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  1. Zinc or copper deficiency-induced impaired inflammatory response to brain trauma may be caused by the concomitant metallothionein changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Giralt, M.; Thomsen, Pernille Sjølin

    2001-01-01

    , and this response was significantly blunted by zinc deficiency. The MT-III isoform was moderately increased by both TBI and zinc deficiency. TBI strongly increased oxidative stress levels, as demonstrated by malondialdehyde (MDA), protein tyrosine nitration (NITT), and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) levels irs......, all of which were potentiated by zinc deficiency. Further analysis revealed unbalanced expression of prooxidant and antioxidant proteins besides MT, since the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and Cu,Zn-SOD were increased and decreased, respectively, by zinc deficiency. All......The role of zinc- and copper-deficient diets on the inflammatory response to traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been evaluated in adult rats. As expected, zinc deficiency decreased food intake and body weight gain, and the latter effect was higher than that observed in pair-fed rats. In noninjured...

  2. Baroreflex deficiency induces additional impairment of vagal tone, diastolic function and calcium handling proteins after myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostarda, Cristiano; Rodrigues, Bruno; Medeiros, Alessandra; Moreira, Edson D; Moraes-Silva, Ivana C; Brum, Patricia C; Angelis, Katia De; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    Baroreflex dysfunction has been considered an important mortality predictor after myocardial infarction (MI). However, the impact of baroreflex deficiency prior to MI on tonic autonomic control and cardiac function, and on the profile of proteins associated with intracellular calcium handling has not yet been studied. The aim of the present study was to analyze how the impairment of baroreflex induced by sinoaortic denervation (SAD) prior to MI in rats affects the tonic autonomic control, ventricular function and cardiomyocyte calcium handling proteins. After 15 days of following or SAD surgery, rats underwent MI. Echocardiographic, hemodynamic, autonomic and molecular evaluations were performed 90 days after MI. Baroreflex impairment led to additional damage on: left ventricular remodeling, diastolic function, vagal tonus and intrinsic heart rate after MI. The loss of vagal component of the arterial baroreflex and vagal tonus were correlated with changes in the cardiac proteins involved in intracellular calcium homeostasis. Furthermore, additional increase in sodium calcium exchanger expression levels was associated with impaired diastolic function in experimental animals. Our findings strongly suggest that previous arterial baroreflex deficiency may induce additional impairment of vagal tonus, which was associated with calcium handling proteins abnormalities, probably triggering ventricular diastolic dysfunction after MI in rats. PMID:24936224

  3. Impairment of Neutrophil Migration to Remote Inflammatory Site during Lung Histoplasmosis

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    Alexandra I. Medeiros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc induces a pulmonary disease in which leukotrienes promote activation and recruitment of effectors cells. It is also well-recognized that leukotriene B4 (LTB4 and platelet-activating factor (PAF induce leukocyte recruitment to inflammatory sites. We investigated the impact of pulmonary Hc infection on PMN migration to a remote inflammatory site. Our results show that pulmonary Hc infection impairs LTB4- or PAF-stimulated PMN recruitment to air pouch. Yet, remote inflammation did not modify PMN numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF of Hc-infected mice. Interestingly, the concomitant administration of PAF and LTB4 receptor antagonists inhibited PMN recruitment to both BALF and the remote site, demonstrating cooperation between both mediators. Along that line, our results show that PAF-elicited PMN chemotaxis was abrogated in 5-lipoxygenase-deficient animals. These results suggest caution in the indiscriminate use of anti-inflammatory drugs during infectious diseases.

  4. A novel potassium deficiency-induced stimulon in Anabaena torulosa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    torulosa and of nine proteins in Escherichia coli. These were termed potassium deficiency-induced proteins or. PDPs and constitute hitherto unknown potassium deficiency–induced stimulons. Potassium deficiency also enhanced the synthesis of certain osmotic stress-induced proteins. Addition of K+ repressed the ...

  5. Cepharanthine Prevents Estrogen Deficiency-Induced Bone Loss by Inhibiting Bone Resorption

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    Chen-he Zhou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a common health problem worldwide caused by an imbalance of bone formation vs. bone resorption. However, current therapeutic approaches aimed at enhancing bone formation or suppressing bone resorption still have some limitations. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that cepharanthine (CEP, derived from Stephania cepharantha Hayata exerted a protective effect on estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss. This protective effect was confirmed to be achieved through inhibition of bone resorption in vivo, rather than through enhancement of bone formation in vivo. Furthermore, the in vitro study revealed that CEP attenuated receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL-induced osteoclast formation, and suppressed bone resorption by impairing the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-AKT signaling pathways. The inhibitory effect of CEP could be partly reversed by treatment with anisomycin (a JNK and p38 agonist and/or SC79 (an AKT agonist in vitro. Our results thus indicated that CEP could prevent estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss by inhibiting osteoclastogenesis. Hence, CEP might be a novel therapeutic agent for anti-osteoporosis therapy.

  6. The association of fatigue, pain, depression and anxiety with work and activity impairment in immune mediated inflammatory diseases.

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    Murray W Enns

    Full Text Available Impairment in work function is a frequent outcome in patients with chronic conditions such as immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID, depression and anxiety disorders. The personal and economic costs of work impairment in these disorders are immense. Symptoms of pain, fatigue, depression and anxiety are potentially remediable forms of distress that may contribute to work impairment in chronic health conditions such as IMID. The present study evaluated the association between pain [Medical Outcomes Study Pain Effects Scale], fatigue [Daily Fatigue Impact Scale], depression and anxiety [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale] and work impairment [Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Scale] in four patient populations: multiple sclerosis (n = 255, inflammatory bowel disease (n = 248, rheumatoid arthritis (n = 154 and a depression and anxiety group (n = 307, using quantile regression, controlling for the effects of sociodemographic factors, physical disability, and cognitive deficits. Each of pain, depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and fatigue individually showed significant associations with work absenteeism, presenteeism, and general activity impairment (quantile regression standardized estimates ranging from 0.3 to 1.0. When the distress variables were entered concurrently into the regression models, fatigue was a significant predictor of work and activity impairment in all models (quantile regression standardized estimates ranging from 0.2 to 0.5. These findings have important clinical implications for understanding the determinants of work impairment and for improving work-related outcomes in chronic disease.

  7. Effects of betaine supplementation and choline deficiency on folate deficiency-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Liu, Yi-qun; Morita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2012-01-01

    The effect of betaine status on folate deficiency-induced hyperhomocysteinemia was investigated to determine whether folate deficiency impairs homocysteine removal not only by the methionine synthase (MS) pathway but also by the betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) pathway. For this purpose, we investigated the effect of dietary supplementation with betaine at a high level (1%) in rats fed a folate-deprived 10% casein diet (10C) and 20% casein diet (20C). We also investigated the effect of choline deprivation on folate deficiency-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats fed 20C. Supplementation of folate-deprived 10C and 20C with 1% betaine significantly suppressed folate deprivation-induced hyperhomocysteinemia, but the extent of suppression was partial or limited, especially in rats fed 10C, the suppression of plasma homocysteine increment being 48.5% in rats fed 10C and 69.7% in rats fed 20C. Although betaine supplementation greatly increased hepatic betaine concentration and BHMT activity, these increases did not fully explain why the effect of betaine supplementation was partial or limited. Folate deprivation markedly increased the hepatic concentration of N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG), a known inhibitor of BHMT, and there was a significant positive correlation between hepatic DMG concentration and plasma homocysteine concentration, suggesting that folate deficiency increases hepatic DMG concentration and thereby depresses BHMT reaction, leading to interference with the effect of betaine supplementation. Choline deprivation did not increase plasma homocysteine concentration in rats fed 20C, but it markedly enhanced plasma homocysteine concentration when rats were fed folate-deprived 20C. This indicates that choline deprivation reinforced folate deprivation-induced hyperhomocysteinemia. Increased hepatic DMG concentration was also associated with such an effect. These results support the concept that folate deficiency impairs homocysteine metabolism not only

  8. The effects of implant topography on osseointegration under estrogen deficiency induced osteoporotic conditions: Histomorphometric, transcriptional and ultrastructural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhibin; Xiao, Yin; Hashimi, Saeed; Hamlet, Stephen M; Ivanovski, Saso

    2016-09-15

    Compromised bone quality and/or healing in osteoporosis are recognised risk factors for impaired dental implant osseointegration. This study examined the effects of (1) experimentally induced osteoporosis on titanium implant osseointegration and (2) the effect of modified implant surface topography on osseointegration under osteoporosis-like conditions. Machined and micro-roughened surface implants were placed into the maxillary first molar root socket of 64 ovariectomised and sham-operated Sprague-Dawley rats. Subsequent histological and SEM observations showed tissue maturation on the micro-rough surfaced implants in ovariectomised animals as early as 3days post-implantation. The degree of osseointegration was also significantly higher around the micro-rough implants in ovariectomised animals after 14days of healing although by day 28, similar levels of osseointegration were found for all test groups. The micro-rough implants significantly increased the early (day 3) gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and dentin matrix protein 1 in implant adherent cells. By day 7, the expression of inflammatory genes decreased while the expression of the osteogenic markers increased further although there were few statistically significant differences between the micro-rough and machined surfaces. Osteocyte morphology was also affected by estrogen deficiency with the size of the cells being reduced in trabecular bone. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency induced osteoporotic conditions negatively influenced the early osseointegration of machined implants while micro-rough implants compensated for these deleterious effects by enhancing osteogenic cell differentiation on the implant surface. Lower bone density, poor bone quality and osseous microstructural changes are all features characteristic of osteoporosis that may impair the osseointegration of dental implants. Using a clinically relevant trabecular bone

  9. Fructose downregulates miR-330 to induce renal inflammatory response and insulin signaling impairment: Attenuation by morin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ting-Ting; Song, Lin; Chen, Tian-Yu; Wang, Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Juan; Ding, Xiao-Qin; Yang, Yan-Zi; Pan, Ying; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2017-08-01

    Fructose induces insulin resistance with kidney inflammation and injury. MicroRNAs are emerged as key regulators of insulin signaling. Morin has insulin-mimetic effect with the improvement of insulin resistance and kidney injury. This study investigated the protective mechanisms of morin against fructose-induced kidney injury, with particular focus on miR-330 expression change, inflammatory response, and insulin signaling impairment. miR-330, sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1)/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor (S1PR)1/3 signaling, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)/NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, and insulin signaling were detected in kidney cortex of fructose-fed rats and fructose-exposed HK-2 cells, respectively. Whether miR-330 mediated inflammatory response to affect insulin signaling was examined using SphK1 inhibitor, S1PR1/3 short interfering RNA, or miR-330 mimic/inhibitor, respectively. Fructose was found to downregulate miR-330 expression to increase SphK1/S1P/S1PR1/3 signaling, and then activate NF-κB/NLRP3 inflammasome to produce IL-1β, causing insulin signaling impairment. Moreover, morin upregulated miR-330 and partly attenuated inflammatory response and insulin signaling impairment to alleviate kidney injury. These findings suggest that morin protects against fructose-induced kidney insulin signaling impairment by upregulating miR-330 to reduce inflammatory response. Morin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of kidney injury associated with fructose-induced inflammation and insulin signaling impairment. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. dNTP deficiency induced by HU via inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase affects neural tube development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Zhen; Wang, Xiuwei; Dong, Yanting; Xu, Lin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Murine NTDs were successfully induced by means of hydroxyurea (HU). • The impairment of dNTP was induced via inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase. • dNTP deficiency induced by HU caused defective DNA synthesis and repair. • Abnormal apoptosis and proliferation induced by HU affected neural tube development. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental toxic chemicals in utero during the neural tube development period can cause developmental disorders. To evaluate the disruption of neural tube development programming, the murine neural tube defects (NTDs) model was induced by interrupting folate metabolism using methotrexate in our previous study. The present study aimed to examine the effects of dNTP deficiency induced by hydroxyurea (HU), a specific ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor, during murine neural tube development. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally injected with various doses of HU on gestation day (GD) 7.5, and the embryos were checked on GD 11.5. RNR activity and deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) levels were measured in the optimal dose. Additionally, DNA damage was examined by comet analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Cellular behaviors in NTDs embryos were evaluated with phosphorylation of histone H3 (PH-3) and caspase-3 using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The results showed that NTDs were observed mostly with HU treatment at an optimal dose of 225 mg/kg b/w. RNR activity was inhibited and dNTP levels were decreased in HU-treated embryos with NTDs. Additionally, increased DNA damage, decreased proliferation, and increased caspase-3 were significant in NTDs embryos compared to the controls. Results indicated that HU induced murine NTDs model by disturbing dNTP metabolism and further led to the abnormal cell balance between proliferation and apoptosis

  11. Partial IGF-1 deficiency induces brain oxidative damage and edema, which are ameliorated by replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puche, Juan E; Muñoz, Úrsula; García-Magariño, Mariano; Sádaba, María C; Castilla-Cortázar, Inma

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) induces multiple cytoprotective effects on every tissue, including the brain. Since the mechanisms by which IGF-1 produces neuroprotection are not fully understood, the aim of this work was to delve into the underlying mechanisms. IGF-1 deficient mice (Hz) were compared with wild type (WT) and Hz mice treated with low doses of IGF-1 (2 µg/100 g body weight/day) for 10 days (Hz + IGF). Gene expression, quantitative PCR, histology, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed in the three groups. IGF-1 deficiency induced increased oxidative damage determined by markers of lipid peroxidation and hypoxia, as well as gene expression of heat shock proteins, antioxidant enzymes, and molecules involved in inflammation, apoptosis, and mitochondrial protection. These changes correlated with edema and learning impairment in Hz mice. IGF-1 therapy improved all these alterations. In conclusion, IGF-1 deficiency is responsible for increased brain oxidative damage, edema, and impaired learning and memory capabilities which are rescued by IGF-1 replacement therapy. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  12. Role of inflammatory markers in Elderly Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Salwa S; Bahaaeldin, Ahmed M; Khater, Mohamed S; Bekhet, Meram M; Hebah, Hayam A; Hasanin, Ghada A

    2018-04-22

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment. The etiology of cognitive impairment in people with T2DM is uncertain but, chronic hyperglycemia, cerebral micro vascular disease, severe hypoglycemia, and increased prevalence of macro vascular disease are implicated. to determine the serum levels of soluble vascular adhesion molecule (sVCAM-1) and highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in elderly type 2 diabetics with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Our study was conducted on 90 elderly subjects (aged 60 years old or more). They were divided into Group І, 30 patients with T2DM and mild cognitive impairment, group ІІ, 30 patients with T2DM without cognitive impairment and group III, 30 healthy subjects as a control group. They were subjected to history taking, full clinical examination, anthropometric measurement, the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination III (ACE---III 2012), Fasting plasma glucose, 2 hours plasma glucose, HbA1c, lipid profile, protein/creatinine ratio, serum sVCAM-1 and hs-CRP. Serum levels of sVCAM-1 in diabetic elderly patients with MCI were significantly higher (946.7 ± 162.01 ng/ml) than diabetic elderly patients without cognitive impairment (479.06 ± 65.27 ng/ml) and control (263.7 ± 72.05 ng/ml) with (P=0.002). Serum levels of Hs-CRP in diabetic elderly patients with MCI were significantly higher than as diabetic elderly patients without cognitive impairment and control with (P=0.005). Elderly diabetic patients with mild cognitive impairment, have higher levels of soluble adhesion molecules and markers of low-grade systemic inflammation than other groups. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Renal impairment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: association with aminosalicylate therapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elseviers, M. M.; D'Haens, G.; Lerebours, E.; Plane, C.; Stolear, J. C.; Riegler, G.; Capasso, G.; van Outryve, M.; Mishevska-Mukaetova, P.; Djuranovic, S.; Pelckmans, P.; de Broe, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, several case reports have been published suggesting an association between the use of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the development of chronic tubulo-interstitial nephritis. Apart from lesions associated to 5-ASA treatment,

  14. Nitric oxide from inflammatory origin impairs neural stem cell proliferation by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

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    Bruno Pereira Carreira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation is characterized by activation of microglial cells, followed by production of nitric oxide (NO, which may have different outcomes on neurogenesis, favoring or inhibiting this process. In the present study, we investigated how the inflammatory mediator NO can affect proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC, and explored possible mechanisms underlying this effect. We investigated which mechanisms are involved in the regulation of NSC proliferation following treatment with an inflammatory stimulus (LPS plus IFN-γ, using a culture system of subventricular zone (SVZ-derived NSC mixed with microglia cells obtained from wild-type mice (iNOS+/+ or from iNOS knockout mice (iNOS-/-. We found an impairment of NSC cell proliferation in iNOS+/+ mixed cultures, which was not observed in iNOS-/- mixed cultures. Furthermore, the increased release of NO by activated iNOS+/+ microglial cells decreased the activation of the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway, which was concomitant with an enhanced nitration of the EGF receptor. Preventing nitrogen reactive species formation with MnTBAP, a scavenger of peroxynitrite, or using the peroxynitrite degradation catalyst FeTMPyP, cell proliferation and ERK signaling were restored to basal levels in iNOS+/+ mixed cultures. Moreover, exposure to the NO donor NOC-18 (100 µM, for 48 h, inhibited SVZ-derived NSC proliferation. Regarding the antiproliferative effect of NO, we found that NOC-18 caused the impairment of signaling through the ERK/MAPK pathway, which may be related to increased nitration of the EGF receptor in NSC. Using MnTBAP nitration was prevented, maintaining ERK signaling, rescuing NSC proliferation. We show that NO from inflammatory origin leads to a decreased function of the EGF receptor, which compromised proliferation of NSC. We also demonstrated that NO-mediated nitration of the EGF receptor caused a decrease in its phosphorylation, thus preventing regular proliferation signaling through the

  15. Ketogenic Diet Impairs FGF21 Signaling and Promotes Differential Inflammatory Responses in the Liver and White Adipose Tissue.

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    Mohamed Asrih

    Full Text Available Beside its beneficial effects on weight loss, ketogenic diet (KD causes dyslipidemia, a pro-inflammatory state involved in the development of hepatic steatosis, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, although the latter is still being debated. Additionally, KD is known to increase fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 plasma levels. However, FGF21 cannot initiate its beneficial actions on metabolism in these conditions. We therefore hypothesized and tested in the present study that KD may impair FGF21 signaling.Using indirect calorimetry, we found that KD-fed mice exhibited higher energy expenditure than regular chow (RC-fed mice associated with increased Ucp1 levels in white adipose tissue (WAT, along with increased plasma FGF21 levels. We then assessed the effect of KD on FGF21 signaling in both the liver and WAT. We found that Fgfr4 and Klb (β-klotho were downregulated in the liver, while Fgfr1 was downregulated in WAT of KD-fed mice. Because inflammation could be one of the mechanisms linking KD to impaired FGF21 signaling, we measured the expression levels of inflammatory markers and macrophage accumulation in WAT and liver and found an increased inflammation and macrophage accumulation in the liver, but surprisingly, a reduction of inflammation in WAT.We also showed that KD enhances lipid accumulation in the liver, which may explain hepatic inflammation and impaired Fgfr4 and Klb expression. In contrast, import of lipids from the circulation was significantly reduced in WAT of KD-fed mice, as suggested by a downregulation of Lpl and Cd36. This was further associated with reduced inflammation in WAT.Altogether, these results indicate that KD could be beneficial for a given tissue but deleterious for another.

  16. Impaired behavioural pain responses in hph-1 mice with inherited deficiency in GTP cyclohydrolase 1 in models of inflammatory pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasser, A.; Bjerrum, Ole Jannik; Heegaard, A.-M.

    2013-01-01

    following intraplantar injection of CFA, formalin and capsaicin; whereas decreased basal level of GTP-CH1 activity had no influence in naïve hph-1 mice on acute mechanical and heat pain thresholds. Moreover, the hph-1 mice showed no signs of motor impairment or dystonia-like symptoms......Background: GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTP-CH1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), encoded by the GCH1 gene, has been implicated in the development and maintenance of inflammatory pain in rats. In humans, homozygous carriers of a " pain-protective" (PP) haplotype...... of the GCH1 gene have been identified exhibiting lower pain sensitivity, but only following pain sensitisation. Ex vivo, the PP GCH1 haplotype is associated with decreased induction of GCH1 after stimulation, whereas the baseline BH4 production is not affected. Contrary, loss of function mutations in the GCH...

  17. Loss of the inducible Hsp70 delays the inflammatory response to skeletal muscle injury and severely impairs muscle regeneration.

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    Sarah M Senf

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle regeneration following injury is a highly coordinated process that involves transient muscle inflammation, removal of necrotic cellular debris and subsequent replacement of damaged myofibers through secondary myogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms which coordinate these events are only beginning to be defined. In the current study we demonstrate that Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is increased following muscle injury, and is necessary for the normal sequence of events following severe injury induced by cardiotoxin, and physiological injury induced by modified muscle use. Indeed, Hsp70 ablated mice showed a significantly delayed inflammatory response to muscle injury induced by cardiotoxin, with nearly undetected levels of both neutrophil and macrophage markers 24 hours post-injury. At later time points, Hsp70 ablated mice showed sustained muscle inflammation and necrosis, calcium deposition and impaired fiber regeneration that persisted several weeks post-injury. Through rescue experiments reintroducing Hsp70 intracellular expression plasmids into muscles of Hsp70 ablated mice either prior to injury or post-injury, we confirm that Hsp70 optimally promotes muscle regeneration when expressed during both the inflammatory phase that predominates in the first four days following severe injury and the regenerative phase that predominates thereafter. Additional rescue experiments reintroducing Hsp70 protein into the extracellular microenvironment of injured muscles at the onset of injury provides further evidence that Hsp70 released from damaged muscle may drive the early inflammatory response to injury. Importantly, following induction of physiological injury through muscle reloading following a period of muscle disuse, reduced inflammation in 3-day reloaded muscles of Hsp70 ablated mice was associated with preservation of myofibers, and increased muscle force production at later time points compared to WT. Collectively our

  18. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease

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    Benjamin B. Williams

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and colitis-associated cancer (CAC. Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33 is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33−/− mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33−/− mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33−/− mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33−/− mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33−/− mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33−/− mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms

  19. Spirulina platensis attenuates the associated neurobehavioral and inflammatory response impairments in rats exposed to lead acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Samah R; Khalifa, Hesham A; Abdel-Motal, Sabry M; Mohammed, Hesham H; Elewa, Yaser H A; Mahmoud, Hend Atta

    2018-08-15

    Heavy metals are well known as environmental pollutants with hazardous impacts on human and animal health because of their wide industrial usage. In the present study, the role of Spirulina platensis in reversing the oxidative stress-mediated brain injury elicited by lead acetate exposure was evaluated. In order to accomplish this aim, rats were orally administered with 300 mg/kg bw Spirulina for 15 d, before and simultaneously with an intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg bw lead acetate [6 injections through the two weeks]. As a result, the co-administration of Spirulina with lead acetate reversed the most impaired open field behavioral indices; however, this did not happen for swimming performance, inclined plane, and grip strength tests. In addition, it was observed that Spirulina diminished the lead content that accumulated in both the blood and the brain tissue of the exposed rats, and reduced the elevated levels of oxidative damage indices, and brain proinflammatory markers. Also, because of the Spirulina administration, the levels of the depleted biomarkers of antioxidant status and interleukin-10 in the lead-exposed rats were improved. Moreover, Spirulina protected the brain tissue (cerebrum and cerebellum) against the changes elicited by lead exposure, and also decreased the reactivity of HSP70 and Caspase-3 in both cerebrum and cerebellum tissues. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that Spirulina has a potential use as a food supplement in the regions highly polluted with heavy metals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prefrontal cortex and mediodorsal thalamus reduced connectivity is associated with spatial working memory impairment in rats with inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Cruz, Helder; Sousa, Mafalda; Vieira, Joana B; Lima, Deolinda; Galhardo, Vasco

    2013-11-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the mediodorsal thalamus (MD) form interconnected neural circuits that are important for spatial cognition and memory, but it is not known whether the functional connectivity between these areas is affected by the onset of an animal model of inflammatory pain. To address this issue, we implanted 2 multichannel arrays of electrodes in the mPFC and MD of adult rats and recorded local field potential activity during a food-reinforced spatial working memory task. Recordings were performed for 3weeks, before and after the establishment of the pain model. Our results show that inflammatory pain caused an impairment of spatial working memory performance that is associated with changes in the activity of the mPFC-MD circuit; an analysis of partial directed coherence between the areas revealed a global decrease in the connectivity of the circuit. This decrease was observed over a wide frequency range in both the frontothalamic and thalamofrontal directions of the circuit, but was more evident from MD to mPFC. In addition, spectral analysis revealed significant oscillations of power across frequency bands, namely with a strong theta component that oscillated after the onset of the painful condition. Finally, our data revealed that chronic pain induces an increase in theta/gamma phase coherence and a higher level of mPFC-MD coherence, which is partially conserved across frequency bands. The present results demonstrate that functional disturbances in mPFC-MD connectivity are a relevant cause of deficits in pain-related working memory. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Binswanger's disease: biomarkers in the inflammatory form of vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Gary A

    2018-03-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) is a major public health concern because of the increased incidence of vascular disease in the aging population and the impact of vascular disease on Alzheimer's disease. VCID is a heterogeneous group of diseases for which there are no proven treatments. Biomarkers can be used to select more homogeneous populations. Small vessel disease is the most prevalent form of VCID and is the optimal form for treatment trials because there is a progressive course with characteristic pathological changes. Subcortical ischemic vascular disease of the Binswanger type (SIVD-BD) has a characteristic set of features that can be used both to identify patients and to follow treatment. SIVD-BD patients have clinical, neuropsychological, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and imaging features that can be used as biomarkers. No one feature is diagnostic, but a multimodal approach defines the SIVD-BD spectrum disorder. The most important features are large white matter lesions with axonal damage, blood-brain barrier disruption as shown by magnetic resonance imaging and CSF, and neuropsychological evidence of executive dysfunction. We have used these features to create a Binswanger Disease Scale and a probability of SIVD-BD, using a machine-learning algorithm. The patients discussed in this review are derived from published studies. Biomarkers not only aid in early diagnosis before the disease process has progressed too far for treatment, but also can indicate response to treatment. Refining the use of biomarkers will allow dementia treatment to enter the era of precision medicine. This article is part of the Special Issue "Vascular Dementia". © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. Impaired behavioural pain responses in hph-1 mice with inherited deficiency in GTP cyclohydrolase 1 in models of inflammatory pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTP-CH1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), encoded by the GCH1 gene, has been implicated in the development and maintenance of inflammatory pain in rats. In humans, homozygous carriers of a “pain-protective” (PP) haplotype of the GCH1 gene have been identified exhibiting lower pain sensitivity, but only following pain sensitisation. Ex vivo, the PP GCH1 haplotype is associated with decreased induction of GCH1 after stimulation, whereas the baseline BH4 production is not affected. Contrary, loss of function mutations in the GCH1 gene results in decreased basal GCH1 expression, and is associated with DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD). So far it is unknown if such mutations affect acute and inflammatory pain. Results In the current study, we examined the involvement of the GCH1 gene in pain models using the hyperphenylalaninemia 1 (hph-1) mouse, a genetic model for DRD, with only 10% basal GTP-CH1 activity compared to wild type mice. The study included assays for determination of acute nociception as well as models for pain after sensitisation. Pain behavioural analysis of the hph-1 mice showed reduced pain-like responses following intraplantar injection of CFA, formalin and capsaicin; whereas decreased basal level of GTP-CH1 activity had no influence in naïve hph-1 mice on acute mechanical and heat pain thresholds. Moreover, the hph-1 mice showed no signs of motor impairment or dystonia-like symptoms. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate novel evidence that genetic mutations in the GCH1 gene modulate pain-like hypersensitivity. Together, the present data suggest that BH4 is not important for basal heat and mechanical pain, but they support the hypothesis that BH4 plays a role in inflammation-induced hypersensitivity. Our studies suggest that the BH4 pathway could be a therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory pain conditions. Moreover, the hph-1 mice provide a valid model to

  3. Attention and memory impairments in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis and inflammatory bowel disease in comparison to healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Bartosz; Stanisławska-Kubiak, Maia; Strzelecki, Wojciech; Mojs, Ewa

    2017-10-01

    The main aim of the study was to analyze and compare attention and memory performance in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and in healthy controls. 28 patients with CF, 30 patients with IBD and 30 healthy subjects took part in the study (all in age range of 7-17). All subjects were in intellectual norm. To analyze the functioning of attention, the d2 Test of Attention by Brickenkamp (d2 test) was applied. Memory performance was assessed using the Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT) and the Trial of 10 words. The CF and IBD groups committed significantly more errors in the d2 test than the healthy controls. The CF group also had significantly higher fluctuation rates and received significantly lower scores in overall concentration performance than the control group. Patients with CF made more mistakes and had fewer correct memory projections in BVRT than the healthy controls. Patients with IBD committed significantly more errors in BVRT than the control group. Patients with CF and IBD also got significantly lower scores in the Trial of 10 words than the control group. Pediatric patients with CF and IBD performed more poorly than the healthy controls on attention and memory tests. More distinct cognitive impairments were observed in the CF group. Further research is needed to find the underlying mechanisms and clinical and/or functional significance of observed cognitive deficits. © American Federation for Medical Research (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Palmitate-induced inflammatory pathways in human adipose microvascular endothelial cells promote monocyte adhesion and impair insulin transcytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Nicolas J; Azizi, Paymon M; Li, Yujin E; Liu, Jun; Wang, Changsen; Chan, Kenny L; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Bazinet, Richard P; Heit, Bryan; Bilan, Philip J; Lee, Warren L; Klip, Amira

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation and immune cell recruitment to adipose tissue, muscle and intima of atherosclerotic blood vessels. Obesity and hyperlipidemia are also associated with tissue insulin resistance and can compromise insulin delivery to muscle. The muscle/fat microvascular endothelium mediates insulin delivery and facilitates monocyte transmigration, yet its contribution to the consequences of hyperlipidemia is poorly understood. Using primary endothelial cells from human adipose tissue microvasculature (HAMEC), we investigated the effects of physiological levels of fatty acids on endothelial inflammation and function. Expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules was measured by RT-qPCR. Signaling pathways were evaluated by pharmacological manipulation and immunoblotting. Surface expression of adhesion molecules was determined by immunohistochemistry. THP1 monocyte interaction with HAMEC was measured by cell adhesion and migration across transwells. Insulin transcytosis was measured by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Palmitate, but not palmitoleate, elevated the expression of IL-6, IL-8, TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). HAMEC had markedly low fatty acid uptake and oxidation, and CD36 inhibition did not reverse the palmitate-induced expression of adhesion molecules, suggesting that inflammation did not arise from palmitate uptake/metabolism. Instead, inhibition of TLR4 to NF-κB signaling blunted palmitate-induced ICAM-1 expression. Importantly, palmitate-induced surface expression of ICAM-1 promoted monocyte binding and transmigration. Conversely, palmitate reduced insulin transcytosis, an effect reversed by TLR4 inhibition. In summary, palmitate activates inflammatory pathways in primary microvascular endothelial cells, impairing insulin transport and increasing monocyte transmigration. This behavior may contribute in vivo to reduced tissue insulin action and enhanced tissue

  5. Correlation between morphological expansion and impairment of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients with Crohn's disease – Preliminary data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Wurnig, Moritz; Boss, Andreas; Patak, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to investigate if alterations of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflamed small-bowel segments correlate with length, wall-thickness and prelesionary dilatation of inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients suffering from Crohn's disease assessed with MRI. Methods and materials: This retrospective IRB approved study included 25 patients (12 males, 18–77y) with inflammatory lesions examined using (MRE) magnetic resonance imaging enterography. Cine MRE was performed using a coronal 2D steady-state free precession sequence (TR 2.9, TE 1.25) on a 1.5T MRI scanner. Small bowel motility was examined using a dedicated MR-motility assessment software (Motasso, Vers. 1.0, Sohard AG, Bern, Switzerland). Motility patterns (contraction frequency, relative occlusion rate and mean diameter) were assessed in correlation to wall thickness, length and prelesionary dilatation of the lesions. Statistical analysis was performed by calculation of the Pearson's-Correlation coefficient. Results: The length of the inflammatory segments, the wall thickening and prelesionary dilatation did not correlate with the frequency of the contractions (r = 0.17, p = 0.477; r = 0.316, p = 0.123; r = 0.161, p = 0.441) or the impairment of luminal occlusion (r = 0.274, p = 0.184; r = 0.199, p = .0339; r = 0.015, p = 0.945) and only the prelesionary dilatation (r = 0.410, p = 0.042) correlated to the mean luminal diameter of the segment. Conclusion: The degree of motility impairment within inflammatory small bowel lesions does not significantly correlate with the extent of the lesion but with the motility measured in prelesionary, non-affected segments, suggesting an interdependent functional aspect of inflammation even in morphologically non-affected small bowel segments

  6. Correlation between morphological expansion and impairment of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients with Crohn's disease – Preliminary data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Wurnig, Moritz; Boss, Andreas [University Hospital Zürich, Department of Radiology, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland); Patak, Michael A., E-mail: Michael.Patak@patak.ch [University Hospital Zürich, Department of Radiology, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland); Hirslanden Clinic, Radiology, Witellikerstrasse 40, 8032 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to investigate if alterations of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflamed small-bowel segments correlate with length, wall-thickness and prelesionary dilatation of inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients suffering from Crohn's disease assessed with MRI. Methods and materials: This retrospective IRB approved study included 25 patients (12 males, 18–77y) with inflammatory lesions examined using (MRE) magnetic resonance imaging enterography. Cine MRE was performed using a coronal 2D steady-state free precession sequence (TR 2.9, TE 1.25) on a 1.5T MRI scanner. Small bowel motility was examined using a dedicated MR-motility assessment software (Motasso, Vers. 1.0, Sohard AG, Bern, Switzerland). Motility patterns (contraction frequency, relative occlusion rate and mean diameter) were assessed in correlation to wall thickness, length and prelesionary dilatation of the lesions. Statistical analysis was performed by calculation of the Pearson's-Correlation coefficient. Results: The length of the inflammatory segments, the wall thickening and prelesionary dilatation did not correlate with the frequency of the contractions (r = 0.17, p = 0.477; r = 0.316, p = 0.123; r = 0.161, p = 0.441) or the impairment of luminal occlusion (r = 0.274, p = 0.184; r = 0.199, p = .0339; r = 0.015, p = 0.945) and only the prelesionary dilatation (r = 0.410, p = 0.042) correlated to the mean luminal diameter of the segment. Conclusion: The degree of motility impairment within inflammatory small bowel lesions does not significantly correlate with the extent of the lesion but with the motility measured in prelesionary, non-affected segments, suggesting an interdependent functional aspect of inflammation even in morphologically non-affected small bowel segments.

  7. Thymidine kinase 2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion in mouse liver leads to defect β-oxidation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshan Zhou

    Full Text Available Thymidine kinase 2 (TK2 deficiency in humans causes mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depletion syndrome. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and search for treatment options, we previously generated and described a TK2 deficient mouse strain (TK2(-/- that progressively loses its mtDNA. The TK2(-/- mouse model displays symptoms similar to humans harboring TK2 deficient infantile fatal encephalomyopathy. Here, we have studied the TK2(-/- mouse model to clarify the pathological role of progressive mtDNA depletion in liver for the severe outcome of TK2 deficiency. We observed that a gradual depletion of mtDNA in the liver of the TK2(-/- mice was accompanied by increasingly hypertrophic mitochondria and accumulation of fat vesicles in the liver cells. The levels of cholesterol and nonesterified fatty acids were elevated and there was accumulation of long chain acylcarnitines in plasma of the TK2(-/- mice. In mice with hepatic mtDNA levels below 20%, the blood sugar and the ketone levels dropped. These mice also exhibited reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation due to decreased transport of long chain acylcarnitines into the mitochondria. The gradual loss of mtDNA in the liver of the TK2(-/- mice causes impaired mitochondrial function that leads to defect β-oxidation and, as a result, insufficient production of ketone bodies and glucose. This study provides insight into the mechanism of encephalomyopathy caused by TK2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion that may be used to explore novel therapeutic strategies.

  8. Thymidine kinase 2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion in mouse liver leads to defect β-oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoshan; Kannisto, Kristina; Curbo, Sophie; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Hultenby, Kjell; Isetun, Sindra; Gåfvels, Mats; Karlsson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) deficiency in humans causes mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and search for treatment options, we previously generated and described a TK2 deficient mouse strain (TK2(-/-)) that progressively loses its mtDNA. The TK2(-/-) mouse model displays symptoms similar to humans harboring TK2 deficient infantile fatal encephalomyopathy. Here, we have studied the TK2(-/-) mouse model to clarify the pathological role of progressive mtDNA depletion in liver for the severe outcome of TK2 deficiency. We observed that a gradual depletion of mtDNA in the liver of the TK2(-/-) mice was accompanied by increasingly hypertrophic mitochondria and accumulation of fat vesicles in the liver cells. The levels of cholesterol and nonesterified fatty acids were elevated and there was accumulation of long chain acylcarnitines in plasma of the TK2(-/-) mice. In mice with hepatic mtDNA levels below 20%, the blood sugar and the ketone levels dropped. These mice also exhibited reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation due to decreased transport of long chain acylcarnitines into the mitochondria. The gradual loss of mtDNA in the liver of the TK2(-/-) mice causes impaired mitochondrial function that leads to defect β-oxidation and, as a result, insufficient production of ketone bodies and glucose. This study provides insight into the mechanism of encephalomyopathy caused by TK2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion that may be used to explore novel therapeutic strategies.

  9. Thymidine kinase 2 deficiency-induced mitochondrial DNA depletion causes abnormal development of adipose tissues and adipokine levels in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Villarroya

    Full Text Available Mammal adipose tissues require mitochondrial activity for proper development and differentiation. The components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain/oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. The maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA is a key element for a functional mitochondrial oxidative activity in mammalian cells. To ascertain the role of mtDNA levels in adipose tissue, we have analyzed the alterations in white (WAT and brown (BAT adipose tissues in thymidine kinase 2 (Tk2 H126N knockin mice, a model of TK2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion. We observed respectively severe and moderate mtDNA depletion in TK2-deficient BAT and WAT, showing both tissues moderate hypotrophy and reduced fat accumulation. Electron microscopy revealed altered mitochondrial morphology in brown but not in white adipocytes from TK2-deficient mice. Although significant reduction in mtDNA-encoded transcripts was observed both in WAT and BAT, protein levels from distinct OXPHOS complexes were significantly reduced only in TK2-deficient BAT. Accordingly, the activity of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly lowered only in BAT from TK2-deficient mice. The analysis of transcripts encoding up to fourteen components of specific adipose tissue functions revealed that, in both TK2-deficient WAT and BAT, there was a consistent reduction of thermogenesis related gene expression and a severe reduction in leptin mRNA. Reduced levels of resistin mRNA were found in BAT from TK2-deficient mice. Analysis of serum indicated a dramatic reduction in circulating levels of leptin and resistin. In summary, our present study establishes that mtDNA depletion leads to a moderate impairment in mitochondrial respiratory function, especially in BAT, causes substantial alterations in WAT and BAT development, and has a profound impact in the endocrine properties of adipose tissues.

  10. Thymidine kinase 2 deficiency-induced mitochondrial DNA depletion causes abnormal development of adipose tissues and adipokine levels in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroya, Joan; Dorado, Beatriz; Vilà, Maya R; Garcia-Arumí, Elena; Domingo, Pere; Giralt, Marta; Hirano, Michio; Villarroya, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Mammal adipose tissues require mitochondrial activity for proper development and differentiation. The components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain/oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS) are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. The maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a key element for a functional mitochondrial oxidative activity in mammalian cells. To ascertain the role of mtDNA levels in adipose tissue, we have analyzed the alterations in white (WAT) and brown (BAT) adipose tissues in thymidine kinase 2 (Tk2) H126N knockin mice, a model of TK2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion. We observed respectively severe and moderate mtDNA depletion in TK2-deficient BAT and WAT, showing both tissues moderate hypotrophy and reduced fat accumulation. Electron microscopy revealed altered mitochondrial morphology in brown but not in white adipocytes from TK2-deficient mice. Although significant reduction in mtDNA-encoded transcripts was observed both in WAT and BAT, protein levels from distinct OXPHOS complexes were significantly reduced only in TK2-deficient BAT. Accordingly, the activity of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly lowered only in BAT from TK2-deficient mice. The analysis of transcripts encoding up to fourteen components of specific adipose tissue functions revealed that, in both TK2-deficient WAT and BAT, there was a consistent reduction of thermogenesis related gene expression and a severe reduction in leptin mRNA. Reduced levels of resistin mRNA were found in BAT from TK2-deficient mice. Analysis of serum indicated a dramatic reduction in circulating levels of leptin and resistin. In summary, our present study establishes that mtDNA depletion leads to a moderate impairment in mitochondrial respiratory function, especially in BAT, causes substantial alterations in WAT and BAT development, and has a profound impact in the endocrine properties of adipose tissues. © 2011 Villarroya et al.

  11. TNFα altered inflammatory responses, impaired health and productivity, but did not affect glucose or lipid metabolism in early-lactation dairy cows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yuan

    Full Text Available Inflammation may be a major contributing factor to peripartum metabolic disorders in dairy cattle. We tested whether administering an inflammatory cytokine, recombinant bovine tumor necrosis factor-α (rbTNFα, affects milk production, metabolism, and health during this period. Thirty-three Holstein cows (9 primiparous and 24 multiparous were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments at parturition. Treatments were 0 (Control, 1.5, or 3.0 µg/kg body weight rbTNFα, which were administered once daily by subcutaneous injection for the first 7 days of lactation. Statistical contrasts were used to evaluate the treatment and dose effects of rbTNFα administration. Plasma TNFα concentrations at 16 h post-administration tended to be increased (P0.10 was detected; rbTNFα treatments increased (P0.10 by rbTNFα administration, but 6 out of 16 measured eicosanoids changed (P0.10 by rbTNFα treatment. Glucose turnover rate was unaffected (P=0.18 by rbTNFα administration. The higher dose of rbTNFα tended to increase the risk of cows developing one or more health disorders (P=0.08. Taken together, these results indicate that administration of rbTNFα daily for the first 7 days of lactation altered inflammatory responses, impaired milk production and health, but did not significantly affect liver triglyceride accumulation or nutrient metabolism in dairy cows.

  12. Improved endothelial function and lipid profile compensate for impaired hemostatic and inflammatory status in iatrogenic chronic subclinical hyperthyroidism of thyroid cancer patients on L-t4 therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazdag, A; Nagy, E V; Burman, K D; Paragh, G; Jenei, Z

    2010-06-01

    We aimed to compare the changes of endothelial function and haemostatic, inflammatory and metabolic parameters of short-term iatrogenic hypothyroidism to the characteristics of subclinical hyperthyroidism in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Twenty four women (mean age 42.4+/-8.1 years) had undergone total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation in treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer. We measured serum thyroglobulin, thyroid function, plasma levels of lipid parameters, homocystine, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, von Willebrandt factor activity (vWF), nitric oxide, as well as flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) and nitroglycerin-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery during iatrogenic hypothyroidism (TSH 89.82+/-29.36 mU/L) and again in the same patients during subclinical hyperthyroidism secondary to exogenous levothyroxine administration (TSH 0.24+/-0.11 mU/L). In hypothyroidism, FMD was markedly lower than in subclinical hyperthyroidism (6.79+/-4.44 vs. 14.37+/-8.33%, phyperthyroidism was associated with improved endothelial function and lipid profile, while haemostatic and inflammatory parameters were impaired. The two opposite mechanisms may well compensate for each other at the level of the vessel wall. (c) J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  13. Ceftiofur impairs pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion through the inhibition of the activation of NF-κB and MAPK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ci Xinxin; Song Yu; Zeng Fanqin; Zhang Xuemei; Li Hongyu; Wang Xinrui; Cui Junqing; Deng Xuming

    2008-01-01

    Ceftiofur is a new broad-spectrum, third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic for veterinary use. Immunopharmacological studies can provide new information on the immunomodulatory activities of some drugs, including their effect on cytokine productions. For this reason, we investigated the effect of ceftiofur on cytokine productions in vitro. We found that ceftiofur can downregulate tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), but did not affect interleukin-10 (IL-10) production. We further investigated signal transduction mechanisms to determine how ceftiofur affects. RAW 264.7 cells were pretreated with 1, 5, or 10 mg/L of ceftiofur 1 h prior to treatment with 1 mg/L of LPS. Thirty minutes later, cells were harvested and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation was measured by Western blot. Alternatively, cells were fixed and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation was measured using immunocytochemical analysis. Signal transduction studies showed that ceftiofur significantly inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and c-jun NH 2 -terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation protein expression. Ceftiofur also inhibited p65-NF-κB translocation into the nucleus. Therefore, ceftiofur may inhibit LPS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines by blocking NF-κB and MAPKs signaling in RAW264.7 cells

  14. Homeostatic regulation of T cell trafficking by a B cell derived peptide is impaired in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apta, Bonita; Kuravi, Sahithi J.; Yates, Clara M.; Kennedy, Amy; Odedra, Arjun; Alassiri, Mohammed; Harrison, Matthew; Martin, Ashley; Barone, Francesca; Nayar, Saba; Hitchcock, Jessica R.; Cunningham, Adam F.; Raza, Karim; Filer, Andrew; Copland, David A.; Dick, Andrew D.; Robinson, Joseph; Kalia, Neena; Walker, Lucy S. K.; Buckley, Christopher D.; Nash, Gerard B.; Narendran, Parth; Rainger, G. Ed.

    2015-01-01

    During an inflammatory response, lymphocyte recruitment into tissue must be tightly controlled because dysregulated trafficking contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic disease. Here we show that during inflammation and in response to adiponectin, B cells tonically inhibit T cell trafficking by secreting a peptide (PEPITEM) proteolytically derived from 14.3.3.ζδ protein. PEPITEM binds cadherin-15 on endothelial cells, promoting synthesis and release of sphingosine-1 phosphate, which inhibits trafficking of T cells without affecting recruitment of other leukocytes. Expression of adiponectin receptors on B cells and adiponectin induced PEPITEM secretion wanes with age, implying immune senescence of the pathway. Additionally, these changes are evident in individuals with type-1-diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis, and circulating PEPITEM in patient serum is reduced compared to healthy age matched donors. In both diseases, tonic inhibition of T cell trafficking across inflamed endothelium is lost. Importantly, control of patient T cell trafficking is re-established by exogenous PEPITEM. Moreover, in animal models of peritonitis, hepatic I/R injury, Salmonella infection, Uveitis and Sjögren’s Syndrome, PEPITEM could reduce T cell recruitment into inflamed tissues. PMID:25894827

  15. Predictors of Impaired Mental Health and Support Seeking in Adults With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Online Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Simon; Andrews, Jane M; Porter, Anna

    This study explored the possible factors associated with psychological distress in adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and also engagement in mental health services (MHS) in those reporting distress in a large Australian cohort. Participants with IBD completed an online survey assessing perceived IBD activity (Manitoba Index; MI), mental health status (K10), demographic details, and engagement with MHS for IBD-associated issues. Of 336 participants, 76.5% perceived themselves as having active disease over the past 6 months, and on K10 scores, 51.8% had a mental health issue. Of participants with a mental health issue, only 21.3% were currently receiving mental health support. A stepwise logistic regression analysis correctly classified 78.7% of the status of receiving mental health support, with lower income (mental health support. The data show that in individuals with ongoing symptoms attributed to active IBD, mental health issues are highly prevalent, with older age and higher income being additional drivers of mental health issues. The greater challenge, however, seems not to be identifying mental health issues, but in getting those in need to engage in MHS.

  16. TNFα Altered Inflammatory Responses, Impaired Health and Productivity, but Did Not Affect Glucose or Lipid Metabolism in Early-Lactation Dairy Cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedova, Laman K.; Sordillo, Lorraine M.; Bradford, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation may be a major contributing factor to peripartum metabolic disorders in dairy cattle. We tested whether administering an inflammatory cytokine, recombinant bovine tumor necrosis factor-α (rbTNFα), affects milk production, metabolism, and health during this period. Thirty-three Holstein cows (9 primiparous and 24 multiparous) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments at parturition. Treatments were 0 (Control), 1.5, or 3.0 µg/kg body weight rbTNFα, which were administered once daily by subcutaneous injection for the first 7 days of lactation. Statistical contrasts were used to evaluate the treatment and dose effects of rbTNFα administration. Plasma TNFα concentrations at 16 h post-administration tended to be increased (P0.10) was detected; rbTNFα treatments increased (P0.10) by rbTNFα administration, but 6 out of 16 measured eicosanoids changed (Pinsulin, β-hydroxybutyrate, non-esterified fatty acids, triglyceride, 3-methylhistidine, and liver triglyceride were unaffected (P>0.10) by rbTNFα treatment. Glucose turnover rate was unaffected (P = 0.18) by rbTNFα administration. The higher dose of rbTNFα tended to increase the risk of cows developing one or more health disorders (P = 0.08). Taken together, these results indicate that administration of rbTNFα daily for the first 7 days of lactation altered inflammatory responses, impaired milk production and health, but did not significantly affect liver triglyceride accumulation or nutrient metabolism in dairy cows. PMID:24260367

  17. Two Consecutive Days of Crossfit Training Affects Pro and Anti-inflammatory Cytokines and Osteoprotegerin without Impairments in Muscle Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibana, Ramires A; de Almeida, Leonardo M; Frade de Sousa, Nuno M; Nascimento, Dahan da Cunha; Neto, Ivo V de Sousa; de Almeida, Jeeser A; de Souza, Vinicius C; Lopes, Maria de Fátima T P L; Nobrega, Otávio de Tolêdo; Vieira, Denis C L; Navalta, James W; Prestes, Jonato

    2016-01-01

    = 0.018) as compared to pre-exercise values. Osteoprotegerin displayed a decrease 48 h following WOD 2 (~25%; p = 0.018) as compared with pre intervention. In conclusion, two consecutive Crossfit® training sessions increase pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines with no interference on muscle performance in the recovery period.

  18. Glutamic acid ameliorates estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal-like symptoms in ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Hee-Yun; Yang, Woong Mo; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2015-09-01

    Some amino acids are considered alternative therapies for improving menopausal symptoms. Glutamic acid (GA), which is abundant in meats, fish, and protein-rich plant foods, is known to be a neurotransmitter or precursor of γ-aminobutyric acid. Although it is unclear if GA functions in menopausal symptoms, we hypothesized that GA would attenuate estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal symptoms. The objective to test our hypothesis was to examine an estrogenic effect of GA in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells, and ER-positive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The results demonstrated that administration with GA to mice suppressed body weight gain and vaginal atrophy when compared with the OVX mice. A microcomputed tomographic analysis of the trabecular bone showed increases in bone mineral density, trabecular number, and connectivity density as well as a significant decrease in total porosity of the OVX mice treated with GA. In addition, GA increased serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and estrogen compared with the OVX mice. Furthermore, GA induced proliferation and increased ER-β messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, estrogen response element (ERE) activity, extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, and alkaline phosphatase activity in MG-63 cells. In MCF-7 cells, GA also increased proliferation, Ki-67 mRNA expression, ER-β mRNA expression, and ERE activity. Estrogen response element activity increased by GA was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist. Taken together, our data demonstrated that GA has estrogenic and osteogenic activities in OVX mice, MG-63 cells, and MCF-7 cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Alterations in protein kinase C activity and processing during zinc-deficiency-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Susan S; Clegg, Michael S; Momma, Tony Y; Niles, Brad J; Duffy, Jodie Y; Daston, George P; Keen, Carl L

    2004-10-01

    Protein kinases C (PKCs) are a family of serine/threonine kinases that are critical for signal transduction pathways involved in growth, differentiation and cell death. All PKC isoforms have four conserved domains, C1-C4. The C1 domain contains cysteine-rich finger-like motifs, which bind two zinc atoms. The zinc-finger motifs modulate diacylglycerol binding; thus, intracellular zinc concentrations could influence the activity and localization of PKC family members. 3T3 cells were cultured in zinc-deficient or zinc-supplemented medium for up to 32 h. Cells cultured in zinc-deficient medium had decreased zinc content, lowered cytosolic classical PKC activity, increased caspase-3 processing and activity, and reduced cell number. Zinc-deficient cytosols had decreased activity and expression levels of PKC-alpha, whereas PKC-alpha phosphorylation was not altered. Inhibition of PKC-alpha with Gö6976 had no effect on cell number in the zinc-deficient group. Proteolysis of the novel PKC family member, PKC-delta, to its 40-kDa catalytic fragment occurred in cells cultured in the zinc-deficient medium. Occurrence of the PKC-delta fragment in mitochondria was co-incident with caspase-3 activation. Addition of the PKC-delta inhibitor, rottlerin, or zinc to deficient medium reduced or eliminated proteolysis of PKC-delta, activated caspase-3 and restored cell number. Inhibition of caspase-3 processing by Z-DQMD-FMK (Z-Asp-Gln-Met-Asp-fluoromethylketone) did not restore cell number in the zinc-deficient group, but resulted in processing of full-length PKC-delta to a 56-kDa fragment. These results support the concept that intracellular zinc concentrations influence PKC activity and processing, and that zinc-deficiency-induced apoptosis occurs in part through PKC-dependent pathways.

  20. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity affects the density of mast cells in abdominal fat depots and lymph nodes in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altintas Mehmet M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance. Here, we explored the effects of leptin deficiency-induced obesity on the density of mast cells in metabolic (abdominal fat depots, skeletal muscle, and liver and lymphatic (abdominal lymph nodes, spleen, and thymus organs. Fourteen-week-old male leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and their controls fed a standard chow were studied. Tissue sections were stained with toluidine blue to determine the density of mast cells. CD117/c-kit protein expression analysis was also carried out. Furthermore, mast cells containing immunoreactive tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine involved in obesity-linked insulin resistance, were identified by immunostaining. Results ob/ob mice demonstrated adiposity and insulin resistance. In abdominal fat depots, mast cells were distributed differentially. While most prevalent in subcutaneous fat in controls, mast cells were most abundant in epididymal fat in ob/ob mice. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity was accompanied by a 20-fold increase in the density of mast cells in epididymal fat, but a 13-fold decrease in subcutaneous fat. This finding was confirmed by CD117/c-kit protein expression analysis. Furthermore, we found that a subset of mast cells in epididymal and subcutaneous fat were immunoreactive for TNF-α. The proportion of mast cells immunoreactive for TNF-α was higher in epididymal than in subcutaneous fat in both ob/ob and control mice. Mast cells were also distributed differentially in retroperitoneal, mesenteric, and inguinal lymph nodes. In both ob/ob mice and lean controls, mast cells were more prevalent in retroperitoneal than in mesenteric and inguinal lymph nodes. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity was accompanied by increased mast cell density in all lymph node stations examined. No significant difference in the density of mast cells in skeletal muscle, liver, spleen, and thymus was

  1. BET protein function is required for inflammation: Brd2 genetic disruption and BET inhibitor JQ1 impair mouse macrophage inflammatory responses1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Anna C.; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S.; Denis, Gerald V.

    2013-01-01

    Histone acetylation regulates activation and repression of multiple inflammatory genes known to play critical roles in chronic inflammatory diseases. However, proteins responsible for translating the histone acetylation code into an orchestrated pro-inflammatory cytokine response remain poorly characterized. Bromodomain extra terminal (BET) proteins are “readers” of histone acetylation marks with demonstrated roles in gene transcription, but the ability of BET proteins to coordinate the response of inflammatory cytokine genes through translation of histone marks is unknown. We hypothesize that members of the BET family of dual bromodomain-containing transcriptional regulators directly control inflammatory genes. We examined the genetic model of brd2 lo mice, a BET protein hypomorph, to show that Brd2 is essential for pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. Studies that utilize siRNA knockdown and a small molecule inhibitor of BET protein binding, JQ1, independently demonstrate BET proteins are critical for macrophage inflammatory responses. Furthermore, we show that Brd2 and Brd4 physically associate with the promoters of inflammatory cytokine genes in macrophages. This association is absent in the presence of BET inhibition by JQ1. Finally, we demonstrate that JQ1 ablates cytokine production in vitro and blunts the “cytokine storm” in endotoxemic mice by reducing levels of IL-6 and TNF-α while rescuing mice from LPS-induced death. We propose that targeting BET proteins with small molecule inhibitors will benefit hyper-inflammatory conditions associated with high levels of cytokine production. PMID:23420887

  2. Iron Retention in Root Hemicelluloses Causes Genotypic Variability in the Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongli Shi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Antagonistic interactions of phosphorus (P hamper iron (Fe acquisition by plants and can cause Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis. To determine the physiological processes underlying adverse Fe–P interactions, the maize lines B73 and Mo17, which differ in chlorosis susceptibility, were grown hydroponically at different Fe:P ratios. In the presence of P, Mo17 became more chlorotic than B73. The higher sensitivity of Mo17 to Fe deficiency was not related to Fe–P interactions in leaves but to lower Fe translocation to shoots, which coincided with a larger pool of Fe being fixed in the root apoplast of P-supplied Mo17 plants. Fractionating cell wall components from roots showed that most of the cell wall-contained P accumulated in pectin, whereas most of the Fe was bound to root hemicelluloses, revealing that co-precipitation of Fe and P in the apoplast was not responsible for Fe inactivation in roots. A negative correlation between chlorophyll index and hemicellulose-bound Fe in 85 inbred lines of the intermated maize B73 × Mo17 (IBM population indicated that apoplastic Fe retention contributes to genotypic differences in chlorosis susceptibility of maize grown under low Fe supplies. Our study indicates that Fe retention in the hemicellulose fraction of roots is an important determinant in the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis of graminaceous plant species with low phytosiderophore release, like maize.

