WorldWideScience

Sample records for defining neighborhood structure

  1. Cartographic Modeling: Computer-assisted Analysis of Spatially Defined Neighborhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, J. K.; Tomlin, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    Cartographic models addressing a wide variety of applications are composed of fundamental map processing operations. These primitive operations are neither data base nor application-specific. By organizing the set of operations into a mathematical-like structure, the basis for a generalized cartographic modeling framework can be developed. Among the major classes of primitive operations are those associated with reclassifying map categories, overlaying maps, determining distance and connectivity, and characterizing cartographic neighborhoods. The conceptual framework of cartographic modeling is established and techniques for characterizing neighborhoods are used as a means of demonstrating some of the more sophisticated procedures of computer-assisted map analysis. A cartographic model for assessing effective roundwood supply is briefly described as an example of a computer analysis. Most of the techniques described have been implemented as part of the map analysis package developed at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

  2. Defining Neighborhood Boundaries for Social Measurement: Advancing Social Work Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kirk A.; Hipp, J. Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Much of the current neighborhood-based research uses variables aggregated on administrative boundaries such as zip codes, census tracts, and block groups. However, other methods using current technological advances in geographic sciences may broaden our ability to explore the spatial concentration of neighborhood factors affecting individuals and…

  3. How neighborhood structural and institutional features can shape neighborhood social connectedness: a multilevel study of adolescent perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Michela; Vieno, Alessio; Santinello, Massimo; Perkins, Douglas D

    2013-06-01

    According to the norms and collective efficacy model, the levels of social connectedness within a local community are a function of neighborhood structural characteristics, such as socioeconomic status and ethnic composition. The current work aims to determine whether neighborhood structural and institutional features (neighborhood wealth, percentage of immigrants, population density, opportunities for activities and meeting places) have an impact on different components of neighborhood social connectedness (intergenerational closure, trust and reciprocity, neighborhood-based friendship and personal relationships with neighbors). The study involved a representative sample of 389 early and middle adolescents aged 11-15 years old, coming from 31 Italian neighborhoods. Using hierarchical linear modeling, our findings showed that high population density, ethnic diversity, and physical and social disorder might represent obstacles for the creation of social ties within the neighborhood. On the contrary, the presence of opportunities for activities and meeting places in the neighborhood was associated with higher levels of social connectedness among residents.

  4. Adolescent self-defined neighborhoods and activity spaces: spatial overlap and relations to physical activity and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colabianchi, Natalie; Coulton, Claudia J; Hibbert, James D; McClure, Stephanie M; Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E; Davis, Esa M

    2014-05-01

    Defining the proper geographic scale for built environment exposures continues to present challenges. In this study, size attributes and exposure calculations from two commonly used neighborhood boundaries were compared to those from neighborhoods that were self-defined by a sample of 145 urban minority adolescents living in subsidized housing estates. Associations between five built environment exposures and physical activity, overweight and obesity were also examined across the three neighborhood definitions. Limited spatial overlap was observed across the various neighborhood definitions. Further, many places where adolescents were active were not within the participants׳ neighborhoods. No statistically significant associations were found between counts of facilities and the outcomes based on exposure calculations using the self-defined boundaries; however, a few associations were evident for exposures using the 0.75mile network buffer and census tract boundaries. Future investigation of the relationship between the built environment, physical activity and obesity will require practical and theoretically-based methods for capturing salient environmental exposures.

  5. Smooth Neighborhood Structures in a Smooth Topological Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Ramadan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various concepts related to a smooth topological spaces have been introduced and relations among them studied by several authors (Chattopadhyay, Ramadan, etc. In this study, we presented the notions of three sorts of neighborhood structures of a smooth topological spaces and give some of their properties which are results by Ying extended to smooth topological spaces.

  6. Structural and experiential neighborhood contexts, developmental stage, and antisocial behavior among urban adolescents in poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, E; Yoshikawa, H; Roberts, A; Chesir-Teran, D; Allen, L; Friedman, J L; Aber, J L

    1998-01-01

    This study explored the effects of structural and experiential neighborhood factors and developmental stage on antisocial behavior, among a sample of poor urban adolescents in New York City. Conceptually and empirically distinct profiles of neighborhood experience were derived from the data, based on measures of perceived neighborhood cohesion, poverty-related hassles, and involvement in neighborhood organizations and activities. Both the profiles of neighborhood experience and a measure of census-tract-level neighborhood hazard (poverty and violence) showed relationships to antisocial behavior. Contrary to expectation, higher levels of antisocial behavior were reported among adolescents residing in moderate-structural-risk neighborhoods than those in high-structural-risk neighborhoods. This effect held only for teens in middle (not early) adolescence and was stronger for teens perceiving their neighborhoods as hassling than for those who did not. Implications for future research and preventive intervention are discussed.

  7. Forecasting prices of single family homes using GIS-defined neighborhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboudan, Mak; Sarkar, Avijit

    2008-03-01

    We estimate spatiotemporal models of average neighborhood single family home prices to use in predicting individual property prices. Average home-price variations are explained in terms of changes in average neighborhood house attributes, spatial attributes, and temporal economic variables. Models adopting three different definitions of neighborhoods are estimated with quarterly cross-sectional data over the period 2000 2004 from four cities in Southern California. Heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation problems are detected and adjusted for via a sequential routine. Results of these models suggest that forecasts obtained using city neighborhood average price equations may have advantage over forecasts obtained using city aggregated price equations.

  8. Optimum Criteria for Developing Defined Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic aspects concerning distributed applications are presented: definition, particularities and importance. For distributed applications linear, arborescent, graph structures are defined with different versions and aggregation methods. Distributed applications have associated structures which through their characteristics influence the costs of the stages in the development cycle and the exploitation costs transferred to each user. The complexity of the defined structures is analyzed. The minimum and maximum criteria are enumerated for optimizing distributed application structures.

  9. Neighborhood disorder, sleep quality, and psychological distress: testing a model of structural amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Terrence D; Burdette, Amy M; Hale, Lauren

    2009-12-01

    Using data from the 2004 Survey of Texas Adults (n=1504), we examine the association between perceived neighborhood disorder and psychological distress. Building on previous research, we test whether the effect of neighborhood disorder is mediated and moderated by sleep quality. Our specific analytic strategy follows a two-stage theoretical model of structural amplification. In the first stage, perceptions of neighborhood disorder increase psychological distress indirectly by reducing sleep quality. In the second stage, the effect of neighborhood disorder on psychological distress is amplified by poor sleep quality. The results of our analyses are generally consistent with our theoretical model. We find that neighborhood disorder is associated with poorer sleep quality and greater psychological distress. We also observe that the positive association between neighborhood disorder and psychological distress is mediated (partially) and moderated (amplified) by poor sleep quality.

  10. Association of father involvement and neighborhood quality with kindergartners' physical activity: a multilevel structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beets, Michael W; Foley, John T

    2008-01-01

    Examine the effects of father-child involvement and neighborhood characteristics with young children's physical activity (PA) within a multilevel framework. Cross-sectional analysis of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort 1998. Nationally representative sample. Data were available for 10,694 kindergartners (5-6 years; 5240 girls) living in 1053 neighborhoods. Parental report of child's PA level, father characteristics (e.g., time spent with child, age, education, socioeconomic status, hours worked), family time spent doing sports/ activities together, and neighborhood quality (e.g., safety, presence of crime violence, garbage). Child weight status, motor skills, ethnicity, and television viewing were used as covariates. Multilevel structural equation modeling with children nested within neighborhoods. At the child level father-child time and family time doing sports together were positively associated with children's PA. At the neighborhood level parental perception of a neighborhood's safety for children to play outside fully mediated the effect of neighborhood quality on children's PA. Overall 19.1% and 7.6% of the variance in PA was explained at the child and neighborhood levels, respectively. Family-based interventions for PA should consider father-child time, with this contributing to a child's overall PA level. Further, neighborhood quality is an important predictor of PA only to the extent by which parents perceive it to be unsafe for their child to play outdoors.

  11. Neighborhood structure effects on the Dynamic response of soil-structure interaction by harmonic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Dan-guang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For realizing the variation of structural dynamic characteristics due to neighbor structure in buildings group, the surface structure is idealized as an equivalent single degree of freedom system with rigid base whose site consists of a single homogeneous layer. Based on the model, a equivalent method on the equivalent seismic excitation is proposed. Then, the differences of seismic response and equivalent seismic input between soil - structure interaction (SSI system and structure -soil-structure interaction (SSSI system are investigated by harmonic analysis. The numerical results show that dynamic responses would be underestimated in SSSI system when the forcing frequencies are close to the Natural frequency if the effects of neighborhood structure were ignored. Neighborhood structure would make the translational displacement increase and rocking vibration decrease. When establishing an effective seismic input, it is necessary to consider the impact of inertia interaction.

  12. Investigating the relationship between neighborhood poverty and mortality risk: a marginal structural modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, D Phuong; Wang, Lu; Elliott, Michael R

    2013-08-01

    Extant observational studies generally support the existence of a link between neighborhood context and health. However, estimating the causal impact of neighborhood effects from observational data has proven to be a challenge. Omission of relevant factors may lead to overestimating the effects of neighborhoods on health while inclusion of time-varying confounders that may also be mediators (e.g., income, labor force status) may lead to underestimation. Using longitudinal data from the 1990 to 2007 years of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, this study investigates the link between neighborhood poverty and overall mortality risk. A marginal structural modeling strategy is employed to appropriately adjust for simultaneous mediating and confounding factors. To address the issue of possible upward bias from the omission of key variables, sensitivity analysis to assess the robustness of results against unobserved confounding is conducted. We examine two continuous measures of neighborhood poverty - single-point and a running average. Both were specified as piece-wise linear splines with a knot at 20 percent. We found no evidence from the traditional naïve strategy that neighborhood context influences mortality risk. In contrast, for both the single-point and running average neighborhood poverty specifications, the marginal structural model estimates indicated a statistically significant increase in mortality risk with increasing neighborhood poverty above the 20 percent threshold. For example, below 20 percent neighborhood poverty, no association was found. However, after the 20 percent poverty threshold is reached, each 10 percentage point increase in running average neighborhood poverty was found to increase the odds for mortality by 89 percent [95% CI = 1.22, 2.91]. Sensitivity analysis indicated that estimates were moderately robust to omitted variable bias.

  13. Intimate partner violence in neighborhood context: The roles of structural disadvantage, subjective disorder, and emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Jennifer E; Kuhl, Danielle C; Giordano, Peggy C; Longmore, Monica A; Manning, Wendy D

    2015-09-01

    Most theoretical treatments of intimate partner violence (IPV) focus on individual-level processes. Some researchers have attempted to situate IPV within the larger neighborhood context, but few studies have sought to link structural- and individual-level factors. The current analyses fill a research gap by examining the role of anger and depression in the association between neighborhood disadvantage and IPV. Using data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (TARS) and the 2000 Census, this study focuses on structural indicators of disadvantage as well as subjective disorder, and highlights the complex associations between neighborhood conditions, emotional distress, and IPV. Findings indicate that anger and depressive symptoms partially explain the association between neighborhood disadvantage and IPV. Additionally, the associations between disadvantage, disorder, and IPV depend on respondent's level of anger. Results underscore the need to further consider the role of neighborhood factors (both objective and subjective) in relation to IPV, and also suggest the utility of introducing individual-level emotional measures to assess the circumstances under which neighborhoods matter most.

  14. Groups definable in o-minimal structures: structure theorem, G^000, definable amenability and bounded orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Pillay, Anand

    2010-01-01

    We settle some open problems in the special case of groups in o-minimal structures, such as the equality of G^00 and G^000 and the equivalence of definable amenability and existence of a type with bounded orbit. We prove almost exactness of the G to G^00 functor. We ask further questions about types with bounded orbits in NIP theories.

  15. Lithographically defined microporous carbon-composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Finnegan, Patrick Sean; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-12-06

    A microporous carbon scaffold is produced by lithographically patterning a carbon-containing photoresist, followed by pyrolysis of the developed resist structure. Prior to exposure, the photoresist is loaded with a nanoparticulate material. After pyrolysis, the nanonparticulate material is dispersed in, and intimately mixed with, the carbonaceous material of the scaffold, thereby yielding a carbon composite structure.

  16. Early Adolescent Perceptions of Neighborhood: Strengths, Structural Disadvantage, and Relations to Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, Dawn P.; Hughes, Diane L.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable evidence shows the detriments of neighborhood social disorganization for urban youth. Researchers have focused less on potential neighborhood strengths or on the interplay of neighborhood perceptions and objective neighborhood characteristics. The authors examined the presence and perception of positive and negative neighborhood…

  17. The Block Neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    We define the block neighborhood of a reversible CA, which is related both to its decomposition into a product of block permutations and to quantum computing. We give a purely combinatorial characterization of the block neighborhood, which helps in two ways. First, it makes the computation of the block neighborhood of a given CA relatively easy. Second, it allows us to derive upper bounds on the block neighborhood: for a single CA as function of the classical and inverse neighborhoods, and for the composition of several CAs. One consequence of that is a characterization of a class of "elementary" CAs that cannot be written as the composition of two simpler parts whose neighborhoods and inverse neighborhoods would be reduced by one half.

  18. Durham Neighborhood Compass Neighborhoods

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The Durham Neighborhood Compass is a quantitative indicators project with qualitative values, integrating data from local government, the Census Bureau and other...

  19. Random Neighborhood Graphs as Models of Fracture Networks on Rocks: Structural and Dynamical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new model to account for the main structural characteristics of rock fracture networks (RFNs). The model is based on a generalization of the random neighborhood graphs to consider fractures embedded into rectangular spaces. We study a series of 29 real-world RFNs and find the best fit with the random rectangular neighborhood graphs (RRNGs) proposed here. We show that this model captures most of the structural characteristics of the RFNs and allows a distinction between small and more spherical rocks and large and more elongated ones. We use a diffusion equation on the graphs in order to model diffusive processes taking place through the channels of the RFNs. We find a small set of structural parameters that highly correlates with the average diffusion time in the RFNs. In particular, the second smallest eigenvalue of the Laplacian matrix is a good predictor of the average diffusion time on RFNs, showing a Pearson correlation coefficient larger than $0.99$ with the average diffusion time on RFNs. ...

  20. Directional properties of sets definable in o-minimal structures

    CERN Document Server

    Koike, Satoshi; Paunescu, Laurentiu; Shiota, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    In a former paper the first and third authors introduced the notion of direction set for a subset of R^n, and showed that the dimension of the common direction set of two subanalytic subsets, called directional dimension, is preserved by a bi-Lipschitz homeomorphism, provided that their images are also subanalytic. In this paper we give a generalisation of the above result to sets definable in an o-minimal structure on an arbitrary real closed field. More precisely, we first prove our main theorem and discuss in detail directional properties in the case of an Archimedean real closed field, and then we give a proof in the case of a general real closed field. In addition, related to our main result, we show the existence of special polyhedra in some Euclidean space, illustrating that the bi-Lipschitz equivalence does not always imply the existence of a definable one.

  1. Defining a neural network controller structure for a rubbertuator robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, M; Inoue, K; Negishi, K; Yamanaka, T

    2000-01-01

    Rubbertuator (Rubber-Actuator) robot arm is a pneumatic robot, unique with its lightweight, high power, compliant and spark free nature. Compressibility of air in the actuator tubes and the elastic nature of the rubber, however, are the two major sources of increased non-linearity and complexity in motion control. Soft computing, exploiting the tolerance of uncertainty and vagueness in cognitive reasoning has been offering easy to handle, robust, and low-priced solutions to several non-linear industrial applications. Nonetheless, the black-box approach in these systems results in application specific architectures with some important design parameters left for fine tuning (i.e. number of nodes in a neural network). In this study we propose a more systematic method in defining the structure of a soft computing technique, namely the backpropagation neural network, when used as a controller for rubbertuator robot systems. The structure of the neural network is based on the physical model of the robot, while the neural network itself is trained to learn the trajectory independent parameters of the model that are essential for defining the robot dynamics. The proposed system performance was compared with a well-tuned PID controller and shown to be more accurate in trajectory control for rubbertuator robots.

  2. Toward structurally defined carbon dots as ultracompact fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCroy, Gregory Ethan; Sonkar, Sumit Kumar; Yang, Fan; Veca, L Monica; Wang, Ping; Tackett, Kenneth N; Yu, Jing-Jiang; Vasile, Eugeniu; Qian, Haijun; Liu, Yamin; Luo, Pengju George; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2014-05-27

    There has been much discussion on the need to develop fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) as ultracompact probes, with overall size profiles comparable to those of the genetically encoded fluorescent tags. In the use of conventional semiconductor QDs for such a purpose, the beautifully displayed dependence of fluorescence color on the particle diameter becomes a limitation. More recently, carbon dots have emerged as a new platform of QD-like fluorescent nanomaterials. The optical absorption and fluorescence emissions in carbon dots are not bandgap in origin, different from those in conventional semiconductor QDs. The absence of any theoretically defined fluorescence color-dot size relationships in carbon dots may actually be exploited as a unique advantage in the size reduction toward having carbon dots serve as ultracompact QD-like fluorescence probes. Here we report on carbon dots of less than 5 nm in the overall dot diameter with the use of 2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)bis(ethylamine) (EDA) molecules for the carbon particle surface passivation. The EDA-carbon dots were found to be brightly fluorescent, especially over the spectral range of green fluorescent protein. These aqueous soluble smaller carbon dots also enabled more quantitative characterizations, including the use of solution-phase NMR techniques, and the results suggested that the dot structures were relatively simple and better-defined. The potential for these smaller carbon dots to serve as fluorescence probes of overall sizes comparable to those of fluorescent proteins is discussed.

  3. The global financial crisis and neighborhood decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiers, M.D.; Bolt, G.; Van Ham, M.; Van Kempen, R.

    2016-01-01

    Neighborhood decline is a complex and multidimensional process. National and regional variations in economic and political structures (including varieties in national welfare state arrangements), combined with differences in neighborhood history, development, and population composition, make it impo

  4. Choice Neighborhood Grantees

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Choice Neighborhoods grants transform distressed neighborhoods, public and assisted projects into viable and sustainable mixed-income neighborhoods by linking...

  5. Demarcation of local neighborhoods to study relations between contextual factors and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chor Dora

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have highlighted the importance of collective social factors for population health. One of the major challenges is an adequate definition of the spatial units of analysis which present properties potentially related to the target outcomes. Political and administrative divisions of urban areas are the most commonly used definition, although they suffer limitations in their ability to fully express the neighborhoods as social and spatial units. Objective This study presents a proposal for defining the boundaries of local neighborhoods in Rio de Janeiro city. Local neighborhoods are constructed by means of aggregation of contiguous census tracts which are homogeneous regarding socioeconomic indicators. Methodology Local neighborhoods were created using the SKATER method (TerraView software. Criteria used for socioeconomic homogeneity were based on four census tract indicators (income, education, persons per household, and percentage of population in the 0-4-year age bracket considering a minimum population of 5,000 people living in each local neighborhood. The process took into account the geographic boundaries between administrative neighborhoods (a political-administrative division larger than a local neighborhood, but smaller than a borough and natural geographic barriers. Results The original 8,145 census tracts were collapsed into 794 local neighborhoods, distributed along 158 administrative neighborhoods. Local neighborhoods contained a mean of 10 census tracts, and there were an average of five local neighborhoods per administrative neighborhood. The local neighborhood units demarcated in this study are less socioeconomically heterogeneous than the administrative neighborhoods and provide a means for decreasing the well-known statistical variability of indicators based on census tracts. The local neighborhoods were able to distinguish between different areas within administrative neighborhoods

  6. Neighborhood Variation in Gang Member Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Charles M.; Schnebly, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between neighborhood structure, violent crime, and concentrations of gang members at the neighborhood level. We rely on official police gang list data, police crime data, and two waves of decennial census data characterizing the socioeconomic and demographic conditions of 93 neighborhoods in Mesa, Arizona.…

  7. Neighborhood structure influences the convergence in light capture efficiency and carbon gain: an architectural approach for cloud forest shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Q, J Antonio; Cordero S, Roberto A

    2016-06-01

    Although plant competition is recognized as a fundamental factor that limits survival and species coexistence, its relative importance on light capture efficiency and carbon gain is not well understood. Here, we propose a new framework to explain the effects of neighborhood structures and light availability on plant attributes and their effect on plant performance in two understory shade-tolerant species (Palicourea padifolia (Roem. & Schult.) C.M. Taylor & Lorence and Psychotria elata (Swartz)) within two successional stages of a cloud forest in Costa Rica. Features of plant neighborhood physical structure and light availability, estimated by hemispherical photographs, were used to characterize the plant competition. Plant architecture, leaf attributes and gas exchange parameters extracted from the light-response curve were used as functional plant attributes, while an index of light capture efficiency (silhouette to total area ratio, averaged over all viewing angles, STAR) and carbon gain were used as indicators of plant performance. This framework is based in a partial least square Path model, which suggests that changes in plant performance in both species were affected in two ways: (i) increasing size and decreasing distance of neighbors cause changes in plant architecture (higher crown density and greater leaf dispersion), which contribute to lower STAR and subsequently lower carbon gain; and (ii) reductions in light availability caused by the neighbors also decrease plant carbon gain. The effect of neighbors on STAR and carbon gain were similar for the two forests sites, which were at different stages of succession, suggesting that the architectural changes of the two understory species reflect functional convergence in response to plant competition. Because STAR and carbon gain are variables that depend on multiple plant attributes and environmental characteristics, we suggest that changes in these features can be used as a whole-plant response approach to

  8. The defining features of the modern entrepreneurship network structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Kochubey

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article the various forms of network enterprises are analyzed, the key characteristics of network structures are identified. The relationship between network types and forms of business organization is shown. The studies of different types of network structures are systematized.

  9. Moving Beyond Neighborhood: Activity Spaces and Ecological Networks As Contexts for Youth Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Christopher R; Soller, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Many scholars, policy analysts, and practitioners agree that neighborhoods are important contexts for urban youth. Yet, despite decades of research, our knowledge of why and how neighborhoods influence the day-to-day lives of youth is still emerging. Theories about neighborhood effects largely assume that neighborhoods operate to influence youth through exposure-based mechanisms. Extant theoretical approaches, however, have neglected the processes by which neighborhood socioeconomic contexts influence the routine spatial exposures-or activity spaces-of urban residents. In this article, we argue that exposure to organizations, institutions, and other settings that characterize individual activity spaces is a key mechanism through which neighborhoods influence youth outcomes. Moreover, we hypothesize that aggregate patterns of shared local exposure-captured by the concept of ecological networks-are influenced by neighborhood socioeconomic characteristics and are independently consequential for neighborhood youth. Neighborhoods in which residents intersect in space more extensively as a result of routine conventional activities will exhibit higher levels of social capital relevant to youth well-being, including (1) familiarity, (2) beneficial (weak) social ties, (3) trust, (4) shared expectations for pro-social youth behavior (collective efficacy), and (5) the capacity for consistent monitoring of public space. We then consider the implications of ecological networks for understanding the complexities of contextual exposure. We specifically discuss the role of embeddedness in ecological communities-that is, clusters of actors and locations that intersect at higher rates-for understanding contextual influences that are inadequately captured by geographically defined neighborhoods. We conclude with an overview of new approaches to data collection that incorporate insights from an activity-space and ecological-network perspective on neighborhood and contextual influences

  10. A rationale and approach for defining and structuring testability requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klion, J.

    1985-08-01

    Testability concepts and requirements are being applied to many Air Force electronic equipment/system development programs. Insufficient guidance exists as to the definition and structure of testability requirements and the interface between such requirements and maintainability, availability, and integrated diagnostics. The purpose of this report is to provide one logical approach and associated guidance to the definition and structure of testability needs and: (1) the relationship of testability to other system parameters; (2) the translation of testability needs to testability requirements; (3) the interpretation of testability terms, concepts and requirements; (4) the structure and scope of testability requirements; (5) and the identification of those factors, constraints and contingencies which must be considered when invoking testability requirements.

  11. User Defined Structural Searches in MediaWiki

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouvin, Niels Olof; Albertsen, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    Wikipedia has been the poster child of user contributed content using the space of MediaWiki as the canvas on which to write. While well suited for authoring simple hypermedia documents, MediaWiki does not lend itself easily to let the author create dynamically assembled documents, or create pages...... that monitor other pages. While it is possible to create such "special" pages, it requires PHP coding and thus administrative rights to the MediaWiki server. We present in this paper work on a structural query language (MediaWiki Query Language - MWQL) to allow users to add dynamically evaluated searches...

  12. Structured attachment of bacterial molecular motors for defined microflow induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woerdemann Mike

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial rotational motor complexes that propel flagellated bacteria possess unique properties like their size of a few nanometres and the ability of selfreproduction that have led to various exciting applications including biohybrid nano-machines. One mandatory prerequisite to utilize bacterial nano motors in fluid applications is the ability to transfer force and torque to the fluid, which usually can be achieved by attachment of the bacterial cell to adequate surfaces. Additionally, for optimal transfer of force or torque, precise control of the position down to the single cell level is of utmost importance. Based on a PIV (particle image velocimetry evaluation of the induced flow of single bacteria,we propose and demonstrate attachment of arbitrary patterns of motile bacterial cells in a fast light-based two-step process for the first time to our knowledge. First, these cells are pre-structured by holographic optical tweezers and then attached to a homogeneous, polystyrene-coated surface. In contrast to the few approaches that have been implemented up to now and which rely on pre-structured surfaces, our scheme allows for precise control on a single bacterium level, is versatile, interactive and has low requirements with respect to the surface preparation.

  13. Architectural frameworks: defining the structures for implementing learning health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Lysanne; Michalowski, Wojtek; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael; Jones, Lori; Grudniewicz, Agnes

    2017-06-23

    The vision of transforming health systems into learning health systems (LHSs) that rapidly and continuously transform knowledge into improved health outcomes at lower cost is generating increased interest in government agencies, health organizations, and health research communities. While existing initiatives demonstrate that different approaches can succeed in making the LHS vision a reality, they are too varied in their goals, focus, and scale to be reproduced without undue effort. Indeed, the structures necessary to effectively design and implement LHSs on a larger scale are lacking. In this paper, we propose the use of architectural frameworks to develop LHSs that adhere to a recognized vision while being adapted to their specific organizational context. Architectural frameworks are high-level descriptions of an organization as a system; they capture the structure of its main components at varied levels, the interrelationships among these components, and the principles that guide their evolution. Because these frameworks support the analysis of LHSs and allow their outcomes to be simulated, they act as pre-implementation decision-support tools that identify potential barriers and enablers of system development. They thus increase the chances of successful LHS deployment. We present an architectural framework for LHSs that incorporates five dimensions-goals, scientific, social, technical, and ethical-commonly found in the LHS literature. The proposed architectural framework is comprised of six decision layers that model these dimensions. The performance layer models goals, the scientific layer models the scientific dimension, the organizational layer models the social dimension, the data layer and information technology layer model the technical dimension, and the ethics and security layer models the ethical dimension. We describe the types of decisions that must be made within each layer and identify methods to support decision-making. In this paper, we outline

  14. 基于新型邻域结构的混合算法求解作业车间调度%A Hybrid Algorithm with a New Neighborhood Structure for the Job Shop Scheduling Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵诗奎

    2016-01-01

    In order to optimize the maximum completion time, a hybrid solving method with a new neighborhood structure is proposed for the job shop scheduling problem (JSP). In the hybrid algorithm, genetic algorithm is adopted for global search, and local search is achieved based on neighborhood structure. In the design of the neighborhood structure, the calculation method of operation head and tail length, and the key operations searching method are studied based on Gantt chart. Through the analysis of various neighborhood structures and related theories, it points out that the foundation of neighborhood structure is to guide the key operations to utilize machine idle time, and can be divided into two types: direct use and indirect use. The two utilization ways are both comprehensively considered, and the corresponding movement strategies are defined according to the type of key operations with scientific guidance. The effective movement range is expanded, breaking through the location restrictions of inside, direct adjacent before and behind of the operation block. The experimental results of 43 benchmarks show that the proposed algorithm has good performance. In addition, the new neighborhood structure can further be integrated with other intelligent algorithms for solving JSP problem.%针对作业车间调度问题(Job shop scheduling problem,JSP),以优化最大完工时间为目标,提出一种融合新型邻域结构的混合求解方法。混合算法由具有全局搜索能力的遗传算法和基于邻域结构的邻域搜索算法构成。在邻域结构的设计中,研究了基于甘特图的工序头尾长度计算方法,以及关键工序查找方法。通过分析已有各种邻域结构及相关理论性质,指出邻域结构的根本在于引导关键工序对机器空闲时间进行利用,并将利用方式分为两种情况:直接利用和间接利用。综合两种利用方式,科学指导关键工序的移动,根据关键工序的类

  15. Neighborhood Community Council Coordinators in Simi Valley -- An All American City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsinger, Eve

    1973-01-01

    Describes the incorporation of Simi Valley and its governmental structure based on human resources, environmental affairs, public services, and general services. Discusses the neighborhood safety agency and neighborhood councils and the role of the neighborhood council coordinator. (DN)

  16. Large Neighborhood Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pisinger, David; Røpke, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Heuristics based on large neighborhood search have recently shown outstanding results in solving various transportation and scheduling problems. Large neighborhood search methods explore a complex neighborhood by use of heuristics. Using large neighborhoods makes it possible to find better...... candidate solutions in each iteration and hence traverse a more promising search path. Starting from the large neighborhood search method,we give an overview of very large scale neighborhood search methods and discuss recent variants and extensions like variable depth search and adaptive large neighborhood...... search....

  17. Bad neighborhoods on the internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moura, Giovane C.M.; Sadre, Ramin; Pras, Aiko

    2014-01-01

    Analogous to the real world, sources of malicious activities on the Internet tend to be concentrated in certain networks instead of being evenly distributed. In this article we formally define and frame such areas as Internet Bad Neighborhoods. By extending the reputation of malicious IP addresses t

  18. Bad Neighborhoods on the Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira Moura, G.C.; Sadre, R.; Pras, A.

    2014-01-01

    Analogous to the real world, sources of malicious activities on the Internet tend to be concentrated in certain networks instead of being evenly distributed. In this article, we formally define and frame such areas as Internet Bad Neighborhoods. By extending the reputation of malicious IP addresses

  19. Bad neighborhoods on the internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira Moura, Giovane; Sadre, R.; Pras, Aiko

    Analogous to the real world, sources of malicious activities on the Internet tend to be concentrated in certain networks instead of being evenly distributed. In this article we formally define and frame such areas as Internet Bad Neighborhoods. By extending the reputation of malicious IP addresses

  20. Bad Neighborhoods on the Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira Moura, G.C.; Sadre, R.; Pras, A.

    2014-01-01

    Analogous to the real world, sources of malicious activities on the Internet tend to be concentrated in certain networks instead of being evenly distributed. In this article, we formally define and frame such areas as Internet Bad Neighborhoods. By extending the reputation of malicious IP addresses

  1. Neighborhood Decline and the Economic Crisis (discussion paper)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiers, M.D.; Bolt, G.; Van Ham, M.; Van Kempen, R.

    2014-01-01

    Neighborhood decline is a complex and multidimensional process. National and regional variation in economic and political structures (including variety in national welfare state arrangements), combined with differences in neighborhood history, development and population composition, makes it

  2. Assessment of post-fire forest structural diversity using neighborhood parameter in the Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana Yemilet Avila Flores; Marco Aurelio González Tagle; Javier Jiménez Pérez; Oscar Aguirre Calderón; Eduardo Treviño Garza

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to characterize the spatial structure patterns of a Pinus hartwegii forest in the Sierra Madre Oriental, affected by a fire in 1998. Sampling was stratified by fire severity. A total of three fire severity classes (low, medium and high) were defined. Three sample plots of 40m x 40m were established for each...

  3. Is immigrant neighborhood inequality less pronounced in suburban areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Chad R; Firebaugh, Glenn

    2016-05-01

    We investigate suburbanization and neighborhood inequality among 14 immigrant groups using census tract data from the 2008-2012 American Community Survey. Immigrant neighborhood inequality is defined here as the degree to which immigrants reside in neighborhoods that are poorer than the neighborhoods in which native whites reside. Using city and suburb Gini coefficients which reflect the distributions of groups across neighborhoods with varying poverty rates, we find that the immigrant-white gap is attenuated in the suburbs. This finding applies to most of the nativity groups and remains after accounting for metropolitan context, the segregation of poverty, and group-specific segregation levels, poverty rates, and acculturation characteristics. Despite reduced neighborhood inequality in the suburbs, large group differences persist. A few immigrant groups achieve residential parity or better vis-à-vis suburban whites while others experience high levels of neighborhood inequality and receive marginal residential returns on suburban location.

  4. Neighborhoods - MO 2014 Springfield Neighborhood Organizations (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Neighborhood Organization polygons for the City of Springfield, inside city limits only. Created by the Planning and Development Department. Maintained by the GIS...

  5. Neighborhoods - MO 2011 Springfield Neighborhood Organizations (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Neighborhood Organization polygons for the City of Springfield, inside city limits only. Created by the Planning and Development Department. Maintained by the GIS...

  6. Proposal of a new indicator to define ductility applied to corroded steel reinforcement on concrete structures

    OpenAIRE

    Cobo Escamilla, Alfonso; Moreno Fernandez, Maria Esther; Fernández Cánovas, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The carbonation of concrete or the chlorides ingress in such quantity to reach the level of bars is triggers of reinforcement corrosion. One of the most significant effects of reinforcing steel corrosion on reinforced concrete structures is the decline in the ductility-related properties of the steel. Reinforcement ductility has a decisive effect on the overall ductility of reinforced concrete structures. Different Codes classify the type of steel depending on their ductility defined by...

  7. Legislative Provisions Underlying Trade Unions' Right to Define Their Organizational Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobchenko, Victoria V.; Penov, Yury V.; Safonov, Valery A.

    2016-01-01

    The article contains a comparative analysis of constitutional and other legislative provisions that ensure a trade union's right to define its own administrative structure in European states. The aim of the study is to reveal the management's problems of European trade unions, declarative and empirical mass-character legislative provisions, which…

  8. Preference Mining Using Neighborhood Rough Set Model on Two Universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Preference mining plays an important role in e-commerce and video websites for enhancing user satisfaction and loyalty. Some classical methods are not available for the cold-start problem when the user or the item is new. In this paper, we propose a new model, called parametric neighborhood rough set on two universes (NRSTU), to describe the user and item data structures. Furthermore, the neighborhood lower approximation operator is used for defining the preference rules. Then, we provide the means for recommending items to users by using these rules. Finally, we give an experimental example to show the details of NRSTU-based preference mining for cold-start problem. The parameters of the model are also discussed. The experimental results show that the proposed method presents an effective solution for preference mining. In particular, NRSTU improves the recommendation accuracy by about 19% compared to the traditional method. PMID:28044074

  9. Preference Mining Using Neighborhood Rough Set Model on Two Universes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Preference mining plays an important role in e-commerce and video websites for enhancing user satisfaction and loyalty. Some classical methods are not available for the cold-start problem when the user or the item is new. In this paper, we propose a new model, called parametric neighborhood rough set on two universes (NRSTU), to describe the user and item data structures. Furthermore, the neighborhood lower approximation operator is used for defining the preference rules. Then, we provide the means for recommending items to users by using these rules. Finally, we give an experimental example to show the details of NRSTU-based preference mining for cold-start problem. The parameters of the model are also discussed. The experimental results show that the proposed method presents an effective solution for preference mining. In particular, NRSTU improves the recommendation accuracy by about 19% compared to the traditional method.

  10. Rural neighborhoods and child aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Natasha K; Wretman, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    Structural equation modeling with latent variables was used to evaluate the direct and mediated effects of a neighborhood risk factor (negative teen behaviors) on the parent-report aggressive behavior of 213 students in grades 3 through 5 attending a school in a low-income, rural community. Contagion and social control hypotheses were examined as well as hypotheses about whether the neighborhood served as a microsystem or exosystem for rural pre-adolescents. Analyses took into account the clustering of students and ordinal nature of the data. Findings suggest that rural neighborhoods may operate as both a microsystem and exosystem for children, with direct contagion effects on their aggressive behaviors as well as indirect social control effects through parenting practices. Direct effects on aggression were also found for parenting practices and child reports of friends' negative behaviors. Pre-adolescence may be a transitional stage, when influences of the neighborhood on child behavior begin to compete with influences of caregivers. Findings can inform the timing and targets of violence prevention in rural communities.

  11. Superpose3D: a local structural comparison program that allows for user-defined structure representations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Federico Gherardini

    Full Text Available Local structural comparison methods can be used to find structural similarities involving functional protein patches such as enzyme active sites and ligand binding sites. The outcome of such analyses is critically dependent on the representation used to describe the structure. Indeed different categories of functional sites may require the comparison program to focus on different characteristics of the protein residues. We have therefore developed superpose3D, a novel structural comparison software that lets users specify, with a powerful and flexible syntax, the structure description most suited to the requirements of their analysis. Input proteins are processed according to the user's directives and the program identifies sets of residues (or groups of atoms that have a similar 3D position in the two structures. The advantages of using such a general purpose program are demonstrated with several examples. These test cases show that no single representation is appropriate for every analysis, hence the usefulness of having a flexible program that can be tailored to different needs. Moreover we also discuss how to interpret the results of a database screening where a known structural motif is searched against a large ensemble of structures. The software is written in C++ and is released under the open source GPL license. Superpose3D does not require any external library, runs on Linux, Mac OSX, Windows and is available at http://cbm.bio.uniroma2.it/superpose3D.

  12. On the local integrability of almost-product structures defined by space-time metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Delphenich, D H

    2016-01-01

    The splitting of the tangent bundle of space-time into temporal and spatial sub-bundles defines an almost-product structure. In particular, any space-time metric can be locally expressed in time-orthogonal form, in such a way that whether or not that almost-product structure is locally generated by a coordinate chart is a matter of the integrability of the Pfaff equation that the temporal 1-form of that expression for the metric defines. When one applies that analysis to the known exact solutions to the Einstein field equations, one finds that many of the common ones are completely-integrable, although some of the physically-interesting ones are not.

  13. Well-defined azazirconacyclopropane complexes supported on silica structurally determined by 2D NMR comparative elucidation

    KAUST Repository

    El Eter, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Grafting of Zr(NMe2)4 on mesoporous silica SBA-15 afforded selectively well-defined surface species SiOZr(NMe2) (η2NMeCH2). 2D solid-state NMR (1H- 13C HETCOR, Multiple Quantum) experiments have shown a unique structural rearrangement occurring on the immobilised zirconium bis methylamido ligand. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  14. Neighborhood properties are important determinants of temperature sensitive mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Lockwood

    Full Text Available Temperature-sensitive (TS mutants are powerful tools to study gene function in vivo. These mutants exhibit wild-type activity at permissive temperatures and reduced activity at restrictive temperatures. Although random mutagenesis can be used to generate TS mutants, the procedure is laborious and unfeasible in multicellular organisms. Further, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the TS phenotype are poorly understood. To elucidate TS mechanisms, we used a machine learning method-logistic regression-to investigate a large number of sequence and structure features. We developed and tested 133 features, describing properties of either the mutation site or the mutation site neighborhood. We defined three types of neighborhood using sequence distance, Euclidean distance, and topological distance. We discovered that neighborhood features outperformed mutation site features in predicting TS mutations. The most predictive features suggest that TS mutations tend to occur at buried and rigid residues, and are located at conserved protein domains. The environment of a buried residue often determines the overall structural stability of a protein, thus may lead to reversible activity change upon temperature switch. We developed TS prediction models based on logistic regression and the Lasso regularized procedure. Through a ten-fold cross-validation, we obtained the area under the curve of 0.91 for the model using both sequence and structure features. Testing on independent datasets suggested that the model predicted TS mutations with a 50% precision. In summary, our study elucidated the molecular basis of TS mutants and suggested the importance of neighborhood properties in determining TS mutations. We further developed models to predict TS mutations derived from single amino acid substitutions. In this way, TS mutants can be efficiently obtained through experimentally introducing the predicted mutations.

  15. An improved Hough Transform neighborhood map for straight line segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shengzhi; van Wyk, Barend Jacobus; Tu, Chunling; Zhang, Xinghui

    2010-03-01

    The distance between a straight line and a straight line segment in the image space is proposed in this paper. Based on this distance, the neighborhood of a straight line segment is defined and mapped into the parameter space to obtain the parameter space neighborhood of the straight line segment. The neighborhood mapping between the image space and parameter space is a one to one reversible map. The mapped region in the parameter space is analytically derived and it is proved that it can be efficiently approximated by a quadrangle. The proposed straight line segment neighborhood technique for the HT outperforms conventional straight line neighborhood methods currently used with existing HT variations. In contrast to the straight line neighborhoods used in existing HT variations, the proposed straight line segment neighborhood has several advantages including: 1) the detection error of the proposed neighborhood is not affected by the length of the straight line segments; 2) a precision requirement in the image space described using the proposed distance can be explicitly resolved using the proposed formulation; 3) the proposed neighborhood has the ability to distinguish between segments belonging to the same straight line. A variety of experiments are executed to demonstrate that the proposed neighborhood has a variety of interesting properties of high practical value.

  16. How Culture Constructs Our Sense of Neighborhood: Mental Maps and Children's Perceptions of Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Carol Ann

    2010-01-01

    This research examines the effects of culture on a child's perceptions of his or her neighborhood by comparing the neighborhood sketch maps of a group of Amish and non-Amish children from the same rural Pennsylvania neighborhood. The results of this study lend credence to the belief that early and intensive acculturation helps define our sense of…

  17. Expanding Learning Opportunities for Youth and Their Families in the Mission Promise Neighborhood: An Interim Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipes, Laurel; Ruiz de Velasco, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    San Francisco's Mission Promise Neighborhood (MPN) is a federally-funded Promise Neighborhood initiative that supports community-based organizations, schools, and other public agencies to work in defined neighborhoods and build integrated supports for children and youth from cradle to college and career. Since 2013, the Gardner Center has…

  18. Chemically defined structured lipids: current status and future directions in gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, J

    1999-04-01

    Over the past two decades various concepts for the supply of lipids in parenteral and enteral nutrition have been developed. Traditionally, the nutritional dietary management typically includes physical mixtures of medium chain and long-chain triglycerides. Recently, chemically defined structured lipids have been developed that combine the advantages of conventional fats with those of special purposes. The first structured lipids were produced by mixing pure medium-chain triglycerides and long-chain triglycerides, allowing hydrolysis to free fatty acids, followed by random transesterification of the fatty acids into mixed triglyceride molecules. This results in a triglyceride containing combinations of short-, medium-, and long-chain fatty acids on a single glycerol backbone. These have unique chemical, physical, and/or physiological properties which differ from simply blending mixtures from the starting fats. By use of 1,3-specific or 2-specific lipases it is now possible to synthesize 1,3-specific or 2-specific triglycerides containing short- and/or medium-chain acids. For instance, incorporation of linoleic, arachidonic, or eicosapentaenoic acid at the sn-2 position is being evaluated for the specific objective of modulating membrane fatty acid composition and essential fatty acid absorption in models of cancer, burns, and immune dysfunction. This contribution reviews the current status of experimental and clinical studies of chemically defined structured lipid-based fat emulsions, with emphasis on their therapeutic potential for nutritional support in hospitalized patients.

  19. Activation of proto-oncogenes by disruption of chromosome neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S; Day, Daniel S; Valton, Anne-Laure; Bak, Rasmus O; Li, Charles H; Goldmann, Johanna; Lajoie, Bryan R; Fan, Zi Peng; Sigova, Alla A; Reddy, Jessica; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Lee, Tong Ihn; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Porteus, Matthew H; Dekker, Job; Young, Richard A

    2016-03-25

    Oncogenes are activated through well-known chromosomal alterations such as gene fusion, translocation, and focal amplification. In light of recent evidence that the control of key genes depends on chromosome structures called insulated neighborhoods, we investigated whether proto-oncogenes occur within these structures and whether oncogene activation can occur via disruption of insulated neighborhood boundaries in cancer cells. We mapped insulated neighborhoods in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and found that tumor cell genomes contain recurrent microdeletions that eliminate the boundary sites of insulated neighborhoods containing prominent T-ALL proto-oncogenes. Perturbation of such boundaries in nonmalignant cells was sufficient to activate proto-oncogenes. Mutations affecting chromosome neighborhood boundaries were found in many types of cancer. Thus, oncogene activation can occur via genetic alterations that disrupt insulated neighborhoods in malignant cells.

  20. Electrical and structural properties of ZnO synthesized via infiltration of lithographically defined polymer templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Chang-Yong, E-mail: cynam@bnl.gov; Stein, Aaron; Kisslinger, Kim; Black, Charles T. [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2015-11-16

    We investigate the electrical and structural properties of infiltration-synthesized ZnO. In-plane ZnO nanowire arrays with prescribed positional registrations are generated by infiltrating diethlyzinc and water vapor into lithographically defined SU-8 polymer templates and removing organic matrix by oxygen plasma ashing. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that homogeneously amorphous as-infiltrated polymer templates transform into highly nanocrystalline ZnO upon removal of organic matrix. Field-effect transistor device measurements show that the synthesized ZnO after thermal annealing displays a typical n-type behavior, ∼10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3} carrier density, and ∼0.1 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} electron mobility, reflecting highly nanocrystalline internal structure. The results demonstrate the potential application of infiltration synthesis in fabricating metal oxide electronic devices.

  1. Neighborhood Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This tool assists the public and Choice Neighborhoods applicants to prepare data to submit with their grant application by allowing applicants to draw the exact...

  2. Using operational and defined fractions to assess soil organic matter stabilization and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwath, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    Studies on soil organic matter (SOM) began with alkaline solvents revealing a dark colored substance that could be isolated under low pH. Further studies revealed fulvic and humic acids and humin fractions leading to theories on functional groups and metal-clay bridging mechanisms. The fate of isotopes in these fractions revealed soil carbon pools with varying turnover rates with half the soil carbon (C) in humin and acid hydrolyzed fractions over 1000 years old. These results are the basis of the three pool conceptual framework used in many biogeochemical models. Theories on the role of functional groups and compound classes further elaborated concepts on physical (aggregates) and chemical mechanisms of C stabilization. With the advance of analytical instrumentation, the operational fractions were further defined to the compound and molecular levels. These studies confirmed the majority of soil C is microbially derived. Our observation that all microbial groups contributed nonselectively to soil C maintenance independent of mineralogy suggests that compound characteristics within integrated structures are more important than the source of individual compounds for stabilizing soil C. In dissolved organic C floccing studies using Near Edge X-ray Fine Structure analysis, we found that aromatic compounds interacted first with Fe, however, the majority of direct bonds to Fe were polysaccharides, reinforcing that an integrative chemical structure rather than direct bonds imparted stability in organo-metal interactions. Using a novel differential scanning calorimeter coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer setup, we confirmed that the presence of clays (independent of clay type) increased the microbial utilization of calcium stabilized high versus low temperature compounds, asserting that higher temperature compounds (i.e., phenolics) are likely less tightly bound by clay minerals. The integration of operational and defined fractions of SOM remains a legitimate

  3. Defining trauma in complex care management: Safety-net providers' perspectives on structural vulnerability and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson-Lastad, Ariana; Yen, Irene H; Fleming, Mark D; Van Natta, Meredith; Rubin, Sara; Shim, Janet K; Burke, Nancy J

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we delineate how staff of two complex care management (CCM) programs in urban safety net hospitals in the United States understand trauma. We seek to (1) describe how staff in CCM programs talk about trauma in their patients' lives; (2) discuss how trauma concepts allow staff to understand patients' symptoms, health-related behaviors, and responses to care as results of structural conditions; and (3) delineate the mismatch between long-term needs of patients with histories of trauma and the short-term interventions that CCM programs provide. Observation and interview data gathered between February 2015 and August 2016 indicate that CCM providers define trauma expansively to include individual experiences of violence such as childhood abuse and neglect or recent assault, traumatization in the course of accessing health care and structural violence. Though CCM staff implement elements of trauma-informed care, the short-term design of CCM programs puts pressure on the staff to titrate their efforts, moving patients towards graduation or discharge. Trauma concepts enable clinicians to name structural violence in clinically legitimate language. As such, trauma-informed care and structural competency approaches can complement each other. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Community social organization, parents, and peers as mediators of perceived neighborhood block characteristics on delinquent and prosocial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantillon, Dan

    2006-03-01

    Research on contextual and neighborhood effects has grown exponentially over the past decade as researchers have reacknowledged that community matters. Although empirical findings have consistently documented the significant influence of neighborhood context, the field is just beginning to investigate the varied and multiple pathways through which this influence is transmitted. The current study found support for both a direct and indirect influence of perceived neighborhood structural characteristics (i.e., neighborhood stability, income), measured at the block level, on neighborhood and youth outcomes. Directly, perceived neighborhood advantage led to significantly lower neighborhood rates of official delinquency and higher rates of prosocial activity. Indirectly, perceived neighborhood advantage significantly impacted outcomes by influencing more proximal constructs such as community social organization, informal social control, parenting practices, and affiliation with delinquent peers. Different pathways were significant across neighborhood and youth outcomes, yet perceived neighborhood advantage, in particular neighborhood stability, consistently exerted substantial effects, highlighting the need for more comprehensive and multilevel prevention efforts.

  5. Detecting neighborhood vacancy level in Detroit city using remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Wang, R.; Yang, A.; Vojnovic, I.

    2015-12-01

    With the decline of manufacturing industries, many Rust Belt cities, which enjoyed prosperity in the past, are now suffering from financial stress, population decrease and urban poverty. As a consequence, urban neighborhoods deteriorate. Houses are abandoned and left to decay. Neighborhood vacancy brings on many problems. Governments and agencies try to survey the vacancy level by going through neighborhoods and record the condition of each structure, or by buying information of active mailing addresses to get approximate neighborhood vacancy rate. But these methods are expensive and time consuming. Remote sensing provides a quick and comparatively cost-efficient way to access spatial information on social and demographical attributes of urban area. In our study, we use remote sensing to detect a major aspect of neighborhood deterioration, the vacancy levels of neighborhoods in Detroit city. We compared different neighborhoods using Landsat 8 images in 2013. We calculated NDVI that indicates the greenness of neighborhoods with the image in July 2013. Then we used thermal infrared information from image in February to detect human activities. In winter, abandoned houses will not consume so much energy and therefore neighborhoods with more abandoned houses will have smaller urban heat island effect. Controlling for the differences in terms of the greenness obtained from summer time image, we used thermal infrared from winter image to determine the temperatures of urban surface. We find that hotter areas are better maintained and have lower house vacancy rates. We also compared the changes over time for neighborhoods using Landsat 7 images from 2003 to 2013. The results show that deteriorated neighborhoods have increased NDVI in summer and get colder in winter due to abandonment of houses. Our results show the potential application of remote sensing as an easily accessed and efficient way to obtain data about social conditions in cities. We used the neighborhood

  6. Neighborhood context and immigrant children's physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Mackenzie; Kimbro, Rachel Tolbert

    2014-09-01

    Physical activity is an important determinant of obesity and overall health for children, but significant race/ethnic and nativity disparities exist in the amount of physical activity that children receive, with immigrant children particularly at risk for low levels of physical activity. In this paper, we examine and compare patterns in physical activity levels for young children of U.S.-born and immigrant mothers from seven race/ethnic and nativity groups, and test whether physical activity is associated with subjective (parent-reported) and objective (U.S. Census) neighborhood measures. The neighborhood measures include parental-reported perceptions of safety and physical and social disorder and objectively defined neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage and immigrant concentration. Using restricted, geo-coded Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten (ECLS-K) data (N = 17,510) from 1998 to 1999 linked with U.S. Census 2000 data for the children's neighborhoods, we utilize zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) models to predict the odds of physical inactivity and expected days of physical activity for kindergarten-aged children. Across both outcomes, foreign-born children have lower levels of physical activity compared to U.S.-born white children. This disparity is not attenuated by a child's socioeconomic, family, or neighborhood characteristics. Physical and social disorder is associated with higher odds of physical inactivity, while perceptions of neighborhood safety are associated with increased expected days of physical activity, but not with inactivity. Immigrant concentration is negatively associated with both physical activity outcomes, but its impact on the probability of physical inactivity differs by the child's race/ethnic and nativity group, such that it is particularly detrimental for U.S.-born white children's physical activity. Research interested in improving the physical activity patterns of minority and second-generation immigrant children should

  7. Ant Community Structure (Hymenoptera: Formicidae in Two Neighborhoods with Different Urban Profiles in the City of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcione Piva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some ant species are highly abundant in cities, may form huge unicolonial populations with thousands of individuals able to displace native fauna, and impoverish ecological relationships in urban environments. In this work, we study the ant community in two neighborhoods with different urban profiles, one recently populated and another from the 1900s in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Two hundred and ninety houses were sampled with baits for ant collections. Results show that the recent urbanized neighborhood with greater disturbance favors opportunistic and dominant species to colonize it, like Tapinoma melanocephalum. We also made a temporal analysis in the ancient neighborhood, collecting ants after ten years from a first survey. T. melanocephalum has a broader range than ten years ago, displaced other ant species, but confronts with Pheidole megacephala that was not found in the recent urbanized neighborhood.

  8. Neighborhoods, Neighborhoods, Published in unknown, Norton County Appraisal Office.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Neighborhoods dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of unknown. It is described as 'Neighborhoods'. Data by this publisher are...

  9. Cultural Mechanisms in Neighborhood Effects Research in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, David J.; Hepburn, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the current state of the U.S. literature on cultural mechanisms in neighborhood effects research. We first define what we mean by neighborhood effects and by cultural mechanisms. We then review and critique two theoretical perspectives on the cultural context of disadvantaged neighborhoods that are explicitly integrated into recent neighborhood effects literature in the U.S.: “deviant subculture” and “cultural heterogeneity.” We then draw on other related U.S. literatures from urban studies, cultural sociology, and culture and inequality to suggest some other conceptualizations that may be useful in advancing our understanding of the role of culture in neighborhood effects. We discuss the conceptual and methodological issues that will have to be grappled with in order to move this literature forward and conclude by offering concrete suggestions, both short-term and long-term, for a research agenda. PMID:26504263

  10. Structure-function relationship of anticoagulant and antithrombotic well-defined sulfated polysaccharides from marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2012-01-01

    Marine sulfated polysaccharides (MSPs), such as sulfated fucans (SFs), sulfated galactans (SGs), and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) isolated from invertebrate animals, are highly anionic polysaccharides capable of interacting with certain cationic proteins, such as (co)-factors of the coagulation cascade during clotting-inhibition process. Primarily, these molecular complexes between MSPs and coagulation-related proteins seem to be driven mostly by electrostatic interactions. However, through a systematic comparison using several novel well-defined sulfated polysaccharides composed of repetitive oligosaccharides with clear sulfation patterns, it was proved that those molecular interactions are essentially regulated by the stereochemistry of the glycans (which depends on a conjunction of anomeric configurations, sugar types, conformational preferences, glycosylation, and sulfation sites), rather than just a mere consequence of the electronegative density charges (mainly from number of sulfate groups). Here, we present an overview about the structure-function relationship of the invertebrate MSPs with regular structures as potential anticoagulant and antithrombotic agents, as pathologies related to the cardiovascular system are one of the major causes of mortality in the world.

  11. Porous hydrogels with well-defined pore structure for biomaterials applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Andrew J.

    When any medical device is implanted inside the body, the natural inflammatory response causes the device to be encapsulated with a thin layer of dense, relatively avascular fibrous tissue, effectively sealing off the device from the surrounding tissue and isolating it from the rest of the body. For medical devices such as electrodes and glucose sensors, where functionality depends on the ability of the device to interact with the surrounding biochemistry, the "foreign body response" poses a formidable obstacle. Previous studies have demonstrated that porous materials with pore dimensions on the order of cell dimensions can induce a modified foreign body response, resulting in more vascularized capsule tissue. However, the utility of these studies is limited because the materials used had broad pore size distributions and poorly defined pore geometries. This thesis is motivated by the unavailability of biomaterials with well-defined and controlled pore size, and by the lack of understanding of the relationships between pore dimensions and the foreign body response. Our sphere templating technology permits the fabrication of open-pore structures with precisely controlled pore dimensions. We can produce these sphere-templated pore structures out of a variety of polymeric materials, including poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (polyHEMA), silicone rubber, and degradable copolymers of polyHEMA and poly(epsilon-caprolactone). We applied our precision-engineered pore structures in vivo to investigate the role of pore size in the foreign body response. We implanted porous polyHEMA with various pore geometries under the skin of mice and found that the level of intra-pore vascularization increases with decreasing pore size, with vascular density directly proportional to the specific surface area of the implant, and that the threshold pore throat diameter for rapid tissue in-growth is approximately 8 mum. Based on our empirical results coupled with first principles, we

  12. A Multilevel Investigation of Neighborhood Effects on Parental Warmth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendulkar, Shalini A.; Buka, Stephen; Dunn, Erin C.; Subramanian, S. V.; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2010-01-01

    Although researchers recognize that social contexts shape parenting behaviors, the relationship between neighborhood environment and parenting remains poorly understood. To address this gap, we investigated the associations between compositional and contextual (structural, social, and safety) characteristics of neighborhoods and parental warmth.…

  13. Generalized multi-layered granulations and approximations based on neighborhood systems under incomplete information systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ming; FENG Bo-qin

    2005-01-01

    A generalized multi-layered granulation structure used by neighborhood systems is proposed. With granulated views, the concepts of approximations under incomplete information systems are studied, which are represented by covering of the universe. With respect to different levels of granulations, a pair of lower and upper approximations is defined and an approximation structure is investigated, which lead to a more general approximation structure. The generalized multi-layered granulation structure provides a basis of the proposed framework of granular computing. Using this framework, the interesting and useful results about information granulation and approximation reasoning can be obtained. This paper presents some useful explorations about the incomplete information systems from information views.

  14. 昆明世博生态城半山邻里植物群落结构分析%Analysis of plant community structure of Mid-levels neighborhood in Kunming expoeco-city

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董素君; 赵林森

    2014-01-01

    以世博生态城半山邻里居住区为研究对象,从园林植物群落的物种结构、水平结构、垂直结构和时间结构4方面对该居住区的绿化环境进行分析和评价。%Taking Mid-levels neighborhood housing estate in the Expo eco-city as study object, this paper analyzed and evaluated its green environment from the four aspects of species structure, horizontal structures, vertical structure and temporal structure of gardening plant communities.

