rely on pneumatic or fluidic actuators but are electrically powered and actuated using either shape-memory alloy microcoils or motor tendons, and they can be modified to accept other muscle-like actuators such as electroactive polymers. The technology is extremely versatile, and different designs can be quickly and cheaply fabricated by casting elastomeric polymers or by direct 3D printing. Softworms can crawl, inch or roll, and they are steerable and even climb steep inclines. Softworms can be made in any shape but here we describe modular and monolithic designs requiring little assembly. These modules can be combined to make multi-limbed devices. We also describe two approaches for controlling such highly deformable structures using either model-free state transition-reward matrices or distributed, mechanically coupled oscillators. In addition to their value as a research platform, these robots can be developed for use in environmental, medical and space applications where cheap, lightweight and shape-changing deformable robots will provide new

  2. Deformable Organic Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeongjun; Oh, Jin Young; Kim, Taeho Roy; Gu, Xiaodan; Kim, Yeongin; Wang, Ging-Ji Nathan; Wu, Hung-Chin; Pfattner, Raphael; To, John W F; Katsumata, Toru; Son, Donghee; Kang, Jiheong; Matthews, James R; Niu, Weijun; He, Mingqian; Sinclair, Robert; Cui, Yi; Tok, Jeffery B-H; Lee, Tae-Woo; Bao, Zhenan

    2018-02-01

    Deformable electronic devices that are impervious to mechanical influence when mounted on surfaces of dynamically changing soft matters have great potential for next-generation implantable bioelectronic devices. Here, deformable field-effect transistors (FETs) composed of single organic nanowires (NWs) as the semiconductor are presented. The NWs are composed of fused thiophene diketopyrrolopyrrole based polymer semiconductor and high-molecular-weight polyethylene oxide as both the molecular binder and deformability enhancer. The obtained transistors show high field-effect mobility >8 cm 2 V -1 s -1 with poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) polymer dielectric and can easily be deformed by applied strains (both 100% tensile and compressive strains). The electrical reliability and mechanical durability of the NWs can be significantly enhanced by forming serpentine-like structures of the NWs. Remarkably, the fully deformable NW FETs withstand 3D volume changes (>1700% and reverting back to original state) of a rubber balloon with constant current output, on the surface of which it is attached. The deformable transistors can robustly operate without noticeable degradation on a mechanically dynamic soft matter surface, e.g., a pulsating balloon (pulse rate: 40 min -1 (0.67 Hz) and 40% volume expansion) that mimics a beating heart, which underscores its potential for future biomedical applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. 3D printing of natural organic materials by photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva Gonçalves, Joyce Laura; Valandro, Silvano Rodrigo; Wu, Hsiu-Fen; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Mettra, Bastien; Monnereau, Cyrille; Schmitt Cavalheiro, Carla Cristina; Pawlicka, Agnieszka; Focsan, Monica; Lin, Chih-Lang; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2016-03-01

    In previous works, we have used two-photon induced photochemistry to fabricate 3D microstructures based on proteins, anti-bodies, and enzymes for different types of bio-applications. Among them, we can cite collagen lines to guide the movement of living cells, peptide modified GFP biosensing pads to detect Gram positive bacteria, anti-body pads to determine the type of red blood cells, and trypsin columns in a microfluidic channel to obtain a real time biochemical micro-reactor. In this paper, we report for the first time on two-photon 3D microfabrication of DNA material. We also present our preliminary results on using a commercial 3D printer based on a video projector to polymerize slicing layers of gelatine-objects.

  4. A QUADTREE ORGANIZATION CONSTRUCTION AND SCHEDULING METHOD FOR URBAN 3D MODEL BASED ON WEIGHT

    OpenAIRE

    C. Yao; G. Peng; Y. Song; M. Duan

    2017-01-01

    The increasement of Urban 3D model precision and data quantity puts forward higher requirements for real-time rendering of digital city model. Improving the organization, management and scheduling of 3D model data in 3D digital city can improve the rendering effect and efficiency. This paper takes the complexity of urban models into account, proposes a Quadtree construction and scheduling rendering method for Urban 3D model based on weight. Divide Urban 3D model into different rendering weigh...

  5. Investigating the Importance of 3D Structure & Topography in Seismic Deformation Modeling: Case Study of the April 2015 Nepal Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, L.; Gharti, H. N.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, observations of deformation at plate boundaries have been greatly improved by the development of techniques in space geodesy. However, models of seismic deformation remain limited and are unable to account for realistic 3D structure in topography and material properties. We demonstrate the importance of 3D structure using a spectral-element method that incorporates fault geometry, topography, and heterogeneous material properties in a (non)linear viscoelastic domain. Our method is benchmarked against Okada's analytical technique and the PyLith software package. The April 2015 Nepal earthquake is used as a case study to examine whether 3D structure can affect the predictions of seismic deformation models. We find that the inclusion of topography has a significant effect on our results.

  6. Deformation of the Early Glaucomatous Monkey Optic Nerve Head Connective Tissue after Acute IOP Elevation in 3-D Histomorphometric Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongli; Thompson, Hilary; Roberts, Michael D.; Sigal, Ian A.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To retest the hypothesis that monkey ONH connective tissues become hypercompliant in early experimental glaucoma (EEG), by using 3-D histomorphometric reconstructions, and to expand the characterization of EEG connective tissue deformation to nine EEG eyes. Methods. Trephinated ONH and peripapillary sclera from both eyes of nine monkeys that were perfusion fixed, with one normal eye at IOP 10 mm Hg and the other EEG eye at 10 (n = 3), 30 (n = 3), or 45 (n = 3) mm Hg were serial sectioned, 3-D reconstructed, 3-D delineated, and quantified with 3-D reconstruction techniques developed in prior studies by the authors. Overall, and for each monkey, intereye differences (EEG eye minus normal eye) for each parameter were calculated and compared by ANOVA. Hypercompliance in the EEG 30 and 45 eyes was assessed by ANOVA, and deformations in all nine EEG eyes were separately compared by region without regard for fixation IOP. Results. Hypercompliant deformation was not significant in the overall ANOVA, but was suggested in a subset of EEG 30/45 eyes. EEG eye deformations included posterior laminar deformation, neural canal expansion, lamina cribrosa thickening, and posterior (outward) bowing of the peripapillary sclera. Maximum posterior laminar deformation and scleral canal expansion co-localized to either the inferior nasal or superior temporal quadrants in the eyes with the least deformation and involved both quadrants in the eyes achieving the greatest deformation. Conclusions. The data suggest that, in monkey EEG, ONH connective tissue hypercompliance may occur only in a subset of eyes and that early ONH connective tissue deformation is maximized in the superior temporal and/or inferior nasal quadrants. PMID:20702834

  7. A meshless EFG-based algorithm for 3D deformable modeling of soft tissue in real-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Elahe; Farahmand, Farzam; Durali, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The meshless element-free Galerkin method was generalized and an algorithm was developed for 3D dynamic modeling of deformable bodies in real time. The efficacy of the algorithm was investigated in a 3D linear viscoelastic model of human spleen subjected to a time-varying compressive force exerted by a surgical grasper. The model remained stable in spite of the considerably large deformations occurred. There was a good agreement between the results and those of an equivalent finite element model. The computational cost, however, was much lower, enabling the proposed algorithm to be effectively used in real-time applications.

  8. An Effective Approach of Teeth Segmentation within the 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Based on Deformable Surface Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xutang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to extract the pixels of teeth from 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT image, in this paper, a novel 3D segmentation approach based on deformable surface mode is developed for 3D tooth model reconstruction. Different forces are formulated to handle the segmentation problem by using different strategies. First, the proposed method estimates the deformation force of vertex model by simulating the deformation process of a bubble under the action of internal pressure and external force field. To handle the blurry boundary, a “braking force” is proposed deriving from the 3D gradient information calculated by transforming the Sobel operator into three-dimension representation. In addition, a “border reinforcement” strategy is developed for handling the cases with complicate structures. Moreover, the proposed method combines affine cell image decomposition (ACID grid reparameterization technique to handle the unstable changes of topological structure and deformability during the deformation process. The proposed method was performed on 510 CBCT images. To validate the performance, the results were compared with those of two other well-studied methods. Experimental results show that the proposed approach had a good performance in handling the cases with complicate structures and blurry boundaries well, is effective to converge, and can successfully achieve the reconstruction task of various types of teeth in oral cavity.

  9. Simultaneous acquisition of 3D shape and deformation by combination of interferometric and correlation-based laser speckle metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekiff, Markus; Berssenbrügge, Philipp; Kemper, Björn; Denz, Cornelia; Dirksen, Dieter

    2015-12-01

    A metrology system combining three laser speckle measurement techniques for simultaneous determination of 3D shape and micro- and macroscopic deformations is presented. While microscopic deformations are determined by a combination of Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI) and Digital Speckle Photography (DSP), macroscopic 3D shape, position and deformation are retrieved by photogrammetry based on digital image correlation of a projected laser speckle pattern. The photogrammetrically obtained data extend the measurement range of the DHI-DSP system and also increase the accuracy of the calculation of the sensitivity vector. Furthermore, a precise assignment of microscopic displacements to the object's macroscopic shape for enhanced visualization is achieved. The approach allows for fast measurements with a simple setup. Key parameters of the system are optimized, and its precision and measurement range are demonstrated. As application examples, the deformation of a mandible model and the shrinkage of dental impression material are measured.

  10. A 3D Analysis of Rock Block Deformation and Failure Mechanics Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Emily; Hutchinson, D. Jean; Kromer, Ryan A.; Edwards, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Many natural geological hazards are present along the Thompson River corridor in British Columbia, Canada, including one particularly hazardous rocky slope known as the White Canyon. Railway tracks used by Canadian National (CN) and Canadian Pacific (CP) Railway companies pass through this area at the base of the Canyon slope. The geologically complex and weathered rock face exposed at White Canyon is prone to rockfalls. With a limited ditch capacity, these falling rocks have the potential to land on the tracks and therefore increase the risk of train derailment. Since 2012, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data has been collected at this site on a regular basis to enable researchers at Queen's University to study these rockfalls in greater detail. In this paper, the authors present a summary of an analysis of these TLS datasets including an examination of the pre-failure deformation patterns exhibited by failed rock blocks as well as an investigation into the influence of structural constraints on the pre-failure behavior of these blocks. Aligning rockfall source zones in an early point cloud dataset to a later dataset generates a transformation matrix describing the movement of the block from one scan to the next. This process was repeated such that the motion of the block over the entire TLS data coverage period was measured. A 3D roto-translation algorithm was then used to resolve the motion into translation and rotation components (Oppikofer et al. 2009; Kromer et al. 2015). Structural information was plotted on a stereonet for further analysis. A total of 111 rockfall events exceeding a volume of 1 m3 were analyzed using this approach. The study reveals that although some rockfall source blocks blocks do not exhibit detectable levels of deformation prior to failure, others do experience cm-level translation and rotation on the order of 1 to 6 degrees before detaching from the slope. Moreover, these movements may, in some cases, be related to the discontinuity

  11. Scoliosis corrective force estimation from the implanted rod deformation using 3D-FEM analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yuichiro; Ito, Manabu; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Sudo, Hideki; Salmingo, Remel; Tadano, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Improvement of material property in spinal instrumentation has brought better deformity correction in scoliosis surgery in recent years. The increase of mechanical strength in instruments directly means the increase of force, which acts on bone-implant interface during scoliosis surgery. However, the actual correction force during the correction maneuver and safety margin of pull out force on each screw were not well known. In the present study, estimated corrective forces and pull out forces were analyzed using a novel method based on Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Twenty adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients (1 boy and 19 girls) who underwent reconstructive scoliosis surgery between June 2009 and Jun 2011 were included in this study. Scoliosis correction was performed with 6mm diameter titanium rod (Ti6Al7Nb) using the simultaneous double rod rotation technique (SDRRT) in all cases. The pre-maneuver and post-maneuver rod geometry was collected from intraoperative tracing and postoperative 3D-CT images, and 3D-FEA was performed with ANSYS. Cobb angle of major curve, correction rate and thoracic kyphosis were measured on X-ray images. Average age at surgery was 14.8, and average fusion length was 8.9 segments. Major curve was corrected from 63.1 to 18.1 degrees in average and correction rate was 71.4%. Rod geometry showed significant change on the concave side. Curvature of the rod on concave and convex sides decreased from 33.6 to 17.8 degrees, and from 25.9 to 23.8 degrees, respectively. Estimated pull out forces at apical vertebrae were 160.0N in the concave side screw and 35.6N in the convex side screw. Estimated push in force at LIV and UIV were 305.1N in the concave side screw and 86.4N in the convex side screw. Corrective force during scoliosis surgery was demonstrated to be about four times greater in the concave side than in convex side. Averaged pull out and push in force fell below previously reported safety margin. Therefore, the SDRRT maneuver was

  12. Diffraction-amalgamated grain boundary tracking for mapping 3D crystallographic orientation and strain fields during plastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, Hiroyuki; Kamiko, Takanobu; Tanabe, Yasuto; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Leclere, D.J.; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Hirayama, Kyosuke

    2016-01-01

    By amalgamating the X-ray diffraction technique with the grain boundary tracking technique, a novel method, diffraction-amalgamated grain boundary tracking (DAGT), has been developed. DAGT is a non-destructive in-situ analysis technique for characterising bulk materials, which can be applied up to near the point of fracture. It provides information about local crystal orientations and detailed grain morphologies in three dimensions, together with high-density strain mapping inside grains. As it obtains the grain morphologies by utilising X-ray imaging instead of X-ray diffraction, which latter is typically vulnerable to plastic deformation, DAGT is a fairly robust technique for analysing plastically deforming materials. Texture evolution and localised deformation behaviours have here been successfully characterised in Al–Cu alloys, during tensile deformation of 27% in applied strain. The characteristic rotation behaviours of grains were identified, and attributed to the effects of interaction with adjacent grains on the basis of the 3D local orientation and plastic strain distributions. It has also been revealed that 3D strain distribution in grains is highly heterogeneous, which is not explained by known mechanisms such as simple incompatibility with adjacent grains or strain percolation through soft grains. It has been clarified that groups consisting of a few adjacent grains may deform coordinately, especially in shear and lateral deformation, and the characteristic deformation pattern is thereby formed on a mesoscopic scale.

  13. Acquisition and Neural Network Prediction of 3D Deformable Object Shape Using a Kinect and a Force-Torque Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawbe, Bilal; Cretu, Ana-Maria

    2017-05-11

    The realistic representation of deformations is still an active area of research, especially for deformable objects whose behavior cannot be simply described in terms of elasticity parameters. This paper proposes a data-driven neural-network-based approach for capturing implicitly and predicting the deformations of an object subject to external forces. Visual data, in the form of 3D point clouds gathered by a Kinect sensor, is collected over an object while forces are exerted by means of the probing tip of a force-torque sensor. A novel approach based on neural gas fitting is proposed to describe the particularities of a deformation over the selectively simplified 3D surface of the object, without requiring knowledge of the object material. An alignment procedure, a distance-based clustering, and inspiration from stratified sampling support this process. The resulting representation is denser in the region of the deformation (an average of 96.6% perceptual similarity with the collected data in the deformed area), while still preserving the object's overall shape (86% similarity over the entire surface) and only using on average of 40% of the number of vertices in the mesh. A series of feedforward neural networks is then trained to predict the mapping between the force parameters characterizing the interaction with the object and the change in the object shape, as captured by the fitted neural gas nodes. This series of networks allows for the prediction of the deformation of an object when subject to unknown interactions.

  14. Outcome and safety analysis of 3D printed patient specific pedicle screw jigs for complex spinal deformities: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Bhavuk; Gupta, Manish; Singh, Menaka; Kalyanasundaram, Dinesh

    2018-05-03

    Spinal deformities are very challenging to treat and have a great risk of neurological complications due to hardware placement during corrective surgery. Various techniques have been introduced to ensure safe and accurate placement of pedicle screws. Patient-specific screw guides with pre-drawn and pre-validated trajectory seems to be an attractive option. We have focused on developing 3D printing technique for complex spinal deformities in India. This study also aimed to compare the placement of pedicle screw with 3D printing and free hand technique. This is a retrospective comparative clinical study at an academic institutional setting. A total of 20 patients were enrolled during the study, 10 were operated with the help of 3D printing (group 1) and 10 were operated with freehand technique (group 2). Group 1 included 6 congenital, 3 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), one post tubercular kyphosis and Group 2 included 5 congenital, 4 AIS and one post tubercular kyphosis patient. Primary outcomes were measured in terms of screw violation and secondary outcome were measured in terms of Surgical time, Blood loss, Radiation exposure (no. of shoots required) and complications. MIMICS v18.0 Software was used for 3D reconstruction from CT scan images of all the patients. 3-Matic software was used to create drill guide. 3-D printer from Stratasys Mojo ABS P 430 model material cartilage (a thermoplastic material) was used for printing of vertebrae model and jigs. Two sample test of proportion was used to compare correctly and wrongly pedicle screw placement with 3D printing and freehand technique. T-test with equal variance was used for operating surgical time and blood loss. This work was carried out by collaboration of Orthopaedics Department, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi and Biomedical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi. This project received the grant of USD 60000 from Department of Biotechnology (DBT

  15. A workflow for sub-/seismic structure and deformation quantification of 3-D reflection seismic data sets across different scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawczyk, C.M.; Lohr, T.; Oncken, O. [GFZ Potsdam (Germany); Tanner, D.C. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). GZG; Endres, H. [RWTH Aachen (Germany)]|[TEEC, Isernhagen (Germany); Trappe, H.; Kukla, P. [TEEC, Isernhagen (Germany)

    2007-09-13

    The evolution of a sedimentary basin is mostly affected by deformation. Large-scale, subsurface deformation is typically identified by seismic data, sub-seismic small-scale fractures by well data. Between these two methods, we lack a deeper understanding of how deformation scales. We analysed a 3-D reflection seismic data set in the North German Basin, in order to determine the magnitude and distribution of deformation and its accumulation in space and time. A five-step approach is introduced for quantitative deformation and fracture prediction. An increased resolution of subtle tectonic lineaments is achieved by coherency processing, allowing to unravel the kinematics in the North German Basin from structural interpretation. Extensional events during basin initiation and later inversion are evident. 3-D retrodeformation shows major-strain magnitudes between 0-20% up to 1.3 km away from a fault trace, and variable deviations of associated extensional fractures. Good correlation of FMI data, strain distribution from retro-deformation and from geostatistic tools (see also Trappe et al., this volume) allows the validation of the results and makes the prediction of small-scale faults/fractures possible. The temporal component will be gained in the future by analogue models. The suggested workflow is applicable to reflection seismic surveys and yields in great detail both the tectonic history of a region as well as predictions for hydrocarbon plays or deep groundwater or geothermal reservoirs. (orig.)

  16. Analysis of mitochondrial 3D-deformation in cardiomyocytes during active contraction reveals passive structural anisotropy of orthogonal short axes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Yaniv

    Full Text Available The cardiomyocyte cytoskeleton, composed of rigid and elastic elements, maintains the isolated cell in an elongated cylindrical shape with an elliptical cross-section, even during contraction-relaxation cycles. Cardiomyocyte mitochondria are micron-sized, fluid-filled passive spheres distributed throughout the cell in a crystal-like lattice, arranged in pairs sandwiched between the sarcomere contractile machinery, both longitudinally and radially. Their shape represents the extant 3-dimensional (3D force-balance. We developed a novel method to examine mitochondrial 3D-deformation in response to contraction and relaxation to understand how dynamic forces are balanced inside cardiomyocytes. The variation in transmitted light intensity induced by the periodic lattice of myofilaments alternating with mitochondrial rows can be analyzed by Fourier transformation along a given cardiomyocyte axis to measure mitochondrial deformation along that axis. This technique enables precise detection of changes in dimension of ∼1% in ∼1 µm (long-axis structures with 8 ms time-resolution. During active contraction (1 Hz stimulation, mitochondria deform along the length- and width-axes of the cell with similar deformation kinetics in both sarcomere and mitochondrial structures. However, significant deformation anisotropy (without hysteresis was observed between the orthogonal short-axes (i.e., width and depth of mitochondria during electrical stimulation. The same degree of deformation anisotropy was also found between the myocyte orthogonal short-axes during electrical stimulation. Therefore, the deformation of the mitochondria reflects the overall deformation of the cell, and the apparent stiffness and stress/strain characteristics of the cytoskeleton differ appreciably between the two cardiomyocyte orthogonal short-axes. This method may be applied to obtaining a better understanding of the dynamic force-balance inside cardiomyocytes and of changes in the

  17. Deep convolutional neural network and 3D deformable approach for tissue segmentation in musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Zhou, Zhaoye; Jang, Hyungseok; Samsonov, Alexey; Zhao, Gengyan; Kijowski, Richard

    2018-04-01

    To describe and evaluate a new fully automated musculoskeletal tissue segmentation method using deep convolutional neural network (CNN) and three-dimensional (3D) simplex deformable modeling to improve the accuracy and efficiency of cartilage and bone segmentation within the knee joint. A fully automated segmentation pipeline was built by combining a semantic segmentation CNN and 3D simplex deformable modeling. A CNN technique called SegNet was applied as the core of the segmentation method to perform high resolution pixel-wise multi-class tissue classification. The 3D simplex deformable modeling refined the output from SegNet to preserve the overall shape and maintain a desirable smooth surface for musculoskeletal structure. The fully automated segmentation method was tested using a publicly available knee image data set to compare with currently used state-of-the-art segmentation methods. The fully automated method was also evaluated on two different data sets, which include morphological and quantitative MR images with different tissue contrasts. The proposed fully automated segmentation method provided good segmentation performance with segmentation accuracy superior to most of state-of-the-art methods in the publicly available knee image data set. The method also demonstrated versatile segmentation performance on both morphological and quantitative musculoskeletal MR images with different tissue contrasts and spatial resolutions. The study demonstrates that the combined CNN and 3D deformable modeling approach is useful for performing rapid and accurate cartilage and bone segmentation within the knee joint. The CNN has promising potential applications in musculoskeletal imaging. Magn Reson Med 79:2379-2391, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Quantitative characterization of 3D deformations of cell interactions with soft biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Christian

    In recent years, the importance of mechanical forces in directing cellular function has been recognized as a significant factor in biological and physiological processes. In fact, these physical forces are now viewed equally as important as biochemical stimuli in controlling cellular response. Not only do these cellular forces, or cell tractions, play an important role in cell migration, they are also significant to many other physiological and pathological processes, both at the tissue and organ level, including wound healing, inflammation, angiogenesis, and embryogenesis. A complete quantification of cell tractions during cell-material interactions can lead to a deeper understanding of the fundamental role these forces play in cell biology. Thus, understanding the function and role of a cell from a mechanical framework can have important implications towards the development of new implant materials and drug treatments. Previous research has contributed significant descriptions of cell-tissue interactions by quantifying cell tractions in two-dimensional environments; however, most physiological processes are three-dimensional in nature. Recent studies have shown morphological differences in cells cultured on two-dimensional substrates versus three-dimensional matrices, and that the intrinsic extracellular matrix interactions and migration behavior are different in three dimensions versus two dimensions. Hence, measurement techniques are needed to investigate cellular behavior in all three dimensions. This thesis presents a full-field imaging technique capable of quantitatively measuring cell traction forces in all three spatial dimensions, and hence addresses the need of a three-dimensional quantitative imaging technique to gain insight into the fundamental role of physical forces in biological processes. The technique combines laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) with digital volume correlation (DVC) to track the motion of fluorescent particles during cell

  19. Twisted 3D N=4 supersymmetric YM on deformed A{sub 3}{sup *} lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidi, El Hassan [Lab of High Energy Physics, Modeling and Simulations, Faculty of Science, University Mohamed V-Agdal, Morocco and Centre of Physics and Mathematics, CPM, Rabat (Morocco)

    2014-01-15

    We study a class of twisted 3D N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory on particular 3-dimensional lattice L{sub 3D} formally denoted as L{sub 3D}{sup su{sub 3}×u{sub 1}} and given by non-trivial fibration L{sub 1D}{sup u{sub 1}}×L{sub 2D}{sup su{sub 3}} with base L{sub 2D}{sup su{sub 3}}=A{sub 2}{sup *}, the weight lattice of SU(3). We first, develop the twisted 3D N=4 SYM in continuum by using superspace method where the scalar supercharge Q is manifestly exhibited. Then, we show how to engineer the 3D lattice L{sub 3D}{sup su{sub 3}×u{sub 1}} that host this theory. After that we build the lattice action S{sub latt} invariant under the following three points: (i) U(N) gauge invariance, (ii) BRST symmetry, (iii) the S{sub 3} point group symmetry of L{sub 3D}{sup su{sub 3}×u{sub 1}}. Other features such as reduction to twisted 2D supersymmetry with 8 supercharges living on L{sub 2D}≡L{sub 2D}{sup su{sub 2}×u{sub 1}}, the extension to twisted maximal 5D SYM with 16 supercharges on lattice L{sub 5D}≡L{sub 5D}{sup su{sub 4}×u{sub 1}} as well as the relation with known results are also given.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Bulge Deformation between 2D and 3D Finite Element Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Qin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bulge deformation of the slab is one of the main factors that affect slab quality in continuous casting. This paper describes an investigation into bulge deformation using ABAQUS to model the solidification process. A three-dimensional finite element analysis model of the slab solidification process has been first established because the bulge deformation is closely related to slab temperature distributions. Based on slab temperature distributions, a three-dimensional thermomechanical coupling model including the slab, the rollers, and the dynamic contact between them has also been constructed and applied to a case study. The thermomechanical coupling model produces outputs such as the rules of bulge deformation. Moreover, the three-dimensional model has been compared with a two-dimensional model to discuss the differences between the two models in calculating the bulge deformation. The results show that the platform zone exists in the wide side of the slab and the bulge deformation is affected strongly by the ratio of width-to-thickness. The indications are also that the difference of the bulge deformation for the two modeling ways is little when the ratio of width-to-thickness is larger than six.

  1. 3D skin length deformation of lower body during knee joint flexion for the practical application of functional sportswear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiyoung; Hong, Kyunghi

    2015-05-01

    With the advent of 3D technology in the design process, a tremendous amount of scanned data is available. However, it is difficult to trace the quantitative skin deformation of a designated location on the 3D body surface data during movement. Without identical landmarks or reflective markers, tracing the same reference points on the different body postures is not easy because of the complex shape change of the body. To find the least deformed location on the body, which is regarded as the optimal position of seams for the various lengths of functional compression pants, landmarks were directly marked on the skin of six subjects and scanned during knee joint flexion. Lines of non-extension (LoNE) and maximum stretch (LoMS) were searched for, both by tracing landmarks and newly drawn guidelines based on ratio division in various directions. Considering the waist as the anchoring position of the pants, holistic changes were quantified and visualized from the waistline in lengthwise and curvilinear deformation along the dermatomes of the lower body for various lengths of pants. Widthwise and unit area skin deformation data of the skin were also provided as guidelines for further use such as streamlined pants or design of other local wearing devices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  2. 3D Quaternary deformation pattern in the central Po Plain (Northern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sileo, G.; Mueller, K.; Michetti, A. M.; Livio, F.; Berlusconi, A.; Carcano, C.; Rogledi, S.; Vittori, E.

    2009-04-01

    have been identified. We interpreted them as N-verging fault propagation folds with low angle ramps that detach the Gonfolite Lombarda clastics (Oligo - Miocene; Bernoulli et al., 1989; Gelati et al., 1991) from the underlying Upper Cretaceous carbonates. The present-day geomorphic evidence of these two structures are represented by the Pievedizio, Capriano, Castenedolo and Ciliverghe Hills South of Brescia (Livio et al, 2008; Michetti et al., 2008). On the basin floor domain nine structures have been identified. Six of them belong to the Southern Alps and we interpreted them as S-verging fault propagation folds. All these structures have a double plunging termination (Burbank & Anderson, 2001) that mark the endpoints of actively slipping blind thrusts. These structures range from 11 to 16 km long with an average strike of N 110° E. The remaining three structures record shortening at the leading edge of the Apennines; their axial lengths range from 8 to 28 km and the average axial strike is 110°. These structures thus define the 3D architecture of blind thrusts hidden beneath the basin floor; these collectively define the two active, facing fronts of the Apennines and Southern Alps thrust belts (Fantoni et al. 2004). ‘R' Surface The second analyzed surface is the ‘R' surface (0.9 Myr.); strain measured across this sequence stratigraphic boundary confirmed and further defines the magnitude and timing of shortening accommodated by fault propagation folds described on the ‘A' surface. Differences between the basin between "A" and "R" surface time include the arrangement of the structures on the basin floor and by the number of the identified structures. The Alpine platform domain in "R" time is in fact more extended than on the ‘A' surface, and a less steep slope links it with a wider but less deep basin domain; the Apennines platform is smaller, because it has been involved in the deformation of the more internal Apennines structures. The basin floor is ca. 30

  3. Fabrication, Characterization, And Deformation of 3D Structural Meta-Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemayor, Lauren C.

    Current technological advances in fabrication methods have provided pathways to creating architected structural meta-materials similar to those found in natural organisms that are structurally robust and lightweight, such as diatoms. Structural meta-materials are materials with mechanical properties that are determined by material properties at various length scales, which range from the material microstructure (nm) to the macro-scale architecture (mum -- mm). It is now possible to exploit material size effect, which emerge at the nanometer length scale, as well as structural effects to tune the material properties and failure mechanisms of small-scale cellular solids, such as nanolattices. This work demonstrates the fabrication and mechanical properties of 3-dimensional hollow nanolattices in both tension and compression. Hollow gold nanolattices loaded in uniaxial compression demonstrate that strength and stiffness vary as a function of geometry and tube wall thickness. Structural effects were explored by increasing the unit cell angle from 30° to 60° while keeping all other parameters constant; material size effects were probed by varying the tube wall thickness, t, from 200nm to 635nm, at a constant relative density and grain size. In-situ uniaxial compression experiments reveal an order-of-magnitude increase in yield stress and modulus in nanolattices with greater lattice angles, and a 150% increase in the yield strength without a concomitant change in modulus in thicker-walled nanolattices for fixed lattice angles. These results imply that independent control of structural and material size effects enables tunability of mechanical properties of 3-dimensional architected meta-materials and highlight the importance of material, geometric, and microstructural effects in small-scale mechanics. This work also explores the flaw tolerance of 3D hollow-tube alumina kagome nanolattices with and without pre-fabricated notches, both in experiment and simulation

  4. Three-dimensional (3D) visualization of reflow porosity and modeling of deformation in Pb-free solder joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudek, M.A.; Hunter, L.; Kranz, S.; Williams, J.J.; Lau, S.H.; Chawla, N.

    2010-01-01

    The volume, size, and dispersion of porosity in solder joints are known to affect mechanical performance and reliability. Most of the techniques used to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) nature of these defects are destructive. With the enhancements in high resolution computed tomography (CT), the detection limits of intrinsic microstructures have been significantly improved. Furthermore, the 3D microstructure of the material can be used in finite element models to understand their effect on microscopic deformation. In this paper we describe a technique utilizing high resolution (< 1 μm) X-ray tomography for the three-dimensional (3D) visualization of pores in Sn-3.9Ag-0.7Cu/Cu joints. The characteristics of reflow porosity, including volume fraction and distribution, were investigated for two reflow profiles. The size and distribution of porosity size were visualized in 3D for four different solder joints. In addition, the 3D virtual microstructure was incorporated into a finite element model to quantify the effect of voids on the lap shear behavior of a solder joint. The presence, size, and location of voids significantly increased the severity of strain localization at the solder/copper interface.

  5. Object-constrained meshless deformable algorithm for high speed 3D nonrigid registration between CT and CBCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ting; Kim, Sung; Goyal, Sharad; Jabbour, Salma; Zhou Jinghao; Rajagopal, Gunaretnum; Haffty, Bruce; Yue Ning

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: High-speed nonrigid registration between the planning CT and the treatment CBCT data is critical for real time image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) to improve the dose distribution and to reduce the toxicity to adjacent organs. The authors propose a new fully automatic 3D registration framework that integrates object-based global and seed constraints with the grayscale-based ''demons'' algorithm. Methods: Clinical objects were segmented on the planning CT images and were utilized as meshless deformable models during the nonrigid registration process. The meshless models reinforced a global constraint in addition to the grayscale difference between CT and CBCT in order to maintain the shape and the volume of geometrically complex 3D objects during the registration. To expedite the registration process, the framework was stratified into hierarchies, and the authors used a frequency domain formulation to diffuse the displacement between the reference and the target in each hierarchy. Also during the registration of pelvis images, they replaced the air region inside the rectum with estimated pixel values from the surrounding rectal wall and introduced an additional seed constraint to robustly track and match the seeds implanted into the prostate. The proposed registration framework and algorithm were evaluated on 15 real prostate cancer patients. For each patient, prostate gland, seminal vesicle, bladder, and rectum were first segmented by a radiation oncologist on planning CT images for radiotherapy planning purpose. The same radiation oncologist also manually delineated the tumor volumes and critical anatomical structures in the corresponding CBCT images acquired at treatment. These delineated structures on the CBCT were only used as the ground truth for the quantitative validation, while structures on the planning CT were used both as the input to the registration method and the ground truth in validation. By registering the planning CT to the CBCT, a

  6. 3D High Resolution Mesh Deformation Based on Multi Library Wavelet Neural Network Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhibi, Naziha; Elkefi, Akram; Bellil, Wajdi; Amar, Chokri Ben

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with the features of a novel technique for large Laplacian boundary deformations using estimated rotations. The proposed method is based on a Multi Library Wavelet Neural Network structure founded on several mother wavelet families (MLWNN). The objective is to align features of mesh and minimize distortion with a fixed feature that minimizes the sum of the distances between all corresponding vertices. New mesh deformation method worked in the domain of Region of Interest (ROI). Our approach computes deformed ROI, updates and optimizes it to align features of mesh based on MLWNN and spherical parameterization configuration. This structure has the advantage of constructing the network by several mother wavelets to solve high dimensions problem using the best wavelet mother that models the signal better. The simulation test achieved the robustness and speed considerations when developing deformation methodologies. The Mean-Square Error and the ratio of deformation are low compared to other works from the state of the art. Our approach minimizes distortions with fixed features to have a well reconstructed object.

  7. a Quadtree Organization Construction and Scheduling Method for Urban 3d Model Based on Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, C.; Peng, G.; Song, Y.; Duan, M.

    2017-09-01

    The increasement of Urban 3D model precision and data quantity puts forward higher requirements for real-time rendering of digital city model. Improving the organization, management and scheduling of 3D model data in 3D digital city can improve the rendering effect and efficiency. This paper takes the complexity of urban models into account, proposes a Quadtree construction and scheduling rendering method for Urban 3D model based on weight. Divide Urban 3D model into different rendering weights according to certain rules, perform Quadtree construction and schedule rendering according to different rendering weights. Also proposed an algorithm for extracting bounding box extraction based on model drawing primitives to generate LOD model automatically. Using the algorithm proposed in this paper, developed a 3D urban planning&management software, the practice has showed the algorithm is efficient and feasible, the render frame rate of big scene and small scene are both stable at around 25 frames.

  8. A QUADTREE ORGANIZATION CONSTRUCTION AND SCHEDULING METHOD FOR URBAN 3D MODEL BASED ON WEIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasement of Urban 3D model precision and data quantity puts forward higher requirements for real-time rendering of digital city model. Improving the organization, management and scheduling of 3D model data in 3D digital city can improve the rendering effect and efficiency. This paper takes the complexity of urban models into account, proposes a Quadtree construction and scheduling rendering method for Urban 3D model based on weight. Divide Urban 3D model into different rendering weights according to certain rules, perform Quadtree construction and schedule rendering according to different rendering weights. Also proposed an algorithm for extracting bounding box extraction based on model drawing primitives to generate LOD model automatically. Using the algorithm proposed in this paper, developed a 3D urban planning&management software, the practice has showed the algorithm is efficient and feasible, the render frame rate of big scene and small scene are both stable at around 25 frames.

  9. Multi-stage 3D-2D registration for correction of anatomical deformation in image-guided spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcha, M. D.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Jacobson, M. W.; Goerres, J.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-06-01

    A multi-stage image-based 3D-2D registration method is presented that maps annotations in a 3D image (e.g. point labels annotating individual vertebrae in preoperative CT) to an intraoperative radiograph in which the patient has undergone non-rigid anatomical deformation due to changes in patient positioning or due to the intervention itself. The proposed method (termed msLevelCheck) extends a previous rigid registration solution (LevelCheck) to provide an accurate mapping of vertebral labels in the presence of spinal deformation. The method employs a multi-stage series of rigid 3D-2D registrations performed on sets of automatically determined and increasingly localized sub-images, with the final stage achieving a rigid mapping for each label to yield a locally rigid yet globally deformable solution. The method was evaluated first in a phantom study in which a CT image of the spine was acquired followed by a series of 7 mobile radiographs with increasing degree of deformation applied. Second, the method was validated using a clinical data set of patients exhibiting strong spinal deformation during thoracolumbar spine surgery. Registration accuracy was assessed using projection distance error (PDE) and failure rate (PDE  >  20 mm—i.e. label registered outside vertebra). The msLevelCheck method was able to register all vertebrae accurately for all cases of deformation in the phantom study, improving the maximum PDE of the rigid method from 22.4 mm to 3.9 mm. The clinical study demonstrated the feasibility of the approach in real patient data by accurately registering all vertebral labels in each case, eliminating all instances of failure encountered in the conventional rigid method. The multi-stage approach demonstrated accurate mapping of vertebral labels in the presence of strong spinal deformation. The msLevelCheck method maintains other advantageous aspects of the original LevelCheck method (e.g. compatibility with standard clinical workflow, large

  10. 3D EBSD charactyerization of deformation structures in commercial purity aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fengxiang, Lin; Godfrey, A.; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    A method to map the microstructure in deformed aluminum in three dimensions is presented. The method employs serial sectioning by mechanical polishing, and electropolishing to obtain a good surface quality, and orientation mapping of individual grains in each section by electron backscattered...... are analyzed in terms of the deformation-induced orientation spread within each grain. In particular the advantage of using three dimensional data, as opposed to two dimensional data, is illustrated, by inclusion of information about the three dimensional morphology of a grain and its neighbors....

  11. An Experimental Comparison of Similarity Assessment Measures for 3D Models on Constrained Surface Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Lulin; Yang, Zhixin

    2010-05-01

    To address the issues in the area of design customization, this paper expressed the specification and application of the constrained surface deformation, and reported the experimental performance comparison of three prevail effective similarity assessment algorithms on constrained surface deformation domain. Constrained surface deformation becomes a promising method that supports for various downstream applications of customized design. Similarity assessment is regarded as the key technology for inspecting the success of new design via measuring the difference level between the deformed new design and the initial sample model, and indicating whether the difference level is within the limitation. According to our theoretical analysis and pre-experiments, three similarity assessment algorithms are suitable for this domain, including shape histogram based method, skeleton based method, and U system moment based method. We analyze their basic functions and implementation methodologies in detail, and do a series of experiments on various situations to test their accuracy and efficiency using precision-recall diagram. Shoe model is chosen as an industrial example for the experiments. It shows that shape histogram based method gained an optimal performance in comparison. Based on the result, we proposed a novel approach that integrating surface constrains and shape histogram description with adaptive weighting method, which emphasize the role of constrains during the assessment. The limited initial experimental result demonstrated that our algorithm outperforms other three algorithms. A clear direction for future development is also drawn at the end of the paper.

  12. Mean deformation metrics for quantifying 3D cell–matrix interactions without requiring information about matrix material properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, David A.; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Estrada, Jonathan B.; Toyjanova, Jennet; Kesari, Haneesh; Reichner, Jonathan S.; Franck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanobiology relates cellular processes to mechanical signals, such as determining the effect of variations in matrix stiffness with cell tractions. Cell traction recorded via traction force microscopy (TFM) commonly takes place on materials such as polyacrylamide- and polyethylene glycol-based gels. Such experiments remain limited in physiological relevance because cells natively migrate within complex tissue microenvironments that are spatially heterogeneous and hierarchical. Yet, TFM requires determination of the matrix constitutive law (stress–strain relationship), which is not always readily available. In addition, the currently achievable displacement resolution limits the accuracy of TFM for relatively small cells. To overcome these limitations, and increase the physiological relevance of in vitro experimental design, we present a new approach and a set of associated biomechanical signatures that are based purely on measurements of the matrix's displacements without requiring any knowledge of its constitutive laws. We show that our mean deformation metrics (MDM) approach can provide significant biophysical information without the need to explicitly determine cell tractions. In the process of demonstrating the use of our MDM approach, we succeeded in expanding the capability of our displacement measurement technique such that it can now measure the 3D deformations around relatively small cells (∼10 micrometers), such as neutrophils. Furthermore, we also report previously unseen deformation patterns generated by motile neutrophils in 3D collagen gels. PMID:26929377

  13. From 3D Bioprinters to a fully integrated Organ Biofabrication Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamai, V. E.; Dernowsek, J. A.; Nogueira, J.; Lara, V.; Vilalba, F.; Mironov, V. A.; Rezende, R. A.; da Silva, J. V.

    2016-04-01

    About 30 years ago, the 3D printing technique appeared. From that time on, engineers in medical science field started to look at 3D printing as a partner. Firstly, biocompatible and biodegradable 3D structures for cell seeding called “scaffolds” were fabricated for in vitro and in vivo animal trials. The advances proved to be of great importance, but, the use of scaffolds faces some limitations, such as low homogeneity and low density of cell aggregates. In the last decade, 3D bioprinting technology emerged as a promising approach to overcome these limitations and as one potential solution to the challenge of organ fabrication, to obtain very similar 3D human tissues, not only for transplantation, but also for drug discovery, disease research and to decrease the usage of animals in laboratory experimentation. 3D bioprinting allowed the fabrication of 3D alive structures with higher and controllable cell density and homogeneity. Other advantage of biofabrication is that the tissue constructs are solid scaffold-free. This paper presents the 3D bioprinting technology; equipment development, stages and components of a complex Organ Bioprinting Line (OBL) and the importance of developing a Virtual OBL.

  14. Novel characteristics of energy spectrum for 3D Dirac oscillator analyzed via Lorentz covariant deformed algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betrouche, Malika; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2013-11-14

    We investigate the Lorentz-covariant deformed algebra for Dirac oscillator problem, which is a generalization of Kempf deformed algebra in 3 + 1 dimension of space-time, where Lorentz symmetry are preserved. The energy spectrum of the system is analyzed by taking advantage of the corresponding wave functions with explicit spin state. We obtained entirely new results from our development based on Kempf algebra in comparison to the studies carried out with the non-Lorentz-covariant deformed one. A novel result of this research is that the quantized relativistic energy of the system in the presence of minimal length cannot grow indefinitely as quantum number n increases, but converges to a finite value, where c is the speed of light and β is a parameter that determines the scale of noncommutativity in space. If we consider the fact that the energy levels of ordinary oscillator is equally spaced, which leads to monotonic growth of quantized energy with the increment of n, this result is very interesting. The physical meaning of this consequence is discussed in detail.

  15. Computer Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding, a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld such as aluminum alloys. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and thus tracks the aluminum deformation flow paths in a unique 3-dimensional manner. CT scanning is a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  16. Outcome analysis after helmet therapy using 3D photogrammetry in patients with deformational plagiocephaly: the role of root mean square.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Mahsa Bidgoli; Brown, Trevor M; Clausen, April; DaSilva, Trevor; Ho, Emily; Forrest, Christopher R

    2014-02-01

    Deformational plagiocephaly (DP) is a multifactorial non-synostotic cranial deformity with a reported incidence as high as 1 in 7 infants in North America. Treatment options have focused on non-operative interventions including head repositioning and the use of an orthotic helmet device. Previous studies have used linear and two dimensional outcome measures to assess changes in cranial symmetry after helmet therapy. Our objective was to demonstrate improvement in head shape after treatment with a cranial molding helmet by using Root Mean Square (RMS), a measure unique to 3D photogrammetry, which takes into account both changes in volume and shape over time. Three dimensional photographs were obtained before and after molding helmet treatment in 40 infants (4-10 months old) with deformational plagiocephaly. Anatomical reference planes and measurements were recorded using the 3dMD Vultus(®) analysis software. RMS was used to quantify symmetry by superimposing left and right quadrants and calculating the mean value of aggregate distances between surfaces. Over 95% of the patients demonstrated an improvement in symmetry with helmet therapy. Furthermore, when the sample of infants was divided into two treatment subgroups, a statistically significant correlation was found between the age at the beginning of treatment and the change in the RMS value. When helmet therapy was started before 7 months of age a greater improvement in symmetry was seen. This work represents application of the technique of RMS analysis to demonstrate the efficacy of treatment of deformational plagiocephaly with a cranial molding helmet. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping registration of reconstructed 3D histological section images and in vivo MR images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Ceritoglu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of neuroanatomical abnormalities in neuropsychiatric diseases is based largely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and post mortem histological analyses of the brain. Further advances in elucidating altered brain structure in these human conditions might emerge from combining MRI and histological methods. We propose a multistage method for registering 3D volumes reconstructed from histological sections to corresponding in vivo MRI volumes from the same subjects: (1 manual segmentation of white matter (WM, gray matter (GM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF compartments in histological sections, (2 alignment of consecutive histological sections using 2D rigid transformation to construct a 3D histological image volume from the aligned sections, (3 registration of reconstructed 3D histological volumes to the corresponding 3D MRI volumes using 3D affine transformation, (4 intensity normalization of images via histogram matching and (5 registration of the volumes via intensity based Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric (LDDMM image matching algorithm. Here we demonstrate the utility of our method in the transfer of cytoarchitectonic information from histological sections to identify regions of interest in MRI scans of nine adult macaque brains for morphometric analyses. LDDMM improved the accuracy of the registration via decreased distances between GM/CSF surfaces after LDDMM (0.39±0.13 mm compared to distances after affine registration (0.76±0.41 mm. Similarly, WM/GM distances decreased to 0.28±0.16 mm after LDDMM compared to 0.54±0.39 mm after affine registration. The multistage registration method may find broad application for mapping histologically based information, e.g., receptor distributions, gene expression, onto MRI volumes.

  18. 3D-printed biological organs: medical potential and patenting opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has emerged as a new disruptive technology that may address the ever-increasing demand for organ transplants. 3D bioprinting offers many technical features that allow for building functional biological tissue constructs by dispensing the individual or group of cells into specific locations along with various types of bio-scaffold materials and extracellular matrices, and thus, may provide flexibility needed for on-demand individualized construction of biological organs. Several key classes of 3D bioprinting techniques are reviewed, including potential medical and industrial applications. Several unanswered engineering components for the ultimate creation of printed biological organs are also discussed. The complicated nature of the human organs, in addition to the legal and ethical requirements for safe implantation into the human body, would require significant research and development to produce marketable bioprinted organs. This also suggests the possibility for further patenting and licensing opportunities from different sectors of the economy.

  19. A Hybrid 3D Colon Segmentation Method Using Modified Geometric Deformable Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Falahieh Hamidpour

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays virtual colonoscopy has become a reliable and efficient method of detecting primary stages of colon cancer such as polyp detection. One of the most important and crucial stages of virtual colonoscopy is colon segmentation because an incorrect segmentation may lead to a misdiagnosis.  Materials and Methods: In this work, a hybrid method based on Geometric Deformable Models (GDM in combination with an advanced region growing and thresholding methods is proposed. GDM are found to be an attractive tool for structural based image segmentation particularly for extracting the objects with complicated topology. There are two main parameters influencing the overall performance of GDM algorithm; the distance between the initial contour and the actual object’s contours and secondly the stopping term which controls the deformation. To overcome these limitations, a two stage hybrid based segmentation method is suggested to extract the rough but precise initial contours at the first stage of the segmentation. The extracted boundaries are smoothed and improved using a modified GDM algorithm by improving the stopping terms of the algorithm based on the gradient value of image voxels. Results: The proposed algorithm was implemented on forty data sets each containing 400-480 slices. The results show an improvement in the accuracy and smoothness of the extracted boundaries. The improvement obtained for the accuracy of segmentation is about 6% in comparison to the one achieved by the methods based on thresholding and region growing only. Discussion and Conclusion: The extracted contours using modified GDM are smoother and finer. The improvement achieved in this work on the performance of stopping function of GDM model together with applying two stage segmentation of boundaries have resulted in a great improvement on the computational efficiency of GDM algorithm while making smoother and finer colon borders.

  20. Supersymmetric deformations of 3D SCFTs from tri-Sasakian truncation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karndumri, Parinya [Chulalongkorn University, String Theory and Supergravity Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2017-02-15

    We holographically study supersymmetric deformations of N = 3 and N = 1 superconformal field theories in three dimensions using four-dimensional N = 4 gauged supergravity coupled to three-vector multiplets with non-semisimple SO(3) x (T{sup 3},T{sup 3}) gauge group. This gauged supergravity can be obtained from a truncation of 11-dimensional supergravity on a tri-Sasakian manifold and admits both N = 1,3 supersymmetric and stable non-supersymmetric AdS{sub 4} critical points. We analyze the BPS equations for SO(3) singlet scalars in detail and study possible supersymmetric solutions. A number of RG flows to non-conformal field theories and half-supersymmetric domain walls are found, and many of them can be given analytically. Apart from these ''flat'' domain walls, we also consider AdS{sub 3}-sliced domain wall solutions describing two-dimensional conformal defects with N = (1,0) supersymmetry within the dual N = 1 field theory while this type of solutions does not exist in the N = 3 case. (orig.)

  1. The deformation of the front of a 3D interface crack propagating quasistatically in a medium with random fracture properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindra, Nadjime; Lazarus, Véronique; Leblond, Jean-Baptiste

    One studies the evolution in time of the deformation of the front of a semi-infinite 3D interface crack propagating quasistatically in an infinite heterogeneous elastic body. The fracture properties are assumed to be lower on the interface than in the materials so that crack propagation is channelled along the interface, and to vary randomly within the crack plane. The work is based on earlier formulae which provide the first-order change of the stress intensity factors along the front of a semi-infinite interface crack arising from some small but otherwise arbitrary in-plane perturbation of this front. The main object of study is the long-time behavior of various statistical measures of the deformation of the crack front. Special attention is paid to the influences of the mismatch of elastic properties, the type of propagation law (fatigue or brittle fracture) and the stable or unstable character of 2D crack propagation (depending on the loading) upon the development of this deformation.