  3. Minocycline reduces inflammatory parameters in the brain structures and serum and reverses memory impairment caused by the administration of amyloid β (1-42) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, Michelle Lima; Mina, Francielle; Bellettini-Santos, Tatiani; Carneiro, Franciellen Gonçalves; Luz, Aline Pereira; Schiavo, Gustavo Luis; Andrighetti, Matheus Scopel; Scheid, Maylton Grégori; Bolfe, Renan Pereira; Budni, Josiane

    2017-07-03

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common type of age-related dementia. Cognitive decline, beta-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuroinflammation are the main pathophysiological characteristics of AD. Minocycline is a tetracycline derivative with anti-inflammatory properties that has a neuroprotective effect. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of minocycline on memory, neurotrophins and neuroinflammation in an animal model of AD induced by the administration of Aβ (1-42) oligomer. Male BALB/c mice were treated with minocycline (50mg/kg) via the oral route for a total of 17days, 24h after intracerebroventricular administration of Aβ (1-42) oligomer. At the end of this period, was performed the radial maze test, and 24h after the last minocycline administration, serum was collected and the cortex and hippocampus were dissected for biochemical analysis. The administration of minocycline reversed the memory impairment caused by Aβ (1-42). In the hippocampus, minocycline reversed the increases in the levels of interleukin (IL-1β), Tumor Necrosis Factor- alpha (TNF-α) and, IL-10 caused by Aβ (1-42). In the cortex, AD-like model increase the levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and, IL-4. Minocycline treatment reversed this. In the serum, Aβ (1-42) increased the levels of IL-1β and IL-4, and minocycline was able to reverse this action, but not to reverse the decrease of IL-10 levels. Minocycline also reversed the increase in the levels of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus caused by Aβ (1-42), and reduced Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) increases in the total cortex. Therefore, our results indicate that minocycline causes improvements in the spatial memory, and cytokine levels were correlated with this effect in the brain it. Besides this, minocycline reduced BDNF and NGF levels, highlighting the promising effects of minocycline in treating AD-like dementia. Copyright © 2017

  4. BET protein function is required for inflammation: Brd2 genetic disruption and BET inhibitor JQ1 impair mouse macrophage inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Anna C; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S; Denis, Gerald V

    2013-04-01

    Histone acetylation regulates activation and repression of multiple inflammatory genes known to play critical roles in chronic inflammatory diseases. However, proteins responsible for translating the histone acetylation code into an orchestrated proinflammatory cytokine response remain poorly characterized. Bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins are "readers" of histone acetylation marks, with demonstrated roles in gene transcription, but the ability of BET proteins to coordinate the response of inflammatory cytokine genes through translation of histone marks is unknown. We hypothesize that members of the BET family of dual bromodomain-containing transcriptional regulators directly control inflammatory genes. We examined the genetic model of brd2 lo mice, a BET protein hypomorph, to show that Brd2 is essential for proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. Studies that use small interfering RNA knockdown and a small-molecule inhibitor of BET protein binding, JQ1, independently demonstrate BET proteins are critical for macrophage inflammatory responses. Furthermore, we show that Brd2 and Brd4 physically associate with the promoters of inflammatory cytokine genes in macrophages. This association is absent in the presence of BET inhibition by JQ1. Finally, we demonstrate that JQ1 ablates cytokine production in vitro and blunts the "cytokine storm" in endotoxemic mice by reducing levels of IL-6 and TNF-α while rescuing mice from LPS-induced death. We propose that targeting BET proteins with small-molecule inhibitors will benefit hyperinflammatory conditions associated with high levels of cytokine production.

  5. Determination of glucose deficiency-induced cell death by mitochondrial ATP generation-driven proton homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanfen Cui; Yuanyuan Wang; Miao Liu; Li Qiu; Pan Xing; Xin Wang; Guoguang Ying; Binghui Li

    2017-01-01

    Glucose is one of major nutrients and its catabolism provides energy and/or building bricks for cell proliferation.Glucose deficiency results in cell death.However,the underlying mechanism still remains elusive.By using our recently developed method to monitor real-time cellular apoptosis and necrosis,we show that glucose deprivation can directly elicit necrosis,which is promoted by mitochondrial impairment,depending on mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation instead of ATP depletion.We demonstrate that glucose metabolism is the major source to produce protons.Glucose deficiency leads to lack of proton provision while mitochondrial electron transfer chain continues consuming protons to generate energy,which provokes a compensatory iysosomal proton effiux and resultant increased lysosomal pH.This lysosomal alkalinization can trigger apoptosis or necrosis depending on the extent of alkalinization.Taken together,our results build up a metabolic connection between glycolysis,mitochondrion,and lysosome,and reveal an essential role of glucose metabolism in maintaining proton homeostasis to support cell survival.

  6. Severe riboflavin deficiency induces alterations in the hepatic proteome of starter Pekin ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Hegeman, Maria A; Hu, Jian; Xie, Ming; Shi, Wenbiao; Jiang, Yong; de Boer, Vincent; Guo, Yuming; Hou, Shuisheng; Keijer, Jaap

    2017-11-01

    Suboptimal vitamin B2 status is encountered globally. Riboflavin deficiency depresses growth and results in a fatty liver. The underlying mechanisms remain to be established and an overview of molecular alterations is lacking. We investigated hepatic proteome changes induced by riboflavin deficiency to explain its effects on growth and hepatic lipid metabolism. In all, 360 1-d-old Pekin ducks were divided into three groups of 120 birds each, with twelve replicates and ten birds per replicate. For 21 d, the ducks were fed ad libitum a control diet (CAL), a riboflavin-deficient diet (RD) or were pair-fed with the control diet to the mean daily intake of the RD group (CPF). When comparing RD with CAL and CPF, growth depression, liver enlargement, liver lipid accumulation and enhanced liver SFA (C6 : 0, C12 : 0, C16 : 0, C18 : 0) were observed. In RD, thirty-two proteins were enhanced and thirty-one diminished (>1·5-fold) compared with CAL and CPF. Selected proteins were confirmed by Western blotting. The diminished proteins are mainly involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), whereas the enhanced proteins are mainly involved in TAG and cholesterol biosynthesis. RD causes liver lipid accumulation and growth depression probably by impairing fatty acid β-oxidation and ETC. These findings contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of liver lipid metabolic disorders due to RD.

  7. MCP-1/CCR-2-double-deficiency severely impairs the migration of hematogenous inflammatory cells following transient cerebral ischemia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Strecker, Jan-Kolja; Minnerup, Jens; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Schilling, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and its receptor CCR-2 are known to play a major role in inflammatory responses after cerebral ischemia. Mice deficient in either MCP-1 or CCR-2 have been reported to develop smaller infarct sizes and show decreased numbers of infiltrating inflammatory cells. In the present study we used green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice to investigate the effect of MCP-1/CCR-2-double deficiency on the recruitment of inflammatory cells in a model of both, mild and severe cerebral ischemia. We show that MCP-1/CCR-2-double deficiency virtually entirely abrogates the recruitment of hematogenous macrophages and significantly reduces neutrophil migration to the ischemic brain 4 and 7 days following focal cerebral ischemia. This argues for a predominant role of the MCP-1/CCR-2 axis in chemotaxis of monocytes despite a wide redundancy in the chemokine-receptor-system. Chemokine analysis revealed that even candidates known to be involved in monocyte and neutrophil recruitment like MIP-1α, CXCL-1, C5a, G-CSF and GM-CSF showed a reduced and delayed or even a lack of relevant compensatory response in MCP-1(-/-)/CCR-2(-/-)-mice. Solely, chemokine receptor 5 (CCR-5) increased early in both, but rose above wildtype levels at day 7 in MCP-1(-/-)/CCR-2(-/-)-animals, which might explain the higher number of activated microglial cells compared to control mice. Our study was, however, not powered to investigate infarct volumes. Further studies are needed to clarify whether these mechanisms of inflammatory cell recruitment might be essential for early infarct development and final infarct size and to evaluate potential therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. BMI-1 Mediates Estrogen-Deficiency-Induced Bone Loss by Inhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinbo; Wang, Qian; Yang, Renlei; Zhang, Jiaqi; Li, Xing; Zhou, Xichao; Miao, Dengshun

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that estrogen regulates bone homeostasis through regulatory effects on oxidative stress. However, it is unclear how estrogen deficiency triggers reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Recent studies provide evidence that the B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 (BMI-1) plays a critical role in protection against oxidative stress and that this gene is directly regulated by estrogen via estrogen receptor (ER) at the transcriptional level. In this study, ovariectomized mice were given drinking water with/without antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, 1 mg/mL) supplementation, and compared with each other and with sham mice. Results showed that ovariectomy resulted in bone loss with increased osteoclast surface, increased ROS levels, T cell activation, and increased TNF and RANKL levels in serum and in CD4 T cells; NAC supplementation largely prevented these alterations. BMI-1 expression levels were dramatically downregulated in CD4 T cells from ovariectomized mice. We supplemented drinking water to BMI-1-deficient mice with/without NAC and compared them with each other and with wild-type (WT) mice. We found that BMI-1 deficiency mimicked alterations observed in ovariectomy whereas NAC supplementation reversed all alterations induced by BMI-1 deficiency. Because T cells are critical in mediating ovariectomy-induced bone loss, we further assessed whether BMI-1 overexpression in lymphocytes can protect against estrogen deficiency-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss by inhibiting oxidative stress, T cell activation, and RANKL production. When WT and Eμ-BMI-1 transgenic mice with BMI-1 specifically overexpressed in lymphocytes were ovariectomized and compared with each other and with WT sham mice, we found that BMI-1 overexpression in lymphocytes clearly reversed all alterations induced by ovariectomy. Results from this study indicate that estrogen deficiency downregulates BMI-1 and subsequently increases ROS, T cell activation, and

  9. Maternal supplementation with conjugated linoleic acid in the setting of diet-induced obesity normalises the inflammatory phenotype in mothers and reverses metabolic dysfunction and impaired insulin sensitivity in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Stephanie A; Vickers, Mark H; Zhang, Xiaoyuan D; Gray, Clint; Reynolds, Clare M

    2015-12-01

    Maternal consumption of a high-fat diet significantly impacts the fetal environment and predisposes offspring to obesity and metabolic dysfunction during adulthood. We examined the effects of a high-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation on metabolic and inflammatory profiles and whether maternal supplementation with the anti-inflammatory lipid conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) could have beneficial effects on mothers and offspring. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a control (CD; 10% kcal from fat), CLA (CLA; 10% kcal from fat, 1% total fat as CLA), high-fat (HF; 45% kcal from fat) or high fat with CLA (HFCLA; 45% kcal from fat, 1% total fat as CLA) diet ad libitum 10days prior to and throughout gestation and lactation. Dams and offspring were culled at either late gestation (fetal day 20, F20) or early postweaning (postnatal day 24, P24). CLA, HF and HFCLA dams were heavier than CD throughout gestation. Plasma concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and tumour necrosis factor-α were elevated in HF dams, with restoration in HFCLA dams. Male and female fetuses from HF dams were smaller at F20 but displayed catch-up growth and impaired insulin sensitivity at P24, which was reversed in HFCLA offspring. HFCLA dams at P24 were protected from impaired insulin sensitivity as compared to HF dams. Maternal CLA supplementation normalised inflammation associated with consumption of a high-fat diet and reversed associated programming of metabolic dysfunction in offspring. This demonstrates that there are critical windows of developmental plasticity in which the effects of an adverse early-life environment can be reversed by maternal dietary interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased expression of TLR9 associated with pro-inflammatory S100A8 and IL-8 in diabetic wounds could lead to unresolved inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) cases with impaired wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanhaiya; Agrawal, Neeraj K; Gupta, Sanjeev K; Sinha, Pratima; Singh, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by persistent hyperglycemia which causes a chain of abrupt biochemical and physiological changes. Immune dys-regulation is the hallmark of T2DM that could contribute to prolonged inflammation causing transformation of wounds into non-healing chronic ulcers. Toll like receptor -9 (TLR9) is a major receptor involved in innate immune regulation. TLR9 activation induces release of pro-inflammatory molecules like S100A8 and interleukin-8 (IL-8) by myeloid cells causing migration of myeloid cells to the site of inflammation. We hypothesized that pro-inflammatory S100A8 and IL-8 proteins could cause persistent inflammation in chronic wounds like diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) and may contribute to impaired wound healing in T2DM patients. Expression of TLR9 and its downstream effector molecules S100A8, and IL-8 were analyzed in chronic diabetic wound and non-diabetic control wound tissue samples by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative RT-PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence. CD11b(+)CD33(+) myeloid cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. TLR9 message and protein were higher in diabetic wounds compared to control wounds (p=0.03, t=2.21 for TLR9 mRNA; p=diabetic wounds (p=0.003, t=3.1 for S100A8 mRNA; p=0.04, t=2.04 for IL-8). CD11b(+) CD33(+) myeloid cells were decreased in T2DM as compared to non-diabetic controls (p=0.001, t=3.6). DFU subjects had higher levels of CD11b(+) CD33(+) myeloid cells as compared to non-DFU T2DM control (p=0.003, t=2.8). Infection in the wound microenvironment could be the cause of increase in CD11b(+)CD33(+) myeloid cells in DFU (p=0.03, t=2.5). The up-regulation of myeloid cell-derived pro-inflammatory molecules S100A8 and IL-8 in combination with lower levels of CD11b(+) CD33(+) myeloid cells may cause the impairment of wound healing in T2DM subjects leading to chronic ulcers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Early post-natal exposure to intermittent hypoxia in rodents is pro-inflammatory, impairs white matter integrity and alters brain metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnall, Robert A.; Chen, Xi; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V.; Sirieix, Chrystelle M.; Gimi, Barjor; Knoblach, Susan; McEntire, Betty L.; Hunt, Carl E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Preterm infants are frequently exposed to intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with apnea and periodic breathing that may result in inflammation and brain injury that later manifests as cognitive and executive function deficits. We used a rodent model to determine whether early postnatal exposure to IH would result in inflammation and brain injury. Methods Rat pups were exposed to IH from P2–P12. Control animals were exposed to room air. Cytokines were analyzed in plasma and brain tissue at P13 and P18. At P20–P22, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) were performed. Results Pups exposed to IH had increased plasma Gro/CXCL1 and cerebellar IFN-γ and IL-1β at P13, and brainstem enolase at P18. DTI showed a decrease in FA and AD in the corpus callosum (CC) and cingulate gyrus and an increase in RD in the CC. MRS revealed decreases in NAA/Cho, Cr, Tau/Cr and Gly/Cr and increases in TCho and GPC in the brainstem and decreases in NAA/Cho in the hippocampus. Conclusions We conclude that early postnatal exposure to IH, similar in magnitude experienced in human preterm infants, is associated with evidence for pro-inflammatory changes, decreases in white matter integrity, and metabolic changes consistent with hypoxia. PMID:28388601

  12. Homeostatic regulation of T cell trafficking by a B cell-derived peptide is impaired in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimen, Myriam; McGettrick, Helen M; Apta, Bonita; Kuravi, Sahithi J; Yates, Clara M; Kennedy, Amy; Odedra, Arjun; Alassiri, Mohammed; Harrison, Matthew; Martin, Ashley; Barone, Francesca; Nayar, Saba; Hitchcock, Jessica R; Cunningham, Adam F; Raza, Karim; Filer, Andrew; Copland, David A; Dick, Andrew D; Robinson, Joseph; Kalia, Neena; Walker, Lucy S K; Buckley, Christopher D; Nash, Gerard B; Narendran, Parth; Rainger, G Ed

    2015-05-01

    During an inflammatory response, lymphocyte recruitment into tissue must be tightly controlled because dysregulated trafficking contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic disease. Here we show that during inflammation and in response to adiponectin, B cells tonically inhibit T cell trafficking by secreting a peptide (PEPITEM) proteolytically derived from 14.3.3 zeta delta (14.3.3.ζδ) protein. PEPITEM binds cadherin-15 on endothelial cells, promoting synthesis and release of sphingosine-1 phosphate, which inhibits trafficking of T cells without affecting recruitment of other leukocytes. Expression of adiponectin receptors on B cells and adiponectin-induced PEPITEM secretion wanes with age, implying immune senescence of the pathway. Additionally, these changes are evident in individuals with type 1 diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis, and circulating PEPITEM in patient serum is reduced compared to that of healthy age-matched donors. In both diseases, tonic inhibition of T cell trafficking across inflamed endothelium is lost. Control of patient T cell trafficking is re-established by treatment with exogenous PEPITEM. Moreover, in animal models of peritonitis, hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury, Salmonella infection, uveitis and Sjögren's syndrome, PEPITEM reduced T cell recruitment into inflamed tissues.

  13. Combining nitric oxide release with anti-inflammatory activity preserves nigrostriatal dopaminergic innervation and prevents motor impairment in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Impagnatiello Francesco

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current evidence suggests a role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD and in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP model of basal ganglia injury. Reportedly, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs mitigate DAergic neurotoxicity in rodent models of PD. Consistent with these findings, epidemiological analysis indicated that certain NSAIDs may prevent or delay the progression of PD. However, a serious impediment of chronic NSAID therapy, particularly in the elderly, is gastric, renal and cardiac toxicity. Nitric oxide (NO-donating NSAIDs, have a safer profile while maintaining anti-inflammatory activity of parent compounds. We have investigated the oral activity of the NO-donating derivative of flurbiprofen, [2-fluoro-α-methyl (1,1'-biphenyl-4-acetic-4-(nitrooxybutyl ester], HCT1026 (30 mg kg-1 daily in rodent chow in mice exposed to the parkinsonian neurotoxin MPTP. Methods Ageing mice were fed with a control, flurbiprofen, or HCT1026 diet starting ten days before MPTP administration and continuing for all the experimental period. Striatal high affinity synaptosomial dopamine up-take, motor coordination assessed with the rotarod, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH- and dopamine transporter (DAT fiber staining, stereological cell counts, immunoblotting and gene expression analyses were used to assess MPTP-induced nigrostriatal DAergic toxicity and glial activation 1-40 days post-MPTP. Results HCT1026 was well tolerated and did not cause any measurable toxic effect, whereas flurbiprofen fed mice showed severe gastrointestinal side-effects. HCT1026 efficiently counteracted motor impairment and reversed MPTP-induced decreased synaptosomal [3H]dopamine uptake, TH- and DAT-stained fibers in striatum and TH+ neuron loss in subtantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc, as opposed to age-matched mice fed with a control diet. These effects were associated to a significant decrease in reactive

  14. Zinc deficiency-induced iron accumulation, a consequence of alterations in iron regulatory protein-binding activity, iron transporters, and iron storage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Brad J; Clegg, Michael S; Hanna, Lynn A; Chou, Susan S; Momma, Tony Y; Hong, Heeok; Keen, Carl L

    2008-02-22

    One consequence of zinc deficiency is an elevation in cell and tissue iron concentrations. To examine the mechanism(s) underlying this phenomenon, Swiss 3T3 cells were cultured in zinc-deficient (D, 0.5 microM zinc), zinc-supplemented (S, 50 microM zinc), or control (C, 4 microM zinc) media. After 24 h of culture, cells in the D group were characterized by a 50% decrease in intracellular zinc and a 35% increase in intracellular iron relative to cells in the S and C groups. The increase in cellular iron was associated with increased transferrin receptor 1 protein and mRNA levels and increased ferritin light chain expression. The divalent metal transporter 1(+)iron-responsive element isoform mRNA was decreased during zinc deficiency-induced iron accumulation. Examination of zinc-deficient cells revealed increased binding of iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) and decreased binding of IRP1 to a consensus iron-responsive element. The increased IRP2-binding activity in zinc-deficient cells coincided with an increased level of IRP2 protein. The accumulation of IRP2 protein was independent of zinc deficiency-induced intracellular nitric oxide production but was attenuated by the addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or ascorbate to the D medium. These data support the concept that zinc deficiency can result in alterations in iron transporter, storage, and regulatory proteins, which facilitate iron accumulation.

  15. Change of cholinergic transmission and memory deficiency induced by injection of b-amyloid protein into NBM of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The change of cholinergic transmission of b-amyloid protein (b-AP) treated rats was studied by intracerebral microdialysis sampling combined with HPLC analysis. b-AP1-40 was injected into nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM). Passive avoidance response test (step-down test) and delayed alternation task were used for memory testing. The impairment of memory after injection of b-AP1-40 into NBM exhibited mainly the deficiency of short-term working memory. One week after injection of b-AP1-40 the release of acetylcholine (ACh) from frontal cortex of freely-moving rats decreased significantly, and the response of cholinergic nerve ending to the action of high [K+] solution was rather weak. In control animals the percentage of increase of ACh- release during behavioral performance was 57%, while in b-AP1-40 - treated rats it was 34%. The temporary in-crease of the ACh-release of the rat put into a new place was also significantly diminished in b-AP1-40 -treated rats. The results show that the injection of b-AP1-40 into NBM impairs the cholinergic transmission in frontal cortex, and the impairment of cholinergic transmission may be the main cause of the deficit of working memory.

  16. PKA-RIIB Deficiency Induces Brown Fatlike Adipocytes in Inguinal WAT and Promotes Energy Expenditure in Male FVB/NJ Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Wu, Wei; Huang, Shan; Xue, Ruidan; Wang, Yi; Wan, Yun; Zhang, Lv; Qin, Lang; Zhang, Qiongyue; Zhu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Ye, Hongying; Wu, Xiaohui; Li, Yiming

    2017-03-01

    Obesity has become the most common metabolic disorder worldwide. Promoting brown adipose tissue (BAT) and beige adipose tissue formation, and therefore, a functional increase in energy expenditure, may counteract obesity. Mice lacking type IIβ regulatory subunit of adenosine 3',5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA-RIIB) display reduced adiposity and resistance to diet-induced obesity. PKA-RIIB, encoded by the Prkar2b gene, is most abundant in BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT) and in the brain. In this study, we show that mice lacking PKA-RIIB have increased energy expenditure, limited weight gain, and improved glucose metabolism. PKA-RIIB deficiency induces brownlike adipocyte in inguinal WAT (iWAT). PKA-RIIB deficiency also increases the expression of uncoupling protein 1 and other thermogenic genes in iWAT and primary preadipocytes from iWAT through a mechanism involving increased PKA activity, which is represented by increased phosphorylation of PKA substrate, cAMP response element binding protein, and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Our study provides evidence for the role of PKA-RIIB deficiency in regulating thermogenesis in WAT, which may potentially have therapeutic implications for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  17. Sitagliptin, An Anti-diabetic Drug, Suppresses Estrogen Deficiency-Induced OsteoporosisIn Vivo and Inhibits RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuandong Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a disease characterized by excessive osteoclastic bone resorption. Some anti-diabetic drugs were demonstrated for anti-osteoclastic bone-loss effects. The present study investigated the skeletal effects of chronic administration of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV inhibitor that is increasingly used for type 2 diabetes treatments, in an estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis and elucidated the associated mechanisms. This study indicated that sitagliptin effectively prevented ovariectomy-induced bone loss and reduced osteoclast numbers in vivo. It was also indicated that sitagliptin suppressed receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation, bone resorption, and F-actin ring formation in a manner of dose-dependence. In addition, sitagliptin significantly reduced the expression of osteoclast-specific markers in mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages, including calcitonin receptor (Calcr, dendrite cell-specific transmembrane protein (Dc-stamp, c-Fos, and nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (Nfatc1. Further study indicated that sitagliptin inhibited osteoclastogenesis by suppressing AKT and ERK signaling pathways, scavenging ROS activity, and suppressing the Ca2+ oscillation that consequently affects the expression and/or activity of the osteoclast-specific transcription factors, c-Fos and NFATc1. Collectively, these findings suggest that sitagliptin possesses beneficial effects on bone and the suppression of osteoclast number implies that the effect is exerted directly on osteoclastogenesis.

  18. Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Visual Impairment KidsHealth / For Teens / Visual Impairment What's in ...

  19. Antivascular endothelial growth factors for inflammatory chorioretinal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Iacono, Pierluigi; Verbraak, Frank D.; Bandello, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Macular edema (ME) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) can complicate the course of several inflammatory chorioretinal diseases, leading to a severe visual function impairment. The most frequently involved clinical entities include for example multifocal choroiditis, presumed ocular

  20. Impaired Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Get the Facts What Works: Strategies to Increase Car Seat and Booster Seat ... narcotics. 3 That’s one percent of the 111 million self-reported episodes of alcohol-impaired driving among U.S. ...

  1. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity exacerbates ultraviolet B radiation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and cell survival signals in ultraviolet B-irradiated mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Som D.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated in several inflammatory diseases and in different types of cancer. Chronic inflammation induced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been implicated in various skin diseases, including melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. As the relationship between obesity and susceptibility to UV radiation-caused inflammation is not clearly understood, we assessed the role of obesity on UVB-induced inflammation, and mediators of this inflammatory response, using the genetically obese (leptin-deficient) mouse model. Leptin-deficient obese (ob/ob) mice and wild-type counterparts (C57/BL6 mice) were exposed to UVB radiation (120 mJ/cm 2 ) on alternate days for 1 month. The mice were then euthanized and skin samples collected for analysis of biomarkers of inflammatory responses using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, ELISA and real-time PCR. Here, we report that the levels of inflammatory responses were higher in the UVB-exposed skin of the ob/ob obese mice than those in the UVB-exposed skin of the wild-type non-obese mice. The levels of UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression, prostaglandin-E 2 production, proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell survival signals (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and p-Akt-Ser 473 ) were higher in the skin of the ob/ob obese mice than the those in skin of their wild-type non-obese counterparts. Compared with the wild-type non-obese mice, the leptin-deficient obese mice also exhibited greater activation of NF-κB/p65 and fewer apoptotic cells in the UVB-irradiated skin. Our study suggests for the first time that obesity in mice is associated with greater susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammatory responses and, therefore, obesity may increase susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammation-associated skin diseases, including the risk of skin cancer.

  2. Physical Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewin, Shari

    Many health conditions can lead to physical impairments that impact computer and Web access. Musculoskeletal conditions such as arthritis and cumulative trauma disorders can make movement stiff and painful. Movement disorders such as tremor, Parkinsonism and dystonia affect the ability to control movement, or to prevent unwanted movements. Often, the same underlying health condition also has sensory or cognitive effects. People with dexterity impairments may use a standard keyboard and mouse, or any of a wide range of alternative input mechanisms. Examples are given of the diverse ways that specific dexterity impairments and input mechanisms affect the fundamental actions of Web browsing. As the Web becomes increasingly sophisticated, and physically demanding, new access features at the Web browser and page level will be necessary.

  3. A Shift in ApoM/S1P Between HDL-Particles in Women With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated With Impaired Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the ApoM/S1P Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frej, Cecilia; Mendez, Armando J; Ruiz, Mario; Castillo, Melanie; Hughes, Thomas A; Dahlbäck, Björn; Goldberg, Ronald B

    2017-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) patients have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease despite high levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Apolipoprotein M (apoM) and its ligand sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P) exert many of the anti-inflammatory effects of HDL. We investigated whether apoM and S1P are altered in T1D and whether apoM and S1P are important for HDL functionality in T1D. ApoM and S1P were quantified in plasma from 42 healthy controls and 89 T1D patients. HDL was isolated from plasma and separated into dense, medium-dense, and light HDL by ultracentrifugation. Primary human aortic endothelial cells were challenged with tumor necrosis factor-α in the presence or absence of isolated HDL. Proinflammatory adhesion molecules E-selectin and vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 were quantified by flow cytometry. Activation of the S1P 1 - receptor was evaluated by analyzing downstream signaling targets and receptor internalization. There were no differences in plasma levels of apoM and S1P between controls and T1D patients, but the apoM/S1P complexes were shifted from dense to light HDL particles in T1D. ApoM/S1P in light HDL particles from women were less efficient in inhibiting expression of vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 than apoM/S1P in denser particles. The light HDL particles were unable to activate Akt, whereas all HDL subfractions were equally efficient in activating Erk and receptor internalization. ApoM/S1P in light HDL particles were inefficient in inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-α-induced vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in contrast to apoM/S1P in denser HDL particles. T1D patients have a higher proportion of light particles and hence more dysfunctional HDL, which could contribute to the increased cardiovascular disease risk associated with T1D. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Palaskar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is an uncommon lesion of unknown cause. It encompasses a spectrum of myofibroblastic proliferation along with varying amount of inflammatory infiltrate. A number of terms have been applied to the lesion, namely, inflammatory pseudotumor, fibrous xanthoma, plasma cell granuloma, pseudosarcoma, lymphoid hamartoma, myxoid hamartoma, inflammatory myofibrohistiocytic proliferation, benign myofibroblatoma, and most recently, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. The diverse nomenclature is mostly descriptive and reflects the uncertainty regarding true biologic nature of these lesions. Recently, the concept of this lesion being reactive has been challenged based on the clinical demonstration of recurrences and metastasis and cytogenetic evidence of acquired clonal chromosomal abnormalities. We hereby report a case of inflammatory pseudotumor and review its inflammatory versus neoplastic behavior.

  5. Dry eye disease as an inflammatory disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calonge, Margarita; Enríquez-de-Salamanca, Amalia; Diebold, Yolanda; González-García, María J; Reinoso, Roberto; Herreras, José M; Corell, Alfredo

    2010-08-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a prevalent inflammatory disorder of the lacrimal functional unit of multifactorial origin leading to chronic ocular surface disease, impaired quality of vision, and a wide range of complications, eventually causing a reduction in quality of life. It still is a frustrating disease because of the present scarcity of therapies that can reverse, or at least stop, its progression. A comprehensive literature survey of English-written scientific publications on the role of inflammation in DED. New investigations have demonstrated that a chronic inflammatory response plays a key role in the pathogenesis of human DED. Additionally, correlations between inflammatory molecules and clinical data suggest that inflammation can be responsible for some of the clinical symptoms and signs. Research efforts to clarify its pathophysiology are leading to a better understanding of DED, demonstrating that inflammation, in addition to many other factors, plays a relevant role.

  6. Ascorbic acid deficiency increases endotoxin influx to portal blood and liver inflammatory gene expressions in ODS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Yuki; Miura, Natsuko; Kobayashi, Misato; Hoshinaga, Yukiko; Murai, Atsushi; Aoyama, Hiroaki; Ito, Hiroyuki; Morita, Tatsuya; Horio, Fumihiko

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether ascorbic acid (AsA) deficiency-induced endotoxin influx into portal blood from the gastrointestinal tract contributes to the inflammatory changes in the liver. The mechanisms by which AsA deficiency provokes inflammatory changes in the liver were investigated in Osteogenic Disorder Shionogi (ODS) rats (which are unable to synthesize AsA). Male ODS rats (6-wk-old) were fed a diet containing sufficient (300 mg/kg) AsA (control group) or a diet without AsA (AsA-deficient group) for 14 or 18 d. On day 14, the hepatic mRNA levels of acute-phase proteins and inflammation-related genes were significantly higher in the AsA-deficient group than the control group, and these elevations by AsA deficiency were exacerbated on day 18. The serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, which induce acute-phase proteins in the liver, were also significantly elevated on day 14 in the AsA-deficient group compared with the respective values in the control group. IL-1β mRNA levels in the liver, spleen, and lung were increased by AsA deficiency. Moreover, on both days 14 and 18, the portal blood endotoxin concentration was significantly higher in the AsA-deficient group than in the control group, and a significant correlation between serum IL-1β concentrations and portal endotoxin concentrations was found in AsA-deficient rats. In the histologic analysis of the ileum tissues, the number of goblet cells per villi was increased by AsA deficiency. These results suggest that AsA deficiency-induced endotoxin influx into portal blood from the gastrointestinal tract contributes to the inflammatory changes in the liver. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Curcumin in inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehzad, Adeeb; Rehman, Gauhar; Lee, Young Sup

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric is also used as a remedy for the treatment and prevention of inflammatory diseases. Acute and chronic inflammation is a major factor in the progression of obesity, type II diabetes, arthritis, pancreatitis, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases, as well as certain types of cancer. Turmeric has a long history of use in Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Recent studies on the efficacy and therapeutic applicability of turmeric have suggested that the active ingredient of tumeric is curcumin. Further, compelling evidence has shown that curcumin has the ability to inhibit inflammatory cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis through multiple molecular targets and mechanisms of action. Curcumin is safe, non-toxic, and mediates its anti-inflammatory effects through the down-regulation of inflammatory transcription factors, cytokines, redox status, protein kinases, and enzymes that all promote inflammation. In addition, curcumin induces apoptosis through mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, as well as activation of caspase cascades. In the current study, the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin were evaluated relative to various chronic inflammatory diseases. Based on the available pharmacological data obtained from in vitro and in vivo research, as well as clinical trials, an opportunity exists to translate curcumin into clinics for the prevention of inflammatory diseases in the near future. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. 15-deoxy-δ12,14-prostaglandin j2 inhibits osteolytic breast cancer bone metastasis and estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Rim Kim

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the major cause of cancer death in women worldwide. The most common site of metastasis is bone. Bone metastases obstruct the normal bone remodeling process and aberrantly enhance osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, which results in osteolytic lesions. 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 is an endogenous ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ that has anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity at micromolar concentrations through PPARγ-dependent and/or PPARγ-independent pathways. We investigated the inhibitory activity of 15d-PGJ2 on the bone loss that is associated with breast cancer bone metastasis and estrogen deficiency caused by cancer treatment. 15d-PGJ2 dose-dependently inhibited viability, migration, invasion, and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP production in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. 15d-PGJ2 suppressed receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL mRNA levels and normalized osteoprotegerin (OPG mRNA levels in hFOB1.19 osteoblastic cells treated with culture medium from MDA-MB-231 cells or PTHrP, which decreased the RANKL/OPG ratio. 15d-PGJ2 blocked RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and inhibited the formation of resorption pits by decreasing the activities of cathepsin K and matrix metalloproteinases, which are secreted by mature osteoclasts. 15d-PGJ2 exerted its effects on breast cancer and bone cells via PPARγ-independent pathways. In Balb/c nu/nu mice that received an intracardiac injection of MDA-MB-231 cells, subcutaneously injected 15d-PGJ2 substantially decreased metastatic progression, cancer cell-mediated bone destruction in femora, tibiae, and mandibles, and serum PTHrP levels. 15d-PGJ2 prevented the destruction of femoral trabecular structures in estrogen-deprived ICR mice as measured by bone morphometric parameters and serum biochemical data. Therefore, 15d-PGJ2 may be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer

  9. Inflammatory Drug (NSAID)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inflammatory Drug (NSAID)-Induced Seizures in a Patient with HIV Infection ... interaction not supported by existing literature, and it is possible that the background HIV infection may have a role to .... Foods and Drug Administration and Control.

  10. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... white women. Inflammatory breast tumors are frequently hormone receptor negative, which means they cannot be treated with ...

  11. Chronic inflammatory demyelinative polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Said, Gérard; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinative polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired polyneuropathy presumably of immunological origin. It is characterized by a progressive or a relapsing course with predominant motor deficit. The diagnosis rests on the association of non-length-dependent predominantly motor...

  12. Role overload, pain and physical dysfunction in early rheumatoid or undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Sally; Looper Karl; Zelkowitz Phyllis; Purden Margaret; Baron Murray

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Inflammatory arthritis impairs participation in societal roles. Role overload arises when the demands by a given role set exceed the resources; time and energy, to carry out the required tasks. The present study examines the association between role overload and disease outcomes in early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Methods Patients (n = 104) of 7.61 months mean duration of inflammatory arthritis completed self-report questionnaires on sociodemographics, disease character...

  13. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  14. Diabetic Retinopathy: Vascular and Inflammatory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, F.; Cancarini, A.; dell'Omo, R.; Rezzola, S.; Romano, M. R.; Costagliola, C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of visual impairment in the working-age population of the Western world. The pathogenesis of DR is complex and several vascular, inflammatory, and neuronal mechanisms are involved. Inflammation mediates structural and molecular alterations associated with DR. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways associated with DR are not completely characterized. Previous studies indicate that tissue hypoxia and dysregulation of immune responses associated with diabetes mellitus can induce increased expression of numerous vitreous mediators responsible for DR development. Thus, analysis of vitreous humor obtained from diabetic patients has made it possible to identify some of the mediators (cytokines, chemokines, and other factors) responsible for DR pathogenesis. Further studies are needed to better understand the relationship between inflammation and DR. Herein the main vitreous-related factors triggering the occurrence of retinal complication in diabetes are highlighted. PMID:26137497

  15. Cortical visual impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Koželj, Urša

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we discuss cortical visual impairment, diagnosis that is in the developed world in first place, since 20 percent of children with blindness or low vision are diagnosed with it. The objectives of the thesis are to define cortical visual impairment and the definition of characters suggestive of the cortical visual impairment as well as to search for causes that affect the growing diagnosis of cortical visual impairment. There are a lot of signs of cortical visual impairment. ...

  16. Illness perceptions and outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease : Is coping a mediator?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erp, Sanne J. H.; Brakenhoff, Lianne K. P. M.; Vollmann, M.; van der Heijde, Désirée M.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Fidder, Herma H.; Hommes, D.W.; Kaptein, Ad A.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Scharloo, Margreet

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often experience severe impairment in different life domains. Psychological factors, such as illness perceptions and coping, may play a role in the adjustment to IBD as indicated by mental and physical health, activity and work impairment. The

  17. Inflammatory reaction in chondroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Sigeki; Sato, Keiji; Sugiura, Hideshi; Iwata, Hisashi

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction accompanying chondroblastoma and to define the value of the finding in clinical practice. We reviewed the clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in six patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma. In all cases, MR imaging showered marrow and soft tissue edema. In four of six cases, periosteal reaction related to intra-osseous edema was more clearly demonstrated on MR imaging than on radiographs. Follow-up MR studies after surgery were available in three patients and all showed disappearance of inflammatory responses such as marrow and soft tissue edema, and reactive synovitis. We propose that these inflammatory reactions of chondroblastomas are inportant signs for detecting residual tumor in recurrences after surgery, as well as for making a precise diagnosis. The MR changes may also be valuable in demonstrating eradication of the tumor. (orig./MG)

  18. Lung inflammatory pseudo tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veliz, Elizabeth; Leone, Gaetano; Cano, Fernando; Sanchez, Jaime

    2005-01-01

    The inflammatory pseudo tumor is a non neoplastic process characterized by an irregular growth of inflammatory cells. We described the case of a 38 year-old patient, she went to our institute for a in situ cervix cancer and left lung nodule without breathing symptoms; valued by neumology who did bronchoscopy with biopsy whose result was negative for malignancy. She went to surgery in where we find intraparenquima nodule in felt lingula of approximately 4 cms, we remove it; the result was: Inflammatory pseudotumor. This pathology is a not very frequent, it can develop in diverse regions of the organism, it is frequent in lung. The image tests are not specific for the diagnose, which it is possible only with the biopsy. The treatment is the complete resection. (The author)

  19. Inflammatory reaction in chondroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Sigeki [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sato, Keiji [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sugiura, Hideshi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Iwata, Hisashi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction accompanying chondroblastoma and to define the value of the finding in clinical practice. We reviewed the clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in six patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma. In all cases, MR imaging showered marrow and soft tissue edema. In four of six cases, periosteal reaction related to intra-osseous edema was more clearly demonstrated on MR imaging than on radiographs. Follow-up MR studies after surgery were available in three patients and all showed disappearance of inflammatory responses such as marrow and soft tissue edema, and reactive synovitis. We propose that these inflammatory reactions of chondroblastomas are inportant signs for detecting residual tumor in recurrences after surgery, as well as for making a precise diagnosis. The MR changes may also be valuable in demonstrating eradication of the tumor. (orig./MG)

  20. Vasculitis and inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard A; Scott, David G I

    2016-10-01

    Vasculitis has been described in most types of inflammatory arthritis. The best described and most widely recognised form is rheumatoid vasculitis. The incidence of systemic rheumatoid vasculitis has declined significantly following the general early use of methotrexate in the 1990s, and it is now a rare form of vasculitis. Treatment of rheumatoid vasculitis is conventionally with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, but there is an increasing role for rituximab similar to that in other types of vasculitis. Despite these developments the mortality of rheumatoid vasculitis remains high. Vasculitis in other types of inflammatory arthritis is less well described and the treatment remains empirical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. T cells in vascular inflammatory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas L Lintermans

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation of the human vasculature is a manifestation of many different diseases ranging from systemic autoimmune diseases to chronic inflammatory diseases, in which multiple types of immune cells are involved. For both autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases several observations support a key role for T lymphocytes in these disease pathologies, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Previous studies in several autoimmune diseases have demonstrated a significant role for a specific subset of CD4+ T cells termed effector memory T cells. This expanded population of effector memory T cells may contribute to tissue injury and disease progression. These cells exert multiple pro-inflammatory functions through the release of effector cytokines. Many of these cytokines have been detected in the inflammatory lesions and participate in the vasculitic reaction, contributing to recruitment of macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, NK cells, B cells and T cells. In addition, functional impairment of regulatory T cells paralyzes anti-inflammatory effects in vasculitic disorders. Interestingly, activation of effector memory T cells in uniquely dependent on the voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channel providing an anchor for specific drug targeting. In this review, we focus on the CD4+ T cells in the context of vascular inflammation and describe the evidence supporting the role of different T cell subsets in vascular inflammation. Selective targeting of pathogenic effector memory T cells might enable a more tailored therapeutic approach that avoids unwanted adverse side effects of generalized immunosuppression by modulating the effector functions of T cell responses to inhibit the development of vascular inflammation.

  2. Efferocytosis is impaired in Gaucher macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Borger, Daniel K; Grey, Richard J; Kirby, Martha; Anderson, Stacie; Lopez, Grisel; Sidransky, Ellen

    2017-04-01

    Gaucher disease, the inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase, is characterized by the presence of glucosylceramide-laden macrophages resulting from impaired digestion of aged erythrocytes or apoptotic leukocytes. Studies of macrophages from patients with type 1 Gaucher disease with genotypes N370S/N370S, N370S/L444P or N370S/c.84dupG revealed that Gaucher macrophages have impaired efferocytosis resulting from reduced levels of p67 phox and Rab7. The decreased Rab7 expression leads to impaired fusion of phagosomes with lysosomes. Moreover, there is defective translocation of p67 phox to phagosomes, resulting in reduced intracellular production of reactive oxygen species. These factors contribute to defective deposition and clearance of apoptotic cells in phagolysosomes, which may have an impact on the inflammatory response and contribute to the organomegaly and inflammation seen in patients with Gaucher disease. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  3. Is Hearing Impairment Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, inflammatory disease that affects 1% of the population. The auditory system may be involved during the course of disease; however the association of RA and hearing impairment has not been clearly defined. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review...... is to evaluate published clinical reports related to hearing impairment in patients with RA. Furthermore, we discuss possible pathologies and associated factors as well as new treatment modalities. METHOD: A thorough literature search was performed using available databases including Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane...... and ComDisDome to cover all relative reports. The following keywords were used: hearing loss, hearing difficulties, hearing disorders, hearing impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, mixed hearing loss, autoimmune hearing loss, drug ototoxicity, drug-induced hearing loss, hearing...

  4. Renal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerwagen, S T; Jensen, C; Bagi, P

    2007-01-01

    Renal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare soft-tissue tumor of controversial etiology with a potential for local recurrence after incomplete surgical resection. The radiological findings in renal IMT are not well described. We report two cases in adults with a renal mass treated...

  5. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a serious condition, in women. 1 in 8 women with a history of PID experience difficulties getting pregnant. You can prevent PID if you know how to protect yourself. What is PID? Pelvic inflammatory disease is an infection of a woman’s reproductive organs. It is a complication often caused ...

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide, yet the reasons remain unknown. New therapeutic approaches have been introduced in medical IBD therapy, but their impact on the natural history of IBD remains uncertain. This review will summarize the recent findings...

  7. Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) Overview Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an intermediate stage between the expected cognitive decline of normal aging and the more-serious decline of dementia. It ...

  8. Zinc absorption in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valberg, L.S.; Flanagan, P.R.; Kertesz, A.; Bondy, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    Zinc absorption was measured in 29 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and a wide spectrum of disease activity to determine its relationship to disease activity, general nutritional state, and zinc status. Patients with severe disease requiring either supplementary oral or parenteral nutrition were excluded. The mean 65ZnCl2 absorption, in the patients, determined using a 65Zn and 51Cr stool-counting test, 45 +/- 17% (SD), was significantly lower than the values, 54 +/- 16%, in 30 healthy controls, P less than 0.05. Low 65ZnCl2 absorption was related to undernutrition, but not to disease activity in the absence of undernutrition or to zinc status estimated by leukocyte zinc measurements. Mean plasma zinc or leukocyte zinc concentrations in patients did not differ significantly from controls, and only two patients with moderate disease had leukocyte zinc values below the 5th percentile of normal. In another group of nine patients with inflammatory bowel disease of mild-to-moderate severity and minimal nutritional impairment, 65Zn absorption from an extrinsically labeled turkey test meal was 31 +/- 10% compared to 33 +/- 7% in 17 healthy controls, P greater than 0.1. Thus, impairment in 65ZnCl2 absorption in the patients selected for this study was only evident in undernourished persons with moderate or severe disease activity, but biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency was uncommon, and clinical features of zinc depletion were not encountered

  9. Adapting for Impaired Patrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuyler, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Describes how a library, with an MCI Corporation grant, approached the process of setting up computers for the visually impaired. Discusses preparations, which included hiring a visually-impaired user as a consultant and contacting the VIP (Visually Impaired Persons) group; equipment; problems with the graphical user interface; and training.…

  10. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Charles M; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2006-04-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is the body's response to an infectious or noninfectious insult. Although the definition of SIRS refers to it as an "inflammatory" response, it actually has pro- and anti-inflammatory components. This review outlines the pathophysiology of SIRS and highlights potential targets for future therapeutic intervention in patients with this complex entity.

  11. Memory Impairment in Children with Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Gillian; Dworzynski, Katharina; Slonims, Vicky; Simonoff, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess whether any memory impairment co-occurring with language impairment is global, affecting both verbal and visual domains, or domain specific. Method: Visual and verbal memory, learning, and processing speed were assessed in children aged 6 years to 16 years 11 months (mean 9y 9m, SD 2y 6mo) with current,…

  12. Inflammatory manifestations of experimental lymphatic insufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Tabibiazar

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sustained lymph stagnation engenders a pathological response that is complex and not well characterized. Tissue inflammation in lymphedema may reflect either an active or passive consequence of impaired immune traffic. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We studied an experimental model of acute post-surgical lymphedema in the tails of female hairless, immunocompetent SKH-1 mice. We performed in vivo imaging of impaired immune traffic in experimental, murine acquired lymphatic insufficiency. We demonstrated impaired mobilization of immunocompetent cells from the lymphedematous region. These findings correlated with histopathological alterations and large-scale transcriptional profiling results. We found intense inflammatory changes in the dermis and the subdermis. The molecular pattern in the RNA extracted from the whole tissue was dominated by the upregulation of genes related to acute inflammation, immune response, complement activation, wound healing, fibrosis, and oxidative stress response. CONCLUSIONS: We have characterized a mouse model of acute, acquired lymphedema using in vivo functional imaging and histopathological correlation. The model closely simulates the volume response, histopathology, and lymphoscintigraphic characteristics of human acquired lymphedema, and the response is accompanied by an increase in the number and size of microlymphatic structures in the lymphedematous cutaneous tissues. Molecular characterization through clustering of genes with known functions provides insights into processes and signaling pathways that compose the acute tissue response to lymph stagnation. Further study of genes identified through this effort will continue to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and lead to potential therapeutic strategies for lymphatic vascular insufficiency.

  13. CT characterization of inflammatory paranasal sinus disease in cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggesboe, H.B.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: In patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) the prevalence of paranasal sinus affection approaches 100%. We hypothesized that the hyper viscous mucus reducing mucociliary clearance in CF patients could give sinonasal inflammatory patterns different from those in non-CF patients. We wanted to compare the extent and distribution of paranasal sinus disease and the inflammatory patterns in these two groups of patients. Material and Methods: One-hundred-and-eight CF patients (3-54 years old) and 79 controls (7-51 years old) with paranasal sinus disease confirmed at coronal CT were compared. The extent of disease was noted for each sinus and summed for all sinuses. Inflammatory patterns were identified and classified into: 1) routine surgery group (sporadic, infundibular and ostiomeatal complex (OMC) patterns) and 2) complex surgery group (sinonasal polyposis and sphenoethmoid recess (SER) patterns). Results: CF patients had more widespread sinonasal inflammatory changes and more advanced disease for each sinus. Most CF patients displayed sinonasal polyposis and SER patterns while most controls displayed sporadic, infundibular or OMC patterns. As a result, 67% of CF patients were classified to the complex surgery group, compared to only 19% of controls. Conclusion: The impaired mucociliary clearance in CF causes widespread inflammatory paranasal sinus disease, with inflammatory patterns more often requiring extensive surgery, with a higher risk of cerebrospinal fluid leak or bleeding, or involving areas that are more difficult to reach with the endoscope

  14. Obesity-driven gut microbiota inflammatory pathways to metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Agra eCavalcante-Silva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The intimate interplay between immune system, metabolism and gut microbiota plays an important role in controlling metabolic homeostasis and possible obesity development. Obesity involves impairment of immune response affecting both innate and adaptive immunity. The main factors involved in the relationship of obesity with inflammation have not been completely elucidated. On the other hand, gut microbiota, via innate immune receptors, has emerged as one of the key factors regulating events triggering acute inflammation associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Inflammatory disorders lead to several signalling transduction pathways activation, inflammatory cytokine, chemokine production and cell migration, which in turn cause metabolic dysfunction. Inflamed adipose tissue, with increased macrophages infiltration, is associated with impaired preadipocyte development and differentiation to mature adipose cells, leading to ectopic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. This review focuses on the relationship between obesity and inflammation, which is essential to understand the pathological mechanisms governing metabolic syndrome.

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Peter R; Iser, John

    2005-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in frequency in Australia. General practitioners play an important role in early diagnosis and in a multidisciplinary approach to managing such patients. Keeping abreast of evolving concepts, particularly in treatment, is challenging. This article aims to address key issues in diagnosis and management to better equip general practitioners for their role in multidisciplinary management of patients with IBD. Making the diagnosis can be difficult, but is facilitated by appropriate clinical suspicion and sensible judgment as to who undergoes diagnostic tests such as colonoscopy. Treatment of ulcerative colitis has changed little in recent years, except for our improved ability to deliver mesalazine to the large bowel via the recent availability of several oral and rectal preparations. Prevention of relapse using these is an important strategy in the majority of patients. Treatment of Crohn disease is changing due to more realistic concepts of the natural history of the disease and the development of new, powerful anti-inflammatory therapies. Attention to issues other than intestinal inflammation such as nutrition, education and counselling, remain important in achieving optimal management.

  16. Inflammatory breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagnerova, M.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an extremely aggressive disease that progresses rapidly and carries a very grim prognosis. It is characterized by erythema, rapid enlargement of the breast, skin ridging, and a characteristics peau d´orange appearance of the skin secondary to dermal lymphatic tumor involvement. Although a palpable tumor may not by present, about 55% to 85% of patient will present with metastases to the axillary or supraclavicular lymph nodes. Diagnosis of IBC is made on the basis of these clinical characteristics, as well as histologic verification of carcinoma. Accurate diagnosis is critically important, as multimodal therapy can significantly improve outcome if instituted early enough. Primary systemic treatment (neoadjuvant, induction, initials) is standard treatment for inflammatory breast cancer. If treatment response is not satisfactory it is necessary to look for new treatment regimens with different concept of dose intensity, density and sequence of treatment. In the neoadjuvant setting it is possible to employ all targeted and non-targeted therapies as was shown in a number of clinical trials. (author)

  17. Impaired esophageal motor function in eosinophilic esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilio Santander

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic immunoallergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus that represents a major cause of digestive morbidity among the pediatric and young adult populations. Despite the fact that key symptoms in adults include dysphagia and food impaction, many patients lack structural changes in the esophagus to account for their complaints, which suggests the presence of underlying motor disorders and esophageal distensibility impairment. In the last few years the esophageal motility of these patients has been studied using various approaches, most particularly high-resolution manometry, ambulatory manometry, and impedance planimetry. This review focuses on the most relevant findings and scientific evidence regarding esophageal motor disorders in eosinophilic esophagitis.

  18. Impaired esophageal motor function in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Cecilio; Chavarría-Herbozo, Carlos M; Becerro-González, Irene; Burgos-Santamaría, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic immunoallergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus that represents a major cause of digestive morbidity among the pediatric and young adult populations. Despite the fact that key symptoms in adults include dysphagia and food impaction, many patients lack structural changes in the esophagus to account for their complaints, which suggests the presence of underlying motor disorders and esophageal distensibility impairment. In the last few years the esophageal motility of these patients has been studied using various approaches, most particularly high-resolution manometry, ambulatory manometry, and impedance planimetry. This review focuses on the most relevant findings and scientific evidence regarding esophageal motor disorders in eosinophilic esophagitis.

  19. Criteria for driver impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brookhuis, K.A.; De Waard, D.; Fairclough, S.H

    2003-01-01

    Most traffic accidents can be attributed to driver impairment, e.g. inattention, fatigue, intoxication, etc. It is now technically feasible to monitor and diagnose driver behaviour with respect to impairment with the aid of a limited number of in-vehicle sensors. However, a valid framework for the

  20. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezza, Teresa; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Algieri, Francesca; Utrilla, Maria Pilar; Rodriguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients’ life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects. PMID:27070642

  1. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Vezza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients’ life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects.

  2. Neuroimmune regulation of inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnierse, Anneke

    2006-01-01

    The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Patients suffer from abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding and a substantial personal burden. The etiology of IBD is gradually being unraveled but remains a complex

  3. Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Didde; Andreassen, Bente Utoft; Heegaard, Niels Henrik H

    2018-01-01

    Background: Kidney disease has been reported in adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is regarded an extraintestinal manifestation or more rarely a side effect of the medical treatment. Methods: In this cross-sectional study we describe the extent of kidney pathology in a cohort of 56...... children with IBD. Blood and urine samples were analyzed for markers of kidney disease and ultrasonography was performed to evaluate pole-to-pole kidney length. Results: We found that 25% of the patients had either previously reported kidney disease or ultrasonographic signs of chronic kidney disease...... are at risk of chronic kidney disease, and the risk seems to be increased with the severity of the disease....

  4. Inflammatory biomarkers and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line Jee Hartmann; Schultz, Martin; Gaardsting, Anne

    2017-01-01

    and previous cancer diagnoses compared to patients who were not diagnosed with cancer. Previous cancer, C-reactive protein (CRP) and suPAR were significantly associated with newly diagnosed cancer during follow-up in multiple logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, sex and CRP. Neither any of the PRRs......In Denmark, patients with serious nonspecific symptoms and signs of cancer (NSSC) are referred to the diagnostic outpatient clinics (DOCs) where an accelerated cancer diagnostic program is initiated. Various immunological and inflammatory biomarkers have been associated with cancer, including...... soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) and the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) pentraxin-3, mannose-binding lectin, ficolin-1, ficolin-2 and ficolin-3. We aimed to evaluate these biomarkers and compare their diagnostic ability to classical biomarkers for diagnosing cancer...

  5. Complement Activation in Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Giang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The complement system is a fundamental part of the innate immune system, playing a crucial role in host defense against various pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Activation of complement results in production of several molecules mediating chemotaxis, opsonization, and mast cell degranulation, which can contribute to the elimination of pathogenic organisms and inflammation. Furthermore, the complement system also has regulating properties in inflammatory and immune responses. Complement activity in diseases is rather complex and may involve both aberrant expression of complement and genetic deficiencies of complement components or regulators. The skin represents an active immune organ with complex interactions between cellular components and various mediators. Complement involvement has been associated with several skin diseases, such as psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, cutaneous vasculitis, urticaria, and bullous dermatoses. Several triggers including auto-antibodies and micro-organisms can activate complement, while on the other hand complement deficiencies can contribute to impaired immune complex clearance, leading to disease. This review provides an overview of the role of complement in inflammatory skin diseases and discusses complement factors as potential new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  6. Congenital hearing impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, Caroline D. [Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Establishing the etiology of congenital hearing impairment can significantly improve treatment for certain causes of hearing loss and facilitates genetic counseling. High-resolution CT and MRI have contributed to the evaluation and management of hearing impairment. In addition, with the identification of innumerable genetic loci and genetic defects involved in hearing loss, genetic testing has emerged as an invaluable tool in the assessment of hearing impairment. Some of the common forms of congenital hearing loss are reviewed and their imaging features illustrated. (orig.)