  15. Community Detection by Neighborhood Similarity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xu; XIE Zheng; YI Dong-Yun

    2012-01-01

    Detection of the community structure in a network is important for understanding the structure and dynamics of the network.By exploring the neighborhood of vertices,a local similarity metric is proposed,which can be quickly computed.The resulting similarity matrix retains the same support as the adjacency matrix.Based on local similarity,an agglomerative hierarchical clustering algorithm is proposed for community detection.The algorithm is implemented by an efficient max-heap data structure and runs in nearly linear time,thus is capable of dealing with large sparse networks with tens of thousands of nodes.Experiments on synthesized and real-world networks demonstrate that our method is efficient to detect community structures,and the proposed metric is the most suitable one among all the tested similarity indices.%Detection of the community structure in a network is important for understanding the structure and dynamics of the network. By exploring the neighborhood of vertices, a local similarity metric is proposed, which can be quickly computed. The resulting similarity matrix retains the same support as the adjacency matrix. Based on local similarity, an agglomerative hierarchical clustering algorithm is proposed for community detection. The algorithm is implemented by an efficient max-heap data structure and runs in nearly linear time, thus is capable of dealing with large sparse networks with tens of thousands of nodes. Experiments on synthesized and real-world networks demonstrate that our method is efficient to detect community structures, and the proposed metric is the most suitable one among all the tested similarity indices.

  16. The Impact of Morphological Features on Summer Temperature Variations on the Example of Two Residential Neighborhoods in Ljubljana, Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Fikfak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study conducted in this paper is focused on a predominantly residential area of the City of Ljubljana—Koseze, which is characterized by generally favorable (bioclimatic conditions. Nonetheless, thermal satellite images showed that residential neighborhoods within the Koseze district display unexpected variations in summer temperatures. This observation called into question the benefits of existing bioclimatic features and indicated the need to investigate and compare two neighborhoods with similar urban parameters, with the aim to identify morphological differential characteristics impacting urban heat island (UHI intensity. By applying the study methodology based on a literature review, surveys of key precedents, detailed mapping in two Koseze locations, in situ measurements, observations and recordings, thermal imagery, and the analyses of statistical data, as well as by defining the four main categories of morphological urban parameters—structure, cover, fabric and metabolism, it was concluded that both neighborhoods have common morphological elements mitigating the UHI effect. Additionally, it was found that the neighborhood with higher UHI intensity has several less favorable features, such as busier roads, larger surface of parking corridors, and the existence of underground parking space. The traffic as an element of urban morphology hence represents the main cause of differences among UHI levels in the two Koseze neighborhoods.

  17. Neighborhood walkability, physical activity, and walking behavior: the Swedish Neighborhood and Physical Activity (SNAP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundquist, Kristina; Eriksson, Ulf; Kawakami, Naomi; Skog, Lars; Ohlsson, Henrik; Arvidsson, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    More knowledge concerning the association between physical activity and objectively measured attributes of the built environment is needed. Previous studies on the association between objectively measured neighborhood walkability, physical activity, and walking have been conducted in the U.S. or Australia and research findings are available from only one country in Europe - Belgium. The first aim of this Swedish study of 2269 adults was to examine the associations between neighborhood walkability and walking for active transportation or leisure, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and whether these hypothesized associations are moderated by age, gender, income, marital status and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status. The second aim was to determine how much of the total variance of the walking and physical activity outcomes can be attributed to neighborhood-level differences. Neighborhood walkability was objectively measured by GIS methods. An index consisting of residential density, street connectivity, and land use mix was constructed to define 32 highly and less walkable neighborhoods in Stockholm City. MVPA was measured objectively during 7 days with an accelerometer and walking was assessed using the validated International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Multilevel linear as well as logistic models (mixed-effects, mixed-distribution models) were used in the analysis. The statistically significant and "adjusted" results for individuals living in highly walkable neighborhoods, as compared to those living in less walkable neighborhoods, were: (1) 77% and 28% higher odds for walking for active transportation and walking for leisure, respectively, (2) 50 min more walking for active transportation/week, and (3) 3.1 min more MVPA/day. The proportion of the total variance at the neighborhood level was low and ranged between 0.0% and 2.1% in the adjusted models. The findings of the present study stress that future policies concerning the

  18. Your House, Your Car, Your Education: The Socioeconomic Situation of the Neighborhood and Its Impact on Life Satisfaction in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Joerg; Goebel, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This study deals with the impact of socioeconomic conditions and social integration into a local neighborhood on individual life satisfaction in Germany. While the majority of ecological studies to date are based on very broad neighborhood concepts, using large research units for defining neighborhood the present study contains micro-geographic…

  19. Your House, Your Car, Your Education: The Socioeconomic Situation of the Neighborhood and Its Impact on Life Satisfaction in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Joerg; Goebel, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This study deals with the impact of socioeconomic conditions and social integration into a local neighborhood on individual life satisfaction in Germany. While the majority of ecological studies to date are based on very broad neighborhood concepts, using large research units for defining neighborhood the present study contains micro-geographic…

  20. Social disintegration and the spread of AIDS--II. Meltdown of sociogeographic structure in urban minority neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, R

    1993-10-01

    An elementary model of sociogeographic network structure in an urban minority community suggests externally applied stress, particularly that which triggers frequent individual or family moves of increasing distance, may cause a sudden 'phase change' resulting in disconnection of previously integrated subgroups from the community. Such 'community meltdown' would seriously disrupt mechanisms for social control, economic opportunity and socialization of youth, while intensifying substance abuse and indiscriminate and frequent sexual activity, particularly among the very young. 'Phase change' of this nature would seem to preclude success of programs to control spread of HIV infection, particularly in heterosexual populations. The possibility is explored that programs of 'community recrystalization' in disintegrated urban area might likewise need to exceed some threshold of investment and organizing activity before becoming effective. However, if supported to levels above threshold, this work implies such programs might have very great impact in a very short time. The possibility of interaction between behavioral pathologies resulting from the initial meltdown and further consequent deterioration in sociogeographic network structure leads to speculation that the threshold for recrystalization may become significantly and progressively greater than for meltdown. Implications of these matters for diffusion of HIV into the general population are discussed.

  1. Secretion and activation of the Serratia marcescens hemolysin by structurally defined ShlB mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Avijit; Könninger, Ulrich; Selvam, Arun; Braun, Volkmar

    2014-05-01

    The ShlA hemolysin of Serratia marcescens is secreted across the outer membrane by the ShlB protein; ShlB belongs to the two-partner secretion system (type Vb), a subfamily of the Omp85 outer membrane protein assembly and secretion superfamily. During secretion, ShlA is converted from an inactive non-hemolytic form into an active hemolytic form. The structure of ShlB is predicted to consist of the N-terminal α-helix H1, followed by the two polypeptide-transport-associated domains POTRA P1 and P2, and the β-barrel of 16 β-strands. H1 is inserted into the pore of the β-barrel in the outer membrane; P1 and P2 are located in the periplasm. To obtain insights into the secretion and activation of ShlA by ShlB, we isolated ShlB mutants impaired in secretion and/or activation. The triple H1 P1 P2 mutant did not secrete ShlA. The P1 and P2 deletion derivatives secreted reduced amounts of ShlA, of which P1 showed some hemolysis, whereas P2 was inactive. Deletion of loop 6 (L6), which is conserved among exporters of the Omp85 family, compromised activation but retained low secretion. Secretion-negative mutants generated by random mutagenesis were located in loop 6. The inactive secreted ShlA derivatives were complemented in vitro to active ShlA by an N-terminal ShlA fragment (ShlA242) secreted by ShlB. Deletion of H1 did not impair secretion of hemolytic ShlA. The study defines domains of ShlB which are important for ShlA secretion and activation.

  2. Rethinking the Cultural Context of Schooling Decisions in Disadvantaged Neighborhoods: From Deviant Subculture to Cultural Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, David J

    2011-10-01

    The literature on neighborhood effects on schooling theorizes that neighborhood cultural context is an important mechanism generating such effects. However, explanations that rely on subcultural theories, such as oppositional culture, have met with considerable criticism on empirical grounds, and no alternative account of the cultural context of disadvantaged neighborhoods has been developed in the education literature. This study develops a new account of the cultural context of schooling decisions in disadvantaged neighborhoods based on the concept of cultural heterogeneity, defined as the presence of a wide array of competing and conflicting cultural models. It applies this concept to neighborhood effects on college enrollment. Using survey data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this study shows that disadvantaged neighborhoods exhibit greater heterogeneity in college goals and that adolescents in more heterogeneous neighborhoods are less likely to act in concert with the college goals that they articulate.

  3. Crystal structures of two transcriptional regulators from Bacillus cereus define the conserved structural features of a PadR subfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guntur Fibriansah

    Full Text Available PadR-like transcriptional regulators form a structurally-related family of proteins that control the expression of genes associated with detoxification, virulence and multi-drug resistance in bacteria. Only a few members of this family have been studied by genetic, biochemical and biophysical methods, and their structure/function relationships are still largely undefined. Here, we report the crystal structures of two PadR-like proteins from Bacillus cereus, which we named bcPadR1 and bcPadR2 (products of gene loci BC4206 and BCE3449 in strains ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987, respectively. BC4206, together with its neighboring gene BC4207, was previously shown to become significantly upregulated in presence of the bacteriocin AS-48. DNA mobility shift assays reveal that bcPadR1 binds to a 250 bp intergenic region containing the putative BC4206-BC4207 promoter sequence, while in-situ expression of bcPadR1 decreases bacteriocin tolerance, together suggesting a role for bcPadR1 as repressor of BC4206-BC4207 transcription. The function of bcPadR2 (48% identical in sequence to bcPadR1 is unknown, but the location of its gene just upstream from genes encoding a putative antibiotic ABC efflux pump, suggests a role in regulating antibiotic resistance. The bcPadR proteins are structurally similar to LmrR, a PadR-like transcription regulator in Lactococcus lactis that controls expression of a multidrug ABC transporter via a mechanism of multidrug binding and induction. Together these proteins define a subfamily of conserved, relatively small PadR proteins characterized by a single C-terminal helix for dimerization. Unlike LmrR, bcPadR1 and bcPadR2 lack a central pore for ligand binding, making it unclear whether the transcriptional regulatory roles of bcPadR1 and bcPadR2 involve direct ligand recognition and induction.

  4. Crystal structures of two transcriptional regulators from Bacillus cereus define the conserved structural features of a PadR subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibriansah, Guntur; Kovács, Ákos T; Pool, Trijntje J; Boonstra, Mirjam; Kuipers, Oscar P; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H

    2012-01-01

    PadR-like transcriptional regulators form a structurally-related family of proteins that control the expression of genes associated with detoxification, virulence and multi-drug resistance in bacteria. Only a few members of this family have been studied by genetic, biochemical and biophysical methods, and their structure/function relationships are still largely undefined. Here, we report the crystal structures of two PadR-like proteins from Bacillus cereus, which we named bcPadR1 and bcPadR2 (products of gene loci BC4206 and BCE3449 in strains ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987, respectively). BC4206, together with its neighboring gene BC4207, was previously shown to become significantly upregulated in presence of the bacteriocin AS-48. DNA mobility shift assays reveal that bcPadR1 binds to a 250 bp intergenic region containing the putative BC4206-BC4207 promoter sequence, while in-situ expression of bcPadR1 decreases bacteriocin tolerance, together suggesting a role for bcPadR1 as repressor of BC4206-BC4207 transcription. The function of bcPadR2 (48% identical in sequence to bcPadR1) is unknown, but the location of its gene just upstream from genes encoding a putative antibiotic ABC efflux pump, suggests a role in regulating antibiotic resistance. The bcPadR proteins are structurally similar to LmrR, a PadR-like transcription regulator in Lactococcus lactis that controls expression of a multidrug ABC transporter via a mechanism of multidrug binding and induction. Together these proteins define a subfamily of conserved, relatively small PadR proteins characterized by a single C-terminal helix for dimerization. Unlike LmrR, bcPadR1 and bcPadR2 lack a central pore for ligand binding, making it unclear whether the transcriptional regulatory roles of bcPadR1 and bcPadR2 involve direct ligand recognition and induction.

  5. Modeling satisfaction amongst the elderly in different Chinese urban neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bingqiu; Gao, Xiaolu; Lyon, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Rapidly aging populations constitute a critical issue for researchers and policymakers across the world; the challenges of a shifting demographic structure are particularly pertinent in the case of China. Population control strategies implemented in China in the late 1970s have substantially changed the social and demographic structure of Chinese cities and the traditional role of families in caring for elderly people. To meet the growing needs of elderly residents "aging in place," age-friendly environments and new types of senior services are required and encouraged. This research examines the satisfaction of seniors in relation to the elderly services and living environments available to them, through empirical studies of six types of neighborhoods in Beijing. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), a satisfaction model under the Person-Environment Fit (P-E Fit) model framework was developed. This model considered the senior respondent's health status, economic attributes, family and social support networks, and neighborhood living environments. Social support was found to be the primary factor affecting satisfaction amongst the urban elderly in Beijing. The research also highlights the need to differentiate between different types of neighborhoods, which can differ significantly in terms of the socio-economic attributes (i.e., family structure, income, and education) of their senior residents. As such, based on the path coefficients revealed by different structural equation models of various neighborhoods, four types of neighborhoods were identified: in Type 1 neighborhoods, the neighborhood environment and the senior services provided by communities were primary factors in elderly satisfaction; in Type 2 neighborhoods, the satisfaction of inhabitants was strongly influenced by personal attributes such as health and income; Type 3 neighborhoods were residence of low-income people where the level of social support was the foremost factor; and in Type 4, social

  6. Planning According to New Urbanism: the Ostadsara Neighborhood Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Zali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The modern urbanism activities have led to rupture of previous spatial structure of neighborhoods and destruction of their identity. The New Urbanism Movement, as one of the successful models in urbanization field attempts to revive this lost national-social identity through the project of returning to traditional structure of neighborhoods by applying modern urbanization models and methods. The current paper aims at evaluation and analysis of “the Ostadsara neighborhood's organization based on new urbanism principles” and representation of solutions for planning a successful neighborhood center considering these principles. In this regard, various methods including library method, observation, photography, questionnaire and interview with users of the environment were utilized. The results from identification and assessment of weaknesses and strengths and specification and analysis of potential threats and opportunities shows the possibility of applying walkability, connectivity and integration, improvement of public transportation, improvement of architecture quality and urban design, maintenance and improvement of public and green open spaces, maintenance and strengthening the structure of traditional neighborhood units and using cooperation of Ostadsara neighborhood's inhabitants. Finally, the current study will represent appropriate strategies for changing the mentioned neighborhood into a desirable and prosperous one.

  7. Framework to Define Structure and Boundaries of Complex Health Intervention Systems: The ALERT Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boriani, Elena; Esposito, Roberto; Frazzoli, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    with carefully defined system boundaries. Exploring individual components of such systems from different viewpoints gives a wide overview and helps to understand the elements and the relationships that drive actions and consequences within the system. In this study, we present an application and assessment...

  8. The Digital Hood: Social Media Use among Youth in Disadvantaged Neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robin; Gilliard-Matthews, Stacia; Dunaev, Jamie; Woods, Marcus; Brawner, Bridgette M

    2017-06-01

    This study examines the role of social media in the lives of youth living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Feminist Standpoint theory, which privileges the voices of marginalized communities in understanding social phenomena, suggests that youth at the margins have specific knowledge that helps us understand social media more broadly. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 30 females and 30 males aged 13 to 24 about their social worlds and neighborhoods, both on- and offline. The findings reveal a dynamic and somewhat concerning interplay between the geographic neighborhood and the digital neighborhood, whereby negative social interactions in the geographic neighborhood are reproduced and amplified on social media.

  9. Reconsidering the Neighborhood Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Martin; Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2016-01-01

    The state of the national economy often directs voting. But how do citizens form perceptions of a complex and abstract macroeconomy? This study examines whether exposure to unemployment in citizens’ immediate residential surroundings shapes their perceptions of the national economy. Using novel...... microcontexts when forming perceptions of the national economy. Furthermore, we provide evidence that measures of unemployment in more aggregate contexts are not only poor reflections of what individuals are likely to experience in their immediate neighborhood but also seem to capture a different mechanism...

  10. Charge-Induced Unzipping of Isolated Proteins to a Defined Secondary Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Flórez, Ana Isabel; Mucha, Eike; Ahn, Doo-Sik; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Pagel, Kevin; von Helden, Gert

    2016-03-01

    Here we present a combined experimental and theoretical study on the secondary structure of isolated proteins as a function of charge state. In infrared spectra of the proteins ubiquitin and cytochrome c, amide I (C=O stretch) and amide II (N-H bend) bands can be found at positions that are typical for condensed-phase proteins. For high charge states a new band appears, substantially red-shifted from the amide II band observed at lower charge states. The observations are interpreted in terms of Coulomb-driven transitions in secondary structures from mostly helical to extended C5 -type hydrogen-bonded structures. Support for this interpretation comes from simple energy considerations as well as from quantum chemical calculations on model peptides. This transition in secondary structure is most likely universal for isolated proteins that occur in mass spectrometric experiments.

  11. Contribution to Structural Elucidation: Behaviours of Substructures Partially Defined from 2D NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EPOUHE, Celine; FAN, Bo-Tao; YUAN, Shen-Gang; PANAYE, A.; DOUCET, J. P

    2003-01-01

    Structural elucidation (automatic determination of the structure of a molecule from its spectra) is frequently hampered by combinatorial explosion when trying to assemble the identified substructures. We devised a new method which can avoid this pitfall by a systematic examination of allowed 13C chemical shifts ranges for all substructures chemically possible and combined with a progressive pruning thanks to neighbouring relationships appearing from 2D NMR. This method is explained by a detailed example.

  12. Housing, Neighborhoods, and Children's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen, Ingrid Gould; Glied, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    In theory, improving low-income families' housing and neighborhoods could also improve their children's health, through any number of mechanisms. For example, less exposure to environmental toxins could prevent diseases such as asthma; a safer, less violent neighborhood could improve health by reducing the chances of injury and death, and by…

  13. Conceptualizing and comparing neighborhood and activity space measures for food environment research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Thomas W; Jilcott Pitts, Stephanie B; McGuirt, Jared T; Keyserling, Thomas C; Ammerman, Alice S

    2014-11-01

    Greater accessibility to geospatial technologies has led to a surge of spatialized public health research, much of which has focused on food environments. The purpose of this study was to analyze differing spatial measures of exposure to supermarkets and farmers׳ markets among women of reproductive age in eastern North Carolina. Exposure measures were derived using participant-defined neighborhoods, investigator-defined road network neighborhoods, and activity spaces incorporating participants׳ time space behaviors. Results showed that mean area for participant-defined neighborhoods (0.04 sq. miles) was much smaller than 2.0 mile road network neighborhoods (3.11 sq. miles) and activity spaces (26.36 sq. miles), and that activity spaces provided the greatest market exposure. The traditional residential neighborhood concept may not be particularly relevant for all places. Time-space approaches capturing activity space may be more relevant, particularly if integrated with mixed methods strategies.

  14. X-ray structures define human P2X3 receptor gating cycle and antagonist action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Steven E.; Lü, Wei; Oosterheert, Wout; Shekhar, Mrinal; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-10-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric, non-selective cation channels activated by ATP that have important roles in the cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems. Despite their central function in human physiology and although they are potential targets of therapeutic agents, there are no structures of human P2X receptors. The mechanisms of receptor desensitization and ion permeation, principles of antagonism, and complete structures of the pore-forming transmembrane domains of these receptors remain unclear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the human P2X3 receptor in apo/resting, agonist-bound/open-pore, agonist-bound/closed-pore/desensitized and antagonist-bound/closed states. The open state structure harbours an intracellular motif we term the ‘cytoplasmic cap’, which stabilizes the open state of the ion channel pore and creates lateral, phospholipid-lined cytoplasmic fenestrations for water and ion egress. The competitive antagonists TNP-ATP and A-317491 stabilize the apo/resting state and reveal the interactions responsible for competitive inhibition. These structures illuminate the conformational rearrangements that underlie P2X receptor gating and provide a foundation for the development of new pharmacological agents.

  15. Learning and combining image neighborhoods using random forests for neonatal brain disease classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Veronika A; Glocker, Ben; Hahner, Nadine; Eixarch, Elisenda; Sanroma, Gerard; Gratacós, Eduard; Rueckert, Daniel; González Ballester, Miguel Ángel; Piella, Gemma

    2017-08-09

    It is challenging to characterize and classify normal and abnormal brain development during early childhood. To reduce the complexity of heterogeneous data population, manifold learning techniques are increasingly applied, which find a low-dimensional representation of the data, while preserving all relevant information. The neighborhood definition used for constructing manifold representations of the population is crucial for preserving the similarity structure and it is highly application dependent. The recently proposed neighborhood approximation forests learn a neighborhood structure in a dataset based on a user-defined distance. We propose a framework to learn multiple pairwise distances in a population of brain images and to combine them in an unsupervised manner optimally in a manifold learning step. Unlike other methods that only use a univariate distance measure, our method allows for a natural combination of multiple distances from heterogeneous sources. As a result, it yields a representation of the population that preserves the multiple distances. Furthermore, our method also selects the most predictive features associated with the distances. We evaluate our method in neonatal magnetic resonance images of three groups (term controls, patients affected by intrauterine growth restriction and mild isolated ventriculomegaly). We show that combining multiple distances related to the condition improves the overall characterization and classification of the three clinical groups compared to the use of single distances and classical unsupervised manifold learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Correlating Precisely Defined Primary Structure with Crystalline Properties in Halogen Containing Polyolefins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boz, Emine; Alamo, Rufina G.; Wagener, Kenneth B.

    Polyethylene (PE) and poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) are among the most important polymers produced in industry, although other halogen-containing derivatives of PE, such as poly(tetrafluorethylene) (PTFE) have also found wides pread use. A related class of polymers is the ethylene-co-vinyl-halide family. Such copolymers are expected to show distinct properties relative to their better known industrial analogues. For example, much interest has focused on ethylene vinyl chloride (EVC) polymers based on their potential for improved thermal stability relative to PVC. Various techniques have been used to synthesize these ethylene vinyl halide (EVH) copolymers and the simplest approach is halogenation of PE, which results in an irregular distribution of halogens along the polymer backbone and poorly defined materials.

  17. Nanocatalyst structure as a template to define chirality of nascent single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Zhao, Jin; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Chirality is a crucial factor in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) because it determines its optical and electronic properties. A chiral angle spanning from 0° to 30° results from twisting of the graphene sheet conforming the nanotube wall and is equivalently expressed by chiral indexes (n,m). However, lack of chirality control during SWCNT synthesis is an obstacle for a widespread use of these materials. Here we use first-principles density functional theory (DFT) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to propose and illustrate basic concepts supporting that the nanocatalyst structure may act as a template to control the chirality during nanotube synthesis. DFT optimizations of metal cluster (Co and Cu)∕cap systems for caps of various chiralities are used to show that an inverse template effect from the nascent carbon nanostructure over the catalyst may exist in floating catalysts; such effect determines a negligible chirality control. Classical MD simulations are used to investigate the influence of a strongly interacting substrate on the structure of a metal nanocatalyst and illustrate how such interaction may help preserve catalyst crystallinity. Finally, DFT optimizations of carbon structures on stepped (211) and (321) cobalt surfaces are used to demonstrate the template effect imparted by the nanocatalyst surface on the growing carbon structure at early stages of nucleation. It is found that depending on the step structure and type of building block (short chains, single atoms, or hexagonal rings), thermodynamics favor armchair or zigzag termination, which provides guidelines for a chirality controlled process based on tuning the catalyst structure and the type of precursor gas.

  18. Facilitating the openEHR approach - organizational structures for defining high-quality archetypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Christian Dominik; Garde, Sebastian; Knaup, Petra

    2008-01-01

    Using openEHR archetypes to establish an electronic patient record promises rapid development and system interoperability by using or adopting existing archetypes. However, internationally accepted, high quality archetypes which enable a comprehensive semantic interoperability require adequate development and maintenance processes. Therefore, structures have to be created involving different health professions. In the following we present a model which facilitates and governs distributed but cooperative development and adoption of archetypes by different professionals including peer reviews. Our model consists of a hierarchical structure of professional committees and descriptions of the archetype development process considering these different committees.

  19. How Neighborhoods Influence Child Maltreatment: A Review of the Literature and Alternative Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulton, Claudia J.; Crampton, David S.; Irwin, Molly; Spilsbury, James C.; Korbin, Jill E.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature on the relationships between neighborhoods and child maltreatment and identify future directions for research in this area. Method: A search of electronic databases and a survey of experts yielded a list of 25 studies on the influence of geographically defined neighborhoods on child maltreatment. These studies…

  20. Toward defining deep brain stimulation targets in MNI space: A subcortical atlas based on multimodal MRI, histology and structural connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Siobhan; Plettig, Philip; Li, Ningfei; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Collins, D Louis; Herrington, Todd M; Kühn, Andrea A; Horn, Andreas

    2017-05-20

    Three-dimensional atlases of subcortical brain structures are valuable tools to reference anatomy in neuroscience and neurology. For instance, they can be used to study the position and shape of the three most common deep brain stimulation (DBS) targets, the subthalamic nucleus (STN), internal part of the pallidum (GPi) and ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (VIM) in spatial relationship to DBS electrodes. Here, we present a composite atlas based on manual segmentations of a multimodal high resolution brain template, histology and structural connectivity. In a first step, four key structures were defined on the template itself using a combination of multispectral image analysis and manual segmentation. Second, these structures were used as anchor points to coregister a detailed histological atlas into standard space. Results show that this approach significantly improved coregistration accuracy over previously published methods. Finally, a sub-segmentation of STN and GPi into functional zones was achieved based on structural connectivity. The result is a composite atlas that defines key nuclei on the template itself, fills the gaps between them using histology and further subdivides them using structural connectivity. We show that the atlas can be used to segment DBS targets in single subjects, yielding more accurate results compared to priorly published atlases. The atlas will be made publicly available and constitutes a resource to study DBS electrode localizations in combination with modern neuroimaging methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Enzyme-free translation of DNA into sequence-defined synthetic polymers structurally unrelated to nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jia; Hili, Ryan; Liu, David R

    2013-04-01

    The translation of DNA sequences into corresponding biopolymers enables the production, function and evolution of the macromolecules of life. In contrast, methods to generate sequence-defined synthetic polymers with similar levels of control have remained elusive. Here, we report the development of a DNA-templated translation system that enables the enzyme-free translation of DNA templates into sequence-defined synthetic polymers that have no necessary structural relationship with nucleic acids. We demonstrate the efficiency, sequence-specificity and generality of this translation system by oligomerizing building blocks including polyethylene glycol, α-(D)-peptides, and β-peptides in a DNA-programmed manner. Sequence-defined synthetic polymers with molecular weights of 26 kDa containing 16 consecutively coupled building blocks and 90 densely functionalized β-amino acid residues were translated from DNA templates using this strategy. We integrated the DNA-templated translation system developed here into a complete cycle of translation, coding sequence replication, template regeneration and re-translation suitable for the iterated in vitro selection of functional sequence-defined synthetic polymers unrelated in structure to nucleic acids.

  2. X-ray structures define human P2X3 receptor gating cycle and antagonist action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansoor, Steven E.; Lü, Wei; Oosterheert, W.; Shekhar, Mrinal; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-01-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric, non-selective cation channels activated by ATP that have important roles in the cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems. Despite their central function in human physiology and although they are potential targets of therapeutic agents, there are no structures of human

  3. Tissue engineering by self-assembly of cells printed into topologically defined structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Karoly; Norotte, Cyrille; Damon, Brook; Marga, Francoise; Neagu, Adrian; Besch-Williford, Cynthia L; Kachurin, Anatoly; Church, Kenneth H; Park, Hyoungshin; Mironov, Vladimir; Markwald, Roger; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Forgacs, Gabor

    2008-03-01

    Understanding the principles of biological self-assembly is indispensable for developing efficient strategies to build living tissues and organs. We exploit the self-organizing capacity of cells and tissues to construct functional living structures of prescribed shape. In our technology, multicellular spheroids (bio-ink particles) are placed into biocompatible environment (bio-paper) by the use of a three-dimensional delivery device (bio-printer). Our approach mimics early morphogenesis and is based on the realization that the genetic control of developmental patterning through self-assembly involves physical mechanisms. Three-dimensional tissue structures are formed through the postprinting fusion of the bio-ink particles, in analogy with early structure-forming processes in the embryo that utilize the apparent liquid-like behavior of tissues composed of motile and adhesive cells. We modeled the process of self-assembly by fusion of bio-ink particles, and employed this novel technology to print extended cellular structures of various shapes. Functionality was tested on cardiac constructs built from embryonic cardiac and endothelial cells. The postprinting self-assembly of bio-ink particles resulted in synchronously beating solid tissue blocks, showing signs of early vascularization, with the endothelial cells organized into vessel-like conduits.

  4. Community Structure in Large Networks: Natural Cluster Sizes and the Absence of Large Well-Defined Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Leskovec, Jure; Dasgupta, Anirban; Mahoney, Michael W

    2008-01-01

    A large body of work has been devoted to defining and identifying clusters or communities in social and information networks. We explore from a novel perspective several questions related to identifying meaningful communities in large social and information networks, and we come to several striking conclusions. We employ approximation algorithms for the graph partitioning problem to characterize as a function of size the statistical and structural properties of partitions of graphs that could plausibly be interpreted as communities. In particular, we define the network community profile plot, which characterizes the "best" possible community--according to the conductance measure--over a wide range of size scales. We study over 100 large real-world social and information networks. Our results suggest a significantly more refined picture of community structure in large networks than has been appreciated previously. In particular, we observe tight communities that are barely connected to the rest of the network ...

  5. Phytoplankton community structure defined by key environmental variables in Tagus estuary, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogueira, Maria José; Oliveira, Maria do Rosário; Cabeçadas, Graça

    2007-12-01

    In this work, we analyze environmental (physical and chemical) and biological (phytoplankton) data obtained along Tagus estuary during three surveys, carried out in productive period (May/June/July) at ebb tide. The main objective of this study was to identify the key environmental factors affecting phytoplankton structure in the estuary. BIOENV analysis revealed that, in study period, temperature, salinity, silicate and total phosphorus were the variables that best explained the phytoplankton spatial pattern in the estuary (Spearman correlation, rho=0.803). A generalized linear model (GLM) also identified salinity, silicate and phosphate as having a high explanatory power (63%) of phytoplankton abundance. These selected nutrients appear to be consistent with the requirements of the dominant phytoplankton group, Baccilariophyceae. Apparently, phytoplankton community is adapted to fluctuations in light intensity, as suspended particulate matter did not come out as a key factor in shaping phytoplankton structure along Tagus estuary.

  6. Bayesian population structure analysis reveals presence of phylogeographically specific sublineages within previously ill-defined T group of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Yann; Zheng, Chao; Wu, Guihui; Sun, Qun; Rastogi, Nalin

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic structure, and evolutionary history have been studied for years by several genotyping approaches, but delineation of a few sublineages remains controversial and needs better characterization. This is particularly the case of T group within lineage 4 (L4) which was first described using spoligotyping to pool together a number of strains with ill-defined signatures. Although T strains were not traditionally considered as a real phylogenetic group, they did contain a few phylogenetically meaningful sublineages as shown using SNPs. We therefore decided to investigate if this observation could be corroborated using other robust genetic markers. We consequently made a first assessment of genetic structure using 24-loci MIRU-VNTRs data extracted from the SITVIT2 database (n = 607 clinical isolates collected in Russia, Albania, Turkey, Iraq, Brazil and China). Combining Minimum Spanning Trees and Bayesian population structure analyses (using STRUCTURE and TESS softwares), we distinctly identified eight tentative phylogenetic groups (T1-T8) with a remarkable correlation with geographical origin. We further compared the present structure observed with other L4 sublineages (n = 416 clinical isolates belonging to LAM, Haarlem, X, S sublineages), and showed that 5 out of 8 T groups seemed phylogeographically well-defined as opposed to the remaining 3 groups that partially mixed with other L4 isolates. These results provide with novel evidence about phylogeographically specificity of a proportion of ill-defined T group of M. tuberculosis. The genetic structure observed will now be further validated on an enlarged worldwide dataset using Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS). PMID:28166309

  7. Bayesian population structure analysis reveals presence of phylogeographically specific sublineages within previously ill-defined T group of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Yann; Zheng, Chao; Wu, Guihui; Sun, Qun; Rastogi, Nalin

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic structure, and evolutionary history have been studied for years by several genotyping approaches, but delineation of a few sublineages remains controversial and needs better characterization. This is particularly the case of T group within lineage 4 (L4) which was first described using spoligotyping to pool together a number of strains with ill-defined signatures. Although T strains were not traditionally considered as a real phylogenetic group, they did contain a few phylogenetically meaningful sublineages as shown using SNPs. We therefore decided to investigate if this observation could be corroborated using other robust genetic markers. We consequently made a first assessment of genetic structure using 24-loci MIRU-VNTRs data extracted from the SITVIT2 database (n = 607 clinical isolates collected in Russia, Albania, Turkey, Iraq, Brazil and China). Combining Minimum Spanning Trees and Bayesian population structure analyses (using STRUCTURE and TESS softwares), we distinctly identified eight tentative phylogenetic groups (T1-T8) with a remarkable correlation with geographical origin. We further compared the present structure observed with other L4 sublineages (n = 416 clinical isolates belonging to LAM, Haarlem, X, S sublineages), and showed that 5 out of 8 T groups seemed phylogeographically well-defined as opposed to the remaining 3 groups that partially mixed with other L4 isolates. These results provide with novel evidence about phylogeographically specificity of a proportion of ill-defined T group of M. tuberculosis. The genetic structure observed will now be further validated on an enlarged worldwide dataset using Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS).

  8. A microtremor survey to define the subsoil structure in a mud volcano areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzera, Francesco; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Lupi, Matteo; Karyono, Karyono; Mazzini, Adriano

    2017-04-01

    Mud erupting systems have been observed and studied in different localities on the planet. They are characterized by emissions of fluids and fragmented sedimentary rocks creating large structures with different morphologies. This is mainly due to the presence of clay-bearing strata that can be buoyant in the surrounding regions and over-pressured fluids that facilitate the formation of diapirs through sedimentary rocks. In this study, we investigate the Lusi mud erupting system mainly by using ambient vibration methods. In particular, thickness of the sediments and the body wave velocities have been investigated. Results are integrated with gravimetry and electrical resistivity data in order to locate the main geological discontinuities in the area as well as to reconstruct a 3D model of the buried structure. The approach commonly used for this type of studies is based on the ratio of the horizontal to vertical components of ground motion (HVSR) and on passive array techniques. The HVSR generally enables to recognize peaks that point out to the fundamental frequency of the site, which usually fit quite well the theoretical resonance curves. The combination of HVSR and shear wave velocity, coming from passive array techniques, enables to collect valuable information about the subsurface structures. Here we present new data collected at the mud volcano and sedimentary hosted hydrothermal system sites in order to investigate the depths of the main discontinuities and of the hypothesized hydrocarbon reservoirs. We present the case study of Salse di Nirano (northen Italy), Salinelle (Mt. Etna, Sicily) and Lusi hydrothermal systems (Indonesia). Our results indicate that the ambient vibrations study approach represents a swift and simplified methods that provides quick information on the shallow subsoil structure of the investigated areas.

  9. Mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils defined by secondary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolini, C.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Wang, C.; Besenbacher, F.; Dong, M.

    2015-04-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology are extensively studied - among these parameters, the secondary structures and the pH have been revealed to be crucial, since a variation in pH changes the fibril morphology and net chirality during protein aggregation. It is important to quantify the mechanical properties of these fibrils in order to help the design of effective strategies for treating diseases related to the presence of amyloid fibrils. In this work, we show that by changing pH the mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils vary as well. In particular, we reveal that these mechanical properties are strongly related to the content of secondary structures. We analysed and estimated the Young's modulus (E) by comparing the persistence length (Lp) - measured from the observation of TEM images by using statistical mechanics arguments - with the mechanical information provided by peak force quantitative nanomechanical property mapping (PF-QNM). The secondary structure content and the chirality are investigated by means of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SR-CD). Results arising from this study could be fruitfully used as a protocol to investigate other medical or engineering relevant peptide fibrils.Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology

  10. Complex structure of engineered modular domains defining molecular interaction between ICAM-1 and integrin LFA-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungkwon Kang

    Full Text Available Intermolecular contacts between integrin LFA-1 (α(Lβ(2 and ICAM-1 derive solely from the integrin α(L I domain and the first domain (D1 of ICAM-1. This study presents a crystal structure of the engineered complex of the α(L I domain and ICAM-1 D1. Previously, we engineered the I domain for high affinity by point mutations that were identified by a directed evolution approach. In order to examine α(L I domain allostery between the C-terminal α7-helix (allosteric site and the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (active site, we have chosen a high affinity variant without mutations directly influencing either the position of the α7-helix or the active sites. In our crystal, the α(L I domain was found to have a high affinity conformation to D1 with its α7-helix displaced downward away from the binding interface, recapitulating a current understanding of the allostery in the I domain and its linkage to neighboring domains of integrins in signaling. To enable soluble D1 of ICAM-1 to fold on its own, we also engineered D1 to be functional by mutations, which were found to be those that would convert hydrogen bond networks in the solvent-excluded core into vdW contacts. The backbone structure of the β-sandwich fold and the epitope for I domain binding of the engineered D1 were essentially identical to those of wild-type D1. Most deviations in engineered D1 were found in the loops at the N-terminal region that interacts with human rhinovirus (HRV. Structural deviation found in engineered D1 was overall in agreement with the function of engineered D1 observed previously, i.e., full capacity binding to α(L I domain but reduced interaction with HRV.

  11. Enantioselective Catalysis by Using Short, Structurally Defined DNA Hairpins as Scaffold for Hybrid Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Jasmin J; Singh, Raghvendra P; Heuer, Andreas; Hennecke, Ulrich

    2017-05-02

    A new type of DNA metal complex hybrid catalyst, which is based on single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides, is described. It was shown that oligonucleotides as short as 14 nucleotides that fold into hairpin structures are suitable as nucleic acid components for DNA hybrid catalysts. With these catalysts, excellent enantioinduction in asymmetric Diels-Alder reactions with selectivity values as high as 96 % enantiomeric excess (ee) can be achieved. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that a rather flexible loop combined with a rigid stem region provides DNA scaffolds with these high selectivity values. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. (Re)defining component structures in morphological constructions: a cognitive grammar perspective

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Huyssteen, GB

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available in some other (Germanic) languages, Afrikaans compounding often employs a so-called linking morpheme to form a new compound. In a compound like perdekar ?horse cart? the question is whether it should be analyzed as [[[perd]e] kar] (i.e. where the -e...-rep ?untouched?) or with suffixes (like hag- in haglik ?precarious?).9 In Figure 6 cran morphemes are therefore indicated as central component structures, in line with stems. Linking morphemes occur in the middle of two stems (e.g. perd-e-kar ?horse cart...

  13. Preparation of Magnetic Hybrid Microspheres with Well-Defined Yolk-Shell Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A facile and efficient route was reported to prepare a kind of yolk-shell magnetic hybrid microspheres by suspension polymerization and calcinations method. The morphology, structure, and composition of the magnetic microspheres were characterized by FTIR, XRD, TEM, SEM, and TGA analysis. The vibrating-sample magnetometry (VSM results clearly showed that the magnetic particles were superparamagnetic with saturation magnetization of 32.82 emu/g which makes the microcomposites easily controlled by an external magnetic field. The results revealed that the magnetic hybrid microspheres might have important applications in magnetic bioseparation and drug delivery.

  14. Melville's Carnival Neighborhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyn Kelley

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Treatments of the relationship between Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville have tended to focus on it as a failed friendship or aborted romance —as inspiring in Melville hopes and longings that Hawthorne could never fulfill. Viewed as a relationship between neighbors, not only friends or lovers, and seen through the prism of unconsidered works like Melville’s Israel Potter (1854­5, 1855 and “The Encantadas” (1854, 1856, the connection might look slightly different. For as neighbors Hawthorne and Melville may have found opportunities for greater freedom, fluidity, and festivity than friendship or love could always offer. Taking place in the carnival neighborhood of their redoubtable friend, Sarah Huyler Morewood, Hawthorne’s and Melville’s relationship may have explored some of her subversive energies as well.

  15. Interaction between parenting and neighborhood quality on the risk of adolescent regular smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaozhong; Shenassa, Edmond D

    2012-03-01

    To conduct the first study to examine potential interaction between parenting style and neighborhood quality on the risk of adolescent regular smoking. We analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents (n = 1,213 pairs of adolescents and their parents) who participated in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics during 2002-2003. Regular smoking behavior and parental monitoring level were reported by adolescents. Parenting style (i.e., authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and uninvolved) was defined by cross-classifying self-reported parental warmth and control. Based on parents' perceived neighborhood quality regarding raising children, neighborhoods were identified as either higher quality or lower quality. Adolescents in lower-quality neighborhoods were more likely to be regular smokers (13.7% vs. 8.5%; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.02-3.65) than those in higher-quality neighborhoods. In lower-quality neighborhoods, adolescents of authoritarian parents (16.9%; AOR = 10.97, 95% CI = 3.36-35.84) were more likely and those of uninvolved parents (20.3%; AOR = 3.47, 95% CI = 0.91-13.17) were marginally more likely to be regular smokers than those of authoritative parents (4.3%). However, among adolescents in higher-quality neighborhoods, parenting style was independent of the risk of regular smoking. There was marginally significant interaction between authoritarian parenting style and neighborhood quality. Parental monitoring was associated with reduced risk of adolescent smoking, regardless of neighborhood quality. There was no interaction between parental monitoring and neighborhood quality. Authoritative parenting is associated with reduced risk of adolescent regular smoking in lower-quality neighborhoods but not in higher-quality neighborhoods. Authoritative parenting style and parental monitoring may buffer adverse influences of low-quality neighborhood.

  16. Different reactions to adverse neighborhoods in games of cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Chunyan; Weissing, Franz J; Perc, Matjaz; Xie, Guangming; Wang, Long; 10.1371/journal.pone.0035183

    2012-01-01

    In social dilemmas, cooperation among randomly interacting individuals is often difficult to achieve. The situation changes if interactions take place in a network where the network structure jointly evolves with the behavioral strategies of the interacting individuals. In particular, cooperation can be stabilized if individuals tend to cut interaction links when facing adverse neighborhoods. Here we consider two different types of reaction to adverse neighborhoods, and all possible mixtures between these reactions. When faced with a gloomy outlook, players can either choose to cut and rewire some of their links to other individuals, or they can migrate to another location and establish new links in the new local neighborhood. We find that in general local rewiring is more favorable for the evolution of cooperation than emigration from adverse neighborhoods. Rewiring helps to maintain the diversity in the degree distribution of players and favors the spontaneous emergence of cooperative clusters. Both propert...

  17. Band structure engineering of graphene by a local gate defined periodic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Carlos; Maher, Patrick; Scarabelli, Diego; Dean, Cory; Kim, Philip

    Recent improvements in 2-dimensional (2D) material layering have resulted in enhanced device quality and created pathways for new device architectures. We fabricate periodic arrays from a patterned local back gate and a uniform top gate on hBN encapsulated graphene channels. The symmetry and lattice size of the periodic potential can be determined by state-of-art electron beam lithography and etching, achieving a lattice constant of 35 nm. The strength of the electric potential modulation can be controlled through applied voltage on the patterned gate. We observe signatures of superlattice modulation near the main Dirac peak in the density dependent resistance measurement at zero magnetic field. Current studies focus on the exploration of Hofstadter fractal band structures under magnetic fields. Our nano-patterned engineered superlattices on graphene hold great promise for wider applications.

  18. Structure of a Eurkaryotic CLC Transporter Defines an Intermediate State in the Transport Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Feng; E Campbell; Y Hsiung; R MacKinnon

    2011-12-31

    CLC proteins transport chloride (Cl{sup -}) ions across cell membranes to control the electrical potential of muscle cells, transfer electrolytes across epithelia, and control the pH and electrolyte composition of intracellular organelles. Some members of this protein family are Cl{sup -} ion channels, whereas others are secondary active transporters that exchange Cl{sup -} ions and protons (H{sup +}) with a 2:1 stoichiometry. We have determined the structure of a eukaryotic CLC transporter at 3.5 angstrom resolution. Cytoplasmic cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) domains are strategically positioned to regulate the ion-transport pathway, and many disease-causing mutations in human CLCs reside on the CBS-transmembrane interface. Comparison with prokaryotic CLC shows that a gating glutamate residue changes conformation and suggests a basis for 2:1 Cl{sup -}/H{sup +} exchange and a simple mechanistic connection between CLC channels and transporters.

  19. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF STRUCTURALLY WELL-DEFINED POLYMER-INORGANIC HYBRID NANOPARTICLES VIA ATRP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Bai; Jie-bin Pang; Kun-yuan Qiu; Yen Wei

    2002-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) using cuprous chloride/2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) was applied to graft polymerization of styrene on the surface of silica nanoparticles to synthesize polymer-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles. 2-(4-Chloromethylphenyl) ethyltriethoxysilane (CTES) was immobilized on the surface of silica nanoparticles through condensation reaction of the silanol groups on silica with triethoxysilane group of CTES. Then ATRP of St was initiated by this surface-modified silica nanoparticles bearing benzyl chloride groups, and formed PSt graft chains on the surface of silica nanoparticles. The thickness of the graft chains increased with reaction time. End group analysis confirmed the occurrence of ATRP. Thermal analysis indicated that thermal stabilization of these resulting hybrid nanoparticles also increases with polymerization conversion. The results above show that this "grafting from" reaction could be used for the preparation of polymer-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles with controlled structure of the polymer's end groups.

  20. Difficulties in Defining Social-Emotional Intelligence, Competences and Skills - a Theoretical Analysis and Structural Suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moana Monnier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Demands related to the frequency of and time required for interactional tasks in everyday occupational routines are continuously growing. When it comes to qualifying a person’s ability to interact with others, two prototypical concepts are often used: social competences and emotional intelligence. In connection to discussions about curriculum standards in Germany, these are viewed as important attributes that should be taught, supported and if possible assessed in educational pathways toward an occupation (KMK, 2007. However, in looking for a generally approved and widely used definition, many problems arise on the inter-conceptual and intra-conceptual level, triggering implementation difficulties in educational curricula. This article highlights these difficulties by selecting five well-established key theories and comparing their communalities and differences. Analyzing definitions of intelligence, competences and skills, taking an action regulation perspective and highlighting the interdependence of social and emotional aspects, a structural system to facilitate the transfer into the educational context is proposed.

  1. Defining the electronic and geometric structure of one-electron oxidized copper-bis-phenoxide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storr, Tim; Verma, Pratik; Pratt, Russell C; Wasinger, Erik C; Shimazaki, Yuichi; Stack, T Daniel P

    2008-11-19

    The geometric and electronic structure of an oxidized Cu complex ([CuSal](+); Sal = N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) with a non-innocent salen ligand has been investigated both in the solid state and in solution. Integration of information from UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, electrochemistry, resonance Raman spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations provides critical insights into the nature of the localization/delocalization of the oxidation locus. In contrast to the analogous Ni derivative [NiSal](+) (Storr, T.; et al. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2007, 46, 5198), which exists solely in the Ni(II) ligand-radical form, the locus of oxidation is metal-based for [CuSal](+), affording exclusively a Cu(III) species in the solid state (4-300 K). Variable-temperature solution studies suggest that [CuSal](+) exists in a reversible spin-equilibrium between a ligand-radical species [Cu(II)Sal(*)](+) (S = 1) and the high-valent metal form [Cu(III)Sal](+) (S = 0), indicative of nearly isoenergetic species. It is surprising that a bis-imine-bis-phenolate ligation stabilizes the Cu(III) oxidation state, and even more surprising that in solution a spin equilibrium occurs without a change in coordination number. The oxidized tetrahydrosalen analogue [CuSal(red)](+) (Sal(red) = N,N'-bis(3,5-di- tert-butylhydroxybenzyl)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) exists as a temperature-invariant Cu(II)-ligand-radical complex in solution, demonstrating that ostensibly simple variations of the ligand structure affect the locus of oxidation in Cu-bis-phenoxide complexes.

  2. Metric propositional neighborhood logics on natural numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresolin, Davide; Della Monica, Dario; Goranko, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    Metric Propositional Neighborhood Logic (MPNL) over natural numbers. MPNL features two modalities referring, respectively, to an interval that is “met by” the current one and to an interval that “meets” the current one, plus an infinite set of length constraints, regarded as atomic propositions...... is decidable in double exponential time and expressively complete with respect to a well-defined sub-fragment of the two-variable fragment FO2[N,=,numbers. Moreover, we show that MPNL can be extended in a natural way...

  3. The interaction between impulsivity and neighborhood context on offending: the effects of impulsivity are stronger in poorer neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, D R; Caspi, A; Moffitt, T E; Wikström, P O; Loeber, R; Novak, S

    2000-11-01

    This research blends 2 traditions of theorizing on the causes of crime, one focused on the role of individual differences and the other focused on structural and contextual variables. Two related studies examined the relations among impulsivity, neighborhood context, and juvenile offending. The first, cross-sectional study uses a large sample of 13-year-old inner-city boys, whereas the second, longitudinal study offers a conceptual replication using 17-year-old inner-city boys who are a subset of the original sample. Across both studies, results indicate that the effects of impulsivity on juvenile offending are stronger in poorer neighborhoods. Furthermore, nonimpulsive boys in poor neighborhoods were at no greater risk for delinquency than nonimpulsive boys in better-off neighborhoods.

  4. Neighborhood Context and Immigrant Young Children's Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Tama; Shuey, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored how neighborhood social processes and resources, relevant to immigrant families and immigrant neighborhoods, contribute to young children's behavioral functioning and achievement across diverse racial/ethnic groups. Data were drawn from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, a neighborhood-based,…

  5. Electronic Structure and Reactivity of a Well-Defined Mononuclear Complex of Ti(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, Gayan B; Zolnhofer, Eva M; Fortier, Skye; Grant, Lauren N; Carroll, Patrick J; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Meyer, Karsten; Krzystek, J; Ozarowski, Andrew; Jackson, Timothy A; Mindiola, Daniel J; Telser, Joshua

    2015-11-02

    A facile and high-yielding protocol to the known Ti(II) complex trans-[(py)4TiCl2] (py = pyridine) has been developed. Its electronic structure has been probed experimentally using magnetic susceptibility, magnetic circular dichroism, and high-frequency and high-field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies in conjunction with ligand-field theory and computational methods (density functional theory and ab initio methods). These studies demonstrated that trans-[(py)4TiCl2] has a (3)Eg ground state (dxy(1)dxz,yz(1) orbital occupancy), which, as a result of spin–orbit coupling, yields a ground-state spinor doublet that is EPR active, a first excited-state doublet at ∼60 cm(–1), and two next excited states at ∼120 cm(–1). Reactivity studies with various unsaturated substrates are also presented in this study, which show that the Ti(II) center allows oxidative addition likely via formation of [Ti(η(2)-R2E2)Cl2(py)n] E = C, N intermediates. A new Ti(IV) compound, mer-[(py)3(η(2)-Ph2C2)TiCl2], was prepared by reaction with Ph2C2, along with the previously reported complex trans-(py)3Ti═NPh(Cl)2, from reaction with Ph2N2. Reaction with Ph2CN2 also yielded a new dinuclear Ti(IV) complex, [(py)2(Cl)2Ti(μ2:η(2)-N2CPh2)2Ti(Cl)2], in which the two Ti(IV) ions are inequivalently coordinated. Reaction with cyclooctatetraene (COT) yielded a new Ti(III) complex, [(py)2Ti(η(8)-COT)Cl], which is a rare example of a mononuclear “piano-stool” titanium complex. The complex trans-[(py)4TiCl2] has thus been shown to be synthetically accessible, have an interesting electronic structure, and be reactive toward oxidation chemistry.

  6. Composition, structure and mechanical properties define performance of pulmonary surfactant membranes and films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Elisa; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory surface in the mammalian lung is stabilized by pulmonary surfactant, a membrane-based system composed of multiple lipids and specific proteins, the primary function of which is to minimize the surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface, optimizing the mechanics of breathing and avoiding alveolar collapse, especially at the end of expiration. The goal of the present review is to summarize current knowledge regarding the structure, lipid-protein interactions and mechanical features of surfactant membranes and films and how these properties correlate with surfactant biological function inside the lungs. Surfactant mechanical properties can be severely compromised by different agents, which lead to surfactant inhibition and ultimately contributes to the development of pulmonary disorders and pathologies in newborns, children and adults. A detailed comprehension of the unique mechanical and rheological properties of surfactant layers is crucial for the diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases, either by analyzing the contribution of surfactant impairment to the pathophysiology or by improving the formulations in surfactant replacement therapies. Finally, a short review is also included on the most relevant experimental techniques currently employed to evaluate lung surfactant mechanics, rheology, and inhibition and reactivation processes.

  7. Composition, structure and mechanical properties define performance of pulmonary surfactant membranes and films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortiz, Elisa Parra; Perez-Gil, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory surface in the mammalian lung is stabilized by pulmonary surfactant, a membrane-based system composed of multiple lipids and specific proteins, the primary function of which is to minimize the surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface, optimizing the mechanics of breath......The respiratory surface in the mammalian lung is stabilized by pulmonary surfactant, a membrane-based system composed of multiple lipids and specific proteins, the primary function of which is to minimize the surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface, optimizing the mechanics...... of breathing and avoiding alveolar collapse, especially at the end of expiration. The goal of the present review is to summarize current knowledge regarding the structure, lipid-protein interactions and mechanical features of surfactant membranes and films and how these properties correlate with surfactant...... biological function inside the lungs. Surfactant mechanical properties can be severely compromised by different agents, which lead to surfactant inhibition and ultimately contributes to the development of pulmonary disorders and pathologies in newborns, children and adults. A detailed comprehension...

  8. Analysis of early accountable care organizations defines patient, structural, cost, and quality-of-care characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Arnold M; Jha, Ashish K; Orav, E John; Liebman, Daniel L; Audet, Anne-Marie J; Zezza, Mark A; Guterman, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) have attracted interest from many policy makers and clinical leaders because of their potential to improve the quality of care and reduce costs. Federal ACO programs for Medicare beneficiaries are now up and running, but little information is available about the baseline characteristics of early entrants. In this descriptive study we present data on the structural and market characteristics of these early ACOs and compare ACOs' patient populations, costs, and quality with those of their non-ACO counterparts at baseline. We found that ACO patients were more likely than non-ACO patients to be older than age eighty and had higher incomes. ACO patients were less likely than non-ACO patients to be black, covered by Medicaid, or disabled. The cost of care for ACO patients was slightly lower than that for non-ACO patients. Slightly fewer than half of the ACOs had a participating hospital. Hospitals that were in ACOs were more likely than non-ACO hospitals to be large, teaching, and not-for-profit, although there was little difference in their performance on quality metrics. Our findings can be useful in interpreting the early results from the federal ACO programs and in establishing a baseline to assess the programs' development.

  9. Current relevance of fungal and trypanosomatid glycolipids and sphingolipids: studies defining structures conspicuously absent in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio K. Takahashi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, glycosphingolipids have been attracting attention due to their role on biological systems as second messengers or modulators of signal transduction, affecting several events, which range from apoptosis to regulation of the cell cycle. In pathogenic fungi, glycolipids are expressed in two classes: neutral monohexosylceramides (glucosyl-or galactosylceramide and acidic glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides (the latter class carries longer glycan chains. It is worth to mention that monohexosylceramides exhibit significant structural differences in their lipid moieties compared to their mammalian counterparts, whereas the glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides exhibit remarkable structural differences in their carbohydrate moieties in comparison to mammal glycosphingolipids counterpart. We observed that glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides are capable of promoting immune response in infected humans. In addition, inhibiting fungal glycosphingolipid biosynthetic pathways leads to an inhibition of colony formation, spore germination, cell cycle, dimorphism and hyphal growth. Other pathogens, such as trypanosomatids, also present unique glycolipids, which may have an important role for the parasite development and/or disease establishment. Regarding host-pathogen interaction, cell membrane rafts, which are enriched in sphingolipids and sterols, participate in parasite/fungal infection. In this review, it is discussed the different biological roles of (glyco (sphingolipids of pathogenic/opportunistic fungi and trypanosomatids.Recentemente, glicoesfingolipídeos têm atraído atenção devido ao seu papel na biologia celular como segundo-mensageiro ou moduladores da transdução de sinal, afetando vários eventos, desde apoptose até a regulação do ciclo celular. Em fungos patogênicos, existem duas classes de glicolipídeos: monohexosil ceramidas neutras (glucosil-ou galactosilceramida e glicosilinositol fosforilceramidas (os quais apresentam

  10. A defining aspect of human resilience in the workplace: a structural modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everly, George S; Davy, Jeanettte A; Smith, Kenneth J; Lating, Jeffrey M; Nucifora, Frederick C

    2011-06-01

    It has been estimated that up to 90% of the US population is exposed to at least 1 traumatic event during their lifetime. Although there is growing evidence that most people are resilient, meaning that they have the ability to adapt to or rebound from adversity, between 5% and 10% of individuals exposed to traumatic events meet criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder. Therefore, identifying the elements of resilience could lead to interventions or training programs designed to enhance resilience. In this article, we test the hypothesis that the effects of stressor conditions on outcomes such as job-related variables may be mediated through the cognitive and affective registrations of those events, conceptualized as subjective stress arousal. The subjects were 491 individuals employed in public accounting, who were sampled from a mailing list provided by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. The stressors used in this study were role ambiguity, role conflict, and role overload and the outcome measures were performance, turnover intentions, job satisfaction, and burnout. Stress arousal was measured using a previously developed stress arousal scale. We conducted a series of 2 EQS structural modeling analyses to assess the impact of stress arousal. The first model examined only the direct effects from the role stressors to the outcome constructs. The second model inserted stress arousal as a mediator in the relations between the role stressors and the outcomes. The results of our investigation supported the notion that subjective stress arousal provides greater explanatory clarity by mediating the effects of stressors upon job-related outcome. Including stress arousal in the model provided a much more comprehensive understanding of the relation between stressor and outcomes, and the contribution of role ambiguity and role conflict were better explained. By understanding these relations, anticipatory guidance and crisis intervention programs can be

  11. Measuring Physical Neighborhood Quality Related to Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Rollings

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although sociodemographic factors are one aspect of understanding the effects of neighborhood environments on health, equating neighborhood quality with socioeconomic status ignores the important role of physical neighborhood attributes. Prior work on neighborhood environments and health has relied primarily on level of socioeconomic disadvantage as the indicator of neighborhood quality without attention to physical neighborhood quality. A small but increasing number of studies have assessed neighborhood physical characteristics. Findings generally indicate that there is an association between living in deprived neighborhoods and poor health outcomes, but rigorous evidence linking specific physical neighborhood attributes to particular health outcomes is lacking. This paper discusses the methodological challenges and limitations of measuring physical neighborhood environments relevant to health and concludes with proposed directions for future work.

  12. Measuring Physical Neighborhood Quality Related to Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollings, Kimberly A.; Wells, Nancy M.; Evans, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Although sociodemographic factors are one aspect of understanding the effects of neighborhood environments on health, equating neighborhood quality with socioeconomic status ignores the important role of physical neighborhood attributes. Prior work on neighborhood environments and health has relied primarily on level of socioeconomic disadvantage as the indicator of neighborhood quality without attention to physical neighborhood quality. A small but increasing number of studies have assessed neighborhood physical characteristics. Findings generally indicate that there is an association between living in deprived neighborhoods and poor health outcomes, but rigorous evidence linking specific physical neighborhood attributes to particular health outcomes is lacking. This paper discusses the methodological challenges and limitations of measuring physical neighborhood environments relevant to health and concludes with proposed directions for future work. PMID:25938692

  13. Methods to measure the impact of home, social, and sexual neighborhoods of urban gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beryl A Koblin

    Full Text Available Men who have sex with men (MSM accounted for 61% of new HIV diagnoses in the United States in 2010. Recent analyses indicate that socio-structural factors are important correlates of HIV infection. NYCM2M was a cross-sectional study designed to identify neighborhood-level characteristics within the urban environment that influence sexual risk behaviors, substance use and depression among MSM living in New York City. The sample was recruited using a modified venue-based time-space sampling methodology and through select websites and mobile applications. This paper describes novel methodological approaches used to improve the quality of data collected for analysis of the impact of neighborhoods on MSM health. Previous research has focused predominately on residential neighborhoods and used pre-determined administrative boundaries (e.g., census tracts that often do not reflect authentic and meaningful neighborhoods. This study included the definition and assessment of multiple neighborhoods of influence including where men live (home neighborhood, socialize (social neighborhood and have sex (sexual neighborhood. Furthermore, making use of technological advances in mapping, we collected geo-points of reference for each type of neighborhood and identified and constructed self-identified neighborhood boundary definitions. Finally, this study collected both perceived neighborhood characteristics and objective neighborhood conditions to create a comprehensive, flexible and rich neighborhood-level set of covariates. This research revealed that men perceived their home, social and sexual neighborhoods in different ways. Few men (15% had the same home, social and sexual neighborhoods; for 31%, none of the neighborhoods was the same. Of the three types of neighborhoods, the number of unique social neighborhoods was the lowest; the size of sexual neighborhoods was the smallest. The resultant dataset offers the opportunity to conduct analyses that will yield

  14. Durham Neighborhood Compass Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The Durham Neighborhood Compass is a quantitative indicators project with qualitative values, integrating data from local government, the Census Bureau and other...

  15. Neighborhoods, Published in 2003, Freelance.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Neighborhoods dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2003. Data by this publisher are often provided in State Plane...

  16. The Relative Importance of Mothers’ and Youths’ Neighborhood Perceptions for Youth Alcohol Use and Delinquency

    OpenAIRE

    Byrnes, Hilary F.; Chen, Meng-Jinn; Miller, Brenda A.; Maguin, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Prior studies have examined the influence of neighborhood perceptions on youth outcomes, but few studies have examined whose report of neighborhoods, parents’ or youths’, are most important in predicting youth outcomes. This study addresses the relative associations of youths’ and mothers’ neighborhood perceptions with youth alcohol use and delinquency. The sample includes 499 mother-child dyads (youth age: 10 to 16 [mean = 13.3; SD = 2]). Structural equation modeling showed that youths’ perc...

  17. Crystal Structures of Two Transcriptional Regulators from Bacillus cereus Define the Conserved Structural Features of a PadR Subfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fibriansah, Guntur; Kovacs, Akos T.; Pool, Trijntje J.; Boonstra, Mirjam; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W. H.

    2012-01-01

    PadR-like transcriptional regulators form a structurally-related family of proteins that control the expression of genes associated with detoxification, virulence and multi-drug resistance in bacteria. Only a few members of this family have been studied by genetic, biochemical and biophysical method

  18. Neighborhood food environment and obesity in community-dwelling older adults: individual and neighborhood effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruchno, Rachel; Wilson-Genderson, Maureen; Gupta, Adarsh K

    2014-05-01

    We tested hypotheses about the relationship between neighborhood-level food sources and obesity, controlling for individual-level characteristics. Data (collected November 2006-April 2008) derived from a random-digit-dial sample of 5688 community-dwelling adults aged 50 to 74 years residing in 1644 census tracts in New Jersey. Using multilevel structural equation models, we created latent constructs representing density of fast-food establishments and storefronts (convenience stores, bars and pubs, grocery stores) and an observed indicator for supermarkets at the neighborhood level, simultaneously modeling obesity and demographic characteristics (age, gender, race, education, household income) at the individual level. When we controlled for individual-level age, gender, race, education, and household income, densities of fast-food establishments and storefronts were positively associated with obesity. Supermarkets were not associated with obesity. Because people living in neighborhoods with a higher density of fast food and storefronts are more likely to be obese, these neighborhoods may be optimal sites for interventions.

  19. MORE than just fear : On the intricate interplay between perceived neighborhood disorder, collective efficacy, and action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinhans, Reinout; Bolt, Gideon

    2014-01-01

    Collective efficacy is defined as social cohesion among neighbors combined with their willingness to intervene on behalf of the common good. Through collective efficacy, forms of perceived neighborhood disorder may be successfully targeted. Simultaneously, perceived disorder undermines preconditions

  20. Frontonasal dysplasia, macroblepharon, eyelid colobomas, ear anomalies, macrostomia, mental retardation and CNS structural anomalies: defining the phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guion-Almeida, M L; Richieri-Costa, A

    2001-04-01

    We report a Brazilian boy, born to normal and nonconsanguineous parents showing, among other signs, brachycephaly, a wide forehead, a widow's peak, hypertelorism, wide palpebral fissures with multiple eyelid colobomas, a broad nasal root, a long philtrum, macrostomia, prominent lips, a high arched palate, a midline alveolar cleft, a small and grooved chin, ear anomalies, structural anomaly of the corpus callosum, and mental retardation. To our knowledge this additional patient defines a particular clinical condition previously reported [Guion-Almeida M.L. Richieri-Costa A. (1999) Clinical Dysmorphol 8;1-4; Masuno M. et al. (2000) Clin Dysmorphol 9:59-60].

  1. Poly(2-acetoxyethyl methacrylate)/polystyrene latex interpenetrating polymer networks with well-defined phase-separated structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Wang; Shan Shi; Li Na Bian; Li Min Zhou; Li Qun Zhao; Shin Ichi Kuroda

    2011-01-01

    A series of poly (2-acetoxyethyl methacrylate)/polystyrene (PAEMA/PS) latex interpenetrating polymer networks (LIPNs) were prepared by seeded soap-free emulsion polymerization of styrene on the crosslinked PAEMA seed particles using an oil-soluble initiator. These PAEMA/PS LIPNs showed a well-defined phase-separated structure with PS phase dispersing in continuous PAEMA phase. The domain size of PS phase was found to depend on the crosslinking degree of PAEMA seed particles and the amount of second-stage styrene monomer.

  2. CLEARPOND: cross-linguistic easy-access resource for phonological and orthographic neighborhood densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Viorica; Bartolotti, James; Chabal, Sarah; Shook, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Past research has demonstrated cross-linguistic, cross-modal, and task-dependent differences in neighborhood density effects, indicating a need to control for neighborhood variables when developing and interpreting research on language processing. The goals of the present paper are two-fold: (1) to introduce CLEARPOND (Cross-Linguistic Easy-Access Resource for Phonological and Orthographic Neighborhood Densities), a centralized database of phonological and orthographic neighborhood information, both within and between languages, for five commonly-studied languages: Dutch, English, French, German, and Spanish; and (2) to show how CLEARPOND can be used to compare general properties of phonological and orthographic neighborhoods across languages. CLEARPOND allows researchers to input a word or list of words and obtain phonological and orthographic neighbors, neighborhood densities, mean neighborhood frequencies, word lengths by number of phonemes and graphemes, and spoken-word frequencies. Neighbors can be defined by substitution, deletion, and/or addition, and the database can be queried separately along each metric or summed across all three. Neighborhood values can be obtained both within and across languages, and outputs can optionally be restricted to neighbors of higher frequency. To enable researchers to more quickly and easily develop stimuli, CLEARPOND can also be searched by features, generating lists of words that meet precise criteria, such as a specific range of neighborhood sizes, lexical frequencies, and/or word lengths. CLEARPOND is freely-available to researchers and the public as a searchable, online database and for download at http://clearpond.northwestern.edu.

  3. Classification of infrastructure networks by neighborhood degree distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Giustolisi, O; Ridolfi, L

    2016-01-01

    A common way of classifying network connectivity is the association of the nodal degree distribution to specific probability distribution models. During the last decades, researchers classified many networks using the Poisson or Pareto distributions. Urban infrastructures, like transportation (railways, roads, etc.) and distribution (gas, water, energy, etc.) systems, are peculiar networks strongly constrained by spatial characteristics of the environment where they are constructed. Consequently, the nodal degree of such networks spans very small ranges not allowing a reliable classification using the nodal degree distribution. In order to overcome this problem, we here (i) define the neighborhood degree, equal to the sum of the nodal degrees of the nearest topological neighbors, the adjacent nodes and (ii) propose to use neighborhood degree to classify infrastructure networks. Such neighborhood degree spans a wider range of degrees than the standard one allowing inferring the probabilistic model in a more re...

  4. µ-shapes: Delineating urban neighborhoods using volunteered geographic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Aadland

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Urban neighborhoods are a unique form of geography in that their boundaries rely on a social definition rather than a well-defined physical or administrative boundary. Currently, geographic gazetteers capture little more than then the centroid of a neighborhood, limiting potential applications of the data. In this paper, we present µ-shapes, an algorithm that employs fuzzy-set theory to model neighborhood boundaries suitable for populating gazetteers using volunteered geographic information (VGI. The algorithm is evaluated using a reference dataset and VGI from the Map Kibera Project. A confusion matrix comparison between the reference dataset and µ-shape's output demonstrated high sensitivity and accuracy. Analysis of variance indicated that the algorithm was able to distinguish between boundary and interior blocks. This suggests that, given the existing state of GIS technology, the µ-shapes algorithm can enable neighborhood-related queries that incorporate spatial uncertainty, e.g., find all restaurants within the core of a neighborhood.

  5. Exploring the evolution of node neighborhoods in Dynamic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, Günce Keziban; Labatut, Vincent; Naskali, Ahmet Teoman

    2017-09-01

    Dynamic Networks are a popular way of modeling and studying the behavior of evolving systems. However, their analysis constitutes a relatively recent subfield of Network Science, and the number of available tools is consequently much smaller than for static networks. In this work, we propose a method specifically designed to take advantage of the longitudinal nature of dynamic networks. It characterizes each individual node by studying the evolution of its direct neighborhood, based on the assumption that the way this neighborhood changes reflects the role and position of the node in the whole network. For this purpose, we define the concept of neighborhood event, which corresponds to the various transformations such groups of nodes can undergo, and describe an algorithm for detecting such events. We demonstrate the interest of our method on three real-world networks: DBLP, LastFM and Enron. We apply frequent pattern mining to extract meaningful information from temporal sequences of neighborhood events. This results in the identification of behavioral trends emerging in the whole network, as well as the individual characterization of specific nodes. We also perform a cluster analysis, which reveals that, in all three networks, one can distinguish two types of nodes exhibiting different behaviors: a very small group of active nodes, whose neighborhood undergo diverse and frequent events, and a very large group of stable nodes.

  6. Neighborhood poverty and racial differences in ESRD incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Nataliya; McClellan, William; Klein, Mitchel; Flanders, Dana; Kleinbaum, David; Soucie, J Michael; Presley, Rodney

    2008-02-01

    Poverty is associated with increased risk of ESRD, but its contribution to observed racial differences in disease incidence is not well-defined. To explore the contribution of neighborhood poverty to racial disparity in ESRD incidence, we analyzed a combination of US Census and ESRD Network 6 data comprising 34,767 patients that initiated dialysis in Georgia, North Carolina, or South Carolina between January 1998 and December 2002. Census tracts were used as the geographic units of analysis, and the proportion of the census tract population living below the poverty level was our measure of neighborhood poverty. Incident ESRD rates were modeled using two-level Poisson regression, where race, age and gender were individual covariates (level 1), and census tract poverty was a neighborhood covariate (level 2). Neighborhood poverty was strongly associated with higher ESRD incidence for both blacks and whites. Increasing poverty was associated with a greater disparity in ESRD rates between blacks and whites, with the former at greater risk. This raises the possibility that blacks may suffer more from lower socioeconomic conditions than whites. The disparity persisted across all poverty levels. The reasons for increasingly higher ESRD incidence among US blacks as neighborhood poverty increases remain to be explained.

  7. Neighborhood-level social processes and substantiated cases of child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Beth E; Goerge, Robert M; Gilsanz, Paola; Hill, Andrea; Subramanian, S V; Holton, John K; Duncan, Dustin T; Beatriz, Elizabeth D; Beardslee, William R

    2016-01-01

    Child maltreatment is a preventable public health problem. Research has demonstrated that neighborhood structural factors (e.g. poverty, crime) can influence the proportion of a neighborhood's children who are victims of maltreatment. A newer strategy is the identification of potentially modifiable social processes at the neighborhood level that can also influence maltreatment. Toward this end, this study examines neighborhood-level data (maltreatment cases substantiated by Illinois' child protection agency, 1995-2005, social processes measured by the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, U.S. Census data, proportions of neighborhoods on public assistance, and crime data) that were linked across clusters of contiguous, relatively homogenous Chicago, IL census tracts with respect to racial/ethnic and socioeconomic composition. Our analysis-an ecological-level, repeated cross-sectional design utilizing random-intercept logit models-with a sensitivity analysis using spatial models to control for spatial autocorrelation-revealed consistent associations between neighborhood social processes and maltreatment. Neighborhoods higher in collective efficacy, intergenerational closure, and social networks, and lower in disorder had lower proportions of neglect, physical abuse, and sexual abuse substantiated cases, controlling for differences in structural factors. Higher collective efficacy and social network size also predicted a lower proportion of substance-exposed infants. This research indicates that strategies to mobilize neighborhood-level protective factors may decrease child maltreatment more effectively than individual and family-focused efforts alone.

  8. On Certain Subclasses of Analytic Functions Defined by Differential Subordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesam Mahzoon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and study certain subclasses of analytic functions which are defined by differential subordination. Coefficient inequalities, some properties of neighborhoods, distortion and covering theorems, radius of starlikeness, and convexity for these subclasses are given.

  9. Comparing neighborhoods of adults with serious mental illness and of the general population: research implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Thomas; Prvu Bettger, Janet; Brusilovskiy, Eugene; Wong, Yin-Ling Irene; Metraux, Stephen; Salzer, Mark S

    2013-08-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health emphasizes the importance of assessing the impact of environmental factors on functioning and disability. Drawing on this emphasis, this study used a set of objective measures to compare the characteristics of neighborhoods of adults with serious mental illness and of the general population. It also examined the relationship between neighborhood characteristics and neighborhood concentration of persons with serious mental illness. The sample comprised 15,246 adults who were treated for serious mental illness in Philadelphia between 1997 and 2000. Principal-components analysis of 22 neighborhood characteristics resulted in an ideal-factor solution of six components. The mean values of each component in neighborhoods of persons with serious mental illness were compared with values in an equally sized group of neighborhoods created by randomly generated addresses representative of the city's general population. Ordinary least-squares regression was used to assess the association between neighborhood characteristics and neighborhood concentration of persons with serious mental illness. Neighborhoods in which adults with serious mental illness resided had higher levels of physical and structural inadequacy, drug-related activity, and crime than comparison neighborhoods. Higher levels of physical and structural inadequacy, crime, drug-related activity, social instability, and social isolation were associated with higher concentration of persons with serious mental illness in the neighborhood's adult population. The differences in neighborhood characteristics identified in this study point to factors that merit closer attention as potential barriers or facilitators in the functioning, participation, and community integration of persons with serious mental illness.

  10. A multidisciplinary geological and geophysical approach to define structural and hydrogeological implications of the Molinaccio spring (Spello, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercoli, Maurizio; Pauselli, Cristina; Forte, Emanuele; Di Matteo, Lucio; Mazzocca, Massimiliano; Frigeri, Alessandro; Federico, Costanzo

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, a multidisciplinary geological and geophysical approach has been applied in the complex area of Molinaccio spring (Spello, Umbria, Central Italy) to: 1) understand the large-scale geologic and tectonic structure of the area; 2) define the hydrogeological behavior of the various formations in relationship with the identified structural elements; 3) highlight at small-scale the tectonic structures and their relationships with the water caption tunnel, which is the draining structure of a still working, ancient Roman aqueduct giving water to the village of Spello and to the surrounding plain. Our approach includes different techniques like Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), direct geological investigations, archaeological studies, GIS data collection and integration. The GPR data revealed, in the area of the water-caption tunnel, two main tectonic structures, both also confirmed by ERT data: the presence of a zone (maximum 2 m wide), interpreted as a normal fault area and an overthrust that puts in contact the permeable Scaglia Rossa limestone (Early Turonian-Middle Eocene), and the Scaglia Variegata-Cinerea marly limestones (Middle Eocene-Upper Oligocene) on the footwall, characterized by lower hydraulic permeability. Using some rough information available on the sub-surface path of the tunnel, that shows a sharp bend after a long straight course, together with the geophysical images, was possible to describe how Romans built the tunnel: they probably followed the wet outcropping rock during the excavation, and changed abruptly the dig direction when they intercepted the normal fault area, aligning then the excavation along its strike. This latter result is important also because recently a multidisciplinary project has been developed to restore and exploit the entire water supply structure, which is not only a well-preserved example of Roman remains with high archaeological value, but also a vital

  11. Neighborhood-following algorithms for linear programming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Wenbao

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present neighborhood-following algorithms for linear programming. When the neighborhood is a wide neighborhood, our algorithms are wide neighborhood primal-dual interior point algorithms. If the neighborhood degenerates into the central path, our algorithms also degenerate into path-following algorithms. We prove that our algorithms maintain the O(√nL)-iteration complexity still, while the classical wide neighborhood primal-dual interior point algorithms have only the O(nL)-iteration complexity. We also proved that the algorithms are quadratic convergence if the optimal vertex is nondegenerate. Finally, we show some computational results of our algorithms.

  12. Structure of branching enzyme- and amylomaltase modified starch produced from well-defined amylose to amylopectin substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorndecha, Waraporn; Sagnelli, Domenico; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Thermostable branching enzyme (BE, EC 2.4.1.18) from Rhodothermus obamensis in combination with amylomaltase (AM, EC 2.4.1.25) from Thermus thermophilus was used to modify starch structure exploring potentials to extensively increase the number of branch points in starch. Amylose is an important...... constituent in starch and the effect of amylose on enzyme catalysis was investigated using amylose-only barley starch (AO) and waxy maize starch (WX) in well-defined ratios. All products were analysed for amylopectin chain length distribution, α-1,6 glucosidic linkages content, molar mass distribution...... by the molar mass rather that the branching density of the glucan per se . Our data demonstrate that a higher amylose content in the substrate starch efficiently produces α-1,6 glucosidic linkages and that the present of amylose generates a higher Μw and more resistant product than amylopectin. The combination...

  13. Examining the social porosity of environmental features on neighborhood sociability and attachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Hipp

    Full Text Available The local neighborhood forms an integral part of our lives. It provides the context through which social networks are nurtured and the foundation from which a sense of attachment and cohesion with fellow residents can be established. Whereas much of the previous research has examined the role of social and demographic characteristic in relation to the level of neighboring and cohesion, this paper explores whether particular environmental features in the neighborhood affect social porosity. We define social porosity as the degree to which social ties flow over the surface of a neighborhood. The focus of our paper is to examine the extent to which a neighborhood's environmental features impede the level of social porosity present among residents. To do this, we integrate data from the census, topographic databases and a 2010 survey of 4,351 residents from 146 neighborhoods in Australia. The study introduces the concepts of wedges and social holes. The presence of two sources of wedges is measured: rivers and highways. The presence of two sources of social holes is measured: parks and industrial areas. Borrowing from the geography literature, several measures are constructed to capture how these features collectively carve up the physical environment of neighborhoods. We then consider how this influences residents' neighboring behavior, their level of attachment to the neighborhood and their sense of neighborhood cohesion. We find that the distance of a neighborhood to one form of social hole-industrial areas-has a particularly strong negative effect on all three dependent variables. The presence of the other form of social hole-parks-has a weaker negative effect. Neighborhood wedges also impact social interaction. Both the length of a river and the number of highway fragments in a neighborhood has a consistent negative effect on neighboring, attachment and cohesion.

  14. The resilience of neighborhood social processes: A case study of the 2011 Brisbane flood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickes, Rebecca; Britt, Chester; Broidy, Lisa

    2017-02-01

    Social disorganization theories position neighborhood social capital and collective efficacy as key social processes that should facilitate community resilience in the aftermath of disaster. Yet limited evidence demonstrates that these social processes are themselves resilient with some studies showing that disaster can fracture even once cohesive neighborhoods. In this paper we assess the stability of neighborhood level collective efficacy and social capital before and after a disaster. We use multilevel structural equation modeling and draw on census and longitudinal survey data collected from over 4000 residents living in 148 neighborhoods in Brisbane, Australia before and after a significant flood event. We examine what happens to social capital and collective efficacy in flooded and non-flooded neighborhoods and assess whether demographic shifts are associated with change and/or stability in these processes. We find strong evidence that these processes operate similarly across flooded and not flooded communities. Our findings also reveal significant stability for our measures of social capital across time, while collective efficacy increases post flood across all neighborhoods, but more so in flooded neighborhoods. Neighborhood demographics have limited effect on patterns of stability or change in these social processes. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings for our understanding of neighborhood resilience in the wake of disaster.

  15. Neighborhood poverty, aspirations and expectations, and initiation of sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubbin, Catherine; Brindis, Claire D; Jain, Sonia; Santelli, John; Braveman, Paula

    2010-10-01

    Cross-sectional research has demonstrated associations between neighborhood socioeconomic characteristics and adolescents' initiation of heterosexual intercourse. Prospective designs are needed to move toward causal inference, and to identify mediating and moderating influences to inform policies and programs. Among 5,838 nonsexually active participants in wave I (1994-1995) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, multilevel logistic regression analyses were used to predict initiation of sex by wave II (1996); models were stratified by gender and age group (11-14 and 15-17 yr). Predictors measured at wave I included census tract-level (neighborhood) poverty concentration, family-level income, parental education, race/ethnicity, and family structure. Adolescent college aspirations and life expectations were tested as possible mediators or moderators of the neighborhood poverty-sexual initiation association. Neighborhood poverty concentration predicted older (15-17 yr) girls' and boys' sexual initiation, after considering individual-level covariates. However, adolescent college aspirations and life expectations were not found to mediate the prediction relationship. Moderating effects were identified for girls (college aspirations) and boys (positive life expectations) in high-poverty neighborhoods, paradoxically reflecting increased risk. In this longitudinal study, moderating effects generally considered protective against sexual initiation were not protective or were harmful for adolescents living in high-poverty neighborhoods. Subsequent research to understand how to reduce the health risks of living in poor neighborhoods must examine an even wider range of variables and/or use different methodologies. Copyright © 2010 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neighborhood perceptions and allostatic load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Deurzen, Ioana; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Christensen, Ulla;

    2016-01-01

    this line of argumentation, in the present study we test whether subjective perceptions of neighborhood characteristics relate to an objective measure of stress-related physiological functioning, namely allostatic load (AL). We use a large dataset of 5280 respondents living in different regions of Denmark...... and we account for two alternative mechanisms, i.e., the objective characteristics of the living environment and the socio-economic status of individuals. Our results support the chronic stress mechanisms linking neighborhood quality to health. Heightened perceptions of disorder and pollution were found...

  17. Design and synthesis of structurally well-defined functional polypropylenes via transition metal-mediated olefin polymerization chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Jinyong

    2006-01-01

    Functionalization of polyolefins is an industrially important yet scientifically challenging research subject.This paper summarizes our recent effort to access structurally well-defined functional polypropylenes via transition metal-mediated olefin polymerization.In one approach,polypropylenes containing side chain functional groups of controlled concentrations were obtained by Ziegler-Natta-catalyzed copolymerization of propylene in combination with either living anionic or controlled radical polymerization of polar monomers.The copolymerization of propylene with 1,4-divinylbenzene using an isospecific MgC12-supported TIC14 catalyst yielded potypropylenes containing pendant styrene moieties.Both metalation reaction with n-butyllithium and hydrochlorination reaction with dry hydrogen chloride selectively and quantitatively occurred at the pendant reactive sites,generating polymeric benzyllithium and 1-chloroethylbenzene species.These species initiated living anionic polymerization of styrene(S)and atom transfer radical polymerization(in the presence of CuC1 and pentamethyldiethylenetriamine) of methyl methacrylate(MMA),respectively,resulting in functional polypropylene graft copolymers(PP-g-PS and PP-g-PMMA)with controllable graft lengths.In another approach,chain end-functionalized polypropylenes containing a terminal OH-group with controlled molecular weights were directly prepared by propylene polymerization with a metaUocene catalyst through a selective aluminum chain transfer reaction.Both approaches proved to be desirable polyolefin functionalization routes in terms of efficiency and polymer structure controllability.

  18. Structure of dimeric, recombinant Sulfolobus solfataricus phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase: a bent dimer defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rune W; Leggio, Leila Lo; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-03-01

    The enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl-1-α-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase (EC 2.7.6.1) catalyses the Mg(2+)-dependent transfer of a diphosphoryl group from ATP to the C1 hydroxyl group of ribose 5-phosphate resulting in the production of PRPP and AMP. A nucleotide sequence specifying Sulfolobus solfataricus PRPP synthase was synthesised in vitro with optimised codon usage for expression in Escherichia coli. Following expression of the gene in E. coli PRPP synthase was purified by heat treatment and ammonium sulphate precipitation and the structure of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A bent dimer oligomerisation was revealed, which seems to be an abundant feature among PRPP synthases for defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP. Molecular replacement was used to determine the S. solfataricus PRPP synthase structure with a monomer subunit of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii PRPP synthase as a search model. The two amino acid sequences share 35 % identity. The resulting asymmetric unit consists of three separated dimers. The protein was co-crystallised in the presence of AMP and ribose 5-phosphate, but in the electron density map of the active site only AMP and a sulphate ion were observed. Sulphate ion, reminiscent of the ammonium sulphate precipitation step of the purification, seems to bind tightly and, therefore, presumably occupies and blocks the ribose 5-phosphate binding site. The activity of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase is independent of phosphate ion.

  19. Schools, Neighborhood Risk Factors, and Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willits, Dale; Broidy, Lisa; Denman, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    Prior research has identified a link between schools (particularly high schools) and neighborhood crime rates. However, it remains unclear whether the relationship between schools and crime is a reflection of other criminogenic dynamics at the neighborhood level or whether schools influence neighborhood crime patterns independently of other…

  20. Can Geographic Bridging Social Capital Improve the Health of People Who Live in Deprived Urban Neighborhoods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-O; Cho, Byong-Hee

    2016-10-01

    The growing number of people living in deprived urban neighborhoods, which often have unhealthy environments, is of growing concern to inequality researchers. Social capital could be a resource to help such communities get ahead. In this study, we examined the differential effects of bonding and bridging social capital on self-rated health using two operational definitions, which we call personal and geographic social capital. Bonding and bridging social capital were operationally distinguished as respondents' perceived similarity to other members of a group with respect to personal characteristics (personal social capital) or as structural similarity with respect to geographical location (geographic social capital). The results showed that although both bonding and bridging social capital as defined by person-based criteria were associated with increased odds of self-rated health compared to those who reported zero participation, when defined by place-based criteria, only bridging social capital was associated with increased odds of self-rated health; no clear association was found between health and belonging to groups within the neighborhood, so-called geographic bonding social capital. The present study suggests that geographic bridging social capital can function as linking social capital that enables an upward approach depending on the political and economic contexts of urbanization.

  1. Some remarks on the size of tubular neighborhoods in contact topology and fillability

    CERN Document Server

    Niederkrüger, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    The well known tubular neighborhood theorem for contact submanifolds states that a small enough neighborhood of such a submanifold N is uniquely determined by the contact structure on N, and the conformal symplectic structure of the normal bundle. In particular, if the submanifold N has trivial normal bundle then its tubular neighborhood will be contactomorphic to a neighborhood of Nx{0} in the model space NxR^{2k}. In this article we make the observation that if (N,\\xi_N) is a 3-dimensional overtwisted submanifold with trivial normal bundle in (M,\\xi), and if its model neighborhood is sufficiently large, then (M,\\xi) does not admit an exact symplectic filling.

  2. Internet bad neighborhoods temporal behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moura, Giovane C.M.; Sadre, Ramin; Pras, Aiko

    2014-01-01

    Malicious hosts tend to be concentrated in certain areas of the IP addressing space, forming the so-called Bad Neighborhoods. Knowledge about this concentration is valuable in predicting attacks from unseen IP addresses. This observation has been employed in previous works to filter out spam. In thi

  3. Internet Bad Neighborhoods Temporal Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira Moura, G.C.; Sadre, R.; Pras, A.

    2014-01-01

    Malicious hosts tend to be concentrated in certain areas of the IP addressing space, forming the so-called Bad Neighborhoods. Knowledge about this concentration is valuable in predicting attacks from unseen IP addresses. This observation has been employed in previous works to filter out spam. In th

  4. Neighborhood Effects on Felony Sentencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldredge, John

    2007-01-01

    The relatively high imprisonment rates of African American men from poor neighborhoods raise a question of whether felony sentences are influenced by ecological factors, separately from or in conjunction with a defendant's race. To provide insight on the topic, both legal and extralegal effects on imprisonment and sentence length were modeled for…

  5. Defining RNA motif-aminoglycoside interactions via two-dimensional combinatorial screening and structure-activity relationships through sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-10-15

    RNA is an extremely important target for the development of chemical probes of function or small molecule therapeutics. Aminoglycosides are the most well studied class of small molecules to target RNA. However, the RNA motifs outside of the bacterial rRNA A-site that are likely to be bound by these compounds in biological systems is largely unknown. If such information were known, it could allow for aminoglycosides to be exploited to target other RNAs and, in addition, could provide invaluable insights into potential bystander targets of these clinically used drugs. We utilized two-dimensional combinatorial screening (2DCS), a library-versus-library screening approach, to select the motifs displayed in a 3×3 nucleotide internal loop library and in a 6-nucleotide hairpin library that bind with high affinity and selectivity to six aminoglycoside derivatives. The selected RNA motifs were then analyzed using structure-activity relationships through sequencing (StARTS), a statistical approach that defines the privileged RNA motif space that binds a small molecule. StARTS allowed for the facile annotation of the selected RNA motif-aminoglycoside interactions in terms of affinity and selectivity. The interactions selected by 2DCS generally have nanomolar affinities, which is higher affinity than the binding of aminoglycosides to a mimic of their therapeutic target, the bacterial rRNA A-site.

  6. Direct and indirect effects of neighborhood characteristics on the perpetration of dating violence across adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ling-Yin; Foshee, Vangie A; Reyes, Heathe Luz McNaughton; Ennett, Susan T; Halpern, Carolyn T

    2015-03-01

    Neighborhood context plays a role in the development of adolescent health risk behaviors, but few studies have investigated the influence of neighborhoods on the perpetration of dating violence. This longitudinal study examined the direct effects of risky neighborhood structural and physical characteristics on trajectories of the perpetration of dating violence, tested whether collective efficacy mediated these relationships, and determined if the effects varied by the sex of the adolescent. Adolescent data are from a multi-wave longitudinal study from grades 8 to 12; neighborhood data were collected from parents' interviews and U.S. Census data. Multilevel growth curve models were conducted with 3,218 students; the sample was 50% male, 41% White, 50% Black, and 9% other race/ethnicity. In models examining risky neighborhood variables one at a time, and controlling for potential individual-level confounders, the sex of the adolescent interacted with economic disadvantage, residential instability, and physical disorder; these risky neighborhood characteristics increased risk for girls' but not boys' perpetrating of dating violence. In full models with all of the risky neighborhood variables, the sex of the adolescent continued to interact with neighborhood economic disadvantage; living in economically disadvantaged neighborhoods increased girls' but not boys' risk for dating violence across all ages. No other risky neighborhood effects were found for boys or girls. Collective efficacy did not mediate the relationships between other neighborhood characteristics and the outcome. These findings suggest that dating violence prevention strategies for girls should consider the contexts in which they live rather than only targeting changes in their individual characteristics.

  7. Inequalities in neighborhood child asthma admission rates and underlying community characteristics in one US county.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Andrew F; Moncrief, Terri; Huang, Bin; Simmons, Jeffrey M; Sauers, Hadley; Chen, Chen; Kahn, Robert S

    2013-08-01

    To characterize variation and inequalities in neighborhood child asthma admission rates and to identify associated community factors within one US county. This population-based prospective, observational cohort study consisted of 862 sequential child asthma admissions among 167 653 eligible children ages 1-16 years in Hamilton County, Ohio. Admissions occurred at a tertiary-care pediatric hospital and accounted for nearly 95% of in-county asthma admissions. Neighborhood admission rates were assessed by geocoding addresses to city- and county-defined neighborhoods. The 2010 US Census provided denominator data. Neighborhood admission distribution inequality was assessed by the use of Gini and Robin Hood indices. Associations between neighborhood rates and socioeconomic and environmental factors were assessed using ANOVA and linear regression. The county admission rate was 5.1 per 1000 children. Neighborhood rates varied significantly by quintile: 17.6, 7.7, 4.9, 2.2, and 0.2 admissions per 1000 children (P Robin Hood index of 0.38 indicated significant inequality. Neighborhood-level educational attainment, car access, and population density best explained variation in neighborhood admission rates (R(2) = 0.55). In a single year, asthma admission rates varied 88-fold across neighborhood quintiles in one county; a reduction of the county-wide admission rate to that of the bottom quintile would decrease annual admissions from 862 to 34. A rate of zero was present in 15 neighborhoods, which is evidence of what may be attainable. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Metric Propositional Neighborhood Logics: Expressiveness, Decidability, and Undecidability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresolin, Davide; Della Monica, Dario; Goranko, Valentin;

    2010-01-01

    Metric Propositional Neighborhood Logic (MPNL) over natural numbers. MPNL features two modalities referring, respectively, to an interval that is “met by” the current one and to an interval that “meets” the current one, plus an infinite set of length constraints, regarded as atomic propositions...... that MPNL is decidable in double exponential time and expressively complete with respect to a well-defined subfragment of the two-variable fragment FO2[N, =,...

  9. Does neighborhood social cohesion modify the relationship between neighborhood social norms and smoking behaviors in Mexico?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Paula; Fleischer, Nancy L; Moore, Spencer; Shigematsu, Luz Myriam Reynales; Santillán, Edna Arillo; Thrasher, James F

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the separate and combined relationships of neighborhood social norms and neighborhood social cohesion with smoking behavior in a cohort of adult Mexican smokers. Neighborhood anti-smoking norms were measured as the proportion of residents in each neighborhood who believed that society disapproves of smoking. Perceived social cohesion was measured using a 5-item cohesion scale and aggregated to the neighborhood level. Higher neighborhood anti-smoking norms were associated with less successful quitting. Neighborhood social cohesion modified the relationship between neighborhood social norms and two smoking behaviors: smoking intensity and quit attempts. Residents of neighborhoods with weaker anti-smoking norms and higher social cohesion had lower smoking intensity and more quit attempts than residents living in other areas. Social cohesion may help buffer smoking behavior in areas with weak social norms.

  10. Spatially adaptive morphological image filtering using intrinsic structuring elements:

    OpenAIRE

    Johan Debayle; Jean-Charles Pinoli

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with spatially adaptive morphological filtering, extending the theory of mathematical morphology to the paradigm of adaptive neighborhood. The basic idea in this approach is to substitute the extrinsically-defined, fixed-shape, fixed-size structuring elements generally used by morphological operators, by intrinsically-defined, variable-shape, variable-size structuring elements. These last so-called intrinsic structuring elements fit to the local features of the image, with re...

  11. Perceptions of the Neighborhood Environment and Children’s Afterschool Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Samantha M; Dowda, Marsha; Colabianchi, Natalie; Porter, Dwayne; Dishman, Rod K.; Pate, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggests the neighborhood environment may be an important influence on children’s physical activity (PA) behaviors; however, findings are inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to further understand the relationship between perceptions of the neighborhood environment and children’s afterschool moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA). Utilizing a structural equation modeling technique, we tested a conceptual model linking parent and child perceptions of the neighborhood environment, parent support for PA, and child outdoor PA with children’s afterschool MVPA. We found that child perception of the neighborhood environment and outdoor PA were positively associated with afterschool MVPA. In addition, parent support for PA positively influenced children’s outdoor PA. The neighborhood environment and outdoor activity appear to play an influential role on children’s afterschool PA behaviors. PMID:25679820

  12. Perceptions of the Neighborhood Environment and Children's Afterschool Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Samantha; Dowda, Marsha; Colabianchi, Natalie; Porter, Dwayne; Dishman, Rod K; Pate, Russell R

    2015-05-01

    Previous research suggests the neighborhood environment may be an important influence on children's physical activity (PA) behaviors; however, findings are inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to further understand the relationship between perceptions of the neighborhood environment and children's afterschool moderate-to-vigorous PA. Utilizing a structural equation modeling technique, we tested a conceptual model linking parent and child perceptions of the neighborhood environment, parent support for PA, and child outdoor PA with children's afterschool moderate-to vigorous PA. We found that child perception of the neighborhood environment and outdoor PA were positively associated with afterschool moderate-to-vigorous PA. In addition, parent support for PA positively influenced children's outdoor PA. The neighborhood environment and outdoor activity appear to play an influential role on children's afterschool PA behaviors.

  13. Neighborhood-Level Interventions to Improve Childhood Opportunity and Lift Children Out of Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandel, Megan; Faugno, Elena; Mingo, Angela; Cannon, Jessie; Byrd, Kymberly; Garcia, Dolores Acevedo; Collier, Sheena; McClure, Elizabeth; Jarrett, Renée Boynton

    2016-04-01

    Population health is associated with the socioeconomic characteristics of neighborhoods. There is considerable scientific and policy interest in community-level interventions to alleviate child poverty. Intergenerational poverty is associated with inequitable access to opportunities. Improving opportunity structures within neighborhoods may contribute to improved child health and development. Neighborhood-level efforts to alleviate poverty for all children require alignment of cross-sector efforts, community engagement, and multifactorial approaches that consider the role of people as well as place. We highlight several accessible tools and strategies that health practitioners can engage to improve regional and local systems that influence child opportunity. The Child Opportunity Index is a population-level surveillance tool to describe community-level resources and inequities in US metropolitan areas. The case studies reviewed outline strategies for creating higher opportunity neighborhoods for pediatricians interested in working across sectors to address the impact of neighborhood opportunity on child health and well-being.

  14. The Importance of Social Context: Neighborhood Stressors, Stress-Buffering Mechanisms, and Alcohol, Drug, and Mental Health Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Stockdale, Susan E.; Wells, Kenneth B.; Tang, Lingqi; Belin, Thomas R.; Zhang, Lily; SHERBOURNE, CATHY D.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the relationship among neighborhood stressors, stress-buffering mechanisms, and likelihood of alcohol, drug, and mental health (ADM) disorders in adults from 60 US communities (n=12,716). Research shows that larger support structures may interact with individual support factors to affect mental health, but few studies have explored buffering effects of these neighborhood characteristics. We test a conceptual model that explores effects of neighborhood stressors and stress-...

  15. Direct Neighborhood Discriminant Analysis for Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Face recognition is a challenging problem in computer vision and pattern recognition. Recently, many local geometrical structure-based techiniques are presented to obtain the low-dimensional representation of face images with enhanced discriminatory power. However, these methods suffer from the small simple size (SSS problem or the high computation complexity of high-dimensional data. To overcome these problems, we propose a novel local manifold structure learning method for face recognition, named direct neighborhood discriminant analysis (DNDA, which separates the nearby samples of interclass and preserves the local within-class geometry in two steps, respectively. In addition, the PCA preprocessing to reduce dimension to a large extent is not needed in DNDA avoiding loss of discriminative information. Experiments conducted on ORL, Yale, and UMIST face databases show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Neighborhood Effects on Youth Crime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotger, Gabriel Pons; Galster, George Charles

    We investigate the degree to which youth (ages 14-29) criminal offenses are influenced by neighbors, identifying causal effects with a natural experimental allocation of social housing in Copenhagen. We find that youth exposed to a one percentage point higher concentration of neighbors with drug...... criminal records are 6% more likely to be charged for criminal offenses (both drug and property crimes), and this impact manifests itself after six months of exposure. This neighborhood effect is stronger for previous offenders, and does not lead to criminal partnerships. Our exploration of alternative...... mechanisms suggests youth interaction in proximate residential context with older adults with drug crime experience as the most plausible source of neighborhood effects....

  17. Tourism, art and urban neighborhoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Skoll

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: One of the most troubling aspects of cultural studies, is the lack of comparative cases to expand the horizons of micro-sociology. Based on this, the present paper explores the effects of gentrification in one neighborhood, Riverwest in Milwaukee, Wisconsin USA. This essay-review explores the role of arts, not only as creating an image of neighborhoods, but as a mechanism to prevent the commoditization of spaces. Riverwest has never been commoditized as a tourist-product like many other tourist-sites. The concept of patrimony and heritage are placed under the lens of scrutiny in this investigation. To some extent, some cities are produced to be consumed while others do not, is one of the intriguing points this research explores.

  18. Tourism, art and urban neighborhoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Skoll

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most troubling aspects of cultural studies, is the lack of comparative cases to expand the horizons of micro-sociology. Based on this, the present paper explores the effects of gentrification in one neighborhood, Riverwest in Milwaukee, Wisconsin USA. This essay-review explores the role of arts, not only as creating an image of neighborhoods, but as a mechanism to prevent the commoditization of spaces. Riverwest has never been commoditized as a tourist-product like many other tourist-sites. The concept of patrimony and heritage are placed under the lens of scrutiny in this investigation. To some extent, some cities are produced to be consumed while others do not, is one of the intriguing points this research explores.

  19. Define Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    "Project" is a key concept in IS management. The word is frequently used in textbooks and standards. Yet we seldom find a precise definition of the concept. This paper discusses how to define the concept of a project. The proposed definition covers both heavily formalized projects and informally...... organized, agile projects. Based on the proposed definition popular existing definitions are discussed....

  20. An investigation of Bartonella spp., Rickettsia typhi, and Seoul hantavirus in rats (Rattus spp.) from an inner-city neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada: is pathogen presence a reflection of global and local rat population structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Bai, Ying; Kosoy, Michael Y; Wood, Heidi; DiBernardo, Antonia; Lindsay, Robbin; Bidulka, Julie; Tang, Patrick; Jardine, Claire; Patrick, David

    2015-01-01

    Urban Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) are reservoirs for variety of zoonotic pathogens. Many of these pathogens, including Rickettsia typhi, Bartonella spp., and Seoul hantavirus (SEOV), are thought to be endemic in rat populations worldwide; however, past field research has found these organisms to be absent in certain rat populations. Rats (Rattus spp.) from an inner city neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada, were tested for exposure to and/or infection with SEOV and R. typhi (using serology and PCR), as well as Bartonella spp. (using culture and sequencing). Approximately 25% of 404 rats tested were infected with Bartonella tribocorum, which demonstrated significant geographic clustering within the study area. Infection was associated with both season and sexual maturity. Seroreactivity against R. typhi and SEOV was observed in 0.36% and 1.45% of 553 rats tested, respectively, although PCR screening results for these pathogens were negative, suggesting that they are not endemic in the study population. Overall, these results suggest that the geographic distribution of rat-associated zoonoses, including R. typhi, SEOV, and Bartonella spp., is less ubiquitous than previously appreciated, and is likely dependent on patterns of dispersion and establishment of the rat reservoir host. Further study on global and local Rattus spp. population structures may help to elucidate the ecology of zoonotic organisms in these species.

  1. Racial/ethnic residential segregation, neighborhood poverty and urinary biomarkers of diet in New York City adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Stella S; Ruff, Ryan R; Jung, Molly; Waddell, Elizabeth Needham

    2014-12-01

    Consuming less sodium and more potassium are components of a healthy diet and reduced cardiovascular disease risk. Racial/ethnic segregation and poverty are both associated with dietary habits, but data linking dietary intake to neighborhood characteristics are limited, particularly in Hispanic and Asian American ethnic enclaves. This study presents relationships between neighborhood-level segregation, poverty and biologic indicators of sodium and potassium consumption. Data were from the 2010 Heart Follow-Up Study, a cross-sectional health survey, which included 24-h urine collections and self-reported health status (n = 1656). Black, Hispanic, and Asian segregated areas and neighborhood poverty were defined for aggregated zip-code areas. Multivariable models assessed the association between neighborhood segregation and poverty and sodium and potassium intake, after adjustment for individual-level covariates. In unadjusted models, potassium intake (a marker of fruit and vegetable consumption) was lower in high-versus low-Hispanic segregated neighborhoods, and the sodium-potassium ratio was higher in high-versus low black and Hispanic segregated neighborhoods, and in high-versus low-poverty neighborhoods; the sodium-potassium ratio was lower in high-versus low Asian segregated neighborhoods. Segregation and poverty were not independently associated with nutrition biomarkers after adjustment for demographics and for each other; however, practical consideration of neighborhood race/ethnic composition may be useful to understand differences in consumption.

  2. Neighborhood-Level Poverty at Menarche and Prepregnancy Obesity in African-American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E; Peters, Rosalind M; Burmeister, Charlotte; Bielak, Lawrence F; Johnson, Dayna A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Menarche is a critical time point in a woman's reproductive system development; exposures at menarche may influence maternal health. Living in a poorer neighborhood is associated with adult obesity; however, little is known if neighborhood factors at menarche are associated with prepregnancy obesity. Methods. We examined the association of neighborhood-level poverty at menarche with prepregnancy body mass index category in 144 pregnant African-American women. Address at menarche was geocoded to census tract (closest to year of menarche); neighborhood-level poverty was defined as the proportion of residents living under the federal poverty level. Cumulative logistic regression was used to examine the association of neighborhood-level poverty at menarche, in quartiles, with categorical prepregnancy BMI. Results. Before pregnancy, 59 (41%) women were obese. Compared to women in the lowest neighborhood-level poverty quartile, women in the highest quartile had 2.9 [1.2, 6.9] times higher odds of prepregnancy obesity; this was slightly attenuated after adjusting for age, marital status, education, and parity (odds ratio: 2.3 [0.9, 6.3]). Conclusions. Living in a higher poverty neighborhood at menarche is associated with prepregnancy obesity in African-American women. Future studies are needed to better understand the role of exposures in menarche on health in pregnancy.

  3. Exploring neighborhoods in the metagenome universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aßhauer, Kathrin P; Klingenberg, Heiner; Lingner, Thomas; Meinicke, Peter

    2014-07-14

    The variety of metagenomes in current databases provides a rapidly growing source of information for comparative studies. However, the quantity and quality of supplementary metadata is still lagging behind. It is therefore important to be able to identify related metagenomes by means of the available sequence data alone. We have studied efficient sequence-based methods for large-scale identification of similar metagenomes within a database retrieval context. In a broad comparison of different profiling methods we found that vector-based distance measures are well-suitable for the detection of metagenomic neighbors. Our evaluation on more than 1700 publicly available metagenomes indicates that for a query metagenome from a particular habitat on average nine out of ten nearest neighbors represent the same habitat category independent of the utilized profiling method or distance measure. While for well-defined labels a neighborhood accuracy of 100% can be achieved, in general the neighbor detection is severely affected by a natural overlap of manually annotated categories. In addition, we present results of a novel visualization method that is able to reflect the similarity of metagenomes in a 2D scatter plot. The visualization method shows a similarly high accuracy in the reduced space as compared with the high-dimensional profile space. Our study suggests that for inspection of metagenome neighborhoods the profiling methods and distance measures can be chosen to provide a convenient interpretation of results in terms of the underlying features. Furthermore, supplementary metadata of metagenome samples in the future needs to comply with readily available ontologies for fine-grained and standardized annotation. To make profile-based k-nearest-neighbor search and the 2D-visualization of the metagenome universe available to the research community, we included the proposed methods in our CoMet-Universe server for comparative metagenome analysis.

  4. Exploring Neighborhoods in the Metagenome Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin P. Aßhauer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The variety of metagenomes in current databases provides a rapidly growing source of information for comparative studies. However, the quantity and quality of supplementary metadata is still lagging behind. It is therefore important to be able to identify related metagenomes by means of the available sequence data alone. We have studied efficient sequence-based methods for large-scale identification of similar metagenomes within a database retrieval context. In a broad comparison of different profiling methods we found that vector-based distance measures are well-suitable for the detection of metagenomic neighbors. Our evaluation on more than 1700 publicly available metagenomes indicates that for a query metagenome from a particular habitat on average nine out of ten nearest neighbors represent the same habitat category independent of the utilized profiling method or distance measure. While for well-defined labels a neighborhood accuracy of 100% can be achieved, in general the neighbor detection is severely affected by a natural overlap of manually annotated categories. In addition, we present results of a novel visualization method that is able to reflect the similarity of metagenomes in a 2D scatter plot. The visualization method shows a similarly high accuracy in the reduced space as compared with the high-dimensional profile space. Our study suggests that for inspection of metagenome neighborhoods the profiling methods and distance measures can be chosen to provide a convenient interpretation of results in terms of the underlying features. Furthermore, supplementary metadata of metagenome samples in the future needs to comply with readily available ontologies for fine-grained and standardized annotation. To make profile-based k-nearest-neighbor search and the 2D-visualization of the metagenome universe available to the research community, we included the proposed methods in our CoMet-Universe server for comparative metagenome analysis.

  5. Neighborhood quality and labor market outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil

    2014-01-01

    Settlement in a socially deprived neighborhood may hamper individual labor market outcomes because of lack of employed or highly skilled contacts. I investigate this hypothesis by exploiting a unique natural experment that occurred between 1986 and 1998 when refugee immigrants to Denmark were...... assigned to municpalities quasi-randomly, which successfully addresses the methodological problem of endogenous neighborhood selection. I show that individuals sort intor neighborhoods. Taking account of location sorting, living in a socially deprived neighborhood does not affect labor market outcomes...... of refugee men. Their labor market outcomes are also not affected by the overall employment rate and the overall average skill level in the neighborhood. However, an increase in the average skill level of non-Western immigrant men living in the neighborhood raises their employment probability, while...

  6. Travel beyond the home neighborhood for delinquent behaviors: moderation of home neighborhood influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompsett, Carolyn J; Amrhein, Kelly E; Hassan, Sarah

    2014-06-01

    Neighborhood research indicates that adolescents are at higher risk for delinquency when they reside in neighborhoods low in collective efficacy, low in perceived prosocial norms and values, and high in availability of substances and firearms. However, as adolescents develop, they are more likely to independently travel during their day-to-day activities, and the effects of their home neighborhood may be weakened as they spend time in other communities. The current study surveyed 179 adolescents involved in the juvenile justice system in a small Midwestern city on their perceptions of their home neighborhood and self-reported delinquency. While perceptions of several home neighborhood characteristics significantly predicted severity of delinquency for all respondents, neighborhood effects were significantly weaker for those adolescents who tended to engage in illegal behaviors outside their home neighborhood. These findings suggest that future research and prevention efforts should include more attention to how adolescents may be influenced by multiple neighborhoods.

  7. Neighborhood Quality and Labor Market Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil

    neighborhood may, therefore, hamper individual labor market outcomes because of lack of employed contacts. I investigate this hypothesis by exploiting a unique natural experiment that occurred between 1986 and 1998 when refugee immigrants to Denmark were assigned to municipalities quasirandomly, which...... successfully addresses the methodological problem of endogenous neighborhood selection. Taking account of location sorting, living in a socially deprived neighborhood does not affect labor market outcomes of refugee men. Furthermore, their labor market outcomes are not affected by the overall employment rate...

  8. Influences on Neighborhood Walking in Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose; Clarke, Philippa J.; Ronis, David L.; Cherry, Carol Loveland; Nyquist, Linda; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional survey study was to examine the influence of self-efficacy, outcome expectations and environment on neighborhood walking in older adults with (n=163, mean age=78.7, SD=7.96 years) and without (n=163, mean age=73.6, SD=7.93 years) mobility limitations (controlling for demographic characteristics). Measures included: Neighborhood Physical Activity Questionnaire, Multidimensional Outcome Expectations for Exercise Scale, Neighborhood Environment Walkability Sca...

  9. A neighborhood susceptibility index for planning of local physical interventions in response to pandemic influenza outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpka, Toomas; Eriksson, Henrik; Strömgren, Magnus; Eriksson, Olle; Ekberg, Joakim; Grimvall, Anders; Nyce, James; Gursky, Elin; Holm, Einar

    2010-11-13

    The global spread of a novel A (H1N1) influenza virus in 2009 has highlighted the possibility of a devastating pandemic similar to the 'Spanish flu' of 1917-1918. Responding to such pandemics requires careful planning for the early phases where there is no availability of pandemic vaccine. We set out to compute a Neighborhood Influenza Susceptibility Index (NISI) describing the vulnerability of local communities of different geo-socio-physical structure to a pandemic influenza outbreak. We used a spatially explicit geo-physical model of Linköping municipality (pop. 136,240) in Sweden, and employed an ontology-modeling tool to define simulation models and transmission settings. We found considerable differences in NISI between neighborhoods corresponding to primary care areas with regard to early progress of the outbreak, as well as in terms of the total accumulated share of infected residents counted after the outbreak. The NISI can be used in local preparations of physical response measures during pandemics.

  10. CLEARPOND: cross-linguistic easy-access resource for phonological and orthographic neighborhood densities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Marian

    Full Text Available Past research has demonstrated cross-linguistic, cross-modal, and task-dependent differences in neighborhood density effects, indicating a need to control for neighborhood variables when developing and interpreting research on language processing. The goals of the present paper are two-fold: (1 to introduce CLEARPOND (Cross-Linguistic Easy-Access Resource for Phonological and Orthographic Neighborhood Densities, a centralized database of phonological and orthographic neighborhood information, both within and between languages, for five commonly-studied languages: Dutch, English, French, German, and Spanish; and (2 to show how CLEARPOND can be used to compare general properties of phonological and orthographic neighborhoods across languages. CLEARPOND allows researchers to input a word or list of words and obtain phonological and orthographic neighbors, neighborhood densities, mean neighborhood frequencies, word lengths by number of phonemes and graphemes, and spoken-word frequencies. Neighbors can be defined by substitution, deletion, and/or addition, and the database can be queried separately along each metric or summed across all three. Neighborhood values can be obtained both within and across languages, and outputs can optionally be restricted to neighbors of higher frequency. To enable researchers to more quickly and easily develop stimuli, CLEARPOND can also be searched by features, generating lists of words that meet precise criteria, such as a specific range of neighborhood sizes, lexical frequencies, and/or word lengths. CLEARPOND is freely-available to researchers and the public as a searchable, online database and for download at http://clearpond.northwestern.edu.

  11. Active living neighborhoods: is neighborhood walkability a key element for Belgian adolescents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Meester Femke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In adult research, neighborhood walkability has been acknowledged as an important construct among the built environmental correlates of physical activity. Research into this association has only recently been extended to adolescents and the current empirical evidence is not consistent. This study investigated whether neighborhood walkability and neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES are associated with physical activity among Belgian adolescents and whether the association between neighborhood walkability and physical activity is moderated by neighborhood SES and gender. Methods In Ghent (Belgium, 32 neighborhoods were selected based on GIS-based walkability and SES derived from census data. In total, 637 adolescents (aged 13-15 year, 49.6% male participated in the study. Physical activity was assessed using accelerometers and the Flemish Physical Activity Questionnaire. To analyze the associations between neighborhood walkability, neighborhood SES and individual physical activity, multivariate multi-level regression analyses were conducted. Results Only in low-SES neighborhoods, neighborhood walkability was positively associated with accelerometer-based moderate to vigorous physical activity and the average activity level expressed in counts/minute. For active transport to and from school, cycling for transport during leisure time and sport during leisure time no association with neighborhood walkability nor, with neighborhood SES was found. For walking for transport during leisure time a negative association with neighborhood SES was found. Gender did not moderate the associations of neighborhood walkability and SES with adolescent physical activity. Conclusions Neighborhood walkability was related to accelerometer-based physical activity only among adolescent boys and girls living in low-SES neighborhoods. The relation of built environment to adolescent physical activity may depend on the context.

  12. A variable neighborhood Walksat-based algorithm for MAX-SAT problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhmala, Noureddine

    2014-01-01

    The simplicity of the maximum satisfiability problem (MAX-SAT) combined with its applicability in many areas of artificial intelligence and computing science made it one of the fundamental optimization problems. This NP-complete problem refers to the task of finding a variable assignment that satisfies the maximum number of clauses (or the sum of weights of satisfied clauses) in a Boolean formula. The Walksat algorithm is considered to be the main skeleton underlying almost all local search algorithms for MAX-SAT. Most local search algorithms including Walksat rely on the 1-flip neighborhood structure. This paper introduces a variable neighborhood walksat-based algorithm. The neighborhood structure can be combined easily using any local search algorithm. Its effectiveness is compared with existing algorithms using 1-flip neighborhood structure and solvers such as CCLS and Optimax from the eighth MAX-SAT evaluation.

  13. Family functioning as a mediator between neighborhood conditions and children's health: evidence from a national survey in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yingling; Chen, Qian

    2012-06-01

    This study examines whether the associations between neighborhood conditions and children's health can be indirect and operate through aspects of family functioning. We use data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health in the United States with the interviewed parents/guardians as the only source of the data. Our study sample includes 53,023 children aged between 6 and 17 years. Using structural equation modeling, we test both direct and indirect relationships between a family functioning index, a general indicator of children's health status, and three neighborhood factors: neighborhood physical resources, environmental threats, and collective efficacy. Covariates in the analysis include gender, age, income, race, family structure, parental education, and health insurance coverage. All the three neighborhood factors show direct associations with children's general health status, as well as indirect associations mediated by aspects of family functioning. Among the three neighborhood factors, collective efficacy and environmental threats are found to have much stronger associations with children's general health than physical resources. When designing health-promoting neighborhoods for children and families, it may be more efficient for urban planners and health professionals to focus on community programs that reduce environmental stressors and foster neighborhood cohesion than programs that solely improve physical infrastructure. This study also verifies that aspects of family functioning mediate the associations between neighborhood conditions and children's health. It is recommended that both family and neighborhood are critical points for child health intervention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neighborhoods and mental health: exploring ethnic density, poverty, and social cohesion among Asian Americans and Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seunghye; Zhang, Wei; Walton, Emily

    2014-06-01

    This study examines the associations of neighborhood ethnic density and poverty with social cohesion and self-rated mental health among Asian Americans and Latinos. Path analysis is employed to analyze data from the 2002-2003 National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) and the 2000 U.S. Census (N = 2095 Asian Americans living in N = 259 neighborhoods; N = 2554 Latinos living in N = 317 neighborhoods). Findings reveal that neighborhood ethnic density relates to poor mental health in both groups. Social cohesion partially mediates that structural relationship, but is positively related to ethnic density among Latinos and negatively related to ethnic density among Asian Americans. Although higher neighborhood poverty is negatively associated with mental health for both groups, the relationship does not hold in the path models after accounting for social cohesion and covariates. Furthermore, social cohesion fully mediates the association between neighborhood poverty and mental health among Latinos. This study highlights the necessity of reconceptualizing existing theories of social relationships to reflect complex and nuanced mechanisms linking neighborhood structure and mental health for diverse racial and ethnic groups.

  15. Neighborhood context and health: How neighborhood social capital affects individual health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohnen, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Does it matter for my health in which neighborhood I live? The fact is, health is determined not only by individual characteristics but also by the neighborhood in which someone lives. This thesis shows that health clusters in Dutch neighborhoods and that this is not only a composition effect (that

  16. Connecting Schools to Neighborhood Revitalization: The Case of the Maple Heights Neighborhood Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Lawrence P.

    2014-01-01

    This case study focuses on the way a neighborhood association connects schools to broad change in an urban neighborhood of a large Midwestern city. The first section provides a review of the literature on community involvement in school and neighborhood reform. It reviews the historical origins of the current school-community relationship, the…

  17. Hyperbolic neighborhoods as organizers of finite-time exponential stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva; Ouellette, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    Hyperbolic points and their unsteady generalization, hyperbolic trajectories, drive the exponential stretching that is the hallmark of nonlinear and chaotic flow. Typical experimental and observational velocity data is unsteady and available only over a finite time interval, and in such situations hyperbolic trajectories will move around in the flow, and may lose their hyperbolicity at times. Here we introduce a way to determine their region of influence, which we term a hyperbolic neighborhood, which marks fluid elements whose dynamics are instantaneously dominated by the hyperbolic trajectory. We establish, using both theoretical arguments and numerical verification from model and experimental data, that the hyperbolic neighborhoods profoundly impact Lagrangian stretching experienced by fluid elements. In particular, we show that fluid elements traversing a flow experience exponential boosts in stretching while within these time-varying regions, that greater residence time within hyperbolic neighborhoods is directly correlated to larger Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) values, and that FTLE diagnostics are reliable only when the hyperbolic neighborhoods have a geometrical structure which is regular in a specific sense. Future Fellowship Grant FT130100484 from the Australian Research Council (SB), and a Terman Faculty Fellowship from Stanford University (NO).

  18. A Multi-Neighborhood Multi-Operator Algorithm for the Uncapacitated Exam Proximity Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Wong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm featuring multiple local search operators and multiple neighborhood structures is applied to the uncapacitated exam proximity problem. The use of multiplicity is to enable effective interplay between intensification and diversification during the search process. The algorithmic design is inspired by Hansen and Mladenovic's Variable Neighborhood Descent algorithm and the "one operator, one landscape" point of view. Its performance was evaluated using publicly available datasets. For the uncapacitated exam proximity problem, the multi-neighborhood and multi-operator algorithm compared favorably against other search techniques. These results should encourage further research on the application of multiple operator approach as solution techniques to the uncapacitated exam proximity problem.

  19. Reviewing the concept of healthy communities in traditional neighborhoods of Iran (Case study: Imamzade Yahya neighborhood of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shieh

    2013-01-01

    In this article, in order to explore the health system and its indicators in urban neighborhoods, after auditing the conceptual model and identifying the structures affecting the health, which are derived from theoretical considerations around issue, components resulting from the conceptual model in the traditional neighborhood of Imamzade Yahya, which is one of the neighborhoods of the historic fabric of Tehran, are assessed. Given the importance of subjective indicators of environment in health and lack of health statistics and information at local scale in Iran, a questionnaire was designed to assess the health of Imamzade Yahya neighborhood’s residents. Results show the interconnected relation between physical- environmental and social indicators of health including quality of housing, neighborhood facilities and sense of belonging to neighborhood, safety perception of residents in the neighborhood of Imamzade Yahya. Another result of the study shows low level of resident’s mobility and physical activity despite mixed uses and the low permeability of the transportation network for riding, which can be caused by physical exhaustion, lack of local facilities and attractions for residents and safety and security of the neighborhood and lack of separate pedestrian and bicycle lanes and numerous barriers to walking out. Another finding suggests the desirability of social indicators of health in this area, despite the possibility of face to face contacts and physical system complementation of the social system which might be caused by the decrease in social cohesion and bonds within neighborhoods and migrant sending from neighborhood and lack of public realms in it to shape social relations.4– ConclusionFindings of this study indicate the importance of physical and social environment of neighborhoods on population health. According to the criteria listed for a healthy neighborhood and according to the case study, in terms of the health system, we cannot distinguish

  20. Relations among Neighborhood Social Networks, Home Literacy Environments, and Children's Expressive Vocabulary in Suburban At-Risk Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froiland, John Mark; Powell, Douglas R.; Diamond, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    In response to increasing research and policy interest in the neighborhood context of early school success, this study examined relations among neighborhood social networks, home literacy practices/resources, and children's expressive vocabulary in a suburban at-risk sample in the USA at the beginning of the school year. In a Structural Equation…

  1. Where We Live: The Unexpected Influence of Urban Neighborhoods on the Academic Performance of African American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Samantha; Overstreet, Stacy; Cunningham, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents who live in low-income neighborhoods face numerous unique challenges. Examining their resilience in multiple contexts sheds light on what contributes to the diverse outcomes of these youth. The current study examines how adolescents' reports of structural and experiential neighborhood characteristics buffered the impact of exposure to…

  2. Relations among Neighborhood Social Networks, Home Literacy Environments, and Children's Expressive Vocabulary in Suburban At-Risk Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froiland, John Mark; Powell, Douglas R.; Diamond, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    In response to increasing research and policy interest in the neighborhood context of early school success, this study examined relations among neighborhood social networks, home literacy practices/resources, and children's expressive vocabulary in a suburban at-risk sample in the USA at the beginning of the school year. In a Structural Equation…

  3. Neighborhood Disorder and Children’s Antisocial Behavior: The Protective Effect of Family Support Among Mexican American and African American Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Rand D.; Conger, Katherine J.; Martin, Monica J.; Brody, Gene; Simons, Ronald; Cutrona, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Using data from a sample of 673 Mexican Origin families, the current investigation examined the degree to which family supportiveness acted as a protective buffer between neighborhood disorder and antisocial behavior during late childhood (i.e. intent to use controlled substances, externalizing, and association with deviant peers). Children’s perceptions of neighborhood disorder fully mediated associations between census and observer measures of neighborhood disorder and their antisocial behavior. Family support buffered children from the higher rates of antisocial behavior generally associated with living in disorderly neighborhoods. An additional goal of the current study was to replicate these findings in a second sample of 897 African American families, and that replication was successful. These findings suggest that family support may play a protective role for children living in dangerous or disadvantaged neighborhoods. They also suggest that neighborhood interventions should consider several points of entry including structural changes, resident perceptions of their neighborhood and family support. PMID:22089092

  4. Defining excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, B

    1993-05-01

    Excellence in the pharmacy profession, particularly pharmacy management, is defined. Several factors have a significant effect on the ability to reach a given level of excellence. The first is the economic and political climate in which pharmacists practice. Stricter controls, reduced resources, and the velocity of change all necessitate nurturing of values and a work ethic to maintain excellence. Excellence must be measured by the services provided with regard to the resources available; thus, the ability to achieve excellence is a true test of leadership and innovation. Excellence is also time dependent, and today's innovation becomes tomorrow's standard. Programs that raise the level of patient care, not those that aggrandize the profession, are the most important. In addition, basic services must be practiced at a level of excellence. Quality assessment is a way to improve care and bring medical treatment to a higher plane of excellence. For such assessment to be effective and not punitive, the philosophy of the program must be known, and the goal must be clear. Excellence in practice is dependent on factors such as political and social norms, standards of practice, available resources; perceptions, time, the motivation to progress to a higher level, and the continuous innovation required to reshape the profession to meet the needs of society.

  5. Community Gardening, Neighborhood Meetings, and Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaimo, Katherine; Reischl, Thomas M.; Allen, Julie Ober

    2010-01-01

    This study examined associations between participation in community gardening/beautification projects and neighborhood meetings with perceptions of social capital at both the individual and neighborhood levels. Data were analyzed from a cross-sectional stratified random telephone survey conducted in Flint, Michigan (N=1916). Hierarchical linear…

  6. Perceived neighborhood social cohesion and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S; Park, Nansook; Peterson, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    Research in the last three decades has shown that negative neighborhood factors such as neighborhood violence, noise, traffic, litter, low neighborhood socioeconomic status, and poor air quality increase the risk of poor health. Fewer studies have examined the potential protective effect that neighborhood factors can have on health, particularly stroke. We examined whether higher perceived neighborhood social cohesion was associated with lower stroke incidence after adjusting for traditional risk and psychological factors that have been linked with stroke risk. Prospective data from the Health and Retirement Study--a nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50--were used. Analyses were conducted on a subset of 6740 adults who were stroke-free at baseline. Analyses adjusted for chronic illnesses and relevant sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychosocial factors. Over a four-year follow-up, higher perceived neighborhood social cohesion was associated with a lower risk of stroke. Each standard deviation increase in perceived neighborhood social cohesion was associated with a multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (O.R.) of 0.85 for stroke incidence (95% CI, 0.75-0.97, p social cohesion remained significant after adjusting for a comprehensive set of risk factors. Therefore, perceived neighborhood social cohesion plays an important role in protecting against stroke.

  7. Neighborhood social capital and individual health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohnen, S.M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Völker, B.G.M.; Flap, H.D.

    2010-01-01

    Neighborhood social capital is increasingly considered to be an important determinant of an individual’s health. Using data from the Netherlands we investigate the influence of neighborhood social capital on an individual’s self-reported health, while accounting for other conditions of health on

  8. Social Support and Neighborhood Stressors Among African American Youth: Networks and Relations to Self-Worth

    OpenAIRE

    McMahon, Susan D.; Felix, Erika D.; Nagarajan, Thara

    2010-01-01

    Although neighborhood stressors have a negative impact on youth, and social support can play a protective role, it is unclear what types and sources of social support may contribute to positive outcomes among at-risk youth. We examined the influences of neighborhood disadvantage and social support on global self-worth among low-income, urban African American youth, both concurrently and longitudinally. We examined social support from both a structural and functional perspective, and tested th...

  9. Relations Between Neighborhood Factors, Parenting Behaviors, Peer Deviance, and Delinquency Among Serious Juvenile Offenders

    OpenAIRE

    CHUNG, HE LEN; Steinberg, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined relations among neighborhood structural and social characteristics, parenting practices, peer group affiliations, and delinquency among a group of serious adolescent offenders. The sample of 14–18-year-old boys (N = 488) was composed primarily of economically disadvantaged, ethnic-minority youth living in urban communities. The results indicate that weak neighborhood social organization is indirectly related to delinquency through its associations with parenting beh...

  10. Who Gentrifies Low-Income Neighborhoods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnish, Terra; Walsh, Randall; White, T Kirk

    2010-03-01

    This paper uses confidential Census data, specifically the 1990 and 2000 Census Long Form data, to study demographic processes in neighborhoods that gentrified during the 1990's. In contrast to previous studies, the analysis is conducted at the more refined census-tract level, with a narrower definition of gentrification and more closely matched comparison neighborhoods. Furthermore, our access to individual-level data with census tract identifiers allows us to separately identify recent in-migrants and long-term residents. Our results indicate that, on average, the demographic flows associated with the gentrification of urban neighborhoods during the 1990's are not consistent with displacement and harm to minority households. In fact, taken as a whole, our results suggest that gentrification of predominantly black neighborhoods creates neighborhoods that are attractive to middle-class black households.

  11. SiC-like structures in edge-defined film-fed growth poly-silicon ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivac, B.; Borghesi, A.; Moscardini, M. (Pavia Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica); Bottazzi, P. (CNR, Pavia (IT). Centro di Studio per la Cristallografia Strutturale); Desnica, U.V. (Institut Rudjer Boskovic, Zagreb (Yugoslavia))

    1990-04-01

    A brief article describes a study which shows that during the growth of edge-defined film fed growth (EFG) poly-silicon ribbons under highly asymmetrical conditions and in an atmosphere with carbon dioxide gas added, oxygen is diffused into the growing ribbon. Oxygen atoms further stimulated creation of carbon and silicon self-interstitial aggregates which in turn acted as precursors for SiC phase formation. These clusters of carbon and silicon self-interstitials are not as stable as a SiC phase and therefore can be annealed during a low-temperature thermal treatment. (UK).

  12. PALNS - A software framework for parallel large neighborhood search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    This paper propose a simple, parallel, portable software framework for the metaheuristic named large neighborhood search (LNS). The aim is to provide a framework where the user has to set up a few data structures and implement a few functions and then the framework provides a metaheuristic where...... parallelization "comes for free". We apply the parallel LNS heuristic to two different problems: the traveling salesman problem with pickup and delivery (TSPPD) and the capacitated vehicle routing problem (CVRP)....

  13. PALNS - A software framework for parallel large neighborhood search

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This paper propose a simple, parallel, portable software framework for the metaheuristic named large neighborhood search (LNS). The aim is to provide a framework where the user has to set up a few data structures and implement a few functions and then the framework provides a metaheuristic where parallelization "comes for free". We apply the parallel LNS heuristic to two different problems: the traveling salesman problem with pickup and delivery (TSPPD) and the capacitated vehicle routing pro...

  14. Neighborhood perceptions and hypertension among low-income black women: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bayan, Maliyhah; Islam, Nadia; Edwards, Shawneaqua; Duncan, Dustin T

    2016-10-12

    The majority of studies examining the role of neighborhoods and hypertension-related outcomes have been quantitative in nature and very few studies have examined specific disadvantaged populations, including low-income housing residents. The objective of this study was to use qualitative interviews to explore low-income Black women's perceptions of their neighborhoods and to understand how those perceptions may affect their health, especially as it relates to blood pressure. Seventeen Black female participants, living in public housing communities in New York City, completed one semi-structured, audiotaped interview in July of 2014. All interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed for emerging themes using N'Vivo 10 software. Three major themes emerged: (1) social connectedness, (2) stress factors, and (3) availability of food options. For example, factors that caused stress varied throughout the study population. Sources of stress included family members, employment, and uncleanliness within the neighborhood. Many participants attributed their stress to personal issues, such as lack of employment and relationships. In addition, the general consensus among many participants was that there should be a greater density of healthy food options in their neighborhoods. Some believed that the pricing of fresh foods in the neighborhoods should better reflect the financial status of the residents in the community. Various neighborhood influences, including neighborhood disorder and lack of healthy food options, are factors that appear to increase Black women's risk of developing high blood pressure. Implications of this research include the need to develop interventions that promote good neighborhood infrastructure (e.g. healthy food stores to encourage good nutrition habits and well-lit walking paths to encourage daily exercise), in addition to interventions that increase hypertension awareness in low-income neighborhoods.

  15. Individual, family, and neighborhood correlates of independent mobility among 7 to 11-year-olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ian; Ferrao, Thomas; King, Nathan

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Independent mobility refers to the freedom that children have to move around their neighborhood without adult supervision. It is related to their physical activity and health. We examined the intrapersonal, family, and neighborhood correlates of independent mobility within children. Methods. 497 American parents of 6.9-11.9 year olds completed a survey (November, 2014) that assessed their child's independent mobility range, several intrapersonal characteristics of their child (gender, age, race, etc.), several characteristics of their family (family structure, socioeconomic status, parental physical activity, etc.), and their perceptions of the safety of their neighborhood (18 questions reduced to 4 components). Associations were determined using ordinal logistic regression. Results. Children's age, parent's perception that their neighborhood is safe for children, and parent's fear of neighborhood crime were the independent correlates of independent mobility. Compared to 6.9-7.9 year olds, the odds ratio (95% CI) for increasing independent mobility were 2.31 (1.47-3.64) in 8.0-9.9 year olds and 3.38 (2.13-5.36) in 10.0-11.9 year olds. Compared to children whose parents who did not perceive that their neighborhood was safe for children, the odds ratio for increasing independent mobility was 4.24 (2.68-6.70) for children whose parents perceived their neighborhood was safe for children. Compared to children whose parents had the lowest fear of neighborhood crime, the odds ratio for increasing independent mobility was 0.41 (0.27-0.62) for children whose parents had the highest fear of crime. Conclusions. Children's independent mobility was associated with their age, their parent's perception that their neighborhood was safe for children, and their parent's fear of crime.

  16. Cross Sectional Association between Spatially Measured Walking Bouts and Neighborhood Walkability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Dar Hwang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Walking is the most popular choice of aerobic physical activity to improve health among U.S. adults. Physical characteristics of the home neighborhood can facilitate or hinder walking. The purpose of this study was to quantify neighborhood walking, using objective methods and to examine the association between counts of walking bouts in the home neighborhood and neighborhood walkability. This was a cross-sectional study of 106 adults who wore accelerometers and GPS devices for two weeks. Walking was quantified within 1, 2, and 3 km Euclidean (straight-line and network buffers around the geocoded home location. Walkability was estimated using a commercially available index. Walking bout counts increased with buffer size and were associated with walkability, regardless of buffer type or size (p < 0.001. Quantification of walking bouts within (and outside of pre-defined neighborhood buffers of different sizes and types allowed for the specification of walking locations to better describe and elucidate walking behaviors. These data support the concept that neighborhood characteristics can influence walking among adults.

  17. Contextualizing ethnic educational inequality: the role of stability and quality of neighborhoods and ethnic density in second-generation attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Fenella; Phalet, Karen; Neels, Karel; Deboosere, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the joint impact of neighborhood structure and ethnic density on the educational attainment of the second generation. Using second-generation samples and a majority reference sample from the Belgian Census, multi-level analysis yields the expected positive effects of neighborhood stability and quality and ethnic density on second-generation school completion. Reflecting the ethnic stratification of the Belgian housing market, majority residential concentration tends to coincide with high neighborhood stability and quality and high completion rates, whereas Moroccan concentrations overlap with low neighborhood quality, and low completion rates. For the Turkish and Italian second generation, neighborhood structure moderates ethnic density effects on school completion, in line with segmented assimilation. Our findings suggest distinct Moroccan, Turkish and Italian incorporation modes which reflect differential access to, and investments in ethnic versus mainstream social networks.

  18. Modified Streaming Format for Direct Access Triangular Data Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Abid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We define in this paper an extended solution to improve an Out-of-Core data structure which is the streaming format, by adding new information allowing to reduce file access cost, reducing the neighborhood access delay to constant time. The original streaming format is conceived to manipulate huge triangular meshes. It assumes that the whole mesh cannot be loaded entirely into the main memory. That's why the authors did not include the neighborhood in the file structure. However, almost all of the applications need the neighborhood information in the triangular structures. Using the original streaming format does not allow us to extract the neighborhood information easily. By adding the neighbor indices to the file in the same way as the original format, we can benefit from the streaming format, and at the same time, guarantee a constant time access to the neighborhood. We have adapted our new structure so that it can allow us to apply our direct access algorithm to different parts of the structure without having to go through the entire file.

  19. Alcohol availability and neighborhood poverty and their relationship to binge drinking and related problems among drinkers in committed relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Christy M; Chartier, Karen G; Caetano, Raul; Harris, T Robert

    2012-09-01

    The authors examined the relationship of alcohol outlet density (AOD) and neighborhood poverty with binge drinking and alcohol-related problems among drinkers in married and cohabitating relationships and assessed whether these associations differed across sex. A U.S. national population couples survey was linked to U.S. Census data on AOD and neighborhood poverty. The 1,784 current drinkers in the survey reported on their binge drinking, alcohol-related problems, and other covariates. AOD was defined as the number of alcohol outlets per 10,000 persons and was obtained at the zip code level. Neighborhood poverty was defined as having a low (poverty at the census tract level. We used logistic regression for survey data to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals and tested for differences of associations by sex. Associations of neighborhood poverty with binge drinking were stronger for male than for female drinkers. The association of neighborhood poverty with alcohol-related problems was also stronger for men than for women. We observed no relationships between AOD and binge drinking or alcohol-related problems in this couples survey. Efforts to reduce binge drinking or alcohol-related problems among partners in committed relationships may have the greatest impact if targeted to male drinkers living in high-poverty neighborhoods. Binge drinking and alcohol-related problems, as well as residence in an impoverished neighborhood are risk factors for intimate partner violence (IPV) and other relationship conflicts.

  20. Defining Geopoetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Italiano

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Comme la notion de "Paysage", portion du monde coïncidant avec l’« Anschauungsraum » du sujet (l’« espace de l’intuition » phénoménologique, ne peut plus être appliquée de manière adéquate aux textes littéraires dotés d’une structure topologique complexe et de références géographiques hétérogènes, nous proposons d’introduire le concept de « Géopoétique ». En tant que catégorie opérative, la « Géopoétique » nous permet de comprendre et d’analyser la dimension territoriale, géographique et géo-écologique d’un texte littéraire. Par « Géopoétique », nous désignons la conscience géographique particulière, la connaissance territoriale, qui est une individualisation du rapport Homme-Terre, telle qu’elle ressort des textes littéraires, et qui transcende tous les cadres limitatifs de la perception, surpassant les frontières phénoménologiques de l’« Anschauungsraum ».The notion of “Landscape” —a represented portion of the world that coincides with the subject’s “Anschauungsraum” (the phenomenological “space of intuition” — cannot always be adequately applied to literary texts with a complex topological structure and heterogeneous geographical references. We therefore propose to introduce the concept of Geopoetics. As an operative category, ‘Geopoetics’ enables us to comprehend and to analyse the territorial, geographical and geo-ecological dimension of a literary text. By ‘Geopoetics’, we mean a particularly geographical consciousness, a territorial knowledge, which is an individualization of the nexus Man-Earth, as it emerges from a literary text, and which transcends every limiting frame of perception, surpassing the phenomenological borders of the “Anschauungsraum.”

  1. Cytotoxicity and photocytotoxicity of structure-defined water-soluble C{sub 60}/micelle supramolecular nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metanawin, Tanapak; Tang Tian; Chen Rongjun; Wang Xiaosong [School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, LS2 9TJ (United Kingdom); Vernon, David, E-mail: X.S.Wang@leeds.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, LS2 9TJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-10

    Well-defined, water-soluble C{sub 60}/micelle hierarchical colloids with varied amounts of C{sub 60} sitting on the surface of micellar cores were prepared via the self-assembly of PS-b-PDMA block copolymer micelles and C{sub 60}. The composites can generate a significant amount of reactive oxygen upon irradiation with red light. Cell studies showed that the colloids were either strongly associated with, or internalized by, the cells after 2 h incubation, but did not show obvious toxicity in the dark. In contrast, efficient cell killing was observed when the colloid-incubated cells were exposed to red light. This indicates that the supramolecular colloids are promising as photosensitizers for photodynamic cancer therapy.

  2. Structure of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin E in Complex with TCR Defines the Role of TCR Loop Positioning in Superantigen Recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin E J Rödström

    Full Text Available T cells are crucial players in cell-mediated immunity. The specificity of their receptor, the T cell receptor (TCR, is central for the immune system to distinguish foreign from host antigens. Superantigens are bacterial toxins capable of inducing a toxic immune response by cross-linking the TCR and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II and circumventing the antigen specificity. Here, we present the structure of staphylococcal enterotoxin E (SEE in complex with a human T cell receptor, as well as the unligated T cell receptor structure. There are clear structural changes in the TCR loops upon superantigen binding. In particular, the HV4 loop moves to circumvent steric clashes upon complex formation. In addition, a predicted ternary model of SEE in complex with both TCR and MHC class II displays intermolecular contacts between the TCR α-chain and the MHC, suggesting that the TCR α-chain is of importance for complex formation.

  3. The Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage HK97 gp6: Defining a Large Family of Head-Tail Connector Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A; Sadowski, Paul D; Radford, Devon R; Rubinstein, John L; Battaile, Kevin P; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R [UHN; (Toronto); (HWMRI)

    2011-11-23

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 Å crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly.

  4. Networks of High Mutual Information Define the Structural Proximity of Catalytic Sites: Implications for Catalytic Residue Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buslje, Cristina Marino; Teppa, Elin; Di Doménico, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI) was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis....... A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC) was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls), combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0...

  5. Stratified Sampling of Neighborhood Sections for Population Estimation: A Case Study of Bo City, Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillson, Roger; Alejandre, Joel D; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Ansumana, Rashid; Bockarie, Alfred S; Bangura, Umaru; Lamin, Joseph M; Stenger, David A

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for better estimators of population size in places that have undergone rapid growth and where collection of census data is difficult. We explored simulated estimates of urban population based on survey data from Bo, Sierra Leone, using two approaches: (1) stratified sampling from across 20 neighborhoods and (2) stratified single-stage cluster sampling of only four randomly-sampled neighborhoods. The stratification variables evaluated were (a) occupants per individual residence, (b) occupants per neighborhood, and (c) residential structures per neighborhood. For method (1), stratification variable (a) yielded the most accurate re-estimate of the current total population. Stratification variable (c), which can be estimated from aerial photography and zoning type verification, and variable (b), which could be ascertained by surveying a limited number of households, increased the accuracy of method (2). Small household-level surveys with appropriate sampling methods can yield reasonably accurate estimations of urban populations.

  6. Military Families' Perceptions of Neighborhood Characteristics Affecting Reintegration: Development of an Aggregate Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beehler, Sarah; Ahern, Jennifer; Balmer, Brandi; Kuhlman, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the validity and reliability of an Experience of Neighborhood (EON) measure developed to assess neighborhood characteristics that shape reintegration opportunities for returning service members and their families. A total of 91 post-9/11 veterans and spouses completed a survey administered at the Minnesota State Fair. Participants self-reported on their reintegration status (veterans), social functioning (spouses), social support, and mental health. EON factor structure, internal consistency reliability, and validity (discriminant, content, criterion) were analyzed. The EON measure showed adequate reliability, discriminant validity, and content validity. More work is needed to assess criterion validity because EON scores were not correlated with scores on a Census-based index used to measure quality of military neighborhoods. The EON may be useful in assessing broad local factors influencing health among returning veterans and spouses. More research is needed to understand geographic variation in neighborhood conditions and how those affect reintegration and mental health for military families.

  7. Military Families’ Perceptions of Neighborhood Characteristics Affecting Reintegration: Development of an Aggregate Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beehler, Sarah; Ahern, Jennifer; Balmer, Brandi; Kuhlman, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the validity and reliability of an Experience of Neighborhood (EON) measure developed to assess neighborhood characteristics that shape reintegration opportunities for returning service members and their families. A total of 91 post-9/11 veterans and spouses completed a survey administered at the Minnesota State Fair. Participants self-reported on their reintegration status (veterans), social functioning (spouses), social support, and mental health. EON factor structure, internal consistency reliability, and validity (discriminant, content, criterion) were analyzed. The EON measure showed adequate reliability, discriminant validity, and content validity. More work is needed to assess criterion validity because EON scores were not correlated with scores on a Census-based index used to measure quality of military neighborhoods. The EON may be useful in assessing broad local factors influencing health among returning veterans and spouses. More research is needed to understand geographic variation in neighborhood conditions and how those affect reintegration and mental health for military families. PMID:28936370

  8. The spatial context of the disorder-crime relationship in a study of Reno neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggess, Lyndsay N; Maskaly, Jon

    2014-01-01

    This study extends the current research on the relationship between neighborhood disorder and violent crime rates by incorporating spatial effects and the reciprocal relationship between disorder and violent crime. In particular, we test for both the potential effect of disorder on violence as well as how changes in violent crime rates can impact neighborhood levels of disorder. We control for a variety of factors related to social disorganization theory that can lead to crime and potentially disorder. In order to disentangle these relationships, we use a cross-lagged auto-regressive structural equation model and a unique dataset comprised of calls for police service and reported incidents for 117 neighborhoods in Reno, NV. We find that higher rates of disorder lead to significant, but modest, increases in violent crime, but only aggravated assaults lead to increases in disorder. These effects hold true above and beyond the effect of social disorganization and the influence of spatially proximate neighborhoods.

  9. Structure of branching enzyme- and amylomaltase modified starch produced from well-defined amylose to amylopectin substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorndecha, Waraporn; Sagnelli, Domenico; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Thermostable branching enzyme (BE, EC 2.4.1.18) from Rhodothermus obamensis in combination with amylomaltase (AM, EC 2.4.1.25) from Thermus thermophilus was used to modify starch structure exploring potentials to extensively increase the number of branch points in starch. Amylose is an important...

  10. Pauling and Corey's alpha-pleated sheet structure may define the prefibrillar amyloidogenic intermediate in amyloid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armen, Roger S; DeMarco, Mari L; Alonso, Darwin O V; Daggett, Valerie

    2004-08-10

    Transthyretin, beta(2)-microglobulin, lysozyme, and the prion protein are four of the best-characterized proteins implicated in amyloid disease. Upon partial acid denaturation, these proteins undergo conformational change into an amyloidogenic intermediate that can self-assemble into amyloid fibrils. Many experiments have shown that pH-mediated changes in structure are required for the formation of the amyloidogeneic intermediate, but it has proved impossible to characterize these conformational changes at high resolution using experimental means. To probe these conformational changes at atomic resolution, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of these proteins at neutral and low pH. In low-pH simulations of all four proteins, we observe the formation of alpha-pleated sheet secondary structure, which was first proposed by L. Pauling and R. B. Corey [(1951) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 37, 251-256]. In all beta-sheet proteins, transthyretin and beta(2)-microglobulin, alpha-pleated sheet structure formed over the strands that are highly protected in hydrogen-exchange experiments probing amyloidogenic conditions. In lysozyme and the prion protein, alpha-sheets formed in the specific regions of the protein implicated in the amyloidogenic conversion. We propose that the formation of alpha-pleated sheet structure may be a common conformational transition in amyloidosis.

  11. Defining the structure of the general stress regulon of Bacillus subtilis using targeted microarray analysis and random forest classification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nannapaneni, P.; Hertwig, F.; Depke, M.; Hecker, M.; Mader, U.; Volker, U.; Steil, L.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the SigB-dependent general stress regulon of Bacillus subtilis has previously been characterized by proteomics approaches as well as DNA array-based expression studies. However, comparing the SigB targets published in three previous major transcriptional profiling studies it is obvi

  12. Structure-Function Analysis of 2-Keto-3-Deoxy-D-Glycero-D-Galacto-Nononate-9-Phosphate Phosphatase Defines Specificity Elements in Type C0 had Family Members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.; Wang, L; Dunaway-Mariano, D; Allen, K

    2009-01-01

    The phosphotransferases of the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily (HADSF) act upon a wide range of metabolites in all eukaryotes and prokaryotes and thus constitute a significant force in cell function. The challenge posed for biochemical function assignment of HADSF members is the identification of the structural determinants that target a specific metabolite. The '8KDOP' subfamily of the HADSF is defined by the known structure and catalytic activity of 2-keto-3-deoxy-8-phospho-d-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO-8-P) phosphatase. Homologues of this enzyme have been uniformly annotated as KDO-8-P phosphatase. One such gene, BT1713, from the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron genome was recently found to encode the enzyme 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galacto-9-phosphonononic acid (KDN-9-P) phosphatase in the biosynthetic pathway of the 9-carbon ?-keto acid, 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galactonononic acid (KDN). To find the structural elements that provide substrate-specific interactions and to allow identification of genomic sequence markers, the x-ray crystal structures of BT1713 liganded to the cofactor Mg2+and complexed with tungstate or Formula/Neu5Ac were determined to 1.1, 1.85, and 1.63 A resolution, respectively. The structures define the active site to be at the subunit interface and, as confirmed by steady-state kinetics and site-directed mutagenesis, reveal Arg-64*, Lys-67*, and Glu-56 to be the key residues involved in sugar binding that are essential for BT1713 catalytic function. Bioinformatic analyses of the differentially conserved residues between BT1713 and KDO-8-P phosphatase homologues guided by the knowledge of the structure-based specificity determinants define Glu-56 and Lys-67* to be the key residues that can be used in future annotations.

  13. Intensity inhomogeneity correction of structural MR images: a data-driven approach to define input algorithm parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Marco eGanzetti; Nicole eWenderoth; Dante eMantini

    2016-01-01

    Intensity non-uniformity (INU) in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a major issue when conducting analyses of brain structural properties. An inaccurate INU correction may result in qualitative and quantitative misinterpretations. Several INU correction methods exist, whose performance largely depend on the specific parameter settings that need to be chosen by the user. Here we addressed the question of how to select the best input parameters for a specific INU correction algorithm. Our inve...

  14. Developing a Structural Model to Define Influential Risk Elements in Islamic Banking: An Empirical Study in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Akbar Alem Tabriz; Fariba Riahi; Zahra Banasadegh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the most influential risk elements and determine causal relationships network of risk factors in Islamic banking in Iran. Due to some unique principles used by Islamic banks, they encounter difficulties to manage various risks effectively than conventional banks. Consequently, a structural model was developed from a comprehensive set of risk elements with five reflective and one formative output construct namely; credit, liquidity, market, operational, uni...

  15. Systematic social observation of children’s neighborhoods using Google Street View: a reliable and cost-effective method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odgers, Candice L.; Caspi, Avshalom; Bates, Christopher J.; Sampson, Robert J.; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Children growing up in poor versus affluent neighborhoods are more likely to spend time in prison, develop health problems and die at an early age. The question of how neighborhood conditions influence our behavior and health has attracted the attention of public health officials and scholars for generations. Online tools are now providing new opportunities to measure neighborhood features and may provide a cost effective way to advance our understanding of neighborhood effects on child health. Method A virtual systematic social observation (SSO) study was conducted to test whether Google Street View could be used to reliably capture the neighborhood conditions of families participating in the Environmental-Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study. Multiple raters coded a subsample of 120 neighborhoods and convergent and discriminant validity was evaluated on the full sample of over 1,000 neighborhoods by linking virtual SSO measures to: (a) consumer based geo-demographic classifications of deprivation and health, (b) local resident surveys of disorder and safety, and (c) parent and teacher assessments of children’s antisocial behavior, prosocial behavior, and body mass index. Results High levels of observed agreement were documented for signs of physical disorder, physical decay, dangerousness and street safety. Inter-rater agreement estimates fell within the moderate to substantial range for all of the scales (ICCs ranged from .48 to .91). Negative neighborhood features, including SSO-rated disorder and decay and dangerousness corresponded with local resident reports, demonstrated a graded relationship with census-defined indices of socioeconomic status, and predicted higher levels of antisocial behavior among local children. In addition, positive neighborhood features, including SSO-rated street safety and the percentage of green space, were associated with higher prosocial behavior and healthy weight status among children. Conclusions Our results

  16. G-NEST: a gene neighborhood scoring tool to identify co-conserved, co-expressed genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemay Danielle G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In previous studies, gene neighborhoods—spatial clusters of co-expressed genes in the genome—have been defined using arbitrary rules such as requiring adjacency, a minimum number of genes, a fixed window size, or a minimum expression level. In the current study, we developed a Gene Neighborhood Scoring Tool (G-NEST which combines genomic location, gene expression, and evolutionary sequence conservation data to score putative gene neighborhoods across all possible window sizes simultaneously. Results Using G-NEST on atlases of mouse and human tissue expression data, we found that large neighborhoods of ten or more genes are extremely rare in mammalian genomes. When they do occur, neighborhoods are typically composed of families of related genes. Both the highest scoring and the largest neighborhoods in mammalian genomes are formed by tandem gene duplication. Mammalian gene neighborhoods contain highly and variably expressed genes. Co-localized noisy gene pairs exhibit lower evolutionary conservation of their adjacent genome locations, suggesting that their shared transcriptional background may be disadvantageous. Genes that are essential to mammalian survival and reproduction are less likely to occur in neighborhoods, although neighborhoods are enriched with genes that function in mitosis. We also found that gene orientation and protein-protein interactions are partially responsible for maintenance of gene neighborhoods. Conclusions Our experiments using G-NEST confirm that tandem gene duplication is the primary driver of non-random gene order in mammalian genomes. Non-essentiality, co-functionality, gene orientation, and protein-protein interactions are additional forces that maintain gene neighborhoods, especially those formed by tandem duplicates. We expect G-NEST to be useful for other applications such as the identification of core regulatory modules, common transcriptional backgrounds, and chromatin domains. The

  17. Neighborhood Context and Immigrant Young Children's Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Tama; Shuey, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored how neighborhood social processes and resources, relevant to immigrant families and immigrant neighborhoods, contribute to young children's behavioral functioning and achievement across diverse racial/ethnic groups. Data were drawn from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, a neighborhood-based,…

  18. Surface Structure Dependence of SO 2 Interaction with Ceria Nanocrystals with Well-Defined Surface Facets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumuluri, Uma; Li, Meijun; Cook, Brandon G.; Sumpter, Bobby; Dai, Sheng; Wu, Zili

    2015-12-31

    The effects of the surface structure of ceria (CeO2) on the nature, strength, and amount of species resulting from SO2 adsorption were studied using in situ IR and Raman spectroscopies coupled with mass spectrometry, along with first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). CeO2 nanocrystals with different morphologies, namely, rods (representing a defective structure), cubes (100 facet), and octahedra (111 facet), were used to represent different CeO2 surface structures. IR and Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the structure and binding strength of adsorbed species from SO2 depend on the shape of the CeO2 nanocrystals. SO2 adsorbs mainly as surface sulfites and sulfates at room temperature on CeO2 rods, cubes, and octahedra that were either oxidatively or reductively pretreated. The formation of sulfites is more evident on CeO2 octahedra, whereas surface sulfates are more prominent on CeO2 rods and cubes. This is explained by the increasing reducibility of the surface oxygen in the order octahedra < cubes < rods. Bulk sulfites are also formed during SO2 adsorption on reduced CeO2 rods. The formation of surface sulfites and sulfates on CeO2 cubes is in good agreement with our DFT results of SO2 interactions with the CeO2(100) surface. CeO2 rods desorb SO2 at higher temperatures than cubes and octahedra nanocrystals, but bulk sulfates are formed on CeO2 rods and cubes after high-temperature desorption whereas only some surface sulfates/sulfites are left on octahedra. This difference is rationalized by the fact that CeO2 rods have the highest surface basicity and largest amount of defects among the three nanocrystals, so they bind and react with SO2 strongly and are the most degraded after SO2 adsorption cycles. The fundamental understanding obtained in this work on the effects of the surface structure and defects on the interaction of SO2 with CeO2 provides insights for the design of more sulfur-resistant CeO2-based catalysts.

  19. Radioactive labeling of defined HPMA-based polymeric structures using [18F]FETos for in vivo imaging by positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herth, Matthias Manfred; Barz, Matthias; Moderegger, Dorothea

    2009-01-01

    During the last decades polymer-based nanomedicine has turned out to be a promising tool in modern pharmaceutics. The following article describes the synthesis of well-defined random and block copolymers by RAFT polymerization with potential medical application. The polymers have been labeled...... with the positron-emitting nuclide fluorine-18. The polymeric structures are based on the biocompatible N-(2-hydroxypropyl)-methacrylamide (HPMA). To achieve these structures, functional reactive ester polymers with a molecular weight within the range of 25,000-110,000 g/mol were aminolyzed by 2-hydroxypropylamine...

  20. Neighborhood Quality and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Quasi-Random Neighborhood Assignment of Immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil

    2012-01-01

    neighborhood may, therefore, hamper individual labor market outcomes because of lack of employed contacts. I investigate this hypothesis by exploiting a unique natural experiment that occurred between 1986 and 1998 when refugee immigrants to Denmark were assigned to municipalities quasirandomly, which...... successfully addresses the methodological problem of endogenous neighborhood selection. Taking account of location sorting, living in a socially deprived neighborhood does not affect labor market outcomes of refugee men. Furthermore, their labor market outcomes are not affected by the overall employment rate...... of men living in the neighborhood, but positively affected by the employment rate of non-Western immigrant men and co-national men living in the neighborhood. This is strong evidence that immigrants find jobs in part through their employed immigrant and co-ethnic contacts in the neighborhood of residence...

  1. Travel Beyond the Home Neighborhood for Delinquent Behaviors: Moderation of Home Neighborhood Influences

    OpenAIRE

    Tompsett, Carolyn J.; Amrhein, Kelly E.; Hassan, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Neighborhood research indicates that adolescents are at higher risk for delinquency when they reside in neighborhoods low in collective efficacy, low in perceived prosocial norms and values, and high in availability of substances and firearms. However, as adolescents develop, they are more likely to independently travel during their day-to-day activities, and the effects of their home neighborhood may be weakened as they spend time in other communities. The current study surveyed 179 adolesce...

  2. Outdoor play among children in relation to neighborhood characteristics: a cross-sectional neighborhood observation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarts Marie-Jeanne

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although environmental characteristics as perceived by parents are known to be related to children’s outdoor play behavior, less is known about the relation between independently measured neighborhood characteristics and outdoor play among children. The purpose of this study was to identify quantitative as well as qualitative neighborhood characteristics related to outdoor play by means of neighborhood observations. Methods Questionnaires including questions on outdoor play behavior of the child were distributed among 3,651 parents of primary school children (aged 4–12 years. Furthermore, neighborhood observations were conducted in 33 Dutch neighborhoods to map neighborhood characteristics such as buildings, formal outdoor play facilities, public space, street pattern, traffic safety, social neighborhood characteristics, and general impression. Data of the questionnaires and the neighborhood observations were coupled via postal code of the respondents. Multilevel GEE analyses were performed to quantify the correlation between outdoor play and independently measured neighborhood characteristics. Results Parental education was negatively associated with outdoor play among children. Neither the presence nor the overall quality of formal outdoor play facilities were (positively related to outdoor play among children in this study. Rather, informal play areas such as the presence of sidewalks were related to children’s outdoor play. Also, traffic safety was an important characteristic associated with outdoor play. Conclusions This study showed that, apart from individual factors such as parental education level, certain modifiable characteristics in the neighborhood environment (as measured by neighborhood observations were associated with outdoor play among boys and girls of different age groups in The Netherlands. Local policy makers from different sectors can use these research findings in creating more activity

  3. Properties of predictor based on relative neighborhood graph localized FIR filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Aasted

    1995-01-01

    A time signal prediction algorithm based on relative neighborhood graph (RNG) localized FIR filters is defined. The RNG connects two nodes, of input space dimension D, if their lune does not contain any other node. The FIR filters associated with the nodes, are used for local approximation...

  4. Structures of LeuT in bicelles define conformation and substrate binding in a membrane-like context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Elferich, Johannes; Gouaux, Eric (Oregon HSU)

    2012-02-13

    Neurotransmitter sodium symporters (NSSs) catalyze the uptake of neurotransmitters into cells, terminating neurotransmission at chemical synapses. Consistent with the role of NSSs in the central nervous system, they are implicated in multiple diseases and disorders. LeuT, from Aquifex aeolicus, is a prokaryotic ortholog of the NSS family and has contributed to our understanding of the structure, mechanism and pharmacology of NSSs. At present, however, the functional state of LeuT in crystals grown in the presence of n-octyl-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside ({beta}-OG) and the number of substrate binding sites are controversial issues. Here we present crystal structures of LeuT grown in DMPC-CHAPSO bicelles and demonstrate that the conformations of LeuT-substrate complexes in lipid bicelles and in {beta}-OG detergent micelles are nearly identical. Furthermore, using crystals grown in bicelles and the substrate leucine or the substrate analog selenomethionine, we find only a single substrate molecule in the primary binding site.

  5. Silicon-on-glass pore network micromodels with oxygen-sensing fluorophore films for chemical imaging and defined spatial structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Anheier, Norman C.

    2012-11-21

    Pore network microfluidic models were fabricated by a silicon-on-glass technique that provides the precision advantage of dry etched silicon while creating a structure that is transparent across all microfluidic channels and pores, and can be imaged from either side. A silicon layer is bonded to an underlying borosilicate glass substrate and thinned to the desired height of the microfluidic channels and pores. The silicon is then patterned and through-etched by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), with the underlying glass serving as an etch stop. After bonding on a transparent glass cover plate, one obtains a micromodel in oxygen impermeable materials with water wet surfaces where the microfluidic channels are transparent and structural elements such as the pillars creating the pore network are opaque. The micromodel can be imaged from either side. The advantageous features of this approach in a chemical imaging application are demonstrated by incorporating a Pt porphyrin fluorophore in a PDMS film serving as the oxygen sensing layer and a bonding surface, or in a polystyrene film coated with a PDMS layer for bonding. The sensing of a dissolved oxygen gradient was demonstrated using fluorescence lifetime imaging, and it is shown that different matrix polymers lead to optimal use in different ranges dissolved oxygen concentration. Imaging with the opaque pillars in between the observation direction and the continuous fluorophore film yields images that retain spatial information in the sensor image.

  6. Structures of LeuT in bicelles define conformation and substrate binding in a membrane-like context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Elferich, Johannes; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-01-15

    Neurotransmitter sodium symporters (NSSs) catalyze the uptake of neurotransmitters into cells, terminating neurotransmission at chemical synapses. Consistent with the role of NSSs in the central nervous system, they are implicated in multiple diseases and disorders. LeuT, from Aquifex aeolicus, is a prokaryotic ortholog of the NSS family and has contributed to our understanding of the structure, mechanism and pharmacology of NSSs. At present, however, the functional state of LeuT in crystals grown in the presence of n-octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (β-OG) and the number of substrate binding sites are controversial issues. Here we present crystal structures of LeuT grown in DMPC-CHAPSO bicelles and demonstrate that the conformations of LeuT-substrate complexes in lipid bicelles and in β-OG detergent micelles are nearly identical. Furthermore, using crystals grown in bicelles and the substrate leucine or the substrate analog selenomethionine, we find only a single substrate molecule in the primary binding site.

  7. A specific two-pore domain potassium channel blocker defines the structure of the TASK-1 open pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Anne K; Netter, Michael F; Kempf, Franca; Walecki, Magdalena; Rinné, Susanne; Bollepalli, Murali K; Preisig-Müller, Regina; Renigunta, Vijay; Daut, Jürgen; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Sansom, Mark S P; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Decher, Niels

    2011-04-22

    Two-pore domain potassium (K(2P)) channels play a key role in setting the membrane potential of excitable cells. Despite their role as putative targets for drugs and general anesthetics, little is known about the structure and the drug binding site of K(2P) channels. We describe A1899 as a potent and highly selective blocker of the K(2P) channel TASK-1. As A1899 acts as an open-channel blocker and binds to residues forming the wall of the central cavity, the drug was used to further our understanding of the channel pore. Using alanine mutagenesis screens, we have identified residues in both pore loops, the M2 and M4 segments, and the halothane response element to form the drug binding site of TASK-1. Our experimental data were used to validate a K(2P) open-pore homology model of TASK-1, providing structural insights for future rational design of drugs targeting K(2P) channels.

  8. A Specific Two-pore Domain Potassium Channel Blocker Defines the Structure of the TASK-1 Open Pore*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Anne K.; Netter, Michael F.; Kempf, Franca; Walecki, Magdalena; Rinné, Susanne; Bollepalli, Murali K.; Preisig-Müller, Regina; Renigunta, Vijay; Daut, Jürgen; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Decher, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels play a key role in setting the membrane potential of excitable cells. Despite their role as putative targets for drugs and general anesthetics, little is known about the structure and the drug binding site of K2P channels. We describe A1899 as a potent and highly selective blocker of the K2P channel TASK-1. As A1899 acts as an open-channel blocker and binds to residues forming the wall of the central cavity, the drug was used to further our understanding of the channel pore. Using alanine mutagenesis screens, we have identified residues in both pore loops, the M2 and M4 segments, and the halothane response element to form the drug binding site of TASK-1. Our experimental data were used to validate a K2P open-pore homology model of TASK-1, providing structural insights for future rational design of drugs targeting K2P channels. PMID:21362619

  9. Soft chemistry routes for synthesis of rare earth oxide nanoparticles with well defined morphological and structural characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancic, L.; Marinkovic, B. A.; Marinkovic, K.; Dramicanin, M.; Milosevic, O.

    2011-11-01

    Phosphors of (Y0.75Gd0.25)2O3:Eu3+ (5 at.%) have been prepared through soft chemistry routes. Conversion of the starting nitrates mixture into oxide is performed through two approaches: (a) hydrothermal treatment (HT) at 200 °C/3 h of an ammonium hydrogen carbonate precipitated mixture and (b) by thermally decomposition of pure nitrate precursor solution at 900 °C in dispersed phase (aerosol) within a tubular flow reactor by spray pyrolysis process (SP). The powders are additionally thermally treated at different temperatures: 600, 1000, and 1100 °C for either 3 or 12 h. HT—derived particles present exclusively one-dimensional morphology (nanorods) up to the temperatures of 600 °C, while the leaf-like particles start to grow afterward. SP—derived particles maintain their spherical shape up to the temperatures of 1100 °C. These submicron sized spheres were actually composed of randomly aggregated nanoparticles. All powders exhibits cubic Ia- 3 structure (Y0.75Gd0.25)2O3:Eu and have improved optical characteristics due to their nanocrystalline nature. The detailed study of the influence of structural and morphological powder characteristics on their emission properties is performed based on the results of X-ray powder diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence measurements.

  10. Challenges and complications in neighborhood mapping: from neighborhood concept to operationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yongxin

    2016-07-01

    This paper examines complications in neighborhood mapping and corresponding challenges for the GIS community, taking both a conceptual and a methodological perspective. It focuses on the social and spatial dimensions of the neighborhood concept and highlights their relationship in neighborhood mapping. Following a brief summary of neighborhood definitions, five interwoven factors are identified to be origins of neighborhood mapping difficulties: conceptual vagueness, uncertainty of various sources, GIS representation, scale, and neighborhood homogeneity or continuity. Existing neighborhood mapping methods are grouped into six categories to be assessed: perception based, physically based, inference based, preexisting, aggregated, and automated. Mapping practices in various neighborhood-related disciplines and applications are cited as examples to demonstrate how the methods work, as well as how they should be evaluated. A few mapping strategies for the improvement of neighborhood mapping are prescribed from a GIS perspective: documenting simplifications employed in the mapping procedure, addressing uncertainty sources, developing new data solutions, and integrating complementary mapping methods. Incorporation of high-resolution data and introduction of more GIS ideas and methods (such as fuzzy logic) are identified to be future opportunities.

  11. Atomic-Resolution Structures of Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase with NAD[superscript +] and Fluoroalcohols Define Strained Michaelis Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plapp, Bryce V.; Ramaswamy, S. (inSTEM); (Iowa)

    2013-01-16

    Structures of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with NAD{sup +} and unreactive substrate analogues, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol, were determined at 100 K at 1.12 or 1.14 {angstrom} resolution, providing estimates of atomic positions with overall errors of 0.02 {angstrom}, the geometry of ligand binding, descriptions of alternative conformations of amino acid residues and waters, and evidence of a strained nicotinamide ring. The four independent subunits from the two homodimeric structures differ only slightly in the peptide backbone conformation. Alternative conformations for amino acid side chains were identified for 50 of the 748 residues in each complex, and Leu-57 and Leu-116 adopt different conformations to accommodate the different alcohols at the active site. Each fluoroalcohol occupies one position, and the fluorines of the alcohols are well-resolved. These structures closely resemble the expected Michaelis complexes with the pro-R hydrogens of the methylene carbons of the alcohols directed toward the re face of C4N of the nicotinamide rings with a C-C distance of 3.40 {angstrom}. The oxygens of the alcohols are ligated to the catalytic zinc at a distance expected for a zinc alkoxide (1.96 {angstrom}) and participate in a low-barrier hydrogen bond (2.52 {angstrom}) with the hydroxyl group of Ser-48 in a proton relay system. As determined by X-ray refinement with no restraints on bond distances and planarity, the nicotinamide rings in the two complexes are slightly puckered (quasi-boat conformation, with torsion angles of 5.9{sup o} for C4N and 4.8{sup o} for N1N relative to the plane of the other atoms) and have bond distances that are somewhat different compared to those found for NAD(P){sup +}. It appears that the nicotinamide ring is strained toward the transition state on the path to alcohol oxidation.

  12. A stepwise approach for defining the applicability domain of SAR and QSAR models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Sabcho; Dimitrova, Gergana; Pavlov, Todor;

    2005-01-01

    parametric requirements are imposed in the first stage, specifying in the domain only those chemicals that fall in the range of variation of the physicochemical properties of the chemicals in the training set. The second stage defines the structural similarity between chemicals that are correctly predicted......A stepwise approach for determining the model applicability domain is proposed. Four stages are applied to account for the diversity and complexity of the current SAR/QSAR models, reflecting their mechanistic rationality (including metabolic activation of chemicals) and transparency. General...... by the model. The structural neighborhood of atom-centered fragments is used to determine this similarity. The third stage in defining the domain is based on a mechanistic understanding of the modeled phenomenon. Here, the model domain combines the reliability of specific reactive groups hypothesized to cause...

  13. The Impact of African American Parents' Racial Discrimination Experiences and Perceived Neighborhood Cohesion on their Racial Socialization Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Farzana T; English, Devin; Busby, Danielle R; Lambert, Sharon F; Harrison, Aubrey; Stock, Michelle L; Gibbons, Frederick X

    2016-07-01

    Parental racial socialization is a parenting tool used to prepare African American adolescents for managing racial stressors. While it is known that parents' racial discrimination experiences affect the racial socialization messages they provide, little is known about the influence of factors that promote supportive and communal parenting, such as perceived neighborhood cohesion. In cohesive neighborhoods, neighbors may help parents address racial discrimination by monitoring youth and conveying racial socialization messages; additionally, the effect of neighborhood cohesion on parents' racial socialization may differ for boys and girls because parents socialize adolescents about race differently based on expected encounters with racial discrimination. Therefore, the current study examines how parents' perception of neighborhood cohesion and adolescents' gender moderate associations between parents' racial discrimination experiences and the racial socialization messages they deliver to their adolescents. Participants were a community sample of 608 African American adolescents (54 % girls; mean age = 15.5) and their primary caregivers (86 % biological mothers; mean age = 42.0). Structural equation modeling indicated that parental racial discrimination was associated with more promotion of mistrust messages for boys and girls in communities with low neighborhood cohesion. In addition, parental racial discrimination was associated with more cultural socialization messages about racial pride and history for boys in neighborhoods with low neighborhood cohesion. The findings suggest that parents' racial socialization messages are influenced by their own racial discrimination experiences and the cohesiveness of the neighborhood; furthermore, the content of parental messages delivered varies based on adolescents' gender.

  14. The Impact of African American Parents’ Racial Discrimination Experiences and Perceived Neighborhood Cohesion on their Racial Socialization Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Devin; Busby, Danielle R.; Lambert, Sharon F.; Harrison, Aubrey; Stock, Michelle L.; Gibbons, Frederick X.

    2016-01-01

    Parental racial socialization is a parenting tool used to prepare African American adolescents for managing racial stressors. While it is known that parents’ racial discrimination experiences affect the racial socialization messages they provide, little is known about the influence of factors that promote supportive and communal parenting, such as perceived neighborhood cohesion. In cohesive neighborhoods, neighbors may help parents address racial discrimination by monitoring youth and conveying racial socialization messages; additionally, the effect of neighborhood cohesion on parents’ racial socialization may differ for boys and girls because parents socialize adolescents about race differently based on expected encounters with racial discrimination. Therefore, the current study examines how parents’ perception of neighborhood cohesion and adolescents’ gender moderate associations between parents’ racial discrimination experiences and the racial socialization messages they deliver to their adolescents. Participants were a community sample of 608 African American adolescents (54 % girls; mean age = 15.5) and their primary caregivers (86 % biological mothers; mean age = 42.0). Structural equation modeling indicated that parental racial discrimination was associated with more promotion of mistrust messages for boys and girls in communities with low neighborhood cohesion. In addition, parental racial discrimination was associated with more cultural socialization messages about racial pride and history for boys in neighborhoods with low neighborhood cohesion. The findings suggest that parents’ racial socialization messages are influenced by their own racial discrimination experiences and the cohesiveness of the neighborhood; furthermore, the content of parental messages delivered varies based on adolescents’ gender. PMID:27189721

  15. The importance of social context: neighborhood stressors, stress-buffering mechanisms, and alcohol, drug, and mental health disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Susan E; Wells, Kenneth B; Tang, Lingqi; Belin, Thomas R; Zhang, Lily; Sherbourne, Cathy D

    2007-11-01

    This study examines the relationship among neighborhood stressors, stress-buffering mechanisms, and likelihood of alcohol, drug, and mental health (ADM) disorders in adults from 60 US communities (n=12,716). Research shows that larger support structures may interact with individual support factors to affect mental health, but few studies have explored buffering effects of these neighborhood characteristics. We test a conceptual model that explores effects of neighborhood stressors and stress-buffering mechanisms on ADM disorders. Using Health Care for Communities with census and other data, we found a lower likelihood of disorders in neighborhoods with a greater presence of stress-buffering mechanisms. Higher neighborhood average household occupancy and churches per capita were associated with a lower likelihood of disorders. Cross-level interactions revealed that violence-exposed individuals in high crime neighborhoods are vulnerable to depressive/anxiety disorders. Likewise, individuals with low social support in neighborhoods with high social isolation (i.e., low-average household occupancy) had a higher likelihood of disorders. If replicated by future studies using longitudinal data, our results have implications for policies and programs targeting neighborhoods to reduce ADM disorders.

  16. Neighborhood disadvantage and physical aggression in children and adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis of multilevel studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ling-Yin; Wang, Mei-Yeh; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2016-09-01

    Child and adolescent physical aggression are influenced by multiple contexts, such as peers, family, school, and neighborhood. However, the effect of neighborhoods on youth physical aggression remains unclear. The objective of this study was to quantitatively synthesize studies that have examined the effect of neighborhood disadvantage on physical aggression in children and adolescents and to identify potential moderators. We searched seven databases for articles published before April 25, 2015. Studies were considered eligible if they were published in peer-reviewed journals, used multilevel data, controlled for neighborhood clustering, used physical aggression as the study outcome, and considered children or adolescents as the study population. Of the 152 eligible studies, we included 43 in the meta-analysis. The results from the random-effects model revealed that neighborhood disadvantage was positively and significantly associated with physical aggression (P aggression among studies with younger participants, a higher percentage of female participants, and a longer follow-up period (P aggression. The observed neighborhood effects may also be limited because of the omission of studies that did not provide sufficient information for calculating the pooled effect. In summary, the results provide supporting evidence for the adverse effect of living in disadvantaged neighborhoods on physical aggression after adjusting for the individual-level characteristics of children and adolescents. Interventions targeting structural contexts in neighborhoods are required to assist in reducing physical aggression in young people. Aggr. Behav. 42:441-454, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Neighborhood Stabilization Program Data NSP1 (Statewide)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD's Neighborhood Stabilization Program (www.HUD.gov/nsp) provides emergency assistance to state and local governments to acquire and redevelop foreclosed...

  18. Neighborhood Stabilization Program Data NSP2

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD's Neighborhood Stabilization Program (www.HUD.gov/nsp) provides emergency assistance to state and local governments to acquire and redevelop foreclosed...

  19. Neighborhood Stabilization Program Data NSP3

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD's Neighborhood Stabilization Program (www.HUD.gov/nsp) provides emergency assistance to state and local governments to acquire and redevelop foreclosed...

  20. Moving and the Neighborhood Glass Ceiling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sampson, R. J

    2012-01-01

    .... From Victorian London to present-day America, research has shown links between neighborhood poverty and outcomes such as crime, economic dependency, poor physical health, teenage pregnancy, and school dropout...

  1. The meta-epigenomic structure of purified human stem cell populations is defined at cis-regulatory sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong Mei; Golden, Aaron; Mar, Jessica C.; Einstein, Francine H.; Greally, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism and significance of epigenetic variability in the same cell type between healthy individuals are not clear. Here, we purify human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from different individuals and find that there is increased variability of DNA methylation at loci with properties of promoters and enhancers. The variability is especially enriched at candidate enhancers near genes transitioning between silent and expressed states, and encoding proteins with leukocyte differentiation properties. Our findings of increased variability at loci with intermediate DNA methylation values, at candidate “poised” enhancers, and at genes involved in HSPC lineage commitment suggest that CD34+ cell subtype heterogeneity between individuals is a major mechanism for the variability observed. Epigenomic studies performed on cell populations, even when purified, are testing collections of epigenomes, or meta-epigenomes. Our findings show that meta-epigenomic approaches to data analysis can provide insights into cell subpopulation structure. PMID:25327398

  2. Developing a Structural Model to Define Influential Risk Elements in Islamic Banking: An Empirical Study in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Alem Tabriz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify the most influential risk elements and determine causal relationships network of risk factors in Islamic banking in Iran. Due to some unique principles used by Islamic banks, they encounter difficulties to manage various risks effectively than conventional banks. Consequently, a structural model was developed from a comprehensive set of risk elements with five reflective and one formative output construct namely; credit, liquidity, market, operational, unique risks and total risk by using PLs path modeling which statistically supports all constructs. Fitness Indices imply homogeneity among risk elements and statistics indicate not severe multicollinearity and redundancy in the model. This study provides key insight into causal relationships of influential risk elements in Islamic banking essential for proper resource allocation to compete with conventional banks.

  3. Domain structures and inter-domain interactions defining the holoenzyme architecture of archaeal d-family DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Ikuo; Matsui, Eriko; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Yokoyama, Hideshi

    2013-07-05

    Archaea-specific D-family DNA polymerase (PolD) forms a dimeric heterodimer consisting of two large polymerase subunits and two small exonuclease subunits. According to the protein-protein interactions identified among the domains of large and small subunits of PolD, a symmetrical model for the domain topology of the PolD holoenzyme is proposed. The experimental evidence supports various aspects of the model. The conserved amphipathic nature of the N-terminal putative α-helix of the large subunit plays a key role in the homodimeric assembly and the self-cyclization of the large subunit and is deeply involved in the archaeal PolD stability and activity. We also discuss the evolutional transformation from archaeal D-family to eukaryotic B-family polymerase on the basis of the structural information.

  4. Domain Structures and Inter-Domain Interactions Defining the Holoenzyme Architecture of Archaeal D-Family DNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideshi Yokoyama

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Archaea-specific D-family DNA polymerase (PolD forms a dimeric heterodimer consisting of two large polymerase subunits and two small exonuclease subunits. According to the protein-protein interactions identified among the domains of large and small subunits of PolD, a symmetrical model for the domain topology of the PolD holoenzyme is proposed. The experimental evidence supports various aspects of the model. The conserved amphipathic nature of the N-terminal putative α-helix of the large subunit plays a key role in the homodimeric assembly and the self-cyclization of the large subunit and is deeply involved in the archaeal PolD stability and activity. We also discuss the evolutional transformation from archaeal D-family to eukaryotic B-family polymerase on the basis of the structural information.

  5. NEIGHBORHOOD POVERTY AND NONMARITAL FERTILITY: SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL DIMENSIONS

    OpenAIRE

    South, Scott J.; Crowder, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Data from 4,855 respondents to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics were used to examine spatial and temporal dimensions of the effect of neighborhood poverty on teenage premarital childbearing. Although high poverty in the immediate neighborhood increased the risk of becoming an unmarried parent, high poverty in surrounding neighborhoods reduced this risk. The effect of local neighborhood poverty was especially pronounced when surrounding neighborhoods were economically advantaged. Measuring e...

  6. The UlaG protein family defines novel structural and functional motifs grafted on an ancient RNase fold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coll Miquel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial populations are highly successful at colonizing new habitats and adapting to changing environmental conditions, partly due to their capacity to evolve novel virulence and metabolic pathways in response to stress conditions and to shuffle them by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. A common theme in the evolution of new functions consists of gene duplication followed by functional divergence. UlaG, a unique manganese-dependent metallo-β-lactamase (MBL enzyme involved in L-ascorbate metabolism by commensal and symbiotic enterobacteria, provides a model for the study of the emergence of new catalytic activities from the modification of an ancient fold. Furthermore, UlaG is the founding member of the so-called UlaG-like (UlaGL protein family, a recently established and poorly characterized family comprising divalent (and perhaps trivalent metal-binding MBLs that catalyze transformations on phosphorylated sugars and nucleotides. Results Here we combined protein structure-guided and sequence-only molecular phylogenetic analyses to dissect the molecular evolution of UlaG and to study its phylogenomic distribution, its relatedness with present-day UlaGL protein sequences and functional conservation. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that UlaGL sequences are present in Bacteria and Archaea, with bona fide orthologs found mainly in mammalian and plant-associated Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The incongruence between the UlaGL tree and known species trees indicates exchange by HGT and suggests that the UlaGL-encoding genes provided a growth advantage under changing conditions. Our search for more distantly related protein sequences aided by structural homology has uncovered that UlaGL sequences have a common evolutionary origin with present-day RNA processing and metabolizing MBL enzymes widespread in Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. This observation suggests an ancient origin for the UlaGL family within the broader trunk

  7. The influence of rural home and neighborhood environments on healthy eating, physical activity, and weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegler, Michelle C; Swan, Deanne W; Alcantara, Iris; Feldman, Lynne; Glanz, Karen

    2014-02-01

    Despite the recognition that environments play a role in shaping physical activity and healthy eating behaviors, relatively little research has focused on rural homes and neighborhoods as important settings for obesity prevention. This study, conducted through community-based participatory research, used a social ecological model to examine how home and neighborhood food and physical activity environments were associated with weight status among rural-dwelling adults. Data were from a cross-sectional survey of White and African American adults (n = 513) aged 40-70 years living in rural southwest Georgia. Data were analyzed using measured variable path analysis, a form of structural equation modeling. The results support a social ecological approach to obesity prevention. Physical activity had a direct effect on BMI; self-efficacy, family support for physical activity, and household inventory of physical activity equipment also had direct effects on physical activity. Neighborhood walkability had an indirect effect on physical activity through self-efficacy and family social support. Although neither fruit and vegetable intake nor fat intake had direct effects on BMI, self-efficacy and household food inventories had direct effects on dietary behavior. Perceived access to healthy foods in the neighborhood had an indirect effect on healthy eating and a direct effect on weight; neighborhood cohesion had an indirect effect on healthy eating through self-efficacy. Overall, individual factors and home environments tended to exhibit direct effects on behavior, and neighborhood variables more often exhibited an indirect effect.

  8. THE CYCLE OF VIOLENCE IN CONTEXT: EXPLORING THE MODERATING ROLES OF NEIGHBORHOOD DISADVANTAGE AND CULTURAL NORMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Emily M; Fagan, Abigail A

    2013-05-01

    Although the cycle of violence theory has received empirical support (Widom, 1989a, 1989b), in reality, not all victims of child physical abuse become involved in violence. Therefore, little is known regarding factors that may moderate the relationship between abuse and subsequent violence, particularly contextual circumstances. The current investigation used longitudinal data from 1,372 youth living in 79 neighborhoods who participated in the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN), and it employed a multivariate, multilevel Rasch model to explore the degree to which neighborhood disadvantage and cultural norms attenuate or strengthen the abuse-violence relationship. The results indicate that the effect of child physical abuse on violence was weaker in more disadvantaged communities. Neighborhood cultural norms regarding tolerance for youth delinquency and fighting among family and friends did not moderate the child abuse-violence relationship, but each had a direct effect on violence, such that residence in neighborhoods more tolerant of delinquency and fighting increased the propensity for violence. These results suggest that the cycle of violence may be contextualized by neighborhood structural and cultural conditions.

  9. Structurally Well-Defined Sigmoidal Gold Clusters: Probing the Correlation between Metal Atom Arrangement and Chiroptical Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Wang, Yuechao; Jiang, Hong; Zhao, Liang

    2016-05-04

    Asymmetric arrangement of metal atoms is crucial for understanding the chirality origin of chiral metal nanoclusters and facilitating the design and development of new chiral catalysts and chiroptical devices. Here, we describe the construction of four asymmetric gold and gold-silver clusters by chirality transfer from diimido ligands. The acquired metal clusters show strong circular dichroism (CD) response with large anisotropy factors of up to 6 × 10(-3), larger than the values of most reported chiral gold nanoclusters. Regardless of the same absolute configuration of the applied three diimido ligands, sigmoidal and reverse-sigmoidal arrangements of gold atoms both can be achieved, which resultantly produce an opposite Cotton effect within a specific absorption range. On the basis of the detailed structural characterization via X-ray crystallography and contrast experiments, the chirality contribution of the imido ligand, the asymmetrically arranged metal cluster, and the chiral arrangement of aromatic rings of phosphine ligands have been qualitatively evaluated. Time-dependent DFT calculations reveal that the chiroptical property of the acquired metal clusters is mainly influenced by the asymmetrically arranged metal atoms. Correlation of asymmetric arrangements of metal atoms in clusters with their chiroptical response provides a viable means of fabricating a designable chiral surface of metal nanoclusters and opens a broader prospect for chiral cluster application.

  10. Prostate Cancer Severity Associations with Neighborhood Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charnita M. Zeigler-Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The goal of this paper was to examine neighborhood deprivation and prostate cancer severity. Methods. We studied African American and Caucasian prostate cancer cases from the Pennsylvania State Cancer Registry. Census tract-level variables and deprivation scores were examined in relation to diagnosis stage, grade, and tumor aggressiveness. Results. We observed associations of low SES with high Gleason score among African Americans residing in neighborhoods with low educational attainment (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.13–1.60, high poverty (OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.15–1.67, low car ownership (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.20–1.78, and higher percentage of residents on public assistance (OR = 1.32, 95% = 1.08–1.62. The highest quartile of neighborhood deprivation was also associated with high Gleason score. For both Caucasians and African Americans, the highest quartile of neighborhood deprivation was associated with high Gleason score at diagnosis (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.19–1.52; OR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.21–2.40, resp.. Conclusion. Using a neighborhood deprivation index, we observed associations between high-grade prostate cancer and neighborhood deprivation in Caucasians and African-Americans.

  11. Supportive parenting mediates widening neighborhood socioeconomic disparities in children’s antisocial behavior from ages 5 to 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odgers, Candice L.; Caspi, Avshalom; Russell, Michael A.; Sampson, Robert J.; Arsenault, Louise; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we report a graded relationship between neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and children’s antisocial behavior that (1) can be observed at school entry, (2) widens across childhood, (3) remains after controlling for family-level SES and risk, and (4) is completely mediated by maternal warmth and parental monitoring (defined throughout as supportive parenting). Children were participants in the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study (n=2232), which prospectively tracked the development of children and their neighborhoods across childhood. Direct and independent effects of neighborhood-level SES on children’s antisocial behavior were observed as early as age 5 and the gap between children living in deprived versus more affluent neighborhoods widened as children approached adolescence. By age 12, the effect of neighborhood socioeconomic status on children’s antisocial behavior was as large as the effect observed for our most robust predictor of antisocial behavior – sex! (Cohen’s d = .51 when comparing children growing up in deprived versus more affluent neighborhoods in comparison to Cohen’s d = .53 when comparing antisocial behavior among boys versus girls). However, differences in children’s levels and rate of change in antisocial behavior across deprived versus more affluent neighborhoods were completely mediated by supportive parenting practices. Implications of our findings for studying and reducing socioeconomic disparities in antisocial behavior among children are discussed. PMID:22781850

  12. Intensity inhomogeneity correction of structural MR images: a data-driven approach to define input algorithm parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eGanzetti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Intensity non-uniformity (INU in magnetic resonance (MR imaging is a major issue when conducting analyses of brain structural properties. An inaccurate INU correction may result in qualitative and quantitative misinterpretations. Several INU correction methods exist, whose performance largely depend on the specific parameter settings that need to be chosen by the user. Here we addressed the question of how to select the best input parameters for a specific INU correction algorithm. Our investigation was based on the INU correction algorithm implemented in SPM, but this can be in principle extended to any other algorithm requiring the selection of input parameters. We conducted a comprehensive comparison of indirect metrics for the assessment of INU correction performance, namely the coefficient of variation of white matter (CV_WM, the coefficient of variation of gray matter (CV_GM, and the coefficient of joint variation between white matter and gray matter (CJV. Using simulated MR data, we observed the CJV to be more accurate than CV_WM and CV_GM, provided that the noise level in the INU-corrected image was controlled by means of spatial smoothing. Based on the CJV, we developed a data-driven approach for selecting INU correction parameters, which could effectively work on actual MR images. To this end, we implemented an enhanced procedure for the definition of white and gray matter masks, based on which the CJV was calculated. Our approach was validated using actual T1-weighted images collected with 1.5 T, 3 T and 7 T MR scanners. We found that our procedure can reliably assist the selection of valid INU correction algorithm parameters, thereby contributing to an enhanced inhomogeneity correction in MR images.

  13. Intensity Inhomogeneity Correction of Structural MR Images: A Data-Driven Approach to Define Input Algorithm Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzetti, Marco; Wenderoth, Nicole; Mantini, Dante

    2016-01-01

    Intensity non-uniformity (INU) in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a major issue when conducting analyses of brain structural properties. An inaccurate INU correction may result in qualitative and quantitative misinterpretations. Several INU correction methods exist, whose performance largely depend on the specific parameter settings that need to be chosen by the user. Here we addressed the question of how to select the best input parameters for a specific INU correction algorithm. Our investigation was based on the INU correction algorithm implemented in SPM, but this can be in principle extended to any other algorithm requiring the selection of input parameters. We conducted a comprehensive comparison of indirect metrics for the assessment of INU correction performance, namely the coefficient of variation of white matter (CVWM), the coefficient of variation of gray matter (CVGM), and the coefficient of joint variation between white matter and gray matter (CJV). Using simulated MR data, we observed the CJV to be more accurate than CVWM and CVGM, provided that the noise level in the INU-corrected image was controlled by means of spatial smoothing. Based on the CJV, we developed a data-driven approach for selecting INU correction parameters, which could effectively work on actual MR images. To this end, we implemented an enhanced procedure for the definition of white and gray matter masks, based on which the CJV was calculated. Our approach was validated using actual T1-weighted images collected with 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T MR scanners. We found that our procedure can reliably assist the selection of valid INU correction algorithm parameters, thereby contributing to an enhanced inhomogeneity correction in MR images.

  14. The combined effect of individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status on cancer survival rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ming Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This population-based study investigated the relationship between individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES and mortality rates for major cancers in Taiwan. METHODS: A population-based follow-up study was conducted with 20,488 cancer patients diagnosed in 2002. Each patient was traced to death or for 5 years. The individual income-related insurance payment amount was used as a proxy measure of individual SES for patients. Neighborhood SES was defined by income, and neighborhoods were grouped as living in advantaged or disadvantaged areas. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to compare the death-free survival rates between the different SES groups after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. RESULTS: After adjusting for patient characteristics (age, gender, Charlson Comorbidity Index Score, urbanization, and area of residence, tumor extent, treatment modalities (operation and adjuvant therapy, and hospital characteristics (ownership and teaching level, colorectal cancer, and head and neck cancer patients under 65 years old with low individual SES in disadvantaged neighborhoods conferred a 1.5 to 2-fold higher risk of mortality, compared with patients with high individual SES in advantaged neighborhoods. A cross-level interaction effect was found in lung cancer and breast cancer. Lung cancer and breast cancer patients less than 65 years old with low SES in advantaged neighborhoods carried the highest risk of mortality. Prostate cancer patients aged 65 and above with low SES in disadvantaged neighborhoods incurred the highest risk of mortality. There was no association between SES and mortality for cervical cancer and pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that cancer patients with low individual SES have the highest risk of mortality even under a universal health-care system. Public health strategies and welfare policies must continue to focus on this vulnerable group.

  15. Neighborhood built environment and socio-economic status in relation to multiple health outcomes in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-García, Javier; Queralt, Ana; Adams, Marc A; Conway, Terry L; Sallis, James F

    2017-08-29

    The study aim was to examine associations of neighborhood built environment and neighborhood socio-economic status (SES) with multiple physical activity (PA) behaviors, sedentary time, and obesity indicators among adolescents. Cross-sectional study of 325 adolescents aged 14-18years recruited from schools in Valencia, Spain. Participants' home neighborhoods were classified according to walkability and SES levels. Walkability was defined as an index of three built environment characteristics (i.e., residential density, land use mix, and street connectivity) based on geographic information system data. Moderate-vigorous PA (MVPA) and sedentary time were assessed using accelerometers. Active commuting to school, leisure-time PA, and time in specific sedentary activities were evaluated by questionnaire. Objectively measured weight and height were used to calculate body mass index, and percent body fat was analyzed by bioelectrical impedance. Data were collected in 2013-15. Mixed model regression analyses were performed. Analyses showed an SES-by-walkability interaction for MVPA on weekends. MVPA was highest in high-SES/high-walkable neighborhoods. Another SES-by-walkability interaction was found for sedentary minutes per weekend day. The lowest average sedentary minutes were found in high-SES/high-walkable areas. Neighborhood SES was positively related to participation in sports teams/PA classes and, negatively to time spent in sedentary behaviors. Adolescents living in lower-SES neighborhoods spent more time watching TV and had more obesity and body fat. Present findings strengthen the rationale for targeting neighborhood built and SES environments as health promotion interventions for adolescents. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Decoding ecosystem services in the neighborhood through ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remediation to Restoration to Revitalization (R2R2R) is a place-based practice that requires ongoing communication amongst agencies, local governments, and citizens. One of the challenges is that each of these entities have different relationships with and responsibilities to sites where R2R2R unfolds. Sediment remediation and habitat restoration project goals, community planning, and lived experiences diverge in scale, focus, and interaction depending on the agency or individual. In order to address this disconnect, we developed a framework to sort and classify data and identify ecosystem services collected through inductive methods like participant observation and document analysis. Data were collected between June 2015 and December 2016 and analyzed through content analysis as a first step. Participant observation was conducted in relation to the City of Duluth St. Louis River Corridor planning process at park planning public meetings, community group meetings, and City of Duluth technical advisory meetings. Document analysis was conducted on a variety of City of Duluth plans. The framework that emerged from the analysis includes neighborhood components that individuals, organizations, and local governments may discuss in the context of their community. The characteristics are a mix of built environment types, structural dimensions, personal experiences, and human-environment relationships and include: parks/open spaces, trails or connections, housing, schoo

  17. Variations in active transport behavior among different neighborhoods and across adult life stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars Breum; Madsen, Thomas; Schipperijn, Jasper;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Built environment characteristics are closely related to transport behavior, but observed variations could be due to residents own choice of neighborhood called residential self-selection. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in neighborhood walkability and residential...... self-selection across life stages in relation to active transport behavior. METHODS: The IPEN walkability index, which consists of four built environment characteristics, was used to define 16 high and low walkable neighborhoods in Aarhus, Denmark (250.000 inhabitants). Transport behavior was assessed...... using the IPAQ questionnaire. Life stages were categorized in three groups according to age and parental status. A factor analysis was conducted to investigate patterns of self-selection. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were carried out to evaluate the association between walkability...

  18. The Neighborhood: a Web-based platform to support conceptual teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddens, Jean Foret

    2007-01-01

    The need for reform in nursing education has been clearly defined.The difficulty has been in finding ways to facilitate the process. This article describes an innovative web-based virtual community, The Neighborhood, used to promote conceptual learning across a new curriculum at the University of New Mexico College of Nursing. The Neighborhood features 30 fictional characters that represent various cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds and demonstrate a range of health and psychosocial prob-lems. These characters interact with various community agencies in numerous health care settings. The Neighborhood has strong links to three well-founded teaching strategies: storytelling, case-based learning, and interpretive pedagogy. Because the cases unfold over time, in much the same way problems develop in real life, ongoing exposure to a concept is permitted, facilitating deep understanding.

  19. Neighborhood Residents' Production of Order: The Effects of Collective Efficacy on Responses to Neighborhood Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, William; Schafer, Joseph A.; Varano, Sean P.; Bynum, Timothy S.

    2006-01-01

    Community policing agencies seek to engage communities to build working partnerships, solicit the input of neighborhood residents, and stimulate informal control of crime. A common barrier to these efforts is a lack of citizen participation. The purpose of this article is to assess the relationship between neighborhood-level variables and citizen…

  20. N-topo nilpotency in fuzzy neighborhood rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzi Al-Thukair

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the notion of N-topo nilpotent fuzzy set in a fuzzy neighborhood ring and develop some fundamental results. Here we show that a fuzzy neighborhood ring is locally inversely bounded if and only if for all 0<α<1, the α-level topological rings are locally inversely bounded. This leads us to prove a characterization theorem which says that if a fuzzy neighborhood ring on a division ring is Wuyts-Lowen WNT2 and locally inversely bounded, then the fuzzy neighborhood ring is a fuzzy neighborhood division ring. We also present another characterization theorem which says that a fuzzy neighborhood ring on a division ring is a fuzzy neighborhood division ring if the fuzzy neighborhood ring contains an N-topo nilpotent fuzzy neighborhood of zero.

  1. [Individual characteristics associated with perception of the local neighborhood's territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Célio, Fabiano de Almeida; Xavier, Cesar Coelho; Andrade, Amanda Cristina de Souza; Camargos, Vitor Passos; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira; Friche, Amélia Augusta de Lima; Cortês, Marcela Guimarães; Proietti, Fernando Augusto

    2014-09-01

    There is a growing interest in evaluating the impact of neighborhood characteristics on health. The definition of neighborhood involves two main strategies, one using artificial boundaries, usually created for administrative purposes, and the other based on the individual's definition, namely the perceived neighborhood. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with heterogeneity in the perceived neighborhood among participants in a health survey in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Ordinal logistic regression was used to determine and quantify this association. Larger size of the perceived neighborhood was associated with better socioeconomic status, positive employment status, positive assessment of aesthetic aspects and mobility within the neighborhood, active identification of problems in the neighborhood, less involvement in sports/leisure activities, and knowing more neighbors. The study's results can help produce more significant neighborhood definitions that are more consistent with residents' own perceptions, thereby favoring more accurate estimates of neighborhood impact on health.

  2. Neighborhoods and adolescent health-risk behavior: an ecological network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Christopher R; Soller, Brian; Jackson, Aubrey L

    2015-01-01

    This study integrates insights from social network analysis, activity space perspectives, and theories of urban and spatial processes to present an novel approach to neighborhood effects on health-risk behavior among youth. We suggest spatial patterns of neighborhood residents' non-home routines may be conceptualized as ecological, or "eco"-networks, which are two-mode networks that indirectly link residents through socio-spatial overlap in routine activities. We further argue structural configurations of eco-networks are consequential for youth's behavioral health. In this study we focus on a key structural feature of eco-networks--the neighborhood-level extent to which household dyads share two or more activity locations, or eco-network reinforcement--and its association with two dimensions of health-risk behavior, substance use and delinquency/sexual activity. Using geographic data on non-home routine activity locations among respondents from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A.FANS), we constructed neighborhood-specific eco-networks by connecting sampled households to "activity clusters," which are sets of spatially-proximate activity locations. We then measured eco-network reinforcement and examined its association with dimensions of adolescent health risk behavior employing a sample of 830 youth ages 12-17 nested in 65 census tracts. We also examined whether neighborhood-level social processes (collective efficacy and intergenerational closure) mediate the association between eco-network reinforcement and the outcomes considered. Results indicated eco-network reinforcement exhibits robust negative associations with both substance use and delinquency/sexual activity scales. Eco-network reinforcement effects were not explained by potential mediating variables. In addition to introducing a novel theoretical and empirical approach to neighborhood effects on youth, our findings highlight the importance of intersecting conventional routines for

  3. Decidability of definability

    CERN Document Server

    Tsankov, Manuel Bodirsky; Michael Pinsker; Todor

    2010-01-01

    For a fixed infinite structure $\\Gamma$ with finite signature $\\tau$, we study the following computational problem: Input are quantifier-free first-order $\\tau$-formulas $\\phi_0,\\phi_1,\\dots,\\phi_n$ that define relations $R_0,R_1,\\dots,R_n$ over $\\Gamma$. The question is whether the relation $R_0$ is primitive positive definable from $R_1,\\ldots,R_n$, i.e., definable by a first-order formula that uses only relation symbols for $R_1, \\dots, R_n$, equality, conjunctions, and existential quantification (disjunction, negation, and universal quantification are forbidden). We show decidability of this problem for all structures $\\Gamma$ that have a first-order definition in an ordered homogeneous structure $\\Delta$ with a finite language whose age is a Ramsey class and determined by finitely many forbidden substructures. Examples for structures $\\Gamma$ with this property are the order of the rationals, the random graph, the homogeneous universal poset, the random tournament, all homogeneous universal $C$-relations...

  4. Defining a Two-pronged Structural Model for PB1 (Phox/Bem1p) Domain Interaction in Plant Auxin Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korasick, David A.; Chatterjee, Srirupa; Tonelli, Marco; Dashti, Hesam; Lee, Soon Goo; Westfall, Corey S.; Fulton, D. Bruce; Andreotti, Amy H.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Strader, Lucia C.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2015-04-03

    Phox/Bem1p (PB1) domains are universal structural modules that use surfaces of different charge for protein-protein association. In plants, PB1-mediated interactions of auxin response factors (ARF) and auxin/indole 3-acetic acid inducible proteins regulate transcriptional events modulated by the phytohormone auxin. Here we investigate the thermodynamic and structural basis for Arabidopsis thaliana ARF7 PB1 domain self-interaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR experiments indicate that key residues on both the basic and acidic faces of the PB1 domain contribute to and organize coordinately to stabilize protein-protein interactions. Calorimetric analysis of ARF7PB1 site-directed mutants defines a two-pronged electrostatic interaction. The canonical PB1 interaction between a lysine and a cluster of acidic residues provides one prong with an arginine and a second cluster of acidic residues defining the other prong. Evolutionary conservation of this core recognition feature and other co-varying interface sequences allows for versatile PB1-mediated interactions in auxin signaling.

  5. Neighborhood Energy/Economic Development project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    Energy costs impact low income communities more than anyone else. Low income residents pay a larger percentage of their incomes for energy costs. In addition, they generally have far less discretionary energy use to eliminate in response to increasing energy prices. Furthermore, with less discretionary income, home energy efficiency improvements are often too expensive. Small neighborhood businesses are in the same situation. Improved efficiency in the use of energy can improve this situation by reducing energy costs for residents and local businesses. More importantly, energy management programs can increase the demand for local goods and services and lead to the creation of new job training and employment opportunities. In this way, neighborhood based energy efficiency programs can support community economic development. The present project, undertaken with the support of the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force, was intended to serve as a demonstration of energy/economic programming at the neighborhood level. The San Francisco Neighborhood Energy/Economic Development (NEED) project was designed to be a visible demonstration of bringing the economic development benefits of energy management home to low-income community members who need it most. To begin, a Community Advisory Committee was established to guide the design of the programs to best meet needs of the community. Subsequently three neighborhood energy/economic development programs were developed: The small business energy assistance program; The youth training and weatherization program; and, The energy review of proposed housing development projects.

  6. Evolution of Cooperation with Moore Neighborhood and Self-Playing Rule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbing Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary spatial game is a promising way to unravel the mystery of cooperation, and it has been well recognized that spatial structure could enable cooperation to persist. Schweitzer et al.’s lattice model provides an innovative method to solve the problem. In this paper, we conduct simulations using the same von Neumann neighborhood as in Schweitzer et al.’s study (2002 and observe the effect of initial population and lattice size on the evolution of cooperation. Then, we extend the model with a more complicated Moore neighborhood and self-playing rule for each central player. Simulation results not only provide new evidence for the persistence of cooperation in the evolution with spatial structures, but also investigate critical conditions for the spatial coexistence or the invasion of cooperators and defectors with the more complicated neighborhood.

  7. Structural analysis and anticoagulant activities of the novel sulfated fucan possessing a regular well-defined repeating unit from sea cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingyi; Xu, Li; Zhao, Longyan; Xiao, Chuang; Gao, Na; Luo, Lan; Yang, Lian; Li, Zi; Chen, Lingyun; Zhao, Jinhua

    2015-04-13

    Sulfated fucans, the complex polysaccharides, exhibit various biological activities. Herein, we purified two fucans from the sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis and Ludwigothurea grisea. Their structures were verified by means of HPGPC, FT-IR, GC-MS and NMR. As a result, a novel structural motif for this type of polymers is reported. The fucans have a unique structure composed of a central core of regular (1→2) and (1→3)-linked tetrasaccharide repeating units. Approximately 50% of the units from L. grisea (100% for H. edulis fucan) contain sides of oligosaccharides formed by nonsulfated fucose units linked to the O-4 position of the central core. Anticoagulant activity assays indicate that the sea cucumber fucans strongly inhibit human blood clotting through the intrinsic pathways of the coagulation cascade. Moreover, the mechanism of anticoagulant action of the fucans is selective inhibition of thrombin activity by heparin cofactor II. The distinctive tetrasaccharide repeating units contribute to the anticoagulant action. Additionally, unlike the fucans from marine alga, although the sea cucumber fucans have great molecular weights and affluent sulfates, they do not induce platelet aggregation. Overall, our results may be helpful in understanding the structure-function relationships of the well-defined polysaccharides from invertebrate as new types of safer anticoagulants.

  8. Structural Analysis and Anticoagulant Activities of the Novel Sulfated Fucan Possessing a Regular Well-Defined Repeating Unit from Sea Cucumber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Wu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfated fucans, the complex polysaccharides, exhibit various biological activities. Herein, we purified two fucans from the sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis and Ludwigothurea grisea. Their structures were verified by means of HPGPC, FT-IR, GC–MS and NMR. As a result, a novel structural motif for this type of polymers is reported. The fucans have a unique structure composed of a central core of regular (1→2 and (1→3-linked tetrasaccharide repeating units. Approximately 50% of the units from L. grisea (100% for H. edulis fucan contain sides of oligosaccharides formed by nonsulfated fucose units linked to the O-4 position of the central core. Anticoagulant activity assays indicate that the sea cucumber fucans strongly inhibit human blood clotting through the intrinsic pathways of the coagulation cascade. Moreover, the mechanism of anticoagulant action of the fucans is selective inhibition of thrombin activity by heparin cofactor II. The distinctive tetrasaccharide repeating units contribute to the anticoagulant action. Additionally, unlike the fucans from marine alga, although the sea cucumber fucans have great molecular weights and affluent sulfates, they do not induce platelet aggregation. Overall, our results may be helpful in understanding the structure-function relationships of the well-defined polysaccharides from invertebrate as new types of safer anticoagulants.

  9. Nirvana Neighborhood: Public/private tensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Ardenghi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our object of study is the neighborhood called Nirvana [in City Bell, district of La Plata], and our aim is to describe the traces left by the landscape dynamics which mark different historical periods, and to relate the concept of landscape with this neighborhood's current territorial configuration. Framed in Cultural Geography, we go back to Milton Santos, Paul Claval and Mario Margulis' perspective, from the category of landscape. The methodology used was qualitative, and it entailed observation and photographic records of the area, informal talks with neighbors, compilation of documents and journalistic material about the area, all of which allowed us to dig deep into what is "public" and what is "private" in this neighborhood, where and how the "outside" and the "inside" are established and to decide whether its aim is being an open and including landscape or if what they are actually after is pushing strangers away by means of invisible barriers

  10. The effects of social capital and neighborhood characteristics on intimate partner violence: a consideration of social resources and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirst, Maritt; Lazgare, Luis Palma; Zhang, Yu Janice; O'Campo, Patricia

    2015-06-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a growing public health problem, and gaps exist in knowledge with respect to appropriate prevention and treatment strategies. A growing body of research evidence suggests that beyond individual factors (e.g., socio-economic status, psychological processes, substance abuse problems), neighborhood characteristics, such as neighborhood economic disadvantage, high crime rates, high unemployment and social disorder, are associated with increased risk for IPV. However, existing research in this area has focused primarily on risk factors inherent in neighborhoods, and has failed to adequately examine resources within social networks and neighborhoods that may buffer or prevent the occurrence of IPV. This study examines the effects of neighborhood characteristics, such as economic disadvantage and disorder, and individual and neighborhood resources, such as social capital, on IPV among a representative sample of 2412 residents of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Using a population based sample of 2412 randomly selected Toronto adults with comprehensive neighborhood level data on a broad set of characteristics, we conducted multi-level modeling to examine the effects of individual- and neighborhood-level effects on IPV outcomes. We also examined protective factors through a comprehensive operationalization of the concept of social capital, involving neighborhood collective efficacy, community group participation, social network structure and social support. Findings show that residents who were involved in one or more community groups in the last 12 months and had high perceived neighborhood problems were more likely to have experienced physical IPV. Residents who had high perceived social support and low perceived neighborhood problems were less likely to experience non-physical IPV. These relationships did not differ by neighborhood income or gender. Findings suggest interesting contextual effects of social capital on IPV. Consistent with

  11. The Effect of Neighborhood Recorded Crime on Fear: Does Neighborhood Social Context Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Amber L; Breetzke, Gregory; Ivory, Vivienne

    2015-09-01

    A number of individual and neighborhood-level factors may influence the relationship between recorded crime in one's neighborhood and fear of crime. Understanding these factors may assist in reducing fear, which has been associated with poorer physical and mental health. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the effect of recorded crime rates on fear differs based on the neighborhood social context (social fragmentation) using hierarchical regression modelling, with separate analyses by crime type. Recorded crimes (2008-2010) and national (New Zealand) survey data were used. Higher crime in a neighborhood was associated with higher fear of crime, with only small effect size differences in feelings of fear by recorded type of crime. However, when stratified, the associations between violent and drug/alcohol crimes and fear of crime were larger for those living in highly fragmented neighborhoods compared with less fragmented neighborhoods. Efforts to alleviate fear of crime should focus on the broader neighborhood social context in which these feelings are espoused.

  12. Neighborhood archetypes for population health research: is there no place like home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weden, Margaret M; Bird, Chloe E; Escarce, José J; Lurie, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new, latent archetype approach for studying place in population health. Latent class analysis is used to show how the number, defining attributes, and change/stability of neighborhood archetypes can be characterized and tested for statistical significance. The approach is demonstrated using data on contextual determinants of health for US neighborhoods defined by census tracts in 1990 and 2000. Six archetypes (prevalence 13-20%) characterize the statistically significant combinations of contextual determinants of health from the social environment, built environment, commuting and migration patterns, and demographics and household composition of US neighborhoods. Longitudinal analyses based on the findings demonstrate notable stability (76.4% of neighborhoods categorized as the same archetype ten years later), with exceptions reflecting trends in (ex)urbanization, gentrification/downgrading, and racial/ethnic reconfiguration. The findings and approach is applicable to both research and practice (e.g. surveillance) and can be scaled up or down to study health and place in other geographical contexts or historical periods.

  13. Neighborhood connected perfect domination in graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulandai Vel M.P.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Let $G = (V, E$ be a connected graph. A set $S$ of vertices in $G$ is a perfect dominating set if every vertex $v$ in $V-S$ is adjacent to exactly one vertex in $S$. A perfect dominating set $S$ is said to be a neighborhood connected perfect dominating set (ncpd-set if the induced subgraph $$ is connected. The minimum cardinality of a ncpd-set of $G$ is called the neighborhood connected perfect domination number of $G$ and is denoted by $\\gamma_{ncp}(G$. In this paper we initiate a study of this parameter.

  14. Higher Risk of Heart Disease for Blacks in Poorer Neighborhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163099.html Higher Risk of Heart Disease for Blacks in Poorer Neighborhoods Preventive measures must ... in poor neighborhoods are at higher risk for heart disease and stroke than those who live in wealthier ...

  15. A Greedy Algorithm for Neighborhood Overlap-Based Community Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Meghanathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neighborhood overlap (NOVER of an edge u-v is defined as the ratio of the number of nodes who are neighbors for both u and v to that of the number of nodes who are neighbors of at least u or v. In this paper, we hypothesize that an edge u-v with a lower NOVER score bridges two or more sets of vertices, with very few edges (other than u-v connecting vertices from one set to another set. Accordingly, we propose a greedy algorithm of iteratively removing the edges of a network in the increasing order of their neighborhood overlap and calculating the modularity score of the resulting network component(s after the removal of each edge. The network component(s that have the largest cumulative modularity score are identified as the different communities of the network. We evaluate the performance of the proposed NOVER-based community detection algorithm on nine real-world network graphs and compare the performance against the multi-level aggregation-based Louvain algorithm, as well as the original and time-efficient versions of the edge betweenness-based Girvan-Newman (GN community detection algorithm.

  16. A Well-Defined Silicon Nanocone-Carbon Structure for Demonstrating Exclusive Influences of Carbon Coating on Silicon Anode of Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Luo, Fei; Lu, Hao; Rong, Xiaohui; Liu, Bonan; Chu, Geng; Sun, Yu; Quan, Baogang; Zheng, Jieyun; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi; Qiu, Xinping; Li, Hong; Chen, Liquan

    2017-01-25

    Nanotechnology and carbon coating have been applied to silicon anodes to achieve excellent lithium-ion batteries, but the exclusive influence of carbon coating on solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation is difficult to exhibit distinctly because of the impurity and morphological irregularity of most nanostructured anodes. Here, we design a silicon nanocone-carbon (SNC-C) composite structure as a model anode to demonstrate the significant influences of carbon coating on SEI formation and electrochemical performance, unaffectedly as a result of pure electrode component and distinctly due to regular nanocone morphology. As demonstrated by morphological and elemental analysis, compared to the SNC electrode, the SNC-C electrode maintains a thinner SEI layer (∼10 nm) and more stable structure during cycling as well as longer cycle life (>725 cycles), higher Coulombic efficiency (>99%), and lower electrode polarization. This well-defined structure clearly shows the interface stability attributed to carbon coating and is promising in fundamental research of the silicon anode.

  17. The impact of neighborhood quality, perceived stress, and social support on depressive symptoms during pregnancy in African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurgescu, Carmen; Misra, Dawn P; Sealy-Jefferson, Shawnita; Caldwell, Cleopatra H; Templin, Thomas N; Slaughter-Acey, Jaime C; Osypuk, Theresa L

    2015-04-01

    Living in a lower-quality neighborhood is associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms in the general population as well as among pregnant and postpartum women. However, little is known of the important pathways by which this association occurs. We proposed a model in which perceived stress and social support mediated the effects of neighborhood quality on depressive symptoms during pregnancy (measured by the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression, CES-D, scale) in a sample of 1383 African American women from the Detroit metropolitan area interviewed during their delivery hospitalization. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), we built a latent variable of neighborhood quality using 4 measures (neighborhood disorder, neighborhood safety/danger, walking environment, overall rating). We then tested two SEM mediation models. We found that lower neighborhood quality was associated with higher prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy (standardized total effect = .16, p = .011). We found that perceived stress partially mediated the neighborhood quality association with depressive symptoms. Although the association of social support with depressive symptoms was negligible, social support mediated associations of neighborhood quality with perceived stress [standardized path coefficient = .38 (.02), p = .009]. Our results point to the need for public health, health care, as well as non-health related interventions (e.g. crime prevention programs) to decrease overall exposure to stressors, as well as stress levels of women living in poor quality neighborhoods. Interventions that increase the levels of social support of women during pregnancy are also needed for their potential to decrease stress and ultimately improve mental health at this important time in the life course. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Aging, Neighborhood Attachment, and Fear of Crime: Testing Reciprocal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Joong-Hwan; Kim, Sangmoon

    2009-01-01

    This study attempts to examine the reciprocal effects between fear of crime and neighborhood attachment because aging is a critical factor in both discussions of fear of crime and neighborhood attachment (friendship, neighboring, social cohesion and trust, informal social control, and participation in neighborhood watch program). Using data from…

  19. Environmental Determinants of Neighborhood Satisfaction among Urban Elderly Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirovec, Ronald L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined environmental determinants of neighborhood satisfaction among urban elderly men (N=100). Safety emerged as the major determinant, but its impact on neighborhood satisfaction was lessened when considered in conjunction with housing satisfaction. Urban planners should assign priority to the development of neighborhoods which foster a sense…

  20. Neighborhood Poverty and Nonmarital Fertility: Spatial and Temporal Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Scott J.; Crowder, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Data from 4,855 respondents to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics were used to examine spatial and temporal dimensions of the effect of neighborhood poverty on teenage premarital childbearing. Although high poverty in the immediate neighborhood increased the risk of becoming an unmarried parent, high poverty in surrounding neighborhoods reduced…

  1. Neighborhood decline and the economic crisis: An introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kempen, R.; Bolt, G.; Van Ham, M.

    2016-01-01

    Urban neighborhoods are still important in the lives of its residents. Therefore, it is important to find out how the recent global financial and economic crisis affects these neighborhoods. Which types of neighborhoods and which residents suffer more than others? This introduction provides an overv

  2. Geodemographics profiling of influenza A and B virus infections in community neighborhoods in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Asami

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spread of influenza viruses in a community are influenced by several factors, but no reports have focused on the relationship between the incidence of influenza and characteristics of small neighborhoods in a community. We aimed to clarify the relationship between the incidence of influenza and neighborhood characteristics using GIS and identified the type of small areas where influenza occurs frequently or infrequently. Methods Of the 19,077 registered influenza cases, we analyzed 11,437 influenza A and 5,193 influenza B cases that were diagnosed by the rapid antigen test in 66-86 medical facilities in Isahaya City, Japan, from 2004 to 2008. We used the commercial geodemographics dataset, Mosaic Japan to categorize and classify each neighborhood. Furthermore, we calculated the index value of influenza in crude and age adjusted rates to evaluate the incidence of influenza by Mosaic segmentation. Additional age structure analysis was performed to geodemographics segmentation to explore the relationship between influenza and family structure. Results The observed number of influenza A and B patients in the neighborhoods where young couples with small children lived was approximately 10-40% higher than the expected number (p Conclusions Our analysis indicated that the incidence of influenza A and B in neighborhood groups is related to the family structure, especially the presence of children in households. Simple statistical analysis of geodemographics data is an effective method to understand the differences in the incidence of influenza among neighborhood groups, and it provides a valuable basis for community strategies to control influenza.

  3. 邻域值信息表上的邻域逻辑及其数据推理%Neighborhood Logic and Its Data Reasoning on Neighborhood-Valued Information Table

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘清

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces a neighborhood logic based on the neighborhood-valued information table, which is the logic used as operators with neighborhood topological interior (I) and neighborhood topological closure (C), where neighborhood topological interior and neighborhood topological closure are defined via binary neighborhood systems {N(v)}:I(X)={u∈U:N(v)X∧v∈V} and C(X)={u∈U:N(v)∩X≠Φ∧v∈V}. And the binary neighborhood systems are defined by binary relation BV×U:N(v)={u∈U:v B u}. The logic is also the formulation and a normal form of generalized decision logic by Yao and Liu in 1999. Especially, truth calculus systems are constituted, the truth reasoning can be implemented. The logic is defined on the neighborhood-valued information table of attributes. Each object in the information table is not a single value with respect to attributes, but generalized to a neighborhood of the value. Therefore, three types of satisfiability of a formula can be discussed: the neighborhood-interior satisfiability, the neighborhood-closure satisfiacility, and the neighborhood satisfiability. Truth values of formulas are defined, which are the interval value or neighborhood value, instead of single value. It discusses also the operations of truth values with respect to logical connectives. The semantic model of the proposed logic language is studied. Finally, it gives the data reasoning based on the logic in the paper.%引入了一种基于邻域值信息表的邻域逻辑,它是用邻域拓扑内点和邻域拓扑闭包作为逻辑算子的一种逻辑.其内点和闭包是先经二元关系定义了邻域系统,然后用这种邻域系统来定义它.这种逻辑被定义在信息表上,其表上的每个个体关于属性不是取单独一个值,而是扩充到取一个值的邻域.公式的真值被扩充为一个区间或邻域,因此讨论一个公式可满足性的三种类型:邻域内点可满足、邻域闭包可满足和邻域可满

  4. Green Space Attachment and Health: A Comparative Study in Two Urban Neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; van Dijk, Terry; Tang, Jianjun; van den Berg, Agnes E

    2015-11-12

    The positive relationships between urban green space and health have been well documented. Little is known, however, about the role of residents' emotional attachment to local green spaces in these relationships, and how attachment to green spaces and health may be promoted by the availability of accessible and usable green spaces. The present research aimed to examine the links between self-reported health, attachment to green space, and the availability of accessible and usable green spaces. Data were collected via paper-mailed surveys in two neighborhoods (n = 223) of a medium-sized Dutch city in the Netherlands. These neighborhoods differ in the perceived and objectively measured accessibility and usability of green spaces, but are matched in the physically available amount of urban green space, as well as in demographic and socio-economic status, and housing conditions. Four dimensions of green space attachment were identified through confirmatory factor analysis: place dependence, affective attachment, place identity and social bonding. The results show greater attachment to local green space and better self-reported mental health in the neighborhood with higher availability of accessible and usable green spaces. The two neighborhoods did not differ, however, in physical and general health. Structural Equation Modelling confirmed the neighborhood differences in green space attachment and mental health, and also revealed a positive path from green space attachment to mental health. These findings convey the message that we should make green places, instead of green spaces.

  5. Green Space Attachment and Health: A Comparative Study in Two Urban Neighborhoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The positive relationships between urban green space and health have been well documented. Little is known, however, about the role of residents’ emotional attachment to local green spaces in these relationships, and how attachment to green spaces and health may be promoted by the availability of accessible and usable green spaces. The present research aimed to examine the links between self-reported health, attachment to green space, and the availability of accessible and usable green spaces. Data were collected via paper-mailed surveys in two neighborhoods (n = 223 of a medium-sized Dutch city in the Netherlands. These neighborhoods differ in the perceived and objectively measured accessibility and usability of green spaces, but are matched in the physically available amount of urban green space, as well as in demographic and socio-economic status, and housing conditions. Four dimensions of green space attachment were identified through confirmatory factor analysis: place dependence, affective attachment, place identity and social bonding. The results show greater attachment to local green space and better self-reported mental health in the neighborhood with higher availability of accessible and usable green spaces. The two neighborhoods did not differ, however, in physical and general health. Structural Equation Modelling confirmed the neighborhood differences in green space attachment and mental health, and also revealed a positive path from green space attachment to mental health. These findings convey the message that we should make green places, instead of green spaces.

  6. Community attachment, neighborhood context, and sex worker use among Hispanic migrants in Durham, North Carolina, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrado, Emilio A; Flippen, Chenoa

    2010-04-01

    We build on social disorganization theory to formulate and test a hierarchical model of sex worker use among male Hispanic immigrants in the Durham, North Carolina area. The study considers both individual and neighborhood level dimensions of community organization as central factors affecting immigrants' exposure to sexual risks. At the individual level, we find support for the systemic model of community attachment, as time in the U.S. affects sex worker use, although the pattern is non-linear. At the neighborhood level we find that structural social disorganization, external social disorganization (or broken windows), and collective efficacy all correlate with sex worker use in the expected direction. In addition, we extend power-control theory to the community level to show that neighborhood gender imbalances are a central dimension of migrant men's heightened sex worker use, a factor not systematically considered in research on neighborhoods and health. When taken together, collective efficacy and gender imbalances stand out as central mediators between other dimensions of social disorder and sex worker use. Overall, we stress the importance of considering the neighborhood context of reception as an added dimension for understanding and improving immigrant health.

  7. Neighborhood racial composition, racial discrimination, and depressive symptoms in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Devin; Lambert, Sharon F; Evans, Michele K; Zonderman, Alan B

    2014-12-01

    While evidence indicates that experienced racial discrimination is associated with increased depressive symptoms for African Americans, there is little research investigating predictors of experienced racial discrimination. This paper examines neighborhood racial composition and sociodemographic factors as antecedents to experienced racial discrimination and resultant levels of depressive symptoms among African American adults. The sample included 505 socioeconomically-diverse African American adults from Baltimore, MD. Study data were obtained via self-report and geocoding of participant addresses based on 2010 census data. Study hypotheses were tested using multiple pathways within a longitudinal Structural Equation Model. Experienced racial discrimination was positively associated with age and sex such that older individuals and males experienced increased levels of racial discrimination. In addition, the percentage of White individuals residing in a neighborhood was positively associated with levels of experienced racial discrimination for African American neighborhood residents. Experienced racial discrimination was positively associated with later depressive symptoms. Neighborhood-level contextual factors such as neighborhood racial composition and individual differences in sociodemographic characteristics appear to play an important role in the experience of racial discrimination and the etiology of depression in African American adults.

  8. [Association between the characteristics of the neighborhood environment and physical activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Romo, Gabriel; Garrido-Muñoz, María; Lucía, Alejandro; Mayorga, Juan I; Ruiz, Jonatan R

    2013-01-01

    To assess the relationship between the physical and social attributes of the neighborhood environment and levels of total physical activity (PA), leisure time PA, and active commuting PA in adults. The present cross-sectional study comprised 1500 adults (51.1% women) aged 15-74 years from the Autonomous Region of Madrid (Spain). Data were collected through a structured telephone interview. PA was assessed using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire, version 2. Neighborhood attributes were assessed with the Environmental Module of the International Physical Activity Prevalence Study. The factors associated with a higher probability of achieving moderate to high levels of total PA and active commuting PA were living in high density residential areas, the presence of shops close to the residential area, public transport stops 10-15 minutes away from the home, and the existence of sidewalks in most of the neighborhood's streets (all p <0,05). The factors associated with moderate to high leisure time PA levels were the presence of active people in the residential area and the presence of low-cost recreational facilities (both p <0,05). Our findings suggest that most of the physical and social attributes of the neighborhood environment examined in this study are associated with total and active commuting PA, whereas only certain neighborhood attributes seem to be associated with leisure time PA. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Tobacco smoking in urban neighborhoods: exploring social capital as a protective factor in Santiago, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapag, Jaime C; Poblete, Fernando C; Eicher, Caitlin; Aracena, Marcela; Caneo, Constanza; Vera, Gloria; Martínez, Mayra; Hoyos, Rodrigo; Villarroel, Luis; Bradford, Elizabeth

    2010-09-01

    Research examining the relationship between social capital and health in Latin America has been limited. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between social capital and tobacco use in four low-income neighborhoods in Santiago, Chile. A multistage probability sample was used to select households in 4 of the 10 poorest neighborhoods in the district of Puente Alto, in Santiago, Chile. A cross-sectional survey of 781 participants (81.2% response rate for households) included sociodemographic variables, questions pertaining to neighborhood social capital, and questions pertaining to tobacco. Main analyses were carried out at the individual level by performing a multiple logistic regression of individual tobacco use on individual perceptions of community social capital. The prevalence of smoking was 43.9% of the surveyed population. A five-factor structure for social capital was identified, including "perceived trust in neighbors," "perceived trust in organizations," "reciprocity within the neighborhood," "neighborhood integration," and "social participation." An inverse relationship between trust in neighbors and tobacco smoking was statistically significantly with an adjusted odds ratio of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.91-0.99). Trust in neighbors was also significantly inversely associated with the number of cigarettes smoked. Tobacco control remains a significant challenge in global health, requiring innovative strategies that address changing social contexts as well as the changing epidemiological profile of developing regions.

  10. Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adolescent Substance Use Disorder: The Moderating Role of Maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Elizabeth D; Rogosch, Fred A; Guild, Danielle J; Cicchetti, Dante

    2015-08-01

    The ecological-transactional model proposes that nested contexts interact to influence development. From this perspective, child maltreatment represents an individual-level risk factor posited to interact with numerous other nested contextual levels, such as the neighborhood environment, to affect development. The aim of this study was to investigate whether adolescents with maltreatment histories represent a vulnerable group for whom disadvantaged neighborhoods confer risk for substance use disorders. Participants were 411 adolescents (age 15-18; mean age = 16.24) from an investigation of the developmental sequelae of childhood maltreatment. Multiple-group structural equation models, controlling for family-level socioeconomic status, indicated that neighborhood disadvantage was associated with more marijuana-dependence symptoms among maltreated but not among non-maltreated adolescents. Moreover, among maltreated adolescents, those who experienced multiple subtypes of maltreatment were at greatest risk for problematic marijuana use in the context of neighborhood disadvantage. Interestingly, the direct effect of neighborhood disadvantage, but not the interaction with maltreatment, was related to adolescent alcohol-dependence symptoms. Results highlight the importance of considering multiple levels of influence when examining risk associated with child maltreatment.

  11. Redundancy allocation of series-parallel systems using a variable neighborhood search algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Y.-C. [Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Yuan Ze University, No 135 Yuan-Tung Road, Chung-Li, Taoyuan County, Taiwan 320 (China)]. E-mail: ycliang@saturn.yzu.edu.tw; Chen, Y.-C. [Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Yuan Ze University, No 135 Yuan-Tung Road, Chung-Li, Taoyuan County, Taiwan 320 (China)]. E-mail: s927523@mail.yzu.edu.tw

    2007-03-15

    This paper presents a meta-heuristic algorithm, variable neighborhood search (VNS), to the redundancy allocation problem (RAP). The RAP, an NP-hard problem, has attracted the attention of much prior research, generally in a restricted form where each subsystem must consist of identical components. The newer meta-heuristic methods overcome this limitation and offer a practical way to solve large instances of the relaxed RAP where different components can be used in parallel. Authors' previously published work has shown promise for the variable neighborhood descent (VND) method, the simplest version among VNS variations, on RAP. The variable neighborhood search method itself has not been used in reliability design, yet it is a method that fits those combinatorial problems with potential neighborhood structures, as in the case of the RAP. Therefore, authors further extended their work to develop a VNS algorithm for the RAP and tested a set of well-known benchmark problems from the literature. Results on 33 test instances ranging from less to severely constrained conditions show that the variable neighborhood search method improves the performance of VND and provides a competitive solution quality at economically computational expense in comparison with the best-known heuristics including ant colony optimization, genetic algorithm, and tabu search.

  12. Spatial-temporal modeling of neighborhood sociodemographic characteristics and food stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Archana P; Warren, Joshua L; Peterson, Marc; Rummo, Pasquale; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2015-01-15

    The literature on food stores, neighborhood poverty, and race/ethnicity is mixed and lacks methods of accounting for complex spatial and temporal clustering of food resources. We used quarterly data on supermarket and convenience store locations from Nielsen TDLinx (Nielsen Holdings N.V., New York, New York) spanning 7 years (2006-2012) and census tract-based neighborhood sociodemographic data from the American Community Survey (2006-2010) to assess associations between neighborhood sociodemographic characteristics and food store distributions in the Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) of 4 US cities (Birmingham, Alabama; Chicago, Illinois; Minneapolis, Minnesota; and San Francisco, California). We fitted a space-time Poisson regression model that accounted for the complex spatial-temporal correlation structure of store locations by introducing space-time random effects in an intrinsic conditionally autoregressive model within a Bayesian framework. After accounting for census tract-level area, population, their interaction, and spatial and temporal variability, census tract poverty was significantly and positively associated with increasing expected numbers of supermarkets among tracts in all 4 MSAs. A similar positive association was observed for convenience stores in Birmingham, Minneapolis, and San Francisco; in Chicago, a positive association was observed only for predominantly white and predominantly black tracts. Our findings suggest a positive association between greater numbers of food stores and higher neighborhood poverty, with implications for policy approaches related to food store access by neighborhood poverty.

  13. Cyberbullying Perpetration by Arab Youth: The Direct and Interactive Role of Individual, Family, and Neighborhood Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury-Kassabri, Mona; Mishna, Faye; Massarwi, Adeem Ahmad

    2016-07-25

    This study adopts a social-ecological/contextual perspective to explore Arab youth involvement in cyberbullying perpetration. We explored the association between individual (age, gender, and impulsivity), family (socioeconomic status and parental monitoring), and community (experiencing neighborhood violence) characteristics and cyberbullying perpetration. A moderation model exploring individual, family, and context interactions was tested. A sample of 3,178 Arab students in Grades 7 to 11 completed a structured, anonymous self-report questionnaire. The findings suggest that almost 14% of the participants have cyberbullied others during the last month. Adolescent boys with high impulsivity, low parental monitoring, and who experience a high level of violence in their neighborhood are at especially high risk of cyberbullying perpetration. Parental monitoring moderated the effects of impulsivity and experiencing neighborhood violence on adolescents' involvement in perpetrating cyberbullying. Furthermore, the results show that impulsive adolescents who experience high levels of neighborhood violence are at higher risk of cyberbullying perpetration than low impulsive children who experience the same levels of neighborhood violence. The results highlight the central role parenting plays in protecting their children from involvement in cyberbullying perpetration by buffering the effects of personal and situational risk factors.

  14. Effects of household and neighborhood characteristics on children's exposure to neighborhood poverty and affluence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, Jeffrey M

    2009-06-01

    I construct covariate-adjusted increment-decrement life tables to estimate racial differences in the duration of children's exposure to neighborhood poverty and affluence. Using geocoded data from the 1999 and 2001 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, I estimate that black children born in 1999 can expect to spend about 9 of their first 18 years in poor neighborhoods, compared to less than 2 years for white children. Bivariate inequality in childhood exposure is reduced by 16% after controlling for racial differences in household characteristics, by 39% after controlling for differences in the racial composition and spatial location of children's neighborhoods, and by 46% after controlling for both sets of factors. These findings indicate that household and especially urban ecological factors strongly affect the amount of time that black and white children can expect to spend in poor and nonpoor neighborhoods throughout childhood. I conclude by discussing some policy implications of the findings.

  15. Revisiting causal neighborhood effects on individual ischemic heart disease risk: a quasi-experimental multilevel analysis among Swedish siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Juan; Ohlsson, Henrik; Chaix, Basile; Lichtenstein, Paul; Kawachi, Ichiro; Subramanian, S V

    2013-01-01

    Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is associated to increased individual risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, the value of this association for causal inference is uncertain. Moreover, neighborhoods are often defined by available administrative boundaries without evaluating in which degree these boundaries embrace a relevant socio-geographical context that condition individual differences in IHD risk. Therefore, we performed an analysis of variance, and also compared the associations obtained by conventional multilevel analyses and by quasi-experimental family-based design that provides stronger evidence for causal inference. Linking the Swedish Multi-Generation Register to several other national registers, we analyzed 184,931 families embracing 415,540 full brothers 45-64 years old in 2004, and residing in 8408 small-area market statistics (SAMS) considered as "neighborhoods" in our study. We investigated the association between low neighborhood income (categorized in groups by deciles) and IHD risk in the next four years. We distinguished between family mean and intrafamilial-centered low neighborhood income, which allowed us to investigate both unrelated individuals from different families and full brothers within families. We applied multilevel logistic regression techniques to obtain odds ratios (OR), variance partition coefficients (VPC) and 95% credible intervals (CI). In unrelated individuals a decile unit increase of low neighborhood income increased individual IHD risk (OR = 1.04, 95% CI: 1.03-1.07). In the intrafamilial analysis this association was reduced (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 1.02-1.04). Low neighborhood income seems associated with IHD risk in middle-aged men. However, despite the family-based design, we cannot exclude residual confounding by genetic and non-shared environmental factors. Besides, the low neighborhood level VPC = 1.5% suggest that the SAMS are a rather inappropriate construct of the socio-geographic context that

  16. Associations between neighborhood characteristics and physical activity among youth within rural-urban commuting areas in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasehagen, Laurin; Busacker, Ashley; Kane, Debra; Rohan, Angela

    2012-12-01

    The association among rural-urban communities, neighborhood characteristics, and youth physical activity is inconsistent in the literature. We used data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, for youth aged 10-17 years (n = 45,392), to examine the association between physical activity and neighborhood characteristics, after adjusting for known confounders. We also examined the association between physical activity and neighborhood characteristics within seven levels of Rural-Urban Commuting Areas (RUCAs) that depict a continuum from isolated rural to dense urban communities. Attainment of a minimum physical activity level differed by RUCA (P = 0.0004). In adjusted, RUCA-specific models, the presence of parks was associated with attaining a minimum physical activity level in only one of the seven RUCAs (adjusted odds ratio: 3.49; 95 % confidence interval: 1.55, 7.84). This analysis identified no association between youths' minimum physical activity attainment and neighborhood characteristics in unstratified models; and, RUCA-specific models showed little heterogeneity by rural-urban community type. Although this analysis found little association between youth physical activity and neighborhood characteristics, the findings could reflect the crude categorization of the neighborhood amenities (sidewalks, parks, recreation centers) and detracting elements (litter, dilapidated housing, vandalism) and suggests that simple measurement of the presence of an amenity or detracting element is insufficient for determining potential associations with reaching minimum levels of physical activity. By exploring neighborhood characteristics and features of neighborhood amenities within the context of well-defined community types, like RUCAs, we can better understand how and why these factors contribute to different levels of youth physical activity.

  17. Risky Trade: Individual and Neighborhood-Level Socio-Demographics Associated with Transactional Sex among Urban African American MSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robin; Icard, Larry; Jemmott, John B; O'Leary, Ann; Rutledge, Scott; Hsu, Janet; Stephens-Shields, Alisa

    2017-08-01

    There is a clear, persistent association between poverty and HIV risk and HIV infection. Low educational attainment, neighborhood disadvantage, and residential instability are ways in which poverty is instrumentally experienced in urban America. We investigated the role of lived poverty at both the individual and neighborhood levels in transactional sex behavior among African American men who have sex with men (MSM) residing in urban neighborhoods. Using population-averaged models estimated by generalized estimating equation (GEE) models, we identified individual-level and neighborhood-level factors that are associated with exchanging sex for drugs and/or money. We tested the association between neighborhood and individual-level socioeconomic status and HIV risk behavior by combining area-based measures of neighborhood quality from the US Census with individual survey data from 542 low-income African American MSM. The primary outcome measure was self-reported transactional sex defined as exchanging sex for drugs or money. Individual-level covariates included high school non-completion, income, and problem drug use. Neighborhood-level covariates were high school non-completion and poverty rates. The findings suggested that educational attainment is associated with both the individual level and neighborhood level. Participants were more likely to engage in transactional sex if they did not complete high school (OR = 1.78), and similarly if their neighbors did not complete high school (OR = 7.70). These findings suggest potential leverage points for both community-level interventions and advocacy for this population, particularly related to transactional sex and education, and will aid HIV prevention efforts that seek to address the contextual constraints on individual risk behavior.

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase-10/TIMP-2 structure and analyses define conserved core interactions and diverse exosite interactions in MMP/TIMP complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Jyotica; Soares, Alexei S; Mehner, Christine; Radisky, Evette S

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play central roles in vertebrate tissue development, remodeling, and repair. The endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) regulate proteolytic activity by binding tightly to the MMP active site. While each of the four TIMPs can inhibit most MMPs, binding data reveal tremendous heterogeneity in affinities of different TIMP/MMP pairs, and the structural features that differentiate stronger from weaker complexes are poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structure of the comparatively weakly bound human MMP-10/TIMP-2 complex at 2.1 Å resolution. Comparison with previously reported structures of MMP-3/TIMP-1, MT1-MMP/TIMP-2, MMP-13/TIMP-2, and MMP-10/TIMP-1 complexes offers insights into the structural basis of binding selectivity. Our analyses identify a group of highly conserved contacts at the heart of MMP/TIMP complexes that define the conserved mechanism of inhibition, as well as a second category of diverse adventitious contacts at the periphery of the interfaces. The AB loop of the TIMP N-terminal domain and the contact loops of the TIMP C-terminal domain form highly variable peripheral contacts that can be considered as separate exosite interactions. In some complexes these exosite contacts are extensive, while in other complexes the AB loop or C-terminal domain contacts are greatly reduced and appear to contribute little to complex stability. Our data suggest that exosite interactions can enhance MMP/TIMP binding, although in the relatively weakly bound MMP-10/TIMP-2 complex they are not well optimized to do so. Formation of highly variable exosite interactions may provide a general mechanism by which TIMPs are fine-tuned for distinct regulatory roles in biology.

  19. Neighborhood Disadvantage and Variations in Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathorall, Michelle L.; Xin, Huaibo; Peachey, Andrew; Bibeau, Daniel L.; Schulz, Mark; Aronson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the extent to which neighborhood disadvantage accounts for variation in blood pressure. Methods: Demographic, biometric, and self-reported data from 19,261 health screenings were used. Addresses of participants were geocoded and located within census block groups (n = 14,510, 75.3%). Three hierarchical linear models were…

  20. Virtual neighborhoods and pseudo-holomorphic curves

    OpenAIRE

    Ruan, Yongbin

    1996-01-01

    We use virtual neighborhood technique to establish GW-invariants, Quantum cohomology, equivariant GW-invariants, equivariant quantum cohomology and Floer cohomology for general symplectic manifold. We also establish GW-invariants for a family of symplectic manifolds. As a consequence, we prove Arnold conjecture for nondegenerate Hamiltonian symplectomorphisms.

  1. Neighborhood Quality and Labor Market Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil

    neighborhood may, therefore, hamper individual labor market outcomes because of lack of employed contacts. I investigate this hypothesis by exploiting a unique natural experiment that occurred between 1986 and 1998 when refugee immigrants to Denmark were assigned to municipalities quasirandomly, which...... and that a high quality of contacts increases the individual’s employment chances and annual earnings....

  2. Neighborhood Disadvantage and Reliance on the Police

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, Lonnie M.; Hughes, Lorine A.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary theories suggest that, due to limited access and generalized distrust, residents of disadvantaged neighborhoods are relatively unlikely to report matters to police. Although existing studies reveal few ecological differences in crime reporting, findings may be limited to victim/offense subsets represented in aggregated victimization…

  3. Neighborhood and Friendship Composition in Adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christofer Edling

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The social surroundings in which an individual grows up and spends his or her everyday life have an effect on his or her life chances. Much of the research into this phenomenon focuses on so-called neighborhood effects and has put particular emphasis on the negative effects of growing up in a poor neighborhood. Originating from the sociological study of inner-city problems in the United States, the research has recently been embraced by Scandinavian social scientists, who have generally assessed the phenomenon with reference to social network effects and the lock-in effects of ethnic enclaves. We critique the theoretical assumptions that we find in recent Scandinavian research and argue that a straightforward interpretation of neighborhood effects in terms of network effects is problematic. Our argument is based on an empirical analysis of friendship circles of ninth graders in Stockholm (N = 240. We conclude that the friendship networks of ninth graders extend well beyond the neighborhood, thus casting serious doubt on the network effects assumption of previous research. We also conclude that there is nothing in the reality of these ninth graders that confirms the established concept of the ethnic enclave.

  4. 76 FR 13152 - Promise Neighborhoods Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... efforts. In recognition of the important role that adults play in the educational development of children... development and well-being of children and youth in the neighborhood.\\7\\ The success of the strategy will be... Head Start, Head Start, child care, or publicly funded preschool -- & % of students at or above grade...

  5. Neighborhood Attributes Associated With the Social Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Stephanie T; Schoffman, Danielle E; Kaczynski, Andrew T; Forthofer, Melinda; Wilcox, Sara; Baruth, Meghan

    2016-11-01

    To examine the association between specific attributes of neighborhood environments and four social environment measures. Data were collected as part of a baseline survey among participants enrolling in a walking intervention. Participants were recruited from a metropolitan area in a Southeastern state. Participants (n = 294) were predominantly African-American (67%) and female (86%), with some college education (79%) and a mean age of 49. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire Environment Module assessed perceptions about neighborhood attributes. The social environment was assessed using three distinct scales: social cohesion, social interactions with neighbors, and social support for physical activity from family and friends. Multiple regression models examined associations between neighborhood attributes and social environment measures, adjusting for demographic variables. Having walkable destinations and having access to amenities and transit stops were associated with increased interactions with neighbors (b = 1.32, 1.04, and 1.68, respectively, p bike lanes, racks) were associated with social support for physical activity from family and friends (b = .43 and .30, respectively, p < .05). The study highlights key attributes of neighborhood environments that may be associated with the social context of such settings. © 2016 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.

  6. Malt liquor marketing in inner cities: the role of neighborhood racial composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Pat; Jones-Webb, Rhonda; Hannan, Peter; Pham, Lan

    2011-01-01

    In response to anecdotal reports that African American neighborhoods are targeted for high-alcohol malt liquor advertising, the authors observed alcohol ads on off-premise alcohol outlets, billboards, and transit structures in 10 U.S. cities over 3 years. Malt liquor ads were prevalent on storefronts, but rare on billboards. Using Poisson regression, the authors found that storefront malt liquor ads were more common in neighborhoods with higher percentages of African Americans, even after controlling for social and physical disorder. Results suggest that policymakers attempting to reduce malt liquor-related harms may do well to consider regulations that limit storefront advertising exposure.

  7. Right Propositional Neighborhood Logic over Natural Numbers with Integer Constraints for Interval Lengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresolin, Davide; Goranko, Valentin; Montanari, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    Interval temporal logics are based on interval structures over linearly (or partially) ordered domains, where time intervals, rather than time instants, are the primitive ontological entities. In this paper we introduce and study Right Propositional Neighborhood Logic over natural numbers...... with integer constraints for interval lengths, which is a propositional interval temporal logic featuring a modality for the 'right neighborhood' relation between intervals and explicit integer constraints for interval lengths. We prove that it has the bounded model property with respect to ultimately periodic...

  8. Relations Between Neighborhood Factors, Parenting Behaviors, Peer Deviance, and Delinquency Among Serious Juvenile Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, He Len; Steinberg, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined relations among neighborhood structural and social characteristics, parenting practices, peer group affiliations, and delinquency among a group of serious adolescent offenders. The sample of 14–18-year-old boys (N = 488) was composed primarily of economically disadvantaged, ethnic-minority youth living in urban communities. The results indicate that weak neighborhood social organization is indirectly related to delinquency through its associations with parenting behavior and peer deviance and that a focus on just 1 of these microsystems can lead to oversimplified models of risk for juvenile offending. The authors also find that community social ties may confer both pro- and antisocial influences to youth, and they advocate for a broad conceptualization of neighborhood social processes as these relate to developmental risk for youth living in disadvantaged communities. PMID:16569170

  9. Adaptive-neighborhood speckle removal in multitemporal synthetic aperture radar images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuc, M; Bolon, P; Trouve, E; Buzuloiu, V; Rudant, J P

    2001-11-10

    We present a new method for multitemporal synthetic aperture radar image filtering using three-dimensional (3D) adaptive neighborhoods. The method takes both spatial and temporal information into account to derive the speckle-free value of a pixel. For each pixel individually, a 3D adaptive neighborhood is determined that contains only pixels belonging to the same distribution as the current pixel. Then statistics computed inside the established neighborhood are used to derive the filter output. It is shown that the method provides good results by drastically reducing speckle over homogeneous areas while retaining edges and thin structures. The performances of the proposed method are compared in terms of subjective and objective measures with those given by several classical speckle-filtering methods.

  10. Case Study: LSNA, Logan Square Neighborhood Association. Strong Neighborhoods, Strong Schools. The Indicators Project on Education Organizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Suzanne; Brown, Joanna; Nevarez-La Torre, Aida; Brown, Chris

    This report describes Chicago's Logan Square Neighborhood Association (LSNA), which has long worked to mobilize neighborhood residents to maintain and improve the quality of community life and bring additional resources and services into the neighborhood. LSNA prioritizes the needs of low- and moderate-income residents. LSNA works to make schools…

  11. Two dimensional discriminant neighborhood preserving embedding in face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Meng; Jiang, Jifeng; Lin, Chuang; Wang, Binghui

    2015-03-01

    One of the key issues of face recognition is to extract the features of face images. In this paper, we propose a novel method, named two-dimensional discriminant neighborhood preserving embedding (2DDNPE), for image feature extraction and face recognition. 2DDNPE benefits from four techniques, i.e., neighborhood preserving embedding (NPE), locality preserving projection (LPP), image based projection and Fisher criterion. Firstly, NPE and LPP are two popular manifold learning techniques which can optimally preserve the local geometry structures of the original samples from different angles. Secondly, image based projection enables us to directly extract the optimal projection vectors from twodimensional image matrices rather than vectors, which avoids the small sample size problem as well as reserves useful structural information embedded in the original images. Finally, the Fisher criterion applied in 2DDNPE can boost face recognition rates by minimizing the within-class distance, while maximizing the between-class distance. To evaluate the performance of 2DDNPE, several experiments are conducted on the ORL and Yale face datasets. The results corroborate that 2DDNPE outperforms the existing 1D feature extraction methods, such as NPE, LPP, LDA and PCA across all experiments with respect to recognition rate and training time. 2DDNPE also delivers consistently promising results compared with other competing 2D methods such as 2DNPP, 2DLPP, 2DLDA and 2DPCA.

  12. The nuclear higher-order structure defined by the set of topological relationships between DNA and the nuclear matrix is species-specific in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santiago, Evangelina; Pardo, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando

    2017-01-15

    During the interphase the nuclear DNA of metazoan cells is organized in supercoiled loops anchored to constituents of a nuclear substructure or compartment known as the nuclear matrix. The stable interactions between DNA and the nuclear matrix (NM) correspond to a set of topological relationships that define a nuclear higher-order structure (NHOS). Current evidence suggests that the NHOS is cell-type-specific. Biophysical evidence and theoretical models suggest that thermodynamic and structural constraints drive the actualization of DNA-NM interactions. However, if the topological relationships between DNA and the NM were the subject of any biological constraint with functional significance then they must be adaptive and thus be positively selected by natural selection and they should be reasonably conserved, at least within closely related species. We carried out a coarse-grained, comparative evaluation of the DNA-NM topological relationships in primary hepatocytes from two closely related mammals: rat and mouse, by determining the relative position to the NM of a limited set of target sequences corresponding to highly-conserved genomic regions that also represent a sample of distinct chromosome territories within the interphase nucleus. Our results indicate that the pattern of topological relationships between DNA and the NM is not conserved between the hepatocytes of the two closely related species, suggesting that the NHOS, like the karyotype, is species-specific.

  13. Evaluation of the neighborhood environment walkability scale in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyemi, Adewale L; Sallis, James F; Deforche, Benedicte; Oyeyemi, Adetoyeje Y; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Van Dyck, Delfien

    2013-03-21

    The development of reliable and culturally sensitive measures of attributes of the built and social environment is necessary for accurate analysis of environmental correlates of physical activity in low-income countries, that can inform international evidence-based policies and interventions in the worldwide prevention of physical inactivity epidemics. This study systematically adapted the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) for Nigeria and evaluated aspects of reliability and validity of the adapted version among Nigerian adults. The adaptation of the NEWS was conducted by African and international experts, and final items were selected for NEWS-Nigeria after a cross-validation of the confirmatory factor analysis structure of the original NEWS. Participants (N = 386; female = 47.2%) from two cities in Nigeria completed the adapted NEWS surveys regarding perceived residential density, land use mix - diversity, land use mix - access, street connectivity, infrastructure and safety for walking and cycling, aesthetics, traffic safety, and safety from crime. Self-reported activity for leisure, walking for different purposes, and overall physical activity were assessed with the validated International Physical Activity Questionnaire (long version). The adapted NEWS subscales had moderate to high test-retest reliability (ICC range 0.59 -0.91). Construct validity was good, with residents of high-walkable neighborhoods reporting significantly higher residential density, more land use mix diversity, higher street connectivity, more traffic safety and more safety from crime, but lower infrastructure and safety for walking/cycling and aesthetics than residents of low-walkable neighborhoods. Concurrent validity correlations were low to moderate (r = 0.10 -0.31) with residential density, land use mix diversity, and traffic safety significantly associated with most physical activity outcomes. The NEWS-Nigeria demonstrated acceptable measurement

  14. Relations between Neighborhood Factors, Parenting Behaviors, Peer Deviance, and Delinquency among Serious Juvenile Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, He Len; Steinberg, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined relations among neighborhood structural and social characteristics, parenting practices, peer group affiliations, and delinquency among a group of serious adolescent offenders. The sample of 14-18-year-old boys (N = 488) was composed primarily of economically disadvantaged, ethnic-minority youth living in urban…

  15. Ethnic identity, neighborhood risk, and adolescent drug and sex attitudes and refusal efficacy: the urban African American girls' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneille, Maya A; Belgrave, Faye Z

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the impact of ethnic identity and neighborhood risk on drug and sex attitudes and refusal efficacy among early adolescent urban African American females (n = 175). The model also predicted a moderating relationship of ethnic identity on neighborhood risk for drug and sex attitudes and refusal efficacy. Data were collected as part of a larger drug education program and analyzed via hierarchical multiple regression. The analyses controlled for household structure and menarche. Results indicated a direct relationship of higher ethnic identity and higher sexual refusal efficacy, higher disapproval of drug use, and lowered intentions to use drugs. Neighborhood risk was directly related to lower disapproval of drug use. There was a small moderating effect of ethnic identity on neighborhood risk for intention to use drugs. Findings provide support for prevention programs for African American youth that seek to reduce risk behaviors by increasing ethnic identity, particularly in low resource communities.

  16. Economic reasons for the expansion of ENP (European Neighborhood Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Merim Kasumovic

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available As a tool to promote democratization EU has set up the Copenhagen criteria which clearly define political, judicial and economic prerequisites for EU membership. The justification of implementation of such criteria can be found in high levels of corruption, autocracy and inefficient political systems in potential members and ENP countries. Potential candidates and ENP countries are looking up to EU and expecting financial aid which only becomes available after Copenhagen criteria have been met. It becomes clear than that it is necessary to establish a fertile political ground in ENP partner countries prior to economic cooperation with the EU members. Therefore, this paper will seek to examine if the European Neighborhood Policy (ENP promotes economic cooperation through establishment of synergy between political and economic policies? Is it equally beneficial for EU and partner countries? DOWNLOAD FILE

  17. Neighborhood Influences on Late Life Cognition in the ACTIVE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon M. Sisco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low neighborhood-level socioeconomic status has been associated with poorer health, reduced physical activity, increased psychological stress, and less neighborhood-based social support. These outcomes are correlates of late life cognition, but few studies have specifically investigated the neighborhood as a unique source of explanatory variance in cognitive aging. This study supplemented baseline cognitive data from the ACTIVE (Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly study with neighborhood-level data to investigate (1 whether neighborhood socioeconomic position (SEP predicts cognitive level, and if so, whether it differentially predicts performance in general and specific domains of cognition and (2 whether neighborhood SEP predicts differences in response to short-term cognitive intervention for memory, reasoning, or processing speed. Neighborhood SEP positively predicted vocabulary, but did not predict other general or specific measures of cognitive level, and did not predict individual differences in response to cognitive intervention.

  18. Livable Communities: Creating Safe and Livable Neighborhoods, Towns, and Regions in California

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Community livability is of increasing concern to many Californians as growth-related problems mount. This paper addresses key threats to the livability of the state’s communities and outlines potential policy responses. A "livable" neighborhood can be defined as one that is "pleasant, safe, affordable, and supportive of human community." Key elements of community livability often include an attractive, pedestrian-oriented public realm; low traffic speed, volume, and congestion; decent, af...

  19. Space, race, and poverty: Spatial inequalities in walkable neighborhood amenities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Whalen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Multiple and varied benefits have been suggested for increased neighborhood walkability. However, spatial inequalities in neighborhood walkability likely exist and may be attributable, in part, to residential segregation. OBJECTIVE Utilizing a spatial demographic perspective, we evaluated potential spatial inequalities in walkable neighborhood amenities across census tracts in Boston, MA (US. METHODS The independent variables included minority racial/ethnic population percentages and percent of families in poverty. Walkable neighborhood amenities were assessed with a composite measure. Spatial autocorrelation in key study variables were first calculated with the Global Moran's I statistic. Then, Spearman correlations between neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics and walkable neighborhood amenities were calculated as well as Spearman correlations accounting for spatial autocorrelation. We fit ordinary least squares (OLS regression and spatial autoregressive models when appropriate as a final step. RESULTS Significant positive spatial autocorrelation was found in neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics (e.g. census tract percent Black, but not walkable neighborhood amenities or in the OLS regression residuals. Spearman correlations between neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics and walkable neighborhood amenities were not statistically significant, nor were neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics significantly associated with walkable neighborhood amenities in OLS regression models. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that there is residential segregation in Boston and that spatial inequalities do not necessarily show up using a composite measure. COMMENTS Future research in other geographic areas (including international contexts and using different definitions of neighborhoods (including small-area definitions should evaluate if spatial inequalities are found using composite measures, but also should

  20. Validity of an ecometric neighborhood physical disorder measure constructed by virtual street audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Stephen J; Bader, Michael D M; Lovasi, Gina S; Neckerman, Kathryn M; Teitler, Julien O; Rundle, Andrew G

    2014-09-15

    Neighborhood physical disorder is thought to affect mental and physical health, but it has been difficult to measure objectively and reliably across large geographical areas or multiple locales. Virtual street audits are a novel method for assessing neighborhood characteristics. We evaluated the ecometric properties of a neighborhood physical disorder measure constructed from virtual street audit data. Eleven trained auditors assessed 9 previously validated items developed to capture physical disorder (e.g., litter, graffiti, and abandoned buildings) on 1,826 block faces using Google Street View imagery (Google, Inc., Mountain View, California) dating from 2007-2011 in 4 US cities (San Jose, California; Detroit, Michigan; New York, New York; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania). We constructed a 2-parameter item response theory scale to estimate latent levels of disorder on each block face and defined a function using kriging to estimate physical disorder levels, with confidence estimates, for any point in each city. The internal consistency reliability of the resulting scale was 0.93. The final measure of disorder was positively correlated with US Census data on unemployment and housing vacancy and negatively correlated with data on owner-occupied housing. These results suggest that neighborhood physical disorder can be measured reliably and validly using virtual audits, facilitating research on possible associations between physical disorder and health. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Self-reported physical activity in perceived neighborhood in Czech adults – national study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Mitáš

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: International studies associate physical activity (PA to other factors such as the environment, culture, and policy. External influences on lifestyle and PA, such as the effect of the physical and built environment, are discussed. Neighborhood environments seem to be one of the important aspects in prevention of unhealthy lifestyle and physical inactivity research. OBJECTIVE: The main objective is to analyze the relationship between PA and neighborhood environment of the adult population of the Czech Republic. The study tries to define the basic correlates of PA in relation to environmental and other socio-demographic factors. METHODS: Nationwide data collection of adult PA was done regionally in the Czech Republic between the years 2005–2009 using the IPAQ (long and ANEWS questionnaires. RESULTS: The results show that males realize significantly more vigorous PA than females while females realize more moderate PA and walking than males. PA of residents of smaller communities is higher than those living in large cities. The level of weekly PA does not significantly affect the neighborhood walkability [H(3, 8708 = 19.60; p CONCLUSIONS: The results clearly indicate the need to connect multiple sectors that affect the lifestyle of the general population. Possible solution is an interdisciplinary approach to the evaluation of the fundamental environmental factors influencing the level of PA (walkability; SES; participation in organized and voluntary PA; neighborhood safety; type of transportation; size of the community.

  2. Towards a general characterization of conceptual neighborhoods in temporal and spatial reasoning

    OpenAIRE

    Ligozat, Gérard

    1994-01-01

    International audience; We present a general method for describing the conceptual neighborhood structure of qualitative relations in temporal and spatial reasoning. This method is based on representing the topological structure of the configuration spaces in terms of incidence structures. We illustrate this approach on some of the qualitative calculi introduced in the literature, including Allen’s temporal calculus and Freksa’s directional calculus.

  3. Forecasting Influenza Outbreaks in Boroughs and Neighborhoods of New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wan; Olson, Donald R; Shaman, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    The ideal spatial scale, or granularity, at which infectious disease incidence should be monitored and forecast has been little explored. By identifying the optimal granularity for a given disease and host population, and matching surveillance and prediction efforts to this scale, response to emergent and recurrent outbreaks can be improved. Here we explore how granularity and representation of spatial structure affect influenza forecast accuracy within New York City. We develop network models at the borough and neighborhood levels, and use them in conjunction with surveillance data and a data assimilation method to forecast influenza activity. These forecasts are compared to an alternate system that predicts influenza for each borough or neighborhood in isolation. At the borough scale, influenza epidemics are highly synchronous despite substantial differences in intensity, and inclusion of network connectivity among boroughs generally improves forecast accuracy. At the neighborhood scale, we observe much greater spatial heterogeneity among influenza outbreaks including substantial differences in local outbreak timing and structure; however, inclusion of the network model structure generally degrades forecast accuracy. One notable exception is that local outbreak onset, particularly when signal is modest, is better predicted with the network model. These findings suggest that observation and forecast at sub-municipal scales within New York City provides richer, more discriminant information on influenza incidence, particularly at the neighborhood scale where greater heterogeneity exists, and that the spatial spread of influenza among localities can be forecast.

  4. The Effect of Incremental Changes in Phonotactic Probability and Neighborhood Density on Word Learning by Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkel, Holly L.; Bontempo, Daniel E.; Aschenbrenner, Andrew J.; Maekawa, Junko; Lee, Su-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Phonotactic probability or neighborhood density has predominately been defined through the use of gross distinctions (i.e., low vs. high). In the current studies, the authors examined the influence of finer changes in probability (Experiment 1) and density (Experiment 2) on word learning. Method: The authors examined the full range of…

  5. The Effect of Incremental Changes in Phonotactic Probability and Neighborhood Density on Word Learning by Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkel, Holly L.; Bontempo, Daniel E.; Aschenbrenner, Andrew J.; Maekawa, Junko; Lee, Su-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Phonotactic probability or neighborhood density has predominately been defined through the use of gross distinctions (i.e., low vs. high). In the current studies, the authors examined the influence of finer changes in probability (Experiment 1) and density (Experiment 2) on word learning. Method: The authors examined the full range of…

  6. Validation of French and German versions of a Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion Questionnaire among young Swiss males, and its relationship with substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Marc; Studer, Joseph; Henchoz, Yves; Deline, Stéphane; Baggio, Stéphanie; N'Goran, Alexandra; Mohler-Kuo, Meichun; Gmel, Gerhard

    2016-02-01

    This study main purpose was the validation of both French and German versions of a Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion Questionnaire. The sample group comprised 5065 Swiss men from the "Cohort Study on Substance Use Risk Factors." Multigroup Confirmatory factor analysis showed that a three-factor model fits the data well, which substantiates the generalizability of Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion Questionnaire factor structure, regardless of the language. The Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion Questionnaire demonstrated excellent homogeneity (α = 95) and split-half reliability (r = .96). The Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion Questionnaire was sensitive to community size and participants' financial situation, confirming that it also measures real social conditions. Finally, weak but frequent correlations between Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion Questionnaire and alcohol, cigarette, and cannabis dependence were measured.

  7. A Good Neighborhood for Cells: Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS-05)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Leland W. K.; Goodwin, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Good neighborhoods help you grow. As with a city, the lives of a cell are governed by its neighborhood connections Connections that do not work are implicated in a range of diseases. One of those connections - between prostate cancer and bone cells - will be studied on STS-107 using the Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS-05). To improve the prospects for finding novel therapies, and to identify biomarkers that predict disease progression, scientists need tissue models that behave the same as metastatic or spreading cancer. This is one of several NASA-sponsored lines of cell science research that use the microgravity environment of orbit in an attempt to grow lifelike tissue models for health research. As cells replicate, they "self associate" to form a complex matrix of collagens, proteins, fibers, and other structures. This highly evolved microenvironment tells each cell who is next door, how it should grow arid into what shapes, and how to respond to bacteria, wounds, and other stimuli. Studying these mechanisms outside the body is difficult because cells do not easily self-associate outside a natural environment. Most cell cultures produce thin, flat specimens that offer limited insight into how cells work together. Ironically, growing cell cultures in the microgravity of space produces cell assemblies that more closely resemble what is found in bodies on Earth. NASA's Bioreactor comprises a miniature life support system and a rotating vessel containing cell specimens in a nutrient medium. Orbital BDS experiments that cultured colon and prostate cancers have been highly promising.

  8. Synthesis of well-defined structurally silica-nonlinear polymer core-shell nanoparticles via the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiucun; Hu, Min; Zhu, Wendong; Li, Yaping

    2011-05-01

    We report on the synthesis of the well-defined structurally silica-nonlinear polymer core-shell nanoparticles via the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. At first, 3-(2-bromoisobutyramido)propyl(triethoxy)-silane (the ATRP initiator) was prepared by the reaction of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide. The ATRP initiator was covalently attached onto the nanosilica surface. The subsequent ATRP of HEMA from the initiator-attached SiO 2 surface was carried out in order to afforded functional nanoparticles bearing a hydroxyl moiety at the chain end, SiO 2-g-PHEMA-Br. The esterification reaction of pendent hydroxyl moieties of PHEMA segment with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide afforded the SiO 2-based multifunctional initiator, SiO 2-g-PHEMA(-Br)-Br, bearing one bromine moiety on each monomer repeating unit within the PHEMA segment. Finally, the synthesis of SiO 2-g-PHEMA(-g-PSt)-b-PSt was accomplished by the ATRP of St monomer using SiO 2-g-PHEMA(-Br)-Br as multifunctional initiator. These organic/inorganic hybrid materials have been extensively characterized by FT-IR, XPS, TG, and TEM.

  9. Structure-interfacial properties relationship and quantification of the amphiphilicity of well-defined ionic and non-ionic surfactants using the PIT-slope method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontiveros, Jesús F; Pierlot, Christel; Catté, Marianne; Molinier, Valérie; Salager, Jean-Louis; Aubry, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-15

    The Phase Inversion Temperature of a reference C10E4/n-Octane/Water system exhibits a quasi-linear variation versus the mole fraction of a second surfactant S2 added in the mixture. This variation was recently proposed as a classification tool to quantify the Hydrophilic-Lipophilic Balance (HLB) of commercial surfactants. The feasibility of the so-called PIT-slope method for a wide range of well-defined non-ionic and ionic surfactants is investigated. The comparison of various surfactants having the same dodecyl chain tail allows to rank the polar head hydrophilicity as: SO3Na⩾SO4Na⩾NMe3Br>E2SO3Na≈CO2Na⩾E1SO3Na⩾PhSO3Na>Isosorbide(exo)SO4Na≫IsosorbideendoSO4Na≫E8⩾NMe2O>E7>E6⩾Glucosyl>E5⩾Diglyceryl⩾E4>E3>E2≈Isosorbide(exo)>Glyceryl>Isosorbide(endo). The influence on the surfactant HLB of other structural parameters, i.e. hydrophobic chain length, unsaturation, replacement of Na(+) by K(+) counterion, and isomerism is also investigated. Finally, the method is successfully used to predict the optimal formulation of a new bio-based surfactant, 1-O-dodecyldiglycerol, when performing an oil scan at 25 °C.

  10. Child, family, and neighborhood associations with parent and peer interactive play during early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Mary Kay

    2012-04-01

    To examine national patterns of peer and parent interactive play opportunities that enhance early learning/socialization. Bivariate and multivariable analyses of cross-sectional data on 22,797 children aged 1-5 years from the National Survey of Children's Health 2007 were performed to determine the child, family, and neighborhood factors associated with four parent-initiated activities. Outcomes measures included time (days/week) children spent: participating in peer play; being read to; sung to/told stories; and taken on family outings. Covariates included race/ethnicity, poverty, TV watching, childcare, child and maternal physical and mental health, family factors (structure, size, language, stress, education), and neighborhood factors (amenities, support, physical condition, safety). According to adjusted regression models, minority children from lower income, non-English-speaking households with limited education, poorer maternal health and greater parenting stress were read to/told stories less than children without these characteristics, while neighborhood factors exerted less influence. In contrast, significant reductions in days/week of peer play were associated with unsupportive neighborhoods and those with the poorest physical conditions and limited amenities. Likewise, reductions in outings were associated with fewer neighborhood amenities. The findings of this study indicate that a variety of child, family, and neighborhood factors are associated with parent-initiated behaviors such as reading, storytelling, peer interactive play, and family outings. Appropriate evidence-based home visiting interventions targeting child health, parenting skills, early childhood education, and social services in at-risk communities would appear to be appropriate vehicles for addressing such parent-initiated play activities that have the potential to enhance development.

  11. Cognitive ability, neighborhood deprivation, and young children's emotional and behavioral problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouri, Eirini; Mavroveli, Stella; Tzavidis, Nikos

    2012-06-01

    To examine if cognitive ability moderates the effect of area (neighborhood) deprivation on young children's problem behavior. Data from the first two sweeps of the Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) in the UK were used. Children were clustered in small areas in nine strata in the UK and were aged 9 months at Sweep 1 and 3 years at Sweep 2. Neighborhood deprivation was measured with the Index of Multiple Deprivation at Sweep 1. Overall and specific problem behavior was measured with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire at Sweep 2. To explore moderator specificity we used three indices of ability (verbal cognitive ability, non-verbal cognitive ability, and attainment of developmental milestones). Adjustment was made for child's age and sex, and for Sweep 1 family adversity (number of adverse life events), family structure, mother's social class and psychological distress, and family socio-economic disadvantage. We found both support for our main hypothesis, and evidence for specificity. Neighborhood deprivation was, even after adjustment for covariates, significantly associated with children's peer problems. However, verbal and non-verbal cognitive ability moderated this association. Neighborhood deprivation was related to peer problems even at preschool age. Although the effect of neighborhood deprivation on externalizing problems was mediated by family poverty and parental socio-economic position and although its effect on internalizing problems was mediated by parental mental health, its effect on difficulties with peers was independent of both parental and child characteristics. Cognitive ability moderated the effect of neighborhood deprivation on preschoolers' peer relationships difficulties.

  12. Perceived Neighborhood Safety and Adolescent School Functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Storey, Alexa; Crosnoe, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the association between adolescents’ perceptions of their neighborhoods’ safety and multiple elements of their functioning in school with data on 15 year olds from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (n = 924). In general, perceived neighborhood safety was more strongly associated with aspects of schooling that were more psychosocial in nature (e.g., school attachment) than those that were more cognitive (e.g., test scores). Examination of neighborhoo...

  13. The predictive influence of family and neighborhood assets on fighting and weapon carrying from mid- to late adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegerich, Tamara M; Oman, Roy F; Vesely, Sara K; Aspy, Cheryl B; Tolma, Eleni L

    2014-08-01

    Using a developmental, social-ecological approach to understand the etiology of health-risk behavior and inform primary prevention efforts, we assess the predictive effects of family and neighborhood social processes on youth physical fighting and weapon carrying. Specifically, we focus on relationships among youth and their parents, family communication, parental monitoring, as well as sense of community and neighborhood informal social control, support, concerns, and disorder. This study advances knowledge through its investigation of family and neighborhood structural factors and social processes together, employment of longitudinal models that estimate effects over adolescent development, and use of self-report and observational measures. Data from 1,093 youth/parent pairs were analyzed from the Youth Assets Study using a Generalized Estimating Equation approach; family and neighborhood assets and risks were analyzed as time varying and lagged. Similar family assets affected physical fighting and weapon carrying, whereas different neighborhood social processes influenced the two forms of youth violence. Study findings have implications for the primary prevention of youth violence, including the use of family-based approaches that build relationships and parental monitoring skills and community-level change approaches that promote informal social control and reduce neighborhood concerns about safety.

  14. Relationship between neighborhood context, family management practices and alcohol use among urban, multi-ethnic, young adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobler, Amy L; Komro, Kelli A; Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M

    2009-12-01

    We examined relationships between alcohol-related neighborhood context, protective home and family management practices, and alcohol use among urban, racial/ethnic minority, adolescents. The sample comprised 5,655 youth who were primarily low SES (72%), African American (43%) and Hispanic (29%). Participants completed surveys in 2002-2005 (ages 11-14 years). Items assessed alcohol use, accessibility of alcohol at home and parental family management practices. Neighborhood context measures included: (1) alcohol outlet density; (2) commercial alcohol accessibility; (3) alcohol advertisement exposure; and (4) perceived neighborhood strength, reported by parents and community leaders. Structural equation modeling was used to assess direct and indirect relationships between alcohol-related neighborhood context at baseline, home alcohol access and family management practices in seventh grade, and alcohol use in eighth grade. Neighborhood strength was negatively associated with alcohol use (beta = -0.078, p alcohol advertisements was positively associated with alcohol use (beta = 0.043, p alcohol access were associated with home alcohol access (beta = 0.050, p alcohol access showed a positive association with alcohol use (beta = 0.401, p alcohol access may partially mediate the relationship between neighborhood strength and alcohol use (beta = 0.025, p alcohol access and improving family management practices may be key to preventive efforts to reduce alcohol use.

  15. Auditory and visual lexical neighborhoods in audiovisual speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Sommers, Mitchell; Spehar, Brent

    2007-12-01

    Much evidence suggests that the mental lexicon is organized into auditory neighborhoods, with words that are phonologically similar belonging to the same neighborhood. In this investigation, we considered the existence of visual neighborhoods. When a receiver watches someone speak a word, a neighborhood of homophenes (ie, words that look alike on the face, such as pat and bat) is activated. The simultaneous activation of a word's auditory and visual neighborhoods may, in part, account for why individuals recognize speech better in an auditory-visual condition than what would be predicted by their performance in audition-only and vision-only conditions. A word test was administered to 3 groups of participants in audition-only, vision-only, and auditory-visual conditions, in the presence of 6-talker babble. Test words with sparse visual neighborhoods were recognized more accurately than words with dense neighborhoods in a vision-only condition. Densities of both the acoustic and visual neighborhoods as well as their intersection overlap were predictive of how well the test words were recognized in the auditory-visual condition. These results suggest that visual neighborhoods exist and that they affect auditory-visual speech perception. One implication is that in the presence of dual sensory impairment, the boundaries of both acoustic and visual neighborhoods may shift, adversely affecting speech recognition.

  16. Eliminating Tuberculosis One Neighborhood at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, David E.; McGaha, Paul K.; Wolfgang, Melanie; Robinson, Celia B.; Clark, Patricia A.; Hassell, Willis L.; Robison, Valerie A.; Walker, Kerfoot P.; Wallace, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated a strategy for preventing tuberculosis (TB) in communities most affected by it. Methods. In 1996, we mapped reported TB cases (1985–1995) and positive tuberculin skin test (TST) reactors (1993–1995) in Smith County, Texas. We delineated the 2 largest, densest clusters, identifying 2 highest-incidence neighborhoods (180 square blocks, 3153 residents). After extensive community preparation, trained health care workers went door-to-door offering TST to all residents unless contraindicated. TST-positive individuals were escorted to a mobile clinic for radiography, clinical evaluation, and isoniazid preventive treatment (IPT) as indicated. To assess long-term impact, we mapped all TB cases in Smith County during the equivalent time period after the project. Results. Of 2258 eligible individuals, 1291 (57.1%) were tested, 229 (17.7%) were TST positive, and 147 were treated. From 1996 to 2006, there were no TB cases in either project neighborhood, in contrast with the preintervention decade and the continued occurrence of TB in the rest of Smith County. Conclusions. Targeting high-incidence neighborhoods for active, community-based screening and IPT may hasten TB elimination in the United States. PMID:24899457

  17. White Dwarf Cosmochronology in the Solar Neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Tremblay, P -E; Soderblom, D R; Cignoni, M; Cummings, J

    2014-01-01

    The study of the stellar formation history in the solar neighborhood is a powerful technique to recover information about the early stages and evolution of the Milky Way. We present a new method which consists of directly probing the formation history from the nearby stellar remnants. We rely on the volume complete sample of white dwarfs within 20 pc, where accurate cooling ages and masses have been determined. The well characterized initial-final mass relation is employed in order to recover the initial masses (1 < M/Msun < 8) and total ages for the local degenerate sample. We correct for moderate biases that are necessary to transform our results to a global stellar formation rate, which can be compared to similar studies based on the properties of main-sequence stars in the solar neighborhood. Our method provides precise formation rates for all ages except in very recent times, and the results suggest an enhanced formation rate for the solar neighborhood in the last 5 Gyr compared to the range 5 <...

  18. Using Neighborhood Diversity to Solve Hard Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Ganian, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Parameterized algorithms are a very useful tool for dealing with NP-hard problems on graphs. Yet, to properly utilize parameterized algorithms it is necessary to choose the right parameter based on the type of problem and properties of the target graph class. Tree-width is an example of a very successful graph parameter, however it cannot be used on dense graph classes and there also exist problems which are hard even on graphs of bounded tree-width. Such problems can be tackled by using vertex cover as a parameter, however this places severe restrictions on admissible graph classes. Michael Lampis has recently introduced neighborhood diversity, a new graph parameter which generalizes vertex cover to dense graphs. Among other results, he has shown that simple parameterized algorithms exist for a few problems on graphs of bounded neighborhood diversity. Our article further studies this area and provides new algorithms parameterized by neighborhood diversity for the p-Vertex-Disjoint Paths, Graph Motif and Prec...

  19. Beyond neighborhood poverty: family management, neighborhood disorder, and adolescents' early sexual onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Kathleen M; Leventhal, Tama

    2009-12-01

    The authors examined how neighborhood disorder modifies associations between family management practices and youth transitions to sex among low-income African American and Latino urban families. The sample included 846 young adolescents and their mothers who participated in Welfare, Children and Families: A Three-City Study. Results from multilevel logistic regression models indicated no main effects of family management practices or neighborhood-level conditions on transitions to sex once accounting for demographics. However, higher levels of family routines and parental knowledge (i.e., awareness of youths' friends, whereabouts, and activities) were more strongly associated with a lower probability of youth sexual onset as neighborhood disorder increased. Results provide further evidence for the contextually specific nature of parenting impacts on adolescent adjustment.

  20. Advancement of the 10-species subgingival Zurich Biofilm model by examining different nutritional conditions and defining the structure of the in vitro biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammann Thomas W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontitis is caused by a highly complex consortium of bacteria that establishes as biofilms in subgingival pockets. It is a disease that occurs worldwide and its consequences are a major health concern. Investigations in situ are not possible and the bacterial community varies greatly between patients and even within different loci. Due to the high complexity of the consortium and the availability of samples, a clear definition of the pathogenic bacteria and their mechanisms of pathogenicity are still not available. In the current study we addressed the need of a defined model system by advancing our previously described subgingival biofilm model towards a bacterial composition that reflects the one observed in diseased sites of patients and analysed the structure of these biofilms. Results We further developed the growth media by systematic variation of key components resulting in improved stability and the firm establishment of spirochetes in the 10-species subgingival Zurich biofilm model. A high concentration of heat-inactivated human serum allowed the best proliferation of the used species. Therefore we further investigated these biofilms by analysing their structure by confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The species showed mutual interactions as expected from other studies. The abundances of all organisms present in this model were determined by microscopic counting following species-specific identification by both fluorescence in situ hybridisation and immunofluorescence. The newly integrated treponemes were the most abundant organisms. Conclusions The use of 50% of heat-inactivated human serum used in the improved growth medium resulted in significantly thicker and more stable biofilms, and the quantitative representation of the used species represents the in vivo community of periodontitis patients much closer than in biofilms grown in the two media with less or no

  1. Advancement of the 10-species subgingival Zurich biofilm model by examining different nutritional conditions and defining the structure of the in vitro biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Thomas W; Gmür, Rudolf; Thurnheer, Thomas

    2012-10-05

    Periodontitis is caused by a highly complex consortium of bacteria that establishes as biofilms in subgingival pockets. It is a disease that occurs worldwide and its consequences are a major health concern. Investigations in situ are not possible and the bacterial community varies greatly between patients and even within different loci. Due to the high complexity of the consortium and the availability of samples, a clear definition of the pathogenic bacteria and their mechanisms of pathogenicity are still not available. In the current study we addressed the need of a defined model system by advancing our previously described subgingival biofilm model towards a bacterial composition that reflects the one observed in diseased sites of patients and analysed the structure of these biofilms. We further developed the growth media by systematic variation of key components resulting in improved stability and the firm establishment of spirochetes in the 10-species subgingival Zurich biofilm model. A high concentration of heat-inactivated human serum allowed the best proliferation of the used species. Therefore we further investigated these biofilms by analysing their structure by confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The species showed mutual interactions as expected from other studies. The abundances of all organisms present in this model were determined by microscopic counting following species-specific identification by both fluorescence in situ hybridisation and immunofluorescence. The newly integrated treponemes were the most abundant organisms. The use of 50% of heat-inactivated human serum used in the improved growth medium resulted in significantly thicker and more stable biofilms, and the quantitative representation of the used species represents the in vivo community of periodontitis patients much closer than in biofilms grown in the two media with less or no human serum. The appearance of T. denticola, P. gingivalis, and

  2. Creating nurturing environments: a science-based framework for promoting child health and development within high-poverty neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komro, Kelli A; Flay, Brian R; Biglan, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Living in poverty and living in areas of concentrated poverty pose multiple risks for child development and for overall health and wellbeing. Poverty is a major risk factor for several mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders, as well as for other developmental challenges and physical health problems. In this paper, the Promise Neighborhoods Research Consortium describes a science-based framework for the promotion of child health and development within distressed high-poverty neighborhoods. We lay out a model of child and adolescent developmental outcomes and integrate knowledge of potent and malleable influences to define a comprehensive intervention framework to bring about a significant increase in the proportion of young people in high-poverty neighborhoods who will develop successfully. Based on a synthesis of research from diverse fields, we designed the Creating Nurturing Environments framework to guide community-wide efforts to improve child outcomes and reduce health and educational inequalities.

  3. Neighborhood Risk, Parental Socialization Styles, and Adolescent Conduct Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Gracia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the influence of parental socialization styles (authoritarian, authoritative, indulgent and neglectful, and perceived neighborhood risk on three indicators of conduct problems in adolescence (school misconduct, delinquency, and drug use. The sample consists of 1,017 adolescents, aged between 12 and 17. Results from four multivariate factorial designs yielded only main effects of parenting styles and neighborhood risk. Adolescents from authoritative and indulgent families showed lower conduct problems than those with authoritarian and neglectful parents. Also, higher levels of perceived neighborhood risk were significantly associated with more conduct problems. There were no significant interaction effects between parenting styles and perceived neighborhood risk, but results yielded a significant interaction effect between neighborhood risk and sex. Overall, results do not support the idea that parenting styles are more effective under certain neighborhood risk conditions, and suggest that neighbourhood risk influences adolescents’ psychosocial adjustment beyond the influence of parental socialization styles.

  4. A Social Marketing Approach for Developing a Neighborhood Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Sequeira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on a social marketing project proposal for a community in a social housing neighborhood in Faro, in southern Portugal. The aim of the research is to discuss the possibility of the implementation of a neighborhood network, using a social marketing approach with the goal of strengthening the ties of cooperation, solidarity and friendship between the inhabitants of the neighborhood with a view to fostering social cohesion in the city. The paper offers a theoretical and empirical discussion about the characteristics of particular areas designated as social housing neighborhoods. Data collection was performed in loco by giving a questionnaire to the inhabitants of the neighborhood and by direct observation. The results facilitated a balance between the needs of the residents and their ability to help their neighbors. The results are followed by a discussion and a proposal for a social marketing project targeted to the neighborhood under study.

  5. Defining the minimal structural requirements for partial agonism at the type I myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, R A; Fauq, A; Kozikowski, A P; Nahorski, S R

    1997-02-03

    The novel synthetic analogues D-3-fluoro-myo-inositol 1,5-bisphosphate-4-phosphorothioate, [3F-Ins(1,5)P2-4PS], D-3-fluoro-myo-inositol 1,4-bisphosphate-5-phosphorothioate [3F-Ins(1,4)P2-5PS], and D-3-fluoro-myo-inositol 1-phosphate-4,5-bisphosphorothioate [3F-Ins(1)P-(4,5)PS2] were utilised to define the structure-activity relationships which could produce partial agonism at the Ca2+ mobilising myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] receptor. Based on prior structure-activity data we hypothesised that the minimal structural requirements for lns(1,4,5)P3 receptor partial agonism, were phosphorothioate substitution of the crucial vicinal 4,5-bisphosphate pair accompanied by another structural perturbation, such fluorination of 3-position of the myo-inositol ring. All the analogues fully displaced [3H]Ins(1,4,5)P3 from a single Ins(1,4,5)P3 binding site in pig cerebellar membranes [3F-Ins(1,5)P2-4PS (1C50 = 26 nM), 3F-Ins(1,4)P2-5PS (IC50 = 80 nM) and 3F-Ins(1)P-(4,5)PS2 (IC50 = 109 nM) cf. Ins(1,4,5)P3 (IC50 = 11 nM)]. In contrast, 3F-Ins(1,5)P2-4PS (IC50 = 424 nM) and 3F-Ins(1,4)P2-5PS (IC50 = 3579 nM) were weak full agonists at the Ca2+ mobilising Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor of permeabilised SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, being respectively 4- and 36-fold less potent than Ins(1,4,5)P3 (EC50 = 99 nM). While 3F-Ins(1)P-(4,5)PS2 (EC50 = 11345 nM) was a partial agonist releasing only 64.3 +/- 1.9% of the Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ pools. 3F-Ins(1)P-(4,5)PS2 was unique among the Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor partial agonists so far identified in having a relatively high affinity for the Ins(1,4,5)P3 binding site, accompanied by a significant loss of intrinsic activity for Ca2+ mobilisation. This improved affinity was probably due to the retention of the 1-position phosphate, which enhances interaction with the Ins-(1,4,5)P3 receptor. 3F-Ins(1)P-(4,5)PS2 may be an important lead compound for the development of efficient Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor antagonists.

  6. Generalized rough sets based on neighborhood systems and topological spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mareay

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rough sets theory is an important method for dealing with uncertainty, fuzziness and undefined objects. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for generalized rough sets based on the neighborhood systems induced by an arbitrary binary relation. Four pairs of the dual approximation operators are generated from the core of neighborhood systems. Relationship among different approximation operators are presented. We generate different topological spaces by using the core of these neighborhood systems. Relationship among different generated topologies are discussed.

  7. INTELLIGENT SYSTEM TO EVALUATE THE NEIGHBORHOOD UNIT CRITERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suha A. Abdulrahman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The modern idea of town planning is to plan it under the hierarchic design of service centers levels begin from neighborhood unit level to residential district. It's done by using indicator numbers and areas, that the urban designer returned to them in the planning .this research aims to recognize the neighborhood units slandered by using the intelligent programs system to evaluated three plans of neighborhood unit designed by the researchers to make them in the right design . 

  8. Do neighborhood economic characteristics, racial composition, and residential stability predict perceptions of stress associated with the physical and social environment? Findings from a multilevel analysis in Detroit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Amy J; Zenk, Shannon N; Israel, Barbara A; Mentz, Graciela; Stokes, Carmen; Galea, Sandro

    2008-09-01

    As the body of evidence linking disparities in the health of urban residents to disparate social, economic and environmental contexts grows, efforts to delineate the pathways through which broader social and economic inequalities influence health have burgeoned. One hypothesized pathway connects economic and racial and ethnic inequalities to differentials in stress associated with social and physical environments, with subsequent implications for health. Drawing on data from Detroit, Michigan, we examined contributions of neighborhood-level characteristics (e.g., poverty rate, racial and ethnic composition, residential stability) and individual-level characteristics (e.g., age, gender) to perceived social and physical environmental stress. We found that neighborhood percent African American was positively associated with perceptions of both social and physical environmental stress; neighborhood percent poverty and percent Latino were positively associated with perceived physical environmental stress; and neighborhood residential stability was negatively associated with perceived social environmental stress. At the individual level, whites perceived higher levels of both social and physical environmental stress compared to African American residents of the same block groups, after accounting for other variables included in the models. Our findings suggest the importance of understanding and addressing contributions of neighborhood structural characteristics to perceptions of neighborhood stress. The consistency of the finding that neighborhood racial composition and individual-level race influence perceptions of both social and physical environments suggests the continuing importance of understanding the role played by structural conditions and by personal and collective histories that vary systematically by race and ethnicity within the United States.

  9. Neighborhood Integration and Connectivity Predict Cognitive Performance and Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Watts PhD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Neighborhood characteristics may be important for promoting walking, but little research has focused on older adults, especially those with cognitive impairment. We evaluated the role of neighborhood characteristics on cognitive function and decline over a 2-year period adjusting for measures of walking. Method: In a study of 64 older adults with and without mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD, we evaluated neighborhood integration and connectivity using geographical information systems data and space syntax analysis. In multiple regression analyses, we used these characteristics to predict 2-year declines in factor analytically derived cognitive scores (attention, verbal memory, mental status adjusting for age, sex, education, and self-reported walking. Results: Neighborhood integration and connectivity predicted cognitive performance at baseline, and changes in cognitive performance over 2 years. The relationships between neighborhood characteristics and cognitive performance were not fully explained by self-reported walking. Discussion: Clearer definitions of specific neighborhood characteristics associated with walkability are needed to better understand the mechanisms by which neighborhoods may impact cognitive outcomes. These results have implications for measuring neighborhood characteristics, design and maintenance of living spaces, and interventions to increase walking among older adults. We offer suggestions for future research measuring neighborhood characteristics and cognitive function.

  10. Neighborhood Integration and Connectivity Predict Cognitive Performance and Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Watts PhD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Neighborhood characteristics may be important for promoting walking, but little research has focused on older adults, especially those with cognitive impairment. We evaluated the role of neighborhood characteristics on cognitive function and decline over a 2-year period adjusting for measures of walking. Method: In a study of 64 older adults with and without mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD, we evaluated neighborhood integration and connectivity using geographical information systems data and space syntax analysis. In multiple regression analyses, we used these characteristics to predict 2-year declines in factor analytically derived cognitive scores (attention, verbal memory, mental status adjusting for age, sex, education, and self-reported walking. Results : Neighborhood integration and connectivity predicted cognitive performance at baseline, and changes in cognitive performance over 2 years. The relationships between neighborhood characteristics and cognitive performance were not fully explained by self-reported walking. Discussion : Clearer definitions of specific neighborhood characteristics associated with walkability are needed to better understand the mechanisms by which neighborhoods may impact cognitive outcomes. These results have implications for measuring neighborhood characteristics, design and maintenance of living spaces, and interventions to increase walking among older adults. We offer suggestions for future research measuring neighborhood characteristics and cognitive function.

  11. Forced Displacement From Rental Housing: Prevalence and Neighborhood Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Matthew; Shollenberger, Tracey

    2015-10-01

    Drawing on novel survey data of Milwaukee renters, this study documents the prevalence of involuntary displacement from housing and estimates its consequences for neighborhood selection. More than one in eight Milwaukee renters experienced an eviction or other kind of forced move in the previous two years. Multivariate analyses suggest that renters who experienced a forced move relocate to poorer and higher-crime neighborhoods than those who move under less-demanding circumstances. By providing evidence implying that involuntary displacement is a critical yet overlooked mechanism of neighborhood inequality, this study helps to clarify why some city dwellers live in much worse neighborhoods than their peers.

  12. A note on neighborhood total domination in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nader Jafari Rad

    2015-08-01

    Let = ( ,) be a graph without isolated vertices. A dominating set of is called a neighborhood total dominating set (or just NTDS) if the induced subgraph [()] has no isolated vertex. The minimum cardinality of a NTDS of is called the neighborhood total domination number of and is denoted by nt(). In this paper, we obtain sharp bounds for the neighborhood total domination number of a tree. We also prove that the neighborhood total domination number is equal to the domination number in several classes of graphs including grid graphs.

  13. Effect of a large gaming neighborhood and a strategy adaptation neighborhood for bolstering network reciprocity in a prisoner's dilemma game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Takashi; Tanimoto, Jun; Fukuda, Eriko; Hagishima, Aya; Ikegaya, Naoki

    2014-12-01

    In 2 × 2 prisoner's dilemma (PD) games, network reciprocity is one mechanism for adding social viscosity, leading to a cooperative equilibrium. In this paper, we explain how gaming neighborhoods and strategy-adaptation neighborhoods affect network reciprocity independently in spatial PD games. We explore an appropriate range of strategy adaptation neighborhoods as opposed to the conventional method of making the gaming and strategy adaptation neighborhoods coincide to enhance the level of cooperation. In cases of expanding gaming neighborhoods, network reciprocity falls to a low level relative to the conventional setting. In the discussion below, which is based on the results of our simulation, we explore how these enhancements come about. Essentially, varying the range of the neighborhoods influences how cooperative clusters form and expand in the evolutionary process.

  14. Design of a health-promoting neighborhood intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Jan C; Krishnasamy, Prasanna V

    2007-07-01

    Design and implementation of health-promoting community interventions can advance public health and community well-being; however, realization of such programs is often challenging. Even more challenging is the implementation of ecologic interventions to revitalize built urban environments. A structured intervention entitled ;Intersection Repair; was devised in Portland, Oregon, by a non-profit organization, to implement urban gathering places in the public right of way; specific steps included situation analysis, community outreach, asset mapping, design workshops, construction permitting, building workshops, and process evaluation. The community created human-scale urban landscapes with interactive art installations to encourage social interactions. Such aesthetic improvements, which included painted street murals, information kiosks, hanging gardens, water fountains, benches, and so on, were intended to strengthen social networks and social capital by providing places for residents to engage in conversation. Community engagement in neighborhood design benefits the public at multiple levels, by promoting a healthier lifestyle, over and above urban landscape improvements.

  15. Maximum relevance, minimum redundancy band selection based on neighborhood rough set for hyperspectral data classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Chen, Yuehua; Tan, Kezhu; Xie, Hong; Wang, Liguo; Yan, Xiaozhen; Xie, Wu; Xu, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    Band selection is considered to be an important processing step in handling hyperspectral data. In this work, we selected informative bands according to the maximal relevance minimal redundancy (MRMR) criterion based on neighborhood mutual information. Two measures MRMR difference and MRMR quotient were defined and a forward greedy search for band selection was constructed. The performance of the proposed algorithm, along with a comparison with other methods (neighborhood dependency measure based algorithm, genetic algorithm and uninformative variable elimination algorithm), was studied using the classification accuracy of extreme learning machine (ELM) and random forests (RF) classifiers on soybeans’ hyperspectral datasets. The results show that the proposed MRMR algorithm leads to promising improvement in band selection and classification accuracy.

  16. Identifying Perceived Neighborhood Stressors Across Diverse Communities in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmool, Jessie L C; Yonas, Michael A; Newman, Ogonnaya Dotson; Kubzansky, Laura D; Joseph, Evelyn; Parks, Ana; Callaway, Charles; Chubb, Lauren G; Shepard, Peggy; Clougherty, Jane E

    2015-09-01

    There is growing interest in the role of psychosocial stress in health disparities. Identifying which social stressors are most important to community residents is critical for accurately incorporating stressor exposures into health research. Using a community-academic partnered approach, we designed a multi-community study across the five boroughs of New York City to characterize resident perceptions of key neighborhood stressors. We conducted 14 community focus groups; two to three in each borough, with one adolescent group and one Spanish-speaking group per borough. We then used systematic content analysis and participant ranking data to describe prominent neighborhood stressors and identify dominant themes. Three inter-related themes regarding the social and structural sources of stressful experiences were most commonly identified across neighborhoods: (1) physical disorder and perceived neglect, (2) harassment by police and perceived safety and (3) gentrification and racial discrimination. Our findings suggest that multiple sources of distress, including social, political, physical and economic factors, should be considered when investigating health effects of community stressor exposures and psychological distress. Community expertise is essential for comprehensively characterizing the range of neighborhood stressors that may be implicated in psychosocial exposure pathways.

  17. Parental and Adolescent Perceptions of Neighborhood Safety Related to Adolescents' Physical Activity in Their Neighborhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Cornejo, Irene; Carlson, Jordan A.; Conway, Terry L.; Cain, Kelli L.; Saelens, Brian E.; Frank, Lawrence D.; Glanz, Karen; Roman, Caterina G.; Sallis, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between adolescent and parental perceptions of neighborhood safety and adolescents' physical activity in multiple locations and to investigate the moderating effect of sex within this association. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted with 928 adolescents aged 12 to 16…

  18. Context Matters: Links between Neighborhood Discrimination, Neighborhood Cohesion and African American Adolescents' Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riina, Elizabeth M.; Martin, Anne; Gardner, Margo; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Racial discrimination has serious negative consequences for the adjustment of African American adolescents. Taking an ecological approach, this study examined the linkages between perceived racial discrimination within and outside of the neighborhood and urban adolescents' externalizing and internalizing behaviors, and tested whether neighborhood…

  19. Neighborhood Influences on Perceived Social Support Among Parents: Findings from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendulkar, Shalini A.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Dunn, Erin C.; Buka, Stephen; Subramanian, S. V.

    2012-01-01

    Background Social support is frequently linked to positive parenting behavior. Similarly, studies increasingly show a link between neighborhood residential environment and positive parenting behavior. However, less is known about how the residential environment influences parental social support. To address this gap, we examine the relationship between neighborhood concentrated disadvantage and collective efficacy and the level and change in parental caregiver perceptions of non-familial social support. Methodology/Principal Findings The data for this study came from three data sources, the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) Study's Longitudinal Cohort Survey of caregivers and their offspring, a Community Survey of adult residents in these same neighborhoods and the 1990 Census. Social support is measured at Wave 1 and Wave 3 and neighborhood characteristics are measured at Wave 1. Multilevel linear regression models are fit. The results show that neighborhood collective efficacy is a significant (ß = .04; SE = .02; p = .03), predictor of the positive change in perceived social support over a 7 year period, however, not of the level of social support, adjusting for key compositional variables and neighborhood concentrated disadvantage. In contrast concentrated neighborhood disadvantage is not a significant predictor of either the level or change in social support. Conclusion Our finding suggests that neighborhood collective efficacy may be important for inducing the perception of support from friends in parental caregivers over time. PMID:22493683

  20. Neighborhood-preserving mapping between trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Ibragimov, R.; Guo, Jian-Ying

    2013-01-01

    (v)). Here, for a graph G and a vertex v, we use N(v) to denote the set of vertices which have distance at most i to v in G. We call this problem Neighborhood-Preserving Mapping (NPM). The main result of this paper is a complete dichotomy of the classical complexity of NPM on trees with respect to different...... values of l,d,k. Additionally, we present two dynamic programming algorithms for the case that one of the input trees is a path. © 2013 Springer-Verlag....

  1. CONSIDERING NEIGHBORHOOD INFORMATION IN IMAGE FUZZY CLUSTERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Ning; Zhu Minhui; Zhang Shourong

    2002-01-01

    Fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm is a classical non-supervised classification method.For image classification, fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm makes decisions on a pixel-by-pixel basis and does not take advantage of spatial information, regardless of the pixels' correlation. In this letter, a novel fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm is introduced, which is based on image's neighborhood system. During classification procedure, the novel algorithm regards all pixels'fuzzy membership as a random field. The neighboring pixels' fuzzy membership information is used for the algorithm's iteration procedure. As a result, the algorithm gives a more smooth classification result and cuts down the computation time.

  2. The involvement of citizens and water management: Neighborhood committees leaders in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Córdova Bojórquez

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to analyze public participation in water management through a survey applied to the leaders of neighborhood committees in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua. As part of the methodology, two variables —external and internal influences— and fourteen indicators were utilized. Results show that neighborhood committees, as a public participation structure, are in crisis. The structure shows both internal and external signs of breaking up: there are no clear mechanisms of summons or participation, nor are there any adecuate mechanisms capable of articulating demands and government authority, insofar as external political agents have been allowed to participate in internal management and committee issues. For this reason, the capacity of local neighborhood committees to make decisions regarding city water management is placed in doubt.

  3. Neighborhood Socio-Ecohydrology along a Gradient of Urbanization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson-Smith, D.; Buchert, M.; Stoker, P.; Cannon, M.; Hinners, S.; Li, S.; Endter-Wada, J.; Licon, C.; Bjerregaard, Z.; Li, E.

    2013-12-01

    The work reported here represents a fundamental building block of a larger project that attempts to build the human and research infrastructure needed to understand and tackle the challenges of water sustainability in Utah now and in the future. A major emphasis is the integration of both ecohydrologic and social science research to encompass the complexities of water dynamics in urbanizing watersheds located within arid climatic regions. Our study area includes three neighboring watersheds representing a gradient of urbanization intensity, from relatively pristine montane slopes, to agriculture-dominated rural areas, to the heart of urban Salt Lake City. In order to design an effective social and biophysical instrumentation network along this gradient, it was necessary to identify socio-ecohydrologic contexts that are meaningful and measurable expressions of the diverse ways humans occupy this landscape. Our challenge was to develop a typology of neighborhoods that would reflect combinations of measurable attributes that link urban characteristics and water system outcomes. A subset of these neighborhoods will then be selected for instrumentation and further coordinated data collection on social, engineering, biophysical, and ecological outcomes. Our urban socio-ecohydrology typology was constructed using a wide range of data to characterize Census Block Groups (CBGs) across the Wasatch Range Metropolitan Area (WRMA). CBGs are geographic areas created by the US Census and approximate ';neighborhoods' in most urban settings. Only CBGs with population densities over 50 persons per square mile were included in our typology. A wide range of independent variables were used in a statistical factor/cluster analysis to identify distinctive combinations of land cover, land use, built environment, household structure, socioeconomic status, water infrastructure, policy, and climate characteristics. Variables used in the typology classification were selected because they

  4. Definable deduction relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉平

    1999-01-01

    The nonmonotonic deduction relation in default reasoning is defined with fixed point style, which has the many-extension property that classical logic is not possessed of. These two kinds of deductions both have boolean definability property, that is, their extensions or deductive closures can be defined by boolean formulas. A generalized form of fixed point method is employed to define a class of deduction relations, which all have the above property. Theorems on definability and atomless boolean algebras in model theory are essential in dealing with this assertion.

  5. Some aspects of the selection of blocksize and neighborhood in kriging - a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, P.S.N. (NMDC Ltd., Donimalai Township (India))

    1989-09-01

    When one wants to estimate mineral deposits by the application of geostatistical methods, for example by kriging, one is confronted with the problem of selection of a proper size of the block, amount of discretization for determining the block covariance and the amount of neighborhood that is to be considered. For determining the amount of discretization to estimate the block covariance C (V,V), one has to increase the discretization and note the block covariance. If the increase does not bring out proportionally significant results, discretization can be stopped at that level. As far as block size selection is concerned, it depends upon the structural characteristics of the variogram, the grid size, etc. It is better that the block size is equal to the grid interval. As far as the neighborhood is concerned, it is clarified that taking the entire borehole information creates computational problems. There has to be a moving neighborhood. As far as maximum neighborhood is concerned, it can be such that the slope p of the regression line E(Zv/Zv{sup *}) is as near to 1 as possible. In the absence of adequate information surrounding some of the blocks, it is suggested that at least a minimum information of 3 is taken, because when the information is less than 3, there is no correlation between Zv and Zv{sup *}, when there is no borehole information on the block. Considering a minimum neighborhood of 3 ensures that, at least there would be some positive correlation between Zv an Zv{sup *}.

  6. Assessing the Play Provisions for Children in Urban Neighborhoods of India: Case Study Nagpur, Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti D. Bhonsle

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The creation of satisfying urban environments calls for the planners, designers and policy makers to understand the structures that cause residents to feel satisfied with their environments. The paper focuses on qualitative aspects of the childrens play spaces in the urban neighborhoods of Nagpur which were analysed with the background of their daily activity schedule survey, their assement of the existing play provisions and their aspirations from their neighborhood environment quality. Apart from these studies, the childrens and their parents perceptions of the quality of urban residential environments was also studied. The literature review gave an extract of relevant attributes of environmental quality (EQ which became the theoritical basis for the work. The research generates an approach to assessing the child friendliness of our urban neighborhoods, which in certain ways is not even catering to the most fundamental right of the child to play; it also generates a matrix of children’s needs and parameters relevant to Indian context. A theoretical model of the residents satisfaction is also generated which forms the base for the qualitative questionnaire analysis in SPSS 20 with a set of dependent and independent variables which shows the correlation of the resident’s satisfaction with child friendliness of neighborhoods in the Indian context. The regression model and mathematical equation as an outcome of the qualitative analysis was also validated upon two other urban neighborhoods of the city of Nagpur. The research with all its tools used and the approach adopted can help in undertaking such child-centered researches in other cities of India which have their own unique issues and characteristics of urban growth.

  7. Social deprivation, inequality, and the neighborhood-level incidence of psychotic syndromes in East London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkbride, James B; Jones, Peter B; Ullrich, Simone; Coid, Jeremy W

    2014-01-01

    Although urban birth, upbringing, and living are associated with increased risk of nonaffective psychotic disorders, few studies have used appropriate multilevel techniques accounting for spatial dependency in risk to investigate social, economic, or physical determinants of psychosis incidence. We adopted Bayesian hierarchical modeling to investigate the sociospatial distribution of psychosis risk in East London for DSM-IV nonaffective and affective psychotic disorders, ascertained over a 2-year period in the East London first-episode psychosis study. We included individual and environmental data on 427 subjects experiencing first-episode psychosis to estimate the incidence of disorder across 56 neighborhoods, having standardized for age, sex, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. A Bayesian model that included spatially structured neighborhood-level random effects identified substantial unexplained variation in nonaffective psychosis risk after controlling for individual-level factors. This variation was independently associated with greater levels of neighborhood income inequality (SD increase in inequality: Bayesian relative risks [RR]: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.04-1.49), absolute deprivation (RR: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.08-1.51) and population density (RR: 1.18; 95% CI: 1.00-1.41). Neighborhood ethnic composition effects were associated with incidence of nonaffective psychosis for people of black Caribbean and black African origin. No variation in the spatial distribution of the affective psychoses was identified, consistent with the possibility of differing etiological origins of affective and nonaffective psychoses. Our data suggest that both absolute and relative measures of neighborhood social composition are associated with the incidence of nonaffective psychosis. We suggest these associations are consistent with a role for social stressors in psychosis risk, particularly when people live in more unequal communities.

  8. Neighborhood linguistic diversity predicts infants' social learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Lauren H; Carrazza, Cristina; Woodward, Amanda L

    2014-11-01

    Infants' direct interactions with caregivers have been shown to powerfully influence social and cognitive development. In contrast, little is known about the cognitive influence of social contexts beyond the infant's immediate interactions with others, for example, the communities in which infants live. The current study addressed this issue by asking whether neighborhood linguistic diversity predicts infants' propensity to learn from diverse social partners. Data were taken from a series of experiments in which 19-month-old infants from monolingual, English-speaking homes were tested in paradigms that assessed their tendency to imitate the actions of an adult who spoke either English or Spanish. Infants who lived in more linguistically diverse neighborhoods imitated more of the Spanish speaker's actions. This relation was observed in two separate datasets and found to be independent from variation in infants' general imitative abilities, age, median family income and population density. These results provide novel evidence suggesting that infants' social learning is predicted by the diversity of the communities in which they live.

  9. Neighborhood disadvantage and adolescent stress reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Hackman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lower socioeconomic status (SES is associated with higher levels of life stress, which in turn affect stress physiology. SES is related to basal cortisol and diurnal change, but it is not clear if SES is associated with cortisol reactivity to stress. To address this question, we examined the relationship between two indices of SES, parental education and concentrated neighborhood disadvantage, and the cortisol reactivity of African-American adolescents to a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Test. We found that concentrated disadvantage was associated with cortisol reactivity and this relationship was moderated by gender, such that higher concentrated disadvantage predicted higher cortisol reactivity and steeper recovery in boys but not in girls. Parental education, alone or as moderated by gender, did not predict reactivity or recovery, while neither education nor concentrated disadvantage predicted estimates of baseline cortisol. This finding is consistent with animal literature showing differential vulnerability, by gender, to the effects of adverse early experience on stress regulation and the differential effects of neighborhood disadvantage in adolescent males and females. This suggests that the mechanisms underlying SES differences in brain development and particularly reactivity to environmental stressors may vary across genders.

  10. Neighborhood Processes, Self-Efficacy, and Adolescent Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupere, Veronique; Leventhal, Tama; Vitaro, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Self-efficacy beliefs are central to mental health. Because adolescents' neighborhoods shape opportunities for experiences of control, predictability, and safety, we propose that neighborhood conditions are associated with adolescents' self-efficacy and, in turn, their internalizing problems (i.e., depression/anxiety symptoms). We tested these…

  11. Subgraphs in vertex neighborhoods of K-free graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang-Jensen, J.; Brandt, Stephan

    2004-01-01

    In a K-free graph, the neighborhood of every vertex induces a K-free subgraph. The K-free graphs with the converse property that every induced K-free subgraph is contained in the neighborhood of a vertex are characterized, based on the characterization in the case r = 3 due to Pach [8]. © 2004...

  12. Influence of Perceived Neighborhood Safety on Proactive and Reactive Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fite, Paula J.; Vitulano, Michael; Wynn, Porche'; Wimsatt, Amber; Gaertner, Alden; Rathert, Jamie

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined associations between perceived neighborhood safety and proactive and reactive subtypes of aggression while also considering peer delinquency and poor parental monitoring in a community recruited sample of 89 children (56% male) ranging from 9 to 12 years of age (M=10.44, SD=1.14). In addition, neighborhood safety was…

  13. A national-level analysis of neighborhood form metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Popkin, Barry

    2013-08-01

    Interest in urban neighborhood form is strong among scholars trained in multiple disciplines. The increasing popularity of this field calls for a set of metrics that can be used to describe meaningful patterns of built features in neighborhood environments. This study employs national-level datasets from Add Health, the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) 2001, the U.S. Census TIGER, and the U.S. Geological Survey to construct neighborhood form metrics for 20,467 residents, whose residential environments cover a wide array of geographic areas representative of comprehensive neighborhood types across the United States. Buffers of different sizes (1 km, 3 km, 5 km, and 8 km, respectively) are drawn around each resident's location as the unit of analysis. For the four sets of 20,467 neighborhood environments, 27 neighborhood form metrics are selected, computed, and further reduced through factor analysis. The results suggest that the derived subsets of univariate metrics can be applied across neighborhood types to characterize diverse neighborhood environments.

  14. From Neurons to Neighborhoods: An Update--Workshop Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    "From Neurons to Neighborhoods: An Update: Workshop Summary" is based on the original study "From Neurons to Neighborhoods: Early Childhood Development," which was released in October of 2000. From the time of the original publication's release, much has occurred to cause a fundamental reexamination of the nation's…

  15. Perceived Neighborhood Characteristics and Problem Behavior among Disadvantaged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moren-Cross, Jennifer L.; Wright, Darlene R.; LaGory, Mark; Lanzi, Robin Gaines

    2006-01-01

    Using survey data from former Head Start children in the third grade from 15 sites across the nation (n = 576), this study examines the relationship between maternal subjective neighborhood attributions and their children's behavioral problems. Maternal perceptions of neighborhood characteristics were measured across five domains, including…

  16. The Effect of Orthographic Neighborhood in the Reading Span Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Christelle; Postal, Virginie; Mathey, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at examining whether and to what extent orthographic neighborhood of words influences performance in a working memory span task. Twenty-five participants performed a reading span task in which final words to be memorized had either no higher frequency orthographic neighbor or at least one. In both neighborhood conditions, each…

  17. Neighborhood Characteristics and the Social Control of Registered Sex Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socia, Kelly M.; Stamatel, Janet P.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses geospatial and regression analyses to examine the relationships among social disorganization, collective efficacy, social control, residence restrictions, spatial autocorrelation, and the neighborhood distribution of registered sex offenders (RSOs) in Chicago. RSOs were concentrated in neighborhoods that had higher levels of social…

  18. From Neurons to Neighborhoods: An Update--Workshop Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    "From Neurons to Neighborhoods: An Update: Workshop Summary" is based on the original study "From Neurons to Neighborhoods: Early Childhood Development," which was released in October of 2000. From the time of the original publication's release, much has occurred to cause a fundamental reexamination of the nation's…

  19. Defining and Differentiating the Makerspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousay, Tonia A.

    2017-01-01

    Many resources now punctuate the maker movement landscape. However, some schools and communities still struggle to understand this burgeoning movement. How do we define these spaces and differentiate them from previous labs and shops? Through a multidimensional framework, stakeholders should consider how the structure, access, staffing, and tools…

  20. The geography of recreational open space: influence of neighborhood racial composition and neighborhood poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Dustin T; Kawachi, Ichiro; White, Kellee; Williams, David R

    2013-08-01

    The geography of recreational open space might be inequitable in terms of minority neighborhood racial/ethnic composition and neighborhood poverty, perhaps due in part to residential segregation. This study evaluated the association between minority neighborhood racial/ethnic composition, neighborhood poverty, and recreational open space in Boston, Massachusetts (US). Across Boston census tracts, we computed percent non-Hispanic Black, percent Hispanic, and percent families in poverty as well as recreational open space density. We evaluated spatial autocorrelation in study variables and in the ordinary least squares (OLS) regression residuals via the Global Moran's I. We then computed Spearman correlations between the census tract socio-demographic characteristics and recreational open space density, including correlations adjusted for spatial autocorrelation. After this, we computed OLS regressions or spatial regressions as appropriate. Significant positive spatial autocorrelation was found for neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics (all p value = 0.001). We found marginally significant positive spatial autocorrelation in recreational open space (Global Moran's I = 0.082; p value = 0.053). However, we found no spatial autocorrelation in the OLS regression residuals, which indicated that spatial models were not appropriate. There was a negative correlation between census tract percent non-Hispanic Black and recreational open space density (r S = -0.22; conventional p value = 0.005; spatially adjusted p value = 0.019) as well as a negative correlation between predominantly non-Hispanic Black census tracts (>60 % non-Hispanic Black in a census tract) and recreational open space density (r S = -0.23; conventional p value = 0.003; spatially adjusted p value = 0.007). In bivariate and multivariate OLS models, percent non-Hispanic Black in a census tract and predominantly Black census tracts were associated with

  1. Food shopping behaviors of residents in two Bronx neighborhoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Dannefer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous researchers have documented associations between neighborhood food environments and residents’ diets. However, few quantitative studies have examined the food shopping behaviors of residents in low-income neighborhoods, including the types of stores patronized and frequency of visits. This study presents findings on the food shopping behaviors of residents in the Bronx neighborhoods of West Farms and Fordham. Methods: Street-intercept surveys were conducted in spring 2012 with residents of West Farms and Fordham as part of a broader program evaluation. The survey included questions on general food shopping behaviors including visits to neighborhood bodegas (corner stores and supermarkets, mode of transportation to the supermarket most commonly frequented, and the primary source for purchases of fruits and vegetables. Results: The survey was conducted with 505 respondents. The sample was 59% Hispanic and 34% black, with a median age of 45 years. Thirty-four percent of respondents had less than a high school education, 30% were high school graduates or had their GED, and 36% had attended some college. Almost all respondents (97% shopped at supermarkets in their neighborhood; 84% usually shopped at a supermarket within their neighborhood, and 16% usually shopped at a supermarket outside of their neighborhood. Most respondents (95% shopped at bodegas in their neighborhood, and 65% did so once per day or more. Conclusions: Residents of these neighborhoods have high exposure to local food stores, with the vast majority of respondents shopping at neighborhood supermarkets and bodegas and almost 2 in 3 respondents going to bodegas every day. These findings demonstrate the important role of supermarkets and bodegas in local residents’ shopping patterns and support the inclusion of these stores in efforts to create food environments that support and promote healthy eating.

  2. Historically defined autobiographical periods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Norman R.; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Lee, Peter J.;

    2012-01-01

    The chapter reviews a research programme that has demonstrated the existence of historically defined autobiographical periods and identified the conditions that bring them about. Data from four samples of World War II-generation adults show that historically defined autobiographical periods endure...... over time and theoretical implications are discussed, notably by introducing a new approach to autobiographical memory, Transition Theory, which assumes that autobiographical memory is organized by transitional events that can be selfinitiated or externally imposed - historically defined...

  3. Structural Analysis and Anticoagulant Activities of the Novel Sulfated Fucan Possessing a Regular Well-Defined Repeating Unit from Sea Cucumber

    OpenAIRE

    Mingyi Wu; Li Xu; Longyan Zhao; Chuang Xiao; Na Gao; Lan Luo; Lian Yang; Zi Li; Lingyun Chen; Jinhua Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Sulfated fucans, the complex polysaccharides, exhibit various biological activities. Herein, we purified two fucans from the sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis and Ludwigothurea grisea. Their structures were verified by means of HPGPC, FT-IR, GC–MS and NMR. As a result, a novel structural motif for this type of polymers is reported. The fucans have a unique structure composed of a central core of regular (1→2) and (1→3)-linked tetrasaccharide repeating units. Approximately 50% of the units from...

  4. A common spatial factor analysis model for measured neighborhood-level characteristics: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nethery, Rachel C; Warren, Joshua L; Herring, Amy H; Moore, Kari A B; Evenson, Kelly R; Diez-Roux, Ana V

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the dimensionality of a set of neighborhood-level variables collected on participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) while appropriately accounting for the spatial structure of the data. A common spatial factor analysis model in the Bayesian setting was utilized in order to properly characterize dependencies in the data. Results suggest that use of the spatial factor model can result in more precise estimation of factor scores, improved insight into the spatial patterns in the data, and the ability to more accurately assess associations between the neighborhood environment and health outcomes.

  5. A Common Spatial Factor Analysis Model for Measured Neighborhood-Level Characteristics: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nethery, Rachel C.; Warren, Joshua L.; Herring, Amy H.; Moore, Kari A.B.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the dimensionality of a set of neighborhood-level variables collected on participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) while appropriately accounting for the spatial structure of the data. A common spatial factor analysis model in the Bayesian setting was utilized in order to properly characterize dependencies in the data. Results suggest that use of the spatial factor model can result in more precise estimation of factor scores, improved insight into the spatial patterns in the data, and the ability to more accurately assess associations between the neighborhood environment and health outcomes. PMID:26372887

  6. The Origins of Plasmas in the Earth's Neighborhood (OPEN) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    The nature and objectives of the OPEN program are overviewed. The Origins of Plasmas in the Earth's Neighborhood program was conceived in 1979 and proposed as a major new initiative to study the energetics of the earth's space environment by the end of the 1980s. The objectives of OPEN have been integrated into the Global Geospace Study (GGS) segment to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program now being planned jointly by NASA, ESA, and Japan. The goals will be to develop a global understanding of the flow of energy from the sun through the earth's space environment above the neutral atmosphere and to define the cause and effect relationships between the plasma physics processes that link different regions of this dynamic environment. A network of four spacecraft will be used, each one carrying an instrument complement to characterize the composition and behavior of the upstream solar wind, the high-altitude polar magnetosphere, the equatorial magnetosphere, and the comet-like geomagnetic tail. Multispectral cameras will also be carried to image polar auroras at ultraviolet, visible and X-ray wavelengths. Experimentalists and theorists on the international team will participate.

  7. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...

  8. The effect of individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status on gastric cancer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chia Wu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Gastric cancer is a leading cause of death, particularly in the developing world. The literature reports individual socioeconomic status (SES or neighborhood SES as related to survival, but the effect of both has not been studied. This study investigated the effect of individual and neighborhood SES simultaneously on mortality in gastric cancer patients in Taiwan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A study was conducted of 3,396 patients diagnosed with gastric cancer between 2002 and 2006. Each patient was followed for five years or until death. Individual SES was defined by income-related insurance premium (low, moderate, and high. Neighborhood SES was based on household income dichotomized into advantaged and disadvantaged areas. Multilevel logistic regression model was used to compare survival rates by SES group after adjusting for possible confounding factors. RESULTS: In patients younger than 65 years, 5-year overall survival rates were lowest for those with low individual SES. After adjusting for patient characteristics (age, gender, Charlson Comorbidity Index Score, gastric cancer patients with high individual SES had 68% risk reduction of mortality (adjusted odds ratio [OR] of mortality, 0.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.17-0.61. Patients aged 65 and above had no statistically significant difference in mortality rates by individual SES group. Different neighborhood SES did not statistically differ in the survival rates. CONCLUSION: Gastric cancer patients aged less than 65 years old with low individual SES have higher risk of mortality, even under an universal healthcare system. Public health strategies, education and welfare policies should seek to correct the inequality in gastric cancer survival, especially in those with lower individual SES.

  9. Neighborhood Physical Disorder in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, James W; Mooney, Stephen J; Sheehan, Daniel M; Teitler, Julien O; Neckerman, Kathryn M; Kaufman, Tanya K; Lovasi, Gina S; Bader, Michael D M; Rundle, Andrew G

    Neighborhood physical disorder, or the deterioration of urban environments, is associated with negative mental and physical health outcomes. Eleven trained raters used CANVAS, a web-based system for conducting reliable virtual street audits, to collect data on nine indicators of physical disorder using Google Street View imagery of 532 block faces in New York City, New York, USA. We combined the block face indicator data into a disorder scale using item response theory; indicators ranged in severity from presence of litter, a weak indicator of disorder, to abandoned cars, a strong indicator. Using this scale, we estimated disorder at the center point of each sampled block. We then used ordinary kriging to interpolate estimates of disorder levels throughout the city. The resulting map condenses a complex estimation process into an interpretable visualization of the spatial distribution of physical disorder in New York City.

  10. Youth Activity Involvement, Neighborhood Adult Support, Individual Decision Making Skills, and Early Adolescent Delinquent Behaviors: Testing a Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crean, Hugh F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines a cross-sectional structural equation model of participation in youth activities, neighborhood adult support, individual decision making skills, and delinquent behavior in urban middle school youths (n = 2611). Results indicate extracurricular activity participation had both direct and indirect associations with delinquent…

  11. The association between neighborhood economic hardship, the retail food environment, fast food intake, and obesity: findings from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxy, Michael; Malecki, Kristen C; Givens, Marjory L; Walsh, Matthew C; Nieto, F Javier

    2015-03-13

    Neighborhood-level characteristics such as economic hardship and the retail food environment are assumed to be correlated and to influence consumers' dietary behavior and health status, but few studies have investigated these different relationships comprehensively in a single study. This work aims to investigate the association between neighborhood-level economic hardship, the retail food environment, fast food consumption, and obesity prevalence. Linking data from the population-based Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (SHOW, n = 1,570, 2008-10) and a commercially available business database, the Wisconsin Retail Food Environment Index (WRFEI) was defined as the mean distance from each participating household to the three closest supermarkets divided by the mean distance to the three closest convenience stores or fast food restaurants. Based on US census data, neighborhood-level economic hardship was defined by the Economic Hardship Index (EHI). Relationships were analyzed using multivariate linear and logistic regression models. SHOW residents living in neighborhoods with the highest economic hardship faced a less favorable retail food environment (WRFEI = 2.53) than residents from neighborhoods with the lowest economic hardship (WRFEI = 1.77; p-trend obesity and only a weak borderline-significant association between access to fast food restaurants and self-reported fast food consumption (≥ 2 times/week, OR = 0.59-0.62, p = 0.05-0.09) in urban residents. Participants reporting higher frequency of fast food consumption (≥ 2 times vs. obese (OR = 1.35, p = 0.06). This study indicates that neighborhood-level economic hardship is associated with an unfavorable retail food environment. However inconsistent or non-significant relationships between the retail food environment, fast food consumption, and obesity were observed. More research is needed to enhance methodological approaches to assess the retail food environment and to understand the complex

  12. Preserving Neighborhood Opportunity: Where Federal Housing Subsidies Expire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lens, Michael C.; Reina, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Rent burdens are increasing in U.S. metropolitan areas while subsidies on privately owned, publicly subsidized rental units are expiring. As a result, some of the few remaining affordable units in opportunity neighborhoods are at risk of being converted to market rate. Policy makers face a decision about whether to devote their efforts and scarce resources toward developing new affordable housing, recapitalizing existing subsidized housing, and/or preserving properties with expiring subsidies. There are several reasons to preserve these subsidies, one being that properties may be located in neighborhoods with greater opportunity. In this article, we use several sources of data at the census tract level to learn how subsidy expirations affect neighborhood opportunity for low-income households. Our analysis presents several key findings. First, we find that units that left the project-based Section 8 program were – on average – in lower opportunity neighborhoods, but these neighborhoods were improving. In addition, properties due to expiry from the Section 8 program between 2011 and 2020 are in higher opportunity neighborhoods than any other subsidy program. On the contrary, new Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) units were developed in tracts similar to those where LIHTC units are currently active, which tend to be lower opportunity neighborhoods. PMID:28553063

  13. Disparities in neighborhood food environments: implications of measurement strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Michael D M; Purciel, Marnie; Yousefzadeh, Paulette; Neckerman, Kathryn M

    2010-01-01

    Public health researchers have begun to map the neighborhood “food environment” and examine its association with the risk of overweight and obesity. Some argue that “food deserts”—areas with little or no provision of fresh produce and other healthy food—may contribute to disparities in obesity, diabetes, and related health problems. While research on neighborhood food environments has taken advantage of more technically sophisticated ways to assess distance and density, in general, it has not considered how individual or neighborhood conditions might modify physical distance and thereby affect patterns of spatial accessibility. This study carried out a series of sensitivity analyses to illustrate the effects on the measurement of disparities in food environments of adjusting for cross-neighborhood variation in vehicle ownership rates, public transit access, and impediments to pedestrian travel, such as crime and poor traffic safety. The analysis used geographic information systems data for New York City supermarkets, fruit and vegetable markets, and farmers' markets and employed both kernel density and distance measures. We found that adjusting for vehicle ownership and crime tended to increase measured disparities in access to supermarkets by neighborhood race/ethnicity and income, while adjusting for public transit and traffic safety tended to narrow these disparities. Further, considering fruit and vegetable markets and farmers' markets, as well as supermarkets, increased the density of healthy food outlets, especially in neighborhoods with high concentrations of Hispanics, Asians, and foreign-born residents and in high-poverty neighborhoods.

  14. Neighborhood Economic Deprivation and Social Fragmentation: Associations With Children's Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Erika J; Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E; Saini, Ekjyot K; Philbrook, Lauren E; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2016-12-09

    A growing body of work indicates that experiences of neighborhood disadvantage place children at risk for poor sleep. This study aimed to examine how both neighborhood economic deprivation (a measure of poverty) and social fragmentation (an index of instability) are associated with objective measures of the length and quality of children's sleep. Participants were 210 children (54.3% boys) living predominantly in small towns and semirural communities in Alabama. On average children were 11.3 years old (SD = .63); 66.7% of the children were European American and 33.3% were African American. The sample was socioeconomically diverse with 67.9% of the participants living at or below the poverty line and 32.1% from lower-middle-class or middle-class families. Indicators of neighborhood characteristics were derived from the 2012 American Community Survey and composited to create two variables representing neighborhood economic deprivation and social fragmentation. Child sleep period, actual sleep minutes, and efficiency were examined using actigraphy. Higher levels of neighborhood economic deprivation were associated with fewer sleep minutes and poorer sleep efficiency. More neighborhood social fragmentation was also linked with poorer sleep efficiency. Analyses controlled for demographic characteristics, child health, and family socioeconomic status. Findings indicate that living in economically and socially disadvantaged neighborhoods predicts risk for shorter and lower-quality sleep in children. Examination of community context in addition to family and individual characteristics may provide a more comprehensive understanding of the factors shaping child sleep.

  15. Do Neighborhood Characteristics in Amsterdam Influence Adiposity at Preschool Age?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jessica Hrudey

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neighborhood characteristics may contribute to adiposity in young children, but results in the current literature are inconsistent. This study aimed to investigate whether objective (socioeconomic status (SES and subjective (perceived safety, satisfaction with green spaces and perceived physical disorder neighborhood characteristics directly influence child adiposity (as measured by BMI, percent body fat (%BF and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR. Methods: Data on child BMI, %BF and WHtR were obtained from the Amsterdam Born Children and their Development cohort at 5–6 years of age. Three thousand four hundred and sixty nine (3469 children were included in the analyses. Mixed models, using random intercepts for postal code area to account for neighborhood clustering effects, were used to analyze the relationships of interest. Results: Associations were observed for both perceived safety and neighborhood SES with %BF after adjustment for maternal education and ethnicity. All relationships were eliminated with the inclusion of individual covariates and parental BMI into the models. Conclusions: In general, child adiposity at age 5–6 years was not independently associated with neighborhood characteristics, although a small relationship between child %BF and both neighborhood SES and perceived safety cannot be ruled out. At this young age, familial and individual factors probably play a more important role in influencing child adiposity than neighborhood characteristics.

  16. Neighborhood walkability and the walking behavior of Australian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Neville; Cerin, Ester; Leslie, Eva; duToit, Lorinne; Coffee, Neil; Frank, Lawrence D; Bauman, Adrian E; Hugo, Graeme; Saelens, Brian E; Sallis, James F

    2007-11-01

    The physical attributes of residential neighborhoods, particularly the connectedness of streets and the proximity of destinations, can influence walking behaviors. To provide the evidence for public health advocacy on activity-friendly environments, large-scale studies in different countries are needed. Associations of neighborhood physical environments with adults' walking for transport and walking for recreation must be better understood. Walking for transport and walking for recreation were assessed with a validated survey among 2650 adults recruited from neighborhoods in an Australian city between July 2003 and June 2004, with neighborhoods selected to have either high or low walkability, based on objective measures of connectedness and proximity derived from geographic information systems (GIS) databases. The study design was stratified by area-level socioeconomic status, while analyses controlled for participant age, gender, individual-level socioeconomic status, and reasons for neighborhood self-selection. A strong independent positive association was found between weekly frequency of walking for transport and the objectively derived neighborhood walkability index. Preference for walkable neighborhoods moderated the relationship of walkability with weekly minutes, but not the frequency of walking for transport--walkability was related to higher frequency of transport walking, irrespective of neighborhood self-selection. There were no significant associations between environmental factors and walking for recreation. Associations of neighborhood walkability attributes with walking for transport were confirmed in Australia. They accounted for a modest but statistically significant proportion of the total variation of the relevant walking behavior. The physical environment attributes that make up the walkability index are potentially important candidate factors for future environmental and policy initiatives designed to increase physical activity.

  17. Defining the Interactions of Cellobiohydrolase with Substrate through Structure Function Studies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-409

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.

    2013-07-01

    NREL researchers will use their expertise and skilled resources in numerical computational modeling to generate structure-function relationships for improved cellulase variant enzymes to support the development of cellulases with improved performance in biomass conversion.

  18. An efficient General Variable Neighborhood Search for large Travelling Salesman Problem with Time Windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available General Variable Neighborhood Search (GVNS is shown to be a powerful and robust methodology for solving travelling salesman and vehicle routing problems. However, its efficient implementation may play a significant role in solving large size instances. In this paper we suggest new GVNS heuristic for solving Travelling salesman problem with time windows. It uses different set of neighborhoods, new feasibility checking procedure and a more efficient data structure than the recent GVNS method that can be considered as a state-of-the-art heuristic. As a result, our GVNS is much faster and more effective than the previous GVNS. It is able to improve 14 out of 25 best known solutions for large test instances from the literature.

  19. New Discoveries in the Galactic Neighborhood through Advances in Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    WGLA, AAS; Cowan, John; Drake, Paul; Federman, Steven; Ferland, Gary; Frank, Adam; Herbst, Eric; Olive, Keith; Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel Wolf; Ziurys, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    As the Galactic Neighborhood (GAN) panel is fully aware, the next decade will see major advances in our understanding of this area of research. To quote from their charge, these advances will occur in studies of the galactic neighborhood, including the structure and properties of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, and their stellar populations and evolution, as well as interstellar media and star clusters. Central to the progress in these areas are the corresponding advances in laboratory astrophysics that are required for fully realizing the GAN scientific opportunities within the decade 2010-2020. Laboratory astrophysics comprises both theoretical and experimental studies of the underlying physics and chemistry that produces the observed astrophysical processes. The 5 areas of laboratory astrophysics that we have identified as relevant to the GAN panel are atomic, molecular, solid matter, plasma, and nuclear physics. In this white paper, we describe in Section 2 some of the new scientific opportunities and ...

  20. Experiments to Determine Neighborhood Reactions to Light Airplanes With and Without External Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwell, Fred S

    1953-01-01

    The work reported was part of a program of experimentation with external noise reduction on light airplanes. This particular study was in effect a byproduct survey conceived to utilize already available equipment and personnel to further the findings of the original research and to determine reactions in populated neighborhoods to light aircraft with and without noise-reduction equipment. The findings indicate that at the 10 sites within and about metropolitan Boston the degree of noise reduction previously found to be aerodynamically and structurally feasible did eliminate substantially all neighborhood objections to noise per se. The evidence clearly suggests that, when the noise nuisance is minimized to the extent found feasible, the number and severity of other objections also diminish -- evidently because the flight operations are noticed less when heard less.

  1. Multi-objective flexible job shop scheduling problem using variable neighborhood evolutionary algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun; Ji, Zhicheng; Wang, Yan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, multi-objective flexible job shop scheduling problem (MOFJSP) was studied with the objects to minimize makespan, total workload and critical workload. A variable neighborhood evolutionary algorithm (VNEA) was proposed to obtain a set of Pareto optimal solutions. First, two novel crowded operators in terms of the decision space and object space were proposed, and they were respectively used in mating selection and environmental selection. Then, two well-designed neighborhood structures were used in local search, which consider the problem characteristics and can hold fast convergence. Finally, extensive comparison was carried out with the state-of-the-art methods specially presented for solving MOFJSP on well-known benchmark instances. The results show that the proposed VNEA is more effective than other algorithms in solving MOFJSP.

  2. Image Based Characterization of Formal and Informal Neighborhoods in an Urban Landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graesser, Jordan B [ORNL; Cheriyadat, Anil M [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The high rate of global urbanization has resulted in a rapid increase in informal settlements, which can be de ned as unplanned, unauthorized, and/or unstructured housing. Techniques for ef ciently mapping these settlement boundaries can bene t various decision making bodies. From a remote sensing perspective, informal settlements share unique spatial characteristics that distinguish them from other types of structures (e.g., industrial, commercial, and formal residential). These spatial characteristics are often captured in high spatial resolution satellite imagery. We analyzed the role of spatial, structural, and contextual features (e.g., GLCM, Histogram of Oriented Gradients, Line Support Regions, Lacunarity) for urban neighborhood mapping, and computed several low-level image features at multiple scales to characterize local neighborhoods. The decision parameters to classify formal-, informal-, and non-settlement classes were learned under Decision Trees and a supervised classi cation framework. Experiments were conducted on high-resolution satellite imagery from the CitySphere collection, and four different cities (i.e., Caracas, Kabul, Kandahar, and La Paz) with varying spatial characteristics were represented. Overall accuracy ranged from 85% in La Paz, Bolivia, to 92% in Kandahar, Afghanistan. While the disparities between formal and informal neighborhoods varied greatly, many of the image statistics tested proved robust.

  3. Housing and neighborhood quality among undocumented Mexican and Central American immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew; Greenman, Emily

    2013-11-01

    Extensive research has documented the challenges that undocumented immigrants face in navigating U.S. labor markets, but relatively little has explored the impact of legal status on residential outcomes despite their widespread repercussions for social well-being. Using data from the 1996-2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation to impute documentation status among Mexican and Central American immigrants, we examine group differences in residential outcomes, including homeownership, housing crowding, satisfaction with neighborhood and housing quality, problems with neighborhood crime/safety, governmental services, and environmental issues, and deficiencies with housing units. Results from our analysis indicate that undocumented householders are far less likely to be homeowners than documented migrants, and also live in more crowded homes, report greater structural deficiencies with their dwellings, and express greater concern about the quality of public services and environmental conditions in their neighborhoods. In comparison to native whites, undocumented migrants' residential circumstances are lacking, but their residential outcomes tend to be superior to those of native-born blacks. Overall, our results highlight the pervasive impact of legal status on stratifying Mexicans' and Central Americans' prospects for successful incorporation, but also underscore the rigidity of the black/nonblack divide structuring American residential contexts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Association between neighborhood safety and overweight status among urban adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Renee M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neighborhood safety may be an important social environmental determinant of overweight. We examined the relationship between perceived neighborhood safety and overweight status, and assessed the validity of reported neighborhood safety among a representative community sample of urban adolescents (who were racially and ethnically diverse. Methods Data come from the 2006 Boston Youth Survey, a cross-sectional study in which public high school students in Boston, MA completed a pencil-and-paper survey. The study used a two-stage, stratified sampling design whereby schools and then 9th–12th grade classrooms within schools were selected (the analytic sample included 1,140 students. Students reported their perceptions of neighborhood safety and several associated dimensions. With self-reported height and weight data, we computed body mass index (BMI, kg/m2 for the adolescents based on CDC growth charts. Chi-square statistics and corresponding p-values were computed to compare perceived neighborhood safety by the several associated dimensions. Prevalence ratios (PRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated to examine the association between perceived neighborhood safety and the prevalence of overweight status controlling for relevant covariates and school site. Results More than one-third (35.6% of students said they always felt safe in their neighborhood, 43.9% said they sometimes felt safe, 11.6% rarely felt safe, and 8.9% never felt safe. Those students who reported that they rarely or never feel safe in their neighborhoods were more likely than those who said they always or sometimes feel safe to believe that gang violence was a serious problem in their neighborhood or school (68.0% vs. 44.1%, p p = 0.025. In the fully adjusted model (including grade and school stratified by race/ethnicity, we found a statistically significant association between feeling unsafe in one's own neighborhood and overweight status among

  5. Parental Perceptions of Neighborhood Effects in Latino Comunas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Pilar; Sanchez, Ninive; Castillo, Marcela; Delva, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To obtain rich information about how adult Latinos living in high-poverty/high-drug use neighborhoods perceive and negotiate their environment. Methods In 2008, thirteen adult caregivers in Santiago, Chile were interviewed with open-ended questions to ascertain beliefs about neighborhood effects and drug use. Analysis Inductive analysis was used to develop the codebook/identify trends. Discussion Residents externalized their understanding of drug use and misuse by invoking the concept of delinquent youth. A typology of their perceptions is offered. Learning more about residents’ circumstances may help focus on needs-based interventions. More research with Latino neighborhoods is needed for culturally-competent models of interventions. PMID:22497879

  6. Individual-Level Influences on Perceptions of Neighborhood Disorder: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latkin, Carl A.; German, Danielle; Hua, Wei; Curry, Aaron D.

    2009-01-01

    Health outcomes are associated with aggregate neighborhood measures and individual neighborhood perceptions. In this study, the authors sought to delineate individual, social network, and spatial factors that may influence perceptions of neighborhood disorder. Multilevel regression analysis showed that neighborhood perceptions were more negative…

  7. Social Competence in Late Elementary School: Relationships to Parenting and Neighborhood Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughy, Margaret O'Brien; Franzini, Luisa; Windle, Michael; Dittus, Patricia; Cuccaro, Paula; Elliott, Marc N.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite evidence that neighborhoods confer both risk and resilience for youth development, the existing neighborhood research has a number of methodological limitations including lack of diversity in neighborhoods sampled and neighborhood characteristics assessed. The purpose of this study was to address these methodological limitations of…

  8. Neighborhood Frequency Effect in Chinese Word Recognition: Evidence from Naming and Lexical Decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Feng; Gao, Xin-Yu; Chou, Tai-Li; Wu, Jei-Tun

    2017-01-01

    Neighborhood frequency is a crucial variable to know the nature of word recognition. Different from alphabetic scripts, neighborhood frequency in Chinese is usually confounded by component character frequency and neighborhood size. Three experiments were designed to explore the role of the neighborhood frequency effect in Chinese and the stimuli…

  9. Long range chromosome organization in Escherichia coli: The position of the replication origin defines the non-structured regions and the Right and Left macrodomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Escherichia coli chromosome is organized into four macrodomains (Ori, Ter, Right and Left) and two non-structured regions. This organization influences the segregation of sister chromatids, the mobility of chromosomal DNA, and the cellular localization of the chromosome. The organization of the Ter and Ori macrodomains relies on two specific systems, MatP/matS for the Ter domain and MaoP/maoS for the Ori domain, respectively. Here by constructing strains with chromosome rearrangements to reshuffle the distribution of chromosomal segments, we reveal that the difference between the non-structured regions and the Right and Left lateral macrodomains relies on their position on the chromosome. A change in the genetic location of oriC generated either by an inversion within the Ori macrodomain or by the insertion of a second oriC modifies the position of Right and Left macrodomains, as the chromosome region the closest to oriC are always non-structured while the regions further away behave as macrodomain regardless of their DNA sequence. Using fluorescent microscopy we estimated that loci belonging to a non-structured region are significantly closer to the Ori MD than loci belonging to a lateral MD. Altogether, our results suggest that the origin of replication plays a prominent role in chromosome organization in E. coli, as it determines structuring and localization of macrodomains in growing cell. PMID:28486476

  10. Defining Documentary Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film......A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film...

  11. Definably amenable NIP groups

    OpenAIRE

    Chernikov, Artem; Simon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We study definably amenable NIP groups. We develop a theory of generics, showing that various definitions considered previously coincide, and study invariant measures. Applications include: characterization of regular ergodic measures, a proof of the conjecture of Petrykowski connecting existence of bounded orbits with definable amenability in the NIP case, and the Ellis group conjecture of Newelski and Pillay connecting the model-theoretic connected component of an NIP group with the ideal s...

  12. Assessing residential exposure to urban noise using environmental models: does the size of the local living neighborhood matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenailleau, Quentin M; Bernard, Nadine; Pujol, Sophie; Houot, Hélène; Joly, Daniel; Mauny, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Environmental epidemiological studies rely on the quantification of the exposure level in a surface defined as the subject's exposure area. For residential exposure, this area is often the subject's neighborhood. However, the variability of the size and nature of the neighborhoods makes comparison of the findings across studies difficult. This article examines the impact of the neighborhood's definition on environmental noise exposure levels obtained from four commonly used sampling techniques: address point, façade, buffers, and official zoning. A high-definition noise model, built on a middle-sized French city, has been used to estimate LAeq,24 h exposure in the vicinity of 10,825 residential buildings. Twelve noise exposure indicators have been used to assess inhabitants' exposure. Influence of urban environmental factors was analyzed using multilevel modeling. When the sampled area increases, the average exposure increases (+3.9 dB), whereas the SD decreases (-1.6 dB) (P<0.01). Most of the indicators differ statistically. When comparing indicators from the 50-m and 400-m radius buffers, the assigned LAeq,24 h level varies across buildings from -9.4 to +22.3 dB. This variation is influenced by urban environmental characteristics (P<0.01). On the basis of this study's findings, sampling technique, neighborhood size, and environmental composition should be carefully considered in further exposure studies.

  13. Granular Computing on Partitions, Coverings and Neighborhood Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsau Young(T. Y.) Lin

    2006-01-01

    Granular Computing on partitions(RST),coverings(GrCC) and neighborhood systems(LNS) are examined:(1)The order of generality is RST, GrCC, and then LNS.(2)The quotient structure: In RST, it is called quotient set. In GrCC, it is a simplical complex, called the nerve of the covering in combinatorial topology. For LNS, the structure has no known description.(3)The approximation space of RST is a topological space generated by a partition, called a clopen space. For LNS,it is a generalized/pretopological space which is more general than topological space. For GrCC,there are two possibilities. One is a special case of LNS,which is the topological space generated by the covering. There is another topological space, the topology generated by the finite intersections of the members of a covering. The first one treats covering as a base, the second one as a subbase.(4)Knowledge representations in RST are symbol-valued systems. In GrCC, they are expression-valued systems. In LNS, they are multivalued system; reported in 1998.(5)RST and GRCC representation theories are complete in the sense that granular models can be recaptured fully from the knowledge representations.

  14. Banks and the Racial Patterning of Homicide: A Study of Chicago Neighborhoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María B. Veléz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available While bank investment is a driving force behind neighborhood viability, few studies have directly examined the effects of bank loan practices on neighborhood crime rates. This paper proposes that variation in residential bank loans helps explain the higher rates of homicide in minority neighborhoods in Chicago compared to white neighborhoods. It finds that black and Latino neighborhoods would experience fewer homicides if more financial capital were infused into these neighborhoods. These findings suggest that neighborhoods are shaped profoundly by the decisions of external economic actors.

  15. Role of Positive Parenting in the Association Between Neighborhood Social Disadvantage and Brain Development Across Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Sarah; Vijayakumar, Nandita; Simmons, Julian G; Dennison, Meg; Schwartz, Orli; Pantelis, Christos; Sheeber, Lisa; Byrne, Michelle L; Allen, Nicholas B

    2017-08-01

    The negative effects of socioeconomic disadvantage on lifelong functioning are pronounced, with some evidence suggesting that these effects are mediated by changes in brain development. To our knowledge, no research has investigated whether parenting might buffer these negative effects. To establish whether positive parenting behaviors moderate the effects of socioeconomic disadvantage on brain development and adaptive functioning in adolescents. In this longitudinal study of adolescents from schools in Melbourne, Australia, data were collected at 3 assessments between 2004 and 2012. Data were analyzed between August 2016 and April 2017. Both family (parental income-to-needs, occupation, and education level) and neighborhood measures of socioeconomic disadvantage were assessed. Positive maternal parenting behaviors were observed during interactions in early adolescence. Structural magnetic resonance imaging scans at 3 times (early, middle, and late adolescence) from ages 11 to 20 years. Global and academic functioning was assessed during late adolescence. We used linear mixed models to examine the effect of family and neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage as well as the moderating effect of positive parenting on adolescent brain development. We used mediation models to examine whether brain developmental trajectories predicted functional outcomes during late adolescence. Of the included 166 adolescents, 86 (51.8%) were male. We found that neighborhood, but not family, socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with altered brain development from early (mean [SD] age, 12.79 [0.425] years) to late (mean [SD] age, 19.08 [0.460] years) adolescence, predominantly in the temporal lobes (temporal cortex: random field theory corrected; left amygdala: B, -0.237; P positive parenting moderated the effects of neighborhood disadvantage on the development of dorsal frontal and lateral orbitofrontal cortices as well as the effects of family disadvantage on the development of

  16. The neighborhood energy balance equation: does neighborhood food retail environment + physical activity environment = obesity? The CARDIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone-Heinonen, Janne; Diez-Roux, Ana V; Goff, David C; Loria, Catherine M; Kiefe, Catarina I; Popkin, Barry M; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2013-01-01

    Recent obesity prevention initiatives focus on healthy neighborhood design, but most research examines neighborhood food retail and physical activity (PA) environments in isolation. We estimated joint, interactive, and cumulative impacts of neighborhood food retail and PA environment characteristics on body mass index (BMI) throughout early adulthood. We used cohort data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study [n=4,092; Year 7 (24-42 years, 1992-1993) followed over 5 exams through Year 25 (2010-2011); 12,921 person-exam observations], with linked time-varying geographic information system-derived neighborhood environment measures. Using regression with fixed effects for individuals, we modeled time-lagged BMI as a function of food and PA resource density (counts per population) and neighborhood development intensity (a composite density score). We controlled for neighborhood poverty, individual-level sociodemographics, and BMI in the prior exam; and included significant interactions between neighborhood measures and by sex. Using model coefficients, we simulated BMI reductions in response to single and combined neighborhood improvements. Simulated increase in supermarket density (from 25(th) to 75(th) percentile) predicted inter-exam reduction in BMI of 0.09 kg/m(2) [estimate (95% CI): -0.09 (-0.16, -0.02)]. Increasing commercial PA facility density predicted BMI reductions up to 0.22 kg/m(2) in men, with variation across other neighborhood features [estimate (95% CI) range: -0.14 (-0.29, 0.01) to -0.22 (-0.37, -0.08)]. Simultaneous increases in supermarket and commercial PA facility density predicted inter-exam BMI reductions up to 0.31 kg/m(2) in men [estimate (95% CI) range: -0.23 (-0.39, -0.06) to -0.31 (-0.47, -0.15)] but not women. Reduced fast food restaurant and convenience store density and increased public PA facility density and neighborhood development intensity did not predict reductions in BMI. Findings suggest that

  17. The neighborhood energy balance equation: does neighborhood food retail environment + physical activity environment = obesity? The CARDIA study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne Boone-Heinonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent obesity prevention initiatives focus on healthy neighborhood design, but most research examines neighborhood food retail and physical activity (PA environments in isolation. We estimated joint, interactive, and cumulative impacts of neighborhood food retail and PA environment characteristics on body mass index (BMI throughout early adulthood. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used cohort data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA Study [n=4,092; Year 7 (24-42 years, 1992-1993 followed over 5 exams through Year 25 (2010-2011; 12,921 person-exam observations], with linked time-varying geographic information system-derived neighborhood environment measures. Using regression with fixed effects for individuals, we modeled time-lagged BMI as a function of food and PA resource density (counts per population and neighborhood development intensity (a composite density score. We controlled for neighborhood poverty, individual-level sociodemographics, and BMI in the prior exam; and included significant interactions between neighborhood measures and by sex. Using model coefficients, we simulated BMI reductions in response to single and combined neighborhood improvements. Simulated increase in supermarket density (from 25(th to 75(th percentile predicted inter-exam reduction in BMI of 0.09 kg/m(2 [estimate (95% CI: -0.09 (-0.16, -0.02]. Increasing commercial PA facility density predicted BMI reductions up to 0.22 kg/m(2 in men, with variation across other neighborhood features [estimate (95% CI range: -0.14 (-0.29, 0.01 to -0.22 (-0.37, -0.08]. Simultaneous increases in supermarket and commercial PA facility density predicted inter-exam BMI reductions up to 0.31 kg/m(2 in men [estimate (95% CI range: -0.23 (-0.39, -0.06 to -0.31 (-0.47, -0.15] but not women. Reduced fast food restaurant and convenience store density and increased public PA facility density and neighborhood development intensity did not predict reductions

  18. The Crystal Structure of the Extracellular 11-heme Cytochrome UndA Reveals a Conserved 10-heme Motif and Defined Binding Site for Soluble Iron Chelates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Marcus; Hall, Andrea; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2012-07-03

    Members of the genus Shewanella translocate deca- or undeca-heme cytochromes to the external cell surface thus enabling respiration using extracellular minerals and polynuclear Fe(III) chelates. The high resolution structure of the first undeca-heme outer membrane cytochrome, UndA, reveals a crossed heme chain with four potential electron ingress/egress sites arranged within four domains. Sequence and structural alignment of UndA and the deca-heme MtrF reveals the extra heme of UndA is inserted between MtrF hemes 6 and 7. The remaining UndA hemes can be superposed over the heme chain of the decaheme MtrF, suggesting that a ten heme core is conserved between outer membrane cytochromes. The UndA structure is the first outer membrane cytochrome to be crystallographically resolved in complex with substrates, an Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetate dimer or an Fe(III)-citrate trimer. The structural resolution of these UndA-Fe(III)-chelate complexes provides a rationale for previous kinetic measurements on UndA and other outer membrane cytochromes.

  19. A synthetic peptide derived from the animo acid sequence of canine parvovirus structural proteins which defines a B cell epitope and elicits antiviral antibody in BALB c mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. Carlson; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides, recombinant fusion proteins and mouse monoclonal antibodies were used to delineate a B cell epitope of the VP'2 structural protein of canine parvovirus (CPV). Although this epitope is not preferentially recognized in the normal antibody response to CPV, virus-specific

  20. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy-defined structure of the C-terminal domain of NaChBac and its role in channel assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powl, Andrew M.; O’Reilly, Andrias O.; Miles, Andrew J.; Wallace, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    Extramembranous domains play important roles in the structure and function of membrane proteins, contributing to protein stability, forming association domains, and binding ancillary subunits and ligands. However, these domains are generally flexible, making them difficult or unsuitable targets for obtaining high-resolution X-ray and NMR structural information. In this study we show that the highly sensitive method of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy can be used as a powerful tool to investigate the structure of the extramembranous C-terminal domain (CTD) of the prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) from Bacillus halodurans, NaChBac. Sequence analyses predict its CTD will consist of an unordered region followed by an α-helix, which has a propensity to form a multimeric coiled-coil motif, and which could form an association domain in the homotetrameric NaChBac channel. By creating a number of shortened constructs we have shown experimentally that the CTD does indeed contain a stretch of ∼20 α-helical residues preceded by a nonhelical region adjacent to the final transmembrane segment and that the efficiency of assembly of channels in the membrane progressively decreases as the CTD residues are removed. Analyses of the CTDs of 32 putative prokaryotic NaV sequences suggest that a CTD helical bundle is a structural feature conserved throughout the bacterial sodium channel family. PMID:20663949

  1. The role of the residential neighborhood in linking youths' family poverty trajectory to decreased feelings of safety at school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté-Lussier, Carolyn; Barnett, Tracie A; Kestens, Yan; Tu, Mai Thanh; Séguin, Louise

    2015-06-01

    Although disadvantaged youth are more likely to be victimized at school, victimization only partly explains their decreased feelings of safety at school. We applied a socioecological approach to test the hypotheses that the experience of poverty is associated with decreased feelings of safety at school, and that residential neighborhood features partly mediate the relationship between poverty and feeling less safe at school. This study draws on the Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (QLSCD) which began in 1998 with a representative population-based cohort of 2,120 5-month old infants (49.1% female) and their primary caregiver. The study also includes measures of ego-centred residential neighborhood exposures (based on a 500 m circular buffer zone surrounding the family's residential postal code) derived from a spatial data infrastructure. We used latent growth modeling to estimate youth's family poverty trajectory from age 5 months to 13 years, and structural equation modeling to test our hypotheses. The results suggest that youth experiencing chronic and later-childhood poverty felt less safe at school in part because they lived in neighborhoods that their parents described as being disorderly (e.g., demarked by the presence of garbage, drug use and groups of trouble-makers). These neighborhoods also tended to have less greenery (e.g., trees, parks) and more lone-parent households. Neighborhood features did not help explain the relationship between early-childhood poverty and feeling less safe at school. The findings suggest that targeting residential neighborhood features such as greenery and disorder could improve youth's felt safety at school, particularly for those experiencing chronic and later-childhood poverty.

  2. Neighborhood Watch and Adult Education: Citizens' Groups and Negotiated Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Peter

    1992-01-01

    Britain's Neighborhood Watch coordinators receive limited training, but few expressed interest in an entire course. Adult education programs might best offer modules for specific training in such areas as fundraising, committee skills, and publicity. (SK)

  3. A Streaming Distance Transform Algorithm for Neighborhood-Sequence Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Normand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe an algorithm that computes a “translated” 2D Neighborhood-Sequence Distance Transform (DT using a look up table approach. It requires a single raster scan of the input image and produces one line of output for every line of input. The neighborhood sequence is specified either by providing one period of some integer periodic sequence or by providing the rate of appearance of neighborhoods. The full algorithm optionally derives the regular (centered DT from the “translated” DT, providing the result image on-the-fly, with a minimal delay, before the input image is fully processed. Its efficiency can benefit all applications that use neighborhood- sequence distances, particularly when pipelined processing architectures are involved, or when the size of objects in the source image is limited.

  4. Neighborhoods May Be Key to Teens' Mental Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... see if "neighborhood collective efficacy" -- a blend of social cohesion and shared expectations for social control -- was linked ... really two [measurements] that are distinct, one being social cohesion and mutual trust. This is the idea of ...

  5. Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Districts - MDC_NeighborhoodStabilizationProg

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Boundaries of Miami-Dade County's Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) areas. NSP is a HUD program to provide emergency assistance to state and local governments...

  6. Neighborhoods, comm development communities, Published in 2006, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Neighborhoods dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'comm development communities'. Data...

  7. Municipality and Neighborhood Influences on Volunteering in Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dury, Sarah; Willems, Jurgen; De Witte, Nico; De Donder, Liesbeth; Buffel, Tine; Verté, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    This article explores the relationships between municipality features and volunteering by older adults. In the literature, strong evidence exists of the influence of place on older people's health. However, the question how neighborhoods and municipalities promote or hinder volunteer participation remains under-explored. Data for the research are derived from the Belgian Aging Studies. We estimate logistic multilevel models for older individuals' engagement in volunteering across 141 municipalities in Belgium (N = 67,144). Analysis shows that neighborhood connectedness, neighborhood satisfaction, home ownership, and presence of services predict voluntary engagement at older ages. The findings support that perceptions and quality of social resources that relate to neighborhoods may be important factors to explain volunteering among older adults. Moreover, the findings suggest that volunteering in later life must be considered within a broader framework.

  8. 论对外汉语语序结构排序%Defining and Sequencing Syntactic Structures in L2 Chinese Instructional Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓守信

    2001-01-01

    This article presents a set of criteria that helps determine the sequence of grammatical structures in a systematic fashion. It is a component of what we shall refer to as a pedagogical grammar of L2 Chinese. It includes such factors as L1 Chinese natural sequence, L2 Chinese acquisitional sequence, usage frequency, structural complexity, semantic complexity, and interlinguistic distance. Ample illustrations from Man in this article. A brief description of a corpus of L2 Chinese interlanguage will also be given, as it plays a significant role in a pedagogical grammar. This article concludes that it is imperative that a theoretical framework of a L2 Chinese pedagogical grammar will be established in the field, so that the teaching and/or acquisition of Chinese can proceed on firmer ground.

  9. High-Hall-Mobility Al-Doped ZnO Films Having Textured Polycrystalline Structure with a Well-Defined (0001) Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Junichi; Makino, Hisao; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2016-12-01

    Five hundred-nanometer-thick ZnO-based textured polycrystalline films consisting of 490-nm-thick Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films deposited on 10-nm-thick Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) films exhibited a high Hall mobility (μ H) of 50.1 cm(2)/Vs with a carrier concentration (N) of 2.55 × 10(20) cm(-3). Firstly, the GZO films were prepared on glass substrates by ion plating with dc arc discharge, and the AZO films were then deposited on the GZO films by direct current magnetron sputtering (DC-MS). The GZO interface layers with a preferential c-axis orientation play a critical role in producing AZO films with texture development of a well-defined (0001) orientation, whereas 500-nm-thick AZO films deposited by only DC-MS showed a mixture of the c-plane and the other plane orientation, to exhibit a μ H of 38.7 cm(2)/Vs with an N of 2.22 × 10(20) cm(-3).

  10. High-Hall-Mobility Al-Doped ZnO Films Having Textured Polycrystalline Structure with a Well-Defined (0001) Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Junichi; Makino, Hisao; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2016-06-01

    Five hundred-nanometer-thick ZnO-based textured polycrystalline films consisting of 490-nm-thick Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films deposited on 10-nm-thick Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) films exhibited a high Hall mobility ( μ H) of 50.1 cm2/Vs with a carrier concentration ( N) of 2.55 × 1020 cm-3. Firstly, the GZO films were prepared on glass substrates by ion plating with dc arc discharge, and the AZO films were then deposited on the GZO films by direct current magnetron sputtering (DC-MS). The GZO interface layers with a preferential c-axis orientation play a critical role in producing AZO films with texture development of a well-defined (0001) orientation, whereas 500-nm-thick AZO films deposited by only DC-MS showed a mixture of the c-plane and the other plane orientation, to exhibit a μ H of 38.7 cm2/Vs with an N of 2.22 × 1020 cm-3.

  11. Variable Neighborhood Search Based Algorithm for University Course Timetabling Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Kralev, Velin; Kraleva, Radoslava

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a variable neighborhood search approach as a method for solving combinatoric optimization problems is presented. A variable neighborhood search based algorithm for solving the problem concerning the university course timetable design has been developed. This algorithm is used to solve the real problem regarding the university course timetable design. It is compared with other algorithms that are tested on the same sets of input data. The object and the methodology of study are p...

  12. Adaptive Image Restoration and Segmentation Method Using Different Neighborhood Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Li

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The image restoration methods based on the Bayesian's framework and Markov random fields (MRF have been widely used in the image-processing field. The basic idea of all these methods is to use calculus of variation and mathematical statistics to average or estimate a pixel value by the values of its neighbors. After applying this averaging process to the whole image a number of times, the noisy pixels, which are abnormal values, are filtered out. Based on the Tea-trade model, which states that the closer the neighbor, more contribution it makes, almost all of these methods use only the nearest four neighbors for calculation. In our previous research [1, 2], we extended the research on CLRS (image restoration and segmentation by using competitive learning algorithm to enlarge the neighborhood size. The results showed that the longer neighborhood range could improve or worsen the restoration results. We also found that the autocorrelation coefficient was an important factor to determine the proper neighborhood size. We then further realized that the computational complexity increased dramatically along with the enlargement of the neighborhood size. This paper is to further the previous research and to discuss the tradeoff between the computational complexity and the restoration improvement by using longer neighborhood range. We used a couple of methods to construct the synthetic images with the exact correlation coefficients we want and to determine the corresponding neighborhood size. We constructed an image with a range of correlation coefficients by blending some synthetic images. Then an adaptive method to find the correlation coefficients of this image was constructed. We restored the image by applying different neighborhood CLRS algorithm to different parts of the image according to its correlation coefficient. Finally, we applied this adaptive method to some real-world images to get improved restoration results than by using single

  13. Neighborhood Risk, Parental Socialization Styles, and Adolescent Conduct Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Enrique Gracia; Mª Castillo Fuentes; Fernando García

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to analyze the influence of parental socialization styles (authoritarian, authoritative, indulgent and neglectful), and perceived neighborhood risk on three indicators of conduct problems in adolescence (school misconduct, delinquency, and drug use). The sample consists of 1,017 adolescents, aged between 12 and 17. Results from four multivariate factorial designs yielded only main effects of parenting styles and neighborhood risk. Adolescents from authoritative and indulgent...

  14. Variable Neighborhood Search Based Algorithm for University Course Timetabling Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Kralev, Velin; Kraleva, Radoslava

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a variable neighborhood search approach as a method for solving combinatoric optimization problems is presented. A variable neighborhood search based algorithm for solving the problem concerning the university course timetable design has been developed. This algorithm is used to solve the real problem regarding the university course timetable design. It is compared with other algorithms that are tested on the same sets of input data. The object and the methodology of study are p...

  15. Can play be defined?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Can play be defined? There is reason to raise critical questions about the established academic demand that at phenomenon – also in humanist studies – should first of all be defined, i.e. de-lineated and by neat lines limited to a “little box” that can be handled. The following chapter develops t....... Human beings can very well understand play – or whatever phenomenon in human life – without defining it........ The academic imperative of definition seems to be linked to the positivistic attempts – and produces sometimes monstrous definitions. Have they any philosophical value for our knowledge of what play is? Definition is not a universal instrument of knowledge-building, but a culturally specific construction...

  16. Nouns to Define Homophobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Campo Arias

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The term ‘homophobia’ was introduced in the academic context more than 40 years ago. However, its meaning has changed over time. Objective. To review the nouns used in the last twelve years to define homophobia. Methodology. The authors conducted a systematic search in Medline through Pubmed that included editorials, letters to editors, comments and narrative reviews, in English and Spanish. A qualitative analysis (Grounded theory was applied to analyze nouns used to define homophobia since 2001 through 2012. Results. Authors reviewed three papers including ten nouns to define homophobia, the most common noun was fear. The terms were grouped into two domains: negative attitude and discomfort with homosexuality. Conclusion. Fear is the most used word to describe homophobia. The terms were grouped into two domains: negative attitude and discomfort toward homosexuality.

  17. Neighborhood poverty and allostatic load in African American youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Gene H; Lei, Man-Kit; Chen, Edith; Miller, Gregory E

    2014-11-01

    This study was designed to determine whether living in a neighborhood in which poverty levels increase across adolescence is associated with heightened levels of allostatic load (AL), a biological composite reflecting cardiometabolic risk. The researchers also sought to determine whether receipt of emotional support could ameliorate the effects of increases in neighborhood poverty on AL. Neighborhood concentrations of poverty were obtained from the Census Bureau for 420 African American youth living in rural Georgia when they were 11 and 19 years of age. AL was measured at age 19 by using established protocols for children and adolescents. When youth were 18, caregivers reported parental emotional support and youth assessed receipt of peer and mentor emotional support. Covariates included family poverty status at ages 11 and 19, family financial stress, parental employment status, youth stress, and youths' unhealthful behaviors. Youth who lived in neighborhoods in which poverty levels increased from ages 11 to 19 evinced the highest levels of AL even after accounting for the individual-level covariates. The association of increasing neighborhood poverty across adolescence with AL was not significant for youth who received high emotional support. This study is the first to show an association between AL and residence in a neighborhood that increases in poverty. It also highlights the benefits of supportive relationships in ameliorating this association. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. The link between neighborhood poverty and health: context or composition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, D Phuong; Finch, Brian Karl

    2008-09-15

    Cross-sectional studies of neighborhood context and health are subject to upward bias due to unobserved heterogeneity and to downward bias due to overadjustment for potential mediators in the pathway between neighborhood context and health. In this study, the authors employed two strategies that addressed these two sources of bias. First, to mitigate overadjustment of mediators, they adjusted for baseline characteristics observed just prior to the measurement of neighborhood context, using a combined propensity score and regression strategy. Second, to mitigate underadjustment of unmeasured confounders, they employed a fixed-effects modeling strategy to account for unobserved non-time-varying heterogeneity. Analyses were based on a nationally representative sample of the nonimmigrant US population from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1980-1997) in which respondent-rated health was regressed on neighborhood poverty. The samples consisted of approximately 6,000 respondents for the propensity score/regression models and 45,000 person-years for the fixed-effects models. Both modeling strategies yielded significant estimates of neighborhood poverty and supported a causal link between neighborhood context and health.

  19. Defining "intermittent UVR exposure"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekær, Mette; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Petersen, Bibi Øager;

    2016-01-01

    to define and quantify “intermittent UVR exposure” by an objective measure. Methods: A broad study population of adults and children had data collected during a summer period. Data were personal UVR dosimetry measurements, from which the number of “intermittent days” was derived, sun behaviour diaries.......001). The corresponding numbers for prediction of nevi and lentigo density by retrospective questionnaire data was lower (R2 = 0.11, R2 = 0.26, p defined objective measure of intermittent UVR exposure. This measure may provide a better prediction of solar skin damage and CMM...

  20. The expansion of neighborhood and pattern formation on spatial prisoner's dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaolan; Xu, Fangqian; Yang, Junzhong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    The prisoner's dilemma (PD), in which players can either cooperate or defect, is considered a paradigm for studying the evolution of cooperation in spatially structured populations. There the compact cooperator cluster is identified as a characteristic pattern and the probability of forming such pattern in turn depends on the features of the networks. In this paper, we investigate the influence of expansion of neighborhood on pattern formation by taking a weak PD game with one free parameter T, the temptation to defect. Two different expansion methods of neighborhood are considered. One is based on a square lattice and expanses along four directions generating networks with degree increasing with K = 4 m . The other is based on a lattice with Moore neighborhood and expanses along eight directions, generating networks with degree of K = 8 m . Individuals are placed on the nodes of the networks, interact with their neighbors and learn from the better one. We find that cooperator can survive for a broad degree 4 ≤ K ≤ 70 by taking a loose type of cooperator clusters. The former simple corresponding relationship between macroscopic patterns and the microscopic PD interactions is broken. Under a condition that is unfavorable for cooperators such as large T and K, systems prefer to evolve to a loose type of cooperator clusters to support cooperation. However, compared to the well-known compact pattern, it is a suboptimal strategy because it cannot help cooperators dominating the population and always corresponding to a low cooperation level.

  1. Mutational and structural analysis of KIR3DL1 reveals a lineage-defining allotypic dimorphism that impacts both HLA and peptide sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Geraldine M; Vivian, Julian P; Widjaja, Jacqueline M; Bridgeman, John S; Gostick, Emma; Lafont, Bernard A P; Anderson, Stephen K; Price, David A; Brooks, Andrew G; Rossjohn, Jamie; McVicar, Daniel W

    2014-03-15

    Killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) control the activation of human NK cells via interactions with peptide-laden HLAs. KIR3DL1 is a highly polymorphic inhibitory receptor that recognizes a diverse array of HLA molecules expressing the Bw4 epitope, a group with multiple polymorphisms incorporating variants within the Bw4 motif. Genetic studies suggest that KIR3DL1 variation has functional significance in several disease states, including HIV infection. However, owing to differences across KIR3DL1 allotypes, HLA-Bw4, and associated peptides, the mechanistic link with biological outcome remains unclear. In this study, we elucidated the impact of KIR3DL1 polymorphism on peptide-laden HLA recognition. Mutational analysis revealed that KIR residues involved in water-mediated contacts with the HLA-presented peptide influence peptide binding specificity. In particular, residue 282 (glutamate) in the D2 domain underpins the lack of tolerance of negatively charged C-terminal peptide residues. Allotypic KIR3DL1 variants, defined by neighboring residue 283, displayed differential sensitivities to HLA-bound peptide, including the variable HLA-B*57:01-restricted HIV-1 Gag-derived epitope TW10. Residue 283, which has undergone positive selection during the evolution of human KIRs, also played a central role in Bw4 subtype recognition by KIR3DL1. Collectively, our findings uncover a common molecular regulator that controls HLA and peptide discrimination without participating directly in peptide-laden HLA interactions. Furthermore, they provide insight into the mechanics of interaction and generate simple, easily assessed criteria for the definition of KIR3DL1 functional groupings that will be relevant in many clinical applications, including bone marrow transplantation.

  2. On-line optical and X-ray spectroscopies with crystallography: an integrated approach for determining metalloprotein structures in functionally well defined states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Mark J; Buffey, Steven G; Hough, Michael A; Hasnain, S Samar

    2008-09-01

    X-ray-induced redox changes can lead to incorrect assignments of the functional states of metals in metalloprotein crystals. The need for on-line monitoring of the status of metal ions (and other chromophores) during protein crystallography experiments is of growing importance with the use of intense synchrotron X-ray beams. Significant efforts are therefore being made worldwide to combine different spectroscopies in parallel with X-ray crystallographic data collection. Here the implementation and utilization of optical and X-ray absorption spectroscopies on the modern macromolecular crystallography (MX) beamline 10, at the SRS, Daresbury Laboratory, is described. This beamline is equipped with a dedicated monolithic energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence detector, allowing X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements to be made in situ on the same crystal used to record the diffraction data. In addition, an optical microspectrophotometer has been incorporated on the beamline, thus facilitating combined MX, XAS and optical spectroscopic measurements. By uniting these techniques it is also possible to monitor the status of optically active and optically silent metal centres present in a crystal at the same time. This unique capability has been applied to observe the results of crystallographic data collection on crystals of nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, which contains both type-1 and type-2 Cu centres. It is found that the type-1 Cu centre photoreduces quickly, resulting in the loss of the 595 nm peak in the optical spectrum, while the type-2 Cu centre remains in the oxidized state over a much longer time period, for which independent confirmation is provided by XAS data as this centre has an optical spectrum which is barely detectable using microspectrophotometry. This example clearly demonstrates the importance of using two on-line methods, spectroscopy and XAS, for identifying well defined redox states of metalloproteins during

  3. Defining 5S rRNA structure space: point mutation data can be used to predict the phenotype of multichange variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Madhavi; Fox, George E

    2011-09-01

    A portion of the 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) structure space in the vicinity of the Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA sequence is explored in detail with the intention of establishing principles that will allow a priori prediction of which sequences would be valid members of a particular RNA structure space. Four hundred and one sequence variants differing from the V. proteolyticus 5S rRNA wild-type sequence in 1-7 positions were characterized using an in vivo assay system. Most significantly, it was found that in general, the phenotypic effects of single changes were independent of the phenotypic effect of a second change. As a result, it was possible to use the new data in conjunction with results from prior studies of the same RNA to develop "truth tables" to predict which multiple change variants would be functional and which would be nonfunctional. The actual phenotype of 93.8% of the multichange variants studied was consistent with the predictions made using truth tables thereby providing for perhaps the first time an upper limit estimate of how frequent unexpected interactions are. It was also observed that single changes at positions involved in secondary structure were no more likely to be invalid than changes in other regions. In particular, internal changes in long standard stems were in fact almost always tolerated. Changes at positions that were hypervariable in the context of an alignment of related sequences were, as expected, usually found to be valid. However, the potential validity of changes that were idiosyncratic to a single lineage of related sequences when placed in the V. proteolyticus 5S rRNA context was unpredictable.

  4. Neighborhoods, Iredell County Appraisal Neighborhood areas, Published in 2009, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Iredell County GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Neighborhoods dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as 'Iredell County...

  5. Role of the Substrate Specificity-Defining Residues of Human SIRT5 in Modulating the Structural Stability and Inhibitory Features of the Enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junru Yu

    Full Text Available Sirtuins are emerging as the key regulators of metabolism and aging, and their potential activators and inhibitors are being explored as therapeutics for improving health and treating associated diseases. Despite the global structural similarity among all seven isoforms of sirtuins (of which most of them catalyze the deacetylation reaction, SIRT5 is the only isoform that catalyzes the cleavage of negatively charged acylated substrates, and the latter feature appears to be encoded by the presence of Tyr102 and Arg105 residues at the active site pocket of the enzyme. To determine the contributions of the above residues in SIRT5 (vis a vis the corresponding residues of SIRT1 on substrate selectivity, inhibition by EX527 and nicotinamide, secondary structural features and thermal stability of the enzymes, we created single and double mutations (viz. Y102A, R105l, and Y102A/R105I in SIRT5. The kinetic data revealed that while Y102A mutant enzyme catalyzed both deacetylation and desuccinylation reactions with comparable efficiencies, R105I and Y102A/R105I mutant enzymes favored the deacetylase reaction. Like SIRT1, the nicotinamide inhibition of SIRT5 double mutant (Y102A/R105I exhibited the mixed non-competitive behavior. On the other hand, the desuccinylation reaction of both wild-type and Y102A mutant enzymes conformed to the competitive inhibition model. The inhibitory potency of EX527 progressively increased from Y102A, R105I, to Y102A/R105 mutant enzymes in SIRT5, but it did not reach to the level obtained with SIRT1. The CD spectroscopic data for the wild-type and mutant enzymes revealed changes in the secondary structural features of the enzymes, and such changes were more pronounced on examining their thermal denaturation patterns. A cumulative account of our experimental data reveal mutual cooperation between Y102 and R105 residues in promoting the desuccinylation versus deacetylation reaction in SIRT5, and the overall catalytic feature of

  6. Defining proximity relationships in the tertiary structure of the dopamine transporter. Identification of a conserved glutamic acid as a third coordinate in the endogenous Zn(2+)-binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løland, Claus Juul; Norregaard, L; Gether, U

    1999-01-01

    that Glu(396) is involved in Zn(2+) binding to hDAT. Importantly, Zn(2+) sensitivity was preserved following substitution of Glu(396) with histidine, indicating that the effect of mutating Glu(396) is not an indirect effect because of the removal of a negatively charged residue. The common participation...... of Glu(396), His(193), and His(375) in binding the small Zn(2+) ion implies their proximity in the unknown tertiary structure of hDAT. The close association between TM 7 and 8 was further established by engineering of a Zn(2+)-binding site between His(375) and a cysteine inserted in position 400 in TM 8...

  7. Photochemical tyrosine oxidation in the structurally well-defined α3Y protein: proton-coupled electron transfer and a long-lived tyrosine radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Starla D; Jorge, Christine; Liang, Li; Valentine, Kathleen G; Hammarström, Leif; Tommos, Cecilia

    2014-10-08

    Tyrosine oxidation-reduction involves proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and a reactive radical state. These properties are effectively controlled in enzymes that use tyrosine as a high-potential, one-electron redox cofactor. The α3Y model protein contains Y32, which can be reversibly oxidized and reduced in voltammetry measurements. Structural and kinetic properties of α3Y are presented. A solution NMR structural analysis reveals that Y32 is the most deeply buried residue in α3Y. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a soluble flash-quench generated [Ru(2,2'-bipyridine)3](3+) oxidant provides high-quality Y32-O• absorption spectra. The rate constant of Y32 oxidation (kPCET) is pH dependent: 1.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) (pH 5.5), 1.8 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) (pH 8.5), 5.4 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) (pD 5.5), and 4.0 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) (pD 8.5). k(H)/k(D) of Y32 oxidation is 2.5 ± 0.5 and 4.5 ± 0.9 at pH(D) 5.5 and 8.5, respectively. These pH and isotope characteristics suggest a concerted or stepwise, proton-first Y32 oxidation mechanism. The photochemical yield of Y32-O• is 28-58% versus the concentration of [Ru(2,2'-bipyridine)3](3+). Y32-O• decays slowly, t1/2 in the range of 2-10 s, at both pH 5.5 and 8.5, via radical-radical dimerization as shown by second-order kinetics and fluorescence data. The high stability of Y32-O• is discussed relative to the structural properties of the Y32 site. Finally, the static α3Y NMR structure cannot explain (i) how the phenolic proton released upon oxidation is removed or (ii) how two Y32-O• come together to form dityrosine. These observations suggest that the dynamic properties of the protein ensemble may play an essential role in controlling the PCET and radical decay characteristics of α3Y.

  8. Seismic reflection-based evidence of a transfer zone between the Wagner and Consag basins: implications for defining the structural geometry of the northern Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Escobar, Mario; Suárez-Vidal, Francisco; Hernández-Pérez, José Antonio; Martín-Barajas, Arturo

    2010-12-01

    This study examines the structural characteristics of the northern Gulf of California by processing and interpreting ca. 415 km of two-dimensional multi-channel seismic reflection lines (data property of Petróleos Mexicanos PEMEX) collected in the vicinity of the border between the Wagner and Consag basins. The two basins appear to be a link between the Delfín Superior Basin to the south, and the Cerro Prieto Basin to the north in the Mexicali-Imperial Valley along the Pacific-North America plate boundary. The seismic data are consistent with existing knowledge of four main structures (master faults) in the region, i.e., the Percebo, Santa María, Consag Sur, and Wagner Sur faults. The Wagner and Consag basins are delimited to the east by the Wagner Sur Fault, and to the west by the Consag Sur Fault. The Percebo Fault borders the western margin of the modern Wagner Basin depocenter, and is oriented N10°W, dipping (on average) ˜40° to the northeast. The trace of the Santa María Fault located in the Wagner Basin strikes N19°W, dipping ˜40° to the west. The Consag Sur Fault is oriented N14°W, and dips ˜42° to the east over a distance of 21 km. To the east of the study area, the Wagner Sur Fault almost parallels the Consag Sur Fault over a distance of ˜86 km, and is oriented N10°W with an average dip of 59° to the east. Moreover, the data provide new evidence that the Wagner Fault is discontinuous between the two basins, and that its structure is more complex than previously reported. A structural high separates the northern Consag Basin from the southern Wagner Basin, comprising several secondary faults oriented NE oblique to the main faults of N-S direction. These could represent a zone of accommodation, or transfer zone, where extension could be transferred from the Wagner to the Consag Basin, or vice versa. This area shows no acoustic basement and/or intrusive body, which is consistent with existing gravimetric and magnetic data for the region.

  9. Does the Neighborhood Area of Residence Influence Non-Attendance in an Urban Mammography Screening Program? A Multilevel Study in a Swedish City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerlund, Magdalena; Merlo, Juan; Vicente, Raquel Pérez; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim The public health impact of population-based mammography screening programs depends on high participation rates. Thus, monitoring participation rates, as well as understanding and considering the factors influencing attendance, is important. With the goal to acquire information on the appropriate level of intervention for increasing screening participation our study aimed to (1) examine whether, over and above individual factors, the neighborhood of residence influences a woman’s mammography non-attendance, and (2) evaluate, whether knowing a woman’s neighborhood of residence would be sufficient to predict non-attendance. Methods We analyze all women invited to mammography screening in 2005–09, residing in the city of Malmö, Sweden. Information regarding mammography screening attendance was linked to data on area of residence, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics available from Statistics Sweden. The influence of individual and neighborhood factors was assessed by multilevel logistic regression analysis with 29,901 women nested within 212 neighborhoods. Results The prevalence of non-attendance among women was 18.3%. After adjusting for individual characteristics, the prevalence in the 212 neighborhoods was 3.6%. Neighborhood of residence had little influence on non-attendance. The multilevel analysis indicates that 8.4% of the total individual differences in the propensity of non-attendance were at the neighborhood level. However, when adjusting for specific individual characteristics this general contextual effect decreased to 1.8%. This minor effect was explained by the sociodemographic characteristic of the neighborhoods. The discriminatory accuracy of classifying women according to their non-attendance was 0.747 when considering only individual level variables, and 0.760 after including neighborhood level as a random effect. Conclusion Our results suggest that neighborhoods of residence in Malmö, Sweden (as defined by small

  10. A systematic review of relations between neighborhoods and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Khoa D; Ma, Sai

    2006-09-01

    The relationship between neighborhood characteristics and resident mental health has been widely investigated in individual studies in recent years, but this literature is not adequately reviewed. To systematically review relevant individual research of the relation between neighborhoods and adult mental health by identifying and synthesizing all relevant studies in this literature. We conducted an electronic search with PubMed and PsycINFO, and manual reference-checking, resulting in 8,562 screened studies of which 29 were selected. Studies were included in the main synthesis if they (i) were published in English in peer reviewed journals; (ii) had relevant definitions and measures of neighborhood characteristics; (iii) utilized standardized measures of adult mental health; (iv) controlled for individual characteristics; (v) reported quantitative results; and, (vi) studied a population in a developed country. We focused on two key areas within this literature: the methodologies utilized to study neighborhood effects and quantitative results. With regard to the former, we examined five major issues: (i) definitions and measures of neighborhoods; (ii) definitions and measures of mental health; (iii) controls for individual level characteristics; (iv) conceptual models; and (v) analytical models. As for quantitative results, the relation was reviewed by types of neighborhood characteristics. We summarized general quantitative findings and drew common conclusions across groups of studies. 27/29 studies found statistically significant association between mental health and at least one measure of neighborhood characteristics, after adjusting for individual factors. This association was evident for all types of neighborhood features, varying from sociodemographic characteristics to physical environment, and from objective to subjective measures. Neighborhood effects were weakened when adding individual-level characteristics into the regression models, and were generally

  11. Halo Star Streams in the Solar Neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Kepley, Amanda A; Helmi, Amina; Kinman, T D; Van Duyne, Jeffrey; Martin, John C; Harding, Paul; Norris, John E; Freeman, Kenneth C

    2007-01-01

    We have assembled a sample of halo stars in the solar neighborhood to look for halo substructure in velocity and angular momentum space. Our sample includes red giants, RR Lyrae, and red horizontal branch stars within 2.5 kpc of the Sun with [Fe/H] less than -1.0. It was chosen to include stars with accurate distances, space velocities, and metallicities as well as well-quantified errors. We confirm the existence of the streams found by Helmi and coworkers, which we refer to as the H99 streams. These streams have a double-peaked velocity distribution in the z direction. We use the results of modeling of the H99 streams by Helmi and collaborators to test how one might use v_z velocity information and radial velocity information to detect kinematic substructure in the halo. We find that detecting the H99 streams with radial velocities alone would require a large sample. We use the velocity distribution of the H99 streams to estimate their age. From our model of the progenitor of the H99 streams, we determine th...

  12. Active Seattle: achieving walkability in diverse neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deehr, Rebecca C; Shumann, Amy

    2009-12-01

    The Active Living by Design project based in Seattle (Active Seattle) advocated for policies and projects in diverse communities supporting a more walkable city, while using social marketing and education to get more people walking more often. Walking audits were carried out in select diverse neighborhoods, resulting in recommendations for policy change and built-environment improvements. Advocacy for city-scale policies also occurred. Walking maps and other social-marketing products promoted behavior change. Major Safe Routes to School activities occurred and were made possible by separate funding sources. Positive results of Active Seattle included an increase in funding for pedestrian infrastructure, a pedestrian master plan, a Complete Streets policy, substantial increase in Safe Routes to School activity, and institutionalization of active living and active transportation within partner agencies. Challenges included institutional prioritization for improving pedestrian infrastructure, funding inequity, and a community need that was greater than could be fulfilled. Efforts to overcome funding inequities or other resistance to pedestrian-oriented physical projects will benefit from high-visibility campaigns that have a lasting impact on public perception and decision makers' political will. To reach vulnerable populations that have substantial barriers to increasing walking frequency, extensive staff time for outreach is needed. Changing the built environment to encourage walking may be a long-term solution in communities with diverse populations. Influencing and educating local government officials to make active living projects and policies a high budgetary priority is essential for large-scale impact and long-term change.

  13. Pleural mesothelioma and neighborhood asbestos exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischbein, A.; Rohl, A.N.

    1984-07-06

    Widespread use and occupational exposure to asbestos in US shipyards, particularly during World War II, is one reason for the currently high incidence of asbestos-related diseases, including lung cancer and mesothelioma. There is typically a long latency period between asbestos exposure and resulting disease. A case report is presented which lends additional credence to the earlier suggestion that exposure to asbestos in the neighborhood of the shipyard may be related to the development of malignant mesothelioma in this particular patient. The identification of amosite asbestos fibers in the lung tissue of the patient provides plausible evidence for this etiologic connection. Amosite asbestos is not found in the lungs of persons from the general population, and its occurrence, therefore, indicates either an occupational exposure or an exposure to a specific environmental source. Although only a very small portion of the total amount of asbestos used consists of amosite, this asbestos type is commonly used in shipbuilding and repair and was used a great deal in the shipyard adjacent to which our patient worked.

  14. Crystal Structure of a Fibroblast Growth Factor Homologous Factor (FHF) Defines a Conserved Surface on FHFs for Binding and Modulation of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, R.; Dover, K; Laezza, F; Shtraizent, N; Huang, X; Tchetchik, D; Eliseenkova, A; Goldfarb, M; Mohammadi, M; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) produce sodium currents that underlie the initiation and propagation of action potentials in nerve and muscle cells. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) bind to the intracellular C-terminal region of the Nav alpha subunit to modulate fast inactivation of the channel. In this study we solved the crystal structure of a 149-residue-long fragment of human FHF2A which unveils the structural features of the homology core domain of all 10 human FHF isoforms. Through analysis of crystal packing contacts and site-directed mutagenesis experiments we identified a conserved surface on the FHF core domain that mediates channel binding in vitro and in vivo. Mutations at this channel binding surface impaired the ability of FHFs to co-localize with Navs at the axon initial segment of hippocampal neurons. The mutations also disabled FHF modulation of voltage-dependent fast inactivation of sodium channels in neuronal cells. Based on our data, we propose that FHFs constitute auxiliary subunits for Navs.

  15. Structural Analysis and Deletion Mutagenesis Define Regions of QUIVER/SLEEPLESS that Are Responsible for Interactions with Shaker-Type Potassium Channels and Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meilin Wu

    Full Text Available Ly6 proteins are endogenous prototoxins found in most animals. They show striking structural and functional parallels to snake α-neurotoxins, including regulation of ion channels and cholinergic signaling. However, the structural contributions of Ly6 proteins to regulation of effector molecules is poorly understood. This question is particularly relevant to the Ly6 protein QUIVER/SLEEPLESS (QVR/SSS, which has previously been shown to suppress excitability and synaptic transmission by upregulating potassium (K channels and downregulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs in wake-promoting neurons to facilitate sleep in Drosophila. Using deletion mutagenesis, co-immunoprecipitations, ion flux assays, surface labeling and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that only loop 2 is required for many of the previously described properties of SSS in transfected cells, including interactions with K channels and nAChRs. Collectively our data suggest that QVR/SSS, and by extension perhaps other Ly6 proteins, target effector molecules using limited protein motifs. Mapping these motifs may be useful in rational design of drugs that mimic or suppress Ly6-effector interactions to modulate nervous system function.

  16. Generation of eye field/optic vesicle-like structures from human embryonic stem cells under two-dimensional and chemically defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvini, Maryam; Parivar, Kazem; Safari, Fatemeh; Tondar, Mahdi

    2015-03-01

    Despite the enormous progress in studying retinal cell differentiation from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), none of the reported protocols have produced a cost-effective eye field cells with the capability to further differentiate into retinal derivatives. In this study, by drawing chemicals on our four-step differentiation strategy, we demonstrated the ability of hESCs in assembling such qualifications to follow human retinogenesis in a serum- and feeder-free adherent condition. Two-dimensional (2D) populations of eye field cells arose within early forebrain progeny upon hESCs differentiation. Gene expression analysis showed that the treatment of hESCs with a combination of selected small molecules (SMs) gave rise to the higher expressions of eye field-specific genes, PAX6, RX, and SIX3. Thereafter, a subset of cells gained the transient features of advancing retinal differentiation, including optic vesicle (OV)-like structures, which expressed MITF and CHX10 in a manner imitated in vivo human retinal development. The competency of derived cells in differentiation to retinal derivatives was further investigated. The gene analysis of the cells showed more propensity for generating retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) than neural retina (NR). The generation of OV-like structures in 2D cultures can shed light on molecular events governing retinal specification. It can also facilitate the study of human retinal development.

  17. On Defining Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Though central to any pedagogical development of physics, the concept of mass is still not well understood. Properly defining mass has proven to be far more daunting than contemporary textbooks would have us believe. And yet today the origin of mass is one of the most aggressively pursued areas of research in all of physics. Much of the excitement…

  18. Defining Data Science

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yangyong; Xiong, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Data science is gaining more and more and widespread attention, but no consensus viewpoint on what data science is has emerged. As a new science, its objects of study and scientific issues should not be covered by established sciences. Data in cyberspace have formed what we call datanature. In the present paper, data science is defined as the science of exploring datanature.

  19. Defining Mathematical Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This theoretical paper outlines the process of defining "mathematical giftedness" for a present study on how primary school teaching shapes the mindsets of children who are mathematically gifted. Mathematical giftedness is not a badge of honour or some special value attributed to a child who has achieved something exceptional.…

  20. Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caba, Cosmin Marius

    resources are limited. Hence, to counteract this trend, current QoS mechanisms must become simpler to deploy and operate, in order to motivate NSPs to employ QoS techniques instead of overprovisioning. Software Defined Networking (SDN) represents a paradigm shift in the way telecommunication and data...

  1. Defining Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at the meaning of specific terminology commonly used in student surveys: "effective teaching." The research seeks to determine if there is a difference in how "effective teaching" is defined by those taking student surveys and those interpreting the results. To investigate this difference, a sample group of professors and students…

  2. Defining Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    This article defins game mechanics in relation to rules and challenges. Game mechanics are methods invoked by agents for interacting with the game world. I apply this definition to a comparative analysis of the games Rez, Every Extend Extra and Shadow of the Colossus that will show the relevance...... of a formal definition of game mechanics. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 2008...

  3. Software Defined Cyberinfrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Ian; Blaiszik, Ben; Chard, Kyle; Chard, Ryan

    2017-07-17

    Within and across thousands of science labs, researchers and students struggle to manage data produced in experiments, simulations, and analyses. Largely manual research data lifecycle management processes mean that much time is wasted, research results are often irreproducible, and data sharing and reuse remain rare. In response, we propose a new approach to data lifecycle management in which researchers are empowered to define the actions to be performed at individual storage systems when data are created or modified: actions such as analysis, transformation, copying, and publication. We term this approach software-defined cyberinfrastructure because users can implement powerful data management policies by deploying rules to local storage systems, much as software-defined networking allows users to configure networks by deploying rules to switches.We argue that this approach can enable a new class of responsive distributed storage infrastructure that will accelerate research innovation by allowing any researcher to associate data workflows with data sources, whether local or remote, for such purposes as data ingest, characterization, indexing, and sharing. We report on early experiments with this approach in the context of experimental science, in which a simple if-trigger-then-action (IFTA) notation is used to define rules.

  4. Defining in Classroom Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Maria Alessandra; Fischbein, Efraim

    1997-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the defining process in geometrical context in the reference frame of the theory of "figural concepts." Presents analysis of some examples taken from a teaching experiment at the sixth-grade level. Contains 30 references. (Author/ASK)

  5. Defining Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    This article defins game mechanics in relation to rules and challenges. Game mechanics are methods invoked by agents for interacting with the game world. I apply this definition to a comparative analysis of the games Rez, Every Extend Extra and Shadow of the Colossus that will show the relevance...... of a formal definition of game mechanics. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 2008...

  6. Neighborhood restaurant availability and frequency of eating out in relation to dietary intake in young Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kentaro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Uenishi, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to food service establishments is considered to encourage consumption and contribute to poorer diet quality, and hence adverse health profiles. However, empirical verification of these links remains rare, particularly in young adults and non-Western populations. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis that neighborhood restaurant availability and frequency of eating out are associated with unfavorable patterns of dietary intake and thus possibly higher body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in young Japanese women. The subjects were 989 female Japanese dietetic students 18 to 22 y of age. Dietary intake and frequency of eating out (i.e., consumption of commercially prepared meals) during the preceding month were assessed using a comprehensive, self-administered diet history questionnaire. Neighborhood restaurant availability was defined as the number of restaurants within a 0.5-mile (0.8-km) radius of residence (i.e., full-service restaurants, limited-service restaurants, and cafeterias). Increasing frequency of eating out was associated with higher intake of meat, confectionery and bread, and dietary fat, lower intake of fruit and vegetables, rice, and dietary fiber, and higher dietary energy density. However, neighborhood restaurant availability was not associated with either the frequency of eating out or any of the dietary variables examined. Further, frequency of eating out and neighborhood restaurant availability were not associated with BMI or waist circumference. In conclusion, although frequency of eating out was positively associated with unfavorable dietary intake patterns in a group of young Japanese women, neighborhood restaurant availability was not associated with frequency of eating out or dietary intake.

  7. Quantitative evaluation of evaporation rate during spin-coating of polymer blend films: Control of film structure through defined-atmosphere solvent-casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokarian-Tabari, P; Geoghegan, M; Howse, J R; Heriot, S Y; Thompson, R L; Jones, R A L

    2010-12-01

    Thin films of polymer mixtures made by spin-coating can phase separate in two ways: by forming lateral domains, or by separating into distinct layers. The latter situation (self-stratification or vertical phase separation) could be advantageous in a number of practical applications, such as polymer optoelectronics. We demonstrate that, by controlling the evaporation rate during the spin-coating process, we can obtain either self-stratification or lateral phase separation in the same system, and we relate this to a previously hypothesised mechanism for phase separation during spin-coating in thin films, according to which a transient wetting layer breaks up due to a Marangoni-type instability driven by a concentration gradient of solvent within the drying film. Our results show that rapid evaporation leads to a laterally phase-separated structure, while reducing the evaporation rate suppresses the interfacial instability and leads to a self-stratified final film.

  8. Strategies of Building a Stronger Sense of Community for Sustainable Neighborhoods: Comparing Neighborhood Accessibility with Community Empowerment Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-I Albert Tsai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available New Urbanist development in the U.S. aims at enhancing a sense of community and seeks to return to the design of early transitional neighborhoods which have pedestrian-oriented environments with retail shops and services within walking distances of housing. Meanwhile, 6000 of Taiwan’s community associations have been running community empowerment programs supported by the Council for Cultural Affairs that have helped many neighborhoods to rebuild so-called community cohesion. This research attempts to evaluate whether neighborhoods with facilities near housing and shorter travel distances within a neighborhood would promote stronger social interactions and form a better community attachment than neighborhoods that have various opportunities for residents to participate in either formal or informal social gatherings. After interviewing and surveying residents from 19 neighborhoods in Taipei’s Beitou District, and correlating the psychological sense of community with inner neighborhood’s daily travel distances and numbers of participatory activities held by community organizations under empowerment programs together with frequencies of regular individual visits and casual meetings, statistical evidence yielded that placing public facilities near residential locations is more effective than providing various programs for elevating a sense of community.

  9. Negative life events vary by neighborhood and mediate the relation between neighborhood context and psychological well-being.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine King

    Full Text Available Researchers have speculated that negative life events are more common in troubled neighborhoods, amplifying adverse effects on health. Using a clustered representative sample of Chicago residents (2001-03; n = 3,105 from the Chicago Community Adult Health Survey, we provide the first documentation that negative life events are highly geographically clustered compared to health outcomes. Associations between neighborhood context and negative life events were also found to vary by event type. We then demonstrate the power of a contextualized approach by testing path models in which life events mediate the relation between neighborhood characteristics and health outcomes, including self-rated health, anxiety, and depression. The indirect paths between neighborhood conditions and health through negative life event exposure are highly significant and large compared to the direct paths from neighborhood conditions to health. Our results indicate that neighborhood conditions can have acute as well as chronic effects on health, and that negative life events are a powerful mechanism by which context may influence health.

  10. Breastfeeding and Exposure to Past, Current, and Neighborhood Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Margaret L; Thevenent-Morrison, Kelly; Mittal, Mona; Nelson, Alice; Dozier, Ann M

    2017-08-01

    Objectives Breastfeeding has short- and long-term health benefits for children and mothers, but US breastfeeding rates are suboptimal. Exposure to violence may contribute to these low rates, which vary by race/ethnicity. We studied: (1) whether patterns of violence exposure differ by race/ethnicity and (2) whether these patterns are associated with breastfeeding outcomes. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data drawn from self-report surveys completed by a convenience sample of low-income postpartum women (n = 760) in upstate New York. Latent class analysis was used to identify groups of women with similar responses to seven violence measures, including childhood physical and/or sexual violence, experience of partner violence during or just after pregnancy (physical, emotional, verbal), and neighborhood violence (perceived or by ZIP code). Logistic regression and survival analysis were utilized to determine if classes were associated with breastfeeding initiation, duration, and exclusivity, controlling for demographics. Results Exposure to at least one form of violence was high in this sample (87%). We identified 4 classes defined by violence exposure (combining current and historical exposures). Violence exposure patterns differed between racial/ethnic groups, but patterns were inconsistently associated with breastfeeding plans or outcomes. For White women, history of violence exposure increased the likelihood of earlier breastfeeding cessation. By contrast, among Black women, history of violence exposure increased the likelihood of having a breastfeeding plan and initiating breastfeeding. Conclusions for Practice Some differences between violence exposure classes are likely due to the correlation between race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status in the community studied. Additional studies are warranted to better understand how exposure to violence is related to breastfeeding and how best to support women making decisions about intention, initiation

  11. A Systematic Review of Neighborhood Disparities in Point-of-Sale Tobacco Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph G L; Henriksen, Lisa; Rose, Shyanika W; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Ribisl, Kurt M

    2015-09-01

    We systematically reviewed evidence of disparities in tobacco marketing at tobacco retailers by sociodemographic neighborhood characteristics. We identified 43 relevant articles from 893 results of a systematic search in 10 databases updated May 28, 2014. We found 148 associations of marketing (price, placement, promotion, or product availability) with a neighborhood demographic of interest (socioeconomic disadvantage, race, ethnicity, and urbanicity). Neighborhoods with lower income have more tobacco marketing. There is more menthol marketing targeting urban neighborhoods and neighborhoods with more Black residents. Smokeless tobacco products are targeted more toward rural neighborhoods and neighborhoods with more White residents. Differences in store type partially explain these disparities. There are more inducements to start and continue smoking in lower-income neighborhoods and in neighborhoods with more Black residents. Retailer marketing may contribute to disparities in tobacco use. Clinicians should be aware of the pervasiveness of these environmental cues.

  12. Defining the fascial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adstrum, Sue; Hedley, Gil; Schleip, Robert; Stecco, Carla; Yucesoy, Can A

    2017-01-01

    Fascia is a widely used yet indistinctly defined anatomical term that is concurrently applied to the description of soft collagenous connective tissue, distinct sections of membranous tissue, and a body pervading soft connective tissue system. Inconsistent use of this term is causing concern due to its potential to confuse technical communication about fascia in global, multiple discipline- and multiple profession-spanning discourse environments. The Fascia Research Society acted to address this issue by establishing a Fascia Nomenclature Committee (FNC) whose purpose was to clarify the terminology relating to fascia. This committee has since developed and defined the terms a fascia, and, more recently, the fascial system. This article reports on the FNC's proposed definition of the fascial system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...... to “harmful”)”. Furthermore, a distinction between six types of legal moralism is made. The six types are grouped according to whether they are concerned with the enforcement of positive or critical morality, and whether they are concerned with criminalising, legally restricting, or refraining from legally...... protecting morally wrong behaviour. This is interesting because not all types of legal moralism are equally vulnerable to the different critiques of legal moralism that have been put forth. Indeed, I show that some interesting types of legal moralism have not been criticised at all....

  14. Define Digital Vernacular

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳; 李海英; James Stevens; Rough Nelson

    2014-01-01

    As science and technology developed, the tools of humans developed from humans’hands, to mechanical and digital technologies. The tools influ-ence almost everything in the humans’world, so does vernacular. The digital vernacular could be understood as using digital technology to vernacular; the digital means technologies. It also could be understood as doing vernacular in a digital way;the digital means data and information, in other words it can be seeking truth from facts. Define digital vernacular is not only what is digital vernacular, but also about how to do the digital vernacular and what kind of attitude we should hold to-ward the digital vernacular. Define digital vernacular as both thinking and doing.

  15. Defining local food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Safania Normann

    2013-01-01

    Despite evolving local food research, there is no consistent definition of “local food.” Various understandings are utilized, which have resulted in a diverse landscape of meaning. The main purpose of this paper is to examine how researchers within the local food systems literature define local...... food, and how these definitions can be used as a starting point to identify a new taxonomy of local food based on three domains of proximity....

  16. [To define internet addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonioni, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Internet addiction is a new behavioral disorder difficult to define, especially when referring to young teenagers who make great use of web-mediated relationships. It's necessary to separate the cases of overt dependency on those in which the abuse of internet seems to have a different value, offering the only way to achieve the possible relationship. Internet is mediating a new way of communicating and thinking, this may favor the onset of clinical phenomena intended to surprise.

  17. Race, Neighborhood Economic Status, Income Inequality and Mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolle A Mode

    Full Text Available Mortality rates in the United States vary based on race, individual economic status and neighborhood. Correlations among these variables in most urban areas have limited what conclusions can be drawn from existing research. Our study employs a unique factorial design of race, sex, age and individual poverty status, measuring time to death as an objective measure of health, and including both neighborhood economic status and income inequality for a sample of middle-aged urban-dwelling adults (N = 3675. At enrollment, African American and White participants lived in 46 unique census tracts in Baltimore, Maryland, which varied in neighborhood economic status and degree of income inequality. A Cox regression model for 9-year mortality identified a three-way interaction among sex, race and individual poverty status (p = 0.03, with African American men living below poverty having the highest mortality. Neighborhood economic status, whether measured by a composite index or simply median household income, was negatively associated with overall mortality (p<0.001. Neighborhood income inequality was associated with mortality through an interaction with individual poverty status (p = 0.04. While racial and economic disparities in mortality are well known, this study suggests that several social conditions associated with health may unequally affect African American men in poverty in the United States. Beyond these individual factors are the influences of neighborhood economic status and income inequality, which may be affected by a history of residential segregation. The significant association of neighborhood economic status and income inequality with mortality beyond the synergistic combination of sex, race and individual poverty status suggests the long-term importance of small area influence on overall mortality.

  18. Neighborhood walkability scale (news - brazilian version: validity and reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia de Matos Malavasi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The lack of adherence to practice physical activities urges several researchers to ind answers for this matter. Among these researches, it is investigated how or what motivates people to perform any type of physical activity. Besides that, the environmental conditions are an important reason to establish a healthier lifestyle among individuals. In Brazil, the amount of validated scales about environmental barriers for physical activity in communities is restricted. The validation and the cultural adaptation of these instruments are important not only to compare with studies from other countries, but mainly for planning public politics to improve the adherence to practice physical activities. Thus, the present research aimed to analyze the validity and reliability of the Brazilian version of the Neighborhood EnvironmentWalkability Scale (NEWS. The methodological procedures were structured in three stages. The first stage had the following procedures: translation of NEWS and back-translation by bilingual specialists. The second stage was the adaptation of NEWS to the Brazilian reality through a pilot study and with reliability. The third stage, together with a professional urban panel indicating which neighborhoods had better or worse mobility, it was accomplished a application of the NEWS questionnaire to assure construct validation. The sample of this research were separated in two parts, 75persons for the reliability; and for the validity of the questionnaire 200 residents from the four neighborhoods pointed by the specialists of the city of Florianópolis (SC. Through the NEWS the subjects answered questions about the neighborhoods regarding: type of residences, stores and trade proximity, perception of access to these places, streets characteristics, facilities to walk and ride bicycle, and safety related to traffic and crimes. The statistical analysis was made in the SPSS 11.0 version for the intra-class correlation and reliability for the

  19. Inversion of Gravity Data to Define the Pre-Cenozoic Surface and Regional Structures Possibly Influencing Groundwater Flow in the Rainier Mesa Region, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Phelps, Geoffrey A.; Mankinen, Edward A.

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional inversion of gravity data from the Rainier Mesa area and surrounding regions reveals a topographically complex pre-Cenozoic basement surface. This model of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks is intended for use in a 3D hydrogeologic model being constructed for the Rainier Mesa area. Prior to this study, our knowledge of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks was based on a regional model, applicable to general studies of the greater Nevada Test Site area but inappropriate for higher resolution modeling of ground-water flow across the Rainier Mesa area. The new model incorporates several changes that lead to significant improvements over the previous regional view. First, the addition of constraining wells, encountering old volcanic rocks lying above but near pre-Cenozoic basement, prevents modeled basement from being too shallow. Second, an extensive literature and well data search has led to an increased understanding of the change of rock density with depth in the vicinity of Rainier Mesa. The third, and most important change, relates to the application of several depth-density relationships in the study area instead of a single generalized relationship, thereby improving the overall model fit. In general, the pre-Cenozoic basement surface deepens in the western part of the study area, delineating collapses within the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, and shallows in the east in the Eleana Range and Yucca Flat regions, where basement crops out. In the Rainier Mesa study area, basement is generally shallow (model identifies previously unrecognized structures within the pre-Cenozoic basement that may influence ground-water flow, such as a shallow basement ridge related to an inferred fault extending northward from Rainier Mesa into Kawich Valley.

  20. Inversion of Gravity Data to Define the Pre-Cenozoic Surface and Regional Structures Possibly Influencing Groundwater Flow in the Rainier Mesa Region, Nye County, Nevada.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas G. Hildenbrand; Geoffrey A. Phelps; Edward A. Mankinen

    2006-09-21

    A three-dimensional inversion of gravity data from the Rainier Mesa area and surrounding regions reveals a topographically complex pre-Cenozoic basement surface. This model of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks is intended for use in a 3D hydrogeologic model being constructed for the Rainier Mesa area. Prior to this study, our knowledge of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks was based on a regional model, applicable to general studies of the greater Nevada Test Site area but inappropriate for higher resolution modeling of ground-water flow across the Rainier Mesa area. The new model incorporates several changes that lead to significant improvements over the previous regional view. First, the addition of constraining wells, encountering old volcanic rocks lying above but near pre-Cenozoic basement, prevents modeled basement from being too shallow. Second, an extensive literature and well data search has led to an increased understanding of the change of rock density with depth in the vicinity of Rainier Mesa. The third, and most important change, relates to the application of several depth-density relationships in the study area instead of a single generalized relationship, thereby improving the overall model fit. In general, the pre-Cenozoic basement surface deepens in the western part of the study area, delineating collapses within the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, and shallows in the east in the Eleana Range and Yucca Flat regions, where basement crops out. In the Rainier Mesa study area, basement is generally shallow (< 1 km). The new model identifies previously unrecognized structures within the pre-Cenozoic basement that may influence ground-water flow, such as a shallow basement ridge related to an inferred fault extending northward from Rainier Mesa into Kawich Valley.