  2. 3D DDD modelling of dislocation-precipitate interaction in a nickel-based single crystal superalloy under cyclic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Huang, Minsheng; Zhao, Liguo; Roy, Anish; Silberschmidt, Vadim; Barnard, Nick; Whittaker, Mark; McColvin, Gordon

    2018-06-01

    Strain-controlled cyclic deformation of a nickel-based single crystal superalloy has been modelled using three-dimensional (3D) discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD) for both [0 0 1] and [1 1 1] orientations. The work focused on the interaction between dislocations and precipitates during cyclic plastic deformation at elevated temperature, which has not been well studied yet. A representative volume element with cubic γ‧-precipitates was chosen to represent the material, with enforced periodical boundary conditions. In particular, cutting of superdislocations into precipitates was simulated by a back-force method. The global cyclic stress-strain responses were captured well by the DDD model when compared to experimental data, particularly the effects of crystallographic orientation. Dislocation evolution showed that considerably high density of dislocations was produced for [1 1 1] orientation when compared to [0 0 1] orientation. Cutting of dislocations into the precipitates had a significant effect on the plastic deformation, leading to material softening. Contour plots of in-plane shear strain proved the development of heterogeneous strain field, resulting in the formation of shear-band embryos.

  3. Tsunami Generation and Propagation by 3D deformable Landslides and Application to Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, Brian C.; Fritz, Hermann M.

    2014-05-01

    Tsunamis generated by landslides and volcano flank collapse account for some of the most catastrophic natural disasters recorded and can be particularly devastative in the near field region due to locally high wave amplitudes and runup. The events of 1958 Lituya Bay, 1963 Vajont reservoir, 1980 Spirit Lake, 2002 Stromboli and 2010 Haiti demonstrate the danger of tsunamis generated by landslides or volcano flank collapses. Unfortunately critical field data from these events is lacking. Source and runup scenarios based on real world events are physically modeled using generalized Froude similarity in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin at Oregon State University. A novel pneumatic landslide tsunami generator (LTG) was deployed to simulate landslides with varying geometry and kinematics. The bathymetric and topographic scenarios tested with the LTG are the basin-wide propagation and runup, fjord, curved headland fjord and a conical island setting representing a landslide off an island or a volcano flank collapse. The LTG consists of a sliding box filled with 1,350 kg of landslide material which is accelerated by means of four pneumatic pistons down a 2H:1V slope. The landslide is launched from the sliding box and continues to accelerate by gravitational forces up to velocities of 5 m/s. The landslide Froude number at impact with the water is in the range 1 deformation is measured from above and underwater camera recordings. The landslide deposit is measured on the basin floor with a multiple transducer acoustic array (MTA). Landslide surface reconstruction and kinematics are determined with a stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. Wave runup is recorded with resistance wave gauges along the slope and verified

  4. Deformation analysis of a sinkhole in Thuringia using multi-temporal multi-view stereo 3D reconstruction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petschko, Helene; Goetz, Jason; Schmidt, Sven

    2017-04-01

    Sinkholes are a serious threat on life, personal property and infrastructure in large parts of Thuringia. Over 9000 sinkholes have been documented by the Geological Survey of Thuringia, which are caused by collapsing hollows which formed due to solution processes within the local bedrock material. However, little is known about surface processes and their dynamics at the flanks of the sinkhole once the sinkhole has shaped. These processes are of high interest as they might lead to dangerous situations at or within the vicinity of the sinkhole. Our objective was the analysis of these deformations over time in 3D by applying terrestrial photogrammetry with a simple DSLR camera. Within this study, we performed an analysis of deformations within a sinkhole close to Bad Frankenhausen (Thuringia) using terrestrial photogrammetry and multi-view stereo 3D reconstruction to obtain a 3D point cloud describing the morphology of the sinkhole. This was performed for multiple data collection campaigns over a 6-month period. The photos of the sinkhole were taken with a Nikon D3000 SLR Camera. For the comparison of the point clouds the Multiscale Model to Model Comparison (M3C2) plugin of the software CloudCompare was used. It allows to apply advanced methods of point cloud difference calculation which considers the co-registration error between two point clouds for assessing the significance of the calculated difference (given in meters). Three Styrofoam cuboids of known dimensions (16 cm wide/29 cm high/11.5 cm deep) were placed within the sinkhole to test the accuracy of the point cloud difference calculation. The multi-view stereo 3D reconstruction was performed with Agisoft Photoscan. Preliminary analysis indicates that about 26% of the sinkhole showed changes exceeding the co-registration error of the point clouds. The areas of change can mainly be detected on the flanks of the sinkhole and on an earth pillar that formed in the center of the sinkhole. These changes describe

  5. Putting 3D modelling and 3D printing into practice: virtual surgery and preoperative planning to reconstruct complex post-traumatic skeletal deformities and defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsworth, Kevin; Block, Steve; Glatt, Vaida

    2017-01-01

    3D printing technology has revolutionized and gradually transformed manufacturing across a broad spectrum of industries, including healthcare. Nowhere is this more apparent than in orthopaedics with many surgeons already incorporating aspects of 3D modelling and virtual procedures into their routine clinical practice. As a more extreme application, patient-specific 3D printed titanium truss cages represent a novel approach for managing the challenge of segmental bone defects. This review illustrates the potential indications of this innovative technique using 3D printed titanium truss cages in conjunction with the Masquelet technique. These implants are custom designed during a virtual surgical planning session with the combined input of an orthopaedic surgeon, an orthopaedic engineering professional and a biomedical design engineer. The ability to 3D model an identical replica of the original intact bone in a virtual procedure is of vital importance when attempting to precisely reconstruct normal anatomy during the actual procedure. Additionally, other important factors must be considered during the planning procedure, such as the three-dimensional configuration of the implant. Meticulous design is necessary to allow for successful implantation through the planned surgical exposure, while being aware of the constraints imposed by local anatomy and prior implants. This review will attempt to synthesize the current state of the art as well as discuss our personal experience using this promising technique. It will address implant design considerations including the mechanical, anatomical and functional aspects unique to each case. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  6. Putting 3D modelling and 3D printing into practice: virtual surgery and preoperative planning to reconstruct complex post-traumatic skeletal deformities and defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsworth Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing technology has revolutionized and gradually transformed manufacturing across a broad spectrum of industries, including healthcare. Nowhere is this more apparent than in orthopaedics with many surgeons already incorporating aspects of 3D modelling and virtual procedures into their routine clinical practice. As a more extreme application, patient-specific 3D printed titanium truss cages represent a novel approach for managing the challenge of segmental bone defects. This review illustrates the potential indications of this innovative technique using 3D printed titanium truss cages in conjunction with the Masquelet technique. These implants are custom designed during a virtual surgical planning session with the combined input of an orthopaedic surgeon, an orthopaedic engineering professional and a biomedical design engineer. The ability to 3D model an identical replica of the original intact bone in a virtual procedure is of vital importance when attempting to precisely reconstruct normal anatomy during the actual procedure. Additionally, other important factors must be considered during the planning procedure, such as the three-dimensional configuration of the implant. Meticulous design is necessary to allow for successful implantation through the planned surgical exposure, while being aware of the constraints imposed by local anatomy and prior implants. This review will attempt to synthesize the current state of the art as well as discuss our personal experience using this promising technique. It will address implant design considerations including the mechanical, anatomical and functional aspects unique to each case.

  7. 3D-printed devices for continuous-flow organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragone, Vincenza; Sans, Victor; Rosnes, Mali H; Kitson, Philip J; Cronin, Leroy

    2013-01-01

    We present a study in which the versatility of 3D-printing is combined with the processing advantages of flow chemistry for the synthesis of organic compounds. Robust and inexpensive 3D-printed reactionware devices are easily connected using standard fittings resulting in complex, custom-made flow systems, including multiple reactors in a series with in-line, real-time analysis using an ATR-IR flow cell. As a proof of concept, we utilized two types of organic reactions, imine syntheses and imine reductions, to show how different reactor configurations and substrates give different products.

  8. 3D-printed devices for continuous-flow organic chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza Dragone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a study in which the versatility of 3D-printing is combined with the processing advantages of flow chemistry for the synthesis of organic compounds. Robust and inexpensive 3D-printed reactionware devices are easily connected using standard fittings resulting in complex, custom-made flow systems, including multiple reactors in a series with in-line, real-time analysis using an ATR-IR flow cell. As a proof of concept, we utilized two types of organic reactions, imine syntheses and imine reductions, to show how different reactor configurations and substrates give different products.

  9. Print Me an Organ? Ethical and Regulatory Issues Emerging from 3D Bioprinting in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Frederic; O'Connell, Cathal D; Mladenovska, Tajanka; Dodds, Susan

    2018-02-01

    Recent developments of three-dimensional printing of biomaterials (3D bioprinting) in medicine have been portrayed as demonstrating the potential to transform some medical treatments, including providing new responses to organ damage or organ failure. However, beyond the hype and before 3D bioprinted organs are ready to be transplanted into humans, several important ethical concerns and regulatory questions need to be addressed. This article starts by raising general ethical concerns associated with the use of bioprinting in medicine, then it focuses on more particular ethical issues related to experimental testing on humans, and the lack of current international regulatory directives to guide these experiments. Accordingly, this article (1) considers whether there is a limit as to what should be bioprinted in medicine; (2) examines key risks of significant harm associated with testing 3D bioprinting for humans; (3) investigates the clinical trial paradigm used to test 3D bioprinting; (4) analyses ethical questions of irreversibility, loss of treatment opportunity and replicability; (5) explores the current lack of a specific framework for the regulation and testing of 3D bioprinting treatments.

  10. A 3D-RBS study of irradiation-induced deformation and masking properties of ordered colloidal nanoparticulate masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolnai, Z.; Deak, A.; Nagy, N.; Toth, A.L.; Kotai, E.; Battistig, G.

    2010-01-01

    The 500 keV Xe 2+ irradiation-induced anisotropic deformation of ordered colloidal silica nanoparticulate masks is followed using 2 MeV 4 He + Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) with different measurement geometries and the improved data analysis capabilities of the RBS-MAST spectrum simulation code. The three-dimensional (3D) geometrical transformation from spherical to oblate ellipsoidal and polygonal shape and the decrease of the mask's hole size is described. The masking properties of the silica monolayer and the depth distribution of Xe in the underlying Si substrate vs. the irradiated Xe 2+ fluence are discussed. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) is applied as complementary characterization tool. Our results give contribution to clarify the impact of ion-nanoparticle interactions on the potentials and limits of nanosphere lithography. We also show the capability of the conventional RBS technique to characterize laterally ordered submicron-sized three-dimensional structures.

  11. Qualitative Assessment of a 3D Simulation Program: Faculty, Students, and Bio-Organic Reaction Animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günersel, Adalet B.; Fleming, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that computer-based simulations and animations are especially helpful in fields such as chemistry where concepts are abstract and cannot be directly observed. Bio-Organic Reaction Animations (BioORA) is a freely available 3D visualization software program developed to help students understand the chemistry of biomolecular events.…

  12. A Nonfullerene Small Molecule Acceptor with 3D Interlocking Geometry Enabling Efficient Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewon; Singh, Ranbir; Sin, Dong Hun; Kim, Heung Gyu; Song, Kyu Chan; Cho, Kilwon

    2016-01-06

    A new 3D nonfullerene small-molecule acceptor is reported. The 3D interlocking geometry of the small-molecule acceptor enables uniform molecular conformation and strong intermolecular connectivity, facilitating favorable nanoscale phase separation and electron charge transfer. By employing both a novel polymer donor and a nonfullerene small-molecule acceptor in the solution-processed organic solar cells, a high-power conversion efficiency of close to 6% is demonstrated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Towards Single-Step Biofabrication of Organs on a Chip via 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yenilmez, Bekir; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-09-01

    Organ-on-a-chip engineering employs microfabrication of living tissues within microscale fluid channels to create constructs that closely mimic human organs. With the advent of 3D printing, we predict that single-step fabrication of these devices will enable rapid design and cost-effective iterations in the development stage, facilitating rapid innovation in this field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Self-organized 3D equilibrium formation and its feedback control in RFX-mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piovesan, P.; Bonfiglio, D.; Marrelli, L.; Soppelsa, A.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.

    2014-01-01

    The reversed-field pinch exhibits a strong tendency to self-organize into a helical equilibrium as the plasma current is increased. The helical reversed-field pinch is characterized by reduced magnetic stochasticity and by the formation of electron internal transport barriers. The paper gives an update on recent experimental and modelling work on helical states in RFX-mod (Sonato et al 2003 Fusion Eng. Des. 66 161), also discussing similarities with 3D equilibria in tokamaks. The helical equilibrium is modelled with 3D codes developed for stellarators, such as VMEC/V3FIT. The reconstructed safety factor profile has low or reversed magnetic shear in the core, which may be related to transport barrier formation. A significant extension of the RFX-mod database to high current and density confirms the dependence observed before of various helical state properties on macroscopic quantities. Even under conditions where it does not form spontaneously, such as at low current or high density, the 3D magnetic equilibrium can be stimulated and robustly controlled with external fields applied by an extensive set of non axi-symmetric coils. An advanced magnetic feedback algorithm that compensates for error fields induced by eddy currents in the 3D wall structures has been developed. This work stimulated similar experiments in RFX-mod run as a tokamak, where external 3D fields are applied to control a m = 1/n = 1 helical equilibrium. (paper)

  15. Organic-Inorganic Graphite and Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Based Composites for 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalan Gonzalez, Jorge Alfredo

    This project was multipronged to help fuse together topics of additive manufacturing and two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, and studying the mechanical and electrical properties of the composites produced. The composites are made from the thermoplastic polymer acting as a matrix and the graphite and 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) serving as the filler or reinforcement. Different concentrations of TMD's were added to the matrix to study the effect of composition on the mechanical and electrical properties. To shed insights into the mechanical properties, test coupons were produced as "dog bone" structures for tensile testing using the ASTM D638 type 5 standard, which were printed with the aid of a Lulzbot TAZ 6 3D printer. In the same way, two-terminal resistor-like structures were printed to test the electrical properties inherent to the composites. From the measurements conducted, polyethylene terephthalate glycol (PETG)--graphite composites had a yield strength (YS) ≈ 50 MPa, an ultimate tensile strength (UTS) ≈ 30 MPa and had a better ductility (strain to rupture ≈ 8%) compared to theacrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) composite counterparts. Also, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) had a more positive effect than tungsten disulfide (WS2), since the strength was retained while the ductility was increased at low loadings of the material. Strain levels were measured to be 30%-120% when adding 1 wt% of MoS2 and WS2. On the other hand, with high additions of MoS2 and WS2 (15 and 20 wt%) ductility was completely lost since no plastic deformation occurred during the testing. Moreover, PETG - graphite resistor-like structures were 3-dimensional (3D) printed and tested with the help of a semiconductor parameter analyzer. All samples were tested at different radius of curvatures (0 cm-1, 0.072 cm-1, 0.087 cm-1, 0.112 cm-1, 0.157 cm-1, and 0.262 cm -1) which showed a composite that was strain insensitive. The obtained average conductivity and resistivity

  16. Evaluating analytical ionization quenching correction models for 3D liquid organic scintillator detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsanea, F.; Beddar, S.

    2017-05-01

    Proton therapy offers dosimetric advantage over conventional photon therapy due to the finite range of the proton beam, which improves dose conformity. However, one of the main challenges of proton beam therapy is verification of the complex treatment plans delivered to a patient. Thus, 3D measurements are needed to verify the complex dose distribution. A 3D organic scintillator detector is capable of such measurements. However, organic scintillators exhibit a non-linear relation to the ionization density called ionization quenching. The ionization quenching phenomenon in organic scintillators must be accounted for to obtain accurate dose measurements. We investigated the energy deposition by secondary electrons (EDSE) model to explain ionization quenching in 3D liquid organic scintillator when exposed to proton beams. The EDSE model was applied to volumetric scintillation measurement of proton pencil beam with energies of 85.6, 100.9, 144.9 and 161.9 MeV. The quenching parameter in EDSE model ρq was determined by plotting the total light output vs the initial energy of the ion. The results were compared to the Birks semi-empirical formula of scintillation light emission.

  17. Trans-Hudsonian far-field deformation effects in the Rae foreland: An integrated geological-3D magnetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, J. A.; Tschirhart, V.

    2017-03-01

    The intracratonic Rae cover sequence, deposited ca. 2.2-1.9 Ga, forms a useful marker for unravelling tectonic events that affected the Archean Rae Province at ca.2.0, 1.9 and 1.85 Ga. Polyphase deformation is recognized within the Rae cover rocks, including the 70 × 10 km Montresor belt, and attributed to distal effects of the ca. 1.85 Ga Trans-Hudson orogeny. In this contribution we explore the 3D geometry and structural history of the Montresor belt, previously considered to be a simple syncline lying unconformably on Archean basement. New geological, geophysical and geochronological results define a more complex history in which lower Montresor units were thrust-imbricated with basement gneisses and metamorphosed to the amphibolite facies. Mid-to upper greenschist facies upper Montresor units, exposed in an open synform, are superficially less deformed. However, using high-resolution aeromagnetic data and distinct magnetic marker units considered proxies for bedding, we constructed a set of forward models to explore the three-dimensional geometry of the belt. The re-analysis outlines a set of pre-synform structures defined by low-angle truncations of the magnetic markers. Geometric relationships indicate the presence of at least three faults at low angles to bedding, interpreted as D1 piggy-back thrusts, and bracketed by available geochronology between 1.924 and 1.87 Ga. D1 strain in the upper Montresor strata is significantly less intense than that further south in Rae cover rocks, consistent with a more distal foreland setting during the Trans-Hudson orogeny. The Montresor belt preserves a record of the Trans-Hudson tectonic style at relatively shallow crustal levels as a result of its foreland setting and structural history including a syn-orogenic extensional detachment event.

  18. 3D bioprint me: a socioethical view of bioprinting human organs and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Niki; Haddow, Gill; Seymour, Tirion; Faulkner-Jones, Alan; Shu, Wenmiao

    2017-09-01

    In this article, we review the extant social science and ethical literature on three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting. 3D bioprinting has the potential to be a 'game-changer', printing human organs on demand, no longer necessitating the need for living or deceased human donation or animal transplantation. Although the technology is not yet at the level required to bioprint an entire organ, 3D bioprinting may have a variety of other mid-term and short-term benefits that also have positive ethical consequences, for example, creating alternatives to animal testing, filling a therapeutic need for minors and avoiding species boundary crossing. Despite a lack of current socioethical engagement with the consequences of the technology, we outline what we see as some preliminary practical, ethical and regulatory issues that need tackling. These relate to managing public expectations and the continuing reliance on technoscientific solutions to diseases that affect high-income countries. Avoiding prescribing a course of action for the way forward in terms of research agendas, we do briefly outline one possible ethical framework 'Responsible Research Innovation' as an oversight model should 3D bioprinting promises are ever realised. 3D bioprinting has a lot to offer in the course of time should it move beyond a conceptual therapy, but is an area that requires ethical oversight and regulation and debate, in the here and now. The purpose of this article is to begin that discussion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Self-aligned metallization on organic semiconductor through 3D dual-layer thermal nanoimprint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Y; Cheng, X

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution patterning of metal structures on organic semiconductors is important to the realization of high-performance organic transistors for organic integrated circuit applications. The traditional shadow mask technique has a limited resolution, precluding sub-micron metal structures on organic semiconductors. Thus organic transistors cannot benefit from scaling into the deep sub-micron region to improve their dc and ac performances. In this work, we report an efficient multiple-level metallization on poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with a deep sub-micron lateral gap. By using a 3D nanoimprint mold in a dual-layer thermal nanoimprint process, we achieved self-aligned two-level metallization on P3HT. The 3D dual-layer thermal nanoimprint enables the first metal patterns to have suspending side-wings that can clearly define a distance from the second metal patterns. Isotropic and anisotropic side-wing structures can be fabricated through two different schemes. The process based on isotropic side-wings achieves a lateral-gap in the order of 100 nm (scheme 1). A gap of 60 nm can be achieved from the process with anisotropic side-wings (scheme 2). Because of the capability of nanoscale metal patterning on organic semiconductors with high overlay accuracy, this self-aligned metallization technique can be utilized to fabricate high-performance organic metal semiconductor field-effect transistor. (paper)

  20. Organic MEMS/NEMS-based high-efficiency 3D ITO-less flexible photovoltaic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassegne, Sam; Moon, Kee; Martín-Ramos, Pablo; Majzoub, Mohammad; Őzturk, Gunay; Desai, Krishna; Parikh, Mihir; Nguyen, Bao; Khosla, Ajit; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach based on three-dimensional (3D) architecture for polymeric photovoltaic cells made up of an array of sub-micron and nano-pillars which not only increase the area of the light absorbing surface, but also improve the carrier collection efficiency of bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells is presented. The approach also introduces coating of 3D anodes with a new solution-processable highly conductive transparent polymer (Orgacon™) that replaces expensive vacuum-deposited ITO (indium tin oxide) as well as the additional hole-collecting layer of conventional PEDOT:PSS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate)). In addition, the described procedure is well suited to roll-to-roll high-throughput manufacturing. The high aspect-ratio 3D pillars which form the basis for this new architecture are patterned through micro-electromechanical-system- and nano-electromechanical-system-based processes. For the particular case of P3HT (poly(3-hexylthiophene)) and PCBM (phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester) active material, efficiencies in excess of 6% have been achieved for these photovoltaic cells of 3D architecture using ITO-less flexible PET (polyethylene terephthalate) substrates. This increase in efficiency turns out to be more than twice higher than those achieved for their 2D counterparts. (paper)

  1. The Vocal Tract Organ: A New Musical Instrument Using 3-D Printed Vocal Tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David M

    2017-10-27

    The advent and now increasingly widespread availability of 3-D printers is transforming our understanding of the natural world by enabling observations to be made in a tangible manner. This paper describes the use of 3-D printed models of the vocal tract for different vowels that are used to create an acoustic output when stimulated with an appropriate sound source in a new musical instrument: the Vocal Tract Organ. The shape of each printed vocal tract is recovered from magnetic resonance imaging. It sits atop a loudspeaker to which is provided an acoustic L-F model larynx input signal that is controlled by the notes played on a musical instrument digital interface device such as a keyboard. The larynx input is subject to vibrato with extent and frequency adjustable as desired within the ranges usually found for human singing. Polyphonic inputs for choral singing textures can be applied via a single loudspeaker and vocal tract, invoking the approximation of linearity in the voice production system, thereby making multiple vowel stops a possibility while keeping the complexity of the instrument in reasonable check. The Vocal Tract Organ offers a much more human and natural sounding result than the traditional Vox Humana stops found in larger pipe organs, offering the possibility of enhancing pipe organs of the future as well as becoming the basis for a "multi-vowel" chamber organ in its own right. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Hippo-YAP Pathway Regulates 3D Organ Formation and Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Erika; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2018-04-17

    The vertebrate body shape is formed by the specific sizes and shapes of its resident tissues and organs, whose alignments are essential for proper functioning. To maintain tissue and organ shape, and thereby function, it is necessary to remove senescent, transformed, and/or damaged cells, which impair function and can lead to tumorigenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying three-dimensional (3D) organ formation and homeostasis are not fully clear. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional co-activator that is involved in organ size control and tumorigenesis. Recently, we reported that YAP is essential for proper 3D body shape through regulation of cell tension by using a unique medaka fish mutant, hirame ( hir ). In Madin–Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells, active YAP-transformed cells are eliminated apically when surrounded by normal cells. Furthermore, in a mosaic mouse model, active YAP-expressing damaged hepatocytes undergo apoptosis and are eliminated from the liver. Thus, YAP functions in quantitative and quality control in organogenesis. In this review, we describe the various roles of YAP in vertebrates, including in the initiation of liver cancer.

  3. Recent Advances in Bioink Design for 3D Bioprinting of Tissues and Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shen; Guvendiren, Murat

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing demand for alternative fabrication approaches to develop tissues and organs as conventional techniques are not capable of fabricating constructs with required structural, mechanical, and biological complexity. 3D bioprinting offers great potential to fabricate highly complex constructs with precise control of structure, mechanics, and biological matter [i.e., cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components]. 3D bioprinting is an additive manufacturing approach that utilizes a "bioink" to fabricate devices and scaffolds in a layer-by-layer manner. 3D bioprinting allows printing of a cell suspension into a tissue construct with or without a scaffold support. The most common bioinks are cell-laden hydrogels, decellulerized ECM-based solutions, and cell suspensions. In this mini review, a brief description and comparison of the bioprinting methods, including extrusion-based, droplet-based, and laser-based bioprinting, with particular focus on bioink design requirements are presented. We also present the current state of the art in bioink design including the challenges and future directions.

  4. Recent Advances in Bioink Design for 3D Bioprinting of Tissues and Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shen; Guvendiren, Murat

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing demand for alternative fabrication approaches to develop tissues and organs as conventional techniques are not capable of fabricating constructs with required structural, mechanical, and biological complexity. 3D bioprinting offers great potential to fabricate highly complex constructs with precise control of structure, mechanics, and biological matter [i.e., cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components]. 3D bioprinting is an additive manufacturing approach that utilizes a “bioink” to fabricate devices and scaffolds in a layer-by-layer manner. 3D bioprinting allows printing of a cell suspension into a tissue construct with or without a scaffold support. The most common bioinks are cell-laden hydrogels, decellulerized ECM-based solutions, and cell suspensions. In this mini review, a brief description and comparison of the bioprinting methods, including extrusion-based, droplet-based, and laser-based bioprinting, with particular focus on bioink design requirements are presented. We also present the current state of the art in bioink design including the challenges and future directions. PMID:28424770

  5. 2D→3D polycatenated and 3D→3D interpenetrated metal–organic frameworks constructed from thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylate and rigid bis(imidazole) ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erer, Hakan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Eskişehir Osmangazi University, 26480 Eskişehir (Turkey); Yeşilel, Okan Zafer, E-mail: yesilel@ogu.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Eskişehir Osmangazi University, 26480 Eskişehir (Turkey); Arıcı, Mürsel [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Eskişehir Osmangazi University, 26480 Eskişehir (Turkey); Keskin, Seda [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Koç University, İstanbul (Turkey); Büyükgüngör, Orhan [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Ondokuz Mayıs University, 55139 Samsun (Turkey)

    2014-02-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of rigid 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)benzene (dib) and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)-2,5-dimethylbenzene (dimb) with deprotonated thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) in the presence of Zn(II) and Cd(II) salts in H{sub 2}O produced three new metal–organic frameworks, namely, [Zn(µ-tdc)(H{sub 2}O)(µ-dib)]{sub n} (1), [Cd(µ-tdc)(H{sub 2}O)(µ-dib)]{sub n} (2), and ([Cd{sub 2}(µ{sub 3}-tdc){sub 2}(µ-dimb){sub 2}]·(H{sub 2}O)){sub n}(3). These MOFs were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental, thermal (TG, DTA, DTG and DSC), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Isomorphous complexes 1 and 2 reveal polycatenated 2D+2D→3D framework based on an undulated (4,4)-sql layer. Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework with the point symbol of 6{sup 6}. Molecular simulations were used to assess the potentials of the complexes for H{sub 2} storage application. Moreover, these coordination polymers exhibit blue fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: In this study, hydrothermal reactions of rigid 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)benzene (dib) and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)-2,5-dimethylbenzene (dimb) with deprotonated thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) in the presence of Zn(II) and Cd(II) salts in H{sub 2}O produced three new metal–organic frameworks. Isomorphous complexes 1 and 2 reveal polycatenated 2D+2D→3D framework based on an undulated (4,4)-sql layer. Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework with the point symbol of 6{sup 6}. Molecular simulations were used to assess the potentials of the complexes for H{sub 2} storage application. These coordination polymers exhibit blue fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Complexes 1 and 2 display polycatenated 2D+2D→3D framework. • Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework. • Complex 1 adsorbs the highest amount of

  6. Topographic deformation patterns of knee cartilage after exercises with high knee flexion: an in vivo 3D MRI study using voxel-based analysis at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horng, Annie; Stockinger, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Raya, J.G.; Pietschmann, M.; Hoehne-Hueckstaedt, U.; Glitsch, U.; Ellegast, R.; Hering, K.G.; Glaser, C.

    2015-01-01

    To implement a novel voxel-based technique to identify statistically significant local cartilage deformation and analyze in-vivo topographic knee cartilage deformation patterns using a voxel-based thickness map approach for high-flexion postures. Sagittal 3T 3D-T1w-FLASH-WE-sequences of 10 healthy knees were acquired before and immediately after loading (kneeling/squatting/heel sitting/knee bends). After cartilage segmentation, 3D-reconstruction and 3D-registration, colour-coded deformation maps were generated by voxel-based subtraction of loaded from unloaded datasets to visualize cartilage thickness changes in all knee compartments. Compression areas were found bifocal at the peripheral medial/caudolateral patella, both posterior femoral condyles and both anterior/central tibiae. Local cartilage thickening were found adjacent to the compression areas. Significant local strain ranged from +13 to -15 %. Changes were most pronounced after squatting, least after knee bends. Shape and location of deformation areas varied slightly with the loading paradigm, but followed a similar pattern consistent between different individuals. Voxel-based deformation maps identify individual in-vivo load-specific and posture-associated strain distribution in the articular cartilage. The data facilitate understanding individual knee loading properties and contribute to improve biomechanical 3 models. They lay a base to investigate the relationship between cartilage degeneration patterns in common osteoarthritis and areas at risk of cartilage wear due to mechanical loading in work-related activities. (orig.)

  7. Topographic deformation patterns of knee cartilage after exercises with high knee flexion: an in vivo 3D MRI study using voxel-based analysis at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horng, Annie; Stockinger, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Raya, J.G. [New York University Langone Medical Center, Center for Biomedical Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Pietschmann, M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Munich (Germany); Hoehne-Hueckstaedt, U.; Glitsch, U.; Ellegast, R. [Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the German Social Accident Insurance (IFA), Sankt Augustin (Germany); Hering, K.G. [Miner' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Dortmund (Germany); Glaser, C. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); RZM Zentrum, Munich (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To implement a novel voxel-based technique to identify statistically significant local cartilage deformation and analyze in-vivo topographic knee cartilage deformation patterns using a voxel-based thickness map approach for high-flexion postures. Sagittal 3T 3D-T1w-FLASH-WE-sequences of 10 healthy knees were acquired before and immediately after loading (kneeling/squatting/heel sitting/knee bends). After cartilage segmentation, 3D-reconstruction and 3D-registration, colour-coded deformation maps were generated by voxel-based subtraction of loaded from unloaded datasets to visualize cartilage thickness changes in all knee compartments. Compression areas were found bifocal at the peripheral medial/caudolateral patella, both posterior femoral condyles and both anterior/central tibiae. Local cartilage thickening were found adjacent to the compression areas. Significant local strain ranged from +13 to -15 %. Changes were most pronounced after squatting, least after knee bends. Shape and location of deformation areas varied slightly with the loading paradigm, but followed a similar pattern consistent between different individuals. Voxel-based deformation maps identify individual in-vivo load-specific and posture-associated strain distribution in the articular cartilage. The data facilitate understanding individual knee loading properties and contribute to improve biomechanical 3 models. They lay a base to investigate the relationship between cartilage degeneration patterns in common osteoarthritis and areas at risk of cartilage wear due to mechanical loading in work-related activities. (orig.)

  8. Reactions of 3d-series metallocenes with organic cadmium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razuvaev, G.A.; Mar'in, V.P.; Vyshinskaya, L.I.; Grinval'd, I.I.; Spiridonova, N.N.

    1987-01-01

    Interaction of organic cadmium compounds and 3d-series metallocenes, Cp 2 M (M=V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Co) has been studied. It is shown that direction of these reactions is determined by metallocene nature. Reactions of oxidizing addition leading to σ-complexes formation are characteristic for vanadium and chromium metallocenes. When reacting cobaltocene with R 2 Cd, R group introduction to cyclopentadienyl ring and elimination of cobalt diene complexes take place. Manganocene and nickelocene interaction goes through the stage of complex formation with transition metal - cadmium bond

  9. Bioengineering a 3D integumentary organ system from iPS cells using an in vivo transplantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Ryoji; Ishimaru, Junko; Sugawara, Ayaka; Toyoshima, Koh-Ei; Ishida, Kentaro; Ogawa, Miho; Sakakibara, Kei; Asakawa, Kyosuke; Kashiwakura, Akitoshi; Oshima, Masamitsu; Minamide, Ryohei; Sato, Akio; Yoshitake, Toshihiro; Takeda, Akira; Egusa, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    The integumentary organ system is a complex system that plays important roles in waterproofing, cushioning, protecting deeper tissues, excreting waste, and thermoregulation. We developed a novel in vivo transplantation model designated as a clustering-dependent embryoid body transplantation method and generated a bioengineered three-dimensional (3D) integumentary organ system, including appendage organs such as hair follicles and sebaceous glands, from induced pluripotent stem cells. This bioengineered 3D integumentary organ system was fully functional following transplantation into nude mice and could be properly connected to surrounding host tissues, such as the epidermis, arrector pili muscles, and nerve fibers, without tumorigenesis. The bioengineered hair follicles in the 3D integumentary organ system also showed proper hair eruption and hair cycles, including the rearrangement of follicular stem cells and their niches. Potential applications of the 3D integumentary organ system include an in vitro assay system, an animal model alternative, and a bioengineered organ replacement therapy.

  10. 3D Spin-Liquid State in an Organic Hyperkagome Lattice of Mott Dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Asato; Shuku, Yoshiaki; Matsushita, Michio M.; Tsuchiizu, Masahisa; Hara, Yuuki; Wada, Nobuo; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Awaga, Kunio

    2017-08-01

    We report the first 3D spin liquid state of isotropic organic spins. Structural analysis, and magnetic and heat-capacity measurements were carried out for a chiral organic radical salt, (TBA) 1.5[(-)-NDI -Δ ] (TBA denotes tetrabutylammonium and NDI denotes naphthalene diimide), in which (-)-NDI -Δ forms a K4 structure due to its triangular molecular structure and an intermolecular π -π overlap between the NDI moieties. This lattice was identical to the hyperkagome lattice of S =1 /2 Mott dimers, and should exhibit 3D spin frustration. In fact, even though the high-temperature magnetic susceptibility followed the Curie-Weiss law with a negative Weiss constant of θ =-15 K , the low-temperature magnetic measurements revealed no long-range magnetic ordering down to 70 mK, and suggested the presence of a spin liquid state with a large residual paramagnetism χ0 of 8.5 ×10-6 emu g-1 at the absolute zero temperature. This was supported by the N 14 NMR measurements down to 0.38 K. Further, the low-temperature heat capacities cp down to 68 mK clearly indicated the presence of cp for the spin liquid state, which can be fitted to the power law of T0.62 in the wide temperature range 0.07-4.5 K.

  11. Analysis of the relationship between coexpression domains and chromatin 3D organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E Soler-Oliva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gene order is not random in eukaryotic chromosomes, and co-regulated genes tend to be clustered. The mechanisms that determine co-regulation of large regions of the genome and its connection with chromatin three-dimensional (3D organization are still unclear however. Here we have adapted a recently described method for identifying chromatin topologically associating domains (TADs to identify coexpression domains (which we term "CODs". Using human normal breast and breast cancer RNA-seq data, we have identified approximately 500 CODs. CODs in the normal and breast cancer genomes share similar characteristics but differ in their gene composition. COD genes have a greater tendency to be coexpressed with genes that reside in other CODs than with non-COD genes. Such inter-COD coexpression is maintained over large chromosomal distances in the normal genome but is partially lost in the cancer genome. Analyzing the relationship between CODs and chromatin 3D organization using Hi-C contact data, we find that CODs do not correspond to TADs. In fact, intra-TAD gene coexpression is the same as random for most chromosomes. However, the contact profile is similar between gene pairs that reside either in the same COD or in coexpressed CODs. These data indicate that co-regulated genes in the genome present similar patterns of contacts irrespective of the frequency of physical chromatin contacts between them.

  12. Contribution of Topological Domains and Loop Formation to 3D Chromatin Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuthy Ea

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations on 3D chromatin folding revealed that the eukaryote genomes are both highly compartmentalized and extremely dynamic. This review presents the most recent advances in topological domains’ organization of the eukaryote genomes and discusses the relationship to chromatin loop formation. CTCF protein appears as a central factor of these two organization levels having either a strong insulating role at TAD borders, or a weaker architectural role in chromatin loop formation. TAD borders directly impact on chromatin dynamics by restricting contacts within specific genomic portions thus confining chromatin loop formation within TADs. We discuss how sub-TAD chromatin dynamics, constrained into a recently described statistical helix conformation, can produce functional interactions by contact stabilization.

  13. Determination of red blood cell deformability using centrifugal force in a three-dimensional-printed mini-disk (3D-PMD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjung Lim

    Full Text Available Measuring red blood cell (RBC deformability has become important for clinical disease diagnostics. Various methods for measuring RBC deformability have been developed; however, they require costly and large instruments, long measuring time, and skilled personnel. In this study, we present a three-dimensional-printed mini-disk (3D-PMD for measuring RBC deformability to overcome the previous limitations. For a miniaturized and low-cost setup, the 3D-PMD was fabricated by a 3D printing technique, which had not yet been used for fabricating a lab-on-a-compact disk (LOCD. Using a 3D printing technique, a multi-layered fluidic channel on the mini CD could be fabricated easily. During rotation by a spinning motor, the difference of the length of compressed RBCs in the fluidic channel was measured and analysed as compressibility indices (CIs of normal and glutaraldehyde-treated hardened RBCs. The rotation speed and time were decided as 3000 rpm and 30 min, respectively, at which the difference of CI values between normal and hardened RBCs was largest (CInormal-CIhardened = 0.195.

  14. The Relationship Between Human Nucleolar Organizer Regions and Nucleoli, Probed by 3D-ImmunoFISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sluis, Marjolein; van Vuuren, Chelly; McStay, Brian

    2016-01-01

    3D-immunoFISH is a valuable technique to compare the localization of DNA sequences and proteins in cells where three-dimensional structure has been preserved. As nucleoli contain a multitude of protein factors dedicated to ribosome biogenesis and form around specific chromosomal loci, 3D-immunoFISH is a particularly relevant technique for their study. In human cells, nucleoli form around transcriptionally active ribosomal gene (rDNA) arrays termed nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) positioned on the p-arms of each of the acrocentric chromosomes. Here, we provide a protocol for fixing and permeabilizing human cells grown on microscope slides such that nucleolar proteins can be visualized using antibodies and NORs visualized by DNA FISH. Antibodies against UBF recognize transcriptionally active rDNA/NORs and NOP52 antibodies provide a convenient way of visualizing the nucleolar volume. We describe a probe designed to visualize rDNA and introduce a probe comprised of NOR distal sequences, which can be used to identify or count individual NORs.

  15. Multiple organ definition in CT using a Bayesian approach for 3D model fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Jennifer L.; Weymouth, Terry E.; Meyer, Charles R.

    1995-08-01

    Organ definition in computed tomography (CT) is of interest for treatment planning and response monitoring. We present a method for organ definition using a priori information about shape encoded in a set of biometric organ models--specifically for the liver and kidney-- that accurately represents patient population shape information. Each model is generated by averaging surfaces from a learning set of organ shapes previously registered into a standard space defined by a small set of landmarks. The model is placed in a specific patient's data set by identifying these landmarks and using them as the basis for model deformation; this preliminary representation is then iteratively fit to the patient's data based on a Bayesian formulation of the model's priors and CT edge information, yielding a complete organ surface. We demonstrate this technique using a set of fifteen abdominal CT data sets for liver surface definition both before and after the addition of a kidney model to the fitting; we demonstrate the effectiveness of this tool for organ surface definition in this low-contrast domain.

  16. Measuring in-vivo and in-situ ex-vivo the 3D deformation of the lamina cribrosa microstructure under elevated intraocular pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junchao; Yang, Bin; Voorhees, Andrew P.; Tran, Huong; Brazile, Bryn; Wang, Bo; Schuman, Joel; Smith, Matthew A.; Wollstein, Gadi; Sigal, Ian A.

    2018-02-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) deforms the lamina cribrosa (LC), a structure within the optic nerve head (ONH) in the back of the eye. Evidence suggests that these deformations trigger events that eventually cause irreversible blindness, and have therefore been studied in-vivo using optical coherence tomography (OCT), and ex-vivo using OCT and a diversity of techniques. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no in-situ ex-vivo studies of LC mechanics. Our goal was two-fold: to introduce a technique for measuring 3D LC deformations from OCT, and to determine whether deformations of the LC induced by elevated IOP differ between in-vivo and in-situ ex-vivo conditions. A healthy adult rhesus macaque monkey was anesthetized and IOP was controlled by inserting a 27- gauge needle into the anterior chamber of the eye. Spectral domain OCT was used to obtain volumetric scans of the ONH at normal and elevated IOPs. To improve the visibility of the LC microstructure the scans were first processed using a novel denoising technique. Zero-normalized cross-correlation was used to find paired corresponding locations between images. For each location pair, the components of the 3D strain tensor were determined using non-rigid image registration. A mild IOP elevation from 10 to 15mmHg caused LC effective strains as large as 3%, and about 50% larger in-vivo than in-situ ex-vivo. The deformations were highly heterogeneous, with substantial 3D components, suggesting that accurate measurement of LC microstructure deformation requires high-resolution volumes. This technique will help improve understanding of LC biomechanics and how IOP contributes to glaucoma.

  17. Improving organic tandem solar cells based on water-processed nanoparticles by quantitative 3D nanoimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Emil Bøje Lind; Angmo, Dechan; Dam, Henrik Friis

    2015-01-01

    particle active layer. We extract the layered morphology with structural and density information including the porosity present in the various layers and the silver electrode with high resolution in 3D. The Landfester particle layer is found to have an undesired morphology with negatively correlated top......Organic solar cells have great potential for upscaling due to roll-to-roll processing and a low energy payback time, making them an attractive sustainable energy source for the future. Active layers coated with water-dispersible Landfester particles enable greater control of the layer formation...... specifically reveals the need to improve the coatability and layer formation of Landfester nanoparticles, thus allowing improved solar cells to be produced....

  18. 3D resistivity method to monitor degradation of an organic contaminant in sand boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, P. M.; Bloem, E.; Philippe, R.; French, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    Degradation of organic chemicals under various saturation conditions is a process highly relevant to protect groundwater. The redox potential drives the degradation of organic compounds. Its variation affects the water chemistry, gas release and responses of the geo-electrical signature. This study explores how non-invasive measurements sensitive to geo-electrical properties provides quantitative information about the in-situ redox situation. During this presentation, the preliminary results of a laboratory experiment to study the degradation of deicing chemicals with 3D resistivity and self-potential techniques, water samples will be shown. The experiment consists of sand boxes (1.0x0.5x0.4 m) to which both sides of each box is contaminated with propylene glycol, an aircraft deicing fluid, commonly used in Norwegian airports. Each source is placed near the water table with static conditions. At one side a conductor is placed, linking the contamination zone at the water table and the unsaturated zone with a low water content, to improve the degradation by facilitating the electron exchange. At the other side, degradation occurs under natural conditions. Each box is equipped with 288 electrodes, distributed on six faces to perform 3D resistivity measurements. In addition to the resistivity, self-potential measurements are taken from the sand surface. Six water wells are installed above and below the water table to provide more information on the degradation processes. Moreover, measurements of carbon dioxide on the surface are performed as higher concentrations are expected where the pollutant is degraded.

  19. Measurement of in vitro and in vivo stent geometry and deformation by means of 3D imaging and stereo-photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierzak, Iwona; Cosentino, Daria; Narracott, Andrew J; Bonhoeffer, Philipp; Diaz, Vanessa; Fenner, John W; Schievano, Silvia

    2014-12-01

    To quantify variability of in vitro and in vivo measurement of 3D device geometry using 3D and biplanar imaging. Comparison of stent reconstruction is reported for in vitro coronary stent deployment (using micro-CT and optical stereo-photogrammetry) and in vivo pulmonary valve stent deformation (using 4DCT and biplanar fluoroscopy). Coronary stent strut length and inter-strut angle were compared in the fully deployed configuration. Local (inter-strut angle) and global (dog-boning ratio) measures of stent deformation were reported during stent deployment. Pulmonary valve stent geometry was assessed throughout the cardiac cycle by reconstruction of stent geometry and measurement of stent diameter. Good agreement was obtained between methods for assessment of coronary stent geometry with maximum disagreement of +/- 0.03 mm (length) and +/- 3 degrees (angle). The stent underwent large, non-uniform, local deformations during balloon inflation, which did not always correlate with changes in stent diameter. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the pulmonary valve stent was feasible for all frames of the fluoroscopy and for 4DCT images, with good correlation between the diameters calculated from the two methods. The largest compression of the stent during the cardiac cycle was 6.98% measured from fluoroscopy and 7.92% from 4DCT, both in the most distal ring. Quantitative assessment of stent geometry reconstructed from biplanar imaging methods in vitro and in vivo has shown good agreement with geometry reconstructed from 3D techniques. As a result of their short image acquisition time, biplanar methods may have significant advantages in the measurement of dynamic 3D stent deformation.

  20. Improving organic tandem solar cells based on water-processed nanoparticles by quantitative 3D nanoimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, E B L; Angmo, D; Dam, H F; Thydén, K T S; Andersen, T R; Skjønsfjell, E T B; Krebs, F C; Holler, M; Diaz, A; Guizar-Sicairos, M; Breiby, D W; Andreasen, J W

    2015-08-28

    Organic solar cells have great potential for upscaling due to roll-to-roll processing and a low energy payback time, making them an attractive sustainable energy source for the future. Active layers coated with water-dispersible Landfester particles enable greater control of the layer formation and easier access to the printing industry, which has reduced the use of organic solvents since the 1980s. Through ptychographic X-ray computed tomography (PXCT), we image quantitatively a roll-to-roll coated photovoltaic tandem stack consisting of one bulk heterojunction active layer and one Landfester particle active layer. We extract the layered morphology with structural and density information including the porosity present in the various layers and the silver electrode with high resolution in 3D. The Landfester particle layer is found to have an undesired morphology with negatively correlated top- and bottom interfaces, wide thickness distribution and only partial surface coverage causing electric short circuits through the layer. By top coating a polymer material onto the Landfester nanoparticles we eliminate the structural defects of the layer such as porosity and roughness, and achieve the increased performance larger than 1 V expected for a tandem cell. This study highlights that quantitative imaging of weakly scattering stacked layers of organic materials has become feasible by PXCT, and that this information cannot be obtained by other methods. In the present study, this technique specifically reveals the need to improve the coatability and layer formation of Landfester nanoparticles, thus allowing improved solar cells to be produced.

  1. 3D bioprinting matrices with controlled pore structure and release function guide in vitro self-organization of sweat gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nanbo; Huang, Sha; Yao, Bin; Xie, Jiangfan; Wu, Xu; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-10-03

    3D bioprinting matrices are novel platforms for tissue regeneration. Tissue self-organization is a critical process during regeneration that implies the features of organogenesis. However, it is not clear from the current evidences whether 3D printed construct plays a role in guiding tissue self-organization in vitro. Based on our previous study, we bioprinted a 3D matrix as the restrictive niche for direct sweat gland differentiation of epidermal progenitors by different pore structure (300-μm or 400-μm nozzle diameters printed) and reported a long-term gradual transition of differentiated cells into glandular morphogenesis occurs within the 3D construct in vitro. At the initial 14-day culture, an accelerated cell differentiation was achieved with inductive cues released along with gelatin reduction. After protein release completed, the 3D construct guide the self-organized formation of sweat gland tissues, which is similar to that of the natural developmental process. However, glandular morphogenesis was only observed in 300-μm-printed constructs. In the absence of 3D architectural support, glandular morphogenesis was not occurred. This striking finding made us to identify a previously unknown role of the 3D-printed structure in glandular tissue regeneration, and this self-organizing strategy can be applied to forming other tissues in vitro.

  2. Dissolved organic carbon--contaminant interaction descriptors found by 3D force field calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govers, H A J; Krop, H B; Parsons, J R; Tambach, T; Kubicki, J D

    2002-03-01

    Enthalpies of transfer at 300 K of various partitioning processes were calculated in order to study the suitability of 3D force fields for the calculation of partitioning constants. A 3D fulvic acid (FA) model of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was built in a MM+ force field using AMI atomic charges and geometrical optimization (GO). 3,5-Dichlorobiphenyl (PCB14), 4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl (PCB15), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis-(4-chlorophenyl)-ethane (PPDDT) and 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine (Atrazine) were inserted into different sites and their interaction energies with FA were calculated. Energies of hydration were calculated and subtracted from FA-contaminant interactions of selected sites. The resulting values for the enthalpies of transfer from water to DOC were 2.8, -1.4, -6.4 and 0.0 kcal/mol for PCB 14, PCB15, PPDDT and Atrazine, respectively. The value of PPDDT compared favorably with the experimental value of -5.0 kcal/mol. Prior to this, the method was studied by the calculation of the enthalpies of vaporization and aqueous solution using various force fields. In the MM + force field GO predicted enthalpies of vaporization deviated by +0.7 (PCB14), +3.6 (PCB15) and -0.7 (PPDDT)kcal/mol from experimental data, whereas enthalpies of aqueous solution deviated by -3.6 (PCB14), +5.8 (PCB15) and +3.7 (PPDDT) kcal/mol. Only for PCB14 the wrong sign of this enthalpy value was predicted. Potential advantages and limitations of the approach were discussed.

  3. Real-time deformation of human soft tissues: A radial basis meshless 3D model based on Marquardt's algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianyong; Luo, Zu; Li, Chunquan; Deng, Mi

    2018-01-01

    When the meshless method is used to establish the mathematical-mechanical model of human soft tissues, it is necessary to define the space occupied by human tissues as the problem domain and the boundary of the domain as the surface of those tissues. Nodes should be distributed in both the problem domain and on the boundaries. Under external force, the displacement of the node is computed by the meshless method to represent the deformation of biological soft tissues. However, computation by the meshless method consumes too much time, which will affect the simulation of real-time deformation of human tissues in virtual surgery. In this article, the Marquardt's Algorithm is proposed to fit the nodal displacement at the problem domain's boundary and obtain the relationship between surface deformation and force. When different external forces are applied, the deformation of soft tissues can be quickly obtained based on this relationship. The analysis and discussion show that the improved model equations with Marquardt's Algorithm not only can simulate the deformation in real-time but also preserve the authenticity of the deformation model's physical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantifying 3D Deformation in the 14 November 2016 MW 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand Earthquake Using COSI-Corr Optical Satellite Image Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinke, R. W.; Hollingsworth, J.; Dolan, J. F.; Van Dissen, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    We determined the 3D surface deformation field for 14 November 2016 MW 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand earthquake using a novel version of COSI-Corr optical image correlation software on 20 sets of WorldView satellite images. Our results provide high-precision (better than 1 m) measurements of horizontal and vertical displacement resulting from this event, over areas of 100's of square km. As such, our data set "bridges the gap" between the numerous, high-quality field and lidar-based measurements collected in the very near-field vicinity of the fault (but which may not account for far-field, distributed deformation), and other space-borne techniques such as InSAR that survey a wide spatial aperture but typically decorrelate near the fault. Our results thus provide a clear picture of how surface deformation was manifested in the Kaikoura rupture at a variety of spatial scales, and can aid in understanding how near-fault field measurements reflect broader patterns of strain release in earthquakes, and help us develop a better understanding of the controls on the 3D distribution of near-surface deformation in large earthquakes.

  5. Cam deformity and the omega angle, a novel quantitative measurement of femoral head-neck morphology: a 3D CT gender analysis in asymptomatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascarenhas, Vasco V.; Gaspar, Augusto [Hospital da Luz, MSK imaging Unit (UIME), Imaging Center, Lisbon (Portugal); Rego, Paulo [Hospital da Luz, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Lisbon (Portugal); Dantas, Pedro [Hospital CUF Descobertas, Lisbon (Portugal); Soldado, Francisco [Universitat de Barcelona, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona (Spain); Consciencia, Jose G. [NOVA Medical School, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2017-05-15

    Our objectives were to use 3D computed tomography (CT) to define head-neck morphologic gender-specific and normative parameters in asymptomatic individuals and use the omega angle (Ω ) to provide quantification data on the location and radial extension of a cam deformity. We prospectively included 350 individuals and evaluated 188 asymptomatic hips that underwent semiautomated CT analysis. Different thresholds of alpha angle (α ) were considered in order to analyze cam morphology and determine Ω . We calculated overall and gender-specific parameters for imaging signs of cam morphology (Ω and circumferential α ). The 95 % reference interval limits were beyond abnormal thresholds found in the literature for cam morphology. Specifically, α at 3/1 oclock were 46.9 /60.8 overall, 51.8 /65.4 for men and 45.7 /55.3 for women. Cam prevalence, magnitude, location, and epicenter were significantly gender different. Increasing α correlated with higher Ω , meaning that higher angles correspond to larger cam deformities. Hip morphometry measurements in this cohort of asymptomatic individuals extended beyond current thresholds used for the clinical diagnosis of cam deformity, and α was found to vary both by gender and measurement location. These results suggest that α measurement is insufficient for the diagnosis of cam deformity. Enhanced morphometric evaluation, including 3D imaging and Ω , may enable a more accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. Cam deformity and the omega angle, a novel quantitative measurement of femoral head-neck morphology: a 3D CT gender analysis in asymptomatic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarenhas, Vasco V.; Gaspar, Augusto; Rego, Paulo; Dantas, Pedro; Soldado, Francisco; Consciencia, Jose G.

    2017-01-01

    Our objectives were to use 3D computed tomography (CT) to define head-neck morphologic gender-specific and normative parameters in asymptomatic individuals and use the omega angle (Ω ) to provide quantification data on the location and radial extension of a cam deformity. We prospectively included 350 individuals and evaluated 188 asymptomatic hips that underwent semiautomated CT analysis. Different thresholds of alpha angle (α ) were considered in order to analyze cam morphology and determine Ω . We calculated overall and gender-specific parameters for imaging signs of cam morphology (Ω and circumferential α ). The 95 % reference interval limits were beyond abnormal thresholds found in the literature for cam morphology. Specifically, α at 3/1 oclock were 46.9 /60.8 overall, 51.8 /65.4 for men and 45.7 /55.3 for women. Cam prevalence, magnitude, location, and epicenter were significantly gender different. Increasing α correlated with higher Ω , meaning that higher angles correspond to larger cam deformities. Hip morphometry measurements in this cohort of asymptomatic individuals extended beyond current thresholds used for the clinical diagnosis of cam deformity, and α was found to vary both by gender and measurement location. These results suggest that α measurement is insufficient for the diagnosis of cam deformity. Enhanced morphometric evaluation, including 3D imaging and Ω , may enable a more accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Triangular SPECT system for 3-D total organ volume imaging: Design concept and preliminary imaging results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.B.; Anderson, J.; Covic, J.

    1985-01-01

    SPECT systems based on 2-D detectors for projection data collection and filtered back-projection image reconstruction have the potential for true 3-D imaging, providing contiguous slice images in any orientation. Anger camera-based SPECT systems have the natural advantage supporting planar imaging clinical procedures. However, current systems suffer from two drawbacks; poor utilization of emitted photons, and inadequate system design for SPECT. A SPECT system consisting of three rectangular cameras with radial translation would offer the variable cylindrical FOV of 25 cm to 40 cm diameter allowing close detector access to the object. This system would provide optimized imaging for both brain and body organs in terms of sensitivity and resolution. For brain imaging a tight detector triangle with fan beam collimation, matching detector UFOV to the head, allows full 2 π utilization of emitted photons, resulting in >4 times sensitivity increase over the single detector system. Minification of intrinsic detector resolution in fan beam collimation further improves system resolution. For body organ imaging the three detectors with parallel hole collimators, rotating in non-circular orbit, provide both improved resolution and three-fold sensitivity increase. Practical challenges lie in ensuring perfect image overlap from three detectors without resolution degradation and artifact generation in order to benefit from the above improvements. An experimental system has been developed to test the above imaging concept and we have successfully demonstrated the superior image quality of the overlapped images. Design concept will be presented with preliminary imaging results

  8. Comparison of organs' shapes with geometric and Zernike 3D moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggio, D; Moignier, A; Ben Brahim, K; Gardumi, A; Grandgirard, N; Pierrat, N; Chea, M; Derreumaux, S; Desbrée, A; Boisserie, G; Aubert, B; Mazeron, J-J; Franck, D

    2013-09-01

    The morphological similarity of organs is studied with feature vectors based on geometric and Zernike 3D moments. It is particularly investigated if outliers and average models can be identified. For this purpose, the relative proximity to the mean feature vector is defined, principal coordinate and clustering analyses are also performed. To study the consistency and usefulness of this approach, 17 livers and 76 hearts voxel models from several sources are considered. In the liver case, models with similar morphological feature are identified. For the limited amount of studied cases, the liver of the ICRP male voxel model is identified as a better surrogate than the female one. For hearts, the clustering analysis shows that three heart shapes represent about 80% of the morphological variations. The relative proximity and clustering analysis rather consistently identify outliers and average models. For the two cases, identification of outliers and surrogate of average models is rather robust. However, deeper classification of morphological feature is subject to caution and can only be performed after cross analysis of at least two kinds of feature vectors. Finally, the Zernike moments contain all the information needed to re-construct the studied objects and thus appear as a promising tool to derive statistical organ shapes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fibroblast Cluster Formation on 3D Collagen Matrices Requires Cell Contraction-Dependent Fibronectin Matrix Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Ho, Chin-Han; Grinnell, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblasts incubated on 3D collagen matrices in serum or lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-containing medium self-organize into clusters through a mechanism that requires cell contraction. However, in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-containing medium, cells migrate as individuals and do not form clusters even though they constantly encounter each other. Here, we present evidence that a required function of cell contraction in clustering is formation of fibronectin fibrillar matrix. We found that in serum or LPA but not in PDGF or basal medium, cells organized FN (both serum and cellular) into a fibrillar, detergent-insoluble matrix. Cell clusters developed concomitant with FN matrix formation. FN fibrils accumulated beneath cells and along the borders of cell clusters in regions of cell-matrix tension. Blocking Rho kinase or myosin II activity prevented FN matrix assembly and cell clustering. Using siRNA silencing and function-blocking antibodies and peptides, we found that cell clustering and FN matrix assembly required α5β1 integrins and fibronectin. Cells were still able to exert contractile force and compact the collagen matrix under the latter conditions, which showed that contraction was not sufficient for cell clustering to occur. Our findings provide new insights into how procontractile (serum/LPA) and promigratory (PDGF) growth factor environments can differentially regulate FN matrix assembly by fibroblasts interacting with collagen matrices and thereby influence mesenchymal cell morphogenetic behavior under physiologic circumstances such as wound repair, morphogenesis and malignancy. PMID:23117111

  10. Fibroblast cluster formation on 3D collagen matrices requires cell contraction dependent fibronectin matrix organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Ho, Chin-Han; Grinnell, Frederick

    2013-02-15

    Fibroblasts incubated on 3D collagen matrices in serum or lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-containing medium self-organize into clusters through a mechanism that requires cell contraction. However, in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-containing medium, cells migrate as individuals and do not form clusters even though they constantly encounter each other. Here, we present evidence that a required function of cell contraction in clustering is formation of fibronectin (FN) fibrillar matrix. We found that in serum or LPA but not in PDGF or basal medium, cells organized FN (both serum and cellular) into a fibrillar, detergent-insoluble matrix. Cell clusters developed concomitant with FN matrix formation. FN fibrils accumulated beneath cells and along the borders of cell clusters in regions of cell-matrix tension. Blocking Rho kinase or myosin II activity prevented FN matrix assembly and cell clustering. Using siRNA silencing and function-blocking antibodies and peptides, we found that cell clustering and FN matrix assembly required α5β1 integrins and fibronectin. Cells were still able to exert contractile force and compact the collagen matrix under the latter conditions, which showed that contraction was not sufficient for cell clustering to occur. Our findings provide new insights into how procontractile (serum/LPA) and promigratory (PDGF) growth factor environments can differentially regulate FN matrix assembly by fibroblasts interacting with collagen matrices and thereby influence mesenchymal cell morphogenetic behavior under physiologic circumstances such as wound repair, morphogenesis and malignancy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Physics-based deformable organisms for medical image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamarneh, Ghassan; McIntosh, Chris

    2005-04-01

    Previously, "Deformable organisms" were introduced as a novel paradigm for medical image analysis that uses artificial life modelling concepts. Deformable organisms were designed to complement the classical bottom-up deformable models methodologies (geometrical and physical layers), with top-down intelligent deformation control mechanisms (behavioral and cognitive layers). However, a true physical layer was absent and in order to complete medical image segmentation tasks, deformable organisms relied on pure geometry-based shape deformations guided by sensory data, prior structural knowledge, and expert-generated schedules of behaviors. In this paper we introduce the use of physics-based shape deformations within the deformable organisms framework yielding additional robustness by allowing intuitive real-time user guidance and interaction when necessary. We present the results of applying our physics-based deformable organisms, with an underlying dynamic spring-mass mesh model, to segmenting and labelling the corpus callosum in 2D midsagittal magnetic resonance images.

  12. The Impacts of 3-D Earth Structure on GIA-Induced Crustal Deformation and Future Sea-Level Change in the Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, E. M.; Hay, C.; Latychev, K.; Gomez, N. A.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2017-12-01

    Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) models used to constrain the extent of past ice sheets and viscoelastic Earth structure, or to correct geodetic and geological observables for ice age effects, generally only consider depth-dependent variations in Earth viscosity and lithospheric structure. A et al. [2013] argued that 3-D Earth structure could impact GIA observables in Antarctica, but concluded that the presence of such structure contributes less to GIA uncertainty than do differences in Antarctic deglaciation histories. New seismic and geological evidence, however, indicates the Antarctic is underlain by complex, high amplitude variability in viscoelastic structure, including a low viscosity zone (LVZ) under West Antarctica. Hay et al. [2016] showed that sea-level fingerprints of modern melting calculated using such Earth models differ from those based on elastic or 1-D viscoelastic Earth models within decades of melting. Our investigation is motivated by two questions: (1) How does 3-D Earth structure, especially this LVZ, impact observations of GIA-induced crustal deformation associated with the last deglaciation? (2) How will 3-D Earth structure affect predictions of future sea-level rise in Antarctica? We compute the gravitationally self-consistent sea level, uplift, and gravity changes using the finite volume treatment of Latychev et al. [2005]. We consider four viscoelastic Earth models: a global 1-D model; a regional, West Antarctic-like 1-D model; a 3-D model where the lithospheric thickness varies laterally; and a 3-D model where both viscosity and lithospheric thickness vary laterally. For our Last Glacial Maximum to present investigations we employ ICE6g [Peltier et al., 2015]. For our present-future investigations we consider a melt scenario consistent with GRACE satellite gravity derived solutions [Harig et al., 2015]. Our calculations indicate that predictions of crustal deformations due to both GIA and ongoing melting are strongly influenced by 3-D

  13. Numerical simulation of the time-dependent deformation behaviour of clay-stone rock mass at the Tournemire site with 2D and 3D models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutenberg, M.; Lux, K. H.

    2011-01-01

    Clay-stone rock masses are a reasonable alternative to e.g. salt rock masses as a host rock for underground radioactive waste repositories because of their very low permeability as well as their radionuclide retention capacity. Though clay-stone has been explored for many years, there is still a need for further research on its hydro-mechanical behaviour. Convergence measurements over a 4-year period in the tunnel system of the argillaceous Tournemire site in France yielded the presence of a time-dependent deformation behaviour in indurated clay. Moreover, a mine-by test was carried out with extensometer measurements capturing the rock mass deformation during the excavation process of a new gallery in 2003.This work focuses on the validation of a constitutive model by means of a three-dimensional (3D) simulation of the mine-by test. The utilised constitutive model Hou/Lux-T is based on the viscous constitutive model Lubby2 with which time-dependent deformation behaviour of salt rock can appropriately be simulated. It has been adapted to clay-stone by considering anisotropy effects, and in addition it features a strain-dependent fracture and failure criterion. The results of the mine-by-test simulation show that the calculated stresses and deformations in the rock mass seem to behave reasonably under this constitutive model with respect to time-dependency. A comparison of the 3D results to the results of a simplified two-dimensional (2D) simulation confirms the adequacy of using a 2D model with the constitutive model Hou/Lux-T for the setting at hand, described in the text (material parameters, time scale), in order to assess load-bearing capacity and deformability of the gallery near field away from heading face and tunnel crossing. Finally, a comparison of the 3D simulation results to the extensometer measurement results yields the principal ability of the used constitutive model to describe time-dependent evolutions of stresses and deformations during a three

  14. Architectural protein subclasses shape 3-D organization of genomes during lineage commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips-Cremins, Jennifer E.; Sauria, Michael E. G.; Sanyal, Amartya; Gerasimova, Tatiana I.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Bell, Joshua S. K.; Ong, Chin-Tong; Hookway, Tracy A.; Guo, Changying; Sun, Yuhua; Bland, Michael J.; Wagstaff, William; Dalton, Stephen; McDevitt, Todd C.; Sen, Ranjan; Dekker, Job; Taylor, James; Corces, Victor G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Understanding the topological configurations of chromatin may reveal valuable insights into how the genome and epigenome act in concert to control cell fate during development. Here we generate high-resolution architecture maps across seven genomic loci in embryonic stem cells and neural progenitor cells. We observe a hierarchy of 3-D interactions that undergo marked reorganization at the sub-Mb scale during differentiation. Distinct combinations of CTCF, Mediator, and cohesin show widespread enrichment in looping interactions at different length scales. CTCF/cohesin anchor long-range constitutive interactions that form the topological basis for invariant sub-domains. Conversely, Mediator/cohesin together with pioneer factors bridge shortrange enhancer-promoter interactions within and between larger sub-domains. Knockdown of Smc1 or Med12 in ES cells results in disruption of spatial architecture and down-regulation of genes found in cohesin-mediated interactions. We conclude that cell type-specific chromatin organization occurs at the sub-Mb scale and that architectural proteins shape the genome in hierarchical length scales. PMID:23706625

  15. Structural analysis and implicit 3D modelling of Jwaneng Mine: Insights into deformation of the Transvaal Supergroup in SE Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creus, P. K.; Basson, I. J.; Stoch, B.; Mogorosi, O.; Gabanakgosi, K.; Ramsden, F.; Gaegopolwe, P.

    2018-01-01

    Country rock at Jwaneng Diamond Mine provides a rare insight into the deformational history of the Transvaal Supergroup in southern Botswana. The ca. 235 Ma kimberlite diatremes intruded into late Archaean to Early Proterozoic, mixed, siliciclastic-carbonate sediments, that were subjected to at least three deformational events. The first deformational event (D1), caused by NW-SE directed compression, is responsible for NE-trending, open folds (F1) with associated diverging, fanning, axial planar cleavage. The second deformational event (D2) is probably progressive, involving a clockwise rotation of the principal stress to NE-SW trends. Early D2, which was N-S directed, involved left-lateral, oblique shearing along cleavage planes that developed around F1 folds, along with the development of antithetic structures. Progressive clockwise rotation of far-field forces saw the development of NW-trending folds (F2) and its associated, weak, axial planar cleavage. D3 is an extensional event in which normal faulting, along pre-existing cleavage planes, created a series of rhomboid-shaped, fault-bounded blocks. Normal faults, which bound these blocks, are the dominant structures at Jwaneng Mine. Combined with block rotation and NW-dipping bedding, a horst-like structure on the northwestern limb of a broad, gentle, NE-trending anticline is indicated. The early compressional and subsequent extensional events are consistent throughout the Jwaneng-Ramotswa-Lobatse-Thabazimbi area, suggesting that a large area records the same fault geometry and, consequently, deformational history. It is proposed that Jwaneng Mine is at or near the northernmost limit of the initial, northwards-directed compressional event.

  16. An improved data integration algorithm to constrain the 3D displacement field induced by fast deformation phenomena tested on the Napa Valley earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcari, Marco; Fernández, José; Albano, Matteo; Bignami, Christian; Palano, Mimmo; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we propose an improved algorithm to constrain the 3D ground displacement field induced by fast surface deformations due to earthquakes or landslides. Based on the integration of different data, we estimate the three displacement components by solving a function minimization problem from the Bayes theory. We exploit the outcomes from SAR Interferometry (InSAR), Global Positioning System (GNSS) and Multiple Aperture Interferometry (MAI) to retrieve the 3D surface displacement field. Any other source of information can be added to the processing chain in a simple way, being the algorithm computationally efficient. Furthermore, we use the intensity Pixel Offset Tracking (POT) to locate the discontinuity produced on the surface by a sudden deformation phenomenon and then improve the GNSS data interpolation. This approach allows to be independent from other information such as in-situ investigations, tectonic studies or knowledge of the data covariance matrix. We applied such a method to investigate the ground deformation field related to the 2014 Mw 6.0 Napa Valley earthquake, occurred few kilometers from the San Andreas fault system.

  17. A Review on the 3D Printing of Functional Structures for Medical Phantoms and Regenerated Tissue and Organ Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Medical models, or “phantoms,” have been widely used for medical training and for doctor-patient interactions. They are increasingly used for surgical planning, medical computational models, algorithm verification and validation, and medical devices development. Such new applications demand high-fidelity, patient-specific, tissue-mimicking medical phantoms that can not only closely emulate the geometric structures of human organs, but also possess the properties and functions of the organ structure. With the rapid advancement of three-dimensional (3D printing and 3D bioprinting technologies, many researchers have explored the use of these additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate functional medical phantoms for various applications. This paper reviews the applications of these 3D printing and 3D bioprinting technologies for the fabrication of functional medical phantoms and bio-structures. This review specifically discusses the state of the art along with new developments and trends in 3D printed functional medical phantoms (i.e., tissue-mimicking medical phantoms, radiologically relevant medical phantoms, and physiological medical phantoms and 3D bio-printed structures (i.e., hybrid scaffolding materials, convertible scaffolds, and integrated sensors for regenerated tissues and organs.

  18. One-step fabrication of an organ-on-a-chip with spatial heterogeneity using a 3D bioprinting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungseok; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-07-05

    Although various types of organs-on-chips have been introduced recently as tools for drug discovery, the current studies are limited in terms of fabrication methods. The fabrication methods currently available not only need a secondary cell-seeding process and result in severe protein absorption due to the material used, but also have difficulties in providing various cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM) environments for spatial heterogeneity in the organs-on-chips. Therefore, in this research, we introduce a novel 3D bioprinting method for organ-on-a-chip applications. With our novel 3D bioprinting method, it was possible to prepare an organ-on-a-chip in a simple one-step fabrication process. Furthermore, protein absorption on the printed platform was very low, which will lead to accurate measurement of metabolism and drug sensitivity. Moreover, heterotypic cell types and biomaterials were successfully used and positioned at the desired position for various organ-on-a-chip applications, which will promote full mimicry of the natural conditions of the organs. The liver organ was selected for the evaluation of the developed method, and liver function was shown to be significantly enhanced on the liver-on-a-chip, which was prepared by 3D bioprinting. Consequently, the results demonstrate that the suggested 3D bioprinting method is easier and more versatile for production of organs-on-chips.

  19. Deformation and fatigue of tough 3D printed elastomer scaffolds processed by fused deposition modeling and continuous liquid interface production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew T; Safranski, David L; Wood, Catherine; Guldberg, Robert E; Gall, Ken

    2017-11-01

    Polyurethane (PU) based elastomers continue to gain popularity in a variety of biomedical applications as compliant implant materials. In parallel, advancements in additive manufacturing continue to provide new opportunities for biomedical applications by enabling the creation of more complex architectures for tissue scaffolding and patient specific implants. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of printed architecture on the monotonic and cyclic mechanical behavior of elastomeric PUs and to compare the structure-property relationship across two different printing approaches. We examined the tensile fatigue of notched specimens, 3D crosshatch scaffolds, and two 3D spherical pore architectures in a physically crosslinked polycarbonate urethane (PCU) printed via fused deposition modeling (FDM) as well as a photo-cured, chemically-crosslinked, elastomeric PU printed via continuous liquid interface production (CLIP). Both elastomers were relatively tolerant of 3D geometrical features as compared to stiffer synthetic implant materials such as PEEK and titanium. PCU and crosslinked PU samples with 3D porous structures demonstrated a reduced tensile failure stress as expected without a significant effect on tensile failure strain. PCU crosshatch samples demonstrated similar performance in strain-based tensile fatigue as solid controls; however, when plotted against stress amplitude and adjusted by porosity, it was clear that the architecture had an impact on performance. Square shaped notches or pores in crosslinked PU appeared to have a modest effect on strain-based tensile fatigue while circular shaped notches and pores had little impact relative to smooth samples. When plotted against stress amplitude, any differences in fatigue performance were small or not statistically significant for crosslinked PU samples. Despite the slight difference in local architecture and tolerances, crosslinked PU solid samples were found to perform on par with PCU solid

  20. Cernavoda Unit 2: - BOP 3D model proposal for a possible organization of site activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiesura, G.; Scarsin, Sioli; Orlandi, S.

    1999-01-01

    The scope of this activity is to define characteristics and advantages of the 3D model of Cernavoda BOP to this set up at site for engineering and construction activities. This model will provide a modern and proven tool able to strongly support the site activities with particular regard to the following: 1. engineering activities, - plant arrangement 'double check' for resolution of clashing; - easy management of future design changes; - real time plant configuration updating as soon as any design modification is approved and integrated in the model; - preparation of high quality documentation for procurement, construction and commissioning; - prompt availability of the as built configuration of the plant as soon as the last modification is frozen; 2. material procurement activities, - definition of the priorities in the construction material procurement according to the construction planning by area; - inventory list of equipment, pipes, fittings, valves, cable trays and ventilation ducts to be installed in each construction area; 3. construction activities, - definition of construction sequences, with particular reference in the congested areas, for piping cable trays (electrical and C-and-I) and ventilations ducts; - definition of piping spools by construction contractors; - follow-up of the activities in each area (i.e. construction, painting, insulation, flushing, pressure testing, etc); 4. turn-over and commissioning, - check of the progress. The success of this approach is based on the following: i) proper management of the remote workstations providing easy and reliable access to the model; ii) subdivision of the Integrated Building in construction areas, whose detail design may be allotted to Romanian organizations with multidisciplinary tasks; iii) integration in the model of the remote developed engineering in order to validate the details of the design. (authors)

  1. The application of in-situ 3D X-ray diffraction in annealing experiments: First interpretation of substructure development in deformed NaCl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borthwick, Verity; Schmidt, Søren; Piazolo, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    In-situ 3D X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) annealing experiments were conducted at the ID-11 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble. This allowed us to nondestructively document and subsequently analyse the development of substructures during heating, without the influence...... subgrain boundary formation. These results demonstrate that 3DXRD coupled with in-situ heating is a successful non-destructive technique for examining real-time postdeformational annealing in strongly deformed crystalline materials with complicated microstructures. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications...

  2. Fabrication of a 3D active mixer based on deformable Fe-doped PDMS cones with magnetic actuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riahi, Mohammadreza; Alizadeh, Elaheh

    2012-01-01

    In this paper an active 3D mixer for lab-on-chip applications is presented. The micrometer size cone shape holes are ablated on a PMMA sheet utilizing a CO 2 laser. The holes are filled with Fe micro-particles and the whole structure is molded with PDMS which cause the Fe micro-particles to be trapped in a PDMS cone structure. These Fe-doped PDMS cones are placed in a PMMA micro-channel structure fabricated by CO 2 laser machining. By applying an external periodic magnetic field, the cones periodically bend in the micro-channel and stir the fluid. The fabrication method and the effect of the magnetic field on the bending of the cones with different aspect ratios is also discussed utilizing computer simulation. Doping the polymers with micro- and nano-metallic particles has been carried out by different research groups before, but according to our knowledge, application of such structures for the fabrication of a 3D active mixer has not been presented before. (paper)

  3. The mechanism study between 3D Space-time deformation and injection or extraction of gas pressure change, the Hutubi Underground gas storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoqiang, W.; Li, J.; Daiqing, L.; Li, C.

    2017-12-01

    The surface deformation of underground gas reservoir with the change of injection pressure is an excellent opportunity to study the load response under the action of tectonic movement and controlled load. This paper mainly focuses on the elastic deformation of underground structure caused by the change of the pressure state of reservoir rock under the condition of the irregular change of pressure in the underground gas storage of Hutubi, the largest underground gas storage in Xinjiang, at the same time, it makes a fine study on the fault activities of reservoir and induced earthquakes along with the equilibrium instability caused by the reservoir. Based on the 34 deformation integrated observation points and 3 GPS continuous observation stations constructed in the underground gas storage area of Hutubi, using modern measurement techniques such as GPS observation, precise leveling survey, flow gravity observation and so on, combined with remote sensing technology such as InSAR, the 3d space-time sequence images of the surface of reservoir area under pressure change were obtained. Combined with gas well pressure, physical parameters and regional seismic geology and geophysical data, the numerical simulation and analysis of internal changes of reservoir were carried out by using elastic and viscoelastic model, the deformation mechanical relationship of reservoir was determined and the storage layer under controlled load was basically determined. This research is financially supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.41474016, 41474051, 41474097)

  4. Bioengineering a 3D integumentary organ system from iPS cells using an in vivo transplantation model

    OpenAIRE

    Takagi, Ryoji; Ishimaru, Junko; Sugawara, Ayaka; Toyoshima, Koh-ei; Ishida, Kentaro; Ogawa, Miho; Sakakibara, Kei; Asakawa, Kyosuke; Kashiwakura, Akitoshi; Oshima, Masamitsu; Minamide, Ryohei; Sato, Akio; Yoshitake, Toshihiro; Takeda, Akira; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The integumentary organ system is a complex system that plays important roles in waterproofing, cushioning, protecting deeper tissues, excreting waste, and thermoregulation. We developed a novel in vivo transplantation model designated as a clustering-dependent embryoid body transplantation method and generated a bioengineered three-dimensional (3D) integumentary organ system, including appendage organs such as hair follicles and sebaceous glands, from induced pluripotent stem cells. This bio...

  5. COMPUTER MODELING IN DEFORM-3D FOR ANALYSIS OF PLASTIC FLOW IN HIGH-SPEED HOT EXTRUSION OF BIMETALLIC FORMATIVE PARTS OF DIE TOOLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kachanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern development of industrial production is closely connected with the use of science-based and high technologies to ensure competitiveness of the manufactured products on the world market. There is also much tension around an energy- and resource saving problem which can be solved while introducing new technological processes and  creation of new materials that provide productivity increase through automation and improvement of tool life. Development and implementation of such technologies are rather often considered as time-consuming processes  which are connected with complex calculations and experimental investigations. Implementation of a simulation modelling for materials processing using modern software products serves an alternative to experimental and theoretical methods of research.The aim of this paper is to compare experimental results while obtaining bimetallic samples of a forming tool through the method of speed hot extrusion and the results obtained with the help of computer simulation using DEFORM-3D package and a finite element method. Comparative analysis of plastic flow of real and model samples has shown that the obtained models provide high-quality and reliable picture of plastic flow during high-speed hot extrusion. Modeling in DEFORM-3D make it possible to eliminate complex calculations and significantly reduce a number of experimental studies while developing new technological processes.

  6. Full-frame, high-speed 3D shape and deformation measurements using stereo-digital image correlation and a single color high-speed camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liping; Pan, Bing

    2017-08-01

    Full-frame, high-speed 3D shape and deformation measurement using stereo-digital image correlation (stereo-DIC) technique and a single high-speed color camera is proposed. With the aid of a skillfully designed pseudo stereo-imaging apparatus, color images of a test object surface, composed of blue and red channel images from two different optical paths, are recorded by a high-speed color CMOS camera. The recorded color images can be separated into red and blue channel sub-images using a simple but effective color crosstalk correction method. These separated blue and red channel sub-images are processed by regular stereo-DIC method to retrieve full-field 3D shape and deformation on the test object surface. Compared with existing two-camera high-speed stereo-DIC or four-mirror-adapter-assisted singe-camera high-speed stereo-DIC, the proposed single-camera high-speed stereo-DIC technique offers prominent advantages of full-frame measurements using a single high-speed camera but without sacrificing its spatial resolution. Two real experiments, including shape measurement of a curved surface and vibration measurement of a Chinese double-side drum, demonstrated the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed technique.

  7. Illustrating Concepts in Physical Organic Chemistry with 3D Printed Orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Michael J.; Jorgensen, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Orbital theory provides a powerful tool for rationalizing and understanding many phenomena in chemistry. In most introductory chemistry courses, students are introduced to atomic and molecular orbitals in the form of two-dimensional drawings. In this work, we describe a general method for producing 3D printing files of orbital models that can be…

  8. A method for enabling real-time structural deformation in remote handling control system by utilizing offline simulation results and 3D model morphing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiviranta, Sauli; Saarinen, Hannu; Maekinen, Harri; Krassi, Boris

    2011-01-01

    A full scale physical test facility, DTP2 (Divertor Test Platform 2) has been established in Finland for demonstrating and refining the Remote Handling (RH) equipment designs for ITER. The first prototype RH equipment at DTP2 is the Cassette Multifunctional Mover (CMM) equipped with Second Cassette End Effector (SCEE) delivered to DTP2 in October 2008. The purpose is to prove that CMM/SCEE prototype can be used successfully for the 2nd cassette RH operations. At the end of F4E grant 'DTP2 test facility operation and upgrade preparation', the RH operations of the 2nd cassette were successfully demonstrated to the representatives of Fusion For Energy (F4E). Due to its design, the CMM/SCEE robot has relatively large mechanical flexibilities when the robot carries the nine-ton-weighting 2nd Cassette on the 3.6-m long lever. This leads into a poor absolute accuracy and into the situation where the 3D model, which is used in the control system, does not reflect the actual deformed state of the CMM/SCEE robot. To improve the accuracy, the new method has been developed in order to handle the flexibilities within the control system's virtual environment. The effect of the load on the CMM/SCEE has been measured and minimized in the load compensation model, which is implemented in the control system software. The proposed method accounts for the structural deformations of the robot in the control system through the 3D model morphing by utilizing the finite element method (FEM) analysis for morph targets. This resulted in a considerable improvement of the CMM/SCEE absolute accuracy and the adequacy of the 3D model, which is crucially important in the RH applications, where the visual information of the controlled device in the surrounding environment is limited.

  9. Locoregional deformation pattern of the patellar cartilage after different loading types. High-resolution 3D-MRI volumetry at 3 T in-vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horng, Annie; Raya, J.; Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshadern; Zscharn, M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze locoregional deformation patterns indicative of contact areas in patellar cartilage after different loading exercises. Materials and Methods: 7 healthy patellae were examined in-vivo before and immediately after standardized loading (kneeling, squatting or knee bends) and after 90 minutes of rest using a sagittal 3D-T1-w FLASH WE sequence (22 msec/ 9.8msec/ 15 / 0.3 x 0.3 x 1.5 mm 3 ) at 3 T. After cartilage segmentation and 3D reconstruction, voxel-based and global precision errors (PR) were calculated. The former were used to determine significant differences in local cartilage thickness. Voxel-based 2σ-thickness difference maps were calculated to visualize locoregional deformation patterns. Global changes in volume (Vol), mean thickness (mTh) and cartilage-bone-interface area (CBIA) were calculated. Results: The voxel-based PR depended on cartilage thickness (D) ranging from 0.12 - 0.35 mm. For D ≥ 1 mm the RF was 3 (2.4 %) for Vol, 0.06 mm (2.0 %) for mTh and 16 mm 2 (1.4 %) for CBIA. The focal cartilage deformation equaled 14 % of the local thickness reduction. The deformation areas were oval and located in the peripheral medial (more vertically oriented, all exercises) and caudo-lateral (more horizontally oriented, kneeling and knee bends) aspects of the patella and were least pronounced in knee bends. Significant changes for Vol/mTh ranged from 2.1 to 3.7 %. Conclusion: This MRI-based study is the first to identify in-vivo voxel-based patellar cartilage deformation patterns indicating contact and loading zones after kneeling and squatting. These zones are anatomically and functionally plausible and may represent areas where stress induced degeneration and subsequent OA can originate. The data may facilitate understanding of individual knee loading properties and help to improve and validate biomechanical models for the knee. (orig.)

  10. 3D organic Na4C6O6/graphene architecture for fast sodium storage with ultralong cycle life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianan; Gu, Yue; Yang, Shubin

    2017-11-23

    Sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) have aroused increasing interest as one of the most promising replacements for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Here, a novel organic-inorganic 3D Na 4 C 6 O 6 -graphene architecture was successfully fabricated from commercial Na 2 C 6 O 6 and for the first time applied for sodium storage. Hence, the 3D Na 4 C 6 O 6 -graphene architecture exhibits a high reversible capacity, good cyclic performance and high-rate capability for sodium storage.

  11. 3D TiO2 submicrostructures decorated by silver nanoparticles as SERS substrate for organic pollutants detection and degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jianjun; Su, Huilan; You, Xueling; Gao, Jing; Lau, Woon Ming; Zhang, Di

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Contrive a multifunctional SERS substrate with 3D sub-micrometer structure and multicomponent. • The blue wing of butterfly (Euploea mulciber) is used as template for Ag/TiO 2 nanocomposites. • The 3D submicrostructures Ag/TiO 2 presents superior SERS effect and photocatalytic activity. • Pave a facile route to prepare multifunctional material by utilizing smart structural designs in nature. - Abstract: The blue wing of butterfly Euploea mulciber is used as a template to generate Ag/TiO 2 nanocomposites. Thereinto, Ag nanoparticles are deposited uniformly onto TiO 2 substrate with three dimensional (3D) submicrometer structures. This unique 3D sub-micrometer structures featured with ridges, ribs and struts can provide a large number of active “hot spots” for enhanced Raman signal. Meanwhile, depositing Ag onto the TiO 2 surface can greatly boost its SERS effect and photocatalytic activity by bringing additional electrons into the molecules and inhibiting electrons–holes recombination. Thus, the as-prepared 3D Ag/TiO 2 submicrostructures can not only offer sensitive and reproducible SERS signals, but also present superior photocatalytic activity, which can be utilized to detect and eliminate organic pollutants

  12. Physical Modeling of Tsunamis Generated By 3D Deformable Landslides in Various Scenarios From Fjords to Conical Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, B. C.; Fritz, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Tsunamis generated by landslides and volcano flank collapse can be particularly devastative in the near field region due to locally high wave amplitudes and runup. The events of 1958 Lituya Bay, 1963 Vajont reservoir, 1980 Spirit Lake, 2002 Stromboli and 2010 Haiti demonstrate the danger of tsunamis generated by landslides or volcano flank collapses. Unfortunately critical field data from these events is lacking. Source and runup scenarios based on real world events are physically modeled using generalized Froude similarity in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin at Oregon State University. A novel pneumatic landslide tsunami generator (LTG) was deployed to simulate landslides with varying geometry and kinematics. Two different materials are used to simulate landslides to study the granulometry effects: naturally rounded river gravel and cobble mixtures. The LTG consists of a sliding box filled with 1,350 kg of landslide material which is accelerated by means of four pneumatic pistons down a 2H:1V slope. The landslide is launched from the sliding box and continues to accelerate by gravitational forces up to velocities of 5 m/s. The landslide Froude number at impact with the water is in the range 1 deformation is measured from above and underwater camera recordings. The landslide deposit is measured on the basin floor with a multiple transducer acoustic array (MTA). Landslide surface reconstruction and kinematics are determined with a stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. Wave runup is recorded with resistance wave gauges along the slope and verified with video image processing. The measured landslide and wave parameters are

  13. Three-dimensional (3D) coseismic deformation map produced by the 2014 South Napa Earthquake estimated and modeled by SAR and GPS data integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcari, Marco; Albano, Matteo; Fernández, José; Palano, Mimmo; Samsonov, Sergey; Stramondo, Salvatore; Zerbini, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present a 3D map of coseismic displacements due to the 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake, California, obtained by integrating displacement information data from SAR Interferometry (InSAR), Multiple Aperture Interferometry (MAI), Pixel Offset Tracking (POT) and GPS data acquired by both permanent stations and campaigns sites. This seismic event produced significant surface deformation along the 3D components causing several damages to vineyards, roads and houses. The remote sensing results, i.e. InSAR, MAI and POT, were obtained from the pair of SAR images provided by the Sentinel-1 satellite, launched on April 3rd, 2014. They were acquired on August 7th and 31st along descending orbits with an incidence angle of about 23°. The GPS dataset includes measurements from 32 stations belonging to the Bay Area Regional Deformation Network (BARDN), 301 continuous stations available from the UNAVCO and the CDDIS archives, and 13 additional campaign sites from Barnhart et al, 2014 [1]. These data constrain the horizontal and vertical displacement components proving to be helpful for the adopted integration method. We exploit the Bayes theory to search for the 3D coseismic displacement components. In particular, for each point, we construct an energy function and solve the problem to find a global minimum. Experimental results are consistent with a strike-slip fault mechanism with an approximately NW-SE fault plane. Indeed, the 3D displacement map shows a strong North-South (NS) component, peaking at about 15 cm, a few kilometers far from the epicenter. The East-West (EW) displacement component reaches its maximum (~10 cm) south of the city of Napa, whereas the vertical one (UP) is smaller, although a subsidence in the order of 8 cm on the east side of the fault can be observed. A source modelling was performed by inverting the estimated displacement components. The best fitting model is given by a ~N330° E-oriented and ~70° dipping fault with a prevailing

  14. Role of nanotopography in the development of tissue engineered 3D organs and tissues using mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmasi, Shima; Kalaskar, Deepak M; Yoon, Wai-Weng; Blunn, Gordon W; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-03-26

    Recent regenerative medicine and tissue engineering strategies (using cells, scaffolds, medical devices and gene therapy) have led to fascinating progress of translation of basic research towards clinical applications. In the past decade, great deal of research has focused on developing various three dimensional (3D) organs, such as bone, skin, liver, kidney and ear, using such strategies in order to replace or regenerate damaged organs for the purpose of maintaining or restoring organs' functions that may have been lost due to aging, accident or disease. The surface properties of a material or a device are key aspects in determining the success of the implant in biomedicine, as the majority of biological reactions in human body occur on surfaces or interfaces. Furthermore, it has been established in the literature that cell adhesion and proliferation are, to a great extent, influenced by the micro- and nano-surface characteristics of biomaterials and devices. In addition, it has been shown that the functions of stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells in particular, could be regulated through physical interaction with specific nanotopographical cues. Therefore, guided stem cell proliferation, differentiation and function are of great importance in the regeneration of 3D tissues and organs using tissue engineering strategies. This review will provide an update on the impact of nanotopography on mesenchymal stem cells for the purpose of developing laboratory-based 3D organs and tissues, as well as the most recent research and case studies on this topic.

  15. A 3D global-to-local deformable mesh model based registration and anatomy-constrained segmentation method for image guided prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jinghao; Kim, Sung; Jabbour, Salma; Goyal, Sharad; Haffty, Bruce; Chen, Ting; Levinson, Lydia; Metaxas, Dimitris; Yue, Ning J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In the external beam radiation treatment of prostate cancers, successful implementation of adaptive radiotherapy and conformal radiation dose delivery is highly dependent on precise and expeditious segmentation and registration of the prostate volume between the simulation and the treatment images. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel, fast, and accurate segmentation and registration method to increase the computational efficiency to meet the restricted clinical treatment time requirement in image guided radiotherapy. Methods: The method developed in this study used soft tissues to capture the transformation between the 3D planning CT (pCT) images and 3D cone-beam CT (CBCT) treatment images. The method incorporated a global-to-local deformable mesh model based registration framework as well as an automatic anatomy-constrained robust active shape model (ACRASM) based segmentation algorithm in the 3D CBCT images. The global registration was based on the mutual information method, and the local registration was to minimize the Euclidian distance of the corresponding nodal points from the global transformation of deformable mesh models, which implicitly used the information of the segmented target volume. The method was applied on six data sets of prostate cancer patients. Target volumes delineated by the same radiation oncologist on the pCT and CBCT were chosen as the benchmarks and were compared to the segmented and registered results. The distance-based and the volume-based estimators were used to quantitatively evaluate the results of segmentation and registration. Results: The ACRASM segmentation algorithm was compared to the original active shape model (ASM) algorithm by evaluating the values of the distance-based estimators. With respect to the corresponding benchmarks, the mean distance ranged from -0.85 to 0.84 mm for ACRASM and from -1.44 to 1.17 mm for ASM. The mean absolute distance ranged from 1.77 to 3.07 mm for ACRASM and from 2.45 to

  16. TADs are 3D structural units of higher-order chromosome organization in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Quentin; Jost, Daniel; Chang, Jia-Ming; Cattoni, Diego I.; Papadopoulos, Giorgio L.; Bonev, Boyan; Sexton, Tom; Gurgo, Julian; Jacquier, Caroline; Nollmann, Marcelo; Bantignies, Frédéric; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2018-01-01

    Deciphering the rules of genome folding in the cell nucleus is essential to understand its functions. Recent chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) studies have revealed that the genome is partitioned into topologically associating domains (TADs), which demarcate functional epigenetic domains defined by combinations of specific chromatin marks. However, whether TADs are true physical units in each cell nucleus or whether they reflect statistical frequencies of measured interactions within cell populations is unclear. Using a combination of Hi-C, three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent in situ hybridization, super-resolution microscopy, and polymer modeling, we provide an integrative view of chromatin folding in Drosophila. We observed that repressed TADs form a succession of discrete nanocompartments, interspersed by less condensed active regions. Single-cell analysis revealed a consistent TAD-based physical compartmentalization of the chromatin fiber, with some degree of heterogeneity in intra-TAD conformations and in cis and trans inter-TAD contact events. These results indicate that TADs are fundamental 3D genome units that engage in dynamic higher-order inter-TAD connections. This domain-based architecture is likely to play a major role in regulatory transactions during DNA-dependent processes. PMID:29503869

  17. 3D Coda Attenuation Tomography of Acoustic Emission Data from Laboratory Samples as a tool for imaging pre-failure deformation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinciguerra, S.; King, T. I.; Benson, P. M.; De Siena, L.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, 3D and 4D seismic tomography have unraveled medium changes during the seismic cycle or before eruptive events. As our resolving power increases, however, complex structures increasingly affect images. Being able to interpret and understand these features requires a multi-discipline approach combining different methods, each sensitive to particular properties of the sub-surface. Rock deformation laboratory experiments can relate seismic properties to the evolving medium quantitatively. Here, an array of 1 MHz Piezo-Electric Transducers has recorded high-quality low-noise acoustic emission (AE) data during triaxial compressional experiments. Samples of Carrara Marble, Darley Dale Sandstone and Westerly Granite were deformed in saturated conditions representative of a depth of about 1 km until brittle failure. Using a time window around sample failure, AE data were filtered between 5 and 75 KHz and processed using a 3D P-coda attenuation-tomography method. Ratios of P-direct to P-coda energies calculated for each source-receiver path were inverted using the coda normalisation method for values of Q (P-wave quality factor). The results show Q-variation with respect to an average Q. Q is a combination of the effects of scattering attenuation (Qs) and intrinsic attenuation Q (Qi), which can be correlated to the sample structure. Qs primary controls energy dissipation in the presence at acoustic impedance (AI) surfaces and at fracture tips, independently of rock type, while pore fluid effects dissipate energy (Qi). Damaged zones appear as high-Q and low-Q anomalies in unsaturated and saturated samples, respectively. We have attributed frequency-dependent high-Q to resonance in the presence of AI surfaces. Low Q areas appear behind AI surfaces and are interpreted as energy shadows. These shadows can affect attenuation tomography imaging at field scale.

  18. Performance evaluation of 2D and 3D deep learning approaches for automatic segmentation of multiple organs on CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Yamada, Kazuma; Kojima, Takuya; Takayama, Ryosuke; Wang, Song; Zhou, Xinxin; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate and compare the performance of modern deep learning techniques for automatically recognizing and segmenting multiple organ regions on 3D CT images. CT image segmentation is one of the important task in medical image analysis and is still very challenging. Deep learning approaches have demonstrated the capability of scene recognition and semantic segmentation on nature images and have been used to address segmentation problems of medical images. Although several works showed promising results of CT image segmentation by using deep learning approaches, there is no comprehensive evaluation of segmentation performance of the deep learning on segmenting multiple organs on different portions of CT scans. In this paper, we evaluated and compared the segmentation performance of two different deep learning approaches that used 2D- and 3D deep convolutional neural networks (CNN) without- and with a pre-processing step. A conventional approach that presents the state-of-the-art performance of CT image segmentation without deep learning was also used for comparison. A dataset that includes 240 CT images scanned on different portions of human bodies was used for performance evaluation. The maximum number of 17 types of organ regions in each CT scan were segmented automatically and compared to the human annotations by using ratio of intersection over union (IU) as the criterion. The experimental results demonstrated the IUs of the segmentation results had a mean value of 79% and 67% by averaging 17 types of organs that segmented by a 3D- and 2D deep CNN, respectively. All the results of the deep learning approaches showed a better accuracy and robustness than the conventional segmentation method that used probabilistic atlas and graph-cut methods. The effectiveness and the usefulness of deep learning approaches were demonstrated for solving multiple organs segmentation problem on 3D CT images.

  19. Do we need 3D tube current modulation information for accurate organ dosimetry in chest CT? Protocols dose comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rendon, Xochitl; Zhang, Guozhi; Coudyzer, Walter; Develter, Wim; Bosmans, Hilde; Zanca, Federica

    2017-11-01

    To compare the lung and breast dose associated with three chest protocols: standard, organ-based tube current modulation (OBTCM) and fast-speed scanning; and to estimate the error associated with organ dose when modelling the longitudinal (z-) TCM versus the 3D-TCM in Monte Carlo simulations (MC) for these three protocols. Five adult and three paediatric cadavers with different BMI were scanned. The CTDI vol of the OBTCM and the fast-speed protocols were matched to the patient-specific CTDI vol of the standard protocol. Lung and breast doses were estimated using MC with both z- and 3D-TCM simulated and compared between protocols. The fast-speed scanning protocol delivered the highest doses. A slight reduction for breast dose (up to 5.1%) was observed for two of the three female cadavers with the OBTCM in comparison to the standard. For both adult and paediatric, the implementation of the z-TCM data only for organ dose estimation resulted in 10.0% accuracy for the standard and fast-speed protocols, while relative dose differences were up to 15.3% for the OBTCM protocol. At identical CTDI vol values, the standard protocol delivered the lowest overall doses. Only for the OBTCM protocol is the 3D-TCM needed if an accurate (<10.0%) organ dosimetry is desired. • The z-TCM information is sufficient for accurate dosimetry for standard protocols. • The z-TCM information is sufficient for accurate dosimetry for fast-speed scanning protocols. • For organ-based TCM schemes, the 3D-TCM information is necessary for accurate dosimetry. • At identical CTDI vol , the fast-speed scanning protocol delivered the highest doses. • Lung dose was higher in XCare than standard protocol at identical CTDI vol .

  20. Design of organic 3D microresonators with microfluidics coupled to thin-film processes for photonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huby, N.; Pluchon, D.; Coulon, N.; Belloul, M.; Moreac, A.; Gaviot, E.; Panizza, P.; Bêche, B.

    2010-06-01

    We report on the design and realization of photonic integrated devices based on 3D organic microresonators (MR) shaped by an applied fluid mechanism technique. Such an interdisciplinary approach has been judiciously achieved by combining microfluidics techniques and thin-film processes, respectively, for the realizations of microfluidic and optical chips. The microfluidic framework with flow rates control allows the fabrication of microresonators with diameters ranging from 30 to 160 μm. The resonance of an isolated sphere in air has been demonstrated by way of a modified Raman spectroscopy devoted to the excitation of Whispering Gallery Modes (WGM). Then the 3D-MR have been integrated onto an organic chip and positioned either close to the extremity of a taper or alongside a rib waveguide. Both devices have proved efficient evanescent coupling mechanisms leading to the excitation of the WGM confined at the surface of the organic 3D-MR. Finally, a band-stop filter has been used to detect the resonance spectra of organic resonators once being integrated. Such spectral resonances have been observed with an integrated configuration and characterized with a Δ λ = 1.4 nm free spectral range (FSR), appearing as stemming from a 78 μm-radius MR structure.

  1. Do we need 3D tube current modulation information for accurate organ dosimetry in chest CT? Protocols dose comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Rendon, Xochitl; Develter, Wim [KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Division of Medical Physics and Quality Assessment, Leuven (Belgium); Zhang, Guozhi; Coudyzer, Walter; Zanca, Federica [University Hospitals of the KU Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Bosmans, Hilde [KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Division of Medical Physics and Quality Assessment, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals of the KU Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2017-11-15

    To compare the lung and breast dose associated with three chest protocols: standard, organ-based tube current modulation (OBTCM) and fast-speed scanning; and to estimate the error associated with organ dose when modelling the longitudinal (z-) TCM versus the 3D-TCM in Monte Carlo simulations (MC) for these three protocols. Five adult and three paediatric cadavers with different BMI were scanned. The CTDI{sub vol} of the OBTCM and the fast-speed protocols were matched to the patient-specific CTDI{sub vol} of the standard protocol. Lung and breast doses were estimated using MC with both z- and 3D-TCM simulated and compared between protocols. The fast-speed scanning protocol delivered the highest doses. A slight reduction for breast dose (up to 5.1%) was observed for two of the three female cadavers with the OBTCM in comparison to the standard. For both adult and paediatric, the implementation of the z-TCM data only for organ dose estimation resulted in 10.0% accuracy for the standard and fast-speed protocols, while relative dose differences were up to 15.3% for the OBTCM protocol. At identical CTDI{sub vol} values, the standard protocol delivered the lowest overall doses. Only for the OBTCM protocol is the 3D-TCM needed if an accurate (<10.0%) organ dosimetry is desired. (orig.)

  2. A 3D imaging system for the non-intrusive in-flight measurement of the deformation of an aircraft propeller and a helicopter rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasicki, Bolesław; Boden, Fritz; Ludwikowski, Krzysztof

    2017-02-01

    The non-intrusive in-flight deformation measurement and the resulting local pitch of an aircraft propeller or helicopter rotor blade is a demanding task. The idea of an imaging system integrated and rotating with the air-craft propeller has already been presented at the 30th International Congress on High-Speed Imaging and Photonics (ICHSIP30) in 2012. Since then this system has been designed, constructed and tested in the laboratory as well as in-flight on the Cobra VUT100 of Evektor Aerotechnik, Kunovice (CZ). The major aim of the EU FP7 project AIM2 ("Advanced In-flight Measurement techniques 2" - contract No. 266107) was to ascertain the feasibility of this technique under extreme conditions - vibration and large centrifugal forces - to real flight testing. Based on the gained experience a new rotating system for the application on helicopter rotors has recently been constructed and tested on the whirl tower of Airbus Helicopters, Donauwoerth (D). In this paper the principle of the applied Image Pattern Correlation Technique (IPCT), a specialized type of Digital Image Correlation (DIC), is outlined and the construction of both rotating 3D image acquisition systems dedicated to the in-flight deformation measurement of the aircraft propeller and helicopter rotor are described. Furthermore, the results of the ground and in-flight tests of these systems will be shown and discussed. The obtained results will be helpful for manufacturers in the design of their future aircrafts.

  3. Two novel 3-D bismuth oxalates with organic amines protruding in channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xiaohong; Zhang Hanhui; Cao Yanning; Hu Zhongjian; Chen Yiping; Wang Zhen

    2006-01-01

    Two novel 3-D oxalate-containing bismuth compounds of formula (C 3 N 2 H 5 ) 2 [Bi 2 (C 2 O 4 ) 4 (H 2 O) 2 ].2H 2 O 1 and [NH(C 2 H 5 ) 3 ][Bi 3 (C 2 O 4 ) 5 ] 2 were obtained by hydrothermal synthesis and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic P2/n space group with a=9.7541(13)A, b=17.7404(15)A, c=14.6321(6)A, β=97.280(3) o , Z=4, R 1 =0.0340 and wR 2 =0.0766 for unique 4734 reflections I>2σ(I). Compound 2 belongs to the orthorhombic Pbcn space group with a=14.803(4)A, b=19.783(7)A, c=8.202(2)A, Z=4, R 1 =0.0222 and wR 2 =0.0568 for unique 2472 reflections I>2σ(I). The Bi III centers have nine-fold coordination for 1 and eight-fold for 2 with the Bi atoms in distorted monocapped square antiprism and distorted dodecahedron, respectively. And oxalate ligands adopt different coordination modes: bidentate for 1, bidentate and tricoordinate for 2. Compounds 1 and 2 are both 3-D open-framework structures containing channels with guest molecules. These two compounds exhibit intense blue luminescence with the emission peaks at 419nm for 1 and 442nm for 2, respectively, in the solid state at room temperature. These compounds with novel structural frameworks could be useful in the field of photoactive materials

  4. Modelling atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants in the Northern Hemisphere with a 3-D dynamical model: DEHM-POP

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen , K. M.; Christensen , J. H.; Brandt , J.; Frohn , L. M.; Geels , C.

    2004-01-01

    International audience; The Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM) is a 3-D dynamical atmospheric transport model originally developed to describe the atmospheric transport of sulphur into the Arctic. A new version of the model, DEHM-POP, developed to study the atmospheric transport and environmental fate of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is presented. During environmental cycling, POPs can be deposited and re-emitted several times before reaching a final destination. A description of...

  5. Evaluation of polynomial image deformation for matching of 3D- abdominal MR-images using anatomical landmarks and for atlas construction

    CERN Document Server

    Kimiaei, S; Jonsson, E; Crafoord, J; Maguire, G Q

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate the potential usability of linear and non-linear (polynomial) 3D-warping for constructing an atlas by matching abdominal MR-images from a number of different individuals using manually picked anatomical landmarks. The significance of this study lies in the fact that it illustrates the potential to use polynomial matching at a local or organ level. This is a necessary requirement for constructing an atlas and for fine intra-patient image matching and fusion. Finally 3D-image warping using anatomical landmark for inter-patient intra-modality image co-registration and fusion was found to be a very powerful and robust method. Additionally it can be used for intra-patient inter- modality image matching.

  6. 3D printed, bio-inspired prototypes and analytical models for structured suture interfaces with geometrically-tuned deformation and failure behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Erica; Li, Yaning; Ortiz, Christine; Boyce, Mary C.

    2014-12-01

    Geometrically structured interfaces in nature possess enhanced, and often surprising, mechanical properties, and provide inspiration for materials design. This paper investigates the mechanics of deformation and failure mechanisms of suture interface designs through analytical models and experiments on 3D printed polymer physical prototypes. Suture waveforms with generalized trapezoidal geometries (trapezoidal, rectangular, anti-trapezoidal, and triangular) are studied and characterized by several important geometric parameters: the presence or absence of a bonded tip region, the tip angle, and the geometry. It is shown that a wide range (in some cases as great as an order of magnitude) in stiffness, strength, and toughness is achievable dependent on tip bonding, tip angle, and geometry. Suture interfaces with a bonded tip region exhibit a higher initial stiffness due to the greater load bearing by the skeletal teeth, a double peak in the stress-strain curve corresponding to the failure of the bonded tip and the failure of the slanted interface region or tooth, respectively, and an additional failure and toughening mechanism due to the failure of the bonded tip. Anti-trapezoidal geometries promote the greatest amplification of properties for suture interfaces with a bonded tip due the large tip interface area. The tip angle and geometry govern the stress distributions in the teeth and the ratio of normal to shear stresses in the interfacial layers, which together determine the failure mechanism of the interface and/or the teeth. Rectangular suture interfaces fail by simple shearing of the interfaces. Trapezoidal and triangular suture interfaces fail by a combination of shear and tensile normal stresses in the interface, leading to plastic deformation, cavitation events, and subsequent stretching of interface ligaments with mostly elastic deformation in the teeth. Anti-trapezoidal suture interfaces with small tip angles have high stress concentrations in the teeth

  7. The Application of 3D Printing Technology for Simultaneous Orthognathic Surgery and Mandibular Contour Osteoplasty in the Treatment of Craniofacial Deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanju; Sun, Xiumei; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Yaoyao; Chen, Kai; Wu, Guomin

    2017-12-01

    Because of the limitation of specific preoperative design and surgical templates, orthognathic surgery and mandibular contour osteoplasty are generally performed in two stages. Three-dimensional printing technology has improved the accuracy of the surgery and results in good surgical predictability easily. This study aims to confirm the effectiveness, feasibility and precision of simultaneous mandibular contour osteoplasty and orthognathic surgery with the assistance of 3D printing technology. Ten patients, who were diagnosed with mandibular hypertrophy and bimaxillary deformities, were included in the study. In addition to conventional orthognathic surgery, mandibular angle ostectomy, mandibular outer cortex grinding or mandibular border ostectomy was designed for mandibular hypertrophy. Optimal osteotomy lines and simulated surgeries were designed according the 3D printing model of the mandible. Then, surgical templates were made on the 3D printing model. No muscle excision was performed in any patient. Preoperative, predicted and postoperative measurements were taken, including the gonial angle (Ar-Go-Me) and the mandibular width (Go-Go). All the patients had a reposeful postoperative recovery, with no indication of obvious infection, facial paralysis, osteonecrosis or bone displacement. The gonial angle was improved from 110.3° ± 11.1 to 121.3° ± 2.9, and the mandibular width was improved from 117.5 mm ± 6.8 to 111.9 mm ± 4.2. The discrepancies between simulation and postoperation of the left gonial angle, the right gonial angle and the mandibular width were 0.56° ± 0.22, 0.65° ± 0.3 and 0.49 mm ± 0.43, respectively. The results of our study illustrated the predictability, feasibility and reliability of simultaneous mandibular contour osteoplasty and orthognathic surgery with the assistance of 3D printing technology. Our technique could achieve functional improvement and an aesthetic profile at the same time. This journal requires

  8. 3-D modelling of a bilayer heterojunction organic solar cell based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thin film multilayer stacking theory is applied to the bilayer heterojunction organic solar cell, with the optical matrix of the Abeles theory leading to new expression of generation rate and density of exciton photogenerated in the organic photoactive layer of CuPc/C60. The excitons density is investigated considering the ...

  9. Automated torso organ segmentation from 3D CT images using structured perceptron and dual decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimura, Yukitaka; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a method for torso organ segmentation from abdominal CT images using structured perceptron and dual decomposition. A lot of methods have been proposed to enable automated extraction of organ regions from volumetric medical images. However, it is necessary to adjust empirical parameters of them to obtain precise organ regions. This paper proposes an organ segmentation method using structured output learning. Our method utilizes a graphical model and binary features which represent the relationship between voxel intensities and organ labels. Also we optimize the weights of the graphical model by structured perceptron and estimate the best organ label for a given image by dynamic programming and dual decomposition. The experimental result revealed that the proposed method can extract organ regions automatically using structured output learning. The error of organ label estimation was 4.4%. The DICE coefficients of left lung, right lung, heart, liver, spleen, pancreas, left kidney, right kidney, and gallbladder were 0.91, 0.95, 0.77, 0.81, 0.74, 0.08, 0.83, 0.84, and 0.03, respectively.

  10. Bi–Mn mixed metal organic oxide: A novel 3d-6p mixed metal coordination network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Fa-Nian; Rosa Silva, Ana; Bian, Liang

    2015-01-01

    A new terminology of metal organic oxide (MOO) was given a definition as a type of coordination polymers which possess the feature of inorganic connectivity between metals and the direct bonded atoms and show 1D, 2D or 3D inorganic sub-networks. One such compound was shown as an example. A 3d-6p (Mn–Bi. Named MOOMnBi) mixed metals coordination network has been synthesized via hydrothermal method. The new compound with the molecular formula of [MnBi 2 O(1,3,5-BTC) 2 ] n (1,3,5-BTC stands for benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) was characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction technique that revealed a very interesting 3-dimensional (3D) framework with Bi 4 O 2 (COO) 12 clusters which are further connected to Mn(COO) 6 fragments into a 2D MOO. The topology study indicates an unprecedented topological type with the net point group of (4 13 .6 2 )(4 13 .6 8 )(4 16 .6 5 )(4 18 .6 10 )(4 22 .6 14 )(4 3 ) corresponding to 3,6,7,7,8,9-c hexa-nodal net. MOOMnBi shows catalytic activity in the synthesis of (E)-α,β-unsaturated ketones. - Graphical abstract: This metal organic framework (MOF) is the essence of a 2D metal organic oxide (MOO). - Highlights: • New concept of metal organic oxide (MOO) was defined and made difference from metal organic framework. • New MOO of MOOMnBi was synthesized by hydrothermal method. • Crystal structure of MOOMnBi was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. • The catalytic activity of MOOMnBi was studied showing reusable after 2 cycles

  11. Bi–Mn mixed metal organic oxide: A novel 3d-6p mixed metal coordination network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Fa-Nian, E-mail: fshi@ua.pt [School of Science, Shenyang University of Technology, 110870 Shenyang (China); Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rosa Silva, Ana [Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Bian, Liang [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China)

    2015-05-15

    A new terminology of metal organic oxide (MOO) was given a definition as a type of coordination polymers which possess the feature of inorganic connectivity between metals and the direct bonded atoms and show 1D, 2D or 3D inorganic sub-networks. One such compound was shown as an example. A 3d-6p (Mn–Bi. Named MOOMnBi) mixed metals coordination network has been synthesized via hydrothermal method. The new compound with the molecular formula of [MnBi{sub 2}O(1,3,5-BTC){sub 2}]{sub n} (1,3,5-BTC stands for benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) was characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction technique that revealed a very interesting 3-dimensional (3D) framework with Bi{sub 4}O{sub 2}(COO){sub 12} clusters which are further connected to Mn(COO){sub 6} fragments into a 2D MOO. The topology study indicates an unprecedented topological type with the net point group of (4{sup 13}.6{sup 2})(4{sup 13}.6{sup 8})(4{sup 16}.6{sup 5})(4{sup 18}.6{sup 10})(4{sup 22}.6{sup 14})(4{sup 3}) corresponding to 3,6,7,7,8,9-c hexa-nodal net. MOOMnBi shows catalytic activity in the synthesis of (E)-α,β-unsaturated ketones. - Graphical abstract: This metal organic framework (MOF) is the essence of a 2D metal organic oxide (MOO). - Highlights: • New concept of metal organic oxide (MOO) was defined and made difference from metal organic framework. • New MOO of MOOMnBi was synthesized by hydrothermal method. • Crystal structure of MOOMnBi was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. • The catalytic activity of MOOMnBi was studied showing reusable after 2 cycles.

  12. 3D hybrid-porous carbon derived from carbonization of metal organic frameworks for high performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Weizhai; Mondal, Anjon Kumar; Xu, Jing; Wang, Chengyin; Su, Dawei; Wang, Guoxiu

    2016-09-01

    We report a rational design and synthesis of 3D hybrid-porous carbon with a hierarchical pore architecture for high performance supercapacitors. It contains micropores (<2 nm diameter) and mesopores (2-4 nm), derived from carbonization of unique porous metal organic frameworks (MOFs). Owning to the synergistic effect of micropores and mesopores, the hybrid-porous carbon has exceptionally high ion-accessible surface area and low ion diffusion resistance, which is desired for supercapacitor applications. When applied as electrode materials in supercapacitors, 3D hybrid-porous carbon demonstrates a specific capacitance of 332 F g-1 at a constant charge/discharge current of 500 mA g-1. The supercapacitors can endure more than 10,000 cycles without degradation of capacitance.

  13. Organic ice resists for 3D electron-beam processing: Instrumentation and operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiddi, William; Elsukova, Anna; Beleggia, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Organic vapors condensed into thin layers of ice on the surface of a cold substrate are exposed with an electron beam to create resist patterns for lithography applications. The entire spin- and development-free lithography process requires a single custom instrument. We report the design, material...... choice, implementation and operation of this apparatus. It is based on a scanning electron microscope fitted with an electron beam control system that is normally used for electron beam lithography in a multi-user open-access laboratory. The microscope was also equipped with a gas injection system......, a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostage, a temperature control system, and a load-lock. Three steps are required to initialize the apparatus for organic ice resist processing, and two steps are required to restore the apparatus for routine multi-user operations. Five steps are needed to create organic ice...

  14. Microfluidics and thin-film processes: a recipe for organic integrated photonics based on 3D microresonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huby, N.; Pluchon, D.; Belloul, M.; Moreac, A.; Coulon, N.; Gaviot, E.; Panizza, P.; B"che, B.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the design and realization of photonic integrated devices based on 3D organic microresonators. This has been achieved by combining microfluidics techniques and thin-film processes. The microfluidic device and the control of the flow rates of the continuous and dispersed phases allow the fabrication of organic microresonators with diameter ranging from 30 to 200 μm. The resonance of the sphere in air has been first investigated by using the Raman spectroscopy set-up demonstrating the appropriate photonic properties. Then the microresonators have been integrated on an organic chip made of the photosensitive resin SU-8 and positioned at the extremity of a taper and alongside a rib waveguide. The realization of these structures by thin-film processes needs one step UV-lithography leading to 6μm width and 30μm height. Both devices have proved the efficient evanescent coupling leading to the excitation of the whispering gallery modes confined at the surface of the organic 3D microresonators. Finally, a band-stop filter has been used to detect the resonance spectra of the resonators once integrated.

  15. Transparent model of temporal bone and vestibulocochlear organ made by 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryoji; Taniguchi, Naoto; Uchida, Fujio; Ishizawa, Akimitsu; Kanatsu, Yoshinori; Zhou, Ming; Funakoshi, Kodai; Akashi, Hideo; Abe, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    The vestibulocochlear organ is composed of tiny complex structures embedded in the petrous part of the temporal bone. Landmarks on the temporal bone surface provide the only orientation guide for dissection, but these need to be removed during the course of dissection, making it difficult to grasp the underlying three-dimensional structures, especially for beginners during gross anatomy classes. We report herein an attempt to produce a transparent three-dimensional-printed model of the human ear. En bloc samples of the temporal bone from donated cadavers were subjected to computed tomography (CT) scanning, and on the basis of the data, the surface temporal bone was reconstructed with transparent resin and the vestibulocochlear organ with white resin to create a 1:1.5 scale model. The carotid canal was stuffed with red cotton, and the sigmoid sinus and internal jugular vein were filled with blue clay. In the inner ear, the internal acoustic meatus, cochlea, and semicircular canals were well reconstructed in detail with white resin. The three-dimensional relationships of the semicircular canals, spiral turns of the cochlea, and internal acoustic meatus were well recognizable from every direction through the transparent surface resin. The anterior semicircular canal was obvious immediately beneath the arcuate eminence, and the topographical relationships of the vestibulocochlear organ and adjacent great vessels were easily discernible. We consider that this transparent temporal bone model will be a very useful aid for better understanding of the gross anatomy of the vestibulocochlear organ.

  16. 3D Bioprinting of Developmentally Inspired Templates for Whole Bone Organ Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Andrew C; Cunniffe, Gráinne M; Sathy, Binulal N; Jeon, Oju; Alsberg, Eben; Kelly, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    The ability to print defined patterns of cells and extracellular-matrix components in three dimensions has enabled the engineering of simple biological tissues; however, bioprinting functional solid organs is beyond the capabilities of current biofabrication technologies. An alternative approach would be to bioprint the developmental precursor to an adult organ, using this engineered rudiment as a template for subsequent organogenesis in vivo. This study demonstrates that developmentally inspired hypertrophic cartilage templates can be engineered in vitro using stem cells within a supporting gamma-irradiated alginate bioink incorporating Arg-Gly-Asp adhesion peptides. Furthermore, these soft tissue templates can be reinforced with a network of printed polycaprolactone fibers, resulting in a ≈350 fold increase in construct compressive modulus providing the necessary stiffness to implant such immature cartilaginous rudiments into load bearing locations. As a proof-of-principal, multiple-tool biofabrication is used to engineer a mechanically reinforced cartilaginous template mimicking the geometry of a vertebral body, which in vivo supported the development of a vascularized bone organ containing trabecular-like endochondral bone with a supporting marrow structure. Such developmental engineering approaches could be applied to the biofabrication of other solid organs by bioprinting precursors that have the capacity to mature into their adult counterparts over time in vivo. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Modeling of DNA and Protein Organization Levels with Cn3D Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasinakis, Panagiotis K.; Nicolaou, Despoina

    2017-01-01

    The molecular structure of living organisms and the complex interactions amongst its components are the basis for the diversity observed at the macroscopic level. Proteins and nucleic acids are some of the major molecular components, and play a key role in several biological functions, such as those of development and evolution. This article…

  18. Hydrogen bonded 1D-3D supramolecular structures from Benzylamine and organic acidic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xingjun; Li, XiaoLiang; Jin, Shouwen; Hu, Kaikai; Guo, Jianzhong; Guo, Ming; Xu, Weiqiang; Wang, Daqi

    2018-03-01

    Cocrystallization of the commonly available organic amine, benzylamine, with a series of organic acids afforded a total of seven organic salts with the compositions: (benzylamine)2: (p-nitrophenol)2: (H2O) (1) [(HL)2+⋯(npl-)2⋯(H2O), npl- = p-nitrophenolate], (benzylamine): (4-tert-butylbenzoic acid) (2) [(HL+)⋯(tba-), tba- = 4-tert-butylbenzoate], (benzylamine): (3,4-dichlorobenzoic acid) (3) [(HL+)⋯dcba-), dcba- = 3,4-dichlorobenzoate], (benzylamine): (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid) (4) [(HL+)⋯(dhba-), dhba- = 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate], (benzylamine): (2-bromo-but-2-enedioic acid) (5) [(HL+)⋯(Hbba-), Hbba- = 2-bromo-hydrogenbut-2-enedioate], (benzylamine): (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) (6) [(HL+)⋯(Hpdc-), Hpdc- = 2,6-pyridine hydrogendicarboxylate], and (benzylamine)2: (3-nitrophthalic acid): 2(H2O) (7) [(HL+)2⋯(npa2-)⋯(H2O)2, npa2- = 3-nitrophthalate]. The seven salts have been characterised by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, and elemental analysis, and the melting points of all the salts were also reported. And their structural and supramolecular aspects are fully analyzed. The results reveal that among the seven investigated crystals the NH2 in the benzylamine are protonated when the organic acids are deprotonated, and the crystal packing is interpreted in terms of the strong charge-assisted Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond between the NH3+ and deprotonated acidic groups. Except the Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond, the Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) were also found at the salts 1, 4, 5, 6, and 7. Further analysis of the crystal packing of the salts indicated that a different family of additional CHsbnd O/CH2sbnd O, CH-π/CH2-π, Cπ-Cπ, Osbnd O, O-Cπ, O-π, and Cl-π associations also contribute to the stabilization and expansion of the total high-dimensional framework structures. For the coexistence of the various weak nonbonding interactions, these structures adopted a variety of

  19. Quantitative 3D Analysis of Nuclear Morphology and Heterochromatin Organization from Whole-Mount Plant Tissue Using NucleusJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desset, Sophie; Poulet, Axel; Tatout, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    Image analysis is a classical way to study nuclear organization. While nuclear organization used to be investigated by colorimetric or fluorescent labeling of DNA or specific nuclear compartments, new methods in microscopy imaging now enable qualitative and quantitative analyses of chromatin pattern, and nuclear size and shape. Several procedures have been developed to prepare samples in order to collect 3D images for the analysis of spatial chromatin organization, but only few preserve the positional information of the cell within its tissue context. Here, we describe a whole mount tissue preparation procedure coupled to DNA staining using the PicoGreen ® intercalating agent suitable for image analysis of the nucleus in living and fixed tissues. 3D Image analysis is then performed using NucleusJ, an open source ImageJ plugin, which allows for quantifying variations in nuclear morphology such as nuclear volume, sphericity, elongation, and flatness as well as in heterochromatin content and position in respect to the nuclear periphery.

  20. Uniaxial experimental study of the acoustic emission and deformation behavior of composite rock based on 3D digital image correlation (DIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-Long; Yang, Sheng-Qi; Chen, Kui; Ma, Dan; Li, Feng-Yuan; Wang, Li-Ming

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, uniaxial compression tests were carried out on a series of composite rock specimens with different dip angles, which were made from two types of rock-like material with different strength. The acoustic emission technique was used to monitor the acoustic signal characteristics of composite rock specimens during the entire loading process. At the same time, an optical non-contact 3D digital image correlation technique was used to study the evolution of axial strain field and the maximal strain field before and after the peak strength at different stress levels during the loading process. The effect of bedding plane inclination on the deformation and strength during uniaxial loading was analyzed. The methods of solving the elastic constants of hard and weak rock were described. The damage evolution process, deformation and failure mechanism, and failure mode during uniaxial loading were fully determined. The experimental results show that the θ = 0{°}-45{°} specimens had obvious plastic deformation during loading, and the brittleness of the θ = 60{°}-90{°} specimens gradually increased during the loading process. When the anisotropic angle θ increased from 0{°} to 90{°}, the peak strength, peak strain, and apparent elastic modulus all decreased initially and then increased. The failure mode of the composite rock specimen during uniaxial loading can be divided into three categories: tensile fracture across the discontinuities (θ = 0{°}-30{°}), sliding failure along the discontinuities (θ = 45{°}-75{°}), and tensile-split along the discontinuities (θ = 90{°}). The axial strain of the weak and hard rock layers in the composite rock specimen during the loading process was significantly different from that of the θ = 0{°}-45{°} specimens and was almost the same as that of the θ = 60{°}-90{°} specimens. As for the strain localization highlighted in the maximum principal strain field, the θ = 0{°}-30{°} specimens appeared in the rock

  1. 3D Graphene Functionalized by Covalent Organic Framework Thin Film as Capacitive Electrode in Alkaline Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Zeqi; Xu, Lirong; Wang, Zhikui; Li, Xiaoguang; Pan, Qinmin; Hu, Pingan; Lei, Shengbin

    2015-08-19

    To harness the electroactivity of anthraquinone as an electrode material, a great recent effort have been invested to composite anthraquinone with carbon materials to improve the conductivity. Here we report on a noncovalent way to modify three-dimensional graphene with anthraquinone moieties through on-surface synthesis of two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks. We incorporate 2,6-diamino-anthraquinone moieties into COF through Schiff-base reaction with benzene-1,3,5-tricarbaldehyde. The synthesized COF -graphene composite exhibits large specific capacitance of 31.7 mF/cm(2). Long-term galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling experiments revealed a decrease of capacitance, which was attributed to the loss of COF materials and electrostatic repulsion accumulated during charge-discharge circles which result in the poor electrical conductivity between 2D COF layers.

  2. Fabrication of 3D photonic crystals from chitosan that are responsive to organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guanbo; Yin, Yibing; Pan, Zeng; Chen, Mingxi; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yongli; Gao, Jianping

    2014-12-08

    Inspired by photonic nanostructures in nature, such as the hair-like chaetae on the body of sea mice, inverse opal photonic crystals films were fabricated with chitosan, a kind of biomacromolecule found in nature. First, monodispersed polystyrene (PS) colloidal crystal templates with different particle sizes were prepared. The inverse opal films (IOFs) were fabricated through in situ cross-linking of the PS templates. The IOFs contain periodically ordered interconnecting pores that endow the films with photonic stop bands and structural colors, which are visible to the naked eye. The IOFs exhibit rapid reversible changes in their structural colors and reflectance peaks in response to alcohols and phenols. Possible mechanisms for the shifts in the IOF's reflectance peaks are proposed. The changes in the IOFs in response to alcohols and phenols provide a potential way to visually detect these organic solvents.

  3. A 3D Ag(I) metal-organic framework for sensing luminescence and photocatalytic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hai-Ning; Liu, Li-Wei; Hao, Zeng Chuan; Cui, Guang-Hua

    2018-03-01

    A fluorescent metal-organic framework (MOF), [Ag(btx)0.5(DCTP)0.5]n (1) (H2DCTP = 2,5-dichloroterephthalic acid and btx = 1,4-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl)benzene) has been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffractions and thermogravimetry. The framework of 1 can be classified as a binodal (4,4)-connected PtS topological network. The fluorescence explorations demonstrated that 1 shows selective and sensitive detection towards Cr2O72- with high quenching efficiency of 1.92 × 104 M-1. The rapid and efficient response of 1 to Cr2O72- ion suggests that this material could be used as a luminescent sensor for Cr2O72- ion. Meanwhile the photocatalytic properties of 1 for the degradation of RhB have also been investigated under UV radiation. The possible photocatalytic mechanisms were also speculated. Hence, 1 can become multi-functional material in sensitive detection and effective removal of some environment pollutants in industrial waste water solutions.

  4. 3D Polyaniline Architecture by Concurrent Inorganic and Organic Acid Doping for Superior and Robust High Rate Supercapacitor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawli, Yogesh; Banerjee, Abhik; Dhakras, Dipti; Deo, Meenal; Bulani, Dinesh; Wadgaonkar, Prakash; Shelke, Manjusha; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2016-02-01

    A good high rate supercapacitor performance requires a fine control of morphological (surface area and pore size distribution) and electrical properties of the electrode materials. Polyaniline (PANI) is an interesting material in supercapacitor context because it stores energy Faradaically. However in conventional inorganic (e.g. HCl) acid doping, the conductivity is high but the morphological features are undesirable. On the other hand, in weak organic acid (e.g. phytic acid) doping, interesting and desirable 3D connected morphological features are attained but the conductivity is poorer. Here the synergy of the positive quality factors of these two acid doping approaches is realized by concurrent and optimized strong-inorganic (HCl) and weak-organic (phytic) acid doping, resulting in a molecular composite material that renders impressive and robust supercapacitor performance. Thus, a nearly constant high specific capacitance of 350 F g-1 is realized for the optimised case of binary doping over the entire range of 1 A g-1 to 40 A g-1 with stability of 500 cycles at 40 A g-1. Frequency dependant conductivity measurements show that the optimized co-doped case is more metallic than separately doped materials. This transport property emanates from the unique 3D single molecular character of such system.

  5. 3D Polyaniline Architecture by Concurrent Inorganic and Organic Acid Doping for Superior and Robust High Rate Supercapacitor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawli, Yogesh; Banerjee, Abhik; Dhakras, Dipti; Deo, Meenal; Bulani, Dinesh; Wadgaonkar, Prakash; Shelke, Manjusha; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2016-02-12

    A good high rate supercapacitor performance requires a fine control of morphological (surface area and pore size distribution) and electrical properties of the electrode materials. Polyaniline (PANI) is an interesting material in supercapacitor context because it stores energy Faradaically. However in conventional inorganic (e.g. HCl) acid doping, the conductivity is high but the morphological features are undesirable. On the other hand, in weak organic acid (e.g. phytic acid) doping, interesting and desirable 3D connected morphological features are attained but the conductivity is poorer. Here the synergy of the positive quality factors of these two acid doping approaches is realized by concurrent and optimized strong-inorganic (HCl) and weak-organic (phytic) acid doping, resulting in a molecular composite material that renders impressive and robust supercapacitor performance. Thus, a nearly constant high specific capacitance of 350 F g(-1) is realized for the optimised case of binary doping over the entire range of 1 A g(-1) to 40 A g(-1) with stability of 500 cycles at 40 A g(-1). Frequency dependant conductivity measurements show that the optimized co-doped case is more metallic than separately doped materials. This transport property emanates from the unique 3D single molecular character of such system.

  6. The northern Lesser Antilles oblique subduction zone: new insight about the upper plate deformation, 3D slab geometry and interplate coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaillou, B.; Laurencin, M.; Graindorge, D.; Klingelhoefer, F.

    2017-12-01

    In subduction zones, the 3D geometry of the plate interface is thought to be a key parameter for the control of margin tectonic deformation, interplate coupling and seismogenic behavior. In the northern Caribbean subduction, precisely between the Virgin Islands and northern Lesser Antilles, these subjects remain controversial or unresolved. During the ANTITHESIS cruises (2013-2016), we recorded wide-angle seismic, multichannel reflection seismic and bathymetric data along this zone in order to constrain the nature and the geometry of the subducting and upper plate. This experiment results in the following conclusions: 1) The Anegada Passage is a 450-km long structure accross the forearc related to the extension due to the collision with the Bahamas platform. 2) More recently, the tectonic partitioning due to the plate convergence obliquity re-activated the Anegada Passage in the left-lateral strike-slip system. The partitioning also generated the left-lateral strike-slip Bunce Fault, separating the accretionary prism from the forearc. 3) Offshore of the Virgin Islands margin, the subducting plate shows normal faults parallel to the ancient spreading center that correspond to the primary fabric of the oceanic crust. In contrast, offshore of Barbuda Island, the oceanic crust fabric is unresolved (fracture zone?, exhumed mantle? ). 4) In the direction of the plate convergence vector, the slab deepening angle decreases northward. It results in a shallower slab beneath the Virgin Islands Platform compared to the St Martin-Barbuda forearc. In the past, the collision of the Bahamas platform likely changed the geodynamic settings of the northeastern corner of the Caribbean subduction zone and we present a revised geodynamic history of the region. Currently, various features are likely to control the 3D geometry of the slab: the margin convexity, the convergence obliquity, the heterogeneity of the primary fabric of the oceanic crust and the Bahamas docking. We suggest that

  7. Four new 3D metal-organic frameworks constructed by the asymmetrical pentacarboxylate: gas sorption behaviour and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yang-Tian; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Wu, Yun-Long; Li, Jiang; Xi, Zheng-Ping; Wang, Yao-Yu; Hou, Lei

    2016-10-04

    By using an asymmetrical rigid pentacarboxylic acid ligand, 2,4-di(3',5'-dicarboxylphenyl)benzoic acid (H 5 L), four new three-dimensional (3D) metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), namely {[Cu 2 (HL)(H 2 O) 2 ]·2DMF·2H 2 O} n (1), {[Co 2 (L)(DMA)]·H 2 N(Me) 2 } n (2), {[Co 2 (L)(H 2 O)]·H 2 N(Me) 2 } n (3), {[Mn 2 (L)(DMF)(H 2 O)]·H 2 N(Me) 2 } n (4), were solvothermally synthesized. H 5 L in 1-4 shows different coordination modes and can easily form various metal clusters (secondary building units, SBUs) in the final structures. 1 is a 3D porous framework with a (4,4)-connected pts topology based on the [Cu 2 (COO) 4 ] paddlewheel SBU, wherein six SBUs are connected by twelve HL 4- to get an unprecedented Cu 12 hendecahedron nanocage. 2-4 possess similar dinuclear [M 2 (COO) 5 ] SBUs (M = Co, Mn), which are further extended by L 5- to give rise to 3D frameworks with the uncommon (5,5)-connected nia-5,5-P2 1 /c and bnn topologies. In addition, the desolvated framework of 1 contains polar channels decorated with uncoordinated carboxylate groups, leading to selective adsorption for CO 2 over CH 4 at 195, 273 and 298 K. Moreover, the magnetic properties of 1-4 show that there exist antiferromagnetic interactions between metal ions.

  8. A model to incorporate organ deformation in the evaluation of dose/volume relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, D.; Jaffray, D.; Wong, J.; Brabbins, D.; Martinez, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Measurements of internal organ motion have demonstrated that daily organ deformation exists during the course of radiation treatment. However, a model to evaluate the resultant dose delivered to a daily deformed organ remains a difficult challenge. Current methods which model such organ deformation as rigid body motion in the dose calculation for treatment planning evaluation are incorrect and misleading. In this study, a new model for treatment planning evaluation is introduced which incorporates patient specific information of daily organ deformation and setup variation. The model was also used to retrospectively analyze the actual treatment data measured using daily CT scans for 5 patients with prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: The model assumes that for each patient, the organ of interest can be measured during the first few treatment days. First, the volume of each organ is delineated from each of the daily measurements and cumulated in a 3D bit-map. A tissue occupancy distribution is then constructed with the 50% isodensity representing the mean, or effective, organ volume. During the course of treatment, each voxel in the effective organ volume is assumed to move inside a local 3D neighborhood with a specific distribution function. The neighborhood and the distribution function are deduced from the positions and shapes of the organ in the first few measurements using the biomechanics model of viscoelastic body. For each voxel, the local distribution function is then convolved with the spatial dose distribution. The latter includes also the variation in dose due to daily setup error. As a result, the cumulative dose to the voxel incorporates the effects of daily setup variation and organ deformation. A ''variation adjusted'' dose volume histogram, aDVH, for the effective organ volume can then be constructed for the purpose of treatment evaluation and optimization. Up to 20 daily CT scans and daily portal images for 5 patients with prostate

  9. Left Atrial Deformation Analysis in Patients with Corrected Tetralogy of Fallot by 3D Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography (from the MAGYAR-Path Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kálmán Havasi

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Three-dimensional (3D echocardiography coupled with speckle-tracking echocardiographic (STE capability is a novel methodology which has been demontrated to be useful for the assessment of left atrial (LA volumes and functional properties. There is increased scientific interest on myocardial deformation analysis in adult patients with corrected tetralogy of Fallot (cTOF. Objectives: To compare LA volumes, volume-based functional properties and strain parameters between cTOF patients and age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Methods: The study population consisted of 19 consecutive adult patients with cTOF in sinus rhythm nursing at the University of Szeged, Hungary (mean age: 37.9 ± 11.3 years, 8 men, who had repair at the age of 4.1 ± 2.5 years. They all had undergone standard transthoracic two-dimensional Doppler echocardiographic study extended with 3DSTE. Their results were compared to 23 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean age: 39.2 ± 10.6 years, 14 men. Results: Increased LA volumes and reduced LA emptying fractions respecting cardiac cycle could be demonstrated in cTOF patients compared to controls. LA stroke volumes featuring all LA functions showed no differences between the 2 groups examined. LA global and mean segmental uni- and multidirectional peak strains featuring LA reservoir function were found to be diminished in adult patients with cTOF as compared to controls. Similarly to peak strains reduced global and mean segmental LA strains at atrial contraction characterizing atrial booster pump function could be demonstrated in cTOF patients as compared to controls. Conclusions: Significant deterioration of all LA functions could be demonstrated in adult patients with cTOF late after repair.

  10. Left Atrial Deformation Analysis in Patients with Corrected Tetralogy of Fallot by 3D Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography (from the MAGYAR-Path Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havasi, Kálmán; Domsik, Péter; Kalapos, Anita; McGhie, Jackie S.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Forster, Tamás; Nemes, Attila

    2017-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography coupled with speckle-tracking echocardiographic (STE) capability is a novel methodology which has been demontrated to be useful for the assessment of left atrial (LA) volumes and functional properties. There is increased scientific interest on myocardial deformation analysis in adult patients with corrected tetralogy of Fallot (cTOF). Objectives To compare LA volumes, volume-based functional properties and strain parameters between cTOF patients and age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Methods The study population consisted of 19 consecutive adult patients with cTOF in sinus rhythm nursing at the University of Szeged, Hungary (mean age: 37.9 ± 11.3 years, 8 men, who had repair at the age of 4.1 ± 2.5 years). They all had undergone standard transthoracic two-dimensional Doppler echocardiographic study extended with 3DSTE. Their results were compared to 23 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean age: 39.2 ± 10.6 years, 14 men). Results Increased LA volumes and reduced LA emptying fractions respecting cardiac cycle could be demonstrated in cTOF patients compared to controls. LA stroke volumes featuring all LA functions showed no differences between the 2 groups examined. LA global and mean segmental uni- and multidirectional peak strains featuring LA reservoir function were found to be diminished in adult patients with cTOF as compared to controls. Similarly to peak strains reduced global and mean segmental LA strains at atrial contraction characterizing atrial booster pump function could be demonstrated in cTOF patients as compared to controls. Conclusions Significant deterioration of all LA functions could be demonstrated in adult patients with cTOF late after repair. PMID:28327874

  11. 3D reconstruction modeling of bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells: Effect of the complexity of the boundary on the morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Jeong, Daun; Kim, SeongMin; Choi, Yeong Suk; Ihn, Soo-Ghang; Yun, Sungyoung; Lim, Younhee; Lee, Eunha; Park, Gyeong-Su

    2016-02-01

    Although the morphology of the active layer in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic (BHJ-OPV) cells is critical for determining the quantum efficiency (QE), predicting the real QE for a 3-dimensional (3D) morphology has long been difficult because structural information on the composition complexity of donor (D): acceptor (A) blends with small domain size is limited to 2D observations via various image-processing techniques. To overcome this, we reconstruct the 3D morphology by using an isotropic statistical approach based on 2D energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM) images. This new reconstruction method is validated to obtain the internal QE by using a dynamic Monte Carlo simulation in the BHJ-OPV system with different additives such as 4 vol% 1-chloronaphthalene (CN) and 4 vol% 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) (compared to the case of no additive); the resulting trend is compared with the experimental QE. Therefore, our developed method can be used to predict the real charge transport performance in the OPV system accurately.

  12. TU-AB-202-02: Deformable Image Registration Accuracy Between External Beam Radiotherapy and HDR Brachytherapy CT Images for Cervical Cancer Using a 3D-Printed Deformable Pelvis Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Y; Kadoya, N; Ito, K; Chiba, M; Nakajima, Y; Dobashi, S; Takeda, K; Jingu, K; Kuroda, Y; Sato, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate deformable image registration (DIR) between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR brachytherapy (BT) CT images in cervical cancer is challenging. DSC has been evaluated only on the basis of the consistency of the structure, and its use does not guarantee an anatomically reasonable deformation. We evaluate the DIR accuracy for cervical cancer with DSC and anatomical landmarks using a 3D-printed pelvis phantom. Methods: A 3D-printed, deformable female pelvis phantom was created on the basis of the patient’s CT image. Urethane and silicon were used as materials for creating the uterus and bladder, respectively, in the phantom. We performed DIR in two cases: case-A with a full bladder (170 ml) in both the EBRT and BT images and case-B with a full bladder in the BT image and a half bladder (100 ml) in the EBRT image. DIR was evaluated using DSCs and 70 uterus and bladder landmarks. A Hybrid intensity and structure DIR algorithm with two settings (RayStation) was used. Results: In the case-A, DSCs of the intensity-based DIR were 0.93 and 0.85 for the bladder and uterus, respectively, whereas those of hybrid-DIR were 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. The mean landmark error values of intensity-based DIR were 0.73±0.29 and 1.70±0.19 cm for the bladder and uterus, respectively, whereas those of Hybrid-DIR were 0.43±0.33 and 1.23±0.25 cm, respectively. In both cases, the Hybrid-DIR accuracy was better than the intensity-based DIR accuracy for both evaluation methods. However, for several bladder landmarks, the Hybrid-DIR landmark errors were larger than the corresponding intensity-based DIR errors (e.g., 2.26 vs 1.25 cm). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that Hybrid-DIR can perform with a better accuracy than the intensity-based DIR for both DSC and landmark errors; however, Hybrid-DIR shows a larger landmark error for some landmarks because the technique focuses on both the structure and intensity.

  13. TU-AB-202-02: Deformable Image Registration Accuracy Between External Beam Radiotherapy and HDR Brachytherapy CT Images for Cervical Cancer Using a 3D-Printed Deformable Pelvis Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyasaka, Y; Kadoya, N; Ito, K; Chiba, M; Nakajima, Y; Dobashi, S; Takeda, K; Jingu, K [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Kuroda, Y [Cybermedia Center, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan); Sato, K [Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accurate deformable image registration (DIR) between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR brachytherapy (BT) CT images in cervical cancer is challenging. DSC has been evaluated only on the basis of the consistency of the structure, and its use does not guarantee an anatomically reasonable deformation. We evaluate the DIR accuracy for cervical cancer with DSC and anatomical landmarks using a 3D-printed pelvis phantom. Methods: A 3D-printed, deformable female pelvis phantom was created on the basis of the patient’s CT image. Urethane and silicon were used as materials for creating the uterus and bladder, respectively, in the phantom. We performed DIR in two cases: case-A with a full bladder (170 ml) in both the EBRT and BT images and case-B with a full bladder in the BT image and a half bladder (100 ml) in the EBRT image. DIR was evaluated using DSCs and 70 uterus and bladder landmarks. A Hybrid intensity and structure DIR algorithm with two settings (RayStation) was used. Results: In the case-A, DSCs of the intensity-based DIR were 0.93 and 0.85 for the bladder and uterus, respectively, whereas those of hybrid-DIR were 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. The mean landmark error values of intensity-based DIR were 0.73±0.29 and 1.70±0.19 cm for the bladder and uterus, respectively, whereas those of Hybrid-DIR were 0.43±0.33 and 1.23±0.25 cm, respectively. In both cases, the Hybrid-DIR accuracy was better than the intensity-based DIR accuracy for both evaluation methods. However, for several bladder landmarks, the Hybrid-DIR landmark errors were larger than the corresponding intensity-based DIR errors (e.g., 2.26 vs 1.25 cm). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that Hybrid-DIR can perform with a better accuracy than the intensity-based DIR for both DSC and landmark errors; however, Hybrid-DIR shows a larger landmark error for some landmarks because the technique focuses on both the structure and intensity.

  14. 3D full-field quantification of cell-induced large deformations in fibrillar biomaterials by combining non-rigid image registration with label-free second harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge-Peñas, Alvaro; Bové, Hannelore; Sanen, Kathleen; Vaeyens, Marie-Mo; Steuwe, Christian; Roeffaers, Maarten; Ameloot, Marcel; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2017-08-01

    To advance our current understanding of cell-matrix mechanics and its importance for biomaterials development, advanced three-dimensional (3D) measurement techniques are necessary. Cell-induced deformations of the surrounding matrix are commonly derived from the displacement of embedded fiducial markers, as part of traction force microscopy (TFM) procedures. However, these fluorescent markers may alter the mechanical properties of the matrix or can be taken up by the embedded cells, and therefore influence cellular behavior and fate. In addition, the currently developed methods for calculating cell-induced deformations are generally limited to relatively small deformations, with displacement magnitudes and strains typically of the order of a few microns and less than 10% respectively. Yet, large, complex deformation fields can be expected from cells exerting tractions in fibrillar biomaterials, like collagen. To circumvent these hurdles, we present a technique for the 3D full-field quantification of large cell-generated deformations in collagen, without the need of fiducial markers. We applied non-rigid, Free Form Deformation (FFD)-based image registration to compute full-field displacements induced by MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts in a collagen type I hydrogel by solely relying on second harmonic generation (SHG) from the collagen fibrils. By executing comparative experiments, we show that comparable displacement fields can be derived from both fibrils and fluorescent beads. SHG-based fibril imaging can circumvent all described disadvantages of using fiducial markers. This approach allows measuring 3D full-field deformations under large displacement (of the order of 10 μm) and strain regimes (up to 40%). As such, it holds great promise for the study of large cell-induced deformations as an inherent component of cell-biomaterial interactions and cell-mediated biomaterial remodeling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reducing uncertainties in volumetric image based deformable organ registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.; Yan, D.

    2003-01-01

    Applying volumetric image feedback in radiotherapy requires image based deformable organ registration. The foundation of this registration is the ability of tracking subvolume displacement in organs of interest. Subvolume displacement can be calculated by applying biomechanics model and the finite element method to human organs manifested on the multiple volumetric images. The calculation accuracy, however, is highly dependent on the determination of the corresponding organ boundary points. Lacking sufficient information for such determination, uncertainties are inevitable--thus diminishing the registration accuracy. In this paper, a method of consuming energy minimization was developed to reduce these uncertainties. Starting from an initial selection of organ boundary point correspondence on volumetric image sets, the subvolume displacement and stress distribution of the whole organ are calculated and the consumed energy due to the subvolume displacements is computed accordingly. The corresponding positions of the initially selected boundary points are then iteratively optimized to minimize the consuming energy under geometry and stress constraints. In this study, a rectal wall delineated from patient CT image was artificially deformed using a computer simulation and utilized to test the optimization. Subvolume displacements calculated based on the optimized boundary point correspondence were compared to the true displacements, and the calculation accuracy was thereby evaluated. Results demonstrate that a significant improvement on the accuracy of the deformable organ registration can be achieved by applying the consuming energy minimization in the organ deformation calculation

  16. The microenvironment determines the breast cancer cells' phenotype: organization of MCF7 cells in 3D cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Silva; Maffini, Maricel V; Soto, Ana M; Sonnenschein, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interactions mediate breast development, and the initiation and progression of breast cancer. In the present study, we developed 3-dimensional (3D) in vitro models to study breast cancer tissue organization and the role of the microenvironment in phenotypic determination. The human breast cancer MCF7 cells were grown alone or co-cultured with primary human breast fibroblasts. Cells were embedded in matrices containing either type I collagen or a combination of reconstituted basement membrane proteins and type I collagen. The cultures were carried out for up to 6 weeks. For every time point (1-6 weeks), the gels were fixed and processed for histology, and whole-mounted for confocal microscopy evaluation. The epithelial structures were characterized utilizing immunohistochemical techniques; their area and proliferation index were measured using computerized morphometric analysis. Statistical differences between groups were analyzed by ANOVA, Dunnett's T3 post-hoc test and chi-square. Most of the MCF7 cells grown alone within a collagen matrix died during the first two weeks; those that survived organized into large, round and solid clusters. The presence of fibroblasts in collagen gels reduced MCF7 cell death, induced cell polarity, and the formation of round and elongated epithelial structures containing a lumen. The addition of reconstituted basement membrane to collagen gels by itself had also survival and organizational effects on the MCF7 cells. Regardless of the presence of fibroblasts, the MCF7 cells both polarized and formed a lumen. The addition of fibroblasts to the gel containing reconstituted basement membrane and collagen induced the formation of elongated structures. Our results indicate that a matrix containing both type I collagen and reconstituted basement membrane, and the presence of normal breast fibroblasts constitute the minimal permissive microenvironment to induce near-complete tumor phenotype reversion. These human

  17. Porosity and permeability determination of organic-rich Posidonia shales based on 3-D analyses by FIB-SEM microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grathoff, Georg H.; Peltz, Markus; Enzmann, Frieder; Kaufhold, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this study is to better understand the porosity and permeability in shales to improve modelling fluid and gas flow related to shale diagenesis. Two samples (WIC and HAD) were investigated, both mid-Jurassic organic-rich Posidonia shales from Hils area, central Germany of different maturity (WIC R0 0.53 % and HAD R0 1.45 %). The method for image collection was focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For image and data analysis Avizo and GeoDict was used. Porosity was calculated from segmented 3-D FIB based images and permeability was simulated by a Navier Stokes-Brinkman solver in the segmented images. Results show that the quantity and distribution of pore clusters and pores (≥ 40 nm) are similar. The largest pores are located within carbonates and clay minerals, whereas the smallest pores are within the matured organic matter. Orientation of the pores calculated as pore paths showed minor directional differences between the samples. Both samples have no continuous connectivity of pore clusters along the axes in the x, y, and z direction on the scale of 10 to 20 of micrometer, but do show connectivity on the micrometer scale. The volume of organic matter in the studied volume is representative of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the samples. Organic matter does show axis connectivity in the x, y, and z directions. With increasing maturity the porosity in organic matter increases from close to 0 to more than 5 %. These pores are small and in the large organic particles have little connection to the mineral matrix. Continuous pore size distributions are compared with mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) data. Differences between both methods are caused by resolution limits of the FIB-SEM and by the development of small pores during the maturation of the organic matter. Calculations show no permeability when only considering visible pores due to the lack of axis connectivity. Adding the organic matter with a

  18. Alterations of left ventricular deformation and cardiac sympathetic derangement in patients with systolic heart failure: a 3D speckle tracking echocardiography and cardiac {sup 123}I-MIBG study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leosco, Dario; Parisi, Valentina; Pagano, Gennaro; Femminella, Grazia Daniela; Bevilacqua, Agnese; Formisano, Roberto; Ferro, Gaetana; De Lucia, Claudio; Ferrara, Nicola [University Federico II, Department of Translational Medical Science, Naples (Italy); Pellegrino, Teresa [Italian National Research Council (CNR), Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Science, Naples (Italy); Paolillo, Stefania [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Science, Naples (Italy); SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples (Italy); Prastaro, Maria; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Science, Naples (Italy); Rengo, Giuseppe [University Federico II, Department of Translational Medical Science, Naples (Italy); Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Istituto di Telese, Benevento, BN (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Myocardial contractile function is under the control of cardiac sympathetic activity. Three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (3D-STE) and cardiac imaging with {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-MIBG) are two sophisticated techniques for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) deformation and sympathetic innervation, respectively, which offer important prognostic information in patients with heart failure (HF). The purpose of this investigation was to explore, in patients with systolic HF, the relationship between LV deformation assessed by 3D-STE and cardiac sympathetic derangement evaluated by {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging. We prospectively studied 75 patients with systolic HF. All patients underwent a 3D-STE study (longitudinal, circumferential, area and radial) and {sup 123}I-MIBG planar and SPECT cardiac imaging. 3D-STE longitudinal, circumferential and area strain values were correlated with {sup 123}I-MIBG late heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio and late SPECT total defect score. After stratification of the patients according to ischaemic or nonischaemic HF aetiology, we observed a good correlation of all 3D-STE measurements with late H/M ratio and SPECT data in the ischaemic group, but in patients with HF of nonischaemic aetiology, no correlation was found between LV deformation and cardiac sympathetic activity. At the regional level, the strongest correlation between LV deformation and adrenergic innervation was found for the left anterior descending coronary artery distribution territory for all four 3D-STE values. In multivariate linear regression analyses, including age, gender, LV ejection fraction, NYHA class, body mass index, heart rate and HF aetiology, only 3D-STE area and radial strain values significantly predicted cardiac sympathetic derangement on {sup 123}I-MIBG late SPECT. This study indicated that 3D-STE measurements are correlated with {sup 123}I-MIBG planar and SPECT data. Furthermore, 3D-STE area and radial strain values

  19. Positional isomerism-driven two 3D pillar-layered metal-organic frameworks: Syntheses, topological structures and photoluminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yayong; Zhao, Siwei; Ma, Haoran; Han, Yi; Liu, Kang; Wang, Lei, E-mail: inorchemwl@126.com

    2016-06-15

    Two novel three-dimensional (3D) pillar-layered metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), namely [Zn{sub 2}(μ{sub 2}-OH)(boaba)(1,4-bmimb)]{sub n} (1) and {[Zn_5K_2(μ_2-H_2O)_2(boaba)_4(1,2-bmimb)_2(H_2O)_2]·H_2O}{sub n} (2), were prepared by hydrothermal reactions (H{sub 3}boaba=3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid; 1,4-bmimb=1,4-bis((2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene; 1,2-bmimb =1,2-bis((2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene). Notably, 1 exhibits a (3,5)-connected binodal (6{sup 3})(6{sup 9}·8)-gra net with binuclear [Zn{sub 2}(μ{sub 2}-OH)(COO)]{sup 2+} clusters, while 2 shows a novel (4,4,5,9)-connected 4-nodal net constructed from the unique Zn(II)-K(I) heterometal rod-like substructures. The results indicate that the disposition of the 2-methylimidazolyl groups of bis(imidazole) ligands have a significant effect on structural diversity. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of 1 and 2 have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Two novel 3D pillar-layered metal-organic coordination networks with aromatic multicarboxylate anion and bis(imidazole) ligands have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Display Omitted - Highlights: • It is rarely reported that metal-organic frameworks prepared with 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid. • Two metal-organic frameworks based on positional isomeric ligands were synthesized and structurally characterized. • Compond 1 displays unique (3,5)-connected binodal gra topology. • Compound 2 exhibits (4,4,5,9)-connected 4-nodal topology based on the Zn(II)-K(I) heterometal rod-like substructures. • The photoluminescence properties of compound 1 and 2 have been investigated.

  20. 3D reconstruction of pentacene structural organization in top-contact OTFTs via resonant soft X-ray reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Raffaella; Nardi, Marco Vittorio; Toccoli, Tullio; Verucchi, Roberto; Dinelli, Franco; Gelsomini, Carolina; Koshmak, Konstantin; Giglia, Angelo; Nannarone, Stefano; Pasquali, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Herein, we describe the use of soft X-ray reflectivity at the carbon K-edge to study the molecular organization (orientation, structure, and morphology) of pentacene active films in a top-contact transistor geometry. This technique is not affected by sample charging, and it can be applied in the case of insulating substrates. In addition, the sampling depth is not limited to the near-surface region, giving access to buried device interfaces (metal/organic and dielectric/organic). Spectral lineshape simulations, based on ab-initio calculations using a realistic 3D layer-by-layer model, allow us to unravel the details of the molecular organization in all the specific and crucial areas of the active film, overcoming the limitations of conventional approaches. The tilt angle of the long molecular axis in the whole film is found to progressively decrease with respect to the substrate normal from 25° to 0° with the increasing film thickness. A full vertical alignment, optimal for in-plane charge hopping, is reached only after the complete formation of the first five monolayers. Remarkably, starting from the first one in contact with the dielectric substrate, all the monolayers in the stack show a change in orientation with the increasing thickness. On the other hand, at the buried interface with a gold top-contact, the molecules assume a flat orientation that only propagates for two or three monolayers into the organic film. Top-contact devices with the highest performances can thus be obtained using films of at least ten monolayers. This explains the observed thickness dependence of charge mobility in pentacene transistors.

  1. Bioprinted 3D Primary Liver Tissues Allow Assessment of Organ-Level Response to Clinical Drug Induced Toxicity In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah G Nguyen

    Full Text Available Modeling clinically relevant tissue responses using cell models poses a significant challenge for drug development, in particular for drug induced liver injury (DILI. This is mainly because existing liver models lack longevity and tissue-level complexity which limits their utility in predictive toxicology. In this study, we established and characterized novel bioprinted human liver tissue mimetics comprised of patient-derived hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells in a defined architecture. Scaffold-free assembly of different cell types in an in vivo-relevant architecture allowed for histologic analysis that revealed distinct intercellular hepatocyte junctions, CD31+ endothelial networks, and desmin positive, smooth muscle actin negative quiescent stellates. Unlike what was seen in 2D hepatocyte cultures, the tissues maintained levels of ATP, Albumin as well as expression and drug-induced enzyme activity of Cytochrome P450s over 4 weeks in culture. To assess the ability of the 3D liver cultures to model tissue-level DILI, dose responses of Trovafloxacin, a drug whose hepatotoxic potential could not be assessed by standard pre-clinical models, were compared to the structurally related non-toxic drug Levofloxacin. Trovafloxacin induced significant, dose-dependent toxicity at clinically relevant doses (≤ 4uM. Interestingly, Trovafloxacin toxicity was observed without lipopolysaccharide stimulation and in the absence of resident macrophages in contrast to earlier reports. Together, these results demonstrate that 3D bioprinted liver tissues can both effectively model DILI and distinguish between highly related compounds with differential profile. Thus, the combination of patient-derived primary cells with bioprinting technology here for the first time demonstrates superior performance in terms of mimicking human drug response in a known target organ at the tissue level.

  2. A model to accumulate fractionated dose in a deforming organ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Di; Jaffray, D.A.; Wong, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Measurements of internal organ motion have demonstrated that daily organ deformation exists throughout the course of radiation treatment. However, a method of constructing the resultant dose delivered to the organ volume remains a difficult challenge. In this study, a model to quantify internal organ motion and a method to construct a cumulative dose in a deforming organ are introduced. Methods and Materials: A biomechanical model of an elastic body is used to quantify patient organ motion in the process of radiation therapy. Intertreatment displacements of volume elements in an organ of interest is calculated by applying an finite element method with boundary conditions, obtained from multiple daily computed tomography (CT) measurements. Therefore, by incorporating also the measurements of daily setup error, daily dose delivered to a deforming organ can be accumulated by tracking the position of volume elements in the organ. Furthermore, distribution of patient-specific organ motion is also predicted during the early phase of treatment delivery using the daily measurements, and the cumulative dose distribution in the organ can then be estimated. This dose distribution will be updated whenever a new measurement becomes available, and used to reoptimize the ongoing treatment. Results: An integrated process to accumulate dosage in a daily deforming organ was implemented. In this process, intertreatment organ motion and setup error were systematically quantified, and incorporated in the calculation of the cumulative dose. An example of the rectal wall motion in a prostate treatment was applied to test the model. The displacements of volume elements in the rectal wall, as well as the resultant doses, were calculated. Conclusion: This study is intended to provide a systematic framework to incorporate daily patient-specific organ motion and setup error in the reconstruction of the cumulative dose distribution in an organ of interest. The realistic dose

  3. QSPR study of absorption maxima of organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells based on 3D descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Lei; Liang, Guijie; Wang, Luoxin; Shen, Xiaolin; Xu, Weilin

    2010-07-01

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) study was performed for the prediction of the absorption maxima ( λmax) of organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The entire set of 70 dyes was divided into a training set of 53 dyes and a test set of 17 dyes according to Kennard and Stones algorithm. Three-dimensional (3D) descriptors were calculated to represent the dye molecules. A ten-descriptor model, with a squared correlation coefficient ( R2) of 0.9543 and a standard error of estimation ( s) of 14.7 nm, was produced by using the stepwise multilinear regression analysis (MLRA) on the training set. The reliability of the proposed model was further illustrated using various evaluation techniques: leave-one-out cross-validation procedure, randomization tests, and validation through the external test set. All descriptors involved in the model were derived solely from the chemical structure of the dye molecules, which makes the model very useful to estimate the λmax of dyes before they are actually synthesized.

  4. Atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants - development of a 3-d dynamical transport model covering the northern hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K. M.; Christensen, J. H.; Geels, C.; Frohn, L. M.; Brandt, J.

    2003-04-01

    The Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM) is a 3-D dynamical atmospheric transport model originally developed to describe the atmospheric transport of sulphur, lead, and mercury to the Arctic. The model has been validated carefully for these compounds. A new version of DEHM is currently being developed to describe the atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which are toxic, lipophilic and bio-accumulating compounds showing great persistence in the environment. The model has a horizontal resolution of 150 km x 150 km and 18 vertical layers, and it is driven by meteorological data from the numerical weather prediction model MM5V2. During environmental cycling POPs can be deposited and re-emitted several times before reaching a final destination. A description of the exchange processes between the land/ocean surfaces and the atmosphere is included in the model to account for this multi-hop transport. The present model version describes the atmospheric transport of the pesticide alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH). Other POPs may be included when proper data on emissions and physical-chemical parameters becomes available. The model-processes and the first model results are presented. The atmospheric transport of alpha-HCH for the 1990s is well described by the model.

  5. Modelling atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants in the Northern Hemisphere with a 3-D dynamical model: DEHM-POP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K. M.; Christensen, J. H.; Brandt, J.; Frohn, L. M.; Geels, C.

    2004-03-01

    The Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM) is a 3-D dynamical atmospheric transport model originally developed to describe the atmospheric transport of sulphur into the Arctic. A new version of the model, DEHM-POP, developed to study the atmospheric transport and environmental fate of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is presented. During environmental cycling, POPs can be deposited and re-emitted several times before reaching a final destination. A description of the exchange processes between the land/ocean surfaces and the atmosphere is included in the model to account for this multi-hop transport. The α-isomer of the pesticide hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH) is used as tracer in the model development. The structure of the model and processes included are described in detail. The results from a model simulation showing the atmospheric transport for the years 1991 to 1998 are presented and evaluated against measurements. The annual averaged atmospheric concentration of α-HCH for the 1990s is well described by the model; however, the shorter-term average concentration for most of the stations is not well captured. This indicates that the present simple surface description needs to be refined to get a better description of the air-surface exchange proceses of POPs.

  6. A workflow to process 3D+time microscopy images of developing organisms and reconstruct their cell lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Emmanuel; Savy, Thierry; Rizzi, Barbara; Melani, Camilo; Stašová, Olga; Fabrèges, Dimitri; Špir, Róbert; Hammons, Mark; Čúnderlík, Róbert; Recher, Gaëlle; Lombardot, Benoît; Duloquin, Louise; Colin, Ingrid; Kollár, Jozef; Desnoulez, Sophie; Affaticati, Pierre; Maury, Benoît; Boyreau, Adeline; Nief, Jean-Yves; Calvat, Pascal; Vernier, Philippe; Frain, Monique; Lutfalla, Georges; Kergosien, Yannick; Suret, Pierre; Remešíková, Mariana; Doursat, René; Sarti, Alessandro; Mikula, Karol; Peyriéras, Nadine; Bourgine, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative and systematic analysis of embryonic cell dynamics from in vivo 3D+time image data sets is a major challenge at the forefront of developmental biology. Despite recent breakthroughs in the microscopy imaging of living systems, producing an accurate cell lineage tree for any developing organism remains a difficult task. We present here the BioEmergences workflow integrating all reconstruction steps from image acquisition and processing to the interactive visualization of reconstructed data. Original mathematical methods and algorithms underlie image filtering, nucleus centre detection, nucleus and membrane segmentation, and cell tracking. They are demonstrated on zebrafish, ascidian and sea urchin embryos with stained nuclei and membranes. Subsequent validation and annotations are carried out using Mov-IT, a custom-made graphical interface. Compared with eight other software tools, our workflow achieved the best lineage score. Delivered in standalone or web service mode, BioEmergences and Mov-IT offer a unique set of tools for in silico experimental embryology. PMID:26912388

  7. 3D deformation in strike-slip systems: Analogue modelling and numerical restoration Deformación 3D en sistemas de rumbo: modelación analógica y restauración numérica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel González

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Regional and local strike-slip systems in Chile are complex and pose interesting questions, such as the interaction between strike-slip and reverse faults, how they evolve, and the relationship between shortening, rotation and uplift. Within this context, we developed a new analytical method based on analogue and numerical modelling applied to 3D, pure and transtensional-transpressional strike-slip systems. Analogue modelling results indicate that in restraining stepovers of strike-slip fault systems, where antiformal pop-up structures are usually formed, pre-existent basement structures with a high angle to the main strike-slip fault will generate a higher rotation of blocks. However, when these structures are oriented at a high angle with respect to the main stress convergence vector, the rotation will be less and therefore a higher tendency to uplift will be produced. These results were applied to NW- and SE-striking basement faults oblique to N-S mega-thrust faults in central Chile (32°-35°S, for which we propose a simultaneous development based on the analogue model results. Moreover, we propose that strike-slip movement occurred on thrust faults in central Chile. Furthermore, we performed a numerical restoration of an analogue experiment which modeled a pure strike-slip system, and concluded that the restoration is very sensitive to shortening data as well as to rotational data. These results are extremely important for future numerical and regional analysis of strike-slip systems.Los sistemas de rumbo regionales y locales en Chile son complejos y plantean interesantes preguntas, tales como la interacción entre fallas de rumbo y fallas inversas, cómo evolucionan ellas, y la relación entre acortamiento, rotación y alzamiento. En este contexto, desarrollamos un nuevo método analítico basado en modelamiento analógico y numérico de sistemas de rumbo de cizalle puro y sistemas transpresionales-trantensionales en 3D. Los resultados del

  8. Novel Organic Materials for Multi-photon Photopolymerization and Photografting: Powerful Tools for Precise Microfabracation and Functionalization in 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Two-photon excitation provides the possibility of the activation of chemical or physical processes with high spatial resolution in 3D. Such strategy has been widely used in microfabrication of photonic crystals, polymer-based optical waveguides on integrated circuit boards, high-density 3D optical data storage and other industries requiring high precision. Since the photo-activated chemical or physical processes are confined only within the small focal volume, excellent spatial control could be obtained. Moreover, the excitation source with long wavelength offers the advantages of deeper tissue penetration and less photodamage, making 2PA especially suitable for various biological applications, such as bioimaging and in-vivo biofabrications. The development of novel two-photon absorption (2PA) active organic materials is essential to realize the desired functions. The first part of the thesis focuses on the novel 2PA photoinitiators (2PIs) used for two-photon induced photopolymerization (2PP), a versatile technique for precise 3D microfabrications. High initiation efficiency is the most important character for an efficient PI. Based on a potent lead structure 1,5-bis(4-(N,N-dibutylamino) phenyl)penta-1,4-diyn-3-one, several aromatic ketone-based 2PIs containing triple bonds and dialkylamino groups were synthesized via Sonogashira coupling reactions. 2, 7-substituted fluorenone-based PI B3FL, with the largest 2PA cross section of 440 GM at 800 nm, exhibited the broadest processing windows among the investigated PIs. The double bonds conversion of the cross-linking polymeric network and the mechanical properties of the microstructures were also evaluated by FTIR and nanoindentation measurements, respectively. Beside initiation efficiency of PIs, the ease and cost of preparation are also critical factors from practical aspect. To overcome the problem of the reported 2PIs derived from the complicated syntheses and expensive catalysts, a series of linear and cyclic

  9. Acquired experience on organizing 3D S.UN.COP: international course to support nuclear license by user training in the areas of scaling, uncertainty, and 3D thermal-hydraulics/neutron-kinetics coupled codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petruzzi, Alessandro; D' Auria, Francesco [University of Pisa, San Piero a Grado (Italy). Nuclear Research Group San Piero a Grado (GRNSPG); Galetti, Regina, E-mail: regina@cnen.gov.b [National Commission for Nuclear Energy (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bajs, Tomislav [University of Zagreb (Croatia). Fac. of Electrical Engineering and Computing. Dept. of Power Systems; Reventos, Francesc [Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Physics and Nuclear Engineering

    2011-07-01

    Thermal-hydraulic system computer codes are extensively used worldwide for analysis of nuclear facilities by utilities, regulatory bodies, nuclear power plant designers, vendors, and research organizations. Computer code user represents a source of uncertainty that may significantly affect the results of system code calculations. Code user training and qualification represent an effective means for reducing the variation of results caused by the application of the codes by different users. This paper describes the experience in applying a systematic approach to training code users who, upon completion of the training, should be able to perform calculations making the best possible use of the capabilities of best estimate codes. In addition, this paper presents the organization and the main features of the 3D S.UN.COP (scaling, uncertainty, and 3D coupled code calculations) seminars during which particular emphasis is given to practical applications in connection with the licensing process of best estimate plus uncertainty methodologies, showing the designer, utility and regulatory approaches. (author)

  10. Acquired experience on organizing 3D S.UN.COP: international course to support nuclear license by user training in the areas of scaling, uncertainty, and 3D thermal-hydraulics/neutron-kinetics coupled codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petruzzi, Alessandro; D'Auria, Francesco; Galetti, Regina; Bajs, Tomislav; Reventos, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic system computer codes are extensively used worldwide for analysis of nuclear facilities by utilities, regulatory bodies, nuclear power plant designers, vendors, and research organizations. Computer code user represents a source of uncertainty that may significantly affect the results of system code calculations. Code user training and qualification represent an effective means for reducing the variation of results caused by the application of the codes by different users. This paper describes the experience in applying a systematic approach to training code users who, upon completion of the training, should be able to perform calculations making the best possible use of the capabilities of best estimate codes. In addition, this paper presents the organization and the main features of the 3D S.UN.COP (scaling, uncertainty, and 3D coupled code calculations) seminars during which particular emphasis is given to practical applications in connection with the licensing process of best estimate plus uncertainty methodologies, showing the designer, utility and regulatory approaches. (author)

  11. A 3-D method for delineation of activity distributions and assessment of functional organ volumes with SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Karolinska Hospital and Karolinska Inst., Stockholm; Jacobsson, H.; Jacobson, S.H.; Kimiaei, S.; Larsson, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The distrubution volume of an organ may have a clinical impact in many cases and various methods have been designed to make volume assessments. In this paper, we describe a new method for delineation of the distribution outline and volume determination. The method is based on smoothing, differentiation, image relaxation and voxel counting of single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) image sets with 3-D operators. A special routine corrects for the inherent thickness of the voxel-based outline. Phantom experiments, using a SPECT system with LEGP-collimator and a 64x64 acquisition matrix with 6.3x6.3 mm 2 pixel size, demonstrated good correlation between the measured and the true volumes. For volumes larger than 120 cc the correlation coefficient was 0.9999 with SE 1.0 cc and an average relative deviation of 0.49%. For volumes below 120 cc, the accuracy was impaired due to low resolution power. By improving the system spatial resolution with an LEHR-collimator and a smaller pixel-size (4.1x4.1 mm 2 ), good accuracy was achieved also for volumes in the range from 3 to 120 cc. Measurements of 15 differently shaped phantoms of volumes between 3 and 104 cc demonstrated high correlation between measured and true volumes: R=0.9921 and SE=0.74 cc (5.3%). For volumes as small as 3 and 5 cc, the difference between the true and the assessed volume was 0.6 cc. The reproducibility of the method was within 3% for volumes above 120 cc and within 7% for volumes below. Due to this accuracy, we conclude that the method can be applied for various clinical routine and research applications using SPECT. (orig.)

  12. Conventional 3D staging PET/CT in CT simulation for lung cancer: impact of rigid and deformable target volume alignments for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, G G; Van Sörnsen De Koste, J R; Carson, K J; O'Sullivan, J M; Hounsell, A R; Senan, S

    2011-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans can improve target definition in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As staging PET/CT scans are increasingly available, we evaluated different methods for co-registration of staging PET/CT data to radiotherapy simulation (RTP) scans. 10 patients underwent staging PET/CT followed by RTP PET/CT. On both scans, gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were delineated using CT (GTV(CT)) and PET display settings. Four PET-based contours (manual delineation, two threshold methods and a source-to-background ratio method) were delineated. The CT component of the staging scan was co-registered using both rigid and deformable techniques to the CT component of RTP PET/CT. Subsequently rigid registration and deformation warps were used to transfer PET and CT contours from the staging scan to the RTP scan. Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was used to assess the registration accuracy of staging-based GTVs following both registration methods with the GTVs delineated on the RTP PET/CT scan. When the GTV(CT) delineated on the staging scan after both rigid registration and deformation was compared with the GTV(CT)on the RTP scan, a significant improvement in overlap (registration) using deformation was observed (mean DSC 0.66 for rigid registration and 0.82 for deformable registration, p = 0.008). A similar comparison for PET contours revealed no significant improvement in overlap with the use of deformable registration. No consistent improvements in similarity measures were observed when deformable registration was used for transferring PET-based contours from a staging PET/CT. This suggests that currently the use of rigid registration remains the most appropriate method for RTP in NSCLC.

  13. Crystal structures of eight 3D molecular adducts derived from bis-imidazole, bis(benzimidazole), and organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aihua; Jin, Shouwen; Jin, Shide; Hu, KaiKai; Lin, Zhihao; Liu, Hui; Wang, Daqi

    2018-01-01

    , 5, and 7, salt 5 has the additional Nsbnd H⋯N H-bond, the Nsbnd H⋯S H-bond was established at 8. Further analysis of the crystal packing of the adducts indicated that a different set of additional CHsbnd O/CH2sbnd O, CHsbnd Cl, CH-π/CH2-π, Clsbnd C, Clsbnd N, Osbnd O, O-π, OH-π, and π-π associations contribute to the stabilization and expansion of the total 3D frameworks. For the coexistence of the various weak interactions these structures had homo or hetero supramolecular synthons or both. Some supramolecular synthons, such as R12(4), R22(7), and R22(8) usually found in crystals of organic acids with imidazole unit, were again shown to be appeared in constructing most of these H-bond networks.

  14. Topotactic elimination of water across a C-C ligand bond in a dense 3-D metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Hamish H-M; Kosa, Monica; Griffin, John M; Grey, Clare P; Major, Dan T; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2014-11-11

    Upon heating, lithium L-malate undergoes topotactic dehydration to form a phase containing the unsaturated fumarate ligand, in which the original 3-D framework remains intact. Insight into this unusual transformation has been obtained by single crystal X-ray diffraction, MAS-NMR, in situ powder X-ray diffraction and DFT calculations.

  15. Organization of an interphase system for the coupling of WINS-D4 and SNAP-3D programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frias Suarez, D.

    1989-01-01

    In this report a modular system developed for the CC-1 critical assembly's physical calculation is described. It was based upon the WINS-D4 and SNAP-3D codes, which are coupled by means of an interphase module and a groups diffusion cross sections library

  16. 3D Characterization of Recrystallization Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yubin; Godfrey, Andrew William; MacDonald, A. Nicole

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) volume containing a recrystallizing grain and a deformed matrix in a partially recrystallized pure aluminum was characterized using the 3D electron backscattering diffraction technique. The 3D shape of a recrystallizing boundary, separating the recrystallizing grain...... on the formation of protrusions/retrusions....

  17. Simulations of a rotor with active deformable trailing edge flaps in half-wake inflow: Comparison of EllipSys 3D with HAWC2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Thanasis K.; Zahle, Frederik; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2012-01-01

    Various research projects have focused on active aerodynamic load control of wind turbines using control devices on the blades, for example flaps. The aerodynamic load predictions of utilized aeroelastic codes have not yet been fully validated with full rotor CFD or experimental results. In this ...... a controller based on a Pitot tube velocity feedback measured at flap mid-span. Good agreement is found between EllipSys3D and HAWC2 in the prediction of the dynamic blade loads, considering the high complexity of the flow case....

  18. Nanoengineered implant as a new platform for regenerative nanomedicine using 3D well-organized human cell spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Laetitia; Idoux-Gillet, Ysia; Wagner, Quentin; Eap, Sandy; Brasse, David; Schwinté, Pascale; Arruebo, Manuel; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    In tissue engineering, it is still rare today to see clinically transferable strategies for tissue-engineered graft production that conclusively offer better tissue regeneration than the already existing technologies, decreased recovery times, and less risk of complications. Here a novel tissue-engineering concept is presented for the production of living bone implants combining 1) a nanofibrous and microporous implant as cell colonization matrix and 2) 3D bone cell spheroids. This combination, double 3D implants, shows clinical relevant thicknesses for the treatment of an early stage of bone lesions before the need of bone substitutes. The strategy presented here shows a complete closure of a defect in nude mice calvaria after only 31 days. As a novel strategy for bone regenerative nanomedicine, it holds great promises to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of living bone implants. PMID:28138241

  19. Association of intracellular and synaptic organization in cochlear inner hair cells revealed by 3D electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Bullen, Anwen; West, Timothy; Moores, Carolyn; Ashmore, Jonathan; Fleck, Roland A.; MacLellan-Gibson, Kirsty; Forge, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ways in which cell architecture is modelled to meet cell function is a poorly understood facet of cell biology. To address this question, we have studied the cytoarchitecture of a cell with highly specialised organisation, the cochlear inner hair cell (IHC), using multiple hierarchies of three-dimensional (3D) electron microscopy analyses. We show that synaptic terminal distribution on the IHC surface correlates with cell shape, and the distribution of a highly organised network ...

  20. Flexible 3D Fe@VO2 core-shell mesh: A highly efficient and easy-recycling catalyst for the removal of organic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wang, Ruoqi; Su, Zhen; Zhang, Dandan; Li, Heping; Yan, Youwei

    2018-10-01

    Nowadays, it is extremely urgent to search for efficient and effective catalysts for water purification due to the severe worldwide water-contamination crises. Here, 3D Fe@VO 2 core-shell mesh, a highly efficient catalyst toward removal of organic dyes with excellent recycling ability in the dark is designed and developed for the first time. This novel core-shell structure is actually 304 stainless steel mesh coated by VO 2 , fabricated by an electrophoretic deposition method. In such a core-shell structure, Fe as the core allows much easier separation from the water, endowing the catalyst with a flexible property for easy recycling, while VO 2 as the shell is highly efficient in degradation of organic dyes with the addition of H 2 O 2 . More intriguingly, the 3D Fe@VO 2 core-shell mesh exhibits favorable performance across a wide pH range. The 3D Fe@VO 2 core-shell mesh can decompose organic dyes both in a light-free condition and under visible irradiation. The possible catalytic oxidation mechanism of Fe@VO 2 /H 2 O 2 system is also proposed in this work. Considering its facile fabrication, remarkable catalytic efficiency across a wide pH range, and easy recycling characteristic, the 3D Fe@VO 2 core-shell mesh is a newly developed high-performance catalyst for addressing the universal water crises. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A New Method of Absorption-Phase Nanotomography for 3D Observation of Mineral-Organic-Water Textiles and its Application to Pristine Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiyama, A.; Nakato, A.; Matsuno, J.; Sugimoto, M.; Uesugi, K.; Takeuchi, A.; Nakano, T.; Vaccaro, E.; Russel, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Pristine carbonaceous chondrites contain fine-grained matrix, which is composed largely of amorphous silicates, sub-micron silicate and sulfide crystals, and organic materials. They are regarded as primitive dust in the early Solar System that have suffered minimal alteration in their parent bodies. The matrix generally has different lithologies; some of them are unaltered but some are more or less aqueously altered. Their textures have been examined in 2D usually by FE-SEM/EDS, TEM/EDS, nano-SIMS and micro-XRD. Observation of their complex fine textures, such as spatial relation between different lithologies in 3D, is important for understanding aggregation and alteration processes. Synchrotron radiation (SR)-based X-ray tomography reveals 3D structures nondestructively with high spatial resolution of approximately greater than 100 nm. We have developed a new technique using absorption contrasts called "dual-energy tomography" (DET) to obtain 3D distribution of minerals at SPring-8, SR facility in Japan, and applied successfully to Itokawa particles. Phase and absorption contrast images can be simultaneously obtained in 3D by using "scanning-imaging x-ray microscopy" (SIXM) at SPring-8, which can discriminate between void, water and organic materials. We applied this technique combined with FIB micro-sampling to carbonaceous chondrites to search for primitive liquid water. In this study, we combined the DET and SIXM to obtain three dimensional submicron-scale association between minerals, organic materials and water and applied this to pristine carbonaceous chondrites.

  2. Integrated 3D Geological Modeling to Gain Insight in the Effects of Hydrothermal Alteration on Post-Ore Deformation Style and Strain Localization in the Flin Flon Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Ore System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernst Schetselaar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available 3D geological modeling of lithogeochemical and geological data provides insight into the role of the sulfide ore horizon and associated footwall hydrothermal alteration in localizing shear strain in the Flin Flon volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, Canada, as deformation evolved from brittle-ductile to ductile regimes during collisional stages of the 1.9–1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson orogeny. 3D spatial characterization of hydrothermal alteration based on the Ishikawa index (AI and normative corundum percentages outline sericite + chlorite-rich high strain zones, consisting of Al-enriched and Na-depleted felsic and mafic volcanic rocks in the footwall of the sulfide ore horizon. The hydrothermal vent complex, from which these sheared alteration zones originated, was stacked together with the ore horizon by W-vergent thrust faults during an early collisional deformation regime, imbricating molasse-type clastic sediments with the ore-hosting volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the Flin Flon arc assemblage. Chlorite-rich planar zones marked by high values of the Carbonate–chlorite–pyrite index (CCPI are laterally more extensive and outline a later system of ductile shear zones, in which phyllosilicates, quartz and chalcopyrite in stringer zones localized shear strain and enhanced transposition of the hydrothermal vent stockwork. The contrasting deformation styles of these two thrusting events and their localization within the ore horizon and hydrothermal vent stockwork have important implications for vectoring towards undiscovered ore in this mature mining camp that are possibly also relevant to other strongly deformed VMS ore systems.

  3. 3D TiO{sub 2} submicrostructures decorated by silver nanoparticles as SERS substrate for organic pollutants detection and degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jianjun [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Su, Huilan, E-mail: hlsu@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); You, Xueling; Gao, Jing [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Lau, Woon Ming [Chengdu Green Energy and Green Manufacturing Technology R and D Center, Sichuan 610207 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Di, E-mail: zhangdi@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Contrive a multifunctional SERS substrate with 3D sub-micrometer structure and multicomponent. • The blue wing of butterfly (Euploea mulciber) is used as template for Ag/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites. • The 3D submicrostructures Ag/TiO{sub 2} presents superior SERS effect and photocatalytic activity. • Pave a facile route to prepare multifunctional material by utilizing smart structural designs in nature. - Abstract: The blue wing of butterfly Euploea mulciber is used as a template to generate Ag/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites. Thereinto, Ag nanoparticles are deposited uniformly onto TiO{sub 2} substrate with three dimensional (3D) submicrometer structures. This unique 3D sub-micrometer structures featured with ridges, ribs and struts can provide a large number of active “hot spots” for enhanced Raman signal. Meanwhile, depositing Ag onto the TiO{sub 2} surface can greatly boost its SERS effect and photocatalytic activity by bringing additional electrons into the molecules and inhibiting electrons–holes recombination. Thus, the as-prepared 3D Ag/TiO{sub 2} submicrostructures can not only offer sensitive and reproducible SERS signals, but also present superior photocatalytic activity, which can be utilized to detect and eliminate organic pollutants.

  4. 3D architecture constructed via the confined growth of MoS2 nanosheets in nanoporous carbon derived from metal-organic frameworks for efficient hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Zhou, Xiaoli; Ding, Tao; Wang, Chunde; Yang, Qing

    2015-11-21

    The design and synthesis of robust, high-performance and low-cost three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical structured materials for the electrochemical reduction of water to generate hydrogen is of great significance for practical water splitting applications. In this study, we develop an in situ space-confined method to synthesize an MoS2-based 3D hierarchical structure, in which the MoS2 nanosheets grow in the confined nanopores of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)-derived 3D carbons as electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen production. Benefiting from its unique structure, which has more exposed active sites and enhanced conductivity, the as-prepared MoS2/3D nanoporous carbon (3D-NPC) composite exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with a small onset overpotential of ∼0.16 V, large cathodic currents, small Tafel slope of 51 mV per decade and good durability. We anticipate that this in situ confined growth provides new insights into the construction of high performance catalysts for energy storage and conversion.

  5. The 3D Pelvic Inclination Correction System (PICS): A universally applicable coordinate system for isovolumetric imaging measurements, tested in women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Caecilia S; Williamson, Tom; Winklehner, Thomas; Lisse, Sean; Fink, Daniel; DeLancey, John O L; Betschart, Cornelia

    2017-07-01

    In pelvic organ prolapse (POP), the organs are pushed downward along the lines of gravity, so measurements along this longitudinal body axis are desirable. We propose a universally applicable 3D coordinate system that corrects for changes in pelvic inclination and that allows the localization of any point in the pelvis at rest or under dynamic conditions on magnetic resonance images (MRI) of pelvic floor disorders in a scanner- and software independent manner. The proposed 3D coordinate system called 3D Pelvic Inclination Correction System (PICS) is constructed utilizing four bony landmark points, with the origin set at the inferior pubic point, and three additional points at the sacrum (sacrococcygeal joint) and both ischial spines, which are clearly visible on MRI images. The feasibility and applicability of the moving frame was evaluated using MRI datasets from five women with pelvic organ prolapse, three undergoing static MRI and two undergoing dynamic MRI of the pelvic floor in a supine position. The construction of the coordinate system was performed utilizing the selected landmarks, with an initial implementation completed in MATLAB. In all cases the selected landmarks were clearly visible, with the construction of the 3D PICS and measurement of pelvic organ positions performed without difficulty. The resulting distance from the organ position to the horizontal PICS plane was compared to a traditional measure based on standard measurements in 2D slices. The two approaches demonstrated good agreement in each of the cases. The developed approach makes quantitative assessment of pelvic organ position in a physiologically relevant 3D coordinate system possible independent of pelvic movement relative to the scanner. It allows the accurate study of the physiologic range of organ location along the body axis ("up or down") as well as defects of the pelvic sidewall or birth-related pelvic floor injuries outside the midsagittal plane, not possible before in a 2D

  6. Fabrication and characterization of a magnetic micro-actuator based on deformable Fe-doped PDMS artificial cilium using 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengli; Alici, Gursel; Zhang, Binbin; Beirne, Stephen; Li, Weihua

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes the use of a 3D extrusion printer to fabricate artificial magnetic cilium. The cilia are fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) doped with iron particles so that they remain slender and flexible. They can be driven by a magnetic field to closely mimic the behaviour of biological cilia. Doping iron particles to the polymers has already been done; however, to the best of our knowledge, printing such active and soft magnetic structures has not. The existing methods for manufacturing magnetic polymeric structures are complex and difficult to use for the fabrication of micro-sized high-aspect-ratio cilia. The 3D printing technique we propose here is simple and inexpensive compared to previously suggested fabrication methods. In this study, free-standing magnetic PDMS cilia were fabricated in different sizes up to 5 mm in length and 1 mm in width. The stress-strain curves of the PDMS cilia were experimentally obtained to quantify the effect of the concentration of the iron particles on the modulus of elasticity of the cilia. The higher the iron concentration, the higher the modulus of elasticity. We have quantified the characteristics of the cilia made of 40% w/w iron particles in PDMS. A single cilium (5 × 1 × 0.0035 mm) can output up to 27 μN blocking force under a magnetic field of 160 mT. These cilia can be used as a mixer in lap-on-chip applications and as the anchoring and propulsion legs of endoscopic capsule robots operating within the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Analytical expressions estimating the blocking force are established and compared with the experimental results.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of a magnetic micro-actuator based on deformable Fe-doped PDMS artificial cilium using 3D printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Fengli; Alici, Gursel; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Binbin; Beirne, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of a 3D extrusion printer to fabricate artificial magnetic cilium. The cilia are fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) doped with iron particles so that they remain slender and flexible. They can be driven by a magnetic field to closely mimic the behaviour of biological cilia. Doping iron particles to the polymers has already been done; however, to the best of our knowledge, printing such active and soft magnetic structures has not. The existing methods for manufacturing magnetic polymeric structures are complex and difficult to use for the fabrication of micro-sized high-aspect-ratio cilia. The 3D printing technique we propose here is simple and inexpensive compared to previously suggested fabrication methods. In this study, free-standing magnetic PDMS cilia were fabricated in different sizes up to 5 mm in length and 1 mm in width. The stress-strain curves of the PDMS cilia were experimentally obtained to quantify the effect of the concentration of the iron particles on the modulus of elasticity of the cilia. The higher the iron concentration, the higher the modulus of elasticity. We have quantified the characteristics of the cilia made of 40% w/w iron particles in PDMS. A single cilium (5 × 1 × 0.0035 mm) can output up to 27 μN blocking force under a magnetic field of 160 mT. These cilia can be used as a mixer in lap-on-chip applications and as the anchoring and propulsion legs of endoscopic capsule robots operating within the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Analytical expressions estimating the blocking force are established and compared with the experimental results. (paper)

  8. Locoregional deformation pattern of the patellar cartilage after different loading types. High-resolution 3D-MRI volumetry at 3 T in-vivo; Lokoregionaere Deformationsmuster im Patellarknorpel nach unterschiedlichen Belastungsparadigmen. Hochaufloesende 3-D-MR-Volumetrie bei 3 T in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horng, Annie [University Hospital LMU Munich, Muenchen (Germany). Radiology; Raya, J. [New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (United States). Center of Biomedical Imaging; Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshadern (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Zscharn, M. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshadern (DE). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie] (and others)

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: To analyze locoregional deformation patterns indicative of contact areas in patellar cartilage after different loading exercises. Materials and Methods: 7 healthy patellae were examined in-vivo before and immediately after standardized loading (kneeling, squatting or knee bends) and after 90 minutes of rest using a sagittal 3D-T1-w FLASH WE sequence (22 msec/ 9.8msec/ 15 / 0.3 x 0.3 x 1.5 mm{sup 3}) at 3 T. After cartilage segmentation and 3D reconstruction, voxel-based and global precision errors (PR) were calculated. The former were used to determine significant differences in local cartilage thickness. Voxel-based 2{sigma}-thickness difference maps were calculated to visualize locoregional deformation patterns. Global changes in volume (Vol), mean thickness (mTh) and cartilage-bone-interface area (CBIA) were calculated. Results: The voxel-based PR depended on cartilage thickness (D) ranging from 0.12 - 0.35 mm. For D {>=} 1 mm the RF was < 0.31 mm (< voxel size), and for D {>=} 2 mm, the RF was < 0.22 mm. The global PR was 83 mm{sup 3} (2.4 %) for Vol, 0.06 mm (2.0 %) for mTh and 16 mm{sup 2} (1.4 %) for CBIA. The focal cartilage deformation equaled 14 % of the local thickness reduction. The deformation areas were oval and located in the peripheral medial (more vertically oriented, all exercises) and caudo-lateral (more horizontally oriented, kneeling and knee bends) aspects of the patella and were least pronounced in knee bends. Significant changes for Vol/mTh ranged from 2.1 to 3.7 %. Conclusion: This MRI-based study is the first to identify in-vivo voxel-based patellar cartilage deformation patterns indicating contact and loading zones after kneeling and squatting. These zones are anatomically and functionally plausible and may represent areas where stress induced degeneration and subsequent OA can originate. The data may facilitate understanding of individual knee loading properties and help to improve and validate biomechanical models for the knee

  9. Numerical simulation of the time-dependent deformation behaviour of clay-stone rock mass at the Tournemire site with 2D and 3D models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutenberg, M.; Lux, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Modern repository research foregrounds physico-chemical processes (mechanical, hydraulic, thermal, chemical) and their interactions taking place in the near field and the far field of the geological system being explored. With regard to load bearing behaviour and preservation of barrier integrity, and with the general objective of complete confinement of the waste in the isolating rock zone, the focus is especially on geomechanical processes induced by excavation - including the influences on and by hydraulic, thermal, and chemical processes - as well as on thermal processes induced by heat generation of the deposited radioactive waste and their effects on mechanical and hydraulic processes. In order to improve assessments of the mechanical stability and, in case of a water saturated rock formation, of the hydraulic effects on the host rock of the repository, suitable physical models for numerical simulations of rock and rock mass behaviour have to be found and to be validated. Because of their radionuclide retention capacity, their low water permeability, and their resistance to water, clay-stone rock masses form a reasonable alternative to e.g. salt rock masses as a host rock for deep geological repositories. In past decades, various working groups at an international level have elaborated a broad experimental and theoretical understanding of the geomechanical and geo-hydraulic behaviour of clay-stones and applied this know-how to geologic repository components, e.g. in the context of engineering studies, or in the back-analysis of field tests. In this context, measurement results revealed a continuing convergence of drift walls lasting for a few years after completion of excavation. Possible reasons for this time-dependent deformation behaviour of the clay-stone rock mass might be: - viscous properties of the material from a phenomenological point of view, meaning a constant stress state leading to increasing

  10. 3D Animation Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  11. 3D video

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Laurent; Loscos, Céline

    2013-01-01

    While 3D vision has existed for many years, the use of 3D cameras and video-based modeling by the film industry has induced an explosion of interest for 3D acquisition technology, 3D content and 3D displays. As such, 3D video has become one of the new technology trends of this century.The chapters in this book cover a large spectrum of areas connected to 3D video, which are presented both theoretically and technologically, while taking into account both physiological and perceptual aspects. Stepping away from traditional 3D vision, the authors, all currently involved in these areas, provide th

  12. Exploring 3D non-interpenetrated metal-organic framework with malonate-bridged Co(II) coordination polymer: structural elucidation and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Anowar; Mandal, Tripti; Mitra, Monojit; Manna, Prankrishna; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Seth, Saikat Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2017-12-01

    A Co(II)-based coordination polymer with tetranuclear cobalt(II)-malonate cluster has been easily generated by aqueous medium self-assembly from Cobalt(II) chloride hexahydrate and malonic acid. The structure exhibits a non-interpenetrating, highly undulating two-dimensional (2D) bi-layer network with (4,4) topology. The crystal structure is composed of infinite interdigitated 2D metal-organic bi-layers which extended to an intricate 3D framework through the interbilayer hydrogen bonds. We have studied energetically by means of Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations the H-bonding interactions that connect the 2D metal-organic bi-layers. The finite theoretical models have been used to compute conventional O‒H•••O and unconventional C‒H•••O interactions which plays a key role to build 3D architecture.

  13. Nanoengineered implant as a new platform for regenerative nanomedicine using 3D well-organized human cell spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller L

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laetitia Keller,1,2,* Ysia Idoux-Gillet,1,2,* Quentin Wagner,1,2,* Sandy Eap,1,2,* David Brasse,3 Pascale Schwinté,1,2 Manuel Arruebo,4 Nadia Benkirane-Jessel1,2 1INSERM (French National Institute of Health and Medical Research, “Osteoarticular and Dental Regenerative Nanomedicine” Laboratory, UMR 1109, Faculté de Médecine, FMTS, 2University of Strasbourg, Faculté de Chirurgie Dentaire, 3CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7178, IPHC (Hubert Curien Multidisciplinary Institute, Strasbourg, France; 4Department of Chemical Engineering, INA (Aragon Nanoscience Institute, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In tissue engineering, it is still rare today to see clinically transferable strategies for tissue-engineered graft production that conclusively offer better tissue regeneration than the already existing technologies, decreased recovery times, and less risk of complications. Here a novel tissue-engineering concept is presented for the production of living bone implants combining 1 a nanofibrous and microporous implant as cell colonization matrix and 2 3D bone cell spheroids. This combination, double 3D implants, shows clinical relevant thicknesses for the treatment of an early stage of bone lesions before the need of bone substitutes. The strategy presented here shows a complete closure of a defect in nude mice calvaria after only 31 days. As a novel strategy for bone regenerative nanomedicine, it holds great promises to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of living bone implants. Keywords: bioengineering, implants, osteoblasts, matrix mineralization, microtissues

  14. Fabrication of Light Extraction Efficiency of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with 3D Aspherical Microlens by Using Dry Etching Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available organic light-emitting diode (OLED can enable a greater artificial contrast ratio and viewing angle compared to liquid crystal display (LCD because OLED pixels directly emit light. There is a shortcoming that the internal quantum efficiency can reach values close to 100%, but about 80% light disperses because of the difference among the refractive indices of the substrate, anode, indium tin oxide (ITO film, and air. In this paper, three dimensions aspherical microlens arrays (3D A-MLAs with substrate modifications are developed to simulate the optical luminous field by using FRED software. This study modified parameters of 3D A-MLAs such as the diameter, fill-factor, aspect ratio, dry etching parameters, and electroforming rates of microlens to improve the extraction efficiency of the OLED. In dry etching, not only the aspect ratio with better extraction rate can be obtained by reactive ion etching (RIE dry etching, but also an undercutting phenomenon can be avoided. The dimensions of 3D A-MLAs can be accurately controlled in the electroforming process used to make a nickel-cobalt (Ni-Co metal mold to achieve the designed dimensions. According to the measured results, the average luminance efficacy of the OLEDs with 3D A-MLAs can be enhanced.

  15. Microfluidic-enhanced 3D bioprinting of aligned myoblast-laden hydrogels leads to functionally organized myofibers in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Marco; Testa, Stefano; Mozetic, Pamela; Barbetta, Andrea; Fuoco, Claudia; Fornetti, Ersilia; Tamiro, Francesco; Bernardini, Sergio; Jaroszewicz, Jakub; Święszkowski, Wojciech; Trombetta, Marcella; Castagnoli, Luisa; Seliktar, Dror; Garstecki, Piotr; Cesareni, Gianni; Cannata, Stefano; Rainer, Alberto; Gargioli, Cesare

    2017-07-01

    We present a new strategy for the fabrication of artificial skeletal muscle tissue with functional morphologies based on an innovative 3D bioprinting approach. The methodology is based on a microfluidic printing head coupled to a co-axial needle extruder for high-resolution 3D bioprinting of hydrogel fibers laden with muscle precursor cells (C2C12). To promote myogenic differentiation, we formulated a tailored bioink with a photocurable semi-synthetic biopolymer (PEG-Fibrinogen) encapsulating cells into 3D constructs composed of aligned hydrogel fibers. After 3-5 days of culture, the encapsulated myoblasts started migrating and fusing, forming multinucleated myotubes within the 3D bioprinted fibers. The obtained myotubes showed high degree of alignment along the direction of hydrogel fiber deposition, further revealing maturation, sarcomerogenesis, and functionality. Following subcutaneous implantation in the back of immunocompromised mice, bioprinted constructs generated organized artificial muscle tissue in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that our microfluidic printing head allows to design three dimensional multi-cellular assemblies with an exquisite compartmentalization of the encapsulated cells. Our results demonstrate an enhanced myogenic differentiation with the formation of parallel aligned long-range myotubes. The approach that we report here represents a robust and valid candidate for the fabrication of macroscopic artificial muscle to scale up skeletal muscle tissue engineering for human clinical application. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Integrated light-sheet imaging and flow-based enquiry (iLIFE) system for 3D in-vivo imaging of multicellular organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmi, Chelur K.; Padmanabhan, Sreedevi; Shirlekar, Kalyanee; Rajan, Kanhirodan; Manjithaya, Ravi; Singh, Varsha; Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2017-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate a light-sheet-based 3D interrogation system on a microfluidic platform for screening biological specimens during flow. To achieve this, a diffraction-limited light-sheet (with a large field-of-view) is employed to optically section the specimens flowing through the microfluidic channel. This necessitates optimization of the parameters for the illumination sub-system (illumination intensity, light-sheet width, and thickness), microfluidic specimen platform (channel-width and flow-rate), and detection sub-system (camera exposure time and frame rate). Once optimized, these parameters facilitate cross-sectional imaging and 3D reconstruction of biological specimens. The proposed integrated light-sheet imaging and flow-based enquiry (iLIFE) imaging technique enables single-shot sectional imaging of a range of specimens of varying dimensions, ranging from a single cell (HeLa cell) to a multicellular organism (C. elegans). 3D reconstruction of the entire C. elegans is achieved in real-time and with an exposure time of few hundred micro-seconds. A maximum likelihood technique is developed and optimized for the iLIFE imaging system. We observed an intracellular resolution for mitochondria-labeled HeLa cells, which demonstrates the dynamic resolution of the iLIFE system. The proposed technique is a step towards achieving flow-based 3D imaging. We expect potential applications in diverse fields such as structural biology and biophysics.

  17. Markerless 3D Face Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walder, Christian; Breidt, Martin; Bulthoff, Heinrich

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for the markerless tracking of deforming surfaces such as faces. We acquire a sequence of 3D scans along with color images at 40Hz. The data is then represented by implicit surface and color functions, using a novel partition-of-unity type method of efficiently...... the scanned surface, using the variation of both shape and color as features in a dynamic energy minimization problem. Our prototype system yields high-quality animated 3D models in correspondence, at a rate of approximately twenty seconds per timestep. Tracking results for faces and other objects...

  18. Association of intracellular and synaptic organization in cochlear inner hair cells revealed by 3D electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, Anwen; West, Timothy; Moores, Carolyn; Ashmore, Jonathan; Fleck, Roland A; MacLellan-Gibson, Kirsty; Forge, Andrew

    2015-07-15

    The ways in which cell architecture is modelled to meet cell function is a poorly understood facet of cell biology. To address this question, we have studied the cytoarchitecture of a cell with highly specialised organisation, the cochlear inner hair cell (IHC), using multiple hierarchies of three-dimensional (3D) electron microscopy analyses. We show that synaptic terminal distribution on the IHC surface correlates with cell shape, and the distribution of a highly organised network of membranes and mitochondria encompassing the infranuclear region of the cell. This network is juxtaposed to a population of small vesicles, which represents a potential new source of neurotransmitter vesicles for replenishment of the synapses. Structural linkages between organelles that underlie this organisation were identified by high-resolution imaging. Taken together, these results describe a cell-encompassing network of membranes and mitochondria present in IHCs that support efficient coding and transmission of auditory signals. Such techniques also have the potential for clarifying functionally specialised cytoarchitecture of other cell types. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. QSAR modeling of toxicity of diverse organic chemicals to Daphnia magna using 2D and 3D descriptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Supratik; Roy, Kunal

    2010-01-01

    One of the major economic alternatives to experimental toxicity testing is the use of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) which are used in formulating regulatory decisions of environmental protection agencies. In this background, we have modeled a large diverse group of 297 chemicals for their toxicity to Daphnia magna using mechanistically interpretable descriptors. Three-dimensional (3D) (electronic and spatial) and two-dimensional (2D) (topological and information content indices) descriptors along with physicochemical parameter log K o/w (n-octanol/water partition coefficient) and structural descriptors were used as predictor variables. The QSAR models were developed by stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR), partial least squares (PLS), genetic function approximation (GFA), and genetic PLS (G/PLS). All the models were validated internally and externally. Among several models developed using different chemometric tools, the best model based on both internal and external validation characteristics was a PLS equation with 7 descriptors and three latent variables explaining 67.8% leave-one-out predicted variance and 74.1% external predicted variance. The PLS model suggests that higher lipophilicity and electrophilicity, less negative charge surface area and presence of ether linkage, hydrogen bond donor groups and acetylenic carbons are responsible for greater toxicity of chemicals. The developed model may be used for prediction of toxicity, safety and risk assessment of chemicals to achieve better ecotoxicological management and prevent adverse health consequences.

  20. QSAR modeling of toxicity of diverse organic chemicals to Daphnia magna using 2D and 3D descriptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kar, Supratik [Drug Theoretics and Cheminformatics Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Raja S C Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Roy, Kunal, E-mail: kunalroy_in@yahoo.com [Drug Theoretics and Cheminformatics Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Raja S C Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2010-05-15

    One of the major economic alternatives to experimental toxicity testing is the use of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) which are used in formulating regulatory decisions of environmental protection agencies. In this background, we have modeled a large diverse group of 297 chemicals for their toxicity to Daphnia magna using mechanistically interpretable descriptors. Three-dimensional (3D) (electronic and spatial) and two-dimensional (2D) (topological and information content indices) descriptors along with physicochemical parameter log K{sub o/w} (n-octanol/water partition coefficient) and structural descriptors were used as predictor variables. The QSAR models were developed by stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR), partial least squares (PLS), genetic function approximation (GFA), and genetic PLS (G/PLS). All the models were validated internally and externally. Among several models developed using different chemometric tools, the best model based on both internal and external validation characteristics was a PLS equation with 7 descriptors and three latent variables explaining 67.8% leave-one-out predicted variance and 74.1% external predicted variance. The PLS model suggests that higher lipophilicity and electrophilicity, less negative charge surface area and presence of ether linkage, hydrogen bond donor groups and acetylenic carbons are responsible for greater toxicity of chemicals. The developed model may be used for prediction of toxicity, safety and risk assessment of chemicals to achieve better ecotoxicological management and prevent adverse health consequences.

  1. Development of an organ-specific insert phantom generated using a 3D printer for investigations of cardiac computed tomography protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Kamarul A; McEntee, Mark F; Reed, Warren; Kench, Peter L

    2018-04-30

    An ideal organ-specific insert phantom should be able to simulate the anatomical features with appropriate appearances in the resultant computed tomography (CT) images. This study investigated a 3D printing technology to develop a novel and cost-effective cardiac insert phantom derived from volumetric CT image datasets of anthropomorphic chest phantom. Cardiac insert volumes were segmented from CT image datasets, derived from an anthropomorphic chest phantom of Lungman N-01 (Kyoto Kagaku, Japan). These segmented datasets were converted to a virtual 3D-isosurface of heart-shaped shell, while two other removable inserts were included using computer-aided design (CAD) software program. This newly designed cardiac insert phantom was later printed by using a fused deposition modelling (FDM) process via a Creatbot DM Plus 3D printer. Then, several selected filling materials, such as contrast media, oil, water and jelly, were loaded into designated spaces in the 3D-printed phantom. The 3D-printed cardiac insert phantom was positioned within the anthropomorphic chest phantom and 30 repeated CT acquisitions performed using a multi-detector scanner at 120-kVp tube potential. Attenuation (Hounsfield Unit, HU) values were measured and compared to the image datasets of real-patient and Catphan ® 500 phantom. The output of the 3D-printed cardiac insert phantom was a solid acrylic plastic material, which was strong, light in weight and cost-effective. HU values of the filling materials were comparable to the image datasets of real-patient and Catphan ® 500 phantom. A novel and cost-effective cardiac insert phantom for anthropomorphic chest phantom was developed using volumetric CT image datasets with a 3D printer. Hence, this suggested the printing methodology could be applied to generate other phantoms for CT imaging studies. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical

  2. 3D Culture for Self-Formation of the Cerebellum from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Through Induction of the Isthmic Organizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Keiko

    2017-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) possess self-organizing abilities in 3D culture. This property has been demonstrated in recent studies, including the generation of various neuroectodermal and endodermal tissues. For example, PSCs are able to differentiate into specific type of neural tissues, such as the neocortex and the optic cup, in response to local positional information brought about by signals during embryogenesis. In contrast, the generation of cerebellar tissue from PSCs requires a secondary induction by a signaling center, called the isthmic organizer, which first appears in the cell aggregate in 3D culture. Such developmental complexity of cerebellum has hampered establishment of effective differentiation culture system from PSCs, thus far.We recently reported that cerebellar neurons are generated from human PSCs (hPSCs). In this chapter, we describe an efficient protocol for differentiation of 3D cerebellar neuroepithelium from hPSCs. We also describe the protocols for further differentiation into specific neurons in the cerebellar cortex, such as Purkinje cells and the granule cells.

  3. The role of 3D microenvironmental organization in MCF-7 epithelial–mesenchymal transition after 7 culture days

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroni, Laura [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Vasuri, Francesco, E-mail: vasurifrancesco@libero.it [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Chair of Vascular Surgery, Department of Specialistic Surgery and Anaesthesiological Sciences, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Valente, Sabrina [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Gualandi, Chiara [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician” and National Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM, RU Bologna), Bologna University (Italy); Focarete, Maria Letizia [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician” and National Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM, RU Bologna), Bologna University (Italy); Health Science and Technologies–Interdepartmental Center for Industrial Research (HST-ICIR), Bologna University (Italy); Caprara, Giacomo [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Scandola, Mariastella [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician” and National Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM, RU Bologna), Bologna University (Italy); D' Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy)

    2013-06-10

    We present a multi-technique study on in vitro epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human MCF-7 cells cultured on electrospun scaffolds of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), with random and aligned fiber orientations. Our aim is to investigate the morphological and genetic characteristics induced by extracellular matrix in tumor cells cultured in different 3D environments, and at different time points. Cell vitality was assessed with AlamarBlue at days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Scanning electron microscopy was performed at culture days 3 and 7. Immunohistochemistry (for E-cadherin, β-catenin, cytokeratins, nucleophosmin, tubulin, Ki-67 and vimentin), immunofluorescence (for F-actin) western blot (for E-cadherin, β-catenin and vimentin) and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at day 7. An EMT gene array followed by PCR analysis confirmed the regulation of selected genes. At day 7, scanning electron microscopy on aligned-PLA revealed spindle-shaped cells gathered in buds and ribbon-like structures, with a higher nucleolar/nuclear ratio and a loss in E-cadherin and β-catenin at immunohistochemistry and western blot. An up-regulation of SMAD2, TGF-β2, TFPI2 and SOX10 was found in aligned-PLA compared to random-PLA cultured cells. The topography of the extracellular matrix has a role in tumor EMT, and a more aggressive phenotype characterizes MCF-7 cells cultured on aligned-PLA scaffold. -- Highlights: • After 7 culture days an aligned-PLA scaffold induces a spindle shape to MCF-7 cells. • Despite these changes, the aligned MCF-7 cells keep an epithelial phenotype. • The extracellular environment alone influences the E-cadherin/β-catenin axis. • The extracellular environment can promote the epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  4. The role of 3D microenvironmental organization in MCF-7 epithelial–mesenchymal transition after 7 culture days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroni, Laura; Vasuri, Francesco; Valente, Sabrina; Gualandi, Chiara; Focarete, Maria Letizia; Caprara, Giacomo; Scandola, Mariastella; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-technique study on in vitro epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human MCF-7 cells cultured on electrospun scaffolds of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), with random and aligned fiber orientations. Our aim is to investigate the morphological and genetic characteristics induced by extracellular matrix in tumor cells cultured in different 3D environments, and at different time points. Cell vitality was assessed with AlamarBlue at days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Scanning electron microscopy was performed at culture days 3 and 7. Immunohistochemistry (for E-cadherin, β-catenin, cytokeratins, nucleophosmin, tubulin, Ki-67 and vimentin), immunofluorescence (for F-actin) western blot (for E-cadherin, β-catenin and vimentin) and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at day 7. An EMT gene array followed by PCR analysis confirmed the regulation of selected genes. At day 7, scanning electron microscopy on aligned-PLA revealed spindle-shaped cells gathered in buds and ribbon-like structures, with a higher nucleolar/nuclear ratio and a loss in E-cadherin and β-catenin at immunohistochemistry and western blot. An up-regulation of SMAD2, TGF-β2, TFPI2 and SOX10 was found in aligned-PLA compared to random-PLA cultured cells. The topography of the extracellular matrix has a role in tumor EMT, and a more aggressive phenotype characterizes MCF-7 cells cultured on aligned-PLA scaffold. -- Highlights: • After 7 culture days an aligned-PLA scaffold induces a spindle shape to MCF-7 cells. • Despite these changes, the aligned MCF-7 cells keep an epithelial phenotype. • The extracellular environment alone influences the E-cadherin/β-catenin axis. • The extracellular environment can promote the epithelial–mesenchymal transition

  5. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    The main purpose of the PhD project was to develop methods that increase the 3-D ultrasound imaging quality available for the medical personnel in the clinic. Acquiring a 3-D volume gives the medical doctor the freedom to investigate the measured anatomy in any slice desirable after the scan has...... been completed. This allows for precise measurements of organs dimensions and makes the scan more operator independent. Real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging is still not as widespread in use in the clinics as 2-D imaging. A limiting factor has traditionally been the low image quality achievable using...... a channel limited 2-D transducer array and the conventional 3-D beamforming technique, Parallel Beamforming. The first part of the scientific contributions demonstrate that 3-D synthetic aperture imaging achieves a better image quality than the Parallel Beamforming technique. Data were obtained using both...

  6. EUROPEANA AND 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pletinckx

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  7. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE RADIATION EXPOSURE ON THE TARGET AND CRITICAL ORGANS WITH 2D AND 3D PLANNING OF RADIATION THERAPY FOR LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Gulidov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate feasibility, safety and efficacy of radiotherapy for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Various radiotherapy planning methods have been proposed to decrease normal tissue toxicity. We compared 2D-RT with 3D-RT for NSCLC. Parameters assessed included dose to PTV and organ-at-risk (OAR, multiple conformity and homogeneity indices. Material and methods. Initial and re-simulation CT images from 52 consecutive patients with IIB – IIIB NSCLC were used to quantify dosimetric differences between 2D and 3D conformal radiotherapy. Contouring was performed on both CTs, and plans (n=104 plans and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results. All plans provided comparable PTV coverage. Compared with 2D-RT, 3D-RT significantly reduced the maximum dose to heart (p<0.01, spinal cord (p<0.01, whole lung (p<0.01, esophagus (p<0.02 – Wilcoxon test.

  8. Gain in cellular organization of inflammatory breast cancer: A 3D in vitro model that mimics the in vivo metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, Jorge; Alpaugh, Mary L

    2009-01-01

    The initial step of metastasis in carcinomas, often referred to as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), occurs via the loss of adherens junctions (e.g. cadherins) by the tumor embolus. This leads to a subsequent loss of cell polarity and cellular differentiation and organization, enabling cells of the embolus to become motile and invasive. However highly malignant inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) over-expresses E-cadherin. The human xenograft model of IBC (MARY-X), like IBC, displays the signature phenotype of an exaggerated degree of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) in situ by tumor emboli. An intact E-cadherin/α, β-catenin axis mediates the tight, compact clump of cells found both in vitro and in vivo as spheroids and tumor emboli, respectively. Using electron microscopy and focused ion beam milling to acquire in situ sections, we performed ultrastructural analysis of both an IBC and non-IBC, E-cadherin positive cell line to determine if retention of this adhesion molecule contributed to cellular organization. Here we report through ultrastructural analysis that IBC exhibits a high degree of cellular organization with polar elements such as apical/lateral positioning of E-cadherin, apical surface microvilli, and tortuous lumen-like (canalis) structures. In contrast, agarose-induced spheroids of MCF-7, a weakly invasive E-cadherin positive breast carcinoma cell line, do not exhibit ultrastructural polar features. This study has determined that the highly metastatic IBC with an exaggerated malignant phenotype challenges conventional wisdom in that instead of displaying a loss of cellular organization, IBC acquires a highly structured architecture. These findings suggest that the metastatic efficiency might be linked to the formation and maintenance of these architectural features. The comparative architectural features of both the spheroid and embolus of MARY-X provide an in vitro model with tractable in vivo applications

  9. A bio-inspired, microchanneled hydrogel with controlled spacing of cell adhesion ligands regulates 3D spatial organization of cells and tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Rich, Max H; Lee, Jonghwi; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-07-01

    Bioactive hydrogels have been extensively studied as a platform for 3D cell culture and tissue regeneration. One of the key desired design parameters is the ability to control spatial organization of biomolecules and cells and subsequent tissue in a 3D matrix. To this end, this study presents a simple but advanced method to spatially organize microchanneled, cell adherent gel blocks and non-adherent ones in a single construct. This hydrogel system was prepared by first fabricating a bimodal hydrogel in which the microscale, alginate gel blocks modified with cell adhesion peptides containing Arg-Gly-Asp sequence (RGD peptides), and those free of RGD peptides, were alternatingly presented. Then, anisotropically aligned microchannels were introduced by uniaxial freeze-drying of the bimodal hydrogel. The resulting gel system could drive bone marrow stromal cells to adhere to and differentiate into neuron and glial cells exclusively in microchannels of the alginate gel blocks modified with RGD peptides. Separately, the bimodal gel loaded with microparticles releasing vascular endothelial growth factor stimulated vascular growth solely into microchannels of the RGD-alginate gel blocks in vivo. These results were not attained by the bimodal hydrogel fabricated to present randomly oriented micropores. Overall, the bimodal gel system could regulate spatial organization of nerve-like tissue or blood vessels at sub-micrometer length scale. We believe that the hydrogel assembly demonstrated in this study will be highly useful in developing a better understanding of diverse cellular behaviors in 3D tissue and further improve quality of a wide array of engineered tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Single-cell Hi-C bridges microscopy and genome-wide sequencing approaches to study 3D chromatin organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianov, Sergey V; Tachibana-Konwalski, Kikue; Razin, Sergey V

    2017-10-01

    Recent years have witnessed an explosion of the single-cell biochemical toolbox including chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based methods that provide novel insights into chromatin spatial organization in individual cells. The observations made with these techniques revealed that topologically associating domains emerge from cell population averages and do not exist as static structures in individual cells. Stochastic nature of the genome folding is likely to be biologically relevant and may reflect the ability of chromatin fibers to adopt a number of alternative configurations, some of which could be transiently stabilized and serve regulatory purposes. Single-cell Hi-C approaches provide an opportunity to analyze chromatin folding in rare cell types such as stem cells, tumor progenitors, oocytes, and totipotent cells, contributing to a deeper understanding of basic mechanisms in development and disease. Here, we review key findings of single-cell Hi-C and discuss possible biological reasons and consequences of the inferred dynamic chromatin spatial organization. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Perfusion-decellularized pancreas as a natural 3D scaffold for pancreatic tissue and whole organ engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Saik-Kia; Bertera, Suzanne; Olsen, Phillip; Candiello, Joe; Halfter, Willi; Uechi, Guy; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Johnson, Scott; Sicari, Brian; Kollar, Elizabeth; Badylak, Stephen F.; Banerjee, Ipsita

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 285 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes, with insulin supplementation as the most common treatment measure. Regenerative medicine approaches such as a bioengineered pancreas has been proposed as potential therapeutic alternatives. A bioengineered pancreas will benefit from the development of a bioscaffold that supports and enhances cellular function and tissue development. Perfusion-decellularized organs are a likely candidate for use in such scaffolds since they mimic compositional, architectural and biomechanical nature of a native organ. In this study, we investigate perfusion-decellularization of whole pancreas and the feasibility to recellularize the whole pancreas scaffold with pancreatic cell types. Our result demonstrates that perfusion-decellularization of whole pancreas effectively removes cellular and nuclear material while retaining intricate three-dimensional microarchitecture with perfusable vasculature and ductal network and crucial extracellular matrix (ECM) components. To mimic pancreatic cell composition, we recellularized the whole pancreas scaffold with acinar and beta cell lines and cultured up to 5 days. Our result shows successful cellular engraftment within the decellularized pancreas, and the resulting graft gave rise to strong up-regulation of insulin gene expression. These findings support biological utility of whole pancreas ECM as a biomaterials scaffold for supporting and enhancing pancreatic cell functionality and represent a step toward bioengineered pancreas using regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:23787110

  12. Open 3D Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many professionals and 3D artists consider Blender as being the best open source solution for 3D computer graphics. The main features are related to modeling, rendering, shading, imaging, compositing, animation, physics and particles and realtime 3D/game creation.

  13. Marine Heat Waves Hazard 3D Maps and the Risk for Low Motility Organisms in a Warming Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Galli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Frequency and severity of heat waves is expected to increase as a consequence of climate change with important impacts on human and ecosystems health. However, while many studies explored the projected occurrence of hot extremes on terrestrial systems, few studies dealt with marine systems, so that both the expected change in marine heat waves occurrence and the effects on marine organisms and ecosystems remain less understood and surprisingly poorly quantified. Here we: (i assess how much more frequent, severe, and depth-penetrating marine heat waves will be in the Mediterranean area in the next decades by post-processing the output of an ocean general circulation model; and (ii show that heat waves increase will impact on many species that live in shallow waters and have reduced motility, and related economic activities. This information is made available also as a dataset of temperature threshold exceedance indexes that can be used in combination with biological information to produce risk assessment maps for target species or biomes across the whole Mediterranean Sea. As case studies we compared projected heat waves occurrence with thermotolerance thresholds of low motility organisms. Results suggest a deepening of the survival horizon for red coral (Corallium rubrum, a commercially exploited benthic species already subjected to heat-related mass mortality events and coralligenous reefs as well as a reduction of suitable farming sites for the mussel Mythilus galloprovincialis. In recent years Mediterranean circalittoral ecosystems (coralligenous have been severely and repeatedly impacted by marine heat waves. Our results support that equally deleterious events are expected in the near future also for other ecologically important habitats (e.g., seagrass meadows and aquaculture activities (bivalvae, and point at the need for mitigation strategies.

  14. Fine-Tuning the Quasi-3D Geometry: Enabling Efficient Nonfullerene Organic Solar Cells Based on Perylene Diimides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhitian; Zhang, Linhua; Shao, Ming; Wu, Yao; Zeng, Di; Cai, Xiang; Duan, Jiashun; Zhang, Xiaolu; Gao, Xiang

    2018-01-10

    The geometries of acceptors based on perylene diimides (PDIs) are important for improving the phase separation and charge transport in organic solar cells. To fine-tune the geometry, biphenyl, spiro-bifluorene, and benzene were used as the core moiety to construct quasi-three-dimensional nonfullerene acceptors based on PDI building blocks. The molecular geometries, energy levels, optical properties, photovoltaic properties, and exciton kinetics were systematically studied. The structure-performance relationship was discussed as well. Owing to the finest phase separation, the highest charge mobility and smallest nongeminate recombination, the power conversion efficiency of nonfullerene solar cells using PDI derivatives with biphenyl core (BP-PDI 4 ) as acceptor reached 7.3% when high-performance wide band gap donor material poly[(2,6-(4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)-benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene))-alt-(5,5-(1',3'-di-2-thienyl-5',7'-bis(2-ethylhexyl)benzo[1',2'-c:4',5'-c']dithiophene-4,8-dione))] was blended.

  15. Asymmetric Supercapacitors Using 3D Nanoporous Carbon and Cobalt Oxide Electrodes Synthesized from a Single Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunkhe, Rahul R; Tang, Jing; Kamachi, Yuichiro; Nakato, Teruyuki; Kim, Jung Ho; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2015-06-23

    Nanoporous carbon and nanoporous cobalt oxide (Co3O4) materials have been selectively prepared from a single metal-organic framework (MOF) (zeolitic imidazolate framework, ZIF-67) by optimizing the annealing conditions. The resulting ZIF-derived carbon possesses highly graphitic walls and a high specific surface area of 350 m(2)·g(-1), while the resulting ZIF-derived nanoporous Co3O4 possesses a high specific surface area of 148 m(2)·g(-1) with much less carbon content (1.7 at%). When nanoporous carbon and nanoporous Co3O4 were tested as electrode materials for supercapacitor application, they showed high capacitance values (272 and 504 F·g(-1), respectively, at a scan rate of 5 mV·s(-1)). To further demonstrate the advantages of our ZIF-derived nanoporous materials, symmetric (SSCs) and asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) were also fabricated using nanoporous carbon and nanoporous Co3O4 electrodes. Improved capacitance performance was successfully realized for the ASC (Co3O4//carbon), better than those of the SSCs based on nanoporous carbon and nanoporous Co3O4 materials (i.e., carbon//carbon and Co3O4//Co3O4). The developed ASC with an optimal mass loading can be operated within a wide potential window of 0.0-1.6 V, which leads to a high specific energy of 36 W·h·kg(-1). More interestingly, this ASC also exhibits excellent rate capability (with the highest specific power of 8000 W·kg(-1) at a specific energy of 15 W·h·kg(-1)) combined with long-term stability up to 2000 cycles.

  16. Refined 3d-3d correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alday, Luis F.; Genolini, Pietro Benetti; Bullimore, Mathew; Loon, Mark van [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Andrew Wiles Building,Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-28

    We explore aspects of the correspondence between Seifert 3-manifolds and 3d N=2 supersymmetric theories with a distinguished abelian flavour symmetry. We give a prescription for computing the squashed three-sphere partition functions of such 3d N=2 theories constructed from boundary conditions and interfaces in a 4d N=2{sup ∗} theory, mirroring the construction of Seifert manifold invariants via Dehn surgery. This is extended to include links in the Seifert manifold by the insertion of supersymmetric Wilson-’t Hooft loops in the 4d N=2{sup ∗} theory. In the presence of a mass parameter for the distinguished flavour symmetry, we recover aspects of refined Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group, and in particular construct an analytic continuation of the S-matrix of refined Chern-Simons theory.

  17. The role of 1-D and 3-D radiative heating in the organization of shallow cumulus convection and the formation of cloud streets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakub, Fabian; Mayer, Bernhard

    2017-11-01

    The formation of shallow cumulus cloud streets was historically attributed primarily to dynamics. Here, we focus on the interaction between radiatively induced surface heterogeneities and the resulting patterns in the flow. Our results suggest that solar radiative heating has the potential to organize clouds perpendicular to the sun's incidence angle. To quantify the extent of organization, we performed a high-resolution large-eddy simulation (LES) parameter study. We varied the horizontal wind speed, the surface heat capacity, the solar zenith and azimuth angles, and radiative transfer parameterizations (1-D and 3-D). As a quantitative measure we introduce a simple algorithm that provides a scalar quantity for the degree of organization and the alignment. We find that, even in the absence of a horizontal wind, 3-D radiative transfer produces cloud streets perpendicular to the sun's incident direction, whereas the 1-D approximation or constant surface fluxes produce randomly positioned circular clouds. Our reasoning for the enhancement or reduction of organization is the geometric position of the cloud's shadow and its corresponding surface fluxes. Furthermore, when increasing horizontal wind speeds to 5 or 10 m s-1, we observe the development of dynamically induced cloud streets. If, in addition, solar radiation illuminates the surface beneath the cloud, i.e., when the sun is positioned orthogonally to the mean wind field and the solar zenith angle is larger than 20°, the cloud-radiative feedback has the potential to significantly enhance the tendency to organize in cloud streets. In contrast, in the case of the 1-D approximation (or overhead sun), the tendency to organize is weaker or even prohibited because the shadow is cast directly beneath the cloud. In a land-surface-type situation, we find the organization of convection happening on a timescale of half an hour. The radiative feedback, which creates surface heterogeneities, is generally diminished for large

  18. The role of 1-D and 3-D radiative heating in the organization of shallow cumulus convection and the formation of cloud streets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jakub

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of shallow cumulus cloud streets was historically attributed primarily to dynamics. Here, we focus on the interaction between radiatively induced surface heterogeneities and the resulting patterns in the flow. Our results suggest that solar radiative heating has the potential to organize clouds perpendicular to the sun's incidence angle. To quantify the extent of organization, we performed a high-resolution large-eddy simulation (LES parameter study. We varied the horizontal wind speed, the surface heat capacity, the solar zenith and azimuth angles, and radiative transfer parameterizations (1-D and 3-D. As a quantitative measure we introduce a simple algorithm that provides a scalar quantity for the degree of organization and the alignment. We find that, even in the absence of a horizontal wind, 3-D radiative transfer produces cloud streets perpendicular to the sun's incident direction, whereas the 1-D approximation or constant surface fluxes produce randomly positioned circular clouds. Our reasoning for the enhancement or reduction of organization is the geometric position of the cloud's shadow and its corresponding surface fluxes. Furthermore, when increasing horizontal wind speeds to 5 or 10 m s−1, we observe the development of dynamically induced cloud streets. If, in addition, solar radiation illuminates the surface beneath the cloud, i.e., when the sun is positioned orthogonally to the mean wind field and the solar zenith angle is larger than 20°, the cloud-radiative feedback has the potential to significantly enhance the tendency to organize in cloud streets. In contrast, in the case of the 1-D approximation (or overhead sun, the tendency to organize is weaker or even prohibited because the shadow is cast directly beneath the cloud. In a land-surface-type situation, we find the organization of convection happening on a timescale of half an hour. The radiative feedback, which creates surface heterogeneities, is

  19. A 3d-3d appetizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States)

    2016-11-02

    We test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T[L(p,1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p,1). In particular, for p=1, we show how the familiar S{sup 3} partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p,1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p,1)] on the squashed three-sphere S{sub b}{sup 3}. This enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent G{sub ℂ} complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.

  20. Nonviral Gene Delivery of Growth and Differentiation Factor 5 to Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Injected into a 3D Bovine Intervertebral Disc Organ Culture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bucher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD cell therapy with unconditioned 2D expanded mesenchymal stem cells (MSC is a promising concept yet challenging to realize. Differentiation of MSCs by nonviral gene delivery of growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF5 by electroporation mediated gene transfer could be an excellent source for cell transplantation. Human MSCs were harvested from bone marrow aspirate and GDF5 gene transfer was achieved by in vitro electroporation. Transfected cells were cultured as monolayers and as 3D cultures in 1.2% alginate bead culture. MSC expressed GDF5 efficiently for up to 21 days. The combination of GDF5 gene transfer and 3D culture in alginate showed an upregulation of aggrecan and SOX9, two markers for chondrogenesis, and KRT19 as a marker for discogenesis compared to untransfected cells. The cells encapsulated in alginate produced more proteoglycans expressed in GAG/DNA ratio. Furthermore, GDF5 transfected MCS injected into an IVD papain degeneration organ culture model showed a partial recovery of the GAG/DNA ratio after 7 days. In this study we demonstrate the potential of GDF5 transfected MSC as a promising approach for clinical translation for disc regeneration.

  1. 3D virtuel udstilling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tournay, Bruno; Rüdiger, Bjarne

    2006-01-01

    3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s.......3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s....

  2. Interpenetrating metal-organic and inorganic 3D networks: a computer-aided systematic investigation. Part II [1]. Analysis of the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baburin, I.A.; Blatov, V.A.; Carlucci, L.; Ciani, G.; Proserpio, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    Interpenetration in metal-organic and inorganic networks has been investigated by a systematic analysis of the crystallographic structural databases. We have used a version of TOPOS (a package for multipurpose crystallochemical analysis) adapted for searching for interpenetration and based on the concept of Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedra and on the representation of a crystal structure as a reduced finite graph. In this paper, we report comprehensive lists of interpenetrating inorganic 3D structures from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD), inclusive of 144 Collection Codes for equivalent interpenetrating nets, analyzed on the basis of their topologies. Distinct Classes, corresponding to the different modes in which individual identical motifs can interpenetrate, have been attributed to the entangled structures. Interpenetrating nets of different nature as well as interpenetrating H-bonded nets were also examined

  3. Underwater 3D filming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rinaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie’s box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space (“Gravity” and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. “Filming in space” was possible in “Gravity” using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Underwater filming in 3D was not that easy and effective as filming in 2D, since not long ago. After almost 3 years of research, a French, Austrian and Italian team realized a perfect tool to film underwater, in 3D, without any constrains. This allows filmmakers to bring the audience deep inside an environment where they most probably will never have the chance to be.

  4. Novel metal-organic and supramolecular 3D frameworks constructed from flexible biphenyl-2,5,3‧-tricarboxylate blocks: Synthesis, structural features and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ao; Li, Yu; Zhang, Ze-Min; Zou, Xun-Zhong; Gu, Jin-Zhong; Kirillov, Alexander M.; Chen, Jin-Wei; Chen, Yun-Bo

    2017-10-01

    Biphenyl-2,5,3‧-tricarboxylic acid (H3L) was selected as an unexplored tricarboxylate building block and applied for the hydrothermal synthesis of three novel coordination compounds, namely a 0D tetramer [Co4(HL)2(μ3-HL)2(phen)6(H2O)2]·3H2O (1) and two 3D metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) [Cd3(μ5-L)(μ6-L)(py)(μ-H2O)2(H2O)]n·H2O (2) and [Zn3(μ4-L)2(2,2‧-bpy)(μ-4,4‧-bpy)]n·2H2O (3). These products were easily generated in aqueous medium from the corresponding metal(II) chlorides, H3L, and various N-donor ancillary ligands, selected from 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), pyridine (py), 2,2‧-bipyridine (2,2‧-bpy), and 4,4‧-bipyridine (4,4‧-bpy). Compounds 1-3 were isolated as stable crystalline solids and were fully characterized by IR and UV-vis spectroscopy, elemental, thermogravimetric (TGA), powder (PXRD) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Compound 1 possesses a discrete tetracobalt(II) structure, which is extended into a 3D H-bonded network with the pcu topology. In contrast, MOF 2 discloses a very complex trinodal 4,5,12-connected net with an undocumented topology, while MOF 3 features the nce/I topological framework. The magnetic (for 1) and luminescence (for 2 and 3) properties were also studied and discussed. The present study thus widens a still very limited family of metal-organic and supramolecular frameworks driven by flexible biphenyl-2,5,3‧-tricarboxylate building blocks.

  5. Organic Field-Effect Transistors: A 3D Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of the Current Characteristics in Micrometer-Sized Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Haoyuan

    2017-01-16

    The electrical properties of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are usually characterized by applying models initially developed for inorganic-based devices, which often implies the use of approximations that might be inappropriate for organic semiconductors. These approximations have brought limitations to the understanding of the device physics associated with organic materials. A strategy to overcome this issue is to establish straightforward connections between the macroscopic current characteristics and microscopic charge transport in OFETs. Here, a 3D kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that goes beyond both the conventional assumption of zero channel thickness and the gradual channel approximation to simulate carrier transport and current. Using parallel computing and a new algorithm that significantly improves the evaluation of electric potential within the device, this methodology allows the simulation of micrometer-sized OFETs. The current characteristics of representative OFET devices are well reproduced, which provides insight into the validity of the gradual channel approximation in the case of OFETs, the impact of the channel thickness, and the nature of microscopic charge transport.

  6. Organic Field-Effect Transistors: A 3D Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of the Current Characteristics in Micrometer-Sized Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Haoyuan; Li, Yuan; Li, Hong; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    The electrical properties of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are usually characterized by applying models initially developed for inorganic-based devices, which often implies the use of approximations that might be inappropriate for organic semiconductors. These approximations have brought limitations to the understanding of the device physics associated with organic materials. A strategy to overcome this issue is to establish straightforward connections between the macroscopic current characteristics and microscopic charge transport in OFETs. Here, a 3D kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that goes beyond both the conventional assumption of zero channel thickness and the gradual channel approximation to simulate carrier transport and current. Using parallel computing and a new algorithm that significantly improves the evaluation of electric potential within the device, this methodology allows the simulation of micrometer-sized OFETs. The current characteristics of representative OFET devices are well reproduced, which provides insight into the validity of the gradual channel approximation in the case of OFETs, the impact of the channel thickness, and the nature of microscopic charge transport.

  7. Underwater 3D filming

    OpenAIRE

    Rinaldi, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie’s box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space (“Gravity” ) and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. “Filming in space” was possible in “Gravity” using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Unde...

  8. Blender 3D cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Valenza, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book is aimed at the professionals that already have good 3D CGI experience with commercial packages and have now decided to try the open source Blender and want to experiment with something more complex than the average tutorials on the web. However, it's also aimed at the intermediate Blender users who simply want to go some steps further.It's taken for granted that you already know how to move inside the Blender interface, that you already have 3D modeling knowledge, and also that of basic 3D modeling and rendering concepts, for example, edge-loops, n-gons, or samples. In any case, it'

  9. DELTA 3D PRINTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ȘOVĂILĂ Florin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing is a very used process in industry, the generic name being “rapid prototyping”. The essential advantage of a 3D printer is that it allows the designers to produce a prototype in a very short time, which is tested and quickly remodeled, considerably reducing the required time to get from the prototype phase to the final product. At the same time, through this technique we can achieve components with very precise forms, complex pieces that, through classical methods, could have been accomplished only in a large amount of time. In this paper, there are presented the stages of a 3D model execution, also the physical achievement after of a Delta 3D printer after the model.

  10. Professional Papervision3D

    CERN Document Server

    Lively, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Professional Papervision3D describes how Papervision3D works and how real world applications are built, with a clear look at essential topics such as building websites and games, creating virtual tours, and Adobe's Flash 10. Readers learn important techniques through hands-on applications, and build on those skills as the book progresses. The companion website contains all code examples, video step-by-step explanations, and a collada repository.

  11. Persistently better treatment planning results of intensity-modulated (IMRT) over conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in prostate cancer patients with significant variation of clinical target volume and/or organs-at-risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenoglietto, Pascal; Laliberte, Benoit; Allaw, Ali; Ailleres, Norbert; Idri, Katia; Hay, Meng Huor; Moscardo, Carmen Llacer; Gourgou, Sophie; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Azria, David

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose coverage of planning and clinical target volume (PTV, CTV), and organs-at-risk (OAR) between intensity-modulated (3D-IMRT) and conventional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) before and after internal organ variation in prostate cancer. Methods and materials: We selected 10 patients with clinically significant interfraction volume changes. Patients were treated with 3D-IMRT to 80 Gy (minimum PTV dose of 76 Gy, excluding rectum). Fictitious, equivalent 3D-CRT plans (80 Gy at isocenter, with 95% isodose (76 Gy) coverage of PTV, with rectal blocking above 76 Gy) were generated using the same planning CT data set ('CT planning'). The plans were then also applied to a verification CT scan ('CT verify') obtained at a different moment. PTV, CTV, and OAR dose coverage were compared using non-parametric tests statistics for V95, V90 (% of the volume receiving ≥95 or 90% of the dose) and D50 (dose to 50% of the volume). Results: Mean V95 of the PTV for 'CT planning' was 94.3% (range, 88-99) vs 89.1% (range, 84-94.5) for 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT (p = 0.005), respectively. Mean V95 of the CTV for 'CT verify' was 97% for both 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT. Mean D50 of the rectum for 'CT planning' was 26.8 Gy (range, 22-35) vs 43.5 Gy (range, 33.5-50.5) for 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT (p = 0.0002), respectively. For 'CT verify', this D50 was 31.1 Gy (range, 16.5-44) vs 44.2 Gy (range, 34-55) for 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT (p = 0.006), respectively. V95 of the rectum was 0% for both plans for 'CT planning', and 2.3% (3D-IMRT) vs 2.1% (3D-CRT) for 'CT verify' (p = non-sig.). Conclusion: Dose coverage of the PTV and OAR was better with 3D-IMRT for each patient and remained so after internal volume changes

  12. A 3D Monte Carlo Method for Estimation of Patient-specific Internal Organs Absorbed Dose for 99mTc-hynic-Tyr3-octreotide Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momennezhad, Mehdi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Parach, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Asl, Ruhollah Ghahraman

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tracers are easily available and more widely used than positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers, and SPECT imaging still remains the most prevalent nuclear medicine imaging modality worldwide. The aim of this study is to implement an image-based Monte Carlo method for patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) absorbed dose calculation in patients after injection of 99m Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (hynic)-Tyr 3 -octreotide as a SPECT radiotracer. 99m Tc patient-speci@@@@@@c S values and the absorbed doses were calculated with GATE code for each source-target organ pair in four patients who were imaged for suspected neuroendocrine tumors. Each patient underwent multiple whole-body planar scans as well as SPECT imaging over a period of 1-24 h after intravenous injection of 99m hynic-Tyr 3 -octreotide. The patient-specific S values calculated by GATE Monte Carlo code and the corresponding S values obtained by MIRDOSE program differed within 4.3% on an average for self-irradiation, and differed within 69.6% on an average for cross-irradiation. However, the agreement between total organ doses calculated by GATE code and MIRDOSE program for all patients was reasonably well (percentage difference was about 4.6% on an average). Normal and tumor absorbed doses calculated with GATE were slightly higher than those calculated with MIRDOSE program. The average ratio of GATE absorbed doses to MIRDOSE was 1.07 ± 0.11 (ranging from 0.94 to 1.36). According to the results, it is proposed that when cross-organ irradiation is dominant, a comprehensive approach such as GATE Monte Carlo dosimetry be used since it provides more reliable dosimetric results

  13. Computerized diagnostic data analysis and 3-D visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhmann, D.; Haubner, M.; Krapichler, C.; Englmeier, K.H.; Seemann, M.; Schoepf, U.J.; Gebicke, K.; Reiser, M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To survey methods for 3D data visualization and image analysis which can be used for computer based diagnostics. Material and methods: The methods available are explained in short terms and links to the literature are presented. Methods which allow basic manipulation of 3D data are windowing, rotation and clipping. More complex methods for visualization of 3D data are multiplanar reformation, volume projections (MIP, semi-transparent projections) and surface projections. Methods for image analysis comprise local data transformation (e.g. filtering) and definition and application of complex models (e.g. deformable models). Results: Volume projections produce an impression of the 3D data set without reducing the data amount. This supports the interpretation of the 3D data set and saves time in comparison to any investigation which requires examination of all slice images. More advanced techniques for visualization, e.g. surface projections and hybrid rendering visualize anatomical information to a very detailed extent, but both techniques require the segmentation of the structures of interest. Image analysis methods can be used to extract these structures (e.g. an organ) from the image data. Discussion: At the present time volume projections are robust and fast enough to be used routinely. Surface projections can be used to visualize complex and presegmented anatomical features. (orig.) [de

  14. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  15. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K.; Johnson, Blake N.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and ‘living’ platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with

  16. Wearable 3D measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Yoshitsugu; Imura, Masataka; Tsuchiya, Masanobu; Yasumuro, Yoshihiro; Chihara, Kunihiro

    2003-01-01

    Wearable 3D measurement realizes to acquire 3D information of an objects or an environment using a wearable computer. Recently, we can send voice and sound as well as pictures by mobile phone in Japan. Moreover it will become easy to capture and send data of short movie by it. On the other hand, the computers become compact and high performance. And it can easy connect to Internet by wireless LAN. Near future, we can use the wearable computer always and everywhere. So we will be able to send the three-dimensional data that is measured by wearable computer as a next new data. This paper proposes the measurement method and system of three-dimensional data of an object with the using of wearable computer. This method uses slit light projection for 3D measurement and user"s motion instead of scanning system.

  17. 3D Digital Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøl, Jesper

    wave of new building information modelling tools demands further investigation, not least because of industry representatives' somewhat coarse parlance: Now the word is spreading -3D digital modelling is nothing less than a revolution, a shift of paradigm, a new alphabet... Research qeustions. Based...... on empirical probes (interviews, observations, written inscriptions) within the Danish construction industry this paper explores the organizational and managerial dynamics of 3D Digital Modelling. The paper intends to - Illustrate how the network of (non-)human actors engaged in the promotion (and arrest) of 3...... important to appreciate the analysis. Before turning to the presentation of preliminary findings and a discussion of 3D digital modelling, it begins, however, with an outline of industry specific ICT strategic issues. Paper type. Multi-site field study...

  18. Synthesis of 3D iron and carbon-based composite as a bifunctional sorbent and catalyst for remediation of organic pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Shen, Yi; Wang, Zhaomei

    2017-07-01

    We prepared a 3D monolith by integrating graphite nanosheet encapsulated iron nanoparticles (Fe@GNS) into graphite felt (GF) supports. The structural properties of the resulting Fe@GNS/GF monolith are characterized by x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The Fe@GNS/GF monoliths are utilized as a bifunctional sorbent and catalyst for water remediation. Using Congo red and methyl violet 2B as model pollutants, the sorption and catalytic performance of the Fe@GNS/GF composite are examined. The Fe@GNS/GF monolith possesses maximum sorption capacities of 177 and 142 mg g-1 for the sorption of CR and MV-2B, respectively. It also exhibits rate constants of 0.0563 and 0.0464 min-1 for the catalytic degradation of CR and MV-2B, respectively. As a proof of concept, the Fe@GNS/GF is successfully utilized to decontaminate simulated organic waste water via a combination of sorption and catalytic degradation processes.

  19. 3D ARCHITECTURAL VIDEOMAPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Catanese

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D architectural mapping is a video projection technique that can be done with a survey of a chosen building in order to realize a perfect correspondence between its shapes and the images in projection. As a performative kind of audiovisual artifact, the real event of the 3D mapping is a combination of a registered video animation file with a real architecture. This new kind of visual art is becoming very popular and its big audience success testifies new expressive chances in the field of urban design. My case study has been experienced in Pisa for the Luminara feast in 2012.

  20. Interaktiv 3D design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villaume, René Domine; Ørstrup, Finn Rude

    2002-01-01

    Projektet undersøger potentialet for interaktiv 3D design via Internettet. Arkitekt Jørn Utzons projekt til Espansiva blev udviklet som et byggesystem med det mål, at kunne skabe mangfoldige planmuligheder og mangfoldige facade- og rumudformninger. Systemets bygningskomponenter er digitaliseret som...... 3D elementer og gjort tilgængelige. Via Internettet er det nu muligt at sammenstille og afprøve en uendelig  række bygningstyper som  systemet blev tænkt og udviklet til....

  1. 3D Projection Installations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halskov, Kim; Johansen, Stine Liv; Bach Mikkelsen, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional projection installations are particular kinds of augmented spaces in which a digital 3-D model is projected onto a physical three-dimensional object, thereby fusing the digital content and the physical object. Based on interaction design research and media studies, this article ...... Fingerplan to Loop City, is a 3-D projection installation presenting the history and future of city planning for the Copenhagen area in Denmark. The installation was presented as part of the 12th Architecture Biennale in Venice in 2010....

  2. Herramientas SIG 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R. Feito Higueruela

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications of Geographical Information Systems on several Archeology fields have been increasing during the last years. Recent avances in these technologies make possible to work with more realistic 3D models. In this paper we introduce a new paradigm for this system, the GIS Thetrahedron, in which we define the fundamental elements of GIS, in order to provide a better understanding of their capabilities. At the same time the basic 3D characteristics of some comercial and open source software are described, as well as the application to some samples on archeological researchs

  3. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliesiu, Luca [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Kos, Filip; Poland, David [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Pufu, Silviu S. [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Simmons-Duffin, David [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Yacoby, Ran [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions 〈ψψψψ〉 in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ×ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C{sub T}. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the Gross-Neveu models at large N. We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  4. Shaping 3-D boxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenholt, Rasmus; Madsen, Claus B.

    2011-01-01

    Enabling users to shape 3-D boxes in immersive virtual environments is a non-trivial problem. In this paper, a new family of techniques for creating rectangular boxes of arbitrary position, orientation, and size is presented and evaluated. These new techniques are based solely on position data...

  5. 3D Wire 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordi, Moréton; F, Escribano; J. L., Farias

    This document is a general report on the implementation of gamification in 3D Wire 2015 event. As the second gamification experience in this event, we have delved deeply in the previous objectives (attracting public areas less frequented exhibition in previous years and enhance networking) and have...

  6. 3D Harmonic Echocardiography:

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Voormolen (Marco)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThree dimensional (3D) echocardiography has recently developed from an experimental technique in the ’90 towards an imaging modality for the daily clinical practice. This dissertation describes the considerations, implementation, validation and clinical application of a unique

  7. Automatic balancing of 3D models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Asger Nyman; Schmidt, Ryan; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2014-01-01

    3D printing technologies allow for more diverse shapes than are possible with molds and the cost of making just one single object is negligible compared to traditional production methods. However, not all shapes are suitable for 3D print. One of the remaining costs is therefore human time spent......, in these cases, we will apply a rotation of the object which only deforms the shape a little near the base. No user input is required but it is possible to specify manufacturing constraints related to specific 3D print technologies. Several models have successfully been balanced and printed using both polyjet...... is solved by creating cavities of air and distributing dense materials inside the model. Consequently, the surface is not deformed. However, printing materials with significantly different densities is often not possible and adding cavities of air is often not enough to make the model balance. Consequently...

  8. 3D geometric phase analysis and its application in 3D microscopic morphology measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ronghua; Shi, Wenxiong; Cao, Quankun; Liu, Zhanwei; Guo, Baoqiao; Xie, Huimin

    2018-04-01

    Although three-dimensional (3D) morphology measurement has been widely applied on the macro-scale, there is still a lack of 3D measurement technology on the microscopic scale. In this paper, a microscopic 3D measurement technique based on the 3D-geometric phase analysis (GPA) method is proposed. In this method, with machine vision and phase matching, the traditional GPA method is extended to three dimensions. Using this method, 3D deformation measurement on the micro-scale can be realized using a light microscope. Simulation experiments were conducted in this study, and the results demonstrate that the proposed method has a good anti-noise ability. In addition, the 3D morphology of the necking zone in a tensile specimen was measured, and the results demonstrate that this method is feasible.

  9. 3D Surgical Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive ...

  10. Magma emplacement in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyk, W.; Vogt, K.

    2017-12-01

    Magma intrusion is a major material transfer process in Earth's continental crust. Yet, the mechanical behavior of the intruding magma and its host are a matter of debate. In this study, we present a series of numerical thermo-mechanical experiments on mafic magma emplacement in 3D.In our model, we place the magmatic source region (40 km diameter) at the base of the mantle lithosphere and connect it to the crust by a 3 km wide channel, which may have evolved at early stages of magmatism during rapid ascent of hot magmatic fluids/melts. Our results demonstrate continental crustal response due to magma intrusion. We observe change in intrusion geometries between dikes, cone-sheets, sills, plutons, ponds, funnels, finger-shaped and stock-like intrusions as well as injection time. The rheology and temperature of the host-rock are the main controlling factors in the transition between these different modes of intrusion. Viscous deformation in the warm and deep crust favours host rock displacement and magma pools along the crust-mantle boundary forming deep-seated plutons or magma ponds in the lower to middle-crust. Brittle deformation in the cool and shallow crust induces cone-shaped fractures in the host rock and enables emplacement of finger- or stock-like intrusions at shallow or intermediate depth. A combination of viscous and brittle deformation forms funnel-shaped intrusions in the middle-crust. Low-density source magma results in T-shaped intrusions in cross-section with magma sheets at the surface.

  11. 3D Printing. What's the Harm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Tyler S.; Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Health concerns from 3D printing were first documented by Stephens, Azimi, Orch, and Ramos (2013), who found that commercially available 3D printers were producing hazardous levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when plastic materials were melted through the extruder. UFPs are particles less than 100 nanometers…

  12. Measurement of full-field deformation induced by a dc electrical field in organic insulator films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudou L.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital image correlation method (DIC using the correlation coefficient curve-fitting for full-field surface deformation measurements of organic insulator films is investigated in this work. First the validation of the technique was undertaken. The computer-generated speckle images and the measurement of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE of aluminium are used to evaluate the measurement accuracy of the technique. In a second part the technique is applied to measure the mechanical deformation induced by electrical field application to organic insulators. For that Poly(ethylene naphthalene 2,6-dicarboxylate (PEN thin films were subjected to DC voltage stress and DIC provides the full-field induced deformations of the test films. The obtained results show that the DIC is a practical and robust tool for better comprehension of mechanical behaviour of the organic insulator films under electrical stress.

  13. 3D Bio-Printing Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xianbin

    2018-01-01

    Ultimate goal of tissue engineering is to replace pathological or necrotic body tissue or organ by artificial tissue or organ and tissue engineering is a very promising research field. 3D bio-printing is a kind of emerging technologies and a branch of tissue engineering. It has made significant progress in the past decade. 3D bio-printing can realize tissue and organ construction in vitro and has wide application in basic research and pharmacy. This paper is to make an analysis and review on 3D bio-printing from the perspectives of bioink, printing technology and technology application.

  14. Getting started in 3D with Maya

    CERN Document Server

    Watkins, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Deliver professional-level 3D content in no time with this comprehensive guide to 3D animation with Maya. With over 12 years of training experience, plus several award winning students under his belt, author Adam Watkins is the ideal mentor to get you up to speed with 3D in Maya. Using a structured and pragmatic approach Getting Started in 3D with Maya begins with basic theory of fundamental techniques, then builds on this knowledge using practical examples and projects to put your new skills to the test. Prepared so that you can learn in an organic fashion, each chapter builds on the know

  15. Real-time deformations of organ based on structural mechanics for surgical simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Tagaya, Masashi; Tamura, Nobuhiko; Tsumura, Norimichi; Miyake, Yoichi

    2006-03-01

    This research proposes the deformation model of organs for the development of the medical training system using Virtual Reality (VR) technology. First, the proposed model calculates the strains of coordinate axis. Secondly, the deformation is obtained by mapping the coordinate of the object to the strained coordinate. We assume the beams in the coordinate space to calculate the strain of the coordinate axis. The forces acting on the object are converted to the forces applied to the beams. The bend and the twist of the beams are calculated based on the theory of structural mechanics. The bend is derived by the finite element method. We propose two deformation methods which differ in the position of the beams in the coordinate space. One method locates the beams along the three orthogonal axes (x, y, z). Another method locates the beam in the area where the deformation is large. In addition, the strain of the coordinate axis is attenuated in proportion to the distance from the point of action to consider the attenuation of the stress which is a viscoelastic feature of the organs. The proposed model needs less computational cost compared to the conventional deformation method since our model does not need to divide the object into the elasticity element. The proposed model was implemented in the laparoscopic surgery training system, and a real-time deformation can be realized.

  16. Dual-beam focused ion beam/electron microscopy processing and metrology of redeposition during ion-surface 3D interactions, from micromachining to self-organized picostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberlychan, Warren J

    2009-06-03

    Focused ion beam (FIB) tools have become a mainstay for processing and metrology of small structures. In order to expand the understanding of an ion impinging a surface (Sigmund sputtering theory) to our processing of small structures, the significance of 3D boundary conditions must be realized. We consider ion erosion for patterning/lithography, and optimize yields using the angle of incidence and chemical enhancement, but we find that the critical 3D parameters are aspect ratio and redeposition. We consider focused ion beam sputtering for micromachining small holes through membranes, but we find that the critical 3D considerations are implantation and redeposition. We consider ion beam self-assembly of nanostructures, but we find that control of the redeposition by ion and/or electron beams enables the growth of nanostructures and picostructures.

  17. Relation between the Hurst Exponent and the Efficiency of Self-organization of a Deformable System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfyorova, E. A.; Lychagin, D. V.

    2018-04-01

    We have established the degree of self-organization of a system under plastic deformation at different scale levels. Using fractal analysis, we have determined the Hurst exponent and correlation lengths in the region of formation of a corrugated (wrinkled) structure in [111] nickel single crystals under compression. This has made it possible to single out two (micro-and meso-) levels of self-organization in the deformable system. A qualitative relation between the values of the Hurst exponent and the stages of the stress-strain curve has been established.

  18. Tangible 3D Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejlesen, Aske K.; Ovesen, Nis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental approach to teaching 3D modelling techniques in an Industrial Design programme. The approach includes the use of tangible free form models as tools for improving the overall learning. The paper is based on lecturer and student experiences obtained through...... facilitated discussions during the course as well as through a survey distributed to the participating students. The analysis of the experiences shows a mixed picture consisting of both benefits and limits to the experimental technique. A discussion about the applicability of the technique and about...

  19. Elucidating the 3D structures of Al(iii)-Aβ complexes: a template free strategy based on the pre-organization hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujika, Jon I; Rodríguez-Guerra Pedregal, Jaime; Lopez, Xabier; Ugalde, Jesus M; Rodríguez-Santiago, Luis; Sodupe, Mariona; Maréchal, Jean-Didier

    2017-07-01

    Senile plaques are extracellular deposits found in patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and are mainly formed by insoluble fibrils of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. The mechanistic details about how AD develops are not fully understood yet, but metals such as Cu, Zn, or Fe are proposed to have a non-innocent role. Many studies have also linked the non biological metal aluminum with AD, a species whose concentration in the environment and food has been constantly increasing since the industrial revolution. Gaining a molecular picture of how Al(iii) interacts with an Aβ peptide is of fundamental interest to improve understanding of the many variables in the evolution of AD. So far, no consensus has been reached on how this metal interacts with Aβ, partially due to the experimental complexity of detecting and quantifying the resulting Al(iii)-Aβ complexes. Computational chemistry arises as a powerful alternative to investigate how Al(iii) can interact with Aβ peptides, as suitable strategies could shed light on the metal-peptide description at the molecular level. However, the absence of any reliable template that could be used for the modeling of the metallopeptide structure makes computational insight extremely difficult. Here, we present a novel strategy to generate accurate 3D models of the Al(iii)-Aβ complexes, which still circumvents first principles simulations of metal binding to peptides of Aβ. The key to this approach lies in the identification of experimental structures of the isolated peptide that are favourably pre-organized for the binding of a given metal in configurations of the first coordination sphere that were previously identified as the most stable with amino acid models. This approach solves the problem of the absence of clear structural templates for novel metallopeptide constructs. The posterior refinement of the structures via QM/MM and MD calculations allows us to provide, for the first time, physically sound models for Al

  20. 3D Surgical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  1. Bio-inks for 3D printing of Cartilage Implants : Tailoring gelMA and polyHPMA-lac-PEG hydrogels for the fabrication of spatially organized constructs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouser, V.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    A promising approach to treat cartilage defects is the implantation of stratified cell-laden hydrogel implants that mimic native cartilage. To fabricate such constructs, three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting techniques are promising, as they allow accurate deposition of (cell-laden) biomaterials, the

  2. 3D Architecture, dynamics as well as functional implications of genome organization of the Prader-Willi/Angelmann syndrome region & the Immunoglobin Heavy-Chain locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe general 3D architecture of the immunoglobin heavy-chain (Igh) locus was determined by a novel interdisciplinary combination of high-resolution FISH and high-resolution epifluorescence spectral distance microscopy with analytical analysis, computer simulations, as well as

  3. Body Language Advanced 3D Character Rigging

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Eric; Fong, Jared; Sidwell, Adam G

    2011-01-01

    Whether you're a professional Character TD or just like to create 3D characters, this detailed guide reveals the techniques you need to create sophisticated 3D character rigs that range from basic to breathtaking. Packed with step-by-step instructions and full-color illustrations, Body Language walks you through rigging techniques for all the body parts to help you create realistic and believable movements in every character you design. You'll learn advanced rigging concepts that involve MEL scripting and advanced deformation techniques and even how to set up a character pipeline.

  4. Cardiac muscle organization revealed in 3-D by imaging whole-mount mouse hearts using two-photon fluorescence and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn; Sivaguru, Barghav S; Sivaguru, Vignesh A; Lu, Xiaochen; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Saif, M Taher A; Lin, Brian; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2015-11-01

    The ability to image the entire adult mouse heart at high resolution in 3-D would provide enormous advantages in the study of heart disease. However, a technique for imaging nuclear/cellular detail as well as the overall structure of the entire heart in 3-D with minimal effort is lacking. To solve this problem, we modified the benzyl alcohol:benzyl benzoate (BABB) clearing technique by labeling mouse hearts with periodic acid Schiff (PAS) stain. We then imaged the hearts with a combination of two-photon fluorescence microscopy and automated tile-scan imaging/stitching. Utilizing the differential spectral properties of PAS, we could identify muscle and nuclear compartments in the heart. We were also able to visualize the differences between a 3-month-old normal mouse heart and a mouse heart that had undergone heart failure due to the expression of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) gene mutation (t/t). Using 2-D and 3-D morphometric analysis, we found that the t/t heart had anomalous ventricular shape, volume, and wall thickness, as well as a disrupted sarcomere pattern. We further validated our approach using decellularized hearts that had been cultured with 3T3 fibroblasts, which were tracked using a nuclear label. We were able to detect the 3T3 cells inside the decellularized intact heart tissue, achieving nuclear/cellular resolution in 3-D. The combination of labeling, clearing, and two-photon microscopy together with tiling eliminates laborious and time-consuming physical sectioning, alignment, and 3-D reconstruction.

  5. The detailed 3D multi-loop aggregate/rosette chromatin architecture and functional dynamic organization of the human and mouse genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoch, Tobias A; Wachsmuth, Malte; Kepper, Nick

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dynamic three-dimensional chromatin architecture of genomes and its co-evolutionary connection to its function-the storage, expression, and replication of genetic information-is still one of the central issues in biology. Here, we describe the much debated 3D architecture...... of the human and mouse genomes from the nucleosomal to the megabase pair level by a novel approach combining selective high-throughput high-resolution chromosomal interaction capture (T2C), polymer simulations, and scaling analysis of the 3D architecture and the DNA sequence. RESULTS: The genome is compacted...... into a chromatin quasi-fibre with ~5 ± 1 nucleosomes/11 nm, folded into stable ~30-100 kbp loops forming stable loop aggregates/rosettes connected by similar sized linkers. Minor but significant variations in the architecture are seen between cell types and functional states. The architecture and the DNA sequence...

  6. Heterometallic modular metal-organic 3D frameworks assembled via new tris-β-diketonate metalloligands: nanoporous materials for anion exchange and scaffolding of selected anionic guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Lucia; Ciani, Gianfranco; Maggini, Simona; Proserpio, Davide M; Visconti, Marco

    2010-11-02

    The modular engineering of heterometallic nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) based on novel tris-chelate metalloligands, prepared using the functionalised β-diketone 1,3-bis(4'-cyanophenyl)-1,3-propanedione (HL), is described. The complexes [M(III)L(3)] (M=Fe(3+), Co(3+)) and [M(II)L(3)](NEt(4)) (M=Mn(2+), Co(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+)) have been synthesised and characterised, all of which exhibit a distorted octahedral chiral structure. The presence of six exo-oriented cyano donor groups on each complex makes it a suitable building block for networking through interactions with external metal ions. We have prepared two families of MOFs by reacting the metalloligands [M(III)L(3)] and [M(II)L(3)](-) with many silver salts AgX (X=NO(3)(-), BF(4)(-), PF(6)(-), AsF(6)(-), SbF(6)(-), CF(3)SO(3)(-), tosylate), specifically the [M(III)L(3)Ag(3)]X(3)·Solv and [M(II)L(3)Ag(3)]X(2)·Solv network species. Very interestingly, all of these network species exhibit the same type of 3D structure and crystallise in the same trigonal space group with similar cell parameters, in spite of the different metal ions, ionic charges and X(-) counteranions of the silver salts. We have also succeeded in synthesising trimetallic species such as [Zn(x)Fe(y)L(3)Ag(3)](ClO(4))((2x+3y))·Solv and [Zn(x)Cd(y)L(3)Ag(3)](ClO(4))(2)·Solv (with x+y=1). All of the frameworks can be described as sixfold interpenetrated pcu nets, considering the Ag(+) ions as simple digonal spacers. Each individual net is homochiral, containing only Δ or Λ nodes; the whole array contains three nets of type Δ and three nets of type Λ. Otherwise, taking into account the presence of weak Ag-C σ bonds involving the central carbon atoms of the β-diketonate ligands of adjacent nets, the six interpenetrating pcu networks are joined into a unique non-interpenetrated six-connected frame with the rare acs topology. The networks contain large parallel channels of approximate hexagonal-shaped sections that represent 37

  7. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Keating

    Full Text Available We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics.

  8. 3D Object Metamorphosis with Pseudo Metameshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOCANU, B.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce a novel framework for 3D object metamorphosis, represented by closed triangular meshes. The systems returns a high quality transition sequence, smooth and gradual, that is visual pleasant and consistent to both source and target topologies. The method starts by parameterizing both the source and the target model to a common domain (the unit sphere. Then, the features selected from the two models are aligned by applying the CTPS C2a radial basis functions. We demonstrate how the selected approach can create valid warping by deforming the models embedded into the parametric domain. In the final stage, we propose and validate a novel algorithm to construct a pseudo-supermesh able to approximate both, the source and target 3D objects. By using the pseudo-supermesh we developed a morphing transition consistent with respect to both geometry and topology of the 3D models.

  9. Mobile 3D tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illerhaus, Bernhard; Goebbels, Juergen; Onel, Yener; Sauerwein, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Mobile tomographs often have the problem that high spatial resolution is impossible owing to the position or setup of the tomograph. While the tree tomograph developed by Messrs. Isotopenforschung Dr. Sauerwein GmbH worked well in practice, it is no longer used as the spatial resolution and measuring time are insufficient for many modern applications. The paper shows that the mechanical base of the method is sufficient for 3D CT measurements with modern detectors and X-ray tubes. CT measurements with very good statistics take less than 10 min. This means that mobile systems can be used, e.g. in examinations of non-transportable cultural objects or monuments. Enhancement of the spatial resolution of mobile tomographs capable of measuring in any position is made difficult by the fact that the tomograph has moving parts and will therefore have weight shifts. With the aid of tomographies whose spatial resolution is far higher than the mechanical accuracy, a correction method is presented for direct integration of the Feldkamp algorithm [de

  10. Thermally induced processes in mixtures of aluminum with organic acids after plastic deformations under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhorin, V. A.; Kiselev, M. R.; Roldugin, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    DSC is used to measure the thermal effects of processes in mixtures of solid organic dibasic acids with powdered aluminum, subjected to plastic deformation under pressures in the range of 0.5-4.0 GPa using an anvil-type high-pressure setup. Analysis of thermograms obtained for the samples after plastic deformation suggests a correlation between the exothermal peaks observed around the temperatures of degradation of the acids and the thermally induced chemical reactions between products of acid degradation and freshly formed surfaces of aluminum particles. The release of heat in the mixtures begins at 30-40°C. The thermal effects in the mixtures of different acids change according to the order of acid reactivity in solutions. The extreme baric dependences of enthalpies of thermal effects are associated with the rearrangement of the electron subsystem of aluminum upon plastic deformation at high pressures.

  11. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-07-13

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  12. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  13. 3D printing for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hausman, Kalani Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Get started printing out 3D objects quickly and inexpensively! 3D printing is no longer just a figment of your imagination. This remarkable technology is coming to the masses with the growing availability of 3D printers. 3D printers create 3-dimensional layered models and they allow users to create prototypes that use multiple materials and colors.  This friendly-but-straightforward guide examines each type of 3D printing technology available today and gives artists, entrepreneurs, engineers, and hobbyists insight into the amazing things 3D printing has to offer. You'll discover methods for

  14. A 3D Geometry Model Search Engine to Support Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Gary K. L.; Lau, Rynson W. H.; Zhao, Jianmin

    2009-01-01

    Due to the popularity of 3D graphics in animation and games, usage of 3D geometry deformable models increases dramatically. Despite their growing importance, these models are difficult and time consuming to build. A distance learning system for the construction of these models could greatly facilitate students to learn and practice at different…

  15. Preparation of environment-friendly 3D eggshell membrane-supported anatase TiO2 as a reusable photocatalyst for degradation of organic dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaling; Zhou, Ji; Fan, Yunde; Ye, Yong; Tang, Bin

    2017-12-01

    We fabricated a low-cost and efficient composite photocatalyst material, combining eggshell membrane (ESM) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles, through self-assembly method. ESM with 3D porous structures provide scaffolds for TiO2 nanoparticles. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) was used to modify ESM by grafting amine groups. The microstructure and property of the fabricated composites were studied by various characterization methods. The composite was used for the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB). The results demonstrate that the composite catalyst possesses good photocatalytic performance for dye degradation under sunlight irradiation simulated by a xenon lamp. Functionalization based on nanomaterials may promote the applications of ESM.

  16. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  17. 3D printed bionic ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  18. 3D Volume Rendering and 3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkar, Rujuta A; Taft, Robert M; Grant, Gerald T

    2018-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) volume-rendered images allow 3D insight into the anatomy, facilitating surgical treatment planning and teaching. 3D printing, additive manufacturing, and rapid prototyping techniques are being used with satisfactory accuracy, mostly for diagnosis and surgical planning, followed by direct manufacture of implantable devices. The major limitation is the time and money spent generating 3D objects. Printer type, material, and build thickness are known to influence the accuracy of printed models. In implant dentistry, the use of 3D-printed surgical guides is strongly recommended to facilitate planning and reduce risk of operative complications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 3D game environments create professional 3D game worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Ahearn, Luke

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate resource to help you create triple-A quality art for a variety of game worlds; 3D Game Environments offers detailed tutorials on creating 3D models, applying 2D art to 3D models, and clear concise advice on issues of efficiency and optimization for a 3D game engine. Using Photoshop and 3ds Max as his primary tools, Luke Ahearn explains how to create realistic textures from photo source and uses a variety of techniques to portray dynamic and believable game worlds.From a modern city to a steamy jungle, learn about the planning and technological considerations for 3D modelin

  20. Segmentation of deformable organs from medical images using particle swarm optimization and nonlinear shape priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Ahmed; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2010-03-01

    In many medical applications, the automatic segmentation of deformable organs from medical images is indispensable and its accuracy is of a special interest. However, the automatic segmentation of these organs is a challenging task according to its complex shape. Moreover, the medical images usually have noise, clutter, or occlusion and considering the image information only often leads to meager image segmentation. In this paper, we propose a fully automated technique for the segmentation of deformable organs from medical images. In this technique, the segmentation is performed by fitting a nonlinear shape model with pre-segmented images. The kernel principle component analysis (KPCA) is utilized to capture the complex organs deformation and to construct the nonlinear shape model. The presegmentation is carried out by labeling each pixel according to its high level texture features extracted using the overcomplete wavelet packet decomposition. Furthermore, to guarantee an accurate fitting between the nonlinear model and the pre-segmented images, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is employed to adapt the model parameters for the novel images. In this paper, we demonstrate the competence of proposed technique by implementing it to the liver segmentation from computed tomography (CT) scans of different patients.

  1. 3D+time acquisitions of 3D cell culture by means of lens-free tomographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdeu, Anthony; Laperrousaz, Bastien; Bordy, Thomas; Morales, S.; Gidrol, Xavier; Picollet-D'hahan, Nathalie; Allier, Cédric

    2018-02-01

    We propose a three-dimensional (3D) imaging platform based on lens-free microscopy to perform multi-angle acquisitions on 3D cell cultures embedded in extracellular matrix (ECM). We developed algorithms based on the Fourier diffraction theorem to perform fully 3D reconstructions of biological samples and we adapted the lens-free microscope to incubator conditions. Here we demonstrate for the first time, 3D+time lens-free acquisitions of 3D cell culture over 8 days directly into the incubator. The 3D reconstructed volume is as large as 5 mm3 and provides a unique way to observe in the same 3D cell culture experiment multiple cell migration strategies. Namely, in a 3D cell culture of prostate epithelial cells embedded within a Matrigel® matrix, we are able to distinguish single cell 'leaders', migration of cell clusters, migration of large aggregates of cells, and also close-gap and large-scale branching. In addition, we observe long-scale 3D deformations of the ECM that modify the geometry of the 3D cell culture. Interestingly, we also observed the opposite, i.e. we found that large aggregates of cells may deform the ECM by generating traction forces over very long distances. In sum we put forward a novel 3D lens-free microscopy tomographic technique to study the single and collective cell migrations, the cell-to-cell interactions and the cell-to-matrix interactions.

  2. The Future Is 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Luke

    2015-01-01

    3D printers are a way of producing a 3D model of an item from a digital file. The model builds up in successive layers of material placed by the printer controlled by the information in the computer file. In this article the author argues that 3D printers are one of the greatest technological advances of recent times. He discusses practical uses…

  3. The 3D additivist cookbook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allahyari, Morehshin; Rourke, Daniel; Rasch, Miriam

    The 3D Additivist Cookbook, devised and edited by Morehshin Allahyari & Daniel Rourke, is a free compendium of imaginative, provocative works from over 100 world-leading artists, activists and theorists. The 3D Additivist Cookbook contains .obj and .stl files for the 3D printer, as well as critical

  4. An exploration of polymer adhesion on 3D printer bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazan, M. A.; Ramli, F. R.; Alkahari, M. R.; Abdullah, M. A.; Sudin, M. N.

    2017-06-01

    One of the problems in Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) 3D Printing process is that the extruded plastic filament tends to shrink and warp from the printing platform. The purpose of this research is to explore the warping deformation problem in four aspects i.e. curling, pincushion effect, trapezoid deformation and blocked shrinkage that usually occur in the process. Epoxy resin based adhesive was applied onto the printing platform to reduce and eliminate the warping deformation. Afterwards, by applying the adhesive, the 3D printed models were measured their curling, pincushion, trapezoid and blocked shrinkage using laser scanner and metrology software. The result shows that the pincushion and trapezoid has low deformation compared to curling and blocked shrinkage. Blocked shrinkage effect shows the highest warping deformation value. In comparison of materials, PLA shows the best geometry result with low warping deformation value and the best surface finish.

  5. Organ Surface Deformation Measurement and Analysis in Open Hepatic Surgery: Method and Preliminary Results From 12 Clinical Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Clements, Logan W.; Dumpuri, Prashanth; Chapman, William C.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Galloway, Robert L.; Miga, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of soft tissue deformation has been well documented in neurosurgical procedures and is known to compromise the spatial accuracy of image-guided surgery systems. Within the context of image-guided liver surgery (IGLS), no detailed method to study and analyze the observed organ shape change between preoperative imaging and the intraoperative presentation has been developed. Contrary to the studies of deformation in neurosurgical procedures, the majority of deformation in IGLS is i...

  6. Human Milk Shows Immunological Advantages Over Organic Milk Samples For Infants in the Presence of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS in 3D Energy Maps Using an Organic Nanobiomimetic Memristor/Memcapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S-H. DUH

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human milk is well known for its immunological advantages of protection and support for healthy early childhood cognitive development and prevention of chronic diseases over cow milk for infants. However, little is known about how the immunological advantages are linked to reduce Pathological High Frequency Oscillation (pHFO regarding neural synapse net energy outcomes when lipopolysaccharide (LPS attacks at a clinical concentration range compared with that in cow milk in a 3D energy map. We developed a nanostructure biomimetic memristor/memcapacitor device with a dual function of chronoamperometric (CA sensing/voltage sensing for the direct quantitative evaluation of immunological advantages between human milk and organic cow milk for infants in the presence of wide LPS concentration ranges; those ranges were between 5.0 pg/mL to 500 ng/mL and from 50 ng/mL to 1 µg/mL for both a CA and a voltage method, respectively. The Detection of Limit (DOL results are as follows: 3.73×10-18 g LPS vs. 1.2×10-16 g LPS in 40 µL milk samples using the 3.11×10-7cm3 voltage sensor and the 0.031cm2 CA sensor, respectively, under antibody-free and reagent-free conditions. The 3D energy map results show that cow milk is ten-times more prone to E. Coli attack, and the positive link was revealed that Pathological High Frequency Oscillation (pHFO formations occurred over the studied LPS concentration range from 50 ng/mL up to 1000 ng/mL from Rapid Eye Movement (REM sleep frequency, fast gamma frequency to Sharp Wave-Ripple Complexes (SPW- R frequency. There had no pHFO with human milk samples at Slow Wave Sleeping (SWS, REM and SPW- R frequencies. The microbiota in the human milk samples successfully overcame the endotoxin attack from E. coli bacteria, however the pHFO only occurred at fast gamma frequency linked with the LPS level ≥ 500 ng/mL. Organic milk samples show an order of magnitude lower synapse energy density compared with human milk at SWS for with

  7. TAURUS, Post-processor of 3-D Finite Elements Plots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.E.; Hallquist, J.O.; Kennedy, T.

    2002-01-01

    Description of program or function: TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D (NESC 9725), DYNA3D (NESC 9909), TACO3D (NESC 9838), TOPAZ3D (NESC9599) and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories, and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing

  8. Introducing the Jacobian-volume-histogram of deforming organs: application to parotid shrinkage evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Maggiulli, Eleonora; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Calandrino, Riccardo; Liberini, Simone; Faggiano, Elena; Rizzo, Giovanna; Dell'Oca, Italo; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    The Jacobian of the deformation field of elastic registration between images taken during radiotherapy is a measure of inter-fraction local deformation. The histogram of the Jacobian values (Jac) within an organ was introduced (JVH-Jacobian-volume-histogram) and first applied in quantifying parotid shrinkage. MVCTs of 32 patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy for head-neck cancers were collected. Parotid deformation was evaluated through elastic registration between MVCTs taken at the first and last fractions. Jac was calculated for each voxel of all parotids, and integral JVHs were calculated for each parotid; the correlation between the JVH and the planning dose-volume histogram (DVH) was investigated. On average, 82% (±17%) of the voxels shrinks (Jac 50% (Jac < 0.5). The best correlation between the DVH and the JVH was found between V10 and V15, and Jac < 0.4-0.6 (p < 0.01). The best constraint predicting a higher number of largely compressing voxels (Jac0.5<7.5%, median value) was V15 ≥ 75% (OR: 7.6, p = 0.002). Jac and the JVH are promising tools for scoring/modelling toxicity and for evaluating organ/contour variations with potential applications in adaptive radiotherapy.

  9. A general synthesis strategy for the multifunctional 3D polypyrrole foam of thin 2D nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jiangli; Mo, Maosong; Liu, Zhuming; Ye, Dapeng; Cheng, Zhihua; Xu, Tong; Qu, Liangti

    2018-05-01

    A 3D macroporous conductive polymer foam of thin 2D polypyrrole (PPy) nanosheets is developed by adopting a novel intercalation of guest (monomer Py) between the layers of the lamellar host (3D vanadium oxide foam) template-replication strategy. The 3D PPy foam of thin 2D nanosheets exhibits diverse functions including reversible compressibility, shape memory, absorption/adsorption and mechanically deformable supercapacitor characteristics. The as-prepared 3D PPy foam of thin nanosheets is highly light weight with a density of 12 mg·cm-3 which can bear the large compressive strain up to 80% whether in wet or dry states; and can absorb organic solutions or extract dye molecules fast and efficiently. In particular, the PPy nanosheet-based foamas a mechanically deformable electrode material for supercapacitors exhibits high specific capacitance of 70 F·g-1 at a fast charge-discharge rate of 50 mA·g-1, superior to that of any other typical pure PPy-based capacitor. We envision that the strategy presented here should be applicable to fabrication of a wide variety of organic polymer foams and hydrogels of low-dimensional nanostructures and even inorganic foams and hydrogels of low-dimensional nanostructures, and thus allow for exploration of their advanced physical and chemical properties.

  10. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  11. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  12. 3D IBFV : Hardware-Accelerated 3D Flow Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, Alexandru; Wijk, Jarke J. van

    2003-01-01

    We present a hardware-accelerated method for visualizing 3D flow fields. The method is based on insertion, advection, and decay of dye. To this aim, we extend the texture-based IBFV technique for 2D flow visualization in two main directions. First, we decompose the 3D flow visualization problem in a

  13. 3D IBFV : hardware-accelerated 3D flow visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, A.C.; Wijk, van J.J.

    2003-01-01

    We present a hardware-accelerated method for visualizing 3D flow fields. The method is based on insertion, advection, and decay of dye. To this aim, we extend the texture-based IBFV technique presented by van Wijk (2001) for 2D flow visualization in two main directions. First, we decompose the 3D

  14. 3D for Graphic Designers

    CERN Document Server

    Connell, Ellery

    2011-01-01

    Helping graphic designers expand their 2D skills into the 3D space The trend in graphic design is towards 3D, with the demand for motion graphics, animation, photorealism, and interactivity rapidly increasing. And with the meteoric rise of iPads, smartphones, and other interactive devices, the design landscape is changing faster than ever.2D digital artists who need a quick and efficient way to join this brave new world will want 3D for Graphic Designers. Readers get hands-on basic training in working in the 3D space, including product design, industrial design and visualization, modeling, ani

  15. Using 3D in Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Jo; Kirschenbauer, Sabine; Döllner, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    to display 3D imagery. The extra cartographic degree of freedom offered by using 3D is explored and offered as a motivation for employing 3D in visualization. The use of VR and the construction of virtual environments exploit navigational and behavioral realism, but become most usefil when combined...... with abstracted representations embedded in a 3D space. The interactions between development of geovisualization, the technology used to implement it and the theory surrounding cartographic representation are explored. The dominance of computing technologies, driven particularly by the gaming industry...

  16. Qademah Fault 3D Survey

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Collect 3D seismic data at Qademah Fault location to 1. 3D traveltime tomography 2. 3D surface wave migration 3. 3D phase velocity 4. Possible reflection processing Acquisition Date: 26 – 28 September 2014 Acquisition Team: Sherif, Kai, Mrinal, Bowen, Ahmed Acquisition Layout: We used 288 receiver arranged in 12 parallel lines, each line has 24 receiver. Inline offset is 5 m and crossline offset is 10 m. One shot is fired at each receiver location. We use the 40 kgm weight drop as seismic source, with 8 to 15 stacks at each shot location.

  17. 3D Bayesian contextual classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    We extend a series of multivariate Bayesian 2-D contextual classifiers to 3-D by specifying a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for the feature vectors as well as a prior distribution of the class variables of a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours.......We extend a series of multivariate Bayesian 2-D contextual classifiers to 3-D by specifying a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for the feature vectors as well as a prior distribution of the class variables of a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours....

  18. 3-D printers for libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Griffey, Jason

    2014-01-01

    As the maker movement continues to grow and 3-D printers become more affordable, an expanding group of hobbyists is keen to explore this new technology. In the time-honored tradition of introducing new technologies, many libraries are considering purchasing a 3-D printer. Jason Griffey, an early enthusiast of 3-D printing, has researched the marketplace and seen several systems first hand at the Consumer Electronics Show. In this report he introduces readers to the 3-D printing marketplace, covering such topics asHow fused deposition modeling (FDM) printing workBasic terminology such as build

  19. Estimate of the damage in organs induced by neutrons in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy; Estimacion del dano en organos inducido por neutrones en radioterapia conformada en 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites R, J. L. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Servicio de Seguridad Radiologica, Calzada de la Cruz 118 sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Uribe, M. del R., E-mail: jlbenitesr@prodigy.net.mx [Instituto Tecnico Superior de Radiologia, Calle Leon No. 129, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    By means of Monte Carlo methods was considered the damage in the organs, induced by neutrons, of patients with cancer that receive treatment in modality of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with lineal accelerator Varian Ix. The objective of this work was to estimate the damage probability in radiotherapy patients, starting from the effective dose by neutrons in the organs and tissues out of the treatment region. For that a three-dimensional mannequin of equivalent tissue of 30 x 100 x 30 cm{sup 3} was modeled and spherical cells were distributed to estimate the Kerma in equivalent tissue and the absorbed dose by neutrons. With the absorbed dose the effective dose was calculated using the weighting factors for the organ type and radiation type. With the effective dose and the damage factors, considered in the ICRP 103, was considered the probability of damage induction in organs. (Author)

  20. 3D painting documentation: evaluation of conservation conditions with 3D imaging and ranging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Abate

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of paintings, both on canvas and wooden support, is a crucial issue for the preservation and conservation of this kind of artworks. Many environmental factors (e.g. humidity, temperature, illumination, etc., as well as bad conservation practices (e.g. wrong restorations, inappropriate locations, etc., can compromise the material conditions over time and deteriorate an artwork. The article presents an on-going project realized by a multidisciplinary team composed by the ENEA UTICT 3D GraphLab, the 3D Optical Metrology Unit of the Bruno Kessler Foundation and the Soprintendenza per i Beni Storico Artistici ed Etnoantropologici of Bologna (Italy. The goal of the project is the multi-temporal 3D documentation and monitoring of paintings – at the moment in bad conservation’s situation - and the provision of some metrics to quantify the deformations and damages.

  1. Stereolithographic hydrogel printing of 3D culture chips with biofunctionalized complex 3D perfusion networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Rujing; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2017-01-01

    the required freedom in design, detail and chemistry for fabricating truly 3D constructs have remained limited. Here, we report a stereolithographic high-resolution 3D printing technique utilizing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA, MW 700) to manufacture diffusion-open and mechanically stable hydrogel...... and material flexibility by embedding a highly compliant cell-laden gelatin hydrogel within the confines of a 3D printed resilient PEGDA hydrogel chip of intermediate compliance. Overall, our proposed strategy represents an automated, cost-effective and high resolution technique to manufacture complex 3D......Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models capturing both the structural and dynamic complexity of the in vivo situation are in great demand as an alternative to animal models. Despite tremendous progress in engineering complex tissue/organ models in the past decade, approaches that support...

  2. Abusir 3D survey 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukinori Kawae

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2015, in collaboration with the Czech Institute of Egyptology, we, a Japanese consortium, initiated the Abusir 3D Survey (A-3DS for the 3D documentation of the site’s pyramids, which have not been updated since the time of the architectural investigations of Vito Maragioglio and Celeste Rinaldi in the 1960s to the 1970s. The first season of our project focused on the exterior of Neferirkare’s pyramid, the largest pyramid at Abusir. By developing a strategic mathematical 3D survey plan, step-by-step 3D documentation to suit specific archaeological needs, and producing a new display method for the 3D data, we successfully measured the dimensions of the pyramid in a cost-effective way.

  3. 3D vector flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for 3D vector flow imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of velocity estimation in ultrasound, which plays an important role in the clinic. The velocity of blood has components in all three spatial dimensions, yet...... are (vx, vy, vz) = (-0.03, 95, 1.0) ± (9, 6, 1) cm/s compared with the expected (0, 96, 0) cm/s. Afterwards, 3D vector flow images from a cross-sectional plane of the vessel are presented. The out of plane velocities exhibit the expected 2D circular-symmetric parabolic shape. The experimental results...... verify that the 3D TO method estimates the complete 3D velocity vectors, and that the method is suitable for 3D vector flow imaging....

  4. 3D printing in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  5. E3D, 3-D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, S.; Harris, D.; Schultz, C.; Maddix, D.; Bakowsky, T.; Bent, L.

    2004-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output. 2 - Methods: The software simulates wave propagation by solving the elasto-dynamic formulation of the full wave equation on a staggered grid. The solution scheme is 4-order accurate in space, 2-order accurate in time

  6. Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Pedersen, Peter; Petersen, Asger Greval; Eiskjær, Søren Peter

    2016-01-01

    Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery. A study on anthropomorphic phantoms describing patient radiation exposure in full spine examinations. Authors: Peter Heide Pedersen, Asger Greval Petersen, Søren Peter Eiskjær. Background: Ionizing radiation potentially...... quality images while at the same time reducing radiation dose. At our institution we use the EOS for pre- and postoperative full spine examinations. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to make first time organ dose and effective dose evaluations with micro-dose settings in full spine examinations. Our...... hypothesis is that organ dose and effective doses can be reduced 5-10 times compared to standard settings, without too high image-quality trade off, resulting in a theoretical reduction of radiation induced cancer. Methods: Patient dosimetry is performed on anthropomorphic child phantoms, representing a 5...

  7. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Registration of 3D spectral OCT volumes using 3D SIFT feature point matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Lee, Kyungmoo; van Ginneken, Bram; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2009-02-01

    The recent introduction of next generation spectral OCT scanners has enabled routine acquisition of high resolution, 3D cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina. 3D OCT is used in the detection and management of serious eye diseases such as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. For follow-up studies, image registration is a vital tool to enable more precise, quantitative comparison of disease states. This work presents a registration method based on a recently introduced extension of the 2D Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) framework1 to 3D.2 The SIFT feature extractor locates minima and maxima in the difference of Gaussian scale space to find salient feature points. It then uses histograms of the local gradient directions around each found extremum in 3D to characterize them in a 4096 element feature vector. Matching points are found by comparing the distance between feature vectors. We apply this method to the rigid registration of optic nerve head- (ONH) and macula-centered 3D OCT scans of the same patient that have only limited overlap. Three OCT data set pairs with known deformation were used for quantitative assessment of the method's robustness and accuracy when deformations of rotation and scaling were considered. Three-dimensional registration accuracy of 2.0+/-3.3 voxels was observed. The accuracy was assessed as average voxel distance error in N=1572 matched locations. The registration method was applied to 12 3D OCT scans (200 x 200 x 1024 voxels) of 6 normal eyes imaged in vivo to demonstrate the clinical utility and robustness of the method in a real-world environment.

  9. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  10. CROWDSOURCING BASED 3D MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Somogyi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users’ images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  11. Cyclic cellular automata in 3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, Clifford A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We explore the self-organization of cyclic cellular automata in 3D. → Von Neumann, Moore and two types of intermediate neighborhoods are investigated. → Random neighborhoods self organize through phases into complex nested structures. → Demons are seen to have many alternatives in 3D. - Abstract: Cyclic cellular automata in two dimensions have long been intriguing because they self organize into spirals and that behavior can be analyzed. The form for the patterns that develop is highly dependent upon the form of the neighborhood. We extend this work to three dimensional cyclic cellular automata and observe self organization dependent upon the neighborhood type. This includes neighborhood types intermediate between Von Neumann and Moore neighborhoods. We also observe that the patterns include nested shells with the appropriate forms but that the nesting is far more complex than the spirals that occur in two dimensions.

  12. SU-F-J-127: Multi-Institutional Evaluation of Setup, Organ Deformation, Precision Dosimetry in Total Marrow Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuro, D; Hui, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Totals Marrow Irradiation (TMI) is a highly focused radiation delivery to the human skeleton structure therefore requiring a high amount of precision and accuracy for a quality treatment. Not much is known on how the patient position varies across multiple treatment fractions and how that positioning impacts the dose delivery. Currently TMI is studied as an international collaboration with multiple centers around the world; however, many of these centers used different pretreatment techniques. The goal of this work is to measure the accuracy of patient positioning, its impact on dose delivery and compare the impact of each technique for multiple institutions. Methods: Using Tomotherapy pretreatment MVCTs and the planning KVCTs measurements are made of the 3D setup uncertainties of the TMI treatment. Then, using the dose and plan files of the treatment impact of patient position on dose can be measured. Measurement of organ deformation and center of mass change were done using the Velocity AI program from Varian. We are looking at four the boney targets (skull, spine, pelvis, and femur) and three key sensitive tissues (eyes, lungs, kidneys). Results: Position measurements have been made for 3 different institutions using 3 different pre-treatment techniques. Comparing the translation motion we can observe the greatest change in the Y and Z direction of patient set up. For intra-fractional motion the shoulder and clavicle represent the greatest potential for motion and therefore most likely to have a dose change. Conclusion: All centers use different techniques for their treatment and this study shows that these techniques do not produce the same pretreatment results. We hope to expand this study further. Currently we have 3 centers participating in this study with more centers joining every day.

  13. SU-F-J-127: Multi-Institutional Evaluation of Setup, Organ Deformation, Precision Dosimetry in Total Marrow Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuro, D; Hui, S [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, CTMI Global Health Initiative (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Totals Marrow Irradiation (TMI) is a highly focused radiation delivery to the human skeleton structure therefore requiring a high amount of precision and accuracy for a quality treatment. Not much is known on how the patient position varies across multiple treatment fractions and how that positioning impacts the dose delivery. Currently TMI is studied as an international collaboration with multiple centers around the world; however, many of these centers used different pretreatment techniques. The goal of this work is to measure the accuracy of patient positioning, its impact on dose delivery and compare the impact of each technique for multiple institutions. Methods: Using Tomotherapy pretreatment MVCTs and the planning KVCTs measurements are made of the 3D setup uncertainties of the TMI treatment. Then, using the dose and plan files of the treatment impact of patient position on dose can be measured. Measurement of organ deformation and center of mass change were done using the Velocity AI program from Varian. We are looking at four the boney targets (skull, spine, pelvis, and femur) and three key sensitive tissues (eyes, lungs, kidneys). Results: Position measurements have been made for 3 different institutions using 3 different pre-treatment techniques. Comparing the translation motion we can observe the greatest change in the Y and Z direction of patient set up. For intra-fractional motion the shoulder and clavicle represent the greatest potential for motion and therefore most likely to have a dose change. Conclusion: All centers use different techniques for their treatment and this study shows that these techniques do not produce the same pretreatment results. We hope to expand this study further. Currently we have 3 centers participating in this study with more centers joining every day.

  14. 3-D neutron transport benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, T.; Ikeda, H.

    1991-03-01

    A set of 3-D neutron transport benchmark problems proposed by the Osaka University to NEACRP in 1988 has been calculated by many participants and the corresponding results are summarized in this report. The results of K eff , control rod worth and region-averaged fluxes for the four proposed core models, calculated by using various 3-D transport codes are compared and discussed. The calculational methods used were: Monte Carlo, Discrete Ordinates (Sn), Spherical Harmonics (Pn), Nodal Transport and others. The solutions of the four core models are quite useful as benchmarks for checking the validity of 3-D neutron transport codes

  15. Handbook of 3D integration

    CERN Document Server

    Garrou , Philip; Ramm , Peter

    2014-01-01

    Edited by key figures in 3D integration and written by top authors from high-tech companies and renowned research institutions, this book covers the intricate details of 3D process technology.As such, the main focus is on silicon via formation, bonding and debonding, thinning, via reveal and backside processing, both from a technological and a materials science perspective. The last part of the book is concerned with assessing and enhancing the reliability of the 3D integrated devices, which is a prerequisite for the large-scale implementation of this emerging technology. Invaluable reading fo

  16. Identification of Nucleolus-Associated Chromatin Domains Reveals a Role for the Nucleolus in 3D Organization of the A. thaliana Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Pontvianne

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The nucleolus is the site of rRNA gene transcription, rRNA processing, and ribosome biogenesis. However, the nucleolus also plays additional roles in the cell. We isolated nucleoli using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS and identified nucleolus-associated chromatin domains (NADs by deep sequencing, comparing wild-type plants and null mutants for the nucleolar protein NUCLEOLIN 1 (NUC1. NADs are primarily genomic regions with heterochromatic signatures and include transposable elements (TEs, sub-telomeric regions, and mostly inactive protein-coding genes. However, NADs also include active rRNA genes and the entire short arm of chromosome 4 adjacent to them. In nuc1 null mutants, which alter rRNA gene expression and overall nucleolar structure, NADs are altered, telomere association with the nucleolus is decreased, and telomeres become shorter. Collectively, our studies reveal roles for NUC1 and the nucleolus in the spatial organization of chromosomes as well as telomere maintenance.

  17. A spiro-bifluorene based 3D electron acceptor with dicyanovinylene substitution for solution-processed non-fullerene organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Debin

    2015-04-20

    A novel electron acceptor, namely 2,2′-(12H,12′H-10,10′-spirobi[indeno[2,1-b]fluorene]-12,12′-diylidene)dimalononitrile (4CN-spiro), exhibiting a three-dimensional molecular structure was synthesized and its thermal, photophysical, electrochemical, crystal, and photovoltaic properties were investigated. The novel acceptor exhibits excellent thermal stability with a decomposition temperature of 460 °C, an absorption extending to 600 nm, and a LUMO level of −3.63 eV. Solution processed bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells were fabricated using 4CN-spiro as an acceptor and polythieno[3,4-b]-thiophene-co-benzodithiophene (PTB7) as a donor polymer. The effect of the donor-to-acceptor ratio and processing conditions on the device performance was investigated. A device processed from tetrachloroethane with a donor to acceptor weight ratio of 1 : 1 yielded a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.80%.

  18. Identification of Nucleolus-Associated Chromatin Domains Reveals a Role for the Nucleolus in 3D Organization of the A. thaliana Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Carpentier, Marie-Christine; Durut, Nathalie; Pavlištová, Veronika; Jaške, Karin; Schořová, Šárka; Parrinello, Hugues; Rohmer, Marine; Pikaard, Craig S; Fojtová, Miloslava; Fajkus, Jiří; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2016-08-09

    The nucleolus is the site of rRNA gene transcription, rRNA processing, and ribosome biogenesis. However, the nucleolus also plays additional roles in the cell. We isolated nucleoli using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and identified nucleolus-associated chromatin domains (NADs) by deep sequencing, comparing wild-type plants and null mutants for the nucleolar protein NUCLEOLIN 1 (NUC1). NADs are primarily genomic regions with heterochromatic signatures and include transposable elements (TEs), sub-telomeric regions, and mostly inactive protein-coding genes. However, NADs also include active rRNA genes and the entire short arm of chromosome 4 adjacent to them. In nuc1 null mutants, which alter rRNA gene expression and overall nucleolar structure, NADs are altered, telomere association with the nucleolus is decreased, and telomeres become shorter. Collectively, our studies reveal roles for NUC1 and the nucleolus in the spatial organization of chromosomes as well as telomere maintenance. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Uniaxial Tensile Cyclic Loading Regimes on Matrix Organization and Tenogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Encapsulated within 3D Collagen Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells have become a popular cell choice for tendon repair strategies due to their relative abundance, ease of isolation, and ability to differentiate into tenocytes. In this study, we investigated the solo effect of different uniaxial tensile strains and loading frequencies on the matrix directionality and tenogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells encapsulated within three-dimensional collagen scaffolds. Samples loaded at 0%, 2%, 4%, and 6% strains and 0.1 Hz and 1 Hz frequencies for 2 hours/day over a 7-day period using a custom-built uniaxial tensile strain bioreactor were characterized in terms of matrix organization, cell viability, and musculoskeletal gene expression profiles. The results displayed that the collagen fibers of the loaded samples exhibited increased matrix directionality with an increase in strain values. Gene expression analyses demonstrated that ASC-encapsulated collagen scaffolds loaded at 2% strain and 0.1 Hz frequency showed significant increases in extracellular matrix genes and tenogenic differentiation markers. Importantly, no cross-differentiation potential to osteogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic lineages was observed at 2% strain and 0.1 Hz frequency loading condition. Thus, 2% strain and 0.1 Hz frequency were identified as the appropriate mechanical loading regime to induce tenogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells cultured in a three-dimensional environment.

  20. Effect of Uniaxial Tensile Cyclic Loading Regimes on Matrix Organization and Tenogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Encapsulated within 3D Collagen Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Gayathri; Stasuk, Alexander; Elsaadany, Mostafa; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2017-01-01

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells have become a popular cell choice for tendon repair strategies due to their relative abundance, ease of isolation, and ability to differentiate into tenocytes. In this study, we investigated the solo effect of different uniaxial tensile strains and loading frequencies on the matrix directionality and tenogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells encapsulated within three-dimensional collagen scaffolds. Samples loaded at 0%, 2%, 4%, and 6% strains and 0.1 Hz and 1 Hz frequencies for 2 hours/day over a 7-day period using a custom-built uniaxial tensile strain bioreactor were characterized in terms of matrix organization, cell viability, and musculoskeletal gene expression profiles. The results displayed that the collagen fibers of the loaded samples exhibited increased matrix directionality with an increase in strain values. Gene expression analyses demonstrated that ASC-encapsulated collagen scaffolds loaded at 2% strain and 0.1 Hz frequency showed significant increases in extracellular matrix genes and tenogenic differentiation markers. Importantly, no cross-differentiation potential to osteogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic lineages was observed at 2% strain and 0.1 Hz frequency loading condition. Thus, 2% strain and 0.1 Hz frequency were identified as the appropriate mechanical loading regime to induce tenogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells cultured in a three-dimensional environment.

  1. 3D Models of Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This collaborative grant is developing 3D models of both mouse and human biology to investigate aspects of therapeutic vaccination in order to answer key questions relevant to human cancer immunotherapy.

  2. AI 3D Cybug Gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2010-01-01

    In this short paper I briefly discuss 3D war Game based on artificial intelligence concepts called AI WAR. Going in to the details, I present the importance of CAICL language and how this language is used in AI WAR. Moreover I also present a designed and implemented 3D War Cybug for AI WAR using CAICL and discus the implemented strategy to defeat its enemies during the game life.

  3. 3D Face Apperance Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Astrom, K

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations......We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations...

  4. 3D accelerator magnet calculations using MAGNUS-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pissanetzky, S.; Miao, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The steady trend towards increased magnetic and geometric complexity in the design of accelerator magnets has caused a need for reliable 3D computer models and a better understanding of the behavior of magnetic system in three dimensions. The capabilities of the MAGNUS-3D family of programs are ideally suited to solve this class of problems and provide insight into 3D effects. MAGNUS-3D can solve any problem of magnetostatics involving permanent magnets, nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and electric conductors. MAGNUS-3D uses the finite element method and the two-scalar-potentials formulation of Maxwell's equations to obtain the solution, which can then be used interactively to obtain tables of field components at specific points or lines, plots of field lines, function graphs representing a field component plotted against a coordinate along any line in space (such as the beam line), and views of the conductors, the mesh and the magnetic bodies. The magnetic quantities that can be calculated include the force or torque on conductors or magnetic parts, the energy, the flux through a specified surface, line integrals of any field component along any line in space, and the average field or potential harmonic coefficients. We describe the programs with emphasis placed on their use for accelerator magnet design, and present an advanced example of actual calculations. (orig.)

  5. Enhancement of catalytic activity of enzymes by heating in anhydrous organic solvents: 3D structure of a modified serine proteinase at high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Tyagi, R; Gupta, M N; Singh, T P

    2001-01-01

    For the first time, it is demonstrated that exposure of an enzyme to anhydrous organic solvents at optimized high temperature enhances its catalytic power through local changes at the binding region. Six enzymes, namely, proteinase K, wheat germ acid phosphatase, alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase, chymotrypsin and trypsin were exposed to acetonitrile at 70 degrees C for three hr. The activities of these enzymes were found to be considerably enhanced. In order to understand the basis of this change in the activity of these enzymes, proteinase K was analyzed in detail using X-ray diffraction method. The overall structure of the enzyme was found to be similar to the native structure in aqueous environment. The hydrogen bonding system of the catalytic triad remained intact after the treatment. However, the water structure in the substrate binding site underwent some rearrangement as some of the water molecules were either displaced or completely absent. The most striking observation concerning the water structure was the complete deletion of the water molecule which occupied the position at the so-called oxyanion hole in the active site of the native enzyme. Three acetonitrile molecules were found in the present structure. All the acetonitrile molecules were located in the recognition site. Interlinked through water molecules, the sites occupied by acetonitrile molecules were independent of water molecules. The acetonitrile molecules are involved in extensive interactions with the protein atoms. The methyl group of one of the acetonitrile molecules (CCN1) interacts simultaneously with the hydrophobic side chains of Leu 96, Ile 107 and Leu 133. The development of such a hydrophobic environment at the recognition site introduced a striking conformation change in Ile 107 by rotating its side chain about C alpha-C beta bond by 180 degrees to bring about the delta-methyl group within the range of attractive van der Waals interactions with the methyl group of CCN1. A similar

  6. The future of 3D printing technology in biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Iraj Nabipour

    2015-01-01

    3D printing, one of the hottest cutting-edge interdisciplinary technologies, is projected to have revenue of $8.4 billion in 2020. #D printing technology will implement the concept of personalized medicine in medical healthcare industry and pharmaceutical fabrication. Organ printing, which it is defined as computer-aided, jet based 3D tissue-engineering of living human organs, is an interesting and challengeable field for 3D printing. Customized implants and prostheses can be produced in any ...

  7. Essentials of 3D biofabrication and translation

    CERN Document Server

    Atala, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Essentials of 3D Biofabrication and Translation discusses the techniques that are making bioprinting a viable alternative in regenerative medicine. The book runs the gamut of topics related to the subject, including hydrogels and polymers, nanotechnology, toxicity testing, and drug screening platforms, also introducing current applications in the cardiac, skeletal, and nervous systems, and organ construction. Leaders in clinical medicine and translational science provide a global perspective of the transformative nature of this field, including the use of cells, biomaterials, and macromolecules to create basic building blocks of tissues and organs, all of which are driving the field of biofabrication to transform regenerative medicine. Provides a new and versatile method to fabricating living tissue Discusses future applications for 3D bioprinting technologies, including use in the cardiac, skeletal, and nervous systems, and organ construction Describes current approaches and future challenges for translation...

  8. NGT-3D: a simple nematode cultivation system to study Caenorhabditis elegans biology in 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Young Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the premier experimental model organisms today. In the laboratory, they display characteristic development, fertility, and behaviors in a two dimensional habitat. In nature, however, C. elegans is found in three dimensional environments such as rotting fruit. To investigate the biology of C. elegans in a 3D controlled environment we designed a nematode cultivation habitat which we term the nematode growth tube or NGT-3D. NGT-3D allows for the growth of both nematodes and the bacteria they consume. Worms show comparable rates of growth, reproduction and lifespan when bacterial colonies in the 3D matrix are abundant. However, when bacteria are sparse, growth and brood size fail to reach levels observed in standard 2D plates. Using NGT-3D we observe drastic deficits in fertility in a sensory mutant in 3D compared to 2D, and this defect was likely due to an inability to locate bacteria. Overall, NGT-3D will sharpen our understanding of nematode biology and allow scientists to investigate questions of nematode ecology and evolutionary fitness in the laboratory.

  9. From 3D view to 3D print

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  10. 3D imaging, 3D printing and 3D virtual planning in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pratik; Chong, B S

    2018-03-01

    The adoption and adaptation of recent advances in digital technology, such as three-dimensional (3D) printed objects and haptic simulators, in dentistry have influenced teaching and/or management of cases involving implant, craniofacial, maxillofacial, orthognathic and periodontal treatments. 3D printed models and guides may help operators plan and tackle complicated non-surgical and surgical endodontic treatment and may aid skill acquisition. Haptic simulators may assist in the development of competency in endodontic procedures through the acquisition of psycho-motor skills. This review explores and discusses the potential applications of 3D printed models and guides, and haptic simulators in the teaching and management of endodontic procedures. An understanding of the pertinent technology related to the production of 3D printed objects and the operation of haptic simulators are also presented.

  11. Nano-spatial parameters from 3D to 2D lattice dimensionality by organic variant in [ZnCl4]- [R]+ hybrid materials: Structure, architecture-lattice dimensionality, microscopy, optical Eg and PL correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajit; Verma, Sanjay K.; Alvi, P. A.; Jasrotia, Dinesh

    2016-04-01

    The nanospatial morphological features of [ZnCl]- [C5H4NCH3]+ hybrid derivative depicts 28 nm granular size and 3D spreader shape packing pattern as analyzed by FESEM and single crystal XRD structural studies. The organic moiety connect the inorganic components through N-H+…Cl- hydrogen bond to form a hybrid composite, the replacement of organic derivatives from 2-methylpyridine to 2-Amino-5-choloropyridine results the increase in granular size from 28nm to 60nm and unit cell packing pattern from 3D-2D lattice dimensionality along ac plane. The change in optical energy direct band gap value from 3.01eV for [ZnCl]- [C5H4NCH3]+ (HM1) to 3.42eV for [ZnCl]- [C5H5ClN2]+ (HM2) indicates the role of organic moiety in optical properties of hybrid materials. The photoluminescence emission spectra is observed in the wavelength range of 370 to 600 nm with maximum peak intensity of 9.66a.u. at 438 nm for (HM1) and 370 to 600 nm with max peak intensity of 9.91 a.u. at 442 nm for (HM2), indicating that the emission spectra lies in visible range. PL excitation spectra depicts the maximum excitation intensity [9.8] at 245.5 nm for (HM1) and its value of 9.9 a.u. at 294 nm, specify the excitation spectra lies in UV range. Photoluminescence excitation spectra is observed in the wavelength range of 280 to 350 nm with maximum peak intensity of 9.4 a.u. at 285.5 nm and 9.9 a.u. at 294 and 297 nm, indicating excitation in the UV spectrum. Single crystal growth process and detailed physiochemical characterization such as XRD, FESEM image analysis photoluminescence property reveals the structure stability with non-covalent interactions, lattice dimensionality (3D-2D) correlations interweaving into the design of inorganic-organic hybrid materials.

  12. 3D nuclear organization of telomeres in the Hodgkin cell lines U-HO1 and U-HO1-PTPN1: PTPN1 expression prevents the formation of very short telomeres including "t-stumps"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux Bruno

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cancer cells the three-dimensional (3D telomere organization of interphase nuclei into a telomeric disk is heavily distorted and aggregates are found. In Hodgkin's lymphoma quantitative FISH (3D Q-FISH reveals a major impact of nuclear telomere dynamics during the transition form mononuclear Hodgkin (H to diagnostic multinuclear Reed-Sternberg (RS cells. In vitro and in vivo formation of RS-cells is associated with the increase of very short telomeres including "t-stumps", telomere loss, telomeric aggregate formation and the generation of "ghost nuclei". Results Here we analyze the 3D telomere dynamics by Q-FISH in the novel Hodgkin cell line U-HO1 and its non-receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase N1 (PTPN1 stable transfectant U-HO1-PTPN1, derived from a primary refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma. Both cell lines show equally high telomerase activity but U-HO1-PTPN differs from U-HO1 by a three times longer doubling time, low STAT5A expression, accumulation of RS-cells (p As expected, multinuclear U-HO1-RS-cells and multinuclear U-HO1-PTPN1-RS-cells differ from their mononuclear H-precursors by their nuclear volume (p Conclusion Abundant RS-cells without additional very short telomeres including "t-stumps", high rate of apoptosis, but low STAT5A expression, are hallmarks of the U-HO1-PTPN1 cell line. These characteristics are independent of telomerase activity. Thus, PTPN1 induced dephosphorylation of STAT5 with consecutive lack of Akt/PKB activation and cellular arrest in G2, promoting induction of apoptosis, appears as a possible pathogenetic mechanism deserving further experimental investigation.

  13. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  14. Materialedreven 3d digital formgivning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med forskningsprojektet er for det første at understøtte keramikeren i at arbejde eksperimenterende med digital formgivning, og for det andet at bidrage til en tværfaglig diskurs om brugen af digital formgivning. Forskningsprojektet fokuserer på 3d formgivning og derved på 3d digital...... formgivning og Rapid Prototyping (RP). RP er en fællesbetegnelse for en række af de teknikker, der muliggør at overføre den digitale form til 3d fysisk form. Forskningsprojektet koncentrerer sig om to overordnede forskningsspørgsmål. Det første handler om, hvordan viden og erfaring indenfor det keramiske...... fagområde kan blive udnyttet i forhold til 3d digital formgivning. Det andet handler om, hvad en sådan tilgang kan bidrage med, og hvordan den kan blive udnyttet i et dynamisk samspil med det keramiske materiale i formgivningen af 3d keramiske artefakter. Materialedreven formgivning er karakteriseret af en...

  15. 3D future internet media

    CERN Document Server

    Dagiuklas, Tasos

    2014-01-01

    This book describes recent innovations in 3D media and technologies, with coverage of 3D media capturing, processing, encoding, and adaptation, networking aspects for 3D Media, and quality of user experience (QoE). The main contributions are based on the results of the FP7 European Projects ROMEO, which focus on new methods for the compression and delivery of 3D multi-view video and spatial audio, as well as the optimization of networking and compression jointly across the Future Internet (www.ict-romeo.eu). The delivery of 3D media to individual users remains a highly challenging problem due to the large amount of data involved, diverse network characteristics and user terminal requirements, as well as the user’s context such as their preferences and location. As the number of visual views increases, current systems will struggle to meet the demanding requirements in terms of delivery of constant video quality to both fixed and mobile users. ROMEO will design and develop hybrid-networking solutions that co...

  16. Novel 3D media technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Dagiuklas, Tasos

    2015-01-01

    This book describes recent innovations in 3D media and technologies, with coverage of 3D media capturing, processing, encoding, and adaptation, networking aspects for 3D Media, and quality of user experience (QoE). The contributions are based on the results of the FP7 European Project ROMEO, which focuses on new methods for the compression and delivery of 3D multi-view video and spatial audio, as well as the optimization of networking and compression jointly across the future Internet. The delivery of 3D media to individual users remains a highly challenging problem due to the large amount of data involved, diverse network characteristics and user terminal requirements, as well as the user’s context such as their preferences and location. As the number of visual views increases, current systems will struggle to meet the demanding requirements in terms of delivery of consistent video quality to fixed and mobile users. ROMEO will present hybrid networking solutions that combine the DVB-T2 and DVB-NGH broadcas...

  17. Modification of 3D milling machine to 3D printer

    OpenAIRE

    Taska, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Tato práce se zabývá přestavbou gravírovací frézky na 3D tiskárnu. V první části se práce zabývá možnými technologiemi 3D tisku a možností jejich využití u přestavby. Dále jsou popsány a vybrány vhodné součásti pro přestavbu. V další části je realizováno řízení ohřevu podložky, trysky a řízení posuvu drátu pomocí softwaru TwinCat od společnosti Beckhoff na průmyslovém počítači. Výsledkem práce by měla být oživená 3D tiskárna. This thesis deals with rebuilding of engraving machine to 3D pri...

  18. Aspects of defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study supersymmetric co-dimension 2 and 4 defects in the compactification of the 6d (2,0) theory of type A_N_−_1 on a 3-manifold M. The so-called 3d-3d correspondence is a relation between complexified Chern-Simons theory (with gauge group SL(N,ℂ)) on M and a 3d N=2 theory T_N[M]. We study this correspondence in the presence of supersymmetric defects, which are knots/links inside the 3-manifold. Our study employs a number of different methods: state-integral models for complex Chern-Simons theory, cluster algebra techniques, domain wall theory T[SU(N)], 5d N=2 SYM, and also supergravity analysis through holography. These methods are complementary and we find agreement between them. In some cases the results lead to highly non-trivial predictions on the partition function. Our discussion includes a general expression for the cluster partition function, which can be used to compute in the presence of maximal and certain class of non-maximal punctures when N>2. We also highlight the non-Abelian description of the 3d N=2T_N[M] theory with defect included, when such a description is available. This paper is a companion to our shorter paper http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1751-8113/49/30/30LT02, which summarizes our main results.

  19. Stereoscopic 3D graphics generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Liu, Jianping; Zan, Y.

    1997-05-01

    Stereoscopic display technology is one of the key techniques of areas such as simulation, multimedia, entertainment, virtual reality, and so on. Moreover, stereoscopic 3D graphics generation is an important part of stereoscopic 3D display system. In this paper, at first, we describe the principle of stereoscopic display and summarize some methods to generate stereoscopic 3D graphics. Secondly, to overcome the problems which came from the methods of user defined models (such as inconvenience, long modifying period and so on), we put forward the vector graphics files defined method. Thus we can design more directly; modify the model simply and easily; generate more conveniently; furthermore, we can make full use of graphics accelerator card and so on. Finally, we discuss the problem of how to speed up the generation.

  20. 3-D Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon

    , if this significant reduction in the element count can still provide precise and robust 3-D vector flow estimates in a plane. The study concludes that the RC array is capable of estimating precise 3-D vector flow both in a plane and in a volume, despite the low channel count. However, some inherent new challenges...... ultrasonic vector flow estimation and bring it a step closer to a clinical application. A method for high frame rate 3-D vector flow estimation in a plane using the transverse oscillation method combined with a 1024 channel 2-D matrix array is presented. The proposed method is validated both through phantom...... hampers the task of real-time processing. In a second study, some of the issue with the 2-D matrix array are solved by introducing a 2-D row-column (RC) addressing array with only 62 + 62 elements. It is investigated both through simulations and via experimental setups in various flow conditions...

  1. Ideal 3D asymmetric concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Botella, Angel [Departamento Fisica Aplicada a los Recursos Naturales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E.T.S.I. de Montes, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio Alvarez; Vazquez, Daniel; Bernabeu, Eusebio [Departamento de Optica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Fac. CC. Fisicas, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    Nonimaging optics is a field devoted to the design of optical components for applications such as solar concentration or illumination. In this field, many different techniques have been used for producing reflective and refractive optical devices, including reverse engineering techniques. In this paper we apply photometric field theory and elliptic ray bundles method to study 3D asymmetric - without rotational or translational symmetry - concentrators, which can be useful components for nontracking solar applications. We study the one-sheet hyperbolic concentrator and we demonstrate its behaviour as ideal 3D asymmetric concentrator. (author)

  2. 3D quantum gravity and effective noncommutative quantum field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidel, Laurent; Livine, Etera R

    2006-06-09

    We show that the effective dynamics of matter fields coupled to 3D quantum gravity is described after integration over the gravitational degrees of freedom by a braided noncommutative quantum field theory symmetric under a kappa deformation of the Poincaré group.

  3. Application of DYNA3D in large scale crashworthiness calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, D.J.; Hallquist, J.O.; Igarashi, M.; Shimomaki, K.; Mizuno, M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an example of an automobile crashworthiness calculation. Based on our experiences with the example calculation, we make recommendations to those interested in performing crashworthiness calculations. The example presented in this paper was supplied by Suzuki Motor Co., Ltd., and provided a significant shakedown for the new large deformation shell capability of the DYNA3D code. 15 refs., 3 figs

  4. Time Series Analysis of 3D Coordinates Using Nonstochastic Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velsink, H.

    2016-01-01

    Adjustment and testing of a combination of stochastic and nonstochastic observations is applied to the deformation analysis of a time series of 3D coordinates. Nonstochastic observations are constant values that are treated as if they were observations. They are used to formulate constraints on

  5. Time Series Analysis of 3D Coordinates Using Nonstochastic Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddo Velsink

    2016-01-01

    From the article: Abstract Adjustment and testing of a combination of stochastic and nonstochastic observations is applied to the deformation analysis of a time series of 3D coordinates. Nonstochastic observations are constant values that are treated as if they were observations. They are used to

  6. [H2en]2{La2M(SO4)6(H2O)2} (M=Co, Ni): First organically templated 3d-4f mixed metal sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yanping; Wang Ruiyao; Kong Deyuan; Mao Jianggao; Clearfield, Abraham

    2005-01-01

    The first organically templated 3d-4f mixed metal sulfates, [H 2 en] 2 {La 2 M(SO 4 ) 6 (H 2 O) 2 } (M=Co 1, Ni 2) have been synthesized and structurally determined from non-merohedrally twinned crystals. The two compounds are isostructural and their structures feature a three-dimensional anionic network formed by the lanthanum(III) and nickel(II) ions bridged by sulfate anions. The La(III) ions in both compounds are 10-coordinated by four sulfate anions in bidentate chelating fashion, and two sulfate anions in a unidentate fashion. The transition metal(II) ion is octahedrally coordinated by six oxygens from four sulfate anions and two aqua ligands. The doubly protonated enthylenediamine cations are located at the tunnels formed by 8-membered rings (four La and four sulfate anions)

  7. 3D Terahertz Beam Profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Strikwerda, Andrew; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2013-01-01

    We present a characterization of THz beams generated in both a two-color air plasma and in a LiNbO3 crystal. Using a commercial THz camera, we record intensity images as a function of distance through the beam waist, from which we extract 2D beam profiles and visualize our measurements into 3D beam...

  8. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  9. 3D Pit Stop Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Lael; Shaw, Daniel; Gaidds, Kimberly; Lyman, Gregory; Sorey, Timothy

    2018-01-01

    Although solving an engineering design project problem with limited resources or structural capabilities of materials can be part of the challenge, students making their own parts can support creativity. The authors of this article found an exciting solution: 3D printers are not only one of several tools for making but also facilitate a creative…

  10. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Andersen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent, and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue.

  11. Metrological characterization of 3D imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, G.

    2013-04-01

    Manufacturers often express the performance of a 3D imaging device in various non-uniform ways for the lack of internationally recognized standard requirements for metrological parameters able to identify the capability of capturing a real scene. For this reason several national and international organizations in the last ten years have been developing protocols for verifying such performance. Ranging from VDI/VDE 2634, published by the Association of German Engineers and oriented to the world of mechanical 3D measurements (triangulation-based devices), to the ASTM technical committee E57, working also on laser systems based on direct range detection (TOF, Phase Shift, FM-CW, flash LADAR), this paper shows the state of the art about the characterization of active range devices, with special emphasis on measurement uncertainty, accuracy and resolution. Most of these protocols are based on special objects whose shape and size are certified with a known level of accuracy. By capturing the 3D shape of such objects with a range device, a comparison between the measured points and the theoretical shape they should represent is possible. The actual deviations can be directly analyzed or some derived parameters can be obtained (e.g. angles between planes, distances between barycenters of spheres rigidly connected, frequency domain parameters, etc.). This paper shows theoretical aspects and experimental results of some novel characterization methods applied to different categories of active 3D imaging devices based on both principles of triangulation and direct range detection.

  12. 2-D and 3-D phosphotungstate-based TM-Ln heterometallic derivatives constructed from dimeric [Ln({alpha}-PW{sub 11}O{sub 39}){sub 2}]{sup 11-} fragments and copper-organic complex linkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Sensen [Institute of Molecular and Crystal Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan 475004 (China); Zhao, Junwei, E-mail: zhaojunwei@henu.edu.cn [Institute of Molecular and Crystal Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan 475004 (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Chen, Lijuan [Institute of Molecular and Crystal Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan 475004 (China); Basic Experiment Teaching Center, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan 475004 (China); Li, Yuye; Zhang, Jingli; Li, Yanzhou [Institute of Molecular and Crystal Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan 475004 (China); Niu, Jingyang, E-mail: jyniu@henu.edu.cn [Institute of Molecular and Crystal Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan 475004 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Three organic-inorganic hybrid TM-Ln heterometallic phosphotungstates [Cu(dap){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)][Cu(dap){sub 2}]{sub 3.5}[La({alpha}-HPW{sub 11}O{sub 39}){sub 2}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (1) [Cu(dap){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 0.5}[Cu(dap){sub 2}]{sub 4}[Nd({alpha}-HPW{sub 11}O{sub 39}){sub 2}]{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (2) and [Cu(dap){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}[Cu(dap){sub 2}]{sub 3.5}[Eu({alpha}-PW{sub 11}O{sub 39}){sub 2}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (3) (dap=1,2-diaminopropane) have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, optical diffuse reflectance spectra, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermogravimetric (TG) analyses and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Their common features are that 1-3 all consist of asymmetric sandwich-type subunits [Ln({alpha}-PW{sub 11}O{sub 39}){sub 2}]{sup 11-} and [Cu(dap){sub 2}]{sup 2+} bridges. Both 1 and 2 display the 2-D (4,4)-topological sheets whereas 3 exhibits the 3-D 5-connected (4{sup 6}{center_dot}6{sup 4}) topological framework. The magnetic properties of 2 and 3 and the luminescence performance of 3 have been measured. - Graphical Abstract: Three TM-Ln heterometallic phosphotungstates 1-3 have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, optical diffuse reflectance spectra, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analyses magnetic susceptibility and luminescent properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu{sup II}-Ln{sup III} heterometallic polyoxometalates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2-D and 3-D organic-inorganic hybrid phosphotungstates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2-D and 3-D structures consisting of Cu{sup II}-Ln{sup III} heterometals.

  13. The future of 3D printing technology in biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Nabipour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing, one of the hottest cutting-edge interdisciplinary technologies, is projected to have revenue of $8.4 billion in 2020. #D printing technology will implement the concept of personalized medicine in medical healthcare industry and pharmaceutical fabrication. Organ printing, which it is defined as computer-aided, jet based 3D tissue-engineering of living human organs, is an interesting and challengeable field for 3D printing. Customized implants and prostheses can be produced in any imaginable geometry through the translation of radiological images of patients into digital.stl 3D print files. The creation of anatomical models based on the patient’s pathological conditions using 3D printing technologies would provide good models for training and to design surgical approaches. Hence, 3D printing not only will transform medical healthcare industry but also promises new converging technologies in the field of regenerative medicine.

  14. 3D mapping of turbulence: a laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Louarn, Miska; Dainty, Christopher; Paterson, Carl; Tallon, Michel

    2000-07-01

    In this paper, we present the first experimental results of the 3D mapping method. 3D mapping of turbulence is a method to remove the cone effect with multiple laser guide stars and multiple deformable mirrors. A laboratory experiment was realized to verify the theoretical predictions. The setup consisted of two turbulent phase screens (made with liquid crystal devices) and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. We describe the interaction matrix involved in reconstructing Zernike commands for multiple deformable mirror from the slope measurements made from laser guide stars. It is shown that mirror commands can indeed be reconstructed with the 3D mapping method. Limiting factors of the method, brought to light by this experiment are discussed.

  15. Simulation analysis of turbine blade in 3D printing aquarium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Dyi-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing of the flexibility is the most admirable place, no matter when or where, as long as the machine can make the abstract design of finished products or difficult to process the finished product printed out as a sample. And in the product design, through the 3D print out the entity, to more specific observation of the advantages and disadvantages of finished products, which shorten the time of many creative research and development, but also relatively reduce the defective factors. As in recent years, 3D printing technology is progressing, material adhesion, precision and parts of the degree of cooperation has increased, coupled with many parts taking into account the cost, production and other issues, and then let a lot of light load small parts or special parts choose to use 3D to print the finished product to replace. This study focuses on the plastic turbine blades that drive water in the aquarium, but the 3D printing is done by stacking. However, the general stress analysis software can set the material to analyze the deformation results of the force, nor the 3D to analyze the software. Therefore, this study first analyzes the deformation of turbine blade by software, and then verifies the situation of 3D printing turbine blade, and then compares the actual results of software analysis and 3D printing. The results can provide the future of 3D product consider the strength factor. The study found that the spiral blade design allows the force points to be dispersed to avoid hard focus.

  16. 3D histomorphometric quantification from 3D computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.F. de; Lopes, R.T.

    2004-01-01

    The histomorphometric analysis is based on stereologic concepts and was originally applied to biologic samples. This technique has been used to evaluate different complex structures such as ceramic filters, net structures and cancellous objects that are objects with inner connected structures. The measured histomorphometric parameters of structure are: sample volume to total reconstructed volume (BV/TV), sample surface to sample volume (BS/BV), connection thickness (Tb Th ), connection number (Tb N ) and connection separation (Tb Sp ). The anisotropy was evaluated as well. These parameters constitute the base of histomorphometric analysis. The quantification is realized over cross-sections recovered by cone beam reconstruction, where a real-time microfocus radiographic system is used as tomographic system. The three-dimensional (3D) histomorphometry, obtained from tomography, corresponds to an evolution of conventional method that is based on 2D analysis. It is more coherent with morphologic and topologic context of the sample. This work shows result from 3D histomorphometric quantification to characterize objects examined by 3D computer tomography. The results, which characterizes the internal structures of ceramic foams with different porous density, are compared to results from conventional methods

  17. DYNA3D2000*, Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: DYNA3D2000 is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation. 2 - Method of solution: Discretization of a continuous model transforms partial differential equations into algebraic equations. A numerical solution is then obtained by solving these algebraic equations through a direct time marching scheme. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Recent software improvements have eliminated most of the user identified limitations with dynamic memory allocation and a very large format description that has pushed potential problem sizes beyond the reach of most users. The dominant restrictions remain in code execution speed and robustness, which the developers constantly strive to improve

  18. 3-D Discrete Analytical Ridgelet Transform

    OpenAIRE

    Helbert , David; Carré , Philippe; Andrès , Éric

    2006-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we propose an implementation of the 3-D Ridgelet transform: the 3-D discrete analytical Ridgelet transform (3-D DART). This transform uses the Fourier strategy for the computation of the associated 3-D discrete Radon transform. The innovative step is the definition of a discrete 3-D transform with the discrete analytical geometry theory by the construction of 3-D discrete analytical lines in the Fourier domain. We propose two types of 3-D discrete lines:...

  19. 3D numerical simulations of multiphase continental rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naliboff, J.; Glerum, A.; Brune, S.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of rifted margin architecture suggest continental breakup occurs through multiple phases of extension with distinct styles of deformation. The initial rifting stages are often characterized by slow extension rates and distributed normal faulting in the upper crust decoupled from deformation in the lower crust and mantle lithosphere. Further rifting marks a transition to higher extension rates and coupling between the crust and mantle lithosphere, with deformation typically focused along large-scale detachment faults. Significantly, recent detailed reconstructions and high-resolution 2D numerical simulations suggest that rather than remaining focused on a single long-lived detachment fault, deformation in this phase may progress toward lithospheric breakup through a complex process of fault interaction and development. The numerical simulations also suggest that an initial phase of distributed normal faulting can play a key role in the development of these complex fault networks and the resulting finite deformation patterns. Motivated by these findings, we will present 3D numerical simulations of continental rifting that examine the role of temporal increases in extension velocity on rifted margin structure. The numerical simulations are developed with the massively parallel finite-element code ASPECT. While originally designed to model mantle convection using advanced solvers and adaptive mesh refinement techniques, ASPECT has been extended to model visco-plastic deformation that combines a Drucker Prager yield criterion with non-linear dislocation and diffusion creep. To promote deformation localization, the internal friction angle and cohesion weaken as a function of accumulated plastic strain. Rather than prescribing a single zone of weakness to initiate deformation, an initial random perturbation of the plastic strain field combined with rapid strain weakening produces distributed normal faulting at relatively slow rates of extension in both 2D and

  20. Anisotropic Diffusion based Brain MRI Segmentation and 3D Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    M. Arfan Jaffar; Sultan Zia; Ghaznafar Latif; AnwarM. Mirza; Irfan Mehmood; Naveed Ejaz; Sung Wook Baik

    2012-01-01

    In medical field visualization of the organs is very imperative for accurate diagnosis and treatment of any disease. Brain tumor diagnosis and surgery also required impressive 3D visualization of the brain to the radiologist. Detection and 3D reconstruction of brain tumors from MRI is a computationally time consuming and error-prone task. Proposed system detects and presents a 3D visualization model of the brain and tumor inside which greatly helps the radiologist to effectively diagnose and ...

  1. 3D printing of soft robotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, T. J.; Pikul, J.; Shepherd, R. F.

    2018-06-01

    Soft robots are capable of mimicking the complex motion of animals. Soft robotic systems are defined by their compliance, which allows for continuous and often responsive localized deformation. These features make soft robots especially interesting for integration with human tissues, for example, the implementation of biomedical devices, and for robotic performance in harsh or uncertain environments, for example, exploration in confined spaces or locomotion on uneven terrain. Advances in soft materials and additive manufacturing technologies have enabled the design of soft robots with sophisticated capabilities, such as jumping, complex 3D movements, gripping and releasing. In this Review, we examine the essential soft material properties for different elements of soft robots, highlighting the most relevant polymer systems. Advantages and limitations of different additive manufacturing processes, including 3D printing, fused deposition modelling, direct ink writing, selective laser sintering, inkjet printing and stereolithography, are discussed, and the different techniques are investigated for their application in soft robotic fabrication. Finally, we explore integrated robotic systems and give an outlook for the future of the field and remaining challenges.

  2. 3D reconstruction of tensors and vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defrise, Michel; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2005-01-01

    Here we have developed formulations for the reconstruction of 3D tensor fields from planar (Radon) and line-integral (X-ray) projections of 3D vector and tensor fields. Much of the motivation for this work is the potential application of MRI to perform diffusion tensor tomography. The goal is to develop a theory for the reconstruction of both Radon planar and X-ray or line-integral projections because of the flexibility of MRI to obtain both of these type of projections in 3D. The development presented here for the linear tensor tomography problem provides insight into the structure of the nonlinear MRI diffusion tensor inverse problem. A particular application of tensor imaging in MRI is the potential application of cardiac diffusion tensor tomography for determining in vivo cardiac fiber structure. One difficulty in the cardiac application is the motion of the heart. This presents a need for developing future theory for tensor tomography in a motion field. This means developing a better understanding of the MRI signal for diffusion processes in a deforming media. The techniques developed may allow the application of MRI tensor tomography for the study of structure of fiber tracts in the brain, atherosclerotic plaque, and spine in addition to fiber structure in the heart. However, the relations presented are also applicable to other fields in medical imaging such as diffraction tomography using ultrasound. The mathematics presented can also be extended to exponential Radon transform of tensor fields and to other geometric acquisitions such as cone beam tomography of tensor fields

  3. 5D SYM on 3D deformed spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruhiko Kawano

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We reconsider the relation of superconformal indices of superconformal field theories of class S with five-dimensional N=2 supersymmetric Yang–Mills theory compactified on the product space of a round three-sphere and a Riemann surface. We formulate the five-dimensional theory in supersymmetric backgrounds preserving N=2 and N=1 supersymmetries and discuss a subtle point in the previous paper concerned with the partial twisting on the Riemann surface. We further compute the partition function by localization of the five-dimensional theory on a squashed three-sphere in N=2 and N=1 supersymmetric backgrounds and on an ellipsoid three-sphere in an N=1 supersymmetric background.

  4. 3D integrated superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, D.; Kim, D.; Das, R.; Yost, D.; Gustavsson, S.; Hover, D.; Krantz, P.; Melville, A.; Racz, L.; Samach, G. O.; Weber, S. J.; Yan, F.; Yoder, J. L.; Kerman, A. J.; Oliver, W. D.

    2017-10-01

    As the field of quantum computing advances from the few-qubit stage to larger-scale processors, qubit addressability and extensibility will necessitate the use of 3D integration and packaging. While 3D integration is well-developed for commercial electronics, relatively little work has been performed to determine its compatibility with high-coherence solid-state qubits. Of particular concern, qubit coherence times can be suppressed by the requisite processing steps and close proximity of another chip. In this work, we use a flip-chip process to bond a chip with superconducting flux qubits to another chip containing structures for qubit readout and control. We demonstrate that high qubit coherence (T1, T2,echo > 20 μs) is maintained in a flip-chip geometry in the presence of galvanic, capacitive, and inductive coupling between the chips.

  5. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  6. Mortars for 3D printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demyanenko Olga

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is aimed at developing scientifically proven compositions of mortars for 3D printing modified by a peat-based admixture with improved operational characteristics. The paper outlines the results of experimental research on hardened cement paste and concrete mixture with the use of modifying admixture MT-600 (thermally modified peat. It is found that strength of hardened cement paste increases at early age when using finely dispersed admixtures, which is the key factor for formation of construction and technical specifications of concrete for 3D printing technologies. The composition of new formations of hardened cement paste modified by MT-600 admixture were obtained, which enabled to suggest the possibility of their physico-chemical interaction while hardening.

  7. Automated 3-D Radiation Mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarpinian, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    This work describes an automated radiation detection and imaging system which combines several state-of-the-art technologies to produce a portable but very powerful visualization tool for planning work in radiation environments. The system combines a radiation detection system, a computerized radiation imaging program, and computerized 3-D modeling to automatically locate and measurements are automatically collected and imaging techniques are used to produce colored, 'isodose' images of the measured radiation fields. The isodose lines from the images are then superimposed over the 3-D model of the area. The final display shows the various components in a room and their associated radiation fields. The use of an automated radiation detection system increases the quality of radiation survey obtained measurements. The additional use of a three-dimensional display allows easier visualization of the area and associated radiological conditions than two-dimensional sketches

  8. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LITTLE, CHARLES Q.; PETERS, RALPH R.; RIGDON, J. BRIAN; SMALL, DANIEL E.

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene

  9. 3D neutron transport modelization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warin, X.

    1996-12-01

    Some nodal methods to solve the transport equation in 3D are presented. Two nodal methods presented at an OCDE congress are described: a first one is a low degree one called RTN0; a second one is a high degree one called BDM1. The two methods can be made faster with a totally consistent DSA. Some results of parallelization show that: 98% of the time is spent in sweeps; transport sweeps are easily parallelized. (K.A.)

  10. 3D Printing A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zulkifl Hasan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Solid free fabrication SFF are produced to enhance the printing instrument utilizing distinctive strategies like Piezo spout control multi-spout injet printers or STL arrange utilizing cutting information. The procedure is utilized to diminish the cost and enhance the speed of printing. A few techniques take long at last because of extra process like dry the printing. This study will concentrate on SFFS utilizing UV gum for 3D printing.

  11. 3D neutron transport modelization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warin, X.

    1996-12-01

    Some nodal methods to solve the transport equation in 3D are presented. Two nodal methods presented at an OCDE congress are described: a first one is a low degree one called RTN0; a second one is a high degree one called BDM1. The two methods can be made faster with a totally consistent DSA. Some results of parallelization show that: 98% of the time is spent in sweeps; transport sweeps are easily parallelized. (K.A.). 10 refs.

  12. Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi; Vazquez, Patricia; Vedarethinam, Indumathi

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained...... showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared...

  13. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  14. 3D treatment planning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng B; Li, Sicong

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning systems have evolved and become crucial components of modern radiation therapy. The systems are computer-aided designing or planning softwares that speed up the treatment planning processes to arrive at the best dose plans for the patients undergoing radiation therapy. Furthermore, the systems provide new technology to solve problems that would not have been considered without the use of computers such as conformal radiation therapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The 3D treatment planning systems vary amongst the vendors and also the dose delivery systems they are designed to support. As such these systems have different planning tools to generate the treatment plans and convert the treatment plans into executable instructions that can be implemented by the dose delivery systems. The rapid advancements in computer technology and accelerators have facilitated constant upgrades and the introduction of different and unique dose delivery systems than the traditional C-arm type medical linear accelerators. The focus of this special issue is to gather relevant 3D treatment planning systems for the radiation oncology community to keep abreast of technology advancement by assess the planning tools available as well as those unique "tricks or tips" used to support the different dose delivery systems. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Compact 3D quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Edwar; Deppe, Frank; Renger, Michael; Repp, Daniel; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Pogorzalek, Stefan; Fedorov, Kirill G.; Marx, Achim; Gross, Rudolf

    2018-05-01

    Superconducting 3D microwave cavities offer state-of-the-art coherence times and a well-controlled environment for superconducting qubits. In order to realize at the same time fast readout and long-lived quantum information storage, one can couple the qubit to both a low-quality readout and a high-quality storage cavity. However, such systems are bulky compared to their less coherent 2D counterparts. A more compact and scalable approach is achieved by making use of the multimode structure of a 3D cavity. In our work, we investigate such a device where a transmon qubit is capacitively coupled to two modes of a single 3D cavity. External coupling is engineered so that the memory mode has an about 100 times larger quality factor than the readout mode. Using an all-microwave second-order protocol, we realize a lifetime enhancement of the stored state over the qubit lifetime by a factor of 6 with a fidelity of approximately 80% determined via quantum process tomography. We also find that this enhancement is not limited by fundamental constraints.

  16. 3D Graphics with Spreadsheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Benacka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the formulas for orthographic parallel projection of 3D bodies on computer screen are derived using secondary school vector algebra. The spreadsheet implementation is demonstrated in six applications that project bodies with increasing intricacy – a convex body (cube with non-solved visibility, convex bodies (cube, chapel with solved visibility, a coloured convex body (chapel with solved visibility, and a coloured non-convex body (church with solved visibility. The projections are revolvable in horizontal and vertical plane, and they are changeable in size. The examples show an unusual way of using spreadsheets as a 3D computer graphics tool. The applications can serve as a simple introduction to the general principles of computer graphics, to the graphics with spreadsheets, and as a tool for exercising stereoscopic vision. The presented approach is usable at visualising 3D scenes within some topics of secondary school curricula as solid geometry (angles and distances of lines and planes within simple bodies or analytic geometry in space (angles and distances of lines and planes in E3, and even at university level within calculus at visualising graphs of z = f(x,y functions. Examples are pictured.

  17. 3D GEO: AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Georgopoulos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The expression GEO is mostly used to denote relation to the earth. However it should not be confined to what is related to the earth's surface, as other objects also need three dimensional representation and documentation, like cultural heritage objects. They include both tangible and intangible ones. In this paper the 3D data acquisition and 3D modelling of cultural heritage assets are briefly described and their significance is also highlighted. Moreover the organization of such information, related to monuments and artefacts, into relational data bases and its use for various purposes, other than just geometric documentation is also described and presented. In order to help the reader understand the above, several characteristic examples are presented and their methodology explained and their results evaluated.

  18. 3D Geo: An Alternative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, A.

    2016-10-01

    The expression GEO is mostly used to denote relation to the earth. However it should not be confined to what is related to the earth's surface, as other objects also need three dimensional representation and documentation, like cultural heritage objects. They include both tangible and intangible ones. In this paper the 3D data acquisition and 3D modelling of cultural heritage assets are briefly described and their significance is also highlighted. Moreover the organization of such information, related to monuments and artefacts, into relational data bases and its use for various purposes, other than just geometric documentation is also described and presented. In order to help the reader understand the above, several characteristic examples are presented and their methodology explained and their results evaluated.

  19. 3D Printed Models of Cleft Palate Pathology for Surgical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioufas, Peter A; Quayle, Michelle R; Leong, James C; McMenamin, Paul G

    2016-09-01

    To explore the potential viability and limitations of 3D printed models of children with cleft palate deformity. The advantages of 3D printed replicas of normal anatomical specimens have previously been described. The creation of 3D prints displaying patient-specific anatomical pathology for surgical planning and interventions is an emerging field. Here we explored the possibility of taking rare pediatric radiographic data sets to create 3D prints for surgical education. Magnetic resonance imaging data of 2 children (8 and 14 months) were segmented, colored, and anonymized, and stereolothographic files were prepared for 3D printing on either multicolor plastic or powder 3D printers and multimaterial 3D printers. Two models were deemed of sufficient quality and anatomical accuracy to print unamended. One data set was further manipulated digitally to artificially extend the length of the cleft. Thus, 3 models were printed: 1 incomplete soft-palate deformity, 1 incomplete anterior palate deformity, and 1 complete cleft palate. All had cleft lip deformity. The single-material 3D prints are of sufficient quality to accurately identify the nature and extent of the deformities. Multimaterial prints were subsequently created, which could be valuable in surgical training. Improvements in the quality and resolution of radiographic imaging combined with the advent of multicolor multiproperty printer technology will make it feasible in the near future to print 3D replicas in materials that mimic the mechanical properties and color of live human tissue making them potentially suitable for surgical training.

  20. 3D composite image, 3D MRI, 3D SPECT, hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mito, T.; Shibata, I.; Sugo, N.; Takano, M.; Takahashi, H.

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D)SPECT imaging technique we have studied and published for the past several years is an analytical tool that permits visual expression of the cerebral circulation profile in various cerebral diseases. The greatest drawback of SPECT is that the limitation on precision of spacial resolution makes intracranial localization impossible. In 3D SPECT imaging, intracranial volume and morphology may vary with the threshold established. To solve this problem, we have produced complimentarily combined SPECT and helical-CT 3D images by means of general-purpose visualization software for intracranial localization. In hydrocephalus, however, the key subject to be studied is the profile of cerebral circulation around the ventricles of the brain. This suggests that, for displaying the cerebral ventricles in three dimensions, CT is a difficult technique whereas MRI is more useful. For this reason, we attempted to establish the profile of cerebral circulation around the cerebral ventricles by the production of combined 3D images of SPECT and MRI. In patients who had shunt surgery for hydrocephalus, a difference between pre- and postoperative cerebral circulation profiles was assessed by a voxel distribution curve, 3D SPECT images, and combined 3D SPECT and MRI images. As the shunt system in this study, an Orbis-Sigma valve of the automatic cerebrospinal fluid volume adjustment type was used in place of the variable pressure type Medos valve currently in use, because this device requires frequent changes in pressure and a change in pressure may be detected after MRI procedure. The SPECT apparatus used was PRISM3000 of the three-detector type, and 123I-IMP was used as the radionuclide in a dose of 222 MBq. MRI data were collected with an MAGNEXa+2 with a magnetic flux density of 0.5 tesla under the following conditions: field echo; TR 50 msec; TE, 10 msec; flip, 30ueK; 1 NEX; FOV, 23 cm; 1-mm slices; and gapless. 3D images are produced on the workstation TITAN

  1. 3D silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzefall, Ulrich; Bates, Richard; Boscardin, Maurizio; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Eckert, Simon; Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste; Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne; Lozano, Manuel; Pahn, Gregor; Parkes, Chris; Pellegrini, Giulio; Pennicard, David; Piemonte, Claudio; Ronchin, Sabina; Szumlak, Tomasz; Zoboli, Andrea; Zorzi, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has started operation in autumn 2008, plans for a luminosity upgrade to the Super-LHC (sLHC) have already been developed for several years. This projected luminosity increase by an order of magnitude gives rise to a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors at the LHC experiments. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. Using a strawman layout for the new tracker of the ATLAS experiment as an example, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips of 2-3 cm length are foreseen to cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSD will be exposed to radiation levels up to 10 15 N eq /cm 2 , which makes radiation resistance a major concern for the upgraded ATLAS tracker. Several approaches to increasing the radiation hardness of silicon detectors exist. In this article, it is proposed to combine the radiation hard 3D-design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the established planar technology for strip detectors by using SSDs that have regularly spaced doped columns extending into the silicon bulk under the detector strips. The first 3D SSDs to become available for testing were made in the Single Type Column (STC) design, a technological simplification of the original 3D design. With such 3D SSDs, a small number of prototype sLHC detector modules with LHC-speed front-end electronics as used in the semiconductor tracking systems of present LHC experiments were built. Modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10 15 N eq /cm 2 . The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5μm spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency, an Sr 90 β-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of the results obtained with 3D-STC-modules.

  2. 3D silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzefall, Ulrich [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: ulrich.parzefall@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Bates, Richard [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boscardin, Maurizio [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Eckert, Simon [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Lozano, Manuel [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pahn, Gregor [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Parkes, Chris [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Pellegrini, Giulio [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pennicard, David [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Piemonte, Claudio; Ronchin, Sabina [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Szumlak, Tomasz [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Zoboli, Andrea [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zorzi, Nicola [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has started operation in autumn 2008, plans for a luminosity upgrade to the Super-LHC (sLHC) have already been developed for several years. This projected luminosity increase by an order of magnitude gives rise to a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors at the LHC experiments. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. Using a strawman layout for the new tracker of the ATLAS experiment as an example, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips of 2-3 cm length are foreseen to cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSD will be exposed to radiation levels up to 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, which makes radiation resistance a major concern for the upgraded ATLAS tracker. Several approaches to increasing the radiation hardness of silicon detectors exist. In this article, it is proposed to combine the radiation hard 3D-design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the established planar technology for strip detectors by using SSDs that have regularly spaced doped columns extending into the silicon bulk under the detector strips. The first 3D SSDs to become available for testing were made in the Single Type Column (STC) design, a technological simplification of the original 3D design. With such 3D SSDs, a small number of prototype sLHC detector modules with LHC-speed front-end electronics as used in the semiconductor tracking systems of present LHC experiments were built. Modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5{mu}m spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency, an Sr{sup 90}{beta}-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of

  3. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  4. 3D printing: making things at the library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    3D printers are a new technology that creates physical objects from digital files. Uses for these printers include printing models, parts, and toys. 3D printers are also being developed for medical applications, including printed bone, skin, and even complete organs. Although medical printing lags behind other uses for 3D printing, it has the potential to radically change the practice of medicine over the next decade. Falling costs for hardware have made 3D printers an inexpensive technology that libraries can offer their patrons. Medical librarians will want to be familiar with this technology, as it is sure to have wide-reaching effects on the practice of medicine.

  5. FROMS3D: New Software for 3-D Visualization of Fracture Network System in Fractured Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Y. H.; Um, J. G.; Choi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A new software (FROMS3D) is presented to visualize fracture network system in 3-D. The software consists of several modules that play roles in management of borehole and field fracture data, fracture network modelling, visualization of fracture geometry in 3-D and calculation and visualization of intersections and equivalent pipes between fractures. Intel Parallel Studio XE 2013, Visual Studio.NET 2010 and the open source VTK library were utilized as development tools to efficiently implement the modules and the graphical user interface of the software. The results have suggested that the developed software is effective in visualizing 3-D fracture network system, and can provide useful information to tackle the engineering geological problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses.

  6. 3D display system using monocular multiview displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Saruta, Kazuki; Takeda, Kazutoki

    2002-05-01

    A 3D head mounted display (HMD) system is useful for constructing a virtual space. The authors have researched the virtual-reality systems connected with computer networks for real-time remote control and developed a low-priced real-time 3D display for building these systems. We developed a 3D HMD system using monocular multi-view displays. The 3D displaying technique of this monocular multi-view display is based on the concept of the super multi-view proposed by Kajiki at TAO (Telecommunications Advancement Organization of