  7. Congenital hearing impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, Caroline D.

    2006-01-01

    Establishing the etiology of congenital hearing impairment can significantly improve treatment for certain causes of hearing loss and facilitates genetic counseling. High-resolution CT and MRI have contributed to the evaluation and management of hearing impairment. In addition, with the identification of innumerable genetic loci and genetic defects involved in hearing loss, genetic testing has emerged as an invaluable tool in the assessment of hearing impairment. Some of the common forms of congenital hearing loss are reviewed and their imaging features illustrated. (orig.)

  8. Inflammatory pathways of importance for management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jannie; Coskun, Mehmet; Soendergaard, Christoffer

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract comprising Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Their etiologies are unknown, but they are characterised by an imbalanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators, e.g., tumor necrosis factor......-inflammatory cytokines, antibodies targeting integrins, and small anti-adhesion molecules that block adhesion between leukocytes and the intestinal vascular endothelium, reducing their infiltration into the inflamed mucosa. In this review we have elucidated the major signaling pathways of clinical importance for IBD...

  9. Impairments to Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an external Non-Government web site. Impairments to Vision Normal Vision Diabetic Retinopathy Age-related Macular Degeneration In this ... pictures, fixate on the nose to simulate the vision loss. In diabetic retinopathy, the blood vessels in ...

  10. Stormwater Impaired Watersheds

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Stormwater impaired watersheds occuring on both the Priority Waters (Part D - Completed TMDL) and 303(d) list of waters (Part A - need TMDL) The Vermont State...

  11. Idiopathic inflammatory myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieu, Joanna; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Limaye, Vidya

    2016-02-01

    Knowledge on idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) has evolved with the identification of myositis-associated and myositis-specific antibodies, development of histopathological classification and the recognition of how these correlate with clinical phenotype and response to therapy. In this paper, we outline key advances in diagnosis and histopathology, including the more recent identification of antibodies associated with immune-mediated necrotising myopathy (IMNM) and inclusion body myositis (IBM). Ongoing longitudinal observational cohorts allow further classification of these patients with IIM, their predicted clinical course and response to specific therapies. Registries have been developed worldwide for this purpose. A challenging aspect in IIM, a multisystem disease with multiple clinical subtypes, has been defining disease status and clinically relevant improvement. Tools for assessing activity and damage are now recognised to be important in determining disease activity and guiding therapeutic decision-making. The International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies (IMACS) group has developed such tools for use in research and clinical settings. There is limited evidence for specific treatment strategies in IIM. With significant development in the understanding of IIM and improved classification, longitudinal observational cohorts and trials using validated outcome measures are necessary, to provide important information for evidence-based care in the clinical setting. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Macrophage dysfunction impairs resolution of inflammation in the wounds of diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Khanna

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a characteristic feature of diabetic cutaneous wounds. We sought to delineate novel mechanisms involved in the impairment of resolution of inflammation in diabetic cutaneous wounds. At the wound-site, efficient dead cell clearance (efferocytosis is a pre-requisite for the timely resolution of inflammation and successful healing.Macrophages isolated from wounds of diabetic mice showed significant impairment in efferocytosis. Impaired efferocytosis was associated with significantly higher burden of apoptotic cells in wound tissue as well as higher expression of pro-inflammatory and lower expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Observations related to apoptotic cell load at the wound site in mice were validated in the wound tissue of diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Forced Fas ligand driven elevation of apoptotic cell burden at the wound site augmented pro-inflammatory and attenuated anti-inflammatory cytokine response. Furthermore, successful efferocytosis switched wound macrophages from pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory mode.Taken together, this study presents first evidence demonstrating that diabetic wounds suffer from dysfunctional macrophage efferocytosis resulting in increased apoptotic cell burden at the wound site. This burden, in turn, prolongs the inflammatory phase and complicates wound healing.

  13. Vitamin B12 deficiency results in severe oxidative stress, leading to memory retention impairment in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bito, Tomohiro; Misaki, Taihei; Yabuta, Yukinori; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Fumio

    2017-04-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in various human diseases and conditions, such as a neurodegeneration, which is the major symptom of vitamin B 12 deficiency, although the underlying disease mechanisms associated with vitamin B 12 deficiency are poorly understood. Vitamin B 12 deficiency was found to significantly increase cellular H 2 O 2 and NO content in Caenorhabditis elegans and significantly decrease low molecular antioxidant [reduced glutathione (GSH) and L-ascorbic acid] levels and antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase and catalase) activities, indicating that vitamin B 12 deficiency induces severe oxidative stress leading to oxidative damage of various cellular components in worms. An NaCl chemotaxis associative learning assay indicated that vitamin B 12 deficiency did not affect learning ability but impaired memory retention ability, which decreased to approximately 58% of the control value. When worms were treated with 1mmol/L GSH, L-ascorbic acid, or vitamin E for three generations during vitamin B 12 deficiency, cellular malondialdehyde content as an index of oxidative stress decreased to the control level, but the impairment of memory retention ability was not completely reversed (up to approximately 50%). These results suggest that memory retention impairment formed during vitamin B 12 deficiency is partially attributable to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Integrated Inflammatory Stress (ITIS) Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Elisabeth O.; Hjorth, Poul G.; Olufsen, Mette S.

    2017-01-01

    maintains a long-term level of the stress hormone cortisol which is also anti-inflammatory. A new integrated model of the interaction between these two subsystems of the inflammatory system is proposed and coined the integrated inflammatory stress (ITIS) model. The coupling mechanisms describing....... A constant activation results in elevated levels of the variables in the model while a prolonged change of the oscillations in ACTH and cortisol concentrations is the most pronounced result of different LPS doses predicted by the model....

  15. Radiotherapy of brain inflammatory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pil', B.N.

    1982-01-01

    An experience of radiation treatment of brain inflammatory diseases is described. Radiation treatment goes with antiinflammatory, anticonvulsive agents, with resorbing and dehydrating measures and some times with surgical treatment. The methods of radiation treatment of convexital and optochiasmic arachnoiditis

  16. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner-Blazek, Mirja; Rovira, Alex; Fillipp, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can be class......Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can...... be classified according to previously suggested radiologic characteristics and how this classification relates to prognosis. Searching the databases of eight tertiary referral centres we identified 90 adult patients (61 women, 29 men; mean age 34 years) with ≥1 AIIDL. We collected their demographic, clinical...

  17. Monocytes/Macrophages Control Resolution of Transient Inflammatory Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemen, Hanneke L. D. M.; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Carbajal, Anibal Garza; Wang, Huijing; Mack, Matthias; Zijlstra, Jitske; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Kavelaars, Annemieke

    2014-01-01

    Insights into mechanisms governing resolution of inflammatory pain are of great importance for many chronic pain–associated diseases. Here we investigate the role of macrophages/monocytes and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) in the resolution of transient inflammatory pain. Depletion of mice from peripheral monocytes/macrophages delayed resolution of intraplantar IL-1β- and carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia from 1 to 3 days to >1 week. Intrathecal administration of a neutralizing IL-10 antibody also markedly delayed resolution of IL-1β- and carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. Recently, we showed that IL-1β- and carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia is significantly prolonged in LysM-GRK2+/− mice, which have reduced levels of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in LysM+ myeloid cells. Here we show that adoptive transfer of wild-type, but not of GRK2+/−, bone marrow-derived monocytes normalizes the resolution of IL-1β-induced hyperalgesia in LysM-GRK2+/− mice. Adoptive transfer of IL-10−/− bone marrow-derived monocytes failed to normalize the duration of IL-1β-induced hyperalgesia in LysM-GRK2+/− mice. Mechanistically, we show that GRK2+/− macrophages produce less IL-10 in vitro. In addition, intrathecal IL-10 administration attenuated IL-1β-induced hyperalgesia in LysM-GRK2+/− mice, whereas it had no effect in wild-type mice. Our data uncover a key role for monocytes/macrophages in promoting resolution of inflammatory hyperalgesia via a mechanism dependent on IL-10 signaling in dorsal root ganglia. Perspective We show that IL-10-producing monocytes/macrophages promote resolution of transient inflammatory hyperalgesia. Additionally, we show that reduced monocyte/macrophage GRK2 impairs resolution of hyperalgesia and reduces IL-10 production. We propose that low GRK2 expression and/or impaired IL-10 production by monocytes/macrophages represent peripheral biomarkers for the risk of developing

  18. Platelet CD40L mediates thrombotic and inflammatory processes in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, Dirk; Zernecke, Alma; Seijkens, Tom; Soehnlein, Oliver; Beckers, Linda; Munnix, Imke C. A.; Wijnands, Erwin; Goossens, Pieter; van Kruchten, Roger; Thevissen, Larissa; Boon, Louis; Flavell, Richard A.; Noelle, Randolph J.; Gerdes, Norbert; Biessen, Erik A.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Weber, Christian; Lutgens, Esther

    2010-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L), identified as a costimulatory molecule expressed on T cells, is also expressed and functional on platelets. We investigated the thrombotic and inflammatory contributions of platelet CD40L in atherosclerosis. Although CD40L-deficient (Cd40l(-/-)) platelets exhibited impaired

  19. Vascular cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Vakhnina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular pathology of the brain is the second most common cause of cognitive impairment after Alzheimer's disease. The article describes the modern concepts of etiology, pathogenetic mechanisms, clinical features and approaches to diagnosis and therapy of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI. Cerebrovascular accident, chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency and their combination, sometimes in combination with a concomitant neurodegenerative process, are shown to be the major types of brain lesions leading to VCI. The clinical presentation of VCI is characterized by the neuropsychological status dominated by impairment of the executive frontal functions (planning, control, attention in combination with focal neurological symptoms. The diagnosis is based on comparing of the revealed neuropsychological and neurological features with neuroimaging data. Neurometabolic, acetylcholinergic, glutamatergic, and other vasoactive drugs and non-pharmacological methods are widely used to treat VCI. 

  20. Lithium and Renal Impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Ernst; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Nolen, Willem A

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lithium is established as an effective treatment of mania, of depression in bipolar and unipolar disorder, and in maintenance treatment of these disorders. However, due to the necessity of monitoring and concerns about irreversible adverse effects, in particular renal impairment......, after long-term use, lithium might be underutilized. METHODS: This study reviewed 6 large observational studies addressing the risk of impaired renal function associated with lithium treatment and methodological issues impacting interpretation of results. RESULTS: An increased risk of renal impairment...... associated with lithium treatment is suggested. This increased risk may, at least partly, be a result of surveillance bias. Additionally, the earliest studies pointed toward an increased risk of end-stage renal disease associated with lithium treatment, whereas the later and methodologically most sound...

  1. Neurotoxicity of developmental hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism in rats: Impairments of long-term potentiation are mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi; Wei, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Dong, Jing; Song, Binbin; Min, Hui [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Teng, Weiping, E-mail: twpendocrine@yahoo.com.cn [Liaoning Provincial Key Laboratory of Endocrine Diseases, the First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Chen, Jie, E-mail: chenjie@mail.cmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang (China)

    2013-09-01

    Neurotoxicity of iodine deficiency-induced hypothyroidism during developmental period results in serious impairments of brain function, such as learning and memory. These impairments are largely irreversible, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In addition to hypothyroidism, iodine deficiency may cause hypothyroxinemia, a relatively subtle form of thyroid hormone deficiency. Neurotoxicity of developmental hypothyroxinemia also potentially impairs learning and memory. However, more direct evidence of the associations between developmental hypothyroxinemia and impairments of learning and memory should be provided, and the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the effects of developmental hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism on long-term potentiation (LTP), a widely accepted cellular model of learning and memory, in the hippocampal CA1 region. The activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway – a pathway closely associated with synaptic plasticity and learning and memory – was also investigated. Wistar rats were treated with iodine deficient diet or methimazole (MMZ) to induce developmental hypothyroxinemia or hypothyroidism. The results showed that developmental hypothyroxinemia caused by mild iodine deficiency and developmental hypothyroidism caused by severe iodine deficiency or MMZ significantly reduced the field-excitatory postsynaptic potential (f-EPSP) slope and the population spike (PS) amplitude. Decreased activation of the PI3K signaling pathway was also observed in rats subjected to developmental hypothyroxinemia or hypothyroidism. Our results may support the hypothesis that neurotoxicity of both developmental hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism causes damages to learning and memory. Our results also suggest that decreased activation of the PI3K signaling pathway may contribute to impairments of LTP caused by neurotoxicity of both developmental hypothyroxinemia and

  2. Neurotoxicity of developmental hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism in rats: Impairments of long-term potentiation are mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yi; Wei, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Dong, Jing; Song, Binbin; Min, Hui; Teng, Weiping; Chen, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Neurotoxicity of iodine deficiency-induced hypothyroidism during developmental period results in serious impairments of brain function, such as learning and memory. These impairments are largely irreversible, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In addition to hypothyroidism, iodine deficiency may cause hypothyroxinemia, a relatively subtle form of thyroid hormone deficiency. Neurotoxicity of developmental hypothyroxinemia also potentially impairs learning and memory. However, more direct evidence of the associations between developmental hypothyroxinemia and impairments of learning and memory should be provided, and the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the effects of developmental hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism on long-term potentiation (LTP), a widely accepted cellular model of learning and memory, in the hippocampal CA1 region. The activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway – a pathway closely associated with synaptic plasticity and learning and memory – was also investigated. Wistar rats were treated with iodine deficient diet or methimazole (MMZ) to induce developmental hypothyroxinemia or hypothyroidism. The results showed that developmental hypothyroxinemia caused by mild iodine deficiency and developmental hypothyroidism caused by severe iodine deficiency or MMZ significantly reduced the field-excitatory postsynaptic potential (f-EPSP) slope and the population spike (PS) amplitude. Decreased activation of the PI3K signaling pathway was also observed in rats subjected to developmental hypothyroxinemia or hypothyroidism. Our results may support the hypothesis that neurotoxicity of both developmental hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism causes damages to learning and memory. Our results also suggest that decreased activation of the PI3K signaling pathway may contribute to impairments of LTP caused by neurotoxicity of both developmental hypothyroxinemia and

  3. Interaction of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 2/ABCC2- and MRP4/ABCC4-mediated methotrexate transport.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Sheikh, A.A.K.; Heuvel, J.J.M.W. van den; Koenderink, J.B.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) has been used in combination with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the treatment of inflammatory diseases as well as malignancies. Especially at high MTX dosages, severe adverse effects with this combination may occur, usually resulting from an impaired renal

  4. Social communication impairments: pragmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Robert L

    2007-06-01

    Social communication or pragmatic impairments are characterized and illustrated as involving inappropriate or ineffective use of language and gesture in social contexts. Three clinical vignettes illustrate different pragmatic impairments and the wealth of diagnostic information that can be garnered from observation of a child's social communication behavior. Definitions of, and developmental milestones in, domains of pragmatic competence are provided. Several screening instruments are suggested for use in assessing pragmatic competence within the time-frame of a pediatric examination. Frequent comorbid psychiatric conditions are described and a sample of current neurobiologic research is briefly summarized.

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease: the role of inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Balding

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE mechanisms responsible for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD have not been fully elucidated, although the main cause of disease pathology is attributed to up-regulated inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of polymorphisms in genes encoding pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in IBD patients and controls. We determined genotypes of patients with IBD (n=172 and healthy controls (n=389 for polymorphisms in genes encoding various cytokines (interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF, IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist. Association of these genotypes to disease incidence and pathophysiology was investigated. No strong association was found with occurrence of IBD. Variation was observed between the ulcerative colitis study group and the control population for the TNF-α-308 polymorphism (p=0.0135. There was also variation in the frequency of IL-6-174 and TNF-α-308 genotypes in the ulcerative colitis group compared with the Crohn's disease group (p=0.01. We concluded that polymorphisms in inflammatory genes are associated with variations in IBD phenotype and disease susceptibility. Whether the polymorphisms are directly involved in regulating cytokine production, and consequently pathophysiology of IBD, or serve merely as markers in linkage disequilibrium with susceptibility genes remains unclear.

  6. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused a novel mutation in CDSN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telem, Dana Fuchs; Israeli, Shirli; Sarig, Ofer; Sprecher, Eli

    2012-04-01

    Generalized peeling skin syndrome (PSS) is a rare autosomal recessive dermatosis manifesting with continuous exfoliation of the stratum corneum. The inflammatory (type B) subtype of PSS was recently found to be caused by deleterious mutations in the CDSN gene encoding corneodesmosin, a major component of desmosomal junctions in the uppermost layers of the epidermis. In the present study, we assessed a 10-month-old baby, who presented with generalized superficial peeling of the skin. Using PCR amplification and direct sequencing, we identified the third PSS-associated mutation in CDSN, a homozygous 4 bp duplication in the second exon of the gene (c.164_167dup GCCT; p.Thr57ProfsX6). These data further support the notion that corneodesmosin deficiency impairs cell-cell adhesion in the upper epidermis, paving the way for an abnormal inflammatory response due to epidermal barrier disruption.

  7. Medications and impaired driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetland, Amanda; Carr, David B

    2014-04-01

    To describe the association of specific medication classes with driving outcomes and provide clinical recommendations. The MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for articles published from January 1973 to June 2013 on classes of medications associated with driving impairment. The search included outcome terms such as automobile driving, motor vehicle crash, driving simulator, and road tests. Only English-language articles that contained findings from observational or interventional designs with ≥ 10 participants were included in this review. Cross-sectional studies, case series, and case reports were excluded. Driving is an important task and activity for the majority of adults. Some commonly prescribed medications have been associated with driving impairment measured by road performance, driving simulation, and/or motor vehicle crashes. This review of 30 studies identified findings with barbiturates, benzodiazepines, hypnotics, antidepressants, opioid and nonsteroidal analgesics, anticonvulsants, antipsychotics, antiparkinsonian agents, skeletal muscle relaxants, antihistamines, anticholinergic medications, and hypoglycemic agents. Additional studies of medication impact on sedation, sleep latency, and psychomotor function, as well as the role of alcohol, are also discussed. Psychotropic agents and those with central nervous system side effects were associated with measures of impaired driving performance. It is difficult to determine if such associations are actually a result of medication use or the medical diagnosis itself. Regardless, clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of impaired driving with specific classes of medications, educate their patients, and/or consider safer alternatives.

  8. Peripheral surgical wounding may induce cognitive impairment through interlukin-6-dependent mechanisms in aged mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Yuanlin; Xu, Zhipeng; Huang, Lining; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is associated with morbidity, mortality and increased cost of medical care. However, the neuropathogenesis and targeted interventions of POCD remain largely to be determined. We have found that the peripheral surgical wounding induces an age-dependent A? accumulation, neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pro-inflammatory cytokine interlukin-6 (IL-6) has been reported to be associated with cognitive impairment in rodents and human...

  9. Grammatical Impairments in PPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cynthia K; Mack, Jennifer E

    2014-09-01

    Grammatical impairments are commonly observed in the agrammatic subtype of primary progressive aphasia (PPA-G), whereas grammatical processing is relatively preserved in logopenic (PPA-L) and semantic (PPA-S) subtypes. We review research on grammatical deficits in PPA and associated neural mechanisms, with discussion focused on production and comprehension of four aspects of morphosyntactic structure: grammatical morphology, functional categories, verbs and verb argument structure, and complex syntactic structures. We also address assessment of grammatical deficits in PPA, with emphasis on behavioral tests of grammatical processing. Finally, we address research examining the effects of treatment for progressive grammatical impairments. PPA-G is associated with grammatical deficits that are evident across linguistic domains in both production and comprehension. PPA-G is associated with damage to regions including the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and dorsal white matter tracts, which have been linked to impaired comprehension and production of complex sentences. Detailing grammatical deficits in PPA is important for estimating the trajectory of language decline and associated neuropathology. We, therefore, highlight several new assessment tools for examining different aspects of morphosyntactic processing in PPA. Individuals with PPA-G present with agrammatic deficit patterns distinct from those associated with PPA-L and PPA-S, but similar to those seen in agrammatism resulting from stroke, and patterns of cortical atrophy and white matter changes associated with PPA-G have been identified. Methods for clinical evaluation of agrammatism, focusing on comprehension and production of grammatical morphology, functional categories, verbs and verb argument structure, and complex syntactic structures are recommended and tools for this are emerging in the literature. Further research is needed to investigate the real-time processes underlying grammatical impairments in

  10. The Central Role of the Gut Microbiota in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Marcantonio Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The commensal microbiota is in constant interaction with the immune system, teaching immune cells to respond to antigens. Studies in mice have demonstrated that manipulation of the intestinal microbiota alters host immune cell homeostasis. Additionally, metagenomic-sequencing analysis has revealed alterations in intestinal microbiota in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, and obesity. Perturbations in the microbiota composition result in a deficient immune response and impaired tolerance to commensal microorganisms. Due to altered microbiota composition which is associated to some inflammatory diseases, several strategies, such as the administration of probiotics, diet, and antibiotic usage, have been utilized to prevent or ameliorate chronic inflammatory diseases. The purpose of this review is to present and discuss recent evidence showing that the gut microbiota controls immune system function and onset, development, and resolution of some common inflammatory diseases.

  11. Inflammatory Mediators Drive Adverse Right Ventricular Remodeling and Dysfunction and Serve as Potential Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydykov, Akylbek; Mamazhakypov, Argen; Petrovic, Aleksandar; Kosanovic, Djuro; Sarybaev, Akpay S.; Weissmann, Norbert; Ghofrani, Hossein A.; Schermuly, Ralph T.

    2018-01-01

    Adverse right ventricular (RV) remodeling leads to ventricular dysfunction and failure that represents an important determinant of outcome in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Recent evidence indicates that inflammatory activation contributes to the pathogenesis of adverse RV remodeling and dysfunction. It has been shown that accumulation of inflammatory cells such as macrophages and mast cells in the right ventricle is associated with maladaptive RV remodeling. In addition, inhibition of inflammation in animal models of RV failure ameliorated RV structural and functional impairment. Furthermore, a number of circulating inflammatory mediators have been demonstrated to be associated with RV performance. This work reviews the role of inflammation in RV remodeling and dysfunction and discusses anti-inflammatory strategies that may attenuate adverse structural alterations while promoting improvement of RV function. PMID:29875701

  12. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of Tualang honey in alkali injury on the eyes of rabbits: Experimental animal study

    OpenAIRE

    Bashkaran, Karuppannan; Zunaina, Embong; Bakiah, Shaharuddin; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Sirajudeen, KNS; Naik, Venkatesh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Alkali injury is one of the most devastating injuries to the eye. It results in permanent unilateral or bilateral visual impairment. Chemical eye injury is accompanied by an increase in the oxidative stress. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents play a major role in the treatment of chemical eye injuries. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory (clinical and histopathological) and antioxidant effects of Tualang honey versus conventional treatment ...

  13. Enhanced function of immuno-isolated islets in diabetes therapy by co-encapsulation with an anti-inflammatory drug

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, Tram T.; Thai, Anh V.; Cohen, Joshua; Slosberg, Jeremy E.; Siniakowicz, Karolina; Doloff, Joshua C.; Ma, Minglin; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Tang, Katherine; Gu, Zhen; Cheng, Hao; Weir, Gordon C.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Immuno-isolation of islets has the potential to enable the replacement of pancreatic function in diabetic patients. However, host response to the encapsulated islets frequently leads to fibrotic overgrowth with subsequent impairment of the transplanted grafts. Here, we identified and incorporated anti-inflammatory agents into islet-containing microcapsules to address this challenge. In vivo subcutaneous screening of 16 small molecule anti-inflammatory drugs was performed to identify promising...

  14. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  15. Subclinical Inflammatory Status in Rett Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Cortelazzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation has been advocated as a possible common central mechanism for developmental cognitive impairment. Rett syndrome (RTT is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder, mainly caused by de novo loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding MeCP2. Here, we investigated plasma acute phase response (APR in stage II (i.e., “pseudo-autistic” RTT patients by routine haematology/clinical chemistry and proteomic 2-DE/MALDI-TOF analyses as a function of four major MECP2 gene mutation types (R306C, T158M, R168X, and large deletions. Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate values (median 33.0 mm/h versus 8.0 mm/h, P<0.0001 were detectable in RTT, whereas C-reactive protein levels were unchanged (P=0.63. The 2-DE analysis identified significant changes for a total of 17 proteins, the majority of which were categorized as APR proteins, either positive (n=6 spots or negative (n=9 spots, and to a lesser extent as proteins involved in the immune system (n=2 spots, with some proteins having overlapping functions on metabolism (n=7 spots. The number of protein changes was proportional to the severity of the mutation. Our findings reveal for the first time the presence of a subclinical chronic inflammatory status related to the “pseudo-autistic” phase of RTT, which is related to the severity carried by the MECP2 gene mutation.

  16. Working with impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Maroesjka Versantvoort; Patricia van Echtelt

    2012-01-01

    Original title: Belemmerd aan het werk The Netherlands was long known as a country with high sickness absenteeism rates and a burgeoning group of people who were unfit for work. In response to this, many policy measures have been introduced in recent decades which attempt to limit the benefit volume and foster the reintegration of people with health impairments. What is the position of the Netherlands today in this regard? The main trends in sickness absenteeism, degree of incapacity for work...

  17. Age-Related Sensory Impairments and Risk of Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Mary E; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Schubert, Carla R; Pinto, Alex A; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Klein, Barbara EK; Klein, Ronald; Tweed, Ted S.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives To evaluate the associations of sensory impairments with the 10-year risk of cognitive impairment. Previous work has primarily focused on the relationship between a single sensory system and cognition. Design The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS) is a longitudinal, population-based study of aging in the Beaver Dam, WI community. Baseline examinations were conducted in 1993 and follow-up exams have been conducted every 5 years. Setting General community Participants EHLS members without cognitive impairment at EHLS-2 (1998–2000). There were 1,884 participants (mean age = 66.7 years) with complete EHLS-2 sensory data and follow-up information. Measurements Cognitive impairment was a Mini-Mental State Examination score of impairment was a pure-tone average of hearing thresholds (0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz) of > 25 decibel Hearing Level in either ear. Visual impairment was Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity of impairment was a San Diego Odor Identification Test score of impairment were independently associated with cognitive impairment risk [Hearing: Hazard Ratio (HR) = 1.90, 95% Confidence Interval (C.I.) = 1.11, 3.26; Vision: HR = 2.05, 95% C.I. = 1.24, 3.38; Olfaction: HR = 3.92, 95% C.I. = 2.45, 6.26]. However, 85% with hearing impairment, 81% with visual impairment, and 76% with olfactory impairment did not develop cognitive impairment during follow-up. Conclusion The relationship between sensory impairment and cognitive impairment was not unique to one sensory system suggesting sensorineural health may be a marker of brain aging. The development of a combined sensorineurocognitive measure may be useful in uncovering mechanisms of healthy brain aging. PMID:27611845

  18. Assessment of Hearing Impaired Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Doin E., Ed.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The issue of Directions contains 11 articles on assessment of hearing impaired individuals. Entries have the following titles and authors: "Classroom Assessment Techniques for Hearing Impaired Students--A Literature Review" (B. McKee, M. Hausknecht); "Informal Assessment of Hearing Impaired Students In the Classroom" (B. Culhane, R. Hein);…

  19. Inflammatory Response in Islet Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar A. Kanak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation is a promising beta cell replacement therapy for patients with brittle type 1 diabetes as well as refractory chronic pancreatitis. Despite the vast advancements made in this field, challenges still remain in achieving high frequency and long-term successful transplant outcomes. Here we review recent advances in understanding the role of inflammation in islet transplantation and development of strategies to prevent damage to islets from inflammation. The inflammatory response associated with islets has been recognized as the primary cause of early damage to islets and graft loss after transplantation. Details on cell signaling pathways in islets triggered by cytokines and harmful inflammatory events during pancreas procurement, pancreas preservation, islet isolation, and islet infusion are presented. Robust control of pre- and peritransplant islet inflammation could improve posttransplant islet survival and in turn enhance the benefits of islet cell transplantation for patients who are insulin dependent. We discuss several potent anti-inflammatory strategies that show promise for improving islet engraftment. Further understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response will provide the basis for developing potent therapeutic strategies for enhancing the quality and success of islet transplantation.

  20. Inflammatory Response in Islet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanak, Mazhar A.; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Lawrence, Michael C.; Levy, Marlon F.

    2014-01-01

    Islet cell transplantation is a promising beta cell replacement therapy for patients with brittle type 1 diabetes as well as refractory chronic pancreatitis. Despite the vast advancements made in this field, challenges still remain in achieving high frequency and long-term successful transplant outcomes. Here we review recent advances in understanding the role of inflammation in islet transplantation and development of strategies to prevent damage to islets from inflammation. The inflammatory response associated with islets has been recognized as the primary cause of early damage to islets and graft loss after transplantation. Details on cell signaling pathways in islets triggered by cytokines and harmful inflammatory events during pancreas procurement, pancreas preservation, islet isolation, and islet infusion are presented. Robust control of pre- and peritransplant islet inflammation could improve posttransplant islet survival and in turn enhance the benefits of islet cell transplantation for patients who are insulin dependent. We discuss several potent anti-inflammatory strategies that show promise for improving islet engraftment. Further understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response will provide the basis for developing potent therapeutic strategies for enhancing the quality and success of islet transplantation. PMID:24883060

  1. Inflammatory mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Zhan, S. S.; van Gool, W. A.; Allsop, D.

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is aetiologically heterogeneous, but the pathogenesis is often considered to be initiated by the deposition of amyloid fibrils, followed by neuritic tau pathology and neuronal death. A variety of inflammatory proteins has been identified in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's

  2. Neonatal umbilical inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antenatal scan. The preferred treatment option is resection of the tumor. Spontaneous regression has been described. Ann Pediatr Surg 13:160–162 c 2017 Annals of Pediatric. Surgery. ... Keywords: inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, neonatal tumor, surgical resection ... Other anatomical regions were the brain, the.

  3. Inflammatory mechanisms in the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Moldoveanu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available B Moldoveanu1, P Otmishi1, P Jani1, J Walker1,2, X Sarmiento3, J Guardiola1, M Saad1, Jerry Yu11Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA, 40292; 2Department of Respiratory Therapy, Bellarmine University, Louisville, KY, USA, 40205; 3Intensive Care Medicine Service, University Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain 08916Abstract: Inflammation is the body’s response to insults, which include infection, trauma, and hypersensitivity. The inflammatory response is complex and involves a variety of mechanisms to defend against pathogens and repair tissue. In the lung, inflammation is usually caused by pathogens or by exposure to toxins, pollutants, irritants, and allergens. During inflammation, numerous types of inflammatory cells are activated. Each releases cytokines and mediators to modify activities of other inflammatory cells. Orchestration of these cells and molecules leads to progression of inflammation. Clinically, acute inflammation is seen in pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, whereas chronic inflammation is represented by asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Because the lung is a vital organ for gas exchange, excessive inflammation can be life threatening. Because the lung is constantly exposed to harmful pathogens, an immediate and intense defense action (mainly inflammation is required to eliminate the invaders as early as possible. A delicate balance between inflammation and anti-inflammation is essential for lung homeostasis. A full understanding of the underlying mechanisms is vital in the treatment of patients with lung inflammation. This review focuses on cellular and molecular aspects of lung inflammation during acute and chronic inflammatory states.Keywords: inflammation, lung, inflammatory mediators, cytokines

  4. Inflammatory pathways of importance for management of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Jannie; Coskun, Mehmet; Soendergaard, Christoffer; Salem, Mohammad; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2014-01-07

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract comprising Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Their etiologies are unknown, but they are characterised by an imbalanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators, e.g., tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, as well as increased recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. Advantages in understanding the role of the inflammatory pathways in IBD and an inadequate response to conventional therapy in a large portion of patients, has over the last two decades lead to new therapies which includes the TNF inhibitors (TNFi), designed to target and neutralise the effect of TNF-α. TNFi have shown to be efficient in treating moderate to severe CD and UC. However, convenient alternative therapeutics targeting other immune pathways are needed for patients with IBD refractory to conventional therapy including TNFi. Indeed, several therapeutics are currently under development, and have shown success in clinical trials. These include antibodies targeting and neutralising interleukin-12/23, small pharmacologic Janus kinase inhibitors designed to block intracellular signaling of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, antibodies targeting integrins, and small anti-adhesion molecules that block adhesion between leukocytes and the intestinal vascular endothelium, reducing their infiltration into the inflamed mucosa. In this review we have elucidated the major signaling pathways of clinical importance for IBD therapy and highlighted the new promising therapies available. As stated in this paper several new treatment options are under development for the treatment of CD and UC, however, no drug fits all patients. Hence, optimisations of treatment regimens are warranted for the benefit of the patients either through biomarker establishment or other rationales to maximise the effect of the broad range of mode-of-actions of the present and future drugs in IBD.

  5. Inflammatory and Vasoactive Effects of Serum Following Inhalation of Varied Complex Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Mario J; Chrobak, Izabela; Brower, Jeremy; Roldan, Luis; Fredenburgh, Laura E; McDonald, Jacob D; Campen, Matthew J

    2016-04-01

    Chronic cardiovascular disease is associated with air pollution exposure in epidemiology and toxicology studies. Inhaled toxicants can induce changes in serum bioactivity that impact endothelial inflammatory gene expression in vitro and impair vasorelaxation ex vivo, which are common precursors to atherosclerosis. Comparisons between single pollutants and common combustion mixtures, in terms of driving such serum inflammatory and vasoactive effects, have not been characterized. Healthy C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single 6-h period of contrasting pollutant atmospheres: road dust, mixed vehicle emissions (MVE; a combination of gasoline and diesel engine emissions) particulate matter, mixed vehicle emissions gases, road dust plus ozone, road dust plus MVE, and hardwood smoke. Serum obtained from mice 24 h after these exposures was used as a stimulus to assess inflammatory potential in two assays: incubated with primary murine cerebrovascular endothelial cells for 4 h to measure inflammatory gene expression or applied to naïve aortic rings in an ex vivo myographic preparation. Road dust and wood smoke exposures were most potent at inducing inflammatory gene expression, while MVE atmospheres and wood smoke were most potent at impairing vasorelaxation to acetylcholine. Responses are consistent with recent reports on MVE toxicity, but reveal novel serum bioactivity related to wood smoke and road dust. These studies suggest that the compositional changes in serum and resultant bioactivity following inhalation exposure to pollutants may be highly dependent on the composition of mixtures.

  6. Monoclonal antibody therapy of inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deventer, S. J.; Camoglio, L.

    1997-01-01

    Animal models of inflammatory bowel disease have provided insight in the regulation of mucosal inflammation. This has resulted in novel therapeutic approaches that specifically target a single inflammatory mediator. Monoclonal antibody therapy has been used in steroid refractory Crohn's disease

  7. 20 CFR 220.184 - If the annuitant becomes disabled by another impairment(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... impairment(s). 220.184 Section 220.184 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE... Activity or Medical Improvement § 220.184 If the annuitant becomes disabled by another impairment(s). If a new severe impairment(s) begins in or before the month in which the last impairment(s) ends, the Board...

  8. Cognitive impairments in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Anatolyevich Kostylev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairments in epilepsy are a current problem in neurology. The basis of the idea on the pathogenesis of higher nervous system dysfunctions is the interaction of a few factors that include the form and duration of the disease, gender differences, and the impact of antiepileptic therapy. The role of interattack epileptiform changes in the development of cognitive deficit in adults and epileptic encephalopathies in children is discussed. Up-to-date neurophysiological and neuroimaging diagnostic methods allow the detection of new features in the course and progression of higher nervous system dysfunctions in epilepsy.

  9. Cognitive impairment and pragmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Rexach, Javier; Schatz, Sara

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important ingredients of felicitous conversation exchanges is the adequate expression of illocutionary force and the achievement of perlocutionary effects, which can be considered essential to the functioning of pragmatic competence. The breakdown of illocutionary and perlocutionary functions is one of the most prominent external features of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's Disease, with devastating psychological and social consequences for patients, their family and caregivers. The study of pragmatic functions is essential for a proper understanding of the linguistic and communicative aspects of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. A novel anti-inflammatory role of NCAM-derived mimetic peptide, FGL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Downer, Eric J; Cowley, Thelma R; Lyons, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    as a novel anti-inflammatory agent. Administration of FGL to aged rats attenuated the increased expression of markers of activated microglia, the increase in pro-inflammatory interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and the impairment in long-term potentiation (LTP). We report that the age-related increase in microglial...... activation was accompanied by decreased expression of neuronal CD200, and suggest that the proclivity of FGL to suppress microglial activation is due to its stimulatory effect on neuronal CD200. We demonstrate that FGL enhanced interleukin-4 (IL-4) release from glial cells and IL-4 in turn enhanced neuronal...

  11. Edaravone attenuates intracerebroventricular streptozotocin-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeta, K H; Singh, Devendra; Gupta, Yogendra K

    2017-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a major cause of dementia worldwide. Edaravone, a potent free radical scavenger, is reported to be neuroprotective. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of chronic edaravone administration on intracerebroventricular-streptozotocin (ICV-STZ) induced cognitive impairment in male Wistar rats. Cognitive impairment was developed by single ICV-STZ (3 mg/kg) injection bilaterally on day 1. Edaravone (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg, orally, once daily) was administered for 28 days. Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests were used to assess cognitive functions at baseline and on days 14 and 28. ICV-STZ caused cognitive impairment as evidenced by increased escape latency and decreased time spent in target quadrant in the Morris water maze test and reduced retention latency in the passive avoidance test. STZ caused increase in oxidative stress, cholinesterases, inflammatory cytokines and protein expression of ROCK-II and decrease in protein expression of ChAT. Edaravone ameliorated the STZ-induced cognitive impairment. STZ-induced increase in oxidative stress and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) were mitigated by edaravone. Edaravone also prevented STZ-induced increased protein expression of ROCK-II. Moreover, edaravone significantly prevented STZ-induced increased activity of cholinesterases in the cortex and hippocampus. The decreased expression of ChAT caused by STZ was brought towards normal by edaravone in the hippocampus. The results thus show that edaravone is protective against STZ-induced cognitive impairment, oxidative stress, cholinergic dysfunction and altered protein expressions. This study thus suggests the potential of edaravone as an adjuvant in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Monoclonal antibody therapy of inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deventer, S. J.; Camoglio, L.

    1996-01-01

    Several anti-inflammatory drugs have therapeutic efficacy in inflammatory bowel disease, but their targets remain incompletely characterized. The development of monoclonal antibodies that either recognize epitopes on immune-competent cells, or neutralize pro-inflammatory cytokines, has helped to

  13. Fertility impairment in radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Biedka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Infertility as a result of antineoplastic therapy is becoming a very important issue due to the growing incidence of neoplastic diseases. Routinely applied antineoplastic treatments and the illness itself lead to fertility disorders. Therapeutic methods used in antineoplastic treatment may cause fertility impairment or sterilization due to permanent damage to reproductive cells. The risk of sterilization depends on the patient’s sex, age during therapy, type of neoplasm, radiation dose and treatment area. It is known that chemotherapy and radiotherapy can lead to fertility impairment and the combination of these two gives an additive effect. The aim of this article is to raise the issue of infertility in these patients. It is of growing importance due to the increase in the number of children and young adults who underwent radiotherapy in the past. The progress in antineoplastic therapy improves treatment results, but at the same time requires a deeper look at existential needs of the patient. Reproductive function is an integral element of self-esteem and should be taken into account during therapy planning.

  14. POST-STROKE COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT – PHENOMENOLOGY AND PROGNOSTIC FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Danovska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke patients are at higher risk of developing cognitive impairment. Cognitive dysfunctions, especially progressive ones, worsen stroke prognosis and outcome. A longitudinal follow-up of cognitive disorders, however, is rendered difficult by their heterogeneity and the lack of definitions generally agreed upon. Stroke is a major cause of cognitive deficit. The identification of risk factors, clinical determinants and laboratory markers of post-stroke cognitive deficit may help detect patients at increased risk of cognitive deterioration, and prevent or delay the occurrence of post-stroke cognitive impairments. Though inflammatory processes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of stroke, their role in the complex pathophysiological mechanisms of post-stroke cognitive impairment is not completely understood. Evidence suggests that elevated serum C-reactive protein is associated with both the increased risk of stroke and post-stroke cognitive deficit. The hypothesis of a possible relationship between markers of systemic inflammation and cognitive dysfunctions raises the question of how rational the option of applying non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in a proper therapeutic window will be, especially during the acute phase of stroke, to prevent cognitive decline and dementia.

  15. Early impairment of gut function and gut flora supporting a role for alteration of gastrointestinal mucosa in human immunodeficiency virus pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori, Andrea; Tincati, Camilla; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Torti, Carlo; Quirino, Tiziana; Haarman, Monique; Ben Amor, Kaouther; van Schaik, Jacqueline; Vriesema, Aldwin; Knol, Jan; Marchetti, Giulia; Welling, Gjalt; Clerici, Mario

    Our results show that impairment of the gastrointestinal tracts in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients is present in the early phases of HIV disease. This impairment is associated with alterations in gut microbiota and intestinal inflammatory parameters. These findings support the

  16. Localized scleroderma and regional inflammatory myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivković, Saša A; Freiberg, William; Lacomis, David; Domsic, Robyn T; Medsger, Thomas A

    2014-05-01

    Inflammatory myopathy is rare in localized scleroderma. We report 2 new cases of regional inflammatory myopathy associated with localized scleroderma and review 10 reported cases of localized scleroderma associated with an inflammatory myopathy with regional muscle involvement, more often in the upper extremities. Serum creatine kinase was mildly elevated or normal. Histopathology often showed perimysial inflammation and plasma cell infiltration. These cases demonstrate that inflammatory myopathy should be considered in patients with localized scleroderma and regional muscle weakness, pain or atrophy. Muscle biopsy can confirm the diagnosis of myositis, which if identified, will require anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive therapy. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Post-stroke cognitive impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Anatolyevna Katunina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-stroke cognitive impairments are common effects of stroke. Vascular cognitive impairments are characterized by the heterogeneity of the neuropsychological profile in relation to the site and pattern of stroke. Their common trait is the presence of dysregulation secondary to frontal dysfunction. The treatment of vascular cognitive impairments should be multimodality and aimed at stimulating neuroplasticity processes, restoring neurotransmitter imbalance, and preventing recurrent vascular episodes.

  18. Impairments in Skin Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphree, Rose W

    2017-09-01

    Altered skin integrity increases the chance of infection, impaired mobility, and decreased function and may result in the loss of limb or, sometimes, life. Skin is affected by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic factors can include altered nutritional status, vascular disease issues, and diabetes. Extrinsic factors include falls, accidents, pressure, immobility, and surgical procedures. Ensuring skin integrity in the elderly requires a team approach and includes the individual, caregivers, and clinicians. The twenty-first century clinician has several online, evidence-based tools to assist with optimal treatment plans. Understanding best practices in addressing skin integrity issues can promote positive outcomes with the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Multilingualism and specific language impairment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkkila, Eva; Smolander, Sini; Laasonen, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Specific language impairment is one of the most common developmental disturbances in childhood. With the increase of the foreign language population group an increasing number of children assimilating several languages and causing concern in language development attend clinical examinations. Knowledge of factors underlying the specific language impairment and the specific impairment in general, special features of language development of those learning several languages, as well as the assessment and support of the linguistic skills of a multilingual child is essential. The risk of long-term problems and marginalization is high for children having specific language impairment.

  20. 20 CFR 416.998 - If you become disabled by another impairment(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false If you become disabled by another impairment... Disability Or Blindness § 416.998 If you become disabled by another impairment(s). If a new severe impairment(s) begins in or before the month in which your last impairment(s) ends, we will find that your...

  1. 20 CFR 404.1598 - If you become disabled by another impairment(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false If you become disabled by another impairment... Disability § 404.1598 If you become disabled by another impairment(s). If a new severe impairment(s) begins in or before the month in which your last impairment(s) ends, we will find that your disability is...

  2. Methotrexate for ocular inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangaputra, Sapna; Newcomb, Craig W; Liesegang, Teresa L; Kaçmaz, R Oktay; Jabs, Douglas A; Levy-Clarke, Grace A; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Rosenbaum, James T; Suhler, Eric B; Thorne, Jennifer E; Foster, C Stephen; Kempen, John H

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the outcome of treatment with methotrexate for noninfectious ocular inflammation. Retrospective cohort study. Patients with noninfectious ocular inflammation managed at 4 tertiary ocular inflammation clinics in the United States observed to add methotrexate as a single, noncorticosteroid immunosuppressive agent to their treatment regimen, between 1979 and 2007, inclusive. Participants were identified from the Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases Cohort Study. Demographic and clinical characteristics, including dosage, route of administration of methotrexate, and main outcome measures, were obtained for every eye of every patient at every visit via medical record review by trained expert reviewers. Control of inflammation, corticosteroid-sparing effects, and incidence of and reason for discontinuation of therapy. Among 384 patients (639 eyes) observed from the point of addition of methotrexate to an anti-inflammatory regimen, 32.8%, 9.9%, 21.4%, 14.6%, 15.1%, and 6.3%, respectively, had anterior uveitis, intermediate uveitis, posterior or panuveitis, scleritis, ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid, and other forms of ocular inflammation. In these groups, complete suppression of inflammation sustained for >or=28 days was achieved within 6 months in 55.6%, 47.4%, 38.6%, 56.4%, 39.5%, and 76.7%, respectively. Corticosteroid-sparing success (sustained suppression of inflammation with prednisone Methotrexate was discontinued within 1 year by 42% of patients. It was discontinued owing to ineffectiveness in 50 patients (13%); 60 patients (16%) discontinued because of side effects, which typically were reversible with dose reduction or discontinuation. Remission was seen in 43 patients, with 7.7% remitting within 1 year of treatment. Our data suggest that adding methotrexate to an anti-inflammatory regimen not involving other noncorticosteroid immunosuppressive drugs is moderately effective for management of inflammatory activity and for achieving

  3. A case of inflammatory ascites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Biolato

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Even ascites appears mainly as sign of portal hypertension in patiens with liver cirrhosis, in some case depends on a different lying condition such as right congestive heart failure, peritoneal carcinomatosis or tuberculosis. In these cases, paracentesis represents the key tool for diagnosis. We report a case of cardiac ascites in a 71-years-old woman who developed in four-month an abdominal distension. Preliminary exams showed exudative ascites related to portal hypertension, a pelvic mass with caseous apparence, and inflammatory status ad an elevation of CA-125. Successive evaluation exluded peritoneal carcinomatosis or tuberculosis, underlyng a tricuspidal regurgitation. The literature on ascites has also been reviewed.

  4. Review article: the potential role of nitric oxide in chronic inflammatory bowel disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Rask-Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    The aetiology of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases-ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease-as well as 'microscopic colitis'-both collagenous (COC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC)-remains unknown. Autoimmune mechanisms, cytokine polymorphism, commensal bacteria, infectious agents and vascular...... impairment have all been proposed as playing important roles in the pathogenesis of this spectrum of diseases. A variety of proinflammatory mediators, including tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1beta, interferon gamma, leukotriene B4 and platelet activating factor, promote the adherence...

  5. Shedding light on inflammatory pseudotumor in children: spotlight on inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Lillian M.; Kao, Simon C.S.; Moritani, Toshio; Clark, Eve; Ishigami, Kousei; Sato, Yutaka [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); McCarville, M.B. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Kirby, Patricia [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Pathology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Bahrami, Armita [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Inflammatory pseudotumor is a generic term used to designate a heterogeneous group of inflammatory mass-forming lesions histologically characterized by myofibroblastic proliferation with chronic inflammatory infiltrate. Inflammatory pseudotumor is multifactorial in etiology and generally benign, but it is often mistaken for malignancy given its aggressive appearance. It can occur throughout the body and is seen in all age groups. Inflammatory pseudotumor has been described in the literature by many organ-specific names, resulting in confusion. Recently within this generic category of inflammatory pseudotumor, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor has emerged as a distinct entity and is now recognized as a fibroblastic/myofibroblastic neoplasm with intermediate biological potential and occurring mostly in children. We present interesting pediatric cases of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors given this entity's tendency to occur in children. Familiarity and knowledge of the imaging features of inflammatory pseudotumor can help in making an accurate diagnosis, thereby avoiding unnecessary radical surgery. (orig.)

  6. Cognitive Impairment Associated with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrass, J. Cara; Harrison, John E.

    2018-01-01

    This brief review explores the areas of cognitive impairment that have been observed in cancer patients and survivors, the cognitive assessment tools used, and the management of the observed cognitive changes. Cognitive changes and impairment observed in patients with cancer and those in remission can be related to the direct effects of cancer itself, nonspecific factors or comorbid conditions that are independent of the actual disease, and/or the treatments or combination of treatments administered. Attention, memory, and executive functioning are the most frequently identified cognitive domains impacted by cancer. However, the prevalence and extent of impairment remains largely unknown due to marked differences in methodology, definitions of cognitive impairment, and the assessment measures used. Assessment of cognitive functioning is an important and necessary part of a comprehensive oncological care plan. Research is needed to establish a better understanding of cognitive changes and impairments associated with cancer so that optimal patient outcomes can be achieved. PMID:29497579

  7. Cardiovascular calcification. An inflammatory disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New, S.E.P.; Aikawa, E.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular calcification is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This disease of dysregulated metabolism is no longer viewed as a passive degenerative disease, but instead as an active process triggered by pro-inflammatory cues. Furthermore, a positive feedback loop of calcification and inflammation is hypothesized to drive disease progression in arterial calcification. Both calcific aortic valve disease and atherosclerotic arterial calcification may possess similar underlying mechanisms. Early histopathological studies first highlighted the contribution of inflammation to cardiovascular calcification by demonstrating the accumulation of macrophages and T lymphocytes in 'early' lesions within the aortic valves and arteries. A series of in vitro work followed, which gave a mechanistic insight into the stimulation of smooth muscle cells to undergo osteogenic differentiation and mineralization. The emergence of novel technology, in the form of animal models and more recently molecular imaging, has enabled accelerated progression of this field, by providing strong evidence regarding the concept of this disorder as an inflammatory disease. Although there are still gaps in our knowledge of the mechanisms behind this disorder, this review discusses the various studies that have helped form the concept of the inflammation-dependent cardiovascular calcification paradigm. (author)

  8. Nutrition and cognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando-Requejo, Virgilio

    2016-07-12

    Dementia, closely linked to environmental predisposing factors such as diet, is a public health problem of increasing magnitude: currently there are more than 35 million patients with Alzheimer´s disease, and is expected to exceed 135 million by 2050. If we can delay the development of dementia 5 years will reduce its prevalence by 50%. Patients with dementia modify their diet, and it has been reported in them deficits, among others, of folic acid, vitamin B12, B6, C, E, A, D, K, beta carotene and omega 3 fatty acids, that must be resolved with proper diet and with extra contributions if needed in some cases. But to reduce, or at least delay, the prevalence of dementia we advocate prevention through proper diet from the beginning of life, an idea that is reinforced given that cardiovascular risk factors are related directly to the development of dementia. A lot of literature are available that, although with limits, allows us to make nutritional recommendations for preventing cognitive impairment. Better results are achieved when complete diets have been studied and considered over specific nutrients separately. Particularly, the Mediterranean diet has great interest in this disease, since it ensures a high intake of vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, cereals, fish and olive oil, and moderate intake of meat, dairy products and alcohol. We will focus more on this article in this type of diet.

  9. Streptococcus agalactiae impairs cerebral bioenergetics in experimentally infected silver catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Souza, Carine F; Parmeggiani, Belisa S; Santos, Roberto C V; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Moreira, Karen L S; da Rocha, Maria Izabel U M; da Veiga, Marcelo L; Baldisserotto, Bernardo

    2017-10-01

    It is becoming evident that bacterial infectious diseases affect brain energy metabolism, where alterations of enzymatic complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and creatine kinase (CK) lead to an impairment of cerebral bioenergetics which contribute to disease pathogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS). Based on this evidence, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether alterations in the activity of complex IV of the respiratory chain and CK contribute to impairment of cerebral bioenergetics during Streptococcus agalactiae infection in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen). The activity of complex IV of the respiratory chain in brain increased, while the CK activity decreased in infected animals compared to uninfected animals. Brain histopathology revealed inflammatory demyelination, gliosis of the brain and intercellular edema in infected animals. Based on this evidence, S. agalactiae infection causes an impairment in cerebral bioenergetics through the augmentation of complex IV activity, which may be considered an adaptive response to maintain proper functioning of the electron respiratory chain, as well as to ensure ongoing electron flow through the electron transport chain. Moreover, inhibition of cerebral CK activity contributes to lower availability of ATP, contributing to impairment of cerebral energy homeostasis. In summary, these alterations contribute to disease pathogenesis linked to the CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sleep disturbance induces neuroinflammation and impairment of learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Biao; Dong, Yuanlin; Xu, Zhipeng; Gompf, Heinrich S; Ward, Sarah A P; Xue, Zhanggang; Miao, Changhong; Zhang, Yiying; Chamberlin, Nancy L; Xie, Zhongcong

    2012-12-01

    Hospitalized patients can develop cognitive function decline, the mechanisms of which remain largely to be determined. Sleep disturbance often occurs in hospitalized patients, and neuroinflammation can induce learning and memory impairment. We therefore set out to determine whether sleep disturbance can induce neuroinflammation and impairment of learning and memory in rodents. Five to 6-month-old wild-type C57BL/6J male mice were used in the studies. The mice were placed in rocking cages for 24 h, and two rolling balls were present in each cage. The mice were tested for learning and memory function using the Fear Conditioning Test one and 7 days post-sleep disturbance. Neuroinflammation in the mouse brain tissues was also determined. Of the Fear Conditioning studies at one day and 7 days after sleep disturbance, twenty-four hour sleep disturbance decreased freezing time in the context test, which assesses hippocampus-dependent learning and memory; but not the tone test, which assesses hippocampus-independent learning and memory. Sleep disturbance increased pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 levels and induced microglia activation in the mouse hippocampus, but not the cortex. These results suggest that sleep disturbance induces neuroinflammation in the mouse hippocampus, and impairs hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in mice. Pending further studies, these findings suggest that sleep disturbance-induced neuroinflammation and impairment of learning and memory may contribute to the development of cognitive function decline in hospitalized patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Riis

    2018-01-01

    Inflammation plays a significant role in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases are at increased risk of CVD, but it is debated whether this association is causal or dependent on shared risk factors, other exposures, genes, and/or inflammatory...... pathways. The current review summarizes epidemiological, clinical, and experimental data supporting the role of shared inflammatory mechanisms between atherosclerotic CVD and rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, and periodontitis, respectively, and provides insights to future...... prospects in this area of research. Awareness of the role of inflammation in CVD in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases and the potential for anti-inflammatory therapy, e.g., with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, to also reduce atherosclerotic CVD has evolved into guideline- based recommendations...

  12. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Primary Immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2017-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is most often a polygenic disorder with contributions from the intestinal microbiome, defects in barrier function, and dysregulated host responses to microbial stimulation. There is, however, increasing recognition of single gene defects that underlie a subset of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, particularly those with early-onset disease, and this review focuses on the primary immunodeficiencies associated with early-onset inflammatory bowel disease. The advent of next-generation sequencing has led to an improved recognition of single gene defects underlying some cases of inflammatory bowel disease. Among single gene defects, immune response genes are the most frequent category identified. This is also true of common genetic variants associated with inflammatory bowel disease, supporting a pivotal role for host responses in the pathogenesis. This review focuses on practical aspects related to diagnosis and management of children with inflammatory bowel disease who have underlying primary immunodeficiencies.

  13. Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0461 TITLE: Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jose Silva CONTRACTING...CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0461 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) l 5d...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC, ~5% of all breast cancers ) is the most lethal form of breast cancer , presenting a 5- year

  14. Chronic Inflammatory Disease, Lifestyle and Treatment Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-25

    Autoimmune Diseases; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; Crohn Disease (CD); Colitis, Ulcerative (UC); Arthritis, Rheumatoid (RA); Spondylarthropathies; Arthritis, Psoriatic (PsA); Psoriasis; Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS); Uveitis

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2017-01-01

    and IL-10 is provoked by exercise and exerts direct anti-inflammatory effects by an inhibition of TNF-α and by stimulating IL-1ra, thereby limiting IL-1β signalling. Moreover, muscle-derived IL-6 appears to have direct anti-inflammatory effects and serves as a mechanism to improve glucose tolerance....... In addition, indirect anti-inflammatory effects of long-term exercise are mediated via improvements in body composition. CONCLUSION: Physical activity represents a natural, strong anti-inflammatory strategy with minor side effects and should be integrated in the management of patients with cardiometabolic...

  16. A framework for communication between visually impaired, hearing impaired and speech impaired using arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha, R.; Khandelwa, Prakhar; Gupta, Anusha; Anand, Nayan

    2017-11-01

    A long time ago our society accepted the notion of treating people with disabilities not as unviable and disabled but as differently-abled, recognizing their skills beyond their disabilities. The next step has to be taken by our scientific community, that is, to normalize lives of the people with disabilities and make it so as if they are no different to us. The primary step in this direction would be to normalize communication between people. People with an impaired speech or impaired vision or impaired hearing face difficulties while having a casual conversation with others. Any form of communication feels so strenuous that the impaired end up communicating just the important information and avoid a casual conversation. To normalize conversation between the impaired we need a simple and compact device which facilitates the conversation by providing the information in the desired form.

  17. Inflammatory Arthritis, Sacroiliitis, and Morphea: Evidence of a Systemic Inflammatory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Omair, Mohammed A.; Johnson, Sindhu R.

    2013-01-01

    Morphea is a skin disease characterized by local skin inflammation and fibrosis. Extracutaneous manifestations have been described with this disease including inflammatory arthritis. We describe a case of morphea who developed inflammatory polyarthritis and sacroiliitis coincident with new skin lesions.

  18. Biomarkers in inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue; Birkelund, Svend; Stensballe, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Unambiguous diagnosis of the two main forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD): Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), represents a challenge in the early stages of the diseases. The diagnosis may be established several years after the debut of symptoms. Hence, protein biomarkers...... for early and accurate diagnostic could help clinicians improve treatment of the individual patients. Moreover, the biomarkers could aid physicians to predict disease courses and in this way, identify patients in need of intensive treatment. Patients with low risk of disease flares may avoid treatment...... with medications with the concomitant risk of adverse events. In addition, identification of disease and course specific biomarker profiles can be used to identify biological pathways involved in the disease development and treatment. Knowledge of disease mechanisms in general can lead to improved future...

  19. Inflammatory diseases of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haehnel, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of inflammatory brain diseases from a neuroradiological point of view. Such diseases may be either infectious (e.g., viral encephalitis and pyogenic brain abscess) or non-infectious (e.g., multiple sclerosis), and many of these entities are becoming increasingly important for differential diagnosis, particularly in immunocompromised persons. Neuroimaging contributes greatly to the differentiation of infectious and noninfectious brain diseases and to the distinction between brain inflammation and other, for instance neoplastic, diseases. In order to ensure a standardized approach throughout the book, each chapter is subdivided into three principal sections: epidemiology, clinical presentation and therapy; imaging; and differential diagnosis. A separate chapter addresses technical and methodological issues and imaging protocols. All of the authors are recognized experts in their fields, and numerous high-quality and informative illustrations are included. This book will be of great value not only to neuroradiologists but also to neurologists, neuropediatricians, and general radiologists. (orig.)

  20. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent KURT

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM are a heterogeneous group of disease with complex clinical features. It has been sub-classified as: (1 Dermatomyositis, (2 Polymyositis, and (3 Inclusion body myositis (IBM. Nowadays, there are some studies in literature suggest necrotizing autoimmune myopathy and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy should also be added to this group of disease. There is a debate in the diagnosis of IIMs and up until now, about 12 criteria systems have been proposed. Some of the criteria systems have been used widely such as Griggs et al.'s proposal for IBM. Clinical findings, autoantibodies, enzymes, electrophysiological, and muscle biopsy findings are diagnostic tools. Because of diseases' complexity, none of the findings are diagnostic alone. In this study, we discussed the diagnostic criteria of IMMs and described detailed morphological features. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2016; 4(2.000: 41-45

  1. Inflammatory diseases of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haehnel, Stefan (ed.) [University of Heidelberg Medical Center (Germany). Div. of Neuroradiology

    2009-07-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of inflammatory brain diseases from a neuroradiological point of view. Such diseases may be either infectious (e.g., viral encephalitis and pyogenic brain abscess) or non-infectious (e.g., multiple sclerosis), and many of these entities are becoming increasingly important for differential diagnosis, particularly in immunocompromised persons. Neuroimaging contributes greatly to the differentiation of infectious and noninfectious brain diseases and to the distinction between brain inflammation and other, for instance neoplastic, diseases. In order to ensure a standardized approach throughout the book, each chapter is subdivided into three principal sections: epidemiology, clinical presentation and therapy; imaging; and differential diagnosis. A separate chapter addresses technical and methodological issues and imaging protocols. All of the authors are recognized experts in their fields, and numerous high-quality and informative illustrations are included. This book will be of great value not only to neuroradiologists but also to neurologists, neuropediatricians, and general radiologists. (orig.)

  2. Inflammatory diseases of the myelon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitzer, C.; Krings, T.; Block, F.; Universitaetsklinikum Aachen

    2001-01-01

    Myelitis is defined as inflammatory disease of the spinal cord irrespective of the underlying aetiology or pathologic-anatomic alterations. It can be caused by direct infections, postinfectious or postvaccinal immunological processes or other (auto)immunological diseases such as multiple sclerosis or systemic vasculitis. The clinical presentation is diverse and varies from temporary sensory deficits to persistent tetraplegia with respiratory insufficiency. Diagnostic work-up must include a thorough anamnesis, clinical-neurological examination, neurophysiological studies, analysis of blood and cerebospinal fluid and neuroradiological investigations. Most important is the spinal MRI: small lesions as well as large lesions throughout the extent of the cord with accompanying edema can be identified reliably. Furthermore, neuroradiological examination can proof or rule out important differential diagnoses. In particular in acute transverse myelitis a quick diagnostic work-up with a spinal MRI is indispensible in order to start an appropriate therapy as soon as possible. (orig.) [de

  3. Cognitive impairment in elderly women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Bagger, Yu Z; Tankó, László B

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A variety of factors contribute to the development of cognitive impairment in elderly people. Previous studies have focused upon a single or a few risk factors. In this study we assessed and compared the significance of a wide variety of potential risk factors for cognitive impairment...... in postmenopausal women. METHODS: A total of 208 pairs of elderly women (mean age = 73.2 years) were examined in a cross-sectional case-control study. Each pair consisted of a case (with impaired cognition) and a control subject matched by age and educational status. Cognitive functions were determined using...

  4. Enhanced function of immuno-isolated islets in diabetes therapy by co-encapsulation with an anti-inflammatory drug

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, Tram T.; Thai, Anh V.; Cohen, Joshua; Slosberg, Jeremy E.; Siniakowicz, Karolina; Doloff, Joshua C.; Ma, Minglin; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Tang, Katherine M.; Gu, Zhen; Cheng, Hao; Weir, Gordon C.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel Griffith; Tang, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Immuno-isolation of islets has the potential to enable the replacement of pancreatic function in diabetic patients. However, host response to the encapsulated islets frequently leads to fibrotic overgrowth with subsequent impairment of the transplanted grafts. Here, we identified and incorporated anti-inflammatory agents into islet-containing microcapsules to address this challenge. In vivo subcutaneous screening of 16 small molecule anti-inflammatory drugs was performed to identify promising...

  5. Cannabis for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftali, Timna; Mechulam, Raphael; Lev, Lihi Bar; Konikoff, Fred M

    2014-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been used for centuries as a treatment for a variety of ailments. It contains over 60 different cannabinoid compounds. Studies have revealed that the endocannabinoid system is involved in almost all major immune events. Cannabinoids may, therefore, be beneficial in inflammatory disorders. In murine colitis, cannabinoids decrease histologic and microscopic inflammation. In humans, cannabis has been used to treat a plethora of gastrointestinal problems, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and diabetic gastroparesis. Despite anecdotal reports on medical cannabis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), there are few controlled studies. In an observational study in 30 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), we found that medical cannabis was associated with improvement in disease activity and reduction in the use of other medications. In a more recent placebo-controlled study in 21 chronic CD patients, we showed a decrease in the CD activity index >100 in 10 of 11 subjects on cannabis compared to 4 of 10 on placebo. Complete remission was achieved in 5 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group and 1 of 10 in the placebo group. Yet, in an additional study, low-dose cannabidiol did not have an effect on CD activity. In summary, evidence is gathering that manipulating the endocannabinoid system can have beneficial effects in IBD, but further research is required to declare cannabinoids a medicine. We need to establish the specific cannabinoids, as well as appropriate medical conditions, optimal dose, and mode of administration, to maximize the beneficial effects while avoiding any potential harmful effects of cannabinoid use. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Brain visual impairment in childhood: mini review

    OpenAIRE

    Kozeis, N

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral visual impairment (CVI) is one of the leading causes of severe visual impairment in childhood. This article was written to highlight any new knowledge related to cerebral visual impairment in childhood.

  7. [Insight into the training of patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Váncsa, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Using current recommended treatment, a majority of patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy develop muscle impairment and poor health. Beneficial effects of exercise have been reported on muscle performance, aerobic capacity and health in chronic polymyositis and dermatomyositis, as well as in active disease and inclusion body myositis to some extent. Importantly, randomized controlled trials indicate that improved health and decreased clinical disease activity could be mediated through increased aerobic capacity. Recently, reports seeking pathomechanisms of the underlying effects of exercise on skeletal muscle indicate increased aerobic capacity (i.e. increased mitochondrial capacity and capillary density, reduced lactate levels), activation of genes of aerobic phenotype and muscle growth programs and down regulation of genes related to inflammation. Exercise contributes to both systemic and within-muscle adaptations demonstrating that it is fundamental for improving muscle performance and health in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. There is a need for randomized controlled trials to study the effects of exercise in patients with active disease and inclusion body myositis. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(39), 1557-1562.

  8. Zinc and Regulation of Inflammatory Cytokines: Implications for Cardiometabolic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Meika; Samman, Samir

    2012-01-01

    In atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus, the concomitant presence of low-grade systemic inflammation and mild zinc deficiency highlights a role for zinc nutrition in the management of chronic disease. This review aims to evaluate the literature that reports on the interactions of zinc and cytokines. In humans, inflammatory cytokines have been shown both to up- and down-regulate the expression of specific cellular zinc transporters in response to an increased demand for zinc in inflammatory conditions. The acute phase response includes a rapid decline in the plasma zinc concentration as a result of the redistribution of zinc into cellular compartments. Zinc deficiency influences the generation of cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α, and in response to zinc supplementation plasma cytokines exhibit a dose-dependent response. The mechanism of action may reflect the ability of zinc to either induce or inhibit the activation of NF-κB. Confounders in understanding the zinc-cytokine relationship on the basis of in vitro experimentation include methodological issues such as the cell type and the means of activating cells in culture. Impaired zinc homeostasis and chronic inflammation feature prominently in a number of cardiometabolic diseases. Given the high prevalence of zinc deficiency and chronic disease globally, the interplay of zinc and inflammation warrants further examination. PMID:22852057

  9. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Lichte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes. Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing.

  10. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory kaempferol glycosides from Sedum dendroideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Melo, Giany O; Malvar, David do C; Vanderlinde, Frederico A; Rocha, Fabio F; Pires, Priscila Andrade; Costa, Elson A; de Matos, Lécia G; Kaiser, Carlos R; Costa, Sônia S

    2009-07-15

    To identify the compounds responsible for the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects previously described for Sedum dendroideum, through bioassay-guided fractionation procedures. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated through mouse acetic acid-induced writhing model. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed through croton oil-induced mouse ear oedema and carrageenan-induced peritonitis. The Sedum dendroideum juice afforded seven known flavonoids identified with basis on NMR data. The oral administration of the major kaempferol glycosides kaempferitrin [1] (17.29 micromol/kg), kaempferol 3-O-beta-glucopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside [2] (16.82 micromol/kg), kaempferol 3-O-neohesperidoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside [3] (13.50 micromol/kg) or alpha-rhamnoisorobin [5] (23.13 micromol/kg) inhibited by 47.3%, 25.7%, 60.2% and 58.0%, respectively, the acetic acid-induced nociception (indomethacin: 27.95 micromol/kg, p.o.; 68.9%). Flavonoids 1, 2, 3 or 5, at the same doses, reduced by 39.5%, 46.5%, 35.6% and 33.3%, respectively, the croton oil-induced oedema (dexamethasone: 5.09 micromol/kg, s.c.; 83.7%) and impaired leukocyte migration by 42.9%, 46.3%, 50.4% and 49.6%, respectively (dexamethasone: 5.09 micromol/kg, s.c.; 66.1%). Our findings show that the major kaempferol glycosides may account for the renowned medicinal use of Sedum dendroideum against pain and inflammatory troubles.

  11. Electrophysiology in visually impaired children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genderen, Maria Michielde van

    2006-01-01

    Inherited retinal disorders and posterior visual pathway abnormalities are important causes of visual impairment in children. Visual electrophysiology often is indispensable in diagnosing these conditions. This thesis shows the wide range of use of pediatric electro-ophthalmology, and demonstrates

  12. Inflammatory response and cardioprotection during open-heart surgery: the importance of anaesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, M-S; Zacharowski, K; Angelini, G D

    2008-01-01

    Open-heart surgery triggers an inflammatory response that is largely the result of surgical trauma, cardiopulmonary bypass, and organ reperfusion injury (e.g. heart). The heart sustains injury triggered by ischaemia and reperfusion and also as a result of the effects of systemic inflammatory mediators. In addition, the heart itself is a source of inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species that are likely to contribute to the impairment of cardiac pump function. Formulating strategies to protect the heart during open heart surgery by attenuating reperfusion injury and systemic inflammatory response is essential to reduce morbidity. Although many anaesthetic drugs have cardioprotective actions, the diversity of the proposed mechanisms for protection (e.g. attenuating Ca(2+) overload, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, pre- and post-conditioning-like protection) may have contributed to the slow adoption of anaesthetics as cardioprotective agents during open heart surgery. Clinical trials have suggested at least some cardioprotective effects of volatile anaesthetics. Whether these benefits are relevant in terms of morbidity and mortality is unclear and needs further investigation. This review describes the main mediators of myocardial injury during open heart surgery, explores available evidence of anaesthetics induced cardioprotection and addresses the efforts made to translate bench work into clinical practice.

  13. Inflammatory biomarkers and academic performance in youth. The UP & DOWN Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Cornejo, Irene; Martinez-Gomez, David; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Del Campo-Vecino, Juan; Fernández-Santos, Jorge; Castro-Piñero, Jose; Marcos, Ascensión; Veiga, Oscar L

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation influences cognitive development in infants and older adults, however, how inflammation may affect academic development during childhood and adolescence remains to be elucidated. This study aimed to examine the association between inflammatory biomarkers and academic performance in children and adolescents. A total of 494 youth (238 girls) aged 10.6 ± 3.4 years participated in the study. Four inflammatory biomarkers were selected: C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and white blood cell (WBC) count. An inflammatory index was created using the above mentioned biomarkers. Academic performance was assessed through schools records. Results showed that three of the four inflammatory biomarkers (CRP, IL-6 and WBC) and the inflammatory index were negatively associated with all academic indicators (β values ranging from -0.094 to -0.217, all Pacademic indicators compared with youth in the middle tertile (scores ranging from -0.578 to -0.344) and in the lowest tertile (scores ranging from -0.678 to -0.381). In conclusion, inflammation may impair academic performance independently of body fat levels in youth. Our results are of importance because the consequences of childhood and adolescence inflammation tend to continue into adulthood. Lifestyle interventions in youth may be promising in reducing levels of inflammation beyond the reduction in body fat in order to achieve cognitive benefits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Munkholm, P; Langholz, E

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: We assessed the familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease in Copenhagen County, where there has been a long-term interest in the epidemiology of such disorders. In 1987 we interviewed 662 patients in whom inflammatory bowel disease had been diagnosed before 1979, a...

  15. Nanoparticle-mediated treatment for inflammatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides nanoparticles for treatment of inflammatory diseases. The nanoparticles preferably comprise chitosan and a siRNA targeting a mRNA encoding a pro-inflammatory cytokine, such as e.g. tnf-alfa. A preferred route of administration of the nanoparticles is by injection...

  16. Pregnancy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortoli, A; Pedersen, N; Duricova, D

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies.......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies....

  17. Inflammatory bowel disease: potential therapeutic strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Bregenholt, S

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with potential and possibly primary therapeutics that, through insight into the inflammatory cascade, result in more rational treatment principles replacing the classical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). These ne...

  18. 9 CFR 381.86 - Inflammatory processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inflammatory processes. 381.86 Section 381.86 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Carcasses and Parts § 381.86 Inflammatory processes. Any organ or other part of a carcass which is affected...

  19. Surgical perspectives on inflammatory bowel disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VikasC

    Xia B, Crusius JBA, Meuwissen SGM, Pena AS. Inflammatory bowel disease: Definition, epidemiology, etiologic aspects, and immunologic studies. World J. Gastroentero 1998;4:44658. 2. Fry DR, Mahmood N, Maron DJ, Ross HM, Rombeau. J. Inflammatory bowel disease in Towsend: Sabiston. Textbook of Surgery.

  20. Anti-inflammatory and neuropharmacological activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The crude methanolic extracts of leaves of Caesalpinia pulcherrima were evaluated for its anti-inflammatory and neuropharmacological activities. When given orally to rats at dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg, the extract showed a significant (P<0.001) anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenin induced paw edema in rats ...

  1. Diffuse benign gastric inflammatory hyperplastic polyps presenting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benign gastric inflammatory hyperplasic polyps are benign lesions that rarely occur in young age. We report a case of diffuse benign gastric inflammatory hyperplastic polyps in a 19 year old boy who presented with cough, nausea, and hematamesis. In the presented case symptoms such as nausea and vomiting are non ...

  2. An anti-inflammatory principle from cactus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, E H; Kahng, J H; Lee, S H; Shin, K H

    2001-03-01

    In previous studies, the ethanol extract of cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) showed potent anti-inflammatory action. In the present study, following fractionation of the methanol extract of cactus stems guided by adjuvant-induced chronic inflammation model in mice, an active anti-inflammatory principle has been isolated and identified as beta-sitosterol.

  3. Anti-inflammatory actions of acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freek J. Zijlstra

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture has a beneficial effect when treating many diseases and painful conditions, and therefore is thought to be useful as a complementary therapy or to replace generally accepted pharmacological intervention. The attributive effect of acupuncture has been investigated in inflammatory diseases, including asthma, rhinitis, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, epicondylitis, complex regional pain syndrome type 1 and vasculitis. Large randomised trials demonstrating the immediate and sustained effect of acupuncture are missing. Mechanisms underlying the ascribed immunosuppressive actions of acupuncture are reviewed in this communication. The acupuncture-controlled release of neuropeptides from nerve endings and subsequent vasodilative and anti-inflammatory effects through calcitonine gene-related peptide is hypothesised. The complex interactions with substance P, the analgesic contribution of β-endorphin and the balance between cell-specific pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 are discussed.

  4. Molecular Pathophysiology of Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Y. Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, the scientific community has explored myriads of theories in search of the etiology and a cure for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. The cumulative evidence has pointed to the key role of the intestinal barrier and the breakdown of these mechanisms in IBD. More and more scientists and clinicians are embracing the concept of the impaired intestinal epithelial barrier and its role in the pathogenesis and natural history of IBD. However, we are missing a key tool that bridges these scientific insights to clinical practice. Our goal is to overcome the limitations in understanding the molecular physiology of intestinal barrier function and develop a clinical tool to assess and quantify it. This review article explores the proteins in the intestinal tissue that are pivotal in regulating intestinal permeability. Understanding the molecular pathophysiology of impaired intestinal barrier function in IBD may lead to the development of a biochemical method of assessing intestinal tissue integrity which will have a significant impact on the development of novel therapies targeting the intestinal mucosa.

  5. Candesartan ameliorates impaired fear extinction induced by innate immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, María M; Maldonado, Lizette; Velazquez, Bethzaly; Porter, James T

    2016-02-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) tend to show signs of a relatively increased inflammatory state suggesting that activation of the immune system may contribute to the development of PTSD. In the present study, we tested whether activation of the innate immune system can disrupt acquisition or recall of auditory fear extinction using an animal model of PTSD. Male adolescent rats received auditory fear conditioning in context A. The next day, an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) prior to auditory fear extinction in context B impaired acquisition and recall of extinction. LPS (100 μg/kg) given after extinction training did not impair extinction recall suggesting that LPS did not affect consolidation of extinction. In contrast to cued fear extinction, contextual fear extinction was not affected by prior injection of LPS (100 μg/kg). Although LPS also reduced locomotion, we could dissociate the effects of LPS on extinction and locomotion by using a lower dose of LPS (50 μg/kg) which impaired locomotion without affecting extinction. In addition, 15 h after an injection of 250 μg/kg LPS in adult rats, extinction learning and recall were impaired without affecting locomotion. A sub-chronic treatment with candesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, prevented the LPS-induced impairment of extinction in adult rats. Our results demonstrate that activation of the innate immune system can disrupt auditory fear extinction in adolescent and adult animals. These findings also provide direction for clinical studies of novel treatments that modulate the innate immune system for stress-related disorders like PTSD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dystypia: isolated typing impairment without aphasia, apraxia or visuospatial impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Mika; Soma, Yoshiaki; Arihiro, Shoji; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Naritomi, Hiroaki

    2002-01-01

    We report a 60-year-old right-handed Japanese man who showed an isolated persistent typing impairment without aphasia, agraphia, apraxia or any other neuropsychological deficit. We coined the term 'dystypia' for this peculiar neuropsychological manifestation. The symptom was caused by an infarction in the left frontal lobe involving the foot of the second frontal convolution and the frontal operculum. The patient's typing impairment was not attributable to a disturbance of the linguistic process, since he had no aphasia or agraphia. The impairment was not attributable to the impairment of the motor execution process either, since he had no apraxia. Thus, his typing impairment was deduced to be based on a disturbance of the intermediate process where the linguistic phonological information is converted into the corresponding performance. We hypothesized that there is a specific process for typing which branches from the motor programming process presented in neurolinguistic models. The foot of the left second frontal convolution and the operculum may play an important role in the manifestation of 'dystypia'. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxuan; Lyu, Peiyuan; Ren, Yanyan; An, Jin; Dong, Yanhong

    2017-09-15

    Arterial stiffness is one of the earliest indicators of changes in vascular wall structure and function and may be assessed using various indicators, such as pulse-wave velocity (PWV), the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), the ankle-brachial index (ABI), pulse pressure (PP), the augmentation index (AI), flow-mediated dilation (FMD), carotid intima media thickness (IMT) and arterial stiffness index-β. Arterial stiffness is generally considered an independent predictor of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. To date, a significant number of studies have focused on the relationship between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment. To investigate the relationships between specific arterial stiffness parameters and cognitive impairment, elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the relationship between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment and determine how to interfere with arterial stiffness to prevent cognitive impairment, we searched PUBMED for studies regarding the relationship between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment that were published from 2000 to 2017. We used the following key words in our search: "arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment" and "arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment mechanism". Studies involving human subjects older than 30years were included in the review, while irrelevant studies (i.e., studies involving subjects with comorbid kidney disease, diabetes and cardiac disease) were excluded from the review. We determined that arterial stiffness severity was positively correlated with cognitive impairment. Of the markers used to assess arterial stiffness, a higher PWV, CAVI, AI, IMT and index-β and a lower ABI and FMD were related to cognitive impairment. However, the relationship between PP and cognitive impairment remained controversial. The potential mechanisms linking arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment may be associated with arterial pulsatility, as greater arterial pulsatility

  8. [Nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banai, János

    2009-05-03

    Aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is complex and probably multifactorial. Nutrition has been proposed to be an important aetiological factor for development of IBD. Several components of the diet (such as sugar, fat, fibre, fruit and vegetable, protein, fast food, preservatives etc.) were examined as possible causative agents for IBD. According to some researchers infant feeding (breast feeding) may also contribute to the development of IBD. Though the importance of environmental factors is evidenced by the increasing incidence in developed countries and in migrant population in recent decades, the aetiology of IBD remained unclear. There are many theories, but as yet no dietary approaches have been proved to reduce the risk of developing IBD. The role of nutrition in the management of IBD is better understood. The prevention and correction of malnutrition, the provision of macro- and micronutrients and vitamins and the promotion of optimal growth and development of children are key points of nutritional therapy. In active disease, the effective support of energy and nutrients is a very important part of the therapy. Natural and artificial nutrition or the combination of two can be chosen for supporting therapy of IBD. The author summarises the aetiological and therapeutic role of nutrition in IBD.

  9. Nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gómez, María Josefa; Melián Fernández, Cristóbal; Romeo Donlo, María

    2016-07-12

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic pathology that has an outbreaks course that in recent years have seen an increase in incidence, especially at younger ages. Malnutrition is frequently associated with this condition, therefore, it is very important to ensure a right nutritional intervention, especially in pediatric patients, to ensure an optimal growth and also an improvement in the clinic. Our goal will be updated the role of nutrition in this disease and in its treatment based on the published evidence. Malnutrition in these patients is frequent and is influenced by various factors such as, decreased food intake, increased nutrient requirements, increased protein loss and malabsorption of nutrients. Therefore there should be a nutritional monitoring of all of them, in which anthropometric measurements, laboratory tests and densitometry were made to establish the needs and sufficient caloric intake tailored to each patient. The use of enteral nutrition as a treatment in Crohn’s disease with mild to moderate outbreak in child population, is amply demonstrated, has even shown to be superior to the use of corticosteroids. Therefore we can conclude by stressing that nutritional intervention is a mainstay in the management of patients with IBD, which aims to prevent and / or control disease-related malnutrition to decrease morbidity and mortality and improve quality of life.

  10. Antibiotics and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Maria Lia; Prantera, Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by an altered composition of gut microbiota (dysbiosis) that may contribute to their development. Antibiotics can alter the bacterial flora, and a link between antibiotic use and onset of Crohn's disease (CD), but not ulcerative colitis, has been reported. The hypothesis that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) could be an etiologic agent of CD has not been confirmed by a large study on patients treated by an association of antibiotics active against MAP. The observations supporting a role of intestinal microbiota in CD pathogenesis provide the rationale for a therapeutic manipulation of the intestinal flora through the employment of antibiotics. However, current data do not strongly support a therapeutic benefit from antibiotics, and there is still controversy regarding their use as primary therapy for treatment of acute flares of CD, and for postoperative recurrence prevention. Nevertheless, clinical practice and some studies suggest that a subgroup of patients with colonic involvement, early disease, and abnormal laboratory test of inflammation may respond better to antibiotic treatment. Since their long-term use is frequently complicated by a high rate of side effects, the use of antibiotics that work locally appears to be promising.

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawn B Beaulieu; Sunanda Kane

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis affect women in their child-bearing years. Family planning has come to be a common discussion between the gastroenterologist and the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient.Disease control prior to desired conception and throughout pregnancy is the most important thing to keep in mind when caring for the IBD patient. Continued medical management during pregnancy is crucial in optimizing outcomes. Studies indicate that quiescent disease prior to conception infer the best pregnancy outcomes, similar to those in the general population.Active disease prior to and during pregnancy, can lead to complications such as pre-term labor, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. Although there are no definitive long term effects of pregnancy on IBD, there are some limited studies that suggest that it may alter the disease course. Understanding the literature and its limitations is important in the modern era of IBD care. Educating the patient and taking a team approach with the obstetrician will help achieve successful outcomes for mother and baby.

  12. Fractalkine in human inflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, F; Vetter, R; Kühl, U; Westermann, D; Schultheiss, H-P; Tschöpe, C

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac inflammation is important for the prognosis of patients with inflammatory cardiomyopathy (CMi), but the mechanisms leading to it are not fully elucidated. To study the role of fractalkine (CX3CL1) in chemotactic and adhesive properties of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in patients with CMi. Patients with enterovirus (EV)-positive CMi, patients with virus-negative CMi, patients with parvovirus B19 (B19) genomes with low intramyocardial inflammation and patients without cardiac inflammation and viral infection in the endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) were enrolled (n=10/group). The expression of CX3CL1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) in EMBs was significantly increased in EV-positive and virus-negative patients with CMi in contrast to controls and B19-positive patients (EV+ vs controls: CX3CL1-area fraction (AF) % 0.078±0.012 vs 0.009±0.003 pattenuated positive chronotropic response to β-adrenergic stimulation with isoproterenol. The cardiac and plasma CX3CL1/CX3CR1 system is upregulated in CMi and this affects the functional potential of PBMCs. Moreover, a direct cardiodepressive effect of CX3CL1 in cardiac tissue was demonstrated since neonatal cardiomyocytes exhibited an attenuated positive chronotropic response to β-adrenergic stimulation.

  13. Thiamine Deficiency Induced Neurochemical, Neuroanatomical, and Neuropsychological Alterations: A Reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Nardone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional deficiency can cause, mainly in chronic alcoholic subjects, the Wernicke encephalopathy and its chronic neurological sequela, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS. Long-term chronic ethanol abuse results in hippocampal and cortical cell loss. Thiamine deficiency also alters principally hippocampal- and frontal cortical-dependent neurochemistry; moreover in WKS patients, important pathological damage to the diencephalon can occur. In fact, the amnesic syndrome typical for WKS is mainly due to the damage in the diencephalic-hippocampal circuitry, including thalamic nuclei and mammillary bodies. The loss of cholinergic cells in the basal forebrain region results in decreased cholinergic input to the hippocampus and the cortex and reduced choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities and function, as well as in acetylcholine receptor downregulation within these brain regions. In this narrative review, we will focus on the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological studies shedding light on the effects of thiamine deficiency in experimental models and in humans.

  14. Thiamine Deficiency Induces Anorexia by Inhibiting Hypothalamic AMPK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Alimov, Alexander; Wang, Haiping; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Katz, Wendy; Xu, Mei; Ke, Zun-Ji; Luo, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and eating disorders are prevailing health concerns worldwide. It is important to understand the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential nutrient. Thiamine deficiency (TD) can cause a number of disorders in humans, such as Beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We demonstrated here that TD caused anorexia in C57BL/6 mice. After feeding a TD diet for 16 days, the mice displayed a significant decrease in food intake and an increase in resting energy expenditure (REE), which resulted in a severe weight loss. At the 22nd day, the food intake was reduced by 69% and 74% for male and female mice, respectively in TD group. The REE increased by 9 folds in TD group. The loss of body weight (17–24%) was similar between male and female animals and mainly resulted from the reduction of fat mass (49% decrease). Re-supplementation of thiamine (benfotiamine) restored animal's appetite, leading to a total recovery of body weight. The hypothalamic AMPK is a critical regulator of food intake. TD inhibited the phosphorylation of AMPK in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus without affecting its expression. TD-induced inhibition of AMPK phosphorylation was reversed once thiamine was re-supplemented. In contrast, TD increased AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle and upregulated the uncoupling protein (UCP)-1 in brown adipose tissues which was consistent with increased basal energy expenditure. Re-administration of thiamine stabilized AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle as well as energy expenditure. Taken together, TD may induce anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK activity. With a simultaneous increase in energy expenditure, TD caused an overall body weight loss. The results suggest that the status of thiamine levels in the body may affect food intake and body weight. PMID:24607345

  15. Dopamine alleviates nutrient deficiency-induced stress in Malus hupehensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bowen; Li, Cuiying; Ma, Changqing; Wei, Zhiwei; Wang, Qian; Huang, Dong; Chen, Qi; Li, Chao; Ma, Fengwang

    2017-10-01

    Dopamine mediates many physiological processes in plants. We investigated its role in regulating growth, root system architecture, nutrient uptake, and responses to nutrient deficiencies in Malus hupehensis Rehd. Under a nutrient deficiency, plants showed significant reductions in growth, chlorophyll concentrations, and net photosynthesis, along with disruptions in nutrient uptake, transport, and distribution. However, pretreatment with 100 μM dopamine markedly alleviated such inhibitions. Supplementation with that compound enabled plants to maintain their photosynthetic capacity and development of the root system while promoting the uptake of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, and B, altering the way in which those nutrients were partitioned throughout the plant. The addition of dopamine up-regulated genes for antioxidant enzymes involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle (MdcAPX, MdcGR, MdMDHAR, MdDHAR-1, and MdDHAR-2) but down-regulated genes for senescence (SAG12, PAO, and MdHXK). These results indicate that exogenous dopamine has an important antioxidant and anti-senescence effect that might be helpful for improving nutrient uptake. Our findings demonstrate that dopamine offers new opportunities for its use in agriculture, especially when addressing the problem of nutrient deficiencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Fe deficiency induced changes in rice (Oryza sativa L.) thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwen; Xu, Chao; Li, Kang; Cai, Xiaojie; Wu, Min; Chen, Guoxiang

    2017-01-01

    Iron deficiency is an important abiotic stress that limits productivity of crops all over the world. We selected a hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.), LYPJ, which is super high-yield and widely cultured in China, to investigate changes in the components and structure of thylakoid membranes and photosynthetic performance in response to iron deficiency. Our results demonstrated that photosystem I (PSI) is the primary target for iron deficiency, while the changes in photosystem II (PSII) are important for rebuilding a balance in disrupted energy utilization and dissipation caused by differential degradation of photosynthetic components. The result of immunoblot analysis suggested that the core subunit PsaA declined drastically, while PsbA remained relatively stable. Furthermore, several organizational changes of the photosynthetic apparatus were found by BN-PAGE, including a marked decrease in the PSI core complexes, the Cytb 6 /f complex, and the trimeric form of the LHCII antenna, consistent with the observed unstacking grana. The fluorescence induction analysis indicated a descending PSII activity with energy dissipation enhanced markedly. In addition, we proposed that the crippled CO 2 assimilation could be compensated by the enhanced of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), which is suggested by the decreased ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and photosynthetic efficiency.

  17. Cobalt-deficiency-induced hyperhomocysteinaemia and oxidative status of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangl, G I; Schwarz, F J; Jahn, B; Kirchgessner, M

    2000-01-01

    In ruminants, Co is required for the synthesis of vitamin B12, which in turn is needed for the resynthesis of methionine by methylation of homocysteine and thus, cobalamin deficiency may induce hyperhomocysteinaemia which is brought into context with perturbations of the antioxidative-prooxidative balance. The present study was conducted to explore whether Co deficiency in cattle is also associated with homocysteine-induced disturbances of oxidative status. Co deficiency was induced in cattle by feeding two groups of animals on either a basal maize-silage-based diet that was moderately low in Co (83 micrograms Co/kg DM), or the same diet supplemented with Co to a total of 200 micrograms Co/kg DM, for 43 weeks. Co deficiency was apparent from a reduced vitamin B12 status in serum and liver and an accumulation of homocysteine in plasma which was in excess of 4.8 times higher in Co-deprived cattle than in controls. The much increased level of circulating homocysteine did not indicate severe disturbances in antioxidant-prooxidant balance as measured by individual markers of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and the antioxidative defence system. There were no quantitative difference in plasma thiol groups, nor were there significant changes in concentrations of alpha-tocopherol, microsomal thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and carbonyl groups in liver. However, there was a trend toward increased plasma carbonyl levels indicating a slight degradation of plasma proteins in the hyperhomocysteinaemic cattle. Analysis of the hepatic catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) activity revealed an 11% reduction in Co-deficient cattle relative to the controls. These results indicate that long-term moderate Co deficiency may induce a severe accumulation of plasma homocysteine in cattle, but considerable abnormalities in oxidative status failed to appear.

  18. Patterns of Semantic Memory Impairment in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Joubert

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the semantic memory impairment has been largely documented in Alzheimer's disease, little is known about semantic memory in the preclinical phase of the disease (Mild Cognitive Impairment. The purpose of this study was to document the nature of semantic breakdown using a battery of tests assessing different aspects of conceptual knowledge: knowledge about common objects, famous people and famous public events. Results indicate that all domains of semantic memory were impaired in MCI individuals but knowledge about famous people and famous events was affected to a greater extent than knowledge about objects. This pattern of results suggests that conceptual entities with distinctive and unique properties may be more prone to semantic breakdown in MCI. In summary, results of this study support the view that genuine semantic deficits are present in MCI. It could be useful to investigate the etiological outcome of patients failing or succeeding at such tests.

  19. Ursodeoxycholic acid impairs atherogenesis and promotes plaque regression by cholesterol crystal dissolution in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Niklas; Grebe, Alena; Kerksiek, Anja; Lütjohann, Dieter; Werner, Nikos; Nickenig, Georg; Latz, Eicke; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2016-09-09

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease driven primarily by a continuous retention of cholesterol within the subendothelial space where it precipitates to form cholesterol crystals (CC). These CC trigger a complex inflammatory response through activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and promote lesion development. Here we examined whether increasing cholesterol solubility with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) affects vascular CC formation and ultimately atherosclerotic lesion development. UDCA mediated intracellular CC dissolution in macrophages and reduced IL-1β production. In ApoE(-/-) mice, UDCA treatment not only impaired atherosclerotic plaque development but also mediated regression of established vascular lesions. Importantly, mice treated with UDCA had decreased CC-depositions in atherosclerotic plaques compared to controls. Together, our data demonstrate that UDCA impaired CC and NLRP3 dependent inflammation by increasing cholesterol solubility and diminished atherosclerosis in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of osteopontin in children with systemic inflammatory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    involvement in the acute inflammatory diseases and its possible role as a marker differentiating ... or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Sample collection .... interactions with several integrins, also it mediates .... inflammatory bowel disease.

  1. The inflammatory microenvironment in colorectal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Mairi H; Murray, Graeme I; Stewart, Keith N; Norrie, Gillian; Mayer, Claus; Hold, Georgina L; Thomson, John; Fyfe, Nicky; Hope, Mairi; Mowat, N Ashley G; Drew, Janice E; El-Omar, Emad M

    2011-01-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Inflammatory activity within the stroma of invasive colorectal tumours is known to be a key predictor of disease activity with type, density and location of immune cells impacting on patient prognosis. To date, there has been no report of inflammatory phenotype within pre-malignant human colonic adenomas. Assessing the stromal microenvironment and particularly, inflammatory activity within colorectal neoplastic lesions is central to understanding early colorectal carcinogenesis. Inflammatory cell infiltrate was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paired colonic adenoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa samples, and adenomas exhibiting increasing degrees of epithelial cell dysplasia. Macrophage phenotype was assessed using double stain immunohistochemistry incorporating expression of an intracellular enzyme of function. A targeted array of inflammatory cytokine and receptor genes, validated by RT-PCR, was used to assess inflammatory gene expression. Inflammatory cell infiltrates are a key feature of sporadic adenomatous colonic polyps with increased macrophage, neutrophil and T cell (specifically helper and activated subsets) infiltration in adenomatous colonic polyps, that increases in association with characteristics of high malignant potential, namely, increasing degree of cell dysplasia and adenoma size. Macrophages within adenomas express iNOS, suggestive of a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Several inflammatory cytokine genes (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, CCL20, IL8, CCL23, CCL19, CCL21, CCL5) are dysregulated in adenomas. This study has provided evidence of increased inflammation within pre-malignant colonic adenomas. This may allow potential mechanistic pathways in the initiation and promotion of early colorectal carcinogenesis to be identified.

  2. The Inflammatory Microenvironment in Colorectal Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Mairi H.; Murray, Graeme I.; Stewart, Keith N.; Norrie, Gillian; Mayer, Claus; Hold, Georgina L.; Thomson, John; Fyfe, Nicky; Hope, Mairi; Mowat, N. Ashley G.; Drew, Janice E.; El-Omar, Emad M.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Inflammatory activity within the stroma of invasive colorectal tumours is known to be a key predictor of disease activity with type, density and location of immune cells impacting on patient prognosis. To date, there has been no report of inflammatory phenotype within pre-malignant human colonic adenomas. Assessing the stromal microenvironment and particularly, inflammatory activity within colorectal neoplastic lesions is central to understanding early colorectal carcinogenesis. Inflammatory cell infiltrate was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paired colonic adenoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa samples, and adenomas exhibiting increasing degrees of epithelial cell dysplasia. Macrophage phenotype was assessed using double stain immunohistochemistry incorporating expression of an intracellular enzyme of function. A targeted array of inflammatory cytokine and receptor genes, validated by RT-PCR, was used to assess inflammatory gene expression. Inflammatory cell infiltrates are a key feature of sporadic adenomatous colonic polyps with increased macrophage, neutrophil and T cell (specifically helper and activated subsets) infiltration in adenomatous colonic polyps, that increases in association with characteristics of high malignant potential, namely, increasing degree of cell dysplasia and adenoma size. Macrophages within adenomas express iNOS, suggestive of a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Several inflammatory cytokine genes (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, CCL20, IL8, CCL23, CCL19, CCL21, CCL5) are dysregulated in adenomas. This study has provided evidence of increased inflammation within pre-malignant colonic adenomas. This may allow potential mechanistic pathways in the initiation and promotion of early colorectal carcinogenesis to be identified. PMID:21249124

  3. The inflammatory microenvironment in colorectal neoplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairi H McLean

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Inflammatory activity within the stroma of invasive colorectal tumours is known to be a key predictor of disease activity with type, density and location of immune cells impacting on patient prognosis. To date, there has been no report of inflammatory phenotype within pre-malignant human colonic adenomas. Assessing the stromal microenvironment and particularly, inflammatory activity within colorectal neoplastic lesions is central to understanding early colorectal carcinogenesis. Inflammatory cell infiltrate was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paired colonic adenoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa samples, and adenomas exhibiting increasing degrees of epithelial cell dysplasia. Macrophage phenotype was assessed using double stain immunohistochemistry incorporating expression of an intracellular enzyme of function. A targeted array of inflammatory cytokine and receptor genes, validated by RT-PCR, was used to assess inflammatory gene expression. Inflammatory cell infiltrates are a key feature of sporadic adenomatous colonic polyps with increased macrophage, neutrophil and T cell (specifically helper and activated subsets infiltration in adenomatous colonic polyps, that increases in association with characteristics of high malignant potential, namely, increasing degree of cell dysplasia and adenoma size. Macrophages within adenomas express iNOS, suggestive of a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Several inflammatory cytokine genes (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, CCL20, IL8, CCL23, CCL19, CCL21, CCL5 are dysregulated in adenomas. This study has provided evidence of increased inflammation within pre-malignant colonic adenomas. This may allow potential mechanistic pathways in the initiation and promotion of early colorectal carcinogenesis to be identified.

  4. Cognitive impairment and driving safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, David W; Molnar, Lisa J

    2012-11-01

    As the populations of many countries continue to age, cognitive impairment will likely become more common. Individuals with cognitive impairment pose special challenges for families, health professionals, driving safety professionals, and the larger community, particularly if these older adults depend on driving as their primary means of community mobility. It is vital that we continue to extend our knowledge about the driving behavior of individuals' with cognitive impairment, as well as try to develop effective means of screening and assessing these individuals for fitness to drive and help facilitate their transition to non-driving when appropriate. This special issue is intended to provide researchers and practitioners an opportunity to present the most recent research findings on driving-related issues among older adults with cognitive impairment. The issue contains 11 original contributions from seven countries. The topics covered by these papers are: crash risks; screening, assessment, and fitness to drive; driving performance using a driving simulator; and driving behaviors and driving-related decisions of people with cognitive impairments. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Inflammatory carcinoma of breast: The chameleon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indranil Chakrabarti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory breast carcinoma is an extremely rare, rapidly progressive breast carcinoma which is a great masquerader and often is mistaken as an inflammatory lesion. This leads to the delay in diagnosis. Here, we report such a case where the mistaken clinical diagnosis led to it being treated with antibiotics. However, fine-needle aspiration cytology of the case saved the day. Histopathological confirmation followed by multimodal therapy was rendered, and the patient responded well to the treatment. Thus, awareness and recognition of this rare entity, which mimics various inflammatory and nonmalignant causes, is of paramount importance for the doctors and patients alike.

  6. Science review: Mechanisms of impaired adrenal function in sepsis and molecular actions of glucocorticoids

    OpenAIRE

    Prigent, Hélène; Maxime, Virginie; Annane, Djillali

    2004-01-01

    This review describes current knowledge on the mechanisms that underlie glucocorticoid insufficiency in sepsis and the molecular action of glucocorticoids. In patients with severe sepsis, numerous factors predispose to glucocorticoid insufficiency, including drugs, coagulation disorders and inflammatory mediators. These factors may compromise the hypothalamic–pituitary axis (i.e. secondary adrenal insufficiency) or the adrenal glands (i.e. primary adrenal failure), or may impair glucocorticoi...

  7. Inflammatory Bowel Disease During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Ramona; Korelitz, Burton I.

    2001-06-01

    The management of both male and female patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who wish to have a baby is challenging. For women, the most important factor to bear in mind is that the outcome of pregnancy is largely influenced by disease activity at the time of conception. Women with quiescent disease are likely to have an uncomplicated pregnancy with the delivery of a healthy baby, whereas women with active disease are more likely to have complications such as spontaneous abortions, miscarriages, stillbirths, and exacerbation of the disease. This is more true of patients with Crohn's disease than of patients with ulcerative colitis. Although the safety of medications used during pregnancy is an important issue, the impact of the medications used to treat IBD is less important in comparison to disease activity itself. 5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) products appear to be safe during pregnancy; corticosteroids are probably safe; 6-mercaptopurine and azathioprine should be used with caution; and methotrexate is contraindicated. There are inadequate data on the use of infliximab during pregnancy. In regard to men with IBD, the disease itself does not seem to have any negative impact on fertility. However, there is controversy about the effects of using 6-mercaptopurine and azathioprine prior to and during fertilization. In view of possible adverse pregnancy outcomes, it would be prudent to withhold 6-mercaptopurine and azathioprine therapy in men with IBD for 3 months prior to conception, when feasible. Most IBD medications should be continued before, during, and after pregnancy, with careful attention to the known cautions and exceptions. If IBD in a pregnant patient is in remission, the prognosis for pregnancy is the same as if she did not have IBD. Active disease should therefore be treated aggressively and remission accomplished before pregnancy is attempted. Similarly, a woman who unexpectedly becomes pregnant while her IBD is active should be treated

  8. [Behavioral impairments in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashihara, Kenichi

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral impairments in parkinsonian patients include agitation, hypersexuality, stereotypic movement, pathological gambling, abuse of antiparkinsonian drugs, REM sleep behavioral disorder, and restless legs syndrome. Dementia, psychoses, and emotional disorders, such as depression and anxiety/panic disorder, also impair behavior. Symptoms may be produced by dysfunction of the central nervous system, medication, and/or the psychosocial problems associated with Parkinson's disease. Treatment therefore should be based on the cause of the symptoms seen. In some cases, the reduction or change of antiparkinsonian drugs, or both, may be effective. Treatment of the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, including motor fluctuations, may reduce the risk of panic attacks being evoked in the 'off' period. Use of antidepressants, sedatives, and neuroleptics may often be effective. Physicians should identify the causes of the symptoms of behavioral impairment and select appropriate treatments.

  9. Language Impairment and Generative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Stopar

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with different types of language impairment from the perspective of generative grammar. The paper focuses on syntactic deficiencies observed in aphasic and SLI (specific language impairment patients. We show that the observed ungrammatical structures do not appear in a random fashion but can be predicted by that theory of universal sentence structure which posits a strict hierarchy of its constituent parts. The article shows that while the hierarchically lower elements remain unaffected, the higher positions in the hierarchy show various degrees of syntactic impairment. The paper supports the implementation of recent developments in the field of generative grammar with the intention of encouraging further theoretical, experimental and therapeutic research in the field.

  10. Lysosomal impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehay, Benjamin; Martinez-Vicente, Marta; Caldwell, Guy A; Caldwell, Kim A; Yue, Zhenyue; Cookson, Mark R; Klein, Christine; Vila, Miquel; Bezard, Erwan

    2013-06-01

    Impairment of autophagy-lysosomal pathways (ALPs) is increasingly regarded as a major pathogenic event in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD). ALP alterations are observed in sporadic PD brains and in toxic and genetic rodent models of PD-related neurodegeneration. In addition, PD-linked mutations and post-translational modifications of α-synuclein impair its own lysosomal-mediated degradation, thereby contributing to its accumulation and aggregation. Furthermore, other PD-related genes, such as leucine-rich repeat kinase-2 (LRRK2), parkin, and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), have been mechanistically linked to alterations in ALPs. Conversely, mutations in lysosomal-related genes, such as glucocerebrosidase (GBA) and lysosomal type 5 P-type ATPase (ATP13A2), have been linked to PD. New data offer mechanistic molecular evidence for such a connection, unraveling a causal link between lysosomal impairment, α-synuclein accumulation, and neurotoxicity. First, PD-related GBA deficiency/mutations initiate a positive feedback loop in which reduced lysosomal function leads to α-synuclein accumulation, which, in turn, further decreases lysosomal GBA activity by impairing the trafficking of GBA from the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi to lysosomes, leading to neurodegeneration. Second, PD-related mutations/deficiency in the ATP13A2 gene lead to a general lysosomal impairment characterized by lysosomal membrane instability, impaired lysosomal acidification, decreased processing of lysosomal enzymes, reduced degradation of lysosomal substrates, and diminished clearance of autophagosomes, collectively contributing to α-synuclein accumulation and cell death. According to these new findings, primary lysosomal defects could potentially account for Lewy body formation and neurodegeneration in PD, laying the groundwork for the prospective development of new neuroprotective/disease-modifying therapeutic strategies

  11. Peripheral inflammation acutely impairs human spatial memory via actions on medial temporal lobe glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil A; Doeller, Christian F; Voon, Valerie; Burgess, Neil; Critchley, Hugo D

    2014-10-01

    Inflammation impairs cognitive performance and is implicated in the progression of neurodegenerative disorders. Rodent studies demonstrated key roles for inflammatory mediators in many processes critical to memory, including long-term potentiation, synaptic plasticity, and neurogenesis. They also demonstrated functional impairment of medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures by systemic inflammation. However, human data to support this position are limited. Sequential fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography together with experimentally induced inflammation was used to investigate effects of a systemic inflammatory challenge on human MTL function. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scanning was performed in 20 healthy participants before and after typhoid vaccination and saline control injection. After each scanning session, participants performed a virtual reality spatial memory task analogous to the Morris water maze and a mirror-tracing procedural memory control task. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography data demonstrated an acute reduction in human MTL glucose metabolism after inflammation. The inflammatory challenge also selectively compromised human spatial, but not procedural, memory; this effect that was independent of actions on motivation or psychomotor response. Effects of inflammation on parahippocampal and rhinal glucose metabolism directly mediated actions of inflammation on spatial memory. These data demonstrate acute sensitivity of human MTL to mild peripheral inflammation, giving rise to associated functional impairment in the form of reduced spatial memory performance. Our findings suggest a mechanism for the observed epidemiologic link between inflammation and risk of age-related cognitive decline and progression of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasma inflammatory biomarkers response to aerobic versus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adversely affects quality of life, alteration in ventilatory and skeletal muscles functions. Moreover ... ued intervention (2 patients disliked the diet regimen, 2 patients had work ..... ibility/resistance exercise, reduces serum inflammatory cytokines ...

  13. EVALUATION OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY, ANTIBACTERIAL AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Anti-inflammatory activity was determined using a LOX-inhibitor screening assay kit according to the ... and the Ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). Antimicrobial activities ..... the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the.

  14. Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Olsen, Anja; Carbonnel, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Background: A better understanding of the environmental factors leading to inflammatory bowel disease should help to prevent occurrence of the disease and its relapses. Aim: To review current knowledge on dietary risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: The PubMed, Medline and Cochrane...... Library were searched for studies on diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Results: Established non-diet risk factors include family predisposition, smoking, appendectomy, and antibiotics. Retrospective case–control studies are encumbered with methodological problems. Prospective studies...... on European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty...

  15. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal

  16. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditlev Nytoft; Karstensen, John Gásdal; Riis, Lene Buhl

    2015-01-01

    included. Next, eligible studies were analysed with respect to several parameters, such as technique and clinical aim and definitions of outcomes. RESULTS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy has been used for a wide range of purposes in inflammatory bowel disease, covering assessment of inflammatory severity...... of confocal laser endomicroscopy for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Available literature was searched systematically for studies applying confocal laser endomicroscopy in Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Relevant literature was reviewed and only studies reporting original clinical data were...... of histological features such as colonic crypts, epithelial gaps and epithelial leakiness to fluorescein. CONCLUSIONS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy remains an experimental but emerging tool for assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. It is the only method that enables in vivo functional assessment...

  17. Tomato leaves methanol extract possesses anti- inflammatory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2011-12-16

    Dec 16, 2011 ... demonstrated, the anti-inflammatory effect of tomato leaves and its associated molecular mechanisms have not yet .... dissolved in 10% of culture-grade dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO; Sigma-. Aldrich .... In Vitro Cell. Dev. Biol.

  18. Outcome measures in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, J.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are generally multifaceted disorders and, therefore, measurement of multiple outcomes is relevant to most of these diseases. Developments in outcome measures in the rheumatic diseases are promoted by the development of successful treatments. Outcome measurement will

  19. Genetics Home Reference: idiopathic inflammatory myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stumble while walking and find it difficult to grasp items. As in dermatomyositis and polymyositis, swallowing can ... and development? More about Mutations and Health Inheritance Pattern Most cases of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy are sporadic, ...

  20. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Mo; Yoon, Kwon Ha; Rho, Ji Young; Park, Ki Han; Yun, Ki Jung; Kim, Chang Keun; Won, Jong Jin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Suh, Jae Hee; Auh, Yong Ho

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the CT features of inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver with histopathologic correlation. The CT features of 14 cases (ten patients) with pathologically proven inflammatory hepatic pseudotumor were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with resected and biopsy specimens. The size of lesions ranged between 2.0 and 7.0cm (mean, 3.7 cm); On unenhanced CT, the masses were seen as ill-defined hypodense lesions, while on contrast-enhanced CT they were heterogeneous and multiseptated, with enhancement of internal septa and peripheral wall (n=3D10). In four lesions, central low density and peripheral homogeneous enhancement were seen. On histopathological correlation, the central hypoattenuated area corresponded to chronic inflammatory cell infiltrates with foamy histiocytes, plasmacytes, and lymphocytes, while the hyperattenuated peripheral wall and internal septa represented dense fibrosis. In patients in whon CT shows a heterogeneous enhancing mass, inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver should be included in differential diagnosis

  1. Liver excretory function in patients with inflammatory diseases of the bile duct as reflected by radioimmunoassays of choleglycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buyanov, V.M.; Orduyan, S.L.; Gidzev, M.Sh.; Kasimov, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    Radioimmunoassays of holeglycine in 41 healthy donors, 37 patients with gastroduodenal diseases and 41 ones with inflammatory diseases of the bile ducts have revealed that impaired excretory function of the liver is associated with a reduced coefficient of the bile acid extraction and a decreased bactericidal activity of the bile. The latter fact is conductive to active growth of microorganisms in the bile and thus promotes postoperative septic complications. Early detection of cholestasis resultant froom impaired excretory function with the use of choleglycine radioimmunoassays permits administration of early measures to restore the bile passage and of rational antibacterial therapy to prevent postoperative pyoseptic complications

  2. Postpartum Inflammatory Sacroiliitis-A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seniz Akcay Yalbuzdag

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available During the pregnancy several changes occur in sacroiliac joint and pelvis which may predispose for sacroiliac joint strain and septic sacroiliitis. We describe a case of acute inflammatory sacroiliitis in a patient with HLA B27 positivity during postpartum period, and diagnosed psoriatic arthritis during the follow up period. We aimed to emphasize that inflammatory sacroiliitis should take place whithin differantial diagnose of postpartum low back pain.

  3. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...... of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets....

  4. Helping Patients Cope with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    these strategies can be effective as long as the strategy leads to 1) containment of guilt, fear, anxiety, and grief, 2) generation of hope , 3...patients with a sense of hope and a feeling that the disease can be coped with. The most difficult aspect of living with inflammatory bowel disease is...Recovery (mastectomy patients) and the Ostomy Association. They consist of people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Members support one another by sharing

  5. Use of Prebiotics for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The relevance of diet in both the pathogenesis and the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease is an evolving science. Disturbance of intestinal microflora (dysbiosis) is putatively a key element in the environmental component causing inflammatory bowel disease. Prebiotics are among the dietary components used in an attempt to counteract dysbiosis. Such predominantly carbohydrate dietary components exert effects on the luminal environment by physicochemical changes through pH alteration, by pro...

  6. Depression: An Immuno-Inflammatory Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Sharma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder also known as clinical depression, unipolar depression or depression is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, high suicidal tendencies and deaths. Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that psychiatric illnesses like MDD, are associated with inflammatory processes. While it is unlikely that major depressive disorder is a primary and lsquo;inflammatory' disorder, there is now evidence to suggest that inflammation play a subtle role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. The inflammation in depression cascade pin points to the origin from immune hyperactivity and thus a new theory that explains role of immune system mediated inflammation has been accepted and researched upon. widely. This theory states that depression is accompanied by altered immune function and activation of the inflammatory response system. This theory is strengthened form the fact that the current therapeutic options which mainly target neurotransmitters, are not effective in many patients and these patients has been found to be associated with elevated levels of inflammatory mediators specifically cytokines. It is reported more recently that other risk factors for depression, including psychosocial stress, psychological trauma, sleep disturbance and pain, also increases inflammatory processes. Thus the intervention in the immune system originated from inflammatory cytokines seems a therapeutically viable option in the field of depression research. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(2.000: 223-240

  7. Anti-Inflammatory Iridoids of Botanical Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, A; Mncwangi, N; Vermaak, I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a manifestation of a wide range of disorders which include; arthritis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, physical injury and infection amongst many others. Common treatment modalities are usually non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, paracetamol, indomethacin and ibuprofen as well as corticosteroids such as prednisone. These however, may be associated with a host of side effects due to non-selectivity for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes involved in inflammation and those with selectivity may be highly priced. Thus, there is a continuing search for safe and effective anti-inflammatory molecules from natural sources. Research has confirmed that iridoids exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammation. Iridoids are secondary metabolites present in various plants, especially in species belonging to the Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae, Loganiaceae, Rubiaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Verbenaceae families. Many of these ethnobotanicals have an illustrious history of traditional use alluding to their use to treat inflammation. Although iridoids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities such as cardiovascular, hepatoprotection, hypoglycaemic, antimutagenic, antispasmodic, anti-tumour, antiviral, immunomodulation and purgative effects this review will acutely focus on their anti-inflammatory properties. The paper aims to present a summary for the most prominent iridoid-containing plants for which anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and / or in vivo. PMID:22414102

  8. A zebrafish model of inflammatory lymphangiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhide S. Okuda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a disabling chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. IBD patients have increased intestinal lymphatic vessel density and recent studies have shown that this may contribute to the resolution of IBD. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in IBD-associated lymphangiogenesis are still unclear. In this study, we established a novel inflammatory lymphangiogenesis model in zebrafish larvae involving colitogenic challenge stimulated by exposure to 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS or dextran sodium sulphate (DSS. Treatment with either TNBS or DSS resulted in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (Vegfr-dependent lymphangiogenesis in the zebrafish intestine. Reduction of intestinal inflammation by the administration of the IBD therapeutic, 5-aminosalicylic acid, reduced intestinal lymphatic expansion. Zebrafish macrophages express vascular growth factors vegfaa, vegfc and vegfd and chemical ablation of these cells inhibits intestinal lymphatic expansion, suggesting that the recruitment of macrophages to the intestine upon colitogenic challenge is required for intestinal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. Importantly, this study highlights the potential of zebrafish as an inflammatory lymphangiogenesis model that can be used to investigate the role and mechanism of lymphangiogenesis in inflammatory diseases such as IBD.

  9. Effects of insulin and glucose loading on FDG uptake in experimental malignant tumours and inflammatory lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Songji; Tsukamoto, Eriko; Kato, Takashi; Tamaki, Nagara; Kuge, Yuji; Hikosaka, Kenji; Mochizuki, Takafumi; Hosokawa, Masuo; Kohanawa, Masashi

    2001-01-01

    that FDG uptake in both types of inflammatory lesion was significantly impaired in rats with hyperglycaemia induced by glucose loading, while tumour uptake of FDG was not significantly affected. These results indicate that glucose loading has greater effects on FDG uptake in inflammatory lesions than in tumours, providing a biological basis for differentiation of malignant lesions from benign lesions by FDG-PET in a clinical setting. (orig.)

  10. Sexual Dysfunctions in Men and Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease : The Influence of IBD-Related Clinical Factors and Depression on Sexual Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, Linda G J; Vollebregt, Anna M; Van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Fidder, Herma H; Ten Hove, Willem R; Vliet-Vlieland, Cornelia W; Ter Kuile, Moniek M; de Groot, Helena E; Both, Stephanie

    INTRODUCTION: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is likely to have an impact on sexual function because of its symptoms, like diarrhea, fatigue, and abdominal pain. Depression is commonly reported in IBD and is also related to impaired sexual function. This study aimed to evaluate sexual function and

  11. Regulatory T Cells Protect Fine Particulate Matter-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-cai Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the role of CD4+CD25+ T cells (Tregs in protecting fine particulate matter (PM- induced inflammatory responses, and its potential mechanisms. Methods. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were treated with graded concentrations (2, 5, 10, 20, and 40 µg/cm2 of suspension of fine particles for 24h. For coculture experiment, HUVECs were incubated alone, with CD4+CD25− T cells (Teff, or with Tregs in the presence of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies for 48 hours, and then were stimulated with or without suspension of fine particles for 24 hours. The expression of adhesion molecules and inflammatory cytokines was examined. Results. Adhesion molecules, including vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL- 6 and IL-8, were increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the adhesion of human acute monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1 to endothelial cells was increased and NF-κB activity was upregulated in HUVECs after treatment with fine particles. However, after Tregs treatment, fine particles-induced inflammatory responses and NF-κB activation were significantly alleviated. Transwell experiments showed that Treg-mediated suppression of HUVECs inflammatory responses impaired by fine particles required cell contact and soluble factors. Conclusions. Tregs could attenuate fine particles-induced inflammatory responses and NF-κB activation in HUVECs.

  12. Identification of health problems in patients with acute inflammatory arthritis, using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zochling, J; Grill, E; Scheuringer, M; Liman, W; Stucki, G; Braun, J

    2006-01-01

    To identify the most common health problems experienced by patients with acute inflammatory arthritis using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), and to provide empirical data for the development of an ICF Core Set for acute inflammatory arthritis. Cross-sectional survey of patients with acute inflammatory arthritis of two or more joints requiring admission to an acute hospital. The second level categories of the ICF were used to collect information on patients' health problems. Relative frequencies of impairments, limitations and restrictions in the study population were reported for the ICF components Body Functions, Body Structures, and Activities and Participations. For the component Environmental Factors absolute and relative frequencies of perceived barriers or facilitators were reported. In total, 130 patients were included in the survey. The mean age of the population was 59.9 years (median age 63.0 years), 75% of the patients were female. Most had rheumatoid arthritis (57%) or early inflammatory polyarthritis (22%). Fifty-four second-level ICF categories had a prevalence of 30% or more: 3 (8%) belonged to the component Body Structures and 10 (13%) to the component Body Functions. Most categories were identified in the components Activities and Participation (19; 23%) and Environmental Factors (22; 56%). Patients with acute inflammatory arthritis can be well described by ICF categories and components. This study is the first step towards the development of an ICF Core Set for patients with acute inflammatory arthritis.

  13. Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Etesam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment can emerge in the earliest phases of multiple sclerosis. It strongly impacts different aspects of Multiple Sclerosis (MS patients' lives, like employment, social relationships and the overall quality of life; thus, its on-time recognition and treatment is mandatory. This paper discusses issues, diagnostic methods and treatment options for cognitive dysfunctions in MS. This paper is a descriptive review of the related studies in the recent 10 years, performing a keyword search in the main databases4T. Cognitive impairment mostly involves aspects of information processing, memory and executive functioning in MS. Neuropsychological tests like MACFIMS and BRB-N are recommended for its assessment. Still, there is no fully efficient treatment for cognitive impairment. Researchers have shown some positive effects, using disease-modifying therapies and cognitive rehabilitation. Depression, pain, fatigue and other factors influencing cognitive functions must be paid attention to4T. Recognizing cognitive impairment as a major symptom for MS, makes studying this subject one of the priorities in dealing with the disease. Therefore, a consecutive research for identification and management of this part of quality of life in MS patients is obligatory4T.4T

  14. Current therapy for cognitive impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Vasilyevna Vakhnina

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive impairments (CIs) are a highly common type of neurological disorders particularly in elderly patients. Choice of a therapeutic strategy for CI is determined by the etiology of abnormalities and their degree. Measures to prevent CI progression and dementia: adequate treatment of existing cardiovascular diseases, prevention of stroke, balanced nutrition, moderate physical and intellectual exercises, and combatting overweight and low activity are of ba...

  15. Language Impairment in Autistic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Ann Virginia

    Discussed is the language impairment of children with infantile autism. The speech patterns of autistic children, including echolalia, pronomial reversal, silent language, and voice imitation, are described. The clinical picture of the autistic child is compared to that of children with such other disorders as deafness, retardation, and…

  16. Language Impairment in Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, Judith; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Oostveen, Judith; Knuijt, Simone; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Kremer, Berry (H. ) P. H.

    Background: Several studies have suggested that language impairment can be observed in patients with cerebellar pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate language performance in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Methods: We assessed speech and language in 29 SCA6 patients

  17. Cognitive impairment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru F Crişan

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, especially in severe forms, is commonly associated with multiple cognitive problems. Montreal Cognitive Assessment test (MoCA is used to detect cognitive impairment evaluating several areas: visuospatial, memory, attention and fluency. Our study aim was to evaluate the impact of stable COPD and exacerbation (AECOPD phases on cognitive status using MoCA questionnaire.We enrolled 39 patients (pts, smokers with COPD group D (30 stable and 9 in AECOPD and 13 healthy subjects (control group, having similar level of education and no significant differences regarding the anthropometric measurements. We analyzed the differences in MoCA score between these three groups and also the correlation between this score and inflammatory markers.Patients with AECOPD had a significant (p<0.001 decreased MoCA score (14.6±3.4 compared to stable COPD (20.2±2.4 and controls (24.2±5.8. The differences between groups were more accentuated for the language abstraction and attention (p<0.001 and delayed recall and orientation (p<0.001 sub-topics. No significant variance of score was observed between groups regarding visuospatial and naming score (p = 0.095. The MoCA score was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume (r = 0.28 and reverse correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP (r = -0.57, fibrinogen (r = -0.58, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR (r = -0.55 and with the partial pressure of CO2 (r = -0.47.According to this study, COPD significantly decreases the cognitive status in advanced and acute stages of the disease.

  18. Hypoxic treatment of human dual placental perfusion induces a preeclampsia-like inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Arjun; Schneider, Henning; Aliyev, Eldar; Soydemir, Fatimah; Baumann, Marc; Surbek, Daniel; Hediger, Matthias; Brownbill, Paul; Albrecht, Christiane

    2014-08-01

    Preeclampsia is a human pregnancy-specific disorder characterized by a placental pro-inflammatory response in combination with an imbalance of angiogenic factors and clinical symptoms, including hypertension and proteinuria. Insufficient uteroplacental oxygenation in preeclampsia due to impaired trophoblast invasion during placentation is believed to be responsible for many of the molecular events leading to the clinical manifestations of this disease. We investigated the use of hypoxic treatment of the dual placental perfusion system as a model for preeclampsia. A modified perfusion technique allowed us to achieve a mean soluble oxygen tension within the intervillous space (IVS) of 5-7% for normoxia and preeclampsia). We assayed for the levels of different inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress markers, as well as other factors, such as endothelin (ET)-1 that are known to be implicated as part of the inflammatory response in preeclampsia. Our results show a significant increase under hypoxia in the levels of different inflammatory cytokines, including IL-6 (P=0.002), IL-8 (Ppreeclampsia. This would therefore provide a powerful tool for studying and further delineating the molecular mechanisms involved in the underlying pathophysiology of preeclampsia.

  19. Osteoarthritis guidelines: a progressive role for topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanos SP

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven P Stanos Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Center for Pain Management, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Current treatment guidelines for the treatment of chronic pain associated with osteoarthritis reflect the collective clinical knowledge of international experts in weighing the benefits of pharmacologic therapy options while striving to minimize the negative effects associated with them. Consideration of disease progression, pattern of flares, level of functional impairment or disability, response to treatment, coexisting conditions such as cardiovascular disease or gastrointestinal disorders, and concomitant prescription medication use should be considered when creating a therapeutic plan for a patient with osteoarthritis. Although topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs historically have not been prevalent in many of the guidelines for osteoarthritis treatment, recent evidence-based medicine and new guidelines now support their use as a viable option for the clinician seeking alternatives to typical oral formulations. This article provides a qualitative review of these treatment guidelines and the emerging role of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as a therapy option for patients with localized symptoms of osteoarthritis who may be at risk for oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related serious adverse events. Keywords: osteoarthritis, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, guidelines, topical analgesics, diclofenac

  20. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrient status, supplementation, and mechanisms in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumedha; Natarajan, Radhika; Ziedonis, Douglas; Fan, Xiaoduo

    2017-08-01

    Over 50 million people around the world suffer from schizophrenia, a severe mental illness characterized by misinterpretation of reality. Although the exact causes of schizophrenia are still unknown, studies have indicated that inflammation and oxidative stress may play an important role in the etiology of the disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are crucial for normal central nervous development and proper functioning of neural networks and neurotransmitters. Patients with schizophrenia tend to have abnormal immune activation resulting in elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, ultimately leading to functional brain impairments. Patients with schizophrenia have also been found to suffer from oxidative stress, a result of an imbalance between the production of free radicals and the ability to detoxify their harmful effects. Furthermore, inflammation and oxidative stress are implicated to be related to the severity of psychotic symptoms. Several nutrients are known to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant functions through various mechanisms in our body. The present review evaluates studies and literature that address the status and supplementation of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin D, B vitamins (B6, folate, B12), vitamin E, and carotenoids in different stages of schizophrenia. The possible anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms of action of each nutrient are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Inflammatory Monocytes Mediate Early and Organ-Specific Innate Defense During Systemic Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Lisa Y.; Kasahara, Shinji; Kumasaka, Debra K.; Knoblaugh, Sue E.; Jhingran, Anupam; Hohl, Tobias M.

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungus that can cause systemic disease in patients with breaches in mucosal integrity, indwelling catheters, and defects in phagocyte function. Although circulating human and murine monocytes bind C. albicans and promote inflammation, it remains unclear whether C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)– and Ly6C-expressing inflammatory monocytes exert a protective or a deleterious function during systemic infection. During murine systemic candidiasis, interruption of CCR2-dependent inflammatory monocyte trafficking into infected kidneys impaired fungal clearance and decreased murine survival. Depletion of CCR2-expressing cells led to uncontrolled fungal growth in the kidneys and brain and demonstrated an essential antifungal role for inflammatory monocytes and their tissue-resident derivatives in the first 48 hours postinfection. Adoptive transfer of purified inflammatory monocytes in depleted hosts reversed the defect in fungal clearance to a substantial extent, indicating a compartmentally and temporally restricted protective function that can be transferred to enhance systemic innate antifungal immunity. PMID:23922372

  2. Immunoregulatory action of melatonin. The mechanism of action and the effect on inflammatory cells

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    Sylwia Mańka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Literature data indicate a significant immunoregulatory role of melatonin. Melatonin exerts an effect directly affecting leucocytes bearing specific melatonin receptors or indirectly by means of melatonin regulating other hormones, opioids or cytokines. Despite numerous experiments, the influence of the hormone on the immune system is still controversial. Melatonin affects the immune response acting as both an activator and an inhibitor of the inflammatory process. The hormone acts as an “immunological buffer” activating impaired immunity in immunosuppression, chronic stress or old age as well as suppressing overreaction of the immune system. Melatonin mediates between neurohormonal and immune systems by means of the immune-pineal axis acting as a negative feedback mechanism. The axis connects development of the immune reaction with pineal activity and melatonin secretion induced by inflammatory mediators. The seasonal and circadian fluctuation of the melatonin level and the fluctuation related changes of the immune parameters can be responsible for some autoimmune and infectious diseases. In spite of that, there is a growing number of papers suggesting considerable therapeutic potential of melatonin in inflammatory disease treatment. This paper presents well-systematized information on the mechanism of melatonin action and its influence on cells involved in the inflammatory process – neutrophils and monocytes.

  3. Changes in spatiotemporal gait parameters following intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Mary L; Chin, Russell L; Miranda, Caroline; Latov, Norman

    2017-10-01

    Gait impairment is a common presenting symptom in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). However, gait parameters have not previously been evaluated in detail as potential independent outcome measures. We prospectively measured changes in spatiotemporal gait parameters of 20 patients with CIDP at baseline and following treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), using GAITRite® a computerized walkway system with embedded sensors. Overall, study patients showed significant improvements in gait velocity, cadence, stride length, double support time, stance phase, and swing phase following IVIG treatment. Mean changes in velocity, stance phase, and swing phase, exhibited the greatest statistical significance among the subgroup that exhibited clinically meaningful improvement in Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment disability score, Medical Research Council sum score, and grip strength. Assessment of gait parameters, in particular velocity, step phase and swing phase, is a potentially sensitive outcome measure for evaluating treatment response in CIDP. Muscle Nerve 56: 732-736, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Tumour-Derived Interleukin-1 Beta Induces Pro-inflammatory Response in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alajez, Nehad M; Al-toub, Mashael; Almusa, Abdulaziz

    ’ secreted factors as represented by a panel of human cancer cell lines (breast (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231); prostate (PC-3); lung (NCI-H522); colon (HT-29) and head & neck (FaDu)) on the biological characteristics of MSCs. Background Over the past several years, significant amount of research has emerged......, the goal of this study was to assess the cellular and molecular changes in MSCs in response to secreted factors present in conditioned media (CM) from a panel of human tumor cell lines covering a spectrum of human cancers (Breast, Prostate, Lung, colon, and head and neck). Research Morphological changes...... with bipolar processes. In association with phenotypic changes, genome-wide gene expression and bioinformatics analysis revealed an enhanced pro-inflammatory response of those MSCs. Pharmacological inhibitions of FAK and MAPKK severely impaired the pro-inflammatory response of MSCs to tumor CM (~80-99%, and 55...

  5. Cartilage damage and bone erosion are more prominent determinants of functional impairment in longstanding experimental arthritis than synovial inflammation

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    Silvia Hayer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation of articular joints causing bone and cartilage destruction consequently leads to functional impairment or loss of mobility in affected joints from individuals affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Even successful treatment with complete resolution of synovial inflammatory processes does not lead to full reversal of joint functionality, pointing to the crucial contribution of irreversibly damaged structural components, such as bone and cartilage, to restricted joint mobility. In this context, we investigated the impact of the distinct components, including synovial inflammation, bone erosion or cartilage damage, as well as the effect of blocking tumor necrosis factor (TNF on functional impairment in human-TNF transgenic (hTNFtg mice, a chronic inflammatory erosive animal model of RA. We determined CatWalk-assisted gait profiles as objective quantitative measurements of functional impairment. We first determined body-weight-independent gait parameters, including maximum intensity, print length, print width and print area in wild-type mice. We observed early changes in those gait parameters in hTNFtg mice at week 5 – the first clinical signs of arthritis. Moreover, we found further gait changes during chronic disease development, indicating progressive functional impairment in hTNFtg mice. By investigating the association of gait parameters with inflammation-mediated joint pathologies at different time points of the disease course, we found a relationship between gait parameters and the extent of cartilage damage and bone erosions, but not with the extent of synovitis in this chronic model. Next, we observed a significant improvement of functional impairment upon blocking TNF, even at progressed stages of disease. However, blocking TNF did not restore full functionality owing to remaining subclinical inflammation and structural microdamage. In conclusion, CatWalk gait analysis provides a useful tool for quantitative

  6. IκK-16 decreases miRNA-155 expression and attenuates the human monocyte inflammatory response.

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    Norman James Galbraith

    Full Text Available Excessive inflammatory responses in the surgical patient may result in cellular hypo-responsiveness, which is associated with an increased risk of secondary infection and death. microRNAs (miRNAs, such as miR-155, are powerful regulators of inflammatory signalling pathways including nuclear factor κB (NFκB. Our objective was to determine the effect of IκK-16, a selective blocker of inhibitor of kappa-B kinase (IκK, on miRNA expression and the monocyte inflammatory response. In a model of endotoxin tolerance using primary human monocytes, impaired monocytes had decreased p65 expression with suppressed TNF-α and IL-10 production (P < 0.05. miR-155 and miR-138 levels were significantly upregulated at 17 h in the impaired monocyte (P < 0.05. Notably, IκK-16 decreased miR-155 expression with a corresponding dose-dependent decrease in TNF-α and IL-10 production (P < 0.05, and impaired monocyte function was associated with increased miR-155 and miR-138 expression. In the context of IκK-16 inhibition, miR-155 mimics increased TNF-α production, while miR-155 antagomirs decreased both TNF-α and IL-10 production. These data demonstrate that IκK-16 treatment attenuates the monocyte inflammatory response, which may occur through a miR-155-mediated mechanism, and that IκK-16 is a promising approach to limit the magnitude of an excessive innate inflammatory response to LPS.

  7. Hyperglycemia- and hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance causes alterations in cellular bioenergetics and activation of inflammatory signaling in lymphatic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yang; Fluckey, James D; Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2017-07-01

    Insulin resistance is a well-known risk factor for obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) and associated cardiovascular diseases, but its mechanisms are undefined in the lymphatics. Mesenteric lymphatic vessels from MetSyn or LPS-injected rats exhibited impaired intrinsic contractile activity and associated inflammatory changes. Hence, we hypothesized that insulin resistance in lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) affects cell bioenergetics and signaling pathways that consequently alter contractility. LMCs were treated with different concentrations of insulin or glucose or both at various time points to determine insulin resistance. Onset of insulin resistance significantly impaired glucose uptake, mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption rates, glycolysis, lactic acid, and ATP production in LMCs. Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia also impaired the PI3K/Akt while enhancing the ERK/p38MAPK/JNK pathways in LMCs. Increased NF-κB nuclear translocation and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 and VCAM-1 levels in insulin-resistant LMCs indicated activation of inflammatory mechanisms. In addition, increased phosphorylation of myosin light chain-20, a key regulator of lymphatic muscle contraction, was observed in insulin-resistant LMCs. Therefore, our data elucidate the mechanisms of insulin resistance in LMCs and provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia promote insulin resistance and impair lymphatic contractile status by reducing glucose uptake, altering cellular metabolic pathways, and activating inflammatory signaling cascades.-Lee, Y., Fluckey, J. D., Chakraborty, S., Muthuchamy, M. Hyperglycemia- and hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance causes alterations in cellular bioenergetics and activation of inflammatory signaling in lymphatic muscle. © FASEB.

  8. Splanchnic-aortic inflammatory axis in experimental portal hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Maria-Angeles; de las Heras, Natalia; Nava, Maria-Paz; Regadera, Javier; Arias, Jaime; Lahera, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Splanchnic and systemic low-grade inflammation has been proposed to be a consequence of long-term prehepatic portal hypertension. This experimental model causes minimal alternations in the liver, thus making a more selective study possible for the pathological changes characteristic of prehepatic portal hypertension. Low-grade splanchnic inflammation after long-term triple partial portal vein ligation could be associated with liver steatosis and portal hypertensive intestinal vasculopathy. In fact, we have previously shown that prehepatic portal hypertension in the rat induces liver steatosis and changes in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism similar to those produced in chronic inflammatory conditions described in metabolic syndrome in humans. Dysbiosis and bacterial translocation in this experimental model suggest the existence of a portal hypertensive intestinal microbiome implicated in both the splanchnic and systemic alterations related to prehepatic portal hypertension. Among the systemic impairments, aortopathy characterized by oxidative stress, increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and profibrogenic mediators stand out. In this experimental model of long-term triple portal vein ligated-rats, the abdominal aortic proinflammatory response could be attributed to oxidative stress. Thus, the increased aortic reduced-nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] oxidase activity could be associated with reactive oxygen species production and promote aortic inflammation. Also, oxidative stress mediated by NAD(P)H oxidase has been associated with risk factors for inflammation and atherosclerosis. The splanchnic and systemic pathology that is produced in the long term after triple partial portal vein ligation in the rat reinforces the validity of this experimental model to study the chronic low-grade inflammatory response induced by prehepatic portal hypertension. PMID:24307792

  9. Iron deficiency anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldberg ND

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Neil D Goldberg Emeritus Chief of Gastroenterology, University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, MD, USA Abstract: Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia worldwide, caused by poor iron intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are increasingly likely to have iron deficiency anemia, with an estimated prevalence of 36%–76%. Detection of iron deficiency is problematic as outward signs and symptoms are not always present. Iron deficiency can have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life, necessitating prompt management and treatment. Effective treatment includes identifying and treating the underlying cause and initiating iron replacement therapy with either oral or intravenous iron. Numerous formulations for oral iron are available, with ferrous fumarate, sulfate, and gluconate being the most commonly prescribed. Available intravenous formulations include iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, and ferumoxytol. Low-molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose have been shown to be safe, efficacious, and effective in a host of gastrointestinal disorders. Ferumoxytol is the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved intravenous iron therapy, indicated for iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is also being investigated in Phase 3 studies for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients without chronic kidney disease, including subgroups with IBD. A review of the efficacy and safety of iron replacement in IBD, therapeutic considerations, and recommendations for the practicing gastroenterologist are presented. Keywords: anemia, inflammatory bowel disease, intravenous iron, iron deficiency, oral iron, therapy

  10. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Agrawal, Anshu; Said, Hamid M

    2016-09-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency.

  11. Effects on Glycemic Control in Impaired Wound Healing in Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) Fatty Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuhiro, Miyajima; Hui Teoh, Soon; Yamashiro, Hideaki; Shinohara, Masami; Fatchiyah, Fatchiyah; Ohta, Takeshi; Yamada, Takahisa

    2018-02-01

    Impaired diabetic wound healing is an important issue in diabetic complications. The present study aims to evaluate the protective effect on glycemic control against impaired diabetic wound healing using a diabetic rat model. We investigated the wound healing process and effect on the impaired wound repair by glycemic control in the Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) fatty rat, which is a new animal model of obese type 2 diabetes and may be a good model for study impaired wound healing. Male SDT fatty rats at 15 weeks of age were administered orally with sodium glucose co-transporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitor for 3 weeks. Wounds were induced at 2 weeks after SGLT 2 inhibitor treatment, and the wound areas were periodically examined in morphological and histological analyses. The SDT fatty rats showed a delayed wound healing as compared with the normal rats, but a glycemic control improved the impaired wound healing. In histological analysis in the skin of SDT fatty rats showed severe infiltration of inflammatory cell, hemorrhage and many bacterial masses in the remaining and slight fibrosis of crust on skin tissue . Thought that this results skin performance to be a delay of crust formation and regeneration of epithelium; however, these findings were ameliorated in the SGLT 2 inhibitor treated group. Glycemic control is effective for treatment in diabetic wounds and the SDT fatty rat may be useful to investigate pathophysiological changes in impaired diabetic wound healing.

  12. Therapeutic Effects of PPARα on Neuronal Death and Microvascular Impairment

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    Elizabeth P. Moran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor-alpha (PPARα is a broadly expressed nuclear hormone receptor and is a transcription factor for diverse target genes possessing a PPAR response element (PPRE in the promoter region. The PPRE is highly conserved, and PPARs thus regulate transcription of an extensive array of target genes involved in energy metabolism, vascular function, oxidative stress, inflammation, and many other biological processes. PPARα has potent protective effects against neuronal cell death and microvascular impairment, which have been attributed in part to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Here we discuss PPARα’s effects in neurodegenerative and microvascular diseases and also recent clinical findings that identified therapeutic effects of a PPARα agonist in diabetic microvascular complications.

  13. Curcumin Prevents Acute Neuroinflammation and Long-Term Memory Impairment Induced by Systemic Lipopolysaccharide in Mice

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    Vincenzo Sorrenti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces an acute inflammatory response in the central nervous system (CNS (“neuroinflammation” characterized by altered functions of microglial cells, the major resident immune cells of the CNS, and an increased inflammatory profile that can result in long-term neuronal cell damage and severe behavioral and cognitive consequences. Curcumin, a natural compound, exerts CNS anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective functions mainly after chronic treatment. However, its effect after acute treatment has not been well investigated. In the present study, we provide evidence that 50 mg/kg of curcumin, orally administered for 2 consecutive days before a single intraperitoneal injection of a high dose of LPS (5 mg/kg in young adult mice prevents the CNS immune response. Curcumin, able to enter brain tissue in biologically relevant concentrations, reduced acute and transient microglia activation, pro-inflammatory mediator production, and the behavioral symptoms of sickness. In addition, short-term treatment with curcumin, administered at the time of LPS challenge, anticipated the recovery from memory impairments observed 1 month after the inflammatory stimulus, when mice had completely recovered from the acute neuroinflammation. Together, these results suggest that the preventive effect of curcumin in inhibiting the acute effects of neuroinflammation could be of value in reducing the long-term consequences of brain inflammation, including cognitive deficits such as memory dysfunction.

  14. Hypertension-Induced Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Leading to Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Dong, Yan-Hong; Lyu, Pei-Yuan; Chen, Wei-Hong; Li, Rui

    2018-03-05

    Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia are responsible for more than 80% of dementia cases. These two conditions share common risk factors including hypertension. Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is strongly associated with both hypertension and cognitive impairment. In this review, we identify the pathophysiological changes in CSVD that are caused by hypertension and further explore the relationship between CSVD and cognitive impairment. We searched and scanned the PubMed database for recently published literatures up to December 2017. We used the keywords of "hypertension", "cerebral small vessel disease", "white matter lesions", "enlarged perivascular spaces", "lacunar infarcts", "cerebral microbleeds", and "cognitive impairment" in the database of PubMed. Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the hypertension-induced pathophysiological changes that occur in CSVD and the correlation between CSVD and cognitive impairment. In recent years, studies have demonstrated that hypertension-related changes (e.g., small vascular lesions, inflammatory reactions, hypoperfusion, oxidative stress, damage to autoregulatory processes and the blood-brain barrier, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy) can occur over time in cerebral small vessels, potentially leading to lower cognitive function when blood pressure (BP) control is poor or lacking. Both isolated and co-occurrent CSVD can lead to cognitive deterioration, and this effect may be attributable to a dysfunction in either the cholinergic system or the functionality of cortical and subcortical tracts. We explore the currently available evidence about the hypertensive vasculopathy and inflammatory changes that occur in CSVD. Both are vital prognostic indicators of the development of cognitive impairment. Future studies should be performed to validate the relationship between BP levels and CSVD progression and between the numbers, volumes, and anatomical locations of CSVD and cognitive impairment.

  15. Inflammatory Arthritis, Sacroiliitis, and Morphea: Evidence of a Systemic Inflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Omair

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphea is a skin disease characterized by local skin inflammation and fibrosis. Extracutaneous manifestations have been described with this disease including inflammatory arthritis. We describe a case of morphea who developed inflammatory polyarthritis and sacroiliitis coincident with new skin lesions.

  16. Visual acuity and microperimetric mapping of lesion area in eyes with inflammatory cystoid macular oedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Marion R; Kiss, Christopher G; Huf, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE:   To evaluate the effect of fluid accumulation on local visual function in inflammatory cystoid-macular-edema (ICME). METHODS:   This cross-sectional study applied optical-coherence-tomography over a 12×12 fovea-centered field in 50 patients with ICME and mapped the extent of fluid-fille...... retinal layers also had major impact on both of these two functional parameters. Visual-impairment seems to differ depending on the layers involved, thus different types of fluid accumulation may potentially be given varying treatment priorities....

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandona, Paresh; Chaudhuri, Ajay; Mohanty, Priya; Ghanim, Husam

    2007-07-01

    This review deals with the recent observations on the pro-inflammatory effects of glucose and the anti-inflammatory actions of insulin. Apart from being novel, they are central to our understanding of why hyperglycemia is a prognosticator of bad clinical outcomes including patients with acute coronary syndromes, stroke and in patients in the intensive care unit. The pro-inflammatory effect of glucose as well as that of other macronutrients including fast food meals provides the basis of chronic oxidative stress and inflammation in the obese and their propensity to atherosclerotic disease. The anti-inflammatory action of insulin provides a neutralizing effect to balance macronutrient induced inflammation on the one hand and the possibility of using insulin as an anti-inflammatory drug on the other. The actions of macronutrients and insulin described above explain why insulin resistant states like obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and atherosclerosis. They also suggest that insulin may be antiatherogenic.

  18. Imaging of childhood inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguz, Berna; Ozcan, Hatice Nursun; Omay, Burak; Ozgen, Burce; Haliloglu, Mithat [Division of Pediatric Radiology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Altindag / Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-10-15

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a rare benign neoplasm and most commonly involves the lung but occurs in extrapulmonary locations. To present imaging findings in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors in children based on a single-centre experience. We retrospectively reviewed CT and MRI findings of children diagnosed with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in a single institution. We identified 15 children (range: 1-17 years) with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. The tumor was localized to the lung (n = 5), mediastinum (n = 3), trachea (n = 1), bronchus (n = 1), abdomen (n = 2) and orbit (n = 3). All the extraorbital tumors were solid masses with homogeneous or heterogeneous enhancement. Four lung tumors and one posterior mediastinal tumor contained calcification. Local recurrence following surgical removal occurred in two children with invasion of the esophagus and of the left atrium in one. Localized masses were seen in all children with orbital tumour. Two of these had episcleritis and perineuritis; one had episcleritis, tendonitis, perineuritis, myositis and dacryoadenitis. The locations and imaging features of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are variable. (orig.)

  19. [Clinical overview of auto-inflammatory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgin-Lavialle, S; Rodrigues, F; Hentgen, V; Fayand, A; Quartier, P; Bader-Meunier, B; Bachmeyer, C; Savey, L; Louvrier, C; Sarrabay, G; Melki, I; Belot, A; Koné-Paut, I; Grateau, G

    2018-04-01

    Monogenic auto-inflammatory diseases are characterized by genetic abnormalities coding for proteins involved in innate immunity. They were initially described in mirror with auto-immune diseases because of the absence of circulating autoantibodies. Their main feature is the presence of peripheral blood inflammation in crisis without infection. The best-known auto-inflammatory diseases are mediated by interleukines that consisted in the 4 following diseases familial Mediterranean fever, cryopyrinopathies, TNFRSF1A-related intermittent fever, and mevalonate kinase deficiency. Since 10 years, many other diseases have been discovered, especially thanks to the progress in genetics. In this review, we propose the actual panorama of the main known auto-inflammatory diseases. Some of them are recurrent fevers with crisis and remission; some others evaluate more chronically; some are associated with immunodeficiency. From a physiopathological point of view, we can separate diseases mediated by interleukine-1 and diseases mediated by interferon. Then some polygenic inflammatory diseases will be shortly described: Still disease, Schnitzler syndrome, aseptic abscesses syndrome. The diagnosis of auto-inflammatory disease is largely based on anamnesis, the presence of peripheral inflammation during attacks and genetic analysis, which are more and more performant. Copyright © 2018 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Inflammatory Macrophages Promotes Development of Diabetic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beiyun; Miao, Ya; Zhao, Zhe; Zhong, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and Alzheimer's disease are often associated with each other, whereas the relationship between two diseases is ill-defined. Although hyperglycemia during diabetes is a major cause of encephalopathy, diabetes may also cause chronic inflammatory complications including peripheral neuropathy. Hence the role and the characteristics of inflammatory macrophages in the development of diabetic encephalopathy need to be clarified. Diabetes were induced in mice by i.p. injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Two weeks after STZ injection and confirmation of development of diabetes, inflammatory macrophages were eliminated by i.p. injection of 20µg saporin-conjugated antibody against a macrophage surface marker CD11b (saporin-CD11b) twice per week, while a STZ-treated group received injection of rat IgG of same frequency as a control. The effects of macrophage depletion on brain degradation markers, brain malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase, superoxidase anion-positive cells and nitric oxide (NO) were measured. Saporin-CD11b significantly reduced inflammatory macrophages in brain, without affecting mouse blood glucose, serum insulin, glucose responses and beta cell mass. However, reduced brain macrophages significantly inhibited the STZ-induced decreases in brain MDA, catalase and superoxidase anion-positive cells, and the STZ-induced decreases in brain NO. Inflammatory macrophages may promote development of diabetic encephalopathy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Changes in ion transport in inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenhut Michael

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ion transport is essential for maintenance of transmembranous and transcellular electric potential, fluid transport and cellular volume. Disturbance of ion transport has been associated with cellular dysfunction, intra and extracellular edema and abnormalities of epithelial surface liquid volume. There is increasing evidence that conditions characterized by an intense local or systemic inflammatory response are associated with abnormal ion transport. This abnormal ion transport has been involved in the pathogenesis of conditions like hypovolemia due to fluid losses, hyponatremia and hypokalemia in diarrhoeal diseases, electrolyte abnormalites in pyelonephritis of early infancy, septicemia induced pulmonary edema, and in hypersecretion and edema induced by inflammatory reactions of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract. Components of membranous ion transport systems, which have been shown to undergo a change in function during an inflammatory response include the sodium potassium ATPase, the epithelial sodium channel, the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and calcium activated chloride channels and the sodium potassium chloride co-transporter. Inflammatory mediators, which influence ion transport are tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, interleukins, transforming growth factor, leukotrienes and bradykinin. They trigger the release of specific messengers like prostaglandins, nitric oxide and histamine which alter ion transport system function through specific receptors, intracellular second messengers and protein kinases. This review summarizes data on in vivo measurements of changes in ion transport in acute inflammatory conditions and in vitro studies, which have explored the underlying mechanisms. Potential interventions directed at a correction of the observed abnormalities are discussed.

  2. Impaired sleep and allostatic load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Alice Jessie; Dich, Nadya; Lange, Theis

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Understanding the mechanisms linking sleep impairment to morbidity and mortality is important for future prevention, but these mechanisms are far from elucidated. We aimed to determine the relation between impaired sleep, both in terms of duration and disturbed sleep, and allostatic load...... Biobank with comprehensive information on sleep duration, disturbed sleep, objective measures of an extensive range of biological risk markers, and physical conditions. Results: Long sleep (mean difference 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13, 0.32) and disturbed sleep (0.14; 0.06, 0.22) were associated...... with higher AL as well as with high-risk levels of risk markers from the anthropometric, metabolic, and immune system. Sub-analyses suggested that the association between disturbed sleep and AL might be explained by underlying disorders. Whereas there was no association between short sleep and AL...

  3. Cognitive impairment in anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Volel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are an important biomedical problem due to the high prevalence and significant negative impact on the quality of life and the course of concomitant somatic and neurological diseases. Cognitive impairment (CI is one of the most intensively studied aspects of pathological anxiety. Impairments in attention, executive functions, memory, cognitive deficit, as well as abnormal cognitions and metacognitions are identified in anxiety disorders. Moreover, the treatment of the latter with the most frequently used drugs (antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, tranquilizers does not lead to a significant improvement in cognitive functions, and often contributes to their worsening. In this connection, in addition to psychotherapy, cognitive function-improving agents play a large role in treating anxiety diseases associated with cognitive dysfunction. Ginkgo Biloba extract (EGb 761, Tanakan® that positively affects cognitive functions, especially in the domains of memory, concentration and attention deserves special attention.

  4. Cognitive impairment in Chinese neuromyelitis optica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, N.; Li, Y.J.; Fu, Y.; Shao, J.H.; Luo, L.L.; Yang, L.; Shi, F.D.; Liu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cognitive dysfunction is frequently seen in neuromyelitis optica (NMO). However, the features and influencing factors of cognitive impairment of Chinese NMO patients are unclear. Objective: To investigate the patterns of cognitive impairment in Chinese NMO patients, and correlate the

  5. Multilingualism and Specific Language Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Engel de Abreu, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Is a multilingual education beneficial for children? What are the optimal conditions under which a child can become perfectly multilingual? When should we be concerned about a multilingual child's language skills? What are the signs of Specific Language Impairment in a child who speaks more than one language? Developmental psychologist and Associate Professor in multilingual cognitive development at the University of Luxembourg Pascale Engel de Abreu will address these questions based on what...

  6. Environmental injustice and mobility impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cahill

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of mobility is a growth area in the social sciences. The car system (automobility has hadas one of its consequences reduced opportunities for mobility impaired people to walk in their localenvironment. Immobility has resulted for many people with disabilities. Despite the promotion ofphysical activity by public health guidance local environments are often hazardous for mobilityimpaired people. In particular, there is a problem with cars parking on pavements and pavementcycling.  

  7. Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing YUAN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease cognitive impairment (PD-CI is one of the major non-motor symtoms (NMS of PD, including Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment (PD - MCI and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD. Executive dysfunction is relatively prominent, but other cognitive domains as visuospatial ability, memory and language can also be affected. Main risk factors for PD-CI include male gender, advanced age, low education, severe motor symptoms, low baseline cognitive function and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS. Lewy bodies are main pathological changes, and Alzheimer's disease (AD related pathological changes can also be seen. The application value of decreased α?synuclein (α-Syn and β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ1-42 levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF as biomarkers remains controversial. There are few related research and no defined pathogenic genes currently. Both dopaminergic pathway and acetylcholinergic pathway are involved in the occurrence of PD - CI as demonstrated in PET studies. Cortical and subcortical atrophy are associated with PD - CI as observed in MRI studies. Olfactory dysfunction may be one of the predictors of cognitive impairment. PDD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB share common biological characteristics, therefore the differential diagnosis sometimes is difficult. Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs and memantine help to improve clinical symptoms, but treatment decision should be made with individualization. Cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT has potential clinical value and should be investigated by more studies. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.06.004

  8. Inflammatory Genetic Markers of Prostate Cancer Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tindall, Elizabeth A.; Hayes, Vanessa M. [Cancer Genetics Group, Children’s Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, PO Box 81, Randwick, NSW 2031 (Australia); University of New South Wales, Kensington Campus, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Petersen, Desiree C., E-mail: dpetersen@ccia.unsw.edu.au [Cancer Genetics Group, Children’s Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, PO Box 81, Randwick, NSW 2031 (Australia)

    2010-06-08

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Western society males, with incidence rates predicted to rise with global aging. Etiology of prostate cancer is however poorly understood, while current diagnostic tools can be invasive (digital rectal exam or biopsy) and/or lack specificity for the disease (prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing). Substantial histological, epidemiological and molecular genetic evidence indicates that inflammation is important in prostate cancer pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current status of inflammatory genetic markers influencing susceptibility to prostate cancer. The focus will be on inflammatory cytokines regulating T-helper cell and chemokine homeostasis, together with the Toll-like receptors as key players in the host innate immune system. Although association studies indicating a genetic basis for prostate cancer are presently limited mainly due to lack of replication, larger and more ethnically and clinically defined study populations may help elucidate the true contribution of inflammatory gene variants to prostate cancer risk.

  9. Thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Florian; Sina, Christian; Fellermann, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Although a great variety of new drugs have been introduced for the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases so far, a definite cure of the disease is still out of scope. An anti-inflammatory approach to induce remission followed by maintenance therapy with immunosupressants is still the mainstay of therapy. Thiopurines comprising azathioprine and its active metabolite mercaptopurine as well as tioguanine, are widely used in the therapy of chronic active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Their steroid sparing potential and efficacy in remission maintenance are out of doubt. Unfortunately, untoward adverse events are frequently observed and may preclude further administration or be life threatening. This review will focus on new aspects of thiopurine therapy in IBD, its efficacy and safety. PMID:23555158

  10. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Adhesion Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Molchanova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture presents the materials of foreign studies on the mechanisms responsible for the formation of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS. The hypotheses accounting for the occurrence of SIRS in emergencies are described. Adhesion molecules (AM and endothelial dysfunction are apparent to be involved in the inflammatory process, no matter what the causes of SIRS are. The current classification of AM and adhesion cascades with altered blood flow is presented. There are two lines in the studies of AM. One line is to measure the concentration of AM in the plasma of patients with emergencies of various etiology. The other is to study the impact of antiadhesion therapy on the alleviation of the severity of terminal state and its outcome. The studies provide evidence for that an adhesive process is a peculiar prelude to a systemic inflammatory response.

  11. Inflammatory and redox reactions in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guina, Tina; Biasi, Fiorella; Calfapietra, Simone; Nano, Mario; Poli, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    It has been established that there is a relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer development. The constant colonic inflammation typical of inflammatory bowel diseases is now considered a risk factor for colorectal carcinoma (CRC) development. The inflammatory network of signaling molecules is also required during the late phases of carcinogenesis, to enable cancer cells to survive and to metastasize. Oxidative reactions are an integral part of the inflammatory response, and are generally associated with CRC development. However, when the malignant phenotype is acquired, increased oxidative status induces antioxidant defenses in cancer cells, favoring their aggressiveness. This contradictory behavior of cancer cells toward redox status is of great significance for potential anticancer therapies. This paper summarizes the essential background information relating to the molecules involved in regulating oxidative stress and inflammation during carcinogenesis. Understanding more of their function in CRC stages might provide the foundation for future developments in CRC treatment. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Inflammatory Genetic Markers of Prostate Cancer Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tindall, Elizabeth A.; Hayes, Vanessa M.; Petersen, Desiree C.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Western society males, with incidence rates predicted to rise with global aging. Etiology of prostate cancer is however poorly understood, while current diagnostic tools can be invasive (digital rectal exam or biopsy) and/or lack specificity for the disease (prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing). Substantial histological, epidemiological and molecular genetic evidence indicates that inflammation is important in prostate cancer pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current status of inflammatory genetic markers influencing susceptibility to prostate cancer. The focus will be on inflammatory cytokines regulating T-helper cell and chemokine homeostasis, together with the Toll-like receptors as key players in the host innate immune system. Although association studies indicating a genetic basis for prostate cancer are presently limited mainly due to lack of replication, larger and more ethnically and clinically defined study populations may help elucidate the true contribution of inflammatory gene variants to prostate cancer risk

  13. Nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2013-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, which are both inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Both types of inflammatory bowel disease have a complex etiology, resulting from a genetically determined susceptibility interacting with environmental factors, including the diet and gut microbiota. Genome Wide Association Studies have implicated more than 160 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in disease susceptibility. Consideration of the different pathways suggested to be involved implies that specific dietary interventions are likely to be appropriate, dependent upon the nature of the genes involved. Epigenetics and the gut microbiota are also responsive to dietary interventions. Nutrigenetics may lead to personalized nutrition for disease prevention and treatment, while nutrigenomics may help to understand the nature of the disease and individual response to nutrients.

  14. Dexamethasone impairs hypoxia-inducible factor-1 function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, A.E.; Huck, G.; Stiehl, D.P.; Jelkmann, W.; Hellwig-Buergel, T.

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimeric transcription-factor composed of α- and β-subunits. HIF-1 is not only necessary for the cellular adaptation to hypoxia, but it is also involved in inflammatory processes and wound healing. Glucocorticoids (GC) are therapeutically used to suppress inflammatory responses. Herein, we investigated whether GC modulate HIF-1 function using GC receptor (GR) possessing (HepG2) and GR deficient (Hep3B) human hepatoma cell cultures as model systems. Dexamethasone (DEX) treatment increased HIF-1α levels in the cytosol of HepG2 cells, while nuclear HIF-1α levels and HIF-1 DNA-binding was reduced. In addition, DEX dose-dependently lowered the hypoxia-induced luciferase activity in a reporter gene system. DEX suppressed the hypoxic stimulation of the expression of the HIF-1 target gene VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) in HepG2 cultures. DEX did not reduce hypoxically induced luciferase activity in HRB5 cells, a Hep3B derivative lacking GR. Transient expression of the GR in HRB5 cells restored the susceptibility to DEX. Our study discloses the inhibitory action of GC on HIF-1 dependent gene expression, which may be important with respect to the impaired wound healing in DEX-treated patients

  15. Impaired reproduction after exposure to ADHD drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danborg, Pia Brandt; Simonsen, Anders Lykkemark; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have reported on long-term harms caused by ADHD drugs but they are known to impair growth. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether ADHD drugs impair reproduction in mammals. METHODS: Systematic review of reproduction in studies of animals treated with ADHD drugs. DATA SOURCES: Pub....... CONCLUSION: ADHD drugs impair the reproduction in animals....

  16. Communication Skills and Learning in Impaired Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliöz, Murat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the communication skills of individuals with different disabilities with athletes and sedentary people and to examine their learning abilities which influence the development of communication. A total of 159 male subjects 31 sedentary, 30 visually impaired, 27 hearing impaired, 40 physically impaired and 31…

  17. Mobile Device Impairment ... Similar Problems, Similar Solutions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Simon; Yesilada, Yeliz; Chen, Tianyi

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have defined a new type of impairment in which an able-bodied user's behaviour is impaired by both the characteristics of a device and the environment in which it is used. This behavioural change is defined as a situationally-induced impairment and is often associated with small devices used in a mobile setting or constrained…

  18. Dry Eye: an Inflammatory Ocular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessen, Michelle; Akpek, Esen Karamursel

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconjunctivitis sicca, or dry eye, is a common ocular disease prompting millions of individuals to seek ophthalmological care. Regardless of the underlying etiology, dry eye has been shown to be associated with abnormalities in the pre-corneal tear film and subsequent inflammatory changes in the entire ocular surface including the adnexa, conjunctiva and cornea. Since the recognition of the role of inflammation in dry eye, a number of novel treatments have been investigated designed to inhibit various inflammatory pathways. Current medications that are used, including cyclosporine A, corticosteroids, tacrolimus, tetracycline derivatives and autologous serum, have been effective for management of dry eye and lead to measurable clinical improvement. PMID:25279127

  19. Use of Prebiotics for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Szilagyi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of diet in both the pathogenesis and the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease is an evolving science. Disturbance of intestinal microflora (dysbiosis is putatively a key element in the environmental component causing inflammatory bowel disease. Prebiotics are among the dietary components used in an attempt to counteract dysbiosis. Such predominantly carbohydrate dietary components exert effects on the luminal environment by physicochemical changes through pH alteration, by production of short chain fatty acids and by selectively promoting putatively 'health-beneficial' bacteria. The present review elaborates on some of the background rationale and mechanisms on the use of prebiotics. Additionally, published animal and human trials are discussed.

  20. Inflammatory dentigerous cyst mimicking a periapical cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic cysts are the most common form of cystic lesions that affect the maxillofacial region. The low frequency of dentigerous cysts in children has been reported in dental literature. Dentigerous cysts arise as a result of cystic change in the remains of the enamel organ after the process of enamel formation is complete. They enclose the crown of an unerupted tooth and are attached to the cementoenamel junction. Although most dentigerous cysts are considered developmental cysts, some cases seem to have an inflammatory origin. The purpose of this report is to present a case of an 8-year-old male patient with a dentigerous cyst of inflammatory origin.

  1. Strength Training Decreases Inflammation and Increases Cognition and Physical Fitness in Older Women with Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupel, Matheus U; Direito, Fábio; Furtado, Guilherme E; Minuzzi, Luciéle G; Pedrosa, Filipa M; Colado, Juan C; Ferreira, José P; Filaire, Edith; Teixeira, Ana M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Cognitive impairment that affects older adults is commonly associated with an inflammatory imbalance, resulting in decreased physical fitness. Exercise has been pointed to mitigate immunosenescence and cognitive impairment associated with aging, while increase in physical fitness. However, few studies explored the relationship between changes in cytokine concentration and improvement on cognition due to elastic band strength training. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of strength training on pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines, hematological markers and physical fitness of older women with cognitive impairment. Methods: Thirty-three women (82.7 ± 5.7 years old) participated in the study and were divided in two groups: strength exercise training group (ST; n = 16) and Control Group (CG; n = 17) and were evaluated before and after 28 weeks of the exercise program. The CG did not undergo any type of exercise programs. Data for IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, C-Reactive Protein (CRP), white blood counts (WBC), red blood counts (RBC), Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and physical fitness tests were analyzed in both moments. Results: IL-10 increased in the ST group without changes in CG. TNF-α and CRP increased in the control group while no changes were observed for IFN-γ in both groups. Strength training decreased leukocyte and lymphocyte counts and increase hemoglobin, mean cell volume and mean cell hemoglobin concentration. The MMSE score increased in strength training group but remained unchanged in the control group. A correlation between the variation of granulocyte counts and the MMSE scores was also observed within the total sample. An improvement in physical fitness was observed with strength training. Conclusion: Resistance exercise promoted better anti-inflammatory balance and physical performance simultaneously with an increase in cognitive profile in older women with cognitive impairment.

  2. Impaired bone formation in ovariectomized mice reduces implant integration as indicated by longitudinal in vivo micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zihui; Kuhn, Gisela; Schirmer, Michael; Müller, Ralph; Ruffoni, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Although osteoporotic bone, with low bone mass and deteriorated bone architecture, provides a less favorable mechanical environment than healthy bone for implant fixation, there is no general agreement on the impact of osteoporosis on peri-implant bone (re)modeling, which is ultimately responsible for the long term stability of the bone-implant system. Here, we inserted an implant in a mouse model mimicking estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss and we monitored with longitudinal in vivo micro-computed tomography the spatio-temporal changes in bone (re)modeling and architecture, considering the separate contributions of trabecular, endocortical and periosteal surfaces. Specifically, 12 week-old C57BL/6J mice underwent OVX/SHM surgery; 9 weeks after we inserted special metal-ceramics implants into the 6th caudal vertebra and we measured bone response with in vivo micro-CT weekly for the following 6 weeks. Our results indicated that ovariectomized mice showed a reduced ability to increase the thickness of the cortical shell close to the implant because of impaired peri-implant bone formation, especially at the periosteal surface. Moreover, we observed that healthy mice had a significantly higher loss of trabecular bone far from the implant than estrogen depleted animals. Such behavior suggests that, in healthy mice, the substantial increase in peri-implant bone formation which rapidly thickened the cortex to secure the implant may raise bone resorption elsewhere and, specifically, in the trabecular network of the same bone but far from the implant. Considering the already deteriorated bone structure of estrogen depleted mice, further bone loss seemed to be hindered. The obtained knowledge on the dynamic response of diseased bone following implant insertion should provide useful guidelines to develop advanced treatments for osteoporotic fracture fixation based on local and selective manipulation of bone turnover in the peri-implant region.

  3. Impaired bone formation in ovariectomized mice reduces implant integration as indicated by longitudinal in vivo micro-computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihui Li

    Full Text Available Although osteoporotic bone, with low bone mass and deteriorated bone architecture, provides a less favorable mechanical environment than healthy bone for implant fixation, there is no general agreement on the impact of osteoporosis on peri-implant bone (remodeling, which is ultimately responsible for the long term stability of the bone-implant system. Here, we inserted an implant in a mouse model mimicking estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss and we monitored with longitudinal in vivo micro-computed tomography the spatio-temporal changes in bone (remodeling and architecture, considering the separate contributions of trabecular, endocortical and periosteal surfaces. Specifically, 12 week-old C57BL/6J mice underwent OVX/SHM surgery; 9 weeks after we inserted special metal-ceramics implants into the 6th caudal vertebra and we measured bone response with in vivo micro-CT weekly for the following 6 weeks. Our results indicated that ovariectomized mice showed a reduced ability to increase the thickness of the cortical shell close to the implant because of impaired peri-implant bone formation, especially at the periosteal surface. Moreover, we observed that healthy mice had a significantly higher loss of trabecular bone far from the implant than estrogen depleted animals. Such behavior suggests that, in healthy mice, the substantial increase in peri-implant bone formation which rapidly thickened the cortex to secure the implant may raise bone resorption elsewhere and, specifically, in the trabecular network of the same bone but far from the implant. Considering the already deteriorated bone structure of estrogen depleted mice, further bone loss seemed to be hindered. The obtained knowledge on the dynamic response of diseased bone following implant insertion should provide useful guidelines to develop advanced treatments for osteoporotic fracture fixation based on local and selective manipulation of bone turnover in the peri-implant region.

  4. Iodine nutrition in breast-fed infants is impaired by maternal smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Peter; Nøhr, Susanne B; Pedersen, Klaus M

    2004-01-01

    the sodium-iodide symporter responsible for iodide transport in the lactating mammary gland. Smoking during the period of breastfeeding increases the risk of iodine deficiency-induced brain damage in the child. Women who breastfeed should not smoke, but if they do, an extra iodine supplement should...

  5. Analgesic effect of the neuropeptide cortistatin in murine models of arthritic inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Maria; Souza-Moreira, Luciana; Caro, Marta; O'Valle, Francisco; Forte-Lago, Irene; de Lecea, Luis; Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; Delgado, Mario

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the role of the antiinflammatory neuropeptide cortistatin in chronic pain evoked by joint inflammation. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia was evoked in mouse knee joints by intraplantar injection of tumor necrosis factor α and intraarticular infusion of Freund's complete adjuvant, and the analgesic effects of cortistatin, administered centrally, peripherally, and systemically, were assessed. In addition, the effects of cortistatin on the production of nociceptive peptides and the activation of pain signaling were assayed in dorsal root ganglion cultures and in inflammatory pain models. The role of endogenous cortistatin in pain sensitization and perpetuation of chronic inflammatory states was evaluated in cortistatin-deficient mice. Finally, the effect of noxious/inflammatory stimuli in the production of cortistatin by the peripheral nociceptive system was assayed in vitro and in vivo. Expression of cortistatin was observed in peptidergic nociceptors of the peripheral nociceptive system, and endogenous cortistatin was found to participate in the tuning of pain sensitization, especially in pathologic inflammatory conditions. Results showed that cortistatin acted both peripherally and centrally to reduce the tactile allodynia and heat hyperalgesia evoked by arthritis and peripheral tissue inflammation in mice, via mechanisms that were independent of its antiinflammatory action. These mechanisms involved direct action on nociceptive neurons and regulation of central sensitization. The analgesic effects of cortistatin in murine arthritic pain were linked to binding of the neuropeptide to somatostatin and ghrelin receptors, activation of the G protein subunit Gαi , impairment of ERK signaling, and decreased production of calcitonin gene-related peptide in primary nociceptors. These findings indicate that cortistatin is an antiinflammatory factor with potent analgesic effects that may offer a new approach to pain therapy in pathologic inflammatory

  6. Abrogated inflammatory response promotes neurogenesis in a murine model of Japanese encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulagna Das

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV induces neuroinflammation with typical features of viral encephalitis, including inflammatory cell infiltration, activation of microglia, and neuronal degeneration. The detrimental effects of inflammation on neurogenesis have been reported in various models of acute and chronic inflammation. We investigated whether JEV-induced inflammation has similar adverse effects on neurogenesis and whether those effects can be reversed using an anti-inflammatory compound minocycline.Here, using in vitro studies and mouse models, we observed that an acute inflammatory milieu is created in the subventricular neurogenic niche following Japanese encephalitis (JE and a resultant impairment in neurogenesis occurs, which can be reversed with minocycline treatment. Immunohistological studies showed that proliferating cells were replenished and the population of migrating neuroblasts was restored in the niche following minocycline treatment. In vitro, we checked for the efficacy of minocycline as an anti-inflammatory compound and cytokine bead array showed that production of cyto/chemokines decreased in JEV-activated BV2 cells. Furthermore, mouse neurospheres grown in the conditioned media from JEV-activated microglia exhibit arrest in both proliferation and differentiation of the spheres compared to conditioned media from control microglia. These effects were completely reversed when conditioned media from JEV-activated and minocycline treated microglia was used.This study provides conclusive evidence that JEV-activated microglia and the resultant inflammatory molecules are anti-proliferative and anti-neurogenic for NSPCs growth and development, and therefore contribute to the viral neuropathogenesis. The role of minocycline in restoring neurogenesis may implicate enhanced neuronal repair and attenuation of the neuropsychiatric sequelae in JE survivors.

  7. Postnatal TLR2 activation impairs learning and memory in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madar, Ravit; Rotter, Aviva; Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Mughal, Mohamed R; Arumugam, Thiruma V; Wood, W H; Becker, K G; Mattson, Mark P; Okun, Eitan

    2015-08-01

    Neuroinflammation in the central nervous system is detrimental for learning and memory, as evident form epidemiological studies linking developmental defects and maternal exposure to harmful pathogens. Postnatal infections can also induce neuroinflammatory responses with long-term consequences. These inflammatory responses can lead to motor deficits and/or behavioral disabilities. Toll like receptors (TLRs) are a family of innate immune receptors best known as sensors of microbial-associated molecular patterns, and are the first responders to infection. TLR2 forms heterodimers with either TLR1 or TLR6, is activated in response to gram-positive bacterial infections, and is expressed in the brain during embryonic development. We hypothesized that early postnatal TLR2-mediated neuroinflammation would adversely affect cognitive behavior in the adult. Our data indicate that postnatal TLR2 activation affects learning and memory in adult mice in a heterodimer-dependent manner. TLR2/6 activation improved motor function and fear learning, while TLR2/1 activation impaired spatial learning and enhanced fear learning. Moreover, developmental TLR2 deficiency significantly impairs spatial learning and enhances fear learning, stressing the involvement of the TLR2 pathway in learning and memory. Analysis of the transcriptional effects of TLR2 activation reveals both common and unique transcriptional programs following heterodimer-specific TLR2 activation. These results imply that adult cognitive behavior could be influenced in part, by activation or alterations in the TLR2 pathway at birth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Persistent G. lamblia impairs growth in a murine malnutrition model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelt, Luther A; Roche, James; Kolling, Glynis; Bolick, David; Noronha, Francisco; Naylor, Caitlin; Hoffman, Paul; Warren, Cirle; Singer, Steven; Guerrant, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Giardia lamblia infections are nearly universal among children in low-income countries and are syndemic with the triumvirate of malnutrition, diarrhea, and developmental growth delays. Amidst the morass of early childhood enteropathogen exposures in these populations, G. lamblia–specific associations with persistent diarrhea, cognitive deficits, stunting, and nutrient deficiencies have demonstrated conflicting results, placing endemic pediatric giardiasis in a state of equipoise. Many infections in endemic settings appear to be asymptomatic/ subclinical, further contributing to uncertainty regarding a causal link between G. lamblia infection and developmental delay. We used G. lamblia H3 cyst infection in a weaned mouse model of malnutrition to demonstrate that persistent giardiasis leads to epithelial cell apoptosis and crypt hyperplasia. Infection was associated with a Th2-biased inflammatory response and impaired growth. Malnutrition accentuated the severity of these growth decrements. Faltering malnourished mice exhibited impaired compensatory responses following infection and demonstrated an absence of crypt hyperplasia and subsequently blunted villus architecture. Concomitantly, severe malnutrition prevented increases in B220+ cells in the lamina propria as well as mucosal Il4 and Il5 mRNA in response to infection. These findings add insight into the potential role of G. lamblia as a "stunting" pathogen and suggest that, similarly, malnourished children may be at increased risk of G. lamblia– potentiated growth decrements.

  9. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, Variation in Inflammatory Genes, and Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Witte

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that prostatic inflammation plays a key role in the development of prostate cancer. It remains controversial whether non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Here, we investigate how a previously reported inverse association between NSAID use and the risk of aggressive prostate cancer is modulated by variants in several inflammatory genes. We found that NSAIDs may have differential effects on prostate cancer development, depending on one’s genetic makeup. Further study of these inflammatory pathways may clarify the mechanisms through which NSAIDs impact prostate cancer risk.

  10. The importance of balanced pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms in diffuse lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strieter Robert

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The lung responds to a variety of insults in a remarkably consistent fashion but with inconsistent outcomes that vary from complete resolution and return to normal to the destruction of normal architecture and progressive fibrosis. Increasing evidence indicates that diffuse lung disease results from an imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, with a persistent imbalance that favors pro-inflammatory mediators dictating the development of chronic diffuse lung disease. This review focuses on the mediators that influence this imbalance.

  11. Plasma inflammatory biomarkers response to aerobic versus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasma inflammatory biomarkers response to aerobic versus resisted exercise training for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. ... Recent studies proved that morbidity and mortality of COPD is related to systemic inflammation as it contributes to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.

  12. Stratum corneum biomarkers for inflammatory skin diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppes, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis focusses on development of biomarkers, obtained by a non-invasive sampling method, for skin inflammatory diseases relevant for occupational settings; irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and atopic dermatitis (AD). In various studies, in which different

  13. Intestinal barrier integrity and inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eric Olof; Pedersen, Jannie; Jørgensen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Disruption of normal barrier function is a fundamental factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, which includes increased epithelial cell death, modified mucus configuration, altered expression and distribution of tight junction-proteins, along with a decreased expression of antim......Disruption of normal barrier function is a fundamental factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, which includes increased epithelial cell death, modified mucus configuration, altered expression and distribution of tight junction-proteins, along with a decreased expression...... of antimicrobial peptides. Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with life-long morbidity for affected patients, and both the incidence and prevalence is increasing globally, resulting in substantial economic strain for society. Mucosal healing and re-establishment of barrier integrity is associated......, novel treatment strategies to accomplish mucosal healing and to re-establish normal barrier integrity in inflammatory bowel disease are warranted, and luminal stem cell-based approaches might have an intriguing potential. Transplantation of in vitro expanded intestinal epithelial stem cells derived...

  14. Inflammatory Process in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCO ANTONIO eMERAZ RIOS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer Disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Histopathologically is characterized by the presence of two major hallmarks, the intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs and extracellular neuritic plaques (NPs surrounded by activated astrocytes and microglia. NFTs consist of paired helical filaments of truncated tau protein that is abnormally hyperphosphorylated. The main component in the NP is the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ, a small fragment of 40-42 amino acids with a molecular weight of 4kD. It has been proposed that the amyloid aggregates and microglia activation are able to favor the neurodegenerative process observed in AD patients. However, the role of inflammation in AD is controversial, because in early stages the inflammation could have a beneficial role in the pathology, since it has been thought that the microglia and astrocytes activated could be involved in Aβ clearance. Nevertheless the chronic activation of the microglia has been related with an increase of Aβ and possibly with tau phosphorylation. Studies in AD brains have shown an upregulation of complement molecules, pro-inflammatory cytokines, acute phase reactants and other inflammatory mediators that could contribute with the neurodegenerative process. Clinical trials and animal models with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs indicate that these drugs may decrease the risk of developing AD and apparently reduce Aβ deposition. Finally, further studies are needed to determine whether treatment with anti-inflammatory strategies, may decrease the neurodegenerative process that affects these patients.

  15. The epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2015-01-01

    and cancer risks. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Gold standard epidemiology data on the disease course and prognosis of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are based on unselected population-based cohort studies. RESULTS: The incidence of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) has increased...

  16. Evaluation of Phytochemical Screening and Anti Inflammatory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several species of Mikania have been reported to have anti‑inflammatory properties. ... to be more potent in both the conditions in vivo and in vitro, comparing with the standard drug diclofenac sodium and traditional control rumalaya perhaps due to the presence of phytochemicals like alkaloids and flavonoids in the plant.

  17. Innate lymphoid cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C. P.; Mjösberg, J. M.; Bernink, J. H.; Spits, H.

    2016-01-01

    It is generally believed that inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are caused by an aberrant immune response to environmental triggers in genetically susceptible individuals. The exact contribution of the adaptive and innate immune system has not been elucidated. However, recent advances in treatments

  18. Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome and Shingles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome and Shingles Associated with a Combined Paralysis of Three Oculomotor Nerves: A Case Report. ... CASE DETAILS: A 40 years old patient was seen for a pain of the right side of the face and a complete immobility of the eyeball. The diagnosis of V1 shingles with a pan uveitis ...

  19. Clostridium difficile and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Massimo; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Veres, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection is associated with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in several ways. We sought to investigate C. difficile infection in pediatric patients with IBD in comparison with a group of children with celiac disease and to evaluate IBD disease course o...

  20. Inflammatory activity in Crohn disease: ultrasound findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migaleddu, Vincenzo; Quaia, Emilio; Scano, Domenico; Virgilio, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Improvements in the ultrasound examination of bowel disease have registered in the last years the introduction of new technologies regarding high frequency probes (US), highly sensitive color or power Doppler units (CD-US), and the development of new non-linear technologies that optimize detection of contrast agents. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CE-US) most importantly increases the results in sonographic evaluation of Crohn disease inflammatory activity. CE-US has become an imaging modality routinely employed in the clinical practice for the evaluation of parenchymal organs due to the introduction of new generation microbubble contrast agents which persist in the bloodstream for several minutes after intravenous injection. The availability of high frequency dedicated contrast-specific US techniques provide accurate depiction of small bowel wall perfusion due to the extremely high sensitivity of non-linear signals produced by microbubble insonation. In Crohn's disease, CE-US may characterize the bowel wall thickness by differentiating fibrosis from edema and may grade the inflammatory disease activity by assessing the presence and distribution of vascularity within the layers of the bowel wall (submucosa alone or the entire bowel wall). Peri-intestinal inflammatory involvement can be also characterized. CE-US can provide prognostic data concerning clinical recurrence of the inflammatory disease and evaluate the efficacy of drugs treatments.

  1. Sigma-1 receptor and inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gris, Georgia; Cobos, Enrique José; Zamanillo, Daniel; Portillo-Salido, Enrique

    2015-06-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is a unique ligand-regulated molecular chaperone that interacts with several protein targets such as G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels to modulate their activity. Sig-1R is located in areas of the central and peripheral nervous system that are key to pain control. Previous preclinical studies have suggested a potential therapeutic use of Sig-1R antagonists for the management of neuropathic pain. Recent studies using pharmacological and genetic tools have explored the role of Sig-1R in inflammatory pain conditions. Mice lacking the Sig-1R have shown different patterns of phenotypic responses to inflammatory injury. Systemic or peripheral administration of several Sig-1R antagonists, including the selective Sig-1R antagonist S1RA, inhibited both mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in several preclinical models of inflammatory pain. These recent studies are summarized in the present commentary. Central and peripheral pharmacological blockade of Sig-1R could be an effective option to treat inflammatory pain.

  2. Smoking, inflammatory patterns, and postprandial hypertriglyceridemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Smoking is associated with increased postprandial hypertriglyceridemia (PPT). Inflammation and insulin resistance are potential "drivers" for this phenomenon. We tested whether inflammatory patterns and/or insulin resistance explain the effect of smoking on PPT. Methods: Men and women i...

  3. Current concepts in chronic inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garn, Holger; Bahn, Sabine; Baune, Bernhard T

    2016-01-01

    Recent research indicates that chronic inflammatory diseases, including allergies and autoimmune and neuropsychiatric diseases, share common pathways of cellular and molecular dysregulation. It was the aim of the International von-Behring-Röntgen Symposium (October 16-18, 2014, in Marburg, Germany...

  4. Metallothionein as an Anti-Inflammatory Mediator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichiro Inoue

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of knowledge concerning the regulation of MT, a highly conserved, low molecular weight, cystein-rich metalloprotein, on its proposed functions is necessary to clarify how MT affects cellular processes. MT expression is induced/enhanced in various tissues by a number of physiological mediators. The cellular accumulation of MT depends on the availability of cellular zinc derived from the diet. MT modulates the binding and exchange/transport of heavy metals such as zinc, cadmium, or copper under physiological conditions and cytoprotection from their toxicities, and the release of gaseous mediators such as hydroxyl radicals or nitric oxide. In addition, MT reportedly affects a number of cellular processes, such as gene expression, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. Given the genetic approach, the apparently healthy status of MT-deficient mice argues against an essential biological role for MT; however, this molecule may be critical in cells/tissues/organs in times of stress, since MT expression is also evoked/enhanced by various stresses. In particular, because metallothionein (MT is induced by inflammatory stress, its roles in inflammation are implied. Also, MT expression in various organs/tissues can be enhanced by inflammatory stimuli, implicating in inflammatory diseases. In this paper, we review the role of MT of various inflammatory conditions.

  5. Positron Emission Tomography in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Renata Christian Martins; Gouvea, Clecio Maria, E-mail: renatafelix@cardiol.br, E-mail: renata.felix@inc.saude.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carneiro, Michel Pontes [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    Many articles have demonstrated the role of PET-CT in the evaluation of inflammatory and infectious diseases of the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature on this topic to identify clinical situations in which there is evidence of the usefulness of PET-CT in diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation.

  6. Novel targets for inflammatory bowel disease therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löwenberg, Mark; D'Haens, Geert

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, many new agents have been evaluated for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. In this paper, we critically review recently published literature about these novel therapies, which have been the result of extensive research identifying molecular targets. Of the various

  7. MRI for chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmann, H.J.; Hess, T.; Hahmann, M.; Erb, G.; Richter, G.M.; Duex, M.; Elsing, C.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory bowel disease is diagnosed and monitored by the combination of colonoscopy and small bowel enteroklysis. Magnetic resonance imaging has become the gold standard for the imaging of perirectal and pelvic fistulas. With the advent of ultrafast MRI small and large bowel imaging has become highly attractive and is being advocated more and more in the diagnostic work up of inflammatory bowel disease. Imaging protocols include fast T 1 -weighted gradient echo and T 2 -weighted TSE sequences and oral or rectal bowel distension. Furthermore, dedicated imaging protocols are based on breath-hold imaging under pharmacological bowel paralysis and gastrointestinal MR contrast agents (Hydro-MRI). High diagnostic accuracy can be achieved in Crohn's disease with special reference to the pattern of disease, depth of inflammation, mesenteric reaction, sinus tract depiction and formation of abscess. In ulcerative colitis, the mucosa-related inflammation causes significantly less bowel wall thickening compared to Crohn's disease. Therefore with MRI, the extent of inflammatory changes is always underestimated compared to colonoscopy. According to our experience in more than 200 patients as well as the results in other centers, Hydro-MRI possesses the potential to replace enteroklysis in the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease and most of the follow-up colonoscopies in Crohn's disease. Further technical improvements in 3D imaging will allow interactive postprocessing of the MR data. (orig.) [de

  8. Inhibition of Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Neuro- Inflammatory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... (12): 2005-2010. ISSN: 1596-5996 (print); 1596-9827 (electronic) ... and production of inflammatory mediators, namely, nitric oxide (NO), inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis ... TKE in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusion: .... and incubated at room temperature for 10 min. .... Kuntze ethanol extract ...

  9. Cognitive Impairment in Infratentorial Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Kandemir

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Beginning in the mid-1980s, with anatomical, behavioral, and neuropsychological evidence, it was suggested that the role of the cerebellum extends beyond a purely motor domain. A series of articles were published reviewing the potential role of the cerebellum in cognition. Both of these functions are supported by connections of dentate nucleus and frontal cortex through the thalamus. The cognitive profile of isolated subtentorial and cerebellar infarcts is related to the involved frontal circuit (especially executive functions. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the cognitive profile of cerebellar and subtentorial infarcts. METHODS: Nineteen patients with infratentorial infarcts and 19 neurologically healthy individuals as a control group were included in this study. Neuropsychometric test battery was employed in both of the groups. RESULTS: Age, sex, education, clinical syndrome, and localization had no effect on the cognitive test performances. Performance on the California Verbal Learning Test, a verbal memory test, was worse in the patient group. Patients had difficulties in recognizing the items of the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test, and spent significantly more time to complete the trail making test part B. The patient group also demonstrated lower performance level in the verbal fluency test when compared to the control group. CONCLUSION: The cognitive impairment pattern of the verbal and visual memory tests and impairment determined on the verbal fluency test and the trail making tests may imply frontal impairment. Our results support the knowledge that cerebellar or brainstem strokes cause mild frontal type cognitive syndrome by damaging cerebello-ponto-thalamo-cortical pathways

  10. Impaired reward responsiveness in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nicholas; Hollis, Jeffrey P; Corcoran, Sarah; Gross, Robin; Cuthbert, Bruce; Swails, Lisette W; Duncan, Erica

    2018-03-08

    Anhedonia is a core negative symptom of schizophrenia. Schizophrenia patients report largely intact pleasure in consuming rewards, but have impairments in generating motivated behavior to pursue rewards, and show reduced fMRI activation of the reward pathway during presentation of rewarded stimuli. A computer based task measuring the development of a response bias in favor of rewarded stimuli permits assessment of reward-induced motivation. We hypothesized that subjects with schizophrenia would be impaired on this task. 58 schizophrenia subjects (SCZ) and 52 healthy controls (CON) were studied with a signal detection task to assess reward responsiveness. In multiple trials over three blocks subjects were asked to correctly identify two stimuli that were paired with unequal chance of monetary reward. The critical outcome variable was response bias, the development of a greater percent correct identification of the stimulus that was rewarded more often. An ANOVA on response bias with Block as a repeated-measures factor and Diagnosis as a between-group factor indicated that SCZ subjects achieved a lower bias to rewarded stimuli than CON subjects (F(1,105)=8.82, p=0.004, η 2 =0.078). Post hoc tests indicated that SCZ subjects had significantly impaired bias in Block 1 (p=0.002) and Block 2 (p=0.05), indicating that SCZ were slower to achieve normal levels of bias during the session. SCZ subjects were slower to develop response bias to rewarded stimuli than CON subjects. This finding is consonant with the hypothesis that people with schizophrenia have a blunted capacity to modify behavior in response to reward. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Impaired Follistatin Secretion in Cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnov, Anders Rasmussen; Plomgaard, Peter; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2016-01-01

    compared to healthy control participants. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: To experimentally increase the glucagon-insulin ratio (mimicking the hormonal effect of exercise), we infused glucagon/somatostatin (to inhibit insulin secretion) and compared the acute follistatin increase in eight male cirrhosis...... controls (27.6 ± 3.8 vs 34.5 ± 2.9%, respectively; P = .001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with cirrhosis show impaired capacity to acutely secrete follistatin. The decrease in acute follistatin release may contribute to the loss of muscle mass in liver cirrhosis....

  12. Adipose tissue macrophages impair preadipocyte differentiation in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fen Liu

    Full Text Available The physiologic mechanisms underlying the relationship between obesity and insulin resistance are not fully understood. Impaired adipocyte differentiation and localized inflammation characterize adipose tissue from obese, insulin-resistant humans. The directionality of this relationship is not known, however. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether adipose tissue inflammation is causally-related to impaired adipocyte differentiation.Abdominal subcutaneous(SAT and visceral(VAT adipose tissue was obtained from 20 human participants undergoing bariatric surgery. Preadipocytes were isolated, and cultured in the presence or absence of CD14+ macrophages obtained from the same adipose tissue sample. Adipocyte differentiation was quantified after 14 days via immunofluorescence, Oil-Red O, and adipogenic gene expression. Cytokine secretion by mature adipocytes cultured with or without CD14+macrophages was quantified.Adipocyte differentiation was significantly lower in VAT than SAT by all measures (p<0.001. With macrophage removal, SAT preadipocyte differentiation increased significantly as measured by immunofluorescence and gene expression, whereas VAT preadipocyte differentiation was unchanged. Adipocyte-secreted proinflammatory cytokines were higher and adiponectin lower in media from VAT vs SAT: macrophage removal reduced inflammatory cytokine and increased adiponectin secretion from both SAT and VAT adipocytes. Differentiation of preadipocytes from SAT but not VAT correlated inversely with systemic insulin resistance.The current results reveal that proinflammatory immune cells in human SAT are causally-related to impaired preadipocyte differentiation, which in turn is associated with systemic insulin resistance. In VAT, preadipocyte differentiation is poor even in the absence of tissue macrophages, pointing to inherent differences in fat storage potential between the two depots.

  13. Citrobacter freundii impairs the phosphoryl transfer network in the gills of Rhamdia quelen: Impairment of bioenergetics homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Souza, Carine F; Junior, Guerino B; Moreira, Karen Luise S; da Veiga, Marcelo L; da Rocha, Maria Izabel U M; Baldisserotto, Bernardo

    2018-04-01

    The precise coupling of spatially separated intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-producing and ATP-consuming, catalyzed by creatine kinase (CK), adenylate kinase (AK), and pyruvate kinase (PK), is a critical process in the bioenergetics of tissues with high energy demand, such as the branchial tissue. The effects of Citrobacter freundii infection on gills remain poorly understood, limited only to histopathological studies. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether experimental infection by C. freundii impairs the enzymes of the phosphoryl transfer network in gills of silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen). The CK (cytosolic and mitochondrial) and AK activities decreased in infected compared to uninfected animals, while the PK activity did not differ between groups. The gill histopathology of infected animals revealed extensive degeneration with fusion and necrosis of secondary lamellae, detachment of superficial epithelium, aneurysm, vessel congestion and inflammatory process. Based on these evidences, the inhibition and absence of an efficient communication between CK compartments caused the impairment of the branchial bioenergetics homeostasis, which was not compensated by the augmentation on branchial AK activity in an attempt to restore energy homeostasis. In summary, these alterations contribute to disease pathogenesis linked to branchial tissue in animals infected with C. freundii. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France); Vernhet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  15. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  16. Systemic Inflammatory Reaction in Operative Gynecological Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pronoza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of various methods of anesthesia and treatment on the development of a systemic inflammatory reaction (SIR in gynecological patients. Subjects and methods. The manifestations of SIR were studied in 426 patients who had undergone standard operations on the uterine appendages via traditional laparoscopic access. Ninety-seven women had unoptimized anesthetic maintenance and postoperative preventive antibacterial therapy (Group 1; 95 women had unop-timized anesthetic maintenance and pre- and postoperative massive antibacterial therapy (Group 2; 103 women had optimized anesthetic maintenance and preventive antibacterial therapy (Group 3; 131 women had optimized anesthetic maintenance and massive antibacterial therapy (Group 4. Results. Antibacterial therapy was not found to affect the manifestations of SIR significantly. The optimized anesthetic maintenance that differed from the unoptimized one in higher nociceptive defense had a considerable impact on the manifestation of SIR. Low molecular-weight heparins and preoperative hyperv-olemic hemodilution with hydroxyethyl starch preparations positively affected the study indices. The observed SIR belonged to the second stage of release of the small amount of mediators into systemic circulation. The transition of SIR to the third stage of inflammatory reaction generalization was suggested by changes in other monitored parameters, simultaneously informing about this or that degree of multiple organ dysfunction. Conclusion. Laparoscopic surgical intervention, multicom-ponent preoperative sedation, preventive preoperative analgesia with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, prevention of microcirculatory disorders with low molecular-weight heparins, preoperative hypervolemic hemodilution with hydroxyethyl starch, and use of the loading doses of opioids in the period of induction to anesthesia in combination with propofol lower the level of a systemic inflammatory response

  17. Ameliorating Effects of Ethanol Extract of Fructus mume on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Soo Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that Fructus mume (F. mume extract shows protective effects on memory impairments and anti-inflammatory effects induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Neurodegeneration of basal cholinergic neurons is also observed in the brain with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Therefore, the present study was conducted to examine whether F. mume extracts enhance cognitive function via the action of cholinergic neuron using a scopolamine-induced animal model of memory impairments. F. mume (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg was administered to C57BL/6 mice for 14 days (days 1–14 and memory impairment was induced by scopolamine (1 mg/kg, a muscarinic receptor antagonist for 7 days (days 8–14. Spatial memory was assessed using Morris water maze and hippocampal level of acetylcholinesterase (AChE and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT was examined by ELISA and immunoblotting. Mice that received scopolamine alone showed impairments in acquisition and retention in Morris water maze task and increased activity of AChE in the hippocampus. Mice that received F. mume and scopolamine showed no scopolamine-induced memory impairment and increased activity of AChE. In addition, treatments of F. mume increased ChAT expression in the hippocampus. These results indicated that F. mume might enhance cognitive function via action of cholinergic neurons.

  18. Insulin resistance possible risk factor for cognitive impairment in fibromialgic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Antonietta; Plastino, Massimiliano; Cristiano, Dario; Spanò, Antonio; Cristofaro, Stefano; Opipari, Carlo; Chillà, Antonio; Casalinuovo, Fatima; Colica, Carmen; De Bartolo, Matteo; Pirritano, Domenico; Bosco, Domenico

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate glucose metabolism and/or insulin resistance (IR) in 96 patients with Fibromyalgia (FM), associated or not to cognitive impairment. We investigated glucose metabolism in 96 FM patients. Enrolled patients were divided into two groups: 48 patients with memory deficit (group A) and 48 without memory deficit (control group). We evaluated glucose and insulin levels after a 2 h-Oral-Glucose-Tolerance-Test (2 h-OGTT) and insulin resistance (IR) by the homeostasis model assessment formula (HOMA). Body Mass Index (BMI), waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR), anxiety level, fasting plasma insulin and Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory agents use were higher in patients with FM with memory impairment; while age, sex, waist circumference, education level, fasting plasma glucose, glycate hemoglobin, triglycerides, blood lipid profile, C- Reactivity-Protein (CRP), blood pressure and smoking habits were similar in both groups. Following OGTT the prevalence of glucose metabolism abnormalities was significantly higher in group A. IR was present in 79% patients, of whom 23% had also impaired glucose tolerance, 4% newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus and 52% IR only. Obesity and overweight prevailed in group A. IR, but not BMI or WHR was associated to an increased risk of memory impairment (OR = 2,6; 95% CI: 1,22-3,7). The results of this study suggest that IR may represent a risk factor for memory impairment in fibromialgic patients.

  19. Different activities of Schinus areira L.: anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davicino, R; Mattar, A; Casali, Y; Anesini, C; Micalizzi, B

    2010-12-01

    The anti-inflammatory drugs possess many serious side effects at doses commonly prescribed. It is really important to discover novel regulators of inflammation from natural sources with minimal adverse effects. Schinus areira L. is a plant native from South America and is used in folk medicine as an anti-inflammatory herb. For this study, the activity of aqueous extracts on inflammation and the effect on superoxide anion production in mice macrophages were assayed. Aqueous extracts were prepared by soaking herbs in cold water (cold extract), boiling water (infusion), and simmering water (decoction). Cold extract possess an anti-inflammatory activity. Decoction and infusion showed pro-inflammatory activity. Cold extract increased the production of superoxide anion. It has been proposed to use diverse methods to obtain extracts of S. areira L. with different effects. Cold extract, decoction, and infusion could be utilized as extracts or as pharmacological preparations for topical application.

  20. [Changes of fecal flora and its correlation with inflammatory indicators in patients with inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Ye; Wang, Zhongqiu; Zhou, Youlian; Zhang, Shaoheng; Wang, Pu; Xie, Shan; Jiang, Bo

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the changes in fecal flora and its correlation with the occurrence and progression of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We collected fresh fecal specimens from 167 IBD patients (including 113 with ulcerative colitis and 54 with Crohn's disease) and 54 healthy volunteers. The fecal flora was analyzed by gradient dilution method and the data of inflammatory markers including WBC, PLT, CRP and ESR were collected to assess the association between the fecal flora and the inflammatory markers. The species Enterrococcus (6.60∓0.23, Pflora. The changes in fecal flora did not show a significant correlation with these inflammatory markers. IBD patients have fecal flora imbalance compared with the healthy controls, and this imbalance may contribute to the occurrence and progression of IBD. The decline of Eubacterium contributes to the occurrence and development of IBD.

  1. Reduced Mastication Impairs Memory Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima-Nakayama, Y; Ono, Takehito; Hayashi, M; Inoue, M; Wake, H; Ono, Takashi; Nakashima, T

    2017-08-01

    Mastication is an indispensable oral function related to physical, mental, and social health throughout life. The elderly tend to have a masticatory dysfunction due to tooth loss and fragility in the masticatory muscles with aging, potentially resulting in impaired cognitive function. Masticatory stimulation has influence on the development of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as the growth of maxillofacial tissue in children. Although the relationship between mastication and cognitive function is potentially important in the growth period, the cellular and molecular mechanisms have not been sufficiently elucidated. Here, we show that the reduced mastication resulted in impaired spatial memory and learning function owing to the morphological change and decreased activity in the hippocampus. We used an in vivo model for reduced masticatory stimuli, in which juvenile mice were fed with powder diet and found that masticatory stimulation during the growth period positively regulated long-term spatial memory to promote cognitive function. The functional linkage between mastication and brain was validated by the decrease in neurons, neurogenesis, neuronal activity, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the hippocampus. These findings taken together provide in vivo evidence for a functional linkage between mastication and cognitive function in the growth period, suggesting a need for novel therapeutic strategies in masticatory function-related cognitive dysfunction.

  2. Ego depletion impairs implicit learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kelsey R; Sanchez, Daniel J; Wesley, Abigail H; Reber, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Implicit skill learning occurs incidentally and without conscious awareness of what is learned. However, the rate and effectiveness of learning may still be affected by decreased availability of central processing resources. Dual-task experiments have generally found impairments in implicit learning, however, these studies have also shown that certain characteristics of the secondary task (e.g., timing) can complicate the interpretation of these results. To avoid this problem, the current experiments used a novel method to impose resource constraints prior to engaging in skill learning. Ego depletion theory states that humans possess a limited store of cognitive resources that, when depleted, results in deficits in self-regulation and cognitive control. In a first experiment, we used a standard ego depletion manipulation prior to performance of the Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL) task. Depleted participants exhibited poorer test performance than did non-depleted controls, indicating that reducing available executive resources may adversely affect implicit sequence learning, expression of sequence knowledge, or both. In a second experiment, depletion was administered either prior to or after training. Participants who reported higher levels of depletion before or after training again showed less sequence-specific knowledge on the post-training assessment. However, the results did not allow for clear separation of ego depletion effects on learning versus subsequent sequence-specific performance. These results indicate that performance on an implicitly learned sequence can be impaired by a reduction in executive resources, in spite of learning taking place outside of awareness and without conscious intent.

  3. Sleep, Torpor and Memory Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchykova, S.; Tobler, I.

    It is now well known that daily torpor induces a sleep deficit. Djungarian hamsters emerging from this hypometabolic state spend most of the time in sleep. This sleep is characterized by high initial values of EEG slow-wave activity (SWA) that monotonically decline during recovery sleep. These features resemble the changes seen in numerous species during recovery after prolonged wakefulness or sleep deprivation (SD). When hamsters are totally or partially sleep deprived immediately after emerging from torpor, an additional increase in SWA can be induced. It has been therefore postulated, that these slow- waves are homeostatically regulated, as predicted by the two-process model of sleep regulation, and that during daily torpor a sleep deficit is accumulated as it is during prolonged waking. The predominance of SWA in the frontal EEG observed both after SD and daily torpor provides further evidence for the similarity of these conditions. It has been shown in several animal and human studies that sleep can enhance memory consolidation, and that SD leads to memory impairment. Preliminary data obtained in the Djungarian hamster showed that both SD and daily torpor result in object recognition deficits. Thus, animals subjected to SD immediately after learning, or if they underwent an episode of daily torpor between learning and retention, displayed impaired recognition memory for complex object scenes. The investigation of daily torpor can reveal mechanisms that could have important implications for hypometabolic state induction in other mammalian species, including humans.

  4. Cognitive Impairment in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthimios Dardiotis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment (CI is increasingly recognized as a common adverse consequence of heart failure (HF. Although the exact mechanisms remain unclear, microembolism, chronic or intermittent cerebral hypoperfusion, and/or impaired cerebral vessel reactivity that lead to cerebral hypoxia and ischemic brain damage seem to underlie the development of CI in HF. Cognitive decline in HF is characterized by deficits in one or more cognition domains, including attention, memory, executive function, and psychomotor speed. These deficits may affect patients’ decision-making capacity and interfere with their ability to comply with treatment requirements, recognize and self-manage disease worsening symptoms. CI may have fluctuations in severity over time, improve with effective HF treatment or progress to dementia. CI is independently associated with disability, mortality, and decreased quality of life of HF patients. It is essential therefore for health professionals in their routine evaluations of HF patients to become familiar with assessment of cognitive performance using standardized screening instruments. Future studies should focus on elucidating the mechanisms that underlie CI in HF and establishing preventive strategies and treatment approaches.

  5. Genetic testing for hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topsakal, V; Van Camp, G; Van de Heyning, P

    2005-01-01

    For some patients, genetic testing can reveal the etiology of their hearing impairment, and can provide evidence for a medical diagnosis. However, a gap between fundamental genetic research on hereditary deafness and clinical otology emerges because of the steadily increasing number of discovered genes for hereditary hearing impairment (HHI) and the comparably low clinical differentiation of the HHIs. In an attempt to keep up with the scientific progress, this article enumerates the indications of genetic testing for HHI from a clinical point of view and describes the most frequently encountered HHIs in Belgium. Domains of recent scientific interest, molecular biological aspects, and some pitfalls with HHIs are highlighted. The overview comprises bilateral congenital hearing loss, late-onset progressive high frequency hearing loss, progressive bilateral cochleo-vestibular deficit, and progressive low frequency hearing loss. Also, several syndromal forms of HHI are summarized, and the availability of genetic tests mentioned. Finally, the requirements for successful linkage analysis, an important genetic research tool for localizing the potential genes of a trait on a chromosome, are briefly described.

  6. Chitosan drives anti-inflammatory macrophage polarisation and pro-inflammatory dendritic cell stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI Oliveira

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages and dendritic cells (DC share the same precursor and play key roles in immunity. Modulation of their behaviour to achieve an optimal host response towards an implanted device is still a challenge. Here we compare the differentiation process and polarisation of these related cell populations and show that they exhibit different responses to chitosan (Ch, with human monocyte-derived macrophages polarising towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype while their DC counterparts display pro-inflammatory features. Macrophages and DC, whose interactions with biomaterials are frequently analysed using fully differentiated cells, were cultured directly on Ch films, rather than exposed to the polymer after complete differentiation. Ch was the sole stimulating factor and activated both macrophages and DC, without leading to significant T cell proliferation. After 10 d on Ch, macrophages significantly down-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory markers, CD86 and MHCII. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly TNF-α, decreased with time for cells cultured on Ch, while anti-inflammatory IL-10 and TGF-β1, significantly increased. Altogether, these results suggest an M2c polarisation. Also, macrophage matrix metalloproteinase activity was augmented and cell motility was stimulated by Ch. Conversely, DC significantly enhanced CD86 expression, reduced IL-10 secretion and increased TNF-α and IL-1β levels. Our findings indicate that cells with a common precursor may display different responses, when challenged by the same biomaterial. Moreover, they help to further comprehend macrophage/DC interactions with Ch and the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory signals associated with implant biomaterials. We propose that an overall pro-inflammatory reaction may hide the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, likely relevant for tissue repair/regeneration.

  7. Aberrant innate immune activation following tissue injury impairs pancreatic regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra E Folias

    Full Text Available Normal tissue architecture is disrupted following injury, as resident tissue cells become damaged and immune cells are recruited to the site of injury. While injury and inflammation are critical to tissue remodeling, the inability to resolve this response can lead to the destructive complications of chronic inflammation. In the pancreas, acinar cells of the exocrine compartment respond to injury by transiently adopting characteristics of progenitor cells present during embryonic development. This process of de-differentiation creates a window where a mature and stable cell gains flexibility and is potentially permissive to changes in cellular fate. How de-differentiation can turn an acinar cell into another cell type (such as a pancreatic β-cell, or a cell with cancerous potential (as in cases of deregulated Kras activity is of interest to both the regenerative medicine and cancer communities. While it is known that inflammation and acinar de-differentiation increase following pancreatic injury, it remains unclear which immune cells are involved in this process. We used a combination of genetically modified mice, immunological blockade and cellular characterization to identify the immune cells that impact pancreatic regeneration in an in vivo model of pancreatitis. We identified the innate inflammatory response of macrophages and neutrophils as regulators of pancreatic regeneration. Under normal conditions, mild innate inflammation prompts a transient de-differentiation of acinar cells that readily dissipates to allow normal regeneration. However, non-resolving inflammation developed when elevated pancreatic levels of neutrophils producing interferon-γ increased iNOS levels and the pro-inflammatory response of macrophages. Pancreatic injury improved following in vivo macrophage depletion, iNOS inhibition as well as suppression of iNOS levels in macrophages via interferon-γ blockade, supporting the impairment in regeneration and the

  8. An index of reservoir habitat impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, L.E.; Hunt, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Fish habitat impairment resulting from natural and anthropogenic watershed and in-lake processes has in many cases reduced the ability of reservoirs to sustain native fish assemblages and fisheries quality. Rehabilitation of impaired reservoirs is hindered by the lack of a method suitable for scoring impairment status. To address this limitation, an index of reservoir habitat impairment (IRHI) was developed by merging 14 metrics descriptive of common impairment sources, with each metric scored from 0 (no impairment) to 5 (high impairment) by fisheries scientists with local knowledge. With a plausible range of 5 to 25, distribution of the IRHI scores ranged from 5 to 23 over 482 randomly selected reservoirs dispersed throughout the USA. The IRHI reflected five impairment factors including siltation, structural habitat, eutrophication, water regime, and aquatic plants. The factors were weakly related to key reservoir characteristics including reservoir area, depth, age, and usetype, suggesting that common reservoir descriptors are poor predictors of fish habitat impairment. The IRHI is rapid and inexpensive to calculate, provides an easily understood measure of the overall habitat impairment, allows comparison of reservoirs and therefore prioritization of restoration activities, and may be used to track restoration progress. The major limitation of the IRHI is its reliance on unstandardized professional judgment rather than standardized empirical measurements. ?? 2010 US Government.

  9. Cryotherapy Reduces Inflammatory Response Without Altering Muscle Regeneration Process and Extracellular Matrix Remodeling of Rat Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Ramos, Gracielle; Pinheiro, Clara Maria; Messa, Sabrina Peviani; Delfino, Gabriel Borges; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Salvini, Tania de Fátima; Durigan, Joao Luiz Quagliotti

    2016-01-04

    The application of cryotherapy is widely used in sports medicine today. Cooling could minimize secondary hypoxic injury through the reduction of cellular metabolism and injury area. Conflicting results have also suggested cryotherapy could delay and impair the regeneration process. There are no definitive findings about the effects of cryotherapy on the process of muscle regeneration. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a clinical-like cryotherapy on inflammation, regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling on the Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of rats 3, 7 and 14 days post-injury. It was observed that the intermittent application of cryotherapy (three 30-minute sessions, every 2 h) in the first 48 h post-injury decreased inflammatory processes (mRNA levels of TNF-α, NF-κB, TGF-β and MMP-9 and macrophage percentage). Cryotherapy did not alter regeneration markers such as injury area, desmin and Myod expression. Despite regulating Collagen I and III and their growth factors, cryotherapy did not alter collagen deposition. In summary, clinical-like cryotherapy reduces the inflammatory process through the decrease of macrophage infiltration and the accumulation of the inflammatory key markers without influencing muscle injury area and ECM remodeling.

  10. Altered blood-brain barrier transport in neuro-inflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Geert J; de Vries, Helga E

    2016-06-01

    During neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and multiple sclerosis (MS), the protective function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may be severely impaired. The general neuro-inflammatory response, ranging from activation of glial cells to immune cell infiltration that is frequently associated with such brain diseases may underlie the loss of the integrity and function of the BBB. Consequentially, the delivery and disposition of drugs to the brain will be altered and may influence the treatment efficiency of such diseases. Altered BBB transport of drugs into the CNS during diseases may be the result of changes in both specific transport and non-specific transport pathways. Potential alterations in transport routes like adsorptive mediated endocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis may affect drug delivery to the brain. As such, drugs that normally are unable to traverse the BBB may reach their target in the diseased brain due to increased permeability. In contrast, the delivery of (targeted) drugs could be hampered during inflammatory conditions due to disturbed transport mechanisms. Therefore, the inventory of the neuro-inflammatory status of the neurovasculature (or recovery thereof) is of utmost importance in choosing and designing an adequate drug targeting strategy under disease conditions. Within this review we will briefly discuss how the function of the BBB can be affected during disease and how this may influence the delivery of drugs into the diseased CNS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Osteoarthritis guidelines: a progressive role for topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanos, Steven P

    2013-01-01

    Current treatment guidelines for the treatment of chronic pain associated with osteoarthritis reflect the collective clinical knowledge of international experts in weighing the benefits of pharmacologic therapy options while striving to minimize the negative effects associated with them. Consideration of disease progression, pattern of flares, level of functional impairment or disability, response to treatment, coexisting conditions such as cardiovascular disease or gastrointestinal disorders, and concomitant prescription medication use should be considered when creating a therapeutic plan for a patient with osteoarthritis. Although topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs historically have not been prevalent in many of the guidelines for osteoarthritis treatment, recent evidence-based medicine and new guidelines now support their use as a viable option for the clinician seeking alternatives to typical oral formulations. This article provides a qualitative review of these treatment guidelines and the emerging role of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as a therapy option for patients with localized symptoms of osteoarthritis who may be at risk for oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related serious adverse events.

  12. Inflammatory Mechanisms Associated with Skeletal Muscle Sequelae after Stroke: Role of Physical Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho Junior, Hélio José; Gambassi, Bruno Bavaresco; Diniz, Tiego Aparecido; Fernandes, Isabela Maia da Cruz; Caperuto, Érico Chagas; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Lira, Fabio Santos

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory markers are increased systematically and locally (e.g., skeletal muscle) in stroke patients. Besides being associated with cardiovascular risk factors, proinflammatory cytokines seem to play a key role in muscle atrophy by regulating the pathways involved in this condition. As such, they may cause severe decrease in muscle strength and power, as well as impairment in cardiorespiratory fitness. On the other hand, physical exercise (PE) has been widely suggested as a powerful tool for treating stroke patients, since PE is able to regenerate, even if partially, physical and cognitive functions. However, the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of physical exercise in poststroke patients remain poorly understood. Thus, in this study we analyze the candidate mechanisms associated with muscle atrophy in stroke patients, as well as the modulatory effect of inflammation in this condition. Later, we suggest the two strongest anti-inflammatory candidate mechanisms, myokines and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, which may be activated by physical exercise and may contribute to a decrease in proinflammatory markers of poststroke patients. PMID:27647951

  13. Role overload, pain and physical dysfunction in early rheumatoid or undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Sally Sabry; Looper, Karl Julian; Zelkowitz, Phyllis; Purden, Margaret; Baron, Murray

    2012-05-03

    Inflammatory arthritis impairs participation in societal roles. Role overload arises when the demands by a given role set exceed the resources; time and energy, to carry out the required tasks. The present study examines the association between role overload and disease outcomes in early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Patients (n = 104) of 7.61 months mean duration of inflammatory arthritis completed self-report questionnaires on sociodemographics, disease characteristics and role overload. Pain was assessed using the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and physical functioning was measured with the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical functioning score. Role overload was measured by the Role Overload Scale. Patients indicated the number of social roles they occupied from a total of the three typical roles; marital, parental and paid work. Participants' mean age was 56 years and 70.2% were female. Role overload was not correlated to the number of social roles, however, it was positively associated with pain (p = 0.004) and negatively associated with physical functioning (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, role overload was negatively associated with physical functioning after controlling for the relevant sociodemographic variables. This study identifies a possible reciprocal relationship between role overload and physical functioning in patients with EIA.

  14. QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE: importance of clinical, demographic and psychosocial factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana MAGALHÃES

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Inflammatory bowel disease causes physical and psychosocial consequences that can affect the health related quality of life. Objectives To analyze the relationship between clinical and sociodemographic factors and quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease patients. Methods Ninety two patients with Crohn’s disease and 58 with ulcerative colitis, filled in the inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ-32 and a questionnaire to collect sociodemographic and clinical data. The association between categorical variables and IBDQ-32 scores was determined using Student t test. Factors statistically significant in the univariate analysis were included in a multivariate regression model. Results IBDQ-32 scores were significantly lower in female patients (P<0.001, patients with an individual perception of a lower co-workers support (P<0.001 and career fulfillment (P<0.001, patients requiring psychological support (P = 0.010 and pharmacological treatment for anxiety or depression (P = 0.002. A multivariate regression analysis identified as predictors of impaired HRQOL the female gender (P<0.001 and the perception of a lower co-workers support (P = 0.025 and career fulfillment (P = 0.001. Conclusions The decrease in HRQQL was significantly related with female gender and personal perception of disease impact in success and social relations. These factors deserve a special attention, so timely measures can be implemented to improve the quality of life of patients.

  15. Borneol, a Bicyclic Monoterpene Alcohol, Reduces Nociceptive Behavior and Inflammatory Response in Mice

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    Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Borneol, a bicyclic monoterpene, has been evaluated for antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities were studied by measuring nociception by acetic acid, formalin, hot plate, and grip strength tests, while inflammation was prompted by carrageenan-induced peritonitis. The rotarod test was used to evaluate motor coordination. Borneol produced a significant (P<0.01 reduction of the nociceptive behavior at the early and late phases of paw licking and reduced the writhing reflex in mice (formalin and writhing tests, resp.. When the hot plate test was conducted, borneol (in higher dose produced an inhibition (P<0.05 of the nociceptive behavior. Such results were unlikely to be provoked by motor abnormality. Additionally, borneol-treated mice reduced the carrageenan-induced leukocytes migration to the peritoneal cavity. Together, our results suggest that borneol possess significant central and peripheral antinociceptive activity; it has also anti-inflammatory activity. In addition, borneol did not impair motor coordination.

  16. Anti-inflammatory Chitosan/Poly-γ-glutamic acid nanoparticles control inflammation while remodeling extracellular matrix in degenerated intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Graciosa Q; Leite Pereira, Catarina; Castro, Flávia; Ferreira, Joana R; Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Aguiar, Paulo; Barbosa, Mário A; Neidlinger-Wilke, Cornelia; Goncalves, Raquel M

    2016-09-15

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is one of the most common causes of low back pain (LBP), the leading disorder in terms of years lived with disability. Inflammation can play a role in LPB, while impairs IVD regeneration. In spite of this, different inflammatory targets have been purposed in the context of IVD regeneration. Anti-inflammatory nanoparticles (NPs) of Chitosan and Poly-(γ-glutamic acid) with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac (Df), were previously shown to counteract a pro-inflammatory response of human macrophages. Here, the effect of intradiscal injection of Df-NPs in degenerated IVD was evaluated. For that, Df-NPs were injected in a bovine IVD organ culture in pro-inflammatory/degenerative conditions, upon stimulation with needle-puncture and interleukin (IL)-1β. Df-NPs were internalized by IVD cells, down-regulating IL-6, IL-8, MMP1 and MMP3, and decreasing PGE2 production, compared with IL-1β-stimulated IVD punches. Interestingly, at the same time, Df-NPs promoted an up-regulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, namely collagen type II and aggrecan. Allover, this study suggests that IVD treatment with Df-NPs not only reduces inflammation, but also delays and/or decreases ECM degradation, opening perspectives to new intradiscal therapies for IVD degeneration, based on the modulation of inflammation. Degeneration of the IVD is an age-related progressive process considered to be the major cause of spine disorders. The pro-inflammatory environment and biomechanics of the degenerated IVD is a challenge for regenerative therapies. The novelty of this work is the intradiscal injection of an anti-inflammatory therapy based on Chitosan (Ch)/Poly-(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) nanoparticles (NPs) with an anti-inflammatory drug (diclofenac, Df), previously developed by us. This drug delivery system was tested in a pro-inflammatory/degenerative intervertebral disc ex vivo model. The main findings support the success of an anti-inflammatory

  17. The role of oxidative stress and inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of mastitis in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romana Turk

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mastitis is one of the most frequent diseases of dairy cows throughout the world, therefore it causes the greatest economic losses in dairy cattle industry. These losses are reflected through: reduced milk production, increased costs of medication and the other animal health services, reduced fertility, early culling of animals and the value of discarded milk. Mastitis is also important from the aspects of public health, milk processing and animal welfare. In the pathogenesis of mastitis the key role plays the innate immune response which is the first line of defence against the pathogen invasion of the udder. The innate immune response generates an inflammatory reaction which is the elementary response of an organism to the tissue trauma induced by any physical, chemical or biological causative agent, but primarily it is the protective mechanism of a vital significance which includes increased phagocytic activity, secretion of antimicrobial substances, fibrosis as well as the alterations in tissue structure of affected organ or body cavity. The release of a number of inflammatory mediators as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS is an important part of inflammatory response. In dairy cows, the metabolic challenge that occurred during the transition from dry period to early lactation may additionally increase the release of ROS which may contribute to development of oxidative stress and inflammatory response. Oxidative stress is defined as a shift in the balance from cellular oxidation-reduction reactions towards oxidation, i.e. to the state of excessive release of oxidants when their removal by antioxidants is impaired and even insufficient. During peripartum period antioxidantive status of dairy cows is seriously impaired and consequently both the oxidative stress and inflammatory response may present the predisposing factors to their higher susceptibility to intramammary infections (IMI and mastitis. This association between oxidative stress

  18. The role of oxidative stress and inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of mastitis in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Maćešić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mastitis is one of the most frequent diseases of dairy cows throughout the world, therefore it causes the greatest economic losses in dairy cattle industry. These losses are reflected through: reduced milk production, increased costs of medication and the other animal health services, reduced fertility, early culling of animals and the value of discarded milk. Mastitis is also important from the aspects of public health, milk processing and animal welfare. In the pathogenesis of mastitis the key role plays the innate immune response which is the first line of defence against the pathogen invasion of the udder. The innate immune response generates an inflammatory reaction which is the elementary response of an organism to the tissue trauma induced by any physical, chemical or biological causative agent, but primarily it is the protective mechanism of a vital significance which includes increased phagocytic activity, secretion of antimicrobial substances, fibrosis as well as the alterations in tissue structure of affected organ or body cavity. The release of a number of inflammatory mediators as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS is an important part of inflammatory response. In dairy cows, the metabolic challenge that occurred during the transition from dry period to early lactation may additionally increase the release of ROS which may contribute to development of oxidative stress and inflammatory response. Oxidative stress is defined as a shift in the balance from cellular oxidation-reduction reactions towards oxidation, i.e. to the state of excessive release of oxidants when their removal by antioxidants is impaired and even insufficient. During peripartum period antioxidantive status of dairy cows is seriously impaired and consequently both the oxidative stress and inflammatory response may present the predisposing factors to their higher susceptibility to intramammary infections (IMI and mastitis. This association between oxidative stress

  19. Ebselen abrogates TNFα induced pro‐inflammatory response in glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tewari, Richa; Sharma, Vivek; Koul, Nitin; Ghosh, Abhishek; Joseph, Christy; Hossain Sk, Ugir; Sen, Ellora

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the pro‐inflammatory response mediated by TNFα in glioblastoma and whether treatment with organoselenium Ebselen (2‐phenyl‐1,2‐benzisoselenazol‐3[2H]one) can affect TNFα induced inflammatory response. Exposure to TNFα increased the expression of pro‐inflammatory mediator interleukin IL‐6, IL‐8, monocyte chemoattractant protein‐1 (MCP‐1) and cyclooxygenase (COX‐2). Treatment with Ebselen abrogated TNFα induced increase in pro‐inflammatory mediators. Ebselen not only abrogated T...

  20. Symptoms predicting psychosocial impairment in bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Paul E; Staniford, Jessica; Luck, Amy

    2017-05-12

    The current study aimed to determine which particular eating disorder (ED) symptoms and related features, such as BMI and psychological distress, uniquely predict impairment in bulimia nervosa (BN). Two hundred and twenty-two adults with BN completed questionnaires assessing ED symptoms, general psychological distress, and psychosocial impairment. Regression analyses were used to determine predictors which account for variance in impairment. Four variables emerged as significant predictors of psychosocial impairment: concerns with eating; concerns with weight and shape; dietary restraint; and general psychological distress. Findings support previous work highlighting the importance of weight and shape concerns in determining ED-related impairment. Other ED symptoms, notably dietary restraint and concerns with eating, were also significant predictors as was psychological distress. Results suggest that cognitive aspects of EDs, in addition to psychological distress, may be more important determinants of impairment than behavioural symptoms, such as binge eating or purging.

  1. The relationship between separation anxiety and impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Debra L; Rowe, Richard; Maes, Hermine; Silberg, Judy; Eaves, Lindon; Pickles, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the contemporaneous and prognostic relationship between symptoms of separation anxiety disorder (SAD) and associated functional impairment. The sample comprised n=2067 8–16 year-old twins from a community-based registry. Juvenile subjects and their parents completed a personal interview on two occasions, separated by an average follow-up period of 18 months, about the subject’s current history of SAD and associated functional impairment. Results showed that SAD symptoms typically caused very little impairment but demonstrated significant continuity over time. Older youth had significantly more persistent symptoms than younger children. Prior symptom level independently predicted future symptom level and diagnostic symptom threshold, with and without impairment. Neither diagnostic threshold nor severity of impairment independently predicted outcomes after taking account of prior symptom levels. The results indicate that impairment may index current treatment need but symptom levels provide the best information about severity and prognosis. PMID:17658718

  2. Impaired phagocytosis in localized aggressive periodontitis: rescue by Resolvin E1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Fredman

    Full Text Available Resolution of inflammation is an active temporally orchestrated process demonstrated by the biosynthesis of novel proresolving mediators. Dysregulation of resolution pathways may underlie prevalent human inflammatory diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and periodontitis. Localized Aggressive Periodontitis (LAP is an early onset, rapidly progressing form of inflammatory periodontal disease. Here, we report increased surface P-selectin on circulating LAP platelets, and elevated integrin (CD18 surface expression on neutrophils and monocytes compared to healthy, asymptomatic controls. Significantly more platelet-neutrophil and platelet-monocyte aggregates were identified in circulating whole blood of LAP patients compared with asymptomatic controls. LAP whole blood generates increased pro-inflammatory LTB4 with addition of divalent cation ionophore A23187 (5 µM and significantly less, 15-HETE, 12-HETE, 14-HDHA, and lipoxin A(4. Macrophages from LAP subjects exhibit reduced phagocytosis. The pro-resolving lipid mediator, Resolvin E1 (0.1-100 nM, rescues the impaired phagocytic activity in LAP macrophages. These abnormalities suggest compromised resolution pathways, which may contribute to persistent inflammation resulting in establishment of a chronic inflammatory lesion and periodontal disease progression.

  3. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 improves impaired dermal wound healing in old mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyanenko, Ilya A; Popova, Ekaterina N; Zakharova, Vlada V; Ilyinskaya, Olga P; Vasilieva, Tamara V; Romashchenko, Valeria P; Fedorov, Artem V; Manskikh, Vasily N; Skulachev, Maxim V; Zinovkin, Roman A; Pletjushkina, Olga Yu; Skulachev, Vladimir P; Chernyak, Boris V

    2015-07-01

    The process of skin wound healing is delayed or impaired in aging animals. To investigate the possible role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) in cutaneous wound healing of aged mice, we have applied the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1. The SkQ1 treatment resulted in accelerated resolution of the inflammatory phase, formation of granulation tissue, vascularization and epithelization of the wounds. The wounds of SkQ1-treated mice contained increased amount of myofibroblasts which produce extracellular matrix proteins and growth factors mediating granulation tissue formation. This effect resembled SkQ1-induced differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblast, observed earlierin vitro. The Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFb) produced by SkQ1-treated fibroblasts was found to stimulated motility of endothelial cells in vitro, an effect which may underlie pro-angiogenic action of SkQ1 in the wounds. In vitro experiments showed that SkQ1 prevented decomposition of VE-cadherin containing contacts and following increase in permeability of endothelial cells monolayer, induced by pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF. Prevention of excessive reaction of endothelium to the pro-inflammatory cytokine(s) might account for anti-inflammatory effect of SkQ1. Our findings point to an important role of mtROS in pathogenesis of age-related chronic wounds.

  4. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor of the Bladder: Report of Two Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Na; Oh, Soon Nam; Rha, Sung Eun; Jung, Seung Eun; Lee, Young Joon; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Chan Kwon; Choi, Yeong Jin [Catholic University of Korea St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare condition of unknown origin. Pathologically, the lesion is composed of myofibroblastic spindle cells accompanied by an inflammatory infiltrate of plasma cells, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. We report two cases of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the bladder which showed different imaging features and was falsely diagnosed as malignant tumors. We discuss the imaging findings along with a literature review

  5. Inflammatory cytokines and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Gao, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Because low-grade inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), and pro-inflammatory cytokines govern inflammatory cascades, this study aimed to assess the associations of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and CHD risk in a new prospective study, including meta...

  6. Treatment of Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pierson, Susan H.; Griffith, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis is an increasingly recognized entity. This article reviews the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis, its prevalence, its relationship to different types of multiple sclerosis, and its contribution to long-term functional prognosis. The discussion also focuses on the key elements of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis which distinguish it from other forms of cognitive impairment. Therapeutic interventions potentially effective for the co...

  7. Marital Conflict, Depressive Symptoms, and Functional Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Heejeong; Marks, Nadine F.

    2008-01-01

    Guided by a stress process perspective, we investigated (a) whether marital conflict might directly lead to changes in depression and functional impairment, (b) whether marital conflict might indirectly lead to changes in functional impairment via depression, and (c) whether marital conflict might indirectly lead to changes in depression via functional impairment. We estimated a latent variable causal model using 3 waves of data from the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 1,832)....

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Ørskov; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Andersson, Mikael

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be complicated by primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We aimed to assess the characteristics of Danish PSC-IBD patients and to compare their prognosis with IBD patients without PSC. METHODS: A retrospective nationwide population-based co......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be complicated by primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We aimed to assess the characteristics of Danish PSC-IBD patients and to compare their prognosis with IBD patients without PSC. METHODS: A retrospective nationwide population....... Among patients with PSC and Crohn's disease (CD) 91% had colonic involvement. The PSC-IBD patients had a significantly higher probability of receiving resective surgery (HR; 2.13, 95% CI: 1.50-3.03); of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) (HR; 21.4, 95% CI: 9.6-47.6), of cholangiocarcinoma (HR; 190, 95...

  9. Management of rectal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT is an uncommon mesenchymal neoplasm of intermediate malignant potential. It may occur in various anatomic locations, but rarely in the rectum. This is a case discussion of a 36-year-old male patient with IMT of the rectum. After the patient underwent radical surgery, recurrence was seen after 18 months. Because the tumor was very close to the surrounding tissue, palliative tumor resection was performed followed by concurrent chemo-radiation and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID. After 2-year follow-up, the patient has no evidence of recurrence or metastasis. Surgical resection is very important for patient with rectal IMT, even in relapse cases. And adjuvant chemoradiotherapy and NSAID are in favor of the incompletely resected tumors as our case. But perhaps, the adjuvant treatments could be helpful after radical resection of rectal tumor.

  10. Macrolides in Chronic Inflammatory Skin Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullateef A. Alzolibani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term therapy with the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin was shown to alter the clinical course of diffuse panbronchiolitis in the late 1980s. Since that time, macrolides have been found to have a large number of anti-inflammatory properties in addition to being antimicrobials. These observations provided the rationale for many studies performed to assess the usefulness of macrolides in other inflammatory diseases including skin and hair disorders, such as rosacea, psoriasis, pityriasis rosea, alopecia areata, bullous pemphigoid, and pityriasis lichenoides. This paper summarizes a collection of clinical studies and case reports dealing with the potential benefits of macrolides antibiotics in the treatment of selected dermatoses which have primarily been classified as noninfectious and demonstrating their potential for being disease-modifying agents.

  11. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor of the Nasal Septum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Okumura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an extremely rare case of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the posterior edge of the nasal septum. An 11-year-old boy presented with frequent epistaxis and nasal obstruction persisting for one year. Based on the clinical presentation and imaging studies, juvenile angiofibroma was suspected, but angiography suggested the possibility of another type of tumor. Transnasal endoscopic surgery found that the tumor protruded into the nasopharynx from the posterior end of the nasal septum. Histological examination identified spindle cells with immunoreaction for vimentin, smooth muscle actin, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK, but not for desmin and cytokeratin. This is a report of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor mimicking juvenile angiofibroma. This case suggests that angiography is helpful in the differential diagnosis of epipharyngeal tumor in adolescence.

  12. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cilotti, A.; Bagnolesi, P.; Cigoni, R.; Bimbi, M; Bartolozzi, C.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report their experience with US and CT in 31 cases of inflammatory aneurysms out of a study population of 200 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. The work started with a case that had not been diagnosed at US, either due to the operator's poor knowledge of this pathologic condition or because of improper examination tecnique. The authors stress the importance of a highfrequency probe and proper gain settings which are often necessary for a good visualization of the anterior aortic wall. The correct diagnosis of the inflammatory nature of the aneurysm has been assessed by US ever since, in all cases except for very obese and meteoric patients. in our series, US diagnostic accuracy was 78% versus 33% reported in literature. US was not accurate in evaluating adjacent structures involvement within fibrous tissues (ureteral narrowing, caval narrowing)-which CT did. Neither US nor CT exhibited reliable diagnostic accuracy in demonstrating enteric involvement within fibrous tissues

  13. Scintigraphic detection of inflammatory heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morguet, A.J.; Munz, D.L.; Kreuzer, H.; Emrich, D.

    1994-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the heart encompass myocarditis, endocarditis and pericarditis. This paper discusses the diagnostic potential of scintigraphy in these entities. In myocarditis, indium-111 antimyosin Fab imaging can visualize active myocyte damage and thus contribute substantially to the diagnosis. Antimyosin uptake is also seen in a large subset of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, indicating ongoing myocyte injury in these cases. In endocarditis, immunoscintigraphy using monoclonal technetium-99m-labelled antigranulocyte antibodies provides useful diagnostic information in patients with equivocal echocardiographic findings. Immunoscintigraphy seems to indicate the floridity of the inflammatory process in endocarditis and may be used to monitor antibiotic therapy. In pericarditis, the clinical value of scintigraphy has not been convincingly demonstrated. (orig.)

  14. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  15. Inflammatory stress and sarcomagenesis: a vicious interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radons, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation represents one of the hallmarks of cancer, but its role in sarcomagenesis has long been overlooked. Sarcomas are a rare and heterogeneous group of tumors of mesenchymal origin accounting for less than 1 % of cancers in adults but 21 % of cancers in the pediatric population. Sarcomas are associated with bad prognosis, and their management requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Several lines of evidence indicate that inflammation has been implicated in sarcomagenesis leading to the activation of the key transcription factors HIF-1, NF- κB, and STAT-3 involved in a complex inflammatory network. In the past years, an increasing number of new targets have been identified in the treatment of sarcomas leading to the development of new drugs that aim to interrupt the vicious connection between inflammation and sarcomagenesis. This article makes a brief overview of preclinical and clinical evidence of the molecular pathways involved in the inflammatory stress response in sarcomagenesis and the most targeted therapies.

  16. Scintigraphic detection of inflammatory heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morguet, A J [Dept. of Cardiology and Pulmonology, Centre of Internal Medicine, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany); Munz, D L [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Radiology, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany); Kreuzer, H [Dept. of Cardiology and Pulmonology, Centre of Internal Medicine, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany); Emrich, D [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Radiology, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)

    1994-07-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the heart encompass myocarditis, endocarditis and pericarditis. This paper discusses the diagnostic potential of scintigraphy in these entities. In myocarditis, indium-111 antimyosin Fab imaging can visualize active myocyte damage and thus contribute substantially to the diagnosis. Antimyosin uptake is also seen in a large subset of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, indicating ongoing myocyte injury in these cases. In endocarditis, immunoscintigraphy using monoclonal technetium-99m-labelled antigranulocyte antibodies provides useful diagnostic information in patients with equivocal echocardiographic findings. Immunoscintigraphy seems to indicate the floridity of the inflammatory process in endocarditis and may be used to monitor antibiotic therapy. In pericarditis, the clinical value of scintigraphy has not been convincingly demonstrated. (orig.)

  17. Collective cell migration during inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Wound scratch healing assays of endothelial cell monolayers is a simple model to study collective cell migration as a function of biological signals. A signal of particular interest is the immune response, which after initial wounding in vivo causes the release of various inflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α is an innate inflammatory cytokine that can induce cell growth, cell necrosis, and change cell morphology. We studied the effects of TNF-α on collective cell migration using the wound healing assays and measured several migration metrics, such as rate of scratch closure, velocities of leading edge and bulk cells, closure index, and velocity correlation functions between migrating cells. We observed that TNF-α alters all migratory metrics as a function of the size of the scratch and TNF-α content. The changes observed in migration correlate with actin reorganization upon TNF-α exposure.

  18. Macrolides in Chronic Inflammatory Skin Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzolibani, Abdullateef A.; Zedan, Khaled

    2012-01-01

    Long-term therapy with the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin was shown to alter the clinical course of diffuse panbronchiolitis in the late 1980s. Since that time, macrolides have been found to have a large number of anti-inflammatory properties in addition to being antimicrobials. These observations provided the rationale for many studies performed to assess the usefulness of macrolides in other inflammatory diseases including skin and hair disorders, such as rosacea, psoriasis, pityriasis rosea, alopecia areata, bullous pemphigoid, and pityriasis lichenoides. This paper summarizes a collection of clinical studies and case reports dealing with the potential benefits of macrolides antibiotics in the treatment of selected dermatoses which have primarily been classified as noninfectious and demonstrating their potential for being disease-modifying agents. PMID:22685371

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease in children. Current trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikhare, G.; Kugathasan, S.

    2010-01-01

    Once considered rare in the East, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is now recognized to be an emerging entity in that region. East or West, the clinical features of and treatment options for IBD are the same, but it is possible that the exact pathogeneses or the initiating events differ. In this review, existing knowledge of IBD and new discoveries in the epidemiology, genetics and treatment of IBD are discussed in detail. The diagnosis and management of IBD in children has changed dramatically over the last decade, mainly due to increased awareness, the availability of newer diagnostic modalities such as MRI and video capsule endoscopy, and newer, more powerful treatments such as biologics. It is hoped that the combination of innovative research and advances in drug discoveries will change the natural history of IBD and make a major difference in children who are suffering from this unfortunate lifelong chronic inflammatory disorder. (author)

  20. Ego Depletion Impairs Implicit Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kelsey R.; Sanchez, Daniel J.; Wesley, Abigail H.; Reber, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Implicit skill learning occurs incidentally and without conscious awareness of what is learned. However, the rate and effectiveness of learning may still be affected by decreased availability of central processing resources. Dual-task experiments have generally found impairments in implicit learning, however, these studies have also shown that certain characteristics of the secondary task (e.g., timing) can complicate the interpretation of these results. To avoid this problem, the current experiments used a novel method to impose resource constraints prior to engaging in skill learning. Ego depletion theory states that humans possess a limited store of cognitive resources that, when depleted, results in deficits in self-regulation and cognitive control. In a first experiment, we used a standard ego depletion manipulation prior to performance of the Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL) task. Depleted participants exhibited poorer test performance than did non-depleted controls, indicating that reducing available executive resources may adversely affect implicit sequence learning, expression of sequence knowledge, or both. In a second experiment, depletion was administered either prior to or after training. Participants who reported higher levels of depletion before or after training again showed less sequence-specific knowledge on the post-training assessment. However, the results did not allow for clear separation of ego depletion effects on learning versus subsequent sequence-specific performance. These results indicate that performance on an implicitly learned sequence can be impaired by a reduction in executive resources, in spite of learning taking place outside of awareness and without conscious intent. PMID:25275517

  1. Ego depletion impairs implicit learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey R Thompson

    Full Text Available Implicit skill learning occurs incidentally and without conscious awareness of what is learned. However, the rate and effectiveness of learning may still be affected by decreased availability of central processing resources. Dual-task experiments have generally found impairments in implicit learning, however, these studies have also shown that certain characteristics of the secondary task (e.g., timing can complicate the interpretation of these results. To avoid this problem, the current experiments used a novel method to impose resource constraints prior to engaging in skill learning. Ego depletion theory states that humans possess a limited store of cognitive resources that, when depleted, results in deficits in self-regulation and cognitive control. In a first experiment, we used a standard ego depletion manipulation prior to performance of the Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL task. Depleted participants exhibited poorer test performance than did non-depleted controls, indicating that reducing available executive resources may adversely affect implicit sequence learning, expression of sequence knowledge, or both. In a second experiment, depletion was administered either prior to or after training. Participants who reported higher levels of depletion before or after training again showed less sequence-specific knowledge on the post-training assessment. However, the results did not allow for clear separation of ego depletion effects on learning versus subsequent sequence-specific performance. These results indicate that performance on an implicitly learned sequence can be impaired by a reduction in executive resources, in spite of learning taking place outside of awareness and without conscious intent.

  2. Inflammatory bowel diseases: principles of nutritional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos Fábio Guilherme

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease- are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and to prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission in adults and promoting growth in children. Due to its low complication rate and lower costs, enteral nutrition should be preferred over total parenteral nutrition whenever possible. Both present equal effectiveness in primary therapy for remission of active Crohn's disease. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted, especially in patients presumed to need total parenteral nutrition. Recent research has focused on the use of nutrients as primary treatment agents. Immunonutrition is an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, modulating the inflammation and changing the eicosanoid synthesis profile. However, beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these and other nutrients (glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  3. The evolving epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include assessments of disease burden and evolving patterns of disease presentation. Although it is hoped that sound epidemiologic studies provide aetiological clues, traditional risk factor-based epidemiology has provided limited insights into either Crohn\\'s disease or ulcerative colitis etiopathogenesis. In this update, we will summarize how the changing epidemiology of IBD associated with modernization can be reconciled with current concepts of disease mechanisms and will discuss studies of clinically significant comorbidity in IBD.

  4. Chronic Inflammatory Gingival Overgrowths: Laser Gingivectomy & Gingivoplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Shankar, B Shiva; T, Ramadevi; S, Neetha M; Reddy, P Sunil Kumar; Saritha, G; Reddy, J Muralinath

    2013-01-01

    It is quite common to note chronic inflammatory Gingival overgrowths during and/or post orthodontic treatment. Sometimes the overgrowths may even potentially complicate and/or interrupt orthodontic treatment. With the introduction of soft tissue lasers these problems can now be addressed more easily. Amongst many LASERS now available in Dentistry DIODE LASERS seem to be most ideal for orthodontic soft tissue applications. As newer treatments herald into minimally invasive techniques, DIODE LA...

  5. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Takeshi; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore important in the management of patients with IBD. However, relatively modest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by men with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatment on male fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a systematic search for published studies. A PubMed search were performed using the main search terms “IBD AND male infertility”, ...

  6. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal antigens. MSCs have the capacity to differentiate into a wide variety of distinct cell lineages and to suppress immune responses in vitro and in vivo. The main goal of this thesis was to study the s...

  7. MAP kinases in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Olsen, Jørgen; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian family of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) is activated by diverse extracellular and intracellular stimuli, and thereby they play an essential role in connecting cell-surface receptors to changes in transcriptional programs. The MAPK signaling pathways regulate a wide range...... these signaling pathways have been exploited for the development of therapeutics and discuss the current knowledge of potential MAPK inhibitors and their anti-inflammatory effects in clinical trials related to IBD....

  8. ANTI INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF MORINGA OLIEFERA. LAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K.N. Venkataswera; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Loganathan, V.; Nathan, S. Shanmuganathan

    1999-01-01

    The aqueous and ethanolic (90%) extract of the leaves of M.Oliera Lam (Fam: Moringaceae) were studied for their anti inflammatory action in ale albino rats. Two extracts exhibited maximum action within two hours of challenge. The aqueous extract sowed significant (P<0.01) odema suppression similar to that of Ibuprofen at the first hour of carrageenan injection. The results confirms the folkers claim of the plant. PMID:22556890

  9. Impaired neutrophil function in intestinal lymphangiectasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, R P; Cotter, K L; Losowsky, M S

    1986-01-01

    Impaired neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis were shown in three patients with intestinal lymphangiectasia. Abnormalities in cell associated and serum derived activity occurred, and possible mechanisms are suggested.

  10. Treatment of Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Susan H.; Griffith, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis is an increasingly recognized entity. This article reviews the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis, its prevalence, its relationship to different types of multiple sclerosis, and its contribution to long-term functional prognosis. The discussion also focuses on the key elements of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis which distinguish it from other forms of cognitive impairment. Therapeutic interventions potentially effective for the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis are reviewed including the effects of disease modifying therapies and the use of physical and cognitive interventions. PMID:16720960

  11. Cardiovascular disease risk factors and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David T; Fillit, Howard

    2006-04-15

    The role of cardiovascular disease risk factors in the occurrence and progression of cognitive impairment has been the subject of a significant number of publications but has not achieved widespread recognition among many physicians and educated laymen. It is apparent that the active treatment of certain of these cardiovascular disease risk factors is accompanied by a reduced risk for cognitive impairment. Patients with hypertension who are treated experience fewer cardiovascular disease events as well as less cognitive impairment than similar untreated patients. Patients who exercise may present with less cognitive impairment, and obesity may increase the risk for cognitive impairment. Lipid abnormalities and genetic markers are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and cognitive impairment. Autopsy studies have demonstrated a correlation between elevated levels of cholesterol and amyloid deposition in the brain. Research has demonstrated a relation between atherosclerotic obstruction lesions in the circle of Willis and dementia. Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and cognitive impairment. A number of nonpharmacologic factors have a role in reducing the risk for cognitive impairment. Antioxidants, fatty acids, and micronutrients may have a role, and diets rich in fruits and vegetables and other dietary approaches may improve the outlook for patients considered at risk for cognitive impairment.

  12. In vivo immune signatures of healthy human pregnancy: Inherently inflammatory or anti-inflammatory?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Graham

    Full Text Available Changes in maternal innate immunity during healthy human pregnancy are not well understood. Whether basal immune status in vivo is largely unaffected by pregnancy, is constitutively biased towards an inflammatory phenotype (transiently enhancing host defense or exhibits anti-inflammatory bias (reducing potential responsiveness to the fetus is unclear. Here, in a longitudinal study of healthy women who gave birth to healthy infants following uncomplicated pregnancies within the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD cohort, we test the hypothesis that a progressively altered bias in resting innate immune status develops. Women were examined during pregnancy and again, one and/or three years postpartum. Most pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, including CCL2, CXCL10, IL-18 and TNFα, was reduced in vivo during pregnancy (20-57%, p<0.0001. Anti-inflammatory biomarkers (sTNF-RI, sTNF-RII, and IL-1Ra were elevated by ~50-100% (p<0.0001. Systemic IL-10 levels were unaltered during vs. post-pregnancy. Kinetic studies demonstrate that while decreased pro-inflammatory biomarker expression (CCL2, CXCL10, IL-18, and TNFα was constant, anti-inflammatory expression increased progressively with increasing gestational age (p<0.0001. We conclude that healthy resting maternal immune status is characterized by an increasingly pronounced bias towards a systemic anti-inflammatory innate phenotype during the last two trimesters of pregnancy. This is resolved by one year postpartum in the absence of repeat pregnancy. The findings provide enhanced understanding of immunological changes that occur in vivo during healthy human pregnancy.

  13. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  14. SLPI and inflammatory lung disease in females.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKiernan, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    During the course of certain inflammatory lung diseases, SLPI (secretory leucoprotease inhibitor) plays a number of important roles. As a serine antiprotease it functions to protect the airways from proteolytic damage due to neutrophil and other immune cell-derived serine proteases. With respect to infection it has known antimicrobial and anti-viral properties that are likely to contribute to host defence. Another of its properties is the ability to control inflammation within the lung where it can interfere with the transcriptional induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression induced by NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB). Thus, factors that regulate the expression of SLPI in the airways can impact on disease severity and outcome. Gender represents once such idiosyncratic factor. In females with CF (cystic fibrosis), it is now thought that circulating oestrogen contributes, in part, to the observed gender gap whereby females have worse disease and poorer prognosis than males. Conversely, in asthma, sufferers who are females have more frequent exacerbations at times of low-circulating oestrogen. In the present paper, we discuss how SLPI participates in these events and speculate on whether regulatory mechanisms such as post-transcriptional modulation by miRNAs (microRNAs) are important in the control of SLPI expression in inflammatory lung disease.

  15. Effects of WR1065 on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced motor imbalance: Possible involvement of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, Afshin; Nayebi, Alireza M; Jorjani, Masoumeh; Khalifeh, Solmaz; Haddadi, Rasool

    2016-08-03

    Over production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is postulated to be the main contributor in degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. In this study we investigated the effects of WR1065, a free radical scavenger, on motor imbalance, oxidative stress parameters and inflammatory cytokines in CSF and brain of hemi-parkinsonian rats. Lesion of dopaminergic neurons was done by unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine into the central region of the substentia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to induce hemi-parkinsonism and motor imbalance in rats. WR1065 (20, 40 and 80μg/2μl/rat) was administered three days before 6-OHDA administration. After three weeks behavioral study was performed and then brain and CSF samples were collected to assess tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), interlukin (IL-1β), reduced glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA). WR1065 pre-treatment in rats before receiving 6-OHDA, improved significantly motor impairment and caused reduction of MDA and inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β levels, while GSH level significantly increased when compared with lesioned rats. Our study indicated that WR1065 could improve 6-OHDA-induced motor imbalance. Furthermore, it decreased lipid peroxidation and inflammatory cytokines and restored the level of GSH up to normal range. We suggest that WR1065 can be proposed as a potential neuroprotective agent in motor impairments of PD. However to prove this hypothesis more clinical trial studies should be done. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impaired Resolution of Inflammation in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Whittington

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD remains the leading cause of dementia worldwide, and over the last several decades, the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder has been increasingly elucidated. The initiation of the acute inflammatory response is counterbalanced by an active process termed resolution. This process is designed to restore homeostasis and promote tissue healing by the activation of neutrophilic apoptosis, promotion of neutrophil clearance by macrophages, and increasing anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, while concurrently leading to a diminution in pro-inflammatory mediators. The switch from the initiation to the resolution phase of inflammation is initially characterized by increased production of arachidonic acid-derived pro-resolving lipoxins and decreases in pro-inflammatory prostaglandin and leukotriene levels, subsequently followed by increases in specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators derived from omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3 FAs. There is mounting evidence that in AD, the resolution of inflammation is impaired, resulting in chronic inflammation and the exacerbation of the AD-related pathology. In this review, we examine preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the hypothesis that AD is a neurodegenerative disorder where the impairment or failure of resolution contributes to the disease process. Moreover, we review the literature supporting the potential therapeutic role of ω-3 FAs and specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators in the management of the disease. Lastly, we highlight areas that could strengthen the association of failed resolution to AD and should, therefore, be the focus of future scientific investigations in this research field.

  17. Clean Water Act 303(d) Listed Impaired Waters and their Causes of Impairment from All Years

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Waters identified as impaired as well as their associated causes of impairment from all approved Clean Water Act 303(d) lists submitted by the states. Includes all...

  18. Antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and toxicological evaluation of semi-synthetic molecules obtained from a benzyl-isothiocyanate isolated from Moringa oleifera Lam. in a temporomandibular joint inflammatory hypernociception model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Alain Oliveira; do Val, Danielle Rocha; da Silveira, Felipe Dantas; Gomes, Francisco Isaac Fernandes; Freitas, Hermany Capistrano; de Assis, Ellen Lima; de Almeida, Diana Kelly Castro; da Silva, Igor Iuco Castro; Barbosa, Francisco Geraldo; Mafezoli, Jair; da Silva, Marcos Reinaldo; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana Trindade; de Paulo Teixera Pinto, Vicente de Paulo Teixeira; Filho, Gerardo Cristino; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos

    2018-02-01

    Inflammation is a key component of many clinical conditions that affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and Moringa oleifera Lam. has been used to treat inflammatory diseases. Here, we evaluated the toxicological effects on mice of a naturally-occurring isothiocyanate from M. oleifera and its seven analogue molecules. Further, the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects on a rat model of TMJ inflammatory hypernociception were assessed. The systemic toxicological profile was determined in mice over a 14-day period: MC-1 1 μg/kg; MC-D1 1 μg/kg, MC-D3 100 μg/kg, MC-D6 1 μg/kg, MC-D7 1 μg/kg, MC-D8 1 μg/kg, MC-D9 10 μg/kg, and MC-H 1 μg/kg. The safest molecules were assayed for anti-nociceptive efficacy in the formalin (1.5%, 50 μL) and serotonin (255 mg) induced TMJ inflammatory hypernociception tests. The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated through the vascular permeability assay using Evans blue. Further, the rota-rod test evaluated any motor impairment. Among the tested molecules, MC-D7, MC-D9, and MC-H were not toxic at the survival rate test, biochemical, and hystological analysis. They reduced the formalin-induced TMJ inflammatory hypernociception, but only MC-H decreased the serotonin-induced TMJ inflammation, suggesting an adrenergic receptor-dependent effect. They diminished the plasmatic extravasation, showing anti-inflammatory activity. At the rota-rod test, no difference was observed in comparison with control groups, reinforcing the hypothesis of anti-nociceptive effetc without motor impairment in animals. The analogues MC-D7, MC-D9, and MC-H were safe at the tested doses and efficient in reducing the formalin-induced TMJ hypernociception in rats. Our next steps include determining their mechanisms of anti-nociceptive action. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. A comparative study of renal dysfunction in patients with inflammatory arthropathies: strong association with cardiovascular diseases and not with anti-rheumatic therapies, inflammatory markers or duration of arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among comparable patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and to explore any predictive factors for renal impairment. METHODS: Consecutive patients with peripheral joint disease (oligo and polyarthritis) were recruited from our inflammatory arthritis clinics. We divided patients in two groups: RA group and seronegative inflammatory arthritis group. The cohort consisted of 183 patients (RA = 107, seronegative arthritis = 76 [psoriatic arthritis = 69, undifferentiated oligoarthritis = 7]). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the established Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Demographic details, disease-specific characteristics, anti-rheumatic drugs and the presence of cardiovascular diseases were recorded. RESULTS: In total, 17.48% (n = 32) of the cohort had CKD. There was no statistically significant variation between the two groups as regards baseline demographics, disease characteristics, use of anti-rheumatic drugs and the presence of individual cardiovascular diseases. We found that eGFR and the presence of CKD were similar among these groups. Among patients with CKD, 72% had undiagnosed CKD. No association of statistical significance was noted between CKD and the use of corticosteroids, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and anti-tumor necrosis factor agents. The association of cardiovascular diseases with CKD remained significant after adjusting for confounders (age, gender, duration of arthritis, high C-reactive protein, use of anti-rheumatic drugs). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis are more prone to have CKD. This could have serious implications, as the majority of rheumatology patients use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and different immunosuppressives, such as methotrexate. No association of kidney dysfunction was noted with inflammatory disease

  20. The mast cell integrates the splanchnic and systemic inflammatory response in portal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arias Jorge-Luis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Portal hypertension is a clinical syndrome that is difficult to study in an isolated manner since it is always associated with a greater or lesser degree of liver functional impairment. The aim of this review is to integrate the complications related to chronic liver disease by using both, the array of mast cell functions and mediators, since they possibly are involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of these complications. The portal vein ligated rat is the experimental model most widely used to study this syndrome and it has been considered that a systemic inflammatory response is produced. This response is mediated among other inflammatory cells by mast cells and it evolves in three linked pathological functional systems. The nervous functional system presents ischemia-reperfusion and edema (oxidative stress and would be responsible for hyperdynamic circulation; the immune functional system causes tissue infiltration by inflammatory cells, particularly mast cells and bacteria (enzymatic stress and the endocrine functional system presents endothelial proliferation (antioxidative and antienzymatic stress and angiogenesis. Mast cells could develop a key role in the expression of these three phenotypes because their mediators have the ability to produce all the aforementioned alterations, both at the splanchnic level (portal hypertensive enteropathy, mesenteric adenitis, liver steatosis and the systemic level (portal hypertensive encephalopathy. This hypothetical splanchnic and systemic inflammatory response would be aggravated during the progression of the chronic liver disease, since the antioxidant ability of the body decreases. Thus, a critical state is produced, in which the appearance of noxious factors would favor the development of a dedifferentiation process protagonized by the nervous functional system. This system rapidly induces an ischemia-reperfusion phenotype with hydration and salinization of the body (hepatorenal

  1. Anti-inflammatory and opioid-like activities in methanol extract of Mikania lindleyana, sucuriju

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico A. Vanderlinde

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mikania lindleyana DC., Asteraceae (sucuriju, grows in the Amazon region, where is frequently used to treat pain, inflammatory diseases and scarring. This study was carried out to investigate phytochemical profile accompanied by in vivo antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory screening of n-hexane (HE, dichloromethane (DME and methanol (ME extracts obtained from the aerial parts of the plant. The oral administration of ME (0.1, 0.3, 1 g/kg caused a dose-related reduction (16.2, 42.1 e 70.2% of acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing while HE and DME (1 g/kg, p.o. were ineffective. In the hot plate test, ME (300 mg/kg, p.o. increased the latency of heat stimulus between 30 and 120 min and inhibited the first (45% and second (60% phases of nociception in the formalin test. The antinociception induced by ME or positive control fentanyl (150 µg/kg, s.c. in hot plate and formalin tests was prevented by naloxone (3 mg/kg, s.c.. When submitted to the carrageenan-induced peritonitis test, ME (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 g/kg, p.o. impaired leukocyte migration into the peritoneal cavity by 46.8, 59.4 and 64.8% respectively, while positive control dexamethasone (2 mg/kg, s.c., inhibited leukocyte migration by 71.1%. These results indicate that the antinociception obtained after oral administration of methanol extract of M. lindleyana involves anti-inflammatory mechanisms accompanied with opioid-like activity which could explain the use of the specie for pain and inflammatory diseases.

  2. Microbiota and epigenetic regulation of inflammatory mediators in type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remely, M; Aumueller, E; Jahn, D; Hippe, B; Brath, H; Haslberger, A G

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with alterations in the structure of the gut microbiota leading to low-grade inflammatory responses. An increased penetration of the impaired gut membrane by bacterial components is believed to induce this inflammation, possibly involving epigenetic alteration of inflammatory molecules such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We evaluated changes of the gut microbiota and epigenetic DNA methylation of TLR2 and TLR4 in three groups of subjects: type 2 diabetics under glucagon-like peptide-1 agonist therapy, obese individuals without established insulin resistance, and a lean control group. Clostridium cluster IV, Clostridium cluster XIVa, lactic acid bacteria, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bacteroidetes abundances were analysed by PCR and 454 high-throughput sequencing. The epigenetic methylation in the regulatory region of TLR4 and TLR2 was analysed using bisulfite conversion and pyrosequencing. We observed a significantly higher ratio of Firmicutes/ Bacteroidetes in type 2 diabetics compared to lean controls and obese. Major differences were shown in lactic acid bacteria, with the highest abundance in type 2 diabetics, followed by obese and lean participants. In comparison, F. prausnitzii was least abundant in type 2 diabetics, and most abundant in lean controls. Methylation analysis of four CpGs in the first exon of TLR4 showed significantly lower methylation in obese individuals, but no significant difference between type 2 diabetics and lean controls. Methylation of seven CpGs in the promoter region of TLR2 was significantly lower in type 2 diabetics compared to obese subjects and lean controls. The methylation levels of both TLRs were significantly correlated with body mass index. Our data suggest that changes in gut microbiota and thus cell wall components are involved in the epigenetic regulation of inflammatory reactions. An improved diet targeted to induce gut microbial balance and in the following even epigenetic changes of

  3. Cutting edge: impairment of dendritic cells and adaptive immunity by Ebola and Lassa viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanty, Siddhartha; Hutchinson, Karen; Agarwal, Sudhanshu; McRae, Michael; Rollin, Pierre E; Pulendran, Bali

    2003-03-15

    Acute infection of humans with Ebola and Lassa viruses, two principal etiologic agents of hemorrhagic fevers, often results in a paradoxical pattern of immune responses: early infection, characterized by an outpouring of inflammatory mediators such as TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6, vs late stage infections, which are associated with poor immune responses. The mechanisms underlying these diverse outcomes are poorly understood. In particular, the role played by cells of the innate immune system, such as dendritic cells (DC), is not known. In this study, we show that Ebola and Lassa viruses infect human monocyte-derived DC and impair their function. Monocyte-derived DC exposed to either virus fail to secrete proinflammatory cytokines, do not up-regulate costimulatory molecules, and are poor stimulators of T cells. These data represent the first evidence for a mechanism by which Ebola and Lassa viruses target DC to impair adaptive immunity.

  4. Spatial Coding of Individuals with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Konstantinos; Koustriava, Eleni; Kartasidou, Lefkothea

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the ability of children and adolescents with visual impairments to code and represent near space. Moreover, it examines the impact of the strategies they use and individual differences in their performance. A total of 30 individuals with visual impairments up to the age of 18 were given eight different object…

  5. Recess for Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    During recess, the participation of a student with visual impairments in terms of movement can often be both challenging and rewarding for the student and general education teacher. This paper will address common characteristics of students with visual impairments and present basic solutions to improve the participation of these students in the…

  6. Pragmatic language impairment and associated behavioural problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaars, M.P.; Cuperus, J.; Jansonius, K.; Verhoeven, L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Specific language impairment (SLI) is diagnosed when a child shows isolated structural language problems. The diagnosis of pragmatic language impairment (PLI) is given to children who show difficulties with the use of language in context. Unlike children with SLI, these children tend to

  7. Cognitive impairment in COPD: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Torres-Sánchez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to characterize and clarify the relationships between the various cognitive domains affected in COPD patients and the disease itself, as well as to determine the prevalence of impairment in the various cognitive domains in such patients. To that end, we performed a systematic review using the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, and ScienceDirect. We included articles that provided information on cognitive impairment in COPD patients. The review of the findings of the articles showed a significant relationship between COPD and cognitive impairment. The most widely studied cognitive domains are memory and attention. Verbal memory and learning constitute the second most commonly impaired cognitive domain in patients with COPD. The prevalence of impairment in visuospatial memory and intermediate visual memory is 26.9% and 19.2%, respectively. We found that cognitive impairment is associated with the profile of COPD severity and its comorbidities. The articles reviewed demonstrated that there is considerable impairment of the cognitive domains memory and attention in patients with COPD. Future studies should address impairments in different cognitive domains according to the disease stage in patients with COPD.

  8. Cognitive impairment in COPD: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Rodríguez-Alzueta, Elisabeth; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; López-Torres, Isabel; Moreno-Ramírez, Maria Paz; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize and clarify the relationships between the various cognitive domains affected in COPD patients and the disease itself, as well as to determine the prevalence of impairment in the various cognitive domains in such patients. To that end, we performed a systematic review using the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, and ScienceDirect. We included articles that provided information on cognitive impairment in COPD patients. The review of the findings of the articles showed a significant relationship between COPD and cognitive impairment. The most widely studied cognitive domains are memory and attention. Verbal memory and learning constitute the second most commonly impaired cognitive domain in patients with COPD. The prevalence of impairment in visuospatial memory and intermediate visual memory is 26.9% and 19.2%, respectively. We found that cognitive impairment is associated with the profile of COPD severity and its comorbidities. The articles reviewed demonstrated that there is considerable impairment of the cognitive domains memory and attention in patients with COPD. Future studies should address impairments in different cognitive domains according to the disease stage in patients with COPD.

  9. Marital Conflict, Depressive Symptoms, and Functional Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heejeong; Marks, Nadine F

    2008-01-01

    Guided by a stress process perspective, we investigated (a) whether marital conflict might directly lead to changes in depression and functional impairment, (b) whether marital conflict might indirectly lead to changes in functional impairment via depression, and (c) whether marital conflict might indirectly lead to changes in depression via…

  10. Affective Education for Visually Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Don C.; Gerler, Edwin R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of the Human Development Program (HDP) and the Developing Understanding of Self and Others (DUSO) program used with visually impaired children. Although HDP and DUSO affected the behavior of visually impaired children, they did not have any effect on children's attitudes toward school. (RC)

  11. 38 CFR 4.10 - Functional impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Functional impairment. 4.10 Section 4.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES General Policy in Rating § 4.10 Functional impairment. The basis of disability...

  12. Survivable Impairment-Aware Traffic Grooming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beshir, A.; Nuijts, R.; Malhotra, R.; Kuipers, F.

    2011-01-01

    Traffic grooming allows efficient utilization of network capacity by aggregating several independent traffic streams into a wavelength. In addition, survivability and impairment-awareness (i.e., taking into account the effect of physical impairments) are two important issues that have gained a lot

  13. Men and women differ in inflammatory and neuroendocrine responses to endotoxin but not in the severity of sickness symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Harald; Benson, Sven; Wegner, Alexander; Spreitzer, Ingo; Schedlowski, Manfred; Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2016-02-01

    Impaired mood and increased anxiety represent core symptoms of sickness behavior that are thought to be mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, excessive inflammation seems to be implicated in the development of mood/affective disorders. Although women are known to mount stronger pro-inflammatory responses during infections and are at higher risk to develop depressive and anxiety disorders compared to men, experimental studies on sex differences in sickness symptoms are scarce. Thus, the present study aimed at comparing physiological and psychological responses to endotoxin administration between men and women. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (14 men, 14 women) were intravenously injected with a low dose (0.4 ng/kg) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and plasma concentrations of cytokines and neuroendocrine factors as well as negative state emotions were measured before and until six hours after LPS administration. Women exhibited a more profound pro-inflammatory response with significantly higher increases in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6. In contrast, the LPS-induced increase in anti-inflammatory IL-10 was significantly higher in men. The cytokine alterations were accompanied by changes in neuroendocrine factors known to be involved in inflammation regulation. Endotoxin injection induced a significant increase in noradrenaline, without evidence for sex differences. The LPS-induced increase in cortisol was significantly higher in woman, whereas changes in dehydroepiandrosterone were largely comparable. LPS administration also increased secretion of prolactin, but only in women. Despite these profound sex differences in inflammatory and neuroendocrine responses, men and women did not differ in endotoxin-induced alterations in mood and state anxiety or non-specific sickness symptoms. This suggests that compensatory mechanisms exist that counteract the more pronounced inflammatory response in women, preventing an exaggerated sickness

  14. Contribution of inflammatory pathways to Fabry disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenfeld, Paula; Feriozzi, Sandro

    2017-11-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases are usually considered to be pathologies in which the passive deposition of unwanted materials leads to functional changes in lysosomes. Lysosomal deposition of unmetabolized glycolipid substrates stimulates the activation of pathogenic cascades, including immunological processes, and particularly the activation of inflammation. In lysosomal storage diseases, the inflammatory response is continuously being activated because the stimulus cannot be eliminated. Consequently, inflammation becomes a chronic process. Lysosomes play a role in many steps of the immune response. Leukocyte perturbation and over-expression of immune molecules have been reported in Fabry disease. Innate immunity is activated by signals originating from dendritic cells via interactions between toll-like receptors and globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and/or globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3). Evidence indicates that these glycolipids can activate toll-like receptors, thus triggering inflammation and fibrosis cascades. In the kidney, Gb3 deposition is associated with the increased release of transforming growth factor beta and with epithelial-to-mesenchymal cell transition, leading to the over-expression of pro-fibrotic molecules and to renal fibrosis. Interstitial fibrosis is also a typical feature of heart involvement in Fabry disease. Endomyocardial biopsies show infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages, suggesting a role for inflammation in causing tissue damage. Inflammation is present in all tissues and may be associated with other potentially pathologic processes such as apoptosis, impaired autophagy, and increases in pro-oxidative molecules, which could all contribute synergistically to tissue damage. In Fabry disease, the activation of chronic inflammation over time leads to organ damage. Therefore, enzyme replacement therapy must be started early, before this process becomes irreversible. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  15. Syngeneic B16F10 Melanoma Causes Cachexia and Impaired Skeletal Muscle Strength and Locomotor Activity in Mice

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    Fabrício A. Voltarelli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Muscle wasting has been emerging as one of the principal components of cancer cachexia, leading to progressive impairment of work capacity. Despite early stages melanomas rarely promotes weight loss, the appearance of metastatic and/or solid tumor melanoma can leads to cachexia development. Here, we investigated the B16F10 tumor-induced cachexia and its contribution to muscle strength and locomotor-like activity impairment. C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously injected with 5 × 104 B16F10 melanoma cells or PBS as a Sham negative control. Tumor growth was monitored during a period of 28 days. Compared to Sham mice, tumor group depicts a loss of skeletal muscle, as well as significantly reduced muscle grip strength and epididymal fat mass. This data are in agreement with mild to severe catabolic host response promoted by elevated serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity. Tumor implantation has also compromised general locomotor activity and decreased exploratory behavior. Likewise, muscle loss, and elevated inflammatory interleukin were associated to muscle strength loss and locomotor activity impairment. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumor-driven catabolic state in response to a pro-inflammatory environment that is associated with impaired skeletal muscle strength and decreased locomotor activity in tumor-bearing mice.

  16. Adaptive behavior of children with visual impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive behavior includes a wide range of skills necessary for independent, safe and adequate performance of everyday activities. Practical, social and conceptual skills make the concept of adaptive behavior. The aim of this paper is to provide an insight into the existing studies of adaptive behavior in persons with visual impairment. The paper mainly focuses on the research on adaptive behavior in children with visual impairment. The results show that the acquisition of adaptive skills is mainly low or moderately low in children and youth with visual impairment. Children with visual impairment achieve the worst results in social skills and everyday life skills, while the most acquired are communication skills. Apart from the degree of visual impairment, difficulties in motor development also significantly influence the acquisition of practical and social skills of blind persons and persons with low vision.

  17. Cognitive impairment and mortality among nonagenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kjeld; Nybo, Hanne; Gaist, David

    2002-01-01

    Cognitive impairment has been associated with increased mortality. Most studies, however, have only included small numbers, if at all, of the very old. In a large nationwide survey of all Danes born in 1905 and still alive in 1998, where the baseline examination was conducted, we examined...... the impact of cognitive impairment on mortality over a 2-year period. No cognitive impairment was defined as a score of 24-30 points on the Mini Mental State Examination, mild cognitive impairment was defined as a score of 18-23 points, and severe impairment was defined as a score of 0-17 points. Cox...... regression analysis was applied to adjust for a number of known and suspected factors known or suspected of being associated with cognition and mortality (e.g. sociodemographic factors, sex, smoking, alcohol consumption, depressive symptoms, and physical abilities), and yielded hazard ratios (95% confidence...

  18. Impact of TNF-α (rs1800629 and IL-6 (rs1800795 Polymorphisms on Cognitive Impairment in Asian Breast Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Woo Chae

    Full Text Available Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines is influenced by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the promoter regions of the pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, and cytokines are associated with the occurrence of post-chemotherapy cognitive impairment. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between two common pro-inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms namely, IL6-174 (rs1800795 G>C and TNF-308 (rs1800629 G>A, and chemotherapy-associated cognitive impairment (CACI among Asian early-stage breast cancer patients. In addition, the differential effect of these SNPs on plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels, and the associations of plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels with CACI were also assessed.Asian early-stage breast cancer patients (Stage I to III receiving chemotherapy were prospectively recruited from two cancer centers in Singapore. Patients' cognitive function was longitudinally assessed using the validated FACT-Cog (ver. 3 and an objective computerized battery, Headminder™ at three-time points. Plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels were analyzed using the multiplex immunoassay, and genotyping was performed using Sanger sequencing. Regression analyses and generalized estimating equation were utilized for statistical analysis.A total of 125 patients were included (mean age: 50.3; Chinese: 80.8%; post-menopausal: 48.0%; 68.0% received anthracycline-based chemotherapy. 36.8% patients experienced self-perceived cognitive impairment, detected in memory (32.8% and attention (34.2% domains. Patients with higher levels of anxiety (p<0.001 and insomnia (p = 0.003 also reported more self-perceived cognitive impairment. Higher plasma concentrations of IL-6 were associated with greater severity of self-perceived cognitive impairment (p = 0.001. Polymorphisms of cytokine genes were not associated with expression of plasma cytokines.Present findings further contribute to the growing evidence that supports the role of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 in

  19. Energy Metabolism Impairment in Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevoli, Sabina; Favoni, Valentina; Cortelli, Pietro

    2018-06-22

    Migraine is a common disabling neurological disorder which is characterised by recurring headache associated with a variety of sensory and autonomic symptoms. The pathophysiology of migraine remains not entirely understood, although many mechanisms involving the central and peripheral nervous system are now becoming clear. In particular, it is widely accepted that migraine is associated with energy metabolic impairment of the brain. The purpose of this review is to present an update overview of the energy metabolism involvement in the migraine pathophysiology. Several biochemical, morphological and magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies have confirmed the presence of energy production deficiency together with an increment of energy consumption in migraine patients. An increment of energy demand over a certain threshold create metabolic and biochemical preconditions for the onset of the migraine attack. The defect of oxidative energy metabolism in migraine is generalized. It remains to be determined if the mitochondrial deficit in migraine is primary or secondary. Riboflavin and Co-Enzyme Q10, both physiologically implicated in mitochondrial respiratory chain functioning, are effective in migraine prophylaxis, supporting the hypothesis that improving brain energy metabolism may reduce the susceptibility to migraine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. A methoxydiphenidine-impaired driver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachel, Nicole; Jacobsen-Bauer, Andrea; Skopp, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    Methoxydiphenidine (MXP) was first reported in 1989 as a dissociative anesthetic but did not enter the market for pharmaceuticals. The substance re-appeared in 2013 as a new psychoactive substance. A case of driving under the influence of MXP is reported. The concentration of MXP has been determined from a serum sample (57 ng/mL) by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry following liquid-liquid extraction. In addition, amphetamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine, and its major metabolite were present in concentrations of 111, 28, and 3 ng/mL, respectively. The subject presented with amnesia, out-of-body experiences, bizarre behavior, and decreased motor abilities. At present, information on human toxicity of MXP is not available. MXP is comparable in structure as well as in action at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor to phencyclidine or ketamine. Therefore, it is likely that MXP exerts similar severe psychotropic action in man. However, there is no information on the duration and intensity of MXP's impairing effects, the interpretation of a particular concentration in the blood or serum, and its detectability in routine drug screenings. Confirmation analysis may be confined to cases where the police has specific intelligence that points to MXP use.

  1. Physical Activity and Exercise Therapy Benefits More Than Just Symptoms and Impairments in People With Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T.; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Abbott, J. Haxby

    2018-01-01

    2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and dementia, all of which are associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Physical activity and exercise therapy not only improves symptoms and impairments of OA, it is also effective as prevention of at least 35 chronic conditions and as treatment...... become more physically active alongside participating in structured exercise therapy targeting symptoms and impairments is crucial considering the majority of people with hip and knee OA do not meet physical activity recommendations. OA is associated with a range of chronic comorbidities, including type...... of at least 26 chronic conditions with one of the potential working mechanisms being exercise induced anti-inflammatory effects. Patient education may be crucial to ensure long-term adherence and sustained positive effects on symptoms, impairments, physical activity levels and comorbidities. J Orthop Sports...

  2. Vascular Cognitive Impairment Linked to Brain Endothelium Inflammation in Early Stages of Heart Failure in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamski, Mateusz G; Sternak, Magdalena; Mohaissen, Tasnim; Kaczor, Dawid; Wierońska, Joanna M; Malinowska, Monika; Czaban, Iwona; Byk, Katarzyna; Lyngsø, Kristina S; Przyborowski, Kamil; Hansen, Pernille B L; Wilczyński, Grzegorz; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2018-03-26

    Although advanced heart failure (HF) is a clinically documented risk factor for vascular cognitive impairment, the occurrence and pathomechanisms of vascular cognitive impairment in early stages of HF are equivocal. Here, we characterize vascular cognitive impairment in the early stages of HF development and assess whether cerebral hypoperfusion or prothrombotic conditions are involved. Tgαq*44 mice with slowly developing isolated HF triggered by cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of G-αq*44 protein were studied before the end-stage HF, at the ages of 3, 6, and 10 months: before left ventricle dysfunction; at the stage of early left ventricle diastolic dysfunction (with preserved ejection fraction); and left ventricle diastolic/systolic dysfunction, respectively. In 6- to 10-month-old but not in 3-month-old Tgαq*44 mice, behavioral and cognitive impairment was identified with compromised blood-brain barrier permeability, most significantly in brain cortex, that was associated with myelin sheet loss and changes in astrocytes and microglia. Brain endothelial cells displayed increased E-selectin immunoreactivity, which was accompanied by increased amyloid-β 1-42 accumulation in piriform cortex and increased cortical oxidative stress (8-OHdG immunoreactivity). Resting cerebral blood flow measured by magnetic resonance imaging in vivo was preserved, but ex vivo NO-dependent cortical arteriole flow regulation was impaired. Platelet hyperreactivity was present in 3- to 10-month-old Tgαq*44 mice, but it was not associated with increased platelet-dependent thrombogenicity. We report for the first time that vascular cognitive impairment is already present in the early stage of HF development, even before left ventricle systolic dysfunction. The underlying pathomechanism, independent of brain hypoperfusion, involves preceding platelet hyperreactivity and brain endothelium inflammatory activation. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart

  3. Glucose Toxic Effects on Granulation Tissue Productive Cells: The Diabetics’ Impaired Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Berlanga-Acosta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic noncommunicable disease with an expanding pandemic magnitude. Diabetes predisposes to lower extremities ulceration and impairs the healing process leading to wound chronification. Diabetes also dismantles innate immunity favoring wound infection. Amputation is therefore acknowledged as one of the disease’s complications. Hyperglycemia is the proximal detonator of systemic and local toxic effectors including proinflammation, acute-phase proteins elevation, and spillover of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Insulin axis deficiency weakens wounds’ anabolism and predisposes to inflammation. The systemic accumulation of advanced glycation end-products irreversibly impairs the entire physiology from cells-to-organs. These factors in concert hamper fibroblasts and endothelial cells proliferation, migration, homing, secretion, and organization of a productive granulation tissue. Diabetic wound bed may turn chronically inflammed, procatabolic, and an additional source of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines, establishing a self-perpetuating loop. Diabetic fibroblasts and endothelial cells may bear mitochondrial damages becoming prone to apoptosis, which impairs granulation tissue cellularity and perfusion. Endothelial progenitor cells recruitment and tubulogenesis are also impaired. Failure of wound reepithelialization remains a clinical challenge while it appears to be biologically multifactorial. Ulcer prevention by primary care surveillance, education, and attention programs is of outmost importance to reduce worldwide amputation figures.

  4. Enhanced function of immuno-isolated islets in diabetes therapy by co-encapsulation with an anti-inflammatory drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Tram T; Thai, Anh V; Cohen, Joshua; Slosberg, Jeremy E; Siniakowicz, Karolina; Doloff, Joshua C; Ma, Minglin; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Tang, Katherine M; Gu, Zhen; Cheng, Hao; Weir, Gordon C; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2013-07-01

    Immuno-isolation of islets has the potential to enable the replacement of pancreatic function in diabetic patients. However, host response to the encapsulated islets frequently leads to fibrotic overgrowth with subsequent impairment of the transplanted grafts. Here, we identified and incorporated anti-inflammatory agents into islet-containing microcapsules to address this challenge. In vivo subcutaneous screening of 16 small molecule anti-inflammatory drugs was performed to identify promising compounds that could minimize the formation of fibrotic cell layers. Using parallel non-invasive fluorescent and bioluminescent imaging, we identified dexamethasone and curcumin as the most effective drugs in inhibiting the activities of inflammatory proteases and reactive oxygen species in the host response to subcutaneously injected biomaterials. Next, we demonstrated that co-encapsulating curcumin with pancreatic rat islets in alginate microcapsules reduced fibrotic overgrowth and improved glycemic control in a mouse model of chemically-induced type I diabetes. These results showed that localized administration of anti-inflammatory drug can improve the longevity of encapsulated islets and may facilitate the translation of this technology toward a long-term cure for type I diabetes. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Cross-regulation of cytokine signalling: pro-inflammatory cytokines restrict IL-6 signalling through receptor internalisation and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Simone; Wüller, Stefan; Yang, Xiang-ping; Lippok, Barbara E; Mütze, Barbara; Mais, Christine; de Leur, Hildegard Schmitz-Van; Bode, Johannes G; Gaestel, Matthias; Heinrich, Peter C; Behrmann, Iris; Schaper, Fred; Hermanns, Heike M

    2010-03-15

    The inflammatory response involves a complex interplay of different cytokines which act in an auto- or paracrine manner to induce the so-called acute phase response. Cytokines are known to crosstalk on multiple levels, for instance by regulating the mRNA stability of targeted cytokines through activation of the p38-MAPK pathway. In our study we discovered a new mechanism that answers the long-standing question how pro-inflammatory cytokines and environmental stress restrict immediate signalling of interleukin (IL)-6-type cytokines. We show that p38, activated by IL-1beta, TNFalpha or environmental stress, impairs IL-6-induced JAK/STAT signalling through phosphorylation of the common cytokine receptor subunit gp130 and its subsequent internalisation and degradation. We identify MK2 as the kinase that phosphorylates serine 782 in the cytoplasmic part of gp130. Consequently, inhibition of p38 or MK2, deletion of MK2 or mutation of crucial amino acids within the MK2 target site or the di-leucine internalisation motif blocks receptor depletion and restores IL-6-dependent STAT activation as well as gene induction. Hence, a novel negative crosstalk mechanism for cytokine signalling is described, where cytokine receptor turnover is regulated in trans by pro-inflammatory cytokines and stress stimuli to coordinate the inflammatory response.

  6. Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Raisins (Vitis vinifera L. in Human Gastric Epithelial Cells: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Di Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Raisins (Vitis vinifera L. are dried grapes largely consumed as important source of nutrients and polyphenols. Several studies report health benefits of raisins, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, whereas the anti-inflammatory activity at gastric level of the hydro-alcoholic extracts, which are mostly used for food supplements preparation, was not reported until now. The aim of this study was to compare the anti-inflammatory activity of five raisin extracts focusing on Interleukin (IL-8 and Nuclear Factor (NF-κB pathway. Raisin extracts were characterized by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD analysis and screened for their ability to inhibit Tumor necrosis factor (TNFα-induced IL-8 release and promoter activity in human gastric epithelial cells. Turkish variety significantly inhibited TNFα-induced IL-8 release, and the effect was due to the impairment of the corresponding promoter activity. Macroscopic evaluation showed the presence of seeds, absent in the other varieties; thus, hydro-alcoholic extracts from fruits and seeds were individually tested on IL-8 and NF-κB pathway. Seed extract inhibited IL-8 and NF-κB pathway, showing higher potency with respect to the fruit. Although the main effect was due to the presence of seeds, the fruit showed significant activity as well. Our data suggest that consumption of selected varieties of raisins could confer a beneficial effect against gastric inflammatory diseases.

  7. Nonnecrotizing anterior scleritis mimicking orbital inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch MC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Chen Lynch,1 Andrew B Mick21Optometry Clinic, Ocala West Veterans Affairs Specialty Clinic, Ocala, FL, USA; 2Eye Clinic, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USABackground: Anterior scleritis is an uncommon form of ocular inflammation, often associated with coexisting autoimmune disease. With early recognition and aggressive systemic therapy, prognosis for resolution is good. The diagnosis of underlying autoimmune disease involves a multidisciplinary approach.Case report: A 42-year-old African American female presented to the Eye Clinic at the San Francisco Veteran Affairs Medical Center, with a tremendously painful left eye, worse on eye movement, with marked injection of conjunctiva. There was mild swelling of the upper eyelid. Visual acuity was unaffected, but there was a mild red cap desaturation. The posterior segment was unremarkable. The initial differential diagnoses included anterior scleritis and orbital inflammatory disease. Oral steroid treatment was initiated with rapid resolution over a few days. Orbital imaging was unremarkable, and extensive laboratory work-up was positive only for antinuclear antibodies. The patient was diagnosed with idiopathic diffuse, nonnecrotizing anterior scleritis and has been followed for over 5 years without recurrence. The rheumatology clinic monitors the patient closely, as suspicion remains for potential arthralgias including human leukocyte antigen-B27-associated arthritis, lupus-associated arthritis, seronegative rheumatoid arthritis, recurrent juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and scleroderma, based on her constitutional symptoms and clinical presentation, along with a positive anti-nuclear antibody lab result.Conclusion: Untreated anterior scleritis can progress to formation of cataracts, glaucoma, uveitis, corneal melting, and posterior segment disease with significant risk of vision loss. Patients with anterior scleritis must be aggressively treated with systemic anti-inflammatories

  8. Vicious circles in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, Amnon; Collins, Judith F

    2006-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease can present with a bewildering array of disease manifestations whose overall impact on patient health is difficult to disentangle. The multitude of disease complications and therapeutic side effects result in conflicting ideas on how to best manage a patient. The aim of the study is to test the usefulness of influence diagrams in resolving conflicts centered on managing complex disease processes. The influences of a disease process and the ensuing medical interventions on the health of a patient with inflammatory bowel disease are modeled by an influence diagram. Patient health is the focal point of multiple influences affecting its overall strength. Any downstream influence represents the focal point of other preceding upstream influences. The mathematics underlying the influence diagram is similar to that of a decision tree. Its formalism allows one to consider additive and inhibitory influences and include in the same analysis qualitatively different types of parameters, such as diagnoses, complications, side effects, and therapeutic outcomes. Three exemplary cases are presented to illustrate the potential use of influence diagrams. In all three case scenarios, Crohn's disease resulted in disease manifestations that seemingly interfered with its own therapy. The presence of negative feedback loops rendered the management of each case particularly challenging. The analyses by influence diagrams revealed subtle interactions among the multiple influences and their joint contributions to the patient's overall health that would have been difficult to appreciate by verbal reasoning alone. Influence diagrams represent a decision tool that is particularly suited to improve decision-making in inflammatory bowel disease. They highlight key factors of a complex disease process and help to assess their quantitative interactions.

  9. Pronounced inflammatory response to endotoxaemia during nighttime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, Mahdi; Bendtzen, Klaus; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    endotoxaemia model. DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-over study, where 12 healthy young men received E. coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) 0.3 ng/kg at 12 noon and, on another day, at 12 midnight. Blood samples were analysed for pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines: tumour-necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, soluble...... TNF receptors (sTNF-R)-1 and -2, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), IL-6, and IL-10 as well as YKL-40 and the oxidative stress markers malondialdehyde (MDA), ascorbic acid (AA) and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) before and at 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours after LPS administration. RESULTS...

  10. [Inflammatory brain diseases in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungwitz, J; Voigt, W

    1984-06-01

    Over a period of twenty years all cases of inflammatory diseases treated in a neurological intensive-care unit were analysed in retrospective. For 90 cases of purulent bacterial meningitis, letality amounted to 30%. The need for agent-oriented, intensive early treatment is discussed. At a reduced incidence of tuberculosis, meningitis tuberculosa is generally neglected. In the majority of cases patients suffering from "encephalitic syndrome" make high demands on intensive-therapeutic concepts, including interdisciplinary cooperation, due to high complication-rates and lack of causal therapy. In 95 cases, letality also amounted to 30%.

  11. Anti-inflammatory activity of Lippia dulcis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, S; Meckes, M; Pérez, C; Susunaga, A; Zavala, M A

    2005-10-31

    Lippia dulcis hexane and ethanol extracts were tested for its anti-inflammatory activity in several animal models. Hexane extract showed to be inactive, but the ethanol extract at doses of 400 mg/kg produced significant inhibition of carrageenan-induced paw oedema and reduced the weight of cotton pellet-induced granuloma, moreover, the topical application of 0.5 mg/ear of this extract inhibited the edema induced with TPA by 49.13%, an effect which is of less intensity than that produced by indomethacine at the same dose.

  12. Inflammatory fibroid polyp of sigmoid colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifschitz, O; Lew, S; Witz, M; Reiss, R; Griffel, B

    1979-01-01

    A case of inflammatory fibroid polyp of the sigmoid colon is presented. This is the eight case of this type of polyp in the colon and, to the best of our knowledge, the first one involving the sigmoid and producing intussusception. Symptomatology of the inflamed fibroid polyp in this part of the gut closely simulates gastrointestinal malignancy. The treatment is surgical excision of the polyp, or colonoscopic resection when it is possible. Intraoperative colonoscopy helps the surgeon to localize the lesion and to role out the existence of other lesions.

  13. Focal inflammatory diseases of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oto, Aytekin; Akhan, Okan; Oezmen, Mustafa

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory lesions constitute an important subgroup of focal liver lesions. They may mimic primary or metastatic neoplastic lesions and their differentiation from neoplasia is clinically very important since management of the patient significantly changes. Radiologists should have an important role in both the diagnosis and therapy of these lesions by performing percutaneous aspirations and drainages. In this review we discussed the radiological findings of pyogenic abscesses, amebic abscesses, candidiasis, tuberculosis, hydatic cysts, fascioliasis, ascariasis, schistosomiasis, and sarcoidosis with a special emphasis on US, CT and MR characteristics

  14. Focal inflammatory diseases of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oto, Aytekin; Akhan, Okan; Oezmen, Mustafa

    1999-10-01

    Inflammatory lesions constitute an important subgroup of focal liver lesions. They may mimic primary or metastatic neoplastic lesions and their differentiation from neoplasia is clinically very important since management of the patient significantly changes. Radiologists should have an important role in both the diagnosis and therapy of these lesions by performing percutaneous aspirations and drainages. In this review we discussed the radiological findings of pyogenic abscesses, amebic abscesses, candidiasis, tuberculosis, hydatic cysts, fascioliasis, ascariasis, schistosomiasis, and sarcoidosis with a special emphasis on US, CT and MR characteristics.

  15. Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasreen Mahomed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS refers to a collection of inflammatorydisorders, predominantly related to infectious processes that manifest after the initiation ofantiretroviral therapy (ART and can be classified as unmasking or paradoxical. The prevalenceof IRIS in children in sub-Saharan Africa is low. Approximately half of all cases are associatedwith Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It may be difficult to distinguish IRIS from tuberculosis andother opportunistic infections radiologically; therefore, radiological findings must be interpretedwith clinical and laboratory findings. In this review article, we describe the clinical andradiological manifestations of IRIS in children and provide illustrative radiological examples.

  16. Novel anti-inflammatory agents in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loukides, Stelios; Bartziokas, Konstantinos; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays a central role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD related inflammation is less responsive to inhaled steroids compared to asthma. There are three major novel anti-inflammatory approaches to the management of COPD. The first approach is phosphodiesterase...... on these strategies exist at the moment. A third potential approach involves novel agents whose mechanism of action is closely related to COPD mechanisms and pathophysiology. Such novel treatments are of great interest since they may treat both COPD and co-morbidities. Several novel agents are currently under...

  17. Intermittent fasting attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation and memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Andrea R; Yshii, Lidia M; Viel, Tania A; Buck, Hudson S; Mattson, Mark P; Scavone, Cristoforo; Kawamoto, Elisa M

    2014-05-06

    Systemic bacterial infections often result in enduring cognitive impairment and are a risk factor for dementia. There are currently no effective treatments for infection-induced cognitive impairment. Previous studies have shown that intermittent fasting (IF) can increase the resistance of neurons to injury and disease by stimulating adaptive cellular stress responses. However, the impact of IF on the cognitive sequelae of systemic and brain inflammation is unknown. Rats on IF for 30 days received 1 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline intravenously. Half of the rats were subjected to behavioral tests and the other half were euthanized two hours after LPS administration and the hippocampus was dissected and frozen for analyses. Here, we report that IF ameliorates cognitive deficits in a rat model of sepsis by a mechanism involving NF-κB activation, suppression of the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and enhancement of neurotrophic support. Treatment of rats with LPS resulted in deficits in cognitive performance in the Barnes maze and inhibitory avoidance tests, without changing locomotor activity, that were ameliorated in rats that had been maintained on the IF diet. IF also resulted in reduced levels of mRNAs encoding the LPS receptor TLR4 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the hippocampus. Moreover, IF prevented LPS-induced elevation of IL-1α, IL-1β and TNF-α levels, and prevented the LPS-induced reduction of BDNF levels in the hippocampus. IF also significantly attenuated LPS-induced elevations of serum IL-1β, IFN-γ, RANTES, TNF-α and IL-6 levels. Taken together, our results suggest that IF induces adaptive responses in the brain and periphery that can suppress inflammation and preserve cognitive function in an animal model of systemic bacterial infection.

  18. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asdonk, Tobias, E-mail: tobias.asdonk@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Motz, Inga; Werner, Nikos [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Coch, Christoph; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  19. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asdonk, Tobias; Motz, Inga; Werner, Nikos; Coch, Christoph; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. ► RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. ► EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 μg of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5′end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  20. The role of trophic factors and inflammatory processes in physical activity-induced neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Pałasz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Glial cells and neurotrophins play an important role in maintaining homeostasis of the CNS. Disturbances of their function can lead to a number of nervous system diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD. Current clinical studies provide evidence that moderate physical activity adapted to the health status of PD patients can support pharmacological treatment, slow down the onset of motor impairments, and extend the patients period of independence. Physical activity, by stimulating the production and release of endogenous trophic factors, prevents the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons via inhibition of inflammatory processes and the reduction of oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to present the current state of knowledge for the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties of physical activity as a supportive therapy in Parkinson’s disease.

  1. Ascaris Suum Infection Downregulates Inflammatory Pathways in the Pig Intestine In Vivo and in Human Dendritic Cells In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midttun, Helene L. E.; Acevedo, Nathalie; Skallerup, Per

    2018-01-01

    similar transcriptional pathways in human dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. DCs exposed to ABF secreted minimal amounts of cytokines and had impaired production of cyclooxygengase-2, altered glucose metabolism, and reduced capacity to induce interferon-gamma production in T cells. Our in vivo and in vitro......Ascaris suum is a helminth parasite of pigs closely related to its human counterpart, A. lumbricoides, which infects almost 1 billion people. Ascaris is thought to modulate host immune and inflammatory responses, which may drive immune hyporesponsiveness during chronic infections. Using...... transcriptomic analysis, we show here that pigs with a chronic A. suum infection have a substantial suppression of inflammatory pathways in the intestinal mucosa, with a broad downregulation of genes encoding cytokines and antigen-processing and costimulatory molecules. A. suum body fluid (ABF) suppressed...

  2. 20 CFR 404.1511 - Definition of a disabling impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of a disabling impairment. 404... Definition of a disabling impairment. (a) Disabled workers, persons disabled since childhood and, for months... disabling impairment is an impairment (or combination of impairments) which, of itself, is so severe that it...

  3. Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutashov V.A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to identify the degree of cognitive impairment (CN and to optimize the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Material and methods. A total of 695 patients (278 men and 417 women were ranged from 18 to 63 years. The mean age was 30.2±0.7 years: women (417 28.5±0.5 years, while for men (278 31.8±0.7 years. Relaps-ing-remitting type (RT of MS was established in 520 patients (74.8%, secondary progressive type (VPT MS in 132 patients (18.9% and primary progressive type (PPT MS in 10 patients (1.5%. Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS was detected in 33 patients (4.8%. The diagnosis of MS 662 patients according to the criteria McDonald etal. (2005. Score of neurologic deficit was carried out on an extended scale of disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale — EDSS. CN were evaluated by conventional tests. To estimate the orientation in time, assessment of short-term and long-term memory, attention and concentration, as well as executive functions, memory, language, evaluation of optical-spatial activities, conceptual thinking, the account used by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale (MoCA. For the screening of dementia with a primary lesion of the frontal lobes and subcortical cerebral structures used battery frontal test to assess frontal dysfunction. Results. The ratio of male (265 and female (397 was 1:1.5. The severity of the condition patients EDSS scale ranged from 1.5 to 8.0 points, and the average score was 3.5±1.2. In the group of patients with RT RS average score EDSS was more than a half (2.5±1.1, than in the group of patients with MS VAC (5.5±1.2 and POS PC (6.5±1.2. In the study of history, it was found that the development of the RS (662 patients was preceded by the following conditions: a viral infection in 277 patients (41.84%; fatigue in 147 patients (22.21%; transferred psycho-emotional load from 218 (32.93%; after pregnancy and childbirth in 20 patients (3.02%. Conclusion. Among the patients with MS

  4. Acute lesions that impair affective empathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Kenichi; Hsu, John; Lindquist, Martin; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Jarso, Samson; Crainiceanu, Ciprian; Mori, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    Functional imaging studies of healthy participants and previous lesion studies have provided evidence that empathy involves dissociable cognitive functions that rely on at least partially distinct neural networks that can be individually impaired by brain damage. These studies converge in support of the proposal that affective empathy—making inferences about how another person feels—engages at least the following areas: prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal gyrus, anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, temporal pole, amygdala and temporoparietal junction. We hypothesized that right-sided lesions to any one of these structures, except temporoparietal junction, would cause impaired affective empathy (whereas bilateral damage to temporoparietal junction would be required to disrupt empathy). We studied 27 patients with acute right hemisphere ischaemic stroke and 24 neurologically intact inpatients on a test of affective empathy. Acute impairment of affective empathy was associated with infarcts in the hypothesized network, particularly temporal pole and anterior insula. All patients with impaired affective empathy were also impaired in comprehension of affective prosody, but many patients with impairments in prosodic comprehension had spared affective empathy. Patients with impaired affective empathy were older, but showed no difference in performance on tests of hemispatial neglect, volume of infarct or sex distribution compared with patients with intact affective empathy. PMID:23824490

  5. Intracranial stenosis in cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Saima; Xu, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Vrooman, Henri; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial stenosis is a common vascular lesion observed in Asian and other non-Caucasian stroke populations. However, its role in cognitive impairment and dementia has been under-studied. We, therefore, examined the association of intracranial stenosis with cognitive impairment, dementia and their subtypes in a memory clinic case-control study, where all subjects underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment and 3 T neuroimaging including three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. Intracranial stenosis was defined as ≥50% narrowing in any of the intracranial arteries. A total of 424 subjects were recruited of whom 97 were classified as no cognitive impairment, 107 as cognitive impairment no dementia, 70 vascular cognitive impairment no dementia, 121 Alzheimer's Disease, and 30 vascular dementia. Intracranial stenosis was associated with dementia (age/gender/education - adjusted odds ratios (OR): 4.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93-11.60) and vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (OR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.59-9.93). These associations were independent of cardiovascular risk factors and MRI markers. However, the association with Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia became attenuated in the presence of white matter hyperintensities. Intracranial stenosis is associated with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia independent of MRI markers. In Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia, this association is mediated by cerebrovascular disease. Future studies focusing on perfusion and functional markers are needed to determine the pathophysiological mechanism(s) linking intracranial stenosis and cognition so as to identify treatment strategies.

  6. Purinergic Signalling in Inflammatory Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishkantha eArulkumaran

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular purines have a role in renal physiology and adaption to inflammation. However, inflammatory renal disease may be mediated by extracellular purines, resulting in renal injury. The role of purinergic signalling is dependent on the concentrations of extracellular purines. Low basal levels of purines are important in normal homeostasis and growth. Concentrations of extracellular purines are significantly elevated during inflammation and mediate either an adaptive role or propagate local inflammation. Adenosine signalling mediates alterations in regional renal blood flow by regulation of the renal microcirculation, tubulo-glomerular feedback, and tubular transport of sodium and water. Increased extracellular ATP and renal P2 receptor-mediated inflammation are associated with various renal diseases, including hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and glomerulonephritis. Experimental data suggests P2 receptor deficiency or receptor antagonism is associated with amelioration of antibody-mediated nephritis, suggesting a pathogenic (rather than adaptive role of purinergic signalling. We discuss the role of extracellular nucleotides in adaptation to ischaemic renal injury and in the pathogenesis of inflammatory renal disease.

  7. Medication adherence in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webber Chan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory condition with intestinal and extraintestinal manifestations. Medications are the cornerstone of treatment of IBD. However, patients often adhere to medication poorly. Adherence to medications is defined as the process by which patients take their medications as prescribed. Treatment non-adherence is a common problem among chronic diseases, averaging 50% in developed countries and is even poorer in developing countries. In this review, we will examine the adherence data in IBD which vary greatly depending on the study population, route of administration, and methods of adherence measurement used. We will also discuss the adverse clinical outcomes related to non-adherence to medical treatment including increased disease activity, flares, loss of response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy, and so forth. There are many methods to measure medication adherence namely direct and indirect methods, each with their advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we will explore different intervention strategies to improve adherence to medications.

  8. Inflammatory/granulomatous diseases of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivancevic, V.; Munz, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The term 'inflammatory' and 'granulomatous' lung disease represents a pool of many etiologically different diseases, the pathologic mechanisms of which are characterized by inflammatory reactions of varying intensity and cell composition. In sarcoidosis and other granulomatous diseases as well as in lung fibroses, gallium scintigraphy allows reliable non-invasive estimation of alveolitis activity and is suitable for therapy monitoring. Granulomatous diseases seem to be detectable sensitively by means of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy as well. It is yet uncertain, whether positron emission tomography with F-18 fluordeoxyglucose will play a role in quantitative assessment of disease activity in sarcoidosis. Gallium scintigraphy is very useful in the early detection of pulmonary complications in AIDS patients. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, which is important in this patient population, can also be detected by both Tc-99m and In-111 labelled polyclonal human immunoglobulin, and in future possibly with a monoclonal antibody fragment against Pneumocystis carinii as well. The significance of primary bacterial pneumonias has decreased and nuclear medicine procedures for diagnosing inflammation are needed only exceptionally in this indication. (orig.) [de

  9. Immunological pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hoon Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic inflammatory state of the gastrointestinal tract and can be classified into 2 main clinical phenomena: Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC. The pathogenesis of IBD, including CD and UC, involves the presence of pathogenic factors such as abnormal gut microbiota, immune response dysregulation, environmental changes, and gene variants. Although many investigations have tried to identify novel pathogenic factors associated with IBD that are related to environmental, genetic, microbial, and immune response factors, a full understanding of IBD pathogenesis is unclear. Thus, IBD treatment is far from optimal, and patient outcomes can be unsatisfactory. As result of massive studying on IBD, T helper 17 (Th17 cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are investigated on their effects on IBD. A recent study of the plasticity of Th17 cells focused primarily on colitis. ILCs also emerging as novel cell family, which play a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. IBD immunopathogenesis is key to understanding the causes of IBD and can lead to the development of IBD therapies. The aim of this review is to explain the pathogenesis of IBD, with a focus on immunological factors and therapies.

  10. [Biologic therapy in idiopathic inflammatory myopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Ramos Casals, Manel; Grau Junyent, Josep M

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this article is to study the evidence-based knowledge related to the use of biological therapies in patients diagnosed with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (dermatomyositis, polymyositis and inclusion body myositis). In this review the leading published studies related to the use of biological therapy in patients with myositis are analysed; mainly those with high methodological standards, that means randomized and controlled studies. Methodological drawbacks due to the rarity and heterogeneity of these complex diseases are also addressed. Up to now is not possible to ascertain the biologics as a recommended therapy in patients with myositis, at least based in the current evidence-based knowledge, although it can not be neglected as a therapeutic option in some clinical situations, taking into account the scarce of effective treatments in those patients, especially in refractory myositis. Future studies probably will help to better define the role of biological therapies in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Ocepek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries and Slovenia, and the incidence is still rising. Groups of people with higher risk for colorectal cancer are well defined. Among them are patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk is highest in patients in whom whole large bowel is affected by inflammation, it rises after 8 to 10 years and increases with the duration of the disease. Precancerous lesion is a displastic, chronically inflammed mucosa and not an adenoma as in cases of sporadic colorectal carcinoma.Conclusions: Many studies suggest that the influence of genetic factors differs between sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease related colorectal cancer. Symptomatic patients at the time of diagnosis have a much worse prognosis. The goal of prevention programes is therefore discovering early precancerous lesions. Established screening protocols are based on relatively frequent colonoscopies which are inconvinient for the patient as well as the endoscopist. Use of specific genetic markers, mutations of candidate genes, as a screening method and a prognostic predictor could greatly lighten therapeutic decisions.

  12. Osteomyelitis and Osteonecrosis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis and osteonecrosis are skeletal disorders seen in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Osteomyelitis usually occurs in the pelvic bones, especially in complicated Crohn's disease, presumably by direct extension from a pelvic inflammatory mass, abscess or fistulous tract. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis may be difficult and can lead to spinal extension of the septic process with a resultant neurological deficit, including paraplegia. Osteonecrosis or avascular necrosis has been reported in patients with either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, often, but not exclusively, during or following steroid treatment. The disease is often multifocal, but its natural history is unknown, especially if diagnosed early with modern imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance. In IBD patients, the relationship between osteonecrosis and steroid use is unknown. An adverse steroid effect on bones, especially the femoral heads, may develop in some patients with IBD but, to date, this hypothesis remains unproven. Critical evaluation of published data reveals no consistent association between osteonecrosis and steroid treatment in IBD patients.

  13. Enteral nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassull, M A; Abad, A; Cabré, E; González-Huix, F; Giné, J J; Dolz, C

    1986-01-01

    To assess the effect of the addition of enteral tube feeding with polymeric diets to the standard treatment of acute attacks of inflammatory bowel disease a total of 43 patients admitted to hospital (23 with Crohn's disease and 20 with ulcerative colitis) were studied retrospectively. Total enteral nutrition was given to 26 as the sole nutritional supply and to 17 in conjunction with a normal ward diet, when appropriate, according to the severity of attack (control group). Nutritional state was assessed and classified in all patients at admission and at the end of the study, by measuring the triceps skinfold thickness, mid arm muscle circumference, and serum albumin concentration as representative of body fat, muscle protein, and visceral protein, respectively. At admission the three nutritional variables were not statistically different between the groups. There was a significantly positive effect on mid arm muscle circumference in patients on total enteral nutrition compared with the control group, but there was no effect on either triceps skinfold thickness or serum albumin concentration. The percentage of subjects requiring intravenous albumin infusion, however, was significantly less in the group fed enterally than in the control group. In addition, fewer patients in the group fed enterally required surgical treatment compared with the control group, despite the fact that one of the criteria for starting enteral nutritional support was the expectancy that surgery would be needed. Total enteral nutrition was well tolerated and no major side effects arose during its use in patients with acute exacerbations of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:3098646

  14. Cognitive impairments, HCI and daily living

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keates, Simeon; Kozloski, James; Varker, Philip

    2009-01-01

    As computer systems become increasingly more pervasive in everyday life, it is simultaneously becoming ever more important that the concept of universal access is accepted as a design mantra. While many physical impairments and their implications for human-computer interaction are well understood......, cognitive impairments have received comparatively little attention. One of the reasons for this is the general lack of sufficiently detailed cognitive models. This paper examines how cognitive impairments can affect human-computer interaction in everyday life and the issues involved in trying to make...

  15. Mild Cognitive Impairment Status and Mobility Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette; Holt, Nicole E; Grande, Laura

    2014-01-01

    : An analysis was conducted on baseline data from the Boston Rehabilitative Impairment Study in the Elderly study, a cohort study of 430 primary care patients aged 65 or older. Neuropsychological tests identified participants with MCI and further subclassified those with impairment in memory domains (a......BACKGROUND: The prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and mobility limitations is high among older adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between MCI status and both performance-based and self-report measures of mobility in community-dwelling older adults. METHODS...

  16. Nature is the best source of anti-inflammatory drugs: indexing natural products for their anti-inflammatory bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswad, Miran; Rayan, Mahmoud; Abu-Lafi, Saleh; Falah, Mizied; Raiyn, Jamal; Abdallah, Ziyad; Rayan, Anwar

    2018-01-01

    The aim was to index natural products for less expensive preventive or curative anti-inflammatory therapeutic drugs. A set of 441 anti-inflammatory drugs representing the active domain and 2892 natural products representing the inactive domain was used to construct a predictive model for bioactivity-indexing purposes. The model for indexing the natural products for potential anti-inflammatory activity was constructed using the iterative stochastic elimination algorithm (ISE). ISE is capable of differentiating between active and inactive anti-inflammatory molecules. By applying the prediction model to a mix set of (active/inactive) substances, we managed to capture 38% of the anti-inflammatory drugs in the top 1% of the screened set of chemicals, yielding enrichment factor of 38. Ten natural products that scored highly as potential anti-inflammatory drug candidates are disclosed. Searching the PubMed revealed that only three molecules (Moupinamide, Capsaicin, and Hypaphorine) out of the ten were tested and reported as anti-inflammatory. The other seven phytochemicals await evaluation for their anti-inflammatory activity in wet lab. The proposed anti-inflammatory model can be utilized for the virtual screening of large chemical databases and for indexing natural products for potential anti-inflammatory activity.

  17. Cytomegalovirus infection in inflammatory bowel disease is not associated with worsening of intestinal inflammatory activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Medeiros do Carmo

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus is highly prevalent virus and usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. The pathophysiology and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease often induce a state of immunosuppression. Because this, there are still doubts and controversies about the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease and cytomegalovirus.Evaluate the frequency of cytomegalovirus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and identify correlations.Patients with inflammatory bowel disease underwent an interview, review of records and collection of blood and fecal samples. The search for cytomegalovirus was performed by IgG and IgM blood serology, by real-time PCR in the blood and by qualitative PCR in feces. Results were correlated with red blood cell levels, C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and fecal calprotectin levels for each patient.Among the 400 eligible patients, 249 had Crohn's disease, and 151 had ulcerative colitis. In the group of Crohn's disease, 67 of the patients had moderate or severe disease, but 126 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. In patients with ulcerative colitis, only 21 patients had moderate disease, but 76 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. A large majority of patients had positive CMV IgG. Overall, 10 patients had positive CMV IgM, and 9 patients had a positive qualitative detection of CMV DNA by PCR in the feces. All 400 patients returned negative results after the quantitative detection of CMV DNA in blood by real-time PCR. Analyzing the 19 patients with active infections, we only found that such an association occurred with the use of combined therapy (anti-TNF-alpha + azathioprine.The findings show that latent cytomegalovirus infections are frequent and active cytomegalovirus infection is rare. We did not find any association between an active infection of CMV and inflammatory bowel

  18. Cortical Astrocytes Acutely Exposed to the Monomethylarsonous Acid (MMAIII) Show Increased Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Gene Expression that is Consistent with APP and BACE-1: Over-expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero-Lourdes, C; Uresti-Rivera, E E; Oliva-González, C; Torres-Ramos, M A; Aguirre-Bañuelos, P; Gandolfi, A J

    2016-10-01

    Long-term exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water has been associated with cognitive impairment in children and adults; however, the related pathogenic mechanisms have not been completely described. Increased or chronic inflammation in the brain is linked to impaired cognition and neurodegeneration; iAs induces strong inflammatory responses in several cells, but this effect has been poorly evaluated in central nervous system (CNS) cells. Because astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the CNS and play a critical role in brain homeostasis, including regulation of the inflammatory response, any functional impairment in them can be deleterious for the brain. We propose that iAs could induce cognitive impairment through inflammatory response activation in astrocytes. In the present work, rat cortical astrocytes were acutely exposed in vitro to the monomethylated metabolite of iAs (MMA III ), which accumulates in glial cells without compromising cell viability. MMA III LD 50 in astrocytes was 10.52 μM, however, exposure to sub-toxic MMA III concentrations (50-1000 nM) significantly increased IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, COX-2, and MIF-1 gene expression. These effects were consistent with amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-secretase (BACE-1) increased gene expression, mainly for those MMA III concentrations that also induced TNF-α over-expression. Other effects of MMA III on cortical astrocytes included increased proliferative and metabolic activity. All tested MMA III concentrations led to an inhibition of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Results suggest that MMA III induces important metabolic and functional changes in astrocytes that may affect brain homeostasis and that inflammation may play a major role in cognitive impairment-related pathogenicity in As-exposed populations.

  19. Find Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Blind or Visually Impaired Find Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired Category All ... Territory Other (International) Organization Name Find Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired Browse All ...

  20. Medicinal herbs as possible sources of anti-inflammatory products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Corciovă

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants constitute an inexhaustible source of bioactive compounds that can be valuable for research in the chemistry field of anti-inflammatory compounds. This review describes several plants from international and national flora that have been shown to have anti-inflammatory activity in various clinical trials. The paper includes: general aspects regarding the vegetal source, compounds responsible for anti-inflammatory activity, mechanism of action and clinical trials carried out with extracts or products containing standardized extracts.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide regulated protein expression is only partly impaired in monocytes from patients with type I diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abke Sabine

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocytes play an important role in innate immunity and atherosclerosis. A disturbed secretion of cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS activated monocytes from type 1 diabetes (T1D patients has been described and may contribute to the impaired inflammatory response in these individuals. In the present study the influence of LPS on five different proteins with a function in immunity and atherosclerosis was analyzed in monocytes from controls and T1D patients. Methods Monocytes were isolated from controls and T1D patients and the LPS-stimulated increase of IL-6, CXCL8, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (CCL2, MCP-1 and superoxide dismutase (SOD 2, as well as the LPS-mediated decrease of apolipoprotein E (Apo E in primary human monocytes from controls and T1D patients was determined. Results CCL2 and IL-6 secretion in response to LPS was found significantly reduced in monocytes from T1D patients when compared to controls whereas basal CCL2 release was similar in control and T1D cells. In contrast, CXCL8 and apolipoprotein E secretion and SOD 2 expression upon LPS stimulation is similar from T1D and control monocytes. Conclusion These data indicate that LPS-mediated protein expression is only partly disturbed in monocytes from T1D patients. Reduced secretion of IL-6 and CCL2 in activated monocytes of these patients may contribute to an impaired inflammatory response and vascular disease.

  2. Early Postnatal Lipopolysaccharide Exposure Leads to Enhanced Neurogenesis and Impaired Communicative Functions in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Pang

    Full Text Available Perinatal infection is a well-identified risk factor for a number of neurodevelopmental disorders, including brain white matter injury (WMI and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD. The underlying mechanisms by which early life inflammatory events cause aberrant neural, cytoarchitectural, and network organization, remain elusive. This study is aimed to investigate how systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced neuroinflammation affects microglia phenotypes and early neural developmental events in rats. We show here that LPS exposure at early postnatal day 3 leads to a robust microglia activation which is characterized with mixed microglial proinflammatory (M1 and anti-inflammatory (M2 phenotypes. More specifically, we found that microglial M1 markers iNOS and MHC-II were induced at relatively low levels in a regionally restricted manner, whereas M2 markers CD206 and TGFβ were strongly upregulated in a sub-set of activated microglia in multiple white and gray matter structures. This unique microglial response was associated with a marked decrease in naturally occurring apoptosis, but an increase in cell proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ and the dentate gyrus (DG of hippocampus. LPS exposure also leads to a significant increase in oligodendrocyte lineage population without causing discernible hypermyelination. Moreover, LPS-exposed rats exhibited significant impairments in communicative and cognitive functions. These findings suggest a possible role of M2-like microglial activation in abnormal neural development that may underlie ASD-like behavioral impairments.

  3. [Functional impairment and radiologic fasciitis under erlotinib therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osdoit, S; Wierzbicka, E; Guillet, G

    2011-01-01

    Targeted molecules are recent and valuable weapons in the management of certain cancers. Among them, erlotinib is an inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor approved in non-small lung cancer and pancreatic cancer after failure of first line treatment. Erlotinib is responsible for many cutaneous side effects. We report a case of acute symptomatic fasciitis that has occurred during erlotinib therapy. To our knowledge it is the first case described. A 56-year-old man was treated with erlotinib for a metastatic non-small lung adenocarcinoma. Shortly after the treatment by erlotinib was introduced, he had a severe acneiform rash resistant to doxycycline treatment. After a year of treatment, he presented intense pain in the legs with functional impairment. Medical imaging confirmed fasciitis. It regressed along with the rash after using strong topical corticosteroids during ten days. Besides bacterial fasciitis, inflammatory and oedematous fasciitis have varied aetiologies. The occurrence of a documented fasciitis during anti EGFR-therapy is original and raises the question of underlying mechanism. We suggest three pathophysiological mechanisms: spreading by contiguity; paraneoplastic fasciitis, or specific lesion of the fascia due to anti-EGFR. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Cognitive impairment in patients with AIDS – prevalence and severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkins CC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystal C Watkins,1,2 Glenn J Treisman2 1The Memory Center in Neuropsychiatry, Sheppard Pratt Health System, 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy has prolonged the life expectancy of HIV patients and decreased the number of adults who progress to AIDS and HIV-associated dementia. However, neurocognitive deficits remain a pronounced consequence of HIV/AIDS. HIV-1 infection targets the central nervous system in subcortical brain areas and leads to high rates of delirium, depression, opportunistic central nervous system infections, and dementia. Long-term HIV replication in the brain occurs in astrocytes and microglia, allowing the virus to hide from antiviral medication and later compromise neuronal function. The associated cognitive disturbance is linked to both viral activity and inflammatory and other mediators from these immune cells that lead to the damage associated with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, a general term given for these disturbances. We review the severity and prevalence of the neuropsychiatric complications of HIV including delirium, neurobehavioral impairments (depression, minor cognitive-motor dysfunction, and HIV-associated dementia. Keywords: HIV, delirium, depression, HAND, dementia; HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder

  5. Impaired glucose tolerance in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradat, Pierre-Francois; Bruneteau, Gaelle; Gordon, Paul H; Dupuis, Luc; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Simon, Dominique; Salachas, Francois; Corcia, Philippe; Frochot, Vincent; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Jardel, Claude; Coussieu, Christiane; Le Forestier, Nadine; Lacomblez, Lucette; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Meininger, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Our objectives were to analyse carbohydrate metabolism in a series of ALS patients and to examine potential association with parameters of lipid metabolism and clinical features. Glucose tolerance was assessed by the oral glucose tolerance test in 21 non-diabetic ALS patients and compared with 21 age- and sex-matched normal subjects. Lipids and lactate/pyruvate ratio, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6) and adipocytokines (leptin and adiponectin) were also measured in ALS patients. Mann-Whitney U-tests analysed continuous data and Fisher's exact tests assessed categorical data. Blood glucose determined 120 min after the glucose bolus was significantly higher in patients with ALS (7.41 mmol/l+/-1.68) compared to controls (6.05+/-1.44, p=0.006). ALS patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) according to WHO criteria (n=7, 33%) were more likely to have elevated free fatty acids (FFA) levels compared to patients with normal glucose tolerance (0.77 nmol/l+/-0.30 vs. 0.57+/-0.19, p=0.04). IGT was not associated with disease duration or severity. In conclusion, patients with ALS show abnormal glucose tolerance that could be associated with increased FFA levels, a key determinant of insulin resistance. The origin of glucose homeostasis abnormalities in ALS may be multifactorial and deserves further investigation.

  6. IL-36 cytokines in autoimmunity and inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liping; Wang, Xiaohui; Hong, Xiaoping; Lu, Liwei; Liu, Dongzhou

    2018-01-05

    The inteleukin-36 (IL-36) cytokines include IL-36α, IL-36β, IL-36γ and IL-36Ra, which belong to the IL-1 family and exert pro-inflammatory effects on various target cells such as keratinocytes, synoviocytes, dendritic cells and T cells. Emerging evidence has suggested a role of IL-36 in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases. Here, we provide a brief review on the activation of IL-36 family cytokines and their involvement in autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases, which will provide further insights in understanding the functions of IL-36 family cytokines in the pathophysiology of autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases.

  7. Inflammatory cytokines and immune system modulation by aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Immune function, inflammatory cytokines, aerobic exercise, resistance exercise, aging. ... Physical exercise is effective in reducing (or ameliorate) the ..... moderate resistance training program increases muscle .... Nutrition Metabo-.

  8. Myositis non-inflammatory mechanisms: An up-dated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manole, Emilia; Bastian, Alexandra E; Butoianu, Niculina; Goebel, Hans H

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) represent a heterogeneous group of rare muscular diseases, with no clearly known causes. IIM frequently have an incomplete response to treatment due to the difficulty in distinguishing between IIM forms, and due to neglect their non-inflammatory causes. Important data concerning non-immune mechanisms in IIM pathology have been recently accumulated. There is a correlation between inflammatory and non-inflammatory mechanisms, but their involvement in IIM pathogenesis is still unknown. Here we review some of the most important data regarding the non-immune IIM pathology, highlighting possible future therapeutic targets: endoplasmic reticulum stress, ATP metabolism, ROS generation, autophagy, and microRNAs disturbances.

  9. Role of inflammasomes in inflammatory autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Young-Su

    2018-01-01

    Inflammasomes are intracellular multiprotein complexes that coordinate anti-pathogenic host defense during inflammatory responses in myeloid cells, especially macrophages. Inflammasome activation leads to activation of caspase-1, resulting in the induction of pyroptosis and the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Although the inflammatory response is an innate host defense mechanism, chronic inflammation is the main cause of rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Since rheumatic diseases are inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, it is reasonable to hypothesize that inflammasomes activated during the inflammatory response play a pivotal role in development and progression of these diseases. Indeed, previous studies have provided important observations that inflammasomes are actively involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory/autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on several types of inflammasomes during macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and discuss recent research regarding the role of inflammasomes in the pathogenesis of inflammatory/autoimmune rheumatic diseases. This avenue of research could provide new insights for the development of promising therapeutics to treat inflammatory/autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

  10. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin, E-mail: telgalal@yahoo.co.uk [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Papiewski, Andrzej [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Poland); Szubert, Wojciech [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szopinski, Piotr [Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Clinic of Vascular Surgery (Poland)

    2013-06-15

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  11. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin; Papiewski, Andrzej; Szubert, Wojciech; Szopiński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  12. Some Sleep Drugs Can Impair Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Some Sleep Drugs Can Impair Driving Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. Most Widely Used Sleep Drug Zolpidem—which has been on the market ...

  13. State Alcohol-Impaired-Driving Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2012 Data DOT HS 812 017 May 2014 State Alcohol-Impaired-Driving Estimates This fact sheet contains ... alcohol involvement in fatal crashes for the United States and individually for the 50 States, the District ...

  14. Streptozotocin diabetes and insulin resistance impairment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... insulin resistance impairment of spermatogenesis in adult rat testis: Central Vs local ... Summary: Mammalian reproduction is dynamically regulated by the pituitary ... Group 3 > Streptozotocin-insulin treated group; received a single dose IP ...

  15. Impaired decision making among morbidly obese adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brogan, Amy

    2011-02-01

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) measures affective decision making and has revealed decision making impairments across a wide range of eating disorders. This study aimed to investigate affective decision making in severely obese individuals.

  16. Tone language fluency impairs pitch discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle ePeretz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Here we present evidence that native speakers of a tone language, in which pitch contributes to word meaning, are impaired in the discrimination of falling pitches in tone sequences, as compared to speakers of a non-tone language. Both groups were presented with monotonic and isochronous sequences of five tones (i.e., constant pitch and intertone interval. They were required to detect when the fourth tone was displaced in pitch or time. While speakers of a tone language performed more poorly in the detection of downward pitch changes, they did not differ from non-tone language speakers in their perception of upward pitch changes or in their perception of subtle time changes. Moreover, this impairment cannot be attributed to low musical aptitude since the impairment remains unchanged when individual differences in musical pitch-based processing is taken into account. Thus, the impairment appears highly specific and may reflect the influence of statistical regularities of tone languages.

  17. Osteogenesis imperfecta in childhood: impairment and disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbert, R. H.; van der Graaf, Y.; van Empelen, R.; Beemer, F. A.; Helders, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    To determine clinical characteristics in children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) regarding impairment (range of joint motion and muscle strength) and disability (functional skills) in relation to the different types of the disease, and to study the correlation between characteristics of

  18. Hearing impairment in genotyped Wolfram syndrome patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, R.F.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Bruno, R.; Eller, P.; Barrett, T.G.; Vialettes, B.; Paquis-Fluklinger, V.; Lombardo, F.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Wolfram syndrome is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by the features "DIDMOAD" (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). We sought to study the audiometric data of genotyped Wolfram syndrome patients with sensorineural hearing impairment.

  19. Steroids and statins: an old and a new anti-inflammatory strategy compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Petar M; Maravic-Stojkovic, Vera R; Peric, Miodrag S; Jovic, Miomir Dj; Cirkovic, Milan V; Gradinac, Sinisa Dj; Djukanovic, Bosko P; Milojevic, Predrag S

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the anti-inflammatory effects of methylprednisolone (MP) and atorvastatin and analysed their influences on clinical variables in patients undergoing coronary revascularization. Ninety patients with compromised left ventricular ejection fraction (≤30%) undergoing elective coronary surgery were equally randomized to one of three groups: statin group, treatment with atorvastatin (20 mg/day) 3 weeks before surgery; methylprednisolone group, a single shot of methylpredniosolone (10mg/kg); and control group. Postoperative IL-6 was higher in the control group when compared to the methylprednisolone and statin groups (patrial fibrilation rate and reduced ICU stay (patrial fibrilation rate and reduced ICU stay in patients with significantly impaired cardiac function undergoing coronary revascularization. Treatment with methylprednisolone was associated with less inotropic support requirements and reduced mechanical ventilation time.

  20. New insights into the benefits of exercise for muscle health in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemo Munters, Li; Alexanderson, Helene; Crofford, Leslie J; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2014-07-01

    With recommended treatment, a majority with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) develop muscle impairment and poor health. Beneficial effects of exercise have been reported on muscle performance, aerobic capacity and health in chronic polymyositis and dermatomyositis and to some extent in active disease and inclusion body myositis (IBM). Importantly, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) indicate that improved health and decreased clinical disease activity could be mediated through increased aerobic capacity. Recently, reports seeking mechanisms underlying effects of exercise in skeletal muscle indicate increased aerobic capacity (i.e. increased mitochondrial capacity and capillary density, reduced lactate levels), activation of genes in aerobic phenotype and muscle growth programs, and down regulation in genes related to inflammation. Altogether, exercise contributes to both systemic and within-muscle adaptations demonstrating that exercise is fundamental to improve muscle performance and health in IIM. There is a need for RCTs to study effects of exercise in active disease and IBM.

  1. Communication difficulties in teenagers with health impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samokhvalova, Anna G.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary psychological and pedagogical studies pay special attention to the socialization of physically impaired children, inclusive education and methods of providing such children with a safe environment to assist in their development. However, difficulties in interpersonal communication experienced by children with health impairments have remained beyond the research scope. The authors conducted a comparative analysis of communication difficulties in typically developed teenagers aged 12-13 years (n = 100 and the problems faced by their peers with visual (n = 30, auditory (n = 30, speech (n = 25 and motor (n = 15 impairments. Actual communication difficulties in teenagers were studied in two ways: the subjective component of impaired communication was registered through a content analysis of a sentence completion test and the objective manifestations of impaired communication were identified through expert evaluation of children’s communicative behavior (educators and psychologists who had been in close contact with the teenagers acted as experts. First, the authors identified typical standard communication problems that were characteristic of teenagers aged 12-13 years, that is, problems with aggression, tolerance, the ability to admit wrongdoing and make concessions, empathy, self-control, self-analysis and self-expression in communication. Second, typical communication difficulties characteristic of physically impaired children were revealed: failure to understand meaning; feelings of awkwardness and shame of oneself; expectations of a negative attitude toward oneself; gelotophobia; and manifestations of despotism, petulance and egotism as defensive reactions in situations of impaired communication. Third, the authors described specific communication difficulties in teenagers with auditory, visual, speech and motor impairments.

  2. Cargo distributions differentiate pathological axonal transport impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cassie S; Lee, Robert H

    2012-05-07

    Axonal transport is an essential process in neurons, analogous to shipping goods, by which energetic and cellular building supplies are carried downstream (anterogradely) and wastes are carried upstream (retrogradely) by molecular motors, which act as cargo porters. Impairments in axonal transport have been linked to devastating and often lethal neurodegenerative diseases, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Huntington's, and Alzheimer's. Axonal transport impairment types include a decrease in available motors for cargo transport (motor depletion), the presence of defective or non-functional motors (motor dilution), and the presence of increased or larger cargos (protein aggregation). An impediment to potential treatment identification has been the inability to determine what type(s) of axonal transport impairment candidates that could be present in a given disease. In this study, we utilize a computational model and common axonal transport experimental metrics to reveal the axonal transport impairment general characteristics or "signatures" that result from three general defect types of motor depletion, motor dilution, and protein aggregation. Our results not only provide a means to discern these general impairments types, they also reveal key dynamic and emergent features of axonal transport, which potentially underlie multiple impairment types. The identified characteristics, as well as the analytical method, can be used to help elucidate the axonal transport impairments observed in experimental and clinical data. For example, using the model-predicted defect signatures, we identify the defect candidates, which are most likely to be responsible for the axonal transport impairments in the G93A SOD1 mouse model of ALS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Adaptive behavior of children with visual impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Anđelković Marija

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive behavior includes a wide range of skills necessary for independent, safe and adequate performance of everyday activities. Practical, social and conceptual skills make the concept of adaptive behavior. The aim of this paper is to provide an insight into the existing studies of adaptive behavior in persons with visual impairment. The paper mainly focuses on the research on adaptive behavior in children with visual impairment. The results show that the acquisition of adaptive skills is ...

  4. Reading comprehension of pupils with hearing impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Pinkasová, Lucie

    2010-01-01

    Presented diploma thesis is focused on reading problems of people with hearing impairment. The theoretical part deals a hearing impairment, process of acquisition of reading skills of healthy people and deaf people as well. The practical part efforts to clarify preparations, process and results of the research. I am presenting my own reading comprehension test, which was compiled on purpose due to the research. The goal of my diploma thesis is to determine when the level of reading acquiremen...

  5. Vestibular Function Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Fujimiya, Suguru; Koganezawa, Tadachika; Kadono, Kotarou; Shimizu, Kotone; Fujizuka, Natsu; Takiguchi, Shino; Ueno, Tomoyuki; Monzen, Tatsuya; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Falls and fractures due to impaired balance in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have an adverse effect on the clinical course of the disease. To evaluate balance impairment in AD from the viewpoint of vestibular functional impairment. The subjects were 12 patients with AD, 12 dementia-free elderly adults, and 12 younger adults. Vestibular function was assessed using a stepping test, caloric nystagmus, and a visual suppression (VS) test. The stepping test was abnormal in 9 of the 12 patients in the AD group. An abnormal stepping test was not associated with self-reported dizziness or tendency to fall. Significant VS abnormalities were present in the AD group. The suppression rate of VS was lower in AD patients with either a tendency to fall or constructional apraxia than in AD patients without either. The velocity of the rapid phase of caloric nystagmus before the VS test was similar in the AD group and the elderly control group. Significant abnormalities of both caloric nystagmus and VS were not present in either the elderly or the younger control groups. AD could involve impairments in the vestibular control of balance. The VS test is useful for assessing the tendency to fall in AD. Impairment of VS in AD might arise from cerebral vestibular cortex impairment rather than comorbid peripheral vestibular disorders.

  6. Measuring and managing cognitive impairment in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Sam; Winston, Alan

    2017-06-01

    : Cognitive impairment remains a frequently reported complaint in HIV-positive patients despite virologically suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Rates of cognitive impairment in antiretroviral treated HIV-positive cohorts vary and strongly depend on definitions utilized.The underlying pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and includes immune activation, neuroinflammation, antiretroviral neurotoxicity, the presence of noninfectious comorbidities such as vascular disease and depression and patient lifestyle factors such as recreational drug use.Contributing factors to cognitive impairment may change over time with ageing HIV-positive populations. Cerebrovascular disease and neurodegenerative causes of cognitive impairment may become more common with advancing age; how these factors interact with HIV-associated cognitive impairment is not yet known.Cerebrospinal fluid HIV RNA escape may occur in up to 10% of patients undergoing lumbar puncture clinically and can be associated with compartmentalized and resistant virus.Changes in antiretroviral therapy in patients with cognitive impairment should be based on current and historic resistance profiles of cerebrospinal fluid and plasma virus, or on potential antiretroviral drug neurotoxicity. Whether and how antiretroviral therapy should be changed in the absence of these factors is not known and requires study in adequately powered randomized trials in carefully selected clinical cohorts.

  7. Inflammatory muscle diseases (myositis); Entzuendliche Muskelerkrankungen (Myositiden)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M. [Praxisnetz Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin Bonn Bad Godesberg Rhein Sieg, Bonn (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    Inflammatory muscle diseases are quite heterogeneous and frequently a specific diagnosis is not easy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is best suited to demonstrate pattern and size of inflamed muscles. Sensitivity of MRI in showing inflamed muscles is nearly 100%. Specificity, however, is much lower. In cases of suspected bacterial myositis, sonography may be used to exclude abscess formation prior to MRI for more precise information about inflamed muscles. (orig.) [German] Entzuendliche Muskelerkrankungen stellen eine heterogene Gruppe dar und sind mitunter nur schwer exakt zu diagnostizieren. Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) stellt Ausdehnung und Befallsmuster am besten dar. Der Nachweis entzuendlicher Oedeme oder von Einschmelzungen gelingt mit der MRT in annaehernd 100 % der Faelle. Die Spezifitaet der Methode ist allerdings deutlich geringer. Bei Verdacht auf bakterielle Myositiden kommt erst die Sonographie zum Ausschluss von Einschmelzungen und dann die MRT zum Einsatz. (orig.)

  8. [Lymphoplasmacytic inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivielso Córtazar, E; Yáñez López, J A; Yáñez Gónzalez-Dopeso, L; Diz-Lois Palomares, M; González Conde, B; Alonso Aguirre, P

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a middle-aged woman with antecedents of cholecystectomy and several episodes of resi-dual coledocolitiasis resolved endoscopically. She attended Emergency Services due to a new clinical picture of abdo-minal pain and alteration of hepatic enzymes. Image tests showed lesions that suggested hepatic abscesses without ruling out a malign origin. Given this doubt it was decided to carry out a thick needle biopsy obtaining a diagnosis of an inflammatory pseudotumour of the liver related to IgG4-related disease. This is an infrequent entity but must be taken into consideration because - unlike malign pathology, which is the main differential diagnosis - its behaviour is benign, with a good evolution with medical treatment. That is why a suitable diagnosis is vital to avoid aggressive, diagnostic-therapeutic procedures.

  9. IMMUNOPHENOTYPIC CHARACTERISTICS OF INFLAMMATORY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Berishvili

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation enrolled 31 patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC treated at the N. N. Blokhin Cancer Research Center from 2006 to 2008. IBC is diagnosed on the basis of signs of rapid progression, such as localized or generalized breast induration, red- ness and edema. IBC accounts for less than 5% of all diagnosed breast cancers and is the most lethal form of primary breast cancer. We studied tumor markers of the immunophenotype of IBC and levels and subpopulations of immunocompetent tumor-infiltrating cells. We found that expression of HLA-DR is in negative correlation with MUC-1 expression and lymphoid cells tumor infiltration is asso- ciated with the increase in T-cell subpopulations.

  10. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Cervical Neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rungoe, Christine; Simonsen, Jacob; Riis, Lene

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We examined the risk of cervical neoplasia (dysplasia or cancer) in women with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD). We also calculated the reverse, the risk for diagnosis with cervical neoplasia before development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We...... established a national cohort of women diagnosed with UC (n = 18,691) or CD (n = 8717) between 1979 and 2011 and a control cohort of individually matched women from the general population (controls, n = 1,508,334). Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of screening activity and diagnosis of cervical neoplasia in women...... with IBD were assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) of cervical neoplasia before diagnosis of IBD were calculated by using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Women with CD underwent cervical cancer screening as often as women in the general population (IRR, 0...

  11. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishfaq Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD or Ulcerative Colitis (UC, two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis.

  12. Association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Mallbris, L; Warren, R B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis, Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory disorders with overlapping genetic architecture. However, data on the frequency and risk of CD and UC in psoriasis are scarce and poorly understood. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between CD...... and UC in patients with psoriasis. METHODS: All Danish individuals aged ≥ 18 years between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2012 were linked in nationwide registers. Psoriasis severity was defined in two models: hospital visits and medication. Incidence rates per 10 000 person-years were calculated......, and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: In the total cohort (n = 5 554 100) there were 75 209 incident cases of psoriasis, 11 309 incident cases of CD and 30 310 incident cases of UC, during follow-up. The adjusted IRRs (95% confidence intervals) of CD were 1·28 (1...

  13. Management of inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M A; Sanderson, J D

    2010-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects body image, relationships, family planning, fertility and pregnancy outcomes. However, the common misconception that IBD is a contraindication, or serious concern, in pregnancy is essentially a myth. Most patients with IBD can expect to have uneventful pregnancies. We present an overview of the management of IBD during pregnancy, including management in those planning pregnancy, the suitability of relevant medication during pregnancy and breast feeding, investigation and monitoring of IBD during pregnancy, surgical management and considerations relating to delivery. While there are some definite alterations required in the management of IBD during pregnancy, management is essentially unchanged. With close attention to aspects such as nutrition and smoking cessation, and optimal disease control in the run-up to and during pregnancy, we have an opportunity to help our patients with IBD achieve good pregnancy outcomes.

  14. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Ghasemian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil’s claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle.

  15. The gut microbiota and inflammatory noncommunicable diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Christina E; Renz, Harald; Jenmalm, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    Rapid environmental transition and modern lifestyles are likely driving changes in the biodiversity of the human gut microbiota. With clear effects on physiologic, immunologic, and metabolic processes in human health, aberrations in the gut microbiome and intestinal homeostasis have the capacity...... for neurodevelopment and mental health. These diverse multisystem influences have sparked interest in strategies that might favorably modulate the gut microbiota to reduce the risk of many NCDs. For example, specific prebiotics promote favorable intestinal colonization, and their fermented products have anti....... In human subjects it has been successfully used in cases of Clostridium difficile infection and IBD, although controlled trials are lacking for IBD. Here we discuss relationships between gut colonization and inflammatory NCDs and gut microbiota modulation strategies for their treatment and prevention....

  16. Harnessing dendritic cells in inflammatory skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chung-Ching; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-02-01

    The skin immune system harbors a complex network of dendritic cells (DCs). Recent studies highlight a diverse functional specialization of skin DC subsets. In addition to generating cellular and humoral immunity against pathogens, skin DCs are involved in tolerogenic mechanisms to ensure the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation in the skin when excessive immune responses are initiated and unrestrained. Harnessing DCs by directly targeting DC-derived molecules or selectively modulate DC subsets is a convincing strategy to tackle inflammatory skin diseases. In this review we discuss recent advances underlining the functional specialization of skin DCs and discuss the potential implication for future DC-based therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Progress of inflammatory cytokines in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glaucomais a group of diseases characterized by optic nerve damage and visual field defect, and pathological high intraocular pressure is a risk factor for glaucoma. Glaucoma is affected by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors, and inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. A great deal of studies have confirmed that high expression of connective tissue growth factor(CTGF, tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α, interleukins(ILs, nuclear factor-kappa B(NF-κBand various cytokines in the aqueous humor of patients with glaucoma, which have a close correlation with pathogenesis of glaucoma.This article reviews the progress of inflammatory cytokines and their relationship with glaucoma.

  18. Vedolizumab in Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledder, Oren; Assa, Amit; Levine, Arie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Vedolizumab, an anti-integrin antibody, has proven to be effective in adults with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], but the data in paediatrics are limited. We describe the short-term effectiveness and safety of vedolizumab in a European multi-centre paediatric IBD cohort. Method......: Retrospective review of children [aged 2-18 years] treated with vedolizumab from 19 centres affiliated with the Paediatric IBD Porto group of ESPGHAN. Primary outcome was Week 14 corticosteroid-free remission [CFR]. Results: In all, 64 children were included (32 [50%] male, mean age 14.5 ± 2.8 years...... minor drug-related adverse events. Only 3 of 16 children who underwent endoscopic evaluation had mucosal healing after treatment (19%). Conclusions: Vedolizumab was safe and effective in this cohort of paediatric refractory IBD. These data support previous findings of slow induction rate of vedolizumab...

  19. Diagnostic imaging in pediatric renal inflammatory disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Schroeder, B.A.; Starshak, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Some form of imaging procedure should be used to document the presence of infection of the upper urinary tract in troublesome cases in children. During the past several years, sonography, nuclear radiology, and computed tomography (CT) have had a significant influence on renal imaging. The purpose of this article is to reevaluate the noninvasive imaging procedures that can be used to diagnose pediatric renal inflammatory disease and to assess the relative value of each modality in the various types of renal infection. The authors will not discuss the radiologic evaluation of the child who has had a previous renal infection, in whom cortical scarring or reflux nephropathy is a possibility; these are different clinical problems and require different diagnostic evaluation

  20. [Inflammatory biomarkers in ischemic acute coronary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Rodríguez, Alberto; Abreu-González, Pedro

    2015-10-01

    Diagnosing acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the emergency department is often a complex process. Inflammatory markers might be useful for the rapid assessment of a patient's overall risk and might also help predict future episodes. The clinical use of these biomarkers could potentially lower the number of emergency visits and help in the prevention of future adverse events. The aim of this review was to evaluate the clinical utility of markers of cardiovascular inflammation in emergency patients with ACS. Based on a critical analysis of a selection of the literature, we concluded that none of the biomarkers of cardiovascular inflammation would at present be useful for stratifying risk in emergency situations, aiding prognosis, or guiding therapy for patients with ACS.