WorldWideScience

Sample records for decarbonization

  1. NEWS: US DECARBONIZATION OPTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The quest to reduce reliance on energy generating technologies releasing global warming pollutants usch as carbon dioxide and methane has been a target of concern across the world. An analysis of a map leading to decarbonization in the US has recently beeen described. Carbon rish...

  2. Decarbonization Wedges. November 2015. Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alazard-Toux, N.; Criqui, P.; Devezeaux de Lavergne, J.G.; Chevallet, L.; Gentier, S.; Hache, E.; Le Net, E.; Menanteau, Ph.; Thais, Fr.; Achard, JL.; Allard, Fr.; Authier, O.; Babarit, A.; Badin, Fr.; Bazile, F.; Bernard, O.; Birat, JP.; Brault, P.; Burnol, A.; Carre, Fr.; Delrue, F.; Dufour, A.; Duplan, JL.; Durand, P.; Duval, O.; Fabriol, H.; Ferrant, P.; Flamant, G.; Forti, L.; Garnier, J.; Gimenez, M.; Goyeneche, O.; Hadj Said, N.; Jasserand, Fr.; Kalaydjian, F.; Le Boulluec, M.; Legrand, J.; Lorne, D.; Lucchese, P.; Magand, S.; Malbranche, Ph.; Mermillod, N.; Monot, F.; Olivier, B.; Pacaud, P.; Papillon, Ph.; Ponsot-Jacquin, C.; Quenard, D.; Rachez, X.; Rapin, M.; Rocher, Ph.; Sanjuan, B.; Sauvant-Moynot, V.; Tilagone, R.; Vinot, S.; Berthomieu, R.; Vajnovszki, A.

    2015-01-01

    2015 is a particularly eventful year in the field of energy. From 30 November through 11 December, France will host the 21. Conference of the Parties on Climate Change (COP21) in Paris. The expectations for this international event are high. Its main goal is to obtain an agreement to keep global warming below 2 deg. C by securing a set of voluntary commitments from the various countries and regions of the world to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions and by mobilizing $100 billion per year from 2020 onwards to finance climate change policies, especially in developing countries. In France, the year 2015 was also marked by the adoption of the Energy Transition and Green Growth Act that set a course and defined a road-map, through a set of objectives, aimed at helping our country reduce its CO 2 emissions in the field of energy. In this context, ANCRE (French National Alliance for Energy Research Coordination) would like to reiterate the major role of energy research and innovation in reducing anthropogenic (i.e. human induced) greenhouse gas emissions through research conducted on decarbonization wedges, a key technology in the fight against climate change in the field of energy on a planetary scale. Limiting the temperature increase on the earth's surface to 2 deg. C by 2100 is a challenging target, but it could be achievable with the rapid, sustained development and wide dissemination of a broad set of technologies. However, to achieve this goal, it is indispensable to conduct research aimed at speeding up low carbon technologies deployment and at reducing their cost. Through this joint report to which numerous researchers and experts contributed, ANCRE wishes to continue its efforts to build a global strategic vision that an Alliance comprising nearly 19 different research institutions can provide. This study follows the work conducted on energy transition scenarios for France and the road-maps drawn up by the ten programmatic groups structuring the

  3. Decarbonization of Croatian Energy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnik, V.

    2012-01-01

    Energy system decarbonization is reduction of greenhouse gases (CO 2 ) emission, chiefly from the fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas) combustion. The main objective of an energy system decarbonization is the climate change mitigation, and at the same time development of local industry and employment, better environment and health protection, as well as reduction of the fossil fuels import and foreign debt. Croatia has small fossil fuels reserves and large renewable energy sources (RES) reserves, energy efficiency (ENEF) is relatively low, and energy import, according to the actual Energy strategy 2009, should increase from 50% to 70% until 2020. Croatian energy system participates with about one third in the Croatian foreign trade deficit. The main measures of the Croatian energy system decarbonization should be: increasing ENEF (energy savings), switch from fossil fuels to RES, administrative measures (low carbon development strategy, environmental tax reform, and decoupling income from energy sales). By urgent application of these measures, Croatia could become fossil fuels free until the year 2050.(author)

  4. Computing Pathways for Urban Decarbonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremades, R.; Sommer, P.

    2016-12-01

    Urban areas emit roughly three quarters of global carbon emissions. Cities are crucial elements for a decarbonized society. Urban expansion and related transportation needs lead to increased energy use, and to carbon-intensive lock-ins that create barriers for climate change mitigation globally. The authors present the Integrated Urban Complexity (IUC) model, based on self-organizing Cellular Automata (CA), and use it to produce a new kind of spatially explicit Transformation Pathways for Urban Decarbonization (TPUD). IUC is based on statistical evidence relating the energy needed for transportation with the spatial distribution of population, specifically IUC incorporates variables from complexity science related to urban form, like the slope of the rank-size rule or spatial entropy, which brings IUC a step beyond existing models. The CA starts its evolution with real-world urban land use and population distribution data from the Global Human Settlement Layer. Thus, the IUC model runs over existing urban settlements, transforming the spatial distribution of population so the energy consumption for transportation is minimized. The statistical evidence that governs the evolution of the CA departs from the database of the International Association of Public Transport. A selected case is presented using Stuttgart (Germany) as an example. The results show how IUC varies urban density in those places where it improves the performance of crucial parameters related to urban form, producing a TPUD that shows where the spatial distribution of population should be modified with a degree of detail of 250 meters of cell size. The TPUD shows how the urban complex system evolves over time to minimize energy consumption for transportation. The resulting dynamics or urban decarbonization show decreased energy per capita, although total energy increases for increasing population. The results provide innovative insights: by checking current urban planning against a TPUD, urban

  5. Pathways to deep decarbonization - 2015 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribera, Teresa; Colombier, Michel; Waisman, Henri; Bataille, Chris; Pierfederici, Roberta; Sachs, Jeffrey; Schmidt-Traub, Guido; Williams, Jim; Segafredo, Laura; Hamburg Coplan, Jill; Pharabod, Ivan; Oury, Christian

    2015-12-01

    In September 2015, the Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project published the Executive Summary of the Pathways to Deep Decarbonization: 2015 Synthesis Report. The full 2015 Synthesis Report was launched in Paris on December 3, 2015, at a technical workshop with the Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) program. The Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project (DDPP) is a collaborative initiative to understand and show how individual countries can transition to a low-carbon economy and how the world can meet the internationally agreed target of limiting the increase in global mean surface temperature to less than 2 degrees Celsius (deg. C). Achieving the 2 deg. C limit will require that global net emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) approach zero by the second half of the century. In turn, this will require a profound transformation of energy systems by mid-century through steep declines in carbon intensity in all sectors of the economy, a transition we call 'deep decarbonization'

  6. Pathways to deep decarbonization - Interim 2014 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The interim 2014 report by the Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project (DDPP), coordinated and published by IDDRI and the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN), presents preliminary findings of the pathways developed by the DDPP Country Research Teams with the objective of achieving emission reductions consistent with limiting global warming to less than 2 deg. C. The DDPP is a knowledge network comprising 15 Country Research Teams and several Partner Organizations who develop and share methods, assumptions, and findings related to deep decarbonization. Each DDPP Country Research Team has developed an illustrative road-map for the transition to a low-carbon economy, with the intent of taking into account national socio-economic conditions, development aspirations, infrastructure stocks, resource endowments, and other relevant factors. The interim 2014 report focuses on technically feasible pathways to deep decarbonization

  7. Emission pathway modeling to analyze national ambition levels of decarbonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainuma, Mikiko; Waisman, Henri

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project (DDPP) is a knowledge network comprising 15 Country Research Teams and several Partner Organizations which develop and share methods, assumptions, and findings related to deep decarbonization. It analyzes the technical decarbonization potential, exploring options for deep decarbonization, but also better taking into account existing infrastructure stocks. It shows the possibility to reduce total CO 2 -energy emissions by 45% by 2050, with bottom-up analyses by 15 Country Research Teams

  8. Decarbonizing Europe's power sector by 2050 — Analyzing the economic implications of alternative decarbonization pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jägemann, Cosima; Fürsch, Michaela; Hagspiel, Simeon; Nagl, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The European Union aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80–95% in 2050 compared to 1990 levels. The transition towards a low-carbon economy implies the almost complete decarbonization of Europe's power sector, which could be achieved along various pathways. In this paper, we evaluate the economic implications of alternative energy policies for Europe's power sector by applying a linear dynamic electricity system optimization model in over 36 scenarios. We find that the costs of decarbonizing Europe's power sector by 2050 vary between 139 and 633 bn € 2010 , which corresponds to an increase of between 11% and 44% compared to the total system costs when no CO 2 reduction targets are implemented. In line with economic theory, the decarbonization of Europe's power sector is achieved at minimal costs under a stand-alone CO 2 reduction target, which ensures competition between all low-carbon technologies. If, however, renewable energies are exempted from competition via supplementary renewable energy (RES-E) targets or if investments in new nuclear and CCS power plants are politically restricted, the costs of decarbonization significantly rise. Moreover, we find that the excess costs of supplementary RES-E targets depend on the acceptance of alternative low carbon technologies. For example, given a complete nuclear phase-out in Europe by 2050 and politically implemented restrictions on the application of CCS to conventional power plants, supplementary RES-E targets are redundant. While in such a scenario the overall costs of decarbonization are comparatively high, the excess costs of supplementary RES-E targets are close to zero. - Highlights: • We evaluate the economic implications of alternative energy policies for Europe's power sector. • Total decarbonization costs vary between 139 and 633 billion € 2010 up to 2050. • Decarbonization at minimal costs is ensured by competition between all low carbon technologies. • Excess costs of supplementary

  9. Decarbonization and sequestration for mitigating global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, M.

    2000-01-01

    Mitigating the global warming greenhouse effect while maintaining a fossil fuel economy, requires improving efficiency of utilization of fossil fuels, use of high hydrogen content fossil fuels, decarbonization of fossil fuels, and sequestering of carbon and CO 2 applied to all the sectors of the economy, electric power generation, transportation, and industrial, and domestic power and heat generation. Decarbonization means removal of carbon as C or CO 2 either before or after fossil fuel combustion and sequestration means disposal of the recovered C or CO 2 including its utilization. Removal and recovery of CO 2 from power generation plants and sequestration in the ocean represents one possibility of making a major impact on reducing CO 2 emissions to the atmosphere. This paper will briefly review the progress made in ocean disposal and present some alternative schemes. (author)

  10. Decarbonization process for carbothermically produced aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Marshall J.; Carkin, Gerald E.; DeYoung, David H.; Dunlap, Sr., Ronald M.

    2015-06-30

    A method of recovering aluminum is provided. An alloy melt having Al.sub.4C.sub.3 and aluminum is provided. This mixture is cooled and then a sufficient amount of a finely dispersed gas is added to the alloy melt at a temperature of about 700.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. The aluminum recovered is a decarbonized carbothermically produced aluminum where the step of adding a sufficient amount of the finely dispersed gas effects separation of the aluminum from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates by flotation, resulting in two phases with the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates being the upper layer and the decarbonized aluminum being the lower layer. The aluminum is then recovered from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates through decanting.

  11. pathways to deep decarbonization - 2014 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, Jeffrey; Guerin, Emmanuel; Mas, Carl; Schmidt-Traub, Guido; Tubiana, Laurence; Waisman, Henri; Colombier, Michel; Bulger, Claire; Sulakshana, Elana; Zhang, Kathy; Barthelemy, Pierre; Spinazze, Lena; Pharabod, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    The Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project (DDPP) is a collaborative initiative to understand and show how individual countries can transition to a low-carbon economy and how the world can meet the internationally agreed target of limiting the increase in global mean surface temperature to less than 2 degrees Celsius (deg. C). Achieving the 2 deg. C limit will require that global net emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) approach zero by the second half of the century. This will require a profound transformation of energy systems by mid-century through steep declines in carbon intensity in all sectors of the economy, a transition we call 'deep decarbonization.' Successfully transition to a low-carbon economy will require unprecedented global cooperation, including a global cooperative effort to accelerate the development and diffusion of some key low carbon technologies. As underscored throughout this report, the results of the DDPP analyses remain preliminary and incomplete. The DDPP proceeds in two phases. This 2014 report describes the DDPP's approach to deep decarbonization at the country level and presents preliminary findings on technically feasible pathways to deep decarbonization, utilizing technology assumptions and timelines provided by the DDPP Secretariat. At this stage we have not yet considered the economic and social costs and benefits of deep decarbonization, which will be the topic for the next report. The DDPP is issuing this 2014 report to the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in support of the Climate Leaders' Summit at the United Nations on September 23, 2014. This 2014 report by the Deep Decarbonization Pathway Project (DDPP) summarizes preliminary findings of the technical pathways developed by the DDPP Country Research Partners with the objective of achieving emission reductions consistent with limiting global warming to less than 2 deg. C., without, at this stage, consideration of economic and social costs and benefits. The DDPP is a knowledge

  12. Liberating energy from carbon introduction to decarbonization

    CERN Document Server

    Muradov, Nazim

    2014-01-01

    Liberating Energy from Carbon analyzes energy options in a carbon-constrained world. Major strategies and pathways to decarbonizing the carbon-intensive economy are laid out with a special emphasis on the prospects of achieving low-risk atmospheric CO2 levels. The opportunities and challenges in developing and bringing to market novel low and zero-carbon technologies are highlighted from technical, economic and environmental viewpoints. This book takes a unique approach by treating carbon in a holistic manner?tracking its complete transformation chain from fossil fuel sources to the unique pro

  13. Report on the de-carbonated energy industry in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delalande, Daniel; Thabet, Soraya; Morin, Pauline; Menager, Yann; Feffer, Caroline; Breda, Willy; Furois, Timothee; Barber, Nicolas; Lemaire, Yves; Grenon, Georgina; Boukhetaia, Nadia; Strang, Axel; Thomas, Julien; Oeser, Christian; Cavellec, Sabine; Dumiot, Jacques-Emmanuel; Rondeau, Claudine; Leclercq, Martine; Fyot, Julien; Weill, Jonathan; Furois, Timothee; Lieven, Thierry; Marchal, Julien; Boutot, Romary; Perrette, Lionel; Lewis, Florian; Perfezou, Francois

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this report discusses the objectives of de-carbonated energy in France (for the climate, the environment and competitiveness), outlines the importance of energy efficiency, and of public support to de-carbonated energy productions and to research and development in this sector. The second part, illustrated by many data graphs and tables, gives a commented overview of the production of de-carbonated energies in France in 2011 by distinguishing the different energies: bio-fuels, biomass energy, wind energy, renewable sea energies, geothermal energy, hydroelectricity, nuclear energy, photovoltaic and thermodynamic solar energy. The last part addresses the development of CO 2 capture and storage, of fuel cells, of smart grids, of energy storage, and of a de-carbonated vehicle

  14. How to decarbonize the transport sector?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwaan, Bob van der; Keppo, Ilkka; Johnsson, Filip

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates possible evolution pathways for the transport sector during the 21st century, globally and in Europe, under a climate change control scenario. We attempt to shed light on the question how the transport sector should best be decarbonized. We perform our study with the global bottom-up energy systems model TIAM-ECN, a version of the TIAM model that is broadly used for the purpose of developing energy technology and climate policy scenarios, which we adapted for analyzing in particular the transport sector. Given the global aggregated perspective of TIAM-ECN, that in its current version yields at every point in time a single CO 2 price for different forms of energy use across geographic regions and economic sectors, it generates a decarbonization process that for the transport sector occurs later in time than for the power sector. This merely reflects that emission reductions are generally cheaper for electricity production than for transportation, and that it is thus cost-minimizing to spend limited financial resources available for CO 2 emissions abatement in the power sector first. In our scenarios the use of hydrogen in internal combustion engines and fuel cells, rather than electricity as energy carrier and batteries to store it, gradually becomes the dominant transport technology. This outcome is in agreement with some recent publications but is at loggerheads with the current popularity of the electric car. Based on sensitivity analysis we conclude that even if the establishment of a hydrogen infrastructure proves about an order of magnitude more costly than modeled in our base case, electricity based transportation only broadly emerges if simultaneously also the costs of electric cars go down by at least 40% with respect to our reference costs. One of the explanations for why the electric car is today, by e.g. entrepreneurs, often considered the supposed winner amongst multiple future transportation options is that the decision

  15. How to decarbonize the transport sector?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Zwaan, B.; Keppo, I. [Policy Studies Department, Energy research Center of the Netherlands ECN, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Johnsson, F. [Department of Energy and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2013-10-15

    This article investigates possible evolution pathways for the transport sector during the 21st century, globally and in Europe, under a climate change control scenario. We attempt to shed light on the question how the transport sector should best be decarbonized. We perform our study with the global bottom-up energy systems model TIAM-ECN, a version of the TIAM (TIMES Integrated Assessment Model) model that is broadly used for the purpose of developing energy technology and climate policy scenarios, which we adapted for analyzing in particular the transport sector. Given the global aggregated perspective of TIAM-ECN, that in its current version yields at every point in time a single CO2 price for different forms of energy use across geographic regions and economic sectors, it generates a decarbonization process that for the transport sector occurs later in time than for the power sector. This merely reflects that emission reductions are generally cheaper for electricity production than for transportation, and that it is thus cost-minimizing to spend limited financial resources available for CO2 emissions abatement in the power sector first. In our scenarios the use of hydrogen in internal combustion engines and fuel cells, rather than electricity as energy carrier and batteries to store it, gradually becomes the dominant transport technology. This outcome is in agreement with some recent publications but is at loggerheads with the current popularity of the electric car. Based on sensitivity analysis we conclude that even if the establishment of a hydrogen infrastructure proves about an order of magnitude more costly than modeled in our base case, electricity based transportation only broadly emerges if simultaneously also the costs of electric cars go down by at least 40% with respect to our reference costs. One of the explanations for why the electric car is today, by e.g. entrepreneurs, often considered the supposed winner amongst multiple future transportation

  16. Economic Issues in Power System Decarbonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabolic, D.

    2012-01-01

    Achieving the 80% decrease in carbon-dioxide emissions until 2050, which is the primary goal of the European Union's long-term energy policy, assumes, inter alia, that the electricity part of the system will be able to produce at least 96% of electricity from renewable sources. Moreover, the power system in the widest sense of the word should significantly increase its energy efficiency. Such tremendously ambitious goals, which may as well seem almost unattainable from today's perspective, will certainly require hefty capital investments in plants based on clean technologies, thus, the costs of pollution externalities will not be avoidable anymore. They will have to be bore by the society through substantial increase in energy prices relative to other products and services. Today's subvention schemes, which support current development of renewable sources, will have to be completely abandoned until such a distant future as 2050 is. The power system will have to become self-sustainable in an economic sense. This work pertains to economic challenges which face the power system in a forthcoming processes of rapid decarbonization, as well as to some widely-spread blunders about them.(author)

  17. Manifesto for De-carbonizing Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    A month before the first round of the French presidential elections, on 21 March in Paris, the Shift Project, a think-tank on energy transition headed by Matthieu Auzanneau, presented a Manifesto for De-carbonizing Europe. The manifesto, signed in late March by more than 2,500 people - the majority being directors of companies of all sizes and professional organizations, though many are personalities from the French academic world - calls on European states 'to introduce policies capable, by 2050, of reducing greenhouse gas emissions as near as possible to zero'. It also effectively invites candidates in the presidential elections to commit to this course of action. Beyond the borders of France, at a time when President Donald Trump is sending out more than troubling signals to the rest of the world regarding US involvement in the campaign against climate change, the initiative has the virtue of encouraging European states to take a clearly proactive stance on their commitments to the Paris Agreement of late 2015. That proactive attitude is essential to preserve our planet's climate and limit the disruption future generations will have to face. It is also an important signal to the other signatories of the Paris Agreement to honour the commitments made. This is why Futuribles has taken the decision to carry this manifesto for its readers. (authors)

  18. Historical emissions critical for mapping decarbonization pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkut, J.; Kopp, R. E.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Oppenheimer, M.

    2016-12-01

    Policymakers have set a goal of limiting temperature increase from human influence on the climate. This motivates the identification of decarbonization pathways to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2. In this context, the future behavior of CO2 sources and sinks define the CO2 emissions necessary to meet warming thresholds with specified probabilities. We adopt a simple model of the atmosphere-land-ocean carbon balance to reflect uncertainty in how natural CO2 sinks will respond to increasing atmospheric CO2 and temperature. Bayesian inversion is used to estimate the probability distributions of selected parameters of the carbon model. Prior probability distributions are chosen to reflect the behavior of CMIP5 models. We then update these prior distributions by running historical simulations of the global carbon cycle and inverting with observationally-based inventories and fluxes of anthropogenic carbon in the ocean and atmosphere. The result is a best-estimate of historical CO2 sources and sinks and a model of how CO2 sources and sinks will vary in the future under various emissions scenarios, with uncertainty. By linking the carbon model to a simple climate model, we calculate emissions pathways and carbon budgets consistent with meeting specific temperature thresholds and identify key factors that contribute to remaining uncertainty. In particular, we show how the assumed history of CO2 emissions from land use change (LUC) critically impacts estimates of the strength of the land CO2 sink via CO2 fertilization. Different estimates of historical LUC emissions taken from the literature lead to significantly different parameterizations of the carbon system. High historical CO2 emissions from LUC lead to a more robust CO2 fertilization effect, significantly lower future atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and an increased amount of CO2 that can be emitted to satisfy temperature stabilization targets. Thus, in our model, historical LUC emissions have a

  19. Report on the de-carbonated energy sector in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    For different de-carbonated energies, this report presents the available technologies, describes the value chain, presents the regulatory and legal European and French frameworks, gives a brief overview of the world, European and French markets, presents the main actors at the international or French level, briefly presents research projects, and skill centres. The report addresses the following energies: bio-fuels, biomass energy, wind energy, sea energy, photovoltaic energy, thermal solar energy, CO 2 capture and storage, geothermal energy, hydrogen and fuel cells, smart grids, energy storage, nuclear energy, hydroelectricity, and the de-carbonated vehicle

  20. The decrease of CO2 emission intensity is decarbonization at national and global levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    This viewpoint proposes the definition: 'Decarbonization refers to a decrease of CO 2 emission intensity in a trend'. This viewpoint then argues that an analysis of decarbonization at national and global levels based on that definition would lead to the correct calculation of decarbonization

  1. Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torn, M. S.; Williams, J.

    2015-12-01

    Limiting anthropogenic warming to less than 2°C will require a reduction in global net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on the order of 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. Thus, there is a growing need to understand what would be required to achieve deep decarbonization (DD) in different economies. We examined the technical and economic feasibility of such a transition in the United States, evaluating the infrastructure and technology changes required to reduce U.S. GHG emissions in 2050 by 80% below 1990 levels. Using the PATHWAYS and GCAM models, we found that this level of decarbonization in the U.S. can be accomplished with existing commercial or near-commercial technologies, while providing the same level of energy services and economic growth as a reference case based on the U.S. DOE Annual Energy Outlook. Reductions are achieved through high levels of energy efficiency, decarbonization of electric generation, electrification of most end uses, and switching the remaining end uses to lower carbon fuels. Incremental energy system cost would be equivalent to roughly 1% of gross domestic product, not including potential non-energy benefits such as avoided human and infrastructure costs of climate change. Starting now on the deep decarbonization path would allow infrastructure stock turnover to follow natural replacement rates, which reduces costs, eases demand on manufacturing, and allows gradual consumer adoption. Energy system changes must be accompanied by reductions in non-energy and non-CO2 GHG emissions.

  2. Decarbonization of maritime transport: to be or not to be?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Psaraftis, Harilaos N.

    2018-01-01

    International shipping is at a crossroads as regards decarbonization. The Paris climate change agreement in 2015 (COP21) was hailed by many as a most significant achievement. Others were less enthusiastic, and more recently American President Trump decided to take the U.S. out of the agreement. F...

  3. Engineering Electricity Markets for a Decarbonized Energy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenle, Rasmus Ploug; Pallesen, Trine

    Decarbonization of the Danish electricity sector has recently been sought achieved through the introduction of a novel retail electricity market, named EcoGrid, designed to create price responsive consumers. By following the market design process undertaken by engineers at the Technical Universit...... of introducing synthetic markets as means of governance.......Decarbonization of the Danish electricity sector has recently been sought achieved through the introduction of a novel retail electricity market, named EcoGrid, designed to create price responsive consumers. By following the market design process undertaken by engineers at the Technical University...... of Denmark, the analysis addresses the question: how do engineers make markets? The answer to this question as presented here is: engineers design control systems. By tracing the origins of EcoGrid, this paper documents the governing of electricity consumers through a ‘synthetic market’, i.e. a market...

  4. Impacts of National Decarbonization Targets for Subnational Societal Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, W.; Iyer, G.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon mitigation has well-recognized linkages with other environmental and socioeconomic priorities, such as air pollution, economic development, employment, etc. While climate change is a global issue, many other societal priorities are local concerns. Since local efforts form the pillars of achieving co-benefits and avoiding dis-benefits at the national level, it is critical to go beyond national-level analyses and focus on the synergies and tradeoffs at the subnational level. Here we use the United States as an example to evaluate the impacts of mid-century national-level deep decarbonization target for state-level societal priorities. Based on the Global Change Assessment Model with state-level details for the US (GCAM-USA), we design two mid-century scenarios: A Reference scenario that assumes the U.S. undertakes no additional climate mitigation policy, and a Deep Decarbonization Scenario that assumes the U.S. achieves the NDC goal through 2025 (26-28% reduction relative to 2005 levels) and then follows a straight-line trajectory to 80% reductions in economy-wide GHG emissions by 2050 relative to 2005. We then compare these two scenarios for a variety of metrics of carbon mitigation and other societal priorities in 2050. We highlight two findings. First, the synergies and tradeoffs of carbon mitigation with other societal goals at the subnational level can be quite different from the national level. For example, while deep decarbonization could improve national energy security by reducing the overall dependence on energy imports, it may exacerbate energy independence goals for some states by increasing inter-state electricity imports. Second, achieving national-level decarbonization target could result in unequal regional impacts across states. We find uneven geographic impacts for air pollution (more co-reductions occur in the eastern states), economic costs (energy prices increase more in the northeastern states) and employment (jobs increase in the western

  5. Essays on the economics of decarbonization and renewable energy support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaegemann, Cosima Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The thesis consists of five essays investigating various aspects associated with the decarbonization of Europe's power sector and the politically incentivized expansion of renewable energy generation. The first essay analyzes the economic implications of alternative decarbonization pathways and policy instruments for Europe's power sector up to 2050 and illustrates the importance of ensuring competition between all low-carbon technologies in order to limit the costs of decarbonization. The second essay analyzes the economic inefficiency associated with the concept of grid parity for the case of photovoltaic (PV). In order to both enhance overall welfare and avoid redistributional effects, the indirect financial incentive for in-house PV electricity consumption should be abolished. The third essay discusses the system price effect of wind and solar power generation and illustrates that the decrease in the marginal value of wind and solar power (as a consequence of increased penetration) is already highly relevant for both wind and solar power generation in Germany. The fourth essay adds to the ongoing debate surrounding the cost-efficient achievement of politically implemented renewable energy targets. Renewable energy support schemes that fail to incentivize investors to account for differences in the marginal value of wind and solar power generation are associated with excess costs as they prevent the equalization of net marginal costs across technologies and regions. The fifth essay analyzes the economic value of storage as a function of the overall generation mix and illustrates the economic inefficiency arising from feed-in tariff systems for the special case of thermal energy storage units in concentrating solar power plants.

  6. Essays on the economics of decarbonization and renewable energy support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaegemann, Cosima Claudia

    2014-06-05

    The thesis consists of five essays investigating various aspects associated with the decarbonization of Europe's power sector and the politically incentivized expansion of renewable energy generation. The first essay analyzes the economic implications of alternative decarbonization pathways and policy instruments for Europe's power sector up to 2050 and illustrates the importance of ensuring competition between all low-carbon technologies in order to limit the costs of decarbonization. The second essay analyzes the economic inefficiency associated with the concept of grid parity for the case of photovoltaic (PV). In order to both enhance overall welfare and avoid redistributional effects, the indirect financial incentive for in-house PV electricity consumption should be abolished. The third essay discusses the system price effect of wind and solar power generation and illustrates that the decrease in the marginal value of wind and solar power (as a consequence of increased penetration) is already highly relevant for both wind and solar power generation in Germany. The fourth essay adds to the ongoing debate surrounding the cost-efficient achievement of politically implemented renewable energy targets. Renewable energy support schemes that fail to incentivize investors to account for differences in the marginal value of wind and solar power generation are associated with excess costs as they prevent the equalization of net marginal costs across technologies and regions. The fifth essay analyzes the economic value of storage as a function of the overall generation mix and illustrates the economic inefficiency arising from feed-in tariff systems for the special case of thermal energy storage units in concentrating solar power plants.

  7. Implications of Deep Decarbonization for Carbon Cycle Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. D.; Williams, J.; Torn, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    The energy-system transformations required to achieve deep decarbonization in the United States, defined as a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions of 80% or more below 1990 levels by 2050, have profound implications for carbon cycle science, particularly with respect to 4 key objectives: understanding and enhancing the terrestrial carbon sink, using bioenergy sustainably, controlling non-CO2 GHGs, and emissions monitoring and verification. (1) As a source of mitigation, the terrestrial carbon sink is pivotal but uncertain, and changes in the expected sink may significantly affect the overall cost of mitigation. Yet the dynamics of the sink under changing climatic conditions, and the potential to protect and enhance the sink through land management, are poorly understood. Policy urgently requires an integrative research program that links basic science knowledge to land management practices. (2) Biomass resources can fill critical energy needs in a deeply decarbonized system, but current understanding of sustainability and lifecycle carbon aspects is limited. Mitigation policy needs better understanding of the sustainable amount, types, and cost of bioenergy feedstocks, their interactions with other land uses, and more efficient and reliable monitoring of embedded carbon. (3) As CO2 emissions from energy decrease under deep decarbonization, the relative share of non-CO2 GHGs grows larger and their mitigation more important. Because the sources tend to be distributed, variable, and uncertain, they have been under-researched. Policy needs a better understanding of mitigation priorities and costs, informed by deeper research in key areas such as fugitive CH4, fertilizer-derived N2O, and industrial F-gases. (4) The M&V challenge under deep decarbonization changes with a steep decrease in the combustion CO2 sources due to widespread electrification, while a greater share of CO2 releases is net-carbon-neutral. Similarly, gas pipelines may carry an increasing share of

  8. Transparent national strategies for long-term decarbonization in compliance with the 2 deg. C goal: The Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombier, Michel; Waisman, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen countries among the biggest emitters of greenhouse gases are involved in the Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project (DDPP), which is based on 'country teams' of climate experts. This international project seeks to draw the pathways for a transition toward national decarbonization in compliance with the goal of limiting global warming to 2 deg. C maximum by 2050. These pathways should serve to: a) foresee the economic, technical and behavioral 'ruptures' to be addressed in order to facilitate the transition; b) identify specifically national factors in pathways toward decarbonization; and c) analyze the effects over time of this transition and the sequencing of the measures that might cause them. A preliminary report was released in September 2014, and the final report is scheduled for mid-2015. In support of an international agreement during the Paris Climate Conference, it will focus on the implications of deep decarbonization and the conditions for achieving it

  9. The role of capital costs in decarbonizing the electricity sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Lion; Steckel, Jan Christoph

    2016-11-01

    Low-carbon electricity generation, i.e. renewable energy, nuclear power and carbon capture and storage, is more capital intensive than electricity generation through carbon emitting fossil fuel power stations. High capital costs, expressed as high weighted average cost of capital (WACC), thus tend to encourage the use of fossil fuels. To achieve the same degree of decarbonization, countries with high capital costs therefore need to impose a higher price on carbon emissions than countries with low capital costs. This is particularly relevant for developing and emerging economies, where capital costs tend to be higher than in rich countries. In this paper we quantitatively evaluate how high capital costs impact the transformation of the energy system under climate policy, applying a numerical techno-economic model of the power system. We find that high capital costs can significantly reduce the effectiveness of carbon prices: if carbon emissions are priced at USD 50 per ton and the WACC is 3%, the cost-optimal electricity mix comprises 40% renewable energy. At the same carbon price and a WACC of 15%, the cost-optimal mix comprises almost no renewable energy. At 15% WACC, there is no significant emission mitigation with carbon pricing up to USD 50 per ton, but at 3% WACC and the same carbon price, emissions are reduced by almost half. These results have implications for climate policy; carbon pricing might need to be combined with policies to reduce capital costs of low-carbon options in order to decarbonize power systems.

  10. Beyond emission targets: how to decarbonize the passenger transport sector? Results from the Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project for Transport (DDPP-T)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-11-01

    Reaching the ambitious climate objective of the Paris Agreement requires decreasing significantly sectoral emissions from the transport sector. However, the ambition pledged for the transport sector under the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) remains very limited. The DDPP-T analyzes Paris-compatible sectoral strategies for the passenger transport that can serve to inform the 2018 Facilitative Dialogue and the preparation of future, more ambitious, NDCs by 2020. In a context of an expected steep increase in global mobility demand, deep decarbonization will require a mix of different 'well-known' options: the rapid diffusion of low-carbon vehicles and low-carbon fuels and the modal shift towards low-carbon modes like public transport and non-motorized transport (cycling and walking). However, while crucial, these options are not 'silver bullets' that on their own meet the decarbonization challenge, given their intrinsic individual limitations. The project adopts an integrated approach of sectoral deep decarbonization strategies articulating the diffusion of low-carbon technologies with the future of mobility and all its drivers, such as the demographic and economic situation, the localization of population centers, the transport and urban planning, the lifestyles and the features of mobility services. The strategies are context-specific in order to capture different country circumstances, and consider a long-term horizon to inform the short-term conditions enabling structural changes of the transport system. Building on four country analyses (France, Japan, Mexico and the United Kingdom), this Issue Brief derives five cross-cutting messages for a deep decarbonization of the passenger transport sector. Key messages: - Deep decarbonization of the passenger transport sector requires strong actions on four pillars of transformation. Only a consistent articulation of these synergistic pillars allows an effective deep decarbonization. - Deep

  11. Energy [R]Evolution: Opportunities for Decarbonizing Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The future of conventional energy in Canada is uncertain. World oil prices have suffered steep declines recently and there are no strong arguments for recovery in the foreseeable future. The country is now engaged in serious debates and discussions over the value of GHG emissions, pipelines, oil and gas operations, and renewable energy. Oilsands deposits in northern Alberta require long-term investment and decades of consistent sales to repay those investments. The election of more progressive governments in Alberta and Canada may provide the national and global credibility and opportunity to address the environmental problems caused by Oilsands and other fossil fuel developments. The discussion will focus on the possible ways forward for Canada to diversify the regional and national economy with renewable energy networks, thereby meeting our Paris GHG emission reduction commitments. The end goal of this work is to see the Canadian economy decarbonized within two decades.

  12. Decarbonizing Sweden’s energy and transportation system by 2050

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Bramstoft

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Decarbonizing Sweden’s transportation sector is necessary to realize its long-term vision of eliminating net greenhouse gas (GHG emissions from the energy system by 2050. Within this context, this study develops two scenarios for the transportation sector: one with high electrification (EVS and the other with high biofuel and biomethane utilization (BIOS. The energy system model STREAM is utilized to compute the socioeconomic system cost and simulate an integrated transportation, electricity, gas, fuel refinery, and heat system. The results show that electrifying a high share of Sweden’s road transportation yields the least systems cost. However, in the least-cost scenario (EVS, bioenergy resources account for 57% of the final energy use in the transportation sector. Further, a sensitivity analysis shows that the costs of different types of cars are the most sensitive parameters in the comparative analysis of the scenarios.

  13. Requirements to nuclear power to significantly contribute to decarbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zipper, Reinhard [Forschungs- und Technologieberatung Zipper (FTBZ), Haan (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    By the end of the UN Climate Conference 2015 in Paris all members agreed to take action with the goal to limit climate warming to less than 2 C compared to pre-industrial status. CO{sub 2} emissions are supposed to be the main driver of climate change. This implies that all kinds of energy supply must be reengineered to avoid deployment of fossil fuels as far as practicable. Nuclear energy has a minimal CO{sub 2} footprint and with the ability to flexibly adjust to the individual demands of supply regions it may be favored to play a major role in decarbonization. However, on this path some principal obstacles must be removed to gain general public, policy and industry acceptance.

  14. Decarbonizing Sweden’s energy and transportation system by 2050

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramstoft, Rasmus; Skytte, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Decarbonizing Sweden’s transportation sector is necessary to realize its long-term vision of eliminating net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the energy system by 2050. Within this context, this study develops two scenarios for the transportation sector: one with high electrification (EVS......) and the other with high biofuel and biomethane utilization (BIOS). The energy system model STREAM is utilized to compute the socioeconomic system cost and simulate an integrated transportation, electricity, gas, fuel refinery, and heat system. The results show that electrifying a high share of Sweden’s road...... transportation yields the least systems cost. However, in the least-cost scenario (EVS), bioenergy resources account for 57% of the final energy use in the transportation sector. Further, a sensitivity analysis shows that the costs of different types of cars are the most sensitive parameters in the comparative...

  15. Decarbonation in an intracratonic setting: Insight from petrological-thermomechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Christopher M.; Gorczyk, Weronika

    2017-08-01

    Cratons form the stable core roots of the continental crust. Despite long-term stability, cratons have failed in the past. Cratonic destruction (e.g., North Atlantic Craton) due to chemical rejuvenation at the base of the lithosphere remains poorly constrained numerically. We use 2-D petrological-thermomechanical models to assess cratonic rifting characteristics and mantle CO2 degassing in the presence of a carbonated subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). We test two tectonothermal SCLM compositions: Archon (depleted) and Tecton (fertilized) using 2 CO2 wt % in the bulk composition to represent a metasomatized SCLM. We parameterize cratonic breakup via extensional duration (7-12 Ma; full breakup), tectonothermal age, TMoho (300-600°C), and crustal rheology. The two compositions with metasomatized SCLMs share similar rifting features and decarbonation trends during initial extension. However, we show long-term (>67 Ma) stability differences due to lithospheric density contrasts between SCLM compositions. The Tecton model shows convective removal and thinning of the metasomatized SCLM during failed rifting. The Archon composition remained stable, highlighting the primary role for SCLM density even when metasomatized at its base. In the short-term, three failed rifting characteristics emerge: failed rifting without decarbonation, failed rifting with decarbonation, and semifailed rifting with dry asthenospheric melting and decarbonation. Decarbonation trends were greatest in the failed rifts, reaching peak fluxes of 94 × 104 kg m-3. Increased TMoho did not alter the effects of rifting or decarbonation. Lastly, we show mantle regions where decarbonation, mantle melting in the presence of carbonate, and preservation of carbonated mantle occur during rifting.

  16. Ionic Liquid Design and Process Simulation for Decarbonization of Shale Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xinyan; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    suitable ILs based on the COSMO-RS (conductor-like screening model for real solvents) model, an absorption mechanism, and experimental data. Besides the Henry's constant, the viscosity and toxicity of ILs should also be taken into consideration for an industrial decarbonization process. Furthermore......, process simulation was performed to evaluate the new IL-based decarbonization technology. Considering CO2 solubility, CO2/CH4 selectivity and toxicity and viscosity of ILs, [bmim][NTf2] has been screened to be the potential solvent among 90 classes of ILs. Based on reliable experimental data, a rigorous...

  17. Numerical analysis on infiltration-driven decarbonation during skarnification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, X.; Lee, C. T.; Dasgupta, R.

    2017-12-01

    Interaction of arc magmas with carbonate sequences on active margins leads to contact metamorphism and metasomatism by infiltrating magmatic fluids. This skarnification process releases CO2 to the metasomatic fluids, which transport carbon to shallow reservoirs and can affect the long-term carbon budget in the exogenic system [1]. In this study, we apply a self-consistent 1D finite difference model to an impure marble consisting of quartz and calcite, in a similar scheme as ref [2]. The Darcian flow is modeled with a fixed boundary condition of water influx, taking into account the reaction kinetics [3,4] and pore space compaction. The modeling results show that the reaction front lags the fluid infiltration front and propagates at the rate scaling with: = k × [infiltrating fluid flux] / [reactant amount], where k is a function of the reaction kinetics and rock rheology. The reaction front does not advance until one reactant is exhausted; thus a protolith assemblage of 50:50 quartz:calcite has the slowest-moving reaction front. The steady-state carbon flux scales with the distance of reaction front to comply with mass conservation, and thus yields a linear relationship with the infiltrating flux and is largely independent of the protolith quartz:calcite ratio. Assuming that the rate of global magma emplacement on the continental arcs is 3 km3/yr [5], the arc magmas exsolve 5 vol.% water as they crystallize, and 40% of such magmas intrude carbonate sequences, the total steady-state carbon flux due to skarnification is 0.2 Tmol/yr. By contrast, Mount Etna alone emits carbon up to 0.2 Tmol/yr, most of which is the product of magma-carbonate interaction [6]. We note that the infiltration of pure water produces a wollastonite marble; natural metasomatic fluid is saturated with silica and other components, which leads to greater decarbonation and the formation of calc-silicate skarn. Wallrock assimilation also adds to the carbon flux from arcs, so the simplified

  18. Developing 2050 decarbonization strategies in the EU: Insights on good practice from national experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartor, Oliver; Donat, Lena; Duwe, Matthias; Umpfenbach, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that achieving deep cuts to GHG emissions requires a close link between long term strategic planning and short term policy action. Long term decarbonization strategies are important at a technical level, because they can help countries to identify concrete and feasible pathways to decarbonization, based on their national particularities, and then to determine their implications for immediate policies and measures. They can also serve an important social and political function, by facilitating a concrete and analytically based discussion between national stakeholders about what long-term decarbonization implies. Article 4.19 called on Parties to the Paris Agreement to develop long term low emissions development strategies, and decision 1/CP21 invites Parties to present them ahead of 2020. To implement this requirement across all 28 EU countries, the EU is in the process of agreeing minimum requirements and guidelines under a draft new governance regulation for the EU's Energy Union project. Unfortunately, early drafts of this document contain too little detail on what these strategies should include, or how member states should go about developing them. This is a concern, not only for the quality of climate governance in the EU, but also in terms of the potentially negative signal the EU may send under the Paris process, if many of its member states are incapable of producing robust and credible 2050 decarbonization strategies. A small number of EU member states have already developed their own 2050 decarbonization strategies and plans. This study - which was jointly undertaken by IDDRI in France and Ecologic in Germany - highlights some important lessons that can be learned from recent experiences with 2050 decarbonization strategies in selected EU countries. It builds on experiences in a small group of EU member states to highlight some examples of good practice when it comes to long term decarbonization strategy development. If the

  19. Decarbonization of fossil fuels as a strategy to control global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, T.; Abbasi, S.A. [Pondicherry Central University, Pondicherry (India)

    2011-05-15

    With the world reaching near-total consensus on the seriousness of the global warming impacts, and on the urgency to halt further warming, R & D efforts have intensified many-fold to find ways and means of global warming control. One of the avenues being explored is 'decarbonization' of fossil fuel use by either decarbonizing the fuels before they are burnt or by capturing the CO{sub 2} they emit on combustion. In this paper the various available options are reviewed in the context of their economic and environmental viability. It emerges that even as the goal is very enchanting, the possibility of it's realization appears remote. It also follows that the only sure method of reducing greenhouse gas emissions presently available to humankind is by reducing consumption of energy and other resources.

  20. Effect of iron supplementation on the erosive potential of carbonated or decarbonated beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Thiemi Kato

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated, in vitro, the effect of iron (previously exposed with enamel powder or added directly to the beverage on the erosive potential of carbonated or decarbonated beverage. Four sets of experiments were done. For groups E1 and E3, a solution containing 30 mmol/L FeSO4 was added to bovine enamel powder (particles between 75-106 mm before exposure to the carbonated or decarbonated beverage (Sprite Zero®, respectively. For groups E2 and E4, 15 mmol/L FeSO4 was added directly to the carbonated or decarbonated beverage, respectively. Control groups were included for comparison. In controls C1 and C3, the experiments E1 and E3 were repeated, but the iron solution was replaced by deionized water. For controls C2 and C4, the carbonated and decarbonated beverage, respectively, was used, without addition of iron. After addition of the beverage to the powdered enamel (40 mg enamel powder/400 mL of final volume, the sample was vortexed for 30 s and immediately centrifuged for 30 s (11,000 rpm. The supernatant was removed after 1 min 40 s. This procedure was repeated in quintuplicate and the phosphate released was analyzed spectrophotometrically. The results were analyzed by Student's t-test (p<0.05. E2 presented the best results with a significant inhibition (around 36% of phosphate released. For E3 and E4 a non-significant inhibition (around 4 and 12%, respectively, was observed. For E1 an increase in phosphate loss was detected. Thus, the protective effect of iron seems to be better when this ion is directly added to the carbonated beverage.

  1. Carbon dioxide emissions effects of grid-scale electricity storage in a decarbonizing power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Michael T.; Jaramillo, Paulina; Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2018-01-01

    While grid-scale electricity storage (hereafter ‘storage’) could be crucial for deeply decarbonizing the electric power system, it would increase carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in current systems across the United States. To better understand how storage transitions from increasing to decreasing system CO2 emissions, we quantify the effect of storage on operational CO2 emissions as a power system decarbonizes under a moderate and strong CO2 emission reduction target through 2045. Under each target, we compare the effect of storage on CO2 emissions when storage participates in only energy, only reserve, and energy and reserve markets. We conduct our study in the Electricity Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) system and use a capacity expansion model to forecast generator fleet changes and a unit commitment and economic dispatch model to quantify system CO2 emissions with and without storage. We find that storage would increase CO2 emissions in the current ERCOT system, but would decrease CO2 emissions in 2025 through 2045 under both decarbonization targets. Storage reduces CO2 emissions primarily by enabling gas-fired generation to displace coal-fired generation, but also by reducing wind and solar curtailment. We further find that the market in which storage participates drives large differences in the magnitude, but not the direction, of the effect of storage on CO2 emissions.

  2. Simulation and Prediction of Decarbonated Development in Tourist Attractions Associated with Low-carbon Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyan Luo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the field of tourism, the development of tourist attractions is gradually playing a crucial role in tourism economy, regional economy and national economy. While tourism economy is stimulated by growing demand, tourist attractions have been facing the situation that ecological environment is becoming fragile and environmental protection is increasingly difficult in China. As low-carbon economy is highlighted more than ever before, how to develop green economy, how to apply theories and technologies, which are related to low-carbon economy, to push forward decarbonation, to protect the ecological environment, and to boost the development of tourism economy have become the core problems for the sustainable development of tourist attractions system. In addition, this system has drawn the attention of scholars and practitioners in recent years. On the basis of low-carbon economy, this paper tries to define the decarbonated development goals and the connotation of tourist attractions system. In addition, it also discusses system structure associated with system dynamics and system engineering, and constructs system simulation model. In the end, a case study is conducted, that is, to predict the development trend of Jiuzhai Valley by adopting the constructed system so as to extend the previous research on low-carbon tourism and to guide the decarbonated development in tourist attractions.

  3. Application of improved PSO-RBF neural network in the synthetic ammonia decarbonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwei LI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The synthetic ammonia decarbonization is a typical complex industrial process, which has the characteristics of time variation, nonlinearity and uncertainty, and the on-line control model is difficult to be established. An improved PSO-RBF neural network control algorithm is proposed to solve the problems of low precision and poor robustness in the complex process of the synthetic ammonia decarbonization. The particle swarm optimization algorithm and RBF neural network are combined. The improved particle swarm algorithm is used to optimize the RBF neural network's hidden layer primary function center, width and the output layer's connection value to construct the RBF neural network model optimized by the improved PSO algorithm. The improved PSO-RBF neural network control model is applied to the key carbonization process and compared with the traditional fuzzy neural network. The simulation results show that the improved PSO-RBF neural network control method used in the synthetic ammonia decarbonization process has higher control accuracy and system robustness, which provides an effective way to solve the modeling and optimization control of a complex industrial process.

  4. Electrification and Decarbonization: Exploring U.S. Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Scenarios with Widespread Electrification and Power Sector Decarbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, Daniel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bielen, Dave [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eichman, Josh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eurek, Kelly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Logan, Jeff [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mai, Trieu [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McMillan, Colin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Parker, Andrew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Vimmerstedt, Laura [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wilson, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-07-19

    Electrification of end-use services in the transportation, buildings, and industrial sectors coupled with decarbonization of electricity generation has been identified as one of the key pathways to achieving a low-carbon future in the United States. By lowering the carbon intensity of the electricity generation and substituting electricity for higher-emissions fossil fuels in end-use sectors, significant reductions in carbon dioxide emissions can be achieved. This report describes a preliminary analysis that examines the potential impacts of widespread electrification on the U.S. energy sector. We develop a set of exploratory scenarios under which electrification is aggressively pursued across all end-use sectors and examine the impacts of achieving these electrification levels on electricity load patterns, total fossil energy consumption, carbon dioxide emissions, and the evolution of the U.S. power system.

  5. Renewable energy and CCS in German and European power sector decarbonization scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludig, Sylvie

    2013-11-06

    In order to avoid unmanageable impacts of anthropogenic climate change, it is necessary to achieve substantial CO{sub 2} emission reductions in all energy sectors. Due to salient decarbonization options such as renewable energy technologies and carbon capture and storage (CCS), the power sector plays a major role in climate change mitigation strategies. However, these options come with a set of challenges: the output of wind and solar energy varies in time and space and CCS faces technical challenges and public acceptance problems. This thesis develops power sector decarbonization scenarios for the EU and Germany while taking into account both the interplay of renewable energy technologies and CCS as mitigation options as well as the technical challenges of renewable energy integration. More specifically, a series of model based studies address the respective roles of CCS and renewable energy technologies in emission reduction strategies while evaluating technical integration options such as transmission, storage and balancing technologies. Results show that large-scale expansion of renewable energies will play the main role in power sector decarbonization scenarios, but the availability of CCS could lead to lower total costs and easier reaching of emission reduction targets through compensation of emissions generated by balancing technologies. Long-distance transmission enables better siting of renewable energy and thus higher achievable renewable shares in power generation and higher capacity factors. These indirect effects of delayed expansions induce additional power system costs, which are high relative to investment costs for new transmission lines. Results also reveal a preference for flexible technologies in combination with high shares of renewables for balancing purposes rather than inflexible baseload plants. A case study for the EU shows that a near-complete decarbonization is possible both with and without transmission expansions, but total power

  6. Decarbonization of the U.S. electricity sector: Are state energy policy portfolios the solution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carley, Sanya

    2011-01-01

    State governments have taken the lead on U.S. energy and climate policy. It is not yet clear, however, whether state energy policy portfolios can generate results in a similar magnitude or manner to their presumed carbon mitigation potential. This article seeks to address this lack of policy evidence and contribute empirical insights on the carbon mitigation effects of state energy portfolios within the U.S. electricity sector. Using a dynamic, long-term electricity dispatch model with U.S. power plant, utility, and transmission and distribution data between 2010 and 2030, this analysis builds a series of state-level policy portfolio scenarios and performs a comparative scenario analysis. Results reveal that state policy portfolios have modest to minimal carbon mitigation effects in the long run if surrounding states do not adopt similar portfolios as well. The difference in decarbonization potential between isolated state policies and larger, more coordinated policy efforts is due in large part to carbon leakage, which is the export of carbon intensive fossil fuel-based electricity across state lines. Results also confirm that a carbon price of $50/metric ton CO 2 e can generate substantial carbon savings. Although both policy options - an energy policy portfolio or a carbon price - are effective at reducing carbon emissions in the present analysis, neither is as effective alone as when the two strategies are combined. - Research highlights: → Scenario modeling exercise to assess effectiveness of state energy policy portfolios. → Regional coordination has greater decarbonization potential than state policies. → Some states benefit more from regional policy coordination than others. → Emissions leakage attenuates the effect of isolated state policy portfolios. → Carbon price with coordinated energy portfolio has greatest decarbonization potential.

  7. Integration of the steam cycle and CO2 capture process in a decarbonization power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Gang; Hu, Yue; Tang, Baoqiang; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    A new integrated system with power generation and CO 2 capture to achieve higher techno-economic performance is proposed in this study. In the new system, three measures are adopted to recover the surplus energy from the CO 2 capture process. The three measures are as follows: (1) using a portion of low-pressure steam instead of high-pressure extracted steam by installing the steam ejector, (2) mixing a portion of flash-off water with the extracted steam to utilize the superheat degree of the extracted steam, and (3) recycling the low-temperature waste heat from the CO 2 capture process to heat the condensed water. As a result, the power output of the new integrated system is 107.61 MW higher than that of a decarbonization power plant without integration. The efficiency penalty of CO 2 capture is expected to decrease by 4.91%-points. The increase in investment produced by the new system is 3.25 M$, which is only 0.88% more than the total investment of a decarbonization power plant without integration. Lastly, the cost of electricity and CO 2 avoided is 15.14% and 33.1% lower than that of a decarbonization power generation without integration, respectively. The promising results obtained in this study provide a new approach for large-scale CO 2 removal with low energy penalty and economic cost. - Highlights: • Energy equilibrium in CO 2 capture process is deeply analyzed in this paper. • System integration is conducted in a coal-fired power plant with CO 2 capture. • The steam ejector is introduced to utilize the waste energy from CO 2 capture process. • Thermodynamic, exergy and techno-economic analyses are quantitatively conducted. • Energy-saving effects are found in the new system with minimal investment

  8. Unit Commitment Towards Decarbonized Network Facing Fixed and Stochastic Resources Applying Water Cycle Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba-Allah I. ElAzab

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a trustworthy unit commitment study to schedule both Renewable Energy Resources (RERs with conventional power plants to potentially decarbonize the electrical network. The study has employed a system with three IEEE thermal (coal-fired power plants as dispatchable distributed generators, one wind plant, one solar plant as stochastic distributed generators, and Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs which can work either loads or generators based on their charging schedule. This paper investigates the unit commitment scheduling objective to minimize the Combined Economic Emission Dispatch (CEED. To reduce combined emission costs, integrating more renewable energy resources (RER and PEVs, there is an essential need to decarbonize the existing system. Decarbonizing the system means reducing the percentage of CO2 emissions. The uncertain behavior of wind and solar energies causes imbalance penalty costs. PEVs are proposed to overcome the intermittent nature of wind and solar energies. It is important to optimally integrate and schedule stochastic resources including the wind and solar energies, and PEVs charge and discharge processes with dispatched resources; the three IEEE thermal (coal-fired power plants. The Water Cycle Optimization Algorithm (WCOA is an efficient and intelligent meta-heuristic technique employed to solve the economically emission dispatch problem for both scheduling dispatchable and stochastic resources. The goal of this study is to obtain the solution for unit commitment to minimize the combined cost function including CO2 emission costs applying the Water Cycle Optimization Algorithm (WCOA. To validate the WCOA technique, the results are compared with the results obtained from applying the Dynamic Programming (DP algorithm, which is considered as a conventional numerical technique, and with the Genetic Algorithm (GA as a meta-heuristic technique.

  9. Mantle wedge infiltrated with saline fluids from dehydration and decarbonation of subducting slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Yoshikawa, Masako; Kumagai, Yoshitaka; Mirabueno, Ma Hannah T; Okuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2013-06-11

    Slab-derived fluids play an important role in heat and material transfer in subduction zones. Dehydration and decarbonation reactions of minerals in the subducting slab have been investigated using phase equilibria and modeling of fluid flow. Nevertheless, direct observations of the fluid chemistry and pressure-temperature conditions of fluids are few. This report describes CO2-bearing saline fluid inclusions in spinel-harzburgite xenoliths collected from the 1991 Pinatubo pumice deposits. The fluid inclusions are filled with saline solutions with 5.1 ± 1.0% (wt) NaCl-equivalent magnesite crystals, CO2-bearing vapor bubbles, and a talc and/or chrysotile layer on the walls. The xenoliths contain tremolite amphibole, which is stable in temperatures lower than 830 °C at the uppermost mantle. The Pinatubo volcano is located at the volcanic front of the Luzon arc associated with subduction of warm oceanic plate. The present observation suggests hydration of forearc mantle and the uppermost mantle by slab-derived CO2-bearing saline fluids. Dehydration and decarbonation take place, and seawater-like saline fluids migrate from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge. The presence of saline fluids is important because they can dissolve more metals than pure H2O and affect the chemical evolution of the mantle wedge.

  10. Decarbonizing the Global Economy - An Integrated Assessment of Low Carbon Emission Scenarios proposed in Climate Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokamp, Sascha; Khabbazan, Mohammad Mohammadi

    2017-04-01

    In 2015, the Conference of the Parties (COP 21) reaffirmed to targeting the global mean temperature rise below 2 °C in 2100 while finding no consent on decarbonizing the global economy, and instead, the final agreement called for enhanced scientific investigation of low carbon emission scenarios (UNFCC, 2015). In addition, the Climate Action Network International (CAN) proposes Special Reports to address decarbonization and low carbon development including 1.5 °C scenarios (IPCC, 2016). In response to these developments, we investigate whether the carbon emission cuts, in accordance with the recent climate policy proposals, may reach the climate target. To tackle this research question, we employ the coupled climate-energy-economy integrated assessment Model of INvestment and endogenous technological Development (MIND, cf. Edenhofer et al., 2005, Neubersch et al. 2014). Extending MIND's climate module to the two-box version used in the Dynamic Integrated model of Climate and the Economy (DICE, cf. Nordhaus and Sztorc, 2013, Nordhaus 2014), we perform a cost-effectiveness analysis with constraints on anthropogenic carbon emissions. We show that a climate policy scenario with early decarbonization complies with the 2° C climate target, even without Carbon Capturing and Storage (CCS) or negative emissions (see van Vuuren et al., 2013, for negative emissions). However, using emission inertia of 3.7 percent annually, reflecting the inflexibility on transforming the energy sector, we find a climate policy with moderately low emissions from 2100 onwards at a cost in terms of Balanced Growth Equivalents (BGE, cf. Anthoff and Tol, 2009) of 0.764 % that requires an early (2035 vs. 2120) peak of investments in renewable energy production compared to a business-as-usual scenario. Hence, decarbonizing the global economy and achieving the 2 °C target might still be possible before 2100, but the window of opportunity is beginning to close. References: Anthoff, D., and Tol, R

  11. Assessing the economic feasibility of the gradual decarbonization of a large electric power system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos-Alamillos, Francisco; Archer, Cristina; Noel, Lance Douglas

    2017-01-01

    The decarbonization of power systems is among the primary actions to fight air pollution and climate change. In this study, we evaluate the costs of a gradual transition towards a new power system in which the oldest coal plants are replaced with low-carbon power plants. We developed the Wind...... Energy Integration Cost Advisor Model (WEICAM) to analyze different strategies for this energy transition and determine the most cost-effective roadmap, with and without externalities. The test case is the PJM Interconnection, one of the power systems in the United States with the largest fraction...... decommissioned and an increase in the levelized cost of electricity from 49.1 to 53.6 $/MWh (without externalities). In addition, selecting the windiest sites – even far away from the PJM region – is cheaper than selecting local but less windy sites. When externalities due to human health and environmental...

  12. Decarbonation and carbonation processes in the slab and mantle wedge - insights from thermomechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, C. M.; Gorczyk, W.; Connolly, J. A.; Gerya, T.; Hobbs, B. E.; Ord, A.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones offer one of the most geologically active and complex systems to investigate. They initiate a process in which crustal sediments are recycled, mantle heterogeneities arise, and mantle wedge refertilization occurs via slab derived volatiles and magma generation. Slab derived volatiles, consisting primarily of H2O - CO2 fluids, are especially critical in subduction evolution as they rheologically weaken the mantle wedge, decrease solidus temperatures, and rock-fluid interactions result in metasomatism. While the effects of H2O in these processes have been well studied in the past decades, CO2's role remains open for much scientific study. This is partly attributed to the sensitivity of decarbonation to the thermal gradient of the subduction zone, bulk compositions (sediments, basalts, peridotites) and redox state of the mantle. Here we show benchmarking results of a subduction scenario that implements carbonation-decarbonation reactions into a fully coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical modeling code. We resolve stable mineralogy and extract rock properties via Perple_X at a resolution of 5°C and 25 MPa. The numerical technique employed is a characteristics-based marker-in-cell technique with conservative finite-differences that includes visco-elastic-plastic rheologies (I2ELVIS). The devolatilized fluids are tracked via markers that are either generated or consumed based on P-T conditions. The fluids are also allowed to freely advect within the velocity field. The hosts for CO2 in this system are computed via GLOSS average sediments (H2O: 7.29 wt% & CO2: 3.01 wt%), metabasalts ( H2O: 2.63 & CO2: 2.90 wt%), and ophicarbonates (H2O: 1.98 wt% & CO2: 5.00 wt%). Our results demonstrate the feasibility of applying this decarbonation-carbonation numerical method to a range of geodynamic scenarios that simulate the removal of CO2 from the subducting slab. Such applicable scenarios include sediment diapirism into the convecting wedge and better

  13. Competing Air Quality and Water Conservation Co-benefits from Power Sector Decarbonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, W.; Wagner, F.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Ramana, M. V.; Zhai, H.; Small, M.; Zhang, X.; Dalin, C.

    2016-12-01

    Decarbonizing the power sector can reduce fossil-based generation and associated air pollution and water use. However, power sector configurations that prioritize air quality benefits can be different from those that maximize water conservation benefits. Despite extensive work to optimize the generation mix under an air pollution or water constraint, little research has examined electricity transmission networks and the choice of which fossil fuel units to displace in order to achieve both environmental objectives simultaneously. When air pollution and water stress occur in different regions, the optimal transmission and displacement decisions still depend on priorities placed on air quality and water conservation benefits even if low-carbon generation planning is fixed. Here we use China as a test case, and develop a new optimization framework to study transmission and displacement decisions and the resulting air quality and water use impacts for six power sector decarbonization scenarios in 2030 ( 50% of national generation is low carbon). We fix low-carbon generation in each scenario (e.g. type, location, quantity) and vary technology choices and deployment patterns across scenarios. The objective is to minimize the total physical costs (transmission costs and coal power generation costs) and the estimated environmental costs. Environmental costs are estimated by multiplying effective air pollutant emissions (EMeff, emissions weighted by population density) and effective water use (Weff, water use weighted by a local water stress index) by their unit economic values, Vem and Vw. We are hence able to examine the effect of varying policy priorities by imposing different combinations of Vem and Vw. In all six scenarios, we find that increasing the priority on air quality co-benefits (higher Vem) reduces air pollution impacts (lower EMeff) at the expense of lower water conservation (higher Weff); and vice versa. Such results can largely be explained by differences

  14. Decarbonizing the European electricity sector. Modeling and policy analysis for electricity and CO_2 infrastructure networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oei, Pao-Yu Charly Robin

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation uses three models to analyze different decarbonization strategies for combating global climate change: The cost minimizing mixed-integer model CCTS-Mod examines the economics of Carbon Capture, Transport, and Storage (CCTS) for the electricity and industry sector; the welfare maximizing quadratically constrained model ELMOD focuses on different trajectories for renewable energy sources (RES) and transmission grid expansions; and the equilibrium model ELCO combines the insights of the individual sectors to a combined CCTS and electricity investment and dispatch model. Modeling results show that an investment in CCTS is beneficial for the iron and steel sector once the CO_2 certificate price exceeds 50 Euros/t CO_2. The threshold is 75 Euros/t CO_2 for the cement industry and 100 Euros/t CO_2 for the electricity sector. Additional revenues from using CO_2 for enhanced oil recovery (CO_2-EOR) lead to an earlier adoption of CCTS in the North Sea region. The lack of economies of scale results in increasing CO_2 storage costs of more than 30%, while transport costs even double. Research from the last years, however, indicates that CCTS is unlikely to play an important role in decarbonizing the electricity sector. The identified reasons for this are incumbents' resistance to structural change, wrong technology choices, over-optimistic cost estimates, a premature focus on energy projects instead of industry, and the underestimation of transport and storage issues. Keeping global temperature rise below 2 C therefore implies the phase-out of fossilfueled power plants and, in particular, of CO_2-intensive coal power plants. The low CO_2 price established by the European Emissions Trading Scheme is insufficient to induce a fuel switch in the medium term. Therefore, supplementary national measures are necessary to reduce coal-based power generation; i.a. feed-in tariffs for RES, minimum CO_2 prices, or emissions performance standards. Analyses for Germany show

  15. Feasibility and Costs of Natural Gas as a Bridge to Deep Decarbonization in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. D.; McJeon, H. C.; Muratori, M.; Shi, W.

    2015-12-01

    Achieving emissions reductions consistent with a 2 degree Celsius global warming target requires nearly complete replacement of traditional fossil fuel combustion with near-zero carbon energy technologies in the United States by 2050. There are multiple technological change pathways consistent with this deep decarbonization, including strategies that rely on renewable energy, nuclear, and carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies. The replacement of coal-fired power plants with natural gas-fired power plants has also been suggested as a bridge strategy to achieve near-term emissions reduction targets. These gas plants, however, would need to be replaced by near-zero energy technologies or retrofitted with CCS by 2050 in order to achieve longer-term targets. Here we examine the costs and feasibility of a natural gas bridge strategy. Using the Global Change Assessment (GCAM) model, we develop multiple scenarios that each meet the recent US Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) to reduce GHG emissions by 26%-28% below its 2005 levels in 2025, as well as a deep decarbonization target of 80% emissions reductions below 1990 levels by 2050. We find that the gas bridge strategy requires that gas plants be retired on average 20 years earlier than their designed lifetime of 45 years, a potentially challenging outcome to achieve from a policy perspective. Using a more idealized model, we examine the net energy system costs of this gas bridge strategy compared to one in which near-zero energy technologies are deployed in the near tem. We explore the sensitivity of these cost results to four factors: the discount rate applied to future costs, the length (or start year) of the gas bridge, the relative capital cost of natural gas vs. near-zero energy technology, and the fuel price of natural gas. The discount rate and cost factors are found to be more important than the length of the bridge. However, we find an important interaction as well. At low discount rates

  16. Application of the radioisotope process when studying the decarbonization of low-alloy multicomponent steels in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlinov, L.V.; Evstratov, V.D.

    1982-06-01

    By means of the radioisotope process and the method of a planning matrix for factor experiments quantitative values have been found for the influence of alloys of chromium molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, titanium on the decarbonization of low alloy pearlitic steels in sodium at temperatures of 500 to 800 0 C. It has been proved that of all alloys with a concentration of 1 to 3% Cr, 1 to 2% Mo, 0 to 1% Nb, 0 to 0.25% V, and 0 to 0.25% Ti, which had been studied, the alloys of iron with 1-3% Cr and 1% Mo showed the greatest tendency for decarbonization in sodium where the carbon concentration decreases from 0.01 to 0.02% at the surface. An increase of the concentration of molybdenum and especially of niobium and titanium leads to a decrease of the decarbonization tendency of steel because the surface concentration of carbon remains at the level of 0.08 to 0.09% in alloys which contain up to 1% niobium and in complex alloy steels with up to 1% niobium, 0.25% vanadium, and 0.25% titanium. (orig.) [de

  17. Evidences for decarbonation and exfoliation of layered double hydroxide in N,N-dimethylformamide-ethanol solvent mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordijo, Claudia R.; Leopoldo Constantino, Vera R.; Oliveira Silva, Denise de

    2007-01-01

    The behavior of a Hydrotalcite-like material (carbonate-containing Mg,Al-layered double hydroxide) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF)-ethanol mixture, at ambient temperature, has been investigated. The releasing of CO 2 and production of a formate-containing material occurred mainly for 1:1 (v/v) solvent mixture. Decarbonation of Hydrotalcite is promoted by DMF hydrolysis followed by neutralization of brucite-like layers through HCOO - intercalation. Translucent colloidal dispersion of LDH nanoparticles from the formate-containing phase was characterized by transmission electron (TEM) and atomic force (AFM) microscopies. The absence of (00l) reflection at X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern for dried colloidal dispersion indicated delamination of Hydrotalcite. The restacked sample exhibited broad reflections and typical hydroxide ordered layers non-basal (110) diffraction peaks. A LDH-HCOO - material was also prepared and characterized by FTIR and FT-Raman spectroscopies. Decarbonation and exfoliation of Hydrotalcite in N,N-dimethylformamide-ethanol mixed solvent provide an interesting method for preparation of new intercalated LDH materials. - Graphical abstract: Hydrotalcite suspended in 1:1 (v/v) N,N-dimethylformamide-ethanol solvent mixture, at ambient temperature, undergoes decarbonation and exfoliation. The process is promoted by DMF hydrolysis. Restacking of LDH layers is achieved by evaporating the solvent

  18. Water conservation implications for decarbonizing non-electric energy supply: A hybrid life-cycle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiyuan; Wang, Can; Shi, Lei; Cai, Wenjia; Zhang, Lixiao

    2018-08-01

    Low-carbon transition in the non-electric energy sector, which includes transport and heating energy, is necessary for achieving the 2 °C target. Meanwhile, as non-electric energy accounts for over 60% of total water consumption in the energy supply sector, it is vital to understand future water trends in the context of decarbonization. However, few studies have focused on life-cycle water impacts for non-electric energy; besides, applying conventional LCA methodology to assess non-electric energy has limitations. In this paper, a Multi-Regional Hybrid Life-Cycle Assessment (MRHLCA) model is built to assess total CO 2 emissions and water consumption of 6 non-electric energy technologies - transport energy from biofuel and gasoline, heat supply from natural gas, biogas, coal, and residual biomass, within 7 major emitting economies. We find that a shift to natural gas and residual biomass heating can help economies reduce 14-65% CO 2 and save more than 21% water. However, developed and developing economies should take differentiated technical strategies. Then we apply scenarios from IMAGE model to demonstrate that if economies take cost-effective 2 °C pathways, the water conservation synergy for the whole energy supply sector, including electricity, can also be achieved. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. SWITCH-China: A Systems Approach to Decarbonizing China's Power System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gang; Avrin, Anne-Perrine; Nelson, James H; Johnston, Josiah; Mileva, Ana; Tian, Jianwei; Kammen, Daniel M

    2016-06-07

    We present an integrated model, SWITCH-China, of the Chinese power sector with which to analyze the economic and technological implications of a medium to long-term decarbonization scenario while accounting for very-short-term renewable variability. On the basis of the model and assumptions used, we find that the announced 2030 carbon peak can be achieved with a carbon price of ∼$40/tCO2. Current trends in renewable energy price reductions alone are insufficient to replace coal; however, an 80% carbon emission reduction by 2050 is achievable in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Target Scenario with an optimal electricity mix in 2050 including nuclear (14%), wind (23%), solar (27%), hydro (6%), gas (1%), coal (3%), and carbon capture and sequestration coal energy (26%). The co-benefits of carbon-price strategy would offset 22% to 42% of the increased electricity costs if the true cost of coal and the social cost of carbon are incorporated. In such a scenario, aggressive attention to research and both technological and financial innovation mechanisms are crucial to enabling the transition at a reasonable cost, along with strong carbon policies.

  20. Sustainable Mobility: Using a Global Energy Model to Inform Vehicle Technology Choices in a Decarbonized Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Wallington

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of CO2 emissions associated with vehicle use is an important element of a global transition to sustainable mobility and is a major long-term challenge for society. Vehicle and fuel technologies are part of a global energy system, and assessing the impact of the availability of clean energy technologies and advanced vehicle technologies on sustainable mobility is a complex task. The global energy transition (GET model accounts for interactions between the different energy sectors, and we illustrate its use to inform vehicle technology choices in a decarbonizing economy. The aim of this study is to assess how uncertainties in future vehicle technology cost, as well as how developments in other energy sectors, affect cost-effective fuel and vehicle technology choices. Given the uncertainties in future costs and efficiencies for light-duty vehicle and fuel technologies, there is no clear fuel/vehicle technology winner that can be discerned at the present time. We conclude that a portfolio approach with research and development of multiple fuel and vehicle technology pathways is the best way forward to achieve the desired result of affordable and sustainable personal mobility. The practical ramifications of this analysis are illustrated in the portfolio approach to providing sustainable mobility adopted by the Ford Motor Company.

  1. Balancing reserves within a decarbonized European electricity system in 2050. From market developments to model insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Casimir

    2017-01-01

    This paper expands the discussion about future balancing reserve provision to the long-term perspective of 2050. Most pathways for a transformation towards a decarbonized electricity sector rely on very high shares of fluctuating renewables. This can be a challenge for the provision of balancing reserves, although their influence on the balancing cost is unclear. Apart from the transformation of the generation portfolio, various technical and regulatory developments within the balancing framework might further influence balancing costs: i) dynamic dimensioning of balancing reserves, ii) provision by fluctuating renewables or new (battery) storage technologies, and iii) exchange of balancing reserves between balancing zones. The first part of this paper discusses and transforms these developments into quantitative scenario definitions. The second part applies these scenarios to dynELMOD (dynamic Electricity Model), an investment model of the European electricity system that is extended to include balancing reserve provision. In contrast to other models applied in most papers on balancing reserves, this model is capable of evaluating the interdependencies between developments in balancing reserve provision and high shares of fluctuating renewables jointly. The results show that balancing reserve cost can be kept at current levels for a renewable electricity system until 2050, when using a dynamic reserve sizing horizon. Apart from the sizing horizon, storage capacity withholding duration and additional balancing demand from RES are the main driver of balancing costs. Renewables participation in balancing provision is mainly important for negative reserves, while storages play an important role for the provision of positive reserves. However, only on very few occasions, additional storage investments are required for balancing reserve provision, as most of the time sufficient storage capacities are available in the electricity system.

  2. Balancing reserves within a decarbonized European electricity system in 2050. From market developments to model insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Casimir [German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Energy, Transportation, Environment; Univ. of Technology, Berlin (Germany). Workgroup for Infrastructure Policy (WIP)

    2017-03-30

    This paper expands the discussion about future balancing reserve provision to the long-term perspective of 2050. Most pathways for a transformation towards a decarbonized electricity sector rely on very high shares of fluctuating renewables. This can be a challenge for the provision of balancing reserves, although their influence on the balancing cost is unclear. Apart from the transformation of the generation portfolio, various technical and regulatory developments within the balancing framework might further influence balancing costs: i) dynamic dimensioning of balancing reserves, ii) provision by fluctuating renewables or new (battery) storage technologies, and iii) exchange of balancing reserves between balancing zones. The first part of this paper discusses and transforms these developments into quantitative scenario definitions. The second part applies these scenarios to dynELMOD (dynamic Electricity Model), an investment model of the European electricity system that is extended to include balancing reserve provision. In contrast to other models applied in most papers on balancing reserves, this model is capable of evaluating the interdependencies between developments in balancing reserve provision and high shares of fluctuating renewables jointly. The results show that balancing reserve cost can be kept at current levels for a renewable electricity system until 2050, when using a dynamic reserve sizing horizon. Apart from the sizing horizon, storage capacity withholding duration and additional balancing demand from RES are the main driver of balancing costs. Renewables participation in balancing provision is mainly important for negative reserves, while storages play an important role for the provision of positive reserves. However, only on very few occasions, additional storage investments are required for balancing reserve provision, as most of the time sufficient storage capacities are available in the electricity system.

  3. From carbonization to decarbonization?-Past trends and future scenarios for China's CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steckel, Jan Christoph; Jakob, Michael; Marschinski, Robert; Luderer, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    Along the lines of the Kaya identity, we perform a decomposition analysis of historical and projected emissions data for China. We compare the results with reduction requirements implied by globally cost-effective mitigation scenarios and official Chinese policy targets. For the years 1971-2000 we find that the impact of high economic growth on emissions was partially compensated by a steady fall in energy intensity. However, the end - and even reversal - of this downward trend, along with a rising carbon intensity of energy, resulted in rapid emission growth during 2000-2007. By applying an innovative enhanced Kaya-decomposition method, we also show how the persistent increase in the use of coal has caused carbon intensity to rise throughout the entire time-horizon of the analysis. These insights are then compared to model scenarios for future energy system developments generated by the ReMIND-R model. The analysis reaffirms China's indispensable role in global efforts to implement any of three exemplary stabilization targets (400, 450, or 500 ppm CO 2 -only), and underscore the increasing importance of carbon intensity for the more ambitious targets. Finally, we compare China's official targets for energy intensity and carbon intensity of GDP to projections for global cost-effective stabilization scenarios, finding them to be roughly compatible in the short-to-mid-term. - Highlights: → An extended Kaya-decomposition is applied to historical data and ReMIND-R scenario results for China. → Reversing a historic trend, energy intensity has increased in recent years. → The contribution of coal in increasing carbon intensity and emissions has been constant in the past. → Decarbonization becomes increasingly important with increasingly ambitious climate targets. → Chinese targets for carbon intensity of GDP are in line with a 450 ppm CO 2 -only stabilization scenario.

  4. Intra-slab COH fluid fluxes evidenced by fluid-mediated decarbonation of lawsonite eclogite-facies altered oceanic metabasalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Chu, Xu; Martin, Laure; Ague, Jay J.; Monié, Patrick; Groppo, Chiara; Martinez, Isabelle; Chaduteau, Carine

    2018-04-01

    The interplay between the processes controlling the mobility of H2O and C-bearing species during subduction zone metamorphism exerts a critical control on plate tectonics and global volatile recycling. Here we present the first study on fresh, carbonate-bearing, lawsonite eclogite-facies metabasalts from Alpine Corsica, France, which reached the critical depths at which important devolatilization reactions occur in subducting slabs. The studied samples indicate that the evolution of oceanic crustal sequences subducted under present-day thermal regimes is dominated by localized fluid-rock interactions that are strongly controlled by the nature and extent of inherited (sub)seafloor hydrothermal processes, and by the possibility of deep fluids to be channelized along inherited or newly-formed discontinuities. Fluid channelization along inherited discontinuities controlled local rehydration and dehydration/decarbonation reactions and the stability of carbonate and silicate minerals at the blueschist-eclogite transition. Fluid-mediated decarbonation was driven by upward, up-temperature fluid flow in the inverted geothermal gradient of a subducting oceanic slab, a process that has not been documented in natural samples to date. We estimate that the observed fluid-rock reactions released 20-60 kg CO2 per m3 of rock (i.e. 0.7-2.1 wt% CO2), which is in line with the values predicted from decarbonation of metabasalts in open systems at these depths. Conversely, the estimated time-integrated fluid fluxes (20-50 t/m2) indicate that the amount of carbon transported by channelized fluid flow within the volcanic part of subducting oceanic plates is potentially much higher than previous numerical estimates, testifying to the percolation of C-bearing fluids resulting from devolatilization/dissolution processes operative in large reservoirs.

  5. Electricity diversification, decentralization, and decarbonization: The role of U.S. state energy policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Sanya

    In response to mounting concerns about climate change and an over-dependence on fossil fuels, U.S. state governments have assumed leadership roles in energy policy. State leaders across the country have constructed policies that target electricity sector operations, and aim to increase the percentage of renewable electricity generation, increase the use of distributed generation, and decrease carbon footprints. The policy literature, however, lacks compelling empirical evidence that state initiatives toward these ends are effective. This research seeks to contribute empirical insights that can help fill this void in the literature, and advance policy knowledge about the efficacy of these instruments. This three-essay dissertation focuses on the assessment of state energy policy instruments aimed at the diversification, decentralization, and decarbonization of the U.S. electricity sector. The first essay considers the effects of state efforts to diversify electricity portfolios via increases in renewable energy. This essay asks: are state-level renewable portfolio standards (RPS) effective at increasing renewable energy deployment, as well as the share of renewable energy out of the total generation mix? Empirical results demonstrate that RPS policies so far are effectively encouraging total renewable energy deployment, but not the percentage of renewable energy generation. The second essay considers state policy efforts to decentralize the U.S. electricity sector via instruments that remove barriers to distributed generation (DG) deployment. The primary question this essay addresses is whether the removal of legal barriers acts as a primary motivating factor for DG deployment. Empirical results reveal that net metering policies are positively associated with DG deployment; interconnection standards significantly increase the likelihood that end-users will adopt DG capacity; and utility DG adoption is related to standard market forces. The third essay asks: what are

  6. Progressive Time-Weighted Dynamic Energy Efficiency, Energy Decoupling Rate, and Decarbonization: An Empirical Study on G7 and BRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Jung Tu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Energy is a critical factor of economic growth, but the overuse of it results in global warming and climate change. Hence, energy efficiency improvement can help mitigate climate change and prevent economic losses or even ecological extinction. The data envelopment analysis (DEA approach has been extensively applied for energy efficiency estimation, but past studies of this estimation employ a static mode that does not consider consecutive periods and the carry-over effect. This study estimates energy efficiency under a weight-restricted dynamic DEA (WrD-DEA model, creates a weight-restricted dynamic energy efficiency (WrD-EE indicator, and discusses issues concerning the energy decoupling rate and decarbonization. We utilize members in the Group of Seven (G7 and BRICS (Brazil, China, India, Russia, and South Africa for our experimental observations. The main results herein are: (1 BRICS has larger room for improvement to achieve the standard ratio of the energy decoupling rate than the G7; (2 the G7 and BRICS do not converge to decarbonization; and (3 BRICS exhibits more rapid improvement on energy efficiency than the G7.

  7. Key indicators for tracking 2030 strategies towards decarbonization in the EU: which indicators, why and what process for using them?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartor, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Decarbonizing national economies will require significant structural transformations of national energy systems and a number of emissions intensive sectors. Policy makers will therefore need to identify a comprehensive and coherent set of goals for each key aspect of the transition and monitor progress towards achieving these goals using indicators. But which specific goals and indicators should they focus on? And how can we be sure that the approach is consistent with achieving deep transformation change? This paper attempts to answer this question. This question is particularly relevant for current policy debate in Europe, where EU Member States have agreed to develop a set of 'key indicators' to track progress towards decarbonization as part of the new Energy Union governance mechanism. The EU is currently in the process of developing a 'new governance mechanism' to ensure the effective implementation of the EU's Energy Union project and the achievement of the EU's targets under the 2030 Climate and Energy Framework. The new governance mechanism will have far- reaching consequences for the way that the EU and its Member States plan, monitor and coordinate on energy and climate policy post-2020. Key indicators will have a crucial role to play in this mechanism. The purpose of indicators for climate and energy policy is to monitor progress towards EU climate and energy goals. However, since the bulk of policy action towards these goals generally takes place at the Member State level, these goals must also be adopted at Member State level for the indicators to track the success of policy implementation. For this, the goals that indicators track need to be included in national climate and energy plans. The EU has proposed to make this the case for some EU goals contained in the Energy Union project, but not for other ones. A closer integration of European indictors and national plans and targets set by Member States is needed. A singular use of indicators only to

  8. Workshop Report: International Workshop to Explore Synergies between Nuclear and Renewable Energy Sources as a Key Component in Developing Pathways to Decarbonization of the Energy Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Boardman, Richard; Ruth, Mark; Lyons, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    An international workshop was organized in June 2016 to explore synergies between nuclear and renewable energy sources. Synergies crossing electricity, transportation, and industrial sectors were the focus of the workshop, recognizing that deep decarbonization will require efforts that go far beyond the electricity sector alone. This report summarizes the key points made within each presentation and highlights outcomes that were arrived at in the discussions.

  9. Workshop Report: International Workshop to Explore Synergies between Nuclear and Renewable Energy Sources as a Key Component in Developing Pathways to Decarbonization of the Energy Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boardman, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lyons, Peter B. [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)

    2016-08-01

    An international workshop was organized in June 2016 to explore synergies between nuclear and renewable energy sources. Synergies crossing electricity, transportation, and industrial sectors were the focus of the workshop, recognizing that deep decarbonization will require efforts that go far beyond the electricity sector alone. This report summarizes the key points made within each presentation and highlights outcomes that were arrived at in the discussions.

  10. Decarbonizing the European electricity sector. Modeling and policy analysis for electricity and CO{sub 2} infrastructure networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, Pao-Yu Charly Robin

    2016-03-03

    This dissertation uses three models to analyze different decarbonization strategies for combating global climate change: The cost minimizing mixed-integer model CCTS-Mod examines the economics of Carbon Capture, Transport, and Storage (CCTS) for the electricity and industry sector; the welfare maximizing quadratically constrained model ELMOD focuses on different trajectories for renewable energy sources (RES) and transmission grid expansions; and the equilibrium model ELCO combines the insights of the individual sectors to a combined CCTS and electricity investment and dispatch model. Modeling results show that an investment in CCTS is beneficial for the iron and steel sector once the CO{sub 2} certificate price exceeds 50 Euros/t CO{sub 2}. The threshold is 75 Euros/t CO{sub 2} for the cement industry and 100 Euros/t CO{sub 2} for the electricity sector. Additional revenues from using CO{sub 2} for enhanced oil recovery (CO{sub 2}-EOR) lead to an earlier adoption of CCTS in the North Sea region. The lack of economies of scale results in increasing CO{sub 2} storage costs of more than 30%, while transport costs even double. Research from the last years, however, indicates that CCTS is unlikely to play an important role in decarbonizing the electricity sector. The identified reasons for this are incumbents' resistance to structural change, wrong technology choices, over-optimistic cost estimates, a premature focus on energy projects instead of industry, and the underestimation of transport and storage issues. Keeping global temperature rise below 2 C therefore implies the phase-out of fossilfueled power plants and, in particular, of CO{sub 2}-intensive coal power plants. The low CO{sub 2} price established by the European Emissions Trading Scheme is insufficient to induce a fuel switch in the medium term. Therefore, supplementary national measures are necessary to reduce coal-based power generation; i.a. feed-in tariffs for RES, minimum CO{sub 2} prices, or

  11. Hybrid Electricity Markets with Long-Term Risk-Sharing Arrangements: Adapting Market Design to Security of Supply and decarbonization Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROQUES, Fabien; FINON, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    The re-emergence of policy interventionism in electricity markets raises questions as to how market design can best be adapted to meeting the investment challenge associated with security of supply (SoS) and decarbonization objectives. This paper takes an institutionalist approach in terms of modularity of the market design, and reviews the standard historical approach towards competitive markets, in order to analyse the roles and interactions of the initial and additional market 'modules'. We argue that a number of additional modules is required to achieve long-term policy objectives, such as decarbonization and security of supply (SoS). But, in turn, they destabilise the initial modules of the market design, in particular by the entries of renewables. We review the international experience with hybrid market design and draw a number of policy recommendations at to best practices, as well as suggesting ways in which the initial market modules can be improved to prevent inconsistencies with the new modules. The move towards a hybrid market regime, which relies on a combination of planning, long-term risk sharing arrangements and improved markets entrenched in a function of short-term coordination, appears to be unavoidable where decarbonization policies are adopted. (authors)

  12. Quantifying the Contribution of Urban-Industrial Efficiency and Symbiosis to Deep Decarbonization: Impact of 637 Chinese Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, A.; Tong, K.; Fang, A.; Lal, R.; Nagpure, A.; Li, Y.; Yu, H.; Jiang, D.; Russell, A. G.; Shi, L.; Chertow, M.; Wang, Y.; Wang, S.

    2016-12-01

    demonstrate the contribution urban symbiosis on decarbonization and health co-benefits.

  13. A new proposed approach for future large-scale de-carbonization coal-fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Gang; Liang, Feifei; Wu, Ying; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Wenyi

    2015-01-01

    The post-combustion CO 2 capture technology provides a feasible and promising method for large-scale CO 2 capture in coal-fired power plants. However, the large-scale CO 2 capture in conventionally designed coal-fired power plants is confronted with various problems, such as the selection of the steam extraction point and steam parameter mismatch. To resolve these problems, an improved design idea for the future coal-fired power plant with large-scale de-carbonization is proposed. A main characteristic of the proposed design is the adoption of a back-pressure steam turbine, which extracts the suitable steam for CO 2 capture and ensures the stability of the integrated system. A new let-down steam turbine generator is introduced to retrieve the surplus energy from the exhaust steam of the back-pressure steam turbine when CO 2 capture is cut off. Results show that the net plant efficiency of the improved design is 2.56% points higher than that of the conventional one when CO 2 capture ratio reaches 80%. Meanwhile, the net plant efficiency of the improved design maintains the same level to that of the conventional design when CO 2 capture is cut off. Finally, the match between the extracted steam and the heat demand of the reboiler is significantly increased, which solves the steam parameter mismatch problem. The techno-economic analysis indicates that the proposed design is a cost-effective approach for the large-scale CO 2 capture in coal-fired power plants. - Highlights: • Problems caused by CO 2 capture in the power plant are deeply analyzed. • An improved design idea for coal-fired power plants with CO 2 capture is proposed. • Thermodynamic, exergy and techno-economic analyses are quantitatively conducted. • Energy-saving effects are found in the proposed coal-fired power plant design idea

  14. On the way to 2050 - Which ingredients for a de-carbonated future? An analysis of the 'Energy Road map 2050' of the European Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    This document presents and discusses the climate objective of the Energy road map, some macro-economic hypotheses (oil price, economic growth), the different trajectories defined in the Energy Road map, the role of electricity in the de-carbonation of the energy system, energy savings (potential and under-exploited), the evolution of the installed electric capacity, the balancing of the electric system, the global costs of the energy system, the EU energy bill in 2050, the evolution of electricity price, and the European carbon trading scheme

  15. The journey towards decarbonization: Exploring socio-technical transitions in the electricity sector in the province of Ontario (1885–2013) and potential low-carbon pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbloom, Daniel; Meadowcroft, James

    2014-01-01

    This article employs the multi-level perspective on socio-technical transitions to explore the historical evolution of the electricity regime in the province of Ontario from 1885-2013 and to interpret the potential for future movement towards decarbonization. With an emphasis on the political and social dimensions of transitions, this analysis traces the key features influencing change within Ontario's electricity system over the past century. This paper uses multiple criteria (the phase of electrification; role of the electricity system in economic development; structures of ownership, market and regulation; dominant technologies; and the relative stability of arrangements) to characterize distinct regime configurations and periods of instability which separate relatively stable system orientations. Lessons are drawn from the historical case with implications for future decarbonization in the province, including the importance of: (1) residual momentum; (2) embedded guiding principles; and, (3) politico-economic coalitions. - Highlights: • Investigates transitions in the electricity sector using the multi-level perspective. • Explores the socio-technical evolution of the electricity system in Ontario. • Draws lessons relevant for low-carbon transitions. • Poses key questions for the development of low-carbon pathways in Ontario. • Provides insights on the political dimensions of low-carbon transitions

  16. Mitigation: Decarbonization unique to cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nadine

    2017-10-01

    Strategies that reduce fossil-fuel use can achieve both global carbon mitigation and local health-protection goals. Now research shows the dual benefits of compact urban design and circular economy policies in Chinese cities.

  17. Pathways to deep decarbonization in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P.; Dhar, Subash; Pathak, Minal

    This report is a part of the global Deep Decarbonisation Pathways (DDP) Project. The analysis consider two development scenarios for India and assess alternate roadmaps for transiting to a low carbon economy consistent with the globally agreed 2°C stabilization target. The report does not conside...

  18. Organizing Consumers for a Decarbonized Electricity System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Trine; Jenle, Rasmus Ploug

    2018-01-01

    This paper studies a Danish smart grid experiment, EcoGrid EU, designed to sustain the increase of wind power in the electricity system. EcoGrid EU is designed as a real-time market, through which engineers seek to realize price responsive electricity consumers through the introduction of smart...... meters, variable short-term price signals and training users. Based on observations and interviews with scientist, consumers and technicians, this paper analyses the attempt to produce a new kind of electricity consumer. Drawing on social studies of markets, we argue that the project entails constructing...... a new form of calculative agency. We illustrate the extensive work put into the creation of a new, reconfigured electricity consumer, as well as the challenges associated with the construction of consumers willing and able to act in accordance with the EcoGrid script. On one hand, this study adds...

  19. Rapid solar-thermal decarbonization of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Jaimee Kristen

    Due to the ever-increasing demand for energy and the concern over the environmental impact of continuing to produce energy using current methods, there is interest in developing a hydrogen economy. Hydrogen is a desirable energy source because it is abundant in nature and burns cleanly. One method for producing hydrogen is to utilize a renewable energy source to obtain high enough temperatures to decompose a fossil fuel into its elements. This thesis work is directed at developing a solar-thermal aerosol flow reactor to dissociate methane to carbon black and hydrogen. The technology is intended as a "bridge" between current hydrogen production methods, such as conventional steam-methane reformers, and future "zero emission" technology for producing hydrogen, such as dissociating water using a renewable heating source. A solar furnace is used to heat a reactor to temperatures in excess of 2000 K. The final reactor design studied consists of three concentric vertical tubes---an outer quartz protection tube, a middle solid graphite heating tube, and an inner porous graphite reaction tube. A "fluid-wall" is created on the inside wall of the porous reaction tube in order to prevent deposition of the carbon black co-product on the reactor tube wall. The amorphous carbon black produced aids in heating the gas stream by absorbing radiation from the reactor wall. Conversions of 90% are obtained at a reactor wall temperature of 2100 K and an average residence time of 0.01 s. Computer modeling is also performed to study the gas flow and temperature profiles in the reactor as well as the kinetics of the methane dissociation reaction. The simulations indicate that there is little flow of the fluid-wall gas through the porous wall in the hot zone region, but this can be remedied by increasing the inlet temperature of the fluid-wall gas and/or increasing the tube permeability only in the hot zone region of the wall. The following expression describes the kinetics of methane dissociation in a solar-thermal fluid-wall reactor: dXdt=5.8x108 exp-155,600RT 1-X 7.2s-1. The experimental and theoretical work reported in this thesis is the groundwork that will be utilized in scaling up the reactor to produce hydrogen in distributed or centralized facilities.

  20. Comment on “Synthesis of ceria (CeO_2 and CeO_2_−_x) nanoparticles via decarbonation and Ce(III) oxidation of synthetic bastnaesite (CeCO_3F)” by Montes-Hernandez et al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gysi, Alexander P.; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    Montes-Hernandez et al. [5] recently reported results of a study of the decarbonation of fine-grained synthetic bastnäsite-(Ce) precipitates involving the oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) and the formation of ceria (CeO_2 and CeO_2_-_x with oxygen vacancies) nano-particles. The purpose of their study was to show that oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) occurs spontaneously during heating of bastnäsite-(Ce) in air, a vacuum, N_2 or Ar gas. However, their interpretation of the formation of CeO_2 is not supported by the findings of Gysi and Williams-Jones [3], who showed that natural bastnäsite-(Ce) decomposes to form rare earth element (REE) oxyfluorides (REEOF). The latter was documented using differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TGA) experiments under a deoxygenated N_2 atmosphere. In their experiments, Gysi and Williams-Jones [3] found no evidence for the oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV). This raises the question of whether the experiments of Montes-Hernandez et al. [5] in a N_2 atmosphere (and by extension in an Ar atmosphere) were compromised because of contamination by O_2 and that, as a result, they reached the erroneous conclusion that Ce(III) oxidizes spontaneously to Ce(IV) during heating of bastnäsite-(Ce) under these conditions. In order to explain the disagreement between their findings and those of Gysi and Williams-Jones [3], Montes-Hernandez et al. [5], proposed that the X-ray diffraction data of the former study were incorrectly interpreted. Here, we provide further evidence that the natural bastnäsite-(Ce) employed in the study by Gysi and Williams-Jones [3] decomposed to form REE oxyfluorides (i.e., CeOF, LaOF, PrOF and NdOF) and not CeO_2, and supply explanations for why Montes-Hernandez et al. [5] erroneously concluded that CeO_2 is produced during decomposition of this mineral under N_2 and Ar atmospheres. In so doing, we hope to provide new insights into the decomposition of bastnäsite-(Ce) that will help guide future

  1. Comment on “Synthesis of ceria (CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2−x}) nanoparticles via decarbonation and Ce(III) oxidation of synthetic bastnaesite (CeCO{sub 3}F)” by Montes-Hernandez et al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gysi, Alexander P., E-mail: agysi@mines.edu [Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1516 Illinois Street, Golden, CO, 80401 (United States); Williams-Jones, Anthony E. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, 3450 University Street, Montreal, QC, Canada, H3A 2A7 (Canada)

    2016-11-01

    Montes-Hernandez et al. [5] recently reported results of a study of the decarbonation of fine-grained synthetic bastnäsite-(Ce) precipitates involving the oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) and the formation of ceria (CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2-x} with oxygen vacancies) nano-particles. The purpose of their study was to show that oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) occurs spontaneously during heating of bastnäsite-(Ce) in air, a vacuum, N{sub 2} or Ar gas. However, their interpretation of the formation of CeO{sub 2} is not supported by the findings of Gysi and Williams-Jones [3], who showed that natural bastnäsite-(Ce) decomposes to form rare earth element (REE) oxyfluorides (REEOF). The latter was documented using differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TGA) experiments under a deoxygenated N{sub 2} atmosphere. In their experiments, Gysi and Williams-Jones [3] found no evidence for the oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV). This raises the question of whether the experiments of Montes-Hernandez et al. [5] in a N{sub 2} atmosphere (and by extension in an Ar atmosphere) were compromised because of contamination by O{sub 2} and that, as a result, they reached the erroneous conclusion that Ce(III) oxidizes spontaneously to Ce(IV) during heating of bastnäsite-(Ce) under these conditions. In order to explain the disagreement between their findings and those of Gysi and Williams-Jones [3], Montes-Hernandez et al. [5], proposed that the X-ray diffraction data of the former study were incorrectly interpreted. Here, we provide further evidence that the natural bastnäsite-(Ce) employed in the study by Gysi and Williams-Jones [3] decomposed to form REE oxyfluorides (i.e., CeOF, LaOF, PrOF and NdOF) and not CeO{sub 2}, and supply explanations for why Montes-Hernandez et al. [5] erroneously concluded that CeO{sub 2} is produced during decomposition of this mineral under N{sub 2} and Ar atmospheres. In so doing, we hope to provide new insights into the decomposition of

  2. Anticipating the Environmental Impacts and Behavioral Drivers of Deep Decarbonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is seeking regular and early career applications proposing research that will contribute to an improved ability to understand and anticipate the public health and environmental impacts and behavioral drivers of significant changes in energy consumption

  3. Decarbonization by means of hydrogen; Dekarbonisierung mittels Wasserstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreutzer, Ulrich [Siemens AG, Muenchen (Germany). Research in Energy and Electronics, Corporate Technology

    2018-01-15

    Hydrogen electrolysis plays a crucial role in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. With the help of regeneratively generated electricity, it converts water into its constituents hydrogen and oxygen without producing carbon dioxide. Experts are working on the still young PEM technology, which is particularly efficient and environmentally friendly. The holistic optimization of the plant plays an important role. [German] Wasserstoffelektrolyse spielt eine entscheidende Rolle, um CO{sub 2}-Emissionen einzudaemmen. Mit Hilfe regenerativ erzeugtem Strom wandelt sie Wasser in seine Bestandteile Wasserstoff und Sauerstoff um, ohne dass dabei Kohlenstoffdioxid entsteht. Experten arbeiten an der noch jungen PEM-Technologie, die besonders effizient und umweltvertraeglich ist. Eine wichtige Bedeutung hat dabei die ganzheitliche Optimierung der Anlage.

  4. Decarbonization scenarios in the electricity sector in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Van Thanh

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of CO_2 emissions issue is clearly a world challenge today and COP21 highlighted the international requirements for countries to address related issues in the short and long term. The fundamental objective of the thesis is to contribute to the identification of possible climate policy solutions related to growing electricity production in a developing country, namely Vietnam, taking into account the need to reduce carbon energy sources. For this purpose several scenarios for electricity sector development are constructed in order to measure effects of choices related to the electricity production on CO_2 emissions. The thesis presents an overview of the energy situation in Vietnam and highlights the rapid increase in electricity consumption due to population pressure and new needs. It also considers major issues of coal and gas imports, new energy sources, in light of economic constraints but also environmental challenges. The theoretical and analytical chapter reviews the analyses of electricity master plans construction, major available economic tools for energy demand forecast models. This forms the framework to understanding the complexity of the 'electric bet' which Vietnam faces. After a presentation of potential quantitative simulation instruments, ELECsim was chosen for modeling the electricity sector in Vietnam. This leads to a comprehensive scenario approach; Scenarios are based on several assumptions about the evolution of economic growth and demographics, energy prices, the power generation technology development, the declared carbon value, discount rates and change rate. As a first step in energy and climate policy Vietnam can control the demand growth by strong action on energy efficiency, while reducing parallel to both the electricity production costs and CO_2 emissions. Several scenarios are then proposed, highlighting both the need to search for higher energy efficiency and the promotion of low-carbon energies. Research envisages a rapid shift in policy choices to face the needs of an accelerated but sustainable economic development. Six scenarios were constructed on the basis of a reference scenario, focusing successively on energy efficiency, nuclear, CCS, renewables and a more balanced electricity mix. Environmental constraints (CO_2 emissions reduction) have priority in the scenario building process. This multi-criteria approach is very new in Vietnam, a country more familiar with supply cost-based approach. Scenarios analyzed here take into account the carbon intensity reduction of Vietnam's power sector. It is proposed as the benchmark threshold, the emission level of 50-80 g/kWh (similar to reference level studied in two of Vietnam's neighboring Asian economies such as Indonesia and India). In our research, the different mix of electricity generation offer relevant solutions. They allow meeting the economic and environmental challenges related to the expansion of the Vietnam's electricity sector. The analysis takes into account several dimensions such as the increasing demand pressure, fuels supply security with alternative choices, reduced high electrical production total costs, control of external bill, considered social impact (especially on health of citizens) and land use and, finally, compliance with standards related to the regional, national and global environment/climate protection. (author) [fr

  5. Carbonate Looping for De-Carbonization of Cement Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Andersen, Maria Friberg; Lin, Weigang

    2011-01-01

    Cement industry is one of the largest emitter of CO2 other than power generation plants, which includes the emissions from combustion of fuel and also from calcination of limestone for clinker production. In order to reduce CO2 emissions from the cement industry an effective an economically...... feasible technology is to be developed. The carbonate looping process is a promising technology, which is particularly suitable for the cement industry as limestone could be used for capture and release of CO2. Integration of carbonate looping process into cement pyroprocess has two advantages: 1...... integrated into cement pyro-process. The energy required for regeneration in the calciner increases with increase in average conversion of calcined limestone and energy that can be extracted from carbonator decreases with increasing average conversion. Further the influence of type of limestone...

  6. Challenges of coal conversion for decarbonized energy in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciazko, Marek; Jalosinski, Krzysztof; Majchrzak, Henryk; Michalski, Mieczyslaw; Tymowski, Henryk; Witos, Tadeusz; Wroblewska, Elzbieta

    2010-09-15

    Carbon dioxide is considered to be the main challenge for the coal-based power generation as well as for any other industrial application of coal. Poland's energy sector is primarily based on coal combustion that covers almost 90% of demand. Future development of that sector depends on the restriction on value of carbon dioxide emission or trading allowances. There are two main technological approaches to development of new coal based generation capacity, namely: gasification and pre-combustion capture; supercritical combustion and post-combustion capture. The current situation in development of three this type projects in Poland is presented.

  7. Decarbonizing the international shipping industry: Solutions and policy recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zheng; El Makhloufi, Abdel; Chen, Yang; Tang, Jiayuan

    2018-01-01

    Ship-source greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could increase by up to 250% by 2050 from their 2012 levels, owing to increasing global freight volumes. Binding international legal agreements to regulate GHGs, however, are lacking as technical solutions remain expensive, and crucial industrial support is absent. In 2003, the International Maritime Organization adopted Resolution A.963 (23) to regulate shipping CO 2 emissions via technical, operational, and market-based routes. However, progress has been slow and uncertain; there is no concrete emission reduction target or definitive action plan. Yet, a full-fledged roadmap may not even emerge until 2023. In this policy analysis, we revisit the progress of technical, operational, and market-based routes and the associated controversies. We argue that 1) a performance-based index, though good-intentioned, has loopholes affecting meaningful CO 2 emission reductions driven by technical advancements; 2) using slow steaming to cut energy consumption stands out among all operational solutions thanks to its immediate and obvious results, but with the already slow speed in practice, this single source has limited emission reduction potential; 3) without a technology-savvy shipping industry, a market-based approach is essentially needed to address the environmental impact. To give shipping a 50:50 chance for contributing fairly and proportionately to keep global warming below 2°C, deep emission reductions should occur soon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Monitoring decarbonization and resilience in Latin America and the Caribbean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zevallos, Pia; Castro, Rodrigo; Aldana, Rocio; Apaclla, Karol

    2015-11-01

    Climate change is already an inherent part of our future that will result in considerable negative effects which are not only inevitable, but also irreversible. In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) the effects of climate change and its associated impacts on human and productive systems are already evident. There is a real and current need to adapt and build resilience to climate change that will only become more pressing if global actions to stabilize GHG emissions continue to be postponed. LAC is not properly adapted to existing climate risks, and there is an 'adaptation gap (or deficit)', which is actually part of a larger development deficit. Delayed action in both mitigation and adaptation will increase this deficit. It has been estimated that the total investment necessary in the region to adapt to the inevitable physical effects of climate change is approximately one quarter to one sixth of the costs of these impacts. Achieving climate stabilization requires the region to reduce its emissions to 1.43 Gt CO_2 by 2050, at a cost of approximately US $100 billion per year. Significant mitigation efforts are still required, given that the region is exposed to increased pressure relating to land use changes and industrialization, which in turn increases energy consumption. However, it is estimated that the co-benefits of mitigation could be as high as 30% to 100% of the total abatement costs. The fight against climate change can be tackled as a management issue; both of GHG emissions and climate risk. A National System of Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV) facilitates decision-making and national planning; it helps track the achievement of goals; promotes coordination and communication between the sectors; generates comparable and transparent information, and facilitates its exchange; and helps identify and showcase good practices, as well as building trust (both between countries and in the private sector) and increasing the likelihood of international support. Clear institutional agreements and leadership at the highest level are key to boosting low-emissions development, helping to build resilience and promoting comprehensive solutions

  9. How Engineers Make Markets Organizing Electricity System Decarbonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenle, Rasmus Ploug; Pallesen, Trine

    2017-01-01

    construction process undertaken by scientists at the Technical University of Denmark, this article shows how engineers have approached the task by designing markets as technical control systems. It is demonstrated that EcoGrid has been designed by modeling a retail electricity market on three different...... conceptions of control systems as found in the discipline of control systems engineering. By tracing the origins of EcoGrid, this article documents the governing of electricity consumers through what we here call a synthetic market, i.e. a market artifact devised to attain goals. These findings about...

  10. EUROPE AND ITS GREEN FUTURE. ELECTRIFICATION AND DECARBONIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baciu Adrian

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present a great challenge which humanity faces, and which is climate change. Together with food and water shortages which will hit more and more humanity in the years ahead, climate change (which will only amplify these negative facts will bring negative consequences on economy and society, and in international relations area, too. In this context, the importance of the subject speaks for itself. The research is focused on EU objectives in climate area and in sustainable development, indicating that renewable energy could be a solution for energy independence, and for reducing CO2 concentration level, too. The subject is very important one nowadays being subject of intense debates and negotiations, having a high degree of visibility in international forums and in international press. The paper wants to show what EU aims in the future related to its development through fossil fuels consumption reduction and as a base for starting research are researched realized under the aegis of Group Futuribles from Paris, of the National Centre for Sustainable Development from Bucharest, from American Academy of Arts and Science, and International Energy Agency from Paris. We take from IEA data and present them in the tables in order to have a synthetic view upon energy in EU countries, and of course, there are presented trends in energy consumption in renewable at European level. The development of the subject with the involvements in transport area only brings a fresh air in the debates regarding reducing energy vulnerability together with fighting climate changes. There are presented some peculiarities of CO2 pollution and their implications, and consequences; and of course, solutions for fighting climate change is part of this presentation. Reducing oil consumption and expanding renewable resources (wind, solar, and hydro and nuclear energy coupled with the electrification of the economy and transportation sectors, and rising energy efficiency are of outmost importance in fighting climate change. Becoming leader in this area, EU aims not only to promote sustainable development, but to influence in a significant manner the future negotiations in climate area, gaining through this strategy a better position on the world scene. The added value of our endeavor is in the superposed areas of EU energy independence, freeing transportation sector from the place of being hostage to potential oil crisis in the future, and all of these in the context of fighting climate change. The paper presents how energy independence could be obtained through renewable expansion, while fighting climate change, too.

  11. 中国电力系统低碳转型的路径探析——基于社会技术转型思路%Exploring Transition Pathways for a Decarbonized Electricity System in China——Based on the Socio-technical Transition Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卓淳; 姚遂

    2012-01-01

    The Multi-lever Perspective (MLP) of socio-technical transition is the new development of transition theory. It claims that transition is a non-linear and evolutional process through three interlocking levers (technological niches in micro-lever, socio-technical regime in meso-lever, landscape in macro-lever) , and seeks to understand the long time changes of the socio-technical regime by analyzing the interaction between technological and social factors. Drawing upon MLP approach and its typology of transition pathways, this paper first describes and analyses the dynamitic changes that have taken place in the electricity system in China . Then it proposes a conceptual framework of the transition pathways for a decarbonized electricity system, in short-term, mid-term and long-term dimensions. Along the short-term transformation path, the electricity system continues and extends existing institutional structures and governance models. It will achieve the government' s 2020 emission reduction targets and renewable energy targets, through the regime actors' conscious adjustment of their innovation and development directions, which will mitigate the internal conflicts and pressures in the regime. Along the mid-term reconfiguration path, electricity system will experience substantive changes in electricity resource structure. Thermal power gradually decreases. Its dominance will be challenged by the renewable energy generation. The power system will turn out to be diversified mode. With the final breakthroughs of innovation of new low-carbon energy technologies, high-carbon coal power system will eventually be replaced by low-carbon system along the long-term re-alignment path. Theoretically and methodologically, this analysis will enrich the debates on low-carbon transition in China. It will also be useful informing policy-makers and other stakeholders.%社会技术转型的多层视角(MLP)是转型理论的最新进展,它认为转型是由三个层面——微观

  12. Towards Global De-Carbonization: Examining the Role of Freight Forwarders in Green Logistics in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofi Wireko, Joseph; Owusu, Mavis

    2015-01-01

    The problem of carbon emission is a global phenomenon and cross-border in nature. There is almost a dearth of literature on the practice of green logistics by freight forwarders in Ghana and for that matter in most countries within the West African sub-region. This paper examines the role...... of freight forwarders in reducing carbon emissions by adopting “green logistics” as part of the global efforts in addressing global warming. The study employs a pre-test and case study method, to ensure sufficient collection of relevant material, taking into account the lack of research in this subject...... in Ghana. Materials obtained from the interviews and the questionnaires were used to explore the knowledge of employees regarding green logistics, examine the challenges in implementing green logistics, and assess the internal and external pressures that impact on freight forwarders and the needed...

  13. Decarbonization of the German energy system due to falling or rising power consumption?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guminski, Andrej; Roon, Serafin von

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication of the draft ''Climate Protection Plan 2050'' and the ''Green Paper on Energy Efficiency'', it is clear that the Federal Government is focusing on the electrification of the heat and transport sector in order to increase the share of renewable energies in these sectors. This step is not uncontroversial, and represents a paradigm shift in science and politics, because the reduction of the cross electricity consumption move into the background. It is now necessary to clearly distinguish between the conventional power consumption, which must continue to be tested for energy savings and efficiency potential, and the new power consumption, here referred to as the coupling current, which is accepted in order to achieve the objectives of the energy transition. Since the consideration of the energy transition as a purely national project is too short, possible positive and negative effects of the European Union Emission Trading System (EU ETS) deserve particular attention with regard to this reorientation. [de

  14. The whole world's watching: decarbonizing the economy and saving the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.; O'Connell, B.

    2000-11-01

    In this book the authors explain how money can be channeled into the technology that will preserve the lifestyles we currently enjoy and create a new era of economic growth. This is a book that proposes real, concrete solutions. Environmentalists and politicians will not stop climate change from occurring: industry will and it will happen a lot sooner than we think. Global warming is real and not a problem that will disappear on its own. This book explains why it is now time to mobilize the world's financial markets to work for the good of mankind. The money to finance the changes necessary to prevent climatic mutation should come from Wall Street, instead of Washington or Berlin. (author)

  15. Time for Decarbonization of Conservation and Development Projects? The Political Ecology of Carbon Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre L. Ibisch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The globe's first carbon projects were designed and implemented approximately 20 years ago following scientific insights that emissions of greenhouse gases needed to be mitigated. Visible in some of these early projects were the important aspects of social governance and local benefit sharing. The projects promised to be a panacea to environmental, social and economic problems in remote rural areas of developing countries. However, it took another decade before a wave of hundreds of carbon projects were launched. Many of the projects were offered under the mechanism of REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation, plus the role of conservation, sustainable forest management and carbon enhancement, as well as under a variety of voluntary schemes and national programs, public-private partnerships, and forestry-based investment initiatives. As decision-makers prepare the Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climatic Change in Paris (COP21, Earthscan has released a book entitled `Carbon conflicts and forest landscapes in Africa', edited by Melissa Leach and Ian Scoones. According to the editors, the focus of the book is on what happens on the ground when carbon forestry projects arrive, what types of projects work, and, equally important, what doesn’t work.

  16. The impact of carbon capture and storage on a decarbonized German power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiecker, S.; Eickholt, V.; Weber, C.

    2014-01-01

    The European energy policy is substantially driven by the target to reduce the CO 2 -emissions significantly and to mitigate climate change. Nevertheless European power generation is still widely based on fossil fuels. The carbon capture and storage technology (CCS) could be part of an approach to achieve ambitious CO 2 reduction targets without large scale transformations of the existing energy system. In this context the paper investigates on how far the CCS-technology could play a role in the European and most notably in the German electricity generation sector. To account for all the interdependencies with the European neighboring countries, the embedding of the German electricity system is modeled using a stochastic European electricity market model (E2M2s). After modeling the European side constraints, the German electricity system is considered in detail with the stochastic German Electricity market model (GEM2s). The focus is thereby on the location of CCS plant sites, the structure of the CO 2 -pipeline network and the regional distribution of storage sites. Results for three different European energy market scenarios are presented up to the year 2050. Additionally, the use of CCS with use of onshore and offshore sites is investigated. - Highlights: • We present a model framework for the evaluation of carbon capture and storage (CCS). • Different scenarios to analyze regional differences within Germany. • Interdependencies between CO 2 bound and demand are the main influencing factors. • A comprehensive investment in CCS power plants is not likely in the next decades. • Storage sites are no restricting factor but public acceptance is a crucial point

  17. Let us de-carbonate - 9 proposals for Europe to enter a new era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahraman, Zeynep; Guerin, Andre-Jean; Jancovici, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Published by Shift Project (a think tank on energy transition), this book present and discuss nine fields for priority action: electricity, autonomous vehicles, smart urban mobility, to give back advantage to rail transport, a new industrial revolution, an energy sober housing, an exemplary public real estate, promotion of bio-construction, and a sustainable agriculture. The authors provide key data, and necessary clues for a better understanding in order to become an informed actor of energy transition

  18. Development of pre-combustion decarbonization technologies for zero-CO{sub 2} power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner Renzenbrink; Karl-Josef Wolf; Frank Hannemann; Gerhard Zimmermann; Erik Wolf [RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The drastic rise in power generation that is expected on a global scale will also lead to a strong increase in CO{sub 2} emissions due to the high share of fossil energy sources used, which is quite contrary to the objectives of climate protection. In this dilemma, zero-CO{sub 2} power generation technologies might permit to make a decisive step on the road toward a necessary CO{sub 2} reduction. In the integrated ENCAP project (EU FP 6), a consortium of engineering companies, power plant manufacturers and research institutes lead-managed by RWE Power is drawing up technical IGCC/IRCC concepts including CO{sub 2} capture and spurring the necessary development of new gas turbine burners for the combustion of hydrogen-rich gases. Based on the working structure within ENCAP, this paper is divided into two parts. In the first part, the results of the process development for the different concepts based on hard coal, lignite and natural gas including CO{sub 2} capture is presented giving the technical and economic key figures of the processes. In the second part, the current status of burner development for the combustion of H{sub 2}-rich gases within ENCAP is given. 1 ref., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Towards a de-carbonized energy system in North-Eastern Morocco: Prospective Geothermal Resource

    OpenAIRE

    Rimi, Abdelkrim; Zarhloule, Yassine; Barkaoui, Alae Eddine; Correia, António; Carneiro, Júlio; Verdoya, Massimo; Lucazeau, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Geothermal data has been indicating promising potentialities in the north-eastern Morocco. This paper presents new temperature data, recently recorded in water boreholes located in the Berkane and Oujda areas. Generally, the observed temperature gradients are rather high. One hole near Berkane, revealed an average geothermal gradient of more than 110 °C/km at depths greater than 300 m. This result confirms the geothermal gradient estimated in a mining borehole located about 30 km west of the ...

  20. The European Power System. Decarbonization and Cost Reduction: Lost in Transmissions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaureguy-Naudin, Maite

    2012-01-01

    Europe's energy policy is commonly defined by three axes of equal importance: security of supplies, competitiveness and sustainable development. The European Commission is mandated to develop the policy tools that allow the implementation of this common policy. Early on, challenges arose from the trade-offs to be made not only between these three pillars but also between a common European policy and national approaches. The European Commission has always had to struggle in attempting to keep a balanced line. Over the past twenty years, the EU has been engaged in the liberalization of the electricity and gas sector. For a long time, liberalization was the main objective of European energy policy. Liberalization of the electricity sector was supposed to bring many benefits. Foremost, these included the more efficient allocation of generation and transmission capacities, and the enhancement of the competitiveness of the European economy as a whole, through lower energy costs. The trading of electricity output between countries was part of this strategy. Interconnections are vital to facilitating electricity trade between Member States. It is in this context that interest in cross-border interconnections has increased. However, new constraints have emerged and have put climate change at the top of European agenda. In December 2008, as part of the fight against climate change, the European Union adopted its Energy and Climate package endorsing three objectives for 2020: i) a 20% increase in energy efficiency, ii) a 20% reduction in GHG emissions (compared to 1990), and iii) a 20% share of renewable energy sources in final energy consumption. A direct consequence of the later objective is that renewable energy sources (RES) in electricity generation are expected to expand from 20.3% of electricity output in 2010, to around 33%, in order to meet the objective set by the European Commission. Hydroelectric power has limited additional potential due to geographical constraints. Wind energy is expected to provide most of the extra renewable energy required in electricity generation to meet this objective. Even though photovoltaic electricity production is less mature than wind energy, this technology is also strongly supported by new energy policies. Overall, the variability of these intermittent technologies can be dealt with by interconnection capacities, to a certain extent. Strong interconnections between neighboring countries are crucial for greater wind-power and solar penetration in the European system

  1. A decarbonization strategy for the electricity sector: New-source subsidies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Kenneth C.

    2010-01-01

    An expedient phase-out of carbon emissions in the electricity sector could be facilitated by imposing carbon fees and applying the revenue exclusively to subsidize new, low-carbon generation sources. Since there would initially be no 'new sources', fees would be substantially zero at the outset of the program. Nevertheless, the program would immediately create high price incentives for low-carbon capacity expansion. Fees would increase as new, low-carbon sources gain market share, but price competition from a growing, subsidized clean-energy industry would help maintain moderate retail electricity prices. Subsidies would automatically phase out as emitting sources become obsolete.

  2. Pathways to Decarbonization. Natural Gas and Renewable Energy. Lessons Learned from Energy System Stakeholders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pless, Jacquelyn [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Arent, Douglas J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Logan, Jeffrey [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cochran, Jaquelin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zinaman, Owen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stark, Camila [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-04-30

    Ensuring the resilience, reliability, flexibility, and affordability of the U.S. electric grid is increasingly important as the country addresses climate change and an aging infrastructure. State and federal policy and actions by industry, non-profits, and others create a dynamic framework for achieving these goals. Three principle low-carbon generation technologies have formed the basis for multiple scenarios leading toward a low-carbon, resilient, and affordable power system. While there is no “silver bullet,” one avenue identified by key stakeholders is the opportunity to invest in natural gas (NG) and renewable resources, both of which offer abundant domestic resource bases and contribute to energy independence, carbon mitigation, and economic growth. NG and renewable electricity (RE) have traditionally competed for market share in the power sector, but there is a growing experience base and awareness for their synergistic use (Cochran et al. 2014). Building upon these observations and previous work, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA), in collaboration with the Center for the New Energy Economy and the Gas Technology Institute, convened a series of workshops in 2014 to explore NG and RE synergies in the U.S. power sector. This report captures key insights from the workshop series, Synergies of Natural Gas and Renewable Energy: 360 Degrees of Opportunity, as well as supporting economic valuation analyses conducted by JISEA researchers that quantify the value proposition of investing in NG and RE together as complements.

  3. Decarbonizing Public Bus Transport – a case study on Curitiba, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Düllmann Vasques Pereira, Joana Lena

    2018-01-01

    Air pollution is becoming a major issue in cities across the world, its common cause being the use of fossil fuel combustion engines in both private and collective transport modes. However, alternative technologies, such as biofuels, hybrid and battery electric vehicles, are on the rise. The objective of this thesis is to assess the optimal system’s configuration – a combination of electric traction and the use of biofuels – in a sub-group of Curitiba’s public bus network through the applicat...

  4. Tendances Carbone no. 106. Free allocation in the EU ETS by 2030: paving the way for decarbonization of industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalard, Matthieu; Alberola, Emilie; Dahan, Lara

    2015-10-01

    Among the publications of I4CE, 'Tendances Carbone' bulletin specifically studies the developments of the European market for CO 2 allowances. Beside some statistical figures about energy production/consumption and carbon markets, this issue specifically addresses the following points: - EU ETS - MSR: On September 18, EU Environment Ministers adopted the Market Stability Reserve (MSR) for a start date in 2018. - EU ETS - MSR: On September, the timeline for the revision of the Directive for Phase IV of the EU ETS was detailed. A vote in plenary is expected in November 2016. - Energy Union: On September 28, a European Council meeting on Energy published draft conclusions on the governance system of the Energy Union, based on National Energy and Climate Plans to be drawn up in 2018

  5. Opportunities for Decarbonizing Existing U.S. Coal-Fired Power Plants via CO2 Capture, Utilization and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Haibo; Ou, Yang; Rubin, Edward S

    2015-07-07

    This study employs a power plant modeling tool to explore the feasibility of reducing unit-level emission rates of CO2 by 30% by retrofitting carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) to existing U.S. coal-fired electric generating units (EGUs). Our goal is to identify feasible EGUs and their key attributes. The results indicate that for about 60 gigawatts of the existing coal-fired capacity, the implementation of partial CO2 capture appears feasible, though its cost is highly dependent on the unit characteristics and fuel prices. Auxiliary gas-fired boilers can be employed to power a carbon capture process without significant increases in the cost of electricity generation. A complementary CO2 emission trading program can provide additional economic incentives for the deployment of CCS with 90% CO2 capture. Selling and utilizing the captured CO2 product for enhanced oil recovery can further accelerate CCUS deployment and also help reinforce a CO2 emission trading market. These efforts would allow existing coal-fired EGUs to continue to provide a significant share of the U.S. electricity demand.

  6. Decarbonization scenarios for the EU and MENA power system: Considering spatial distribution and short term dynamics of renewable generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, Markus; Ludig, Sylvie; Bauer, Nico

    2012-01-01

    We use the multi-scale power system model LIMES-EU + to explore coordinated long term expansion pathways for Renewable Energy (RE) generation, long distance transmission and storage capacities for the power sector of the Europe and Middle East/North Africa (MENA) regions that lead to a low emission power system. We show that ambitious emission reduction targets can be achieved at moderate costs by a nearly complete switch to RE sources until 2050, if transmission and storage capacities are expanded adequately. Limiting transmission capacities to current levels leads to higher storage requirements, higher curtailments, and to an increase in temporal and spatial electricity price variations. Results show an escalation of electricity prices if emission reductions exceed a critical value. Adequate expansion of transmission and storage capacities shift this threshold from 70% to 90% emission reductions in 2050 relative to 2010. - Highlights: ► We present an EU+MENA power system model that considers long term investments and integration of renewables. ► For low emission targets, renewable integration issues lead to escalating electricity prices. ► The feasibility frontier can be pushed by adequate transmission and storage investments. ► The transformation from wind/fossil to wind/solar regime changes integration requirements. ► Low emission targets can be reached without significant interconnections between EU and MENA regions.

  7. Decarbonization of the German energy system due to falling or rising power consumption?; Dekarbonisierung des deutschen Energiesystems durch sinkenden oder steigenden Stromverbrauch?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guminski, Andrej; Roon, Serafin von [Forschungsgesellschaft fuer Energiewirtschaft mbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Since the publication of the draft ''Climate Protection Plan 2050'' and the ''Green Paper on Energy Efficiency'', it is clear that the Federal Government is focusing on the electrification of the heat and transport sector in order to increase the share of renewable energies in these sectors. This step is not uncontroversial, and represents a paradigm shift in science and politics, because the reduction of the cross electricity consumption move into the background. It is now necessary to clearly distinguish between the conventional power consumption, which must continue to be tested for energy savings and efficiency potential, and the new power consumption, here referred to as the coupling current, which is accepted in order to achieve the objectives of the energy transition. Since the consideration of the energy transition as a purely national project is too short, possible positive and negative effects of the European Union Emission Trading System (EU ETS) deserve particular attention with regard to this reorientation. [German] Spaetestens seit der Veroeffentlichung des Entwurfs zum ''Klimaschutzplan 2050'' und des ''Gruenbuch Energieeffizienz'' ist klar, dass die Bundesregierung auf die Elektrifizierung des Waerme- und Verkehrssektors setzt, um den Anteil der erneuerbaren Energien in diesen Sektoren zu steigern. Dieser Schritt ist nicht unumstritten und stellt einen Paradigmenwechsel in Wissenschaft und Politik dar, denn auf einmal rueckt die Senkung des Bruttostromverbrauchs in den Hintergrund. Es gilt jetzt, klar zu trennen zwischen dem herkoemmlichen Stromverbrauch, der weiterhin auf Energieeinspar- und -effizienzpotenziale hin untersucht werden muss, und dem neuen, hier Koppelstrom genannten Stromverbrauch, welcher in Kauf genommen wird, um die Ziele der Energiewende zu erreichen. Da die Betrachtung der Energiewende als rein nationales Projekt zu kurz greift, verdienen moegliche positive und negative Effekte des European Union Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) in Bezug auf diese Neuausrichtung besondere Beachtung.

  8. Integrated underground gas storage of CO2 and CH4 to decarbonize the "power-to-gas-to-gas-to-power" technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Michael; Streibel, Martin; Nakaten, Natalie; Kempka, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Massive roll-out of renewable energy production units (wind turbines and solar panels) leads to date to excess energy which cannot be consumed at the time of production. So far, long-term storage is proposed via the so called 'power-to-gas' technology. Energy is transferred to methane gas and subsequently combusted for power production - 'power-to-gas-to-power' (PGP) - when needed. PGP profits from the existing infrastructure of the gas market and could be deployed immediately. However, major shortcoming is the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) from renewables and its emission into the atmosphere. We present an innovative idea which is a decarbonised extension of the PGP technology. The concept is based on a closed carbon cycle: (1) Hydrogen (H2) is generated from renewable energy by electrolysis and (2) transformed into methane (CH4) with CO2 taken from an underground geological storage. (3) CH4 produced is stored in a second storage underground until needed and (4) combusted in a combined-cycled power plant on site. (5) CO2 is separated during energy production and re-injected into the storage formation. We studied a show case for the cities Potsdam and Brandenburg/Havel in the Federal State of Brandenburg in Germany to determine the energy demand of the entire process chain and the costs of electricity (COE) using an integrated techno-economic modelling approach (Nakaten et al. 2014). Taking all of the individual process steps into account, the calculation shows an overall efficiency of 27.7 % (Streibel et al. 2013) with total COE of 20.43 euro-cents/kWh (Kühn et al. 2013). Although the level of efficiency is lower than for pump and compressed air storage, the resulting costs are similar in magnitude, and thus competitive on the energy storage market. The great advantage of the concept proposed here is that, in contrast to previous PGP approaches, this process is climate-neutral due to CO2 utilisation. For that purpose, process CO2 is temporally stored in an underground reservoir. If existing locations in Europe, where natural gas storage in porous formations is performed, were to be extended by CO2 storage sites, a significant quantity of wind and solar energy produced could be stored as methane. The overall process chain is in this case carbon neutral. Kühn M., Nakaten N., Streibel M., Kempka T. (2013) Klimaneutrale Flexibilisierung regenerativer Überschussenergie mit Untergrundspeichern. ERDÖL ERDGAS KOHLE 129(10), 348-352. Nakaten, N., Schlüter, R., Azzam, R., Kempka, T. (2014) Development of a techno-economic model for dynamic calculation of COE, energy demand and CO2 emissions of an integrated UCG-CCS process, Energy (in press). doi: 10.1016/j.energy.2014.01.014 Streibel M., Nakaten N., Kempka T., Kühn M. (2013) Analysis of an integrated carbon cycle for storage of renewables. Energy Procedia 40, 202-211. doi: 10.1016/j.egypro.2013.08.024.

  9. Considering the Role of Natural Gas in the Deep Decarbonization of the U.S. Electricity Sector. Natural Gas and the Evolving U.S. Power Sector Monograph Series: Number 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Wesley [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beppler, Ross [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zinaman, Owen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Logan, Jeffrey [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-02-12

    Natural gas generation in the U.S. electricity sector has grown substantially in recent years, while the sector's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have generally declined. This relationship highlights the concept of natural gas as a potential enabler of a transition to a lower-carbon future. This work considers that concept by using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Renewable Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. ReEDS is a long-term capacity expansion model of the U.S. electricity sector. We examine the role of natural gas within the ReEDS modeling framework as increasingly strict carbon emission targets are imposed on the electricity sector. In addition to various natural gas price futures, we also consider scenarios that emphasize a low-carbon technology in order to better understand the role of natural gas if that low-carbon technology shows particular promise. Specifically, we consider scenarios with high amounts of energy efficiency (EE), low nuclear power costs, low renewable energy (RE) costs, and low carbon capture and storage (CCS) costs. Within these scenarios we find that requiring the electricity sector to lower CO2 emissions over time increases near-to-mid-term (through 2030) natural gas generation (see Figure 1 - left). The long-term (2050) role of natural gas generation in the electricity sector is dependent on the level of CO2 emission reduction required. Moderate reductions in long-term CO2 emissions have relatively little impact on long-term natural gas generation, while more stringent CO2 emission limits lower long-term natural gas generation (see Figure 1 - right). More stringent carbon targets also impact other generating technologies, with the scenarios considered here seeing significant decreases in coal generation, and new capacity of nuclear and renewable energy technologies over time. Figure 1 also demonstrates the role of natural gas in the context of scenarios where a specific low-carbon technology is advantaged. In 2030, natural gas generation in the technology scenarios is quite similar to that in the reference scenarios, indicating relatively little change in the role of natural gas in the near-to-mid-term due to advancements in those technology areas. The 2050 natural gas generation shows more significant differences, suggesting that technology advancements will likely have substantial impacts on the role of natural gas in the longer-term timeframe. Natural gas generation differences are most strongly driven by alternative natural gas price trajectories--changes in natural gas generation in the Low NG Price and High NG Price scenarios are much larger than in any other scenario in both the 2030 and 2050 timeframes. The only low-carbon technology scenarios that showed any increase in long-term natural gas generation relative to the reference case were the Low CCS cost scenarios. Carbon capture and storage technology costs are currently high, but have the potential to allow fossil fuels to play a larger role in low-carbon grid. This work considers three CCS cost trajectories for natural gas and coal generators: a baseline trajectory and two lower cost trajectories where CO2 capture costs reach $40/metric ton and $10/metric ton, respectively. We find that in the context of the ReEDS model and with these assumed cost trajectories, CCS can increase the long-term natural gas generation under a low carbon target (see Figure 2). Under less stringent carbon targets we do not see ReEDS electing to use CCS as part of its electricity generating portfolio for the scenarios considered in this work.

  10. Dematerialization in Finnish energy use, 1972-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, J.W. [Turku School of Economics, P.O. Box 110, FIN-20521, Turku (Finland)

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyzes dematerialization, particularity decarbonization and energy saving with regard to Finnish energy use. The results show that Finland has achieved good results in decarbonization and energy saving. However, the results are not as impressive when compared to other developed countries.

  11. State at the rescue of economy de-carbonation: how much does it cost? How to channel public investments in order to maximize reductions of greenhouse gas emissions without degrading the economic balance-sheet of our country? - Carbon Newsletter Nr 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forget, Astrid; Schuller, Aurelien; Chillaz, Vincent de; Gassiat, Claire; Ramos, Clement; Ledoux, Roman

    2016-06-01

    The authors first discuss why and how to assess the efficiency of public policies on climate change. Then, they show that the support to varying renewable energies displays a rather low and varying efficiency. They refer to some modelling works, notice that the additional electric power production is mainly substituted to nuclear-based electricity, and also notice that trade balances of photovoltaic and ground-based wind energies are negative. The next part addresses the issue of housing with two possibilities: the renovation of existing buildings in compliance with the current standard, or the strengthening of this standard. Two cases (new construction and renovation) are briefly discussed, as well a method and modelling of calculation of the cost of an avoided ton of CO_2, notably in the case of a BBC (low consumption building) renovation, and in the case of a BEPAS-type new construction. The authors then compare the efficiency of public policies regarding electric power sustainable production and the housing sector, discuss whether methanization is an efficient way to avoid CO_2 and fossil fuel imports. In the next part, they discuss the development of new suburban bus lines (example in Madrid, expected effects)

  12. Energy markets and climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krozer, Yoram

    2017-01-01

    Innovations mechanisms on energy markets are discussed, in particular valorization of energy products which invokes decarbonization of energy recourses. The valorization, meaning higher value of energy products, is expressed as electrification and entry of modern renewable energy based on

  13. City transformations in a 1.5 °C warmer world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solecki, William; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Dhakal, Shobhakar; Roberts, Debra; Barau, Aliyu Salisu; Schultz, Seth; Ürge-Vorsatz, Diana

    2018-03-01

    Meeting the ambitions of the Paris Agreement will require rapid and massive decarbonization of cities, as well as adaptation. Capacity and requirement differs across cities, with challenges and opportunities for transformational action in both the Global North and South.

  14. Turning Paris into reality at the University of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, David G.; Abdulla, Ahmed; Auston, David; Brase, Wendell; Brouwer, Jack; Brown, Karl; Davis, Steven J.; Kappel, Carrie V.; Meier, Alan; Modera, Mark; Zarin Pass, Rebecca; Phillips, David; Sager, Jordan; Weil, David; TomKat Natural Gas Exit Strategies Working Group

    2018-03-01

    The Paris Agreement highlights the need for local climate leadership. The University Of California's approach to deep decarbonization offers lessons in efficiency, alternative fuels and electrification. Bending the emissions curve globally requires efforts that blend academic insights with practical solutions.

  15. Oxy-fuel combustion as an alternative for increasing lime production in rotary kilns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, D.A.; Chejne, F.; Mejía, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A one-dimensional model for oxy-fuel combustion in a rotary kiln was developed. • Flue gas recirculation becomes an important parameter for controlling the process. • Combustion process decreases the flame length making it more dense. • Increases of 12% in raw material with 40% of FGR and conversion of 98% was obtained. - Abstract: The effect of Flue Gas Recirculation (FGR) on the decarbonation process during oxy-fuel combustion in a lime (and cement) rotary kiln is analyzed using an unsteady one-dimensional Eulerian–Lagrangian mathematical model. The model considers gas and limestone as continuous phases and the coal particles as the discrete phase. The model predicts limestone decarbonation, temperature and species distribution of gas and solid phases along the kiln. Simulation results of an air-combustion case are successfully validated with reported experimental data. This model is used to study and to compare the conventional air combustion process with oxy-fuel combustion with FGR ratios between 30% and 80% as controller parameter in this process. Changes in decarbonation process due to energy fluxes by convection and radiation with different FGRs were simulated and analyzed. Simulation results indicate a temperature increase of 20% in the gas and solid phases and a higher decarbonation rate of 40% in relation to the air-combustion case, for a given constant fuel consumption rate. However, for a given temperature, the increase of the CO_2 partial pressure in the oxy-fuel case promotes a reduction of the decarbonation rate. Therefore, there is a compromise between FGR and decarbonation rate, which is analyzed in the present study. Simulation results of the decarbonation step in low FGR cases, compared to air-combustion case, shows that conversion takes place in shorter distances in the kiln, suggesting that the production rate can be increased for existing kilns in oxy-fuel kilns or, equivalently, shorter kilns can be designed for an

  16. Mamizu climate policy: an evaluation of Japanese carbon emissions reduction targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pielke, Roger A Jr

    2009-01-01

    This letter evaluates Japan's so-called 'Mamizu' climate policies proposed in mid-2009 in terms of the implied rates of decarbonization of the Japanese economy for short-term and long-term targets. The letter uses the Kaya identity to structure the evaluation, employing both a bottom up approach (based on projections of future Japanese population, economic growth, and technology) and a top down approach (deriving implied rates of decarbonization consistent with the targets and various rates of economic growth). Both approaches indicate that the Japanese economy would have to achieve rates of decarbonization of 2.6% to meet a 2020 target of reducing emissions by 15% below 2005 levels, and 5.0% to meet a 2050 target of an 80% reduction below 2005 levels. A target of 25% below 1990 emissions proposed by the opposition party (which subsequently formed a government following elections in August 2009) implies a rate of decarbonization of 4.6% annually to 2020. The letter argues that international criticism of Japanese Mamizu climate policy proposals as being too weak was unfounded, and if anything, the proposals may have been too ambitious. In either case, climate policy would be strengthened through the support of a diversity of approaches to decarbonization.

  17. Renewable energies - Alain Chardon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    In an interview, the chairman of Cleantechs and Decarbonate, Capgemini Consulting, comments the challenge of the struggle against global warming, discusses the role of gas on the way towards a de-carbonated economy, the cost of renewable energies compared to that of fossil and nuclear energies. He outlines other brakes upon the development of renewable energies, discusses the political issues and the challenge of meeting European objectives with respect with the share of renewable energies in the energy mix and the electricity mix by 2020

  18. State of the Low-Carbon Energy Union: Assessing the EU's progress towards its 2030 and 2050 climate objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, Thomas; Pierfederici, Roberta; Sartor, Oliver; Berghmans, Nicolas; Samadi, Sascha; Fischedick, Manfred; Knoop, Katharina; Pye, Steve; Criqui, Patrick; Mathy, Sandrine; Capros, Pantelis; Fragkos, Panagiotis; Bukowski, Maciej; Sniegocki, Aleksander; Virdis, Maria Rosa; Gaeta, Maria; Pollier, Karine; Cassisa, Cyril

    2016-11-01

    Rather than examining aggregate emissions trends, this study delves deep into the dynamics affecting each sector of the EU energy system. It examines the structural changes taking place in power production, transport, buildings and industry, and benchmarks these with the changes required to reach the 2030 and 2050 targets. In so doing it aims to influence both the ambition and direction of future policy decisions, both at Member State and EU level. In order to assess the adequacy of the EU and its Member States policies with the 2030 and 2050 decarbonization objectives, this study goes beyond the aggregate GHG emissions or energy use figures and analyse the underlying drivers of emission changes, following a sectoral approach (power generation, buildings, industry, and transport). Historical trends of emission drivers are compared with the required long-term deep decarbonization pathways, which provide sectoral 'benchmarks' or 'corridors' against which to analyse the rate and direction of historical change for each Member State and the EU in aggregate. This approach allows the identification of the necessary structural changes in the energy system and policy interventions to reach deep decarbonization, and therefore the comparison with the current policy programs at European and Member State level. The EU has made significant progress in the structural decarbonization of its energy system. However, despite of this progress, the EU is currently 'off-track' to achieve its objectives by 2030 and 2050. First, the rate of change is insufficient across a large number of the indicators assessed. Second, too much of the change in aggregate emissions has been driven by cyclical effects rather than structural decarbonization, notably the impact of the financial crisis and subsequent slow recovery. Third, long-term decarbonization options, for example to decarbonize industrial processes and materials, are not being adequately prepared. While some policies under the EU's 2030

  19. A French-German Energy Transition Alliance in Europe. The Case of the Power and Transport Sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescia, Dimitri; Buck, Matthias; Berghmans, Nicolas; Meyer, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Both France and Germany have ratified the Paris Agreement on Climate Change and are pursuing broad, long-term strategies to deeply decarbonize their economies by 2050. (France aims to reduce GHG emissions by 75% and Germany by 80 to 95% relative to their 1990 levels.) This strong political commitment to fighting climate change is deeply rooted in values and beliefs of German and French citizens and enjoys broad public support in both countries. The French Transition Energetique and the German Energiewende form the backbones of their respective decarbonization strategies. Both envisage step-by-step changes in the energy system, encompassing the power, transport and heating and cooling sectors

  20. Thermal effects of massive CO2 emissions associated with subduction volcanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    Large volumes of CO₂ are emitted during volcanic activity at convergent plate boundaries, not only from volcanic centers. Their C isotopic signature indicates that this CO₂ is mainly derived from the decarbonation of subducted limestones or carbonated metabasalts, not as often admitted from magma

  1. Benefits of coal-fired power generation with flexible CCS in a future northwest European power system with large scale wind power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wijk, Pieter Cornelis; Brouwer, Anne Sjoerd|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330822748; Van den Broek, Machteld|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/092946895; Slot, Thijs; Stienstra, Gerard; Van der Veen, Wim; Faaij, André P C

    Coal-fired power generation with carbon capture and storage (CCS) is projected as a cost-effective technology to decarbonize the power sector. Intermittent renewables could reduce its load factor and revenues, so flexible capture unit operation strategies (flexible CCS) have been suggested to

  2. National post-2020 greenhouse gas targets and diversity-aware leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinshausen, M.; Jeffery, Louise; Guetschow, Johannes; Hoehne, N.E.; Schaeffer, M.

    2015-01-01

    Achieving the collective goal of limiting warming to below 2 °C or 1.5 °C compared to pre-industrial levels requires a transition towards a fully decarbonized world. Annual greenhouse gas emissions on such a path in 2025 or 2030 can be allocated to individual countries using a variety of allocation

  3. An integrative approach to the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies inside a Water-Energy Nexus Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaca Jiménez, Santiago David; Nonhebel, Sanderine; Dijkema, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The energy sector is a major source of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Therefore, the sector’s de-carbonization is imperative if we intend to curb the progression of Climate Change. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) was created in an attempt to reduce the carbon footprint of energy production.

  4. Transportation and the environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banister, D.; Anderton, K.; Bonilla, D.; Givoni, M.; Schwanen, T.

    2011-01-01

    The growth of CO2-intensive transport, mobility and the impact of transport on the environment are reviewed. The recent global exponential growth in transport is unsustainable and must end unless the transport sector can decarbonize. The paper examines solutions for low-carbon transport systems; the

  5. European Short-term Electricity Market Designs under High Penetration of Wind Power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaves Avila, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    The EU has ambitious policies for decarbonization of the electricity sector. Due to recent technological developments, wind power already represents a significant share of the generation mix in some European countries. As a result, short-term electricity markets and balancing arrangements must be

  6. Gas turbine requirements for a carbon constrained environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.M.; Lacy, B.P.; Yilmaz, E.; (and others) [GE Energy, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2006-07-01

    With carbon capture, the pre-combustion decarbonization of natural gas, or syngas derived from coal gasification results in gas turbines fuels that consist of 90% or higher hydrogen content. This paper discusses the challenge of low CO{sub 2} processes for advanced gas turbines with particular focus on high hydrogen combustion. 4 refs., 13 figs.

  7. CONTROL ALGORITMS OF BOF MELTING WITH CONSIDERING THE INFLUENCE OF UNCONTROLLED DISTURBANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Bogushevsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes influence of uncontrollable disturbances for output parameters of converting smelting. You also find numerical values of impact impurity of scrap, falling mixer slag with cast iron, limestone instead of lime and water from cooled elements on decarbonization, bathtub temperature and slag basicity. Created a control algorithm with the influence of uncontrolled disturbance.

  8. PECULIARITIES OF INFLUENCE OF THERMO-MECHANICAL PROCESSING IN PRODUCTION LINE OF MILL 150 OF THE BELARUSIAN METALLURGICAL WORKS ON QUALITATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH-CARBON ROLLED WIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Lutsenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Using of new arrangement of finishing train of block structure with divisibility of deformation and system of inter-block control of the semi-finished rolled products temperature enables to decrease disorder of mechanical properties, to reduce the depth of the decarbonized layer.

  9. U.S. electric power sector transitions required to achieve 80% reductions in economy-wide greenhouse gas emissions: Results based on a state-level model of the U.S. energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Gokul C.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, Gordon P.; Ledna, Catherine M.; McJeon, Haewon C.; Wise, M. A.

    2017-05-01

    The United States has articulated a deep decarbonization strategy for achieving a reduction in economy-wide greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of 80% below 2005 levels by 2050. Achieving such deep emissions reductions will entail a major transformation of the energy system and of the electric power sector in particular. , This study uses a detailed state-level model of the U.S. energy system embedded within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM-USA) to demonstrate pathways for the evolution of the U.S. electric power sector that achieve 80% economy-wide reductions in GHG emissions by 2050. The pathways presented in this report are based on feedback received during a workshop of experts organized by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis. Our analysis demonstrates that achieving deep decarbonization by 2050 will require substantial decarbonization of the electric power sector resulting in an increase in the deployment of zero-carbon and low-carbon technologies such as renewables and carbon capture utilization and storage. The present results also show that the degree to which the electric power sector will need to decarbonize and low-carbon technologies will need to deploy depends on the nature of technological advances in the energy sector, the ability of end-use sectors to electrify and level of electricity demand.

  10. Strategic technology policy as a supplement to renewable energy standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Carolyn; Greaker, Mads; Rosendahl, Knut Einar

    2018-01-01

    In many regions, renewable energy targets are a primary decarbonization policy. Most of the same jurisdictions also subsidize the manufacturing and/or deployment of renewable energy technologies, some being sufficiently aggressive as to engender WTO disputes. We consider a downstream energy-using

  11. Rethinking EU energy security considering past trends and future prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amineh, Mehdi P.; Crijns - Graus, Wina

    2014-01-01

    EU energy policy objectives are directed at three highly interdependent areas: energy supply security, competitiveness and decarbonization to prevent climate change. In this paper, we focus on the issue of energy supply security. Security of energy supply for the immediate and medium-term future is

  12. Mechanisms blocking the dynamics of the European offshore wind energy innovation system – Challenges for policy intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson, Staffan; Karltorp, Kersti

    2013-01-01

    Decarbonizing electricity production in the EU may necessitate building new “low-carbon” capacity (excluding nuclear investments) to deliver 3500 TWh by 2050. Offshore wind power has the potential to contribute substantially to fill this gap. Realizing this potential is, however, difficult since deployment offshore does not constitute a simple diversification by the onshore wind turbine industry to a new segment. This paper identifies factors obstructing the development of the northern European innovation system centered on offshore wind power, specifies a set of associated policy challenges and discusses various policy responses. - Highlights: • Offshore wind power has a strategic role in decarbonizing EU's supply of electricity. • There are numerous obstacles to deployment of offshore wind turbines. • We specify seven major policy challenges in diverse policy domains. • Managing these requires coordination of interventions across policy domains and national boundaries

  13. The role of nuclear energy meeting electricity needs in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rising, R.

    2017-01-01

    Demand for electricity has risen dramatically regardless of economic shocks while accelerating rise in world electricity consumption. Decarbonizing electricity generation - need for low life cycle emissions: Nuclear energy is among the best and makes quick, lasting decarbonization possible. Harmonized regulatory processes: Enhance standardization, harmonize and update global codes and standards. Nuclear is regulated, financed and managed outside of normal protocols without an expansion of nuclear, many economies will fall short of their net mid-century carbon dioxide emission goal and society will fall short of the 2-degree scenario. Timely licensing of new technologies. In effective safety paradigm it good to embrace a holistic approach to society risks from electricity generation so that health and environmental benefits of all sources are maximized

  14. Effect of annealing on the composition and structure of TiC and TaC powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrda, J.; Blazhikova, J.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of annealing (1300-2000 deg C) upon lattice parameters and composition of TiC and TaC powders has been investigated. It is established that the lowest deviation from stoichiometric composition of TiC and TaC is the result of annealing the samples, placed in graphite crucibles, in the medium of pure argon. It is shown, that the processes of decarbonizing and crystal defect formation produce decisive effect upon recrystallization of titanium and tantalum carbides. Using the methods of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy significant difference is detected in structural changes in TiC at high temperature heat treatment compared to recrystallization processes in metals. Singled out are the following stages of the process: carbide decarbonizing and arizing of lattice distortions connected with it; progressing disorientation of mosaic blocks, connected with the increase in stresses of the second kind and subsequent gragmentation of big crystals; relief in fragmentated crystals

  15. The roles of users in shaping transitions to new energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schot, Johan; Kanger, Laur; Verbong, Geert

    2016-05-01

    Current government information policies and market-based instruments aimed at influencing the energy choices of consumers often ignore the fact that consumer behaviour is not fully reducible to individuals making rational conscious decisions all the time. The decisions of consumers are largely configured by shared routines embedded in socio-technical systems. To achieve a transition towards a decarbonized and energy-efficient system, an approach that goes beyond individual consumer choice and puts shared routines and system change at its centre is needed. Here, adopting a transitions perspective, we argue that consumers should be reconceptualized as users who are important stakeholders in the innovation process shaping new routines and enacting system change. We review the role of users in shifts to new decarbonized and energy-efficient systems and provide a typology of user roles.

  16. Business models and market pricing mechanisms within virtual microgrids for smart energy networks : a European market perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Alamban, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, a number of countries across the world have taken up steps to increase the share of renewables such as Wind and Solar PV in their generation portfolio. EU has a goal to enable the transmission and distribution of up to 35% of electricity from dispersed and concentrated renewable sources by 2020 and a completely de-carbonized electricity production by 2050. However, these "clean" sources too have a lot of critics questioning the stability and reliability of...

  17. Hydrogen superpermeable membrane operation under plasma conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacal, M.; Bruneteau, A.M.; Livshits, A.I.; Alimov, V.N.; Notkin, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of ion bombardment on hydrogen plasma-driven permeation through a superpermeable niobium membrane was investigated. It was found that the increase of membrane temperature and the doping of membrane material with oxygen results in the decrease of ion bombardment effect and in permeability increase. It was demonstrated that membrane decarbonization leads to the formation of a membrane state resistant to sputtering. Possible applications of the membrane resistant to ion bombardment as plasma facing components are considered

  18. Design considerations and sustainability of self-compacting concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Grünewald, Steffen; De Schutter, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete (SCC) differs from conventional vibrated concrete (CVC) in the rheological behaviour, which is achieved by adequate mix design. The application and production requirements also pose demands on the mix design and workability. Effective production requires adequate strength control. The use of Portland Cement promotes a rapid early age strength development, but it comes with a relative high impact on the environment since decarbonation and a high energ...

  19. Optimisation de Contrôle Commande des Systèmes de Génération d'Electricité à Cycle de Relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed , Mariam

    2014-01-01

    One of our current major challenges is decarbonizing the electric grid by eliminating fuel based electricity generators, and replacing them preferably by nature-friendly publicly accepted resources. That is where renewable energy resources raise as a promising solution. Power relaxation-cycle systems represent an interesting and particular class of renewable. Such a system needs to regain periodically a state that allows energy production. Hence, it has two phases: A generation during which t...

  20. Optimisation de contrôle commande des systèmes de génération d'électricité à cycle de relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed , Mariam Samir

    2014-01-01

    One of our current major challenges is decarbonizing the electric grid by eliminating fuel based electricity generators, and replacing them preferably by nature-friendly publicly accepted resources. That is where renewable energy resources raise as a promising solution. Power relaxation-cycle systems represent an interesting and particular class of renewable. Such a system needs to regain periodically a state that allows energy production. Hence, it has two phases: A generation during which t...

  1. Knowledge based decision making: perspective on natural gas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ydstie, B. Erik; Stuland, Kjetil M.

    2009-07-01

    Conclusions (drawn by the author): Decarbonization of energy sources - From coal to renewable. Natural Gas Abundantly available - Norway is no. 3 exporter. Natural gas important as - Hydrogen source for chemicals; - Electricity; - End consumer usage (heating etc). Large potential for application of model based decision making; - Where and when to install platforms and drill wells - How to operate platforms and pipeline systems; - How to operate and optimize chemical production; - Optimization of electricity generation systems. (author)

  2. How can nuclear phaseout and climate protection be combined? Sustainable power supply in the residential sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallentin, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear phaseout and the resulting energy turnaround will bring about changes in the power supply systems, especially if climate protection goals are to be reached. The author presents the example of a housing development in Germany which mirrors the private households sector. It is shown that the only way to achieve sustainable power supply is by consequently enhancing efficiency and by decarbonizing heat and power supply. The next two decades will be decisive.

  3. H2 at Scale: Benefitting our Future Energy System - Update for the Hydrogen Technical Advisory Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark

    2016-12-06

    Hydrogen is a flexible, clean energy carrying intermediate that enables aggressive market penetration of renewables while deeply decarbonizing our energy system. H2 at Scale is a concept that supports the electricity grid by utilizing energy without other demands at any given time and also supports transportation and industry by providing low-priced hydrogen to them. This presentation is an update to the Hydrogen Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC).

  4. Progress in thermal comfort research over the last twenty years

    OpenAIRE

    de Dear, R; Akimoto, T; Arens, E; Brager, G; Candido, C; Cheong, K.W.; Li, B; Nishihara, N; Sekhar, S.C.; Tanabe, S; Toftum, J; Zhang, H; Zhu, Y

    2013-01-01

    Climate change and the urgency of decarbonizing the built environment are driving technological innovation in the way we deliver thermal comfort to occupants. These changes, in turn, seem to be setting the directions for contemporary thermal comfort research. This article presents a literature review of major changes, developments, and trends in the field of thermal comfort research over the last 20 years. One of the main paradigm shift was the fundamental conceptual reorientation that has ta...

  5. A Public Finance Perspective on Climate Policy: Six Interactions That May Enhance Welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Siegmeier, Jan; Mattauch, Linus; Franks, Max; Klenert, David; Schultes, Anselm; Edenhofer, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    Climate change economics mostly neglects sizeable interactions of carbon pricing with other fiscal policy instruments. Conversely, public finance typically overlooks the effects of future decarbonization efforts when devising instruments for the major goals of fiscal policy. We argue that such a compartmentalisation is undesirable: policy design taking into account such interdependencies may enhance welfare and change the distribution of mitigation costs within and across generations. This cl...

  6. The Climate-Energy package: Usage and impact of offsets in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galharret, S.

    2009-09-01

    This paper aims at clarifying the current European dispositions on the quantity of allowable carbon emission 'offsets' over the 2008-2012 and 2012-2020 periods, as well as the implications on the level of the European reduction effort with respect to a unilateral path of de-carbonation of economy by 2020. The author makes a distinction between sectors submitted or not to the Emission Trading Scheme (ETS)

  7. Development and validation of A quasi-dimensional model for (M)Ethanol-Fuelled SI engines

    OpenAIRE

    Vancoillie, Jeroen; Verhelst, Sebastian; Sileghem, Louis; Demuynck, Joachim; Galle, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    RESEARCH OBJECTIVE - The use of methanol and ethanol in spark-ignition engines forms an interesting approach to decarbonizing transport and securing domestic energy supply. Experimental work has produced promising results, however, the full potential of light alcohols in modern engine technology remains to be explored. Today, this can be addressed at low cost using system simulations of the whole engine, provided that the employed models account for the effect of the fuel on engine operation....

  8. Origin of earthquake swarms in the western Bohemian Massif: Is the mantle CO 2 degassing, followed by the Cheb Basin subsidence, an essential driving force?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babuška, Vladislav; Růžek, Bohuslav; Dolejš, D.

    668-669, February (2016), s. 42-51 ISSN 0040-1951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/07/1088; GA ČR GAP210/12/2381; GA ČR GAP210/12/2336 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : West Bohemia * decarbonation reaction * swarm earthquake s Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.693, year: 2016

  9. Uranium ore processing minimizing reagent losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaogiang, Chen; Moret, J.; Lyaudet, G.

    1989-01-01

    The uranium ore is treated by sodium carbonates and the solution is divided in two parts: a production solution which is decarbonated by an acid before uranium precipitation with sodium hydroxide and a recycling solution directly treated by sodium hydroxide for precipitation of about 85% of uranium and total transformation of sodium bicarbonate into sodium carbonate, the quantity of sodium hydroxide used on the recycling solution brings sodium ions required for attack of the ore [fr

  10. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    OpenAIRE

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is emerging beyond its conventional role as an additive component for gasoline production, chemical and fertilizer manufacture, and food production to become a promising fuel for transportation and stationary power. Hydrogen offers a potentially unmatched ability to deliver a de-carbonized energy system, thereby addressing global climate change concerns, while simultaneously improving local air quality and reducing dependence on imported fossil fuels. This "trifecta" of potential ben...

  11. The sustainability challenge of meeting carbon dioxide targets in Europe by 2020

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saikku, Laura; Rautiainen, Aapo; Kauppi, Pekka E.

    2008-01-01

    Following the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union obligated itself to lower its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 20% below their 1990 level, by the year 2020. Carbon dioxide is the major GHG. To fulfil this obligation, the nations must meet the sustainability challenge of countering rising population plus affluence with the dematerialization of less energy per GDP plus the decarbonization of less carbon per energy. To test the feasibility of meeting the challenge, we analysed carbon dioxide emission during 1993-2004. Although emissions in the entire Union grew only by an average of 0.31% per year, emissions and their drivers varied markedly among the 27 member states. Dematerialization and decarbonization did occur, but not enough to offset the slight population growth plus rapidly increasing affluence. To fulfil its obligation in the next 12 years, the EU27 would have to counter its increasing population and affluence by a combined dematerialization and decarbonization 1.9-2.6 times faster than during 1993-2004. Hence, fulfilling its obligation by addressing fossil carbon emissions alone is very unlikely. (author)

  12. The sustainability challenge of meeting carbon dioxide targets in Europe by 2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikku, Laura; Rautiainen, Aapo; Kauppi, Pekka E. [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-02-15

    Following the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union obligated itself to lower its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 20% below their 1990 level, by the year 2020. Carbon dioxide is the major GHG. To fulfil this obligation, the nations must meet the sustainability challenge of countering rising population plus affluence with the dematerialization of less energy per GDP plus the decarbonization of less carbon per energy. To test the feasibility of meeting the challenge, we analysed carbon dioxide emission during 1993-2004. Although emissions in the entire Union grew only by an average of 0.31% per year, emissions and their drivers varied markedly among the 27 member states. Dematerialization and decarbonization did occur, but not enough to offset the slight population growth plus rapidly increasing affluence. To fulfil its obligation in the next 12 years, the EU27 would have to counter its increasing population and affluence by a combined dematerialization and decarbonization 1.9-2.6 times faster than during 1993-2004. Hence, fulfilling its obligation by addressing fossil carbon emissions alone is very unlikely. (author)

  13. The British Climate Change Act: a critical evaluation and proposed alternative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pielke Jr, Roger A

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates the United Kingdom's Climate Change Act of 2008 in terms of the implied rates of decarbonization of the UK economy for a short-term and a long-term target established in law. The paper uses the Kaya identity to structure the evaluation, employing both a bottom up approach (based on projections of future UK population, economic growth, and technology) and a top down approach (deriving implied rates of decarbonization consistent with the targets and various rates of projected economic growth). Both approaches indicate that the UK economy would have to achieve annual rates of decarbonization in excess of 4 or 5%. To place these numbers in context, the UK would have to achieve the 2006 carbon efficiency of France by about 2015, a level of effort comparable to the building of about 30 new nuclear power plants, displacing an equivalent amount of fossil energy. The paper argues that the magnitude of the task implied by the UK Climate Change Act strongly suggests that it is on course to fail, and discusses implications.

  14. Carbon Retention and Isotopic Evolution in Deeply Subducted Sediments: Evidence from the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Kollars, J.; Bebout, G. E.; Agard, P.; Angiboust, S.

    2012-12-01

    Subduction-zone metamorphism of oceanic crust and carbonate-rich seafloor sediments plays an important regulatory role in the global C cycle by controlling the fraction of subducting C entering long-term storage in the mantle and the fraction of subducting C emitted into the atmosphere in arc volcanic gases. Modeling studies suggest that the extent of decarbonation of subducting sediments could be strongly affected by extents of infiltration by external H2O-rich fluids and that, in cool subduction zones, the dehydration of subducting oceanic slabs may not release sufficient H2O to cause significant decarbonation of overlying sediments [Gorman et al. (2006), G-cubed; Hacker (2008), G-cubed]. Metasedimentary suites in the Western Alps (sampled from the Schistes Lustres, Zermatt-Saas ophiolite, and at Lago di Cignana) were subducted to depths corresponding to 1.5-3.2 GPa, over a range of peak temperatures of 350-600°C, and are associated with HP/UHP-metamorphosed Jurassic ophiolitic rocks [Agard et al. (2001), Bull. soc. geol. France; Frezzotti et al. (2011), Nature Geoscience]. These metasedimentary suites are composed of interlayered metapelites and metacarbonates and represent a range of peak P-T conditions experienced in modern, relatively cool subduction zones. Integrated petrologic and isotopic study of these rocks allows an analysis of decarbonation and isotopic exchange among oxidized and reduced C reservoirs along prograde subduction-zone P-T paths. Petrographic work on Schistes Lustres metacarbonates indicates only minor occurrences of calc-silicate phases, consistent with the rocks having experienced only very minor decarbonation during prograde metamorphism. Carbonate δ13CVPDB values (-1.5 to 1‰) are similar to values typical of marine carbonates. Higher grade, UHP-metamorphosed carbonates at Cignana show mineralogic evidence of decarbonation; however, the δ13C of the calcite in these samples remains similar to that of marine carbonate. With

  15. Achieving stringent climate targets. An analysis of the role of transport and variable renewable energies using energy-economy-climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietzcker, Robert Carl

    2014-07-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is threatening the welfare of mankind. Accordingly, policy makers have repeatedly stated the goal of slowing climate change and limiting the increase of global mean temperature to less than 2 C above pre-industrial times (the so-called ''two degree target''). Stabilizing the temperature requires drastic reductions of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to nearly zero. As the global system of energy supply currently relies on fossil fuels, reducing GHG emissions can only be achieved through a full-scale transformation of the energy system. This thesis investigates the economic requirements and implications of different scenarios that achieve stringent climate mitigation targets. It starts with the analysis of characteristic decarbonization patterns and identifies two particularly relevant aspects of mitigation scenarios: deployment of variable renewable energies (VRE) and decarbonization of the transport sector. After investigating these fields in detail, we turned towards one of the most relevant questions for policy makers and analyzed the trade-off between the stringency of a climate target and its economic requirements and implications. All analyses are based on the improvement, application, comparison, and discussion of large-scale IAMs. The novel ''mitigation share'' metric allowed us to identify the relevance of specific technology groups for mitigation and to improve our understanding of the decarbonization patterns of different energy subsectors. It turned out that the power sector is decarbonized first and reaches lowest emissions, while the transport sector is slowest to decarbonize. For the power sector, non-biomass renewable energies contribute most to emission reductions, while the transport sector strongly relies on liquid fuels and therefore requires biomass in combination with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) to reduce emissions. An in-depth investigation of the solar power

  16. Evidence and future scenarios of a low-carbon energy transition in Central America: a case study in Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barido, Diego Ponce de Leon; Johnston, Josiah; Moncada, Maria V.; Callaway, Duncan; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2015-10-01

    The global carbon emissions budget over the next decades depends critically on the choices made by fast-growing emerging economies. Few studies exist, however, that develop country-specific energy system integration insights that can inform emerging economies in this decision-making process. High spatial- and temporal-resolution power system planning is central to evaluating decarbonization scenarios, but obtaining the required data and models can be cost prohibitive, especially for researchers in low, lower-middle income economies. Here, we use Nicaragua as a case study to highlight the importance of high-resolution open access data and modeling platforms to evaluate fuel-switching strategies and their resulting cost of power under realistic technology, policy, and cost scenarios (2014-2030). Our results suggest that Nicaragua could cost-effectively achieve a low-carbon grid (≥80%, based on non-large hydro renewable energy generation) by 2030 while also pursuing multiple development objectives. Regional cooperation (balancing) enables the highest wind and solar generation (18% and 3% by 2030, respectively), at the least cost (US127 MWh-1). Potentially risky resources (geothermal and hydropower) raise system costs but do not significantly hinder decarbonization. Oil price sensitivity scenarios suggest renewable energy to be a more cost-effective long-term investment than fuel oil, even under the assumption of prevailing cheap oil prices. Nicaragua’s options illustrate the opportunities and challenges of power system decarbonization for emerging economies, and the key role that open access data and modeling platforms can play in helping develop low-carbon transition pathways.

  17. A tale of two cities: Comparison of impacts on CO2 emissions, the indoor environment and health of home energy efficiency strategies in London and Milton Keynes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrubsole, C.; Das, P.; Milner, J.; Hamilton, I. G.; Spadaro, J. V.; Oikonomou, E.; Davies, M.; Wilkinson, P.

    2015-11-01

    Dwellings are a substantial source of global CO2 emissions. The energy used in homes for heating, cooking and running electrical appliances is responsible for a quarter of current total UK emissions and is a key target of government policies for greenhouse gas abatement. Policymakers need to understand the potential impact that such decarbonization policies have on the indoor environment and health for a full assessment of costs and benefits. We investigated these impacts in two contrasting settings of the UK: London, a predominantly older city and Milton Keynes, a growing new town. We employed SCRIBE, a building physics-based health impact model of the UK housing stock linked to the English Housing Survey, to examine changes, 2010-2050, in end-use energy demand, CO2 emissions, winter indoor temperatures, airborne pollutant concentrations and associated health impacts. For each location we modelled the existing (2010) housing stock and three future scenarios with different levels of energy efficiency interventions combined with either a business-as-usual, or accelerated decarbonization of the electricity grid approach. The potential for CO2 savings was appreciably greater in London than Milton Keynes except when substantial decarbonization of the electricity grid was assumed, largely because of the lower level of current energy efficiency in London and differences in the type and form of the housing stock. The average net impact on health per thousand population was greater in magnitude under all scenarios in London compared to Milton Keynes and more beneficial when it was assumed that purpose-provided ventilation (PPV) would be part of energy efficiency interventions, but more detrimental when interventions were assumed not to include PPV. These findings illustrate the importance of considering ventilation measures for health protection and the potential variation in the impact of home energy efficiency strategies, suggesting the need for tailored policy

  18. Scenarios for Deep Carbon Emission Reductions from Electricity by 2050 in Western North America using the Switch Electric Power Sector Planning Model: California's Carbon Challenge Phase II, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel; Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    This study used a state-of-the-art planning model called SWITCH for the electric power system to investigate the evolution of the power systems of California and western North America from present-day to 2050 in the context of deep decarbonization of the economy. Researchers concluded that drastic power system carbon emission reductions were feasible by 2050 under a wide range of possible futures. The average cost of power in 2050 would range between $149 to $232 per megawatt hour across scenarios, a 21 to 88 percent increase relative to a business-as-usual scenario, and a 38 to 115 percent increase relative to the present-day cost of power. The power system would need to undergo sweeping change to rapidly decarbonize. Between present-day and 2030 the evolution of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council power system was dominated by implementing aggressive energy efficiency measures, installing renewable energy and gas-fired generation facilities and retiring coal-fired generation. Deploying wind, solar and geothermal power in the 2040 timeframe reduced power system emissions by displacing gas-fired generation. This trend continued for wind and solar in the 2050 timeframe but was accompanied by large amounts of new storage and long-distance high-voltage transmission capacity. Electricity storage was used primarily to move solar energy from the daytime into the night to charge electric vehicles and meet demand from electrified heating. Transmission capacity over the California border increased by 40 - 220 percent by 2050, implying that transmission siting, permitting, and regional cooperation will become increasingly important. California remained a net electricity importer in all scenarios investigated. Wind and solar power were key elements in power system decarbonization in 2050 if no new nuclear capacity was built. The amount of installed gas capacity remained relatively constant between present-day and 2050, although carbon capture and sequestration was

  19. Thermal decomposition of dolomite under CO2: insights from TGA and in situ XRD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Perejon, Antonio; Medina, Santiago; Perez-Maqueda, Luis A

    2015-11-28

    Thermal decomposition of dolomite in the presence of CO2 in a calcination environment is investigated by means of in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The in situ XRD results suggest that dolomite decomposes directly at a temperature around 700 °C into MgO and CaO. Immediate carbonation of nascent CaO crystals leads to the formation of calcite as an intermediate product of decomposition. Subsequently, decarbonation of this poorly crystalline calcite occurs when the reaction is thermodynamically favorable and sufficiently fast at a temperature depending on the CO2 partial pressure in the calcination atmosphere. Decarbonation of this dolomitic calcite occurs at a lower temperature than limestone decarbonation due to the relatively low crystallinity of the former. Full decomposition of dolomite leads also to a relatively low crystalline CaO, which exhibits a high reactivity as compared to limestone derived CaO. Under CO2 capture conditions in the Calcium-Looping (CaL) process, MgO grains remain inert yet favor the carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO especially in the solid-state diffusion controlled phase. The fundamental mechanism that drives the crystallographic transformation of dolomite in the presence of CO2 is thus responsible for its fast calcination kinetics and the high carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO, which makes natural dolomite a potentially advantageous alternative to limestone for CO2 capture in the CaL technology as well as SO2in situ removal in oxy-combustion fluidized bed reactors.

  20. Thermal stability and oxidizing properties of mixed alkaline earth-alkali molten carbonates: A focus on the lithium-sodium carbonate eutectic system with magnesium additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frangini, Stefano; Scaccia, Silvera

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • TG/DSC analysis was conducted on magnesium-containing eutectic Li/Na eutectic carbonates. • Magnesium influence on the oxygen solubility properties of carbonate was also experimentally determined at 600 °C and 650 °C. • A reproducible partial decarbonation process in premelting region caused formation of magnesium oxycarbonate-like phases. • The acidobase buffering action of magnesium oxycarbonate species could explain the high basic/oxidizing properties of such carbonate melts. • A general correlation between thermal instability in premelting region and basic/oxidizing melt properties was established. - Abstract: A comparative study on thermal behavior and oxygen solubility properties of eutectic 52/48 lithium/sodium carbonate salt containing minor additions of magnesium up to 10 mol% has been made in order to determine whether a general correlation between these two properties can be found or not. Consecutive TG/DSC heating/cooling thermal cycles carried out under alternating CO 2 and N 2 gas flows allowed to assign thermal events observed in the premelting region to a partial decarbonation process of the magnesium-alkali mixed carbonates. The observed decarbonation process at 460 °C is believed to come from initial stage of thermal decomposition of magnesium carbonate resulting in the metastable formation of magnesium oxycarbonate-like phases MgO·2MgCO 3 , in a similar manner as previously reported for lanthanum. Reversible formation and decomposition of the magnesium carbonate phase has been observed under a CO 2 gas atmosphere. The intensity of the decomposition process shows a maximum for a 3 mol% MgO addition that gives also the highest oxygen solubility, suggesting therefore that instability thermal analysis in the premelting region can be considered as providing an effective measure of the basicity/oxidizing properties of alkali carbonate melts with magnesium or, in more general terms, with cations that are strong modifiers of

  1. ''Green'' path from fossil-based to hydrogen economy: An overview of carbon-neutral technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim Z. [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL 32922 (United States); Veziroglu, T. Nejat [Clean Energy Research Institute, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    While the dominant role of hydrogen in a sustainable energy future is widely accepted, the strategies for the transition from fossil-based to hydrogen economy are still actively debated. This paper emphasizes the role of carbon-neutral technologies and fuels during the transition period. To satisfy the world's growing appetite for energy and keep our planet healthy, at least 10 TW (or terawatt) of carbon-free power has to be produced by mid-century. Three prominent options discussed in the literature include: decarbonization of fossil energy, nuclear energy and renewable energy sources. These options are analyzed in this paper with a special emphasis on the role of hydrogen as a carbon-free energy carrier. In particular, the authors compare various fossil decarbonization strategies and evaluate the potential of nuclear and renewable energy resources to meet the 10 TW target. An overview of state-of-the-art technologies for production of carbon-free energy carriers and transportation fuels, and the assessment of their commercial potential is provided. It is shown that neither of these three options alone could provide 10 TW of carbon-neutral power without major changes in the existing infrastructure, and/or technological breakthroughs in many areas, and/or a considerable environmental risk. The authors propose a scenario for the transition from current fossil-based to hydrogen economy that includes two key elements: (i) changing the fossil decarbonization strategy from one based on CO{sub 2} sequestration to one that involves sequestration and/or utilization of solid carbon, and (ii) producing carbon-neutral synthetic fuels from bio-carbon and hydrogen generated from water using carbon-free sources (nuclear, solar, wind, geothermal). This strategy would allow taking advantage of the existing fuel infrastructure without an adverse environmental impact, and it would secure a smooth carbon-neutral transition from fossil-based to future hydrogen economy. (author)

  2. Clean Restructuring: Design Elements for Low-Carbon Wholesale Markets and Beyond. A 21st Century Power Partnership Thought Leadership Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Monisha [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Valenzuela, Jose Maria [World Wildlife Fund, Mexico DF (Mexico); Mora, Hector Alejandro Beltran [Energy Regulatory Commission of Mexico, Mexico DF (United States); Moller Porst, Kim [Danish Energy Agency, Copenhagen (Denmark); Hasselager, Anders [Danish Energy Agency, Copenhagen (Denmark); Friis-Jensen, Sandra [Danish Energy Agency, Copenhagen (Denmark); Vingaard, Mette [Danish Energy Agency, Copenhagen (Denmark); Wigand, Fabian [Ecofys, London (England); Tiedemann, Silvana [Ecofys, London (England); Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zinaman, Owen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Logan, Jeffrey [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Countries around the world are in various stages of reforming and restructuring their power systems to better meet development needs and decarbonization commitments. Changes in technology, business models, societal needs, and environmental goals are increasing pressure on countries to consider improvements to their power systems. This report addresses key issues associated with clean restructuring--the transition from traditional, vertically integrated utilities to competitive wholesale markets that rely increasingly on variable renewable electricity sources, demand response, and other clean energy options. The report also includes case studies from Mexico, Denmark, and Germany to provide real-world examples of clean restructuring from different perspectives.

  3. What is Needed in the EU's 2030 Climate and Energy Framework. Interim Discussion Paper and Results from a Research Project Led by IDDRI and Climate Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartor, Oliver; Spencer, Thomas IDDRI; Colombier, Michel; Bart, Istvan; Cochran, Ian; Neuhoff, Karsten; Szpor, Aleksander; Tuerk, Andreas; Wyns, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    The EU 2030 Climate and Energy Framework presents a number of technical challenges whose solution will be essential to its effectiveness. These include: the question of the role and reform of the ETS, the approach to decarbonization of non-ETS sectors, and the mechanisms that exist for governing the package of policies at EU and Member State level. This discussion paper presents preliminary results from an analysis of these challenges, as well as proposals that could be included in the package of post- 2020 climate policies. (authors)

  4. Setting the Foundation for Transforming the U.S. Energy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Jon M.; Virden, Jud W.; Walton, Terry L.; Brog, Terrence K.; Stiles, Dennis L.; Alderson, Karis P.; Melland, Jodi C.; Hobbs, Lori L.; Martinez, Sam J.; Quadrel, Marilyn J.; Quinn, Rod K.

    2008-12-29

    Setting the Foundation for Transforming the U.S. Energy System: Three Federal Action Plans for Near- and Long-term Success is a short document written for the incoming U.S. Federal Administration's Transistion Team. The document represents what we believe to be foundational elements of a broad campaign to make rapid progress towards these goals for the longterm transformation necessary to meet our national economic, security, and environmental goals. The three immediate action plans include: * Creating Tomorrow’s Electricity Infrastructure * Decarbonizing the Energy Economy *Enabling Science-Based Policy

  5. Ecological indices of manufacture of Portland cement clinker and production of the dolomite clinker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinnichenko Varvara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the production of dolomite clinker in comparison with that of Portland cement is environmentally appropriate. When calcining dolomite for cementitious binder, the pollution of the atmosphere by carbon dioxide is reduced due to its isolation during decarbonization reactions of calcium carbonates. Reducing fuel consumption for clinker burning provides less carbon dioxide emissions from combustion products. Reducing the firing temperature creates obstacles to the formation of nitrogen oxides. The production of binders from dolomite in comparison with the production of Portland cement helps to protect the environment from contamination

  6. Electric vehicles and India's low carbon passenger transport: A long-term co-benefits assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhar, Subash; Pathak, Minal; Shukla, Priyadarshi

    2017-01-01

    Electric vehicles have attracted the attention of India's policy makers as clean technology alternatives due to their multiple advantages like higher efficiency and lower air pollution in short to medium term and reduced CO2 emissions as electricity gets decarbonized in the long-run under low...... carbon scenarios. This paper uses an energy system model ANSWER-MARKAL to analyse the role of electric vehicles (EV) in India. The modelling assessment spans the period 2010 to 2050 and analyses future EV demand in India under three scenarios: i) a ‘Reference’ scenario which includes the continuation...

  7. Melting of corrosion–resisting steels using air in bath agitation at the end of oxygen blowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gizatulin, R A; Valuev, D V; Valueva, A V; Yedesheva, Ch V

    2014-01-01

    A number of metallurgical plants employ ladle stirring with argon at the end of oxygen blowing during the melting process of corrosion–resisting steels [1, 2]. At the same time, the scarcity and relatively high cost of argon, its low pressure in a shop air pipeline restrain most plants from using argon for corrosion–resisting steel production. Compressed air was used instead of argon to intensify the process of decarbonizing when chromium–nickel stainless steels were made with a 40–ton electric arc furnace at the Kuznetsk Metallurgical Plant

  8. Evaluating the efficiency of nuclear energy policies: an empirical examination for 26 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozgor, Giray; Demir, Ender

    2017-08-01

    The decarbonization of the global economy is an urgent concern. As a potential solution, it can be important to understand the efficiency of nuclear energy policies. For this purpose, the paper analyzes whether there is a unit root in nuclear energy consumption in 26 countries and it uses the unit root tests with two endogenous (unknown) structural breaks. The paper finds that nuclear energy consumption is stationary around a level and the time trend in 25 of 26 countries and nuclear energy consumption contains a unit root only in France. The paper also discusses the potential implications of the findings.

  9. India's INDC for transport and 2 C stabilization target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhar, Subash; Shukla, Priyadarshi Ramprasad; Pathak, Minal

    2017-01-01

    Transport sector accounted for 13 % of India's energy-related CO2 emissions. India's Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDC) specify an economy wide decarbonization target of 33 to 35 % between 2005 and 2030 and includes announcements for urban transport, intercity transportation...... to model future scenarios for India till year 2050. Three scenarios are explored in this paper: i) a business-As-usual scenario ii) an INDC scenario iii) implementation of INDC in a strong climate regime aiming for the 2 oC target. The assessment shows that CO2 reductions from transport would happen...

  10. ADVANTAGES OF RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINING SCALE MASS AND DECARBURIZED LAYER OF ROLLED COIL STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Parusov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the universal empirical relationships that allow for operational calculation of scale mass and decarbonized layer depth based on the parameters of the technological process for rolled coil steel production. Methodology. The research is carried out on the industrial batches of the rolled steel of SAE 1006 and SAE 1065 grades. Scale removability was determined in accordance with the procedure of «Bekaert» company by the specifi-cations: GA-03-16, GA-03-18, GS-03-02, GS-06-01. The depth of decarbonized layer was identified in accordance with GOST 1763-68 (M method. Findings. Analysis of experimental data allowed us to determine the rational temperature of coil formation of the investigated steel grades, which provide the best possible removal of scale from the metal surface, a minimal amount of scale, as well as compliance of the metal surface color with the require-ments of European consumers. Originality. The work allowed establishing correlation of the basic quality indicators of the rolled coil high carbon steel (scale mass, depth of decarbonized layer and inter-laminar distance in pearlite with one of the main parameters (coil formation temperature of the deformation and heat treatment mode. The re-sulting regression equations, without metallographic analysis, can be used to determine, with a minimum error, the quantitative values of the total scale mass, depth of decarbonized layer and the average inter-lamellar distance in pearlite of the rolled coil high carbon steel. Practical value. Based on the specifications of «Bekaert» company (GA-03-16, GA-03-18, GS-03-02 and GS-06-01 the method of testing descaling by mechanical means from the surface of the rolled coil steel of low- and high-carbon steel grades was developed and approved in the environment of PJSC «ArcelorMittal Kryvyi Rih». The work resulted in development of the rapid method for determination of total and remaining scale mass on the rolled coil steel

  11. The 4.0 power system at the heart of the performance of 'France 2040'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-10-01

    This prospective study (France in 2040) first describes a dynamic and low carbon economy characterized by an innovating industry, committed and responsible consumers, optimised and de-carbonated transports, and sustainable and connected territories. The second part describes what the electric system could be with its evolution and the central role of electricity. The third part comments the development of the electricity sector as a sector of excellence, based on the development of digital economy, a dynamic growth, job creation, and citizenship (a societal responsibility of enterprises)

  12. Who is producing current without derailing the climate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, Sylvestre

    2014-01-01

    The author examines whether it would be possible to massively produce electricity without disturbing the climate. He outlines the rather high level of CO 2 emissions by the energy sector in the World, the continuous increase of electricity consumption (mainly due to China). He comments the level of energy transition in western countries (level of low-carbon or de-carbonated energy), and notices that some good performance are due to the levels of nuclear energy and hydroelectric energy. He discusses the challenges raised by a perspective of phasing out nuclear for different countries

  13. The German energy landscape in 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauer, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a brief overview of the German energy sector: stagnation of primary energy consumption, shares of the different energy sources (renewable, coal, lignite, oil, gas, nuclear), shares of the different electric power production sources and their recent evolution. It evokes issues related to the objectives defined for energy transition, the high level of renewable energy production and the high level of power exports. It outlines that consumption must be reduced to reach the objectives defined for 2020. It notices a stagnation of the energy system de-carbonation, and comments the evolution of electricity prices

  14. Views by SLC on the reports of the 7 work-groups of the National Debate on Energy Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This document discusses and sometimes criticizes how the French national debate on energy transition has been organized, and the proposals made by the seven work-groups. It outlines some good ideas, other ideas which are either false or in contradiction with the objectives of the energy policy, other fuzzy ideas, the lack of prior analyses, lessons which could be learned from the German policy, and the reference to the European policy. In the next part, the authors discuss the main points according to 'Sauvons le Climat': the promotion of de-carbonated energies, a prudent re-examination of the energy mix, and a new balance for subsidies awarded to renewable energies

  15. Formation of microstructure and properties on hot working and heat treatment of high strength modular cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trajno, A.I.; Yusupov, V.S.; Kugushin, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of plastic deformation of high strength modular cast iron (HSNCI) is under study. The microstructure and mechanical properties of hot worked and heat treated cast iron are investigated for the composition, %: Fe - 2.9 C - 2.4 Si - 0.7 Ni - 0.05 Mg - 0.04 Ce. It is stated that HSNCI can withstand various types of hot working without fracturing. Graphite inclusions lose their modular shape irreversibly during plastic deformation. Subsequent heat treatment affects the metal matrix only. The heating in oxidizing environment is noted to result in cast iron surface decarbonization [ru

  16. Biogas study. State of the art and potential of biomethane vehicle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthiaud, Julien; Greninger, Aude; Oliveti-Selmi, Olga; Bouvart, Frederique; Lorne, Daphne; Prieur, Anne; Bastide, Guillaume; Plassat, Gabriel; Theobald, Olivier; Wenisch, Sandrine; Courtois, Jean-Paul; Etienne, Carole; Gagnepain, Laurent; Holuigue, Jean-Pierre; Hosteins, Michel; Jouette, Philippe; Juvigny, Gina; Lacoste, Julien; Lefevre, Felix; Le Leuch, Louis-Marie; Querleu, Cecile; Servais, Claude; Verchin, Jean-Claude; Tilagone, Richard; Tissot-Favre, Vincent

    2009-02-01

    This document presents approaches to the production of biomethane as a vehicle fuel and its resources (organic wastes, energetic crops, gasification) involved on the short term or on a longer term. The potential of each type of resource and production costs are discussed. The biomethane vehicle fuel production is described. This production comprises four main steps: production of raw biogas, purification, metering and odorization and quality checking, and storage. Purification processes are mentioned (de-carbonation, desulfurization, dehydration), and production costs are discussed. Expected technological advances are evoked. Lastly, the contribution of this gaseous biofuel to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is assessed

  17. The I-tese Letter - Number 16 Summer 2012. Itese Days 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behar, Christophe; Bigot, Bernard; Bennouna, Samia; Dautremont, Severine; Devezeaux, Jean-Guy; Koljonen, Tiina; Legee, Frederic; Percebois, Jacques; Thais, Francoise

    2012-01-01

    This issue contains contributions made during a meeting. The authors addressed the technological perspectives for to-morrow and after-to-morrow energy mixes (Bernard Bigot, CEA), the de-carbonated energy mix for to-morrow (Christophe Behar, CEA), the issue of to-morrow's energy mix (I-tese), methods and criteria to be used for energy prospective studies (Jacques Percebois), the economic impacts of the Fukushima accident (Frederic Legee, Samia Bennouna, Severine Dautremont and Francoise Thais, I-tese), why and how the transition to low carbon energy systems calls for multilevel perspectives and new analysis methodologies (Tiina Koljonen, VTT)

  18. Germany: the electricity bill soars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauer, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    As Germany is already one of the European countries where electricity prices are the highest for households (twice more than in France), the author comments the past evolution of these prices and shows that they will probably increase again in 2017 to finance energy transition. This increase is notably due to higher taxes (a comparison with the French CSPE tax is presented and commented), and to a costly grid renewal. As the energy transition appears to be very expensive (about 500 billions euros by 2025), the cost-benefit rate of the German energy transition is disastrous and the de-carbonation of the electricity sector does not progress

  19. Iridium anomaly in the cretaceous-paleogene boundary at Højerup (Stevns Klint, Denmark and Woodside Creek (New Zealand: The question of an enormous proportion of extraterrestrial component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premović Pavle I.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary clays at Højerup and Woodside Creek show anomalous enrichments of iridium compared with the marine sedimentary rocks. For the average iridium content of 465 ppb in CI chondrite the estimate of the carbonaceous chondritic proportions in the decarbonated iridium-rich boundary layers, based on the integrated iridium fluencies, is about 26% at Højerup and 65% at Woodside Creek. These proportions are most likely too high due to a significant Ir influx from the nearby marine or continental site to these sections.

  20. Stress description model by non destructive magnetic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flambard, C.; Grossiord, J.L.; Tourrenc, P.

    1983-01-01

    Since a few years, CETIM investigates analysis possibilities of materials, by developing a method founded on observation of ferromagnetic noise. By experiments, correlations have become obvious between state of the material and recorded signal. These correlations open to industrial applications to measure stresses and strains in elastic and plastic ranges. This article starts with a brief historical account and theoretical backgrounds of the method. The experimental frame of this research is described, and the main results are analyzed. Theoretically, a model was built up, and we present it. It seems in agreement with some experimental observations. The main results concerning stress application, thermal and surface treatments (decarbonizing) are presented [fr

  1. Amino sugars in suspended particulate matter from the Bay of Bengal during the summer monsoon of 2001

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, L.; De; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Bhosle, N.B.

    and pseudopeptidoglycan (Brock et al 1994). AS are also important con- stituents of many biopolymers such as polysac- charides, glycoproteins and glycolipids (Sharon 1965). Moreover, chitin, a polymer of amino sugar, N-acetyl glucosamine (Muzzarelli 1977; Benner.../F glass fibre filters (0.7?m pore size) for the analysis of particu- late organic carbon (POC), particulate nitrogen (PN) and amino sugars (AS) concentration and composition. 2.3 Analysis of samples The SPM samples were de-carbonated overnight using fuming...

  2. Introduction of artificial intelligence techniques for computerized management of defects in an industrial process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utzel, N.

    1991-06-01

    An optimized management of Tore Supra Tokamak requires a computerized defect management. The aim is the analysis of an inhibited situation not corrected by automatisms of the process and that can be handled only by human intervention. The operator should understand, make a diagnosis and act to restore the system. In this report are studied an expert system helping the operator to analyze defects of the two main cooling loops (decarbonated water and pressurized water), management of the history of malfunction and recording of diagnosises, elaboration of an adapted expert model and installation of a methodology for defect management in other processes of Tore Supra [fr

  3. Clean Restructuring: Design Elements for Low Carbon Wholesale Markets and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-05-01

    Countries around the world are in various stages of power system reform and restructuring to more effectively meet development goals and decarbonization commitments. Changes in social dynamics, technology, business models, and environmental goals are increasing pressure for countries to consider improvements to their power systems. This brochure overviews the 21st Century Power Partnerships thought leadership report that explores the clean restructuring pathway in depth, envisions an end state, and articulates three main areas of consideration for decision makers embarking on a clean restructuring process. The report also details case studies from Germany, Denmark, and Mexico.

  4. Technical progress and climatic change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausubel, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    The global warming debate has neglected and thus underestimated the importance of technical change in considering reduction in greenhouse gases and adaptation to climate change. Relevant quantitative cases of long-run technical change during the past 100 years are presented in computing, communications, transport, energy, and agriculture. A noteworthy technological trajectory is that of decarbonization, or decreasing carbon intensity of primary energy. If human societies have not yet reached the end of the history of technology, the cost structure for mitigation and adaptation changes could be cheap. (Author)

  5. Potential for Electrified Vehicles to Contribute to U.S. Petroleum and Climate Goals and Implications for Advanced Biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Paul J; Cronin, Keith R; Frost, Ethan A; Runge, Troy M; Dale, Bruce E; Reinemann, Douglas J; Detlor, Jennifer

    2015-07-21

    To examine the national fuel and emissions impacts from increasingly electrified light-duty transportation, we reconstructed the vehicle technology portfolios from two national vehicle studies. Using these vehicle portfolios, we normalized assumptions and examined sensitivity around the rates of electrified vehicle penetration, travel demand growth, and electricity decarbonization. We further examined the impact of substituting low-carbon advanced cellulosic biofuels in place of petroleum. Twenty-seven scenarios were benchmarked against a 50% petroleum-reduction target and an 80% GHG-reduction target. We found that with high rates of electrification (40% of miles traveled) the petroleum-reduction benchmark could be satisfied, even with high travel demand growth. The same highly electrified scenarios, however, could not satisfy 80% GHG-reduction targets, even assuming 80% decarbonized electricity and no growth in travel demand. Regardless of precise consumer vehicle preferences, emissions are a function of the total reliance on electricity versus liquid fuels and the corresponding greenhouse gas intensities of both. We found that at a relatively high rate of electrification (40% of miles and 26% by fuel), an 80% GHG reduction could only be achieved with significant quantities of low-carbon liquid fuel in cases with low or moderate travel demand growth.

  6. Lime treatment of stabilized leachates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renou, S.; Poulain, S.; Givaudan, J. G.; Sahut, C.; Moulin, P.

    2009-01-01

    Reverse Osmosis is the most widely used method for treating municipal solid waste landfill leachates, since it produces a permeate in compliance with reject requirements. However, the efficiency of this process at the industrial scale is limited mainly because of membrane fouling and the high osmotic pressures involved. Although lime precipitation is traditionally used to eliminate the temporary hardness of water by de-carbonation, it has also been shown to be highly efficient in removing humic substances which are known to have strong fouling potential towards membranes. Our objective is to study the lime/leachate physico-chemistry, in order to determine the potential of the lime precipitation as pre-treatment for reverse osmosis. The results show that the lime treatment makes it possible (i) to act efficiently on the inorganic fraction of leachates through a de-carbonation mechanism which entails massive precipitation of the carbonates under the form of CaCO 3 , (ii) to eliminate by co-precipitation the high Molecular Weight (MW) organic macromolecules (≥ 50, 000 g.mol -1 ) such as humic acids, and (iii) to generate a stable residue that can be easily stored at a landfill. The reverse osmosis step will be facilitated through significant reduction of the osmotic pressures and prevention of membrane fouling. (authors)

  7. Energies-climate review (Panorama energies-climate) - issue 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goubet, Cecile; Beriot, Nicolas; Daurian, Aurelien; Vieillefosse, Alice; Ducastelle, Julien; Le Guen, Solenn; Strang, Axel; Courtois, Sophie; Brender, Pierre; Guibert, Olivier de; Croquette, Gilles; Simiu, Diane; Venturini, Isabelle; Hesske, Philip; Oriol, Louise; Louati, Sami; Cadin, Didier; Korman, Bernard; Defays, Julien; Balian, Armelle; Guichaoua, Sabine; Isoard, Vivien; Lamy, Jean-michel; Pelce, Frederic; Fondeville, Louis; Baumont, Thierry; Triquet, Olivier; Mouloudi, Fadwa; Quintaine, Thierry; Reizine, Stanislas; Pertuiset, Thomas; Caron, Antoine; Blanchard, Sidonie; Timsit, Isabelle; Lewis, Florian; Ducouret, Melanie; Leclercq, Martine; Derville, Isabelle; Grenon, Georgina; Thomas, Julien; Oeser, Christian; Thouin, Catherine; Dumiot, Jacques-Emmanuel; Rondeau, Claudine; Menager, Yann; Barber, Nicolas; Weill, Jonathan; Furois, Timothee; Thomines, Marie; Brunet-Lecomte, Helene; Boutot, Romary; Strang, Axel; Giraud, Jean; Thomas, Julien; Oeser, Christian; Perrette, Lionel; Breda, Willy; Panetier, Vincent; Miraval, Bruno; Delaugerre, Frederique; Leinekugel Le Cocq, Thibaut; Lemaire, Yves; Thabet, Soraya

    2013-01-01

    This issue first analyses what is at stake with energy transition: struggle against climate change, management of energy demand and promotion of energy efficiency, struggle against energy poverty, development of technologies for tomorrow's energy system. It discusses France's position within its European and international environment: European energy-climate objectives, world context of oil and gas markets, European electricity markets, imports and exports, energy bill. It presents and analyses the situation of the oil and gas sector in France: hydrocarbon exploration and production in France, refining activities, substitution fuels, oil infrastructures, oil product retailing, and gas infrastructures. It then presents the French electric system (electricity production, electricity transport and distribution grids and networks, electric system safety) and the industrial sectors involved in de-carbonated energy production: biomass, wind energy, sea energy, geothermal energy, hydroelectricity, nuclear energy, photovoltaic and thermodynamic solar energy. It addresses the industrial sectors involved in a better use of energy: dynamic control of smart energy systems (smart grids, hydrogen, energy storage), CO 2 capture and storage, de-carbonated vehicle and its ecosystem. The last part addresses oil product prices, gas prices, electricity prices, the energy tax system, and the arrangements and costs of the support to renewable energy production

  8. A retrospective analysis of funding and focus in US advanced fission innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, A.; Ford, M. J.; Morgan, M. G.; Victor, D. G.

    2017-08-01

    Deep decarbonization of the global energy system will require large investments in energy innovation and the deployment of new technologies. While many studies have focused on the expenditure that will be needed, here we focus on how government has spent public sector resources on innovation for a key carbon-free technology: advanced nuclear. We focus on nuclear power because it has been contributing almost 20% of total US electric generation, and because the US program in this area has historically been the world’s leading effort. Using extensive data acquired through the Freedom of Information Act, we reconstruct the budget history of the Department of Energy’s program to develop advanced, non-light water nuclear reactors. Our analysis shows that—despite spending 2 billion since the late 1990s—no advanced design is ready for deployment. Even if the program had been well designed, it still would have been insufficient to demonstrate even one non-light water technology. It has violated much of the wisdom about the effective execution of innovative programs: annual funding varies fourfold, priorities are ephemeral, incumbent technologies and fuels are prized over innovation, and infrastructure spending consumes half the budget. Absent substantial changes, the possibility of US-designed advanced reactors playing a role in decarbonization by mid-century is low.

  9. Smart electric grids in the United Kingdom energy strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloaguen, Olivier; Dreyfus, Charles-Antoine

    2011-09-01

    This study first gives an overview of the current status and limitations of the British power grid. It indicates the British energy mix, describes the network structure and its economic operation (gross and retail market with the bid and offer system, role of the System Operator, ways to increase the electricity production). It presents the energy policy and its regulation framework, outlines the current limitations and challenges (ageing grid, power crunch, de-carbonation challenges). It presents the development of a smart grid as a solution to economy de-carbonation challenges: definition of the 'smart grid concept', smart grid development planning (from 2010 to 2050), technological transition associated with smart electric grid development (a cleaner but more intermittent and random electricity production, better use of fossil fuels, electric energy storage, consequences for the grid, introduction and effects of smart meters). It describes the new associated economic model: evolution of the value chain, financial challenges (required investments, expected benefits, subsidies), new regulation system. It addresses the strategic challenges and the various uncertainties (notably in terms of consumption, privacy issue in relation with the use of smart meters, and project implementation).

  10. Basic properties of the mixed oxides obtained by thermal decomposition of hydrotalcites containing different metallic compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, J.S.; Figueras, F.; Gravelle, M.; Kumbhar, P.; Lopez, J.; Besse, J.P.

    2000-01-25

    Carbonated layered double hydroxides (LDHs) containing Al, Fe, or Cr in a Mg(OH){sub 2} matrix or Al dissolved in hydroxides of Mg, Cu, Ni, Co, or Zn are used as precursors of basic catalysts. Decarbonation is studied by thermal analysis. The average basic strength, evaluated by the decarbonation temperature, is related to the partial charge of oxygen in the LDHs obtained from the Sanderson theory of electronegativity. The enthalpy of adsorption of CO{sub 2} on the resulting mixed oxides is measured by calorimetry. A homogeneous surface is generally observed for CO{sub 2} adsorption, with initial heats of adsorption close to those reported for MgO. The number of sites determined by this method is proportional to the rate constants for {beta}-isophorone isomerization, suggesting that both techniques measure surface properties. The layered structure in which OH{sup {minus}} is the compensating anion can be re-formed by hydration. This process does not appreciably change the adsorption of CO{sub 2}; thus, oxygens and hydroxyls show similar basic strengths in this case.

  11. Characterization of interactions of coal surface with solvent by flow microcalorimetric measurement. 3; Netsuryo sokutei ni yoru sekitan hyomen to yozai tono sogo sayo no hyoka. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, N.; Sasaki, M.; Yoshida, T. [Hokkaido National Industrial Research Institute, Sapporo (Japan); Kotanigawa, T. [Japan International Corporation Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    An investigation was given on the relationship between methanol adsorbing behavior of reformed coal surface and oxygen containing functional groups in coal. Akabira bituminous coal was air-oxidized or Yallourn brown coal was decarbonated in oil as a reformation treatment. Both of the treated and untreated coals showed an adsorption heat curve of the Langmuir type. The Akabira coal had its oxygen content and the adsorption heat increased as a result of the air oxidizing reformation treatment. The Yallourn coal had its oxygen content and adsorption heat decreased as a result decarbonation reformation treatment. Oxygen containing functional groups act as strong adsorption sites for methanol, and the maximum adsorption amount depends on oxygen content in the coals. Since the coal surface is non-uniform in terms of energy, methanol is adsorbed first into sites with higher molar adsorption heat, and then into lower sites sequentially. Therefore, distribution of the molar adsorption heat can be derived from the relationship between adsorption amount and adsorption heat by changing methanol adsorption amount. The distribution of molar adsorption heat becomes broader when the oxygen content is high, and narrower when low. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Quantification of fossil organic matter in contaminated sediments from an industrial watershed: Validation of the quantitative multimolecular approach by radiocarbon analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanneau, Laurent; Faure, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The quantitative multimolecular approach (QMA) based on an exhaustive identification and quantification of molecules from the extractable organic matter (EOM) has been recently developed in order to investigate organic contamination in sediments by a more complete method than the restrictive quantification of target contaminants. Such an approach allows (i) the comparison between natural and anthropogenic inputs, (ii) between modern and fossil organic matter and (iii) the differentiation between several anthropogenic sources. However QMA is based on the quantification of molecules recovered by organic solvent and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, which represent a small fraction of sedimentary organic matter (SOM). In order to extend the conclusions of QMA to SOM, radiocarbon analyses have been performed on organic extracts and decarbonated sediments. This analysis allows (i) the differentiation between modern biomass (contemporary 14 C) and fossil organic matter ( 14 C-free) and (ii) the calculation of the modern carbon percentage (PMC). At the confluence between Fensch and Moselle Rivers, a catchment highly contaminated by both industrial activities and urbanization, PMC values in decarbonated sediments are well correlated with the percentage of natural molecular markers determined by QMA. It highlights that, for this type of contamination by fossil organic matter inputs, the conclusions of QMA can be scaled up to SOM. QMA is an efficient environmental diagnostic tool that leads to a more realistic quantification of fossil organic matter in sediments.

  13. Improvement in the makeup of Asco Nuclear Site with the addition of a R.O. plant to the makeup treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cascante, C.; Boronat, M.; Lloret, J.

    1988-01-01

    At present, the Asco nuclear site makes use of a complete water treatment support system that perform pretreatment (decarbonization, decantation, chlorination, filtration), reverse osmosis (regulation atmospheric tank, chemical conditioning of pretreated water, microfiltration, membrane chains, degasifier, pH correction), storage of osmotized water (atmospherical tank), demineralization (dechlorinizer, cationic exchanger, anionic exchanger, degasifier, strong anionic exchanger, catalytic reducer of oxygen, interchange of mixed layer), and storage of demineralized water (tank with atmospherical nitrogen). The installation of reverse osmosis equipment in the R.O. plant at the Asco nuclear site has its objective to reduce in a substantial way the total solids from the water coming from the Ebro river which is then submitted to a process of floculation, decarbonization, decantation and filtration, prior to total demineralization. The process is based on the property of semipermeable membranes in which a pressure is applied to water which contains dissolved solids, and only the dissolvent can pass through them, thus providing desalted water and a concentrate which contains the carried dissolved solids. (Nogami, K.)

  14. Natural wind variability triggered drop in German redispatch volume and costs from 2015 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohland, Jan; Reyers, Mark; Märker, Carolin; Witthaut, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    Avoiding dangerous climate change necessitates the decarbonization of electricity systems within the next few decades. In Germany, this decarbonization is based on an increased exploitation of variable renewable electricity sources such as wind and solar power. While system security has remained constantly high, the integration of renewables causes additional costs. In 2015, the costs of grid management saw an all time high of about € 1 billion. Despite the addition of renewable capacity, these costs dropped substantially in 2016. We thus investigate the effect of natural climate variability on grid management costs in this study. We show that the decline is triggered by natural wind variability focusing on redispatch as a main cost driver. In particular, we find that 2016 was a weak year in terms of wind generation averages and the occurrence of westerly circulation weather types. Moreover, we show that a simple model based on the wind generation time series is skillful in detecting redispatch events on timescales of weeks and beyond. As a consequence, alterations in annual redispatch costs in the order of hundreds of millions of euros need to be understood and communicated as a normal feature of the current system due to natural wind variability.

  15. Natural wind variability triggered drop in German redispatch volume and costs from 2015 to 2016.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Wohland

    Full Text Available Avoiding dangerous climate change necessitates the decarbonization of electricity systems within the next few decades. In Germany, this decarbonization is based on an increased exploitation of variable renewable electricity sources such as wind and solar power. While system security has remained constantly high, the integration of renewables causes additional costs. In 2015, the costs of grid management saw an all time high of about € 1 billion. Despite the addition of renewable capacity, these costs dropped substantially in 2016. We thus investigate the effect of natural climate variability on grid management costs in this study. We show that the decline is triggered by natural wind variability focusing on redispatch as a main cost driver. In particular, we find that 2016 was a weak year in terms of wind generation averages and the occurrence of westerly circulation weather types. Moreover, we show that a simple model based on the wind generation time series is skillful in detecting redispatch events on timescales of weeks and beyond. As a consequence, alterations in annual redispatch costs in the order of hundreds of millions of euros need to be understood and communicated as a normal feature of the current system due to natural wind variability.

  16. Is the issue of energy transition correctly posed in present debates?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candel, Sebastien; Brechet, Yves; Brezin, Edouard; Fontecave, Marc; Andre, Jean-Claude; Balian, Roger; Balibar, Sebastien; Bamberger, Yves; Cesarsky, Catherine; Courtillot, Vincent; Duplessy, Jean-Claude; Encrenaz, Pierre; Guillaumont, Robert; Joliot, Pierre; Laval, Guy; Pironneau, Olivier; Pouchard, Michel; Rebut, Paul-Henri; Roux, Didier; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    As it is commonly stated that it would be possible to massively developed renewable energies in order to de-carbonate our energy system by getting rid of fossil and nuclear energies, the authors recall and discuss some facts. They outline that the solution depend on geographical and climatic constraints which are proper to each country, that renewable energies only represents about a quarter of our consumption and raise the problem of intermittency. Moreover, the present status of energy storage technology does not provide a viable and possible solution, and is still to be further developed. They also outline problems faced in Germany where coal fired plants had to be created to solve issues of electricity availability. They outline that France is one of the less carbon-emitting country, due to the importance of nuclear energy. Thus, they outline that realistic scenarios must be proposed in which nuclear will still have its role in a de-carbonated system, and with investments in basic, technological and industrial research on various fields (nuclear wastes and safety, energy storage, CO 2 capture and sequestration)

  17. Carbonation by fluid-rock interactions at high-pressure conditions: Implications for carbon cycling in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Francesca; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Beyssac, Olivier; Martinez, Isabelle; Ague, Jay J.; Chaduteau, Carine

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate-bearing lithologies are the main carbon carrier into subduction zones. Their evolution during metamorphism largely controls the fate of carbon, regulating its fluxes between shallow and deep reservoirs. Recent estimates predict that almost all subducted carbon is transferred into the crust and lithospheric mantle during subduction metamorphism via decarbonation and dissolution reactions at high-pressure conditions. Here we report the occurrence of eclogite-facies marbles associated with metasomatic systems in Alpine Corsica (France). The occurrence of these marbles along major fluid-conduits as well as textural, geochemical and isotopic data indicating fluid-mineral reactions are compelling evidence for the precipitation of these carbonate-rich assemblages from carbonic fluids during metamorphism. The discovery of metasomatic marbles brings new insights into the fate of carbonic fluids formed in subducting slabs. We infer that rock carbonation can occur at high-pressure conditions by either vein-injection or chemical replacement mechanisms. This indicates that carbonic fluids produced by decarbonation reactions and carbonate dissolution may not be directly transferred to the mantle wedge, but can interact with slab and mantle-forming rocks. Rock-carbonation by fluid-rock interactions may have an important impact on the residence time of carbon and oxygen in subduction zones and lithospheric mantle reservoirs as well as carbonate isotopic signatures in subduction zones. Furthermore, carbonation may modulate the emission of CO2 at volcanic arcs over geological time scales.

  18. Investigational study of evaluation of the global energy system as a global environmental protection technology; Chikyu kankyo taisaku gijutsu toshite no global energy system no hyoka ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    With relation to some global energy systems of which viability is predicted in the future, an evaluation was conducted from the viewpoints of economical efficiency, energy balance, CO2 emission, etc. The fossil fuel CO2 capture system, the conventional thermal power plant added with CO2 recovery/treatment facilities, is expected to reduce approximately 70-75% of the CO2 emission. The fossil fuel decarbonated hydrogen system, which decarbonates fossil fuels, recovers/treats CO2 at the place of fuel supply and uses as hydrogen, is of poor practical application from an economical point of view. The fossil fuel methanol synthesis system, which synthesizes methanol from fossil fuels at the place of fuel supply, generates electric power and recovers/treats CO2 with the methanol, is large in energy loss and CO2 emission and low in overall efficiency and CO2 reduction effect at the time of methanol synthesis. The renewable energy hydrogen system is an ultimate system with no emission of CO2, though it costs much. 110 refs., 83 figs., 107 tabs.

  19. COP21: success at 'the end of the beginning'. Climate Brief No.38

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultheel, Clement; Morel, Romain; Hainaut, Hadrien; Deheza, Mariana; Shishlov, Igor; Depoues, Vivian; Leguet, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The Paris Agreement provides a clear signal and a solid framework for climate action. Balanced and ambitious in its objectives - including full decarbonization of the global economy before the end of the century - it has all the conditions to encourage everyone to do more. In establishing a new international climate change regime, the Agreement focuses on the essentials: guiding countries towards low-carbon and climate resilient economies. The main challenge resides not in the direct implementation of the decisions taken in Paris, but rather in the alignment of countries' national strategies with a decarbonization trajectory. COP21 marks the advent of a new regime of international cooperation rather than a 'utopian' and politically unpalatable system to punish or coerce States to take action. It confirms the desire to engage both State and non-State actors on climate action. In this respect, it is a real victory of multilateralism. Indeed, COP21 marks the 'end of the beginning' of a long negotiations process to shift to a permanent regime, completed by regular appointments to boost ambition. This victory, however, will become historical only if this cooperation leads to enhanced action and concrete results. And this is where the hard work begins

  20. Do We Need Gas as a Bridging Fuel? A Case Study of the Electricity System of Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Díaz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many future electricity scenarios, including those from the International Energy Agency, use natural gas to bridge the transition to renewables, in particular as a means of balancing intermittent generation from new renewables. Given that such strategies may be inconsistent with strategies to limit climate change to below 2 °C, we address the question of whether such use of gas is necessary or cost effective. We conduct a techno-economic case study of Switzerland, using a cost optimization model. We explore a range of electricity costs, comparing scenarios in which gas is used as a source of base-load power, a source of balancing capacity, and not used at all. Costs at the high end of the range show that a complete decarbonization increases system-wide costs by 3% compared to a gas bridging scenario, and 13–46% compared to a carbon-intensive scenario, depending on the relative shares of solar and wind. Costs at the low end of the range show that system-wide costs are equal or lower for both completely decarbonized and gas bridging scenarios. In conclusion, gas delivers little to no cost savings as a bridging fuel in a system that switches to wind and solar.

  1. Natural wind variability triggered drop in German redispatch volume and costs from 2015 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyers, Mark; Märker, Carolin; Witthaut, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    Avoiding dangerous climate change necessitates the decarbonization of electricity systems within the next few decades. In Germany, this decarbonization is based on an increased exploitation of variable renewable electricity sources such as wind and solar power. While system security has remained constantly high, the integration of renewables causes additional costs. In 2015, the costs of grid management saw an all time high of about € 1 billion. Despite the addition of renewable capacity, these costs dropped substantially in 2016. We thus investigate the effect of natural climate variability on grid management costs in this study. We show that the decline is triggered by natural wind variability focusing on redispatch as a main cost driver. In particular, we find that 2016 was a weak year in terms of wind generation averages and the occurrence of westerly circulation weather types. Moreover, we show that a simple model based on the wind generation time series is skillful in detecting redispatch events on timescales of weeks and beyond. As a consequence, alterations in annual redispatch costs in the order of hundreds of millions of euros need to be understood and communicated as a normal feature of the current system due to natural wind variability. PMID:29329349

  2. Energy storage deployment and innovation for the clean energy transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittner, Noah; Lill, Felix; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2017-09-01

    The clean energy transition requires a co-evolution of innovation, investment, and deployment strategies for emerging energy storage technologies. A deeply decarbonized energy system research platform needs materials science advances in battery technology to overcome the intermittency challenges of wind and solar electricity. Simultaneously, policies designed to build market growth and innovation in battery storage may complement cost reductions across a suite of clean energy technologies. Further integration of R&D and deployment of new storage technologies paves a clear route toward cost-effective low-carbon electricity. Here we analyse deployment and innovation using a two-factor model that integrates the value of investment in materials innovation and technology deployment over time from an empirical dataset covering battery storage technology. Complementary advances in battery storage are of utmost importance to decarbonization alongside improvements in renewable electricity sources. We find and chart a viable path to dispatchable US$1 W-1 solar with US$100 kWh-1 battery storage that enables combinations of solar, wind, and storage to compete directly with fossil-based electricity options.

  3. The economics of renewable energy expansion in rural Sub-Saharan Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichmann, Uwe; Meisner, Craig; Murray, Siobhan; Wheeler, David

    2011-01-01

    Accelerating development in Sub-Saharan Africa will require massive expansion of access to electricity-currently reaching only about one third of households. This paper explores how essential economic development might be reconciled with the need to keep carbon emissions in check. We develop a geographically explicit framework and use spatial modeling and cost estimates from recent engineering studies to determine where stand-alone renewable energy generation is a cost effective alternative to centralized grid supply. Our results suggest that decentralized renewable energy will likely play an important role in expanding rural energy access. However, it will be the lowest cost option for a minority of households in Africa, even when likely cost reductions over the next 20 years are considered. Decentralized renewables are competitive mostly in remote and rural areas, while grid connected supply dominates denser areas where the majority of households reside. These findings underscore the need to decarbonize the fuel mix for centralized power generation as it expands in Africa. - Research highlights: → Expansion of electricity access in Sub-Saharan Africa remains a development priority. → Low carbon options are important to reduce GHG emissions growth and avoid lock-ins. → Spatially explicit cost modeling guides choice of supply options. → Decentralized renewables are lowest cost for a significant minority of households. → Grid supply remains attractive, suggesting focus on decarbonizing centralized supply.

  4. Clean energy and the hydrogen economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, N P; Kurban, Z

    2017-07-28

    In recent years, new-found interest in the hydrogen economy from both industry and academia has helped to shed light on its potential. Hydrogen can enable an energy revolution by providing much needed flexibility in renewable energy systems. As a clean energy carrier, hydrogen offers a range of benefits for simultaneously decarbonizing the transport, residential, commercial and industrial sectors. Hydrogen is shown here to have synergies with other low-carbon alternatives, and can enable a more cost-effective transition to de-carbonized and cleaner energy systems. This paper presents the opportunities for the use of hydrogen in key sectors of the economy and identifies the benefits and challenges within the hydrogen supply chain for power-to-gas, power-to-power and gas-to-gas supply pathways. While industry players have already started the market introduction of hydrogen fuel cell systems, including fuel cell electric vehicles and micro-combined heat and power devices, the use of hydrogen at grid scale requires the challenges of clean hydrogen production, bulk storage and distribution to be resolved. Ultimately, greater government support, in partnership with industry and academia, is still needed to realize hydrogen's potential across all economic sectors.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. The Road Less Travelled: The Deep Challenges of Social Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, K. L.; Moser, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    How do we create the societal transformations necessary to stabilize the global climate and address other global goals? The roadmap metaphor guiding this session reflects a managerial approach to deep decarbonization, one that can be planned, charted, guided and implemented with the tools already known. Transformations and systems change involve far more than technical innovations, policy instruments and behavioral change. Drawing on a wide range of research on transformation processes from the social sciences and humanities and systems science, we argue that current approaches to decarbonization are likely to fail if they ignore theories of social change, including insights on the dynamics of social, cultural, economic and political transformations. Climate stabilization also calls for attention to the relationships between human values, political agency, power, and institutional change. It is precisely these deeper dynamics - which are typically ignored - that stall transformative change. Rather than developing a carbon road map, we suggest both a wider and deeper exploration of the territory of social transformation is needed, and suggest both different metaphors and methods to engage individual change agents and communities of actors, who together can create pathways to sustainability.

  6. Positioning Nuclear Power in the Low-Carbon Electricity Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviel Verbruggen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Addressing climate change requires de-carbonizing future energy supplies in an increasingly energy-dependent world. The IEA and the IPCC (2014 mention the following as low-carbon energy supply options: ‘renewable energy, nuclear power and fossil fuels with carbon capture and storage’. Positioning nuclear power in the decarbonization transition is a problematic issue and is overridden by ill-conceived axioms. Before probing these axioms, we provide an overview of five major, postwar energy-related legacies and some insight into who is engaged in nuclear activities. We check whether low-carbon nuclear power passes the full sustainability test and whether it is compatible with the unfettered deployment of variable renewable power sourced from the sun and from wind and water currents, which delivers two negative answers. We show that the best approach of the sustainable energy transition was Germany’s 2011 decision to phase out nuclear power for a fast development and full deployment of renewable power. This is the best approach for the sustainable energy transition. We offer five practical suggestions to strengthen and accelerate carbon- and nuclear-free transitions. They are related to institutional issues like the role of cost-benefit analysis and the mission of the International Atomic Energy Agency, to the costs of nuclear risks and catastrophes, and to the historical record of nuclear technology and business.

  7. Slow Money for Soft Energy: Lessons for Energy Finance from the Slow Money Movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kock, Beaudry E. [Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)], e-mail: beaudry.kock@ouce.ox.ac.uk

    2012-12-15

    Energy infrastructure is decarbonizing, shifting from dirty coal to cleaner gas- and emissions-free renewables. This is an important and necessary change that unfortunately risks preserving many problematic technical and institutional properties of the old energy system: in particular, the large scales, high aggregation, and excessive centralization of renewable energy infrastructure and, importantly, its financing. Large-scale renewables carry environmental, social and political risks that cannot be ignored, and more importantly they may not alone accomplish the necessary decarbonization of the power sector. We need to revive a different approach to clean energy infrastructure: a 'softer' (Lovins 1978), more distributed, decentralized, local-scale strategy. To achieve this, we need a fundamentally different approach to the financing of clean energy infrastructure. I propose we learn from the 'Slow Money' approach being pioneered in sustainable agriculture (Tasch 2010), emphasizing a better connection to place, smaller scales, and a focus on quality over quantity. This 'slow money, soft energy' vision is not a repudiation of big-scale renewables, since there are some societal needs, which can only be met by big, centralized power. But we do not need the level of concentration in control and finance epitomized by the current trends in the global renewables sector: this can and must change.

  8. The impact of reducing car weight on global emissions: the future fleet in Great Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrenho, André Cabrera; Norman, Jonathan B.; Allwood, Julian M.

    2017-05-01

    Current European policies define targets for future direct emissions of new car sales that foster a fast transition to electric drivetrain technologies. However, these targets do not consider the emissions produced in electricity generation and material production, and therefore fail to incentivise car manufacturers to consider the benefits of vehicle weight reduction. In this paper, we examine the potential benefits of limiting the average weight and altering the material composition of new cars in terms of global greenhouse gas emissions produced during the use phase, electricity generation and material production. We anticipate the emissions savings for the future car fleet in Great Britain until 2050 for various alternative futures, using a dynamic material flow analysis of ferrous metals and aluminium, and considering an evolving demand for car use. The results suggest that fostering vehicle weight reduction could produce greater cumulative emissions savings by 2050 than those obtained by incentivising a fast transition to electric drivetrains, unless there is an extreme decarbonization of the electricity grid. Savings promoted by weight reduction are immediate and do not depend on the pace of decarbonization of the electricity grid. Weight reduction may produce the greatest savings when mild steel in the car body is replaced with high-strength steel. This article is part of the themed issue 'Material demand reduction'.

  9. thermal characteristics of a simulated non-radioactive agricultural waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.Z.; Soliman, H.M.; Abdelmoniem, M.

    2004-01-01

    characterization of thermal degradation of a mixture of a simulated non radioactive contaminated almond shell and cotton straw is important to check possibility of its safe treatment by pyrolysis. thermal analysis of the mixture was carried out using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) under inert atmosphere. thermal degradation of almond shell and cotton straw mixture takes place in two stages namely, volatilization stage and decarbonization stage. kinetics of the thermal degradation was studied to determine the reaction rate, activation energy, entropy change, enthalpy change and free energy for both stages. during pyrolysis, 5.8% water Vapor, 46.4% condensed gases, 29.2% condensed gases, and 18.6% pyrolysis coke residue by weight were obtained . analysis of pyrolysis condensed gases showed that it contained 24.2% N 2 ,7.1% CO, 14% H 2 and 17.3 CO 2 by weight. in addition, results revealed that the heavy elements are concentrated in the coke residue. it was found that the rate constant of the reacion increases by the increase in the temperature for both sages. more above, results revealed that the activation energy for volatilization stage is higher than decarbonization stage

  10. Smart electric grids in the United Kingdom energy strategy; Les reseaux electriques intelligents dans la strategie energetique du Royaume-Uni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloaguen, Olivier [Ambassade de France au Royaume-Uni, Service de presse, 58 Knightsbridge, London SW1X 7JT (United Kingdom); Dreyfus, Charles-Antoine [Ecole des Mines de Paris - MINES Paris Tech, 60, Boulevard Saint-Michel 75272 Paris cedex 06 (France)

    2011-09-15

    This study first gives an overview of the current status and limitations of the British power grid. It indicates the British energy mix, describes the network structure and its economic operation (gross and retail market with the bid and offer system, role of the System Operator, ways to increase the electricity production). It presents the energy policy and its regulation framework, outlines the current limitations and challenges (ageing grid, power crunch, de-carbonation challenges). It presents the development of a smart grid as a solution to economy de-carbonation challenges: definition of the 'smart grid concept', smart grid development planning (from 2010 to 2050), technological transition associated with smart electric grid development (a cleaner but more intermittent and random electricity production, better use of fossil fuels, electric energy storage, consequences for the grid, introduction and effects of smart meters). It describes the new associated economic model: evolution of the value chain, financial challenges (required investments, expected benefits, subsidies), new regulation system. It addresses the strategic challenges and the various uncertainties (notably in terms of consumption, privacy issue in relation with the use of smart meters, and project implementation).

  11. Clean vehicles as an enabler for a clean electricity grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coignard, Jonathan; Saxena, Samveg; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Wang, Dai

    2018-05-01

    California has issued ambitious targets to decarbonize transportation through the deployment of electric vehicles (EVs), and to decarbonize the electricity grid through the expansion of both renewable generation and energy storage. These parallel efforts can provide an untapped synergistic opportunity for clean transportation to be an enabler for a clean electricity grid. To quantify this potential, we forecast the hourly system-wide balancing problems arising out to 2025 as more renewables are deployed and load continues to grow. We then quantify the system-wide balancing benefits from EVs modulating the charging or discharging of their batteries to mitigate renewable intermittency, without compromising the mobility needs of drivers. Our results show that with its EV deployment target and with only one-way charging control of EVs, California can achieve much of the same benefit of its Storage Mandate for mitigating renewable intermittency, but at a small fraction of the cost. Moreover, EVs provide many times these benefits if two-way charging control becomes widely available. Thus, EVs support the state’s renewable integration targets while avoiding much of the tremendous capital investment of stationary storage that can instead be applied towards further deployment of clean vehicles.

  12. Infiltration-driven metamorphism, New England, USA: Regional CO2 fluxes and implications for Devonian climate and extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, E. M.; Ague, Jay J.

    2018-05-01

    We undertake thermodynamic pseudosection modeling of metacarbonate rocks in the Wepawaug Schist, Connecticut, USA, and examine the implications for CO2 outgassing from collisional orogenic belts. Two broad types of pseudosections are calculated: (1) a fully closed-system model with no fluid infiltration and (2) a fluid-buffered model including an H2O-CO2 fluid of a fixed composition. This fluid-buffered model is used to approximate a system open to infiltration by a water-bearing fluid. In all cases the fully closed-system model fails to reproduce the observed major mineral zones, mineral compositions, reaction temperatures, and fluid compositions. The fluid-infiltrated models, on the other hand, successfully reproduce these observations when the XCO2 of the fluid is in the range ∼0.05 to ∼0.15. Fluid-infiltrated models predict significant progressive CO2 loss, peaking at ∼50% decarbonation at amphibolite facies. The closed-system models dramatically underestimate the degree of decarbonation, predicting only ∼15% CO2 loss at peak conditions, and, remarkably, global warming, sea level rise, and, perhaps, extinction in the mid- to late-Devonian.

  13. The electric vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez duran, R.

    2010-01-01

    The decarbonization of transport is a key element in both energy and environmental European policies as well as one of the levers that will help us achieve the goals of improving energy efficiency, reducing CO 2 emissions and energy dependence. The use of electricity compared to other low-carbon fuels such as bio fuels and hydrogen has the advantage of its existing infrastructure (power generation plants, transmission and distribution networks), being only necessary to developed recharging infrastructures. We emphasize the role of electricity networks and their evolution, which will enable to manage demand and maximise the potential of renewable energies. The idea of an electric vehicle is not a recent one but dates back to the beginning of the last century, when first units appeared. Unfortunately, technological barriers were too high at the time to let them succeed. Namely those barriers limited the range of the electric vehicle due to problems with battery recharges. Nowadays, those difficulties have almost been solved and we can state that institutional support and coordination among all actors involved have made the electric vehicle a plausible reality. While the technological improvements needed for the electric vehicle to become cost competitive are carried out, the plug-in hybrid vehicle represents the intermediate step to reach a total decarbonization of transport. Endesa is committed to this revolution in transport mobility and believes that now is the right time to focus our efforts on it. Our goal is to contribute to a more balanced and sustainable world in the near future. (Author)

  14. What Progress on the Idea of a Carbon Price-Signal?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandjean, Alain; Martini, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    In December 2015, the world's leading countries signed an agreement in Paris that committed them to action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, so as to limit the scale of current global warming. If this is to be done, action is required to improve energy efficiency, but also to genuinely 'de-carbonize' production systems. Now, as Alain Grandjean and Mireille Martini emphasize here, the transition to a de-carbonized economy has very little chance of coming about as long as there are no costs attached to emitting greenhouse gases. Hence the importance of establishing a carbon 'price-signal' that encourages countries to redesign their economic model. After rehearsing the various conceivable arrangements for taxing carbon and the way its price might be set, Grandjean and Martini look more specifically at France, Europe and the European emissions-trading market. They show how that market is still imperfect in its operation and stress the need for complementary provisions. Lastly, they examine the question of a carbon price signal at the international level, where such a scheme must necessarily be designed on a differential basis. (authors)

  15. Potential for widespread electrification of personal vehicle travel in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needell, Zachary A.; McNerney, James; Chang, Michael T.; Trancik, Jessika E.

    2016-09-01

    Electric vehicles can contribute to climate change mitigation if coupled with decarbonized electricity, but only if vehicle range matches travellers’ needs. Evaluating electric vehicle range against a population’s needs is challenging because detailed driving behaviour must be taken into account. Here we develop a model to combine information from coarse-grained but expansive travel surveys with high-resolution GPS data to estimate the energy requirements of personal vehicle trips across the US. We find that the energy requirements of 87% of vehicle-days could be met by an existing, affordable electric vehicle. This percentage is markedly similar across diverse cities, even when per capita gasoline consumption differs significantly. We also find that for the highest-energy days, other vehicle technologies are likely to be needed even as batteries improve and charging infrastructure expands. Car sharing or other means to serve this small number of high-energy days could play an important role in the electrification and decarbonization of transportation.

  16. Energy situation in France and in the World - What political choices?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    Energy production and distribution play a key-role in the evolution of our societies. The resources coming from the Earth's crust are limited and our energy production system has negative impacts on the environment which have to be minimized. Political projects have to take these constraints into consideration with a long-term vision. The French Society of Physics (SFP) approached the experts of the Energy-Environment commission to shade light on the energy debate in France and in the rest of the world. A precise and brief analysis of the French and worldwide energy situation is presented in a first part (situation and prospective, costs, benefits and risks, decarbonization, R and D, energy saving and conservation..). Then, a series of 10 thematic information sheets summarizes different economical, environmental and political aspects of the energy question: resources and reserves, environmental impact of various power generation sources, risks, costs and benefits of the different energy industries, energy costs, production irregularity management, networks and storage facilities, European transportation networks and super-networks for electricity, gas, petroleum and CO 2 , consumption abatement, decarbonization strategies, energy policy choices for France from 2010 to 2050

  17. Application of lithium orthosilicate for high-temperature thermochemical energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasu, Hiroki; Ryu, Junichi; Kato, Yukitaka

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Li_4SiO_4/CO_2 system is proposed for use in chemical heat pump systems at 650 and 700 °C. • Li_4SiO_4/CO_2 system showed an enough cyclic reaction durability for 5 cycles. • The energy storage density of Li_4SiO_4 was estimated to be 750 kJ L"−"1 and 780 kJ kg"−"1. • It was demonstrated that Li_4SiO_4 could be used as a thermal heat storage material. - Abstract: A lithium orthosilicate/carbon dioxide (Li_4SiO_4/CO_2) reaction system is proposed for use in thermochemical energy storage (TcES) and chemical heat pump (CHP) systems at around 700 °C. Carbonation of Li_4SiO_4 exothermically produces lithium carbonate (Li_2CO_3) and lithium metasilicate (Li_2SiO_3). Decarbonation of these products is used for heat storage, and carbonation is used for heat output in a TcES system. A Li_4SiO_4 sample around 20 μm in diameter was prepared from Li_2CO_3 and SiO_2 using a solid-state reaction method. To determine the reactivity of the sample, Li_4SiO_4 carbonation and decarbonation experiments were conducted under CO_2 at several pressures in a closed reactor using thermogravimetric analysis. The Li_4SiO_4 sample’s carbonation and decarbonation performance was sufficient for use as a TcES material at around 700 °C. In addition, both reaction temperatures of Li_4SiO_4 varied with the CO_2 pressure. The durability under repeated Li_4SiO_4 carbonation and decarbonation was tested using temperature swing and pressure swing methods. Both methods showed that the Li_4SiO_4 sample has sufficient durability. These results indicate that the temperature for heat storage and heat output by carbonation and decarbonation, respectively, could be controlled by controlling the CO_2 pressure. Li_4SiO_4/CO_2 can be used not only for TcES but also in CHPs. The volumetric and gravimetric thermal energy densities of Li_4SiO_4 for TcES were found to be 750 kJ L"−"1 and 780 kJ kg"−"1, where the porosity of Li_4SiO_4 was assumed to be 59%. When the reaction system

  18. European Electricity Markets in Crisis: Diagnostic and Way Forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roques, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    The European electricity industry is going through a profound crisis as several factors combine to create a challenging operating environment for thermal plants. The key issue is that the regulatory and market framework create a climate of deep policy and regulatory uncertainty which will hamper investments and will not deliver on the long term objectives of decarbonization and competitiveness of the European economy. This report analyses both the short and long term challenges for the European electricity markets, and highlights some directions for reform. The report has three main parts. The first part describes the current status quo and challenges associated with the long term decarbonization of the European economy: Section 1 sets the scene by describing the current challenges for the European electricity industry and the challenges associated with the long term decarbonization of the European economy; Section 2 quantifies the investment challenge for the electricity industry and shows how the current regulatory uncertainty undermines investments and will likely not deliver on the stated policy objectives; The second part of the report focusses on the 'extrinsic' issues which affect electricity markets: Section 3 reviews the wider context for electricity market liberalization, which calls for a rethink of the European energy policy framework, including the recent developments in global energy markets, as well as the impact of rising energy prices on economic competitiveness; Section 4 presents the distortive effects of support policies for low carbon technologies and the issues with the European carbon Trading Scheme; The third and last part of the report concentrates on the 'intrinsic issues' with electricity markets: Section 5 details the experience to date with European electricity markets liberalization, and highlights the achievements as well as the shortcomings of the liberalization and integration process; Section 6 dwells into the 'intrinsic issues

  19. Dynamics of energy technologies and global change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grubler, A.; Nakicenovic, N.; Victor, D.G.

    1999-01-01

    Technological choices largely determine the long-term characteristics of industrial society, including impacts on the natural environment. However, the treatment of technology in existing models that are used to project economic and environmental futures remains highly stylized. Based on work over two decades at IIASA, we present a useful typology for technology analysis and discuss methods that can be used to analyze the impact of technological changes on the global environment, especially global warming. Our focus is energy technologies, the main source of many atmospheric environmental problems. We show that much improved treatment of technology is possible with a combination of historical analysis and new modeling techniques. In the historical record, we identify characteristic 'learning rates' that allow simple quantified characterization of the improvement in cost and performance due to cumulative experience and investments. We also identify patterns, processes and timescales that typify the diffusion of new technologies in competitive markets. Technologies that are long-lived and are components of interlocking networks typically require the longest time to diffuse and co-evolve with other technologies in the network; such network effects yield high barriers to entry even for superior competitors. These simple observations allow three improvements to modeling of technological change and its consequences for global environmental change. One is that the replacement of long-lived infrastructures over time has also replaced the fuels that power the economy to yield progressively more energy per unit of carbon pollution - from coal to oil to gas. Such replacement has 'decarbonized' the global primary energy supply 0.3% per year. In contrast, most baseline projections for emissions of carbon, the chief cause of global warming, ignore this robust historical trend and show Iittle or no decarbonization. A second improvement is that by incorporating learning curves and

  20. Multi-scale investigation into the mechanisms of fault mirror formation in seismically active carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Markus; Chatzaras, Vasileios; Niemeijer, Andre; King, Helen; Drury, Martyn; Plümper, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    Mirror surfaces along principal slip zones in carbonate rocks have recently received considerable attention as they are thought to form during fault slip at seismic velocities and thus may be a marker for paleo-seismicity (Siman-Tov et al., 2013). Therefore, these structures represent an opportunity to improve our understanding of earthquake mechanics in carbonate faults. Recent investigations reported the formation of fault mirrors in natural rocks as well as in laboratory experiments and connected their occurrence to the development of nano-sized granular material (Spagnuolo et al., 2015). However, the underlying formation and deformation mechanisms of these fault mirrors are still poorly constrained and warrant further research. In order to understand the influence and significance of these fault products on the overall fault behavior, we analysed the micro-, and nanostructural inventory of natural fault samples containing mirror slip surfaces. Here we present first results on the possible formation mechanisms of fault mirrors and associated deformation mechanisms operating in the carbonate fault gouge from two seismically active fault zones in central Greece. Our study specifically focuses on mirror slip surfaces obtained from the Arkitsa fault in the Gulf of Evia and the Schinos fault in the Gulf of Corinth. The Schinos fault was reactivated by a magnitude 6.7 earthquake in 1981 while the Arkitsa fault is thought to have been reactivated by a magnitude 6.9 earthquake in 1894. Our investigations encompass a combination of state-of-the-art analytical techniques including X-ray computed tomography, focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Using this multiscale analytical approach, we report decarbonation-reaction structures, considerable calcite twinning and grain welding immediately below the mirror slip surface. Grains or areas indicating decarbonation reactions show a foam

  1. Hydrogen in energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-02-01

    This publication proposes a rather brief overview of challenges related to the use of hydrogen as an energy vector in the fields of transports and of energy storage to valorise renewable energies. Processes (steam reforming of natural gas or bio-gas, alkaline or membrane electrolysis, biological production), installation types (centralised or decentralised), raw materials and/or energy (natural gas, water, bio-gas, electricity, light), and their respective industrial maturity are indicated. The role of hydrogen to de-carbonate different types of transports is described (complementary energy for internal combustion as well as electrical vehicles) as well as its role in the valorisation and integration of renewable energies. The main challenges faced by the hydrogen sector are identified and discussed, and actions undertaken by the ADEME are indicated

  2. Petroleum formation by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in plate tectonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szatmari, P. (Petrobras Research Center, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1989-08-01

    A somewhat speculative hypothesis of petroleum genesis in the upper lithosphere is proposed, based on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. This hypothesis is distinct from both the organic (biogenic) model and the inorganic model of hydrocarbon degassing from the Earth's interior. The hypothesis presented in this paper proposes that petroleum liquids form by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on magnetite and hematite catalysts when carbon dioxide (derived by massive metamorphic or igneous decarbonation of subducted sedimentary carbonates) reacts with hydrogen generated by the serpentinization (in the absence of air) of shallow-mantle lithosphere and ophiolite thrust sheets. Oblique plate movements may favor hydrocarbon formation by creating deep faults that aid fluid flow and serpentinization. The world's richest oil provinces, including those of the Middle East, may be tentatively interpreted to have formed by this mechanism. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. macro-economic assessment of energy visions 2030-2050 by the ADEME - Technical document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callonnec, G.; Landa, G.; Maillet, P.; Reynes, F.

    2013-10-01

    After a brief presentation of the energy transition scenario designed by the ADEME and which is based on principles of efficiency and sobriety, and on a largely de-carbonated energy supply, this report presents the ThreeME model (ThreeME stands for macro-economic multi-sector model of assessment of energy and environment policies). It is a neo-Keynesian model which integrates a dynamic interaction between supply and demand. The application of this model to energy transition is discusses as well as the model calibration. Results are then discussed (reference scenario, modelling of the ADEME scenario) and expansionary effects are outlined in terms of household purchasing power, investment, employment, reduction of trade balance deficit, induced effects on GDP, shadow value of carbon, and public finances

  4. I-tese Newsletter - Number 26, Fall 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bontems, Vincent; Devezeaux, Jean-Guy; Duquesnoy, Thierry; Gabriel, Sophie; Jasserand, Frederic; Leurent, Martin; Monnet, Antoine; Popiolek, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    A first article presents and discusses the study 'Decarbonization wedges' performed by the National Alliance of Coordination of Research for Energy (ANCRE) to assess low carbon technologies aimed at the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. This study addressed the maturity and development trajectory of these technologies as well as the potential deadlocks or accelerators. It aimed at identifying R and D actions to be performed to remain on a world trajectory of 2 degrees. Different approaches have been considered. Then, a set of articles addresses the following topics: what is to be expected from innovation, an analysis of the Finnish experiment of nuclear cogeneration, a first economic assessment of nuclear cogeneration for urban heating in France. A set of brief articles addresses a multi criteria analysis of innovation policies in favour of solar mobility in France by 2030, an OECD report on the projected cost of generating electricity, and uranium markets as they are perceived by the IAEA

  5. Update of the ADEME 2035-2050 energy-climate scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combet, Emmanuel; Marchal, David; Vincent, Isabelle; Mairet, Nicolas; Briand, Vincent; Cals, Guilain; Sidat, Patricia; Bellini, Robert; Guenard, Vincent; Berthomieu, Nadine; Canal, David; Laplaige, Philippe; Delanoe, Julien; Morlot, Rodolphe; Biscaglia, Stephane; Cardona Maestro, Astrid; Thouin, Simon; Bardinal, Marc; Eglin, Thomas; Gagnepain, Bruno; Martin, Sarah; Proharam, Florence; Streiff, Frederic; El Khamlichi, Aicha; Bodineau, Luc; Bastide, Guillaume; Moch, Yves; Marry, Solene; Lefranc, Anne; Mefflet-Piperel, Mathieu; Chassignet, Mathieu; Boulard, Severine; Carballes, Sandrine; Ducreux, Bertrand- Olivier; Barbusse, Stephane; Plassat, Gabriel; Pasquier, Maxime; Tremeac, Yann; Nauleau, Marie-Laure; Meunier, Laurent; Callonnec, Gael

    2017-08-01

    After a discussion of the evolution of the economic and demographic context, this report, illustrated by many data tables and graphs, proposes an analysis of demand evolutions in the building and urban sectors, in the transport and mobility sectors, in the food, agriculture and soil use sectors, and assesses the corresponding evolution of final energy consumptions. The second part analyses, discusses and assesses the various and important potentials of production of renewable energy: proposition of two variations for the de-carbonated energy mix, biomass mobilisation, directly used renewable energy sources, production mix of heat networks, the gas system. It then proposes a synthetic overview and discussion of the evolution of energy offer. The evolution of greenhouse gas emissions is then assessed and discussed. Lessons learned from this update are highlighted, and perspectives are discussed. A synthetic version of this report is also provided

  6. Price Signals from Electricity Markets and Subsidy Schemes for Renewable Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabolic, D.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing share of renewable generation itself gives rise to price risks on the electricity markets. Subsidy schemes, in general, additionally distort price signals produced by economic mechanisms of otherwise free markets. In the electricity industry, subsidy schemes, once designed merely to incentivize electricity system decarbonization in its kick-off phase, seem to have grown to such a volume, that they, too, started to profoundly interfere with the whole market structure, and to distort price signals that used to govern long-term development of an adequately structured generation system. This article was made as an attempt to discuss contemporary electricity system policies in relation to RES integration. The economic relations in the sector are growingly influenced, or sometimes even hard-handedly guided, by political institutions, rather than by economic interests of the investors, which may in turn cause considerable problems in achieving ultimate policy goals due to unsustainability of such an economic arrangement.(author)

  7. Unravelling the argument for bioenergy production in developing countries. A world-economy perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchler, Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers a critical look at how energy security-, food and agriculture-, and climate change-oriented international organizations frame biomass energy production in developing countries, in particular, ethanol production in Brazil. Using the world-economy system as a theoretical lens, the paper raises a concern as to whether the way these global institutions frame bioenergy's role in developing regions manifests energy and ecological inequalities between the core and the periphery, as well as creates internal contradictions that perpetuate unequal exchange embedded in the system. Simultaneously, these organizations frame Brazil as a semi-peripheral state that, while successful in finding a niche concurring with the core's demand for cheap energy and cost-effective decarbonization strategies, is not necessarily a suitable role model for the periphery's socio-economic development. (author)

  8. The North American Energy System: Chapter 3 of SOCCR-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, K. R.; Marcotullio, P. J.; McGlynn, E.; Bruhwiler, L.; Davis, K. J.; Davis, S. J.; Engel-Cox, J.; Field, J.; Gately, C.; Kammen, D. M.; McMahon, J.; Morrow, W.; Torrie, R.

    2017-12-01

    North America (Canada, Mexico and the United States), has a large and complex energy system, which in this case includes the extraction and conversion of primary energy sources and their storage, transmission, distribution and ultimate end use in the building, transportation and industrial sectors. The presentation assesses the contribution of this energy system to the carbon cycle. The assessment includes the identification of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use in the different end use, changes over the past 10 years (since the last SOCCR) and the drivers of change. The assessment focuses on our understanding of the energy trends and system feedback dynamics, key drivers of change as a basis for carbon management. The energy systems' carbon emissions from the North American system are placed in global context and a review of scenarios into the future emissions levels, which demonstrate the requirements for de-carbonization in the medium and longer term.

  9. CEA 2009 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    After an indication of several key figures about the activity of the CEA (Centre d'Etudes Atomiques) and its relationship with the academic as well as the industrial field, in France and worldwide, this 2009 annual report presents its various research programs in the field of defence and of global security: basic research (nuclear weapons and propulsion, struggle against proliferation and terrorism) and applied research (nuclear deterrence, national and international security). Then, it presents the programs in the field of de-carbonated energy: basic research (in material science and in life sciences) and applied research (fission energy, fusion energy, new energy technologies). A last group of research programs deals with information and health technologies and concerns life and material sciences, micro- and nano-technologies, software technologies. Interaction with other research institutions and bodies is also evoked. A brief scientific assessment is proposed. Finally, the different structures building the CEA are presented

  10. Developing country finance in a post-2020 global climate agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Phillip M.; Liao, Zhenliang; Davis, Steven J.; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2015-11-01

    A central task for negotiators of the post-2020 global climate agreement is to construct a finance regime that supports low-carbon development in developing economies. As power sector investments between developing countries grow, the climate finance regime should incentivize the decarbonization of these major sources of finance by integrating them as a complement to the commitments of developed nations. The emergence of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, South-South Cooperation Fund and other nascent institutions reveal the fissures that exist in rules and norms surrounding international finance in the power sector. Structuring the climate agreement in Paris to credit qualified finance from the developing world could have several advantages, including: (1) encouraging low-carbon cooperation between developing countries; (2) incentivizing emerging investors to prefer low-carbon investments; and (3) enabling more cost-effective attainment of national and global climate objectives. Failure to coordinate on standards now could hinder low-carbon development in the decades to come.

  11. Data on development of new energy technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The paper compiles data on the trend of development of new energy technologies into a book. By category, renewable energy is solar energy, wind power generation, geothermal power generation, ocean energy, and biomass. As a category of fuel form conversion, cited are coal liquefaction/gasification, coal gasification combined cycle power generation, and natural gas liquefaction/decarbonization. The other categories are cogeneration by fuel cell and ceramic gas turbine, district heat supply system, power load leveling technology, transportation-use substitution-fuel vehicle, and others (Stirling engine, superconducting power generator, etc.). The data are systematically compiled on essential principles, transition of introduction, objectives of introduction, status of production, cost, development schedule, performance, etc. The paper also deals with the related legislation system, developmental organizations, and a menu for power companies' buying surplus power.

  12. Energy transition: which opportunities for the French industry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousson, Guillaume; Pouzeratte, Francois; Pierret, Christian; Bensasson, Bruno; Bouttes, Jean-Paul; Bouygues, Olivier; Durdilly, Robert; Geoffron, Patrice; Ladoucette, Philippe de; Lepercq, Thierry; Maillard, Dominique; Rosier, Philippe; Sauquet, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Regulatory requirements introduced by the new policy of energy transition will force the French industry to look for alternatives to oil and coal. Within this context, this publication contains contributions proposed by industrial and academic experts which aim at discussing how the French industry can seize the opportunity of energy transition to strengthen itself. The authors discuss the issue of competitiveness, the role of de-carbonated electricity, the context of energy transition in France, the evolutions and transformations of the energy market. They also outline the lack of an energy vision in France, the role of the electricity grid as a vector of energy transition, and the fact that the debate on energy transition did not result in concrete solutions

  13. The carbon footprint of global tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzen, Manfred; Sun, Ya-Yen; Faturay, Futu; Ting, Yuan-Peng; Geschke, Arne; Malik, Arunima

    2018-06-01

    Tourism contributes significantly to global gross domestic product, and is forecast to grow at an annual 4%, thus outpacing many other economic sectors. However, global carbon emissions related to tourism are currently not well quantified. Here, we quantify tourism-related global carbon flows between 160 countries, and their carbon footprints under origin and destination accounting perspectives. We find that, between 2009 and 2013, tourism's global carbon footprint has increased from 3.9 to 4.5 GtCO2e, four times more than previously estimated, accounting for about 8% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Transport, shopping and food are significant contributors. The majority of this footprint is exerted by and in high-income countries. The rapid increase in tourism demand is effectively outstripping the decarbonization of tourism-related technology. We project that, due to its high carbon intensity and continuing growth, tourism will constitute a growing part of the world's greenhouse gas emissions.

  14. Adsorption of 14CO2 by ceramic with the composition YBa2Cu3Ox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Os'kina, T.E.; Soldatov, E.A.; Tret'yakov, Yu.D.; Kravchuk, A.I.; Eremina, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    The isotherms for 14 CO 2 absorption by a yttrium barium cuprate ceramic were determined as functions of stoichiometry, density, and carbon dioxide and water vapor tensions at room temperature. An empirical equation was found that related material absorption capacity to these factors over the parameter range investigated. The most significant factors and the effect of the interaction between carbon dioxide and water were identified. Data on absorption kinetics were used to compute the diffusion coefficient 14 CO 2 in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.45 , which equaled (1.87 ± 0.71)·10 -11 cm 2 /sec. The diffusion coefficient for water in this system was shown to be two orders of magnitude greater. This paper gives data on thermal decarbonization of the ceramic

  15. The increasing role of the visible hand in European electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, Dominique

    2013-05-01

    In this article, the author discusses the fact that the ambitious objective of de-carbonation of electric power systems is in increasing tension with the objective of a deeper power market liberalisation in the European Union. This can be noticed in the case of renewable energies which are promoted through purchase tariffs or through mandatory green certificates. Thus, risks are carried by operators, whereas it was not the case in the previous public service monopoly situation. The author describes market and regulation failures which result in a discouragement of investments in renewable energies and in low carbon technologies. Then, he presents three types of tools which combine public coordination and long term arrangements. In the next part, adopting an institutional prospective approach, he examines how new institutional means will have to complement the long term coordination of the market when this coordination is progressively faded by a large scale deployment of electric power produced from renewable energy sources and low carbon technologies

  16. Chapter 2. The University as a Living Laboratory for Climate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew St. Clair

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The story of the University of California’s institutional goal of de-carbonization by 2025, already years in the making, was a key feature of a systemwide Summit on carbon neutrality and climate mitigation in the Fall of 2015. This report, commissioned by the Summit, represents a unique multi-campus, interdisciplinary collaboration, an attempt by one university system to harness its diverse intellectual resources to address the crisis of global climate disruption. This chapter puts the Bending the Curve report into the context of the University of California’s (UC carbon neutrality and sustainability initiatives and offers one example of how a large organization can become a “living laboratory”— a research, teaching and learning, and innovation testbed—for climate solutions.

  17. An Active Role of Citizens on the Energy Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrlec, D.

    2016-01-01

    In order to fulfil climate and energy goals that EU has set for the period until 2030 and also after 2050, an engagement of the entire society is necessary. The energy sector is entering a transition towards a so called 4D model: decarbonization, decentralisation, distribution and democratisation. Citizens' engagement and responsibility in this transition requires active consumption management, energy generation and application of energy efficiency measures. To be competitive on the energy market, various forms of collective citizen collaborations are needed and to encourage people to participate in those, they have to be further educated so that the energy sector transition can succeed. The expected road transportation electrification posts further challenges on the energy sector. Horizontal connection of more EU policies, climate-energy, circular economy, digital agenda shows that a holistic approach is needed for the transition into a new, resource and energy more efficient, society.(author).

  18. A novel CO2 sequestration system for environmentally producing hydrogen from fossil-fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eucker IV, W.

    2007-01-01

    Aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbers are currently used to capture carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from industrial flue gases in various fossil-fuel based energy production systems. MEA is a highly volatile, corrosive, physiologically toxic, and foul-smelling chemical that requires replacement after 1000 operational hours. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), a novel class of materials with negligible vapor pressures and potentiality as benign solvents, may be the ideal replacement for MEA. Ab initio computational modeling was used to investigate the molecular interactions of ILs with CO 2 . The energetic and thermodynamic parameters of the RTILs as CO 2 solvents are on par with MEA. As viable competitors to the present CO 2 separation technology, RTILs may economize the fossil-fuel decarbonization process with the ultimate aim of realizing a green hydrogen economy

  19. Natural gas position in the energy sector of the 21. century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltier, Th.

    2000-01-01

    Natural gas with its abundant reserves, largely distributed all around the world, and with its low environmental impacts, should assert its position since the beginning of the 21. century. However, the fundamentals of our world are changing more and more rapidly and some short term events can modify this long term optimistic vision of natural gas development. This was the topic debated during a round table of the WOC 9 working committee of the CMG 2000 worldwide gas congress: the long term future of natural gas industry, the population need for a sustainable development, the potentialities of gas resources, the need for large scale interconnected energy networks, the new technologies favourable to the development of natural gas uses, the progressive 'decarbonization' of energy sources, the global warming and the role of R and D, the risks that could threat natural gas development. (J.S.)

  20. Status and potential of bio-methane fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This document first indicates and describes the various bio-methane production processes which can be implemented on a short term (use of organic wastes or effluents), on a medium term (from energetic crops) and on a longer term (gasification). It discusses and assesses the potential production of bio-methane fuel from different sources and processes. It describes the steps of the production of bio-methane fuel from biogas, with notably biogas refinement to produce bio-methane through three processes (de-carbonation, desulfurization, dehydration). Cost productions are assessed. Expected technology advances are evoked. Finally, the authors outline the contribution of bio-methane in the limitation of greenhouse gas emissions in the transport sector

  1. Nuclear power unnecessary for climate protection. There are more cost-efficient alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemfert, Claudia; Oei, Pao-Yu [DIW Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Energy, Transportation, Environment; Burandt, Thorsten; Hainsch, Karlo [TU Berlin (Germany); Loeffler, Konstantin [TU Berlin (Germany); DIW Berlin (Germany); Hirschhausen, Christian von [DIW Berlin (Germany). International Infrastructure Policy and Industrial Organization

    2017-07-01

    The world needs to continue working to protect the climate - this is generally undisputed. However, there is no agreement on which technologies should be used to decarbonize the energy sector. Many international scenarios still assume a relevant role for nuclear power in the future. However, a study by the German Institute for Economic Research shows that the Paris climate protection target - limiting global warming to below two degrees - can be achieved inexpensively without nuclear power. The results of a global energy system model indicate that no new nuclear power plants have to be built in order to meet the global climate target. It would be cheaper to use a combination of renewable energy and energy storage systems.

  2. Gas in the EU in the Policy of Climate Preservation and Fulfillment of EU Obligations in the Paris Climate Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosnjak, R.

    2016-01-01

    In the last forty years, European energy policies were characterized by efforts toward environment preservation: firstly by reducing harmful gas emissions and secondly by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The reduction of harmful gases epitomised a renaissance of natural gas consumption as the cleanest fossil fuel. While it was expected that natural gas will, at least in the transitional period up until a complete decarbonization of energy sector, replace consumption of carbon and other fossil fuels with a higher greenhouse gas emission, because of the global economy crisis and because of the change between the ratio of fuel and electrical energy prices, those expectations haven't reached their full potential. This material will present an impact of the climate preservation policies on the expected gas consumption and the possibilities of supplying the European Union with gas in the future.(author).

  3. The South is acting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atiq Rahman, A.

    1997-01-01

    Global scientists and the exper community are calling for a 20 per cent cut from 1990 levels of greenhouse-gas emissions by 2010. But, in reality, levels have increased by more than 12 per cent over the five years since the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change was agreed in Rio. The debate seems to be increasingly shifting - and is sometimes manipulated - from scientific concerns and ecological imperatives to uncertainty about economics and the costs of taking actions. The enormous ecological cost of inaction has often been kept out of these calculations. So has the fact that many new jobs would be created from opportunities - such as the expansion of solar energy - arising from a de-carbonized economy

  4. Progress in thermal comfort research over the last twenty years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dear, R. J. de; Akimoto, T.; Arens, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change and the urgency of decarbonizing the built environment are driving technological innovation in the way we deliver thermal comfort to occupants. These changes, in turn, seem to be setting the directions for contemporary thermal comfort research. This article presents a literature...... review of major changes, developments, and trends in the field of thermal comfort research over the last 20 years. One of the main paradigm shift was the fundamental conceptual reorientation that has taken place in thermal comfort thinking over the last 20 years; a shift away from the physically based...... developed, driven by the continuous challenge to model thermal comfort at the same anatomical resolution and to combine these localized signals into a coherent, global thermal perception. Finally, the demand for ever increasing building energy efficiency is pushing technological innovation in the way we...

  5. Acting efficiently on climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appert, Olivier; Moncomble, Jean-Eudes

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is a major issue. A survey of the utility companies that account for 80% of the world's electric power was released during the 20. climate conference in Lima as part of the World Energy Council' Global Electricity Initiative. It has concluded that all these utilities see climate change as being real and declare that policies for adapting to it are as important as policies for limiting it. Nonetheless, 97% of these utilities think that consumers will refuse to pay more for decarbonized electricity. This is the core problem in the fight against climate change: all agree that the issue is urgent, some agree about what should be done, but none wants to pay

  6. A focus on the ANCRE general meeting of June 12, 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittoun, Jacques; Alazard, Nathalie; Devezeaux, Jean-Guy; Fabre, Francoise; Genet, Roger; Michel, Laurent; Matlosz, Michael; Boissier, Fabrice; Bernard, Herve

    2015-01-01

    This document gathers Power Point presentations presented during the ANCRE (National Alliance of Coordination of Research for Energy) general assembly. In the first one, after some recalls about the ANCRE, the author presents the context, an assessment and achievements, international actions and partnerships, some return on experience, and perspectives. The second one presents the financing, missions, activities and action plan of the ANR, the French National Research Agency. The third one reports the ADEME's commitment, activities, strategy, research and development activities, investment programme in the energy and ecologic transition. The fourth contribution presents the missions and objectives, governance, programmes of the EERA (European Energy Research Alliance). The last one describes the progress of 'decarbonization wedges' project

  7. The nuclear option in front of climate change. Associated risks, limitations and inhibition to alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marignac, Yves; Besnard, Manon

    2015-10-01

    Within the context of struggle against climate change, the reduction of fossil energy consumption and of the associated carbon dioxide production is considered as the main lever of reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, and nuclear energy is then a matter of debate as a massively available de-carbonated energy but presenting some unacceptable risks. In this synthesis, the authors first propose an overview of risks which cannot be separated from the use of nuclear energy: proliferation as a major, persistent and often ignored threat, a re-assessed and increasing risk of accident, and an accumulation of wastes, materials and sites. In a second part, they show that it has a limited efficiency on emission reduction: indirect but non-null CO 2 emissions, influence of the energy mix, marginal contribution to emission management, declining energetic and climatic role, limited field of action. In the third part, the authors state that nuclear energy could be an inhibitor to the most performing solutions

  8. CEA 2009 annual report; CEA rapport annuel 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    After an indication of several key figures about the activity of the CEA (Centre d'Etudes Atomiques) and its relationship with the academic as well as the industrial field, in France and worldwide, this 2009 annual report presents its various research programs in the field of defence and of global security: basic research (nuclear weapons and propulsion, struggle against proliferation and terrorism) and applied research (nuclear deterrence, national and international security). Then, it presents the programs in the field of de-carbonated energy: basic research (in material science and in life sciences) and applied research (fission energy, fusion energy, new energy technologies). A last group of research programs deals with information and health technologies and concerns life and material sciences, micro- and nano-technologies, software technologies. Interaction with other research institutions and bodies is also evoked. A brief scientific assessment is proposed. Finally, the different structures building the CEA are presented

  9. Beyond Solar Fuels: Renewable Energy-Driven Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzafame, Paola; Abate, Salvatare; Ampelli, Claudio; Genovese, Chiara; Passalacqua, Rosalba; Centi, Gabriele; Perathoner, Siglinda

    2017-11-23

    The future feasibility of decarbonized industrial chemical production based on the substitution of fossil feedstocks (FFs) with renewable energy (RE) sources is discussed. Indeed, the use of FFs as an energy source has the greatest impact on the greenhouse gas emissions of chemical production. This future scenario is indicated as "solar-driven" or "RE-driven" chemistry. Its possible implementation requires to go beyond the concept of solar fuels, in particular to address two key aspects: i) the use of RE-driven processes for the production of base raw materials, such as olefins, methanol, and ammonia, and ii) the development of novel RE-driven routes that simultaneously realize process and energy intensification, particularly in the direction of a significant reduction of the number of the process steps. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Nuclear remains an economic and ecologic asset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The author herein outlines the several benefits of nuclear energy and nuclear industry for France. He first outlines that France possesses 97 per cent of de-carbonated electricity thanks to nuclear energy (77 pc) and renewable energies (20 pc, mainly hydraulic), and that renewable energies must be developed in the building and transport sectors to be able to get rid of the environmentally and financially costly fossil energies. He outlines that reactor maintenance and the nuclear fuel cycle industry are fields of technological leadership for the French nuclear industry which is, after motor industry and aircraft industry, the third industrial sector in France. He indicates that nuclear electricity is to remain the most competitive one, and that nuclear energy and renewable energies must not be opposed to it but considered as complementary in the struggle against climate change, i.e. to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to get rid of the prevalence of fossil energies

  11. Exploring the Potential Business Case for Synergies Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Jaquelin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zinaman, Owen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Logan, Jeffrey [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Arent, Doug [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Natural gas and renewable energy each contribute to economic growth, energy independence, and carbon mitigation, sometimes independently and sometimes collectively. Often, natural gas and renewables are considered competitors in markets, such as those for bulk electricity. This paper attempts to address the question, 'Given near- and long-term needs for abundant, cleaner energy sources and decarbonization, how can more compelling business models be created so that these two domestic forms of energy work in greater concert?' This paper explores revenue opportunities that emerge from systems-level perspectives in 'bulk energy' (large-scale electricity and natural gas production, transmission, and trade) and four 'distribution edge' subsectors: industrial, residential, commercial, and transportation end uses.

  12. A regenerative elastocaloric heat pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt; Eriksen, Dan; Dallolio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    A large fraction of global energy use is for refrigeration and air-conditioning, which could be decarbonized if efficient renewable energy technologies could be found. Vapour-compression technology remains the most widely used system to move heat up the temperature scale after more than 100 years...... a regenerative elastocaloric heat pump that exhibits a temperature span of 15.3 K on the water side with a corresponding specific heating power up to 800 W kg−1 and maximum COP (coefficient-of-performance) values of up to 7. The efficiency and specific heating power of this device exceeds those of other devices...... based on caloric effects. These results open up the possibility of using the elastocaloric effect in various cooling and heat-pumping applications....

  13. U.S. Natural Gas System Methane Emissions: State of Knowledge from LCAs, Inventories, and Atmospheric Measurements (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, G.

    2014-04-01

    Natural gas (NG) is a potential "bridge fuel" during transition to a decarbonized energy system: It emits less carbon dioxide during combustion than other fossil fuels and can be used in many industries. However, because of the high global warming potential of methane (CH4, the major component of NG), climate benefits from NG use depend on system leakage rates. Some recent estimates of leakage have challenged the benefits of switching from coal to NG, a large near-term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction opportunity. During this presentation, Garvin will review evidence from multiple perspectives - life cycle assessments (LCAs), inventories and measurements - about NG leakage in the US. Particular attention will be paid to a recent article in Science magazine which reviewed over 20 years of published measurements to better understand what we know about total methane emissions and those from the oil and gas sectors. Scientific and policy implications of the state of knowledge will be discussed.

  14. The timing of biological carbon sequestration and carbon abatement in the energy sector under optimal strategies against climate risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitz, V.; Hourcade, J.Ch.; Ciais, Ph.

    2005-10-01

    This paper addresses the timing of the use of biological carbon sequestration and its capacity to alleviate the carbon constraint on the energy sector. We constructed a stochastic optimal control model balancing the costs of fossil emission abatement, the opportunity costs of lands allocated to afforestation, and the costs of uncertain climate damages. We show that a minor part of the sequestration potential should start immediately as a 'brake', slowing down both the rate of growth of concentrations and the rate of abatement in the energy sector. thus increasing the option value of the emission trajectories. But, most of the potential is put in reserve to be used as a 'safety valve' after the resolution of uncertainty, if a higher and faster decarbonization is required: sequestration cuts off the peaks of costs of fossil abatement and postpones the pivoting of the energy system by up to two decades. (authors)

  15. Electric vehicles and India's low carbon passenger transport: A long-term co-benefits assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhar, Subash; Pathak, Minal; Shukla, Priyadarshi

    2017-01-01

    Electric vehicles have attracted the attention of India's policy makers as clean technology alternatives due to their multiple advantages like higher efficiency and lower air pollution in short to medium term and reduced CO2 emissions as electricity gets decarbonized in the long-run under low......) are related to sourcing of raw materials for batteries and battery reprocessing and disposal. The findings show that: i) in the reference scenario, the EVs 2-wheelers will achieve a significant share by 2050. Electric 4-wheelers though would have a small share even in 2050; ii) EV push policies though lead...... to significant diffusion of electric 2- wheelers in India by 2030. These policies enhance diffusion of electric 4-wheelers only if financial incentives are sustained in the long-term, iii) the application of global carbon price on the Indian economy in the 2° C stabilization scenario increases competitiveness...

  16. Optimal processing conditions for a dolomite cracker for cracking of tar from gasification of biomass fuels. Optimale procesbetingelser for en dolomitkrakker til krakning af tjaere fra forgasning af biobraendsler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fjellerup, J.

    1989-08-15

    Gasification of fuels derived from biomass is of interest in connection with combined cycle systems. During gasification tar compounds can be produced, and these can block further stages of the process. As gas turbines are very sensitive to tar compounds it is necessary to remove the tar completely from the gas. The most effective method appears to be catalytic cracking and it is suggested that dolomite is an effective and cheap catalysator. Based on a survey of relevant literature, the aim was to discover optimal conditions for the process of dolomite cracking. It is concluded that it is important to decarbonate the dolomite before use, that dolomite is not suitable for use in fluidized beds as it can become eroded and is subsequently very quickly blown out, and that it is important to hold the temperature at a level of ca. 800 deg. C. Conditions for fixed bed cracking both with and without steam are also desderibed. (AB) 15 refs.

  17. Deposit and scale prevention methods in thermal sea water desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, K.R.

    1977-01-01

    Introductory remarks deal with the 'fouling factor' and its influence on the overall heat transfer coefficient of msf evaporators. The composition of the matter dissolved in sea water and the thermal and chemical properties lead to formation of alkaline scale or even hard, sulphate scale on the heat exchanger tube walls and can hamper plant operation and economics seriously. Among the scale prevention methods are 1) pH control by acid dosing (decarbonation), 2) 'threshold treatment' by dosing of inhibitors of different kind, 3) mechanical cleaning by sponge rubber balls guided through the heat exchanger tubes, in general combined with methods no. 1 or 2, and 4) application of a scale crystals germ slurry (seeding). Mention is made of several other scale prevention proposals. The problems encountered with marine life (suspension, deposit, growth) in desalination plants are touched. (orig.) [de

  18. Information report submitted by the Commission for European Affairs on the directive proposition by the European Parliament and the Council on the deployment on alternative fuels infrastructure- Nr 1126

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savary, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    As clean fuels are facing three main obstacles (high vehicle cost, low consumer receptivity, and lack of charge ports and refuelling stations), this report discusses the context and the implications of a European directive which aims establishing constraining objectives for infrastructures dedicated to clean fuels as electricity, hydrogen and natural gas. The author presents this directive in relationship with the objective of development of low-carbon or de-carbonated transports through the use of electricity, hydrogen, bio-fuels, liquefied or compressed natural gas (LNG and CNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and in relationship with European connector harmonisation. He outlines the interest of the European initiative with respect to the French position: being ahead with the existence of a French plan for the development of the electric vehicle, France must not fall behind on the issue of connector system. Two strategies are proposed in conclusion

  19. N. Sarkosy calls for a global development of civil nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    The President Sarkosy called to develop the nuclear power and ask to international financing institutions to resolutely engage in financing nuclear energy power. Mister Yukiya Amano, chief of IAEA declared that:' nuclear power can make a major contribution to economic development and help mitigate climate change'. Mister Manuel Barroso, president of European Commission, said: 'We are confident that the new economy of the European Union will involve the decarbonization of our electricity supply and has announced an initiative to raise European safety standards and international safety and make them legally binding throughout the world '. Mister Daniel Poneman, U.S. Assistant Secretary of Energy said that the United States is working domestically to reinvigorate the nuclear industry and ensure that alongside all countries can have access to nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, in a manner that minimizes proliferation. (N.C.)

  20. What to do? Does science have a role?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasselmann, K.

    2009-01-01

    A new generation of integrated assessment models of climate change policies is needed to capture the basic dynamical processes that govern the required transformation of the present fossil-based global economic system to a sustainable de-carbonized system. After an overview of the abatement technologies and policy instruments that are already available and able today to achieve the transformation, three examples are presented of typical actor-based, system-dynamical models that are able to simulate some of the key dynamics of the transition processes. In addition to developing a new hierarchy of integrated assessment models, scientists need also to better educate the public and policy makers on the wide-reaching implications of the inherent inertia of the climate system. (author)

  1. ANCRE scenarios for energy transition. Report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alazard-Toux, Nathalie; Des Courtils, Nicolas; Hache, Emmanuel; Liegeard, Alban; Lorne, Daphne; Duplan, Jean-Luc; Kalaydjian, Francois; Heintze, Eric; Tilagone, Richard; Henriot, Stephane; Forti, Laurent; Barthelemy, Pascal; Merlen, Elisabeth; Criqui, Patrick; Mathy, Sandrine; Menanteau, Philippe; Devezeaux De Lavergne, Jean-Guy; Avril, Sophie; Cavata, Christian; Le Duigou, Alain; Le Net, Elisabeth; Marcucci-Demeure, Jeanne; Safa, Henri; Topper, Benjamin; Touboul, Francoise; Carre, Franck; Joly, Jean-Pierre; Charbit, Francoise; Mermilliod, Nicole; Mermilliod, Nicole; Le Net, Elisabeth; Teissier, Olivier; Charrue, Herve; Colonna, Paul; Legrand, Jack; Vidal, Olivier; Goffe, Bruno; Mueller, Alex; Flamant, Gilles; Allard, Francis; Most, Jean-Michel; Matarasso, Pierre; Brault, Pascal; Lemoine, Lionel; Achard, Jean-Luc; Uster, Guillaume; Delsey, Jean; Lucchese, Paul; Tadrist, Lounes; Hadjsaid, Nouredine

    2014-01-01

    This report first gives an overview of the energy system by presenting the determining factors of energy demand and of CO 2 emissions per sector (housing and office building, transport, industry, agriculture, forestry and biomass), by analysing energy systems and CO 2 emissions (energy sources, energy vectors, networks and storage, energy and CO 2 assessment for France), and by describing the guidelines of the scenarios proposed by ANCRE. The three main scenarios are characterized by a stronger sobriety, an electricity-based de-carbonation (with a variant based on nuclear and renewable energies), and diversified vectors. They are notably compared to a trend-based reference scenario. Results are discussed in terms of energy consumption (primary and final energy, consumption by the different sectors), of energy production and CO 2 emissions. Scenarios are assessed in terms of economic, environmental and societal, political and strategic criteria. Some consequences for research topics and funding are identified

  2. Carbon dioxide may become a resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugneland, Petter; Areklett, Ivar

    2002-01-01

    The greenhouse gas CO 2 may become a product that the oil companies would pay for. In an extensive international resource project methods for CO 2 capture, transport and storage are being investigated. CO 2 capture means that carbon dioxide that is formed in the combustion of fossil fuels is separated out from the process, either from the fuel (decarbonization), or from the flue gas, and then stored. The article briefly describes the international joint project CO 2 Capture Project (CCP), in which eight oil companies are participating. If one can find a method for injecting CO 2 into oil reservoirs that leads to increased oil production, then part of the extra cost of removing the carbon dioxide from flue gas may be repaid

  3. Cooling tower make-up water processing for nuclear power plants: a comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, O; Flunkert, F; Hampel, G; Schiffers, A [Rheinisch-Westfaelisches Elektrizitaetswerk A.G., Essen (Germany, F.R.)

    1977-01-01

    In water-cooled nuclear power plants, 1 to 2% of the total investment costs go to cooling tower make-up water processing. The crude water taken from rivers or stationary waters for cooling must be sufficiently purified regarding its content of solids, carbonate hardness and corrosive components so as to guarantee an operation free of disturbances. At the same time, the processing methods must be selected for operational-economic reasons in such a manner that waste water and waste problems are kept small regarding environmental protection. The various parameters described have a decisive influence on the processing methods of the crude water, individual processes (filtration, sedimentation, decarbonization) are described, circuit possibilities for cooling water systems are compared and the various processes are analyzed and compared with regard to profitableness and environmental compatability.

  4. Information report on greenhouse gas emission trading systems, in the name of the Sustainable Development and Land Management Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In its first part, this report explains the choice of trading systems due to the impossibility to define taxes on carbon emissions and to the influence of international negotiations. It also describes the operation of the European system with its three allocation phases (an experimental framework between 2005 and 2007, an actually constraining framework between 2008 and 2012, and a sustainable frame from 2013), and outlines the realistic character of emission reduction objective by 2020. It identifies and discusses the weaknesses of the European system, notably due to an insufficiently regulated market and to a partial taking into account of emission. The second part identifies ways to improve the system by extending it (including new sectors, taking some particular emissions into account, and valuing carbon sequestration), by preserving the competitiveness of European industries, and by aiming at the construction of a de-carbonated Europe

  5. Design and Macroeconomic Analysis of an 'Acceptable' Low-Carbon Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibas, Ruben; Mathy, Sandrine; Fink, Meike

    2016-01-01

    Two observations motivate our research: the lack of acceptability of climate policies and the deficit of credibility, legitimacy and ownership of low-carbon scenarios. Both constitute a barrier to decision-making and slow the energy transition. To overcome these limitations, we have scripted a scenario using a co-development method involving 30 stakeholders from civil society and the private and public sectors. Stakeholders contributed significantly to the methodology by requesting data transparency, sensitivity tests and the clarification of economic and financial impacts. We incorporated the set of policies regarded as acceptable into the Imaclim-R model. The resulting scenario cuts CO_2 emissions by 68 % in 2050, an outcome close to the 75 % reduction target. The measures are beneficial to employment and economic growth, except in the short term. These findings provide solid foundations to build acceptable decarbonization pathways

  6. Global Biofuels at the Crossroads: An Overview of Technical, Policy, and Investment Complexities in the Sustainability of Biofuel Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Araújo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels have the potential to alter the transport and agricultural sectors of decarbonizing societies. Yet, the sustainability of these fuels has been questioned in recent years in connection with food versus fuel trade-offs, carbon accounting, and land use. Recognizing the complicated playing field for current decision-makers, we examine the technical attributes, policy, and global investment activity for biofuels (primarily liquids. Differences in feedstock and fuel types are considered, in addition to policy approaches of major producer countries. Issues with recent, policy-driven trade developments are highlighted to emphasize how systemic complexities associated with sustainability must also be managed. We conclude with near-term areas to watch.

  7. Economic assessment of energetic scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandjean, Alain; Bureau, Dominique; Schubert, Katheline; Henriet, Fanny; Maggiar, Nicolas; Criqui, Patrick; Le Teno, Helene; Baumstark, Luc; Crassous, Renaud; Roques, Fabien

    2013-09-01

    This publication gathers contributions proposed by different members of the Economic Council for a Sustainable Development (CEDD) on the issue of energy transition, and more precisely on scenarios elaborated with respect to energy transition. A first set of contributions addresses models of energy transition (assessment of scenario costs to reach a factor 4; the issue of de-carbonation of energy consumption; study of ELECsim, a tool to highlight costs of scenarios of evolution of the electric power system). The second part addresses arbitrations and choice assessment (the importance of social and economic impacts of scenarios; challenges related to the joint definition of the discount rate and of the evolution of carbon value in time; the issue of assessment of the integration of renewable energies into the power system)

  8. Solar energy for buildings: clean energies utilisation and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omer, Abdeen M.

    2015-01-01

    The move towards a de-carbonized world, driven partly by climate science and partly by the business opportunities it offers, will need the promotion of environmentally friendly alternatives, if an acceptable stabilization level of atmospheric carbon dioxide is to be achieved. This requires the harnessing and use of natural resources that produce no air pollution or greenhouse gases and provides comfortable coexistence of human, livestock, and plants. This article presents a comprehensive review of energy sources, and the development of sustainable technologies to explore these energy sources. It also includes potential renewable energy technologies, efficient energy systems, energy savings techniques and other mitigation measures necessary to reduce climate changes. The article concludes with the technical status of the ground source heat pumps (GSHP) technologies. (full text)

  9. CO{sub 2} mitigation costs of large-scale bioenergy technologies in competitive electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, L [Mid-Sweden University, Ostersund (Sweden). Dept. of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Ecotechnology; Madlener, R [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland). CEPE

    2003-11-01

    In this study, we compare and contrast the impact of recent technological developments in large biomass-fired and natural-gas-fired cogeneration and condensing plants in terms of CO{sub 2} mitigation costs and under the conditions of a competitive electricity market. The CO{sub 2} mitigation cost indicates the minimum economic incentive required (e.g. in the form of a carbon tax) to equal the cost of a less carbon extensive system with the cost of a reference system. The results show that CO{sub 2} mitigation costs are lower for biomass systems than for natural gas systems with decarbonization. However, in liberalized energy markets and given the sociopolitical will to implement carbon extensive energy systems, market-based policy measures are still required to make biomass and decarbonization options competitive and thus help them to penetrate the market. This cost of cogeneration plants, however, depends on the evaluation method used. If we account for the limitation of heat sinks by expanding the reference entity to include both heat and power, as is typically recommended in life-cycle analysis, then the biomass-based gasification combined cycle (BIG/CC) technology turns out to be less expensive and to exhibit lower CO{sub 2} mitigation costs than biomass-fired steam turbine plants. However, a heat credit granted to cogeneration systems that is based on avoided cost of separate heat production, puts the steam turbine technology despite its lower system efficiency at an advantage. In contrast, when a crediting method based on avoided electricity production in natural gas fired condensing plants is employed, the BIG/CC technology turns out to be more cost competitive than the steam turbine technology for carbon tax levels beyond about $150/t C. Furthermore, steam turbine plants are able to compete with natural gas fired cogeneration plants at carbon tax levels higher than about $90/tC. (author)

  10. Decarbonisation of olefin processes using biomass pyrolysis oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifzadeh, M.; Wang, L.; Shah, N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Decarbonization of olefin processes using biomass pyrolysis oil was proposed. • The decarbonization is based on integrated catalytic processing of bio-oil. • The retrofitted process features significant economic and environmental advantages. - Abstract: An imperative step toward decarbonisation of current industrial processes is to substitute their petroleum-derived feedstocks with biomass and biomass-derived feedstocks. For decarbonisation of the petrochemical industry, integrated catalytic processing of biomass pyrolysis oil (also known as bio-oil) is an enabling technology. This is because, under certain conditions, the reaction products form a mixture consisting of olefins and aromatics, which are very similar to the products of naphtha hydro-cracking in the conventional olefin processes. These synergies suggest that the catalytic bio-oil upgrading reactors can be seamlessly integrated to the subsequent separation network with minimal retrofitting costs. In addition, the integrated catalytic processing provides a high degree of flexibility for optimization of different products in response to market fluctuations. With the aim of assessing the techno-economic viability of this pathway, five scenarios in which different fractions of bio-oil (water soluble/water insoluble) were processed with different degrees of hydrogenation were studied in the present research. The results showed that such a retrofit is not only economically viable, but also provides a high degree of flexibility to the process, and contributes to decarbonisation of olefin infrastructures. Up to 44% reductions in greenhouse gas emissions were observed in several scenarios. In addition, it was shown that hydrogen prices lower than 6 $/kg will result in bio-based chemicals which are cheaper than equivalent petrochemicals. Alternatively, for higher hydrogen prices, it is possible to reform the water insoluble phase of bio-oil and produce bio-based chemicals, cheaper than

  11. China's transportation energy consumption and CO2 emissions from a global perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Xiang; Chen, Wenying; Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Patel, Pralit L.; Yu, Sha; Kyle, G. Page

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing energy demand from China's transportation sector in the last two decades have raised concerns over national energy security, local air pollution, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, and there is broad consensus that China's transportation sector will continue to grow in the coming decades. This paper explores the future development of China's transportation sector in terms of service demands, final energy consumption, and CO 2 emissions, and their interactions with global climate policy. This study develops a detailed China transportation energy model that is nested in an integrated assessment model—Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM)—to evaluate the long-term energy consumption and CO 2 emissions of China's transportation sector from a global perspective. The analysis suggests that, without major policy intervention, future transportation energy consumption and CO 2 emissions will continue to rapidly increase and the transportation sector will remain heavily reliant on fossil fuels. Although carbon price policies may significantly reduce the sector's energy consumption and CO 2 emissions, the associated changes in service demands and modal split will be modest, particularly in the passenger transport sector. The analysis also suggests that it is more difficult to decarbonize the transportation sector than other sectors of the economy, primarily owing to its heavy reliance on petroleum products. -- Highlights: •Transport sector in China are analyzed from a global perspective. •Passenger transport turnover reduction and modal shifts is less sensitive to carbon price. •Bio-fuel, electricity and H 2 will play an important role for carbon mitigation in transport sector. •The transport sector is more difficult to decarbonize than other sectors

  12. Low CO2-emissions hybrid solar combined-cycle power system with methane membrane reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Na; Cai, Ruixian

    2013-01-01

    Based on the principle of cascade utilization of multiple energy resources, a gas-steam combined cycle power system integrated with solar thermo-chemical fuel conversion and CO 2 capture has been proposed and analyzed. The collected solar heat at 550 °C drives the endothermic methane reforming and is converted to the produced syngas chemical exergy, and then released as high-temperature thermal energy via combustion for power generation, achieving its high-efficiency heat-power conversion. The reforming reaction is integrated with a hydrogen separation membrane, which continuously withdraws hydrogen from the reaction zone and enables nearly full methane conversion. The CO 2 enriched gas being concentrated in the retentate zone is collected and processed with pre-combustion decarbonization. The system is thermodynamically simulated using the ASPEN PLUS code. The results show that with 91% CO 2 captured, the specific CO 2 emission is 25 g/kWh. An exergy efficiency of 58% and thermal efficiency of 51.6% can be obtained. A fossil fuel saving ratio of 31.2% is achievable with a solar thermal share of 28.2%, and the net solar-to-electricity efficiency based on the gross solar heat incident on the collector is about 36.4% compared with the same gas-steam combined cycle system with an equal CO 2 removal ratio obtained by post-combustion decarbonization. - Highlights: ► A solar-assisted hybrid combined cycle power system has been proposed and analyzed. ► The system integrates power generation with solar-driven reforming and CO 2 capture. ► solar heat upgrading and high-efficiency heat-to-power conversion are achieved. ► membrane reforming enables high CH 4 conversion and pre-combustion CO 2 capture. ► The system thermodynamic performances have been investigated and compared

  13. Optimizing long-term investments for a sustainable development of the ASEAN power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Matthias; Roger, Albert; Hamacher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The electricity consumption in the ASEAN (Association of East Asian Nations) region is one of the fastest growing in the world and will lead to a dramatic increase in greenhouse gas emissions in the next decades. A decarbonization of the region's electricity supply is thus a very important measure when taking action on global climate change. This paper defines cost-optimal pathways towards a sustainable power system in the region by employing linear optimization. The proposed model simultaneously optimizes the required capacities and the hourly operation of generation, transmission, and storage. The obtained results show that all different kinds of renewable sources will have to be utilized, while none of them should have a share of more than one third. The findings give reason for setting up an ASEAN power grid, as it enables the transportation of electricity from the best sites to load centers and leads to a balancing of the fluctuations from wind and solar generation. We suggest fostering a diversified extension of renewables and to elaborate on political and technical solutions that enable the build up an transnational supergrid. - Highlights: • Article presents an optimization model of the ASEAN power system with high temporal and spatial resolution. • Cost-optimal investment options for achieving a sustainable electricity system are explored. • All types of renewable energies have to be employed while none of them should provide more than one third of overall supply. • Large transcontinental transmission grids will be crucial for a cost-minimal decarbonization of the ASEAN electricity sector

  14. Magnesium and related low alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, J; Caillat, R; Darras, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    In the first part the authors examine the comparative corrosion of commercial magnesium, of a magnesium-zirconium alloy (0,4 per cent {<=} Zr {<=} 0,7 per cent) of a ternary magnesium-zinc-zirconium alloy (0,8 per cent {<=} Zn {<=} 1,2 per cent) and of english 'Magnox type' alloys, in dry carbon dioxide-free air, in damp carbon dioxide-free air, and in dry and damp carbon dioxide, at temperatures from 300 to 600 deg. C. In the second part the structural stability of these materials is studied after annealings, of 10 to 1000 hours at 300 to 450 deg. C. Variations in grain after these heat treatments and mechanical stretching properties at room temperature are presented. Finally various creep rate and life time diagrams are given for these materials, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 450 deg. C. (author) [French] Dans une premiere partie les auteurs etudient la corrosion comparee du magnesium commercial, d'un alliage magnesium-zirconium (0,4 pour cent {<=} Zr {<=} 0,7 pour cent), d'un alliage ternaire magnesium-zinc-zirconium (0,8 pour cent {<=} Zn {<=} 1,2 pour cent), et d'alliages anglais 'type Magnox', dans l'air sec decarbonate, l'air humide decarbonate, le gaz carbonique sec et humide a des temperatures de 300 a 600 deg. C. Dans une seconde partie, est etudiee la stabilite structurale de ces materiaux apres des recuits de 300 a 450 deg. C, et de 10 a 1000 heures. Sont presentees les variations, apres ces traitements thermiques, de la grosseur du grain, et des caracteristiques mecaniques de traction a la temperature ambiante. Enfin, quelques diagrammes de vitesse de fluage et de durees de vie sont presentes sur ces materiaux pour des temperatures variant entre 300 et 450 deg. C. (auteur)

  15. Sulfur degassing due to contact metamorphism during flood basalt eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallup, Christine; Edmonds, Marie; Turchyn, Alexandra V.

    2013-11-01

    We present a study aimed at quantifying the potential for generating sulfur-rich gas emissions from the devolatilization of sediments accompanying sill emplacement during flood basalt eruptions. The potential contribution of sulfur-rich gases from sediments might augment substantially the magma-derived sulfur gases and hence impact regional and global climate. We demonstrate, from a detailed outcrop-scale study, that sulfur and total organic carbon have been devolatilized from shales immediately surrounding a 3-m thick dolerite sill on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. Localized partial melting occurred within a few centimetres of the contact in the shale, generating melt-filled cracks. Pyrite decomposed on heating within 80 cm of the contact, generating sulfur-rich gases (a mixture of H2S and SO2) and pyrrhotite. The pyrrhotite shows 32S enrichment, due to loss of 34S-enriched SO2. Further decomposition and oxidation of pyrrhotite resulted in hematite and/or magnetite within a few cm of the contact. Iron sulfates were produced during retrogressive cooling and oxidation within 20 cm of the contact. Decarbonation of the sediments due to heating is also observed, particularly along the upper contact of the sill, where increasing δ13C is consistent with loss of methane gas. The geochemical and mineralogical features observed in the shales are consistent with a short-lived intrusion, emplaced in desulfurization, as well as decarbonation, of shales adjacent to an igneous intrusion. The liberated fluids, rich in sulfur and carbon, are likely to be focused along regions of low pore fluid pressure along the margins of the sill. The sulfur gases liberated from the sediments would have augmented the sulfur dioxide (and hydrogen sulfide) yield of the eruption substantially, had they reached the surface. This enhancement of the magmatic sulfur budget has important implications for the climate impact of large flood basalt eruptions that erupt through thick, volatile-rich sedimentary

  16. The effect of vacuum environment on creep rupture properties of Inconel 617 at 1000 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnami, Masateru; Imamura, Riuzo

    1981-01-01

    The creep rupture strength of nickel-base superalloy in weakly acidic gas at high temperature above 1000 deg C lowers remarkably as compared with that in the atmosphere, and this problem is one of the important subjects in connection with the research and development of high temperature heat exchangers for multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor system being developed in Japan. In the case of Inconel 617, abnormal decarbonization phenomenon occurs in weakly acidic gas, and this is regarded as the cause of lowering the creep strength. In this study, the effects of the decarbonization in weak vacuum at 1000 deg C and the oxidation of Inconel 617 on its crack occurrence and propagation were clarified experimentally with notched plate test pieces. The material used was Inconel 617 nickel-base superalloy made by Huntington Alloys Inc. in the U.S. The creep rupture experiment was carried out with a simple tension creep tester. At the nominal stress of 3.5 kg/mm 2 , the creep rupture time in 0.3 Torr was the shortest when the grain size was 78 μm, and the creep rupture time increased as the grain size became larger. The creep rupture time in 0.3 Torr decreased to a half of that in the atmosphere. In 0.3 Torr, cracks occurred early, and propagated fast as compared with in the atmosphere. This is because the local creep velocity at the bottom of notches and in front of creep cracks is fast owing to the lack of protective oxide film. (Kako, I.)

  17. Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles For High Efficiency Zero Emission Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. D. Rao; J. Francuz; H. Liao; A. Verma; G. S. Samuelsen

    2006-11-01

    Table 1 shows that the systems efficiency, coal (HHV) to power, is 35%. Table 2 summarizes the auxiliary power consumption within the plant. Thermoflex was used to simulate the power block and Aspen Plus the balance of plant. The overall block flow diagram is presented in Figure A1.3-1 and the key unit process flow diagrams are shown in subsequent figures. Stream data are given in Table A1.3-1. Equipment function specifications are provided in Tables A1.3-2 through 17. The overall plant scheme consists of a cryogenic air separation unit supplying 95% purity O{sub 2} to GE type high pressure (HP) total quench gasifiers. The raw gas after scrubbing is treated in a sour shift unit to react the CO with H{sub 2}O to form H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. The gas is further treated to remove Hg in a sulfided activated carbon bed. The syngas is desulfurized and decarbonized in a Selexol acid gas removal unit and the decarbonized syngas after humidification and preheat is fired in GE 7H type steam cooled gas turbines. Intermediate pressure (IP) N{sub 2} from the ASU is also supplied to the combustors of the gas turbines as additional diluent for NOx control. A portion of the air required by the ASU is extracted from the gas turbines. The plant consists of the following major process units: (1) Air Separation Unit (ASU); (2) Gasification Unit; (3) CO Shift/Low Temperature Gas Cooling (LTGC) Unit; (4) Acid Gas Removal Unit (AGR) Unit; (5) Fuel Gas Humidification Unit; (6) Carbon Dioxide Compression/Dehydration Unit; (7) Claus Sulfur Recovery/Tail Gas Treating Unit (SRU/TGTU); and (8) Power Block.

  18. Framing clean energy campaigns to promote civic engagement among parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, Nichole; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Hoyos, Lisa; Rauch, Molly

    2018-03-01

    Civic engagement is one important way citizens can influence the rate of decarbonization in the electricity sector. However, motivating engagement can be challenging even if people are affected and interested in participating. Here we employed a randomized controlled trial to assess the effect of clean energy campaigns emphasizing cost savings, health, climate, or health and climate, or no additional information at all (control) on civic engagement behaviors (signing a petition or making a phone call). We targeted parents as they have been shown to be powerful agents of political and business practice change in other contexts, and hence, could play an important role in the decarbonization of the electricity sector. In Study 1, we recruited n = 292 parents already engaged in climate advocacy; in Study 2, we recruited a representative sample of n = 1254 parents drawn from the general public. Both studies were conducted in Michigan, Florida, and California, as these states have sizable advocacy group membership, divergent energy profiles, and strategic importance to the climate movement. In both studies, we find the odds of taking action are reduced by over 90% when participants are asked to make a phone call and leave a voicemail message, versus signing an online petition. Among the parents already engaged in advocacy, we observe a ceiling effect regarding attitudes towards clean energy and find the cost campaign produces unintended consequences. Among our public sample, we find that participants who believe the campaign to be credible and comprehendible are more likely to take action than those who discredit the campaign or do not understand its message. Additionally, we find parents who have children under the age of 18 negatively adjust their attitudes towards fossil fuels after being presented with health information. Ultimately, we find that campaign messages can influence energy attitudes and parents are willing to take action on the topic if the

  19. Environmental and natural resource implications of sustainable urban infrastructure systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergesen, Joseph D.; Suh, Sangwon; Baynes, Timothy M.; Kaviti Musango, Josephine

    2017-12-01

    As cities grow, their environmental and natural resource footprints also tend to grow to keep up with the increasing demand on essential urban services such as passenger transportation, commercial space, and thermal comfort. The urban infrastructure systems, or socio-technical systems providing these services are the major conduits through which natural resources are consumed and environmental impacts are generated. This paper aims to gauge the potential reductions in environmental and resources footprints through urban transformation, including the deployment of resource-efficient socio-technical systems and strategic densification. Using hybrid life cycle assessment approach combined with scenarios, we analyzed the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water use, metal consumption and land use of selected socio-technical systems in 84 cities from the present to 2050. The socio-technical systems analyzed are: (1) bus rapid transit with electric buses, (2) green commercial buildings, and (3) district energy. We developed a baseline model for each city considering gross domestic product, population density, and climate conditions. Then, we overlaid three scenarios on top of the baseline model: (1) decarbonization of electricity, (2) aggressive deployment of resource-efficient socio-technical systems, and (3) strategic urban densification scenarios to each city and quantified their potentials in reducing the environmental and resource impacts of cities by 2050. The results show that, under the baseline scenario, the environmental and natural resource footprints of all 84 cities combined would increase 58%-116% by 2050. The resource-efficient scenario along with strategic densification, however, has the potential to curve down GHG emissions to 17% below the 2010 level in 2050. Such transformation can also limit the increase in all resource footprints to less than 23% relative to 2010. This analysis suggests that resource-efficient urban infrastructure and decarbonization of

  20. Pathways to Mexico’s climate change mitigation targets: A multi-model analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veysey, Jason; Octaviano, Claudia; Calvin, Katherine; Martinez, Sara Herreras; Kitous, Alban; McFarland, James; Zwaan, Bob van der

    2016-01-01

    Mexico’s climate policy sets ambitious national greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction targets—30% versus a business-as-usual baseline by 2020, 50% versus 2000 by 2050. However, these goals are at odds with recent energy and emission trends in the country. Both energy use and GHG emissions in Mexico have grown substantially over the last two decades. We investigate how Mexico might reverse current trends and reach its mitigation targets by exploring results from energy system and economic models involved in the CLIMACAP-LAMP project. To meet Mexico’s emission reduction targets, all modeling groups agree that decarbonization of electricity is needed, along with changes in the transport sector, either to more efficient vehicles or a combination of more efficient vehicles and lower carbon fuels. These measures reduce GHG emissions as well as emissions of other air pollutants. The models find different energy supply pathways, with some solutions based on renewable energy and others relying on biomass or fossil fuels with carbon capture and storage. The economy-wide costs of deep mitigation could range from 2% to 4% of GDP in 2030, and from 7% to 15% of GDP in 2050. Our results suggest that Mexico has some flexibility in designing deep mitigation strategies, and that technological options could allow Mexico to achieve its emission reduction targets, albeit at a cost to the country. - Highlights: • We explore paths to deep mitigation for Mexico (50% cut in GHG emissions by 2050). • We present results from six models and compare them with Mexican climate policy. • We find a range of potential paths and costs, implying options for policy makers. • An important commonality between the paths is a decarbonized electricity supply. • Estimated mitigation costs vary but are higher than official published estimates.

  1. Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traut, Elizabeth; Hendrickson, Chris; Klampfl, Erica; Liu, Yimin; Michalek, Jeremy J.

    2012-01-01

    Electrified vehicles can reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by shifting energy demand from gasoline to electricity. GHG reduction potential depends on vehicle design, adoption, driving and charging patterns, charging infrastructure, and electricity generation mix. We construct an optimization model to study these factors by determining optimal design of conventional vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and battery electric vehicles (BEVs) with optimal allocation of vehicle designs and dedicated workplace charging infrastructure in the fleet for minimum life cycle cost or GHG emissions over a range of scenarios. We focus on vehicles with similar body size and acceleration to a Toyota Prius under government 5-cycle driving conditions. We find that under the current US grid mix, PHEVs offer only small GHG emissions reductions compared to HEVs, and workplace charging is insignificant. With grid decarbonization, PHEVs and BEVs offer substantial GHG emissions reductions, and workplace charging provides additional benefits. HEVs are optimal or near-optimal for minimum cost in most scenarios. High gas prices and low vehicle and battery costs are the major drivers for PHEVs and BEVs to enter and dominate the cost-optimal fleet. Carbon prices have little effect. Cost and range restrictions limit penetration of BEVs. - Highlights: ► We pose an MINLP model to minimize cost and GHG emissions of electrified vehicles. ► We design PHEVs and BEVs and assign vehicles and charging infrastructure in US fleet. ► Under US grid mix, PEVs provide minor GHG reductions and work chargers do little. ► HEVs are robust; PEVs and work charging potential improve with a decarbonized grid. ► We quantify factors needed for PEVs to enter and dominate the optimal fleet.

  2. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; T. Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-07-01

    After rapid growth in economic development and energy demand over the last three decades, China has undertaken energy efficiency improvement efforts to reduce its energy intensity under the 11th Five Year Plan (FYP). Since becoming the world's largest annual CO{sub 2} emitter in 2007, China has set reduction targets for energy and carbon intensities and committed to meeting 15% of its total 2020 energy demand with non-fossil fuel. Despite having achieved important savings in 11th FYP efficiency programs, rising per capita income and the continued economic importance of trade will drive demand for transport activity and fuel use. At the same time, an increasingly 'electrified' economy will drive rapid power demand growth. Greater analysis is therefore needed to understand the underlying drivers, possible trajectories and mitigation potential in the growing industrial, transport and power sectors. This study uses scenario analysis to understand the likely trajectory of China's energy and carbon emissions to 2030 in light of the current and planned portfolio of programs, policies and technology development and ongoing urbanization and demographic trends. It evaluates the potential impacts of alternative transportation and power sector development using two key scenarios, Continued Improvement Scenario (CIS) and Accelerated Improvement Scenario (AIS). CIS represents the most likely path of growth based on continuation of current policies and meeting announced targets and goals, including meeting planned appliance efficiency standard revisions, fuel economy standards, and industrial targets and moderate phase-out of subcritical coal-fired generation with additional non-fossil generation. AIS represents a more aggressive trajectory of accelerated improvement in energy intensity and decarbonized power and transport sectors. A range of sensitivity analysis and power technology scenarios are tested to evaluate the impact of additional actions such as

  3. Global Energy-Economy-Environment (E3) Scenarios to 2050 and Beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrattenholzer, L.

    2005-01-01

    The Environmentally Compatible Energy Strategies (ECS) Program at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) develops policy-relevant global and world-regional energy perspectives. The basic premise of the ECS's research program is a global trend of d ecarbonization . Firstly, decarbonization includes a trend toward ever-greater efficiency, or ever less waste, in society's use of energy resources. Secondly, it includes a trend towards less carbon-intensive fossil fuels (e.g., from coal toward natural gas) and, further, to non-fossil fuels, especially renewable energy carriers. Technological change is generally regarded as one of the key drivers of sustained economic growth. Long-term energy scenarios developed at IIASA and elsewhere show that, depending on key assumptions on drivers such as population, economic growth and technological development, global energy development can be environmentally unsustainable. First, energy development might not lead to stabilizing greenhouse concentrations and might thus have significant negative impacts on the global climate. In addition, some, especially coal-intensive, scenarios might lead to levels of acid deposition at which significant damage to sensitive ecosystems is expected to occur in Europe and, even more so, in Asia. A continuation of the observed historical long-term trends of decarbonization, dematerialization, and energy efficiency improvements might therefore not be sufficient to achieve sustainable growth. Targeted technological development aiming at accelerating decarbonization, dematerialization, and/or efficiency improvement may be one of the most effective means for reconciling economic growth with global environmental objectives. This might require a step-up in investments in R and D and in the demonstration of technologies so as to stimulate both learning-by-searching and learning-by-doing. In this presentation, global E3 scenarios will be summarized in the following three groups: Non

  4. The Effects of Varying Crustal Carbonate Composition on Assimilation and CO2 Degassing at Arc Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, L. B.; Holmes, A. K.; Dasgupta, R.; Tumiati, S.

    2015-12-01

    Magma-crustal carbonate interaction and subsequent decarbonation can provide an additional source of CO2 release to the exogenic system superimposed on mantle-derived CO2. Carbonate assimilation at present day volcanoes is often modeled by limestone consumption experiments [1-4]. Eruptive products, however, do not clearly display the characteristic ultracalcic melt compositions produced during limestone-magma interaction [4]. Yet estimated CO2outflux [5] and composition of volcanics in many volcanic systems may allow ~3-17% limestone- or dolostone-assimilated melt contribution. Crystallization may retain ultracalcic melts in pyroxenite cumulates. To extend our completed study on limestone assimilation, here we explore the effect of varying composition from calcite to dolomite on chemical and thermal decarbonation efficiency of crustal carbonates. Piston cylinder experiments at 0.5 GPa and 900-1200 °C demonstrate that residual mineralogy during interaction with magma shifts from CaTs cpx and anorthite/scapolite in the presence of calcite to Di cpx and Fo-rich olivine with dolomite. Silica-undersaturated melts double in magnesium content, while maintaining high (>30 wt.%) CaO values. At high-T, partial thermal breakdown of dolomite into periclase and CO2 is minimal (<5%) suggesting that in the presence of magma, CO2 is primarily released due to assimilation. Assimilated melts at identical P-T conditions depict similarly high volatile contents (10-20 wt.% by EMPA deficit at 0.5 GPa, 1150 °C with hydrous basalt) with calcite or dolomite. Analysis of the coexisting fluid phase indicates the majority of water is dissolved in the melt, while CO2 released from the carbonate is preferentially partitioned into the vapor. This suggests that although assimilated melts have a higher CO2 solubility, most of the CO2can easily degas from the vapor phase at arc volcanoes, possibly more so at volcanic plumbing systems traversing dolomite [8]. [1]Conte et al 2009 EuJMin (21) 763

  5. EU Energy Market Development in Light of Fulfilling Obligations from the Paris Climate Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dizdarevic, N.

    2016-01-01

    In light of the Paris Climate Agreement, the Union has set an ambitious goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent below the 1990 level until year 2050. The climate and energy frame of the EU defines goals for 2030 that include at least 40 percent reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in comparison with the 1990 level, as well as achieving at least 27 percent share of RES in energy consumption for the entire Union and at least 27 percent improvement of energy efficiency. It is expected that the power sector will give a decisive contribution to decarbonization. It is estimated that, in order to fulfil such goals, the share of low-carbon technologies in energy mix will have to increase from the current 45 percent to 60 percent in 2020, through fulfilling the goal with the RES share, then to 75-80 percent in 2030 and eventually to almost 100 percent in 2050. The bulk of that share will be investments to RES with a variable production (wind and solar power plants; further on addressed as variable RES producers). For the fulfilment of said goals, a structural change of electricity generation sector will be necessary to achieve a significant level of decarbonization in 2030, which will have significant repercussions on the electricity market considering the participation of variable RES producers on the wholesale market. Therefore, it is necessary to start with the transition as soon as possible and to send signals about the vitality of lowering investments into high-carbon technologies to a minimum in the next two decades. In that context, this paper is dedicated to the restructure of electricity generation sector and the reform of electricity market with the purpose of achieving high share of variable RES producers on the wholesale market. After the introduction, the base setting of the Paris Agreement will be pointed out and its influence on the EU electricity market will be examined. After that, the achieved level of electricity market development in the

  6. Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, Michael [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Groissbock, Markus [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cardoso, Goncalo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Muller, Andreas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lai, Judy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Governor Brown’s research priorities include an additional 6.5 GW of combined heat and power (CHP) by 2030. As of 2009, roughly 0.25 GW of small natural gas and biogas fired CHP is documented by the Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) database. The SGIP is set to expire, and the anticipated grid de-carbonization based on the development of 20 GW of renewable energy will influence the CHP adoption. Thus, an integrated optimization approach for this analysis was chosen that allows optimizing the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) such as photovoltaics (PV), CHP, storage technologies, etc. in the California commercial sector from the building owners’ perspective. To solve this DER adoption problem the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and used extensively to address the problem of optimally investing and scheduling DER under multiple settings, has been used. The application of CHP at large industrial sites is well known, and much of its potential is already being realized. Conversely, commercial sector CHP, especially those above 50 to 100 kW peak electricity load, is widely overlooked. In order to analyze the role of DER in CO2 reduction, 147 representative sites in different climate zones were selected from the California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS). About 8000 individual optimization runs, with different assumptions for the electric tariffs, natural gas costs, marginal grid CO2 emissions, and nitrogen oxide treatment costs, SGIP, fuel cell lifetime, fuel cell efficiency, PV installation costs, and payback periods for investments have been performed. The most optimistic CHP potential contribution in this sector in 2020 will be 2.7 GW. However, this result requires a SGIP in 2020, 46% average electric efficiency for fuel cells, a payback period for investments of 10 years, and a CO2 focused approach of the building owners. In

  7. Designing planning and reporting for good governance of the EU's post-2020 climate and energy goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartor, Oliver; Colombier, Michel; Spencer, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The European Union has agreed climate and energy goals for 2030. These objectives include, among others: reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40%; increase the share of renewable energy to at least 27% of total final energy consumption; improve the efficiency of energy consumption by at least 27-30%. But while the targets are clear, what remains less clear is how the EU is to ensure that they are collectively achieved by its 28 Member States and how the actions Member States take to meet their goals by 2030 can be made consistent with Europe's more ambitious, climate objectives to reduce emissions by 80-95% by 2050. This paper puts forward a proposal for a new European Energy Union 'governance mechanism' that attempts to answer these questions, taking into account the priorities of different Member States in the current European context. The EU's 2020 Climate and Energy Package could assign legally-binding national targets to Member States for different aspects of their energy systems, such as for renewable energy, because these targets, although ambitious, remained at the margins of the national energy mix. But as the low-carbon transition makes progress, the changes required to national energy mixes become more fundamental and structural, and national competencies become increasingly important in defining the strategic direction of the energy sector and decarbonization strategies. However, it is also crucial that Member State's nationally determined strategies are consistent with the EU's overarching climate and energy goals, both to 2030 and 2050, and that their progress on key areas of EU relevance and competency can be effectively monitored. Doing this will require a more nuanced approach to governing EU climate policy than the two extremes that are currently presented in the debate: either a) a set of top-down, legally binding targets for all aspects of Energy Union, or b) a harmonised but ultimately very weak planning and reporting instrument with no

  8. Solar energy in the context of energy use, energy transportation and energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, David J C

    2013-08-13

    Taking the UK as a case study, this paper describes current energy use and a range of sustainable energy options for the future, including solar power and other renewables. I focus on the area involved in collecting, converting and delivering sustainable energy, looking in particular detail at the potential role of solar power. Britain consumes energy at a rate of about 5000 watts per person, and its population density is about 250 people per square kilometre. If we multiply the per capita energy consumption by the population density, then we obtain the average primary energy consumption per unit area, which for the UK is 1.25 watts per square metre. This areal power density is uncomfortably similar to the average power density that could be supplied by many renewables: the gravitational potential energy of rainfall in the Scottish highlands has a raw power per unit area of roughly 0.24 watts per square metre; energy crops in Europe deliver about 0.5 watts per square metre; wind farms deliver roughly 2.5 watts per square metre; solar photovoltaic farms in Bavaria, Germany, and Vermont, USA, deliver 4 watts per square metre; in sunnier locations, solar photovoltaic farms can deliver 10 watts per square metre; concentrating solar power stations in deserts might deliver 20 watts per square metre. In a decarbonized world that is renewable-powered, the land area required to maintain today's British energy consumption would have to be similar to the area of Britain. Several other high-density, high-consuming countries are in the same boat as Britain, and many other countries are rushing to join us. Decarbonizing such countries will only be possible through some combination of the following options: the embracing of country-sized renewable power-generation facilities; large-scale energy imports from country-sized renewable facilities in other countries; population reduction; radical efficiency improvements and lifestyle changes; and the growth of non-renewable low

  9. The heat capacity of a natural monticellite and phase equilibria in the system CaO-MgO-SiO2-CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Z.D.; Essene, E.J.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Metz, G.W.; Westrum, E.F.; Hemingway, B.S.; Valley, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The heat capacity of a natural monticellite (Ca1.00Mg.09Fe.91Mn.01Si0.99O3.99) measured between 9.6 and 343 K using intermittent-heating, adiabatic calorimetry yields Cp0(298) and S2980 of 123.64 ?? 0.18 and 109.44 ?? 0.16 J ?? mol-1 K-1 respectively. Extrapolation of this entropy value to end-member monticellite results in an S0298 = 108.1 ?? 0.2 J ?? mol-1 K-1. High-temperature heat-capacity data were measured between 340-1000 K with a differential scanning calorimeter. The high-temperature data were combined with the 290-350 K adiabatic values, extrapolated to 1700 K, and integrated to yield the following entropy equation for end-member monticellite (298-1700 K): ST0(J ?? mol-1 K-1) = S2980 + 164.79 In T + 15.337 ?? 10-3 T + 22.791 ?? 105 T-2 - 968.94. Phase equilibria in the CaO-MgO-SiO2 system were calculated from 973 to 1673 K and 0 to 12 kbar with these new data combined with existing data for akermanite (Ak), diopside (Di), forsterite (Fo), merwinite (Me) and wollastonite (Wo). The location of the calculated reactions involving the phases Mo and Fo is affected by their mutual solid solution. A best fit of the thermodynamically generated curves to all experiments is made when the S0298 of Me is 250.2 J ?? mol-1 K-1 less than the measured value of 253.2 J ?? mol-1 K-1. A best fit to the reversals for the solid-solid and decarbonation reactions in the CaO-MgO-SiO2-CO2 system was obtained with the ??G0298 (kJ ?? mole-1) for the phases Ak(-3667), Di(-3025), Fo(-2051), Me(-4317) and Mo(-2133). The two invariant points - Wo and -Fo for the solid-solid reactions are located at 1008 ?? 5 K and 6.3 ?? 0.1 kbar, and 1361 ?? 10 K and 10.2 ?? 0.2 kbar respectively. The location of the thermodynamically generated curves is in excellent agreement with most experimental data on decarbonation equilibria involving these phases. ?? 1986.

  10. Mineralogy and origin of surficial uranium deposits hosted in travertine and calcrete from central Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, H.N.; Salameh, E.M.; Clark, I.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Surficial uranium deposits are hosted in thick travertine and calcrete. • Tyuyamunite–strelkinite are the major components in central Jordan. • The leached water was enriched in redox sensitive U and V. • Deposition is related to unusual highly alkaline circulating water. - Abstract: Secondary uranium encrustations are hosted in thick travertine and calcrete deposits of Pleistocene–Recent age in central Jordan. The central Jordan varicolored marble and travertine are equivalent to the active metamorphic area in Maqarin, north Jordan. More than 100 samples were collected from the outcrops of the varicolored marble, travertine, calcrete, and the yellow uranium encrustations. The secondary yellow encrustations are mainly composed of uranyl vanadate complexes. Tyuyamunite Ca(UO 2 ) 2 V 2 5+ O 8 ·3(H 2 O)–strelkinite Na 2 (UO 2 ) 2 V 2 O 8 ·6(H 2 O) solid solution series are the major components and their composition reflects changes in the Ca/Na ratio in solution. Potentially, new vanadium free calcium uranate phases (restricted to the varicolored marble) were identified with CaO:UO 3 ratios different from the known mineral vorlanite (CaU 6+ )O 4 . Carbon and oxygen isotope data from calcite in the varicolored marble are characterized by Rayleigh-type enrichment in light isotopes associated with release of 13 C and 18 O enriched CO 2 by high temperature decarbonation during combustion of the bituminous marl. Stable isotope results from uranium hosted travertine and calcrete varieties exhibit a wide range in isotopic values, between decarbonated and normal sedimentary carbonate rocks. The depleted δ 13 C and δ 18 O values in the travertine are related to the kinetic reaction of atmospheric CO 2 with hyperalkaline Ca(OH) 2 water. The gradual enrichment of δ 13 C and δ 18 O values in the calcrete towards equilibrium with the surrounding environment is related to continuous evaporation during seasonal dry periods. Uranium mineralization in

  11. The public perceptions of carbon dioxide capture and storage in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shackley, S.; Gough, C.; McLachlan, C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presented the results of a study investigating public perceptions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage (CCS) technologies. The study was comprised of citizen panels in which members of the public met over a 5-week period to receive instruction on CCS technologies. A further survey of 212 individuals was also conducted. Results of the citizen panel study showed that while there was a general acceptance of CCS, the technology was not enthusiastically supported by the majority of panel members. The acceptance of CCS was dependent on an awareness of the anticipated severity of climate change; the extent of the CO 2 reductions required; and the perception of CCS as part of a wider sustainable energy strategy. An integrated approach to decarbonization was preferred by both survey respondents and citizen panel participants. The citizen panels supposed further CCS research activities as part of a broad program to reduce emissions. Both panel and survey respondents were concerned that CCS represented a means of treating the symptoms of climate change rather than the causes. A minority of opponents rejected CCS by suggesting that it was wrong to inject the earth with industrial waste by-products. A small minority were in favour of CCS as an effective means of rapidly reducing the risks of global climate change. Results from the survey showed the majority of individuals who were not informed about CCS were not strongly opinionated about its implementation. However, only 13 per cent of respondents supported the use of CCS. Half of the survey respondents developed a more positive attitude towards CCS after they had been provided with information on the use of CCS as a means of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CCS was preferred to nuclear power or increased energy prices to reduce demand. Concern was expressed that CCS would divert research and development resources and attention away from renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. It was

  12. The Path Forward from Paris: the Challenge for Tropical Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, C.

    2016-12-01

    The pledges of emissions reductions put forth at the COP21 in Paris fall short of ensuring the desired guardrail of 2 C warming, let alone the more stringent, but necessary, goal of 1.5 C warming if we want to minimize the increasing risks of climate change over both the short term of decades and the long term of centuries. Decarbonization of the global economy is mandatory, which implies a gargantuan challenge of decarbonizing the energy system. Given the likelihood of decreasing strength of the natural sinks in the global oceans and land biota as warming progresses, it may be necessary to reach nearly zero net emissions by midcentury and even negative net emissions by the end of the century. In addition to massive and rapid implementation of renewable energy systems, desirable mitigation trajectories involve large-scale reforestation and ecosystem restoration and also bioenergy capture and storage systems (BECCS). Tropical countries can play an important role to meet both goals as long as they are able to implement sustainable agriculture at the large scale that is nearly carbon-neutral and resilient to unavoidable climate change. And reaching sustainability in the agricultural sector—remembering that agricultural direct emissions and indirect emissions due to deforestation account for almost one quarter of global emissions—is under the constraint to meet food security for all, that is, food production has to grow 70% by midcentury, with concomitant reduction of waste in the food chain. I will take the example of mitigation options for Brazil—a large tropical country with per capita emissions of about 7.5 ton CO2-eq—to illustrate sustainable development trajectories of reaching carbon neutrality by midcentury. That will imply developing a modern, more productive carbon-neutral agriculture within the next two decades, reducing tropical deforestation to nearly zero within a decade, restoring ecosystems and increasing renewable energy use to over 80% of its

  13. Getting out of the perfect storm: towards coherence between electricity market policies and EU climate and energy goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedinger, Andreas; Spencer, Thomas; Sartor, Oliver; Mathieu, Mathilde; Colombier, Michel; Ribera, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the EU power market has been hit by a 'perfect storm', combining multiple interacting factors: revision of demand expectations, growth of both conventional and renewable capacities, a drastic shift from gas to coal power plants and a lack of visibility on future evolutions. Some of these factors are related to the climate agenda, but mostly, they show the inherent and structural difficulties of the current design of the EU power market itself. Within the debate on EU's 2030 framework for climate and energy policies, this situation raises the question: how can the EU's policies address current difficulties of the power market while simultaneously achieving the structural targets of security, affordability and sustainability of supply in the context of decarbonization? Hitherto, the two agendas of internal electricity market policy and climate policy have been largely considered in isolation or even as conflicting agendas. However, a secure low-carbon transition will require significant policy intervention in the electricity sector, including in electricity market design. And, vice versa, an ambitious and coherent package on climate and energy policy can help restore an efficient and competitive electricity market, by strengthening investment signals, improving coordination among member states and providing a sound market framework to improve the technical and economic integration of new low-carbon technologies. Against this background, future challenges for the European policy framework should be considered along two lines: the balance between market forces and regulatory intervention, and the interplay between national and regional approaches. A reinforced EU ETS will have an important role to play, but will not be sufficient on its own to guide both dispatching and investment decisions. Complementary policies will be needed, to provide visibility on the retirement of old carbon intensive plants as well as enhanced coordination

  14. Agora Energiewende (2017). The Energiewende in a nutshell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pescia, Dimitri [Agora Energiewende, Berlin (Germany); Ichiyanagi, Emi [Renewable Energy Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Energy systems worldwide are in a state of transformation. With the adoption of the Paris Climate Agreement in December 2015, the foundation for international climate policy has fundamentally changed. The decision to limit global warming to be well below to 2 C can only be achieved if energy systems are completely decarbonized over the long term. Accordingly, the European Union has adopted ambitious goals to move toward a low-carbon economy and fully integrated energy markets. Furthermore, the G7 countries reaffirmed in May 2016 in Ise-Shima, Japan that they would strive to fully decarbonize their power systems, and China has become the world's largest renewable energy market. Germany is playing a prominent role in this transformation process, having adopted one of the most ambitious energy transition programs of all industrial nations - the Energiewende. With this long-term strategy - started more than a decade ago and invigorated after the Fukushima nuclear accident - the country has decided to fundamentally transform its power sector by phasing out nuclear and coal in favor of renewable energy. Wind and solar energy form the backbone of the German Energiewende. Yet around the world, wind and solar are abundantly available and generation technology costs are rapidly decreasing. In 2016, renewable energy projects set low-cost records in countries around the globe, from Chile and Morocco to the United Arab Emirates and Denmark. Thus, many of the developments we currently see in Germany, and in other vanguard countries, are highly relevant for the rest of the world. While the German approach is not unique worldwide, the speed and scope of the Energiewende are exceptional, and have attracted wide attention and debate in Europe and abroad. Against this backdrop, many lessons can surely be learned from the German experience with adopting renewables, both positive and negative. It is therefore crucial to provide an accurate and impartial overview of the progress of

  15. Carbon dioxide generation and drawdown during active orogenesis of siliciclastic rocks in the Southern Alps, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Catriona D.; Wright, Sarah L.; Craw, Dave; James, Rachael H.; Alt, Jeffrey C.; Cox, Simon C.; Pitcairn, Iain K.; Teagle, Damon A. H.

    2018-01-01

    Collisional mountain building influences the global carbon cycle through release of CO2 liberated by metamorphic reactions and promoting mechanical erosion that in turn increases chemical weathering and drawdown of atmospheric CO2. The Southern Alps is a carbonate-poor, siliciclastic mountain belt associated with the active Australian Pacific plate boundary. On-going, rapid tectonic uplift, metamorphism and hydrothermal activity are mobilising carbon. Here we use carbon isotope measurements of hot spring fluids and gases, metamorphic host rocks, and carbonate veins to establish a metamorphic carbon budget. We identify three major sources for CO2 within the Southern Alps: (1) the oxidation of graphite; (2) consumption of calcite by metamorphic reactions at the greenschist-amphibolite facies boundary, and (3) the dissolution of groundmass and vein-hosted calcite. There is only a minor component of mantle CO2 arising on the Alpine Fault. Hot springs have molar HCO3-/Ca2+ ∼9, which is substantially higher than produced by the dissolution of calcite indicating that deeper metamorphic processes must dominate. The total CO2 flux to the near surface environment in the high uplift region of the Southern Alps is estimated to be ∼6.4 × 108 mol/yr. Approximately 87% of this CO2 is sourced from coupled graphite oxidation (25%) and disseminated calcite decarbonation (62%) reactions during prograde metamorphism. Dissolution of calcite and mantle-derived CO2 contribute ∼10% and ∼3% respectively. In carbonate-rich orogens CO2 production is dominated by metamorphic decarbonation of limestones. The CO2 flux to the atmosphere from degassing of hot springs in the Southern Alps is 1.9 to 3.2 × 108 mol/yr, which is 30-50% of the flux to the near surface environment. By contrast, the drawdown of CO2 through surficial chemical weathering ranges between 2.7 and 20 × 109 mol/yr, at least an order of magnitude greater than the CO2 flux to the atmosphere from this orogenic belt

  16. The state of nuclear power two years after Fukushima – The ASEAN perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian, Victor; Chou, S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper provides a holistic analysis on the importance of nuclear power. • This paper examines the drivers for nuclear power post-Fukushima. • This paper studies the responses towards “safer nuclear”. • Nuclear remains a reliable and clean base-load technology. • Pronouncing the demise of nuclear power will not be sustainable. - Abstract: Given the need to rein in the rise in the global average temperature, decarbonizing the electricity sector, which accounts for nearly 50% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, is crucial. The suitability of nuclear power as a base-load technology and its relatively negligible GHG emissions raised expectations of a nuclear renaissance, until the Fukushima disaster brought discussions about nuclear power’s potential to a standstill. However, completely ruling out nuclear may not be sustainable owing to the realities of rising energy demand, climate change considerations, and the need for reliable base-load supply technology, especially in the case of fast growing economies in the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN). The Fukushima disaster was a wake-up call for both governments and the nuclear industry. Led by the International Atomic Energy Agency, the more advanced economies conducted stringent reviews of safety standards and emergency response procedures in the event of a catastrophe. Meanwhile the industry responded with strong commitments towards “Fukushima proof” designs, alongside other advancements towards “safer” fission power. In the ASEAN context, we argue in this paper that in addition to the economic advantage, nuclear power can help address the twin objectives of energy security and mitigating climate change effects. In ASEAN, there is still a strong momentum towards nuclear power development due to strategic considerations. In this paper, we reviewed in a holistic approach the various factors influencing decision making on nuclear power. Using ASEAN as a case

  17. Three essays on decision-making in energy policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Zachary Ann

    This dissertation examines three issues surrounding decision-making in energy policy. Over the past decade, technological advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have allowed the economical extraction of natural gas and petroleum from shale basins. Thus far, natural gas has been produced from shale at a commercial scale only in certain American States and Canadian Provinces, though potential shale plays exist elsewhere in North America and the world. Whether, how, and to what extent SGD diffuses to new shale basins and jurisdictions will depend on several questions about energy policy. The first chapter examines the potential for SGD in the European Union. Among EU institutions, the European Parliament has been the strongest proponent for regulation of SGD, preferring a balance between environmental protection and opportunities for economic development, energy security, and climate mitigation. Analysis of roll call voting on SGD in the Seventh European Parliament shows that ideological preferences are the primary explanation of voting behavior, followed by national interests in decarbonization. Prospects for further regulatory action are discussed. ? The second chapter takes a closer look at the potential of shale gas to facilitate decarbonization in the electricity sector. Proponents of SGD have claimed that high carbon fossil fuels can be immediately phased out and replaced in the short term by power plants that burn cheap, abundant natural gas, which emits half the greenhouse gasses over a well-to-wire life cycle. A value of information analysis examines the conditions under which this may be so and quantifies how valuable it would be to have perfect information about uncertain parameters in a cost function characterizing the global electricity sector. The third chapter is describes a new tool of policy analysis, the Indiana Scalable Energy-Economy Model (IN-SEEM). State and local governments have played an increasing role in energy and climate

  18. Techno-economic assessment of the need for bulk energy storage in low-carbon electricity systems with a focus on compressed air storage (CAES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei Mohamadabadi, Hossein

    Increasing electrification of the economy while decarbonizing the electricity supply is among the most effective strategies for cutting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in order to abate climate change. This thesis offers insights into the role of bulk energy storage (BES) systems to cut GHG emissions from the electricity sector. Wind and solar energies can supply large volumes of low-carbon electricity. Nevertheless, large penetration of these resources poses serious reliability concerns to the grid, mainly because of their intermittency. This thesis evaluates the performance of BES systems - especially compressed air energy storage (CAES) technology - for integration of wind energy from engineering and economic aspects. Analytical thermodynamic analysis of Distributed CAES (D-CAES) and Adiabatic CAES (A-CAES) suggest high roundtrip storage efficiencies ( 80% and 70%) compared to conventional CAES ( 50%). Using hydrogen to fuel CAES plants - instead of natural gas - yields a low overall efficiency ( 35%), despite its negligible GHG emissions. The techno-economic study of D-CAES shows that exporting compression heat to low-temperature loads (e.g. space heating) can enhance both the economic and emissions performance of compressed air storage plants. A case study for Alberta, Canada reveals that the abatement cost of replacing a conventional CAES with D-CAES plant practicing electricity arbitrage can be negative (-$40 per tCO2e, when the heat load is 50 km away from the air storage site). A green-field simulation finds that reducing the capital cost of BES - even drastically below current levels - does not substantially impact the cost of low-carbon electricity. At a 70% reduction in the GHG emissions intensity of the grid, gas turbines remain three times more cost-efficient in managing the wind variability compared to BES (in the best case and with a 15-minute resolution). Wind and solar thus, do not need to wait for availability of cheap BES systems to cost

  19. Differences between silica and limestone concretes that may affect their interaction with corium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journeau, C.; Haquet, J. F.; Piluso, P.; Bonnet, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Recent Molten Core Concrete Interaction tests performed at Argonne National Laboratory and at CEA Cadarache have shown that, whereas the ablation of limestone-rich concretes is almost isotropic, the ablation of silica-rich concretes is much faster towards the sides than towards the bottom of the cavity. The following differences exists between limestone-rich and silica-rich concretes: limestone concretes liberate about twice as much gas, at a given ablation rate than siliceous concretes (more than 50% more at constant heat flux) and this can affect pool hydraulics and crust stability: limestone concrete has a higher liquidus temperature than siliceous concrete and molten limestone concrete has a larger diffusion coefficient and can more easily dissolve a corium crust than siliceous melt; limestone aggregates are destroyed by de-carbonation at around 1000 K while silica aggregates melt only above 2000 K, so that floating silica aggregates can form cold spots increasing corium solidification near the interface; de-carbonation of limestone leads to a significant shrinkage of concrete melt volume compared to the cold solid that hampers the mechanical stability of overlying crusts; the chemical composition of molten mortar (sand + cement) and concrete (sand + gravel + cement) is close for limestone-rich concretes while it is different for siliceous concretes, so that the melt composition may vary significantly in case of non-simultaneous melting of the siliceous concrete constituents; molten silicates have a large viscosity, so that transport properties are different for the two types of concretes. The small range of plant concrete compositions that have been considered for MCCI experiments has not yet been found sufficient to determine which of the above-mentioned differences is paramount to explain the observed difference in ablation patterns. Separate Effect Tests using specially-designed 'artificial concretes' and prototypic corium would provide the necessary

  20. Fixing the climate throughout market finance? On price and value in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espagne, Etienne; Hourcade, Jean-Charles; Perrissin Fabert, Baptiste

    2015-01-01

    The financial and environmental crisis are usually handled in different academic, expertise and public decision networks. This separation has become untenable in the age of the Anthropocene. In fact, no ambitious climate agreement can be achieved without first finding an answer to the question of how to finance the transition towards a de-carbonized society. In this text, we further develop the reasons for which these two fields should be considered as a single unit. To this end, we go back to the fundamental difference between the price of carbon and the social value of carbon. The belief that the two can be equated through simple market mechanisms has been a failure. An external force is necessary to reduce the difference between the two. In the case of climate change, it takes the form of the IPCC's results and the political commitment to keep the temperature increase below 2 deg. C compared to its pre-industrial levels. New forms of climate policies emerge from this analysis, which now incorporate all financial actors toward this goal

  1. Confronting the climate change challenge: discussing the role of rural India under cumulative emission budget approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaechele, Harald; Amjath-Babu, T.S.; Kutter, Thomas; Specht, Kathrin; Nautiyal, Sunil; Müller, Klaus; Raju, K.V.

    2011-01-01

    Current global climate policy architecture does not aim at stabilizing the greenhouse gases concentration in the atmosphere that may achieve the proclaimed 2 °C guard rail. An alternative approach that targets on limiting the global cumulative emission to accomplish such an outcome is put forward by German Advisory Board of Global Change (WBGU). This research work further elaborates the approach and its flexibility instrument i.e. carbon trading. As the approach visualises sharing of the carbon budget (750Gt CO 2 ) equally to every human being (2.7 t CO 2 per capita), India is the country with largest tradable surplus reflecting its low emission per capita and large population. The research work further analyzes the emission profile of rural India and the significance of its future emission pathways within the proposed framework. It also shows how low carbon development in India can assist in cost effective decarbonization of industrialized countries and mitigation of climate change, given a global climate treaty based on the WBGU approach.

  2. The Implications of Deep Mitigation Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, K. V.

    2016-12-01

    The 21st Conference of Parties to the UNFCCC agreement called for limiting climate change to "well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C." A climate target of 1.5°C places a stringent constraint on allowable emissions over the twenty-first century. Roegli et al. (2015) set that constraint at 200-415 GtCO2 between 2011 and 2100 for a likely chance of staying below 1.5°C in 2100. Limiting emissions to these levels requires that global emissions peak and decline over the coming decades, with net negative global emissions by mid-century. This level of decarbonization requires dramatic shifts in the energy and agricultural sectors, and comes at significant economic costs. This talk explores the effect of mitigating climate change to 1.5°C on the economy, energy system, and terrestrial system. We quantify the required deployment of various low carbon technologies, as well as the amount of existing capital that is abandoned in an effort to limit emissions. We show the shifts required in the terrestrial system, including its contribution to carbon sequestration through afforestation and bioenergy. Additionally, we show the implications of deep mitigation pathways on energy, food, and carbon prices. We contrast these results with a reference, no climate policy, world and a 2°C.

  3. Experimental investigation of the stability of Fe-rich carbonates in the lower mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulard, E.; Menguy, N.; Auzende, A.; Benzerara, K.; Bureau, H.; Antonangeli, D.; Corgne, A.; Morard, G.; Siebert, J.; Perrillat, J.; Guyot, F. J.; Fiquet, G.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonates are the main C-bearing minerals that are transported deep in the Earth's mantle via subduction of the oceanic lithosphere [1]. The fate of carbonates at mantle conditions plays a key role in the deep carbon cycle. Decarbonation, melting or reduction of carbonates will affect the extent and the way carbon is recycled into the deep Earth. To clarify the fate of carbonates in the deep mantle, high-pressure high-temperature experiments were carried out up to 105 GPa and 2850 K on oxide assemblages of (Mg,Fe)O + CO2. The presence of Fe(II) in starting materials induces redox reactions from which Fe(II) is oxidized and a part of the carbon is reduced. This leads to an assemblage of magnetite, diamonds, and carbonates or, pressure depending, their newly discovered Fe(III)-bearing high-pressure polymorphs based on a silicate-like chemistry with tetrahedrally coordinated carbon [2]. Our results show the possibility for carbon to be recycled in the lowermost mantle and provide evidence of a possible coexistence of reduced and oxidized carbon at lower mantle conditions. [1] Sleep, N. H., and K. Zahnle (2001) J. Geophys. Res.-Planets 106(E1), 1373-1399. [2] Boulard et al. (2011) PNAS, 108, 5184-5187.

  4. American’s Energy Future: An Analysis of the Proposed Energy Policy Plans in Presidential Election

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsun Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As the leader of the largest economy, President of the United States has substantive influence on addressing climate change problems. However, a presidential election is often dominated by issues other than energy problems. This paper focuses on the 2016 presidential election, and examines the energy plans proposed by the leading Democrat and Republican candidates. Our data from the Iowa caucus survey in January 2016 suggests that voters were more concerned about terrorism and economic issues than environmental issues. We then compare the Democratic and Republican candidate’s view of America’s energy future, and evaluate their proposed renewable energy targets. We find that the view on renewable energy is polarized between Democratic and Republican candidates, while candidates from both parties agree on the need for energy efficiency. Results from our ordinal least squares regression models suggests that Democratic candidates have moderate to ambitious goals for developing solar and other renewables. The Republican candidates favor fossil fuels and they choose not to provide any specific target for developing renewable energy. In addition, this trend of party polarization has grown more significant when compared with the past three presidential elections. Our observation suggests that energy policies need to be discussed more often regarding the diversification and decarbonization of the nation’s energy system.

  5. Structural evolution and electrical properties of BaTiO{sub 3} doped with Gd{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Lara, Juan Pablo; Perez Labra, Miguel; Barrientos Hernandez, Francisco Raul, E-mail: miguelabra@hotmail.com [Autonomous University of Hidalgo (Mexico); Romero Serrano, Jose Antonio; Hernandez Ramirez, Aurelio [Metallurgy and Materials Department, ESIQIE-IPN, UPALM, Zacatenco (Mexico); Avila Davila, Erika Osiris [Mechanical Engineering Department, Technological Institute of Pachuca, Hidalgo (Mexico); Thangarasu, Pandiyan [Facultad de Quimica, UNAM, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2017-03-15

    BaTiO{sub 3} doped with Gd{sup 3+} (Ba{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x/4}O{sub 3}) was synthesized using the solid-state reaction method with x = 0.001, 0.003, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25, 0.30, and 0.35 Gd{sup 3+} (wt. %). The powders were decarbonated at 900 °C and sintered at 1400 °C for 8 hours. The tetragonality of the synthesized Gd{sup 3+}-doped BaTiO{sub 3} particles was analyzed. XRD patterns and Raman spectra revealed that the crystal phase of the obtained particles was predominately tetragonal BaTiO{sub 3}; the intensity of the Raman bands at 205 cm{sup -1}, 265 cm{sup -1}, and 304 cm{sup -1} decreased when Gd'3{sup +} was increased. A secondary phase (Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}) was found when the Gd{sup 3+} content was higher than 0.15 wt. %. The capacitance of the sintering pellets was measured at 1 kHz; these values were used to calculate the relative permittivity, the maximum permittivity values were recorded for the samples with x = 0.001, 0.005, and 0.1. (author)

  6. Sodium environment effects to structural materials for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Masayoshi; Fujimura, Tadato; Kondo, Tatsuo; Okabayashi, Kunio; Matsumoto, Keishi.

    1976-03-01

    Among the material technology for liquid metal-cooling fast breeder reactors, the characteristic points are high temperature, liquid sodium as a heat medium, and high energy-high density neutron energy spectra, accordingly the secular change of materials due to these factors must be taken into the design. The project of material tests in sodium was started from the metallographical studies on corrosion and mass transfer phenomena in sodium environment, and was evolved to the tests and studies on short time strength, creep strength, fatigue strength, and embrittlement in sodium environment. Concerning the corrosion and mass transfer tests, low purity and medium purity material testing loops were employed, and the test of immersion in sodium was carried out. Domestically produced austenitic stainless steel and Cr-Mo steel were tested, and the measurement of weight change, surface inspection, and the observation of cross sectional structure were carried out before and after the immersion. The decrease of thickness due to the leaching of surface metal and the lowering of strength due to the change of composition or structure come into question only in case of very thin walled stainless tubes, and the lowering of heat transfer is negligible. Cr-Mo steel also showed good corrosion resistance in sodium, but the effect of decarbonization on the strength needs some investigation in the production specifications. (Kako, I.)

  7. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions for climate stabilization: framing regional options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabisi, Laura Schmitt; Reich, Peter B; Johnson, Kris A; Kapuscinski, Anne R; Su, Sangwon H; Wilson, Elizabeth J

    2009-03-15

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has stated that stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations will require reduction of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by as much as 80% by 2050. Subnational efforts to cut emissions will inform policy development nationally and globally. We projected GHG mitigation strategies for Minnesota, which has adopted a strategic goal of 80% emissions reduction by 2050. A portfolio of conservation strategies, including electricity conservation, increased vehicle fleet fuel efficiency, and reduced vehicle miles traveled, is likely the most cost-effective option for Minnesota and could reduce emissions by 18% below 2005 levels. An 80% GHG reduction would require complete decarbonization of the electricity and transportation sectors, combined with carbon capture and sequestration at power plants, or deep cuts in other relatively more intransigent GHG-emitting sectors. In order to achieve ambitious GHG reduction goals, policymakers should promote aggressive conservation efforts, which would probably have negative net costs, while phasing in alternative fuels to replace coal and motor gasoline over the long-term.

  8. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions for climate stabilization: framing regional options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laura Schmitt Olabisi; Peter B. Reich; Kris A. Johnson; Anne R. Kapuscinski; Sangwon Suh; Elizabeth J. Wilson [University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN (United States). Ecosystem Science and Sustainability Initiative

    2009-03-15

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has stated that stabilizing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations will require reduction of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by as much as 80% by 2050. Subnational efforts to cut emissions will inform policy development nationally and globally. We projected GHG mitigation strategies for Minnesota, which has adopted a strategic goal of 80% emissions reduction by 2050. A portfolio of conservation strategies, including electricity conservation, increased vehicle fleet fuel efficiency, and reduced vehicle miles traveled, is likely the most cost-effective option for Minnesota and could reduce emissions by 18% below 2005 levels. An 80% GHG reduction would require complete decarbonization of the electricity and transportation sectors, combined with carbon capture and sequestration at power plants, or deep cuts in other relatively more intransigent GHG-emitting sectors. In order to achieve ambitious GHG reduction goals, policymakers should promote aggressive conservation efforts, which would probably have negative net costs, while phasing in alternative fuels to replace coal and motor gasoline over the long-term. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Promoting Decentralized Sustainable Energy Systems in Different Supply Scenarios: The Role of Autarky Aspiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecker, Franz; Hahnel, Ulf J. J.; Spada, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The development of decentralized renewable energy systems is of crucial importance for the decarbonization of energy generation worldwide. Purchase decisions regarding innovative energy systems depend to some extent on consumers’ perception of the systems’ degree of autarky. We assumed that, in addition to the energetic perspective, consumers associate other non-energetic facets such as independence, autonomy, self-sufficiency, or control with the concept of autarky. These psychological facets of autarky were expected to contribute to purchase decisions. In Study 1, participants (N = 168) evaluated three future energy supply scenarios. The scenarios varied regarding their range of autarky (household/neighborhood/small town), but the individually realized degree of energetic autarky did not vary. Participants reported a higher willingness to pay in connection with a higher perceived psychological autarky for the Household Scenario. Study 1’s findings were confirmed by Study 2, in which qualitative interviews (N = 13) also revealed that participants favored the Household Scenario on several points. These evaluations were driven by the anticipated psychological facets of autarky that is the subjective perception of being independent, autonomous, self-sufficient, energy secure, and of control. To promote an adoption of renewable energy systems, these psychological autarky facets need to be addressed. Enabling the people to self-determine, control, and secure their energy provision even in complex organizational settings in such a manner is likely to increase their acceptance and therefore foster the required social transition as a whole.

  10. A regenerative elastocaloric heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tušek, Jaka; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Eriksen, Dan; Dall'Olio, Stefano; Tušek, Janez; Pryds, Nini

    2016-10-01

    A large fraction of global energy use is for refrigeration and air-conditioning, which could be decarbonized if efficient renewable energy technologies could be found. Vapour-compression technology remains the most widely used system to move heat up the temperature scale after more than 100 years; however, caloric-based technologies (those using the magnetocaloric, electrocaloric, barocaloric or elastocaloric effect) have recently shown a significant potential as alternatives to replace this technology due to high efficiency and the use of green solid-state refrigerants. Here, we report a regenerative elastocaloric heat pump that exhibits a temperature span of 15.3 K on the water side with a corresponding specific heating power up to 800 W kg-1 and maximum COP (coefficient-of-performance) values of up to 7. The efficiency and specific heating power of this device exceeds those of other devices based on caloric effects. These results open up the possibility of using the elastocaloric effect in various cooling and heat-pumping applications.

  11. Calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reactivity in a packed bed reactor of a chemical heat pump for high-temperature gas reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yukitaka; Yamada, Mitsuteru; Kanie, Toshihiro; Yoshizawa, Yoshio

    2001-01-01

    The thermal performance of a chemical heat pump that uses a calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reaction system was discussed as a heat storage system for utilizing heat output from high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). Calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reactivity for the heat pump was measured using a packed bed reactor containing 1.0 kg of reactant. The reactor was capable of storing heat at 900 deg. C by decarbonation of calcium carbonate and generating up to 997 deg. C by carbonation of calcium oxide. The amount of stored heat in the reactor was 800-900 kJ kg -1 . The output temperature of the reactor could be controlled by regulating the carbonation pressure. The thermal storage performance of the reactor was superior to that of conventional sensible heat storage systems. A heat pump using this CaO/CO 2 reactor is expected to contribute to thermal load leveling and to realize highly efficient utilization of HTGR output due to the high heat storage density and high-quality temperature output of the heat pump

  12. Effect of Calcium Oxide Microstructure on the Diffusion of Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes Ramos, João Pedro; Stora, T

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxide (CaO) powder targets have been successfully used at CERN-ISOLDE to produce neutron deficient exotic argon and carbon isotopes under proton irradiation at high temperatures (>1000°C). These targets outperform the other related targets for the production of the same beams. However, they presented either slow release rates (yields) from the beginning or a rapid decrease over time. This problem was believed to come from the target microstructure degradation, justifying the material investigation. In order to do so, the synthesis, reactivity in ambient air and sintering kinetics of CaO were studied, through surface area determination by N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction for crystalline phase identification and crystallite size determination, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy to investigate the microstructure. The synthesis studies revealed that a nanometric material is obtained from the decarbonation of CaCO3 in vacuum at temperatures higher than 550°C, which is very reactive in air....

  13. Numerical simulation of thermal-hydraulic processes in the riser chamber of installation for clinker production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borsuk Grzegorz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinker burning process has a decisive influence on energy consumption and the cost of cement production. A new problem is to use the process of decarbonization of alternative fuels from waste. These issues are particularly important in the introduction of a two-stage combustion of fuel in a rotary kiln without the typical reactor-decarbonizator. This work presents results of numerical studies on thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the riser chamber, which will be designed to burn fuel in the system where combustion air is supplied separately from the clinker cooler. The mathematical model is based on a combination of two methods of motion description: Euler description for the gas phase and Lagrange description for particles. Heat transfer between particles of raw material and gas was added to the numerical calculations. The main aim of the research was finding the correct fractional distribution of particles. For assumed particle distribution on the first stage of work, authors noted that all particles were carried away by the upper outlet to the preheater tower, what is not corresponding to the results of experimental studies. The obtained results of calculations can be the basis for further optimization of the design and operating conditions in the riser chamber with the implementation of the system.

  14. Is Planetary-Scale High Tech Civilization Climatically Sustainable?: The Geophysics v Economics Paradigm War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffert, M.

    2012-12-01

    Climate/energy policy is gridlocked between (1) a geophysics perspective revealing long-term instabilities from continued energy consumption growth, of which the fossil fuel greenhouse an early symptom; and (2) short-term, fossil-fuel energized-rapid-economic-growth-driven policies likely adaptive for hunter-gatherers competing for scarce food, but climatically fatal to planetary-scale economies dependent on agriculture and "energy slaves." Incorporating social science into climate/energy policy formulation has focused on integrated assessment models (IAMs) exploring scenarios (parallel universes making different social choices) depicting the evolution of GDP, energy consumed, the energy technology mixture, land use, greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions, and radiative forcing). Representative concentration pathways (RCP) scenarios developed for the IPCC AR5 report imply 5-10 degree C warming from fossil fuel burning unless unprecedentedly fast decarbonization rates ~ 7 %/yr are implemented from 2020 to 2100. A massive transition to carbon neutrality by midcentury is needed to keep warming use continues growing at 2%/year, fossil-fuel-greenhouse level warming would be generated by heat rejecting in only 200-300 years underscoring that sustainability implies a steady state planetary economy (FIG.2). Evolutionary psychology and neuroeconomics are emergent disciplines that may illuminate the physical v social science paradigm conflict threatening human survivability.

  15. Targeted opportunities to address the climate-trade dilemma in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhu; Davis, Steven J.; Feng, Kuishuang; Hubacek, Klaus; Liang, Sai; Anadon, Laura Diaz; Chen, Bin; Liu, Jingru; Yan, Jinyue; Guan, Dabo

    2016-02-01

    International trade has become the fastest growing driver of global carbon emissions, with large quantities of emissions embodied in exports from emerging economies. International trade with emerging economies poses a dilemma for climate and trade policy: to the extent emerging markets have comparative advantages in manufacturing, such trade is economically efficient and desirable. However, if carbon-intensive manufacturing in emerging countries such as China entails drastically more CO2 emissions than making the same product elsewhere, then trade increases global CO2 emissions. Here we show that the emissions embodied in Chinese exports, which are larger than the annual emissions of Japan or Germany, are primarily the result of China’s coal-based energy mix and the very high emissions intensity (emission per unit of economic value) in a few provinces and industry sectors. Exports from these provinces and sectors therefore represent targeted opportunities to address the climate-trade dilemma by either improving production technologies and decarbonizing the underlying energy systems or else reducing trade volumes.

  16. Challenges to China's transition to a low carbon electricity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Williams, Jim; Ding Jianhua; Hu Junfeng

    2011-01-01

    We examine the challenges to China's transition to a low carbon electricity system, in which renewable energy would play a significant role. China's electricity system currently lacks the flexibility in planning, operations, and pricing to respond to conflicting pressures from demand growth, rising costs, and environmental mandates in a way that simultaneously maintains reliability, decarbonizes the system, and keeps prices within acceptable bounds. Greater flexibility crucially requires the ability to more systematically and transparently manage and allocate costs. This will require re-orientating sector institutions still rooted in central planning, and strengthening independent regulation. Some of the necessary changes require fundamental political and legal reforms beyond the scope of energy policy. However, the system's flexibility can still be increased through the development of traditional planning and regulatory tools and approaches, such as an avoided cost basis for energy efficiency investments, more integrated planning to improve the coordination of generation, transmission, and demand-side investments, and a transparent ratemaking process. The judicious application of OECD electricity sector experience and skills can support these developments. - Research highlights: → China's electricity system currently lacks the flexibility to integrate renewables and reduce CO 2 emissions on a large scale at an acceptable cost and level of reliability. → The challenges to increased flexibility are more institutional than technological. → Chinese government agencies need new approaches to basic power system planning and ratemaking. → OECD countries can help address these challenges through the transfer of 'soft' technologies.

  17. Revisiting the case for intensity targets: Better incentives and less uncertainty for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschinski, Robert; Edenhofer, Ottmar

    2010-01-01

    In the debate on post-Kyoto global climate policy, intensity targets, which set a maximum amount of emissions per GDP, figure as prominent alternative to Kyoto-style absolute emission targets, especially for developing countries. This paper re-examines the case for intensity targets by critically assessing several of its properties, namely (i) reduction of cost-uncertainty, (ii) reduction of 'hot air', (iii) compatibility with international emissions trading, (iv) incentive to decouple carbon emissions and economic output (decarbonization), and, (v) use as a substitute for banking/borrowing. Relying on simple analytical models, it is shown that the effect on cost-uncertainty is ambiguous and depends on parameter values, and that the same holds for the risk of 'hot air'; that the intensity target distorts international emissions trading; that despite potential asymmetries in the choice of abatement technology between absolute and intensity target, the incentive for a lasting transformation of the energy system is not necessarily stronger under the latter; and, finally, that only a well-working intensity target could substitute banking/borrowing to some extent-but also vice versa. Overall, the results suggest that due to the increased complexity and the potentially only modest benefits of an intensity target, absolute targets remain a robust choice for a cautious policy maker.

  18. Development of technology for reduction of radiotoxicity of uranium mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwangwook; Lee, E. H.; Yang, H. B.

    2012-03-01

    The phase 1 of this research project was carried out as a project entitled 'Development of technology for reduction of actinide radiotoxicity' in 2007 to 2009. Its phase 2 was carried out as a project entitled 'Development of technology for reduction of radiotoxicity of uranium mixture' in 2010 to 2011. Five unit research items to accomplish it such as evaluation of dissolution and aquatic chemistry characteristics of U, TRU, RE, and etc elements evaluation of chemical and electrolytic dissolution characteristics of U and SIMFUEL oxides evaluation of removal of environmentally-detrimental elements, and high purity precipitation of uranium evaluation of salt-free electrolytic decarbonation characteristics, and recovery of used carbonate salt, and development of the process to treat uranium mixture materials and the relevant unit equipments and system with engineering concept. were carried out. The obtained results were as follows. -Evaluation of chemical characteristics of several uranium oxide materials and verification of insolubility properties of TRU oxides in carbonate media -Suggestion of the optimal conditions for dissolutions of uranium and SIMFUEL oxides - Development of technology for co-precipitation of environmentally-detrimental elements - Development of an electrolytic recycle way of used carbonate salt solution - Suggestion of a new conceptual process, named COL process to treat spent nuclear fuel, uranium-bearing wastes with high and low contents

  19. Large temporal scale and capacity subsurface bulk energy storage with CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, M. O.; Fleming, M. R.; Adams, B. M.; Ogland-Hand, J.; Nelson, E. S.; Randolph, J.; Sioshansi, R.; Kuehn, T. H.; Buscheck, T. A.; Bielicki, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Decarbonizing energy systems by increasing the penetration of variable renewable energy (VRE) technologies requires efficient and short- to long-term energy storage. Very large amounts of energy can be stored in the subsurface as heat and/or pressure energy in order to provide both short- and long-term (seasonal) storage, depending on the implementation. This energy storage approach can be quite efficient, especially where geothermal energy is naturally added to the system. Here, we present subsurface heat and/or pressure energy storage with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) and discuss the system's efficiency, deployment options, as well as its advantages and disadvantages, compared to several other energy storage options. CO2-based subsurface bulk energy storage has the potential to be particularly efficient and large-scale, both temporally (i.e., seasonal) and spatially. The latter refers to the amount of energy that can be stored underground, using CO2, at a geologically conducive location, potentially enabling storing excess power from a substantial portion of the power grid. The implication is that it would be possible to employ centralized energy storage for (a substantial part of) the power grid, where the geology enables CO2-based bulk subsurface energy storage, whereas the VRE technologies (solar, wind) are located on that same power grid, where (solar, wind) conditions are ideal. However, this may require reinforcing the power grid's transmission lines in certain parts of the grid to enable high-load power transmission from/to a few locations.

  20. How a future energy world could look?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewert M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The future energy system will change significantly within the next years as a result of the following Mega Trends: de-carbonization, urbanization, fast technology development, individualization, glocalization (globalization and localization and changing demographics. Increasing fluctuating renewable production will change the role of non-renewable generation. Distributed energy from renewables and micro generation will change the direction of the energy flow in the electricity grids. Production will not follow demand but demand has to follow production. This future system is enabled by the fast technical development of information and communication technologies which will be present in the entire system. In this paper the results of a comprehensive analysis with different scenarios is summarized. Tools were used like the analysis of policy trends in the European countries, modelling of the European power grid, modelling of the European power markets and the analysis of technology developments with cost reduction potentials. With these tools the interaction of the main actors in the energy markets like conventional generation and renewable generation, grid transport, electricity storage including new storage options from E-Mobility, Power to Gas, Compressed Air Energy storage and demand side management were considered. The potential application of technologies and investments in new energy technologies were analyzed within existing frameworks and markets as well as new business models in new markets with different frameworks. In the paper the over all trend of this analysis is presented by describing a potential future energy world. This world represents only one of numerous options with comparable characteristics.

  1. How a future energy world could look?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, M.

    2012-10-01

    The future energy system will change significantly within the next years as a result of the following Mega Trends: de-carbonization, urbanization, fast technology development, individualization, glocalization (globalization and localization) and changing demographics. Increasing fluctuating renewable production will change the role of non-renewable generation. Distributed energy from renewables and micro generation will change the direction of the energy flow in the electricity grids. Production will not follow demand but demand has to follow production. This future system is enabled by the fast technical development of information and communication technologies which will be present in the entire system. In this paper the results of a comprehensive analysis with different scenarios is summarized. Tools were used like the analysis of policy trends in the European countries, modelling of the European power grid, modelling of the European power markets and the analysis of technology developments with cost reduction potentials. With these tools the interaction of the main actors in the energy markets like conventional generation and renewable generation, grid transport, electricity storage including new storage options from E-Mobility, Power to Gas, Compressed Air Energy storage and demand side management were considered. The potential application of technologies and investments in new energy technologies were analyzed within existing frameworks and markets as well as new business models in new markets with different frameworks. In the paper the over all trend of this analysis is presented by describing a potential future energy world. This world represents only one of numerous options with comparable characteristics.

  2. Change of unit skeletons during an artificial coalification; Jinko sekitanka katei ni okeru tan`i kokkaku kozo no henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y.; Miki, Y.; Hayamizu, K. [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba (Japan); Okada, K. [Coal Mining Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    In order to obtain knowledge about formation and growth of condensed ring structure in a coalification process, discussions were given on product skeleton structure by using hydrogenation and hydrocracking of heated cellulose. In underwater heating of cellulose, reaction of dehydration has occurred at 200{degree}C or lower, that of decarbonation at 250{degree}C or higher, and that of demethanizing at 300{degree}C, resulting in production of a dark-brown coal-like substance. The substance has lower H/C value and higher O/C value than coal. As the underwater heating temperature rises, the hydrogenation reactivity of the heated substance decreases, and so does the ratio of conversion into toluene solubles. These phenomena are related to strength of cross-linking bond between unit skeleton structures. A substance heated at an underwater heating temperature of 200{degree}C turns toluene-soluble almost completely even during the hydrogenation reaction (350{degree}C for 2 hours), but the soluble product decreases at underwater heating temperatures of 250 and 300{degree}C. However, soluble product of more than 90% was obtained when hydrocracking (at 425{degree}C for one hour) was performed. The toluene-soluble product in the heated substance is only 50% when the underwater heating temperature reaches 350{degree}C even if the hydrocracking is carried out. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Hydro-economic modeling of integrated solutions for the water-energy-land nexus in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, S.; Kahil, M.; Wada, Y.; Krey, V.; Byers, E.; Johnson, N. A.; Burek, P.; Satoh, Y.; Willaarts, B.; Langan, S.; Riahi, K.

    2017-12-01

    This study focused on the development of the Extended Continental-scale Hydro-economic Optimization model (ECHO) and its application to the analysis of long-term water, energy and land use pathways for Africa. The framework is important because it integrates multi-decadal decisions surrounding investments into new water infrastructure, electric power generation and irrigation technologies. The improved linkages in ECHO reveal synergies between water allocation strategies across sectors and the greenhouse gas emissions resulting from electricity supply. The African case study features a reduced-form transboundary river network and associated environmental flow constraints covering surface and groundwater withdrawals. Interactions between local water constraints and the continental-scale economy are captured in the model through the combination of regional electricity markets. Spatially-explicit analysis of land availability is used to restrict future reservoir expansion. The analysis demonstrates the massive investments required to ensure rapidly expanding water, energy and food demands in Africa aligned with human development objectives are met in a sustainable way. Modeled constraints on environmental flows in line with presumptive ecological guidelines trigger diffusion of energy-intensive water supply technologies in water-stressed regions, with implications for the cost and speed of the electricity sector decarbonization required to achieve climate targets.

  4. The Novel Application of Optimization and Charge Blended Energy Management Control for Component Downsizing within a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Shankar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available  The adoption of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs is widely seen as an interim solution for the decarbonization of the transport sector. Within a PHEV, determining the required energy storage capacity of the battery remains one of the primary concerns for vehicle manufacturers and system integrators. This fact is particularly pertinent since the battery constitutes the largest contributor to vehicle mass. Furthermore, the financial cost associated with the procurement, design and integration of battery systems is often cited as one of the main barriers to vehicle commercialization. The ability to integrate the optimization of the energy management control system with the sizing of key PHEV powertrain components presents a significant area of research. Contained within this paper is an optimization study in which a charge blended strategy is used to facilitate the downsizing of the electrical machine, the internal combustion engine and the high voltage battery. An improved Equivalent Consumption Method has been used to manage the optimal power split within the powertrain as the PHEV traverses a range of different drivecycles. For a target CO2 value and drivecycle, results show that this approach can yield significant downsizing opportunities, with cost reductions on the order of 2%–9% being realizable.

  5. Peaking China’s CO2 Emissions: Trends to 2030 and Mitigation Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available China has submitted its nationally determined contribution to peak its energy-related emissions around 2030. To understand how China might develop its economy while controlling CO2 emissions, this study surveys a number of recent modeling scenarios that project the country’s economic growth, energy mix, and associated emissions until 2050. Our analysis suggests that China’s CO2 emissions will continue to grow until 2040 or 2050 and will approximately double their 2010 level without additional policy intervention. The alternative scenario, however, suggests that peaking CO2 emissions around 2030 requires the emission growth rate to be reduced by 2% below the reference level. This step would result in a plateau in China’s emissions from 2020 to 2030. This paper also proposed a deep de-carbonization pathway for China that is consistent with China’s goal of peaking emissions by around 2030, which can best be achieved through a combination of improvements in energy and carbon intensities. Our analysis also indicated that the potential for energy intensity decline will be limited over time. Thus, the peaking will be largely dependent on the share of non-fossil fuel energy in primary energy consumption.

  6. Driving forces in energy-related CO2 emissions in south and east coastal China: commonality and variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, C.; Liu, Y.; Jin, J.; Wei, T.

    2015-12-01

    East and south coastal China contributes to respectively about 30% and 8% of CO2 emissions in China and the world, and therefore play a critical role in achieving the national goal of emission reduction to mitigate the global warming. It also serves as a benchmark for the less developed regions of China, in terms of achieving the developed world's human development standard under lower per capita emissions. We analyze the driving forces of emissions in this region and their provincial characteristics by applying the Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index method. Our findings show that emissions have been doubled during the period from 2000 to 2012, along with three and two folds increase in economy and energy consumption, respectively. This suggests a persistent lock between economic growth and emissions, even in this socioeconomically advanced region in China. Provincial difference in annual emission growth reveals three distinguished low-carbon developmental stages, owning mainly to the effectiveness of energy efficiency in reducing emission growth. This may explain why previous climate policies have aimed to reduce carbon intensity. These results indicate that targeted measures on enhancing energy efficiency in the short term and de-carbonization of both the economic and energy structure in the long term can lower the emission growth more effectively and efficiently. They also suggest that factor-driven emission reduction strategies and policies are needed in the geographically and socioeconomically similar regions.

  7. Comparative analysis of greenhouse gas emissions between scenarios - Contribution of the Experts Group - National Debate on Energy Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Within the frame of the French national debate on energy transition, this document briefly presents and comments calculations of greenhouse gas emissions according to 11 scenarios associated with 4 pathways: electrification and de-carbonation (NegaTEP), steady demand and diversification (Ancre DIV), efficiency and diversification (Ademe), and energy saving and phasing out nuclear (Negawatt). These pathways and scenarios are analysed in terms of greenhouse gas emissions and with respect to the objective of a factor-4 reduction by 2050. Emission data for 1990 and 2011 are recalled, as well as France commitments. The author outlines that only four scenarios reach this factor-4 objective as far as CO 2 combustion is concerned, that a factor 2 seems to be possible for some specific sectors (agriculture and wastes). He notices significant decreases in industrial processes since 1990, that only 2 scenarios and 2 pathways reach the factor-4 as far as all greenhouse gases are concerned. When taking energy demand into account, no scenario is able to reach the factor-4 without any strong policy of energy saving. Two conditions are therefore identified to reach this factor: a significant decrease of energy demand, and an action on all emission sources

  8. Dynamic Analysis of the Temperature and the Concentration Profiles of an Industrial Rotary Kiln Used in Clinker Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIULIA C.Q. RODRIGUES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cement is one of the most used building materials in the world. The process of cement production involves numerous and complex reactions that occur under different temperatures. Thus, there is great interest in the optimization of cement manufacturing. Clinker production is one of the main steps of cement production and it occurs inside the kiln. In this paper, the dry process of clinker production is analysed in a rotary kiln that operates in counter flow. The main phenomena involved in clinker production is as follows: free residual water evaporation of raw material, decomposition of magnesium carbonate, decarbonation, formation of C3A and C4AF, formation of dicalcium silicate, and formation of tricalcium silicate. The main objective of this study was to propose a mathematical model that realistically describes the temperature profile and the concentration of clinker components in a real rotary kiln. In addition, the influence of different speeds of inlet gas and solids in the system was analysed. The mathematical model is composed of partial differential equations. The model was implemented in Mathcad (available at CCA/UFES and solved using industrial input data. The proposal model is satisfactory to describe the temperature and concentration profiles of a real rotary kiln.

  9. Dynamic Analysis of the Temperature and the Concentration Profiles of an Industrial Rotary Kiln Used in Clinker Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Diulia C Q; Soares, Atílio P; Costa, Esly F; Costa, Andréa O S

    2017-01-01

    Cement is one of the most used building materials in the world. The process of cement production involves numerous and complex reactions that occur under different temperatures. Thus, there is great interest in the optimization of cement manufacturing. Clinker production is one of the main steps of cement production and it occurs inside the kiln. In this paper, the dry process of clinker production is analysed in a rotary kiln that operates in counter flow. The main phenomena involved in clinker production is as follows: free residual water evaporation of raw material, decomposition of magnesium carbonate, decarbonation, formation of C3A and C4AF, formation of dicalcium silicate, and formation of tricalcium silicate. The main objective of this study was to propose a mathematical model that realistically describes the temperature profile and the concentration of clinker components in a real rotary kiln. In addition, the influence of different speeds of inlet gas and solids in the system was analysed. The mathematical model is composed of partial differential equations. The model was implemented in Mathcad (available at CCA/UFES) and solved using industrial input data. The proposal model is satisfactory to describe the temperature and concentration profiles of a real rotary kiln.

  10. Engineering Support for Handling Controller Conflicts in Energy Storage Systems Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Zanabria

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Energy storage systems will play a major role in the decarbonization of future sustainable electric power systems, allowing a high penetration of distributed renewable energy sources and contributing to the distribution network stability and reliability. To accomplish this, a storage system is required to provide multiple services such as self-consumption, grid support, peak-shaving, etc. The simultaneous activation of controllers operation may lead to conflicts, as a consequence the execution of committed services is not guaranteed. This paper presents and discusses a solution to the exposed issue by developing an engineering support approach to semi-automatically detect and handle conflicts for multi-usage storage systems applications. To accomplish that an ontology is developed and exploited by model-driven engineering mechanisms. The proposed approach is evaluated by implementing a use case example, where detection of conflicts is automatically done at an early design stage. Besides this, exploitable source code for conflicts resolution is generated and used during the design and prototype stages of controllers development. Thus, the proposed engineering support enhances the design and development of storage system controllers, especially for multi-usage applications.

  11. Nested barriers to low-carbon infrastructure investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granoff, Ilmi; Hogarth, J. Ryan; Miller, Alan

    2016-12-01

    Low-carbon, 'green' economic growth is necessary to simultaneously improve human welfare and avoid the worst impacts of climate change and environmental degradation. Infrastructure choices underpin both the growth and the carbon intensity of the economy. This Perspective explores the barriers to investing in low-carbon infrastructure and some of the policy levers available to overcome them. The barriers to decarbonizing infrastructure 'nest' within a set of barriers to infrastructure development more generally that cause spending on infrastructure--low-carbon or not--to fall more than 70% short of optimal levels. Developing countries face additional barriers such as currency and political risks that increase the investment gap. Low-carbon alternatives face further barriers, such as commercialization risk and financial and public institutions designed for different investment needs. While the broader barriers to infrastructure investment are discussed in other streams of literature, they are often disregarded in literature on renewable energy diffusion or climate finance, which tends to focus narrowly on the project costs of low- versus high-carbon options. We discuss how to overcome the barriers specific to low-carbon infrastructure within the context of the broader infrastructure gap.

  12. Can Growth Be Green?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This short article, based on a presentation at the London School of Economics, criticizes the common opinion that "green growth" offers a relatively painless - some even say pain-free - transition path for capitalist economies. After a brief summary of the daunting arithmetic entailed in combining fast decarbonization with continuing growth, the article advances 3 propositions. First, market-based carbon mitigation programs, such as carbon trading, cannot be sufficient and must be coupled with other policy pillars that foster transformative investment and widespread regulation. Second, a political economy of climate policy needs to draw on the lessons of comparative social policy research, which emphasizes the role of international pressures, interests, institutions, and ideas. Taking these into account gives a more realistic perspective on climate policy making in today's neoliberal world. Third, more radical policies on both consumption and production are called for, to ensure that carbon mitigation is not pursued at the expense of equity and social welfare. These include policies to restrain high-carbon luxury consumption and a transition toward shorter paid working time. The conclusion is that a realistic program of green growth will be immensely difficult and entail radical political change. © SAGE Publications 2015.

  13. Incorporating land-use requirements and environmental constraints in low-carbon electricity planning for California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Grace C; Torn, Margaret S; Williams, James H

    2015-02-17

    The land-use implications of deep decarbonization of the electricity sector (e.g., 80% below 1990 emissions) have not been well-characterized quantitatively or spatially. We assessed the operational-phase land-use requirements of different low-carbon scenarios for California in 2050 and found that most scenarios have comparable direct land footprints. While the per MWh footprint of renewable energy (RE) generation is initially higher, that of fossil and nuclear generation increases over time with continued fuel use. We built a spatially explicit model to understand the interactions between resource quality and environmental constraints in a high RE scenario (>70% of total generation). We found that there is sufficient land within California to meet the solar and geothermal targets, but areas with the highest quality wind and solar resources also tend to be those with high conservation value. Development of some land with lower conservation value results in lower average capacity factors, but also provides opportunity for colocation of different generation technologies, which could significantly improve land-use efficiency and reduce permitting, leasing, and transmission infrastructure costs. Basing siting decisions on environmentally-constrained long-term RE build-out requirements produces significantly different results, including better conservation outcomes, than implied by the current piecemeal approach to planning.

  14. The Carbon Impact of Investments in Mirova Equity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Mirova is publishing the first measurement of its equity portfolios' carbon impact. They total euro 2.8 billion and 47% of its assets under management, in accordance with the commitments made as part of the Montreal Carbon Pledge and the Portfolio Decarbonization Coalition. This measurement has been carried out using Carbon Impact Analytics, an innovative methodology co-developed with Carbone 4, which emphasises: - Emissions induced by the activity of investees on their overall scope of responsibility, from cradle to grave, - Emissions avoided through the implementation of low-carbon strategies. The consolidated equity Portfolio presents induced emissions that are less than half that of a European benchmark (97 tCO_2/Meuro vs. 222 tCO_2/Meuro). This performance owes its strength mainly to the absence of very high-carbon companies (coal or oil) in all of Mirova's portfolios. As for its European environmental strategy, Mirova presents avoided emissions that are more than three times higher than the benchmark (-43 tCO_2/Meuro vs. -12 tCO_2/Meuro), thanks to investments specifically targeting leading companies providing low-carbon solutions. This particular investment strategy illustrates Mirova's determination to be aligned with a scenario in which the rise in temperatures does not exceed the 2 deg. C threshold. (authors)

  15. Mapping of semi-arid iron bearing red sands on emerged areas around lake marshes (Tablas de Daimiel, Spain using hyperspectral DAIS 7915 spectrometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Beisl

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are particularly sensitive environments receiving attention from the natural sciences community due to their wealth of both flora and fauna, and often considered as natural parks. In the Tablas de Daimiel (La Mancha, Central Spain, Digital Airborne Imaging Spectrometer data (DAIS 7915 have been analyzed to map geological processes on areas around the receding wetland which have never been flooded by water in the past. Sediments permanently exposed to the atmosphere dehydrate and oxide, developing different mineralogical associations arranged on planation surfaces. Such planation surfaces are key in the geological knowledge of recent climate change and landscape evolution. Progressive iron oxide/hydroxide rate and decarbonation can be spectrally followed on the Holocene sands framing the current marshy area. Such mineralogical changes are geologically registered on flat surfaces at different heights over the receding shore of the paleolake. Interacting erosion and sedimentation processes are responsible for the development of the flat morphological surfaces with increasing dryness. Maps are built for four different morphological units consisting of planation surfaces following chronologically the receding marsh during the last 2000 years before the present. Interactive spectral responses of mineralogical associations are described on the imagery, field and laboratory spectra.

  16. