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Sample records for deep-inspiration breath hold

  1. Dosimetric Considerations in Respiratory-Gated Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold for Left Breast Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walston, Steve; Quick, Allison M; Kuhn, Karla; Rong, Yi

    2017-02-01

    To present our clinical workflow of incorporating AlignRT for left breast deep inspiration breath-hold treatments and the dosimetric considerations with the deep inspiration breath-hold protocol. Patients with stage I to III left-sided breast cancer who underwent lumpectomy or mastectomy were considered candidates for deep inspiration breath-hold technique for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free-breathing and deep inspiration breath-hold computed tomography for each patient to determine whether deep inspiration breath-hold was beneficial based on dosimetric comparison. The AlignRT system was used for patient setup and monitoring. Dosimetric measurements and their correlation with chest wall excursion and increase in left lung volume were studied for free-breathing and deep inspiration breath-hold plans. Deep inspiration breath-hold plans had significantly increased chest wall excursion when compared with free breathing. This change in geometry resulted in reduced mean and maximum heart dose but did not impact lung V 20 or mean dose. The correlation between chest wall excursion and absolute reduction in heart or lung dose was found to be nonsignificant, but correlation between left lung volume and heart dose showed a linear association. It was also identified that higher levels of chest wall excursion may paradoxically increase heart or lung dose. Reduction in heart dose can be achieved for many left-sided breast and chest wall patients using deep inspiration breath-hold. Chest wall excursion as well as left lung volume did not correlate with reduction in heart dose, and it remains to be determined what metric will provide the most optimal and reliable dosimetric advantage.

  2. How Important Is a Reproducible Breath Hold for Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Breast Radiation Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiant, David; Wentworth, Stacy; Liu, Han; Sintay, Benjamin

    2015-11-15

    Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) for left-sided breast cancer has been shown to reduce heart dose. Surface imaging helps to ensure accurate breast positioning, but it does not guarantee a reproducible breath hold (BH) at DIBH treatments. We examine the effects of variable BH positions for DIBH treatments. Twenty-five patients who underwent free breathing (FB) and DIBH scans were reviewed. Four plans were created for each patient: FB, DIBH, FB_DIBH (the DIBH plans were copied to the FB images and recalculated, and image registration was based on breast tissue), and P_DIBH (a partial BH with the heart shifted midway between the FB and DIBH positions). The FB_DIBH plans give a "worst-case" scenario for surface imaging DIBH, where the breast is aligned by surface imaging but the patient is not holding their breath. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests were used to compare the dose metrics. The DIBH plans gave lower heart dose and comparable breast coverage versus FB in all cases. The FB_DIBH plans showed no significant difference versus FB plans for breast coverage, mean heart dose, or maximum heart dose (P≥.10). The mean heart dose differed between FB_DIBH and FB by <2 Gy for all cases, and the maximum heart dose differed by <2 Gy for 21 cases. The P_DIBH plans showed significantly lower mean heart dose than FB (P<.01). The mean heart doses for the P_DIBH plans were

  3. Geometric uncertainties in voluntary deep inspiration breath hold radiotherapy for locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, G F; Dueck, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) increases lung volume and can potentially reduce treatment-related toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer. We estimated geometric uncertainties in visually guided voluntary DIBH and derived the appropriate treatment margins for different...

  4. Dosimetric comparison of moderate deep inspiration breath-hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, F; Wu, S; Zhou, J; Li, F; Sun, J; Lin, Q; Lin, H; Guan, X; He, Z

    2015-05-01

    This study determined the dosimetric comparison of moderate deep inspiration breath-hold using active breathing control and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) after breast-conserving surgery for left-sided breast cancer. Thirty-one patients were enrolled. One free breathe and two moderate deep inspiration breath-hold images were obtained. A field-in-field-IMRT free-breathing plan and two field-in-field-IMRT moderate deep inspiration breath-holding plans were compared in the dosimetry to target volume coverage of the glandular breast tissue and organs at risks for each patient. The breath-holding time under moderate deep inspiration extended significantly after breathing training (Pinspiration breath-holding in the target volume coverage. The volume of the ipsilateral lung in the free-breathing technique were significantly smaller than the moderate deep inspiration breath-holding techniques (Pinspiration breath-holding plans. There were no significant differences in target volume coverage between the three plans for the field-in-field-IMRT (all P>0.05). The dose to ipsilateral lung, coronary artery and heart in the field-in-field-IMRT were significantly lower for the free-breathing plan than for the two moderate deep inspiration breath-holding plans (all Pinspiration breath-holding plans. The whole-breast field-in-field-IMRT under moderate deep inspiration breath-hold with active breathing control after breast-conserving surgery in left-sided breast cancer can reduce the irradiation volume and dose to organs at risks. There are no significant differences between various moderate deep inspiration breath-holding states in the dosimetry of irradiation to the field-in-field-IMRT target volume coverage and organs at risks. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold with CINE imaging for breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estoesta, Reuben Patrick; Attwood, Lani; Naehrig, Diana; Claridge-Mackonis, Elizabeth; Odgers, David; Martin, Darren; Pham, Melissa; Toohey, Joanne; Carroll, Susan

    2017-10-01

    Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) techniques for breast cancer radiation therapy (RT) have reduced cardiac dose compared to Free Breathing (FB). Recently, a voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (vDIBH) technique was established using in-room lasers and skin tattoos to monitor breath-hold. An in-house quality assessment of positional reproducibility during RT delivery with vDIBH in patients with left-sided breast cancer was evaluated. The electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used in cinematographic (CINE) mode to capture a sequence of images during beam delivery. Weekly CINE images were retrospectively assessed for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients receiving RT in vDIBH, and compared with CINE images of 20 patients treated in FB. The intra-beam motion was assessed and the distance from the beam central axis (CA) to the internal chest wall (ICW) was measured on each CINE image. These were then compared to the planned distance on digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). The maximum intra-beam motion for any one patient measurement was 0.30 cm for vDIBH and 0.20 cm for FB. The mean difference between the distance from the CA to ICW on DRR and the equivalent distance on CINE imaging (as treated) was 0.28 cm (SD 0.17) for vDIBH patients and 0.25 cm (SD 0.14) for FB patients (P = 0.458). The measured values were comparable for patients undergoing RT in vDIBH, and for those in FB. This quality assessment showed that using in-room lasers and skin tattoos to independently monitor breath-hold in vDIBH as detected by 'on-treatment' CINE imaging is safe and effective. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  6. Review of deep inspiration breath-hold techniques for the treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latty, Drew; Stuart, Kirsty E; Wang, Wei; Ahern, Verity

    2015-01-01

    Radiation treatment to the left breast is associated with increased cardiac morbidity and mortality. The deep inspiration breath-hold technique (DIBH) can decrease radiation dose delivered to the heart and this may facilitate the treatment of the internal mammary chain nodes. The aim of this review is to critically analyse the literature available in relation to breath-hold methods, implementation, utilisation, patient compliance, planning methods and treatment verification of the DIBH technique. Despite variation in the literature regarding the DIBH delivery method, patient coaching, visual feedback mechanisms and treatment verification, all methods of DIBH delivery reduce radiation dose to the heart. Further research is required to determine optimum protocols for patient training and treatment verification to ensure the technique is delivered successfully

  7. Review of deep inspiration breath-hold techniques for the treatment of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latty, Drew, E-mail: drew.latty@health.nsw.gov.au [Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Stuart, Kirsty E [Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Westmead Breast Cancer Institute, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Wang, Wei [Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Westmead Breast Cancer Institute, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Nepean Cancer Care Centre, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Ahern, Verity [Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    Radiation treatment to the left breast is associated with increased cardiac morbidity and mortality. The deep inspiration breath-hold technique (DIBH) can decrease radiation dose delivered to the heart and this may facilitate the treatment of the internal mammary chain nodes. The aim of this review is to critically analyse the literature available in relation to breath-hold methods, implementation, utilisation, patient compliance, planning methods and treatment verification of the DIBH technique. Despite variation in the literature regarding the DIBH delivery method, patient coaching, visual feedback mechanisms and treatment verification, all methods of DIBH delivery reduce radiation dose to the heart. Further research is required to determine optimum protocols for patient training and treatment verification to ensure the technique is delivered successfully.

  8. Technical aspects of the deep inspiration breath-hold technique in the treatment of thoracic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mah, Dennis; Hanley, Joseph; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Yorke, Ellen; Braban, Louise; Ling, C. Clifton; Leibel, Stephen A.; Mageras, Gikas

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this paper is to describe our initial experience with the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique in conformal treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer with particular emphasis on the technical aspects required for implementation. Methods and Materials: In the DIBH technique, the patient is verbally coached through a modified slow vital capacity maneuver and brought to a reproducible deep inspiration breath-hold level. The goal is to immobilize the tumor and to expand normal lung out of the high-dose region. A physicist or therapist monitors and records patient breathing during simulation, verification, and treatment using a spirometer with a custom computer interface. Examination of internal anatomy during fluoroscopy over multiple breath holds establishes the reproducibility of the DIBH maneuver for each patient. A reference free-breathing CT scan and DIBH planning scan are obtained. To provide an estimate of tumor motion during normal tidal breathing, additional scan sets are obtained at end inspiration and end expiration. These are also used to set the spirometer action levels for treatment. Patient lung inflation is independently verified over the course of treatment by comparing the distance from the isocenter to the diaphragm measured from the DIBH digitally reconstructed radiographs to the distance measured on the portal films. Patient breathing traces obtained during treatment were examined retrospectively to assess the reproducibility of the technique. Results: Data from the first 7 patients, encompassing over 250 treatments, were analyzed. The inferred displacement of the centroid of gross tumor volume from its position in the planning scan, as calculated from the spirometer records in over 350 breath holds was 0.02 ± 0.14 cm (mean and standard deviation). These data are consistent with the displacements of the diaphragm (-0.1 ± 0.4 cm; range, from -1.2 to 1.1 cm) relative to the isocenter, as measured on the (92) portal films

  9. Reproducibility of deep inspiration breath hold for prone left-sided whole breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulliez, Thomas; Veldeman, Liv; Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Speleers, Bruno; Van Greveling, Annick; Berwouts, Dieter; Remouchamps, Vincent; Van den Broecke, Rudy; De Neve, Wilfried

    2015-01-09

    Investigating reproducibility and instability of deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) in the prone position to reduce heart dose for left-sided whole breast irradiation. Thirty patients were included and underwent 2 prone DIBH CT-scans during simulation. Overlap indices were calculated for the ipsilateral breast, heart and lungs to evaluate the anatomical reproducibility of the DIBH maneuver. The breathing motion of 21 patients treated with prone DIBH were registered using magnetic probes. These breathing curves were investigated to gain data on intra-fraction reproducibility and instability of the different DIBH cycles during treatment. Overlap index was 0.98 for the ipsilateral breast and 0.96 for heart and both lungs between the 2 prone DIBH-scans. The magnetic sensors reported population amplitudes of 2.8 ± 1.3 mm for shallow breathing and 11.7 ± 4.7 mm for DIBH, an intra-fraction standard deviation of 1.0 ± 0.4 mm for DIBH, an intra-breath hold instability of 1.0 ± 0.6 mm and a treatment time of 300 ± 69 s. Prone DIBH can be accurately clinically implemented with acceptable reproducibility and instability.

  10. Reproducibility of deep inspiration breath hold for prone left-sided whole breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulliez, Thomas; Veldeman, Liv; Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Speleers, Bruno; Van Greveling, Annick; Berwouts, Dieter; Remouchamps, Vincent; Van den Broecke, Rudy; De Neve, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Investigating reproducibility and instability of deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) in the prone position to reduce heart dose for left-sided whole breast irradiation. Thirty patients were included and underwent 2 prone DIBH CT-scans during simulation. Overlap indices were calculated for the ipsilateral breast, heart and lungs to evaluate the anatomical reproducibility of the DIBH maneuver. The breathing motion of 21 patients treated with prone DIBH were registered using magnetic probes. These breathing curves were investigated to gain data on intra-fraction reproducibility and instability of the different DIBH cycles during treatment. Overlap index was 0.98 for the ipsilateral breast and 0.96 for heart and both lungs between the 2 prone DIBH-scans. The magnetic sensors reported population amplitudes of 2.8 ± 1.3 mm for shallow breathing and 11.7 ± 4.7 mm for DIBH, an intra-fraction standard deviation of 1.0 ± 0.4 mm for DIBH, an intra-breath hold instability of 1.0 ± 0.6 mm and a treatment time of 300 ± 69 s. Prone DIBH can be accurately clinically implemented with acceptable reproducibility and instability

  11. How Important Is a Reproducible Breath Hold for Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Breast Radiation Therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiant, David; Wentworth, Stacy; Liu, Han; Sintay, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) for left-sided breast cancer has been shown to reduce heart dose. Surface imaging helps to ensure accurate breast positioning, but it does not guarantee a reproducible breath hold (BH) at DIBH treatments. We examine the effects of variable BH positions for DIBH treatments. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients who underwent free breathing (FB) and DIBH scans were reviewed. Four plans were created for each patient: FB, DIBH, FB_DIBH (the DIBH plans were copied to the FB images and recalculated, and image registration was based on breast tissue), and P_DIBH (a partial BH with the heart shifted midway between the FB and DIBH positions). The FB_DIBH plans give a “worst-case” scenario for surface imaging DIBH, where the breast is aligned by surface imaging but the patient is not holding their breath. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests were used to compare the dose metrics. Results: The DIBH plans gave lower heart dose and comparable breast coverage versus FB in all cases. The FB_DIBH plans showed no significant difference versus FB plans for breast coverage, mean heart dose, or maximum heart dose (P≥.10). The mean heart dose differed between FB_DIBH and FB by <2 Gy for all cases, and the maximum heart dose differed by <2 Gy for 21 cases. The P_DIBH plans showed significantly lower mean heart dose than FB (P<.01). The mean heart doses for the P_DIBH plans were

  12. How Important Is a Reproducible Breath Hold for Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Breast Radiation Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiant, David, E-mail: David.wiant@conehealth.com; Wentworth, Stacy; Liu, Han; Sintay, Benjamin

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) for left-sided breast cancer has been shown to reduce heart dose. Surface imaging helps to ensure accurate breast positioning, but it does not guarantee a reproducible breath hold (BH) at DIBH treatments. We examine the effects of variable BH positions for DIBH treatments. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients who underwent free breathing (FB) and DIBH scans were reviewed. Four plans were created for each patient: FB, DIBH, FB-DIBH (the DIBH plans were copied to the FB images and recalculated, and image registration was based on breast tissue), and P-DIBH (a partial BH with the heart shifted midway between the FB and DIBH positions). The FB-DIBH plans give a “worst-case” scenario for surface imaging DIBH, where the breast is aligned by surface imaging but the patient is not holding their breath. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests were used to compare the dose metrics. Results: The DIBH plans gave lower heart dose and comparable breast coverage versus FB in all cases. The FB-DIBH plans showed no significant difference versus FB plans for breast coverage, mean heart dose, or maximum heart dose (P≥.10). The mean heart dose differed between FB-DIBH and FB by <2 Gy for all cases, and the maximum heart dose differed by <2 Gy for 21 cases. The P-DIBH plans showed significantly lower mean heart dose than FB (P<.01). The mean heart doses for the P-DIBH plans were

  13. Accuracy evaluation of a 3-dimensional surface imaging system for guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Honnef, Joeri; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy (DIBH-RT) for patients with left-sided breast cancer. For this purpose, setup data based on captured 3D surfaces was compared with setup data based on cone beam

  14. Heart dose reduction by prone deep inspiration breath hold in left-sided breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulliez, Thomas; Veldeman, Liv; Speleers, Bruno; Mahjoubi, Khalil; Remouchamps, Vincent; Van Greveling, Annick; Gilsoul, Monique; Berwouts, Dieter; Lievens, Yolande; Van den Broecke, Rudy; De Neve, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac disease has been related to heart dose after left-sided breast radiotherapy. This trial evaluates the heart sparing ability and feasibility of deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) in the prone position for left-sided whole breast irradiation (WBI). Twelve patients underwent CT-simulation in supine shallow breathing (SB), supine DIBH, prone SB and prone DIBH. A validation cohort of 38 patients received prone SB and prone DIBH CT-scans; the last 30 patients were accepted for prone DIBH treatment. WBI was planned with a prescription dose of 40.05 Gy. DIBH was able to reduce (p<0.001) heart dose in both positions, with results for prone DIBH at least as favorable as for supine DIBH. Mean heart dose was lowered from 2.2 Gy for prone SB to 1.3 Gy for prone DIBH (p<0.001), while preserving the lung sparing ability of prone positioning. Moreover prone DIBH nearly consistently reduced mean heart dose to less then 2 Gy, regardless of breast volume. All patients were able to perform the simulation procedure, 28/30 patients were treated with prone DIBH. This trial demonstrates the ability and feasibility of prone DIBH to acquire optimal heart and lung sparing for left-sided WBI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a deep inspiration breath-hold system for radiotherapy utilizing a laser distance measurer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christer Andre; Skottner, Nils; Frengen, Jomar; Lund, Jo-Åsmund

    2017-01-01

    Deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) is a technique for treating left-sided breast cancer (LSBC). In modern radiotherapy, one of the main aims is to exclude the heart from the beam aperture with an individualized beam design for LSBC. A deep inhalation will raise the chest wall while the volume of the lungs increase, this will again push the heart away from the breast to be treated. There are a few commercial DIBH systems, both invasive and noninvasive. We present an alternative noninvasive DIBH system based upon an industrial laser distance measurer. This system can be installed in a treatment room at a low cost; it is very easy to use and requires limited amount of training for the personnel and the patient. The system is capable of measuring the position of the chest wall with high frequency and precision in real time. The patient views its breathing curve through video glasses, and gets instructions during the treatment session. The system is well tolerated by test subjects due to its noninvasiveness. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Deep Inspiration Breath Hold-Based Radiation Therapy: A Clinical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Simeonova-Chergou, Anna; Wertz, Hansjörg; Stieler, Florian; Jahnke, Anika; Jahnke, Lennart; Fleckenstein, Jens; Vogel, Lena; Arns, Anna; Blessing, Manuel; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Several recent developments in linear accelerator-based radiation therapy (RT) such as fast multileaf collimators, accelerated intensity modulation paradigms like volumeric modulated arc therapy and flattening filter-free (FFF) high-dose-rate therapy have dramatically shortened the duration of treatment fractions. Deliverable photon dose distributions have approached physical complexity limits as a consequence of precise dose calculation algorithms and online 3-dimensional image guided patient positioning (image guided RT). Simultaneously, beam quality and treatment speed have continuously been improved in particle beam therapy, especially for scanned particle beams. Applying complex treatment plans with steep dose gradients requires strategies to mitigate and compensate for motion effects in general, particularly breathing motion. Intrafractional breathing-related motion results in uncertainties in dose delivery and thus in target coverage. As a consequence, generous margins have been used, which, in turn, increases exposure to organs at risk. Particle therapy, particularly with scanned beams, poses additional problems such as interplay effects and range uncertainties. Among advanced strategies to compensate breathing motion such as beam gating and tracking, deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) gating is particularly advantageous in several respects, not only for hypofractionated, high single-dose stereotactic body RT of lung, liver, and upper abdominal lesions but also for normofractionated treatment of thoracic tumors such as lung cancer, mediastinal lymphomas, and breast cancer. This review provides an in-depth discussion of the rationale and technical implementation of DIBH gating for hypofractionated and normofractionated RT of intrathoracic and upper abdominal tumors in photon and proton RT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of lung tumor immobilization using breath hold at deep inspiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Murray, Brad R.; Robinson, Donald M.; Underwood, Lori J.; Hanson, John; Roa, Wilson H.Y.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose:To examine the dosimetric benefit of self-gated radiotherapy at deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) in the treatment of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The relative contributions of tumor immobilization at breath hold (BH) and increased lung volume at deep inspiration (DI) in sparing high-dose lung irradiation (≥20 Gy) were examined. Methods and Materials:Ten consecutive patients undergoing radiotherapy for Stage I-IIIB NSCLC who met the screening criteria were entered on this study. Patients were instructed to BH at DI without the use of external monitors or breath-holding devices (self-gating). Computed tomography (CT) scans of the thorax were performed during free breathing (FB) and DIBH. Fluoroscopy screened for reproducible tumor position throughout DIBH, and determined the maximum superior-inferior (SI) tumor motion during both FB and DIBH. Margins used to define the planning target volume (PTV) from the clinical target volume included 1 cm for setup error and organ motion, plus an additional SI margin for tumor motion, as determined from fluoroscopy. Three conformal treatment plans were then generated for each patient, one from the FB scan with FB PTV margins, a second from the DIBH scan with FB PTV margins, and a third from the DIBH scan with DIBH PTV margins. The percent of total lung volume receiving ≥20 Gy (using a prescription dose of 70.9 Gy to isocenter) was determined for each plan. Results:Self-gating at DIBH was possible for 8 of the 10 patients; 2 patients were excluded, because they were not able to perform a reproducible DIBH. For these 8 patients, the median BH time was 23 (range, 19-52) s. The mean percent of total lung volume receiving ≥20 Gy under FB conditions (FB scan with FB PTV margins) was 12.8%. With increased lung volume alone (DIBH scan with FB PTV margins), this was reduced to 11.0%, tending toward a significant decrease in lung irradiation over FB (p=0.086). With both increased lung volume and tumor

  18. Cardiac motion during deep-inspiration breath-hold: implications for breast cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochun; Pan, Tinsu; Pinnix, Chelsea; Zhang, Sean X; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sun, Tzouh Liang; Gladish, Gregory; Strom, Eric A; Perkins, George H; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Hoffman, Karen E; Buchholz, Thomas A; Yu, T Kuan

    2012-02-01

    Many patients with left-sided breast cancer receive adjuvant radiotherapy during deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) to minimize radiation exposure to the heart. We measured the displacement of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and heart owing to cardiac motion during DIBH, relative to the standard tangential fields for left breast cancer radiotherapy. A total of 20 patients who had undergone computed tomography-based coronary angiography with retrospective electrocardiographic gating were randomly selected for the present study. The patients underwent scanning during DIBH to control the influence of respiration on cardiac motion. Standard medial and lateral tangential fields were placed, and the LADs were contoured on the systolic- and diastolic-phase computed tomography data sets by the clinicians. Displacement of the LAD during cardiac contractions was calculated in three directions: toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, left-right, and anteroposterior. Displacement of the entire heart was measured on the maximal and minimal intensity projection computed tomography images. The mean displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction without the influence of respiration for 20 patients was 2.3 mm (range, 0.7-3.8) toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, 2.6 mm (range, 1.0-6.8) in the left-right direction, and 2.3 mm (range, 0.6-6.5) in the anteroposterior direction. At least 30% of the LAD volume was displaced >5 mm in any direction in 2 patients (10%), and 5 mm in 10 patients (50%). The extent of displacement of the heart periphery during cardiac motion was negligible near the treatment fields. Displacement of the heart periphery near the treatment fields was negligible during DIBH; however, displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction varied substantially between and within patients. We recommend maintaining ≥ 5 mm of distance between the LAD and the field edge for patients undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy during DIBH

  19. Single 20-second acquisition of deep-inspiration breath-hold PET/CT: clinical feasibility for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torizuka, Tatsuo; Tanizaki, Yasuo; Kanno, Toshihiko; Futatsubashi, Masami; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Okada, Hiroyuki; Ouchi, Yasuomi

    2009-10-01

    This study was designed to compare tumor (18)F-FDG uptake between a single 20-s acquisition of deep-inspiration breath-hold PET/CT and free-breathing PET/CT for lung cancer. Before the clinical study, a phantom study was performed to determine the optimum breath-hold time for the PET scan. We studied 47 patients with lung cancer who underwent free-breathing PET/CT with the standard clinical protocol, followed by deep-inspiration breath-hold PET/CT of the thorax. In breath-hold PET/CT, the patients were asked to hold their breath in deep inspiration for 10 s during the CT scan and for 20 s during the PET scan. Maximum tumor (18)F-FDG standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was measured in free-breathing PET and breath-hold PET, and the percentage difference between these 2 values was calculated. Breath-hold PET showed a significant increase in SUVmax, as compared with free-breathing PET (8.26 +/- 4.59 vs. 11.25 +/- 7.24, P < 0.0001). The mean difference in SUVmax was 39.5% +/- 43.4%, and the range was 2.9%-248.3%. The difference in SUVmax was significant when compared between tumors in the upper lung (n = 22) and tumors in the lower lung (n = 25) (24.4% +/- 17.7% vs. 52.9% +/- 54.3%, P = 0.0077). The mean tumor size of the group with a high SUVmax difference (n = 13) was significantly smaller than that of the group with a low SUVmax difference (n = 34) (2.45 +/- 0.87 cm vs. 3.21 +/- 1.22 cm, P = 0.043), using a cutoff of 39.5%. The single 20-s acquisition of breath-hold PET/CT enabled more precise measurement of SUVmax, especially in the lower lung field and for small tumors, which may be affected by respiratory motion. This technique is feasible in the clinical setting and requires only a minor increase in examination time.

  20. SU-E-J-62: Breath Hold for Left-Sided Breast Cancer: Visually Monitored Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Amplitude Evaluated Using Real-Time Position Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conroy, L; Quirk, S; Smith, WL; Yeung, R; Phan, T; Hudson, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We used Real-Time Position Management (RPM) to evaluate breath hold amplitude and variability when gating with a visually monitored deep inspiration breath hold technique (VM-DIBH) with retrospective cine image chest wall position verification. Methods: Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer were treated using VM-DIBH. Respiratory motion was passively collected once weekly using RPM with the marker block positioned at the xiphoid process. Cine images on the tangent medial field were acquired on fractions with RPM monitoring for retrospective verification of chest wall position during breath hold. The amplitude and duration of all breath holds on which treatment beams were delivered were extracted from the RPM traces. Breath hold position coverage was evaluated for symmetric RPM gating windows from ± 1 to 5 mm centered on the average breath hold amplitude of the first measured fraction as a baseline. Results: The average (range) breath hold amplitude and duration was 18 mm (3–36 mm) and 19 s (7–34 s). The average (range) of amplitude standard deviation per patient over all breath holds was 2.7 mm (1.2–5.7 mm). With the largest allowable RPM gating window (± 5 mm), 4 of 10 VM-DIBH patients would have had ≥ 10% of their breath hold positions excluded by RPM. Cine verification of the chest wall position during the medial tangent field showed that the chest wall was greater than 5 mm from the baseline in only 1 out of 4 excluded patients. Cine images verify the chest wall/breast position only, whether this variation is acceptable in terms of heart sparing is a subject of future investigation. Conclusion: VM-DIBH allows for greater breath hold amplitude variability than using a 5 mm gating window with RPM, while maintaining chest wall positioning accuracy within 5 mm for the majority of patients

  1. Monte Carlo calculations support organ sparing in Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Sibolt, Patrik; Larsen, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Studies indicate that Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) is advantageous over Free-Breathing (FB) for locally advanced lung cancer radiotherapy. However, these studies were based on simplified dose calculation algorithms, potentially critical due to the heterogeneous nature...... than breathing technique. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved....

  2. Target position uncertainty during visually guided deep-inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy in locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydhog, Jonas Scherman; de Blanck, Steen Riisgaard; Josipovic, Mirjana

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to estimate the uncertainty in voluntary deep-inspiration breath hold (DISH) radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.Methods: Perpendicular fluoroscopic movies were acquired in free breathing (FB) and DIBH during a course...... of visually guided DIBH radiotherapy of nine patients with NSCLC. Patients had liquid markers injected in mediastinal lymph nodes and primary tumours. Excursion, systematic- and random errors, and inter-breath-hold position uncertainty were investigated using an image based tracking algorithm.Results: A mean...... (root-mean-square of the intra-BH SD) during DIBH were 0.5 and 0.3 mm (AP), 0.5 and 0.3 mm (LR), 0.8 and 0.4 mm (CC), respectively. The mean inter-breath-hold shifts were -0.3 mm (AP), -0.2 mm (LR), and -0.2 mm (CC).Conclusion: Intra- and inter-breath-hold uncertainty of tumours and lymph nodes were...

  3. The advantage of deep-inspiration breath-hold and cone-beam CT based soft-tissue registration for locally advanced lung cancer radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Rahma, Fatma; Sjöström, David

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Three cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) registration strategies combined with deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and free-breathing (FB) were explored, in terms of obtaining the smallest planning target volume (PTV). Material and methods: CBCT images were acquired pre...

  4. Introduction of moderate deep inspiration breath hold for radiation therapy of left breast: Initial experience of a regional cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comsa, Daria; Barnett, Erin; Le, Ken; Mohamoud, Gulaid; Zaremski, Dana; Fenkell, Louis; Kassam, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Practical aspects of introducing moderate deep inspiration breath hold (mDIBH) for treatment of left breast cancer in a regional cancer program in terms of workflow and treatment delivery requirements are described. Differences in heart and lung doses between free breathing (FB) and mDIBH plans are presented as well as heart position reproducibility and resulting dosimetric impact using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). A mDIBH process was established. Therapists observed duration and quantity of breath holds required for setup, imaging, and beam delivery during treatment. Treatment plans were generated on the FB and mDIBH CT datasets allowing comparison of heart and lung dose-volume data for 50 patients. Five consecutive CBCT images were used to measure the distance between the heart and chest wall for 5 patients. Estimates of dose to the translated heart were then made with the treatment planning system. When compared with FB delivery, mDIBH treatment time for tangents and boosts increased by 5 minutes, while 3- or 4-field techniques increased by 10 minutes. Differences in heart dose D10 cc, mean, V30 and V10 were statistically significant between the FB and mDIBH tangents and 3- or 4-field treatment plans. Statistically significant differences in V20, V10, V5, and mean lung doses were observed for 3- and 4-field FB and mDIBH plans. Differences between lung V5 dose metrics for FB and mDIBH 2-field plans were statistically significant. Interfraction mean translations in heart position coronally ranged from -6.2 to 2.6 mm and resulted in non-negligible increases in the heart dose. Moderate deep inspiration breath hold has been successfully implemented in our regional cancer center for treatment of left breast cancer and is now a standard practice. This change in practice from FB to mDIBH treatment has not impacted our ability to meet provincial guidelines for patient throughput. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier

  5. [Involved-node radiotherapy combined with deep-inspiration breath-hold technique in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumier, A; Bakkour, M; Ghalibafian, M; Beaudre, A; Blanchard, P; Martinetti, F; Girinsky, T

    2012-04-01

    To assess the clinical outcome of the involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) concept with the use of deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique in patients with localized supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma. All were patients with stage I-II Hodgkin lymphoma and they were treated with chemotherapy prior to irradiation. Radiation treatments were delivered using the involved-node radiotherapy concept according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Guidelines and a spirometer dedicated to DIBH radiotherapy was used for every patient. Twenty-seven patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (26 patients with primary Hodgkin lymphoma, one with refractory disease), treated from November 2004 to October 2010, were retrospectively analysed. The median age was 27 years (range 16 to 54). Seventeen (63%) patients had stage I-IIA and 10 (37%) had stage I-IIB disease. All patients received two to six cycles of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine. The median radiation dose to patients was 30,6 Gy (range: 19,8-40). Protection of various organs at risk was satisfactory. Median follow-up, 3-year progression-free and 3-year overall survival were 38 months (range: 7-70), 96% (95%CI: 79-99%) and 95% (95%CI: 75-99%), respectively. Recurrence occurred in one patient (mediastinal in-field relapse). There was one grade 3 acute toxicity (transient pneumonitis). Our results suggest that patients with localized Hodgkin lymphoma can be safely and efficiently treated using deep-inspiration breath technique and the involved-node radiotherapy concept. Longer follow-up is needed to assess late toxicity, especially for the heart and the coronary arteries. Copyright © 2011 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Involved-node radiotherapy combined with deep-inspiration breath-hold technique in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paumier, A.; Bakkour, M.; Ghalibafian, M.; Blanchard, P.; Girinsky, T.; Beaudre, A.; Martinetti, F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - To assess the clinical outcome of the involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) concept with the use of deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique in patients with localized supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients and methods. - All were patients with stage I-II Hodgkin lymphoma and they were treated with chemotherapy prior to irradiation. Radiation treatments were delivered using the involved-node radiotherapy concept according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Guidelines and a spirometer dedicated to DIBH radiotherapy was used for every patient. Results. - Twenty-seven patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (26 patients with primary Hodgkin lymphoma, one with refractory disease), treated from November 2004 to October 2010, were retrospectively analysed. The median age was 27 years (range 16 to 54). Seventeen (63%) patients had stage I-IIA and 10 (37%) had stage I-IIB disease. All patients received two to six cycles of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine. The median radiation dose to patients was 30,6 Gy (range: 19,8-40). Protection of various organs at risk was satisfactory. Median follow-up, 3-year progression-free and 3-year overall survival were 38 months (range: 7-70), 96% (95% CI: 79-99%) and 95% (95% CI: 75-99%), respectively. Recurrence occurred in one patient (mediastinal in-field relapse). There was one grade 3 acute toxicity (transient pneumonitis). Conclusions. - Our results suggest that patients with localized Hodgkin lymphoma can be safely and efficiently treated using deep-inspiration breath technique and the involved-node radiotherapy concept. Longer follow-up is needed to assess late toxicity, especially for the heart and the coronary arteries. (authors)

  7. The cardiac dose-sparing benefits of deep inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, Lloyd M, E-mail: lloyd.smyth@epworth.org.au [Epworth Radiation Oncology, Level 4, The Epworth Centre, Richmond, Victoria (Australia); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, School of Biomedical Sciences, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Knight, Kellie A [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, School of Biomedical Sciences, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Aarons, Yolanda K; Wasiak, Jason [Epworth Radiation Oncology, Level 4, The Epworth Centre, Richmond, Victoria (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    Despite technical advancements in breast radiation therapy, cardiac structures are still subject to significant levels of irradiation. As the use of adjuvant radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery continues to improve survival for early breast cancer patients, the associated radiation-induced cardiac toxicities become increasingly relevant. Our primary aim was to evaluate the cardiac-sparing benefits of the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. An electronic literature search of the PubMed database from 1966 to July 2014 was used to identify articles published in English relating to the dosimetric benefits of DIBH. Studies comparing the mean heart dose of DIBH and free breathing treatment plans for left breast cancer patients were eligible to be included in the review. Studies evaluating the reproducibility and stability of the DIBH technique were also reviewed. Ten studies provided data on the benefits of DIBH during left breast irradiation. From these studies, DIBH reduced the mean heart dose by up to 3.4 Gy when compared to a free breathing approach. Four studies reported that the DIBH technique was stable and reproducible on a daily basis. According to current estimates of the excess cardiac toxicity associated with radiation therapy, a 3.4 Gy reduction in mean heart dose is equivalent to a 13.6% reduction in the projected increase in risk of heart disease. DIBH is a reproducible and stable technique for left breast irradiation showing significant promise in reducing the late cardiac toxicities associated with radiation therapy.

  8. Heart position variability during voluntary moderate deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy for breast cancer determined by repeat CBCT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haaren, Paul; Claassen-Janssen, Fiere; van de Sande, Ingrid; Boersma, Liesbeth; van der Sangen, Maurice; Hurkmans, Coen

    2017-08-01

    Voluntary moderate deep inspiration breath hold (vmDIBH) in left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy reduces cardiac dose. The aim of this study was to investigate heart position variability in vmDIBH using CBCT and to compare this variability with differences in heart position between vmDIBH and free breathing (FB). For 50 patients initial heart position with respect to the field edge (HP-FE) was measured on a vmDIBH planning CT scan. Breath-hold was monitored using an in-house developed vertical plastic stick. On pre-treatment CBCT scans, heart position variability with respect to the field edge (Δ HP-FE ) was measured, reflecting heart position variability when using an offline correction protocol. After registering the CBCT scan to the planning CT, heart position variability with respect to the chest wall (Δ HP-CW ) was measured, reflecting heart position variability when using an online correction protocol. As a control group, vmDIBH and FB computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired for 30 patients and registering both scans on the chest wall. For 34 out of 50 patients, the average HP-FE and HP-CW increased over the treatment course in comparison to the planning CT. Averaged over all patients and all treatment fractions, the Δ HP-FE and the Δ HP-CW was 0.8±4.2mm (range -9.4-+10.6mm) and 1.0±4.4mm (range -8.3-+10.4mm) respectively. The average gain in heart to chest wall distance was 11.8±4.6mm when using vmDIBH instead of FB. In conclusion, substantial variability in heart position using vmDIBH was observed during the treatment course. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Minimizing late effects for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma: deep inspiration breath-hold, IMRT, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Marianne C; Maraldo, Maja V; Schut, Deborah A; Lundemann, Michael; Brodin, N Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R; Berthelsen, Anne K; Specht, Lena; Petersen, Peter M

    2015-05-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CD), lung cancer, and breast cancer. We investigated the risk for the development of CD and secondary lung, breast, and thyroid cancer after radiation therapy (RT) delivered with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) compared with free-breathing (FB) using 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT) and intensity modulated RT (IMRT). The aim of this study was to determine which treatment modality best reduced the combined risk of life-threatening late effects in patients with mediastinal HL. Twenty-two patients with early-stage mediastinal HL were eligible for the study. Treatment plans were calculated with both 3DCRT and IMRT on both DIBH and FB planning computed tomographic scans. We reported the estimated dose to the heart, lung, female breasts, and thyroid and calculated the estimated life years lost attributable to CD and to lung, breast, and thyroid cancer. DIBH lowered the estimated dose to heart and lung regardless of delivery technique (P<.001). There was no significant difference between IMRT-FB and 3DCRT-DIBH in mean heart dose, heart V20Gy, and lung V20Gy. The mean breast dose was increased with IMRT regardless of breathing technique. Life years lost was lowest with DIBH and highest with FB. In this cohort, 3DCRT-DIBH resulted in lower estimated doses and lower lifetime excess risks than did IMRT-FB. Combining IMRT and DIBH could be beneficial for a subgroup of patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Minimizing Late Effects for Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold, IMRT, or Both?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznar, Marianne C., E-mail: marianne.camille.aznar@regionh.dk [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Sciences, Niels Bohr Institute, and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Maraldo, Maja V.; Schut, Deborah A. [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lundemann, Michael [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Sciences, Niels Bohr Institute, and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brodin, N Patrik [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Institute of Onco-Physics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Vogelius, Ivan R. [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Berthelsen, Anne K. [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena; Petersen, Peter M. [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CD), lung cancer, and breast cancer. We investigated the risk for the development of CD and secondary lung, breast, and thyroid cancer after radiation therapy (RT) delivered with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) compared with free-breathing (FB) using 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT) and intensity modulated RT (IMRT). The aim of this study was to determine which treatment modality best reduced the combined risk of life-threatening late effects in patients with mediastinal HL. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with early-stage mediastinal HL were eligible for the study. Treatment plans were calculated with both 3DCRT and IMRT on both DIBH and FB planning computed tomographic scans. We reported the estimated dose to the heart, lung, female breasts, and thyroid and calculated the estimated life years lost attributable to CD and to lung, breast, and thyroid cancer. Results: DIBH lowered the estimated dose to heart and lung regardless of delivery technique (P<.001). There was no significant difference between IMRT-FB and 3DCRT-DIBH in mean heart dose, heart V20Gy, and lung V20Gy. The mean breast dose was increased with IMRT regardless of breathing technique. Life years lost was lowest with DIBH and highest with FB. Conclusions: In this cohort, 3DCRT-DIBH resulted in lower estimated doses and lower lifetime excess risks than did IMRT-FB. Combining IMRT and DIBH could be beneficial for a subgroup of patients.

  11. The deep inspiration breath hold technique using Abches reduces cardiac dose in patients undergoing left-sided breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ha Yoon; Chang, Jee Suk; Lee, Ik Jae; Park, Kwang Woo; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Jun Won; Keum, Ki Chang

    2013-01-01

    We explored whether the deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique using Abches during left-sided breast irradiation was effective for minimizing the amount of radiation to the heart and lung compared to free breathing (FB). Between February and July 2012, a total of 25 patients with left-sided breast cancer underwent two computed tomography scans each with the DIBH using Abches and using FB after breast-conserving surgery. The scans were retrospectively replanned using standardized criteria for the purpose of this study. The DIBH plans for each patient were compared with FB plans using dosimetric parameters. All patients were successfully treated with the DIBH technique using Abches. Significant differences were found between the DIBH and FB plans for mean heart dose (2.52 vs. 4.53 Gy), heart V30 (16.48 vs. 45.13 cm 3 ), V20 (21.35 vs. 54.55 cm 3 ), mean left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) dose (16.01 vs. 26.26 Gy, all p 3 of the LAD (41.65 vs. 47.27 Gy, p = 0.017). The mean left lung dose (7.53 vs. 8.03 Gy, p = 0.073) and lung V20 (14.63% vs. 15.72%, p 0.060) of DIBH using Abches were not different significantly compared with FB. We report that the use of a DIBH technique using Abches in breathing adapted radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer is easily feasible in daily practice and significantly reduces the radiation doses to the heart and LAD, therefore potentially reducing cardiac risk.

  12. Accuracy evaluation of a 3-dimensional surface imaging system for guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Honnef, Joeri; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy (DIBH-RT) for patients with left-sided breast cancer. For this purpose, setup data based on captured 3D surfaces was compared with setup data based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty patients treated with DIBH-RT after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included. Before the start of treatment, each patient underwent a breath-hold CT scan for planning purposes. During treatment, dose delivery was preceded by setup verification using CBCT of the left breast. 3D surfaces were captured by a surface imaging system concurrently with the CBCT scan. Retrospectively, surface registrations were performed for CBCT to CT and for a captured 3D surface to CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors, group mean, systematic error, random error, and 95% limits of agreement were calculated. Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. Good correlation between setup errors was found: R(2)=0.70, 0.90, 0.82 in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Systematic errors were ≤0.17 cm in all directions. Random errors were ≤0.15 cm. The limits of agreement were -0.34-0.48, -0.42-0.39, and -0.52-0.23 cm in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. ROC analysis showed that a threshold between 0.4 and 0.8 cm corresponds to promising true positive rates (0.78-0.95) and false positive rates (0.12-0.28). The results support the application of 3D surface imaging for image guidance in DIBH-RT after BCS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3-Dimensional Surface Imaging System for Guidance in Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Honnef, Joeri; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy (DIBH-RT) for patients with left-sided breast cancer. For this purpose, setup data based on captured 3D surfaces was compared with setup data based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients treated with DIBH-RT after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included. Before the start of treatment, each patient underwent a breath-hold CT scan for planning purposes. During treatment, dose delivery was preceded by setup verification using CBCT of the left breast. 3D surfaces were captured by a surface imaging system concurrently with the CBCT scan. Retrospectively, surface registrations were performed for CBCT to CT and for a captured 3D surface to CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors, group mean, systematic error, random error, and 95% limits of agreement were calculated. Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. Results: Good correlation between setup errors was found: R 2 =0.70, 0.90, 0.82 in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Systematic errors were ≤0.17 cm in all directions. Random errors were ≤0.15 cm. The limits of agreement were −0.34-0.48, −0.42-0.39, and −0.52-0.23 cm in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. ROC analysis showed that a threshold between 0.4 and 0.8 cm corresponds to promising true positive rates (0.78-0.95) and false positive rates (0.12-0.28). Conclusions: The results support the application of 3D surface imaging for image guidance in DIBH-RT after BCS.

  14. Prospective phase II trial of image-guided radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma: benefit of deep inspiration breath-hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Peter M; Aznar, Marianne C; Berthelsen, Anne K; Loft, Annika; Schut, Deborah A; Maraldo, Maja; Josipovic, Mirjana; Klausen, Thomas L; Andersen, Flemming L; Specht, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Long-term Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors have an increased risk of late cardiac morbidity and secondary lung cancer after chemotherapy and mediastinal radiotherapy. In this prospective study we investigate whether radiotherapy with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) can reduce radiation doses to the lungs, heart, and cardiac structures without compromising the target dose. Twenty-two patients (14 female, 8 male), median age 30 years (18-65 years), with supra-diaphragmatic HL were enrolled and had a thoracic PET/CT with DIBH in addition to staging FDG-PET/CT in free breathing (FB) and a planning CT in both FB and DIBH. For each patient an involved-node radiotherapy plan was done for both DIBH and FB, and the doses to the lungs, heart, and female breasts were recorded prospectively. Mean doses to the heart valves and coronary arteries were recorded retrospectively. Patients were treated with the technique yielding the lowest doses to normal structures. Nineteen patients were treated with DIBH and three with FB. DIBH reduced the mean estimated lung dose by 2.0 Gy (median: 8.5 Gy vs. 7.2 Gy) (p < 0.01) and the mean heart dose by 1.4 Gy (6.0 Gy vs. 3.9 Gy) (p < 0.01) compared to FB. The lung and heart V20Gy were reduced with a median of 5.3% and 6.3%. Mean doses to the female breasts were equal with FB and DIBH. DIBH can significantly decrease the estimated mean doses to the heart and lungs without lowering the dose to the target in radiotherapy for patients with mediastinal HL.

  15. SU-E-J-33: Cardiac Movement in Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold for Left-Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M; Lee, S; Suh, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the displacement of heart using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) CT data compared to free-breathing (FB) CT data and radiation exposure to heart. Methods: Treatment planning was performed on the computed tomography (CT) datasets of 20 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Heart, lung and both breasts were outlined. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy divided into 28 fractions. The dose distributions in all the plans were required to fulfill the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement specifications that include 100% coverage of the CTV with ≥ 95% of the prescribed dose and that the volume inside the CTV receiving > 107% of the prescribed dose should be minimized. Displacement of heart was measured by calculating the distance between center of heart and left breast. For the evaluation of radiation dose to heart, minimum, maximum and mean dose to heart were calculated. Results: The maximum and minimum left-right (LR) displacements of heart were 8.9 mm and 3 mm, respectively. The heart moved > 4 mm in the LR direction in 17 of the 20 patients. The distances between the heart and left breast ranged from 8.02–17.68 mm (mean, 12.23 mm) and 7.85–12.98 mm (mean, 8.97 mm) with DIBH CT and FB CT, respectively. The maximum doses to the heart were 3115 cGy and 4652 cGy for the DIBH and FB CT dataset, respectively. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that the DIBH technique could help to reduce the risk of radiation dose-induced cardiac toxicity by using movement of cardiac; away from radiation field. The DIBH technique could be used in an actual treatment room for a few minutes and could effectively reduce the cardiac dose when used with a sub-device or image acquisition standard to maintain consistent respiratory motion

  16. Dosimetric comparison of deep inspiration breath hold and free breathing technique in stereotactic body radiotherapy for localized lung tumor using Flattening Filter Free beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Karthick Raj; Bhuiyan, Md. Anisuzzaman; Alam, Md. Mahbub; Ahmed, Sharif; Sumon, Mostafa Aziz; Sengupta, Ashim Kumar; Rahman, Md. Shakilur; Azharul Islam, Md. S. M.

    2018-03-01

    Aim: To compare the dosimetric advantage of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized lung tumor between deep inspiration breath hold technique and free breathing technique. Materials and methods: We retrospectively included ten previously treated lung tumor patients in this dosimetric study. All the ten patients underwent CT simulation using 4D-CT free breathing (FB) and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) techniques. Plans were created using three coplanar full modulated arc using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) bream with a dose rate of 1400 MU/min. Same dose constraints for the target and the critical structures for a particular patient were used during the plan optimization process in DIBH and FB datasets. We intend to deliver 50 Gy in 5 fractions for all the patients. For standardization, all the plans were normalized at target mean of the planning target volume (PTV). Doses to the critical structures and targets were recorded from the dose volume histogram for evaluation. Results: The mean right and left lung volumes were inflated by 1.55 and 1.60 times in DIBH scans compared to the FB scans. The mean internal target volume (ITV) increased in the FB datasets by 1.45 times compared to the DIBH data sets. The mean dose followed by standard deviation (x¯ ± σx¯) of ipsilateral lung for DIBH-SBRT and FB-SBRT plans were 7.48 ± 3.57 (Gy) and 10.23 ± 4.58 (Gy) respectively, with a mean reduction of 36.84% in DIBH-SBRT plans. Ipsilateral lung were reduced to 36.84% in DIBH plans compared to FB plans. Conclusion: Significant dose reduction in ipsilateral lung due to the lung inflation and target motion restriction in DIBH-SBRT plans were observed compare to FB-SBRT. DIBH-SBRT plans demonstrate superior dose reduction to the normal tissues and other critical structures.

  17. CT evaluation of patient deep inspiration self-breath-holding: How precisely can patients reproduce the tumor position in the absence of respiratory monitoring devices?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Kuriyama, Kengo; Komiyama, Takafumi; Tanaka, Shiho; Ueki, Junko; Sano, Naoki; Araki, Tsutomu; Ikenaga, Satoshi; Tateda, Yoshihito; Aikawa, Yoshihito

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reproducibility of tumor position under patient deep inspiration self-breath-holding in the absence of respiratory monitoring devices, as well as to compare the reproducibility of deep inspiration self-breath-holding on the verbal command of a radiation technologist (Passive mode) with that initiated by patients' own estimation (Active mode). Twenty patients with lung cancer were shown how the tumor and diaphragm move during the respiration cycle. Patients were instructed to hold their breath during deep inspiration and reproduce identical tumor position as well as possible either by the Active mode or by the Passive mode. After patients had practiced self-breath-holding during deep inspiration, a set of three CT scans was obtained for each of the two modes of self-breath-holding (6 CT scans total) to obtain randomly timed images of 2 mm thickness in the vicinity of the tumor. The first three scans were performed during breath-hold using the Active mode, and next three scans were using the Passive mode. Maximum difference in tumor position for the three CT scans was then calculated along three axes: cranial-caudal (C-C); anterior-posterior (A-P); and right-left (R-L). In the 20 patients who underwent analysis of self-breath-holding, mean maximum difference in tumor position obtained under breath-hold using the Active and the Passive modes were: 2.2 and 3.1 mm along the C-C axis; 1.4 and 2.4 mm along the A-P axis; and 1.3 and 2.2 mm along the R-L axis, respectively. These differences in all axes were significantly smaller (p<0.05) for the Active mode than for the Passive mode. Most tumors displayed maximal respiratory movement along the C-C axis, and minimal movement along the R-L axis, but tumors located in the upper lung displayed maximal movement along the A-P axis. Significant correlation (p<0.05) was observed between differences along three axes in either mode of breath-hold. In conclusion, the reproducibility of

  18. Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer: A Word of Caution on the Dose to the Axillary Lymph Node Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borm, Kai Joachim; Oechsner, Markus; Combs, Stephanie E; Duma, Marciana-Nona

    2018-01-01

    To assess the differences in unintended regional nodal irradiation between free breathing (FB) and deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) during tangential field irradiation. We randomly chose 32 patients from our database who underwent both DIBH and FB treatment planning. Contouring of the axillary lymph node levels (LI, LII, and LIII) was performed retrospectively according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group contouring atlas. We assessed the center of mass of each level and the planning target volume, as well as the dose distribution (Dmean, Dmedian, Dmax, Dmin, V30, and V40) in the lymph node levels I-III. Subsequently center of mass movement and dose changes due to deep inspiration treatment planning were calculated. All lymph node levels showed significant (Pinspiration breath-hold results in a significant dose reduction in level I. Only minor changes in dose distribution were recorded for levels II and III. Thus, DIBH seems to have an impact on unintended regional nodal irradiation as compared with FB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Adaptation requirements due to anatomical changes in free-breathing and deep-inspiration breath-hold for standard and dose-escalated radiotherapy of lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibolt, Patrik; Ottosson, Wiviann; Sjöström, David; Larsen, Christina; Behrens, Claus F

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy of lung cancer patients is subject to uncertainties related to heterogeneities, anatomical changes and breathing motion. Use of deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) can reduce the treated volume, potentially enabling dose-escalated (DE) treatments. This study was designed to investigate the need for adaptation due to anatomical changes, for both standard (ST) and DE plans in free-breathing (FB) and DIBH. The effect of tumor shrinkage (TS), pleural effusion (PE) and atelectasis was investigated for patients and for a CIRS thorax phantom. Sixteen patients were computed tomography (CT) imaged both in FB and DIBH. Anatomical changes were simulated by CT information editing and re-calculations, of both ST and DE plans, in the treatment planning system. PE was systematically simulated by adding fluid in the dorsal region of the lung and TS by reduction of the tumor volume. Phantom simulations resulted in maximum deviations in mean dose to the GTV-T (GTV-T) of -1% for 3 cm PE and centrally located tumor, and + 3% for TS from 5 cm to 1 cm diameter for an anterior tumor location. For the majority of the patients, simulated PE resulted in a decreasing GTV-T with increasing amount of fluid and increasing GTV-T for decreasing tumor volume. Maximum change in GTV-T of -3% (3 cm PE in FB for both ST and DE plans) and + 10% (2 cm TS in FB for DE plan) was observed. Large atelectasis reduction increased the GTV-T with 2% for FB and had no effect for DIBH. Phantom simulations provided potential adaptation action levels for PE and TS. For the more complex patient geometry, individual assessment of the dosimetric impact is recommended for both ST and DE plans in DIBH as well as in FB. However, DIBH was found to be superior over FB for DE plans, regarding robustness of GTV-T to TS.

  20. SU-E-T-383: Evaluation of Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique for Post-Mastectomy Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depauw, N; Patel, S; MacDonald, S; Lu, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath-hold techniques (DIBH) have been shown to carry significant dosimetric advantages in conventional radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of DIBH techniques for post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) using proton pencil beam scanning (PBS). Method: Ten PMRT patients, with or without breast implant, underwent two helical CT scans: one with free breathing and the other with deep inspiration breath-hold. A prescription of 50.4 Gy(RBE) to the whole chest wall and lymphatics (axillary, supraclavicular, and intramammary nodes) was considered. PBS plans were generated for each patient’s CT scan using Astroid, an in-house treatment planning system, with the institution conventional clinical PMRT parameters; that is, using a single en-face field with a spot size varying from 8 mm to 14 mm as a function of energy. Similar optimization parameters were used in both plans in order to ensure appropriate comparison. Results: Regardless of the technique (free breathing or DIBH), the generated plans were well within clinical acceptability. DIBH allowed for higher target coverage with better sparing of the cardiac structures. The lung doses were also slightly improved. While the use of DIBH techniques might be of interest, it is technically challenging as it would require a fast PBS delivery, as well as the synchronization of the beam delivery with a gating system, both of which are not currently available at the institution. Conclusion: DIBH techniques display some dosimetric advantages over free breathing treatment for PBS PMRT patients, which warrants further investigation. Plans will also be generated with smaller spot sizes (2.5 mm to 5.5 mm and 5 mm to 9 mm), corresponding to new generation machines, in order to further quantify the dosimetric advantages of DIBH as a function of spot size

  1. Magnitude of shift of tumor position as a function of moderated deep inspiration breath-hold: An analysis of pooled data of lung patients with active breath control in image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and magnitude of shift of tumor position by using active breathing control and iView-GT for patients with lung cancer with moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH technique. Eight patients with 10 lung tumors were studied. CT scans were performed in the breath-holding phase. Moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold under spirometer-based monitoring system was used. Few important bony anatomic details were delineated by the radiation oncologist. To evaluate the interbreath-hold reproducibility of the tumor position, we compared the digital reconstruction radiographs (DRRs from planning system with the DRRs from the iView-GT in the machine room. We measured the shift in x, y, and z directions. The reproducibility was defined as the difference between the bony landmarks from the DRR of the planning system and those from the DRR of the iView-GT. The maximum shift of the tumor position was 3.2 mm, 3.0 mm, and 2.9 mm in the longitudinal, lateral, and vertical directions. In conclusion, the moderated deep-inspiration breath-hold method using a spirometer is feasible, with relatively good reproducibility of the tumor position for image-guided radiotherapy in lung cancers.

  2. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for lung tumors: the potential value of target immobilization and reduced lung density in dose escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, Joseph; Debois, Marc M.; Mah, Dennis; Mageras, Gikas S.; Raben, Adam; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Mychalczak, Borys; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Gloeggler, Paul J.; Lutz, Wendell; Ling, C. Clifton; Leibel, Steven A.; Fuks, Zvi; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This study evaluates the dosimetric benefits and feasibility of a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique in the treatment of lung tumors. The technique has two distinct features--deep inspiration, which reduces lung density, and breath-hold, which immobilizes lung tumors, thereby allowing for reduced margins. Both of these properties can potentially reduce the amount of normal lung tissue in the high-dose region, thus reducing morbidity and improving the possibility of dose escalation. Methods and Materials: Five patients treated for non-small cell lung carcinoma (Stage IIA-IIIB) received computed tomography (CT) scans under 4 respiration conditions: free-breathing, DIBH, shallow inspiration breath-hold, and shallow expiration breath-hold. The free-breathing and DIBH scans were used to generate 3-dimensional conformal treatment plans for comparison, while the shallow inspiration and expiration scans determined the extent of tumor motion under free-breathing conditions. To acquire the breath-hold scans, the patients are brought to reproducible respiration levels using spirometry, and for DIBH, modified slow vital capacity maneuvers. Planning target volumes (PTVs) for free-breathing plans included a margin for setup error (0.75 cm) plus a margin equal to the extent of tumor motion due to respiration (1-2 cm). Planning target volumes for DIBH plans included the same margin for setup error, with a reduced margin for residual uncertainty in tumor position (0.2-0.5 cm) as determined from repeat fluoroscopic movies. To simulate the effects of respiration-gated treatments and estimate the role of target immobilization alone (i.e., without the benefit of reduced lung density), a third plan is generated from the free-breathing scan using a PTV with the same margins as for DIBH plans. Results: The treatment plan comparison suggests that, on average, the DIBH technique can reduce the volume of lung receiving more than 25 Gy by 30% compared to free-breathing

  3. Postoperative irradiation of left-sided breast cancer patients and cardiac toxicity. Does deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique protect the heart?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stranzl, H.; Zurl, B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the impact of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique during postoperative left-sided tangential breast irradiation on minimizing irradiated heart amount compared to normal breathing. Patients and methods: in 22 patients with left-sided breast cancer, postoperative CT scanning was performed in different respiratory phases using the Varian Real-time Position Management System trademark for monitoring of respiratory chest wall motion. Each patient underwent two CT scans: during normal breathing and DIBH. For each scan, an optimized plan was designed with tangential photon fields encompassing the clinical target volume after breast-conserving surgery or modified radical mastectomy. The resulting dose-volume histograms were compared between both breathing techniques for irradiated volume and dose to the heart. Results: the mean patient age was 51 years (range: 34-77 years). The DIBH-gated technique was well accepted by all patients. The significant reduction in dose to the irradiated heart volume for the DIBH technique compared to the normal breathing was 56% (mean heart dose: 2.3 Gy vs. 1.3 Gy; p = 0.01). Conclusion: this study demonstrates that irradiated cardiac volumes can significantly be reduced in left-sided breast cancer patients using DIBH technique for postoperative tangential radiotherapy. Moreover, the technique is safe and feasible in daily routine. (orig.)

  4. Real-time monitoring and control on deep inspiration breath-hold for lung cancer radiotherapy--combination of ABC and external marker tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Victy Y W; Tung, Stewart Y; Ng, Alice W Y; Li, Francis A S; Leung, Joyce O Y

    2010-09-01

    In this article, the breath-hold and gating concepts were combined for application of lung cancer radiation treatment. The tumor movement was immobilized based on deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH), in which the breath-hold consistency and stability were monitored by infrared (IR) tracking and controlled by gating with a predefined threshold. The authors' goal is to derive the benefits from both techniques, namely, the minimized treatment margin and the known advantages of deep inspiration. The efficacy of the technique in terms of tumor immobility and treatment setup accuracy was evaluated in the study. Fourteen patients who were diagnosed with non small cell lung cancer were included in this study. The control of tumor immobility was investigated interfractionally and intrafractionally. The intrabreath-hold tumor motion was devised based on the external marker movement, in which the tumor-marker correlation was studied. The margin of the planning target volume (PTV) was evaluated based on two factors: (1) The treatment setup error accounts for the patient setup and interbreath-hold variations and (2) the intrabreath-hold tumor motion in which the residual tumor motion during irradiation was studied. As the result of the study, the group systematic error and group random error of treatment setup measured at the isocenter were 0.2(R) +/- 1.6, 1.0(A) +/- 2.0, and 0.3(S) +/- 1.5 mm in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and caudal-cranial (CC) directions, respectively. The Pearson correlation coefficient were 0.81 (LR), 0.76 (AP), and 0.85 (CC) mm and suggest tendency in linear correlation of tumor and marker movement. The intrabreath-hold tumor was small in all directions. The group PTV margins of 3.8 (LR), 4.6 (AP), and 4.8 (CC) mm were evaluated to account for both setup errors and residual tumor motion during irradiation. The study applies the DIBH technique in conjunction with IR positional tracking for tumor immobilization and treatment setup

  5. Cardiac dose reduction with deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy patients with and without regional nodal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Rosanna; Conroy, Leigh; Long, Karen; Walrath, Daphne; Li, Haocheng; Smith, Wendy; Hudson, Alana; Phan, Tien

    2015-09-22

    Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) reduces heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD) dose during left-sided breast radiation therapy (RT); however there is limited information about which patients derive the most benefit from DIBH. The primary objective of this study was to determine which patients benefit the most from DIBH by comparing percent reduction in mean cardiac dose conferred by DIBH for patients treated with whole breast RT ± boost (WBRT) versus those receiving breast/chest wall plus regional nodal irradiation, including internal mammary chain (IMC) nodes (B/CWRT + RNI) using a modified wide tangent technique. A secondary objective was to determine if DIBH was required to meet a proposed heart dose constraint of Dmean irradiation.

  6. Deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy for lung cancer: impact on image quality and registration uncertainty in cone beam CT image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte F; Bangsgaard, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the impact of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and tumour baseline shifts on image quality and registration uncertainty in image-guided DIBH radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced lung cancer. METHODS: Patients treated with daily cone beam CT (CBCT)-guided free...... and visualization of tumour and anatomical structures. We examined the impact of tumour baseline shift between consecutive DIBHs on CBCT image quality. RESULTS: CBCT scans from 15 patients were analysed. Intraobserver image registration uncertainty was approximately 2 mm in both FB and DIBH, except...... for the craniocaudal direction in FB, where it was >3 mm. On the 31st fraction, the intraobserver uncertainty increased compared with the second fraction. This increase was more pronounced in FB. Image quality scores improved in DIBH compared with FB for all parameters in all patients. Simulated tumour baseline shifts...

  7. Comparison of cardiac and lung doses for breast cancer patients with free breathing and deep inspiration breath hold technique in 3 dimensional conformal radiotherapy - a dosimetric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj Mani, Karthick; Poudel, Suresh; Maria Das, K. J.

    2017-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the cardio-pulmonary doses between Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) and Free Breathing (FB) technique in left sided breast irradiation. Materials & Methods: DIBH CT and FB CT were acquired for 10 left sided breast patients who underwent whole breast irradiation with or without nodal irradiation. Three fields single isocenter technique were used for patients with node positive patients along with two tangential conformal fields whereas only two tangential fields were used in node negative patients. All the critical structures like lungs, heart, esophagus, thyroid, etc., were delineated in both DIBH and FB scan. Both DIBH and FB scans were fused with the Dicom origin as they were acquired with the same Dicom coordinates. Plans were created in the DIBH scan for a dose range between 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Critical structures doses were recorded from the Dose Volume Histogram for both the DIBH and FB data set for evaluation. Results: The average mean heart dose in DIBH vs FB was 13.18 Gy vs 6.97 Gy, (p = 0.0063) significantly with DIBH as compared to FB technique. The relative reduction in average mean heart dose was 47.12%. The relative V5 reduced by 14.70% (i.e. 34.42% vs 19.72%, p = 0.0080), V10 reduced by 13.83% (i.e. 27.79 % vs 13.96%, p = 0.0073). V20 reduced by 13.19% (i.e. 24.54 % vs 11.35%, p = 0.0069), V30 reduced by 12.38% (i.e. 22.27 % vs 9.89 %, p = 0.0073) significantly with DIBH as compared to FB. The average mean left lung dose reduced marginally by 1.43 Gy (13.73 Gy vs 12.30 Gy, p = 0.4599) but insignificantly with DIBH as compared to FB. Other left lung parameters (V5, V10, V20 and V30) shows marginal decreases in DIBH plans compare to FB plans. Conclusion: DIBH shows a substantial reduction of cardiac doses but slight and insignificant reduction of pulmonary doses as compared with FB technique. Using the simple DIBH technique, we can effectively reduce the cardiac morbidity and at the same time radiation induced lung

  8. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for lung tumors: the potential value of target immobilization and reduced lung density in dose escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, J.; Debois, M.M.; Raben, A.; Mageras, G.S.; Lutz, W.R.; Mychalczak, B.; Schwartz, L.H.; Gloeggler, P.J.; Leibel, S.A.; Fuks, Z.; Kutcher, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Lung tumors are subject to movement due to respiratory motion. Conventionally, a margin is applied to the clinical target volume (CTV) to account for this and other treatment uncertainties. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric benefits of a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique which has two distinct features - deep inspiration which reduces lung density and breath-hold which immobilizes lung tumors. Both properties can potentially reduce the mass of normal lung tissue in the high dose region, thus improving the possibility of dose escalation. Methods and Materials: To study the efficacy of the DIBH technique, CT scans are acquired for each patient under 4 respiration conditions: free-breathing; DIBH; shallow inspiration breath-hold; shallow expiration breath-hold. The free-breathing and DIBH scans are used to generate treatment plans for comparison of standard and DIBH techniques, while the shallow inspiration and expiration scans provide information on the maximum extent of tumor motion under free-breathing conditions. To acquire the breath-hold scans, the patients are brought to reproducible respiration levels using spirometry and slow vital capacity maneuvers. For the treatment plan comparison free-breathing and DIBH planning target volumes (PTVs) are constructed consisting of the CTV plus a margin for setup error and lung tumor motion. For both plans the margin for setup error is the same while the margin for lung tumor motion differs. The margin for organ motion in free-breathing is determined by the maximum tumor excursions in the shallow inspiration and expiration CT scans. For the DIBH, tumor motion is reduced to the extent to which DIBH can be maintained and the margin for any residual tumor motion is determined from repeat fluoroscopic movies, acquired with the patient monitored using spirometry. Three-dimensional treatment plans, generated using apertures based on the free-breathing and DIBH PTVs, are

  9. Quantitative assessment of irradiated lung volume and lung mass in breast cancer patients treated with tangential fields in combination with deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp, Karin Sigrid; Zurl, Brigitte; Stranzl, Heidi; Winkler, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison of the amount of irradiated lung tissue volume and mass in patients with breast cancer treated with an optimized tangential-field technique with and without a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique and its impact on the normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP). Material and Methods: Computed tomography datasets of 60 patients in normal breathing (NB) and subsequently in DIBH were compared. With a Real-Time Position Management Respiratory Gating System (RPM), anteroposterior movement of the chest wall was monitored and a lower and upper threshold were defined. Ipsilateral lung and a restricted tangential region of the lung were delineated and the mean and maximum doses calculated. Irradiated lung tissue mass was computed based on density values. NTCP for lung was calculated using a modified Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. Results: Mean dose to the ipsilateral lung in DIBH versus NB was significantly reduced by 15%. Mean lung mass calculation in the restricted area receiving ≤ 20 Gy (M 20 ) was reduced by 17% in DIBH but associated with an increase in volume. NTCP showed an improvement in DIBH of 20%. The correlation of individual breathing amplitude with NTCP proved to be independent. Conclusion: The delineation of a restricted area provides the lung mass calculation in patients treated with tangential fields. DIBH reduces ipsilateral lung dose by inflation so that less tissue remains in the irradiated region and its efficiency is supported by a decrease of NTCP. (orig.)

  10. Reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold irradiation with forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer significantly reduces cardiac radiation exposure compared to inverse intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolukbasi, Yasemin; Saglam, Yucel; Selek, Ugur; Topkan, Erkan; Kataria, Anglina; Unal, Zeynep; Alpan, Vildan

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the objective utility of our clinical routine of reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold irradiation for left-sided breast cancer patients on reducing cardiac exposure. Free-breathing and reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold scans were evaluated for our 10 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients treated with reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold. The study was based on the adjuvant dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2 Gy/fraction. Both inverse and forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated for each computed tomography dataset. Reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold plans with forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly spared the heart and left anterior descending artery compared to generated free-breathing plans based on mean doses - free-breathing vs reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold, left ventricle (296.1 vs 94.5 cGy, P = 0.005), right ventricle (158.3 vs 59.2 cGy, P = 0.005), left anterior descending artery (171.1 vs 78.1 cGy, P = 0.005), and whole heart (173.9 vs 66 cGy, P = 0.005), heart V20 (2.2% vs 0%, P = 0.007) and heart V10 (4.2% vs 0.3%, P = 0.007) - whereas they revealed no additional burden on the ipsilateral lung. Reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold and free-breathing plans with inverse intensity-modulated radiotherapy provided similar organ at risk sparing by reducing the mean doses to the left ventricle, left anterior descending artery, heart, V10-V20 of the heart and right ventricle. However, forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy showed significant reduction in doses to the left ventricle, left anterior descending artery, heart, right ventricle, and contralateral breast (mean dose, 248.9 to 12.3 cGy, P = 0.005). The mean doses for free-breathing vs reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold of the proximal left anterior descending artery were 1.78 vs 1.08 Gy and of the distal left anterior descending artery were 8.11 vs 3.89 Gy, whereas mean distances to the 50 Gy

  11. Functional Mechanism of Lung Mosaic CT Attenuation: Assessment with Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Perfusion SPECT-CT Fusion Imaging and Non-Breath-Hold Technegas SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, K.; Yasuhiko, K.; Iwanaga, H.; Tokuda, O.; Matsunaga, N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The functional mechanism of lung mosaic computed tomography attenuation (MCA) in pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) and obstructive airway disease (OAD) has not yet been fully clarified. Purpose: To clarify the mechanism of MCA in these diseases by assessing the relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at MCA sites with the use of automated deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. Material and Methods: Subjects were 42 PVD patients (31 pulmonary thromboembolism, four primary/two secondary pulmonary hypertension, and five Takayasu arteritis), 12 OAD patients (five acute asthma, four obliterative bronchiolitis, and three bronchiectasis), and 12 normal controls, all of whom had MCA on DIBrH CT. The relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at the lung slices with MCA was assessed using DIBrH perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. The severity of perfusion defects with or without MCA was quantified by regions-of-interest analysis. Results: On DIBrH CT and perfusion SPECT, in contrast to no noticeable CT attenuation abnormality and fairly uniform perfusion in controls, 60 MCA and 274 perfusion defects in PVD patients, and 18 MCA and 61 defects in OAD patients were identified, with a total of 77 ventilation defects on Technegas SPECT in all patients. SPECT-CT correlation showed that, throughout the 78 MCA sites of all patients, lung perfusion was persistently decreased at low CT attenuation and preserved at intervening high CT attenuation, while lung ventilation was poorly correlated with CT attenuation change. The radioactivity ratios of reduced perfusion and the intervening preserved perfusion at the 78 perfusion defects with MCA were significantly lower than those at the remaining 257 defects without MCA (P<0.0001). Conclusion: Although further validation is

  12. Functional Mechanism of Lung Mosaic CT Attenuation: Assessment with Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Perfusion SPECT-CT Fusion Imaging and Non-Breath-Hold Technegas SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, K.; Yasuhiko, K. (Dept. of Radiology, St. Hill Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)); Iwanaga, H.; Tokuda, O.; Matsunaga, N. (Dept. of Radiology, Yamaguchi Univ. School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan))

    2009-01-15

    Background: The functional mechanism of lung mosaic computed tomography attenuation (MCA) in pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) and obstructive airway disease (OAD) has not yet been fully clarified. Purpose: To clarify the mechanism of MCA in these diseases by assessing the relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at MCA sites with the use of automated deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. Material and Methods: Subjects were 42 PVD patients (31 pulmonary thromboembolism, four primary/two secondary pulmonary hypertension, and five Takayasu arteritis), 12 OAD patients (five acute asthma, four obliterative bronchiolitis, and three bronchiectasis), and 12 normal controls, all of whom had MCA on DIBrH CT. The relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at the lung slices with MCA was assessed using DIBrH perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. The severity of perfusion defects with or without MCA was quantified by regions-of-interest analysis. Results: On DIBrH CT and perfusion SPECT, in contrast to no noticeable CT attenuation abnormality and fairly uniform perfusion in controls, 60 MCA and 274 perfusion defects in PVD patients, and 18 MCA and 61 defects in OAD patients were identified, with a total of 77 ventilation defects on Technegas SPECT in all patients. SPECT-CT correlation showed that, throughout the 78 MCA sites of all patients, lung perfusion was persistently decreased at low CT attenuation and preserved at intervening high CT attenuation, while lung ventilation was poorly correlated with CT attenuation change. The radioactivity ratios of reduced perfusion and the intervening preserved perfusion at the 78 perfusion defects with MCA were significantly lower than those at the remaining 257 defects without MCA (P<0.0001). Conclusion: Although further validation is

  13. Radiation-induced second malignancies after involved-node radiotherapy with deep-inspiration breath-hold technique for early stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: a dosimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Uwe; Sumila, Marcin; Robotka, Judith; Weber, Damien; Gruber, Günther

    2014-02-18

    To estimate the risk of radiation induced second cancers after radiotherapy using deep-inspiration breath-hold (DI) technique with three-dimensional conformal (3DCRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). Early-stage HL with mediastinal and supraclavicular involvement was studied using an Alderson phantom. A whole body CT was performed and all tissues were delineated. The clinical target volumes and planning target volumes (PTV) were determined according to the German Hodgkin study group guidelines. Free-breathing (FB) technique and DI technique were simulated by different safety margins for the PTV definition. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. Second cancer risk was estimated for various tissues with a second cancer model including fractionation. When compared with FB-3DCRT, estimated relative life time attributable risk (LAR) of cancer induction after DI-3DCRT was 0.86, 0.76, 0.94 and 0.92 for breast, lung, esophagus and stomach, respectively. With DI-VMAT, the corresponding values were 2.05, 1.29, 1.01, 0.93, respectively. For breast cancer, the LAR observed with DI-VMAT was not substantially distinguishable from the LAR computed for mantle RT with an administered dose of 40 Gy. This study suggests that DI may reduce the LAR of secondary cancers of all OARs and may be a valuable technique when using 3DCRT. Conversely, VMAT may increase substantially the LAR and should be cautiously implemented in clinical practice.

  14. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervino, Laura I; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B

    2009-01-01

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  15. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerviño, Laura I.; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A.; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-11-01

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  16. Deep inspiration breath hold with electromagnetic confirmation of chest wall position for adjuvant therapy of left-sided breast cancer: Technique and accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathpal, Madeera; Tinnel, Brent; Sun, Kelly; Ninneman, Stephanie; Malmer, Cynthia; Wendt, Stacie; Buff, Sheena; Valentich, David; Gossweiler, Marisa; Macdonald, Dusten

    2016-01-01

    With most patients now living long after their breast cancer diagnosis, minimizing long-term side effects of breast cancer treatment, such as reducing late cardiac and pulmonary side effects of radiation therapy (RT), is particularly important. It is now possible to use an electromagnetic tracking system to allow real-time tracking of chest wall (CW) position during the delivery of RT. Here, we report our experience using electromagnetic surface transponders as an added measure of CW position during deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). We conducted a single-institution institutional review board-approved retrospective review of 15 female left-sided breast cancer patients treated between July 2012 and June 2013 with conventional whole breast radiation. We compared daily port films with treatment planning digitally reconstructed radiographs to establish daily setup accuracy, then used Calypso tracings to compare the position of the CW during the daily port film with the position of the CW during that day's treatment to determine the reproducibility of the breath hold position. Finally, we created competing treatment plans not using DIBH and used a paired t test to compare mean heart (MH) and left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery dose between the 2 techniques. Mean total error (inter- and intrafraction) was dominated by interfraction error and was greatest in the longitudinal direction with a mean of 2.13 mm and 2 standard deviations of 8.2 mm. DIBH significantly reduced MH and LAD dose versus free breathing plans (MH, 1.26 Gy vs 2.84 Gy, P ≤ .001; LAD, 5.49 Gy vs 18.15 Gy, P ≤ .001). This study demonstrates that DIBH with electromagnetic confirmation of CW position is feasible, and allows potential improvement in the accurate delivery of adjuvant RT therapy for breast cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Deep Inspiration Breath Hold [(18)F]FDG PET-CT on 4-rings scanners in evaluating lung lesions: evidences from a phantom and a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caobelli, Federico; Puta, Erinda; Kaiser, Stefano Ren; Massetti, Valentina; Andreoli, Michela; Mostarda, Angelica; Soffientini, Alberto; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Guerra, Ugo Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the clinical feasibility of a Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) (18)F-FDG PET-CT acquisition in apnea and compare the results obtained between these acts of acquisition in apnea and in Free Breathing in the evaluation of lung lesions. A pre-clinical phantom study was performed to evaluate the shortest simulated DIBH time according to the minimum detectable lesion that can be detected by our ultrasound scanner. This study was conducted by changing acquisition time and sphere-to-background activity ratio values and by using radioactivity densities similar to those generally found in clinical examinations. In the clinical study, 25 patients with pulmonary lesions underwent a standard whole body (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan in free breathing followed by a 20s single thorax acquisition PET/CT in DIBH acquisition. The phantom study indicated that a 20-s acquisition time provides an accurate evaluation of smallest sphere shaped lesions. In the clinical study, PET-CT scans obtained in DIBH studies showed a significant reduction of misalignment between the PET and CT scan images and an increase of SUVmax compared to free breathing acquisitions. A correlation between the %BH-index and lesion displacement between PET and CT images in FB acquisition was demonstrated, significantly higher for lesions with a displacement>8mm. The single 20s acquisition of DIBH PET-CT is a feasible technique for lung lesion detection in the clinical setting. It only requires a minor increase in examination time without special patient training. 20s DIBH scan provided a more precise measurement of SUVmax, especially for lesions in the lower lung lobes which usually show greater displacement between PET and CT scan images in FB acquisition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  18. Feasibility study of deep inspiration breath-hold based volumetric modulated arc therapy for locally advanced left sided breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Shanmugam Thirumalai; Radha, Chandrasekaran Anu; Kathirvel, Murugesan; Arun, Gandhi; Subramanian, Shanmuga

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) based volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for locally advanced left sided breast cancer patients undergoing radical mastectomy. DIBH immobilizes the tumor bed providing dosimetric benefits over free breathing (FB). Ten left sided post mastectomy patients were immobilized in a supine position with both the arms lifted above the head on a hemi-body vaclock. Two thermoplastic masks were prepared for each patient, one for normal free breathing and a second made with breath-hold to maintain reproducibility. DIBH CT scans were performed in the prospective mode of the Varian real time position management (RPM) system. The planning target volume (PTV) included the left chest wall and supraclavicular nodes and PTV prescription dose was 5000cGy in 25 fractions. DIBH-3DCRT planning was performed with the single iso-centre technique using a 6MV photon beam and the field-in-field technique. VMAT plans for FB and DIBH contained two partial arcs (179o-300oCCW/CW). Dose volume histograms of PTV and OAR's were analyzed for DIBH-VMAT, FB-VMAT and DIBH-3DCRT. In DIBH mode daily orthogonal (0o and 90o) KV images were taken to determine the setup variability and weekly twice CBCT to verify gating threshold level reproducibility. DIBH-VMAT reduced the lung and heart dose compared to FB-VMAT, while maintaining similar PTV coverage. The mean heart V30Gy was 2.3% ±2.7, 5.1% ±3.2 and 3.3% ±7.2 and for left lung V20Gy was 18.57% ±2.9, 21.7% ±3.9 and 23.5% ±5.1 for DIBH-VMAT, FB-VMAT and DIBH-3DCRT respectively. DIBH-VMAT significantly reduced the heart and lung dose for left side chest wall patients compared to FB-VMAT. PTV conformity index, homogeneity index, ipsilateral lung dose and heart dose were better for DIBH-VMAT compared to DIBH-3DCRT. However, contralateral lung and breast volumes exposed to low doses were increased with DIBH-VMAT.

  19. Monitoring deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided localized breast cancer radiotherapy with an in-house developed laser distance meter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christer A; Abramova, Tatiana; Frengen, Jomar; Lund, Jo-Åsmund

    2017-09-01

    Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) in left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy is a technique to reduce cardiac and pulmonary doses while maintaining target coverage. This study aims at evaluating an in-house developed DIBH system. Free-breathing (FB) and DIBH plans were generated for 22 left-sided localized breast cancer patients who had radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery. All patients were treated utilizing an in-house laser distance measuring system. 50 Gy was prescribed, and parameters of interest were target coverage, left anterior descending coronary artery, (LAD) and heart doses. Portal images were acquired and the reproducibility and stability of DIBH treatment were compared to FB. The comparing result shows there is a significant reduction in all LAD and heart dose statistics for DIBH compared to FB plans without compromising the target coverage. The maximum LAD dose was reduced from 43.7 Gy to 29.0 Gy and the volume of the heart receiving >25 Gy was reduced from 3.3% to 1.0% using the in-house system, both statistically significant. The in-house system gave a reproducible and stable DIBH treatment where the systematic error ∑, and random error σ, were less than 2.2 mm in all directions, but were not significantly better than at FB. The system was well tolerated and all patients completed their treatment sessions with DIBH. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with the deep-inspiration breath-hold technique in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumier, Amaury; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Gilmore, Jennifer; Beaudre, Anne; Blanchard, Pierre; el Nemr, Mohammed; Azoury, Farez; al Hamokles, Hweej; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Girinsky, Theodore

    2012-03-15

    To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's disease. Patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for left-sided breast cancer: An analysis of predictors for organ-at-risk sparing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, Steven; Takita, Cristiane; Reis, Isildinha; Zhao, Wei; Amestoy, William; Wright, Jean

    2015-01-01

    To identify anatomic and treatment characteristics that correlate with organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique to guide patient selection for this technique. Anatomic and treatment characteristics and radiation doses to OARs were compared between free-breathing and DIBH plans. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors independently predicting for cardiac sparing. We identified 64 patients: 44 with intact breast and 20 postmastectomy. For changes measured directly on treatment planning scans, DIBH plans decreased heart-chest wall length (6.5 vs 5.0cm, p < 0.001), and increased lung volume (1074.4 vs 1881.3cm(3), p < 0.001), and for changes measured after fields are set, they decreased maximum heart depth (1.1 vs 0.3cm, p < 0.001) and heart volume in field (HVIF) (9.1 vs 0.9cm(3), p < 0.001). DIBH reduced the mean heart dose (3.4 vs 1.8Gy, p < 0.001) and lung V20 (19.6% vs 15.3%, p < 0.001). Regression analysis found that only change in HVIF independently predicted for cardiac sparing. We identified patients in the bottom quartile of the dosimetric benefits seen with DIBH and categorized the cause of this "minimal benefit." Overall, 29% of patients satisfied these criteria for minimal benefit with DIBH and the most common cause was favorable baseline anatomy. Only the reduction in HVIF predicted for reductions in mean heart dose; no specific anatomic surrogate for the dosimetric benefits of DIBH technique could be identified. Most patients have significant dosimetric benefit with DIBH, and this technique should be planned and evaluated for all patients receiving left-sided breast/chest wall radiation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy in left-sided breast cancer: Dosimetrical comparison and clinical feasibility in 20 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Rodrigo; Ammerpohl, Mark; Morgenstern, Christina; Nielinger, Lisa; Erichsen, Patricia; Abdallah, Abdallah; Galalae, Razvan

    2015-09-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer (BC) is a well-established indication. The risk of ischaemic heart disease after radiotherapy for BC increases linearly with the heart mean dose with no apparent threshold. Radiotherapy to the left breast in deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) reduces the dose to the heart. A new linac system with an integrated surface scanner (SS) for DIBH treatments was recently installed in our department. We tested it for potential benefits, safety, patients' acceptance/compliance and associated additional workload. Twenty consecutive patients following BCS for breast carcinoma of the left side were enrolled in our institutional DIBH protocol. We compared dose to the heart and ipsilateral lung (IL) between plans in DIBH and free breathing (FB) using standard defined parameters: mean dose, maximal dose to a volume of 2 cm(3) (D2 cm (3)), volume receiving ≥ 5 Gy (V5), 10 Gy (V10), 15 Gy (V15) and 20 Gy (V20). Comparison of median calculated dose values was performed using a two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank test. DIBH was associated with a statistically significant reduction (p < 0.001) in all studied parameters for the heart and the IL. In 16 of 20 patients the heart D2 cm (3) was less than 42 Gy in DIBH. In FB the heart D2 cm (3) was ≥ 42 Gy in 17 of 20 patients. The median daily treatment time was 9 min. Radiotherapy of the left breast in DIBH using a SS could easily be incorporated into daily routine and is associated with significant dose reduction to the heart and IL.

  3. Prospective assessment of deep inspiration breath-hold using 3-dimensional surface tracking for irradiation of left-sided breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanguturi, Shyam K; Lyatskaya, Yulia; Chen, Yuhui; Catalano, Paul J; Chen, Ming Hui; Yeo, Wee-Pin; Marques, Alex; Truong, Linh; Yeh, Mary; Orlina, Lawrence; Wong, Julia S; Punglia, Rinaa S; Bellon, Jennifer R

    2015-01-01

    Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) is used to decrease cardiac irradiation during radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer. The patients most likely to benefit and the impact on treatment time remain largely unknown. We sought to identify predictors for the use of DIBH and to quantify differences in dosimetry and treatment time using a prospective registry. A total of 150 patients with left breast cancer were enrolled. All patients were simulated with both free breathing (FB) and DIBH. RT was delivered by either modality. Alternate scans were planned with use of deformable registration to include identical RT volumes. DIBH patients were monitored by a real-time surface tracking system, AlignRT (Vision RT, Ltd, London, United Kingdom). Baseline characteristics and treatment times were compared by Fisher exact test and Wilcoxon rank sum test. Dosimetric endpoints were analyzed by Wilcoxon signed rank test, and linear regression identified predictors for change in mean heart dose (∆MHD). We treated 38 patients with FB and 110 with DIBH. FB patients were older, more likely to have heart and lung disease, and less likely to receive chemotherapy or immediate reconstruction (all P 20 cGy improvement in MHD in 107 patients but a >20 cGy increase in MHD in 14. Both MHD and lung V20 were significantly lower in DIBH than in paired FB plans. On multivariate analysis, younger age (4.18 cGy per year; P < .0001), higher body mass index (6.06 cGy/kg/m(2); P = .0018), and greater change in lung volumes (130 cGy/L; P = .003) were associated with greater ∆MHD. DIBH improves cardiac dosimetry without significantly impacting treatment time in most patients. Greater inspiratory lung volumes augment this benefit. Because the improvement with DIBH was not uniform, patients should be scanned with both FB and DIBH. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dosimetric Benefits of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined With the Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique in Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paumier, Amaury, E-mail: amaury.paumier@igr.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Ghalibafian, Mithra; Gilmore, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Beaudre, Anne [Physics Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Blanchard, Pierre; El Nemr, Mohammed; Azoury, Farez; Al Hamokles, Hweej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Lefkopoulos, Dimitri [Physics Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Girinsky, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. Results: There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Conclusions: Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department.

  5. Cardiac and pulmonary dose reduction for tangentially irradiated breast cancer, utilizing deep inspiration breath-hold with audio-visual guidance, without compromising target coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikstroem, Johan; Hjelstuen, Mari H.B.; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Dybvik, Kjell Ivar

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose. Cardiac disease and pulmonary complications are documented risk factors in tangential breast irradiation. Respiratory gating radiotherapy provides a possibility to substantially reduce cardiopulmonary doses. This CT planning study quantifies the reduction of radiation doses to the heart and lung, using deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). Patients and methods. Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two CT scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPM respiratory gating system. Audio coaching and visual feedback (audio-visual guidance) were used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed with conformal tangential fields, focusing on good coverage (V95>98%) of the planning target volume (PTV). Dose-volume histograms were calculated and compared. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, ipsilateral lung and the contralateral breast were assessed. Results. Compared to FB, the DIBH-plans obtained lower cardiac and pulmonary doses, with equal coverage of PTV. The average mean heart dose was reduced from 3.7 to 1.7 Gy and the number of patients with >5% heart volume receiving 25 Gy or more was reduced from four to one of the 17 patients. With DIBH the heart was completely out of the beam portals for ten patients, with FB this could not be achieved for any of the 17 patients. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 18.1 to 6.4 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 20 Gy was reduced from 12.2 to 10.0%. Conclusion. Respiratory gating with DIBH, utilizing audio-visual guidance, reduces cardiac and pulmonary doses for tangentially treated left sided breast cancer patients without compromising the target coverage

  6. Dosimetric Benefits of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined With the Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique in Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paumier, Amaury; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Gilmore, Jennifer; Beaudre, Anne; Blanchard, Pierre; El Nemr, Mohammed; Azoury, Farez; Al Hamokles, Hweej; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Girinsky, Theodore

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin’s disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with early-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. Results: There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Conclusions: Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin’s lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department.

  7. Feasibility of deep-inspiration breath-hold PET/CT with short-time acquisition: detectability for pulmonary lesions compared with respiratory-gated PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shozo; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Yamamoto, Haruki; Hiko, Shigeaki; Horita, Akihiro; Nakajima, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) PET/CT with short-time acquisition and respiratory-gated (RG) PET/CT are performed for pulmonary lesions to reduce the respiratory motion artifacts, and to obtain more accurate standardized uptake value (SUV). DIBH PET/CT demonstrates significant advantages in terms of rapid examination, good quality of CT images and low radiation exposure. On the other hand, the image quality of DIBH PET is generally inferior to that of RG PET because of short-time acquisition resulting in poor signal-to-noise ratio. In this study, RG PET has been regarded as a gold standard, and its detectability between DIBH and RG PET studies was compared using each of the most optimal reconstruction parameters. In the phantom study, the most optimal reconstruction parameters for DIBH and RG PET were determined. In the clinical study, 19 cases were examined using each of the most optimal reconstruction parameters. In the phantom study, the most optimal reconstruction parameters for DIBH and RG PET were different. Reconstruction parameters of DIBH PET could be obtained by reducing the number of subsets for those of RG PET in the state of fixing the number of iterations. In the clinical study, high correlation in the maximum SUV was observed between DIBH and RG PET studies. The clinical result was consistent with that of the phantom study surrounded by air since most of the lesions were located in the low pulmonary radioactivity. DIBH PET/CT may be the most practical method which can be the first choice to reduce respiratory motion artifacts if the detectability of DIBH PET is equivalent with that of RG PET. Although DIBH PET may have limitations in suboptimal signal-to-noise ratio, most of the lesions surrounded by low background radioactivity could provide nearly equivalent image quality between DIBH and RG PET studies when each of the most optimal reconstruction parameters was used.

  8. Feasibility of deep-inspiration breath-hold PET/CT with short-time acquisition. Detectability for pulmonary lesions compared with respiratory-gated PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Shozo; Yamamoto, Haruki; Hiko, Shigeaki; Horita, Akihiro; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Nakajima, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT with short-time acquisition and respiratory-gated (RG) PET/CT are performed for pulmonary lesions to reduce the respiratory motion artifacts, and to obtain more accurate standardized uptake value (SUV). DIBH PET/CT demonstrates significant advantages in terms of rapid examination, good quality of CT images and low radiation exposure. On the other hand, the image quality of DIBH PET is generally inferior to that of RG PET because of short-time acquisition resulting in poor signal-to-noise ratio. In this study, RG PET has been regarded as a gold standard, and its detectability between DIBH and RG PET studies was compared using each of the most optimal reconstruction parameters. In the phantom study, the most optimal reconstruction parameters for DIBH and RG PET were determined. In the clinical study, 19 cases were examined using each of the most optimal reconstruction parameters. In the phantom study, the most optimal reconstruction parameters for DIBH and RG PET were different. Reconstruction parameters of DIBH PET could be obtained by reducing the number of subsets for those of RG PET in the state of fixing the number of iterations. In the clinical study, high correlation in the maximum SUV was observed between DIBH and RG PET studies. The clinical result was consistent with that of the phantom study surrounded by air since most of the lesions were located in the low pulmonary radioactivity. DIBH PET/CT may be the most practical method which can be the first choice to reduce respiratory motion artifacts if the detectability of DIBH PET is equivalent with that of RG PET. Although DIBH PET may have limitations in suboptimal signal-to-noise ratio, most of the lesions surrounded by low background radioactivity could provide nearly equivalent image quality between DIBH and RG PET studies when each of the most optimal reconstruction parameters was used. (author)

  9. Utility of Deep Inspiration Breath Hold for Left-Sided Breast Radiation Therapy in Preventing Early Cardiac Perfusion Defects: A Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Timothy M., E-mail: zagar@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kaidar-Person, Orit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Tang, Xiaoli [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, West Harrison, New York (United States); Jones, Ellen E.; Matney, Jason; Das, Shiva K.; Green, Rebecca L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Sheikh, Arif [Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Khandani, Amir H.; McCartney, William H.; Oldan, Jorge Daniel; Wong, Terence Z. [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early cardiac single photon computed tomography (SPECT) findings after left breast/chest wall postoperative radiation therapy (RT) in the setting of deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective single-institution single-arm study of patients who were planned for tangential RT with DIBH to the left breast/chest wall (± internal mammary nodes). The DIBH was done by use of a controlled surface monitoring technique (AlignRT, Vision RT Ltd, London, UK). The RT was given with tangential fields and a heart block. Radiation-induced cardiac perfusion and wall motion changes were assessed by pre-RT and 6-month post-RT SPECT scans. A cumulative SPECT summed-rest score was used to quantify perfusion in predefined left ventricle segments. The incidence of wall motion abnormalities was assessed in each of these same segments. Results: A total of 20 patients with normal pre-RT scans were studied; their median age was 56 years (range, 39-72 years). Seven (35%) patients also received irradiation to the left internal mammary chain, and 5 (25%) received an additional RT field to supraclavicular nodes. The median heart dose was 94 cGy (range, 56-200 cGy), and the median V25{sub Gy} was zero (range, 0-0.1). None of the patients had post-RT perfusion or wall motion abnormalities. Conclusions: Our results suggest that DIBH and conformal cardiac blocking for patients receiving tangential RT for left-sided breast cancer is an effective means to avoid early RT-associated cardiac perfusion defects.

  10. Cardiac dosimetric evaluation of deep inspiration breath-hold level variances using computed tomography scans generated from deformable image registration displacement vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, Taylor; Rahn, Doug; Semenov, Denis; Gu, Xuejun; Yashar, Catheryn; Einck, John; Jiang, Steve; Cerviño, Laura

    2016-01-01

    There is a reduction in cardiac dose for left-sided breast radiotherapy during treatment with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) when compared with treatment with free breathing (FB). Various levels of DIBH may occur for different treatment fractions. Dosimetric effects due to this and other motions are a major component of uncertainty in radiotherapy in this setting. Recent developments in deformable registration techniques allow displacement vectors between various temporal and spatial patient representations to be digitally quantified. We propose a method to evaluate the dosimetric effect to the heart from variable reproducibility of DIBH by using deformable registration to create new anatomical computed tomography (CT) scans. From deformable registration, 3-dimensional deformation vectors are generated with FB and DIBH. The obtained deformation vectors are scaled to 75%, 90%, and 110% and are applied to the reference image to create new CT scans at these inspirational levels. The scans are then imported into the treatment planning system and dose calculations are performed. The average mean dose to the heart was 2.5 Gy (0.7 to 9.6 Gy) at FB, 1.2 Gy (0.6 to 3.8 Gy, p < 0.001) at 75% inspiration, 1.1 Gy (0.6 to 3.1 Gy, p = 0.004) at 90% inspiration, 1.0 Gy (0.6 to 3.0 Gy) at 100% inspiration or DIBH, and 1.0 Gy (0.6 to 2.8 Gy, p = 0.019) at 110% inspiration. The average mean dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was 19.9 Gy (2.4 to 46.4 Gy), 8.6 Gy (2.0 to 43.8 Gy, p < 0.001), 7.2 Gy (1.9 to 40.1 Gy, p = 0.035), 6.5 Gy (1.8 to 34.7 Gy), and 5.3 Gy (1.5 to 31.5 Gy, p < 0.001), correspondingly. This novel method enables numerous anatomical situations to be mimicked and quantifies the dosimetric effect they have on a treatment plan.

  11. Cardiac dosimetric evaluation of deep inspiration breath-hold level variances using computed tomography scans generated from deformable image registration displacement vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Taylor; Rahn, Doug; Semenov, Denis; Gu, Xuejun; Yashar, Catheryn; Einck, John; Jiang, Steve; Cerviño, Laura

    2016-01-01

    There is a reduction in cardiac dose for left-sided breast radiotherapy during treatment with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) when compared with treatment with free breathing (FB). Various levels of DIBH may occur for different treatment fractions. Dosimetric effects due to this and other motions are a major component of uncertainty in radiotherapy in this setting. Recent developments in deformable registration techniques allow displacement vectors between various temporal and spatial patient representations to be digitally quantified. We propose a method to evaluate the dosimetric effect to the heart from variable reproducibility of DIBH by using deformable registration to create new anatomical computed tomography (CT) scans. From deformable registration, 3-dimensional deformation vectors are generated with FB and DIBH. The obtained deformation vectors are scaled to 75%, 90%, and 110% and are applied to the reference image to create new CT scans at these inspirational levels. The scans are then imported into the treatment planning system and dose calculations are performed. The average mean dose to the heart was 2.5Gy (0.7 to 9.6Gy) at FB, 1.2Gy (0.6 to 3.8Gy, p inspiration, 1.1Gy (0.6 to 3.1Gy, p = 0.004) at 90% inspiration, 1.0Gy (0.6 to 3.0Gy) at 100% inspiration or DIBH, and 1.0Gy (0.6 to 2.8Gy, p = 0.019) at 110% inspiration. The average mean dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was 19.9Gy (2.4 to 46.4Gy), 8.6Gy (2.0 to 43.8Gy, p < 0.001), 7.2Gy (1.9 to 40.1Gy, p = 0.035), 6.5Gy (1.8 to 34.7Gy), and 5.3Gy (1.5 to 31.5Gy, p < 0.001), correspondingly. This novel method enables numerous anatomical situations to be mimicked and quantifies the dosimetric effect they have on a treatment plan. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiac dose reduction with deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy patients with and without regional nodal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, Rosanna; Conroy, Leigh; Long, Karen; Walrath, Daphne; Li, Haocheng; Smith, Wendy; Hudson, Alana; Phan, Tien

    2015-01-01

    Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) reduces heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD) dose during left-sided breast radiation therapy (RT); however there is limited information about which patients derive the most benefit from DIBH. The primary objective of this study was to determine which patients benefit the most from DIBH by comparing percent reduction in mean cardiac dose conferred by DIBH for patients treated with whole breast RT ± boost (WBRT) versus those receiving breast/chest wall plus regional nodal irradiation, including internal mammary chain (IMC) nodes (B/CWRT + RNI) using a modified wide tangent technique. A secondary objective was to determine if DIBH was required to meet a proposed heart dose constraint of D mean < 4 Gy in these two cohorts. Twenty consecutive patients underwent CT simulation both free breathing (FB) and DIBH. Patients were grouped into two cohorts: WBRT (n = 11) and B/CWRT + RNI (n = 9). 3D-conformal plans were developed and FB was compared to DIBH for each cohort using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests for continuous variables and McNemar’s test for discrete variables. The percent relative reduction conferred by DIBH in mean heart and LAD dose, as well as lung V 20 were compared between the two cohorts using Wilcox rank-sum testing. The significance level was set at 0.05 with Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. All patients had comparable target coverage on DIBH and FB. DIBH statistically significantly reduced mean heart and LAD dose for both cohorts. Percent reduction in mean heart and LAD dose with DIBH was significantly larger in the B/CWRT + RNI cohort compared to WBRT group (relative reduction in mean heart and LAD dose: 55.9 % and 72.1 % versus 29.2 % and 43.5 %, p < 0.02). All patients in the WBRT group and five patients (56 %) in the B/CWBRT + RNI group met heart D mean <4 Gy with FB. All patients met this constraint with DIBH. All patients receiving WBRT met D mean Heart < 4 Gy on FB, while only slightly over

  13. SU-F-T-514: Evaluation of the Accuracy of Free-Breathing and Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Gated Beam Delivery Using An Elekta Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jermoumi, M; Cao, D; Housley, D; Shepard, D; Xie, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we evaluated the performance of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy. We examined whether the use of either a short gating window or a long beam hold impacts the accuracy of the delivery Methods: The performance of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy was assessed using a 20cmX 20cm open field with the radiation delivered using a range of beam-on and beam-off time periods. Two SBRT plans were used to examine the accuracy of gated beam delivery for clinical treatment plans. For the SBRT cases, tests were performed for both free-breathing based gating and for gated delivery with a simulated breath-hold. A MatriXX 2D ion chamber array was used for data collection, and the gating accuracy was evaluated using gamma score. Results: For the 20cmX20cm open field, the gated beam delivery agreed closely with the non-gated delivery results. Discrepancies in the agreement, however, began to appear with a 5-to-1 ratio of the beam-off to beam-on. For these tight gating windows, each beam-on segment delivered a small number of monitor units. This finding was confirmed with dose distribution analysis from the delivery of the two VMAT plans where the gamma score(±1%,2%/1mm) showed passing rates in the range of 95% to 100% for gating windows of 25%, 38%, 50%, 63%, 75%, and 83%. Using a simulated sinusoidal breathing signal with a 4 second period, the gamma score of freebreathing gating and breath-hold gating deliveries were measured in the range of 95.7% to 100%. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that Elekta linacs can be used to accurately deliver respiratory gated treatments for both free-breathing and breath-hold patients. The accuracy of beams delivered in a gated delivery mode at low small MU proved higher than similar deliveries performed in a non-gated (manually interrupted) fashion.

  14. Accuracy of routine treatment planning 4-dimensional and deep-inspiration breath-hold computed tomography delineation of the left anterior descending artery in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Benjamin M; Vennarini, Sabina; Lin, Lilie; Freedman, Gary; Santhanam, Anand; Low, Daniel A; Both, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    To assess the feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) CT to accurately contour the left anterior descending artery (LAD), a primary indicator of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity for patients undergoing radiation therapy. Ten subjects were prospectively imaged with a cardiac-gated MRI protocol to determine cardiac motion effects, including the displacement of a region of interest comprising the LAD. A series of planar views were obtained and resampled to create a 3-dimensional (3D) volume. A 3D optical flow deformable image registration algorithm determined tissue displacement during the cardiac cycle. The measured motion was then used as a spatial boundary to characterize motion blurring of the radiologist-delineated LAD structure for a cohort of 10 consecutive patients enrolled prospectively on a breast study including 4DCT and DIBH scans. Coronary motion-induced blurring artifacts were quantified by applying an unsharp filter to accentuate the LAD structure despite the presence of motion blurring. The 4DCT maximum inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases were coregistered to determine the LAD displacement during tidal respiration, as visualized in 4DCT. The average 90th percentile heart motion for the region of interest was 0.7 ± 0.1 mm (left-right [LR]), 1.3 ± 0.6 mm (superior-inferior [SI]), and 0.6 ± 0.2 mm (anterior-posterior [AP]) in the cardiac-gated MRI cohort. The average relative increase in the number of voxels comprising the LAD contour was 69.4% ± 4.5% for the DIBH. The LAD volume overestimation had the dosimetric impact of decreasing the reported mean LAD dose by 23% ± 9% on average in the DIBH. During tidal respiration the average relative LAD contour increase was 69.3% ± 5.9% and 67.9% ± 4.6% for inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases, respectively. The average 90th percentile LAD motion was 4.8 ± 1.1 mm (LR), 0.9 ± 0.4 mm (SI), and 1

  15. Clinical experience with 3-dimensional surface matching-based deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided breast cancer radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Zagar, Timothy M; Bair, Eric; Jones, Ellen L; Fried, David; Zhang, Longzhen; Tracton, Gregg; Xu, Zijie; Leach, Traci; Chang, Sha; Marks, Lawrence B

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) surface matching is a novel method to administer deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer to reduce cardiac exposure. We analyzed port (x-ray) films to assess patient setup accuracy and treatment times to assess the practical workflow of this system. The data from 50 left-sided breast cancer patients treated with DIBH were studied. AlignRT (London, UK) was used. The distance between the field edge and the anterior pericardial shadow as seen on the routine port films (dPORT), and the corresponding distance seen on the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) from the planning (dDRR) were compared as a quantitative measure of setup accuracy. Variations of dPORT - dDRR over the treatment course were assessed. In a subset of 21 patients treated with tangential beams alone, the daily treatment durations were analyzed to assess the practical workflow of this system. Considering all 50 patients, the mean absolute systematic uncertainty between dPORT and dDRR was 0.20 cm (range, 0 to 1.22 cm), the mean systematic uncertainty was -0.07 cm (range, -1.22 to 0.67 cm), and their mean random uncertainty was 0.19 cm (range, 0 to 0.84 cm). There was no significant change in dPORT - dDRR during the course of treatment. The mean patient treatment duration for the 21 patients studied was 11 minutes 48 seconds. On intrapatient assessments, 15/21 had nonsignificant trends toward reduced treatment durations during their course of therapy. On interpatient comparisons, the mean treatment times declined as we gained more experience with this technique. The DIBH patient setup appears to provide a fairly reproducible degree of cardiac sparing with random uncertainties of ≈ 0.2 cm. The treatment durations are clinically acceptable and appear not to change significantly over time on an intrapatient basis, and to improve over time on an interpatient basis. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by

  16. Cardiac dose-sparing effects of deep-inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation : Is IMRT more beneficial than VMAT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Mazen; Kunzelmann, Leonie; Metzger, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G

    2017-10-01

    Given the reduction in death from breast cancer, as well as improvements in overall survival, adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the standard treatment for breast cancer. However, left-sided breast irradiation was associated with an increased rate of fatal cardiovascular events due to incidental irradiation of the heart. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to minimize cardiac toxicity of left-sided breast irradiation by new treatment methods such as deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and new radiation techniques, particularly intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DIBH irradiation on cardiac dose compared with free-breathing (FB) irradiation, while the secondary objective was to compare the advantages of IMRT versus VMAT plans in both the FB and the DIBH position for left-sided breast cancer. In all, 25 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients underwent CT simulation in the FB and DIBH position. Five patients were excluded with no cardiac displacement following DIBH-CT simulation. The other 20 patients were irradiated in the DIBH position using respiratory gating. Four different treatment plans were generated for each patient, an IMRT and a VMAT plan in the DIBH and in the FB position, respectively. The following parameters were used for plan comparison: dose to the heart, left anterior descending coronary artery (mean dose, maximum dose, D25% and D45%), ipsilateral, contralateral lung (mean dose, D20%, D30%) and contralateral breast (mean dose). The percentage in dose reduction for organs at risk achieved by DIBH for both IMRT and VMAT plans was calculated and compared for each patient by each treatment plan. DIBH irradiation significantly reduced mean dose to the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LADCA) using both IMRT (heart -20%; p = 0.0002, LADCA -9%; p = 0.001) and VMAT (heart -23%; p = 0.00003, LADCA -16%; p = 0

  17. SU-F-BRB-03: Quantifying Patient Motion During Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Using the ABC System with Simultaneous Surface Photogrammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Y; Rahimi, A; Sawant, A [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Active breathing control (ABC) has been used to reduce treatment margin due to respiratory organ motion by enforcing temporary breath-holds. However, in practice, even if the ABC device indicates constant lung volume during breath-hold, the patient may still exhibit minor chest motion. Consequently, therapists are given a false sense of security that the patient is immobilized. This study aims at quantifying such motion during ABC breath-holds by monitoring the patient chest motion using a surface photogrammetry system, VisionRT. Methods: A female patient with breast cancer was selected to evaluate chest motion during ABC breath-holds. During the entire course of treatment, the patient’s chest surface was monitored by a surface photogrammetry system, VisionRT. Specifically, a user-defined region-of-interest (ROI) on the chest surface was selected for the system to track at a rate of ∼3Hz. The surface motion was estimated by rigid image registration between the current ROI image captured and a reference image. The translational and rotational displacements computed were saved in a log file. Results: A total of 20 fractions of radiation treatment were monitored by VisionRT. After removing noisy data, we obtained chest motion of 79 breath-hold sessions. Mean chest motion in AP direction during breath-holds is 1.31mm with 0.62mm standard deviation. Of the 79 sessions, the patient exhibited motion ranging from 0–1 mm (30 sessions), 1–2 mm (37 sessions), 2–3 mm (11 sessions) and >3 mm (1 session). Conclusion: Contrary to popular assumptions, the patient is not completely still during ABC breath-hold sessions. In this particular case studied, the patient exhibited chest motion over 2mm in 14 out of 79 breath-holds. Underestimating treatment margin for radiation therapy with ABC could reduce treatment effectiveness due to geometric miss or overdose of critical organs. The senior author receives research funding from NIH, VisionRT, Varian Medical Systems

  18. SU-F-BRB-03: Quantifying Patient Motion During Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Using the ABC System with Simultaneous Surface Photogrammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Y; Rahimi, A; Sawant, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Active breathing control (ABC) has been used to reduce treatment margin due to respiratory organ motion by enforcing temporary breath-holds. However, in practice, even if the ABC device indicates constant lung volume during breath-hold, the patient may still exhibit minor chest motion. Consequently, therapists are given a false sense of security that the patient is immobilized. This study aims at quantifying such motion during ABC breath-holds by monitoring the patient chest motion using a surface photogrammetry system, VisionRT. Methods: A female patient with breast cancer was selected to evaluate chest motion during ABC breath-holds. During the entire course of treatment, the patient’s chest surface was monitored by a surface photogrammetry system, VisionRT. Specifically, a user-defined region-of-interest (ROI) on the chest surface was selected for the system to track at a rate of ∼3Hz. The surface motion was estimated by rigid image registration between the current ROI image captured and a reference image. The translational and rotational displacements computed were saved in a log file. Results: A total of 20 fractions of radiation treatment were monitored by VisionRT. After removing noisy data, we obtained chest motion of 79 breath-hold sessions. Mean chest motion in AP direction during breath-holds is 1.31mm with 0.62mm standard deviation. Of the 79 sessions, the patient exhibited motion ranging from 0–1 mm (30 sessions), 1–2 mm (37 sessions), 2–3 mm (11 sessions) and >3 mm (1 session). Conclusion: Contrary to popular assumptions, the patient is not completely still during ABC breath-hold sessions. In this particular case studied, the patient exhibited chest motion over 2mm in 14 out of 79 breath-holds. Underestimating treatment margin for radiation therapy with ABC could reduce treatment effectiveness due to geometric miss or overdose of critical organs. The senior author receives research funding from NIH, VisionRT, Varian Medical Systems

  19. Cardiac dose-sparing effects of deep-inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation. Is IMRT more beneficial than VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakka, Mazen; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G. [Coburg Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Coburg (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Faculty of Medicine, Erlangen (Germany); Kunzelmann, Leonie; Metzger, Martin [Coburg Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Coburg (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Given the reduction in death from breast cancer, as well as improvements in overall survival, adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the standard treatment for breast cancer. However, left-sided breast irradiation was associated with an increased rate of fatal cardiovascular events due to incidental irradiation of the heart. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to minimize cardiac toxicity of left-sided breast irradiation by new treatment methods such as deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and new radiation techniques, particularly intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DIBH irradiation on cardiac dose compared with free-breathing (FB) irradiation, while the secondary objective was to compare the advantages of IMRT versus VMAT plans in both the FB and the DIBH position for left-sided breast cancer. In all, 25 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients underwent CT simulation in the FB and DIBH position. Five patients were excluded with no cardiac displacement following DIBH-CT simulation. The other 20 patients were irradiated in the DIBH position using respiratory gating. Four different treatment plans were generated for each patient, an IMRT and a VMAT plan in the DIBH and in the FB position, respectively. The following parameters were used for plan comparison: dose to the heart, left anterior descending coronary artery (mean dose, maximum dose, D25% and D45%), ipsilateral, contralateral lung (mean dose, D20%, D30%) and contralateral breast (mean dose). The percentage in dose reduction for organs at risk achieved by DIBH for both IMRT and VMAT plans was calculated and compared for each patient by each treatment plan. DIBH irradiation significantly reduced mean dose to the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LADCA) using both IMRT (heart -20%; p = 0.0002, LADCA -9%; p = 0.001) and VMAT (heart -23%; p = 0.00003, LADCA -16%; p = 0

  20. Adaptation requirements due to anatomical changes in free-breathing and deep-inspiration breath-hold for standard and dose-escalated radiotherapy of lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibolt, Patrik; Ottosson, Wiviann; Sjöström, David

    2015-01-01

    to investigate the need for adaptation due to anatomical changes, for both standard (ST) and DE plans in free-breathing (FB) and DIBH. Material and methods. The effect of tumor shrinkage (TS), pleural effusion (PE) and atelectasis was investigated for patients and for a CIRS thorax phantom. Sixteen patients were...... computed tomography (CT) imaged both in FB and DIBH. Anatomical changes were simulated by CT information editing and re-calculations, of both ST and DE plans, in the treatment planning system. PE was systematically simulated by adding fl uid in the dorsal region of the lung and TS by reduction of the tumor...... GTV-T with increasing amount of fluid and increasing GTV-T for decreasing tumor volume. Maximum change in GTV-T of -3% (3 cm PE in FB for both ST and DE plans) and + 10% (2 cm TS in FB for DE plan) was observed. Large atelectasis reduction increased the GTV-T with 2% for FB...

  1. A gated deep inspiration breath‐hold radiation therapy technique using a linear position transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissova, Svetlana I.; Yewondwossen, Mammo H.; Andrew, John W.; Hale, Michael E.; Murphy, Carl H.; Purcell, Scott R.

    2005-01-01

    For patients with thoracic and abdominal lesions, respiration‐induced internal organ motion and deformations during radiation therapy are limiting factors for the administration of high radiation dose. To increase the dose to the tumor and to reduce margins, tumor movement during treatment must be minimized. Currently, several types of breath‐synchronized systems are in use. These systems include respiratory gating, deep inspiration breath‐hold, active breathing control, and voluntary breath‐hold. We used a linear position transducer (LPT) to monitor changes in a patient's abdominal cross‐sectional area. The LPT tracks changes in body circumference during the respiratory cycle using a strap connected to the LPT and wrapped around the patient's torso. The LPT signal is monitored by a computer that provides a real‐time plot of the patient's breathing pattern. In our technique, we use a CT study with multiple gated acquisitions. The Philips Medical Systems Q series CT imaging system is capable of operating in conjunction with a contrast injector. This allows a patient performing the deep inspiration breath‐hold maneuver to send a signal to trigger the CT scanner acquisitions. The LPT system, when interfaced to a LINAC, allows treatment to be delivered only during deep inspiration breath‐hold periods. Treatment stops automatically if the lung volume drops from a preset value. The whole treatment can be accomplished with 1 to 3 breath‐holds. This technique has been used successfully to combine automatically gated radiation delivery with the deep inspiration breath‐hold technique. This improves the accuracy of treatment for moving tumors, providing better target coverage, sparing more healthy tissue, and saving machine time. PACS numbers: 87.53.2j, 87.57.‐s PMID:15770197

  2. A case study evaluating deep inspiration breath-hold and intensity-modulated radiotherapy to minimise long-term toxicity in a young patient with bulky mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Jonathan M; Crook, Sarah; Wan, Kenneth; Scott, Lucille; Foroudi, Farshad

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma, but late toxicities such as cardiovascular disease and second malignancy are a major concern. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to reduce cardiac dose from mediastinal radiotherapy. A 24 year-old male with early-stage bulky mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma received involved-site radiotherapy as part of a combined modality programme. Simulation was performed in free breathing (FB) and DIBH. The target and organs at risk were contoured on both datasets. Free breathing-3D conformal (FB-3DCRT), DIBH-3DCRT, FB-IMRT and DIBH-IMRT were compared with respect to target coverage and doses to organs at risk. A 'butterfly' IMRT technique was used to minimise the low-dose bath. In our patient, both DIBH (regardless of mode of delivery) and IMRT (in both FB and DIBH) achieved reductions in mean heart dose. DIBH improved all lung parameters. IMRT reduced high dose (V20), but increased low dose (V5) to lung. DIBH-IMRT was chosen for treatment delivery. Advanced radiotherapy techniques have the potential to further optimise the therapeutic ratio in patients with mediastinal lymphoma. Benefits should be assessed on an individualised basis. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  3. TH-C-12A-11: Target Correlation of a 3D Surface Surrogate for Left Breast Irradiation Using the Respiratory-Gated Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong, Y; Walston, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of 3D optical surface imaging as a new surrogate for respiratory motion gated deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique for left breast cancer patients. Methods: Patients with left-sided breast cancer after lumpectomy or mastectomy were selected as candidates for DIBH technique for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free breathing (FB) and DIBH CTs to determine whether DIBH was beneficial in reducing heart doses. The Real-time Position Management (RPM) system was used to acquire patient's breathing trace during DIBH CT acquisition and treatment delivery. The reference 3D surface models from FB and DIBH CTs were generated and transferred to the “AlignRT” system for patient positioning and real-time treatment monitoring. MV Cine images were acquired for each beam as quality assurance for intra-fractional position verification. The chest wall excursions measured on these images were used to define the actual target position during treatment, and to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of RPM and AlignRT. Results: Reduction in heart dose can be achieved for left-sided breast patients using DIBH. Results showed that RPM has poor correlation with target position, as determined by the MV Cine imaging. This indicates that RPM may not be an adequate surrogate in defining the breath-hold level when used alone. Alternatively, the AlignRT surface imaging demonstrated a better correlation with the actual CW excursion during DIBH. Both the vertical and magnitude real-time deltas (RTDs) reported by AlignRT can be used as the gating parameter, with a recommend threshold of ±3 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: 3D optical surface imaging serves as a superior target surrogate for the left breast treatment when compared to RPM. Working together with the realtime MV Cine imaging, they ensure accurate patient setup and dose delivery, while minimizing the imaging dose to patients

  4. An effective deep-inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy technique for left-breast cancer: impact of post-mastectomy treatment, nodal coverage, and dose schedule on organs at risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rice L

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lynsey Rice,1,2 Christy Goldsmith,1,2 Melanie ML Green,2 Susan Cleator,1,2 Patricia M Price1,2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, The Harley Street Clinic, 2Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK Background: We developed, applied, and prospectively evaluated a novel deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH screening and delivery technique to optimize cardiac sparing in left-breast radiotherapy (RT at our clinic. The impact of set-up and dose variables upon organs at risk (OAR dose in DIBH RT was investigated.Methods and materials: All patients with left-breast cancer referred between 2011 and 2014 – of all disease stages, set-up variations, and dose prescriptions – were included. Radiographers used simple screening criteria at CT simulation, to systematically assess patients for obvious DIBH benefit and capability. Selected patients received forward-planned intensity-modulated RT (IMRT based on a DIBH CT scan. A 3D-surface monitoring system with visual feedback assured reproducible DIBH positioning during gated radiation delivery. Patient, target set-up, and OAR dose information were collected at treatment.Results: Of 272 patients who were screened, 4 withdrew, 56 showed no obvious advantage, and 56 showed benefit but had suitability issues; 156 patients were selected and successfully completed DIBH treatment. The technique was compatible with complex set-up and optimal target coverage was maintained. Comparison of free-breathing (FB and DIBH treatment plans in the first five patients enrolled confirmed DIBH reduced heart radiation by ~80% (p = 0.032. Low OAR doses were achieved overall: the mean (95% confidence interval [CI] heart dose was 1.17 (1.12–1.22 Gy, and the mean ipsilateral lung dose was 5.26 (5.01–5.52 Gy. Patients who underwent a standard radiation schedule (40 Gy/15# after breast-conserving surgery had the lowest OAR doses: post-mastectomy treatment, simultaneous supraclavicular (SCV node

  5. Is the Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique Superior to the Free Breathing Technique in Cardiac and Lung Sparing while Treating both Left-Sided Post-Mastectomy Chest Wall and Supraclavicular Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Darapu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of the deep inspirational breath-hold (DIBH technique and its dosimetric advantages over the free breathing (FB technique in cardiac (heart and left anterior descending artery [LAD] and ipsilateral lung sparing in left-sided post-mastectomy field-in-field conformal radiotherapy. DIBH is highly reproducible, and this study aims to find out its dosimetric benefits over FB. Materials and Methods: Nineteen left-sided mastectomy patients were immobilized using breast boards with both arms positioned above the head. All patients had 2 sets of planning CT images (one in FB and another in DIBH with a Biograph TruePoint HD CT scanner in the same setup. DIBH was performed by tracking the respiratory cycles using a Varian Real-Time Position Management system. The target (chest wall and supraclavicular region, organs at risk (OARs; ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, LAD, and contralateral breast, and other organs of interests were delineated as per the RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group contouring guidelines. The single-isocenter conformal fields in the field treatment plans were generated with the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (Varian Medical Systems for both FB and DIBH images, and the doses to the target and OARs were compared. The standard fractionation regimen of 50 Gy in 25 fractions over a period of 5 weeks was used for all patients in this study. Results and Discussion: The target coverage parameters (V95, V105, V107, and Dmean were found to be 97.8 ± 0.9, 6.1 ± 3.4, 0.2 ± 0.3, and 101.9 ± 0.5% in the FB plans and 98.1 ± 0.8, 6.1 ± 3.2, 0.2 ± 0.3, and 101.9 ± 0.4% in the DIBH plans, respectively. The plan quality indices (conformity index and homogeneity index also showed 1.3 ± 0.2 and 0.1 for the FB plans and 1.2 ± 0.3 and 0.1 for the DIBH plans, respectively. There was a significant reduction in dose to the heart in the DIBH plans compared to the FB plans, with p values of nearly 0 for the

  6. Lower mean heart dose with deep inspiration breath hold-whole breast irradiation compared with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation for women with left-sided tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Emma B; Kirsner, Steve M; Thames, Howard D; Mason, Bryan E; Nelson, Christopher L; Bloom, Elizabeth S

    For left-sided breast cancer, radiation to the heart is a concern. We present a comparison of mean heart and coronary artery biologically effective dose (BED) between accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and whole breast irradiation with deep inspiration breath-hold technique (DIBH-WBI). A total of 100 patients with left-sided, early-stage breast cancer were identified. Fifty underwent single-entry catheter-based APBI and 50 underwent DIBH-WBI. The heart, left anterior descending/interventricular branch, left main, and right coronary artery were delineated. BEDs were calculated from APBI treatment plans (34 Gy in 3.4 Gy twice daily fractions) and for 4 separate plans generated for each DIBH-WBI patient: 50 Gy in 25 fractions (50/25), 50/25 + 10/5 boost, 40/15, and 40/15 + 10/5 boost. BED to the heart and coronary vessels were statistically significantly higher with APBI than with any of the DIBH-WBI dose/fractionation schedules. For women with left-sided early-stage breast cancer, DIBH-WBI resulted in statistically significantly lower mean BED to the heart and coronary vessels compared with APBI. This is likely due to increased physical separation between the heart and tumor bed afforded by the DIBH-WBI technique. Long-term assessment of late effects in these tissues will be required to determine whether these differences are clinically significant. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization of 'involved-node' radiotherapy with the help of the deep-inspiration breath-hold technique in supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin disease; Optimisation de la radiotherapie 'involved-node' grace a l'inspiration profonde bloquee dans la maladie de Hodgkin supradiaphragmatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paumier, A.; Galibafian, M.; Gilmore, J.; Hanna, C.; Raphael, J.; Ferme, C.; Ribrag, V.; Girinsky, T. [Institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a retrospective study aimed at the assessment of conformational radiotherapy optimized with deep-inspiration-breath-hold in an 'involved-node' irradiation of a localized supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin disease. All patients of different ages and suffering from the Hodgkin disease at different stages had chemotherapy before radiotherapy. The treated volumes have been determined according to the 'involved-node' radiotherapy concept. Prescribed doses, doses received by the heart, coronaries and lungs, survival probability over three years are discussed. The concept appears to be efficient and not much toxic. Short communication

  8. Deep Inspiration Breath Hold—Based Radiation Therapy: A Clinical Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit, E-mail: judit.boda-heggemann@umm.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Knopf, Antje-Christin [The Institute of Cancer Research, Royal Cancer Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Simeonova-Chergou, Anna; Wertz, Hansjörg; Stieler, Florian; Jahnke, Anika; Jahnke, Lennart; Fleckenstein, Jens; Vogel, Lena; Arns, Anna; Blessing, Manuel; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Several recent developments in linear accelerator–based radiation therapy (RT) such as fast multileaf collimators, accelerated intensity modulation paradigms like volumeric modulated arc therapy and flattening filter-free (FFF) high-dose-rate therapy have dramatically shortened the duration of treatment fractions. Deliverable photon dose distributions have approached physical complexity limits as a consequence of precise dose calculation algorithms and online 3-dimensional image guided patient positioning (image guided RT). Simultaneously, beam quality and treatment speed have continuously been improved in particle beam therapy, especially for scanned particle beams. Applying complex treatment plans with steep dose gradients requires strategies to mitigate and compensate for motion effects in general, particularly breathing motion. Intrafractional breathing-related motion results in uncertainties in dose delivery and thus in target coverage. As a consequence, generous margins have been used, which, in turn, increases exposure to organs at risk. Particle therapy, particularly with scanned beams, poses additional problems such as interplay effects and range uncertainties. Among advanced strategies to compensate breathing motion such as beam gating and tracking, deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) gating is particularly advantageous in several respects, not only for hypofractionated, high single-dose stereotactic body RT of lung, liver, and upper abdominal lesions but also for normofractionated treatment of thoracic tumors such as lung cancer, mediastinal lymphomas, and breast cancer. This review provides an in-depth discussion of the rationale and technical implementation of DIBH gating for hypofractionated and normofractionated RT of intrathoracic and upper abdominal tumors in photon and proton RT.

  9. Active breathing control (ABC) for Hodgkin's disease: reduction in normal tissue irradiation with deep inspiration and implications for treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Kim, Leonard H.; Kini, Vijay R.; Jaffray, David A.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Wong, John W.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Active breathing control (ABC) temporarily immobilizes breathing. This may allow a reduction in treatment margins. This planning study assesses normal tissue irradiation and reproducibility using ABC for Hodgkin's disease. Methods and Materials: Five patients underwent CT scans using ABC obtained at the end of normal inspiration (NI), normal expiration (NE), and deep inspiration (DI). DI scans were repeated within the same session and 1-2 weeks later. To simulate mantle radiotherapy, a CTV1 was contoured encompassing the supraclavicular region, mediastinum, hila, and part of the heart. CTV2 was the same as CTV1 but included the whole heart. CTV3 encompassed the spleen and para-aortic lymph nodes. The planning target volume (PTV) was defined as CTV + 9 mm. PTVs were determined at NI, NE, and DI. A composite PTV (comp-PTV) based on the range of NI and NE PTVs was determined to represent the margin necessary for free breathing. Lung dose-mass histograms (DMH) for PTV1 and PTV2 and cardiac dose-volume histograms (DVH) for PTV3 were compared at the three different respiratory phases. Results: ABC was well-tolerated by all patients. DI breath-holds ranged from 34 to 45 s. DMHs determined for PTV1 revealed a median reduction in lung mass irradiated at DI of 12% (range, 9-24%; n = 5) compared with simulated free-breathing. PTV2 comparisons also showed a median reduction of 12% lung mass irradiated (range, 8-28%; n = 5). PTV3 analyses revealed the mean volume of heart irradiated decreased from 26% to 5% with deep inspiration (n = 5). Lung volume comparisons between intrasession and intersession DI studies revealed mean variations of 4%. Conclusion: ABC is well tolerated and reproducible. Radiotherapy delivered at deep inspiration with ABC may decrease normal tissue irradiation in Hodgkin's disease patients

  10. SU-F-J-22: Lung VolumeVariability Assessed by Bh-CBCT in 3D Surface Image Guided Deep InspirationBreath Hold (DIBH) Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A; Stanley, D; Papanikolaou, N; Crownover, R [University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: With the increasing use of DIBH techniques for left-sided breast cancer, 3D surface-image guided DIBH techniques have improved patient setup and facilitated DIBH radiation delivery. However, quantification of the daily separation between the heart and left breast still presents a challenge. One method of assuring separation is to ensure consistent left lung filling. With this in mind, the aim of this study is to retrospectively quantify left lung volume from weekly breath hold-CBCTs (bh-CBCT) of left-sided breast patients treated using a 3D surface imaging system. Methods: Ten patients (n=10) previously treated to the left breast using the C-Rad CatalystHD system (C-RAD AG, Uppsala Sweden) were evaluated. Patients were positioned with CatalystHD and with bh-CBCT. bh-CBCTs were acquired at the validation date, first day of treatment and at subsequent weekly intervals. Total treatment courses spanned from 3 to 5 weeks. bh-CBCT images were exported to VelocityAI and the left lung volume was segmented. Volumes were recorded and analyzed. Results: A total of 41 bh-CBCTs were contoured in VelocityAI for the 10 patients. The mean left lung volume for all patients was 1657±295cc based on validation bh-CBCT. With the subsequent lung volumes normalized to the validation lung volume, the mean relative ratios for all patients were 1.02±0.11, 0.97±0.14, 0.98±0.11, 1.02±0.01, and 0.96±0.02 for week 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Overall, the mean left lung volume change was ≤4.0% over a 5-week course; however left lung volume variations of up to 28% were noted in a select patient. Conclusion: With the use of the C-RAD CatalystHD system, the mean lung volume variability over a 5-week course of DIBH treatments was ≤4.0%. By minimizing left lung volume variability, heart to left breast separation maybe more consistently maintained. AN Gutierrez has a research grant from C-RAD AG.

  11. Breath holding spell

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000967.htm Breath holding spell To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Some children have breath holding spells. This is an involuntary stop in breathing ...

  12. Effects of Bronchoconstriction, Minute Ventilation, and Deep Inspiration on the Composition of Exhaled Breath Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debley, Jason S.; Ohanian, Arpy S.; Spiekerman, Charles F.; Aitken, Moira L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is composed of droplets of airway surface liquid (ASL) diluted by water vapor. The goal of this study was to determine if the composition of EBC is affected by changes in airway caliber, minute ventilation, or forceful exhalation, factors that may differ among subjects with asthma in cross-sectional studies. Methods: In a group of subjects with asthma, we measured the effects of the following: (1) a series of three deep-inspiration and forceful-exhalation maneuvers; (2) a doubling of minute ventilation; and (3) acute bronchoconstriction induced by methacholine on EBC volume, dilution of ASL, and concentration of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs). Results: With the exception of an increase in EBC volume with increased minute ventilation, there were no significant changes in the volume, dilution, or levels of CysLTs in EBC introduced by each of these factors. The CIs surrounding the differences introduced by each factor showed that the maximum systematic errors due to these factors were modest. Conclusions: These results indicate that changes in airway caliber, minute ventilation, or breathing pattern among subjects with asthma do not significantly alter the measurements of mediator concentrations in EBC. PMID:20382713

  13. Breath-Holding Spells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Breath-Holding Spells KidsHealth / For Parents / Breath-Holding Spells What's in ... Spells Print en español Espasmos de sollozo About Breath-Holding Spells Many of us have heard stories about stubborn ...

  14. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer: comparison of free breathing gating with the breath-hold technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N; Nøttrup, Trine Jakobi

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer implies a risk of late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. This is the first study to evaluate cardiopulmonary dose sparing of breathing adapted radiotherapy (BART) using free breathing gating......, and to compare this respiratory technique with voluntary breath-hold. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 17 patients were CT-scanned during non-coached breathing manoeuvre including free breathing (FB), end-inspiration gating (IG), end-expiration gating (EG), deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and end-expiration breath......-hold (EBH). The Varian Real-time Position Management system (RPM) was used to monitor respiratory movement and to gate the scanner. For each breathing phase, a population based internal margin (IM) was estimated based on average chest wall excursion, and incorporated into an individually optimised three...

  15. Blue breath holding is benign.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephenson, J B

    1991-01-01

    In their recent publication in this journal, Southall et al described typical cyanotic breath holding spells, both in otherwise healthy children and in those with brainstem lesions and other malformations. Their suggestions regarding possible autonomic disturbances may require further study, but they have adduced no scientific evidence to contradict the accepted view that in the intact child blue breath holding spells are benign. Those families in which an infant suffers an 'apparently life t...

  16. Efficacy of 'breath holding at ease' during CT pulmonary angiography in the improvement of contrast enhancement in pulmonary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, YeYuan Jourena; Ardley, Nicholas; Lau, Kenneth K.; Lau, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess whether breath-hold at ease by patients during the CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) will improve contrast enhancement in pulmonary arteries. Retrospective review was conducted on 51 consecutive CTPA studies undertaken in the traditional method of patients taking deep inspiration and breath-hold immediately prior to scanning, and subsequently 75 consecutive CTPA studies with patients breathing-holding at ease immediately prior to and during the scanning. Attenuation values in pulmonary arteries of different anatomical levels in both groups were measured in Hounsfield unit (HU). Results were compared between the two groups. The mean attenuation value in pulmonary arteries including pulmonary trunk, main and proximal pulmonary arteries calculated in HU in the 'deep inspiration and breath-hold' group was 327 HU (95% confidence interval: 315 to 339 HU). The mean attenuation value in pulmonary arteries in the 'breath hold at ease' group was calculated to be 390 HU (95% confidence interval: 381 to 399 HU); that is, an overall 17.95% increase (P-value<0.0001) in attenuation value in this group. By asking patients to breath-hold at ease instead of taking deep inspiration and breath hold prior to CTPA scan can effectively improve contrast enhancement in pulmonary arteries, therefore producing a higher-quality CT pulmonary angiography scan.

  17. Efficacy of 'breath holding at ease' during CT pulmonary angiography in the improvement of contrast enhancement in pulmonary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, YeYuan Jourena; Lau, Kenneth K; Ardley, Nicholas; Lau, Theodore

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study is to assess whether breath-hold at ease by patients during the CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) will improve contrast enhancement in pulmonary arteries. Retrospective review was conducted on 51 consecutive CTPA studies undertaken in the traditional method of patients taking deep inspiration and breath-hold immediately prior to scanning, and subsequently 75 consecutive CTPA studies with patients breathing-holding at ease immediately prior to and during the scanning. Attenuation values in pulmonary arteries of different anatomical levels in both groups were measured in Hounsfield unit (HU). Results were compared between the two groups. The mean attenuation value in pulmonary arteries including pulmonary trunk, main and proximal pulmonary arteries calculated in HU in the 'deep inspiration and breath-hold' group was 327 HU (95% confidence interval: 315 to 339 HU). The mean attenuation value in pulmonary arteries in the 'breath hold at ease' group was calculated to be 390 HU (95% confidence interval: 381 to 399 HU); that is, an overall 17.95% increase (P-value breath-hold at ease instead of taking deep inspiration and breath hold prior to CTPA scan can effectively improve contrast enhancement in pulmonary arteries, therefore producing a higher-quality CT pulmonary angiography scan. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  18. Breathing adapted radiotherapy of breast cancer: reduction of cardiac and pulmonary doses using voluntary inspiration breath-hold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders N; Korreman, Stine; Nyström, Håkan

    2004-01-01

    of a monitored voluntary breath-hold technique for right-sided as well as for left-sided tumours. PATIENTS AND METHODS: After breast-conserving surgery, 16 patients were CT-scanned in distinct respiratory phases using the varian real-time position management system for the monitoring of respiratory...... anterioposterior chest wall excursion. Each patient underwent three scans: during free breathing (FB), voluntary expiration breath-hold (EBH) and voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). For each scan, an optimised treatment plan was designed with conformal tangential fields encompassing the clinical target...... volume (CTV) of the breast and ipsilateral internal mammary nodes, and an anterior supraclavicular field. RESULTS: Breath-hold was well accepted by the patients, with a median duration of 24 s for both EBH and DIBH. The mean anterioposterior chest wall excursions were 2.5, 2.6 and 4.1 mm during FB, EBH...

  19. Blue breath holding is benign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, J B

    1991-01-01

    In their recent publication in this journal, Southall et al described typical cyanotic breath holding spells, both in otherwise healthy children and in those with brainstem lesions and other malformations. Their suggestions regarding possible autonomic disturbances may require further study, but they have adduced no scientific evidence to contradict the accepted view that in the intact child blue breath holding spells are benign. Those families in which an infant suffers an 'apparently life threatening event' deserve immense understanding and help, and it behoves investigators to exercise extreme care and self criticism in the presentation of new knowledge which may bear upon their management and their morale. PMID:2001115

  20. Deep Inspiration Breath Hold-Based Radiation Therapy : A Clinical Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Simeonova-Chergou, Anna; Wertz, Hansjörg; Stieler, Florian; Jahnke, Anika; Jahnke, Lennart; Fleckenstein, Jens; Vogel, Lena; Arns, Anna; Blessing, Manuel; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Several recent developments in linear accelerator-based radiation therapy (RT) such as fast multileaf collimators, accelerated intensity modulation paradigms like volumeric modulated arc therapy and flattening filter-free (FFF) high-dose-rate therapy have dramatically shortened the duration of

  1. Functional Analysis and Intervention for Breath Holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Lee; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A functional analysis of breath-holding episodes in a 7-year-old girl with severe mental retardation and Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome indicated that breath holding served an operant function, primarily to gain access to attention. Use of extinction, scheduled attention, and a picture card communication system decreased breath holding. (Author/SW)

  2. Effect of Breath Holding on Spleen Volume Measured by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yusuke; Nakajima, Ai; Mizukami, Shinya; Hata, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonographic studies have demonstrated transient reduction in spleen volume in relation to apnea diving. We measured spleen volume under various respiratory conditions by MR imaging to accurately determine the influence of ordinary breath holding on spleen volumetry. Twelve healthy adult volunteers were examined. Contiguous MR images of the spleen were acquired during free breathing and during respiratory manipulations, including breath holding at the end of normal expiration, breath holding at deep inspiration, and the valsalva maneuver, and spleen volume was measured from each image set based on the sum-of-areas method. Acquisition during free breathing was performed with respiratory triggering. The duration of each respiratory manipulation was 30 s, and five sets of MR images were acquired serially during each manipulation. Baseline spleen volume before respiratory manipulation was 173.0 ± 79.7 mL, and the coefficient of variance for two baseline measures was 1.4% ± 1.6%, suggesting excellent repeatability. Spleen volume decreased significantly just after the commencement of respiratory manipulation, remained constant during the manipulation, and returned to the control value 2 min after the cessation of the manipulation, irrespective of manipulation type. The percentages of volume reduction were 10.2% ± 2.9%, 10.2% ± 3.5%, and 13.3% ± 5.7% during expiration breath holding, deep-inspiration breath holding, and the valsalva maneuver, respectively, and these values did not differ significantly. Spleen volume is reduced during short breath-hold apnea in healthy adults. Physiological responses of the spleen to respiratory manipulations should be considered in the measurement and interpretation of spleen volume.

  3. Breath-holding test in evaluation of peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembach, Nikita; Zabolotskikh, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the feasibility of using a breath-holding test in assessing the sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreflex compared with the single-breath carbon dioxide test. The study involved 48 healthy volunteers between the ages of 18-29 years. The breath-holding test was performed followed by the single-breath carbon dioxide test on the next day. A month after the first tests, these tests were repeated to evaluate their reproducibility The coefficient of variability in the single-breath carbon dioxide test ranged from 0 to 32% with a mean of 10±7%. The mean coefficient of variability of the breath-holding test was 6±4% (0-19%). A significant inverse correlation between the results of the two tests was noted following analysis (r=-0.82, pbreath-holding test after deep inspiration reflects the sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreflex as defined by the single-breath carbon dioxide test in healthy subjects. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiotherapy of lung cancer: the inspiration breath hold with a spirometric monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.; Oozeer, R.; Le Thanh, H.; Chastel, D.; Doyen, J.C.; Chauvet, B.; Reboul, F.

    2002-01-01

    A CT acquisition during a free breathing examination generates images of poor quality. It creates an uncertainty on the reconstructed gross tumour volume and dose distribution. The aim of this study is to test the feasibility of a breath hold method applied in all preparation and treatment days. Five patients received a thoracic radiotherapy with the benefit of this procedure. The breathing of the patient was measured with a spirometer. The patient was coached to reproduce a constant level of breath-hold in a deep inspiration. Video glasses helped the patients to fix the breath-hold at the reference level. The patients followed the coaching during preparation and treatment, without any difficulty. The better quality of the CT reconstructed images resulted in an easier contouring. No movements of the gross tumour volume lead to a better coverage. The deep breath hold decreased the volume of irradiated lung. This method improves the reproducibility of the thoracic irradiation. The decrease of irradiated lung volume offers prospects in dose escalation and intensity modulation radiotherapy. (authors)

  5. Breath-holding spells in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ran D

    2015-02-01

    I have children in my clinic who experience seizurelike episodes in which they cry and hold their breath to the point of cyanosis and loss of consciousness. Their examination or investigation findings are normal and referral to a pediatric specialist results in no further investigation. Are breath-holding spells common, and what type of investigation is needed? A breath-holding spell is a benign paroxysmal nonepileptic disorder occurring in healthy children 6 to 48 months of age. The episodes start with a provocation such as emotional upset or minor injury, and might progress to breath holding, cyanosis, and syncope. The episodes are extremely frightening to watch but have benign consequences. Once a clinical diagnosis is made, it is recommended to conduct an electrocardiogram and to rule out anemia, but no further investigation or referral is warranted. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  6. Setup error and motion during deep inspiration breath-hold breast radiotherapy measured with continuous portal imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutz, Christina Maria; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Fledelius, Walther

    2016-01-01

    ). At every third treatment fraction, continuous portal images were acquired. The time-resolved chest wall position during treatment was compared with the planned position to determine the inter-fraction setup errors and the intra-fraction motion of the chest wall. RESULTS: The DIBH compliance was 95% during...... both recruitment periods. A tendency of smaller inter-fraction setup errors and intra-fraction motion was observed for group 2 (medial marker block position). However, apart from a significantly reduced inter-field random shift (σ = 1.7 mm vs. σ = 0.9 mm, p = 0.005), no statistically significant...... differences between the groups were found. In a combined analysis, the group mean inter-fraction setup error was M = - 0.1 mm, with random and systematic errors of σ = 1.7 mm and Σ = 1.4 mm. The group mean inter-field shift was M = 0.0 (σ = 1.3 mm and Σ = 1.1 mm) and the group mean standard deviation...

  7. Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to the Mediastinum for Lymphoma Patients: Setup Uncertainties and Margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Chi, Pai-Chun M; Kao, Jeremy; Williamson, Ryan; Tung, Sam; Andraos, Therese; Milgrom, Sarah A; Pinnix, Chelsea C; Dabaja, Bouthaina S

    2018-01-01

    Patient setup for treating large target volumes can be challenging. In the present study, we measured the local uncertainties in the treatment of mediastinal lymphoma and investigated the need for region-specific planning target volume (PTV) margins. The data from 30 patients who had undergone radiation therapy for mediastinal lymphoma were retrospectively analyzed. A computed tomography (CT)-on-rails (CTOR) system in the treatment room was used for daily image guidance. The total PTV was split into 6 regions: neck, supraclavicular fossa, axilla, mediastinum, upper heart, and lower heart. The total PTV and the 6 local regions were separately aligned to the planning CT scan using automatic rigid registration. The residual local errors using 3 setup strategies were investigated: no image guidance, CTOR setup to total PTV, and simulated cone beam CT setup to the mediastinum. Errors were recorded in the anteroposterior, superoinferior, and right-left directions separately. Using the residual error calculations, the margins required to cover 95% of the clinical target volume for 90% of the patients was estimated. For each patient, 12 to 21 days of daily CTOR data were available for analysis. The residual errors for the total PTV and mediastinum setups were both smaller than those with no image guidance. The lower heart region had more uncertainty with all 3 setup strategies. Margin analysis revealed that the magnitude of the margin is dependent on the imaging strategy, direction, and local region inside the PTV. Margins >7 mm are necessary to account for uncertainty in the neck, lower heart, and axilla regions even under daily CT guidance. Setup uncertainties in the mediastinum are not uniform and are dependent on target location and imaging strategy. However, with the appropriate margin, we can target regions that might not be visualized with the available on-board imager system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Iron and zinc levels in breath-holding spells

    OpenAIRE

    DEDA, Gülhis; AKAR, M. Nejat; CİN, Şükrü; GENÇGÖNÜL, Handan

    2002-01-01

    Breath-Holding spells are a dramatic and commonly observed clinical phenomenon in childhood. The underlyingpathophysiologic mechanisms in breath-holding spells are result from autonomic nervous system dysregulation.Cerebral anoxia is the ultimate factor responsible for the loss of consciousness observed in the severe forms of breath-holding spells.It’s known that, there is relationbetween breath-holding spells and iron-deficiency anemia, and the spells resolve after oral iron supplemantation....

  9. SU-E-T-450: How Important Is a Reproducible Breath Hold for DIBH Breast Radiotherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H; Wentworth, S; Sintay, B; Wiant, D [Cone Health Cancer Center, Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) for left-sided breast cancer has been shown to reduce heart dose. Surface imaging helps to ensure accurate breast positioning, but does not guarantee a reproducible breath hold (BH) at DIBH treatments. We examine the effects of variable BH positions for DIBH treatments. Methods: Twenty-Five patients with free breathing (FB) and DIBH scans were reviewed. Four plans were created for each patient: 1) FB, 2) DIBH, 3) FB-DIBH – the DIBH plans were copied to the FB images and recalculated (image registration was based on breast tissue), and 4) P-DIBH – a partial BH with the heart shifted midway between the FB and DIBH positions. The FB-DIBH plans give “worst case” scenarios for surface imaging DIBH, where the breast is aligned by surface imaging but the patient is not holding their breath. Students t-tests were used to compare dose metrics. Results: The DIBH plans gave lower heart dose and comparable breast coverage versus FB in all cases. The FB-DIBH plans showed no significant difference versus FB plans for breast coverage, mean heart dose, or maximum heart dose (p >= 0.10). The mean heart dose differed between FB-DIBH and FB by < 2 Gy for all cases, the maximum heart dose differed by < 2 Gy for 21 cases. The P-DIBH plans showed significantly lower mean heart dose than FB (p = 0.01). The mean heart doses for the P-DIBH plans were < FB for 22 cases, the maximum dose < FB for 18 cases. Conclusions: A DIBH plan delivered to a FB patient set-up with surface imaging will yield similar dosimetry to a plan created and delivered FB. A DIBH plan delivered with even a partial BH can give reduced heart dose compared to FB techniques when the breast tissue is well aligned.

  10. SU-E-T-450: How Important Is a Reproducible Breath Hold for DIBH Breast Radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H; Wentworth, S; Sintay, B; Wiant, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) for left-sided breast cancer has been shown to reduce heart dose. Surface imaging helps to ensure accurate breast positioning, but does not guarantee a reproducible breath hold (BH) at DIBH treatments. We examine the effects of variable BH positions for DIBH treatments. Methods: Twenty-Five patients with free breathing (FB) and DIBH scans were reviewed. Four plans were created for each patient: 1) FB, 2) DIBH, 3) FB-DIBH – the DIBH plans were copied to the FB images and recalculated (image registration was based on breast tissue), and 4) P-DIBH – a partial BH with the heart shifted midway between the FB and DIBH positions. The FB-DIBH plans give “worst case” scenarios for surface imaging DIBH, where the breast is aligned by surface imaging but the patient is not holding their breath. Students t-tests were used to compare dose metrics. Results: The DIBH plans gave lower heart dose and comparable breast coverage versus FB in all cases. The FB-DIBH plans showed no significant difference versus FB plans for breast coverage, mean heart dose, or maximum heart dose (p >= 0.10). The mean heart dose differed between FB-DIBH and FB by < 2 Gy for all cases, the maximum heart dose differed by < 2 Gy for 21 cases. The P-DIBH plans showed significantly lower mean heart dose than FB (p = 0.01). The mean heart doses for the P-DIBH plans were < FB for 22 cases, the maximum dose < FB for 18 cases. Conclusions: A DIBH plan delivered to a FB patient set-up with surface imaging will yield similar dosimetry to a plan created and delivered FB. A DIBH plan delivered with even a partial BH can give reduced heart dose compared to FB techniques when the breast tissue is well aligned

  11. Sports-related lung injury during breath-hold diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Mijacika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The number of people practising recreational breath-hold diving is constantly growing, thereby increasing the need for knowledge of the acute and chronic effects such a sport could have on the health of participants. Breath-hold diving is potentially dangerous, mainly because of associated extreme environmental factors such as increased hydrostatic pressure, hypoxia, hypercapnia, hypothermia and strenuous exercise. In this article we focus on the effects of breath-hold diving on pulmonary function. Respiratory symptoms have been reported in almost 25% of breath-hold divers after repetitive diving sessions. Acutely, repetitive breath-hold diving may result in increased transpulmonary capillary pressure, leading to noncardiogenic oedema and/or alveolar haemorrhage. Furthermore, during a breath-hold dive, the chest and lungs are compressed by the increasing pressure of water. Rapid changes in lung air volume during descent or ascent can result in a lung injury known as pulmonary barotrauma. Factors that may influence individual susceptibility to breath-hold diving-induced lung injury range from underlying pulmonary or cardiac dysfunction to genetic predisposition. According to the available data, breath-holding does not result in chronic lung injury. However, studies of large populations of breath-hold divers are necessary to firmly exclude long-term lung damage.

  12. Physiology of static breath holding in elite apneists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Anthony R; Drvis, Ivan; Dujic, Zeljko; MacLeod, David B; Ainslie, Philip N

    2018-03-07

    What is the topic of this review? This review provides an up-to-date assessment of the physiology involved with extreme static dry-land breath holding in trained apneists. What advances does it highlight? We specifically highlight the recent findings involved with the cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and metabolic function during a maximal breath hold in elite apneists. Breath hold related activities have been performed for centuries, but only recently within the last ∼30 years has it emerged as an increasingly popular competitive sport. In apnea sport, people compete in disciplines relating to underwater distances or simply maximal breath hold duration - with the current (oxygen un-supplemented) static breath hold record at 11:35 min. Remarkably, many ultra-elite apneists are able to supress respiratory urges to the point where consciousness fundamentally limits a breath hold duration. Here, arterial oxygen saturations as low as ∼50% have been reported. In such cases, oxygen conservation to maintain cerebral functioning is critical, where responses ascribed to the mammalian dive reflex - e.g., sympathetically mediated peripheral vaconstriction, and vagally mediated bradycardia - are central. In defence of maintaining global cerebral oxygen delivery during prolonged breath holds, the cerebral blood flow may increase by ∼100% from resting values. Interestingly, near the termination of prolonged dry static breath holds, recent studies also indicate that reductions in the cerebral oxidative metabolism can occur, likely attributable to the extreme hypercapnia and irrespective of the hypoxemia. In this review we highlight and discuss the recent data on the cardiovascular, metabolic and particularly cerebrovascular function in competitive apneists performing maximal static breath holds. The physiological adaptation and maladaptation with regular breath hold training are also summarized, and future research areas in this unique physiological field are highlighted

  13. Acute effects of cannabis on breath-holding duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Samantha G; Metrik, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Distress intolerance (an individual's perceived or actual inability to tolerate distressing psychological or physiological states) is associated with cannabis use. It is unknown whether a biobehavioral index of distress intolerance, breath-holding duration, is acutely influenced (increased or decreased) by cannabis. Such information may further inform understanding of the expression of psychological or physiological distress postcannabis use. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7%-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed duration of breath holding. Participants (n = 88; 65.9% male) were nontreatment-seeking frequent cannabis users who smoked placebo or active THC cigarette on two separate study days and completed a breath-holding task postsmoking. Controlling for baseline breath-holding duration and participant sex, THC produced significantly shorter breath-holding durations relative to placebo. There was a significant interaction of drug administration × frequency of cannabis use, such that THC decreased breath-holding time among less frequent but not among more frequent users. Findings indicate that cannabis may exacerbate distress intolerance (via shorter breath-holding durations). As compared to less frequent cannabis users, frequent users display tolerance to cannabis' acute effects including increased ability to tolerate respiratory distress when holding breath. Objective measures of distress intolerance are sensitive to contextual factors such as acute drug intoxication, and may inform the link between cannabis use and the expression of psychological distress. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. A pacemaker for asystole in breath-holding spells

    OpenAIRE

    Legge, Leah M; Kantoch, Michal J; Seshia, Shashi S; Soni, Reeni

    2002-01-01

    Two cases of young children with frequent severe breath-holding spells complicated by prolonged asystole and seizures are reported. A ventricular pacemaker was implanted in each child, and both have subsequently remained free of syncope, although they continue to exhibit breath-holding behaviour.

  15. A pacemaker for asystole in breath-holding spells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legge, Leah M; Kantoch, Michal J; Seshia, Shashi S; Soni, Reeni

    2002-01-01

    Two cases of young children with frequent severe breath-holding spells complicated by prolonged asystole and seizures are reported. A ventricular pacemaker was implanted in each child, and both have subsequently remained free of syncope, although they continue to exhibit breath-holding behaviour. PMID:20046299

  16. SU-F-T-254: Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) Analysis of Breath Hold Vs Free Breathing Techniques for Esophageal Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; Doke, K; Pokhrel, D; Aguilera, N; Lominska, C [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Lung and heart doses and associated toxicity are of concern in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. This study evaluates the dosimetry of deep-inspiration-breath-hold (DIBH) technique as compared to freebreathing( FB) using 3D-conformal treatment(3D-CRT) of esophageal cancer. Methods: Eight patients were planned with FB and DIBH CT scans. DIBH scans were acquired using Varian RPM system. FB and DIBH CTs were contoured per RTOG-1010 to create the planning target volume(PTV) as well as organs at risk volumes(OAR). Two sets of gross target volumes(GTV) with 5cm length were contoured for each patient: proximal at the level of the carina and distal at the level of gastroesophageal junction and were enlarged with appropriate margin to generate Clinical Target Volume and PTV. 3D-CRT plans were created on Eclipse planning system for 45Gy to cover 95% of PTV in 25 fractions for both proximal and distal tumors on FB and DIBH scans. For distal tumors celiac nodes were covered electively. DVH parameters for lung and heart OARs were generated and analyzed. Results: All DIBH DVH parameters were normalized to FB plan values. Average of heart-mean and heart-V40 was 0.70 and 0.66 for proximal lesions. For distal lesions ratios were 1.21 and 2.22 respectively. For DIBH total lung volume increased by 2.43 times versus FB scan. Average of lung-mean, V30, V20, V10, V5 are 0.82, 0.92, 0.76, 0.77 and 0.79 for proximal lesions and 1.17,0.66,0.87,0.93 and 1.03 for distal lesions. Heart doses were lower for breath-hold proximal lesions but higher for distal lesions as compared to free-breathing plans. Lung doses were lower for both proximal and distal breath-hold lesions except mean lung dose and V5 for distal lesions. Conclusion: This study showed improvement of OAR doses for esophageal lesions at mid-thoracic level utilizing DIBH vs FB technique but did not show consistent OAR sparing with DIBH for distal lesions.

  17. SU-F-T-254: Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) Analysis of Breath Hold Vs Free Breathing Techniques for Esophageal Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badkul, R; Doke, K; Pokhrel, D; Aguilera, N; Lominska, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Lung and heart doses and associated toxicity are of concern in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. This study evaluates the dosimetry of deep-inspiration-breath-hold (DIBH) technique as compared to freebreathing( FB) using 3D-conformal treatment(3D-CRT) of esophageal cancer. Methods: Eight patients were planned with FB and DIBH CT scans. DIBH scans were acquired using Varian RPM system. FB and DIBH CTs were contoured per RTOG-1010 to create the planning target volume(PTV) as well as organs at risk volumes(OAR). Two sets of gross target volumes(GTV) with 5cm length were contoured for each patient: proximal at the level of the carina and distal at the level of gastroesophageal junction and were enlarged with appropriate margin to generate Clinical Target Volume and PTV. 3D-CRT plans were created on Eclipse planning system for 45Gy to cover 95% of PTV in 25 fractions for both proximal and distal tumors on FB and DIBH scans. For distal tumors celiac nodes were covered electively. DVH parameters for lung and heart OARs were generated and analyzed. Results: All DIBH DVH parameters were normalized to FB plan values. Average of heart-mean and heart-V40 was 0.70 and 0.66 for proximal lesions. For distal lesions ratios were 1.21 and 2.22 respectively. For DIBH total lung volume increased by 2.43 times versus FB scan. Average of lung-mean, V30, V20, V10, V5 are 0.82, 0.92, 0.76, 0.77 and 0.79 for proximal lesions and 1.17,0.66,0.87,0.93 and 1.03 for distal lesions. Heart doses were lower for breath-hold proximal lesions but higher for distal lesions as compared to free-breathing plans. Lung doses were lower for both proximal and distal breath-hold lesions except mean lung dose and V5 for distal lesions. Conclusion: This study showed improvement of OAR doses for esophageal lesions at mid-thoracic level utilizing DIBH vs FB technique but did not show consistent OAR sparing with DIBH for distal lesions.

  18. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Mette K.; van Vulpen, Marco; Barendrecht, Maurits M.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney.

  19. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stam, Mette K; Van Vulpen, Marco; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P M; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W; Barendrecht, Maurits M; Zonnenberg, Bernard A

    2013-01-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney. (paper)

  20. Reproducibility of BOLD signal change induced by breath holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magon, Stefano; Basso, Gianpaolo; Farace, Paolo; Ricciardi, Giuseppe Kenneth; Beltramello, Alberto; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2009-04-15

    Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast is influenced by some physiological factors such as blood flow and blood volume that can be a source of variability in fMRI analysis. Previous studies proposed to use the cerebrovascular response data to normalize or calibrate BOLD maps in order to reduce variability of fMRI data both among brain areas in single subject analysis and across subjects. Breath holding is one of the most widely used methods to investigate the vascular reactivity. However, little is known about the robustness and reproducibility of this procedure. In this study we investigated three different breath holding periods. Subjects were asked to hold their breath for 9, 15 or 21 s in three separate runs and the fMRI protocol was repeated after 15 to 20 days. Our data show that the BOLD response to breath holding after inspiration results in a complex shape due to physiological factors that influence the signal variation with a timing that is highly reproducible. Nevertheless, the reproducibility of the magnitude of the cerebrovascular response to CO(2), expressed as amplitude of BOLD signal and number of responding voxels, strongly depends on duration of breath holding periods. Breath holding period of 9 s results in high variability of the magnitude of the response while longer breath holding durations produce more robust and reproducible BOLD responses.

  1. Postural Change Alters Autonomic Responses to Breath-Holding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Indu; Medow, Marvin S.; Clarke, Debbie; Ocon, Anthony; Stewart, Julian M.

    2011-01-01

    We used breath-holding during inspiration as a model to study the effect of pulmonary stretch on sympathetic nerve activity. Twelve healthy subjects (7 females, 5 males; 19–27 yrs) were tested while they performed an inspiratory breath-hold, both supine and during a 60° head-up tilt (HUT 60). Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), respiration, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), oxygen saturation (SaO2) and end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) were recorded. Cardiac output (CO) and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were calculated. While breath-holding, ETCO2 increased significantly from 41±2 to 60±2 Torr during supine (pBreath-holding results in initial reductions of MSNA, MAP and HR by the pulmonary stretch reflex followed by increased sympathetic activity related to the arterial baroreflex and chemoreflex. PMID:20012144

  2. Impact of breath holding on cardiovascular respiratory and cerebrovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujic, Zeljko; Breskovic, Toni

    2012-06-01

    Human underwater breath-hold diving is a fascinating example of applied environmental physiology. In combination with swimming, it is one of the most popular forms of summer outdoor physical activities. It is performed by a variety of individuals ranging from elite breath-hold divers, underwater hockey and rugby players, synchronized and sprint swimmers, spear fishermen, sponge harvesters and up to recreational swimmers. Very few data currently exist concerning the influence of regular breath holding on possible health risks such as cerebrovascular, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. A literature search of the PubMed electronic search engine using keywords 'breath-hold diving' and 'apnoea diving' was performed. This review focuses on recent advances in knowledge regarding possibly harmful physiological changes and/or potential health risks associated with breath-hold diving. Available evidence indicates that deep breath-hold dives can be very dangerous and can cause serious acute health problems such a collapse of the lungs, barotrauma at descent and ascent, pulmonary oedema and alveolar haemorrhage, cardiac arrest, blackouts, nitrogen narcosis, decompression sickness and death. Moreover, even shallow apnoea dives, which are far more frequent, can present a significant health risk. The state of affairs is disturbing as athletes, as well as recreational individuals, practice voluntary apnoea on a regular basis. Long-term health risks of frequent maximal breath holds are at present unknown, but should be addressed in future research. Clearly, further studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms related to the possible development or worsening of different clinical disorders in recreational or competitive breath holding and to determine the potential changes in training/competition regimens in order to prevent these adverse events.

  3. Single breath-hold MR imaging of liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Jeong; Kim, Seong Hee; Kim, Sun Hee; Chae, Yoo Soon; Chung, Chun Phil; Kim, Yang Sook

    1993-01-01

    Single breath-hold gradient echo images with Small Tip Angle Gradient Echo (STAGE) were evaluated in the study of liver in 16 patients (4 normal liver, 5 hepatoma, 5 cholangiocarcinoma, 1 hemangioma, 1 cavernous transformation of portal vein). We obtained one slice of gradient echo during single breath-hold at the level of pathology defined on conventional spin echo image. Single breath-hold gradient echo images were compared with spin echo images for image quality and artifacts. Single breath-hold gradient image showed improved resolution of vascular detail and excellent contrast between lesion and adjacent normal liver in hepatoma. Cholangiocarcinoma showed decreased contrast between lesion and biliary trees but improved contrast between lesion and blood vessel. Cavernous transformation of portal vein was noted as tortuous vessel of high signal intensity. Single breath-hold gradient echo scan increased vascular artifact, but decreased respiratory artifact leading to improved image quality. Single breath-hold technique can reduce imaging time and improve image quality and may be used as complementary method to the spin echo scan

  4. Brain metabolite values in children with breath-holding spells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calik M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mustafa Calik,1 Dilek Sen Dokumaci,2 Suna Sarikaya,3 Mahmut Demir,4 Ilhan Isik,5 Halil Kazanasmaz,4 Cemil Kaya,4 Hasan Kandemir6 1Department of Pediatric Neurology, 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Neurology, 4Department of Pediatrics, Harran University School of Medicine, 5Department of Pediatric Neurology, Eyyubiye Training and Research Hospital, 6Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Harran University School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey Abstract: Breath-holding spells are benign, paroxysmal events with apnea and postural tone changes after a crying episode in infants. The objective of this study was to investigate the pathologies in brain metabolite values in the absence of seizure in children with breath-holding spells by using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. Brain MRS examination was performed on 18 children with breath-holding spells and 13 neurologically normal children who were included as the control group. There was no significant difference in terms of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA, choline (Cho, creatine (Cr, and myoinositol (mI levels and also in terms of NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mI/Cr ratios between the patients and the control group (all P>0.05. Our study suggested that there is no permanent neuronal damage in patients with breath-holding spells. This result confirms the previous studies, which reported no permanent neuronal damage in patients with breath-holding spells. Keywords: brain metabolite, children, breath holding, magnetic resonance spectroscopy 

  5. Effect of iron supplementation in children with breath holding spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rahul; Omanakuttan, Divin; Singh, Amitabh; Jajoo, Mamta

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of iron supplementation in children with breath holding spells, irrespective of their iron status and study the factors associated with the response. This was a prospective interventional study. Study population comprised of patients aged 6-36 months, attending a paediatric outpatient department with recurrent episodes (more than three in last 4 weeks) of breath holding spells. Children with loss of consciousness or convulsive movements associated with breath holding spells were considered as severe. After baseline investigations, all enrolled patients were given elemental iron at the dose of 3 mg/kg/day as a single daily dose. Four weekly follow-ups were done until 3 months after initiation of the intervention. At 12 weeks, investigations were repeated and outcome assessed for remission or decrease in severity of breath holding episodes. A total of 100 children with breath holding spells received iron supplementation. Almost 73% of children showed complete response, with another 23% showing greater than 50% reduction in frequency. Frequency of spells at diagnosis and intolerance to oral iron were significantly associated with poor response to iron supplementation. Other factors such as age at onset, age at presentation, severity of spells, anaemia and serum iron parameters had no significant association with the response. Of the 27 children without iron deficiency (serum ferritin ≥ 30 µg/L), 77.7% responded completely to iron supplementation, similar to the iron-deficient group. Iron supplementation is effective in the management of breath holding spells. Non-anaemic and iron-replete children with breath holding spells also respond well to iron supplementation. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  6. Immediate effects of breath holding maneuvers onto composition of exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukul, Pritam; Trefz, Phillip; Schubert, Jochen K; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2014-09-01

    Rapid concentration changes due to physiological or pathophysiological effects rather than appearance of unique disease biomarkers are important for clinical application of breath research. Simple maneuvers such as breath holding may significantly affect breath biomarker concentrations. In this study, exhaled volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations were assessed in real time before and after different breath holding maneuvers. Continuous breath-resolved measurements (PTR-ToF-MS-8000) were performed in 31 healthy human subjects in a side-stream sampling mode. After 1 min of tidal breathing participants held their breath for 10, 20, 40, 60 s and as long as possible. Afterwards they continued to breathe normally for another minute. VOC profiles could be monitored in real time by assigning online PTR-ToF-MS data to alveolar or inspired phases of breath. Sudden and profound changes of exhaled VOC concentrations were recorded after different breath holding maneuvers. VOC concentrations returned to base line levels 10-20 s after breath holding. Breath holding induced concentration changes depended on physico-chemical properties of the substances. When substance concentrations were normalized onto end-tidal CO2 content, variation of acetone concentrations decreased, whereas variations of isoprene concentrations were not affected. As the effects of breathing patterns on exhaled substance concentrations depend on individual substance properties, sampling procedures have to be validated for each compound by means of appropriate real-time analysis. Normalization of exhaled concentrations onto exhaled CO2 is only valid for substances having similar physico-chemical properties as CO2.

  7. Iron supplementation for breath-holding attacks in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehetner, Anthony A; Orr, Nigel; Buckmaster, Adam; Williams, Katrina; Wheeler, Danielle M

    2010-05-12

    Breath-holding attacks are common during childhood. Iron supplementation has been claimed to reduce the frequency or severity, or both, of breath-holding attacks in children. To assess the effect of iron supplementation on the frequency and severity of breath-holding attacks in children. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (up to April 2009). We scanned references of included trials. Pharmaceutical companies manufacturing oral iron supplements and some trial authors were contacted for any unpublished data or trials. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing iron supplementation with placebo or no therapy in children breath-holding episodes. These were reported by an observer. The primary outcome was reduction in the frequency (number over time) or severity (leading to cessation of loss of consciousness or convulsive movements), or both, of breath-holding attacks. Two authors (AZ and NO) independently selected studies and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for missing data, where necessary. Risk of bias was assessed using domain-based evaluation. In the presence of low heterogeneity, a fixed-effect meta-analysis was performed with pooled results presented as odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Two trials (87 children) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. In these trials, iron supplementation significantly reduced the frequency of breath-holding attacks in children (OR 76.48; 95% CI 15.65 to 373.72; P breath-holding attacks maintained this significance (OR 53.43; 95% CI 6.57 to 434.57; P = 0.0002). Iron supplementation (at 5 mg/kg/day of elemental iron for 16 weeks) appears to be useful in reducing the frequency and severity of breath-holding attacks. Supplementation is of particular benefit in children with iron deficiency anaemia, responses correlating with the improvements in haemoglobin

  8. Brain metabolite values in children with breath-holding spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Mustafa; Sen Dokumaci, Dilek; Sarikaya, Suna; Demir, Mahmut; Isik, Ilhan; Kazanasmaz, Halil; Kaya, Cemil; Kandemir, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Breath-holding spells are benign, paroxysmal events with apnea and postural tone changes after a crying episode in infants. The objective of this study was to investigate the pathologies in brain metabolite values in the absence of seizure in children with breath-holding spells by using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Brain MRS examination was performed on 18 children with breath-holding spells and 13 neurologically normal children who were included as the control group. There was no significant difference in terms of N -acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), and myoinositol (mI) levels and also in terms of NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mI/Cr ratios between the patients and the control group (all P >0.05). Our study suggested that there is no permanent neuronal damage in patients with breath-holding spells. This result confirms the previous studies, which reported no permanent neuronal damage in patients with breath-holding spells.

  9. Alterations of the beneficial effect of deep inspiration in scleroderma: relationships between lung function and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scichilone, Nicola; Reitano, Simona; Bellia, Maria; Riili, Maria; Togias, Alkis; Midiri, Massimo; Triolo, Giovanni; Bellia, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    It has been postulated that the beneficial effects of deep inspiration are dependent on the magnitude of airway distension by virtue of airway to parenchyma interdependence. This study was designed to examine whether the changes that occur in pulmonary fibrosis affect the beneficial effect of deep inspiration. Thirty-one subjects with scleroderma underwent lung volume and diffusion capacity assessment as well as high-resolution computed tomography. To assess the effect of deep inspiration, each subject underwent methacholine provocations in the absence of deep breaths. When the targeted change in lung function was achieved, subjects were asked to take 4 consecutive deep inspirations after which lung function measurements were repeated. The inspiratory vital capacity (IVC) was used as primary outcome. Only 19 subjects attained the desired reduction in IVC in the absence of deep breaths. In those subjects, deep inspiration reversed the effect of methacholine on IVC by 48 +/- 8.4%. The effect of deep inspiration correlated with DLCO% predicted (r = 0.55, p = 0.01), but not with high-resolution computed tomography abnormalities or baseline lung function measurements. When all subjects were considered, responsiveness to methacholine in the absence of deep inspiration was progressively lower with decreasing DLCO% predicted values (r = 0.51, p = 0.003). In systemic scleroderma, pulmonary abnormalities resulting in mild to moderate reduction in the diffusion capacity are associated with reduced ability of deep inspiration to reverse methacholine-induced early airway closure and bronchoconstriction. When diffusion capacity is severely affected, methacholine fails to produce obstructive airway changes. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. A comparison of the physiological responses to underwater arm cranking and breath holding between synchronized swimmers and breath holding untrained women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alentejano, Teresa C; Bell, Gordon J; Marshall, Dru

    2012-05-01

    Exercise and breath holding in the water such as that performed in the sport of synchronized swimming may evoke the physiological consequences of the diving response. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological responses of breath holding during underwater arm cranking in synchronized swimmers who are trained in breath holding and compare these responses to untrained women. Each participant performed 6 breath holding periods in the water (2 × 10s, 2 × 20s and 2 × 25s) with 2 minutes of normal breathing in between, in either an ascending or descending order while performing arm crank exercise. The intensity of arm crank exercise was set below the individual ventilatory threshold. Both synchronized swimmers and controls were matched on sitting height and then randomly divided into 2 groups: one group started breath holding with the longest (25s) breath holding periods while the other group began breath holding with the shortest (10s) breath holding periods. The synchronized swimmers experienced a significant decrease in heart rate while breath holding for 20 and 25s but the changes in heart rate for the control group was not consistent between subgroups. Full recovery from breath holding was identified for minute ventilation after 25s of recovery from breath holding for all groups. Results suggest synchronized swimmers exhibited a better adaptation to breath holding while exercising underwater.

  11. A Comparison of the Physiological Responses to Underwater Arm Cranking and Breath Holding Between Synchronized Swimmers and Breath Holding Untrained Women

    OpenAIRE

    Alentejano, Teresa C.; Bell, Gordon J.; Marshall, Dru

    2012-01-01

    Exercise and breath holding in the water such as that performed in the sport of synchronized swimming may evoke the physiological consequences of the diving response. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological responses of breath holding during underwater arm cranking in synchronized swimmers who are trained in breath holding and compare these responses to untrained women. Each participant performed 6 breath holding periods in the water (2 ? 10s, 2 ? 20s and 2 ? 25s) with ...

  12. In vivo proton MRS of normal pancreas metabolites during breath-holding and free-breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, T.-H.; Jin, E.-H.; Shen, H.; Zhang, Y.; He, W.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To characterize normal pancreas metabolites using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) at 3 T under conditions of breath-holding and free-breathing. Materials and methods: The pancreases of 32 healthy volunteers were examined using 1 H MRS during breath-holding and free-breathing acquisitions in a single-voxel point-resolved selective spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) technique using a 3 T MRI system. Resonances were compared between paired spectra of the two breathing modes. Furthermore, correlations between lipid (Lip) content and age, body-mass index (BMI), as well as choline (Cho) peak visibility of the normal pancreas were analysed during breath-holding. Results: Twenty-nine pairs of spectra were successfully obtained showing three major resonances, Lip, Cho, cholesterol and the unsaturated parts of the olefinic region of fatty acids (Chol + Unsat). Breath-hold spectra were generally better, with higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNR; Z=–2.646, p = 0.008) and Cho peak visible status (Z=–2.449, p = 0.014). Correlations were significant between spectra acquired by the two breathing modes, especially for Lip height, Lip area, and the area of other peaks at 1.9–4.1 ppm. However, the Lip resonance was significantly different between the spectra of the two breathing modes (p 1 H MRS of the normal pancreas at 3 T is technically feasible and can characterize several metabolites. 1 H MRS during breath-holding acquisition is superior to that during free-breathing acquisition.

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A; Bragg, Christopher M; Lawless, Sarah E; Hatton, Matthew Q F; Ireland, Rob H

    2010-04-21

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV(90)), the volume of total lung receiving >or=10 Gy (V(10)) and >or=20 Gy (V(20)) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean +/- SD reductions for V(10), V(20) and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 +/- 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 +/- 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 +/- 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 +/- 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV(90) was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration.

  14. NOTE: Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Christopher M.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hatton, Matthew Q. F.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90), the volume of total lung receiving >= 10 Gy (V10) and >= 20 Gy (V20) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean ± SD reductions for V10, V20 and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 ± 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 ± 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 ± 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 ± 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV90 was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Changes in Hyperventilation and Breath-hold Diving

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-01-05

    Jan 5, 1974 ... South Africa. S. Afr. Med. l., 48, 18 (1974). Under conditions of normal atmospheric pressure, breath- holding results in important changes in the mechanism whereby the CO, is transported ... haemoglobin in the face of falling CO, output to the ... Hong,' in a field study of Korean diving women, noted that they ...

  16. Brain damage in commercial breath-hold divers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyotaka Kohshi

    Full Text Available Acute decompression illness (DCI involving the brain (Cerebral DCI is one of the most serious forms of diving-related injuries which may leave residual brain damage. Cerebral DCI occurs in compressed air and in breath-hold divers, likewise. We conducted this study to investigate whether long-term breath-hold divers who may be exposed to repeated symptomatic and asymptomatic brain injuries, show brain damage on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI.Our study subjects were 12 commercial breath-hold divers (Ama with long histories of diving work in a district of Japan. We obtained information on their diving practices and the presence or absence of medical problems, especially DCI events. All participants were examined with MRI to determine the prevalence of brain lesions.Out of 12 Ama divers (mean age: 54.9±5.1 years, four had histories of cerebral DCI events, and 11 divers demonstrated ischemic lesions of the brain on MRI studies. The lesions were situated in the cortical and/or subcortical area (9 cases, white matters (4 cases, the basal ganglia (4 cases, and the thalamus (1 case. Subdural fluid collections were seen in 2 cases.These results suggest that commercial breath-hold divers are at a risk of clinical or subclinical brain injury which may affect the long-term neuropsychological health of divers.

  17. Voluntary breath holding affects spontaneous brain activity measured by magnetoencephalography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, N. A.; Reits, D.

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous brain activity was measured by multichannel magnetoencephalography (MEG) during voluntary breath holds. Significant changes in the activity are limited to the alpha rhythm: 0.25 Hz frequency increase and narrowing of the peak. The area of alpha activity shifts slightly toward (fronto-)

  18. Considerable pancreatic tumor motion during breath-holding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, Eelco; van der Horst, Astrid; Versteijne, Eva; Bel, Arjan; van Tienhoven, Geertjan

    2016-01-01

    Breath-holding (BH) is often used to reduce abdominal organ motion during radiotherapy. However, for inhale BH, abdominal tumor motion during BH has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to quantify tumor motion during inhale BH and tumor position variations between consecutive inhale

  19. P Wave Dispersion in Children with Breath-holding Spells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahsin Gider

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A breath-holding spell (BHS is a clinical feature frequently seen in infancy and early childhood and generally bringing children to pediatric cardiology outpatient clinics with the suspicion of cardiac disease. In this study, P wave dispersion (PWD, which is a marker of regional differences in atrial depolarization in electrocardiography and has been demonstrated to be beneficial in defining the risk of supraventricular tachycardia in various patient groups, was studied in children who presented with breath-holding spells. Materials and Methods: Forty-seven patients with breath-holding spells and 36 healthy children as a control group were included in this study. We performed electrocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography on patients and controls. PWD, which is defined as the difference between maximum and minimum p wave duration, was also calculated. Statistical analysis in the study was performed using SPSS version 22.0 and p<0.05 was accepted as significant. Results: Our study indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between the patients and controls in minimum, maximum p wave duration and PWD. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that atrial conduction is probably unaffected in children with breath-holding spells.

  20. Analysis of breath holding for lung CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuda, Toshizo; Eiho, Shigeru; Kuroda, Chikazumi; Hashimoto, Tsutomu

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Movement artifact during lung CT can degrade image quality and, particularly in the case of computer aided diagnosis, make diagnosis inaccurate. In this study, diaphragmatic movement during full arrested inspiration in lung CT was evaluated to identify the optimum time after commencement of breath holding for image acquisition. Methods: For analysis two lung areas were used in this study. These areas, on two images from different time periods after breath holding on the same slice, were evaluated in 47 patients. Results: In approximately 74% of the patients 1 s after commencement of breath holding diaphragm motion was noted to be in the cranial direction. A comparison of the lung areas after 30 s and those after 1 s and 4 s showed significant differences. Those after 7 s showed no significant difference. Conclusions: The results show that the lung base should be scanned at 7 s from the commencement of breath holding. Also, the lungs should also be scanned from the base to apex

  1. Temperamental traits of breath holding children: A case control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarayan, A.; Ganesan, B.; Anbumani; Jayanthini

    2008-01-01

    Background: Clinical observation and few anecdotal reports suggest that the children with breath holding spells (BHS) have certain temperamental traits, which predispose them to behave in certain way. They seem to have low frustration tolerance, which leads to adamant behavior. Vigorous crying, through various mechanisms, precipitates BHS. Materials and Methods: We assessed the temperamental traits of 30 children with BHS and compared them with 30 normal children after matching for age, sex, and socioeconomic status. Temperament was measured using ‘Temperament measurement Schedule’. Results: The data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test. The following temperamental traits, threshold of responsiveness (Pbreath holders. Conclusions: Significantly differing temperamental traits in breath holders suggests that these could influence the behavioral pattern exhibited by them. Breath holding spells can act as an easy marker for difficult temperamental traits, which gives an early opportunity to shape their difficult behavior. PMID:19742234

  2. Ultrasound lung "comets" increase after breath-hold diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Kate; Germonpré, Peter; Charbel, Brian; Cialoni, Danilo; Musimu, Patrick; Sponsiello, Nicola; Marroni, Alessandro; Pastouret, Frédéric; Balestra, Costantino

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the ultrasound lung comets (ULCs) variation, which are a sign of extra-vascular lung water. Forty-two healthy individuals performed breath-hold diving in different conditions: dynamic surface apnea; deep variable-weight apnea and shallow, face immersed without effort (static maximal and non-maximal). The number of ULCs was evaluated by means of an ultrasound scan of the chest, before and after breath-hold diving sessions. The ULC score increased significantly from baseline after dynamic surface apnea (p = 0.0068), after deep breath-hold sessions (p = 0.0018), and after static maximal apnea (p = 0.031). There was no statistically significant difference between the average increase of ULC scores after dynamic surface apnea and deep breath-hold diving. We, therefore, postulate that extravascular lung water accumulation may be due to other factors than (deep) immersion alone, because it occurs during dynamic surface apnea as well. Three mechanisms may be responsible for this. First, the immersion-induced hydrostatic pressure gradient applied on the body causes a shift of peripheral venous blood towards the thorax. Second, the blood pooling effect found during the diving response Redistributes blood to the pulmonary vascular bed. Third, it is possible that the intense involuntary diaphragmatic contractions occurring during the "struggle phase" of the breath-hold can also produce a blood shift from the pulmonary capillaries to the pulmonary alveoli. A combination of these factors may explain the observed increase in ULC scores in deep, shallow maximal and shallow dynamic apneas, whereas shallow non-maximal apneas seem to be not "ULC provoking".

  3. In vivo proton MRS of normal pancreas metabolites during breath-holding and free-breathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, T.-H. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China); Jin, E.-H., E-mail: erhujin1@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China); Shen, H. [GE China Company Ltd, Healthcare, General Electric Company, Beijing (China); Zhang, Y.; He, W. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China)

    2012-07-15

    Aim: To characterize normal pancreas metabolites using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) at 3 T under conditions of breath-holding and free-breathing. Materials and methods: The pancreases of 32 healthy volunteers were examined using {sup 1}H MRS during breath-holding and free-breathing acquisitions in a single-voxel point-resolved selective spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) technique using a 3 T MRI system. Resonances were compared between paired spectra of the two breathing modes. Furthermore, correlations between lipid (Lip) content and age, body-mass index (BMI), as well as choline (Cho) peak visibility of the normal pancreas were analysed during breath-holding. Results: Twenty-nine pairs of spectra were successfully obtained showing three major resonances, Lip, Cho, cholesterol and the unsaturated parts of the olefinic region of fatty acids (Chol + Unsat). Breath-hold spectra were generally better, with higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNR; Z=-2.646, p = 0.008) and Cho peak visible status (Z=-2.449, p = 0.014). Correlations were significant between spectra acquired by the two breathing modes, especially for Lip height, Lip area, and the area of other peaks at 1.9-4.1 ppm. However, the Lip resonance was significantly different between the spectra of the two breathing modes (p < 0.05). In the breath-holding spectra, there were significant positive correlations between Lip peak height, area, and age (r = 0.491 and 0.521, p = 0.007 and 0.004), but not between Lip peak area and BMI. There was no statistical difference in Cho resonances between males and females. The Lip peak height and area were significantly higher in the Cho peak invisible group than in the Cho peak visible group (t = 2.661 and 2.353, p = 0.030 and 0.043). Conclusion: In vivo{sup 1}H MRS of the normal pancreas at 3 T is technically feasible and can characterize several metabolites. {sup 1}H MRS during breath-holding acquisition is superior to that during free-breathing

  4. P Wave Dispersion in Children with Breath-holding Spells

    OpenAIRE

    Tahsin Gider; Bülent Koca; Mustafa Çalık; Ali Yıldırım; Savaş Demirpençe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A breath-holding spell (BHS) is a clinical feature frequently seen in infancy and early childhood and generally bringing children to pediatric cardiology outpatient clinics with the suspicion of cardiac disease. In this study, P wave dispersion (PWD), which is a marker of regional differences in atrial depolarization in electrocardiography and has been demonstrated to be beneficial in defining the risk of supraventricular tachycardia in various patient groups, was studied in childr...

  5. Clinical and Laboratory Findings of Patients with Breath Holding Spells

    OpenAIRE

    Özlem Özdemir; Serpil Çalışkan Can; Evren Semizel; Mehmet S. Okan

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics; physical findings, cardiological, hematological and neurological problems; treatment approaches; and the prognosis of children with breath holding spells.Materials and Method: Seventhy patients were included in this study. All patients were evaluated with detailed history and physical examination. Complete blood count, serum iron and iron binding capacity were studied; cardiological (telecardiography, electro...

  6. Evaluation of QT Dispersion in Children with Breath Holding Spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedian, Amir Hosein; Heidarzadeh Arani, Marzieh; Motaharizad, Davood; Mousavi, Gholam Abbas; Mosayebi, Ziba

    2016-01-01

    Breath holding spells (BHS) are common involuntary reflexes in infancy and early childhood. Differential diagnosis should embrace Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) and paroxysmal abnormalities of rhythm. The aim of this study was to compare QT dispersion (QTd) in children with breath holding spells and normal controls. QT dispersion and Corrected QT(QTc) dispersion were measured in 12 lead surface electrocardiograms in 56 patients with BHS and compared with healthy children of the same age referred to the clinic for regular checkup visits. The most common type of BHS was cyanotic (83.9%). Seven patients (12.5%) had pallid and two patients (3.5%) had mixed spells. There was a history of breath holding spells in 33.9% of the children. QT dispersion was 61.6± 22.5 and 47.1±18.8 ms in patient and control groups, respectively. QTc dispersion (QTcd) was 104 ± 29.6 and 71.9 ±18.2 ms, respectively. There was a significant difference between patient and control groups in terms of QTd and QTcd (P<0.001). QTd and QTcd were increased in children with BHS. Therefore, the evaluation of EKG for early diagnosis of rhythm abnormalities seems reasonable in these children.

  7. Automated daily breath hold stability measurements by real-time imaging in radiotherapy of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, Hans C J; Van Den Bongard, Desirée J G; van Asselen, B

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Breath hold is increasingly used for cardiac sparing in left-sided breast cancer irradiation. We have developed a fast automated method to verify breath hold stability in each treatment fraction. Material and methods We evaluated 504 patients treated with breath hold. Moderate

  8. Responsiveness of the human airway in vitro during deep inspiration and tidal oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Peter B; Jones, Robyn L; Needi, Elangovan Thaya; Cairncross, Alvenia; Mitchell, Howard W; James, Alan L; McFawn, Peter K

    2011-06-01

    In healthy individuals, deep inspiration produces bronchodilation and reduced airway responsiveness, which may be a response of the airway wall to mechanical stretch. The aim of this study was to examine the in vitro response of isolated human airways to the dynamic mechanical stretch associated with normal breathing. Human bronchial segments (n = 6) were acquired from patients without airflow obstruction undergoing lung resection for pulmonary neoplasms. The side branches were ligated and the airways were mounted in an organ bath chamber. Airway narrowing to cumulative concentrations of acetylcholine (3 × 10(-6) M to 3 × 10(-3) M) was measured under static conditions and in the presence of "tidal" oscillations with intermittent "deep inspiration." Respiratory maneuvers were simulated by varying transmural pressure using a motor-controlled syringe pump (tidal 5 to 10 cmH(2)O at 0.25 Hz, deep inspiration 5 to 30 cmH(2)O). Airway narrowing was determined from decreases in lumen volume. Tidal oscillation had no effect on airway responses to acetylcholine which was similar to those under static conditions. Deep inspiration in tidally oscillating, acetylcholine-contracted airways produced potent, transient (inspiration produces bronchodilation and a transient reduction in airway responsiveness, which can explain the beneficial effects of deep inspiration in bronchial provocation testing in vivo.

  9. SU-G-JeP3-15: Is the Reproducibility with Respect to Bone of Tumor Position at Simulation for Breath Hold CT Scans Correlated to the Reproducibility for Multiple Breath Hold CBCTs at Treatment in SBRT Thoracic Patients?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, J; Prajapati, S; Gao, S; Nitsch, P; Sadagopan, R; Wang, X; Balter, P [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate correlation between the reproducibility of tumor position under feedback guided voluntary deep inspiration breath hold gating at simulation and at treatment. Methods: All patients treated with breath hold (BH) have 3-6 BH CTs taken at simulation (sim). In addition, if the relationship between the tumor and nearby bony anatomy on treatment BH CT(or CBCT) is found to be greater than 5 mm different at treatment than it was at sim, a repeat BH CT is taken before treatment. We retrospectively analyzed the sim CTs for 19 patients who received BH SBRT lung treatments and had repeat BH CT on treatment. We evaluated the reproducibility of the tumor position during the simulation CTs and compared this to the reproducibility of the tumor position on the repeat treatment CT with our in-house CT alignment software (CT-Assisted Targeting for Radiotherapy). Results: Comparing the tumor position for multiple simulation BH CTs, we calculated: maximum difference (max) = 0.69cm; average difference (x) = 0.28cm; standard deviation (σ) = 0.18cm. Comparing the repeat BH CBCTs on treatment days we calculated: max = 0.44cm; x = 0.16cm; σ = 0.22cm. We also found that for 95% of our BH cases, the absolute variation in tumor position within the same imaging day was within 5mm of the range at the time of simulation and treatment. We found that 75% of the BH cases had less residual tumor motion on treatment days than at simulation. Conclusion: This suggests that a GTV contour based upon the residual tumor motion in multiple BH datasets plus 2 mm margin should be sufficient to cover the full range of residual tumor motion on treatment days.

  10. Breath-holding times in various phases of respiration and effect of respiratory training in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibdewal, Anil; Munshi, Anusheel; Pathak, Rima; Misra, Shagun; Daptardar, Anuradha; Singh, Vincent; Agarwal, Jai Prakash

    2015-08-01

    Breath-holding (BH) technique is used for reducing the intrafraction-tumour motion in mobile lung tumours treated with radiotherapy (RT). There is paucity of literature evaluating differences in BH times in various phases of respiration in patients with lung cancer. One hundred consecutive patients with lung cancer planned for radical RT/chemoradiation were accrued in the study. Eighty-seven patients were eligible for analysis at RT conclusion. Baseline pulmonary function test (PFT) were performed in all patients, and respiratory training was given from the day of RT planning. Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH), deep expiration breath hold (DEBH) and mid-ventilation breath hold (MVBH) were recorded manually with a stopwatch for each patient at four time points (RT planning/baseline, RT starting, during RT and RT conclusion). Median DIBH times at RT planning, RT starting, during RT and RT conclusion were 21.2, 20.6, 20.1 and 21.1 s, respectively. The corresponding median DEBH and MVBH times were 16.3, 18.2, 18.3, 18.5 s and 19.9, 20.5, 21.3, 22.1 s, respectively. Respiratory training increased MVBH time at RT conclusion compared to baseline, which was statistically significant (19.9-22.1 s, P = 0.002). DIBH or DEBH times were stable at various time points with neither a significant improvement nor decline. Among various patient and tumour factors Forced Vital Capacity pre-bronchodilation (FVCpre ) was the only factor that consistently predicted DIBH, DEBH and MVBH at all four time points with P value <0.05. BH was well tolerated by most lung cancer patients with minimum median BH time of at least 16 s in any of the three phases of respiration. Respiratory training improved MVBH time while consistently maintaining DIBH and DEBH times throughout the course of radiotherapy. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  11. Breath holding during the turn in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, A B

    1986-08-01

    Breath holding times were measured during competition and averaged 5.0 sec in the breaststroke events, 4.3 sec in freestyle, 3.7 sec in butterfly, and 3.3 sec in backstroke. These times represented approximately 30% of the total time of swimming breaststroke and freestyle races but only 20% of the time of backstroke and butterfly events. Pulmonary gas exchanges of O2 and CO2 were studied in eight male swimmers during the first turn after the start of a swim and during the third turn after continuous swimming. It was concluded that biomechanical considerations of optimizing a turn are in most circumstances not limited by the increased PCO2 and the decreased PO2 in the alveoli related to the brief period of breath holding. In turns which last longer than about 5.5 s, the swimmers may experience a strong urge to breathe. This "breaking point" sensation is brief and need not compromise the conclusion of a well-executed turn.

  12. Reduced breath holding index in patients with chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgün, Hakan; Taşdemir, Serdar; Ulaş, Ümit Hıdır; Alay, Semih; Çetiz, Ahmet; Yücel, Mehmet; Öz, Oğuzhan; Odabaşı, Zeki; Demirkaya, Şeref

    2015-09-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular disorder characterized by autonomic nervous system dysfunction and severe headache attacks. Studies have shown that changes in the intracranial vessels during migraine have an important role in the pathophysiology. Many studies have been conducted on the increased risk of stroke in patients with migraine, but insufficient data are available on the mechanism underlying the increase. This study aimed to evaluate basal cerebral blood flow velocity and vasomotor reactivity in patients with chronic migraine. We evaluated 38 patients with chronic migraine. Three of them were excluded because they had auras and four of them were excluded because of their use of medication that can affect cerebral blood flow velocity and breath holding index (beta or calcium channel blockers). Our study population consisted of 31 patients with chronic migraine without aura and 29 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals who were not taking any medication. The mean blood flow velocity and breath holding index were measured on both sides from the middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery, with temporal window insonation. The breath holding index for middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery was significantly lower in the migraine group compared to that of the control group (p < 0.05).The vasomotor reactivity indicates the dilatation potential of a vessel, and it is closely related to autoregulation. According to our results, the vasodilator response of cerebral arterioles to hypercapnia was lower in patients with chronic migraine. These findings showed the existence of impairments in the harmonic cerebral hemodynamic mechanisms in patients with chronic migraine. This finding also supports the existing idea of an increased risk of stroke in patients with chronic migraine due to impaired vasomotor reactivity.

  13. A clinical evaluation of visual feedback-guided breath-hold reproducibility of tumor location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Terashima, Kotaro; Honda, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Arimura, Hidetaka; Hirata, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of visual feedback-guided breath-hold using a machine vision system with a charge-coupled device camera and a monocular head-mounted display. Sixteen patients with lung tumors who were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were enrolled. A machine vision system with a charge-coupled device camera was used for monitoring respiration. A monocular head-mounted display was used to provide the patient with visual feedback about the breathing trace. The patients could control their breathing so that the breathing waveform would fall between the upper and lower threshold lines. Planning and treatment were performed under visual feedback-guided expiratory breath-hold. Electronic portal images were obtained during treatment. The range of cranial-caudal motion of the tumor location during each single breath-hold was calculated as the intra-breath-hold (intra-BH) variability. The maximum displacement between the two to five averaged tumor locations of each single breath-hold was calculated as the inter-breath-hold (inter-BH) variability. All 16 patients tolerated the visual feedback-guided breath-hold maneuvers well. The intra- and inter-BH variability of all patients was 1.5 ± 0.6 mm and 1.2 ± 0.5 mm, respectively. A visual feedback-guided breath-hold technique using the machine vision system is feasible with good breath-hold reproducibility.

  14. Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, Bilal A; Bragg, Christopher M; Lawless, Sarah E; Hatton, Matthew Q F; Ireland, Rob H

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV 90 ), the volume of total lung receiving ≥ 10 Gy (V 10 ) and ≥ 20 Gy (V 20 ) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean ± SD reductions for V 10 , V 20 and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 ± 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 ± 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 ± 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 ± 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV 90 was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration. (note)

  15. Clinical Efficacy of Piracetam on Breath Holding Spells in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ashrafzadeh

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Breath holding spells (BHS is a type of syncope in children , most commonly encontered in the early years of life. Although these athacks don't damage the brain , if these are frequent or prolonged cause , parents frighten , so physician should intervent. In this study we evaluated clinical efficacy of piracetam on B.H.S of children in Mashhad Ghaem Hospital during 2001-2002.In this double blind placebo control study , piracetam or placebo on a randomized basis was administered to children with 40 mg/kg/day in 2 divided doses for 2 months. From the 41 children that were enrolled , 21 cases received piracetam and 20 cases received placebo. Parents denoted the numbers of spells two months before and two months after taking drug. Control of breath holding spells were observed in 90.5% of patients in the group taking piracetam as compared with 40% in the group taking placebo (P = 0.002. Of the all patients 10 cases had iron deficiency anemia so they had taken elemental Fe too. The side effects were the same in these two groups. The results of this study indicated that piracetam was efficient for the treatment of children with B.H.S without greater incidence adverse effects than placebo.

  16. UNDERWATER STROKE KINEMATICS DURING BREATHING AND BREATH-HOLDING FRONT CRAWL SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickos Vezos

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of breathing on the three - dimensional underwater stroke kinematics of front crawl swimming. Ten female competitive freestyle swimmers participated in the study. Each subject swam a number of front crawl trials of 25 m at a constant speed under breathing and breath-holding conditions. The underwater motion of each subject's right arm was filmed using two S-VHS cameras, operating at 60 Hz, which were positioned behind two underwater viewing windows. The spatial coordinates of selected points were calculated using the DLT procedure with 30 control points and after the digital filtering of the raw data with a cut-off frequency of 6 Hz, the hand's linear displacements and velocities were calculated. The results revealed that breathing caused significantly increases in the stroke duration (t9 = 2.764; p < 0.05, the backward hand displacement relative to the water (t9 = 2.471; p<0.05 and the lateral displacement of the hand in the X - axis during the downsweep (t9 = 2.638; p < 0.05. On the contrary, the peak backward hand velocity during the insweep (t9 = 2.368; p < 0.05 and the displacement of the hand during the push phase (t9 = -2.297; p < 0.05 were greatly reduced when breathing was involved. From the above, it was concluded that breathing action in front crawl swimming caused significant modifications in both the basic stroke parameters and the overall motor pattern were, possibly due to body roll during breathing

  17. Assessing and ensuring patient safety during breath-holding for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, M J; Green, S; Stevens, A M; Clutton-Brock, T H

    2014-11-01

    While there is recent interest in using repeated deep inspiratory breath-holds, or prolonged single breath-holds, to improve radiotherapy delivery, breath-holding has risks. There are no published guidelines for monitoring patient safety, and there is little clinical awareness of the pronounced blood pressure rise and the potential for gradual asphyxia that occur during breath-holding. We describe the blood pressure rise during deep inspiratory breath-holding with air and test whether it can be abolished simply by pre-oxygenation and hypocapnia. We measured blood pressure, oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate in 12 healthy, untrained subjects performing breath-holds. Even for deep inspiratory breath-holds with air, the blood pressure rose progressively (e.g. mean systolic pressure rose from 133 ± 5 to 175 ± 8 mmHg at breakpoint, p breath-hold duration and prevented the development of asphyxia but failed to abolish the pressure rise. The pressure rise was not a function of breath-hold duration and was not signalled by any fall in heart rate (remaining at resting levels of 72 ± 2 beats per minute). Colleagues should be aware of the progressive blood pressure rise during deep inspiratory breath-holding that so far is not easily prevented. In breast cancer patients scheduled for breath-holds, we recommend routine screening for heart, cardiovascular, renal and cerebrovascular disease, routine monitoring of patient blood pressure and SpO2 during breath-holding and requesting patients to stop if systolic pressure rises consistently >180 mmHg and or SpO2 falls breath-holds, or prolonged single breath-holding techniques, to improve radiotherapy delivery. But there appears to be no clinical awareness of the risks to patients from breath-holding. We demonstrate the progressive blood pressure rise during deep inspiratory breath-holds with air, which we show cannot be prevented by the simple expedient of pre-oxygenation and hypocapnia. We propose patient

  18. Volumetric modulated arc therapy and breath-hold in image-guided locoregional left-sided breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Hol, Sandra; Poortmans, Philip M.; Essers, Marion

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and/or voluntary moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (vmDIBH) in the radiation therapy (RT) of left-sided breast cancer including the regional lymph nodes. Materials and methods: For 13 patients, four treatment combinations were compared; 3D-conformal RT (i.e., forward IMRT) in free-breathing 3D-CRT(FB), 3D-CRT(vmDIBH), 2 partial arcs VMAT(FB), and VMAT(vmDIBH). Prescribed dose was 42.56 Gy in 16 fractions. For 10 additional patients, 3D-CRT and VMAT in vmDIBH only were also compared. Results: Dose conformity, PTV coverage, ipsilateral and total lung doses were significantly better for VMAT plans compared to 3D-CRT. Mean heart dose (D mean,heart ) reduction in 3D-CRT(vmDIBH) was between 0.9 and 8.6 Gy, depending on initial D mean,heart (in 3D-CRT(FB) plans). VMAT(vmDIBH) reduced the D mean,heart further when D mean,heart was still >3.2 Gy in 3D-CRT(vmDIBH). Mean contralateral breast dose was higher for VMAT plans (2.7 Gy) compared to 3DCRT plans (0.7 Gy). Conclusions: VMAT and 3D-CRT(vmDIBH) significantly reduced heart dose for patients treated with locoregional RT of left-sided breast cancer. When D mean,heart exceeded 3.2 Gy in 3D-CRT(vmDIBH) plans, VMAT(vmDIBH) resulted in a cumulative heart dose reduction. VMAT also provided better target coverage and reduced ipsilateral lung dose, at the expense of a small increase in the dose to the contralateral breast

  19. Comparison of a multi-breath-hold and a single breath-hold cine imaging approach for 4D guide-point modeling of the left ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmaier, C.; Schlosser, T.; Nassenstein, K.; Bruder, O.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Guide-point modeling (GPM) enables reliable and time-efficient assessment of left ventricular (LV) volumes when using sequences that allow acquisition of short- and long-axis scans within a single breath-hold. Slice misalignment may influence GPM analysis of standard multi-breath-hold images due to image acquisition in different breath-holds. Thus, our study aimed to assess if such an approach allows for reliable volumetric calculations in the clinical routine. Materials and Methods: 52 patients were examined on a 1.5 T scanner with multi-breath-hold acquisitions on the standard short- and long-axis using an SSFP (TR 3 ms, TE 1.5 ms, FA 60 ) sequence and a TPAT accelerated SSFP (TR 4.6 msec, TE 1.1msec, FA 60 , acceleration factor 3) sequence that covered the LV in 3 short- and 2 long-axis slices within a single breath-hold. For both datasets GPM was used to assess LV volumes. In addition, LV parameters were calculated by applying the summation of slices (SoS) approach (standard of reference) with the short-axis views of the multi-breath-hold dataset. Results: The post-processing times were shorter with both GPM approaches (both, p 0.97). Conclusion: Cine short- and long-axis images that had been acquired in different breath-holds can be reliably evaluated by the GPM approach. (orig.)

  20. 体力と息こらえ(breath holding)の相関関係

    OpenAIRE

    "川上, 雅之"; "カワカミ, マサユキ"; Masayuki", "Kawakami

    1980-01-01

    "This research is an analysis of the correlation of the length of the breath holding with physical fitness. These tests of physical fitness were measured by side step test, vertical jump, back strenrgth, grip strength, trunk extension, standing trunk flexion and step test. Following results were obtained : 1) The length of breath holding is correlated with physical characteristics such as height, circumference chest and body surface area. 2) The length of breath holding is correlated with phy...

  1. EFFECTS OF ORAL IRON SUPPLEMENT ON BREATH-HOLDING SPELLS IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    S.H. TONEKABONI; S. ALAVI; F. MAHVELATI; Z. TABASI

    2006-01-01

    Objectives:Breath holding spells are one of the most frequent and important diagnostic challenges in pediatrics. The aim of this study, conducted on pediatric patients referring to the pediatric neurology clinic in Hormozgan province, was to evaluate therapeutic effects of iron on breath holding spellsMaterials and Methods:35 children (19 males and 16 females), aged between 3 to 60 months, with a history of breath-holding spells, were included in the trial. To obtain all relevant data a speci...

  2. The Influence of Age on Interaction between Breath-Holding Test and Single-Breath Carbon Dioxide Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Trembach

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was to compare the breath-holding test and single-breath carbon dioxide test in evaluation of the peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity to carbon dioxide in healthy subjects of different age. Methods. The study involved 47 healthy volunteers between ages of 25 and 85 years. All participants were divided into 4 groups according to age: 25 to 44 years (n=14, 45 to 60 years (n=13, 60 to 75 years (n=12, and older than 75 years (n=8. Breath-holding test was performed in the morning before breakfast. The single-breath carbon dioxide (SB-CO2 test was performed the following day. Results. No correlation was found between age and duration of breath-holding (r=0.13 and between age and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity to CO2 (r=0.07. In all age groups there were no significant differences in the mean values from the breath-holding test and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity tests. In all groups there was a strong significant inverse correlation between breath-holding test and SB-CO2 test. Conclusion. A breath-holding test reflects the sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreflex to carbon dioxide in healthy elderly humans. Increasing age alone does not alter the peripheral ventilatory response to hypercapnia.

  3. The Influence of Age on Interaction between Breath-Holding Test and Single-Breath Carbon Dioxide Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembach, Nikita; Zabolotskikh, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Introduction . The aim of the study was to compare the breath-holding test and single-breath carbon dioxide test in evaluation of the peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity to carbon dioxide in healthy subjects of different age. Methods . The study involved 47 healthy volunteers between ages of 25 and 85 years. All participants were divided into 4 groups according to age: 25 to 44 years ( n = 14), 45 to 60 years ( n = 13), 60 to 75 years ( n = 12), and older than 75 years ( n = 8). Breath-holding test was performed in the morning before breakfast. The single-breath carbon dioxide (SB-CO 2 ) test was performed the following day. Results . No correlation was found between age and duration of breath-holding ( r = 0.13) and between age and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity to CO 2 ( r = 0.07). In all age groups there were no significant differences in the mean values from the breath-holding test and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity tests. In all groups there was a strong significant inverse correlation between breath-holding test and SB-CO 2 test. Conclusion . A breath-holding test reflects the sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreflex to carbon dioxide in healthy elderly humans. Increasing age alone does not alter the peripheral ventilatory response to hypercapnia.

  4. Correction for blood pressure improves correlation between cerebrovascular reactivity assessed by breath holding and 6% CO(2) breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Kiran; Chandran, Dinu S; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow velocity to hypercapnia are associated with changes in systemic blood pressure (BP). These confounding BP-dependent changes in cerebral blood flow velocity cause misinterpretation of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) results. The objective of the study was to determine the relationship between CVR assessed by breath holding and 6% CO2 breathing after correcting for BP-dependent changes in cerebral blood flow velocity. In 33 patients of uncomplicated type 2 diabetes mellitus, CVR was assessed as percentage changes in cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebrovascular conductance index. Percentage change in cerebral blood flow velocity during breath holding was positively correlated with that of during 6% CO2 breathing (r = .35; P = .0448). CVR during breath holding and 6% CO2 breathing were better correlated when expressed as percentage changes in cerebrovascular conductance index (r = .49; P = .0040). Similarly, breath-holding test results expressed as percentage changes in cerebral blood flow velocity correctly identified only 37.5% of the poor reactors to 6% CO2 breathing. However, when the breath-holding test results were expressed as percentage changes in cerebrovascular conductance index, 62.5% of the poor reactors to 6% CO2 breathing were correctly identified indicating a better agreement between the test results obtained by the 2 methods. Cerebrovascular response to breath holding is better correlated with that of 6% CO2 breathing when changes in cerebral blood flow velocity were corrected for associated changes in BP. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of cerebral blood flow in extreme breath holding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bain Anthony R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of cerebral blood flow (CBF on a maximal breath-hold (BH in ultra-elite divers was examined. Divers (n = 7 performed one control BH, and one BH following oral administration of the non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (1.2 mg/kg. Arterial blood gases and CBF were measured prior to (baseline, and at BH termination. Compared to control, indomethacin reduced baseline CBF and cerebral delivery of oxygen (CDO2 by about 26% (p < 0.01. Indomethacin reduced maximal BH time from 339 ± 51 to 319 ± 57 seconds (p = 0.04. In both conditions, the CDO2 remained unchanged from baseline to the termination of apnea. At BH termination, arterial oxygen tension was higher following oral administration of indomethacin compared to control (4.05 ± 0.45 vs. 3.44 ± 0.32 kPa. The absolute increase in CBF from baseline to the termination of apnea was lower with indomethacin (p = 0.01. These findings indicate that the impact of CBF on maximal BH time is likely attributable to its influence on cerebral H+ washout, and therefore central chemoreceptive drive to breathe, rather than to CDO2.

  6. Voluntary Breath-hold Technique for Reducing Heart Dose in Left Breast Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Frederick R.; Colgan, Ruth M.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Carr, Karen; Landeg, Steven; Clements, Nicola; McNair, Helen A.; Locke, Imogen; Evans, Philip M.; Haviland, Joanne S.; Yarnold, John R.; Kirby, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    Breath-holding techniques reduce the amount of radiation received by cardiac structures during tangential-field left breast radiotherapy. With these techniques, patients hold their breath while radiotherapy is delivered, pushing the heart down and away from the radiotherapy field. Despite clear dosimetric benefits, these techniques are not yet in widespread use. One reason for this is that commercially available solutions require specialist equipment, necessitating not only significant capital investment, but often also incurring ongoing costs such as a need for daily disposable mouthpieces. The voluntary breath-hold technique described here does not require any additional specialist equipment. All breath-holding techniques require a surrogate to monitor breath-hold consistency and whether breath-hold is maintained. Voluntary breath-hold uses the distance moved by the anterior and lateral reference marks (tattoos) away from the treatment room lasers in breath-hold to monitor consistency at CT-planning and treatment setup. Light fields are then used to monitor breath-hold consistency prior to and during radiotherapy delivery. PMID:25046661

  7. Considerable pancreatic tumor motion during breath-holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lens, Eelco; van der Horst, Astrid; Versteijne, Eva; Bel, Arjan; van Tienhoven, Geertjan

    2016-11-01

    Breath-holding (BH) is often used to reduce abdominal organ motion during radiotherapy. However, for inhale BH, abdominal tumor motion during BH has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to quantify tumor motion during inhale BH and tumor position variations between consecutive inhale BHs in pancreatic cancer patients. Twelve patients with intratumoral fiducials were included and asked to perform three consecutive 30-second inhale BHs on each of three measurement days. During BH, lateral fluoroscopic movies were obtained and a two-dimensional (2D) image correlation algorithm was used to track the fiducials and the diaphragm, yielding the tumor and diaphragm motion during each BH. The tumor position variation between consecutive BHs was obtained from the difference in initial tumor position between consecutive BHs on a single measurement day. We observed tumor motion during BH with a mean absolute maximum displacement over all BHs of 4.2 mm (range 1.0-11.0 mm) in inferior-superior (IS) direction and 2.7 mm (range 0.5-8.0 mm) in anterior-posterior (AP) direction. We found only a moderate correlation between tumor and diaphragm motion in the IS direction (Pearson's correlation coefficient |r|>0.6 in 45 of 76 BHs). The mean tumor position variation between consecutive BHs was 0.2 [standard deviation (SD) 1.7] mm in the inferior direction and 0.5 (SD 0.8) mm in the anterior direction. We observed substantial pancreatic tumor motion during BH as well as considerable position variation between consecutive BHs on a single day. We recommend further quantifying these uncertainties before introducing breath-hold during radiation treatment of pancreatic cancer patients. Also, the diaphragm cannot be used as a surrogate for pancreatic tumor motion.

  8. Feasibility of breathing-adapted PET/CT imaging for radiation therapy of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Andersen, Flemming; Berthelsen, A K

    2011-01-01

    . We investigate the feasibility of introducing a deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) strategy in PET/CT imaging of Hodgkin lymphoma patients and its impact on image quantification parameters.  Methods: Three patients with suspicion of large mediastinal tumour burden were selected for this study...

  9. Feasibility of breathing-adapted PET/CT imaging for radiation therapy of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Andersen, Flemming; Berthelsen, A K

    2011-01-01

    . We investigate the feasibility of introducing a deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) strategy in PET/CT imaging of Hodgkin lymphoma patients and its impact on image quantification parameters. Methods: Three patients with suspicion of large mediastinal tumour burden were selected for this study...

  10. Impaired response to deep inspiration in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Clyde; Desai, Alpa; Togias, Alkis

    2011-01-01

    Deep inspirations modulate airway caliber and airway closure and their effects are impaired in asthma. The association between asthma and obesity raises the question whether the deep inspiration (DI) effect is also impaired in the latter condition. We assessed the DI effects in obese and nonobese nonasthmatics. Thirty-six subjects (17 obese, 19 nonobese) underwent routine methacholine (Mch) challenge and 30 of them also had a modified bronchoprovocation in the absence of DIs. Lung function was monitored with spirometry and forced oscillation (FO) [resistance (R) at 5 Hz (R5), at 20 Hz (R20), R5-R20 and the integrated area of low-frequency reactance (AX)]. The response to Mch, assessed with area under the dose-response curves (AUC), was consistently greater in the routine challenge in the obese (mean ± SE, obese vs. nonobese AUC: R5: 15.7 ± 2.3 vs. 2.4 ± 2.0, P < 0.0005; R20: 5.6 ± 1.4 vs. 1.4 ± 1.2, P = 0.027; R5-R20: 10.2 ± 1.6 vs. 0.9 ± 0.1.4, P < 0.0005; AX: 115.6 ± 22.0 vs. 1.5 ± 18.9, P < 0.0005), but differences between groups in the modified challenge were smaller, indicating reduced DI effects in obesity. Given that DI has bronchodilatory and bronchoprotective effects, we further assessed these components separately. In the obese subjects, DI prior to Mch enhanced Mch-induced bronchoconstriction, but DI after Mch resulted in bronchodilation that was of similar magnitude as in the nonobese. We conclude that obesity is characterized by increased Mch responsiveness, predominantly of the small airways, due to a DI effect that renders the airways more sensitive to the stimulus. PMID:21700888

  11. Qualitative assessment of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography using breath-hold and non-breath-hold techniques in the portal venous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kim, Sun-Ju; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Kim, Kwang-Choul; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the image quality in delineation of the portal venous systems with two different methods, breath-hold and non-breath-hold by using the 3D FLASH sequence. We used a 1.5 T system to obtain magnetic resonance(MR)images. Arterial and portal phase 3D FLASH images were obtained with breath-hold after a bolus injection of GD-DOTA. The detection of PVS on the MR angiograms was classified into three grades. First, the angiograms of the breath-hold method showed well the portal vein, the splenic vein and the superior mesenteric vein systems in 13 of 15 patients (86%) and the inferior mesenteric vein system in 6 of 15 patients (40%), Second, MR angiograms of the non-breath-hold method demonstrated the PVS and the SMV in 12 of 15 patients (80%) and the IMV in 5 of 15 patients (33%). Our study showed contrast-enhanced 3D FLASH MR angiography, together with the breath-hold technique, may provide reliable and accurate information on the portal venous system.

  12. Analysis of diaphragm movement during tidal breathing and during its activation while breath holding using MRI synchronized with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KOLAR, P; NEUWIRTH, J; SANDA, J; SUCHANEK, V; SVATA, Z; VOLEJNIK, J; PIVEC, M

    2009-01-01

    Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with synchronized spirometry we analyzed and compared diaphragm movement during tidal breathing and voluntary movement of the diaphragm while breath holding. Breathing cycles of 16 healthy subjects were examined using a dynamic sequence (77 slices in sagittal plane during 20 s, 1NSA, 240x256, TR4.48, TE2.24, FA90, TSE1, FOV 328). The amplitude of movement of the apex and dorsal costophrenic angle of the diaphragm were measured for two test conditions: tidal breathing and voluntary breath holding. The maximal inferior and superior positions of the diaphragm were subtracted from the corresponding positions during voluntary movements while breath holding. The average amplitude of inferio-superior movement of the diaphragm apex during tidal breathing was 27.3+/-10.2 mm (mean +/- SD), and during voluntary movement while breath holding was 32.5+/-16.2 mm. Movement of the costophrenic angle was 39+/-17.6 mm during tidal breathing and 45.5+/-21.2 mm during voluntary movement while breath holding. The inferior position of the diaphragm was lower in 11 of 16 subjects (68.75 %) and identical in 2 of 16 (12.5 %) subjects during voluntary movement compared to the breath holding. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to demonstrate that movement of the costophrenic angle and apex of the diaphragm had a linear relationship in both examined situations (r=0.876). A correlation was found between the amplitude of diaphragm movement during tidal breathing and lung volume (r=0.876). The amplitude of movement of the diaphragm with or without breathing showed no correlation to each other (r=0.074). The movement during tidal breathing shows a correlation with the changes in lung volumes. Dynamic MRI demonstrated that individuals are capable of moving their diaphragm voluntarily, but the amplitude of movement differs from person to person. In this study, the movements of the diaphragm apex and the costophrenic angle were

  13. Effect of Dyspnea Induced by Breath-holding on Maximal Muscular Strength of Patients with COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Shingai, Kazuya; Kanezaki, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to clarify the effect of dyspnea induced by breath-holding on maximum muscular strength of patients with COPD. [Subjects] This study recruited 14 COPD subjects via public posting. [Methods] Dyspnea was assessed by the modified Borg scale. The subject asked to stop breathing at end-expiration and to hold their breath with a nose clip for as long as possible. Both total breath-holding time and threshold time of dyspnea were measured with a chronogr...

  14. The Ins and Outs of Breath Holding: Simple Demonstrations of Complex Respiratory Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skow, Rachel J.; Day, Trevor A.; Fuller, Jonathan E.; Bruce, Christina D.; Steinback, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of breath holding is complex, and voluntary breath-hold duration is affected by many factors, including practice, psychology, respiratory chemoreflexes, and lung stretch. In this activity, we outline a number of simple laboratory activities or classroom demonstrations that illustrate the complexity of the integrative physiology…

  15. Audiovisual biofeedback guided breath-hold improves lung tumor position reproducibility and volume consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Lee, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be used to improve the reproducibility and consistency of breath-hold lung tumor position and volume, respectively. These results may provide a pathway to achieve more accurate lung cancer radiation treatment in addition to improving various medical imaging and treatments by using breath-hold procedures.

  16. Properties of end-expiratory breath hold responses measured with near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jaakko; Noponen, Tommi; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.

    2011-02-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can be used to assess the cerebrovascular response to breath hold. We measured eight healthy subjects during voluntary end-expiratory breath hold to study inter- and intraindividual variability of the deoxy- (HbR) and oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) response curves for the scalp and cerebral cortex. Although cortical [HbO2] behaves qualitatively similarly in all subjects, there is large inter- and intraindividual variability, and in the case of [HbR] also qualitative variability. However, the linearity of [HbO2] increase during the breath hold has encouraging measurement repeatability, and it may even indicate an individual's CO2 tolerance. This result may help understand why breath hold duration varies between subjects more than the total [HbO2] increase during breath hold.

  17. The Influence of Age on Interaction between Breath-Holding Test and Single-Breath Carbon Dioxide Test

    OpenAIRE

    Trembach, Nikita; Zabolotskikh, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of the study was to compare the breath-holding test and single-breath carbon dioxide test in evaluation of the peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity to carbon dioxide in healthy subjects of different age. Methods. The study involved 47 healthy volunteers between ages of 25 and 85 years. All participants were divided into 4 groups according to age: 25 to 44 years (n = 14), 45 to 60 years (n = 13), 60 to 75 years (n = 12), and older than 75 years (n = 8). Breath-holding test ...

  18. Respiratory hypoalgesia? Breath-holding, but not respiratory phase modulates nociceptive flexion reflex and pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Hassan; Van de Broek, Karlien; Plaghki, Léon; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2016-03-01

    Several observations suggest that respiratory phase (inhalation vs. exhalation) and post-inspiratory breath-holds could modulate pain and the nociceptive reflex. This experiment aimed to investigate the role of both mechanisms. Thirty-two healthy participants received supra-threshold electrocutaneous stimulations to elicit both the Nociceptive Flexion Reflex (NFR) and pain, either during spontaneous inhalations or exhalations, or during three types of instructed breath-holds: following exhalation, at mid-inhalation and at full-capacity inhalation. Whether the electrocutaneous stimulus was applied during inhalation or exhalation did not affect the NFR or pain. Self-reported pain was reduced and the NFR was increased during breath-holding compared to spontaneous breathing. Whereas the type of breath-hold did not impact on self-reported pain, breath-holds at full-capacity inhalation and following exhalation were associated with a lower NFR amplitude compared to breath-holds at mid-inhalation. The present findings confirm that breath-holding can modulate pain (sensitivity) and suggest that both attentional distraction and changes in vagal activity may underlie the observed effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Anatomic and Pathologic Variability During Radiotherapy for a Hybrid Active Breath-Hold Gating Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K.; Gopan, Ellen; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intra- and interfraction variability of tumor and lung volume and position using a hybrid active breath-hold gating technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 159 repeat normal inspiration active breath-hold CTs were acquired weekly during radiotherapy for 9 lung cancer patients (12-21 scans per patient). A physician delineated the gross tumor volume (GTV), lungs, and spinal cord on the first breath-hold CT, and contours were propagated semiautomatically. Intra- and interfraction variability of tumor and lung position and volume were evaluated. Tumor centroid and border variability were quantified. Results: On average, intrafraction variability of lung and GTV centroid position was 0.1). Increases in free-breathing tidal volume were associated with increases in breath-hold ipsilateral lung volume (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The breath-hold technique was reproducible within 2 mm during each fraction. Interfraction variability of GTV position and shape was substantial because of tumor volume and breath-hold lung volume change during therapy. These results support the feasibility of a hybrid breath-hold gating technique and suggest that online image guidance would be beneficial.

  20. Reliable quantification of BOLD fMRI cerebrovascular reactivity despite poor breath-hold performance☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Molly G.; Murphy, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) can be mapped using BOLD fMRI to provide a clinical insight into vascular health that can be used to diagnose cerebrovascular disease. Breath-holds are a readily accessible method for producing the required arterial CO2 increases but their implementation into clinical studies is limited by concerns that patients will demonstrate highly variable performance of breath-hold challenges. This study assesses the repeatability of CVR measurements despite poor task performance, to determine if and how robust results could be achieved with breath-holds in patients. Twelve healthy volunteers were scanned at 3T. Six functional scans were acquired, each consisting of 6 breath-hold challenges (10, 15, or 20 s duration) interleaved with periods of paced breathing. These scans simulated the varying breath-hold consistency and ability levels that may occur in patient data. Uniform ramps, time-scaled ramps, and end-tidal CO2 data were used as regressors in a general linear model in order to measure CVR at the grey matter, regional, and voxelwise level. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) quantified the repeatability of the CVR measurement for each breath-hold regressor type and scale of interest across the variable task performances. The ramp regressors did not fully account for variability in breath-hold performance and did not achieve acceptable repeatability (ICC  0.4). Further analysis of intra-subject CVR variability across the brain (ICCspatial and voxelwise correlation) supported the use of end-tidal CO2 data to extract robust whole-brain CVR maps, despite variability in breath-hold performance. We conclude that the incorporation of end-tidal CO2 monitoring into scanning enables robust, repeatable measurement of CVR that makes breath-hold challenges suitable for routine clinical practice. PMID:23845426

  1. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia in children with severe cyanotic and pallid breath-holding spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMario, F J; Bauer, L; Baxter, D

    1998-09-01

    In this study we investigated centrally mediated parasympathetic regulation of modulated cardiac vagal tone among children with severe cyanotic and pallid breath-holding spells by examining respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia was evaluated in 41 children; 17 subjects with cyanotic breath-holding spells (6 boys, 11 girls; mean age 37.1 months), 7 subjects with pallid breath-holding spells (2 boys, 5 girls; mean age 33.0 months), and 17 controls (8 boys, 9 girls; mean age 41.2 months). Subjects had recurrent (more than 3) severe breath-holding spells. Each subject's electrocardiogram was recorded in a quiet room and digitized by an 80386 personal computer during five 1-minute periods. R-R intervals within each 1-minute period were converted to heart rate in 120 successive 0.5-second intervals. The resultant heart rate time series was converted to its underlying frequency composition by a fast Fourier transform and averaged across minutes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia was defined as the variability in the time series over a frequency range (0.096 Hz to 0.48 Hz) corresponding to a range of respiratory rates from 6 to 30 breaths per minute. ANCOVA adjusting for age and sex was conducted with the subject group as the independent measure. There were no significant differences between subjects with cyanotic breath-holding spells and controls. Pallid breath-holding spell subjects had a marked difference in respiratory sinus arrhythmia from either controls or subjects with cyanotic breath-holding spells, demonstrating less variability in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (P breath-holding spells, caused by a primary central parasympathetic disturbance distinct from the dysregulation found in cyanotic breath-holding spells.

  2. Bronchodilatory effect of deep inspiration in freshly isolated sheep lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, William D; Wang, Lu; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2017-02-01

    Taking a big breath is known to reverse bronchoconstriction induced by bronchochallenge in healthy subjects; this bronchodilatory effect of deep inspiration (DI) is diminished in asthmatics. The mechanism underlying the DI effect is not clear. Observations from experiments using isolated airway smooth muscle (ASM) preparations and airway segments suggest that straining of ASM due to DI could lead to bronchodilation, possibly due to strain-induced reduction in ASM contractility. However, factors external to the lung cannot be excluded as potential causes for the DI effect. Neural reflex initiated by stretch receptors in the lung are known to inhibit the broncho-motor tone and enhance vasodilatation; the former directly reduces airway resistance, and the latter facilitates removal of contractile agonists through the bronchial circulation. If the DI effect is solely mediated by factors extrinsic to the lung, the DI effect would be absent in isolated, nonperfused lungs. Here we examined the DI effect in freshly isolated, nonperfused sheep lungs. We found that imposition of DI on isolated lungs resulted in significant bronchodilation, that this DI effect was present only after the lungs were challenged with a contractile agonist (acetylcholine or histamine), and that the effect was independent of the difference in lung volume observed pre- and post-DI. We conclude that a significant portion of the bronchodilatory DI effect stems from factors internal to the lung related to the activation of ASM. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Nonrigid registration method to assess reproducibility of breath-holding with ABC in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrut, David; Boldea, Vlad; Ayadi, Myriam; Badel, Jean-Noel; Ginestet, Chantal; Clippe, Sebastien; Carrie, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study the interfraction reproducibility of breath-holding using active breath control (ABC), and to develop computerized tools to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) intrathoracic motion in each patient. Methods and materials: Since June 2002, 11 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer enrolled in a Phase II trial have undergone four CT scans: one during free-breathing (reference) and three using ABC. Patients left the room between breath-hold scans. The patient's breath was held at the same predefined phase of the breathing cycle (about 70% of the vital capacity) using the ABC device, then patients received 3D-conformal radiotherapy. Automated computerized tools for breath-hold CT scans were developed to analyze lung and tumor interfraction residual motions with 3D nonrigid registration. Results: All patients but one were safely treated with ABC for 7 weeks. For 6 patients, the lung volume differences were 300 cm 3 and displacements >10 mm, probably owing to atelectasia and emphysema. One patient was excluded, and two others had incomplete data sets. Conclusion: Breath-holding with ABC was effective in 6 patients, and discrepancies were clinically accountable in 2. The proposed 3D nonrigid registration method allows for personalized evaluation of breath-holding reproducibility with ABC. It will be used to adapt the patient-specific internal margins

  4. Breath Holding Spells in Children with Long QT Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jeffrey A; Bos, J Martijn; Etheridge, Susan P; Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetic heart rhythm disorder that may present with syncope, seizures, or sudden cardiac death. Breath holding spells (BHS) occur in 5% of all children and have been noted in children with LQTS anecdotally. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of BHS in children diagnosed with LQTS at ≤5 years of age. A retrospective review was performed to identify children diagnosed with LQTS who were ≤5 years old at initial presentation to our LQTS clinic from August 1999 to November 2013. The mean length of follow-up was 6.4 ± 2.8 years. The electronic medical records were reviewed for clinical presentation of BHS, as well as LQTS-associated symptoms, diagnostic tests, and treatment. The study cohort consisted of 115 children with LQTS (58% male; median age at diagnosis, 11 months [range, birth to 5 years]; mean corrected QT interval (QTc), 478 ± 60 milliseconds). At presentation, 80% of patients were asymptomatic. Genetic testing revealed type 1 LQTS (LQT1) in 48%. Overall, 5 of 115 patients (4.3%) had BHS (2 of 5 [40%] male, mean QTc: 492 ± 14 milliseconds, 4 [80%] with family history of LQTS). BHS were the presenting symptom in 1 of 23 symptomatic patients (4.3%). All BHS occurred in patients with LQT1 (P = .02). Although BHS among children with LQTS are relatively rare and occur at similar frequency as the general population, they can be the presenting symptom for a heart rhythm disorder. Careful attention to BHS is important to distinguish an innocent BHS from a potential LQTS-triggered cardiac event so that proper treatment is initiated. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Whole-heart magnetic resonance coronary angiography with multiple breath-holds and automatic breathing-level tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhara, Shigehide; Ninomiya, Ayako; Okada, Tomohisa; Kanao, Shotaro; Kamae, Toshikazu; Togashi, Kaori

    2010-05-01

    Whole-heart (WH) magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA) studies are usually performed during free breathing while monitoring the position of the diaphragm with real-time motion correction. However, this results in a long scan time and the patient's breathing pattern may change, causing the study to be aborted. Alternatively, WH MRCA can be performed with multiple breath-holds (mBH). However, one problem in the mBH method is that patients cannot hold their breath at the same position every time, leading to image degradation. We have developed a new WH MRCA imaging method that employs both the mBH method and automatic breathing-level tracking to permit automatic tracking of the changes in breathing or breath-hold levels. Evaluation of its effects on WH MRCA image quality showed that this method can provide high-quality images within a shorter scan time. This proposed method is expected to be very useful in clinical WH MRCA studies.

  6. Respiration-correlated treatment delivery using feedback-guided breath hold: A technical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Christopher; Starkschall, George; Balter, Peter; Fitzpatrick, Mathew J.; Antolak, John A.; Tolani, Naresh; Prado, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory motion causes movement of internal structures in the thorax and abdomen, making accurate delivery of radiation therapy to tumors in those areas a challenge. To reduce the uncertainties caused by this motion, we have developed feedback-guided breath hold (FGBH), a novel delivery technique in which radiation is delivered only during a voluntary breath hold that is sustained for as long as the patient feels comfortable. Here we present the technical aspects of FGBH, which involve (1) fabricating the hardware so the respiratory trace can be displayed to the patient, (2) assembling a delay box to be used as a breath-hold detector, and (3) performing quality control tests to ensure that FGBH can be delivered accurately and safely. A commercial respiratory tracking system that uses an external fiducial to monitor abdominal wall motion generates and displays the breathing trace and specific positions in the breathing cycle where a breath hold needs to occur. Hardware was developed to present this display to the patient in the treatment position. Patients view the presentation either on a liquid crystal display or through a pair of virtual reality goggles. Using the respiratory trace as a visual aid, the patient performs a breath hold so that the position representing the location of a fiducial is held within a specified gating window. A delay box was fabricated to differentiate between gating signals received during free breathing and those received during breath hold, allowing radiation delivery only when the fiducial was within the breath-hold gating window. A quality control analysis of the gating delay box and the integrated system was performed to ensure that all of the hardware and components were ready for clinical use

  7. In vivo proton MRS of normal pancreas metabolites during breath-holding and free-breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, T-H; Jin, E-H; Shen, H; Zhang, Y; He, W

    2012-07-01

    To characterize normal pancreas metabolites using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 3T under conditions of breath-holding and free-breathing. The pancreases of 32 healthy volunteers were examined using (1)H MRS during breath-holding and free-breathing acquisitions in a single-voxel point-resolved selective spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) technique using a 3T MRI system. Resonances were compared between paired spectra of the two breathing modes. Furthermore, correlations between lipid (Lip) content and age, body-mass index (BMI), as well as choline (Cho) peak visibility of the normal pancreas were analysed during breath-holding. Twenty-nine pairs of spectra were successfully obtained showing three major resonances, Lip, Cho, cholesterol and the unsaturated parts of the olefinic region of fatty acids (Chol+Unsat). Breath-hold spectra were generally better, with higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNR; Z=-2.646, p=0.008) and Cho peak visible status (Z=-2.449, p=0.014). Correlations were significant between spectra acquired by the two breathing modes, especially for Lip height, Lip area, and the area of other peaks at 1.9-4.1ppm. However, the Lip resonance was significantly different between the spectra of the two breathing modes (pbreath-holding spectra, there were significant positive correlations between Lip peak height, area, and age (r=0.491 and 0.521, p=0.007 and 0.004), but not between Lip peak area and BMI. There was no statistical difference in Cho resonances between males and females. The Lip peak height and area were significantly higher in the Cho peak invisible group than in the Cho peak visible group (t=2.661 and 2.353, p=0.030 and 0.043). In vivo(1)H MRS of the normal pancreas at 3T is technically feasible and can characterize several metabolites. (1)H MRS during breath-holding acquisition is superior to that during free-breathing acquisition. Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  8. The effects of breath-holding on pulmonary regurgitation measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu-Narayan Sonya V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary regurgitation is a common and clinically important residual lesion after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR phase contrast velocity mapping is widely used for measurement of pulmonary regurgitant fraction. Breath-hold acquisitions, usually acquired during held expiration, are more convenient than the non-breath-hold approach, but we hypothesized that breath-holding might affect the amount of pulmonary regurgitation. Methods Forty-three adult patients with a previous repair of tetralogy of Fallot and residual pulmonary regurgitation were investigated with CMR. In each, pulmonary regurgitant fraction was measured from velocity maps transecting the pulmonary trunk, acquired during held expiration, held inspiration, by non-breath-hold acquisition, and also from the difference of right and left ventricular stroke volume measurements. Results Pulmonary regurgitant fraction was lower when measured by velocity mapping in held expiration compared with held inspiration, non-breath-hold or stroke volume difference (30.8 vs. 37.0, 35.6, 35.4%, p = 0.00017, 0.0035, 0.026. The regurgitant volume was lower in held expiration than in held inspiration (41.9 vs. 48.3, p = 0.0018. Pulmonary forward flow volume was larger during held expiration than during non-breath-hold (132 vs. 124 ml, p = 0.0024. Conclusion Pulmonary regurgitant fraction was significantly lower in held expiration compared with held inspiration, free breathing and stroke volume difference. Altered airway pressure could be a contributory factor. This information is relevant if breath-hold acquisition is to be substituted for non-breath-hold in the investigation of patients with a view to re-intervention.

  9. Rare manifestation of a craniovertebral junction anomaly: is blue breath holding always benign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udayakumaran, Suhas

    2013-01-01

    Breath-holding or reflex anoxic seizures predominantly occur in preschool children and usually resolve by late childhood, rarely persisting through adolescence and into adulthood. Investigations are generally unnecessary. Education and reassurance is the mainstay of management. In this report, the author describes a case in which an infant presented with breath-holding spells due to a significant craniovertebral anomaly, and underwent a C1-C2 posterior stabilization. Following the stabilization of his dislocation the breath-holding spells never reappeared. Authors have previously described a rare manifestation of craniovertebral junction anomaly. Additionally, it is important to recognize that in a subset of patients breath-holding spells may be hazardous and not benign.

  10. Diverse presentation of breath holding spells: two case reports with literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Geetanjali; Larsen, Paul; Fernandez, Cristina; Parakh, Manish

    2013-01-01

    Breath holding spells are a common and dramatic form of syncope and anoxic seizure in infancy. They are usually triggered by an emotional stimuli or minor trauma. Based on the color change, they are classified into 3 types, cyanotic, pallid, and mixed. Pallid breath holding spells result from exaggerated, vagally-mediated cardiac inhibition, whereas the more common, cyanotic breathholding spells are of more complex pathogenesis which is not completely understood. A detailed and accurate history is the mainstay of diagnosis. An EKG should be strongly considered to rule out long QT syndrome. Spontaneous resolution of breath-holding spells is usually seen, without any adverse developmental and intellectual sequelae. Rare cases of status epilepticus, prolonged asystole, and sudden death have been reported. Reassurance and education is the mainstay of therapy. Occasionally, pharmacologic intervention with iron, piracetam; atropine may be of benefit. Here we present 2 cases, one of each, pallid and cyanotic breath holding spells.

  11. Diverse Presentation of Breath Holding Spells: Two Case Reports with Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Rathore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breath holding spells are a common and dramatic form of syncope and anoxic seizure in infancy. They are usually triggered by an emotional stimuli or minor trauma. Based on the color change, they are classified into 3 types, cyanotic, pallid, and mixed. Pallid breath holding spells result from exaggerated, vagally-mediated cardiac inhibition, whereas the more common, cyanotic breathholding spells are of more complex pathogenesis which is not completely understood. A detailed and accurate history is the mainstay of diagnosis. An EKG should be strongly considered to rule out long QT syndrome. Spontaneous resolution of breath-holding spells is usually seen, without any adverse developmental and intellectual sequelae. Rare cases of status epilepticus, prolonged asystole, and sudden death have been reported. Reassurance and education is the mainstay of therapy. Occasionally, pharmacologic intervention with iron, piracetam; atropine may be of benefit. Here we present 2 cases, one of each, pallid and cyanotic breath holding spells.

  12. Diverse Presentation of Breath Holding Spells: Two Case Reports with Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Geetanjali; Larsen, Paul; Fernandez, Cristina; Parakh, Manish

    2013-01-01

    Breath holding spells are a common and dramatic form of syncope and anoxic seizure in infancy. They are usually triggered by an emotional stimuli or minor trauma. Based on the color change, they are classified into 3 types, cyanotic, pallid, and mixed. Pallid breath holding spells result from exaggerated, vagally-mediated cardiac inhibition, whereas the more common, cyanotic breathholding spells are of more complex pathogenesis which is not completely understood. A detailed and accurate history is the mainstay of diagnosis. An EKG should be strongly considered to rule out long QT syndrome. Spontaneous resolution of breath-holding spells is usually seen, without any adverse developmental and intellectual sequelae. Rare cases of status epilepticus, prolonged asystole, and sudden death have been reported. Reassurance and education is the mainstay of therapy. Occasionally, pharmacologic intervention with iron, piracetam; atropine may be of benefit. Here we present 2 cases, one of each, pallid and cyanotic breath holding spells. PMID:24191206

  13. Effects of breath-holding position on the QRS amplitudes in the routine electrocardiogram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, D.; Cock, de C.C.; Thijs, A.; Smulders, Y.M.

    2009-01-01

    /=1.5 mm in multiple leads. CONCLUSION: The effect of different extreme breath-holding positions on the QRS complex is on average small but may be substantial in individuals. Lack of standardization of breathing instructions during recording of the ECG may result in differences in application of

  14. [Dosimetric impact of breath-hold in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma by conformal radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubas, A; Chapet, O; Merle, P; Lorchel, F; d'Hombres, A; Mornex, F

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric impact of breath-hold during radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to determinate the optimal respiratory phase for treatment (exhale or inhale). Two CT scans were performed in inhale and in exhale in 20 patients with HCC. The GTV was delineated slice by slice on the inspiration breath hold acquisition (GTV(insp)) and on the expiration breath hold acquisition (GTV(exp)). The superposition of two GTV allowed to obtain the global GTV (free respiration). PTV was defined by adding a margin of 1cm around each GTV. The liver, the duodenum, the two kidneys, the stomach and the spinal cord were delineated on each acquisition as organs at risk (OAR). Three dosimetric plans were created on inspiration, expiration and on global PTV. The mean reduction in the volume of PTV with conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the hold-breath group compared to the free respiration group was of 33.5+/-11.9%. The average difference of V50%, V20, V30, V40 and V50 were around 4% in favor of the breath hold. The average value of NTCP was 8.9% in free respiration, 4.5% in expiration and 3.2% in inspiration. Further improvement in the OARs dosimetric parameters for the breath hold was observed. Compared to the conformal radiotherapy with free respiration, the breath-hold allows reducing the volume of the PTV and the doses to the healthy liver and organs at risk. The use of this modality during different radiotherapy techniques (3D-CRT, IMRT and stereotactic) may be recommended. No difference in dosimetric value has been observed between the breath hold in expiratory and inspiratory phases.

  15. The effectiveness of breath-holding to stabilize lung and pancreas tumors during radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Martin J.; Martin, David; Whyte, Richard; Hai, Jenny; Ozhasoglu, Cihat; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of breath-holding on the short-term reproducibility and long-term variability of tumor position during image-guided radiosurgery. Method: Thirteen patients have undergone single-fraction radiosurgery treatments during which the tumor was repeatedly imaged radiographically to observe its position. The imaging data were used to monitor the efficacy of breath-holding and to periodically readjust the alignment of the treatment beam with the tumor. These measurements have allowed the effects of breathing, heartbeat, patient movement, and instrumental uncertainties to be separately identified in the record of tumor position. Results: During inspiration breath-holding, the lung tumor position was reproducible to within 1 mm, on average, in the direction of maximum displacement during regular breathing, and to within 1.8 mm in three dimensions overall. The pancreas tumor position in three dimensions was reproducible to within 2.5 mm on average. Some patients showed a slow, steady drift of tumor position during the extended sequence of breath-holds, which was compensated by periodic retargeting of the treatment beam. Conclusion: Breath-holding can allow the reduction of tumor motion dosimetry margins to 2 mm or less for lung cancer treatments, provided that the treatment system can detect and adapt to long-term variations in the mean tumor position during a lengthy treatment fraction

  16. Cardiac repolarization changes in the children with breath-holding spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozgar, Hamid; Saleh, Fazl; Farhani, Nahal; Rafiei, Mohammad; Inaloo, Soroor; Asadipooya, Ali-Akbar

    2013-12-01

    Breath-holding spells are known as benign attacks, frequencies of which decrease by the development of the autonomic nervous system. The present study aims to compare the electrocardiographic repolarization in children with breath-holding spells. In this study, QT dispersion, QTc dispersion, T peak to T end dispersion, and P wave dispersion of the twelve-lead surface electrocardiography of fifty children who had breath-holding spells were measured and compared with normal children from April 2011 to August 2012. Forty-four (88%) patients had cyanotic spells, while 6 (12%) had pallid spells. QTc dispersion was increased in the patients with breath-holding spells (148.2±33.1) compared to the healthy children (132±27.3) and the difference was statically significant (P = 0.01). Meanwhile, no statistically significant differences were observed between the patients and the control subjects regarding the other parameters (P > 0.05). QTc dispersion was significantly increased in the patients with breath-holding spells compared to normal children and this is a sign of cardiac repolarization abnormality as well as the increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia in patients with breath-holding spells.

  17. Case report of successful treatment of pallid breath-holding spells with glycopyrrolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jason; Cain, Nicole

    2015-05-01

    Breath-holding spells are a common childhood disorder that typically present before 12 months of age. Whereas most cases are benign, some patients have very severe cases associated with bradycardia that can progress from asystole to syncope and seizures. Treatment studies have implicated the use of several therapies, such as oral iron, fluoxetine, and pacemaker implantation. This is a retrospective study of patients treated with glycopyrrolate for pallid breath-holding spells. Clinical data from 4 patients referred to pediatric cardiology who saw therapeutic benefit from treatment using glycopyrrolate were reviewed to evaluate for clinical response to the drug. Two twin patients, whose symptoms began at 5 months of age, experienced a decrease in breath-holding frequency after 1 month. A patient diagnosed at 7 months of age experienced a decrease in frequency of spells. A patient diagnosed at 10 months of age reported cessation of syncope shortly after initiation of glycopyrrolate and complete resolution of breath-holding spells during prolonged treatment. This case study of 4 patients with pallid breath-holding offers evidence that glycopyrrolate may be beneficial in treating breath-holding spells and has a safer side-effect profile than pacemaker implantation. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Selenium and antioxidant levels decreased in blood of children with breath-holding spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Khaled; Farghaly, Hikma S; Badry, Reda; Othman, Hisham A K

    2014-10-01

    We hypothesize that the imbalance between oxidant and antioxidant systems might be involved in the pathophysiology of breath-holding spells. The aim of this study is to evaluate the oxidant-antioxidant status in children with breath-holding spells compared to healthy children. In a case control study, 67 children with breath-holding spells were compared with 60 healthy children. Malondialdehyde values of the patients were significantly higher than those in control. Levels of selenium, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase of the patient group are significantly lower than those in control. The present study gives helpful data about oxidant-antioxidant systems alterations in breath-holding spells in such a large patient group. These data give support to the hypothesis of the imbalance between oxidant and antioxidant systems, and selenium deficiency might be involved in the pathophysiology of breath-holding spells, suggesting the role of this system dysregulation in breath-holding spells. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Optimizing functional parameter accuracy for breath-hold DCE-MRI of liver tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, Matthew R; Miyazaki, Keiko; Koh, Dow-Mu; Collins, David J; Leach, Martin O; Hawkes, David J; Atkinson, David

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a valuable tool for assessing treatment response to novel cancer therapeutics. With appropriate data acquisition, quantitative functional parameter estimates can be obtained by fitting a model to the data. This research focuses on applying a dual-input single-compartment pharmacokinetic model to breath-hold DCE-MRI imaging of the liver. In this paper, the use of two breath-holds, providing greater temporal information, is compared with a single breath-hold approach. Computer simulations are used to assess the accuracy, precision and sensitivity to input function errors obtained for parameters estimated from the two imaging protocols. Data from ten patients were analysed to assess the noise statistics obtained from the two breath-hold protocols. The noise statistics were used with a pharmacokinetic liver model to simulate data, from which the estimation accuracy, precision and sensitivity for the two protocols were assessed. Data from the ten patients were also analysed, and the estimates were compared with literature values. This work demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining functional liver perfusion estimates over a 3D volume using a sequential breath-hold protocol. The simulation results show that the protocol consisting of two images per breath-hold is to be preferred as it requires identical patient co-operation, but provides parameter estimates that have superior accuracy and precision.

  20. Autonomic nervous system functions in children with breath-holding spells and effects of iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkiran, Abdülkerim; Tutar, Ercan; Atalay, Semra; Deda, Gülhis; Cin, Sükrü

    2005-09-01

    To analyse the activity of the autonomic nervous system during breath-holding spells, we assessed the ECG changes, including ventricular repolarization parameters before and during the spell. We also analysed the effects of iron deficiency on these ECG parameters. The study group consisted of 37 children with breath-holding spells (30 cyanotic, 7 pallid) (mean age+/-SD: 12.9+/-10.8 mo). Twenty-six healthy children (mean age+/-SD: 14.4+/-8.6 mo) served as a control group. All patients and controls had standard 12-lead simultaneous surface ECG. All patients had ECG recordings during at least one severe breath-holding spell obtained by "event recorder". Traces obtained by "event recorder" were analysed in terms of mean heart rate and the frequency and duration of asystole during the spell. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia on standard ECGs and asystole frequency during spells were higher in patients with pallid breath-holding spells. Patients with iron deficiency had a lower frequency of respiratory sinus arrhythmia and prolonged asystole time during the spell. There was no difference in terms of ventricular repolarization parameters (QT/QTc intervals and QT/QTc dispersions) between patients and controls and between patient subgroups (cyanotic versus pallid). These results confirmed the presence of autonomic dysregulation in children with breath-holding spells. Iron deficiency may have an impact on this autonomic dysregulation. Ventricular repolarization was unaffected in patients with breath-holding spells.

  1. Voluntary breath-holding for breast cancer radiotherapy is consistent and stable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Ruth; James, Matthew; Bartlett, Frederick R; Kirby, Anna M; Donovan, Ellen M

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate breath-hold stability and constancy for a voluntary breath-hold (VBH) technique in a retrospective analysis. Movie loop sequences of electronic portal image data from multiple breath holds in a cohort of 19 patients were used to assess within and between breath-hold stability. In vivo dosimetry data based on electronic portal imaging (EPI) were analysed for 31 VBH patients plus a cohort of free-breathing (FB) patients to provide a reference. A phantom experiment simulated the impact on dose of FB, breath hold and unplanned release of breath hold. 165/174 (93%) movie loop data sets had no detectable displacement. For the remaining 12, median displacement = 1.5 mm and maximum displacement = 3 mm (one patient on one fraction). In vivo dosimetry data analysis showed a median dose difference measured to planned of -0.2% (VBH) and -0.1% (FB). Dose distribution evaluation (γ) pass rates were 84% (VBH) and 91% (FB) including the lung region; 93% and 96% with a lung override. Unplanned release of phantom breath-hold position changed median dose by ≤1% and degraded γ pass rates to 79-62%. Failing regions were mostly in the periphery of the treated volume. The data confirmed that multiple VBHs using visual monitoring are stable; in vivo dose verification via EPI was within expected and acceptable levels. These data provide further reassurance that VBH is a safe technique for cardiac sparing breast radiotherapy and support its rapid, widespread implementation.

  2. Quantifying cerebrovascular reactivity in anterior and posterior cerebral circulations during voluntary breath holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Christina D; Steinback, Craig D; Chauhan, Uday V; Pfoh, Jamie R; Abrosimova, Maria; Vanden Berg, Emily R; Skow, Rachel J; Davenport, Margie H; Day, Trevor A

    2016-12-01

    What is the central question of this study? We developed and validated a 'stimulus index' (SI; ratio of end-tidal partial pressures of CO 2 and O 2 ) method to quantify cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in anterior and posterior cerebral circulations during breath holding. We aimed to determine whether the magnitude of CVR is correlated with breath-hold duration. What is the main finding and its importance? Using the SI method and transcranial Doppler ultrasound, we found that the magnitude of CVR of the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations is not positively correlated with physiological or psychological break-point during end-inspiratory breath holding. Our study expands the ability to quantify CVR during breath holding and elucidates factors that affect break-point. The central respiratory chemoreflex contributes to blood gas homeostasis, particularly in response to accumulation of brainstem CO 2 . Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) affects chemoreceptor stimulation inversely through CO 2 washout from brainstem tissue. Voluntary breath holding imposes alterations in blood gases, eliciting respiratory chemoreflexes, potentially contributing to breath-hold duration (i.e. break-point). However, the effects of cerebrovascular reactivity on break-point have yet to be determined. We tested the hypothesis that the magnitude of CVR contributes directly to breath-hold duration in 23 healthy human participants. We developed and validated a cerebrovascular stimulus index methodology [SI; ratio of end-tidal partial pressures of CO 2 and O 2 (P ET ,CO2/P ET ,O2)] to quantify CVR by correlating measured and interpolated values of P ET ,CO2 (r = 0.95, P breath hold. The MCAv CVR magnitude was larger than PCAv (P = 0.001; +70%) during breath holding. We then correlated MCAv and PCAv CVR with the physiological (involuntary diaphragmatic contractions) and psychological (end-point) break-point, within individuals. There were significant inverse but modest relationships

  3. Mean heart dose variation over a course of breath-holding breast cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkerley, Nicolle; Bartlett, Frederick R; Kirby, Anna M; Evans, Philip M; Donovan, Ellen M

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the work was to estimate the dose received by the heart throughout a course of breath-holding breast radiotherapy. 113 cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired for 20 patients treated within the HeartSpare 1A study, in which both an active breathing control (ABC) device and a voluntary breath-hold (VBH) method were used. Predicted mean heart doses were obtained from treatment plans. CBCT scans were imported into a treatment planning system, heart outlines defined, images registered to the CT planning scan and mean heart dose recorded. Two observers outlined two cases three times each to assess interobserver and intraobserver variation. There were no statistically significant differences between ABC and VBH heart dose data from CT planning scans, or in the CBCT-based estimates of heart dose, and no effect from the order of the breath-hold method. Variation in mean heart dose per fraction over the three imaged fractions was breath-holding radiotherapy and was well predicted by the planning system. Advances in knowledge: Mean heart dose was not adversely affected by fraction-to-fraction variations throughout a course of heart-sparing radiotherapy using two well-established breath-holding methods.

  4. Effect of Dyspnea Induced by Breath-holding on Maximal Muscular Strength of Patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingai, Kazuya; Kanezaki, Masashi

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to clarify the effect of dyspnea induced by breath-holding on maximum muscular strength of patients with COPD. [Subjects] This study recruited 14 COPD subjects via public posting. [Methods] Dyspnea was assessed by the modified Borg scale. The subject asked to stop breathing at end-expiration and to hold their breath with a nose clip for as long as possible. Both total breath-holding time and threshold time of dyspnea were measured with a chronograph. Dyspnea reserve time (DRT) was defined by subtracting the threshold time of perception dyspnea from total breath-holding time in order to calculate the 50% DRT. The muscular strengths of maximal handgrip contraction were measured at baseline, 50% threshold time of dyspnea (subliminal point of dyspnea), and the 50% DRT (supraliminal point of dyspnea). [Results] The maximal handgrip at the supraliminal point of dyspnea was significantly lower than the baseline and subliminal point of dyspnea values. There was no statistically significant difference in maximal muscular strength between baseline and the subliminal point of dyspnea value. [Conclusion] The present results demonstrate that dyspnea induced by breath-holding aggravates weakness in the maximum muscular strength of patients with COPD.

  5. Pathophysiology of dyspnea evaluated by breath-holding test: studies of furosemide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Takashi

    2009-05-30

    Breath-holding is one of the most powerful methods to induce the dyspneic sensation, and the breath-holding test gives us much information on the onset and endurance of dyspnea. In conscious subjects, immediately after the start of breath-holding at functional residual capacity (FRC), there is a certain period of no particular respiratory sensation lasting for 20-30s, which is designated "no respiratory sensation period". This period is terminated by the onset of dyspnea and followed by a progressive increase in the intensity of dyspnea until the breaking point of breath-holding. The measurement of the period of no respiratory sensation provides us with information about the threshold of dyspneic sensation whereas the measurement of the total breath-holding time is a behavioral measure of the tolerable limit of dyspneic sensation. The behavioral measure of tolerable limit of dyspnea can permit the study of dyspnea even in anesthetized animals while observing escape behavior in response to airway occlusion. Inhaled furosemide causes prolongation of both the period of no respiratory sensation and total breath-holding time in conscious subjects, indicating that inhaled furosemide alleviates experimentally induced dyspnea. Alleviation of dyspnea with inhaled furosemide in conscious subjects is also consistent with the result of animal studies in which inhaled furosemide suppresses the escape behavior in the lightly anesthetized condition. The purpose of this article is to emphasize the usefulness of breath-holding test as a tool for evaluation of dyspnea. Furthermore, the possible mechanisms of alleviation of dyspnea with inhaled furosemide are highlighted.

  6. Risk of Neurological Insult in Competitive Deep Breath-Hold Diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, Kay; Schöppenthau, Holger; Schipke, Jochen D

    2017-02-01

    It has been widely believed that tissue nitrogen uptake from the lungs during breath-hold diving would be insufficient to cause decompression stress in humans. With competitive free diving, however, diving depths have been ever increasing over the past decades. A case is presented of a competitive free-diving athlete who suffered stroke-like symptoms after surfacing from his last dive of a series of 3 deep breath-hold dives. A literature and Web search was performed to screen for similar cases of subjects with serious neurological symptoms after deep breath-hold dives. A previously healthy 31-y-old athlete experienced right-sided motor weakness and difficulty speaking immediately after surfacing from a breathhold dive to a depth of 100 m. He had performed 2 preceding breath-hold dives to that depth with surface intervals of only 15 min. The presentation of symptoms and neuroimaging findings supported a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Three more cases of neurological insults were retrieved by literature and Web search; in all cases the athletes presented with stroke-like symptoms after single breath-hold dives of depths exceeding 100 m. Two of these cases only had a short delay to recompression treatment and completely recovered from the insult. This report highlights the possibility of neurological insult, eg, stroke, due to cerebral arterial gas embolism as a consequence of decompression stress after deep breath-hold dives. Thus, stroke as a clinical presentation of cerebral arterial gas embolism should be considered another risk of extreme breath-hold diving.

  7. SU-E-T-326: The Oxygen Saturation (SO2) and Breath-Holding Time Variation Applied Active Breathing Control (ABC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, G; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the oxygen saturation (SO2) and breath-holding time variation applied active breathing control (ABC) in radiotherapy of tumor. Methods: 24 volunteers were involved in our trials, and they all did breath-holding motion assisted by ELEKTA Active Breathing Coordinator 2.0 for 10 times respectively. And the patient monitor was used to observe the oxygen saturation (SO2) variation. The variation of SO2, and length of breath-holding time and the time for recovering to the initial value of SO2 were recorded and analyzed. Results: (1) The volunteers were divided into two groups according to the SO2 variation in breath-holding: A group, 14 cases whose SO2 reduction were more than 2% (initial value was 97% to 99%, while termination value was 91% to 96%); B group, 10 cases were less than 2% in breath-holding without inhaling oxygen. (2) The interfraction breath holding time varied from 8 to 20s for A group compared to the first breath-holding time, and for B group varied from 4 to 14s. (3) The breathing holding time of B group prolonged mean 8s, compared to A group. (4) The time for restoring to the initial value of SO2 was from 10s to 30s. And the breath-holding time shortened obviously for patients whose SO2 did not recover to normal. Conclusion: It is very obvious that the SO2 reduction in breath-holding associated with ABC for partial people. It is necessary to check the SO2 variation in breath training, and enough time should be given to recover SO2.

  8. Abdominal organ motion during inhalation and exhalation breath-holds: pancreatic motion at different lung volumes compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lens, Eelco; Gurney-Champion, Oliver J; Tekelenburg, Daniël R; van Kesteren, Zdenko; Parkes, Michael J; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Nederveen, Aart J; van der Horst, Astrid; Bel, Arjan

    2016-11-01

    Contrary to what is commonly assumed, organs continue to move during breath-holding. We investigated the influence of lung volume on motion magnitude during breath-holding and changes in velocity over the duration of breath-holding. Sixteen healthy subjects performed 60-second inhalation breath-holds in room-air, with lung volumes of ∼100% and ∼70% of the inspiratory capacity, and exhalation breath-holds, with lung volumes of ∼30% and ∼0% of the inspiratory capacity. During breath-holding, we obtained dynamic single-slice magnetic-resonance images with a time-resolution of 0.6s. We used 2-dimensional image correlation to obtain the diaphragmatic and pancreatic velocity and displacement during breath-holding. Organ velocity was largest in the inferior-superior direction and was greatest during the first 10s of breath-holding, with diaphragm velocities of 0.41mm/s, 0.29mm/s, 0.16mm/s and 0.15mm/s during BH 100% , BH 70% , BH 30% and BH 0% , respectively. Organ motion magnitudes were larger during inhalation breath-holds (diaphragm moved 9.8 and 9.0mm during BH 100% and BH 70% , respectively) than during exhalation breath-holds (5.6 and 4.3mm during BH 30% and BH 0% , respectively). Using exhalation breath-holds rather than inhalation breath-holds and delaying irradiation until after the first 10s of breath-holding may be advantageous for irradiation of abdominal tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Deposition of micrometer particles in pulmonary airways during inhalation and breath holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yohsuke; Miki, Takahito; Ishikawa, Takuji; Aoki, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2012-06-26

    We investigated how breath holding increases the deposition of micrometer particles in pulmonary airways, compared with the deposition during inhalation period. A subject-specific airway model with up to thirteenth generation airways was constructed from multi-slice CT images. Airflow and particle transport were simulated by using GPU computing. Results indicate that breath holding effectively increases the deposition of 5μm particles for third to sixth generation (G3-G6) airways. After 10s of breath holding, the particle deposition fraction increased more than 5 times for 5μm particles. Due to a small terminal velocity, 1μm particles only showed a 50% increase in the most efficient case. On the other hand, 10μm particles showed almost complete deposition due to high inertia and high terminal velocity, leading to an increase of 2 times for G3-G6 airways. An effective breath holding time for 5μm particle deposition in G3-G6 airways was estimated to be 4-6s, for which the deposition amount reached 75% of the final deposition amount after 10s of breath holding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The ins and outs of breath holding: simple demonstrations of complex respiratory physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skow, Rachel J; Day, Trevor A; Fuller, Jonathan E; Bruce, Christina D; Steinback, Craig D

    2015-09-01

    The physiology of breath holding is complex, and voluntary breath-hold duration is affected by many factors, including practice, psychology, respiratory chemoreflexes, and lung stretch. In this activity, we outline a number of simple laboratory activities or classroom demonstrations that illustrate the complexity of the integrative physiology behind breath-hold duration. These activities require minimal equipment and are easily adapted to small-group demonstrations or a larger-group inquiry format where students can design a protocol and collect and analyze data from their classmates. Specifically, breath-hold duration is measured during a number of maneuvers, including after end expiration, end inspiration, voluntary prior hyperventilation, and inspired hyperoxia. Further activities illustrate the potential contribution of chemoreflexes through rebreathing and repeated rebreathing after a maximum breath hold. The outcome measures resulting from each intervention are easily visualized and plotted and can comprise a comprehensive data set to illustrate and discuss complex and integrated cardiorespiratory physiology. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  11. Reduction of cardiac and pulmonary complication probabilities after breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine S; Pedersen, Anders N; Aarup, Lasse Rye

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Substantial reductions of cardio-pulmonary radiation doses can be achieved using voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) or free breathing inspiration gating (IG) in radiotherapy after conserving surgery for breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological...... implications of such dosimetric benefits. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients from previously reported studies were pooled for a total of 33 patients. All patients underwent DIBH and free breathing (FB) scans, and 17 patients underwent an additional IG scan. Tangential conformal treatment plans covering...... voluntary DIBH and free breathing IG to reduce the risk of both cardiac mortality and pneumonitis for the common technique of adjuvant tangential breast irradiation....

  12. How much margin reduction is possible through gating or breath hold?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelsman, M; Sharp, G C; Bortfeld, T; Onimaru, R; Shirato, H

    2005-01-01

    We determined the relationship between intra-fractional breathing motion and safety margins, using daily real-time tumour tracking data of 40 patients (43 tumour locations), treated with radiosurgery at Hokkaido University. We limited our study to the dose-blurring effect of intra-fractional breathing motion, and did not consider differences in positioning accuracy or systematic errors. The additional shift in the prescribed isodose level (e.g. 95%) was determined by convolving a one-dimensional dose profile, having a dose gradient representing an 8 MV beam through either lung or water, with the probability density function (PDF) of breathing. This additional shift is a measure for the additional margin that should be applied in order to maintain the same probability of tumour control as without intra-fractional breathing. We show that the required safety margin is a nonlinear function of the peak-to-peak breathing motion. Only a small reduction in the shift of isodose curves was observed for breathing motion up to 10 mm. For larger motion, 20 or 30 mm, control of patient breathing during irradiation, using either gating or breath hold, can allow a substantial reduction in safety margins of about 7 or 12 mm depending on the dose gradient prior to blurring. Clinically relevant random setup uncertainties, which also have a blurring effect on the dose distribution, have only a small effect on the margin needed for intra-fractional breathing motion. Because of the one-dimensional nature of our analysis, the resulting margins are mainly applicable in the superior-inferior direction. Most measured breathing PDFs were not consistent with the PDF of a simple parametric curve such as cos 4 , either because of irregular breathing or base-line shifts. Instead, our analysis shows that breathing motion can be modelled as Gaussian with a standard deviation of about 0.4 times the peak-to-peak breathing motion

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Breath-Hold Divers with Cerebral Decompression Sickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Matsuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of cerebral decompression sickness (DCS is still unclear. We report 2 cases of breath-hold divers with cerebral DCS in whom magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated distinctive characteristics. One case presented right hemiparesthesia, diplopia, and gait disturbance after breath-hold diving into the sea at a depth of 20 m. Brain MRI with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR sequence revealed multiple hyperintense lesions in the right frontal lobe, bilateral thalamus, pons, and right cerebellar hemisphere. The second case presented visual and gait disturbance after repetitive breath-hold diving into the sea. FLAIR imaging showed hyperintense areas in the bilateral occipito-parietal lobes. In both cases, diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient mapping revealed hyperintense areas in the lesions identified by FLAIR. Moreover, follow-up MRI showed attenuation of the FLAIR signal abnormalities. These findings are suggestive of transient hyperpermeability in the microvasculature as a possible cause of cerebral DCS.

  14. The Utilization of an Insertable Cardiac Monitor in a Child With Pallid Breath-Holding Spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejman-Yarden, Shai; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Goldshmit, Yuval; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Cicurel, Assi; Katz, Uriel; Mishali, David; Glikson, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Pacing can be a successful treatment for pallid breath-holding spells, primarily in individuals with severe bradycardia. We describe an 18-month-old girl experiencing severe pallid breath-holding spells in whom repeated electrocardiographic, Holter, and electroencephalographic monitoring tests were all normal. Using a subcutaneous insertable cardiac monitor, severe bradycardia was detected during one of this girl's episodes. This finding led to a pacemaker implantation. Subsequently, her breath-holding spells completely resolved. This child illustrates the ability of the insertable cardiac monitor to help and diagnose arrhythmias in children with unresolved clinical findings. The ability to implant it with a minimal scar makes it ideal for uncooperative individuals with relative few and unexpected episodes that are hard to diagnose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Facial immersion in cold water enhances cerebral blood velocity during breath-hold exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Pott, Frank C; Secher, Niels H

    2009-01-01

    perfusion evaluated as the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA V(mean)) during exercise in nine male subjects. At rest, a breath hold of maximum duration increased the arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa(CO(2))) from 4.2 to 6.7 kPa and MCA V(mean) from 37 to 103 cm/s (mean; approximately 178%; P...... breath hold increased Pa(CO(2)) from 5.9 to 8.2 kPa (P ... 180-W exercise (from 47 to 53 cm/s), and this increment became larger with facial immersion (76 cm/s, approximately 62%; P breath hold diverts blood toward the brain with a >100% increase in MCA V(mean), largely...

  16. Sharing breathlessness: investigating respiratory change during observation of breath-holding in another.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Masaoka, Yuri; Kasai, Hideyo; Noguchi, Kengo; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Homma, Ikuo

    2012-03-15

    Studies of empathy show that seeing another person in pain, fear or disgust elicits the same brain activations associated with pain, fear or disgust in oneself. Our interest is to know whether respiratory change can be observed in empathy, that is, whether respiration can be altered when observing emotions in others. A discomfort associated with respiration can be breathlessness. We investigated respiratory pattern and metabolic response during observation of a breath-holding subject. We found that breathlessness occurred in participants who observed breath-holding in another person. It is interesting to note that observers felt more breathlessness after breath-holding ended with an increase in respiratory rate consistent with the breath-holder's respiratory pattern. In addition, observers with high trait anxiety felt more breathlessness accompanied with an increase in respiratory rate. An increase in respiratory rate may be involved in the perception of breathlessness, in addition to the effect of observing breath-holding, indicating shared negative emotion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Breath-Holding During Exhalation as a Simple Manipulation to Reduce Pain Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes del Paso, Gustavo A; Muñoz Ladrón de Guevara, Cristina; Montoro, Casandra I

    2015-09-01

    Baroreceptor stimulation yields antinociceptive effects. In this study, baroreceptors were stimulated by a respiratory maneuver, with the effect of this manipulation on pain perception subsequently measured. Thirty-eight healthy participants were instructed to inhale slowly (control condition) and to hold the air in lungs after a deep inhalation (experimental condition). It was expected that breath-holding would increases blood pressure (BP) and thus stimulate the baroreceptors, which in turn would reduce pain perception. Pain was induced by pressure algometry on the nail of the left-index finger, at three different pressure intensities, and quantified by visual analogue scales. Heart rate (HR) and BP were continuously recorded. Pain perception was lower when pain pressure was administered during the breath-holding phase versus the slow inhalation phase, regardless of the pressure intensity. During breath-holding, a rapid increase in BP and decrease in HR were observed, demonstrating activation of the baroreceptor reflex. Pain perception is reduced when painful stimulation is applied during breath-holding immediately following a deep inhalation. These results suggest that a simple and easy-to-perform respiratory maneuver could be used to reduce acute pain perception. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effect of repetitive end-inspiration breath holding on very short-term heart rate variability in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Chen, Tianjun; Yun, Feng; Huang, Yuanyuan; Li, Jin

    2014-12-01

    Very short-term heart rate variability (HRV) is thought to reflect dynamic changes in autonomic nervous activity, which is helpful in understanding the role of autonomic nervous function (ANF) in the mechanisms underlying apnea-induced cardiac arrhythmias. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of repetitive end-inspiration breath holding on very short-term HRV. A total of 32 young healthy participants took part in the experiments. Three trials were performed, each involving seven repetitive end-inspiration breath holding and a 30 s recovery period between breath holding. Durations of breath holding in the three trials were 1:2:3. The study first evaluated the effect of analyzed data lengths on the stability of HRV indices and determined three HRV indices suitable for very short-term analysis. The results showed that in most cases, during breath holding, the square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal RR intervals (rMSSD) was significantly lower, but normalized units of the power in the low frequency band ranging from 0.04 to 0.15 Hz (nLF) and LF/high frequency (HF) were significantly higher than those during corresponding durations under the normal breathing conditions. On the contrary, during recovery after breath holding, rMSSD was significantly higher but nLF and LF/HF were lower than normal. Moreover, the durations of breath holding had no significant influence on the variations of LF/HF. In addition, as participants repeated the breath holding, HRV indices varied non-linearly. HRV changes may indicate sympathetic activation during breath holding and parasympathetic activation during recovery after breath holding. In conjunction with the existing physiological interpretation based on changes in heart rate, the results may imply that breath holding leads to both cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activation simultaneously, which may be a possible pathogenic factor of apnea-induced arrhythmias.

  19. Effect of repetitive end-inspiration breath holding on very short-term heart rate variability in healthy humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiang; Huang, Yuanyuan; Li, Jin; Chen, Tianjun; Yun, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Very short-term heart rate variability (HRV) is thought to reflect dynamic changes in autonomic nervous activity, which is helpful in understanding the role of autonomic nervous function (ANF) in the mechanisms underlying apnea-induced cardiac arrhythmias. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of repetitive end-inspiration breath holding on very short-term HRV. A total of 32 young healthy participants took part in the experiments. Three trials were performed, each involving seven repetitive end-inspiration breath holding and a 30 s recovery period between breath holding. Durations of breath holding in the three trials were 1:2:3. The study first evaluated the effect of analyzed data lengths on the stability of HRV indices and determined three HRV indices suitable for very short-term analysis. The results showed that in most cases, during breath holding, the square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal RR intervals (rMSSD) was significantly lower, but normalized units of the power in the low frequency band ranging from 0.04 to 0.15 Hz (nLF) and LF/high frequency (HF) were significantly higher than those during corresponding durations under the normal breathing conditions. On the contrary, during recovery after breath holding, rMSSD was significantly higher but nLF and LF/HF were lower than normal. Moreover, the durations of breath holding had no significant influence on the variations of LF/HF. In addition, as participants repeated the breath holding, HRV indices varied non-linearly. HRV changes may indicate sympathetic activation during breath holding and parasympathetic activation during recovery after breath holding. In conjunction with the existing physiological interpretation based on changes in heart rate, the results may imply that breath holding leads to both cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activation simultaneously, which may be a possible pathogenic factor of apnea-induced arrhythmias. (paper)

  20. Horses Auto-Recruit Their Lungs by Inspiratory Breath Holding Following Recovery from General Anaesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Mosing

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the breathing pattern and distribution of ventilation in horses prior to and following recovery from general anaesthesia using electrical impedance tomography (EIT. Six horses were anaesthetised for 6 hours in dorsal recumbency. Arterial blood gas and EIT measurements were performed 24 hours before (baseline and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 hours after horses stood following anaesthesia. At each time point 4 representative spontaneous breaths were analysed. The percentage of the total breath length during which impedance remained greater than 50% of the maximum inspiratory impedance change (breath holding, the fraction of total tidal ventilation within each of four stacked regions of interest (ROI (distribution of ventilation and the filling time and inflation period of seven ROI evenly distributed over the dorso-ventral height of the lungs were calculated. Mixed effects multi-linear regression and linear regression were used and significance was set at p<0.05. All horses demonstrated inspiratory breath holding until 5 hours after standing. No change from baseline was seen for the distribution of ventilation during inspiration. Filling time and inflation period were more rapid and shorter in ventral and slower and longer in most dorsal ROI compared to baseline, respectively. In a mixed effects multi-linear regression, breath holding was significantly correlated with PaCO2 in both the univariate and multivariate regression. Following recovery from anaesthesia, horses showed inspiratory breath holding during which gas redistributed from ventral into dorsal regions of the lungs. This suggests auto-recruitment of lung tissue which would have been dependent and likely atelectic during anaesthesia.

  1. Lung volume reproducibility under ABC control and self-sustained breath-holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaza, Evangelia; Dunlop, Alex; Panek, Rafal; Collins, David J; Orton, Matthew; Symonds-Tayler, Richard; McQuaid, Dualta; Scurr, Erica; Hansen, Vibeke; Leach, Martin O

    2017-03-01

    An Active Breathing Coordinator (ABC) can be employed to induce breath-holds during CT imaging and radiotherapy of lung, breast and liver cancer, and recently during lung cancer MRI. The apparatus measures and controls respiratory volume, hence subject lung volume reproducibility is its principal measure of effectiveness. To assess ABC control quality, the intra-session reproducibility of ABC-induced lung volumes was evaluated and compared with that reached by applying the clinical standard of operator-guided self-sustained breath-holds on healthy volunteers during MRI. Inter-session reproducibility was investigated by repeating ABC-controlled breath-holds on a second visit. Additionally, lung volume agreement with ABC devices used with different imaging modalities in the same institution (MR, CT), or for a breast trial treatment, was assessed. Lung volumes were derived from three-dimensional (3D) T1-weighted MRI datasets by three observers employing semiautomatic lung delineation on a radiotherapy treatment planning system. Inter-observer variability was less than 6% of the delineated lung volumes. Lung volume agreement between the different conditions over all subjects was investigated using descriptive statistics. The ABC equipment dedicated for MR application exhibited good intra-session and inter-session lung volume reproducibility (1.8% and 3% lung volume variability on average, respectively). MR-assessed lung volumes were similar using different ABC equipment dedicated to MR, CT, or breast radiotherapy. Overall, lung volumes controlled by the same or different ABC devices agreed better than with self-controlled breath-holds, as suggested by the average ABC variation of 1.8% of the measured lung volumes (99 mL), compared to the 4.1% (226 mL) variability observed on average with self-sustained breath-holding. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in

  2. Brain responses to emotional stimuli during breath holding and hypoxia: an approach based on the independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, Danilo; Artoni, Fiorenzo; Bedini, Remo; Pingitore, Alessandro; Passera, Mirko; Landi, Alberto; L'Abbate, Antonio; Sebastiani, Laura; Gemignani, Angelo

    2014-11-01

    Voluntary breath holding represents a physiological model of hypoxia. It consists of two phases of oxygen saturation dynamics: an initial slow decrease (normoxic phase) followed by a rapid drop (hypoxic phase) during which transitory neurological symptoms as well as slight impairment of integrated cerebral functions, such as emotional processing, can occur. This study investigated how breath holding affects emotional processing. To this aim we characterized the modulation of event-related potentials (ERPs) evoked by emotional-laden pictures as a function of breath holding time course. We recorded ERPs during free breathing and breath holding performed in air by elite apnea divers. We modeled brain responses during free breathing with four independent components distributed over different brain areas derived by an approach based on the independent component analysis (ICASSO). We described ERP changes during breath holding by estimating amplitude scaling and time shifting of the same components (component adaptation analysis). Component 1 included the main EEG features of emotional processing, had a posterior localization and did not change during breath holding; component 2, localized over temporo-frontal regions, was present only in unpleasant stimuli responses and decreased during breath holding, with no differences between breath holding phases; component 3, localized on the fronto-central midline regions, showed phase-independent breath holding decreases; component 4, quite widespread but with frontal prevalence, decreased in parallel with the hypoxic trend. The spatial localization of these components was compatible with a set of processing modules that affects the automatic and intentional controls of attention. The reduction of unpleasant-related ERP components suggests that the evaluation of aversive and/or possibly dangerous situations might be altered during breath holding.

  3. SU-E-J-55: End-To-End Effectiveness Analysis of 3D Surface Image Guided Voluntary Breath-Holding Radiotherapy for Left Breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M; Feigenberg, S [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of using 3D-surface-image to guide breath-holding (BH) left-side breast treatment. Methods Two 3D surface image guided BH procedures were implemented and evaluated: normal-BH, taking BH at a comfortable level, and deep-inspiration-breath-holding (DIBH). A total of 20 patients (10 Normal-BH and 10 DIBH) were recruited. Patients received a BH evaluation using a commercialized 3D-surface- tracking-system (VisionRT, London, UK) to quantify the reproducibility of BH positions prior to CT scan. Tangential 3D/IMRT plans were conducted. Patients were initially setup under free-breathing (FB) condition using the FB surface obtained from the untaged CT to ensure a correct patient position. Patients were then guided to reach the planned BH position using the BH surface obtained from the BH CT. Action-levels were set at each phase of treatment process based on the information provided by the 3D-surface-tracking-system for proper interventions (eliminate/re-setup/ re-coaching). We reviewed the frequency of interventions to evaluate its effectiveness. The FB-CBCT and port-film were utilized to evaluate the accuracy of 3D-surface-guided setups. Results 25% of BH candidates with BH positioning uncertainty > 2mm are eliminated prior to CT scan. For >90% of fractions, based on the setup deltas from3D-surface-trackingsystem, adjustments of patient setup are needed after the initial-setup using laser. 3D-surface-guided-setup accuracy is comparable as CBCT. For the BH guidance, frequency of interventions (a re-coaching/re-setup) is 40%(Normal-BH)/91%(DIBH) of treatments for the first 5-fractions and then drops to 16%(Normal-BH)/46%(DIBH). The necessity of re-setup is highly patient-specific for Normal-BH but highly random among patients for DIBH. Overall, a −0.8±2.4 mm accuracy of the anterior pericardial shadow position was achieved. Conclusion 3D-surface-image technology provides effective intervention to the treatment process and ensures

  4. Patients' experiences in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their experiences of breath holding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Eva; Thunberg, Per; Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta

    2014-08-01

    To describe patients' experiences of magnetic resonance examination of the liver and their experiences of two breath-hold techniques. Traditionally, patients are instructed by the radiographer to hold their breath during the examination. Alternatively, the patient can initiate the breath hold and start the image acquisition. Studies have revealed that magnetic resonance examinations can be experienced as challenging. Descriptive qualitative. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 28 patients and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The data collection was carried out from autumn 2010 to spring 2011. The patients' main experience was that they felt loss of control. This was described in terms of feeling trapped, being lost in time and lost as a result of uncertainty. They had many questions in their mind that they did not ask. Although their statements often revealed no clear preference regarding the techniques, almost half of the patients seemed to prefer self-initiated breath hold, as it was easier and less stressful. Those who preferred the radiographer-directed technique felt more confident leaving the responsibility to the radiographer. In general, the patients understood the importance of achieving the best quality images possible. Magnetic resonance examination can be experienced as being in loss of control. Nevertheless, not all patients wished to actively participate in magnetic resonance examination. Some preferred to hand over the responsibility to the radiographer. These results can form a base for radiographers' reflections of how to individualize and optimize the nursing care of patients undergoing magnetic resonance examinations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Effect of breath holding on cerebrovascular hemodynamics in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, Teelkien R.; Panerai, Ronney B.; Haeri, Sina; Zeeman, Gerda G.; Belfort, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired autonomic function, which is hypothesized to cause cerebral hemodynamic abnormalities. Our aim was to test this hypothesis by estimating the difference in the cerebrovascular response to breath holding (BH; known to cause

  6. Assessment of heart rate variability in breath holding children by 24 hour Holter monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Osman; Ciftel, Murat; Ozturk, Kezban; Kilic, Omer; Kahveci, Hasan; Laloğlu, Fuat; Ceylan, Ozben

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism in children with breath holding may be generalised autonomic dysregulation. Thus, we performed cardiac rhythm and heart rate variability analyses using 24-hour Holter monitoring to evaluate the cardiac effects of autonomic dysregulation in children with breath-holding spells. We performed cardiac rhythm and heart rate analyses using 24-hour Holter monitors to evaluate the cardiac effects of autonomic dysregulation in children during a breath-holding spell. Our study group consisted of 68 children with breath-holding spells - 56 cyanotic type and 12 pallid type - and 39 healthy controls. Clinical and heart rate variability results were compared between each spell type - cyanotic or pallid - and the control group; significant differences (p50 ms, and square root of the mean of the sum of squares of the differences between adjacent NN intervals values were found between the pallid and cyanotic groups. Holter monitoring for 24 hours and heart rate variability parameters, particularly in children with pallid spells, are crucial for evaluation of cardiac rhythm changes.

  7. MR coronary angiography with breath-hold targeted volumes : Preliminary clinical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geuns, R J; Wielopolski, P A; de Bruin, Hein G.; Rensing, B J; Hulshoff, Marc; van Ooijen, P M; de Feyter, P J; Oudkerk, M

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the clinical value of a magnetic resonance (MR) coronary angiography strategy involving a small targeted volume to image one coronary segment in a single breath hold for the detection of greater than 50% stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight patients referred for elective

  8. MR coronary angiography with breath-hold targeted volumes: preliminary clinical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); P.A. Wielopolski (Piotr); H.G. de Bruin (Hein); B.J.W.M. Rensing (Benno); M. Hulshoff (Maarten); P.M.A. van Ooijen (Peter); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: To assess the clinical value of a magnetic resonance (MR) coronary angiography strategy involving a small targeted volume to image one coronary segment in a single breath hold for the detection of greater than 50% stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS:

  9. Single-breath-hold 3-D CINE imaging of the left ventricle using Cartesian sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzl, Jens; Schmidt, Michaela; Pontana, François; Longère, Benjamin; Lugauer, Felix; Maier, Andreas; Hornegger, Joachim; Forman, Christoph

    2018-02-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate a single-breath-hold approach for Cartesian 3-D CINE imaging of the left ventricle with a nearly isotropic resolution of [Formula: see text] and a breath-hold duration of [Formula: see text]19 s against a standard stack of 2-D CINE slices acquired in multiple breath-holds. Validation is performed with data sets from ten healthy volunteers. A Cartesian sampling pattern based on the spiral phyllotaxis and a compressed sensing reconstruction method are proposed to allow 3-D CINE imaging with high acceleration factors. The fully integrated reconstruction uses multiple graphics processing units to speed up the reconstruction. The 2-D CINE and 3-D CINE are compared based on ventricular function parameters, contrast-to-noise ratio and edge sharpness measurements. Visual comparisons of corresponding short-axis slices of 2-D and 3-D CINE show an excellent match, while 3-D CINE also allows reformatting to other orientations. Ventricular function parameters do not significantly differ from values based on 2-D CINE imaging. Reconstruction times are below 4 min. We demonstrate single-breath-hold 3-D CINE imaging in volunteers and three example patient cases, which features fast reconstruction and allows reformatting to arbitrary orientations.

  10. Horses Auto-Recruit Their Lungs by Inspiratory Breath Holding Following Recovery from General Anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosing, Martina; Waldmann, Andreas D; MacFarlane, Paul; Iff, Samuel; Auer, Ulrike; Bohm, Stephan H; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula; Bardell, David

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the breathing pattern and distribution of ventilation in horses prior to and following recovery from general anaesthesia using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Six horses were anaesthetised for 6 hours in dorsal recumbency. Arterial blood gas and EIT measurements were performed 24 hours before (baseline) and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 hours after horses stood following anaesthesia. At each time point 4 representative spontaneous breaths were analysed. The percentage of the total breath length during which impedance remained greater than 50% of the maximum inspiratory impedance change (breath holding), the fraction of total tidal ventilation within each of four stacked regions of interest (ROI) (distribution of ventilation) and the filling time and inflation period of seven ROI evenly distributed over the dorso-ventral height of the lungs were calculated. Mixed effects multi-linear regression and linear regression were used and significance was set at pbreath holding until 5 hours after standing. No change from baseline was seen for the distribution of ventilation during inspiration. Filling time and inflation period were more rapid and shorter in ventral and slower and longer in most dorsal ROI compared to baseline, respectively. In a mixed effects multi-linear regression, breath holding was significantly correlated with PaCO2 in both the univariate and multivariate regression. Following recovery from anaesthesia, horses showed inspiratory breath holding during which gas redistributed from ventral into dorsal regions of the lungs. This suggests auto-recruitment of lung tissue which would have been dependent and likely atelectic during anaesthesia.

  11. Contrast-enhanced free-breathing 3D T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence for hepatobiliary MRI in patients with breath-holding difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, C S; Neville, A M; Nazeer, H K; Breault, S; Dale, B M; Merkle, E M; Bashir, M R

    2013-11-01

    Evaluate the image quality and diagnostic performance of a free-breathing 3D-gradient-echo sequence with radial acquisition (rGRE) compared with a Cartesian breath-hold 3D-GRE (cGRE) sequence on hepatobiliary phase MRI in patients with breath-holding difficulties. Twenty-eight consecutive patients (15 males; mean age 61 ± 11.9 years) were analysed in this retrospective IRB-approved study. Breath-holding difficulties during gadoxetate-disodium-enhanced liver MRI manifested as breathing artefacts during dynamic-phase imaging. MRI included axial and coronal cGRE and a radially sampled rGRE sequence during the hepatobiliary phase. Two radiologists independently evaluated cGRE and rGRE images for image quality, liver lesion detection and conspicuity, and bile duct conspicuity on a four-point scale. Liver edge sharpness was significantly higher on rGRE images (P breath-holding difficulties, overall image quality and liver lesion conspicuity on hepatobiliary phase MRI can be improved using the rGRE sequence. • Patients with diminished breath-holding capacities present a major challenge in abdominal MRI. • A free-breathing sequence for hepatobiliary-phase MRI can improve image quality. • Further advances are needed to reduce acquisition time of the free-breathing gradient-echo sequence.

  12. 3D Late Gadolinium Enhancement in a Single Prolonged Breath-hold using Supplemental Oxygenation and Hyperventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roujol, Sébastien; Basha, Tamer A.; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Foppa, Murilo; Chan, Raymond H.; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Manning, Warren J.; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of 3D single breath-hold late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) of the left ventricle (LV) using supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation and compressed-sensing acceleration. Methods: Breath-hold metrics (breath-hold duration, diaphragmatic/LV position drift, and maximum variation of RR interval) without and with supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation were assessed in healthy adult subjects using a real time single shot acquisition. Ten healthy subjects and 13 patients then underwent assessment of the proposed 3D breath-hold LGE acquisition (FOV=320×320×100 mm3, resolution=1.6×1.6×5.0 mm3, acceleration rate of 4) and a free breathing acquisition with right hemidiaphragm navigator (NAV) respiratory gating. Semi-quantitative grading of overall image quality, motion artifact, myocardial nulling, and diagnostic value was performed by consensus of two blinded observers. Results: Supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation increased the breath-hold duration (35±11 s to 58±21 s, p0.01). LGE images were of similar quality when compared to free breathing acquisitions but with reduced total scan time (85±22 s to 35±6 s, pbreath-holding and enable single breath-hold 3D accelerated LGE with similar image quality as free breathing with NAV. PMID:24186772

  13. High-pitch coronary CT angiography in dual-source CT during free breathing vs. breath holding in patients with low heart rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.bischoff@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany); Meinel, Felix G. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany); Del Prete, Alessandra [Department of Radiology Magrassi-Lanzara, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Reiser, Maximilian F.; Becker, Hans-Christoph [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Background: Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is usually performed during breath holding to reduce motion artifacts caused by respiration. However, some patients are not able to follow the breathing commands adequately due to deafness, hearing impairment, agitation or pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of high-pitch CCTA in free breathing patients when compared to breath holding patients. Methods: In this study we evaluated 40 patients (20 free breathing and 20 breath holding patients) with a heart rate of 60 bpm or below referred for CCTA who were examined on a 2nd generation dual-source CT system. Image quality of each coronary artery segment was rated using a 4-point grading scale (1: non diagnostic–4: excellent). Results: Mean heart rate during image acquisition was 52 ±5 bpm in both groups. There was no significant difference in mean image quality, slightly favoring image acquisition during breath holding (mean image quality score 3.76 ± 0.32 in breath holding patients vs. 3.61 ± 0.45 in free breathing patients; p = 0.411). Due to a smaller amount of injected contrast medium, there was a trend for signal intensity to be slightly lower in free breathing patients, but this was not statistically significant (435 ± 123 HU vs. 473 ± 117 HU; p = 0.648). Conclusion: In patients with a low heart rate who are not able to hold their breath adequately, CCTA can also be acquired during free breathing without substantial loss of image quality when using a high pitch scan mode in 2nd generation dual-source CT.

  14. High-pitch coronary CT angiography in dual-source CT during free breathing vs. breath holding in patients with low heart rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Bernhard; Meinel, Felix G; Del Prete, Alessandra; Reiser, Maximilian F; Becker, Hans-Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is usually performed during breath holding to reduce motion artifacts caused by respiration. However, some patients are not able to follow the breathing commands adequately due to deafness, hearing impairment, agitation or pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of high-pitch CCTA in free breathing patients when compared to breath holding patients. In this study we evaluated 40 patients (20 free breathing and 20 breath holding patients) with a heart rate of 60 bpm or below referred for CCTA who were examined on a 2nd generation dual-source CT system. Image quality of each coronary artery segment was rated using a 4-point grading scale (1: non diagnostic-4: excellent). Mean heart rate during image acquisition was 52 ± 5 bpm in both groups. There was no significant difference in mean image quality, slightly favoring image acquisition during breath holding (mean image quality score 3.76 ± 0.32 in breath holding patients vs. 3.61 ± 0.45 in free breathing patients; p = 0.411). Due to a smaller amount of injected contrast medium, there was a trend for signal intensity to be slightly lower in free breathing patients, but this was not statistically significant (435 ± 123 HU vs. 473 ± 117 HU; p=0.648). In patients with a low heart rate who are not able to hold their breath adequately, CCTA can also be acquired during free breathing without substantial loss of image quality when using a high pitch scan mode in 2nd generation dual-source CT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC

  16. Treatment of Chronic Breath-Holding in an Adult with Severe Mental Retardation: A Clinical Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Derek D.; Martens, Brian K.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a clinical case study surrounding the behavioral assessment and operant treatment of, an adult with severe mental retardation who engaged in chronic breath-holding. In this clinical case, previous neurological and medical testing had ruled out biological bases for the individual's breath-holding. A functional behavioral assessment…

  17. Breath-hold and free-breathing F-18-FDG-PET/CT in malignant melanoma?detection of additional tumoral foci and effects on quantitative parameters

    OpenAIRE

    B?rwolf, Robert; Zirnsak, Mariana; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract During PET/CT acquisition, respiratory motion generates artifacts in the form of breath-related blurring, which may impair lesion detectability and diagnostic accuracy. This observational study was undertaken to verify whether breath-hold F-18-FDG-PET/CT (bhPET) detects additional foci compared to free-breathing PET/CT (fbPET) in cases of malignant melanoma, and to assess the impact of breath-holding on standard uptake values (SUV) and metabolic isocontoured volume (mVic40). Thirty-f...

  18. Unmasking Brugada-type electrocardiogram on deep inspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamawake, Noriyoshi; Nishizaki, Mitsuhiro; Shimizu, Masato; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Sakurada, Harumizu; Hiraoka, Masayasu

    2014-01-01

     Electrocardiogram (ECG) recorded at the upper intercostal lead positions is recommended as an additional diagnostic clue for Brugada syndrome (BrS), but similar recording conditions to unmask ECG signs have not been explored. We evaluated the diagnostic usefulness for unmasking ECG signs of BrS using recordings at the upper intercostal lead position, on deep inspiration and on standing. In 34 patients (mean age, 49±14 years; 30 male) with diagnosed and suspected BrS, ECG type and ST-elevation in leads V1-V3 recorded at a higher position by 1 rib from the standard position (3ICS), and at standard lead positions (4ICS) on deep inspiration (DI test) and on standing (Stand test) were compared with the conventional lead positions (baseline). While type 1 ECG had been documented in 17 of 34 patients on at least 1 occasion in the past, only 4 had the sign at baseline during the study. Twenty patients had type 1 on 3ICS recording, 18 on DI test, and 6 on Stand test. Among 17 patients without previous documentation of spontaneous type 1, 7 had type 1 on 3ICS recording, 6 on DI test, and 1 on Stand test. ECG recording on deep inspiration is useful to unmask diagnostic signs of BrS and has similar accuracy to 3ICS recording.  

  19. Effects of breath holding at low and high lung volumes on amount of exhaled particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Helene; Gerth, Emilie; Ljungström, Evert; Larsson, Per; Almstrand, Ann-Charlotte; Bake, Björn; Olin, Anna-Carin

    2013-01-15

    Exhaled breath contains particles originating from the respiratory tract lining fluid. The particles are thought to be generated during inhalation, by reopening of airways closed in the preceding expiration. The aim here was to explore processes that control exhaled particle concentrations. The results show that 5 and 10s breath holding at residual volume increased the median concentration of particles in exhaled air by 63% and 110%, respectively, averaged over 10 subjects. An increasing number of closed airways, developing on a timescale of seconds explains this behaviour. Breath holds of 5, 10 and 20s at total lung capacity decreased the concentration to 63%, 45% and 28% respectively, of the directly exhaled concentration. The decrease in particle concentration after breath holding at total lung capacity is caused by gravitational settling in the alveoli and associated bronchioles. The geometry employed here when modelling the deposition is however not satisfactory and ways of improving the description are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Validation of 3D surface imaging in breath-hold radiotherapy for breast cancer: one central camera unit versus three camera units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Betgen, Anja; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-03-01

    In this work we investigated the benefit of the use of two lateral camera units additional to a central camera unit for 3D surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy by comparison with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Ten patients who received DIBH radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery were included. The performance of surface imaging using one and three camera units was compared to using CBCT for setup verification. Breast-surface registrations were performed for CBCT as well as for 3D surfaces, captured concurrently with CBCT, to planning CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors an assessment of the group mean, systematic error, random error, and 95% limits of agreement was made. Correlations between derived surface-imaging [one camera unit;three camera units] and CBCT setup errors were: R2=[0.67;0.75], [0.76;0.87], [0.88;0.91] in left-right, cranio-caudal, and anterior-posterior direction, respectively. Group mean, systematic and random errors were slightly smaller (sub-millimeter differences) and the limits of agreement were 0.10 to 0.25cm tighter when using three camera units compared with one. For the majority of the data, the use of three camera units compared with one resulted in setup errors more similar to the CBCT derived setup errors for the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior directions (p<0.01, Wilcoxon-signed-ranks test). This study shows a better correlation and agreement between 3D surface imaging and CBCT when three camera units are used instead of one and further outlines the conditions under which the benefit of using three camera units is significant.

  1. An insulin based model to explain changes and interactions in human breath-holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangmann, Rosita

    2015-06-01

    Until now oxygen was thought to be the leading factor of hypoxic conditions. Whereas now it appears that insulin is the key regulator of hypoxic conditions. Insulin seems to regulate the redox state of the organism and to determine the breakpoint of human breath-holding. This new hypoxia-insulin hypotheses might have major clinical relevance. Besides the clinical relevance, this hypothesis could explain, for the first time, why the training of the diaphragm, among other factors, results in an increase in breath-holding performance. Elite freedivers/apnea divers are able to reach static breath-holding times to over 6 min. Untrained persons exhibit an unpleasant feeling after more or less a minute. Breath-holding is stopped at the breakpoint. The partial oxygen pressure as well as the carbon dioxide pressure failed to directly influence the breakpoint in earlier studies. The factors that contribute to the breakpoint are still under debate. Under hypoxic conditions the organism needs more glucose, because it changes from the oxygen consuming pentose phosphate (36 ATP/glucose molecule) to the anaerobic glycolytic pathway (2ATP/glucose molecule). Hence insulin, as it promotes the absorption of glucose, is set in the center of interest regarding hypoxic conditions. This paper provides an insulin based model that could explain the changes and interactions in human breath-holding. The correlation between hypoxia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their influence on the sympathetic nerve system and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) is dealt with. It reviews as well the direct interrelation of HIF-1α and insulin. The depression of insulin secretion through the vagus nerve activation via inspiration is discussed. Furthermore the paper describes the action of insulin on the carotid bodies and the diaphragm and therefore a possible role in respiration pattern. Freedivers that go over the breakpoint of breath-holding could exhibit seizures and thus the effect of

  2. SU-F-J-55: Feasibility of Supraclavicular Field Treatment by Investigating Variation of Junction Position Between Breast Tangential and Supraclavicular Fields for Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) Left Breast Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Paxton, A; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Su, F; Salter, B [University Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of supraclavicular field treatment by investigating the variation of junction position between tangential and supraclavicular fields during left breast radiation using DIBH technique. Methods: Six patients with left breast cancer treated using DIBH technique were included in this study. AlignRT system was used to track patient’s breast surface. During daily treatment, when the patient’s DIBH reached preset AlignRT tolerance of ±3mm for all principle directions (vertical, longitudinal, and lateral), the remaining longitudinal offset was recorded. The average with standard-deviation and the range of daily longitudinal offset for the entire treatment course were calculated for all six patients (93 fractions totally). The ranges of average ± 1σ and 2σ were calculated, and they represent longitudinal field edge error with the confidence level of 68% and 95%. Based on these longitudinal errors, dose at junction between breast tangential and supraclavicular fields with variable gap/overlap sizes was calculated as a percentage of prescription (on a representative patient treatment plan). Results: The average of longitudinal offset for all patients is 0.16±1.32mm, and the range of longitudinal offset is −2.6 to 2.6mm. The range of longitudinal field edge error at 68% confidence level is −1.48 to 1.16mm, and at 95% confidence level is −2.80 to 2.48mm. With a 5mm and 1mm gap, the junction dose could be as low as 37.5% and 84.9% of prescription dose; with a 5mm and 1mm overlap, the junction dose could be as high as 169.3% and 117.6%. Conclusion: We observed longitudinal field edge error at 95% confidence level is about ±2.5mm, and the junction dose could reach 70% hot/cold between different DIBH. However, over the entire course of treatment, the average junction variation for all patients is within 0.2mm. The results from our study shows it is potentially feasible to treat supraclavicular field with breast tangents.

  3. Facial immersion in cold water enhances cerebral blood velocity during breath-hold exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Pott, Frank C; Secher, Niels H

    2009-01-01

    180-W exercise (from 47 to 53 cm/s), and this increment became larger with facial immersion (76 cm/s, approximately 62%; P brain with a >100% increase in MCA V(mean), largely...... perfusion evaluated as the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA V(mean)) during exercise in nine male subjects. At rest, a breath hold of maximum duration increased the arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa(CO(2))) from 4.2 to 6.7 kPa and MCA V(mean) from 37 to 103 cm/s (mean; approximately 178%; P...... exercise, a breath hold increased Pa(CO(2)) from 5.9 to 8.2 kPa (P

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of a modified subtraction coronary CT angiography method with short breath-holding time: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Takagi, Hidenobu; Nagata, Kyouhei; Chiba, Takuya; Takeda, Kouta; Ueda, Takanori; Sugawara, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Akinobu; Ueyama, Yuta; Kikuchi, Kei; Sasaki, Tadashi

    2016-10-01

    To explore the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of modified subtraction coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with short breath-holding time in patients who have limited breath-hold capability and severe coronary artery calcification. 11 patients with a coronary calcium score >400 underwent CCTA using a modified subtraction protocol. All patients were unable to hold their breath for more than 20 s. Subjective image quality using a four-point scale and the presence of significant (>50%) luminal stenosis were assessed for each calcified or stented segment on both conventional CCTA and modified subtraction CCTA images and compared with invasive coronary angiography (ICA) as the gold standard. The mean breath-holding time was 13.0 ± 0.9 s. A total of 35 calcified or stented coronary segments were evaluated. The average image quality was increased from 2.1 ± 0.9 with conventional CCTA to 3.1 ± 0.7 with subtraction CCTA (p breath-holding time to be shortened to breath-hold capability and severe calcification. Modified subtraction CCTA can improve the diagnostic accuracy in patients with a high calcium score and patients who are unable to perform long breath-holds.

  5. EFFECTS OF AQUA AEROBICS AND FLOOR AEROBICS ON BREATH HOLDING TIME AMONG SCHOOL GIRLS

    OpenAIRE

    P. V. Shelvam; S. Arunadevi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to find out the effects of aqua aerobics and floor aerobics on breath holding time among school girls. To achieve this purpose of the study, ninety school girls were selected as subjects who were studied Cornation Higher Secondary School, Sivakasi. The selected subjects were aged between 15 to 17 years. The selected subjects were randomly divided into three groups of 30 subjects each group. Group one acted as experimental group I and group two acted as experimenta...

  6. Computer tomography guided lung biopsy using interactive breath-hold control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Haseem; Krag-Andersen, Shella; Naqibullah, Matiullah

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interactive breath-hold control (IBC) may improve the accuracy and decrease the complication rate of computed tomography (CT)-guided lung biopsy, but this presumption has not been proven in a randomized study. METHODS: Patients admitted for CT-guided lung biopsy were randomized....... CONCLUSIONS: The use of IBC for CT-guided lung biopsy was not an advantage for unselected patients in our care, since it did not improve the biopsy accuracy and the risk of pneumothorax was increased....

  7. Correlation of Neurological Symptoms and Breath Holding Index Values in Patients With Severe Internal Carotid Stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zavoreo, Iris; Aleksić-Shibabi, Anka; Demarin, Vida

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of cerebral vasoreactivity measurement in the follow up of patients with severe internal carotid stenosis. We used breath holding index (BHI) as a quantitative parameter of cerebral vasoreactivity and functional state of cerebral hemodynamics. We evaluated data of 150 patients with high grade carotid stenosis (definition according to standardized criteria of the Cerebrovascular Laboratory, Reference Center for Neurovascular Disorders of the Minist...

  8. Reproducibility of diaphragm position assessed with a voluntary breath-holding device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Shigeyuki; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi; Kumano, Tomoyasu; Mizuno, Eiichi; Shibata, Satoshi; Ohashi, Shizuko; Kurata, Yuichi; Ueda, Shinichi; Hori, Naoki; Shouji, Saori; Noto, Kimiya; Kojima, Hironori; Matsui, Osamu

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility of diaphragm position in our new breath-holding radiotherapy for abdominal tumors using image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and a voluntary breath-holding device, Abches. Patients treated with abdominal tumors using IGRT with Abches were enrolled. Twenty patients without dementia or severe lung disease were analyzed. Each fraction of all patients was set up with kV cone-beam CT with reference to the vertebral bodies. Before daily treatment, electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images of the diaphragm at breath-holding exhale phase were acquired. The difference in the diaphragm position relative to the vertebral body was analyzed by comparing EPID images and the digitally reconstructed radiograph of the planning CT. We evaluated the reproducibility of two axes: superior-inferior (S-I) and right-left (R-L) with the EPID measurements. The 443 irradiation data sets were analyzed. The interfractional reproducibility of the diaphragm relative to vertebral bodies was 1.7 ± 1.4 mm in the S-I and 1.4 ± 1.2 mm in the R-L direction. This technique has good interfractional reproducibility and visibility of the diaphragm during irradiation. Its use is feasible in the routine clinical setting and irradiation.

  9. Single breath-hold diffusion-weighted MRI of the liver with parallel imaging: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oner, A.Y.; Celik, H.; Oktar, S.O.; Tali, T.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate prospectively the improvement in the signal:noise ratio (SNR), with the use of parallel technique in single breath-hold diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the liver and its affect on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements. Materials and methods: This study was approved by our institutional review board. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Fifteen patients underwent single breath-hold DWI of the liver with and without parallel imaging technique. SNR and ADC values were measured over a lesion-free right hepatic lobe by two radiologists in both series. When a focal hepatic lesion was present the contrast:noise ratio (CNR) and ADC were also measured. Paired Student's t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean SNR values of the liver were 20.82 ± 7.54 and 15.83 ± 5.95 for DWI with and without parallel imaging, respectively. SNR values measured in DWI using parallel imaging were found to be significantly higher (p -3 mm 2 /s and 1.56 ± 0.28 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s for DWI with and without parallel imaging, respectively. No significant difference was found between the two sequences for hepatic ADC measurement (p > 0.05). Overall lesion CNR was found to be higher in DWI with parallel imaging. Conclusion: Parallel imaging is useful in improving SNR of single breath-hold DWI of the liver without compromising ADC measurements

  10. Panic disorder in a breath-holding challenge test: a simple tool for a better diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardi Antonio E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to observe if anxiety disorder patients - DSM-IV - respond in a similar way to the induction of panic attacks by a breath-holding challenge test. METHOD: We randomly selected 29 panic disorder (PD patients, 27 social anxiety disorder (SAD patients, 21 generalized anxiety disorder (GAD patients. They were induced to breath-hold for as long as possible four times with two-minute interval between them. Anxiety scales were applied before and after the test. RESULTS: A total of 44.8% (n=13 PD patients, 14.8% (n=4 SAD patients, 9.5% (n=2 GAD patients had a panic attack after the test (c²= 21.44, df= 2, p=0.001. There was no heart rate or anxiety levels difference among the groups before and after the test. CONCLUSION: In this breath-holding challenge test the panic disorder patients were more sensitive than other anxiety disorder patients.

  11. Reproducibility of diaphragm position assessed with a voluntary breath-holding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Shigeyuki; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi; Kumano, Tomoyasu

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of diaphragm position in our new breath-holding radiotherapy for abdominal tumors using image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and a voluntary breath-holding device, Abches. Patients treated with abdominal tumors using IGRT with Abches were enrolled. Twenty patients without dementia or severe lung disease were analyzed. Each fraction of all patients was set up with kV cone-beam CT with reference to the vertebral bodies. Before daily treatment, electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images of the diaphragm at breath-holding exhale phase were acquired. The difference in the diaphragm position relative to the vertebral body was analyzed by comparing EPID images and the digitally reconstructed radiograph of the planning CT. We evaluated the reproducibility of two axes: superior-inferior (S-I) and right-left (R-L) with the EPID measurements. The 443 irradiation data sets were analyzed. The interfractional reproducibility of the diaphragm relative to vertebral bodies was 1.7±1.4 mm in the S-I and 1.4±1.2 mm in the R-L direction. This technique has good interfractional reproducibility and visibility of the diaphragm during irradiation. Its use is feasible in the routine clinical setting and irradiation. (author)

  12. Prospective MR image alignment between breath-holds: Application to renal BOLD MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalis, Inge M; Pilutti, David; Krafft, Axel J; Hennig, Jürgen; Bock, Michael

    2017-04-01

    To present an image registration method for renal blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) measurements that enables semiautomatic assessment of parenchymal and medullary R2* changes under a functional challenge. In a series of breath-hold acquisitions, three-dimensional data were acquired initially for prospective image registration of subsequent BOLD measurements. An algorithm for kidney alignment for BOLD renal imaging (KALIBRI) was implemented to detect the positions of the left and right kidney so that the kidneys were acquired in the subsequent BOLD measurement at consistent anatomical locations. Residual in-plane distortions were corrected retrospectively so that semiautomatic dynamic R2* measurements of the renal cortex and medulla become feasible. KALIBRI was tested in six healthy volunteers during a series of BOLD experiments, which included a 600- to 1000-mL water challenge. Prospective image registration and BOLD imaging of each kidney was achieved within a total measurement time of about 17 s, enabling its execution within a single breath-hold. KALIBRI improved the registration by up to 35% as found with mutual information measures. In four volunteers, a medullary R2* decrease of up to 40% was observed after water ingestion. KALIBRI improves the quality of two-dimensional time-resolved renal BOLD MRI by aligning local renal anatomy, which allows for consistent R2* measurements over many breath-holds. Magn Reson Med 77:1573-1582, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Optimising diffusion-weighted MR imaging for demonstrating pancreatic cancer: a comparison of respiratory-triggered, free-breathing and breath-hold techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartalis, Nikolaos; Loizou, Louiza; Edsborg, Nick; Albiin, Nils; Segersvaerd, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    To compare respiratory-triggered, free-breathing, and breath-hold DWI techniques regarding (1) image quality, and (2) signal intensity (SI) and ADC measurements in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Fifteen patients with histopathologically proven PDAC underwent DWI prospectively at 1.5 T (b = 0, 50, 300, 600 and 1,000 s/mm 2 ) with the three techniques. Two radiologists, independently and blindly, assigned total image quality scores [sum of rating diffusion images (lesion detection, anatomy, presence of artefacts) and ADC maps (lesion characterisation, overall image quality)] per technique and ranked them. The lesion SI, signal-to-noise ratio, mean ADC and coefficient of variation (CV) were compared. Total image quality scores for respiratory-triggered, free-breathing and breath-hold techniques were 17.9, 16.5 and 17.1 respectively (respiratory-triggered was significantly higher than free-breathing but not breath-hold). The respiratory-triggered technique had a significantly higher ranking. Lesion SI on all b-values and signal-to-noise ratio on b300 and b600 were significantly higher for the respiratory-triggered technique. For respiratory-triggered, free-breathing and breath-hold techniques the mean ADCs were 1.201, 1.132 and 1.253 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, and mean CVs were 8.9, 10.8 and 14.1 % respectively (respiratory-triggered and free-breathing techniques had a significantly lower mean CV than the breath-hold technique). In both analyses, respiratory-triggered DWI showed superiority and seems the optimal DWI technique for demonstrating PDAC. (orig.)

  14. Optimising diffusion-weighted MR imaging for demonstrating pancreatic cancer: a comparison of respiratory-triggered, free-breathing and breath-hold techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartalis, Nikolaos; Loizou, Louiza; Edsborg, Nick; Albiin, Nils [Karolinska University Hospital, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Segersvaerd, Ralf [Karolinska University Hospital, Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-10-15

    To compare respiratory-triggered, free-breathing, and breath-hold DWI techniques regarding (1) image quality, and (2) signal intensity (SI) and ADC measurements in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Fifteen patients with histopathologically proven PDAC underwent DWI prospectively at 1.5 T (b = 0, 50, 300, 600 and 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}) with the three techniques. Two radiologists, independently and blindly, assigned total image quality scores [sum of rating diffusion images (lesion detection, anatomy, presence of artefacts) and ADC maps (lesion characterisation, overall image quality)] per technique and ranked them. The lesion SI, signal-to-noise ratio, mean ADC and coefficient of variation (CV) were compared. Total image quality scores for respiratory-triggered, free-breathing and breath-hold techniques were 17.9, 16.5 and 17.1 respectively (respiratory-triggered was significantly higher than free-breathing but not breath-hold). The respiratory-triggered technique had a significantly higher ranking. Lesion SI on all b-values and signal-to-noise ratio on b300 and b600 were significantly higher for the respiratory-triggered technique. For respiratory-triggered, free-breathing and breath-hold techniques the mean ADCs were 1.201, 1.132 and 1.253 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, and mean CVs were 8.9, 10.8 and 14.1 % respectively (respiratory-triggered and free-breathing techniques had a significantly lower mean CV than the breath-hold technique). In both analyses, respiratory-triggered DWI showed superiority and seems the optimal DWI technique for demonstrating PDAC. (orig.)

  15. [Assessment of influence of breath holding and hyperventilation on human postural stability with spectral analysis of stabilographic signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakhov, M V; Makarenkova, E A; Mel'nikov, A A; Vikulov, A D

    2014-01-01

    The influence of breath holding and voluntary hyperventilation on the classic stabilometric parameters and the frequency characteristic of stabilographic signal were studied. We measured the stabilometric parameters on the force platform ("Ritm", Russia) on the healthy volunteers (n = 107) during quiet breath, voluntary hyperventilation (20 seconds) and maximal inspiratory breath holding (20 seconds). Respiratory frequency, respiratory amplitude and ventilation were estimated with strain gauge. We found that antero-posterior and medio-lateral sway amplitude and velocity as well as sway surface at breath-holding and at quiet breathing were the same, so breath holding didn't influence the postural stability. However the spectral parameters shifted to the high frequency range due to alteration of the respiratory muscles contractions during breath-holding versus quiet breath. Voluntary hyperventilation caused significant increase of all stabilographic indices that implied an impairment of postural stability, which was due to the increase of respiration frequency and amplitude. We also found that the spectral indices moved toward the high-frequency range with more pronounced degree of this shift versus breath holding. Besides, amplitudes of spectral peaks also increased. Perhaps such change of spectral indices was due to distortion of proprioceptive information because of increased excitability of nerve fibers during hyperventilation. Maximal inspiration breath holding causes strain of the postural control mechanisms that is reflected as elevation of postural sway frequency with no postural stability changes. Hyperventilation leads to the most prominent strain of balance function and decrease of steadiness that is manifested as increase of center of pressure oscillations amplitude and frequency.

  16. Safely prolonging single breath-holds to >5 min in patients with cancer; feasibility and applications for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Stuart; Stevens, Andrea M; Parveen, Sophia; Stephens, Rebecca; Clutton-Brock, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Multiple, short and deep inspiratory breath-holds with air of approximately 20 s are now used in radiotherapy to reduce the influence of ventilatory motion and damage to healthy tissue. There may be further clinical advantages in delivering each treatment session in only one single, prolonged breath-hold. We have previously developed techniques enabling healthy subjects to breath-hold for 7 min. Here, we demonstrate their successful application in patients with cancer. Methods: 15 patients aged 37–74 years undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer were trained to breath-hold safely with pre-oxygenation and mechanically induced hypocapnia under simulated radiotherapy treatment conditions. Results: The mean breath-hold duration was 5.3 ± 0.2 min. At breakpoint, all patients were normocapnic and normoxic [mean end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide was 36 ± 1 standard error millimetre of mercury, (mmHg) and mean oxygen saturation was 100 ± 0 standard error %]. None were distressed, nor had gasping, dizziness or disturbed breathing in the post-breath-hold period. Mean blood pressure had risen significantly from 125 ± 3 to 166 ± 4 mmHg at breakpoint (without heart rate falling), but normalized within approximately 20 s of the breakpoint. During breath-holding, the mean linear anteroposterior displacement slope of the L breast marker was radiotherapy treatment conditions for longer than the typical beam-on time of a single fraction. We discuss the important applications of this technique for radiotherapy. Advances in knowledge: We demonstrate for the first time a technique enabling patients with cancer to deliver safely a single prolonged breath-hold of >5 min (10 times longer than currently used in radiotherapy practice), under simulated radiotherapy treatment conditions. PMID:27168468

  17. Multiple breath-hold CBCT for online image guided radiotherapy of lung tumors: Simulation with a dynamic phantom and first patient data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Fleckenstein, Jens; Lohr, Frank; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Nachit, Mohammed; Blessing, Manuel; Stsepankou, Dzimitry; Loeb, Iris; Kuepper, Beate; Kavanagh, Anthony; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Brada, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; McNair, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Computer controlled breath-hold effectively reduces organ motion for image-guided precision radiotherapy of lung tumors. However, the acquisition time of 3D cone-beam-CT (CBCT) exceeds maximum breath-hold times. We have developed an approach enabling online verification using CBCT image acquisition with ABC (registered) -based breath-hold. Methods: Patient CBCT images were acquired with ABC (registered) -based repeat breath-hold. The clinical situation was also simulated with a Motion Phantom. Reconstruction of patient and phantom images with selection of free-breathing and breath-hold projections only was performed. Results: CBCT-imaging in repeat breath-hold resulted in a precisely spherical appearance of a tumor-mimicking structure in the phantom. A faint 'ghost' structure (free-breathing phases) can be clearly discriminated. Mean percentage of patient breath-hold time was 66%. Reconstruction based on free-breathing-only shows blurring of both tumor and diaphragm, reconstruction based on breath-hold projections only resulted in sharp contours of the same structures. From the phantom experiments, a maximal repositioning error of 1 mm in each direction can be estimated. Discussion and Conclusion: CBCT during repetitive breath hold provides reliable soft-tissue-based positioning. Fast 3D-imaging during one breath-hold is currently under development and has the potential to accelerate clinical linac-based volume imaging.

  18. The assessment of the breath hold and the free breath methods about the blood flow evaluation by using phase contrast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of cardiac blood flow using the magnetic resonance imaging has been limited due to breathing and involuntary movements of the heart. The present study attempted to improve the accuracy of cardiac blood flow testing through phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging by presenting the adequate breathing method and imaging variables by comparing the measurement values of cardiac blood flow. Each was evaluated by comparing the breath hold retrospective 1NEX and non breath hold retrospective 1-3NEX in the ascending aorta and descending aorta. As a result, the average blood flow amount/ velocity of the breath hold retrosepctive 1NEX method in the ascending aorta were 96.17±19.12 ml/sec, 17.04±4.12 cm/sec respectively, which demonstrates a statistically significant difference(p<0.05) with the non-breath hold retrospective method 1NEX of 72.31±13.27 ml and 12.32±3.85. On the other hand, the average 2NEX blood flow and mean flow velocity is 101.90±24.09, 16.84±4.32, 3NEX 103.06±25.49, 16.88±4.19 did not show statistically significant differences(p>0.05).The average blood flow amount/ velocity of the breath hold retrospective 1NEX method in the descending aorta were 76.68±19.72 ml/s, and 22.23±4.8, which did not demonstrate a significant difference in comparison to non-breath hold retrospective method 1-3 NEX. Therefore, the non breath hold retrospective method does not significantly differ in terms of cardiac blood flow in comparison with the breath hold retrospective method in accordance with the increase of NEX, so pediatric patients or patients who are not able to breathe well must have the diagnostic value of their cardiac blood flow tests improved

  19. The assessment of the breath hold and the free breath methods about the blood flow evaluation by using phase contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk Medical center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Measurement of cardiac blood flow using the magnetic resonance imaging has been limited due to breathing and involuntary movements of the heart. The present study attempted to improve the accuracy of cardiac blood flow testing through phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging by presenting the adequate breathing method and imaging variables by comparing the measurement values of cardiac blood flow. Each was evaluated by comparing the breath hold retrospective 1NEX and non breath hold retrospective 1-3NEX in the ascending aorta and descending aorta. As a result, the average blood flow amount/ velocity of the breath hold retrosepctive 1NEX method in the ascending aorta were 96.17±19.12 ml/sec, 17.04±4.12 cm/sec respectively, which demonstrates a statistically significant difference(p<0.05) with the non-breath hold retrospective method 1NEX of 72.31±13.27 ml and 12.32±3.85. On the other hand, the average 2NEX blood flow and mean flow velocity is 101.90±24.09, 16.84±4.32, 3NEX 103.06±25.49, 16.88±4.19 did not show statistically significant differences(p>0.05).The average blood flow amount/ velocity of the breath hold retrospective 1NEX method in the descending aorta were 76.68±19.72 ml/s, and 22.23±4.8, which did not demonstrate a significant difference in comparison to non-breath hold retrospective method 1-3 NEX. Therefore, the non breath hold retrospective method does not significantly differ in terms of cardiac blood flow in comparison with the breath hold retrospective method in accordance with the increase of NEX, so pediatric patients or patients who are not able to breathe well must have the diagnostic value of their cardiac blood flow tests improved.

  20. Anxiety Sensitivity and Breath-Holding Duration in Relation to PTSD Symptom Severity among Trauma Exposed Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenz, Erin C.; Vujanovic, Anka A.; Coffey, Scott F.; Zvolensky, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation examined the main and interactive effects of anxiety sensitivity and behavioral distress tolerance, indexed using the breath-holding task, in relation to PTSD symptom severity among trauma-exposed adults. Participants were 88 adults (63.6% women; Mage = 22.9, SD = 9.1, Range = 18-62), recruited from the community, who met DSM-IV-TR PTSD Criterion A for lifetime trauma exposure. Covariates included number of potentially traumatic events, nonclinical panic attack history, and participant sex. Anxiety sensitivity was significantly incrementally associated with PTSD total symptom severity, as well as Avoidance and Hyperarousal symptom severity (p's Breath-holding duration was not significantly related to PTSD symptom severity (p's > .05). However, breath-holding duration emerged as a significant moderator of the association between anxiety sensitivity and PTSD Avoidance symptom severity, such that lower breath-holding duration exacerbated the effect of heightened anxiety sensitivity with regard to PTSD Avoidance symptom severity. PMID:22047652

  1. Cerebral metabolism and vascular reactivity during breath-hold and hypoxic challenge in freedivers and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mark B; Larsson, Henrik Bw

    2018-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine the cerebral metabolism and vascular reactivity during extended breath-holds (ranging from 2 min 32 s to 7 min 0 s) and during a hypoxic challenge in freedivers and non-diver controls. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the global cerebral....... The freedivers showed remarkable increases in CBF (107%) during the breath-holds, compensating for arterial desaturation, and sustained cerebral oxygen delivery (CDO2). CMRO2was unaffected throughout the breath-holds. During the hypoxic challenge, the freedivers had larger increases in blood flow in the sagittal...... sinus than the non-divers, and could sustain normal CDO2. No differences were found in lactate production, global CBF or CMRO2. We conclude that the mechanism for sustaining brain function during breath-holding in freedivers involves an extraordinary increase in perfusion, and that freedivers present...

  2. Breath-hold MR cholangiopancreatography with three-dimensional, segmented, echo-planar imaging and volume rendering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Wielopolski (Piotr); J. Gaa; D.R. Wielopolski; M. Oudkerk (Matthijs)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractEnd-expiration, 21-second breath-hold, three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) was developed with segmented echo-planar imaging. In 15 healthy subjects and 14 randomly selected patients undergoing liver studies,

  3. Breath-hold times in patients undergoing radiological examinations. Comparison of expiration and inspiration with and without hyperventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groell, R.; Schaffler, G.J.; Schloffer, S.

    2001-01-01

    Background. Breath-holding is necessary for imaging studies of the thorax and abdomen using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound examinations. The purpose of this study was to compare the breath-hold times in expiration and inspiration and to evaluate the effects of hyperventilation. Patients and methods. Thirty patients and 19 healthy volunteers participated in this study after informed consent was obtained in all. The breath-hold times were measured in expiration and inspiration before and after hyperventilation. Results. The mean breath-hold times in expiration (patients: 24±9 sec, volunteers: 27±7 sec) were significantly shorter than those in inspiration (patients: 41±20 sec, p<0.001; volunteers: 62±18 sec, p<0.001). Additional hyperventilation resulted in a significant increase (range: 40-60%, p≤0.005) of the mean breathhold times either in expiration and in inspiration and for both patients and volunteers. Conclusions. Although breath-holding in expiration is recommended for various imaging studies particularly of the thorax and of the abdomen, suspending respiration in inspiration enables the patient a considerable longer breath-hold time. (author)

  4. Optimized subtraction coronary CT angiography protocol for clinical use with short breath-holding time-initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Yuki, Hideaki; Funama, Yoshinori; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamamuro, Megumi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Subtraction coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography (CCTA), which enables the removal of calcium and coronary stents from CCTA images, has been clinically introduced on a second-generation 320-row CT scanner. However, this technique for clinical use is not optimized. The long breath-holding time for two data acquisitions, which causes image misregistration and patient's discomfort, may limit the clinical availability of this subtraction technique. This study received approval from the institutional review board; prior informed consent to participate was obtained from all patients. We performed subtraction CCTA of five patients using the test injection method and optimized the interval time between the first (pulmonary-arterial phase) and the second (coronary-arterial phase) scans to achieve robust subtraction. The patients' breath-holding times were recorded. We compared breath-holding times between our new protocol and previous study's protocol (estimated). Mean breath-holding time in our new protocol was 18.3 ± 3.4 seconds and that in previous protocol was 29.8 ± 3.6 seconds (difference in mean breath-holding time was 11.5 seconds). Misregistration artifacts were not shown in final subtraction CCTA images. These images improved luminal visualization in the calcified lesion. Our test injection protocol can shorten the breath-holding time, which is helpful for successful subtraction CCTA imaging, potentially resulting in an increase of subtraction CCTA examinations in many institutions. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Agreement and repeatability of vascular reactivity estimates based on a breath-hold task and a resting state scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Ilona; Murphy, Kevin; Caseras, Xavier; Wise, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    FMRI BOLD responses to changes in neural activity are influenced by the reactivity of the vasculature. By complementing a task-related BOLD acquisition with a vascular reactivity measure obtained through breath-holding or hypercapnia, this unwanted variance can be statistically reduced in the BOLD responses of interest. Recently, it has been suggested that vascular reactivity can also be estimated using a resting state scan. This study aimed to compare three breath-hold based analysis approaches (block design, sine–cosine regressor and CO2 regressor) and a resting state approach (CO2 regressor) to measure vascular reactivity. We tested BOLD variance explained by the model and repeatability of the measures. Fifteen healthy participants underwent a breath-hold task and a resting state scan with end-tidal CO2 being recorded during both. Vascular reactivity was defined as CO2-related BOLD percent signal change/mm Hg change in CO2. Maps and regional vascular reactivity estimates showed high repeatability when the breath-hold task was used. Repeatability and variance explained by the CO2 trace regressor were lower for the resting state data based approach, which resulted in highly variable measures of vascular reactivity. We conclude that breath-hold based vascular reactivity estimations are more repeatable than resting-based estimates, and that there are limitations with replacing breath-hold scans by resting state scans for vascular reactivity assessment. PMID:25795342

  6. Breath-hold MR imaging of focal hepatic lesions : clinical usefulness of breath-hold TSE T2WI combined by fast low-angle shot (FLASH) MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Ki Whang; Kim, Eun Kyung; Yu, Jeong Sik

    1996-01-01

    To compare the image quality and diagnostic efficacy of turbo spin-echo (TSE) T2WI with breath-hold turbo SE T2WI and to evaluate the clinical usefulness combined breath-hold turbo SE T2WI with FLASH (fast low-angle shot) MR imaging for the evaluation of focal hepatic lesions. A total of 47 patients with known or suspected hepatic mass were prospectively evaluated using a commercially available 1.5-T MR system. All patients were examined with conventional spin-echo T1WI, TSE T2WI, breath-hold TSE T2WI, and T1-Weighted FLASH with and without Gd-DTPA. The images were compared quantitatively (liver-lesion C/N ; CNR [contrast-to-noise ratio] and lesion detectability) and qualitatively (sharpness of anatomic structure, artifact, and overall image quality). A total 69 hepatic lesions were detected in 47 patients. Sixty-seven lesions (97.1%) were detected with Gd-FLASH, 66 (95.7%) with TSE T2WI, 65 (94.2%) with breath-hold TSE T2WI, 62 (89.9%) with non-enhanced FLASH, and 55 (79.7%) with conventional SE T1WI. The CNR of cysts and hemangiomas was significantly greater on turbo SE T2WI and breath-hold TSE T2WI than on other sequences, but there was no significant difference between turbo SE T2WI and breath-hold TSE T2WI. For solid lesions, CNR was greatest on turbo SE T2WI and was similar on breath-hold TSE T2WI and Gd-FLASH without statistical significance, but was significantly higher than conventional SE T1WI. Breath-hold TSE T2WI and Gd-FLASH were qualitatively superior to other sequences except the vascular pulsation artifact of FLASH. Non-enhanced FLASH was also superior to conventional T1WI for CNR, lesion detectability, sharpness, respiratory motion artifact, and overall image quality. Breath-hold TSE T2WI may replace turbo SE T2WI, and as well as conventional SE T1WI, FLASH with or without Gd-DTPA may be used for the evaluation of focal hepatic lesions. The combination of FLASH and breath-hold TSE T2WI may be an excellent technique that can be used to rapidly

  7. A 4D ultrasound real-time tracking system for external beam radiotherapy of upper abdominal lesions under breath-hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihono, Dwi Seno Kuncoro; Vogel, Lena; Thoelking, Johannes; Wenz, Frederik; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Wertz, Hansjoerg [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Weiss, Christel [University of Heidelberg, Department of Biomathematics and Medical Statistics, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Lohr, Frank [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Az. Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Struttura Complessa di Radioterapia, Dipartimento di Oncologia, Modena (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    To evaluate a novel four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound (US) tracking system for external beam radiotherapy of upper abdominal lesions under computer-controlled deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). The tracking accuracy of the research 4D US system was evaluated using two motion phantoms programmed with sinusoidal and breathing patterns to simulate free breathing and DIBH. Clinical performance was evaluated with five healthy volunteers. US datasets were acquired in computer-controlled DIBH with varying angular scanning angles. Tracked structures were renal pelvis (spherical structure) and portal/liver vein branches (non-spherical structure). An external marker was attached to the surface of both phantoms and volunteers as a secondary object to be tracked by an infrared camera for comparison. Phantom measurements showed increased accuracy of US tracking with decreasing scanning range/increasing scanning frequency. The probability of lost tracking was higher for small scanning ranges (43.09% for 10 and 13.54% for 20 ).The tracking success rates in healthy volunteers during DIBH were 93.24 and 89.86% for renal pelvis and portal vein branches, respectively. There was a strong correlation between marker motion and US tracking for the majority of analyzed breath-holds: 84.06 and 88.41% of renal pelvis target results and 82.26 and 91.94% of liver vein target results in anteroposterior and superoinferior directions, respectively; Pearson's correlation coefficient was between 0.71 and 0.99. The US system showed a good tracking performance in 4D motion phantoms. The tracking capability of surrogate structures for upper abdominal lesions in DIBH fulfills clinical requirements. Further investigation in a larger cohort of patients is underway. (orig.) [German] Evaluation eines neuen vierdimensionalen (4D) Ultraschall(US)-Tracking-Systems fuer die externe Strahlentherapie von Oberbauchlaesionen unter computergesteuertem tiefem Atemanhalt (DIBH). Die Tracking-Genauigkeit des 4D

  8. Interfractional diaphragm changes during breath-holding in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Daisuke; Ozawa, Shuichi; Nakashima, Takeo; Tsuda, Shintaro; Ochi, Yusuke; Okumura, Takuro; Masuda, Hirokazu; Hioki, Kazunari; Suzuki, Tathsuhiko; Ohno, Yoshimi; Kimura, Tomoki; Murakami, Yuji; Nagata, Yasushi

    2018-01-01

    IGRT based on bone matching may produce a large target positioning error in terms of the reproducibility of expiration breath-holding on SBRT for liver cancer. We evaluated the intrafractional and interfractional errors using the diaphragm position at the end of expiration by utilising Abches and analysed the factor of the interfractional error. Intrafractional and interfractional errors were measured using a couple of frontal kV images, planning computed tomography (pCT) and daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Moreover, max-min diaphragm position within daily CBCT image sets with respect to pCT and the maximum value of diaphragm position difference between CBCT and pCT were calculated. The mean ± SD (standard deviation) of the intra-fraction diaphragm position variation in the frontal kV images was 1.0 ± 0.7 mm in the C-C direction. The inter-fractional diaphragm changes were 0.4 ± 4.6 mm in the C-C direction, 1.4 ± 2.2 mm in the A-P direction, and -0.6 ± 1.8 mm in the L-R direction. There were no significant differences between the maximum value of the max-min diaphragm position within daily CBCT image sets with respect to pCT and the maximum value of diaphragm position difference between CBCT and pCT. Residual intrafractional variability of diaphragm position is minimal, but large interfractional diaphragm changes were observed. There was a small effect in the patient condition difference between pCT and CBCT. The impact of the difference in daily breath-holds on the interfractional diaphragm position was large or the difference in daily breath-holding heavily influenced the interfractional diaphragm change.

  9. Breath-holding spells may be associated with maturational delay in myelination of brain stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurucu, Sebahattin; Karaoglu, Abdulbaki; Paksu, Sukru M; Oz, Oguzhan; Yaman, Halil; Gulgun, Mustafa; Babacan, Oguzhan; Unay, Bulent; Akin, Ridvan

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate possible contribution of maturational delay of brain stem in the etiology of breath-holding spells in children using brain stem auditory evoked potentials. The study group included children who experienced breath-holding spells. The control group consisted of healthy age- and sex-matched children. Age, gender, type and frequency of spell, hemoglobin, and ferritin levels in study group and brain stem auditory evoked potentials results in both groups were recorded. Study group was statistically compared with control group for brain stem auditory evoked potentials. The mean age of study and control groups was 26.3 ± 14.6 and 28.9 ± 13.9 months, respectively. The III-V and I-V interpeak latencies were significantly prolonged in the study group compared with the control group (2.07 ± 0.2 milliseconds; 1.92 ± 0.13 milliseconds and 4.00 ± 0.27 milliseconds; 3.83 ± 0.19 milliseconds; P = 0.009 and P = 0.03, respectively). At the same time, III-V and I-V interpeak latencies of patients without anemia in the study group compared with those of control group were significantly prolonged (2.09 ± 0.24 milliseconds; 1.92 ± 0.13 milliseconds and 4.04 ± 0.28 milliseconds; 3.83 ± 0.19 milliseconds; P = 0.007 and P = 0.01, respectively). Our results consider that maturational delay in myelination of brain stem may have a role in the etiology of breath-holding spells in children.

  10. Chronic adaptations of lung function in breath-hold diving fishermen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Diniz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to verify and analyze the existence of chronic adaptations of lung function in freediving fishermen whose occupation is artisanal fishing. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 11 breath-hold diving fishermen and 10 non-breath-hold diving fishermen (control from the village of Bitupitá in the municipality of Barroquinha (Ceará - Brazil. Anthropometric measurements, chest and abdominal circumferences as well as spirometric and respiratory muscle strength tests were conducted according to the specifications of the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS. In order to compare the measured values versus the predicted values, Student t test was used in the case of parametric test and Wilcoxon test in the case of nonparametric test. To compare the inter-group means Student t test was used for parametric test and Mann-Whitney test for the nonparametric one. The level of significance was set at α = 5%. Results: The forced vital capacity (FVC (4.9±0.6 l vs. 4.3±0.4 l and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 (4.0±0.5 l vs. 3.6±0.3 l were, respectively, higher in the group of divers compared to the control group (p ≤ 0.05. Furthermore, in the group of free divers, the measured FVC, FEV1 and FEV1/FVC ratios were significantly greater than the predicted ones. No differences were found between the measured respiratory pressures. Conclusions: These results indicate that breath-hold diving seems to produce chronic adaptations of the respiratory system, resulting in elevated lung volumes with no airway obstruction.

  11. Release of erythropoietin and neuron-specific enolase after breath holding in competing free divers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Jattu, T; Nielsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    , and troponin T. Venous blood samples were obtained from 17 competing free divers before and 3 h after sessions of static apnea and underwater swimming. The heart was evaluated by echocardiography. Static apnea for 293 ± 78 s (mean ± SD) and subsequent 88 ± 21 m underwater swimming increased plasma......Free diving is associated with extreme hypoxia. This study evaluated the combined effect of maximal static breath holding and underwater swimming on plasma biomarkers of tissue hypoxemia: erythropoietin, neuron-specific enolase and S100B, C-reactive protein, pro-atrial natriuretic peptide...

  12. Evaluation of the breath-hold approach in proton therapy of lung tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorgisyan, Jenny

    Proton therapy has the potential to improve the treatment effect as compared to conventional radiation therapy for lung cancer patients. However, the proton therapy delivery is prone to uncertainties caused by anatomical changes and motion during the treatment and between the treatment fractions ....... The change in water-equivalent path length (WEPL) is further shown to be a good predictor of plan robustness, in addition to baseline shifts of the tumor. Overall, the results of this thesis encourage a clinical implementation of the breath-hold approach....

  13. Impact of different breathing conditions on the dose to surrounding normal structures in tangential field breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, Ramachandran; Tharmar, Ganesh; Julka, Pramod K.; Rath, Goura K.; Joshi, Rakesh C.; Bansal, Anil K.; Bisht, R.K.; Gopishankar, N.; Pant, G.S.; Thulkar, S.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity is an important concern in tangential field breast radiotherapy. In this study, the impact of three different breathing conditions on the dose to surrounding normal structures such as heart, ipsilateral lung, liver and contralateral breast has been assessed. Thirteen patients with early breast cancer who underwent conservative surgery (nine left-sided and four right-sided breast cancer patients) were selected in this study. Spiral CT scans were performed for all the three breathing conditions, viz., deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH), normal breathing phase (NB) and deep expiration breath-hold (DEBH). Conventional tangential fields were placed on the 3D-CT dataset, and the parameters such as V30 (volume covered by dose >30 Gy) for heart, V20 (volume covered by dose >20 Gy) for ipsilateral lung and V 50 (volume receiving >50% of the prescription dose) for heart and liver were studied. The average reduction in cardiac dose due to DIBH was 64% (range: 26.5-100%) and 74% (range: 37-100%) as compared to NB and DEBH respectively. For right breast cancer, DIBH resulted in excellent liver sparing. Our results indicate that in patients with breast cancer, delivering radiation in deep inspiration breath-hold condition can considerably reduce the dose to the surrounding normal structures, particularly heart and liver. (author)

  14. Assessment of both serum S-100B protein and neuropeptide-Y levels in childhood breath-holding spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Mustafa; Ciftci, Ahmet; Sarikaya, Suna; Kocaturk, Ozcan; Abuhandan, Mahmut; Taskin, Abdullah; Kandemir, Hasan; Yoldas, Tahır Kurtulus; Aksoy, Nurten

    2015-06-01

    Breath-holding spells are common paroxysmal events in children. Although the spells have a benign prognosis in the long term, they may be complicated by loss of consciousness, tonic-clonic movements, and occasionally seizures. Hence, this study aimed to measure the levels of serum S-100B proteins and neuropeptide-Y in the blood of children who experience breath-holding spells. The study groups consisted of 45 patients (13 females, 32 males) with breath-holding spells and a control group of 32 healthy individuals (12 females, 20 males). The serum S-100B levels were measured using commercially available ELISA kits. The neuropeptide-Y levels in the serum were measured with RayBio® Human/Mouse/Rat Neuropeptide Y ELISA kits. The mean serum S-100B protein level of the breath-holding spells group was 56.38 ± 13.26 pg/mL, and of the control group, 48.53 ± 16.77 pg/mL. The mean neuropeptide-Y level was 62.29 ± 13.89 pg/mL in the breath-holding spells group and 58.24 ± 12.30 pg/mL in the control group. There were significant differences between the groups with respect to serum S-100B protein levels (p = 0.025), while there was no statistically significant difference in neuropeptide-Y levels between the breath-holding spells group and the control group (p = 0.192). The findings of this study suggest that frequent and lengthy breath-holding may lead to the development of neuronal metabolic dysfunction or neuronal damage which is most likely related to hypoxia. In light of these findings, future studies should be conducted using biochemical and radiological imaging techniques to support these results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitating aortic regurgitation by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: significant variations due to slice location and breath holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Hamilton-Craig, Christian; Cawley, Peter J; Mitsumori, Lee M; Otto, Catherine M; Maki, Jeffrey H

    2016-09-01

    Compare variability in flow measurements by phase contrast MRI, performed at different locations in the aorta and pulmonary artery (PA) using breath-held (BH) and free-breathing (FB) sequences. Fifty-seven patients with valvular heart disease, confirmed by echocardiography, were scanned using BH technique at 3 locations in the ascending aorta (SOV = sinus of Valsalva, STJ = sinotubular junction, ASC = ascending aorta at level of right pulmonary artery) and 2 locations in PA. Single FB measurement was obtained at STJ for aorta. Obtained metrics (SV = stroke volume, FV = forward volume, BV = backward volume, RF = regurgitant fraction) were evaluated separately for patients with aortic regurgitation (AR, n = 31) and mitral regurgitation (n = 26). No difference was noted between the two measurements in the PA. Significant differences were noted in measured SV at different aortic locations. SV measurements obtained at ASC correlated best with the measurements obtained in the PA. Strongest correlation of AR was measured at the STJ. Measurements of flow volumes by phase contrast MRI differ depending on slice location. When using stroke volumes to calculate pulmonary to systemic blood flow ratio (Qp/Qs), ASC should be used. For quantifying aortic regurgitation, measurement should be obtained at STJ. • Aortic regurgitation can be accurately measured by MRI. • Aortic regurgitation measurement by MRI varies according to the location where measured. • Aortic regurgitation can also be measured by MRI without breath hold.

  16. Breath-hold monitoring and visual feedback for radiotherapy using a charge-coupled device camera and a head-mounted display. System development and feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the technical aspects of the breath-hold technique with respiratory monitoring and visual feedback and to evaluate the feasibility of this system in healthy volunteers. To monitor respiration, the vertical position of the fiducial marker placed on the patient's abdomen was tracked by a machine vision system with a charge-coupled device camera. A monocular head-mounted display was used to provide the patient with visual feedback about the breathing trace. Five healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this study. They held their breath at the end-inspiration and the end-expiration phases. They performed five repetitions of the same type of 15-s breath-holds with and without a head-mounted display, respectively. A standard deviation of five mean positions of the fiducial marker during a 15-s breath-hold in each breath-hold type was used as the reproducibility value of breath-hold. All five volunteers well tolerated the breath-hold maneuver. For the inspiration breath-hold, the standard deviations with and without visual feedback were 1.74 mm and 0.84 mm, respectively (P=0.20). For the expiration breath-hold, the standard deviations with and without visual feedback were 0.63 mm and 0.96 mm, respectively (P=0.025). Our newly developed system might help the patient achieve improved breath-hold reproducibility. (author)

  17. Optical tomographic imaging of the hemodynamic response to a breath hold in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Khalil, Michael A.; Al Abdi, Rabah M.; Reig, Beatriu; Fong, Christopher J.; Hershman, Dawn; Desperito, Elise; Barbour, Randall L.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-02-01

    Continuous wave optical tomography is non-ionizing, uses endogenous contrast, and can be performed quickly and at low cost which makes it a suitable imaging modality for breast cancer screening. Using multiple wavelengths of light to illuminate the breast at various angles, three-dimensional images of the distribution of chromophores such as oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin can help identify cancerous tissue. Dynamic optical imaging can provide additional insight into cancer characteristics such as angiogenesis and metabolism. Here we present the first clinical data acquired with our novel digital breast imaging system. This system is based upon a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) architecture that leverages the immediate digitization of acquired analog data to reduce noise and quickly process large amounts of data. Employing this new instrument we have investigated the dynamic changes due to a breath hold and its potential for use in breast cancer screening. Over the course of a breath hold, images have been collected simultaneously from both breasts at a rate of 1.7 frames per second with 32 sources and 64 detectors per breast and four wavelengths of light at 765, 805, 827, and 905nm. Initial results involving one healthy volunteer and one breast cancer patient support the potential use of dynamic imaging for breast cancer detection.

  18. Reproducibility of organ position using voluntary breath-hold method with spirometer for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Hirokawa, Yutaka; Murakami, Yuji; Tsujimura, Masatsugu; Nakashima, Tateo; Ohno, Yoshimi; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Wadasaki, Koichi; Ito, Katsuhide

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in healthy volunteers the reproducibility of organ position using a voluntary breath-hold method with a spirometer and the feasibility of this method for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy in a clinical setting. Methods and materials: For this study, 5 healthy volunteers were enrolled. After training sessions, they held their breath at the end-inspiration and the end-expiration phase under spirometer-based monitoring. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed twice at each respiratory phase, with a 10-min interval, on 2 separate days. The total number of CT scans was four at each respiratory phase. After CT volume data were transferred to a three-dimensional treatment-planning system, digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were calculated for anterior-posterior and left-right beams. Verification was performed with DRRs relative to the diaphragm position, bony landmarks, and the isocenter in each healthy volunteer at each respiratory phase. To evaluate intrafraction reproducibility, we measured the distance between diaphragm position and bony landmarks. To evaluate interfraction reproducibility, we measured the distance between diaphragm position and the isocenter. Reproducibility and setup error were defined as the average value of the differences between each DRR with regard to the first DRR. Results: Intrafraction reproducibility of the caudal-cranial direction was 4.0 ± 3.5 mm at the end-inspiration phase and 2.2 ± 2.0 mm at the end-expiration phase. Interfraction reproducibility of the caudal-cranial direction was 5.1 ± 4.8 mm at the end-inspiration phase and 2.1 ± 1.8 mm at the end-expiration phase. The end-expiration phase was more stable than the end-inspiration phase. Conclusions: The voluntary breath-hold method with a spirometer is feasible, with relatively good reproducibility. We are encouraged about the use of this technique clinically for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

  19. Attenuation correction of emission PET images with average CT: Interpolation from breath-hold CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzung-Chi; Zhang, Geoffrey; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-05-01

    Misregistration resulting from the difference of temporal resolution in PET and CT scans occur frequently in PET/CT imaging, which causes distortion in tumor quantification in PET. Respiration cine average CT (CACT) for PET attenuation correction has been reported to improve the misalignment effectively by several papers. However, the radiation dose to the patient from a four-dimensional CT scan is relatively high. In this study, we propose a method to interpolate respiratory CT images over a respiratory cycle from inhalation and exhalation breath-hold CT images, and use the average CT from the generated CT set for PET attenuation correction. The radiation dose to the patient is reduced using this method. Six cancer patients of various lesion sites underwent routine free-breath helical CT (HCT), respiration CACT, interpolated average CT (IACT), and 18F-FDG PET. Deformable image registration was used to interpolate the middle phases of a respiratory cycle based on the end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold CT scans. The average CT image was calculated from the eight interpolated CT image sets of middle respiratory phases and the two original inspiration and expiration CT images. Then the PET images were reconstructed by these three methods for attenuation correction using HCT, CACT, and IACT. Misalignment of PET image using either CACT or IACT for attenuation correction in PET/CT was improved. The difference in standard uptake value (SUV) from tumor in PET images was most significant between the use of HCT and CACT, while the least significant between the use of CACT and IACT. Besides the similar improvement in tumor quantification compared to the use of CACT, using IACT for PET attenuation correction reduces the radiation dose to the patient.

  20. Inhaled corticosteroids and the beneficial effect of deep inspiration in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scichilone, Nicola; Permutt, Solbert; Bellia, Vincenzo; Togias, Alkis

    2005-09-15

    Deep inspiration-induced bronchoprotection and bronchodilation are impaired in asthma. We evaluated the effect of inhaled glucocorticosteroids on these phenomena. Two groups of subjects with asthma, 9 with moderate/severe hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, and 12 with mild/borderline hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, received inhaled fluticasone (880 microg daily) for 12 weeks. Serial bronchoprovocations were performed at Weeks 0, 6, and 12. The impact of deep inspirations on the airway response to methacholine was evaluated on the basis of inspiratory vital capacity and FEV(1). Fluticasone produced a wide spectrum of changes in the beneficial effects of deep inspiration, but the mean changes were not significant. The magnitude of the steroid-induced changes in bronchoprotection by deep inspiration correlated with baseline log PC(20) (the provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in FEV(1); higher log PC(20) predicted improvement of the deep inspiration effect). The steroid-induced changes led to the emergence of strong positive correlations between the effects of deep inspiration and the methacholine log PC(20) that did not exist at baseline. We conclude that deep inspiration-induced bronchoprotection can be restored by inhaled glucocorticosteroids only in individuals with mild hyperresponsiveness. After steroid treatment, the beneficial effects of deep inspiration become significant determinants of the magnitude of airway hyperresponsiveness.

  1. Effective of deep breath-hold SPECT in torso area. Examination concerning improvement of resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Takashi; Horiuchi, Shoji; Hayashi, Masuo; Sugibayashi, Keiichi

    2007-01-01

    The routine single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) gives images with reduced resolution of internal organs like diaphragm due to breathing movements. In the present study, authors developed a breath-hold (BH) SPECT method where SPECT projection data were acquired during BH, and examined its usefulness. Equipments used were all Toshiba's dual-detector SPECT system E.CAM, image processor GMS-5500 A/PI, fusion software ART, and CT scanner Aquillion/M8. SPECT data were alternatively acquired at steps during BH and free breath (FB), for an entire step-and-shoot SPECT cycle, and acquisition time for 1 step (view) was set to be 10-15 sec depending on the subject's BH ability. Data from BH and FB views were extracted to get respective SPECT images. An evaluation was first done for a phantom simulating the breathing lung, an elliptical acrylic shell where a balloon connected with an ambu bag was placed. Two point sources of 99m Tc (14 MBq) were attached on the balloon. The phantom study revealed BH method did not give any artifacts. Clinically, 201 Tl-SPECT images of patients with lung tumors were compared for resolution between BH and FB and for their accuracy of registration by superimposing on CT images. Such results were observed as that, when FB gave two regions of Tl accumulation, BH, one region agreeing with the one lesion in the CT image, and that, when Tl accumulation was visualized in BH, but not in FB due to its overlapping with the liver area. Thus BH method could reduce respiratory motion artifacts to improve resolution, and was thought applicable to other imaging methods. (R.T.)

  2. Vascular Reactivity Maps in Patients with Gliomas Using Breath-Holding BOLD fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmahboob, Amir; Peck, Kyung K; Brennan, Nicole P; Karimi, Sasan; Fisicaro, Ryan; Hou, Bob; Holodny, Andrei I

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether breath-holding (BH) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI can quantify differences in vascular reactivity (VR), as there is a need for improved contrast mechanisms in gliomas. 16 patients (gliomas, grade II = 5, III = 2, IV = 9) were evaluated using the BH paradigm: 4-second single deep breath followed by 16 seconds of BH and 40 seconds of regular breathing for five cycles. VR was defined as the difference in BOLD signal between the minimal signal seen at the end of the deep breath and maximal signal seen at the end of BH (peak-to-trough). VR was measured for every voxel and compared for gray versus white matter and tumor versus normal contralateral brain. VR maps were compared to the areas of enhancement and FLAIR/T2 abnormality. VR was significantly lower in normal white matter than gray matter (P < .05) and in tumors compared to the normal, contralateral brain (P < 0.002). The area of abnormal VR (1103 ± 659 mm²) was significantly greater (P = .019) than the enhancement (543 ± 530 mm²), but significantly smaller (P = .0011) than the FLAIR abnormality (2363 ± 1232 mm²). However, the variability in the areas of gadolinium contrast enhancement versus VR abnormality indicates that the contrast mechanism elicited by BH (caused by abnormal arteriolar smooth muscles) appears to be fundamentally different from the contrast mechanism of gadolinium enhancement (caused by the presence of "leaky" gap junctions). BH maps based on peak-to-trough can be used to characterize VR in brain tumors. VR maps in brain tumor patients appear to be caused by a different mechanism than gadolinium enhancement.

  3. Breath holding duration as a measure of distress tolerance: examining its relation to measures of executive control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eSütterlin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research considers distress (intolerance as an essential component in the development of various forms of psychopathology. A behavioral task frequently used to assess distress tolerance is the breath holding task. Although breath holding time (BHT has been associated with behavioral outcomes related to inhibitory control (e.g., smoking cessation, the relationship among breath holding and direct measures of executive control has not yet been thoroughly examined. The present study aims to investigate the relationship between a series of executive function tasks and breath holding duration. Furthermore, we assessed the BHT-task’s test-retest reliability in a one-year follow-up. 113 students completed an initial BHT assessment, 58 of which also completed a series of executive function tasks (the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, the Parametric Go/No-Go task and the N-back memory updating task. A subsample of these students (N = 34 repeated the breath holding task in a second session one year later. Test-retest reliability of the BHT-task over a one year period was high (r = .67, p

  4. Multi-slice CT for visualization of acute pulmonary embolism: single breath-hold subtraction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildberger, J.E.; Mahnken, A.H.; Spuentrup, E.; Guenther, R.W. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Technology, Aachen (Germany); Klotz, E.; Ditt, H. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography, Forchheim (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: the purpose of our preliminary animal study was to evaluate the feasibility of a new subtraction technique for visualization of perfusion defects within the lung parenchyma in segmental and subsegmental pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and methods: in three healthy pigs, PE were artificially induced by fresh human clot material. Within a single breath-hold, CT angiography (CTA) was performed on a 16-slice multi-slice CT scanner (SOMATOM Sensation 16; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) before and after intravenous application of 80 mL of contrast-medium, followed by a saline chaser. Scan parameters were 120 kV and 100 mAs{sub eff.}, using a collimation of 16 x 1.5 mm and a table speed/rot. of 36 mm (pitch: 1.5; rotation time: 0.5 s). A new 3D subtraction technique was developed, which is based on automated segmentation, non-linear spatial filtering and non-rigid registration. Data were analysed using a color-encoded ''compound view'' of parenchymal enhancement and CTA information displayed in axial, coronal and sagittal orientation. Results: subtraction was technically feasible in all three data sets. The mean scan time for each series was 4.7 s, interscan delay was 14.7 s, respectively. Therefore, an average breath-hold of approximately 24 s was required for the overall scanning procedure. Downstream of occluded segmental and subsegmental arteries, perfusion defects were clearly assessable, showing lower or missing enhancement compared to normally perfused lung parenchyma. In all pigs, additional peripheral areas with triangular shaped perfusion defects were delineated, considered typical for PE. Conclusions: our initial results from the animal model studied slow that perfusion imaging of PE is feasible within a single breath-hold. It allows a comprehensive assessment of perfusion deficits as the direct proof of a pulmonary embolus, can be combined with an indirect visual quantification of the density changes in the adjacent lung tissue

  5. Correlation between the arterial pulse wave of the cerebral microcirculation and CBF during breath holding and hyperventilation in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, S; Viola, P; Litterio, P; Buongarzone, M P; Fiorelli, L

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate if relative changes in the amplitude of the arterial pulse wave of the cerebral microcirculation (APWCM) measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) may provide information about relative changes of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in cerebral cortex. In 10 healthy human volunteers, through simultaneous recording of the APWCM amplitude by means of NIRS and the mean blood flow velocity (MBFV) of middle cerebral artery by means of transcranial Doppler (TCD) at rest and during breath holding and hyperventilation, we evaluate a possible correlation between relative changes of the mean APWCM amplitude and relative changes of MBFV. We found a significant linear correlation: breath holding: R(2) 0.84, p breath holding and hyperventilation. APWCM detected by NIRS, a safe, repeatable, inexpensive technology and at the bedside may improve the study of cerebral cortex microcirculation in neurological diseases. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Breath holding duration as a measure of distress tolerance: examining its relation to measures of executive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sütterlin, Stefan; Schroijen, Mathias; Constantinou, Elena; Smets, Elyn; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Recent research considers distress (in)tolerance as an essential component in the development of various forms of psychopathology. A behavioral task frequently used to assess distress tolerance is the breath holding task. Although breath holding time (BHT) has been associated with behavioral outcomes related to inhibitory control (e.g., smoking cessation), the relationship among breath holding and direct measures of executive control has not yet been thoroughly examined. The present study aims to assess (a) the BHT-task's test-retest reliability in a 1-year follow-up and (b) the relationship between a series of executive function tasks and breath holding duration. One hundred and thirteen students completed an initial BHT assessment, 58 of which also completed a series of executive function tasks [the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the Parametric Go/No-Go task and the N-back memory updating task]. A subsample of these students (N = 34) repeated the breath holding task in a second session 1 year later. Test-retest reliability of the BHT-task over a 1-year period was high (r = 0.67, p breath holding in our sample may suggest that other processes (physiological, motivational) besides distress tolerance influence BHT. Overall, the current findings do not support the assumption of active inhibitory control in the BHT-task in a healthy sample. Our findings suggest that individual differences (e.g., in interoceptive or anxiety sensitivity) should be taken into account when examining the validity of BHT as a measure of distress tolerance.

  7. A simple respiratory indicator for irradiation during voluntary breath holding: a one-touch device without electronic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Kawakami, Hideyuki; Marino, Kan; Komiyama, Takafumi; Kuriyama, Kengo; Araya, Masayuki; Saito, Ryo; Aoki, Shinichi; Araki, Tsutomu

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the use, structural principles, operation, and acquired reproducibility of a respiratory monitoring device to be used for voluntary patient breath holding. Evaluation was performed of a respiratory monitoring device that enables determination of the respiratory level in a patient by measuring the movement of two contacts on the abdomen and chest wall. Neither metallic nor electronic materials are used in the mechanics for this device. The initial study group comprised 21 consecutive patients (15 men, six women; mean age, 75 years; range, 56-92 years) with lung or abdominal tumors who underwent examination with the device and computed tomography (CT) for three-dimensional reproducibility of lung base position during voluntary breath holding with or without use of the device. One patient with mild dementia was excluded; in most of the remaining 20 patients, high reproducibility of the breath-holding position was achieved in a short time with the device. In these 20 patients who were able to adapt to use of the device, three-dimensional mean maximum differences in lung base position during three random voluntary breath holds were 2.0 mm along the cranial-caudal axis, 1.5 mm along the anterior-posterior axis, and 1.2 mm along the right-left axis. The differences in all axes were significantly smaller with use of the respiratory monitoring device than without the device. The device demonstrates satisfactory reproducibility of voluntary patient breath holding easily and inexpensively and may offer a convenient device for easy use during irradiation with voluntary breath-holding conditions that require a small internal margin. Copyright RSNA, 2010

  8. Expiratory flow rate, breath hold and anatomic dead space influence electronic nose ability to detect lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikov, Andras; Hernadi, Marton; Korosi, Beata Zita; Kunos, Laszlo; Zsamboki, Gabriella; Sutto, Zoltan; Tarnoki, Adam Domonkos; Tarnoki, David Laszlo; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Horvath, Ildiko

    2014-12-16

    Electronic noses are composites of nanosensor arrays. Numerous studies showed their potential to detect lung cancer from breath samples by analysing exhaled volatile compound pattern ("breathprint"). Expiratory flow rate, breath hold and inclusion of anatomic dead space may influence the exhaled levels of some volatile compounds; however it has not been fully addressed how these factors affect electronic nose data. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate these effects. 37 healthy subjects (44 ± 14 years) and 27 patients with lung cancer (60 ± 10 years) participated in the study. After deep inhalation through a volatile organic compound filter, subjects exhaled at two different flow rates (50 ml/sec and 75 ml/sec) into Teflon-coated bags. The effect of breath hold was analysed after 10 seconds of deep inhalation. We also studied the effect of anatomic dead space by excluding this fraction and comparing alveolar air to mixed (alveolar + anatomic dead space) air samples. Exhaled air samples were processed with Cyranose 320 electronic nose. Expiratory flow rate, breath hold and the inclusion of anatomic dead space significantly altered "breathprints" in healthy individuals (p 0.05). These factors also influenced the discrimination ability of the electronic nose to detect lung cancer significantly. We have shown that expiratory flow, breath hold and dead space influence exhaled volatile compound pattern assessed with electronic nose. These findings suggest critical methodological recommendations to standardise sample collections for electronic nose measurements.

  9. Laughter is not always funny: breath-holding spells in familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maayan, Channa; Katz, Eliot; Begin, Michal; Yuvchev, Ivelin; Kharasch, Virginia S

    2015-02-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a genetic disease characterized by primary autonomic dysfunction including parasympathetic hypersensitivity. Breath-holding spells (BHS) are believed to be caused by autonomic dysregulation mediated via the vagus nerve and increased in patients with a family history of BHS. Details and understanding of its pathophysiology are lacking. In this retrospective study of patients with FD, the incidence of BHS was higher at 53.3%, compared with previous studies in normal children. Laughter as a precipitating factor for BHS has not been previously reported in FD and occurred in 10% of patients in this study. Lower lung volumes, chronic lung disease, chronic CO2 retention, and inadequate autonomic compensation occur in those with FD leading to a higher incidence and severity of BHS when crying or laughing. Thus, FD may be a good model for understanding manifestations of the autonomic nervous system dysfunction and contribute to our knowledge of BHS mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. [The use of Pantogam syrup in treating small children's breath holding spells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polskaya, A V; Chutko, L S; Jakovenko, E V

    To study the efficacy of pantogam syrup 10% (hopantenic acid) in the treatment of breath-holding spells (BHS). Sixty children, aged from 2 to 4 years, with BHS were studied. The evaluation of clinical manifestations and anxiety level was performed. Results of neurophysiological examination (long-term video-EEG-monitoring) were analyzed. Children were divided into 2 groups: main, in which the patients received pantogam syrup, and control group, in which only psychological methods were used. The results of the clinical and neurophysiological studies performed after the treatment, showed the clinical improvement in 73.3% of patients of the main group compared with similar data from the children in the control group (16.7%). The anxiety level significantly decreased after the neuroprotective therapy. A comparative analysis of electroencephalographic indicators demonstrated a significant (рchildren with BHS.

  11. Iron supplementation reduces the frequency and severity of breath-holding attacks in non-anaemic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Zehetner

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron supplementation reduces the frequency and severity of breath-holding attacks (BHAs, particularly in children with iron deficiency. The issue of iron supplementation is less clear for Westernized children with BHAs who present to an outpatient community clinic and are not iron-deficient. This is the first reported case series of iron-replete children with frequent and disabling breath-holding attacks who have responded to a course of oral iron supplementation. This intervention is safe, improves quality of life for both child and carer, and is significantly cost-effective in terms of health resource utilization.

  12. SU-F-T-644: Reproducibility of Target Position Using Moderate Voluntary Breath- Hold During Liver Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, G; Trakul, N; Chang, E; Shiu, A [University Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of target position using moderate voluntary breath-hold during liver stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Methods: Two patients who underwent liver SABR on a Varian TrueBeam STx linac were used for this study. Fiducial markers were placed in and around the target in the liver as surrogates for the target position and motion. GTVs were contoured by assessing tumor extent on contrast enhanced CT. The PTV was created from the GTV by adding 2 mm margins to account for the residual motion during breath-holds. A portable biofeedback system was used to facilitate the breath-hold to a reproducible position. The Varian RPM system was used for gating the linac. Proceeding each treatment, orthogonal kV pairs were taken, and alignment to nearby bony anatomy was performed. Then the breath-hold CBCT was acquired to align the fiducial markers. On-line fluoroscopy was used to fine-tune the breath-hold gating thresholds to correlate with the positions of the fiducial markers. The inter-fraction reproducibility of the target was evaluated by the offsets of the daily breath-hold CBCTs from the paired kV matches as a direct measure of the target position relative to the bony anatomy. The intra-fraction reproducibility of the target position was assessed by the gated window of the RPM marker block for each fraction. Results: The absolute mean offsets between the CBCT and paired kV matches in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions were 0.06 cm, 0.10 cm, and 0.06 cm for patient 1, and 0.37 cm, 0.62 cm, and 0.09 cm for patient 2. The gated window of the RPM marker block for the breath-hold for each fraction was within 0.63 ± 0.16 cm and 0.59 ± 0.12 cm for patients 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: Moderate voluntary breath-hold showed good inter- and intra-fraction reproducibility of target position during liver SABR.

  13. Controlled inspiration depth reduces variance in breath-holding induced BOLD signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Moriah E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) response amplitude during short periods of breath holding (BH) measured by functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) can be an effective metric for intersubject calibration procedures. However, inconsistency in the depth of inspiration during the BH scan may account for a portion of BOLD variation observed in such scans, and it is likely to reduce the effectiveness of the calibration measurement. While modulation of BOLD signal has been correlated with end-tidal CO2 and other measures of breathing, fluctuations in performance of BH have not been studied in the context of their impact on BOLD signal. Here, we studied the degree to which inspiration depth corresponds to BOLD signal change, and tested the effectiveness of a method designed to control inspiration level through visual cues during the BH task paradigm. We observed reliable differences in BOLD signal amplitude corresponding to the depth of inspiration. It was determined that variance in BOLD signal response to BH could be significantly reduced when subjects were given visual feedback during task inspiration periods. The implications of these findings for routine BH studies of BOLD-derived neurovascular response are discussed. PMID:17905599

  14. Controlled inspiration depth reduces variance in breath-holding-induced BOLD signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Moriah E; Glover, Gary H

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response amplitude during short periods of breath holding (BH) measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be an effective metric for intersubject calibration procedures. However, inconsistency in the depth of inspiration during the BH scan may account for a portion of BOLD variation observed in such scans, and it is likely to reduce the effectiveness of the calibration measurement. While modulation of BOLD signal has been correlated with end-tidal CO2 and other measures of breathing, fluctuations in performance of BH have not been studied in the context of their impact on BOLD signal. Here, we studied the degree to which inspiration depth corresponds to BOLD signal change and tested the effectiveness of a method designed to control inspiration level through visual cues during the BH task paradigm. We observed reliable differences in BOLD signal amplitude corresponding to the depth of inspiration. It was determined that variance in BOLD signal response to BH could be significantly reduced when subjects were given visual feedback during task inspiration periods. The implications of these findings for routine BH studies of BOLD-derived neurovascular response are discussed.

  15. Ultrasound lung comets induced by repeated breath-hold diving, a study in underwater fishermen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussuges, A; Coulange, M; Bessereau, J; Gargne, O; Ayme, K; Gavarry, O; Fontanari, P; Joulia, F

    2011-12-01

    Pulmonary edema has been reported in breath-hold divers during fish-catching diving activity. The present study was designed to detect possible increases in extravascular lung water (EVLW) in underwater fishermen after a competition. Thirty healthy subjects were studied. They participated in two different 5-h fish-catching diving competitions: one organized in the winter (10 subjects) and one organized in the autumn (20 subjects). A questionnaire was used to record underwater activity and note respiratory problems. An increase in EVLW was investigated from the detection of ultrasound lung comets (ULC) by chest ultrasonography. Complementary investigations included echocardiography and pulmonary function testing. An increase in EVLW was detected in three out of 30 underwater fishermen after the competition. No signs of cardiovascular dysfunction were found in the entire population and in divers with an increase in the ULC score. Two divers with raised ULC presented respiratory disorders such as cough or shortness of breath. Impairment in spirometric parameters was recorded in these subjects. An increase in EVLW could be observed after a fish-catching diving competition in three out of 30 underwater fishermen. In two subjects, it was related to respiratory disorders and impairment in pulmonary flow. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Effect of breath holding on cerebrovascular hemodynamics in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, Teelkien R; Panerai, Ronney B; Haeri, Sina; Zeeman, Gerda G; Belfort, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired autonomic function, which is hypothesized to cause cerebral hemodynamic abnormalities. Our aim was to test this hypothesis by estimating the difference in the cerebrovascular response to breath holding (BH; known to cause sympathetic stimulation) between women with preeclampsia and a group of normotensive controls. In a prospective cohort analysis, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (BP, noninvasive arterial volume clamping), and end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) were simultaneously recorded during a 20-s breath hold maneuver. CBFV changes were broken down into standardized subcomponents describing the relative contributions of BP, cerebrovascular resistance index (CVRi), critical closing pressure (CrCP), and resistance area product (RAP). The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for changes in relation to baseline values. A total of 25 preeclamptic (before treatment) and 25 normotensive women in the second half of pregnancy were enrolled, and, 21 patients in each group were included in the analysis. The increase in CBFV and EtCO2 was similar in both groups. However, the AUC for CVRi and RAP during BH was significantly different between the groups (3.05 ± 2.97 vs. -0.82 ± 4.98, P = 0.006 and 2.01 ± 4.49 vs. -2.02 ± 7.20, P = 0.037), indicating an early, transient increase in CVRi and RAP in the control group, which was absent in PE. BP had an equal contribution in both groups. Women with preeclampsia have an altered initial CVRi response to the BH maneuver. We propose that this is due to blunted sympathetic or myogenic cerebrovascular response in women with preeclampsia. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. MR cholangiopancreatography: prospective comparison of a breath-hold 2D projection technique with diagnostic ERCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomas, D.J.; Bearcroft, P.W.P.; Gimson, A.E.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare prospectively a breath-hold projection magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) technique with diagnostic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Seventy-six patients with suspected strictures or choledocholithiasis were referred for MRCP and subsequent ERCP examination, which were performed within 4 h of each other. The MRCP technique was performed using fat-suppressed rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) projection images obtained in standardised planes with additional targeted projections as required by the supervising radiologist. Two radiologists (in consensus) assessed the MRCP results prospectively and independently for the presence of bile duct calculi, strictures, non-specific biliary dilatation and pancreatic duct dilatation, and recorded a single primary diagnosis. The ERCP was assessed prospectively and independently by a single endoscopist and used as a gold standard for comparison with MRCP. Diagnostic agreement was assessed by the Kappa statistic. The MRCP technique failed in two patients and ERCP in five. In the remaining 69 referrals ERCP demonstrated normal findings in 23 cases, strictures in 19 cases, choledocholithiasis in 9 cases, non-specific biliary dilatation in 14 cases and chronic pancreatitis in 4 cases. The MRCP technique correctly demonstrated 22 of 23 normal cases, 19 strictures with one false positive (sensitivity 100 %, specificity 98 %), all 9 cases of choledocholithiasis with two false positives (sensitivity 100 %, specificity 97 %), 12 of 14 cases of non-specific biliary dilatation and only 1 of 4 cases of chronic pancreatitis. There was overall good agreement for diagnosis based on a kappa value of 0.88. Breath-hold projection MRCP can provide non-invasively comparable diagnostic information to diagnostic ERCP for suspected choledocholithiasis and biliary strictures and may allow more selective use of therapeutic ERCP. (orig.)

  18. MR cholangiopancreatography: prospective comparison of a breath-hold 2D projection technique with diagnostic ERCP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomas, D.J.; Bearcroft, P.W.P.; Gimson, A.E. [University Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare prospectively a breath-hold projection magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) technique with diagnostic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Seventy-six patients with suspected strictures or choledocholithiasis were referred for MRCP and subsequent ERCP examination, which were performed within 4 h of each other. The MRCP technique was performed using fat-suppressed rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) projection images obtained in standardised planes with additional targeted projections as required by the supervising radiologist. Two radiologists (in consensus) assessed the MRCP results prospectively and independently for the presence of bile duct calculi, strictures, non-specific biliary dilatation and pancreatic duct dilatation, and recorded a single primary diagnosis. The ERCP was assessed prospectively and independently by a single endoscopist and used as a gold standard for comparison with MRCP. Diagnostic agreement was assessed by the Kappa statistic. The MRCP technique failed in two patients and ERCP in five. In the remaining 69 referrals ERCP demonstrated normal findings in 23 cases, strictures in 19 cases, choledocholithiasis in 9 cases, non-specific biliary dilatation in 14 cases and chronic pancreatitis in 4 cases. The MRCP technique correctly demonstrated 22 of 23 normal cases, 19 strictures with one false positive (sensitivity 100 %, specificity 98 %), all 9 cases of choledocholithiasis with two false positives (sensitivity 100 %, specificity 97 %), 12 of 14 cases of non-specific biliary dilatation and only 1 of 4 cases of chronic pancreatitis. There was overall good agreement for diagnosis based on a kappa value of 0.88. Breath-hold projection MRCP can provide non-invasively comparable diagnostic information to diagnostic ERCP for suspected choledocholithiasis and biliary strictures and may allow more selective use of therapeutic ERCP. (orig.) With 6 figs., 1 tab., 20

  19. Effects of Piracetam on Pediatric Breath Holding Spells: A Randomized Double Blind Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABBASKHANIAN, Ali; EHTESHAMI, Sara; SAJJADI, Sadegh; REZAI, Mohammad Sadegh

    2012-01-01

    Objective Breath holding spells (BHS) are common paroxysmal non-epileptic events in the pediatric population which are very stressfull despite their harmless nature. There has been no specific treatment found for the spells yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of piracetam (2-oxo-l-pyrrolidine) on these children. Materials & Methods In this randomized double blind clinical trial study, 150 children with severe BHS referred to our pediatric outpatient service were enrolled from August 2011 to July 2012. The patients were randomized into two equal groups. One received 40mg/kg/day piracetam and the other group received placebo, twice daily. Patients were followed monthly for three months. The number of attacks/month before and after treatment were documented. Results Of the enrolled patients, 86 were boys. The mean age of the patients was 17 months (range, 6 to 24 months). In the piracetam group, 1 month after treatment an 81% response to treatment was found. In the placebo group, none of the patients had complete remission and 7% of the cases had partial remission. Overall, control of breath-holding spells was observed in 91% of the patients in the group taking piracetam as compared with 16% in the group taking placebo at the end of the study. There was no significant difference detected between the groups regarding the prevalence of drug side effects. Conclusion A significant difference was detected between piracetam and placebo in prevention and controlling BHS. Piracetam (40mg/kg/day) had a good effect on our patients. PMID:24665274

  20. Bronchodilatory response to deep inspiration in bronchial segments: the effects of stress vs. strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansell, Thomas K; McFawn, Peter K; Mitchell, Howard W; Noble, Peter B

    2013-08-15

    During deep inspirations (DI), a distending force is applied to airway smooth muscle (ASM; i.e., stress) and the muscle is lengthened (i.e., strain), which produces a transient reversal of bronchoconstriction (i.e., bronchodilation). The aim of the present study was to determine whether an increase in ASM stress or the accompanying increase in strain mediates the bronchodilatory response to DI. We used whole porcine bronchial segments in vitro and a servo-controlled syringe pump that applied fixed-transmural pressure (Ptm) or fixed-volume oscillations, simulating tidal breathing and DI. The relationship between ASM stress and strain during oscillation was altered by increasing doses of acetylcholine, which stiffened the airway wall, or by changing the rate of inflation during DI, which utilized the viscous properties of the intact airway. Bronchodilation to DI was positively correlated with ASM strain (range of r values from 0.81 to 0.95) and negatively correlated with stress (range of r values from -0.42 to -0.98). Fast fixed-Ptm DI produced greater bronchodilation than slow DI, despite less ASM strain. Fast fixed-volume DI produced greater bronchodilation than slow DI, despite identical ASM strain. We show that ASM strain, rather than stress, is the critical determinant of bronchodilation and, unexpectedly, that the rate of inflation during DI also impacts on bronchodilation, independent of the magnitudes of either stress or strain.

  1. WE-DE-209-02: Active Breathing Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsa, D.

    2016-01-01

    Breast radiation therapy is associated with some risk of lung toxicity as well as cardiac toxicity for left-sided cases. Radiation doses to the lung and heart can be reduced by using the deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique, in which the patient is simulated and treated during the deep inspiration phase of the breathing cycle. During DIBH, the heart is usually displaced posteriorly, inferiorly, and to the right, effectively expanding the distance between the heart and the breast/chest wall. As a result, the distance between the medial treatment field border and heart/lung is increased. Also, in a majority of DIBH patients, the air drawn into the thoracic cavity increases the total lung volume. The DIBH was discussed by an AAPM Task Group 10 years ago in the AAPM TG 76 report. However, DIBH is still not the standard of care in many clinics, which may be partially due to challenges associated with its implementation. Therefore, this seccion will focus primarily on how to clinically implement four different DIBH techniques: (1) Active Breathing Control, (2) Spirometric Motion Management, (3) 3D Surface Image-Guided, and (4) Self-held Breath Control with Respiratory Monitoring and Feedback Guidance. Learning Objectives: Describe the physical displacement of the heart and the change in lung volume during DIBH and discuss dosimetric consequences of those changes. Provide an overview of the technical aspects. Describe work flow for patient simulation and treatment. Give an overview of commissioning and routine. Provide practical tips for clinical implementation.

  2. Enhanced airway dilation by positive-pressure inflation of the lungs compared with active deep inspiration in patients with asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slats, Annelies M.; Janssen, Kirsten; de Jeu, Ronald C.; van der Plas, Dirk T.; Schot, Robert; van den Aardweg, Joost G.; Sterk, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Deep inspiration temporarily reduces induced airways obstruction in healthy subjects. This bronchodilatory effect of deep inspiration is impaired in asthma. Passive machine-assisted lung inflation may augment bronchodilation compared with an active deep inspiration in patients with asthma by either

  3. MO-FG-BRA-09: Towards an Optimal Breath-Holding Procedure for Radiotherapy: Differences in Organ Motion During Inhalation and Exhalation Breath-Holds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lens, E; Gurney-Champion, O; Horst, A van der; Tekelenburg, D; Kesteren, Z van; Tienhoven, G van; Nederveen, A; Bel, A [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands); Parkes, M [University of Birmingham, Birmingham, West Midlands (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Breath-holding (BH) is often used to reduce organ motion during radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in pancreatic and diaphragmatic motion during BH between inhalation and exhalation BHs with variable lung volumes and to investigate whether motion increases/decreases during BH. Methods: Sixteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform four different 60-second BHs, from fully inflated to fully deflated lungs (i.e. lung volumes of: 100%, ∼70%, ∼30% and 0% of inspiratory capacity) three times (total of 192 BHs). During each BH, we obtained single-slice (coronal) magnetic-resonance scans with spatial resolution 0.93×0.93×8.0 mm3 and temporal resolution 0.6 s. We used 2-dimensional image correlation to obtain the motion of pancreatic head and diaphragm during BH. Motion magnitude in inferior-superior direction was obtained by determining the maximum displacement during BH. Results: Pancreatic and diaphragmatic drifts occurred during BH and were mostly in the superior direction. We observed significantly smaller pancreatic and diaphragmatic motion magnitudes in inferior-superior direction during exhalation BHs (BH{sub 30%} and BH{sub 0%}) compared to inhalation BHs (BH{sub 100%} and BH{sub 70%}). The mean motion magnitudes of the pancreatic head were 7.0, 6.5, 4.4 and 4.2 mm during BH{sub 100%}, BH{sub 70%}, BH{sub 30%} and BH{sub 0%}, respectively, and mean BH durations were 59.9, 59.1, 59.0 and 52.7 s. For the diaphragm, mean motion magnitudes were 9.8, 9.0, 5.6 and 4.3 mm, respectively. When considering 30-second BHs, as often used in the clinic, the motion was most pronounced during the first 10 s and excluding these from the analysis (yielding an effective BH period of 20 s) significantly reduced (P≤0.002) organ motion. Conclusion: Organ motion was significantly smaller during exhalation BHs compared to inhalation BHs. Also, motion was largest at the start of BH. Hence, waiting for 10 s may significantly decrease

  4. Improvement in tumour control probability with active breathing control and dose escalation: A modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, Mike; Tree, Alison; Brock, Juliet; McNair, Helen; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Panakis, Niki; Brada, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The prognosis from non-small cell lung cancer remains poor, even in those patients suitable for radical radiotherapy. The ability of radiotherapy to achieve local control is hampered by the sensitivity of normal structures to irradiation at the high tumour doses needed. This study aimed to look at the potential gain in tumour control probability from dose escalation facilitated by moderate deep inspiration breath-hold. Method: The data from 28 patients, recruited into two separate studies were used. These patients underwent planning with and without the use of moderate deep inspiration breath-hold with an active breathing control (ABC) device. Whilst maintaining the mean lung dose (MLD) at the level of the conventional plan, the ABC plan dose was theoretically escalated to a maximum of 84 Gy, constrained by usual normal tissue tolerances. Calculations were performed using data for both lungs and for the ipsilateral lung only. Resulting local progression-free survival at 30 months was calculated using a standard logistic model. Results: The prescription dose could be escalated from 64 Gy to a mean of 73.7 ± 6.5 Gy without margin reduction, which represents a statistically significant increase in tumour control probability from 0.15 ± 0.01 to 0.29 ± 0.11 (p < 0.0001). The results were not statistically different whether both lungs or just the ipsilateral lung was used for calculations. Conclusion: A near-doubling of tumour control probability is possible with modest dose escalation, which can be achieved with no extra increase in lung dose if deep inspiration breath-hold techniques are used.

  5. Assessment of reproducibility and stability of different breath-hold maneuvres by dynamic MRI: comparison between healthy adults and patients with pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plathow, Christian; Ley, Sebastian; Zaporozhan, Julia; Puderbach, Michael; Eichinger, Monika; Zuna, Ivan; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Schoebinger, Max; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Gruenig, Ekkehard

    2006-01-01

    To assess the stability and reproducibility of different breath-hold levels in healthy volunteers and patients using dynamic MRI (dMRI). In ten healthy volunteers and ten patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and normal lung function craniocaudal intrathoracic distances (CCD) were measured during inspiratory and expiratory breath-hold (15 s) (in healthy volunteers additionally at a self-chosen mid-inspiratory breath-hold) using dMRI (trueFISP, three images/s). To evaluate stability and intraobserver reproducibility of the different breath-hold levels, CCDs, time-distance curves, confidence intervals (CIs), Mann-Witney U test and regression equations were calculated. In healthy volunteers there was a substantial decrease of the CCD during the inspiratory breath-hold in contrast to the expiratory breath-hold. The CI at inspiration was 2.84±1.28 in the right and 2.1±0.68 in the left hemithorax. At expiration the CI was 2.54±1.18 and 2.8±1.48. Patients were significantly less able to hold their breath at inspiration than controls (P<0.05). In patients CI was 4.53±4.06 and 3.46±2.21 at inspiration and 4.45±4.23 and 4.76±3.73 at expiration. Intraobserver variability showed no significant differences either in patients or in healthy subjects. Reproducibility was significantly lower at a self-chosen breath-hold level of the healthy volunteers. DMRI is able to differentiate stability and reproducibility of different breath-hold levels. Expiratory breath-hold proved to be more stable than inspiratory breath-hold in healthy volunteers and patients. (orig.)

  6. Assessment of reproducibility and stability of different breath-hold maneuvres by dynamic MRI: comparison between healthy adults and patients with pulmonary hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plathow, Christian [German Cancer Research Center Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Ley, Sebastian; Zaporozhan, Julia; Puderbach, Michael; Eichinger, Monika; Zuna, Ivan; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [German Cancer Research Center Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Schoebinger, Max; Meinzer, Hans-Peter [German Cancer Research Center Heidelberg, Department of Medical and Biological Informatics, Heidelberg (Germany); Gruenig, Ekkehard [University of Heidelberg, Department of Internal Medicine III, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    To assess the stability and reproducibility of different breath-hold levels in healthy volunteers and patients using dynamic MRI (dMRI). In ten healthy volunteers and ten patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and normal lung function craniocaudal intrathoracic distances (CCD) were measured during inspiratory and expiratory breath-hold (15 s) (in healthy volunteers additionally at a self-chosen mid-inspiratory breath-hold) using dMRI (trueFISP, three images/s). To evaluate stability and intraobserver reproducibility of the different breath-hold levels, CCDs, time-distance curves, confidence intervals (CIs), Mann-Witney U test and regression equations were calculated. In healthy volunteers there was a substantial decrease of the CCD during the inspiratory breath-hold in contrast to the expiratory breath-hold. The CI at inspiration was 2.84{+-}1.28 in the right and 2.1{+-}0.68 in the left hemithorax. At expiration the CI was 2.54{+-}1.18 and 2.8{+-}1.48. Patients were significantly less able to hold their breath at inspiration than controls (P<0.05). In patients CI was 4.53{+-}4.06 and 3.46{+-}2.21 at inspiration and 4.45{+-}4.23 and 4.76{+-}3.73 at expiration. Intraobserver variability showed no significant differences either in patients or in healthy subjects. Reproducibility was significantly lower at a self-chosen breath-hold level of the healthy volunteers. DMRI is able to differentiate stability and reproducibility of different breath-hold levels. Expiratory breath-hold proved to be more stable than inspiratory breath-hold in healthy volunteers and patients. (orig.)

  7. A Novel Deep Inspiration Maneuver for Difficult Transseptal Puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Tolga; Guler, Tumer Erdem; Yalin, Kivanc; Golcuk, Sukriye Ebru; Ozcan, Kazim Serhan; Guler, Niyazi

    2017-02-01

    Transseptal puncture (TSP) may not be possible in cases of an elastic, aneurysmal, or thickened interatrial septum (IAS). During deep inspiration (DI), the chest wall expands and the diaphragm descends. This makes intrapleural pressure to become more negative, which leads to movement of the IAS to the right side. The aim of this study was to verify prospectively the feasibility, safety, and outcome of DI associated with conventional TSP technique in patients with challenging IAS anatomy. From September 2012 to May 2016, 224 patients underwent TSP due to different indications. Patients were divided into 2 groups: 213 patients in whom the left atrium was successfully accessed in 3 attempts were grouped as conventional TSP group and 11 patients in whom left atrium access was failed after 3 conventional attempts were grouped as DI-TSP group. Conventional TSP was successful in 89.6% of patients with the first attempt. Second and third attempts were required in 4.1% and 1.4%, respectively. Septal puncture was achieved at the first attempt in 10 patients within a median of 1 second of DI maneuver (interquartile range, 1 to 3) and without any complications. Challenging IAS anatomy consisting of IAS aneurysm, a thick IAS, and an excessively mobile IAS were more frequent in the DI-TSP group (45% to 8%, 27% to 3%, and 21% to 5%, respectively, p <0.001). In conclusion, TSP by using the DI maneuver may be a reliable and safe method after failed conventional attempts. If there is any doubt about the correct location of the needle, additional imaging modalities have to be used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bronchodilator effect of deep inspiration and bronchoconstriction-triggered cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Cough in the patients with cough variant asthma is triggered by bronchoconstriction, which responds to bronchodilator therapy. Following airway narrowing induced by inhaled methacholine, deep inspiration (DI) causes dilation of the airways in both asthmatic and non-asthmatic subjects. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between bronchodilator effect of DI and bronchoconstriction-triggered cough. Methods We measured airway responsiveness to methacholine using partial and full flow-volume curves in 28 healthy adults. The expiratory flow at 40% above residual volume from the full forced vital capacity (MEF40) was obtained and the volume was used as the reference volume to determine the isovolume flow from the partial curve (PEF40). Coughs were counted for 32 min during and following the inhalation of methacholine at the provocative concentration which produced a 20% fall or more in FEV1from the post-saline value (PC20-FEV1). The bronchodilator effect of DI on bronchoconstriction induced by methacholine at the PC20-FEV1 concentration was expressed as the ratio of (MEF40-PEF40)/PEF40 (DI index). Results The number of coughs for 32 min during and following the inhalation of PC20-FEV1 concentration of methacholine was 39.3 ± 29.7 (mean ± SD)/32 min. The number of coughs during and following the inhalation was correlated with DI index (r = 0.57, p = 0.0015), but not with PC20-FEV1 or change in FEV1 or PEF40 by inhalation of the PC20-FEV1 concentration of methacholine. Conclusion We found that methacholine-induced cough was associated with the bronchodilator effect of DI on methacholine induced-bronchoconstriction in normal subjects. PMID:19930579

  9. Evaluation of an experimental breath-holding image acquisition with regard to pulmonary nodule detection on chest FDG PET image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Keisuke; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Nemoto, Kouichi; Fujii, Hirofumi; Iwabuchi, Yuto; Fukushi, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2010-01-01

    Breath-hold imaging has been performing more frequently to reduce the respiratory motion artifact in chest imaging by means of positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG). It is difficult to hold breath for 30 seconds or more. We evaluated an experimental breath-holding image acquisition using phantoms with regard to pulmonary nodule detection on chest FDG PET image to examine whether the total acquisition time could be reduced. Images obtained during 180 seconds of continuous movement were compared with static images recorded during 60-180 seconds (15 seconds x 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 times). Although shorter acquisition times resulted in greater variability in background activity, images recorded under static conditions for 90 seconds (15 seconds x 6 times) or less showed nodules that were smaller than those observable in images recorded during continuous movement for 180 seconds. Breath-holding therefore permits the detection of smaller nodules on chest FDG PET images at shorter acquisition times. (author)

  10. Clinical features of panic patients sensitive to hyperventilation or breath-holding methods for inducing panic attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Nardi

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to compare the clinical features of panic disorder (PD patients sensitive to hyperventilation or breath-holding methods of inducing panic attacks. Eighty-five PD patients were submitted to both a hyperventilation challenge test and a breath-holding test. They were asked to hyperventilate (30 breaths/min for 4 min and a week later to hold their breath for as long as possible, four times with a 2-min interval. Anxiety scales were applied before and after the tests. We selected the patients who responded with a panic attack to just one of the tests, i.e., those who had a panic attack after hyperventilating (HPA, N = 24, 16 females, 8 males, mean age ± SD = 38.5 ± 12.7 years and those who had a panic attack after breath holding (BHPA, N = 20, 11 females, 9 males, mean age ± SD = 42.1 ± 10.6 years. Both groups had similar (chi² = 1.28, d.f. = 1, P = 0.672 respiratory symptoms (fear of dying, chest/pain disconfort, shortness of breath, paresthesias, and feelings of choking during a panic attack. The criteria of Briggs et al. [British Journal of Psychiatry, 1993; 163: 201-209] for respiratory PD subtype were fulfilled by 18 (75.0% HPA patients and by 14 (70.0% BHPA patients. The HPA group had a later onset of the disease compared to BHPA patients (37.9 ± 11.0 vs 21.3 ± 12.9 years old, Mann-Whitney, P < 0.001, and had a higher family prevalence of PD (70.8 vs 25.0%, chi² = 19.65, d.f. = 1, P = 0.041. Our data suggest that these two groups - HPA and BHPA patients - may be specific subtypes of PD.

  11. A New Contrast Enhancement Protocol for Subtraction Coronary Computed Tomography Requiring a Short Breath-Holding Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Takahashi, Daichi; Sugaya, Teppei; Furuya, Jungo; Igarashi, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a new contrast enhancement protocol for subtraction coronary computed tomography (SCCTA) requiring a short breath-holding time. In the protocol, test and main boluses were sequentially and automatically injected, and correct timings for pre-contrast and contrast-enhanced scans for main bolus were automatically determined only by the test bolus tracking. Combined with a fixed short main bolus injection for 7 seconds, the breath-holding time was shortened as possible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether use of this new protocol produced adequate quality images, taking into account calcified lesions and in-stent lumens. Patients (n = 127) with calcium scores of >400 Agatston units or a history of stent placement were enrolled. Breath-holding times were recorded, and image quality was visually evaluated by two observers. The mean ± standard deviation breath-holding time was 13.2 ± 0.6 seconds. The mean ± SD computed tomography (CT) number of coronary arteries for the pre-contrast scan was sufficiently low [99.2 ± 32.2 Hounsfield units (HU)] and, simultaneously, that for SCCTA was 367.0 ± 77.2 HU. The rate of segments evaluated as unreadable was sufficiently low (3.8%). Use of the SCCTA protocol was efficient and allowed for a shorter breath-holding time and adequate diagnostic accuracy of SCCTA images, including images of calcified and stent implantation segments. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of climbing Mount Everest on spleen contraction and increase in hemoglobin concentration during breath holding and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engan, Harald K; Lodin-Sundström, Angelica; Schagatay, Fanny; Schagatay, Erika

    2014-04-01

    Release of stored red blood cells resulting from spleen contraction improves human performance in various hypoxic situations. This study determined spleen volume resulting from two contraction-evoking stimuli: breath holding and exercise before and after altitude acclimatization during a Mount Everest ascent (8848 m). Eight climbers performed the following protocol before and after the climb: 5 min ambient air respiration at 1370 m during rest, 20 min oxygen respiration, 20 min ambient air respiration at 1370 m, three maximal-effort breath holds spaced by 2 min, 10 min ambient air respiration, 5 min of cycling at 100 W, and finally 10 min ambient air respiration. We measured spleen volume by ultrasound and capillary hemoglobin (HB) concentration after each exposure, and heart rate (HR) and arterial oxygen saturation (Sao2) continuously. Mean (SD) baseline spleen volume was unchanged at 213 (101) mL before and 206 (52) mL after the climb. Before the climb, spleen volume was reduced to 184 (83) mL after three breath holds, and after the climb three breath holds resulted in a spleen volume of 132 (26) mL (p=0.032). After exercise, the preclimb spleen volume was 186 (89) mL vs. 112 (389) mL) after the climb (p=0.003). Breath hold duration and cardiovascular responses were unchanged after the climb. We concluded that spleen contraction may be enhanced by altitude acclimatization, probably reflecting both the acclimatization to chronic hypoxic exposure and acute hypoxia during physical work.

  13. Exploratory analysis of nonlinear coupling between EEG global field power and end-tidal carbon dioxide in free breathing and breath-hold tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Maria Sole; Valenza, Gaetano; Greco, Alberto; Giannoni, Alberto; Passino, Claudio; Emdin, Michele; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Vanello, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Brain activations underlying control of breathing are not completely known. Furthermore, the coupling between neural and respiratory dynamics is usually estimated through linear correlation measures, thus totally disregarding possible underlying nonlinear interactions. To overcome these limitations, in this preliminary study we propose a nonlinear coupling analysis of simultaneous recordings of electroencephalographic (EEG) and respiratory signals at rest and after variation of carbon dioxide (CO2) level. Specifically, a CO2 increase was induced by a voluntary breath hold task. EEG global field power (GFP) in different frequency bands and end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) were estimated in both conditions. The maximum information coefficient (MIC) and MIC-ρ2 (where ρ represents the Pearson's correlation coefficient) between the two signals were calculated to identify generic associations (i.e. linear and nonlinear correlations) and nonlinear correlations, respectively. With respect to a free breathing state, our results suggest that a breath hold state is characterized by an increased coupling between respiration activity and specific EEG oscillations, mainly involving linear and nonlinear interactions in the delta band (1-4 Hz), and prevalent nonlinear interactions in the alpha band (8-13 Hz).

  14. Advantages of radial volumetric breath-hold examination (VIBE) with k-space weighted image contrast reconstruction (KWIC) over Cartesian VIBE in liver imaging of volunteers simulating inadequate or no breath-holding ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujinaga, Yasunari; Kitou, Yoshihiro; Ohya, Ayumi; Adachi, Yasuo; Tamaru, Naomichi; Shiobara, Aya; Ueda, Hitoshi; Nickel, Marcel D; Maruyama, Katsuya; Kadoya, Masumi

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the superiority of radial volumetric breath-hold examination (r-VIBE) with k-space weighted image contrast reconstruction (KWIC) over Cartesian VIBE (c-VIBE) for reducing motion artefacts. We acquired r-VIBE-KWIC and c-VIBE images in 10 healthy volunteers. Each acquisition lasted 24 seconds. The volunteers held their breath for decreasing lengths of time during the acquisitions, from 24 to 0 seconds (protocols A-E). Magnetic resonance images at the level of the right portal vein and confluence of hepatic veins were assessed by two readers using a five-point scale with a higher number indicating a better study. The mean scores for the complete r-VIBE-KWIC series (r-VIBEfull) and first r-VIBE-KWIC series (r-VIBE1) were not significantly lower than those for c-VIBE in any protocols. The mean scores for c-VIBE were lower than those for r-VIBEfull and r-VIBE1 in protocols C and D. The mean score for c-VIBE was lower than that for r-VIBEfull in protocol E. The mean score for the eighth r-VIBE-KWIC series (r-VIBE8) was lower than that for c-VIBE only in protocol B. r-VIBE-KWIC minimised artefacts relative to c-VIBE at any slice location. The r-VIBE-KWIC's sub-frame images during the breath-holding period were hardly affected by another failed breath-holding period. • A two-reader study revealed r-VIBE-KWIC's advantages over c-VIBE • The image quality of r-VIBE-KWIC's sub-frame images was maintained during breath holding • Full-frame r-VIBE-KWIC images minimized motion artefacts caused by breathing • A complete breath holding over half the acquisition time is recommended for c-VIBE • c-VIBE was susceptible to respiratory motion especially in the subphrenic region.

  15. Breath-holding spells occur disproportionately more often in children with transient erythroblastopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström Schmidt, Sanna; Tedgård, Ulf; Pronk, Cornelis J H

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the concomitant occurrence and possible association of breath-holding spells (BHS) and transient erythroblastopenia of childhood (TEC). This population-based cohort study, carried out in Southern Sweden from 2004 to 2014, included patients with BHS and/or anaemia, including TEC. The subjects were evaluated for the presence of all three conditions and the diagnostic workups, disease characteristics and outcome were analysed. We studied 443 470 children under the age of 10 years during 2004-2014. The total cohort included 321 patients (0.07%) with BHS and 366 patients with a selection of anaemia diagnoses, including 41 with TEC. We found that nine (2.5%) of the 366 patients with anaemia diagnoses also had BHS and that five (12.2%) of the 41 patients with TEC also had BHS. Treatment for anaemia resolved BHS in a number of patients. Our population-based analysis revealed an overrepresentation of BHS among children with TEC, and we identified five patients with concomitant TEC and BHS. We found that correcting anaemia was an effective means of ameliorating potentially debilitating BHS and that the presence of concomitant BHS and TEC was more common than previously assumed. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The value of neurologic and cardiologic assessment in breath holding spells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Unsal; Doksoz, Onder; Celik, Tanju; Akinci, Gulcin; Mese, Timur; Sevim Yilmaz, Tuba

    2014-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate the value of neurologic and cardiologic assessment and also the frequency of iron deficiency anemia in children with Breath Holding Spells (BHS). Methods : The hospital charts of patients diagnosed with BHS between 2011 and 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Results : A total of 165 children (90 boys, 75 girls) with BHS comprised the study group. A matched group of 200 children with febrile convulsions served as controls. Among the first-degree relatives, 13.3% had BHS, 1.8% had febrile convulsions and 12.1% had epilepsy. The spells were cyanotic in 140 (84.8%) children and pallid or mixed in the remainder. BNS type was simple in 46.7% of patients and complicated in the remainder. Eighteen patients had abnormalities in electroencephalography, however only one patient was diagnosed with epilepsy. Sixty nine (47.9%) patients were found to have iron deficiency anemia. Conclusion : Referral of children with clinically definite BHS to pediatric neurology or pediatric cardiology clinics and performance of echocardiography and EEG investigations for exclusion of heart disease or epilepsy appear unnecessary. However, performance of an electrocardiogram to search for prolonged QT syndrome should be considered although no patient in our series had any cardiologic abnormalities. PMID:24639832

  17. Breath holding endurance: stability over time and relationship with self-assessed persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy G.Y. Thompson-Lake

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Breath holding (BH endurance has been suggested as a measure of the distress tolerance that could predict the outcome of attempts to implement behavior changes, such as stopping smoking or illicit substance use. It is not known however, to what degree BH endurance is a variable trait that may vary depending on situational context, or a stable state characteristic. We measured BH in two groups of participants at baseline and 22 and 89 days (N = 62 and N = 41 post-baseline and in a third group at multiple times points across a 5-week period (N = 44. Participants also filled out a questionnaire created to assess their perceived persistence compared to peers. Correlations were found between baseline and final BH measures (r’s > 0.67, p’s < 0.0001 at all time points. When groups were combined, regardless of time point, Spearman’s rank correlation showed a strong positive correlation (rs = 0.66, p < 0.0001. Self-assessed persistence was not related to BH endurance. This study provides evidence of the stability of BH across time when tested under the same conditions in young adults. Further research is needed to clarify whether BH is linked to behavioral outcomes.

  18. Dual breath-hold magnetic resonance cine evaluation of global and regional cardiac function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Dietrich, Olaf; Huber, Armin; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Sincleair, Spencer; Runge, Val M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the accuracy of a multislice cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with parallel imaging in regard to global and regional left ventricular function. Forty-two individuals underwent cine MRI on a 1.5-tesla scanner. Cine MRI used a steady-state free precession technique and was performed as a single-slice technique (nonTSENSE cine) and an accelerated multislice technique (TSENSE cine) with five slices per breath-hold. End diastolic volume (EDV), end systolic volume (ESV), and ejection fraction (EF) were evaluated for all data sets and in regard to regional wall motion and regional wall motion analysis, and quantitative regional wall thickness and systolic thickening were also assessed. EDV, ESV, and EF based on TSENSE cine showed excellent correlation to the nonTSENSE cine approach (all r 2 =0.99, P<0.001). While EDV evaluations showed a small underestimation for TSENSE cine, ESV and EF showed accurate results compared with nonTSENSE cine. Both readers showed good agreement (κ=0.72) in regional wall motion assessment comparing both techniques. Data acquisition for the multislice approach was significantly shorter (∝75%) that in single-slice cine. We conclude that accurate evaluation of regional wall motion and left ventricular EF is possible using accelerated multislice cine MR with high spatial and temporal resolution. (orig.)

  19. The value of neurologic and cardiologic assessment in breath holding spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Unsal; Doksoz, Onder; Celik, Tanju; Akinci, Gulcin; Mese, Timur; Sevim Yilmaz, Tuba

    2014-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate the value of neurologic and cardiologic assessment and also the frequency of iron deficiency anemia in children with Breath Holding Spells (BHS). Methods : The hospital charts of patients diagnosed with BHS between 2011 and 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Results : A total of 165 children (90 boys, 75 girls) with BHS comprised the study group. A matched group of 200 children with febrile convulsions served as controls. Among the first-degree relatives, 13.3% had BHS, 1.8% had febrile convulsions and 12.1% had epilepsy. The spells were cyanotic in 140 (84.8%) children and pallid or mixed in the remainder. BNS type was simple in 46.7% of patients and complicated in the remainder. Eighteen patients had abnormalities in electroencephalography, however only one patient was diagnosed with epilepsy. Sixty nine (47.9%) patients were found to have iron deficiency anemia. Conclusion : Referral of children with clinically definite BHS to pediatric neurology or pediatric cardiology clinics and performance of echocardiography and EEG investigations for exclusion of heart disease or epilepsy appear unnecessary. However, performance of an electrocardiogram to search for prolonged QT syndrome should be considered although no patient in our series had any cardiologic abnormalities.

  20. Attenuation correction by X-ray CT using deep breath-hold SPECT (BrST) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masuo; Kumai, Yoshimasa; Deguchi, Chihiro

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the development of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) networks and software has made possible SPECT attenuation correction using X-ray CT, mainly of the head. However, for thoracic and abdominal imaging, X-ray CT data is acquired with patients performing deep breath-hold, whereas for SPECT image acquisition patients breathe normally. Accurate attenuation correction has been difficult to attain because motion of organs in the diaphragm region due to respiration causes positional discrepancy between the attenuation map obtained by X-ray CT and the SPECT images. We developed a deep breath-hold SPECT (BrST) method and examined the utility of the method in attenuation correction by X-ray CT in the thoracic and abdominal regions of the body. We built a device to simulate respiratory movement and used it in combination with a heart and liver phantom to evaluate the impact of breathing motion on the attenuation correction of myocardial SPECT imaging. The free breathing (FB) method and BrST method were compared in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and liver scintigraphy in a clinical setting. The SPECT count distribution was observed to be homogeneous in the phantom myocardium without breathing motion, while distribution became heterogeneous with breathing motion. In clinical myocardial SPECT imaging, the FB method produced artifacts similar to those of the phantom breathing motion. In clinical myocardial SPECT imaging using the standard NR method similar artifacts were observed as in the simulated NR phantom. However, using the BrST method both the image homogeneity of healthy myocardium and the image contrast in the infarcted region improved. In clinical liver SPECT, underconection occurred in the upper lobe by the FB method. However, accurate attenuation correction was possible by the BrST method, and contrast was also improved. The BrST method, in which SPECT data are acquired with patients performing deep breath-hold as in X-ray CT

  1. Effect of deep inspiration avoidance on ventilation heterogeneity and airway responsiveness in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David G; Berend, Norbert; King, Gregory G; Salome, Cheryl M

    2011-05-01

    The mechanisms by which deep inspiration (DI) avoidance increases airway responsiveness in healthy subjects are not known. DI avoidance does not alter respiratory mechanics directly; however, computational modeling has predicted that DI avoidance would increase baseline ventilation heterogeneity. The aim was to determine if DI avoidance increased baseline ventilation heterogeneity and whether this correlated with the increase in airway responsiveness. Twelve healthy subjects had ventilation heterogeneity measured by multiple-breath nitrogen washout (MBNW) before and after 20 min of DI avoidance. This was followed by another 20-min period of DI avoidance before the inhalation of a single methacholine dose. The protocol was repeated on a separate day with the addition of five DIs at the end of each of the two periods of DI avoidance. Baseline ventilation heterogeneity in convection-dependent and diffusion-convection-dependent airways was calculated from MBNW. The response to methacholine was measured by the percent fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FVC) (airway narrowing) and percent fall in FVC (airway closure). DI avoidance increased baseline diffusion-convection-dependent airways (P = 0.02) but did not affect convection-dependent airways (P = 0.9). DI avoidance increased both airway closure (P = 0.002) and airway narrowing (P = 0.02) during bronchial challenge. The increase in diffusion-convection-dependent airways due to DI avoidance did not correlate with the increase in either airway narrowing (r(s) = 0.14) or airway closure (r(s) = 0.12). These findings suggest that DI avoidance increases diffusion-convection-dependent ventilation heterogeneity that is not associated with the increase in airway responsiveness. We speculate that DI avoidance reduces surfactant release, which increases peripheral ventilation heterogeneity and also predisposes to peripheral airway closure.

  2. Evaluation of Breath-Holding Test in Assessment of Peripheral Chemoreflex Sensitivity in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembach, Nikita; Zabolotskikh, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The sensitivity of peripheral chemoreflex is a marker of the severity of heart failure and the prognosis of the outcome in these patients. The assessment of chemosensitivity in these patients remains an actual problem. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between a Breath-Holding Test (BHT) and single-breath carbon dioxide test and to evaluate the reliability of both tests in patients with Heart Failure (HF). The study was performed in 43 patients with chronic heart failure. All subjects underwent BHT and single-breath carbon dioxide (CB-CO 2 ), the evaluation of both tests was repeated a month later. Relationship of two test was evaluated by correlation analysis. Reliability was assessed with calculation of Standard Error of Measurement (SEM), Coefficient of Variation (CV) and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC). The duration of the breath-holding was inversely correlated to the result of CB-CO 2 test (r = -0.86 at first measurement and r = -0.79 after a month) The ICC was 0.87 (95%CI: 0.78-0.93) for SB-CO 2 test and 0,93 (95%CI: 0.88-0.96) for BHT, the CV was 24% for SB-CO 2 and 13% for BHT. SEM for SB-CO 2 test was 0.04 L / min / mmHg and limits of variation was 0.11 L / min / mmHg; SEM for BHT was 3.6 sec and limits of variation was10 sec. Breath-holding test is a reliable and safe method for assessing the sensitivity of peripheral chemoreflex to carbon dioxide in patients with heart failure.

  3. Treatment of cyanotic breath-holding spells with oral theophylline in a 10-year-old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Meenal; Goraya, Jatinder S

    2015-06-01

    Cyanotic breath-holding spells are generally benign and resolve spontaneously by 4 to 5 years of age. Treatment with iron and other drugs has been employed in selected cases with very frequent and severe episodes. We describe a 10-year-old boy with recent-onset cyanotic breath-holding spells that were activity limiting. He was unable to participate in physical activities with his peers as any argument or emotional upset provoked these spells. Treatment with oral iron and piracetam was ineffective. However, treatment with oral theophylline produced dramatic amelioration of symptoms, and he was once again able to participate in play activities with his peers. We believe that general central nervous system stimulant and respirogenic effects of theophylline were instrumental in control of symptoms in our child. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Frequency of coeliac disease in children with breath-holding spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işikay, Sedat; Hızlı, Şamil

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), which is reported very commonly among patients with breath holding spells (BHS), is the most common presentation of coeliac disease (CD). In that aspect, IDA may be a common pathway linking these two diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of CD in patients with BHS. We studied 348 children with BHS, and 470 age- and sex-matched controls with no known disease. Serological screening for CD was performed in all patients by searching for serum tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A. The first group consisted of 348 children with BHS (231 males, 117 females; mean age 2.23 ± 1.84 years), and the second group consisted of 470 healthy children (284 males, 186 females; mean age 2.11 ± 1.98 years). A total of 300 (86.2%) patients had cyanotic type of BHS only, 27 (7.8%) had pallid type of BHS only and 21 (6%) had mixed type of BHS. The prevalence of IDA was statistically significantly higher in BHS patients compared with controls. Tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A was not detected as positive in any patients in either group; therefore, endoscopic and histopathological examinations were not performed. Our report is the first to describe the frequency of tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A positivity in patients with BHS. There was no evidence of a relationship between CD and BHS, but IDA seems to be an important risk factor in the development of BHS. Therefore, serological screening for CD in patients with BHS does not seem to be necessary. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  5. Pacemaker in complicated and refractory breath-holding spells: when to think about it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Stefano; Nosadini, Margherita; Leoni, Loira; de Palma, Luca; Toldo, Irene; Milanesi, Ornella; Cerutti, Alessia; Suppiej, Agnese

    2015-01-01

    Breath-holding spells (BHS) are benign non-epileptic paroxysmal events of infancy, rarely occurring with high frequency and complicated by prolonged syncope, convulsions and even status epilepticus. In these cases response to medical treatment is often unsatisfactory. Pacemaker implantation is a possible therapeutic option, but its indications, efficacy and complications have not been clarified yet. To report a new case of BHS treated with pacemaker and to review its indications and efficacy in patients with severe BHS. We extensively searched the literature in PubMed on cardiac pacing in patients with BHS and we described a new case. A previously healthy boy presented at the age of 4 months with frequent BHS inconstantly associated to prolonged syncope and post-anoxic non-epileptic and epileptic seizures. Parental reassurance, iron supplementation and piracetam were ineffective. After cardiac pacing at the age of 16 months, BHS and their complications disappeared. We identified 47 patients with BHS treated with pacemaker in the literature. Based on the available data, in all patients asystole or marked bradycardia were documented during BHS or stimulating maneuvers; syncope complicated BHS in 100% of cases and post-anoxic convulsions in 78.3%. Medical treatment before pacing, when administered, was ineffective or poorly tolerated. After pacing, BHS complications disappeared in 86.4% of cases, and decreased in 13.6%. Technical problems with the device were reported in 25.7% of patients and mild medical complications in 11.4%. Pacemaker could be reasonably considered in subjects with frequent and severe BHS, poor response to medications, and demonstration of cardioinhibition during spells. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. SU-E-T-177: Clinical Experience with Spirometer Guided Breath Hold Lung SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H; Manning, M; Sintay, B; Maurer, J; Hayes, L; Wiant, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor motion in lung SBRT is typically managed by creating an internal target volume (ITV) based on 4D-CT information. Another option, which may reduce lung dose and imaging artifact, is to use a breath hold (BH) during simulation and delivery. Here we evaluate the reproducibility of tumor position at repeated BH using a newly released spirometry system. Methods: Three patients underwent multiple BH CT’s at simulation. All patients underwent a BH cone beam CT (CBCT) prior to each treatment. All image sets were registered to a patient’s first simulation CT based on local bony anatomy. The gross tumor volume (GTV), and the diaphragm or the apex of the lung were contoured on the first image set and expanded in 1 mm increments until the GTVs and diaphragms on all image sets were included inside an expanded structure. The GTV and diaphragm margins necessary to encompass the structures were recorded. Results: The first patient underwent 2 BH CT’s and fluoroscopy at simulation, the remaining patients underwent 3 BH CT’s at simulation. In all cases the GTV’s remained within 1 mm expansions and the diaphragms remained within 2 mm expansions on repeat scans. Each patient underwent 3 daily BH CBCT’s. In all cases the GTV’s remained within a 2 mm expansions, and the diaphragms (or lung apex in one case) remained within 2 mm expansions at daily BH imaging. Conclusions: These case studies demonstrate spirometry as an effective tool for limiting tumor motion (and imaging artifact) and facilitating reproducible tumor positioning over multiple set-ups and BH’s. This work was partially supported by Qfix

  7. SU-E-T-177: Clinical Experience with Spirometer Guided Breath Hold Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H; Manning, M; Sintay, B; Maurer, J; Hayes, L; Wiant, D [Cone Health Cancer Center, Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor motion in lung SBRT is typically managed by creating an internal target volume (ITV) based on 4D-CT information. Another option, which may reduce lung dose and imaging artifact, is to use a breath hold (BH) during simulation and delivery. Here we evaluate the reproducibility of tumor position at repeated BH using a newly released spirometry system. Methods: Three patients underwent multiple BH CT’s at simulation. All patients underwent a BH cone beam CT (CBCT) prior to each treatment. All image sets were registered to a patient’s first simulation CT based on local bony anatomy. The gross tumor volume (GTV), and the diaphragm or the apex of the lung were contoured on the first image set and expanded in 1 mm increments until the GTVs and diaphragms on all image sets were included inside an expanded structure. The GTV and diaphragm margins necessary to encompass the structures were recorded. Results: The first patient underwent 2 BH CT’s and fluoroscopy at simulation, the remaining patients underwent 3 BH CT’s at simulation. In all cases the GTV’s remained within 1 mm expansions and the diaphragms remained within 2 mm expansions on repeat scans. Each patient underwent 3 daily BH CBCT’s. In all cases the GTV’s remained within a 2 mm expansions, and the diaphragms (or lung apex in one case) remained within 2 mm expansions at daily BH imaging. Conclusions: These case studies demonstrate spirometry as an effective tool for limiting tumor motion (and imaging artifact) and facilitating reproducible tumor positioning over multiple set-ups and BH’s. This work was partially supported by Qfix.

  8. Prospective study of children with cyanotic and pallid breath-holding spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMario, F J

    2001-02-01

    In this investigation, we sought to prospectively document the natural history of severe breath-holding spells (BHS) among children with both cyanotic and pallid BHS who were referred for neurologic consultation. Prospective cohort study. A structured interview was undertaken at the time of initial consultation and at subsequent 1-year intervals regarding type of BHS, frequency of spells, associated phenomenon, sequelae, family history, and age at termination of spells. A total of 95 children (48 boys, 47 girls) with BHS were identified and followed over a 9-year interval. There were no significant differences between genders. Median onset age was between 6 and 12 months old with 15% presenting younger than 6 months. A median frequency of spells was weekly with 30% experiencing 1 or more spells per day. The median age at peak frequency was between 12 and 18 months old with a range extending from 6 months to 4 years of age. Of the patients whose BHS had remitted for >12 months' time (n = 67), the last spell occurred at a median age of 37 to 42 months. Of those children whose BHS were still occurring, the oldest age at time of latest spell was at 7 years old. Hypoxic convulsions were associated with BHS in

  9. Clinico-laboratory profile of breath-holding spells in children in Sohag University Hospital, Upper Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Abdelrahim Abdrabou; Mohamed, Montaser Mohamed; Sharaf, El-Zahraa El-Said Ahmed; Magdy, Rofaida Mohamed; Allam, Ahmed Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    Breath-holding spells (BHSs) are involuntary pauses of breathing, sometimes accompanied by loss of consciousness. They usually occur in response to an upsetting or surprising situation. Breath-holding spells are usually caused by either a change in the usual breathing pattern or a slowing of the heart rate. In some children, BHSs may be related to iron deficiency anemia. The aim of the work was to study the clinical and laboratory profile of BPHs in children presented to the Neuropediatric Clinic at Sohag University Hospital. An observational prospective study was done at Sohag University Hospital over a period of one year on children diagnosed as having BHSs by clinical history and laboratory evaluation, including complete blood count (CBC), serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron binding capacity, and Electroencephalography (EEG). During the period of study (one year), we reviewed data of 32 children who had been diagnosed as having BHSs. We found that cyanotic spells (71.88%) predominated over pallid spells. There were positive family histories (31.25%) and consanguinity (53.135) in the studied patients. We found a high incidence of iron deficiency anemia (62.5%) in association with BHS. Abnormal EEGs were found in (65.63%) of studied children. BHS is a common, important problem associated with iron deficiency anemia, which is, in turn, a common nutritional problem in our country.

  10. Clinico-laboratory profile of breath-holding spells in children in Sohag University Hospital, Upper Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Abdelrahim Abdrabou; Mohamed, Montaser Mohamed; Sharaf, El-Zahraa El-Said Ahmed; Magdy, Rofaida Mohamed; Allam, Ahmed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breath-holding spells (BHSs) are involuntary pauses of breathing, sometimes accompanied by loss of consciousness. They usually occur in response to an upsetting or surprising situation. Breath-holding spells are usually caused by either a change in the usual breathing pattern or a slowing of the heart rate. In some children, BHSs may be related to iron deficiency anemia. The aim of the work was to study the clinical and laboratory profile of BPHs in children presented to the Neuropediatric Clinic at Sohag University Hospital. Methods An observational prospective study was done at Sohag University Hospital over a period of one year on children diagnosed as having BHSs by clinical history and laboratory evaluation, including complete blood count (CBC), serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron binding capacity, and Electroencephalography (EEG). Results During the period of study (one year), we reviewed data of 32 children who had been diagnosed as having BHSs. We found that cyanotic spells (71.88%) predominated over pallid spells. There were positive family histories (31.25%) and consanguinity (53.135) in the studied patients. We found a high incidence of iron deficiency anemia (62.5%) in association with BHS. Abnormal EEGs were found in (65.63%) of studied children. Conclusion BHS is a common, important problem associated with iron deficiency anemia, which is, in turn, a common nutritional problem in our country. PMID:27279996

  11. Hemodynamic effect of external counterpulsation is a different measure of impaired cerebral autoregulation from vasoreactivity to breath-holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W; Xiong, L; Han, J; Leung, T; Leung, H; Chen, X; Wong, K S L

    2014-02-01

    External counterpulsation (ECP) is a novel method to increase cerebral blood flow, which may benefit acute ischaemic stroke patients. Our aim was to identify whether the hemodynamic effect of ECP is associated with cerebral vasoreactivity to breath-holding. Thirty-seven recent ischaemic stroke patients with large artery steno-occlusive disease were recruited together with 20 healthy controls. All underwent ECP treatment and a breath-holding test combined with transcranial Doppler monitoring on bilateral middle cerebral arteries was performed. The data of the stroke patients were designated as ipsilateral or contralateral based on the side of the infarct, whilst the average of both sides was used in controls. The cerebral augmentation index (CAI) was used to evaluate the augmentation effects of ECP. Cerebral vasoreactivity was assessed by using the breath-holding index (BHI). Middle cerebral artery mean flow velocities significantly increased in the stroke group after ECP but not in controls. BHIs were much smaller in the stroke group than in the controls. The CAI did not correlate with the BHI in either the ipsilateral or contralateral side of the stroke group or in controls. For stroke patients, BHI was significantly lower on the ipsilateral side than the contralateral side, but the CAI showed no difference between the two cerebral hemisphere sides. The CAI of stroke patients was significantly related to mean blood pressure change on the ipsilateral side. The dynamic augmentation effects of ECP as measured by the CAI were different from the well established vasoreactivity to breath-holding. The CAI is suggested as a measure of how well the brain accommodates blood flow augmentation during ECP. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  12. Optical measures of changes in cerebral vascular tone during voluntary breath holding and a Sternberg memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chin Hong; Low, Kathy A; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Fletcher, Mark A; Maclin, Edward L; Chiarelli, Antonio M; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2016-07-01

    The human cerebral vasculature responds to changes in blood pressure and demands for oxygenation via cerebral autoregulation. Changes in cerebrovascular tone (vasoconstriction and vasodilation) also mediate the changes in blood flow measured by the BOLD fMRI signal. This cerebrovascular reactivity is known to vary with age. In two experiments, we demonstrate that cerebral pulse parameters measured using optical imaging can quantify changes in cerebral vascular tone, both globally and locally. In experiment 1, 51 older adults (age range=55-87) performed a voluntary breath-holding task while cerebral pulse amplitude measures were taken. We found significant pulse amplitude variations across breath-holding periods, indicating vasodilation during, and vasoconstriction after breath holding. The breath-holding index (BHI), a measure of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) was derived and found to correlate with age. BHI was also correlated with performance in the Modified Mini-Mental Status Examination, even after controlling for age and education. In experiment 2, the same participants performed a Sternberg task, and changes in regional pulse amplitude between high (set-size 6) and low (set-size 2) task loads were compared. Only task-related areas in the fronto-parietal network (FPN) showed significant reduction in pulse amplitude, indicating vasodilation. Non-task-related areas such as the somatosensory and auditory cortices did not show such reductions. Taken together, these experiments suggest that optical pulse parameters can index changes in brain vascular tone both globally and locally, using both physiological and cognitive load manipulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fast 3-Breath-Hold 3-Dimensional Tagging Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in Patients with Hypertrophic Myocardial Diseases: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Amano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tagging CMR has been established as the standard reference for measurement of myocardial strain. The current 2D tagging technique requires multiple breath-holds to cover the whole heart and cannot show the 3D motions of the left ventricle. We performed fast 3-breath-hold 3D tagging with localized tagging preparation and complementary spatial modulation of magnetization in 10 patients with hypertrophic myocardial diseases and 6 normal volunteers. The left wall motion was observed at any view angle, which allowed for the identification of regional and global hypokinesis using the fast 3D tagging. Although a decrease in the circumferential strain and LGE were observed at the basal septum in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, they were not located together in each patient. In hypertensive heart disease, the decrease in circumferential strain was observed more widely than LGE, and the summed strain of all segments was significantly decreased. The decrease in strain and LGE were observed diffusely in cardiac amyloidosis. In conclusion, fast 3-breath-hold 3D tagging is feasible for the regional and global strain analysis. The location of reduced circumferential strain is not necessarily the same as that of LGE and is related to the global cardiac function in patients with hypertrophic myocardial diseases.

  14. Rapid MR imaging of the liver. Comparison of twelve techniques for single breath-hold whole volume acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Jenner, Goeran; Cooper, T.G.; Potchen, E.J.; Ishigaki, Takeo

    1994-01-01

    Twelve magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences for single breath-hold whole volume acquisition of the liver were evaluated on volunteers. Liver and spleen contrast to noise ratio (C/N), overall image quality, and grade of artifacts were compared. The 12 sequences included T 2 -weighted fast spin echo (FSE) with or without fat suppression (FS), fast multiplanar spoiled gradient recalled imaging (FMPSPGR), fast gradient recalled imaging without preparation pulses (FGR), FGR with inversion recovery preparation pulse nulling the liver or fat (IR-FGR-L and IR-FGR-F), FGR with driven equilibrium preparation pulse (DE-FGR), single shot moderately or heavily T 2 -weighted spin echo echo planar imaging (SE-EPI-mT2 and SE-EPI-hT2), multi-shot moderately T 2 -weighted spin echo echo planar imaging (multi-shot SE-EPI-mT2), inversion recovery EPI, and gradient echo EPI. In the quantitative analysis, FSE + FS showed a significantly higher C/N ratio than the others (p<0.05). In the qualitative evaluation, DE-prepFGR, and single and multi-shot SE-EPI-mT2 had good results, as did FSE and FSE + FS. Further studies should be conducted to determine whether or not these breath-hold sequences can obviate current conventional non-breath-hold sequences. (author)

  15. Screening helical CT for mass screening of lung cancer. Application of low-dose and single-breath-hold scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shigeki; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Isomura, Takayuki; Endo, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kouji; Itoh, Kengo; Naganawa, Shinji; Maruyama, Kunihiro; Ishigaki, Takeo

    1998-01-01

    The usefulness of helical CT with low-dose and single-breath-hold scanning was investigated for lung cancer screening. Twenty-four helical CT scans of the lung were performed using various parameters in 10 healthy volunteers. The effects of tube current and pitch were evaluated by assessment of image quality and detection of simulated nodules. Screening helical CT was performed at 120 kVp, 50 mA, 1 sec/rotation, 10 mm collimation, and a pitch of 2.0 in 110 patients. The ability of this method to detect nodules and masses, focal parenchymal opacities, and diffuse fibrotic changes was evaluated using conventional CT as the gold standard. A reduction in tube current to 50 mA did not significantly change the assessment of image quality or detection of simulated nodules. Although these factors were degraded by increasing the pitch, there was no significant difference between 1.5 and 2.0. Screening helical CT permitted the entire lung to be scanned with ease during a single-breath-hold in all patients. This method detected 177 of 196 nodules and masses (87 for 91 lesions greater than 5 mm in diameter), 54 of 57 focal parenchymal opacitied, and 15 of 15 cases with fibrotic changes. Screening helical CT with low-dose and single-breath-hold scanning shows promise for lung cancer screening. (author)

  16. MR cholangiopancreatography : comparison of breath-hold fast spin echo and respiratory triggered fast spin echo techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Hong, Hye Suk; Chung, Jae Joon; Chung, Jae Bock; Yang, Hee Chul; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jaong Tae

    1997-01-01

    To determine relative image qualities and to evaluate their ability to visualize biliary trees and pancreatic ducts, we compared the breath-hold fast echo (FSE) and respiratory-triggered FSE technique in magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Forty-seven patients with suspected of hepatic disease but no pancreatic or biliary ductal dilatation, as determined by other imaging techniques (group of non-pathologic pancreatobiliary tree), and seven with pancreatic or biliary disease (group of pathologic pancreatobiliary tree) underwent MRCP. Heavily T2-weighted FSE coronal images were obtained by both breath-hold and respiratory triggered techniques. These two images were 3 D-reconstructed using a maximal intensity projection algorithm. Three radiologists scored the image qualities of anatomic by the two techniques. For the visualization of extrahepatic bile ducts, the respiratory triggered FSE sequence was better than the breath-hold sequence; for the evaluation of both a non-dilated and dilated pancreatobiliary system, however, both techniques need further development. (author). 16 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  17. Accuracy of Dose Delivery in Multiple Breath-Hold Segmented Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: A Static Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimiya Noto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Accuracy of dose delivery in multiple breath-hold segmented volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT was evaluated in comparison to noninterrupted VMAT using a static phantom. Material and Methods. Five VMAT plans were evaluated. A Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden was employed. A VMAT delivery sequence was divided into multiple segments according to each of the predefined breath-hold periods (10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds. The segmented VMAT delivery was compared to noninterrupted VMAT delivery in terms of the isocenter dose and pass rates of a dose difference of 1% with a dose threshold of 10% of the maximum dose on a central coronal plane using a two-dimensional dosimeter, MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany. Results. Means of the isocenter dose differences were 0.5%, 0.2%, 0.2%, 0.0%, and 0.0% for the beam-on-times between interrupts of 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds, respectively. Means of the pass rates were 85%, 99.9%, 100%, 100%, and 100% in the same order as the above. Conclusion. Our static phantom study indicated that the multiple breath-hold segmented VMAT maintains stable and accurate dose delivery when the beam-on-time between interrupts is 15 seconds or greater.

  18. Contrast-enhanced 3D MR angiography of the chest and abdomen with breath-holding using phase reordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanuma, Makoto; Sugimoto, Eiichi; Enomoto, Kyoko; Watabe, Tsuneya; Heshiki, Atsuko; Hirata, Hisashi; Kimura, Toshihiko; Takizawa, Osamu.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the feasibility of phase-reordered contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography in 32 consecutive patients with vascular abnormalities in the chest and abdomen. To suppress motion artifacts due to respiratory corruption, a phase-reordering technique was introduced so that the low frequency components of the phase data were obtained first during the imaging period. Image quality and degree of motion suppression were assessed by four radiologists independently without information on breath-holding time. Abnormalities were detected in 30 cases (93.8%), and their extent was correctly assessed in 28 cases (87.5%). More confident assessment was possible in abnormalities of the pulmonary vessels and thoracic aorta than in those of the abdominal aorta and portal venous system. With phase reordering, more than 20 seconds of breath-holding ensured image quality sufficient to correctly assess the vascular abnormalities. While this technique is easy and requires only single breath-holding, it can provide excellent MRA without slice-to-slice spatial misregistration. (author)

  19. Accuracy of Dose Delivery in Multiple Breath-Hold Segmented Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: A Static Phantom Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noto, K.; Ueda, Sh.; Kojima, H.; Isomura, N.; Takemura, A.; Takamatsu, Sh.; Kumano, T.; Takanaka, T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Accuracy of dose delivery in multiple breath-hold segmented volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was evaluated in comparison to non interrupted VMAT using a static phantom. Material and Methods. Five VMAT plans were evaluated. A Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) was employed. A VMAT delivery sequence was divided into multiple segments according to each of the predefined breath-hold periods (10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds). The segmented VMAT delivery was compared to non interrupted VMAT delivery in terms of the isocenter dose and pass rates of a dose difference of 1% with a dose threshold of 10% of the maximum dose on a central coronal plane using a two-dimensional dosimeter, MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). Results. Means of the isocenter dose differences were 0.5%, 0.2%, 0.2%, 0.0%, and 0.0% for the beam-on-times between interrupts of 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds, respectively. Means of the pass rates were 85%, 99.9%, 100%, 100%, and 100% in the same order as the above. Conclusion. Our static phantom study indicated that the multiple breath-hold segmented VMAT maintains stable and accurate dose delivery when the beam-on-time between interrupts is 15 seconds or greater

  20. Single Breath-Hold Physiotherapy Technique; Effective tool for T2* magnetic resonance imaging in young patients with thalassaemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha T. Mevada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging using T2* (MRI T2* is a highly sensitive and non-invasive technique for the detection of tissue iron load. Although the single breath-hold multi-echo T2* technique has been available at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH, Muscat, Oman, since 2006, it could not be performed on younger patients due to their inability to hold their breath after expiration. This study was carried out between May 2007 and May 2015 and assessed 50 SQUH thalassaemic patients aged 7‒17 years old. Seven of these patients underwent baseline and one-year follow-up MRI T2* scans before receiving physiotherapy training. Subsequently, all patients were trained by a physiotherapist to hold their breath for approximately 15‒20 seconds at the end of expiration before undergoing baseline and one-year follow-up MRI T2* scans. Failure rates for the pre- and post-training groups were 6.0% and 42.8%, respectively. These results indicate that the training of thalassaemic patients in breathhold techniques is beneficial and increases rates of compliance for MRI T2* scans.

  1. Double-blind, placebo-controlled trial on the effect of piracetam on breath-holding spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawires, Happy; Botrous, Osama

    2012-07-01

    Breath-holding spells (BHS) are apparently frightening events occurring in otherwise healthy children.The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of piracetam in the treatment of breath-holding spells. Forty patients with BHS (who were classified into two groups)were involved in a double-blinded placebo-controlled prospective study. Piracetam was given to group A while group B received placebo. Patients were followed monthly for a total period of 4 months. The numbers of attacks/month before and monthly after treatment were documented, and the overall number of attacks/month after treatment was calculated in both groups. The median number of attacks/month before treatment in the two groups was 5.5 and 5,respectively, while after the first month of treatment, it was 2 and 5, respectively. The median overall number of attacks/month after treatment in both groups was 1 and 5, respectively.There was a significant decline of number of attacks after piracetam treatment compared to placebo (p valuepiracetam throughout the study period. In conclusion, piracetam is a safe and effective drug for the treatment of breath-holding spells in children.

  2. Cyanotic breath-holding spell: a life-threatening complication after radical resection of a cervicomedullary ganglioglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Hironori; Yoshida, Yuya; Niida, Yo; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamashita, Junkoh

    2005-01-01

    Cyanotic breath-holding spell is a benign and self-limiting disease of young children but occasionally associated with sudden, unexpected death. The authors report a rare case in a 2-year-old girl with a severe form that started after radical resection of a cervicomedullary ganglioglioma. She was admitted to our hospital because of delayed and unstable gait. Since magnetic resonance imaging showed a cervicomedullary tumor, she underwent a radical resection and histology showed the tumor to be a ganglioglioma. Postoperatively, the function of the lower cranial nerves and cerebellum deteriorated and hemiparesis on the left became apparent, but she returned to the preoperative state in a few months. In addition, mild sleep apnea (Ondine curse) and severe cyanotic breath-holding spells occurred. The former responded to medication but the latter failed and continued several times per day with a rapid onset and progression of hypoxemia, loss of consciousness, sweating and opisthotonos. Five months after the operation, the patient returned home with a portable oxygen saturation monitor equipped with an alarm. This case indicates that cyanotic breath-holding spell, as well as sleep apnea, is critical during the early postoperative period. This is the first report observing that such spells may occur as a complication of radical resection of a cervicomedullary tumor. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Longitudinal study of a mouse model of chronic pulmonary inflammation using breath hold gated micro-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaechevarria, Xabier; Perez-Martin, Daniel; Munoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Blanco, David; Biurrun, Gabriel de; Montuenga, Luis M.; Torres, Juan P. de; Zulueta, Javier J.; Bastarrika, Gorka

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using automatic quantitative analysis of breath hold gated micro-CT images to detect and monitor disease in a mouse model of chronic pulmonary inflammation, and to compare image-based measurements with pulmonary function tests and histomorphometry. Forty-nine A/J mice were used, divided into control and inflammation groups. Chronic inflammation was induced by silica aspiration. Fourteen animals were imaged at baseline, and 4, 14, and 34 weeks after silica aspiration, using micro-CT synchronized with ventilator-induced breath holds. Lung input impedance was measured as well using forced oscillation techniques. Five additional animals from each group were killed after micro-CT for comparison with histomorphometry. At all time points, micro-CT measurements show statistically significant differences between the two groups, while first differences in functional test parameters appear at 14 weeks. Micro-CT measurements correlate well with histomorphometry and discriminate diseased and healthy groups better than functional tests. Longitudinal studies using breath hold gated micro-CT are feasible on the silica-induced model of chronic pulmonary inflammation, and automatic measurements from micro-CT images correlate well with histomorphometry, being more sensitive than functional tests to detect lung damage in this model. (orig.)

  4. Longitudinal study of a mouse model of chronic pulmonary inflammation using breath hold gated micro-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artaechevarria, Xabier; Perez-Martin, Daniel; Munoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos [Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Cancer Imaging Laboratory, Oncology Division, Pamplona (Spain); Blanco, David; Biurrun, Gabriel de; Montuenga, Luis M. [Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Biomarkers Laboratory, Pamplona (Spain); Torres, Juan P. de; Zulueta, Javier J. [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Pneumology Department, Pamplona (Spain); Bastarrika, Gorka [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Radiology Department, Pamplona (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of using automatic quantitative analysis of breath hold gated micro-CT images to detect and monitor disease in a mouse model of chronic pulmonary inflammation, and to compare image-based measurements with pulmonary function tests and histomorphometry. Forty-nine A/J mice were used, divided into control and inflammation groups. Chronic inflammation was induced by silica aspiration. Fourteen animals were imaged at baseline, and 4, 14, and 34 weeks after silica aspiration, using micro-CT synchronized with ventilator-induced breath holds. Lung input impedance was measured as well using forced oscillation techniques. Five additional animals from each group were killed after micro-CT for comparison with histomorphometry. At all time points, micro-CT measurements show statistically significant differences between the two groups, while first differences in functional test parameters appear at 14 weeks. Micro-CT measurements correlate well with histomorphometry and discriminate diseased and healthy groups better than functional tests. Longitudinal studies using breath hold gated micro-CT are feasible on the silica-induced model of chronic pulmonary inflammation, and automatic measurements from micro-CT images correlate well with histomorphometry, being more sensitive than functional tests to detect lung damage in this model. (orig.)

  5. Portal venous blood flow while breath-holding after inspiration or expiration and during normal respiration in controls and cirrhotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Kunihiro; Sasao, Ken-ichiro; Watanabe, Manabu

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to measure portal blood flow in 12 healthy controls and 17 cirrhotics while they were breath-holding after inspiration and after expiration. We then compared the results with measurements made during normal respiration in the healthy controls and cirrhotics. Blood flow in the main portal vein under basal fasting conditions was quantitated using the cine phase-contrast MR velocity mapping method. Three measurements were made on one occasion, as follows: throughout the cardiac cycle during normal respiration, with the subject breath-holding after maximal inspiration, and with the subject breath-holding after maximal expiration. During normal respiration, portal blood flow was 1.3±0.2 l/min in controls vs 1.0±0.1 l/min in cirrhotics (P<0.0001); while subjects were breath-holding after inspiration, portal blood flow was 1.0±0.2 l/min in controls vs 0.9±0.1 l/min in cirrhotics; and while subjects were breath-holding after expiration, portal blood flow was 1.5±0.2 l/min in controls vs 1.1±0.2 l/min in cirrhotics (P<0.0001). The differences were primarily due to changes in flow velocity. When the magnitude of these hemodynamic changes in the three respiratory conditions was compared in controls and cirrhotics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant difference (P<0.0001). In controls, portal blood flow decreased during maximal inspiration relative to flow during normal respiration (-24.6±8.3%). Changes in portal blood flow in controls were greater than in cirrhotics (-13.5±4.5%) (P<0.0001); however, the difference in blood flow increase associated with maximal expiration between the two groups (+11.8±9.4% vs +5.9±11.5%) was not significant. We found that the respiration-induced hemodynamic variation in portal blood flow was less in cirrhotics than in the healthy controls. Portal blood flow measurements made during normal respiration using MR imaging closely reflect nearly physiologic conditions

  6. SU-E-J-236: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Breath-Hold Lung Tumor Position Reproducibility Measured with 4D MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Kim, T [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) and the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath-hold

  7. SU-E-J-236: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Breath-Hold Lung Tumor Position Reproducibility Measured with 4D MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J; Kim, T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) and the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath-hold

  8. Clinical outcome of hypofractionated breath-hold image-guided SABR of primary lung tumors and lung metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank; Frauenfeld, Anian; Weiss, Christel; Simeonova, Anna; Neumaier, Christian; Siebenlist, Kerstin; Attenberger, Ulrike; Heußel, Claus Peter; Schneider, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic Ablative RadioTherapy (SABR) of lung tumors/metastases has been shown to be an effective treatment modality with low toxicity. Outcome and toxicity were retrospectively evaluated in a unique single-institution cohort treated with intensity-modulated image-guided breath-hold SABR (igSABR) without external immobilization. The dose–response relationship is analyzed based on Biologically Equivalent Dose (BED). 50 lesions in 43 patients with primary NSCLC (n = 27) or lung-metastases of various primaries (n = 16) were consecutively treated with igSABR with Active-Breathing-Coordinator (ABC®) and repeat-breath-hold cone-beam-CT. After an initial dose-finding/-escalation period, 5x12 Gy for peripheral lesions and single doses of 5 Gy to varying dose levels for central lesions were applied. Overall-survival (OS), progression-free-survival (PFS), progression pattern, local control (LC) and toxicity were analyzed. The median BED2 was 83 Gy. 12 lesions were treated with a BED2 of <80 Gy, and 38 lesions with a BED2 of >80 Gy. Median follow-up was 15 months. Actuarial 1- and 2-year OS were 67% and 43%; respectively. Cause of death was non-disease-related in 27%. Actuarial 1- and 2-year PFS was 42% and 28%. Progression site was predominantly distant. Actuarial 1- and 2 year LC was 90% and 85%. LC showed a trend for a correlation to BED2 (p = 0.1167). Pneumonitis requiring conservative treatment occurred in 23%. Intensity-modulated breath-hold igSABR results in high LC-rates and low toxicity in this unfavorable patient cohort with inoperable lung tumors or metastases. A BED2 of <80 Gy was associated with reduced local control

  9. Dosimetric investigation of breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Kishimoto, Shun; Iwamura, Kohei; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Nakamura, Akira; Matsuo, Yukinori; Shibuya, Keiko; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Radiological Technology, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyoto College of Medical Science, Nantan, Kyoto 622-0041 (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To experimentally investigate the effects of variations in respiratory motion during breath-holding (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (BH-IMRT) dose distribution using a motor-driven base, films, and an ionization chamber. Methods: Measurements were performed on a linear accelerator, which has a 120-leaf independently moving multileaf collimator with 5-mm leaf width at the isocenter for the 20-cm central field. Polystyrene phantoms with dimensions of 40 x 40 x 10 cm were set on a motor-driven base. All gantry angles of seven IMRT plans (a total of 35 fields) were changed to zero, and doses were then delivered to a film placed at a depth of 4 cm and an ionization chamber at a depth of 5 cm in the phantom with a dose rate of 600 MU/min under the following conditions: pulsation from the abdominal aorta and baseline drift with speeds of 0.2 mm/s (BD{sub 0.2mm/s}) and 0.4 mm/s (BD{sub 0.4mm/s}). As a reference for comparison, doses were also delivered to the chamber and film under stationary conditions. Results: In chamber measurements, means {+-} standard deviations of the dose deviations between stationary and moving conditions were -0.52% {+-} 1.03% (range: -3.41-1.05%), -0.07% {+-} 1.21% (range: -1.88-4.31%), and 0.03% {+-} 1.70% (range: -2.70-6.41%) for pulsation, BD{sub 0.2mm/s}, and BD{sub 0.4mm/s}, respectively. The {gamma} passing rate ranged from 99.5% to 100.0%, even with the criterion of 2%/1 mm for pulsation pattern. In the case of BD{sub 0.4mm/s}, the {gamma} passing rate for four of 35 fields (11.4%) did not reach 90% with a criterion of 3%/3 mm. The differences in {gamma} passing rate between BD{sub 0.2mm/s} and BD{sub 0.4mm/s} were statistically significant for each criterion. Taking {gamma} passing rates of > 90% as acceptable with a criterion of 3%/3 mm, large differences were observed in the {gamma} passing rate between the baseline drift of {<=}5 mm and that of >5 mm (minimum {gamma} passing rate: 92.0% vs 82

  10. Non-breath-hold MR cholangiography for the evaluation of obstructive biliart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beak, Seung Yon; Choi, Hye Young; Lee, Sun Wha; Yi, Sun Young

    1996-01-01

    MR cholangiography(MRC) in patients with obstructive biliary diseases was evaluated in order to compare its role with that of ERCP or PTC. Twenty consecutive patients with obstructive biliary and peribiliary diseases (Eleven biliary and peribiliary carcinoma, seven intrahepatic stone diseases and seven extrahepatic stone diseases) were included and ERCP(16 cases) or PTC(four cases) was performed in all twenty cases. Non-breath-hold, heavily T2-weighted, fast spin echo MRC was carried out and 2-D axial, coronal images and 3-D images with maximum intensity projection protocol were obtained. We regarded ERCP or PTC as the gold standard and then compared MRC with ERCP PTC retrospectively. In 11 patients with biliary and peribiliary carcinomas, the level of obstruction was depicted in nine cases(83%) on MRC and in six of seven cases(86%) on ERCP. The causes of obstruction were demonstrated in eight cases(73%) on MRC and in six of seven cases(86%) on ERCP. On MRC, seven cases(64%) revealed similar findings to ERCP or PTC. Of seven cases (1005) on ERCP, IHD stones were detected in four cases(57%) on MRC and in five cases(71%) on ERCP. 2D-MRC was superior to 3D-MRC in the detection of stones. The extent and grade of ductal dilatation was accurately revealed in six cases(86%) on MRC and in seven cases(100%) on ERCP of EHD stones, in six cases(86%) on MRC and in three cases(43%) on ERCP of IHD stones. Six cases(86%) of EHD stones and two cases(29%) of IHD stones revealed similar findings between MRC and ERCP. MRC findings were similar to those of ERCP or PTC in the evaluation of malignant biliary diseases or extrahepatic stone diseases and was valuable in their diagnoses. In the evaluation of intrahepatic stone diseases, MRC demonstrated dilated peripheral IHDs with stones more definitely than ERCP but in the detection its accuracy was low. Further studies may therefore be needed

  11. Novel Dynamic Hepatic Magnetic Resonance Imaging Strategy Using Advanced Parallel Acquisition, Rhythmic Breath-Hold Technique, and Gadoxetate Disodium Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlenkamp, Ute Lina; Wagner, Moritz; Nickel, Dominik; Adam, Ulrich; Krueger, Karsten; Taupitz, Matthias; Schwenke, Carsten; Huppertz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate image quality of a dynamic hepatic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging strategy based on advanced parallel acquisition combined with rhythmic breath-hold and gadoxetate disodium enhancement. Twenty-seven patients (21 male/6 female; mean age, 57.3 years) were enrolled in this institutional review board-approved study and underwent MR imaging at 3 T. The sequence (T1 3-dimensional gradient-recalled echo; acceleration factor, 4; reconstruction mode; controlled aliasing in parallel imaging resulting in higher acceleration factors; acquisition time, 10.4 seconds) was repeated at 8 fixed time points within the 3 minutes after contrast agent injection. Image quality was evaluated on a 5-point scale (1, excellent; 5, nondiagnostic). Dynamic sequences were classified according to perfusion phases and contrast characteristics. Artifacts and position of the liver in the z axis were recorded and analyzed. Overall image quality was found to be 1.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.71). Contrast was scored as excellent in 25 of 27 patients for central vessels and 22 of 27 patients for peripheral vessels. Adequate-quality arterial-phase images were obtained in all 27 patients. Double arterial and single arterial phases were acquired in 13 of 27 and 14 of 27 patients (n = 6 arterial dominant, n = 8 early arterial phases), respectively. In 1 (3.7%) of 27 patients, severe respiratory artifacts were seen during an early arterial phase. Artifacts were observed in 21 of 27 patients and rated as mild in 19 of these. Compromised quality was related to receiver coils (17 of 29), parallel imaging (6 of 29), breathing (3 of 29), and other causes (3 of 29). The position of the liver throughout the dynamic phases was highly constant, with a greatest mean shift of +2.9 mm throughout the first dynamic acquisition. Advanced parallel acquisition with rhythmic breath-hold and gadoxetate injection allows arterial phase imaging without breathing artifacts; a

  12. Voluntary breath-holding duration in healthy subjects with obesity: Role of peripheral chemosensitivity to carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembach, N V; Zabolotskikh, I B

    2018-02-01

    The present study aimed to explore the peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity in healthy subjects with high body mass index (BMI). We studied 26 healthy men with obesity and 23 healthy men without obesity. All participants performed the breath-holding test in the morning, and the single-breath carbon dioxide (SB-CO 2 ) test on the next day. The sensitivity of peripheral chemoreceptors to CO 2 did not differ between two groups (P = .47). In contrast, the duration of breath-holding was significantly lower in participants with elevated BMI (40.6 ± 10.5 s versus 47.2 ± 8.7 s; P < .05). In the multifactor regression model, only differences in waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and SB-CO 2 remained statistically significant (R 2 for the model = 0.62, P < .001). The sensitivity of peripheral chemoreflex to CO 2 was preserved in healthy men with obesity. The higher sensitivity of peripheral chemoreflex to CO 2 and higher WHR were associated with a decrease in the duration of voluntary apnea in subjects with obesity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hypofraction radiotherapy of liver tumor using cone beam computed tomography guidance combined with active breath control by long breath-holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Renming; Wang, Jin; Jiang, Xiaoqin; He, Yinbo; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Nianyong; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and validity of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and active breath control (ABC) by long breath-holding in hypofraction radiotherapy of liver tumor. Twenty-four patients received hypofraction radiotherapy of liver tumor with long breath-holding at end-inhale; four prescriptions were used: 6 Gy×7 (n=8), 10 Gy×4 (n=7), 5 Gy×9 (n=6), 4 Gy×10 (n=3). For each fraction, all patients received pre-correction CBCT scans with ABC, some patients received post-correction and post-treatment CBCT. The interfraction and intrafraction liver positioning errors on medial-lateral (ML), cranial-caudal (CC) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were obtained. The theoretic margin from clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) was calculated based on post-treatment error. The dosimetric parameters of PTV and normal tissue were compared between ABC and free breathing (FB). The interfraction error in liver positioning showed system errors (Σ) of 3.18 mm (ML), 6.80 mm (CC) and 3.05 mm (AP); random error (σ) of 3.03 mm (ML), 6.78 mm (CC) and 3.62 mm (AP). These errors were significantly reduced with CBCT guided online correction. The intrafraction systematic error was 0.72 mm (ML), 2.21 mm (CC), 1.49 mm (AP), and random error was 2.30 mm (ML), 3.58 mm (CC), 2.49 mm (AP). Dosimetric parameters such as PTV, the liver's volume included by 23, 30 Gy isodose curve (V23, V30), mean dose to normal liver (MDTNL) and mean dose to cord were significantly larger for FB (Pbreath-holding at end-inhale is an effective method to reduce liver motion, PTV and dose to normal tissue. Interfraction and intrafraction liver positioning errors were substantial. CBCT guided online correction of positioning error is recommended for liver radiotherapy with end-inhale ABC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Less increase of CT-based calcium scores of the coronary arteries. Effect three years after breast-conserving radiotherapy using breath-hold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mast, M.E.; Kempen-Harteveld, M.L. van; Petoukhova, A.L.; Heijenbrok, M.W.; Scholten, A.N.; Wolterbeek, R.; Schreur, J.H.M.; Struikmans, H.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to compare coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores determined before the start of whole breast irradiation with those determined 3 years afterwards. Changes in CAC scores were analysed in 99 breast cancer patients. Three groups were compared: patients receiving left- and right-sided radiotherapy, and those receiving left-sided radiotherapy with breath-hold. We analysed overall CAC scores and left anterior descending (LAD) and right coronary artery (RCA) CAC scores. Between the three groups, changes of the value of the LAD minus the RCA CAC scores of each individual patient were also compared. Three years after breath-hold-based whole breast irradiation, a less pronounced increase of CAC scores was noted. Furthermore, LAD minus RCA scores in patients treated for left-sided breast cancer without breath-hold were higher when compared to LAD minus RCA scores of patients with right-sided breast cancers and those with left-sided breast cancer treated with breath-hold. Breath-hold in breast-conserving radiotherapy leads to a less pronounced increase of CT-based CAC scores. Therefore, breath-hold probably prevents the development of radiation-induced coronary artery disease. However, the sample size of this study is limited and the follow-up period relatively short. (orig.) [de

  15. Does smoking abstinence influence distress tolerance? An experimental study comparing the response to a breath-holding test of smokers under tobacco withdrawal and under nicotine replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosci, Fiammetta; Anna Aldi, Giulia; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2015-09-30

    Distress tolerance has been operationalized as task persistence in stressful behavioral laboratory tasks. According to the distress tolerance perspective, how an individual responds to discomfort/distress predicts early smoking lapses. This theory seems weakly supported by experimental studies since they are limited in number, show inconsistent results, do not include control conditions. We tested the response to a stressful task in smokers under abstinence and under no abstinence to verify if tobacco abstinence reduces task persistence, thus distress tolerance. A placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, cross-over design was used. Twenty smokers underwent a breath holding test after the administration of nicotine on one test day and a placebo on another test day. Physiological and psychological variables were assessed at baseline and directly before and after each challenge. Abstinence induced a statistically significant shorter breath holding duration relative to the nicotine condition. No different response to the breath holding test was observed when nicotine and placebo conditions were compared. No response to the breath holding test was found when pre- and post-test values of heart rate, blood pressure, Visual Analogue Scale for fear or discomfort were compared. In brief, tobacco abstinence reduces breath holding duration but breath holding test does not influence discomfort. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Navigated three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence for gadoxetic acid liver magnetic resonance imaging in patients with limited breath-holding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Eun Sun; Baek, Jeehyun; Lee, Sangwoo; Iwadate, Yuji; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether a navigator-gated three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence (T1W-GRE, navigated LAVA) can improve diagnostic performance for the detection of focal liver lesions (FLLs) compared to standard breath-hold (BH) T1W-GRE breath-hold LAVA (BH-LAVA) during the hepatobiliary phase (HBP) of gadoxetic acid liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with limited breath-holding capacity. This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board and the requirement for informed consent was waived. We included 372 patients who underwent liver MRI including both navigated LAVA and BH-LAVA sequences. Overall image quality of the two HBP image sets was compared. In patients with limited breath-holding capacity, diagnostic performances in detecting FLLs on the two HBP images were compared using jackknife-alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis by two reviewers. There were 13 cases (13/372; 3.5%) of image acquisition failure using the navigated LAVA sequence due to severe irregular breathing, and 50 of 359 patients had limited breath-holding capacity. In these patients, overall image quality of navigated LAVA (2.78 ± 0.95) was significantly better than that of BH-LAVA (2.42 ± 0.81, P breath-holding capacity (n = 309, 3.96 ± 0.88, 3.81 ± 0.66, respectively, P breath-holding capacity during HBP of gadoxetic acid MRI.

  17. Moderate correlation between breath-holding and CO(2) inhalation/hyperventilation methods for transcranial doppler evaluation of cerebral vasoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussen, Diogo C; Katsnelson, Michael; Rodriguez, Abiezer; Campo, Nelly; Campo-Bustillo, Iszet; Romano, Jose G; Koch, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Both CO(2) inhalation followed by hyperventilation and breath-holding have been utilized to measure cerebral vasomotor reactivity (VMR) but their correlation has been poorly studied and understood. A retrospective study was conducted in 143 subjects (62.6 ± 15.8 years old, 64% men) with transcranial Doppler ultrasonography measurement of mean flow velocity (MFV) at baseline, after 30 seconds of breath-holding, and after CO(2) inhalation followed by hyperventilation, in the left and right middle cerebral artery. Breath-holding index (BHI) was calculated as the percentage of MFV increase from baseline per second of apnea. CO(2) inhalation/hyperventilation index (CO(2) /HV) was calculated as the percentage of MFV difference between CO(2) inhalation and hyperventilation. There were 75 carotid arteries with >70% stenosis or occlusion, and 18 middle cerebral arteries with >50% stenosis or occlusion. The mean BHI was 0.93 ± 0.7 and 0.89 ± 0.6, whereas the mean CO(2) /HV was 61 ± 26% and 60 ± 26%, respectively, on the right and left sides. The correlation between BHI and CO(2) /HV was moderate on the right (r = 0.33; p < 0.01) and left sides (r = 0.38; p < 0.01). Multivariate linear regression analysis indicated that age (p = 0.01) and history of stroke (p = 0.007) were associated independently with an impaired VMR on the right as measured by CO(2) /HV. No predictors for impaired VMR by CO(2) /HV on the left and by BHI on either side were found. CO(2) /HV and BHI are only moderately correlated. Further studies are necessary to determine which method more accurately predicts clinical morbidity. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 2012; Published online in Wiley Online Library. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Breath-Hold Target Localization With Simultaneous Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Fast Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blessing, Manuel; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Arns, Anna; Lohr, Frank; Hesser, Juergen; Wenz, Frederik

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated high-dose radiotherapy for small lung tumors has typically been based on stereotaxy. Cone-beam computed tomography and breath-hold techniques have provided a noninvasive basis for precise cranial and extracranial patient positioning. The cone-beam computed tomography acquisition time of 60 s, however, is beyond the breath-hold capacity of patients, resulting in respiratory motion artifacts. By combining megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) photon sources (mounted perpendicularly on the linear accelerator) and accelerating the gantry rotation to the allowed limit, the data acquisition time could be reduced to 15 s. Methods and Materials: An Elekta Synergy 6-MV linear accelerator, with iViewGT as the MV- and XVI as the kV-imaging device, was used with a Catphan phantom and an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Both image sources performed continuous image acquisition, passing an angle interval of 90 o within 15 s. For reconstruction, filtered back projection on a graphics processor unit was used. It reconstructed 100 projections acquired to a 512 x 512 x 512 volume within 6 s. Results: The resolution in the Catphan phantom (CTP528 high-resolution module) was 3 lines/cm. The spatial accuracy was within 2-3 mm. The diameters of different tumor shapes in the thorax phantom were determined within an accuracy of 1.6 mm. The signal-to-noise ratio was 68% less than that with a 180 o -kV scan. The dose generated to acquire the MV frames accumulated to 82.5 mGy, and the kV contribution was <6 mGy. Conclusion: The present results have shown that fast breath-hold, on-line volume imaging with a linear accelerator using simultaneous kV-MV cone-beam computed tomography is promising and can potentially be used for image-guided radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in the near future.

  19. Single breath hold 3D cardiac cine MRI using kat-ARC: preliminary results at 1.5T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Daniel; Schiebler, Mark L; Lai, Peng; Wang, Kang; Vigen, Karl K; François, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    Validation of a new single breath-hold, three-dimensional, cine balanced steady-state free precession (3D cine bSSFP) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) sequence for left ventricular function. CMR examinations were performed on fifteen patients and three healthy volunteers on a clinical 1.5T scanner using a two-dimensional (2D) cine balanced SSFP CMR sequence (2D cine bSSFP) followed by an investigational 3D cine bSSFP pulse sequence acquired within a single breath hold. Left ventricular end diastolic volume (LVEDV), end systolic volume (LVESV), ejection fraction (LVEF), and myocardial mass were independently segmented on a workstation by two experienced radiologists. Blood pool to myocardial contrast was evaluated in consensus using a Likert scale. Bland-Altman analysis was used to compare these quantitative and nominal measurements for the two sequences. The average acquisition time was significantly shorter for the 3D cine bSSFP than for 2D cine bSSFP (0.36 ± 0.03 vs. 8.5 ± 2.3 min) p = 0.0002. Bland-Altman analyses [bias and (limits of agreement)] of the data derived from these two methods revealed that the LVEF 0.9% (-4.7, 6.4), LVEDV 4.9 ml (-23.0, 32.8), LVESV -0.2 ml (-22.4, 21.9), and myocardial mass -0.4 g (-23.8, 23.0) were not significantly different. There was excellent intraclass correlation for intra-observer variability (0.981, 0.989, 0.997, 0.985) and inter-observer variability (0.903, 0.954, 0.970, 0.842) for LVEF, LVEDV, LVESV, and myocardial mass respectively. 3D cine bSSFP allows for accurate single breath-hold volumetric cine CMR which enables substantial improvements in scanner time efficiency without sacrificing diagnostic accuracy.

  20. Feasibility of single breath-hold left ventricular function with 3 Tesla TSENSE acquisition and 3D modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alistair A; Cowan, Brett R; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Wintersperger, Bernd J

    2008-05-21

    A single breath-hold evaluation of ventricular function would allow assessment in cases where scan time or patient tolerance is limited. Spatiotemporal acceleration techniques such as TSENSE decrease cardiovascular MR acquisition time, but standard slice summation analysis requires enough short axis slices to cover the left ventricle (LV). By reducing the number of short axis slices, incorporating long axis slices, and applying a 3D model based analysis, it may be possible to obtain accurate LV mass and volumes. We evaluated LV volume, mass and ejection fraction at 3.0 T using a 3D modeling analysis in 9 patients with a history of myocardial infarction and one healthy volunteer. Acquisition consisted of a standard short axis SSFP stack and a 15 heart-beat single breath-hold six slice multi-planar (4 short and 2 long axis) TSENSE SSFP protocol with an acceleration factor of R = 4. Differences (standard minus accelerated protocol mean +/- s.d.) and coefficients of variation (s.d. of differences as a percentage of the average estimate) were 7.5 +/- 9.6 mL and 6% for end-diastolic volume (p = 0.035), 0.4 +/- 5.1 mL and 7% for end-systolic volume (p = NS), 7.1 +/- 8.1 mL and 9% for stroke volume (p = 0.022), 2.2 +/- 2.8% and 5% for ejection fraction (p = 0.035), and -7.1 +/- 6.2 g and 4% for LV mass (p = 0.005), respectively. Intra- and inter-observer errors were similar for both protocols (p = NS for all measures). These results suggest that clinically useful estimates of LV function can be obtained in a TSENSE accelerated single breath-hold reduced slice acquisition at 3T using 3D modeling analysis techniques.

  1. A segmented K-space velocity mapping protocol for quantification of renal artery blood flow during breath-holding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Cortsen, M; Söndergaard, L

    1995-01-01

    Two important prerequisites for MR velocity mapping of pulsatile motion are synchronization of the sequence execution to the time course of the flow pattern and robustness toward loss of signal in complex flow fields. Synchronization is normally accomplished by using either prospective ECG...... the segmented k-space technique, in which the entire data acquisition can be made within a breath-hold by the sampling of several phase-encoding lines within a small time window during each heart cycle. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of a segmented k-space velocity mapping protocol...

  2. Breath-holding spells: Prevalence and risk factors in under 6-year old children at south of Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    P. Tootoonchi

    2001-01-01

    To determine breath- holding spells (BHS) prevalence and risk factors in under 6- year- old children, we interviewed mothers of 400 children in a cross- sectional study in 5 health centers at south of Tehran in autumn 1999. 33 children (8.25%) had history of BHS (Male: 19, Female: 14 25 cases were between 2-4 years old (mean: 40±17 months). Seventy percent of cases (23) had onset of attacks after 6 months of age (mean: 10 monthis) and the commonest frequency was one spell per month...

  3. Study of breath-holding spell and its triggering factors in Children’s Hospital Medical Center

    OpenAIRE

    Ashrafi MR

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate breath-holding spell (BHS) and its triggering factors, 47 children with BHS admitted to the out patients clinic of Children's hospital medical center, between Sept 1998-June 1999, were included in this prospective study. Diagnosis of BHS was made for cases by medical history, pediatric physical examination, EEG, ECG and lab findings. 4 cases were excluded from study because of paroxysmal epileptic discharges at their EEGs. Of 43 cases having BHS (M:F: 1.15:1), 74.4% were less...

  4. Radiation during deep inspiration allows loco-regional treatment of left breast and axillary-, supraclavicular- and internal mammary lymph nodes without compromising target coverage or dose restrictions to organs at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelstuen, Mari H B; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Vikström, Johan; Dybvik, Kjell Ivar

    2012-03-01

    Loco-regional radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer represents a treatment planning challenge when the internal mammary chain (IMC) lymph nodes are included in the target volume. This treatment planning study evaluates the reduction in cardiopulmonary doses when radiation is given during deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). This was achieved without compromising dose coverage to the planning target volume (PTV). Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two computed tomography (CT)-scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPM respiratory gating system. Audio-visual guidance was used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed focusing on good coverage (V95% > 98%) of the PTV. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, lungs and contralateral breast were assessed. With equal PTV coverage, average mean heart dose was reduced from 6.2 Gy to 3.1 Gy in DIBH plans as compared to FB. Average volume receiving 25 Gy or more (V25Gy) was reduced from 6.7% to 1.2%, and the number of patients with V25Gy > 5% was reduced from 8 to 1 utilizing DIBH. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 25.0 Gy to 10.9 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving 20 Gy or more (V20Gy) was reduced from 44.5% to 32.7% with DIBH. In 11 of the DIBH plans V20Gy was lower than 35%, in accordance with national guidelines, while none of the FB plans fulfilled this recommendation. Respiratory gated radiotherapy during DIBH is a suitable technique for loco-regional breast irradiation even when IMC lymph nodes are included in the PTV. Cardiopulmonary doses are considerably decreased for all dose levels without compromising the dose coverage to PTV.

  5. A hybrid breath hold and continued respiration-triggered technique for time-resolved 3D MRI perfusion studies in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintze, C.; Stemmer, A.; Bock, M.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of lung cancer perfusion is impaired by respiratory motion. Imaging times for contrast agent wash-out studies often exceed breath hold capabilities, and respiration triggering reduces temporal resolution. Temporally resolved volume acquisition of entire tumors is required to assess heterogeneity. Therefore, we developed and evaluated an MR measurement technique that exceeds a single breath hold, and provides a variable temporal resolution during acquisition while suspending breath-dependent motion. 20 patients with suspected lung cancer were subjected to perfusion studies using a spoiled 3D gradient echo sequence after bolus injection of 0.07 mmol/kg body weight of Gd-DTPA. 10 acquisitions in expiratory breath hold were followed by 50 navigator-triggered acquisitions under free breathing. Post-processing allowed for co-registration of the 3D data sets. An ROI-based visualization of the signal-time curves was performed. In all cases motion-suspended, time-resolved volume data sets (40 x 33 x 10 cm 3 , voxel size: 2.1 x 2.1 x 5.0 mm 3 ) were generated with a variable, initially high temporal resolution (2.25 sec) that was synchronized with the breath pattern and covered up to 8(1)/(2) min. In 7 / 20 cases a remaining offset could be reduced by rigid co-registration. The tumors showed fast wash-in, followed by rapid signal decay (8 / 20) or a plateau. The feasibility of a perfusion study with hybrid breath hold and navigator-triggered time-resolved 3D MRI which combines high initial temporal resolution during breath hold with a long wash-out period under free breathing was demonstrated. (orig.)

  6. Intravenous Gadoxetate Disodium Administration Reduces Breath-holding Capacity in the Hepatic Arterial Phase: A Multi-Center Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Taylor R; Motosugi, Utaroh; Middleton, Michael S; Allen, Brian C; Jaffe, Tracy A; Miller, Chad M; Reeder, Scott B; Sirlin, Claude B; Bashir, Mustafa R

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To determine, in a multicenter double-blinded placebo-controlled trial, whether maximal hepatic arterial phase breath-holding duration is affected by gadoxetate disodium administration. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained for this prospective multi-institutional HIPAA-compliant study; written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. At three sites, a total of 44 volunteers underwent a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examination in which images were acquired before and dynamically after bolus injection of gadoxetate disodium, normal saline, and gadoterate meglumine, administered in random order in a single session. The technologist and volunteer were blinded to the agent. Arterial phase breath-holding duration was timed after each injection, and volunteers reported subjective symptoms. Heart rate (HR) and oxygen saturation were monitored. Images were independently analyzed for motion artifacts by three radiologists. Arterial phase breath-holding duration and motion artifacts after each agent were compared by using the Mann-Whitney U test and the McNemar test. Factors affecting the above outcomes were assessed by using a univariate, multivariable model. Results Arterial phase breath holds were shorter after gadoxetate disodium (mean, 32 seconds ± 19) than after saline (mean, 40 seconds ± 17; P breath holds were shorter after gadoxetate disodium than after both saline and gadoterate meglumine. Three (7%) of 44 volunteers had severe arterial phase motion artifacts after gadoxetate disodium administration, one (2%; P = .62) had them after gadoterate meglumine administration, and none (P = .25) had them after saline administration. HR and oxygen saturation changes were not significantly associated with contrast agent. Conclusion Maximal hepatic arterial phase breath-holding duration is reduced after gadoxetate disodium administration in healthy volunteers, and reduced breath-holding duration is associated with motion

  7. Single breath-hold magnetic resonance cine imaging for fast assessment of global and regional left ventricular function in clinical routine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassenstein, Kai; Heilmaier, Christina; Schlosser, Thomas; Eberle, Holger; Jensen, Christoph J.; Bruder, Oliver; Maderwald, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate a TGRAPPA (temporal parallel acquisition technique)-accelerated, single breath-hold multi-slice cine imaging approach for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) function. One hundred eleven patients were examined at 1.5 T. Cine imaging was performed with single-slice breath-hold acquisitions in short-axis orientation using a SSFP (TR 2.63 ms, TE 1.12 ms, FA 72 ) sequence and a TGRAPPA SSFP (TR 2.66 ms, TE 1.11 ms, FA 72 , AF 3) sequence, which covered the entire LV in multiple short-axis slices during a single breath-hold. End-diastolic (EDV), end-systolic (ESV), stroke volumes (SV), ejection fraction (EF), muscle mass (MM) and regional wall motion were assessed for both data sets. Single breath-hold imaging was feasible in 108 patients. Excellent correlations were observed for all volumetric parameters derived from both data sets (all r > 0.97). While EDV and ESV showed marginally lower values for single breath-hold imaging (EDV: -1.6 ± 7.9 ml; ESV: -1.8 ± 6.0 ml, p < 0.05), no differences were observed for SV, EF, MM and regional wall motion assessment. Single breath-hold imaging required significant shorter acquisition times (28 ± 6 s vs. 335 ± 87 s). TGRAPPA-accelerated multi-slice SSPF imaging allows for fast and accurate assessment of regional and global LV function within a single breath-hold. (orig.)

  8. Fast Determination of Flip Angle and T1 in Hyperpolarized Gas MRI During a Single Breath-Hold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-05-01

    MRI of hyperpolarized media, such as 129Xe and 3He, shows great potential for clinical applications. The optimal use of the available spin polarization requires accurate flip angle calibrations and T1 measurements. Traditional flip angle calibration methods are time-consuming and suffer from polarization losses during T1 relaxation. In this paper, we propose a method to simultaneously calibrate flip angles and measure T1 in vivo during a breath-hold time of less than 4 seconds. We demonstrate the accuracy, robustness and repeatability of this method and contrast it with traditional methods. By measuring the T1 of hyperpolarized gas, the oxygen pressure in vivo can be calibrated during the same breath hold. The results of the calibration have been applied in variable flip angle (VFA) scheme to obtain a stable steady-state transverse magnetization. Coupled with this method, the ultra-short TE (UTE) and constant VFA (CVFA) schemes are expected to give rise to new applications of hyperpolarized media.

  9. Long-term effects of frequent maximal breath-holding on the cardiac health of elite freedivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenkova, I; Chomahidze, P

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are commonly reported in freedivers during maximal voluntary breath-holds, but their influence on the cardiological status and their long-term effects on the cardiac health of these athletes have not been investigated. Here we present the results of a study on 32 healthy young men (mean age 32.6 ± 1.3 years) who were divided into two groups of 16 subjects. One group included 16 continuously training freedivers at the "high achievers in sports" level (DIVERS group). The CONTROL group included 16 healthy young men not involved in sports. The subjects were monitored using 24-h electrocardiogram (ECG), and echocardiological study (EchoCG) for all the subjects was performed. The mean heart rate in the DIVERS group was 69.5 ± 1.7 bpm compared with 70.9 ± 1.5 bpm in the CONTROL group. The minimal heart rate was 42.3 ± 1.0 bpm in the DIVERS group and 48.8 ± 1.7 bpm in the CONTROL group (P breath-holds. These changes are within the normal physiological values and do not limit their freediving practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Characterizing hepatocellular carcinoma using multi-breath-hold two-dimensional susceptibility-weighted imaging: Comparison to conventional liver MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, R.; Zhang, J.; Dai, Y.; You, Z.; Fan, Y.; Cui, J.; Wang, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To characterize the imaging manifestations of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using multi-breath-hold two-dimensional susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) and compare to conventional liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: Forty-three patients with histopathologically confirmed HCC underwent conventional liver MRI, multi-breath-hold two-dimensional SWI, and contrast-enhanced CT preoperatively. The T1-weighted imaging (WI), T2WI, and SWI images were evaluated in consensus by two experienced radiologists. The tumour boundaries, blood products in the tumour, venous vessels, and non-tumour liver parenchyma were compared. Results: SWI demonstrated significantly better tumour boundary detection than T1WI and T2WI imaging (67.4 and 25.6%, respectively). The detection rate for intra-tumoural blood products using SWI was higher than that of T1WI and T2WI (76.7 and 16.3%, respectively). The detection rate for tumour venous vessels using SWI was 72.1%, while none was detected with conventional T1WI and T2WI. The detection rate for siderotic nodules in non-tumour liver parenchyma using SWI was higher than that of conventional T1WI and T2WI (65.1 and 20.9%, respectively). Conclusions: SWI can provide more detailed information than conventional liver MRI in evaluation of tumour boundaries, blood products, venous vasculature, and non-tumour liver parenchyma. SWI is a valuable complement to conventional liver MRI.

  11. [EFFECT OF VOLUNTARY BREATH-HOLDING AND COGNITIVE LOADS ON REGIONAL CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND BIOELECTRIC ACTIVITY OF THE BRAIN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreva, T I; Pasekova, O B; Kriushev, E S; Dobrokvashina, E I; Moreva, O V; Builov, S P; Smirnov, O A; Bragin, L Kh; Voronkov, Iu I

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and bioelectric activity were studied in 10 normal volunteers in order to assess cerebrovascular reactivity during different types of functional testing. The transcranial Doppler was used to measure linear blood velocity (LBV) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during maximal voluntary breath-holding (apnea), controlled verbal association test and tactile memory test. Simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) registered the bioelectric activity of the brain cortex. Both investigations were performed continuously in the course of each test. Breath-holding induced a smooth symmetric increase of CMA blood velocity; LBV rose to maximum values in the majority of the volunteered subjects. Two subjects with small focal changes in the brain's white matter displayed an asymmetric blood flow reaction to apnea. Gain in LBV was materially less during the cognitive tests; the verbal test decreased LBV in one half of the subjects and increased LBV in the other. The tactile memory test increased LBV which was particularly high in the left CMA of all subjects. LBV dynamics during the cognitive tests was essentially different from what was observed in apnea. Blood flow variations in the course of equally the verbal and tactile tests had a regular undulatory character. Concurrent LBV and EEG monitoring made it possible to compare and contrast dynamics of the cerebral blood velocity and bioelectric activity directly during testing and thus to reveal peculiar reactions of the cerebral blood flow to cognitive and physiological testing.

  12. Body Growth and Rapid Hematological Development Support Breath Hold of Baby Belugas (Delphinapterus leucas) during Subice Transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noren, Shawn R; Poll, Caryn P; Edwards, Matthew S

    Body size and oxygen stores in the blood and muscle set breath-hold limits in marine mammals, yet these characteristics are understudied in immature cetaceans. We examined body mass and hematology from birth through adulthood in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). At birth, body mass was 8% and 6% of the maximum mass recorded for adult females and males, respectively. Body mass then increased rapidly, approaching an asymptote around 12 yr for females and 18 yr for males. Interestingly, red blood cell counts, hemoglobin content, and hematocrit levels decreased after birth; this neonatal anemia was reversed as levels increased after 2 mo postpartum. Mature levels were obtained at approximately 8, 9, and 11 mo postpartum, respectively. Neonatal mean corpuscular hemoglobin also increased with ontogeny; mature levels were achieved by approximately 13 mo after birth. In contrast, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration demonstrated a significant but subtle increase throughout ontogeny. Our results indicate that postnatal maturation was required and that maturation occurred far earlier than the age at weaning (i.e., 2-3 yr postpartum). This is atypical of marine mammals, which generally achieve mature hemoglobin levels at weaning. Hematological maturation before maternal independence undoubtedly supports the prolonged breath holds of young belugas transiting under sea ice. This assessment enhances our knowledge of cetacean physiology and provides important inputs for determining age-specific dive capacity, yielding insights into age-specific flexibility to alter underwater behaviors, as will be required for future regime shifts and disturbances.

  13. Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... smaller structures called bronchi. The process of breathing (respiration) is divided into two distinct phases, inspiration (inhalation) and expiration (exhalation). During inspiration, the diaphragm contracts and pulls downward while the muscles between the ribs contract and pull upward. This ...

  14. SU-E-J-211: Design and Study of In-House Software Based Respiratory Motion Monitoring, Controlling and Breath-Hold Device for Gated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, Senthilkumar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this present work was to fabricate an in-house software based respiratory monitoring, controlling and breath-hold device using computer software programme which guides the patient to have uniform breath hold in response to request during the gated radiotherapy. Methods: The respiratory controlling device consists of a computer, inhouse software, video goggles, a highly sensitive sensor for measurement of distance, mounting systems, a camera, a respiratory signal device, a speaker and a visual indicator. The computer is used to display the respiratory movements of the patient with digital as well as analogue respiration indicators during the respiration cycle, to control, breath-hold and analyze the respiratory movement using indigenously developed software. Results: Studies were conducted with anthropomophic phantoms by simulating the respiratory motion on phantoms and recording the respective movements using the respiratory monitoring device. The results show good agreement between the simulated and measured movements. Further studies were conducted for 60 cancer patients with several types of cancers in the thoracic region. The respiratory movement cycles for each fraction of radiotherapy treatment were recorded and compared. Alarm indications are provided in the system to indicate when the patient breathing movement exceeds the threshold level. This will help the patient to maintain uniform breath hold during the radiotherapy treatment. Our preliminary clinical test results indicate that our device is highly reliable and able to maintain the uniform respiratory motion and breathe hold during the entire course of gated radiotherapy treatment. Conclusion: An indigenous respiratory monitoring device to guide the patient to have uniform breath hold device was fabricated. The alarm feature and the visual waveform indicator in the system guide the patient to have normal respiration. The signal from the device can be connected to the radiation

  15. The use of active breathing control (ABC) to reduce margin for breathing motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, John W.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.; Kini, Vijay R.; Robertson, John M.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Martinez, Alavro A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: For tumors in the thorax and abdomen, reducing the treatment margin for organ motion due to breathing reduces the volume of normal tissues that will be irradiated. A higher dose can be delivered to the target, provided that the risk of marginal misses is not increased. To ensure safe margin reduction, we investigated the feasibility of using active breathing control (ABC) to temporarily immobilize the patient's breathing. Treatment planning and delivery can then be performed at identical ABC conditions with minimal margin for breathing motion. Methods and Materials: An ABC apparatus is constructed consisting of 2 pairs of flow monitor and scissor valve, 1 each to control the inspiration and expiration paths to the patient. The patient breathes through a mouth-piece connected to the ABC apparatus. The respiratory signal is processed continuously, using a personal computer that displays the changing lung volume in real-time. After the patient's breathing pattern becomes stable, the operator activates ABC at a preselected phase in the breathing cycle. Both valves are then closed to immobilize breathing motion. Breathing motion of 12 patients were held with ABC to examine their acceptance of the procedure. The feasibility of applying ABC for treatment was tested in 5 patients by acquiring volumetric scans with a spiral computed tomography (CT) scanner during active breath-hold. Two patients had Hodgkin's disease, 2 had metastatic liver cancer, and 1 had lung cancer. Two intrafraction ABC scans were acquired at the same respiratory phase near the end of normal or deep inspiration. An additional ABC scan near the end of normal expiration was acquired for 2 patients. The ABC scans were also repeated 1 week later for a Hodgkin's patient. In 1 liver patient, ABC scans were acquired at 7 different phases of the breathing cycle to facilitate examination of the liver motion associated with ventilation. Contours of the lungs and livers were outlined when applicable

  16. Thin-slice Free-breathing Pseudo-golden-angle Radial Stack-of-stars with Gating and Tracking T1-weighted Acquisition: An Efficient Gadoxetic Acid-enhanced Hepatobiliary-phase Imaging Alternative for Patients with Unstable Breath Holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Kimihiro; Goshima, Satoshi; Noda, Yoshifumi; Kawada, Hiroshi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Okuaki, Tomoyuki; Honda, Masatoshi; Matsuo, Masayuki

    2018-03-09

    To compare four free-breathing scan techniques for gadoxetic acid-enhanced hepatobiliary phase imaging with conventional breath-hold scans. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced hepatobiliary phase imaging with six image acquisition sets performed in 50 patients. Image acquisition sets included fat-suppressed 3D T 1 -weighted turbo field echo with free-breathing pseudo-golden-angle radial stack-of-stars (FBRS) acquisition, FBRS with track (FBRS T ), FBRS with gate and track (FBRS G&T ), thin-slice FBRS with gate and track (thin-slice FBRS G&T ), free-breathing Cartesian acquisition (Cartesian FB ), and breath-hold Cartesian acquisition (Cartesian BH ). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and image quality compared to the six-image acquisition sets. Signal-to-noise ratio and CNR were significantly higher in FBRS, FBRS T , FBRS G&T , and thin-slice FBRS G&T than in Cartesian FB and Cartesian BH (P breath holding.

  17. Effects of interportal error on dose distribution in patients undergoing breath-holding intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer: evaluation of a new treatment planning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Toru; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shibuya, Keiko; Nakata, Manabu; Nakamura, Akira; Matsuo, Yukinori; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Higashimura, Kyoji; Teshima, Teruki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-09-06

    In patients with pancreatic cancer, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) under breath holding facilitates concentration of the radiation dose in the tumor, while sparing the neighboring organs at risk and minimizing interplay effects between movement of the multileaf collimator and motion of the internal structures. Although the breath-holding technique provides high interportal reproducibility of target position, dosimetric errors caused by interportal breath-holding positional error have not been reported. Here, we investigated the effects of interportal breath-holding positional errors on IMRT dose distribution by incorporating interportal positional error into the original treatment plan, using random numbers in ten patients treated for pancreatic cancer. We also developed a treatment planning technique that shortens breath-holding time without increasing dosimetric quality assurance workload. The key feature of our proposed method is performance of dose calculation using the same optimized fluence map as the original plan, after dose per fraction in the original plan was cut in half and the number of fractions was doubled. Results confirmed that interportal error had a negligible effect on dose distribution over multiple fractions. Variations in the homogeneity index and the dose delivered to 98%, 2%, and 50% of the volume for the planning target volume, and the dose delivered to 1 cc of the volume for the duodenum and stomach were ±1%, on average, in comparison with the original plan. The new treatment planning method decreased breath-holding time by 33%, and differences in dose-volume metrics between the original and the new treatment plans were within ± 1%. An additional advantage of our proposed method is that interportal errors can be better averaged out; thus, dose distribution in the proposed method may be closer to the planned dose distribution than with the original plans.

  18. Breath-holding spells: Prevalence and risk factors in under 6-year old children at south of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tootoonchi

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available To determine breath- holding spells (BHS prevalence and risk factors in under 6- year- old children, we interviewed mothers of 400 children in a cross- sectional study in 5 health centers at south of Tehran in autumn 1999. 33 children (8.25% had history of BHS (Male: 19, Female: 14 25 cases were between 2-4 years old (mean: 40±17 months. Seventy percent of cases (23 had onset of attacks after 6 months of age (mean: 10 monthis and the commonest frequency was one spell per month (78.79%. Painful experience and falling and striking the head wee the common triggering factors (79% and 76% respectively and there was significant association between BHS and history of fallin and severe striking of the head. There was no significant associations between BHS and sex, birth weight, birth order, delivery method, type of labor initiating and duration of labor.

  19. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for breath-holding spells followed by cardiac arrest due to left main coronary artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyilmaz, Isa; Altin, Husnu Fırat; Yildiz, Okan; Erek, Ersin; Ergul, Yakup; Guzeltas, Alper

    2015-06-01

    Non-syndromic congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) leads to ventricular hypertrophy and increased oxygen consumption, and when combined with other factors reduces coronary blood flow, potentially resulting in myocardial ischemia and sudden cardiac death. While the anatomic obstruction of coronary circulation is as common in non-syndromic SVAS as in Williams syndrome, it often remains unacknowledged. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an elective procedure that can be used to support patients with cardiac arrest during diagnosis as a way to reduce cardiopulmonary load in preparation for surgery or further treatment. In this report, we describe the rare case of an infant with severe SVAS and mild valvular pulmonary and left main coronary artery stenosis, as well as breath-holding spells. After multiple cardiac arrests, the infant underwent diagnostic catheter angiography on ECMO and had the pathology surgically corrected. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  20. Three-dimensional volumetric interpolated breath-hold MR imaging for whole-body tumor staging in less than 15 minutes: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Thomas C; Goehde, Susanne C; Herborn, Christoph U; Treder, Wiebke; Ruehm, Stefan G; Debatin, Jörg F; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric interpolated breath-hold whole-body MR imaging using CT and nuclear medicine techniques as the standard of reference in patients with metastases. The 3D volumetric interpolated breath-hold whole-body MR imaging examination for metastases screening correlates well with CT and scintigraphy. The use of the rolling table platform permits rapid whole-body imaging in an average of 11 min. The preliminary results indicate that the described technique has the potential to emerge as an all-encompassing alternative to conventional multimodality tumor staging strategies.

  1. Effects of low oxygen dead space ventilation and breath-holding test in evaluating cerebrovascular reactivity: A comparative observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Ke-Ju; Zhong, Ling-Ling; Ni, Xiao-Yu; Xia, Lei; Xue, Liu-Jun; Cheng, Guan-Liang

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to explore the application prospect of low oxygen dead space ventilation (LODSV) in evaluating vasomotor reactivity (VMR) by comparison between LODSV and breath-holding test (BHT). Outpatient or inpatient patients who underwent transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) were enrolled into this study. These patients successively underwent BHT and LODSV. The cooperation degree, tolerance conditions and adverse reactions in patients were recorded, and VMR was calculated, compared and analyzed. Patients had poor cooperation during BHT. Except for compensatory tachypnea after BHT, patients basically had no adverse reaction. The main manifestations of patients undergoing LODSV were deepened breathing and accelerated frequency in the end of the ventilation, and increased heart rate and a slight decline in pulse oxygen that rapidly recovered after ventilation. The increase rate of blood flow velocity in patients undergoing LODSV was significantly higher than in BHT (P<0.001), and its calculated VMR value was approximately 15% higher than BHT (P<0.001). BHT revealed a monophasic curve that slightly descends and rapidly increases, and LODSV revealed a curve that descends for a short time and slowly increases with a platform. LODSV can effectively eliminate the affect of poor cooperation in patients, and avoid intolerance caused by hypoxia. Hence, VMR value is more accurate than that determined by BHT; and this can reflect the maximum reaction ability of the blood vessels. Therefore, this method has higher clinical application value.

  2. Mechanical indentation improves cerebral blood oxygenation signal quality of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during breath holding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C.; Romero, Edwin; LaConte, Stephen M.; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2013-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a well-known technique for non-invasively measuring cerebral blood oxygenation, and many studies have demonstrated that fNIRS signals can be related to cognitive function. However, the fNIRS signal is attenuated by the skin, while scalp blood content has been reported to influence cerebral oxygenation measurements. Mechanical indentation has been shown to increase light transmission through soft tissues by causing interstitial water and blood flow away from the compressed region. To study the effects of indentation on fNIRS, a commercial fNIRS system with 16 emitter/detector pairs was used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation at 2 Hz. This device used diffuse reflectance at 730 nm and 850 nm to calculate deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin concentrations. A borosilicate glass hemisphere was epoxied over each sensor to function as both an indenter and a lens. After placing the indenter/sensor assembly on the forehead, a pair of plastic bands was placed on top of the fNIRS headband and strapped to the head to provide uniform pressure and tightened to approx. 15 N per strap. Cerebral blood oxygenation was recorded during a breath holding regime (15 second hold, 15 second rest, 6 cycles) in 4 human subjects both with and without the indenter array. Results showed that indentation increased raw signal intensity by 85 +/- 35%, and that indentation increased amplitude of hemoglobin changes during breath cycles by 313% +/- 105%. These results suggest that indentation improves sensing of cerebral blood oxygenation, and may potentially enable sensing of deeper brain tissues.

  3. A short-breath-hold technique for lung pO2 mapping with 3He MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G Wilson; Mugler, John P; Altes, Talissa A; Cai, Jing; Mata, Jaime F; de Lange, Eduard E; Tobias, William A; Cates, Gordon D; Brookeman, James R

    2010-01-01

    A pulse-sequence strategy was developed for generating regional maps of alveolar oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in a single 6-sec breath hold, for use in human subjects with impaired lung function. Like previously described methods, pO2 values are obtained by measuring the oxygen-induced T1 relaxation of inhaled hyperpolarized 3He. Unlike other methods, only two 3He images are acquired: one with reverse-centric and the other with centric phase-encoding order. This phase-encoding arrangement minimizes the effects of regional flip-angle variations, so that an accurate map of instantaneous pO2 can be calculated from two images acquired a few seconds apart. By combining this phase-encoding strategy with variable flip angles, the vast majority of the hyperpolarized magnetization goes directly into the T1 measurement, minimizing noise in the resulting pO2 map. The short-breath-hold pulse sequence was tested in phantoms containing known O2 concentrations. The mean difference between measured and prepared pO2 values was 1 mm Hg. The method was also tested in four healthy volunteers and three lung-transplant patients. Maps of healthy subjects were largely uniform, whereas focal regions of abnormal pO2 were observed in diseased subjects. Mean pO2 values varied with inhaled O2 concentration. Mean pO2 was consistent with normal steady-state values in subjects who inhaled 3He diluted only with room air. Copyright (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Motion management within two respiratory-gating windows: feasibility study of dual quasi-breath-hold technique in gated medical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeho; Kim, Siyong; Park, Yang-Kyun; Youn, Kaylin K.; Keall, Paul; Lee, Rena

    2014-11-01

    A dual quasi-breath-hold (DQBH) technique is proposed for respiratory motion management (a hybrid technique combining breathing-guidance with breath-hold task in the middle). The aim of this study is to test a hypothesis that the DQBH biofeedback system improves both the capability of motion management and delivery efficiency. Fifteen healthy human subjects were recruited for two respiratory motion measurements (free breathing and DQBH biofeedback breathing for 15 min). In this study, the DQBH biofeedback system utilized the abdominal position obtained using an real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) to audio-visually guide a human subject for 4 s breath-hold at EOI and 90% EOE (EOE90%) to improve delivery efficiency. We investigated the residual respiratory motion and the delivery efficiency (duty-cycle) of abdominal displacement within the gating window. The improvement of the abdominal motion reproducibility was evaluated in terms of cycle-to-cycle displacement variability, respiratory period and baseline drift. The DQBH biofeedback system improved the abdominal motion management capability compared to that with free breathing. With a phase based gating (mean ± std: 55  ±  5%), the averaged root mean square error (RMSE) of the abdominal displacement in the dual-gating windows decreased from 2.26 mm of free breathing to 1.16 mm of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.007). The averaged RMSE of abdominal displacement over the entire respiratory cycles reduced from 2.23 mm of free breathing to 1.39 mm of DQBH biofeedback breathing in the dual-gating windows (p-value = 0.028). The averaged baseline drift dropped from 0.9 mm min-1 with free breathing to 0.09 mm min-1 with DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.048). The averaged duty-cycle with an 1 mm width of displacement bound increased from 15% of free breathing to 26% of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.003). The study demonstrated that the DQBH biofeedback

  5. Motion management within two respiratory-gating windows: feasibility study of dual quasi-breath-hold technique in gated medical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taeho; Kim, Siyong; Youn, Kaylin K; Park, Yang-Kyun; Keall, Paul; Lee, Rena

    2014-01-01

    A dual quasi-breath-hold (DQBH) technique is proposed for respiratory motion management (a hybrid technique combining breathing-guidance with breath-hold task in the middle). The aim of this study is to test a hypothesis that the DQBH biofeedback system improves both the capability of motion management and delivery efficiency. Fifteen healthy human subjects were recruited for two respiratory motion measurements (free breathing and DQBH biofeedback breathing for 15 min). In this study, the DQBH biofeedback system utilized the abdominal position obtained using an real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) to audio-visually guide a human subject for 4 s breath-hold at EOI and 90% EOE (EOE 90% ) to improve delivery efficiency. We investigated the residual respiratory motion and the delivery efficiency (duty-cycle) of abdominal displacement within the gating window. The improvement of the abdominal motion reproducibility was evaluated in terms of cycle-to-cycle displacement variability, respiratory period and baseline drift. The DQBH biofeedback system improved the abdominal motion management capability compared to that with free breathing. With a phase based gating (mean ± std: 55  ±  5%), the averaged root mean square error (RMSE) of the abdominal displacement in the dual-gating windows decreased from 2.26 mm of free breathing to 1.16 mm of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.007). The averaged RMSE of abdominal displacement over the entire respiratory cycles reduced from 2.23 mm of free breathing to 1.39 mm of DQBH biofeedback breathing in the dual-gating windows (p-value = 0.028). The averaged baseline drift dropped from 0.9 mm min −1 with free breathing to 0.09 mm min −1 with DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.048). The averaged duty-cycle with an 1 mm width of displacement bound increased from 15% of free breathing to 26% of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.003). The study demonstrated that the DQBH

  6. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, J; Chang, Z; Cai, J; Palta, M; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique

  7. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, J; Chang, Z; Cai, J; Palta, M; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique.

  8. [An Examination of Variable Image Positions in the Aortic Valve Blood Flow Using Phase Contrast MRI: Effect of Breath-holding Methods in Healthy Volunteers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kenichi; Morimoto, Noriyoshi; Fukushima, Sachi

    2015-12-01

    Phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) is a useful tool for evaluating valvular pathology. In addition, PC-MRI can provide a noninvasive assessment of blood flow in an arbitrary cross section. However, the blood flow measurement with breath-hold or free breath PC-MRI may be different from each other because of intrathoracic pressure changing and variable image position. The aim of this study was to find both the optimal breath-hold technique and the image position. Quantitative flow images were acquired in four planes (ascending aorta: Ao, sino-tubular junction: STJ, valsalva sinus: valsalva, left ventricular outflow tract: LVOT), in healthy subjects (n=10). The study protocol was divided into two parts: (1) stroke volume (SV) measured in each slice positions by using inspiration, expiration, and navigation method during normal breathing and (2) SV measured at each breath-hold techniques in the Ao, STJ, valsalva, and LVOT. As a result, (1) SV of the respective measurement positions were not significant by using inspiration, expiration, and navigation method and (2) LVOT SV was significantly lower than Ao, STJ, and valsalva.

  9. Incorrect performance of the breath hold method in the old underestimates cerebrovascular reactivity and goes unnoticed without concomitant blood pressure and end-tidal CO(2) registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, A. van; Wit, H.M. de; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The breath hold maneuver is a convenient and frequently used method to assess cerebrovascular reactivity (CR). This study aimed to assess feasibility and reproducibility of this method in healthy older persons. METHODS: Twenty-five healthy volunteers, aged 75 (SD 4) years,

  10. Measuring vascular reactivity with resting-state blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations: A potential alternative to the breath-holding challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Christen, Thomas; Moseley, Michael E; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Wright, Clinton B; Tamura, Manjula K; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2017-07-01

    Measurement of the ability of blood vessels to dilate and constrict, known as vascular reactivity, is often performed with breath-holding tasks that transiently raise arterial blood carbon dioxide (P a CO 2 ) levels. However, following the proper commands for a breath-holding experiment may be difficult or impossible for many patients. In this study, we evaluated two approaches for obtaining vascular reactivity information using blood oxygenation level-dependent signal fluctuations obtained from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data: physiological fluctuation regression and coefficient of variation of the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal. We studied a cohort of 28 older adults (69 ± 7 years) and found that six of them (21%) could not perform the breath-holding protocol, based on an objective comparison with an idealized respiratory waveform. In the subjects that could comply, we found a strong linear correlation between data extracted from spontaneous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal fluctuations and the blood oxygenation level-dependent percentage signal change during breath-holding challenge ( R 2  = 0.57 and 0.61 for resting-state physiological fluctuation regression and resting-state coefficient of variation methods, respectively). This technique may eliminate the need for subject cooperation, thus allowing the evaluation of vascular reactivity in a wider range of clinical and research conditions in which it may otherwise be impractical.

  11. Breath-hold after forced expiration before removal of the biopsy needle decreased the rate of pneumothorax in CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Lingfeng; Xu, Xingxiang [Subei People' s Hospital of Jiangsu Province, Clinical Medical School of Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001, Jiangsu (China); Song, Yong [Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medical, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu (China); Issahar, Ben-Dov [Pulmonary Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Wu, Jingtao; Zhang, Le; Huang, Qian [Subei People' s Hospital of Jiangsu Province, Clinical Medical School of Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001, Jiangsu (China); Chen, Mingxiang, E-mail: chenmx1129@126.com [Subei People' s Hospital of Jiangsu Province, Clinical Medical School of Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of a breath-hold after forced expiration on the rate of pneumothorax after computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Materials and methods: Between January 2008 and December 2011, percutaneous CT-guided lung biopsy was performed in 440 patients. Two hundred and twenty-one biopsies were performed without (control group) and two hundred and nineteen biopsies were performed with (study group) the study maneuver – a breath-hold after forced expiratory approach. Multivariate analysis was performed between groups for risk factors for pneumothorax, including patient demographics, lesion characteristics, and biopsy technique. Results: A reduced number of pneumothoraces (18 [8.2%] vs 35 [15.8%]; P = 0.014) but no significant difference in rate of drainage catheter insertions (2 [0.9%] vs (4 [1.8%]; P = 0.418) were noted in the study group as compared with the control group. By logistic regression analysis, three factors significantly and independently affected the risk for pneumothorax including lesion size (transverse and longitudinal diameter), distance from pleura and utilizing or avoiding the breath-hold after deep expiration maneuver. Conclusion: Breath-holding after forced expiration before removal of the biopsy needle during the percutaneous CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy almost halved the rate of overall pneumothorax. Small lesion size (longitudinal diameter) and the distance from pleura were also predictors of pneumothorax in our study.

  12. Changes in Respiratory Parameters and Fin-Swimming Performance Following a 16-Week Training Period with Intermittent Breath Holding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavrou Vasileios

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of training with intermittent breath holding (IBH on respiratory parameters, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2 and performance. Twenty-eight fin-swimming athletes were randomly divided into two groups and followed the same training for 16 weeks. About 40% of the distance of each session was performed with self-selected breathing frequency (SBF group or IBH (IBH group. Performance time of 50 and 400 m at maximum intensity was recorded and forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC, peak expiratory flow (PEF and SpO2 were measured before and after the 50 m test at baseline and post-training. Posttraining, the respiratory parameters were increased in the IBH but remained unchanged in the SBF group (FEV1: 17 ±15% vs. -1 ±11%; FVC: 22 ±13% vs. 1 ±10%; PEF: 9 ±14% vs. -4 ±15%; p<0.05. Pre compared to post-training SpO2 was unchanged at baseline and decreased post-training following the 50 m test in both groups (p<0.05. The reduction was higher in the IBH compared to the SBF group (p<0.05. Performance in the 50 and 400 m tests improved in both groups, however, the improvement was greater in the IBH compared to the SBF group in both 50 and 400 m tests (p<0.05. The use of IBH is likely to enhance the load on the respiratory muscles, thus, contributing to improvement of the respiratory parameters. Decreased SpO2 after IBH is likely due to adaptation to hypoventilation. IBH favours performance improvement at 50 and 400 m fin-swimming.

  13. Changes in Respiratory Parameters and Fin-Swimming Performance Following a 16-Week Training Period with Intermittent Breath Holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, Vasileios; Toubekis, Argyris G; Karetsi, Eleni

    2015-12-22

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of training with intermittent breath holding (IBH) on respiratory parameters, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and performance. Twenty-eight fin-swimming athletes were randomly divided into two groups and followed the same training for 16 weeks. About 40% of the distance of each session was performed with self-selected breathing frequency (SBF group) or IBH (IBH group). Performance time of 50 and 400 m at maximum intensity was recorded and forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow (PEF) and SpO2 were measured before and after the 50 m test at baseline and post-training. Post-training, the respiratory parameters were increased in the IBH but remained unchanged in the SBF group (FEV1: 17 ±15% vs. -1 ±11%; FVC: 22 ±13% vs. 1 ±10%; PEF: 9 ±14% vs. -4 ±15%; p<0.05). Pre compared to post-training SpO2 was unchanged at baseline and decreased post-training following the 50 m test in both groups (p<0.05). The reduction was higher in the IBH compared to the SBF group (p<0.05). Performance in the 50 and 400 m tests improved in both groups, however, the improvement was greater in the IBH compared to the SBF group in both 50 and 400 m tests (p<0.05). The use of IBH is likely to enhance the load on the respiratory muscles, thus, contributing to improvement of the respiratory parameters. Decreased SpO2 after IBH is likely due to adaptation to hypoventilation. IBH favours performance improvement at 50 and 400 m fin-swimming.

  14. Comparison of transient severe motion in gadoxetate disodium and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI: effect of modified breath-holding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji Soo; Choi, Eun Jung; Park, Eun Hae; Lee, Ju-Hyung

    2018-03-01

    To compare the occurrence of transient severe motion (TSM) between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI and between gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI scans obtained with and without the application of a modified breath-holding technique. We reviewed 80 patients who underwent two magnetic resonance examinations (gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI) with the application of a modified breath-holding technique (dual group). This group was compared with 100 patients who underwent gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI without the application of the modified breath-holding technique (single group). Patient risk factors and motion scores (1 [none] to 5 [non-diagnostic]) for each dynamic-phase imaging were analysed. In the dual group, mean motion scores did not differ significantly between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI (p=0.096-0.807) in any phase. However, in all phases except the late dynamic phase, mean motion scores of the dual group were significantly lower than those in the single group. TSM incidence did not differ significantly between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI in the dual group (3.8% vs. 1.3%, p=0.620). With proper application of the modified breath-holding technique, TSM occurrence with gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI was comparable to that associated with gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI. • The modified breath-holding method significantly reduced the incidence of TSM. • Gadoxetate disodium and gadopentetate dimeglumine showed comparable motion scores. • TSM incidence was comparable between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI.

  15. Breath-hold technique in conventional APPA or intensity-modulated radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Comparison of ILROG IS-RT and the GHSG IF-RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, Jan; Spickermann, Max; Lehrich, Philipp; Reinartz, Gabriele; Eich, Hans; Haverkamp, Uwe [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Schmidberger, Heinz [University Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    The present study addresses the role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in contrast to standard RT (APPA) for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) with a focus on deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique and a comparison between the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) Involved Site Radiotherapy (IS-RT) versus the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) Involved Field Radiotherapy (IF-RT). APPA treatment and 2 IMRT plans were compared for 11 patients with HL. Furthermore, treatment with DIBH versus free breathing (FB) and two different treatment volumes, i.e. IF-RT versus IS-RT, were compared. IMRT was planned as a sliding-window technique with 5 and 7 beam angles. For each patient 12 different treatment plans were calculated (132 plans). Following organs at risk (OAR) were analysed: lung, heart, spinal cord, oesophagus, female breast and skin. Comparisons of the different values with regard to dose-volume histograms (DVH), conformity and homogeneity indices were made. IS-RT reduces treatment volumes. With respect to the planning target volume (PTV), IMRT achieves better conformity but the same homogeneity. Regarding the D{sub mean} for the lung, IMRT shows increased doses, while RT in DIBH reduces doses. The IMRT shows improved values for D{sub max} concerning the spinal cord, whereas the APPA shows an improved D{sub mean} of the lung and the female breast. IS-RT reduces treatment volumes. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy shows advantages in the conformity. Treatment in DIBH also reduces the dose applied to the lungs and the heart. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Auswertung ist es, die konventionelle APPA-Feldanordnung mit der Intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie (IMRT) bei Patienten mit Hodgkin-Lymphom (HL) zu vergleichen. Ein besonderer Fokus liegt hierbei auf der Bestrahlung in tiefer Inspiration und Atemanhaltetechnik (DIBH). Des Weiteren wurde die ''Involved-site''-Radiotherapie (IS-RT) der International

  16. SU-E-T-361: Clinical Benefit of Automatic Beam Gating Mixed with Breath Hold in Radiation Therapy of Left Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J; Hill, G; Spiegel, J; Ye, J; Mehta, V

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical and dosimetric benefits of automatic gating of left breast mixed with breath-hold technique. Methods: Two Active Breathing Control systems, ABC2.0 and ABC3.0, were used during simulation and treatment delivery. The two systems are different such that ABC2.0 is a breath-hold system without beam control capability, while ABC3.0 has capability in both breath-hold and beam gating. At simulation, each patient was scanned twice: one with free breathing (FB) and one with breath hold through ABC. Treatment plan was generated on the CT with ABC. The same plan was also recalculated on the CT with FB. These two plans were compared to assess plan quality. For treatments with ABC2.0, beams with MU > 55 were manually split into multiple subfields. All subfields were identical and shared the total MU. For treatment with ABC3.0, beam splitting was unnecessary. Instead, treatment was delivered in gating mode mixed with breath-hold technique. Treatment delivery efficiency using the two systems was compared. Results: The prescribed dose was 50.4Gy at 1.8Gy/fraction. The maximum heart dose averaged over 10 patients was 46.0±2.5Gy and 24.5±12.2Gy for treatments with FB and with ABC respectively. The corresponding heart V10 was 13.2±3.6% and 1.0±1.6% respectively. The averaged MUs were 99.8±7.5 for LMT, 99.2±9.4 for LLT. For treatment with ABC2.0, normally the original beam was split into 2 subfields. The averaged total time to delivery all beams was 4.3±0.4min for treatments with ABC2.0 and 3.3±0.6min for treatments with ABC3.0 in gating mode. Conclusion: Treatment with ABC tremendously reduced heart dose. Compared to treatments with ABC2.0, gating with ABC3.0 reduced the total treatment time by 23%. Use of ABC3.0 improved the delivery efficiency, and eliminated the possibility of mistreatments. The latter may happen with ABC2.0 where beam is not terminated when breath signal falls outside of the treatment window

  17. Comparative study and clinical implementation of two breathing-adapted radiotherapy techniques: dosimetric benefits for lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, L.; Giraud, P.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Servois, V.

    2006-01-01

    Breathing can lead to organ motions up to several centimeters. For radiotherapy of lung, these motions are generally taken into account by adding a specific margin around the target. Thus, treated volumes are often too large to allow for the high-dose values requested for local control. To manage respiratory motion, deep-inspiration breath-hold technique (DIBH) and gated radiotherapy are starting being used clinically. DIBH consists in asking the patient to perform breath-hold during the treatment and the image acquisition, DIBH level being measured by a spirometer. Gated radiotherapy consists in treating the patient at a certain phase of the free breathing. Linac is synchronized with the motion of a marker' located on the patient chest. Planning images are obtained by a four-dimensional CT (4D-CT) using the same marker. We have assessed the value of these two methods. For lung treatment, compared to a standard treatment, toxicity reduction was mainly due to the lung total volume increase.; It is therefore more significant for breath-hold approach. It is also due to the reduction of safety margins, which is similar for both methods. These two techniques, which have specific advantages and drawbacks, are used routinely at Curie Institute for a large proportion of lung patients, but also for some breast, liver or even Hodgkin disease treatments. (author)

  18. Efficacy of a Brief Psychoeducational Intervention for Mothers of Children with Breath-Holding Spells: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolat, Nurullah; Eliacik, Kayi; Sargin, Enis; Kanik, Ali; Baydan, Figen; Sarioglu, Berrak

    2016-08-01

    Objective Mothers of individuals with breath-holding spells (BHS) suffer more often from anxiety and experience more stressors in their everyday life. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of psychoeducational intervention in reducing BHS and coping with these spells. Participants and Methods Mothers who have children with BHS were randomly assigned to one of the two groups: an intervention group receiving psychoeducational therapy in addition to the routine follow-up (n = 31) and a control group who did not receive psychoeducation in their routine follow-up (n = 28). The data collected at the beginning of the study and at the end of 3rd and 6th months about the frequency of the spells per month, maternal anxiety, and depression levels and mothers' perceived self-knowledge about coping BHS of both groups were compared. Results Mothers in psychoeducation group, compared with controls, improved significantly on state anxiety, depression, perceived anticipation anxiety level for BHS of their children and self-knowledge about coping with the spells. Conclusion The intervention program had a positive effect on anxiety-depression levels of the mothers and the frequency of BHS among the children. The possible link between emotional and autonomic dysregulation in children with BHS and maternal mental health were discussed. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. [Cerebral vasoreactivity: Concordance of breath holding test and acetazolamide injection in current practice: 20 cases of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bortoli, M; Maillet, A; Skopinski, S; Sassoust, G; Constans, J; Boulon, C

    2017-10-01

    Cerebral vasoreactivity (CVR) is the ability of the brain's vascular system to keep cerebral blood inflow stable. Impaired CVR is a risk marker of stroke in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. The gold standard to assess CVR with transcranial ultrasound is acetazolamide (ACTZ) injection. The breath holding test (BHT) might be easier to perform. CVR proved to be efficient in laboratory conditions but not in routine practice. To study the validity of BHT versus ACTZ in routine practice in a vascular exploration unit in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Study of concordance of BHT and ACTZ, to assess CVR in patients consecutively explored on the same day. Eighteen patients with 20 carotid stenosis were included. The temporal window was missing in 20% of cases. Only 11 out of the 20 procedures were analyzed. Concordance was low between BHT and ACTZ to assess CVR (k=0.3714). BHT cannot replace ACTZ injection. It might be a first-step test so that ACTZ injection might be avoided if CVR is normal. Our present results must be confirmed by further study enrolling many more patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Paediatric breath-holding spells are associated with autonomic dysfunction and iron deficiency may play a role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoum, H; Habeeb, N; Elagouza, I; Mobarez, H

    2018-04-01

    This study assessed cardiac performance and iron in subjects aged 12-36 months with breath-holding spells (BHSs). We consecutively recruited 40 subjects (55% male) experiencing BHSs from the general paediatric outpatients department at the Children's Hospital, Ain Shams University, Egypt, from 2015 to 2016. The 20 matched comparisons were mainly healthy siblings. The workup included iron levels and electrocardiograms. The age at the onset of BHSs was 5-24 months with a median monthly frequency of 13. Almost two-thirds of the patients had cyanotic spells, and one-third had pallid spells, lasting 25-90 seconds. Lower serum iron levels and higher QT dispersion and T-wave dispersion were recorded in patients than the comparison group, and 4.8% had dysrhythmia and bradycardia. We observed higher durations of bradycardia during attacks and higher occurrences of dysrhythmia during cyanotic spells, which were more frequent in patients with prolonged or frequent BHSs. Our study of patients aged 12-13 months supported the theory of autonomic dysfunction in BHSs. The ECG findings, especially in patients with prolonged or frequent spells, need to be studied further to evaluate the risk of life-threatening events. Iron deficiency may play a role in autonomic dysfunction in patients with BHSs. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Parental attitude, depression, anxiety in mothers, family functioning and breath-holding spells: A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliacik, Kayi; Bolat, Nurullah; Kanik, Ali; Sargin, Enis; Selkie, Ellen; Korkmaz, Nurhan; Baydan, Figen; Akar, Ebru; Sarioglu, Berrak

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to identify differences in the antenatal stressful life events, parenting style, family functioning, depression and anxiety of mothers who have children with breath-holding spells (BHS) compared with controls. This case control study divided 66 children into a group of children with BHS and a control group, with the children's ages ranging between 6 months and 5 years of age. This study explored underlying anxiety and depression in mothers as well as functioning of their families. Socio-demographical data and stressful life events that the mother experienced during pregnancy were analysed. In order to evaluate the effects of family structure, depression and anxiety in mothers on BHS in children, the Family Assessment Device, and both the Parental Attitude Research Instrument and the Beck Depression Inventory as well as the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory were used to assess both groups. Exposure to stressful life events during pregnancy (P maternal characteristics (P = 0.027) and most of the family functioning subscales were found to be significantly different between BHS and control groups. The association of anxiety, depression, prenatal stressful events and poor family functioning in mothers who have children with BHS is significantly higher than controls. An evaluation of these problems may be beneficial in the management of BHS. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  2. Study of breath-holding spell and its triggering factors in Children’s Hospital Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashrafi MR

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate breath-holding spell (BHS and its triggering factors, 47 children with BHS admitted to the out patients clinic of Children's hospital medical center, between Sept 1998-June 1999, were included in this prospective study. Diagnosis of BHS was made for cases by medical history, pediatric physical examination, EEG, ECG and lab findings. 4 cases were excluded from study because of paroxysmal epileptic discharges at their EEGs. Of 43 cases having BHS (M:F: 1.15:1, 74.4% were less there 24 months of age (Mean age 18.4 mo. 77% of patients had onset of BHS within 12 months of age. Family history of BHS in first degree relatives were found in 51% of patients. Parent consanguinity were found in 30% of cases. The commonest type of BHS were cyanotic (79.1%. Pallid (11.6% and mixed (9.3% were other types. Pain and anger were the commonest triggering factors. 78% of cases were iron deficient and 53% of cases had iron deficiency anemia.

  3. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueck, Jenny; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony; Albertini, Francesca; Persson, Gitte F.; Josipovic, Mirjana; Aznar, Marianne; Weber, Damien C.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery uncertainties resulting from interfractional motion. Methods and Materials: Data from 15 patients with peripheral lung tumors previously treated with stereotactic radiation therapy were included in this study. The patients had 1 computed tomographic (CT) scan in voluntary breath-hold acquired before treatment and 3 scans during the treatment course. PBS proton treatment plans with 2 fields (2F) and 3 fields (3F), respectively, were calculated based on the planning CT scan and subsequently recalculated on the 3 repeated CT scans. Recalculated plans were considered robust if the V 95% (volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose) of the gross target volume (GTV) was within 5% of what was expected from the planning CT data throughout the simulated treatment. Results: A total of 14/15 simulated treatments for both 2F and 3F met the robustness criteria. Reduced V 95% was associated with baseline shifts (2F, P=.056; 3F, P=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V 95% (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). Conclusions: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy. Potential risk factors for reduced V 95% are small targets in combination with large baseline shifts. On the basis of these results, the baseline shift of the tumor should be monitored (eg, through image guided therapy), and appropriate measures should be taken accordingly. The intrafractional motion needs to be investigated to confirm that the breath-hold approach is robust.

  4. PET/CT-guided percutaneous liver mass biopsies and ablations: Targeting accuracy of a single 20 s breath-hold PET acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyn, P.B.; Tatli, S.; Sahni, V.A.; Sadow, C.A.; Forgione, K.; Mauri, G.; Morrison, P.R.; Catalano, P.J.; Silverman, S.G.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether a single 20 s breath-hold positron-emission tomography (PET) acquisition obtained during combined PET/computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous liver biopsy or ablation procedures has the potential to target 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-avid liver masses as accurately as up to 180 s breath-hold PET acquisitions. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 10 adult patients with 13 liver masses who underwent FDG PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsies (n = 5) or ablations (n = 5). PET was acquired as nine sequential 20 s, monitored, same-level breath-hold frames and CT was acquired in one monitored breath-hold. Twenty, 40, 60, and 180 s PET datasets were reconstructed. Two blinded readers marked tumour centres on randomized PET and CT datasets. Three-dimensional spatial localization differences between PET datasets and either 180 s PET or CT were analysed using multiple regression analyses. Statistical tests were two-sided and p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Targeting differences between 20 s PET and 180 s PET ranged from 0.7–20.3 mm (mean 5.3 ± 4.4 mm; median 4.3) and were not statistically different from 40 or 60 s PET (p = 0.74 and 0.91, respectively). Targeting differences between 20 s PET and CT ranged from 1.4–36 mm (mean 9.6 ± 7.1 mm; median 8.2 mm) and were not statistically different from 40, 60, or 180 s PET (p = 0.84, 0.77, and 0.35, respectively). Conclusion: Single 20 s breath-hold PET acquisitions from PET/CT-guided percutaneous liver procedures have the potential to target FDG-avid liver masses with equivalent accuracy to 180 s summed, breath-hold PET acquisitions and may facilitate strategies that improve image registration and shorten procedure times

  5. Less increase of CT-based calcium scores of the coronary arteries. Effect three years after breast-conserving radiotherapy using breath-hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, M.E.; Kempen-Harteveld, M.L. van; Petoukhova, A.L. [Centre West, Radiotherapy, The Hague (Netherlands); Heijenbrok, M.W. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Radiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Scholten, A.N. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wolterbeek, R. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Statistics and Bioinformatics, Leiden (Netherlands); Schreur, J.H.M. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Cardiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Struikmans, H. [Centre West, Radiotherapy, The Hague (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-10-15

    The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to compare coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores determined before the start of whole breast irradiation with those determined 3 years afterwards. Changes in CAC scores were analysed in 99 breast cancer patients. Three groups were compared: patients receiving left- and right-sided radiotherapy, and those receiving left-sided radiotherapy with breath-hold. We analysed overall CAC scores and left anterior descending (LAD) and right coronary artery (RCA) CAC scores. Between the three groups, changes of the value of the LAD minus the RCA CAC scores of each individual patient were also compared. Three years after breath-hold-based whole breast irradiation, a less pronounced increase of CAC scores was noted. Furthermore, LAD minus RCA scores in patients treated for left-sided breast cancer without breath-hold were higher when compared to LAD minus RCA scores of patients with right-sided breast cancers and those with left-sided breast cancer treated with breath-hold. Breath-hold in breast-conserving radiotherapy leads to a less pronounced increase of CT-based CAC scores. Therefore, breath-hold probably prevents the development of radiation-induced coronary artery disease. However, the sample size of this study is limited and the follow-up period relatively short. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser prospektiven Langzeitstudie war der Vergleich der Coronary-Artery-Calcium-(CAC-)Werte vor Beginn der Brustbestrahlung mit den Werten nach 3 Jahren. Aenderungen der CAC-Werte wurden bei 99 Brustkrebspatienten analysiert. Drei Gruppen wurden untersucht: Patienten nach links- und rechtsseitiger Strahlentherapie sowie mit Bestrahlung unter Atemanhalt. Wir analysierten die Gesamt-CAC-Werte sowie die CAC-Werte der vorderen linken absteigenden (''left anterior descending'', LAD) und der rechten Koronararterie (''right coronary artery'', RCA). Zwischen den drei Gruppen wurden auch die Veraenderungen

  6. Breath-holding during the Calibration Scan Improves the Reproducibility of Parallel Transmission at 7T for Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Taisuke; Kudo, Kohsuke; Uwano, Ikuko; Yamashita, Fumio; Kameda, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Makoto; Shirato, Hiroki

    2017-01-10

    The B0 and B1+ maps required for calculation of the radiofrequency (RF) pulse of parallel transmission (pTx) are obtained in calibration scans; however, they may be affected by respiratory motion. We aimed to compare the reproducibility of B0 and B1+ maps and gradient echo (GRE) images of the brain scanned with pTx at 7T between free-breathing (FB) and breath-holding (BH) conditions during the calibration scan. Nine healthy volunteers were scanned by 7T MRI using a two-channel quadrature head coil. In the pTx calibration scans performed with FB and BH, the B0 map was obtained from two different TE images and the B1+ map was calculated by the Bloch-Siegert method. A GRE image (gradient-recalled-acquisition in steady state) was also obtained with RF shimming and RF design of pTx with spoke method, as well as quadrature transmission (qTx). All the scans were repeated over five sessions. The reproducibility of the B0 and B1+ maps and GRE image was evaluated with region-of-interest measurements using inter-session standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation (CV) values. Intensity homogeneity of GRE images was also assessed with in-plane CV. Inter-session SDs of B0 and B1+ maps were significantly smaller in BH (P < 0.01). Inter-session CVs of GRE images were significantly smaller in qTx than BH and FB (P < 0.01, both); however, the CVs of BH were significantly smaller (P < 0.01). In-plane CVs of FB and BH with RF shimming were not significantly different with qTx; however, CVs of FB and BH with RF design were significantly smaller than those of qTx (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). BH could improve the reproducibility of B0 and B1+ maps in pTx calibration scans and GRE images. These results might facilitate the development of pTx in human brain at 7T.

  7. Evaluation of hemodynamic changes by use of phase-contrast MRI for patients with interstitial pneumonia, with special focus on blood flow reduction after breath-holding and bronchopulmonary shunt flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Nanae; Ayukawa, Yuichiro; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of interstitial pneumonia on pulmonary, systemic, and bronchopulmonary shunt flow. Phase-contrast flow measurements in the ascending aorta and pulmonary trunk were performed during free breathing and inspiratory breath-holding by use of a 1.5 T MR scanner. The study population comprised 11 patients with interstitial pneumonia and 15 healthy volunteers. Absolute blood flow, bronchopulmonary shunt flow, and difference in flow between normal breathing and breath-holding were compared between the groups. Both pulmonary and systemic blood flow during both breathing patterns in patients were significantly reduced compared with the volunteers (p breath-holding. The bronchopulmonary shunt was not increased in interstitial pneumonia patients, probably because of stiffness of the bronchial arteries.

  8. Breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT in neuroendocrine tumors: detection of additional lesions and effects on quantitative parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirnsak, Mariana; Bärwolf, Robert; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2016-11-08

    Respiratory motion during PET/CT acquisition generates artifacts in the form of breath-related blurring, which influences the lesion detectability and diagnostic accuracy. The goal of this study was to verify whether breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT (bhPET) allows detection of additional foci compared to free-breathing PET/CT (fbPET), and to assess the impact of breath-holding on standard uptake values (SUV) and isocontoured volume (Vic40) in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Patients with NET (n=39) were included in this study. BhPET and fbPET characteristics of 96 lesions were compared, and correlated with standard contrast-enhanced (ce) CT and MRI for lesion verification. Quantitative parameters SUV (max and mean) and Vic40 were assessed for both methods and evaluated by linear regression and Spearman's correlation. The impact of lesion size, localization and time interval between investigations was also analyzed. bhPET identified one additional metastasis not seen at fbPET but visible at ceMRI. Another additional bhPET focus did not have a morphological correlate. At bhPET, the SUVmax and SUVmean proved significantly higher and the Vic40 significantly lower than at fbPET. Lesion size, localization and time intervals did not impact significantly on SUV or Vic40. Currently, routine use of breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT cannot be recommended as only one additional lesion was identified. Therefore, bhPET has currently no indication in patients with NET. If technical improvements regarding PET/CT scanner sensitivity are available, bhPET should be reevaluated in the future.

  9. Feasibility of Pencil Beam Scanned Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy in Breath-hold for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorgisyan, Jenny; Munck Af Rosenschold, Per; Perrin, Rosalind

    2017-01-01

    ) in terms of the percentage of voxels with 3-mm or more undershoot on repeat CT scans. The dose to the organs at risk was similar for the planned and simulated dose distributions. Three or fewer breath-holds per field would be required for 12 of the 15 patients, which was clinically feasible. CONCLUSIONS......: For 9 of 15 NSCLC patients, IMPT in breath-hold was both dosimetrically robust and feasible to deliver regarding the treatment time. Three patients would have required plan adaption to meet the dosimetric criteria. The change in water-equivalent path length is an indicator of plan robustness and should...... be considered for the selection of patients for whom the plan would require adaptation....

  10. Single breath-hold real-time cine MR imaging: improved temporal resolution using generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Dietrich, Olaf; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Rieber, Johannes; Nittka, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test parallel imaging techniques for improvement of temporal resolution in multislice single breath-hold real-time cine steady-state free precession (SSFP) in comparison with standard segmented single-slice SSFP techniques. Eighteen subjects were examined on a 1.5-T scanner using a multislice real-time cine SSFP technique using the GRAPPA algorithm. Global left ventricular parameters (EDV, ESV, SV, EF) were evaluated and results compared with a standard segmented single-slice SSFP technique. Results for EDV (r=0.93), ESV (r=0.99), SV (r=0.83), and EF (r=0.99) of real-time multislice SSFP imaging showed a high correlation with results of segmented SSFP acquisitions. Systematic differences between both techniques were statistically non-significant. Single breath-hold multislice techniques using GRAPPA allow for improvement of temporal resolution and for accurate assessment of global left ventricular functional parameters. (orig.)

  11. Assessment of renal artery stenosis: Comparison of captopril renography and gadolinium-enhanced breath-hold MR angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongers, V.; Bakker, J.; Beutler, J.J.; Beek, F.J.A.; De Klerk, J.M.H

    2000-05-01

    AIM: To determine the accuracy of captopril renography (CR) and gadolinium-enhanced breath-hold magnetic resonance (MR) angiography in the diagnosis of 50-99% renal artery stenosis (RAS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-three patients with possible RAS, of whom 53% had renal function impairment (creatinine >130 {mu}mol/l), were included.{sup 99m}Tc-mercaptoacetyl triglycine (MAG{sub 3}) renography was performed after an oral dose of 25 mg captopril. Gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography was performed on a standard 1.5 Tesla system: TR 13.5, TE 3.5, flip angle 60 deg. , matrix 195 x 512. Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was the standard of reference. RESULTS: Captropril renography accurately categorized 22 of 26 patients who had either uni- or bilateral RAS of 50-99%. The sensitivity and specificity of CR for the detection of 50-99% stenosis were 85 and 71%, respectively. With MR angiography one occluded artery was incorrectly diagnosed as a stenosis. Sensitivity and specificity were 100 and 94%, respectively. The difference between the accuracies of MR angiography and CR was statistically significant (P = 0.02). The accuracy of CR was lower in patients with renal impairment (70%) than in those with normal renal function (90%). CONCLUSION: MR angiography showed a high accuracy in diagnosing RAS of between 50 and 99%. CR was less accurate than MR angiography, especially in patients with renal function impairment. In patients with normal renal function, however, CR remains a useful diagnostic test. Bongers, V. (2000)

  12. Classifying geometric variability by dominant eigenmodes of deformation in regressing tumours during active breath-hold lung cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ahmed M.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Sleeman, William C., IV; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a lung tumour interfraction geometric variability classification scheme as a means to guide adaptive radiotherapy and improve measurement of treatment response. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to generate statistical shape models of the gross tumour volume (GTV) for 12 patients with weekly breath hold CT scans. Each eigenmode of the PCA model was classified as ‘trending’ or ‘non-trending’ depending on whether its contribution to the overall GTV variability included a time trend over the treatment course. Trending eigenmodes were used to reconstruct the original semi-automatically delineated GTVs into a reduced model containing only time trends. Reduced models were compared to the original GTVs by analyzing the reconstruction error in the GTV and position. Both retrospective (all weekly images) and prospective (only the first four weekly images) were evaluated. The average volume difference from the original GTV was 4.3% ± 2.4% for the trending model. The positional variability of the GTV over the treatment course, as measured by the standard deviation of the GTV centroid, was 1.9 ± 1.4 mm for the original GTVs, which was reduced to 1.2 ± 0.6 mm for the trending-only model. In 3/13 cases, the dominant eigenmode changed class between the prospective and retrospective models. The trending-only model preserved GTV and shape relative to the original GTVs, while reducing spurious positional variability. The classification scheme appears feasible for separating types of geometric variability by time trend.

  13. Mind-body relationships in elite apnea divers during breath holding: a study of autonomic responses to acute hypoxemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eLaurino

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The mental control of ventilation with all associated phenomena,from relaxation to modulation of emotions, from cardiovascular tometabolic adaptations, constitutes a psychophysiological conditioncharacterizing voluntary breath holding (BH. BH induces severalautonomic responses, involving both autonomic cardiovascular andcutaneous pathways, whose characterization is the main aim ofthis study. Electrocardiogram and skin conductance (SC recordingswere collected from 14 elite divers during three conditions: freebreathing (FB, normoxic phase of BH (NPBH and hypoxic phaseof BH (HPBH. Thus, we compared a set of features describing signaldynamics between the three experimental conditions: from heart ratevariability features (in time and frequency domains and by usingnonlinear methods to rate and shape of spontaneous SC responses.The main result of the study rises by applying a Factor Analysis tothe subset of features significantly changed in the two BH phases.Indeed, the Factor Analysis allowed to uncover the structure of latentfactors which modeled the autonomic response: a factor describingthe autonomic balance, one the information increase rate, and alatter the central nervous system driver. The BH did not disrupt theFB factorial structure, and only few features moved among factors.Factor Analysis indicates that during BH i only the SC described theemotional output, ii the sympathetic tone on heart did not change, iiithe dynamics of interbeats intervals showed an increase of long rangecorrelation that anticipates the HPBH, followed by a drop to a randombehavior. In conclusion, data show that the autonomic control onheart rate and skin conductance are differentially modulated duringBH, which could be related to a more pronounced effect on emotionalcontrol induced by the mental training to BH.

  14. Improved quality of life after treatment of prolonged asystole during breath holding spells with a cardiac pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolterer, Bruno; Gebauer, Roman Antonin; Janousek, Jan; Dähnert, Ingo; Riede, Frank Thomas; Paech, Christian

    2015-01-01

    To validate the physical and psychological effectiveness of cardiac pacing in pediatric patients with breath-holding spells (BHS) and prolonged asystole. The records and clinical data of all the patients with BHS who presented to our center in the period of 2001-2013 were reviewed. All patients who received cardiac pacemaker implantation for prolonged asystole during BHS were included. In addition, the parents were asked to fill out a standardized quality of life (QOL) questionnaire. Seven patients were identified. The mean onset of symptoms was 7 month (1-12 months) of age, documented asystole was 12-21 seconds, and a permanent cardiac pacemaker device was implanted at a mean age of 23 months (8 months-3.9 years). No pacemaker related adverse events were recorded. Follow up showed immediate resolution from spells in four cases (4/7). Two patients (2/7) showed significant reduction of frequency and severity of spells, with complete elimination of loss of consciousness (LOC). One patient (1/7) with an additional neurologic disorder continued to have minor pallid BHS and eventually switched from pallid to cyanotic spells without further detection of bradycardia or asystole in holter examination. QOL questionnaire revealed significant reduction in subjective stress levels of patients (P = 0.012) and parents (P = 0.007) after pacemaker implantation. Cardiac pacing using appropriate pacemaker settings seems effective in the prevention of LOC and reduction of the frequency of BHS. Our results imply a reduction of subjective stress levels of patients and parents as well as an increased quality of everyday life. After all, randomized controlled trials of the influence of cardiac pacemaker implantation on subjective stress levels in patients with BHS are needed.

  15. Evaluation of Vasomotor Reactivity by Transcranial Doppler Sonography: Age and Sex Related Differences in Breath Holding Index in Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SA Mousavi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The assessment of cerebral vasoreactivity can provide information regarding the reserve capacity of cerebral circulation. Reduction of this property has been found in association with situations predisposing one toward cerebrovascular disease. In this study, we defined the vasoreactivity of brain vesseles according to age and sex of the patients. Methods: In this descriptive study, 289 healthy subjects (without hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, smoking, CHF, CHD, were admitted from January 2004 to June 2004. The population was divided to four groups, according to age and sex (women and men more and less than 30. After determination of each patient’s flow velocity of middle cerebral artery (MCA by mean of a transcranial doppler instrument (TCD, before and after 30s apnea, breath holding index (BHI was calculated. Data was analyzed, using SPSS software. Results: BHI was significantly higher in women than men (0.918±0.40 versus 0.637±0.22; P<0.001. BHI was significantly lower in older (age > 30 women (0.812±0.31 than in younger ( ≤ 30 years women (0.995±0.44; P<0.001 but there was no significant difference between older (age > 30 men (0.62±0.23 and younger ( ≤ 30 years men (0.65±0.20; P > 0.05. Conclusion: The average of BHI was lower in men than in women in total and in all age subgroups. BHI was relatively constant in all age subgroups in men but there was significant decline in BHI by increasing age in women. So despite of many physiologic changes related to aging, vasomotor reactivity remains relatively constant in men but decreases in women. Findings of our study suggest that changes of cerebrovascular vasomotor reactivity in healthy subjects may be related to aging, but they are probably mainly influenced by sex. Keywords: vasomotor reactivity, BHI, TCD

  16. Multimodal investigation of fMRI and fNIRS derived breath hold BOLD signals with an expanded balloon model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emir, U E; Ozturk, C; Akin, A

    2008-01-01

    Multimodal investigation of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals, using both functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), may give further insight to the underlying physiological principles and the detailed transient dynamics of the vascular response. Utilizing a breath hold task (BHT), we measured deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR) and oxy-hemoglobin (HbO) changes via fNIRS and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) changes by fMRI. Measurements were taken in four volunteers asynchronously and carefully aligned for comparative analysis. In order to describe the main stimulus in BHT, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO 2 ) parameter was integrated into the balloon model as the driving function of cerebral blood flow (CBF) which led to the development of an expanded balloon model (EBM). During BHT, the increase in HbR was observed later than the BOLD peak and coincided temporally with its post-stimulus undershoot. Further investigation of these transients with a PaCO 2 integrated balloon model suggests that post-stimulus undershoot measured by fMRI is dominated by slow return of cerebral blood volume (CBV). This was confirmed by fNIRS measurements. In addition, the BOLD signal decreased with the increase of the initial level of PaCO 2 derived from EBM, indicating an effect of basal CBF level on the BOLD signal. In conclusion, a multimodal approach with an appropriate biophysical model gave a comprehensive description of the hemodynamic response during BHT

  17. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fin, Loic; Daouk, Joel; Morvan, Julie; Esper, Isabelle El; Saidi, Lazhar; Meyer, Marc-Etienne; Bailly, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUV MAX and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUV MAX (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  18. Assessment of left ventricular function with single breath-hold highly accelerated cine MRI combined with guide-point modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmaier, Christina; Nassenstein, Kai; Nielles-Vallespin, Sonia; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Hunold, Peter; Barkhausen, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the performance of highly accelerated cine MRI in multi-orientations combined with a new guide-point modeling post-processing technique (GPM approach) for assessment of left ventricular (LV) function compared to the standard summation of slices method based on a stack of short axis views (SoS approach). Materials and methods: 33 consecutive patients were examined on a 1.5 T scanner with a standard steady state free precession (SSFP) sequence (TR, 3.0 ms; TE, 1.5 m; flip angle (FA), 60 o ; acceleration factor (AF), 2) analyzed with the SoS method and a highly accelerated, single breath-hold temporal parallel acquisition SSFP sequence (TR, 4.6 ms; TE, 1.1 ms; AF, 3) post-processed with the GPM method. LV function values were measured by two independent readers with different experience in cardiac MRI and compared by using the paired t-test and F-test. Inter- and intraobserver agreements were calculated using Bland-Altman-Plots. Results: Mean acquisition and post-processing time was significantly shorter with the GPM approach (15 s/3 min versus 360 s/6 min). For all LV function parameters interobserver agreement between the experienced and non-experienced reader was significantly improved when the GPM approach was used. However, end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were larger for the GPM technique when compared to the SoS method (P 0.121). In both readers and for all parameters variances did not differ significantly (P ≥ 0.409) and the two approaches showed an excellent linear correlation (r > 0.951). Conclusion: Due to its accurate, fast and reproducible assessment of LV function parameters highly accelerated MRI combined with the GPM technique may become the technique of first choice for assessment of LV function in clinical routine.

  19. Improved quality of life after treatment of prolonged asystole during breath holding spells with a cardiac pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolterer, Bruno; Gebauer, Roman Antonin; Janousek, Jan; Dähnert, Ingo; Riede, Frank Thomas; Paech, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To validate the physical and psychological effectiveness of cardiac pacing in pediatric patients with breath-holding spells (BHS) and prolonged asystole. Materials and Methods: The records and clinical data of all the patients with BHS who presented to our center in the period of 2001–2013 were reviewed. All patients who received cardiac pacemaker implantation for prolonged asystole during BHS were included. In addition, the parents were asked to fill out a standardized quality of life (QOL) questionnaire. Results: Seven patients were identified. The mean onset of symptoms was 7 month (1–12 months) of age, documented asystole was 12–21 seconds, and a permanent cardiac pacemaker device was implanted at a mean age of 23 months (8 months–3.9 years). No pacemaker related adverse events were recorded. Follow up showed immediate resolution from spells in four cases (4/7). Two patients (2/7) showed significant reduction of frequency and severity of spells, with complete elimination of loss of consciousness (LOC). One patient (1/7) with an additional neurologic disorder continued to have minor pallid BHS and eventually switched from pallid to cyanotic spells without further detection of bradycardia or asystole in holter examination. QOL questionnaire revealed significant reduction in subjective stress levels of patients (P = 0.012) and parents (P = 0.007) after pacemaker implantation. Conclusion: Cardiac pacing using appropriate pacemaker settings seems effective in the prevention of LOC and reduction of the frequency of BHS. Our results imply a reduction of subjective stress levels of patients and parents as well as an increased quality of everyday life. After all, randomized controlled trials of the influence of cardiac pacemaker implantation on subjective stress levels in patients with BHS are needed. PMID:26085761

  20. Influences of prolonged apnea and oxygen inhalation on pulmonary hemodynamics during breath holding: Quantitative assessment by velocity-encoded MR imaging with SENSE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogami, Munenobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan)], E-mail: aznogami@med.kobe-u.ac.jp; Ohno, Yoshiharu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Higashino, Takanori [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Department of Radiology, Tenri Hospital, Tenri, Nara (Japan); Takenaka, Daisuke [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Department of Radiology, Konan Hospital, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Kawamitsu, Hideaki [Division of Radiology, Kobe University Hospital, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Fujii, Masahiko [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Radiology, Kobe University Hospital, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan)

    2007-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to assess the influence of prolonged apnea and administration of oxygen on pulmonary hemodynamics during breath holding (BH) by using velocity-encoded MR imaging combined with the SENSE technique (velocity MRI). Materials and methods: Ten healthy male volunteers underwent velocity MRI during BH with and without O{sub 2} inhalation. All velocity MRI data sets were obtained continuously with the 2D cine phase-contrast method during a single BH period. The data were then divided into three BH time phases as follows: first, second and third. To evaluate the influence of prolonged apnea on hemodynamics, stroke volume (SV) and maximal change in flow rate during ejection (MCFR) of second and third phases were statistically compared with those of first phase by using the ANOVA followed by Turkey's HSD multiple comparison test. To assess the influence of O{sub 2} on hemodynamics, SV and MCFR with or without O{sub 2} were compared by the paired t-test. To assess the measuring agreement of hemodynamic indices during prolonged breath holding, Bland-Altman's analysis was performed. Results: Prolonged apnea had no significant influence on SV and MCFR regardless of administration of O{sub 2} (p > 0.05). Mean MCFR for all phases was significantly lower with administration of O{sub 2} than without (p < 0.05). The limits of agreement for MCFR with O{sub 2} were smaller than without. Conclusion: O{sub 2} inhalation modulated maximal change in flow rate during ejection, and did not influence stroke volume during breath holding. Influence of O{sub 2} inhalation should be considered for MR measurements of pulmonary hemodynamics during breath holding.

  1. Influences of prolonged apnea and oxygen inhalation on pulmonary hemodynamics during breath holding: Quantitative assessment by velocity-encoded MR imaging with SENSE technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Munenobu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Higashino, Takanori; Takenaka, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Koyama, Hisanobu; Kawamitsu, Hideaki; Fujii, Masahiko; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to assess the influence of prolonged apnea and administration of oxygen on pulmonary hemodynamics during breath holding (BH) by using velocity-encoded MR imaging combined with the SENSE technique (velocity MRI). Materials and methods: Ten healthy male volunteers underwent velocity MRI during BH with and without O 2 inhalation. All velocity MRI data sets were obtained continuously with the 2D cine phase-contrast method during a single BH period. The data were then divided into three BH time phases as follows: first, second and third. To evaluate the influence of prolonged apnea on hemodynamics, stroke volume (SV) and maximal change in flow rate during ejection (MCFR) of second and third phases were statistically compared with those of first phase by using the ANOVA followed by Turkey's HSD multiple comparison test. To assess the influence of O 2 on hemodynamics, SV and MCFR with or without O 2 were compared by the paired t-test. To assess the measuring agreement of hemodynamic indices during prolonged breath holding, Bland-Altman's analysis was performed. Results: Prolonged apnea had no significant influence on SV and MCFR regardless of administration of O 2 (p > 0.05). Mean MCFR for all phases was significantly lower with administration of O 2 than without (p 2 were smaller than without. Conclusion: O 2 inhalation modulated maximal change in flow rate during ejection, and did not influence stroke volume during breath holding. Influence of O 2 inhalation should be considered for MR measurements of pulmonary hemodynamics during breath holding

  2. Comparative study of fast T 2-weighted images using respiratory triggered, breath-hold, fat suppression and phased array multi coil for liver evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbehusen, Cristiane L.; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Palacio, Glaucia A.S.; Szejnfeld, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare both qualitatively and quantitatively six T 2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences varying the respiratory compensation technique, associating or not fat tissue suppression and using different types of coils. We performed a prospective study of 71 consecutive patients that were submitted to MRI of the liver using a 1.5 T magnet. The six following pulse sequences were used: fat-suppressed respiratory triggered with conventional body coil; breath-hold fat-suppressed with conventional body coil; non-suppressed respiratory triggered with conventional body coil; breath-hold non fat-suppressed with conventional body coil; fat-suppressed respiratory triggered with phased-array multi coil; breath-hold fat-suppressed with phased-array multi coil. Images were analyzed quantitatively by measuring the signal-to-noise ratios and qualitatively by evaluating the sharpness of hepatic contours, visibility of intrahepatic vessels and other segmental landmarks, and the presence of artifacts. Results: the qualitative analysis showed that the mean values obtained with the six sequences were 7.8, 4.6, 7.9, 5.2, 6.7 and 4.6 respectively. The respiratory-triggered sequences were better than the breath-hold sequences in both qualitative and quantitative analysis (p < 0.001). No significant differences in the values of signal-to-noise ratios and in overall image quality were found between the sequences with and without fat suppression (p . 0.05). The sequences using the body coil were similar in terms of image quality (p . 0.05) and better regarding signal-to-noise ratios than those obtained with the phased=array multi coil (p ,0.001). Our qualitative and quantitative results suggest that the best MRI sequences for the valuation of the liver are the sequences with respiratory triggering using a conventional body coil, with or without fat suppression. (author)

  3. Quantitative analysis of hepatic fat fraction by single-breath-holding MR spectroscopy with T₂ correction: phantom and clinical study with histologic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Norio; Miyati, Tosiaki; Minami, Takashi; Takeshita, Yumie; Ryu, Yasuji; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Ohno, Naoki; Hamaguchi, Takashi; Kato, Kenichiro; Takamura, Toshinari; Matsui, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this study was on the investigation of the accuracy of the fat fraction of the liver by use of single-breath-holding magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with T (2) correction. Single-voxel proton MRS was performed with several TE values, and the fat fraction was determined with and without T (2) correction. MRS was also performed with use of the point-resolved spectroscopy sequence in single breath holding. The T (2) values of both water and fat were determined separately at the same time, and the effect of T (2) on the fat fraction was corrected. In addition, MRS-based fat fractions were compared with the degree of hepatic steatosis (HS) by liver biopsy in human subjects. With T (2) correction, the MRI-derived fat fractions were in good agreement with the fat fractions in all phantoms, but the fat fractions were overestimated without T (2) correction. R (2) values were in good agreement with the preset iron concentrations in the phantoms. The MRI-derived fat fraction was well correlated with the degree of HS. Iron deposited in the liver affects the signal strength when proton MRS is used for detection of the fat signal in the liver. However, the fat signal can be evaluated more accurately when the T (2) correction is applied. Breath-holding MRS minimizes the respiratory motion, and it can be more accurate in the quantification of the hepatic fat fraction.

  4. Diagnosing Lung Nodules on Oncologic MR/PET Imaging: Comparison of Fast T1-Weighted Sequences and Influence of Image Acquisition in Inspiration and Expiration Breath-Hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, Nina F; Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Brendle, Cornelia; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A; laFougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schraml, Christina

    2016-01-01

    First, to investigate the diagnostic performance of fast T1-weighted sequences for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic magnetic resonance (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET). Second, to evaluate the influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold on diagnostic performance. The study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. PET/CT and MR/PET of 44 cancer patients were evaluated by 2 readers. PET/CT included lung computed tomography (CT) scans in inspiration and expiration (CTin, CTex). MR/PET included Dixon sequence for attenuation correction and fast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in inspiration [VIBEin], volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in expiration [VIBEex]). Diagnostic performance was analyzed for lesion-, lobe-, and size-dependence. Diagnostic confidence was evaluated (4-point Likert-scale; 1 = high). Jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. Seventy-six pulmonary lesions were evaluated. Lesion-based detection rates were: CTex, 77.6%; VIBEin, 53.3%; VIBEex, 51.3%; and Dixon, 22.4%. Lobe-based detection rates were: CTex, 89.6%; VIBEin, 58.3%; VIBEex, 60.4%; and Dixon, 31.3%. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus expiration did not alter diagnostic performance in VIBE sequences. Diagnostic confidence was best for VIBEin and CTex and decreased in VIBEex and Dixon (1.2 ± 0.6; 1.2 ± 0.7; 1.5 ± 0.9; 1.7 ± 1.1, respectively). The JAFROC figure-of-merit of Dixon was significantly lower. All patients with malignant lesions were identified by CTex, VIBEin, and VIBEex, while 3 patients were false-negative in Dixon. Fast T1-weighted VIBE sequences allow for identification of patients with malignant pulmonary lesions. The Dixon sequence is not recommended for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic MR/PET patients. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus

  5. Diagnosing lung nodules on oncologic MR/PET imaging: Comparison of fast T1-weighted sequences and influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenzer, Nina F.; Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Brendle, Cornelia; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A; LaFougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schraml, Christina

    2016-01-01

    First, to investigate the diagnostic performance of fast T1-weighted sequences for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic magnetic resonance (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET). Second, to evaluate the influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold on diagnostic performance. The study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. PET/CT and MR/PET of 44 cancer patients were evaluated by 2 readers. PET/CT included lung computed tomography (CT) scans in inspiration and expiration (CTin, CTex). MR/PET included Dixon sequence for attenuation correction and fast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in inspiration [VIBEin], volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in expiration [VIBEex]). Diagnostic performance was analyzed for lesion-, lobe-, and size-dependence. Diagnostic confidence was evaluated (4-point Likert-scale; 1 = high). Jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. Seventy-six pulmonary lesions were evaluated. Lesion-based detection rates were: CTex, 77.6%; VIBEin, 53.3%; VIBEex, 51.3%; a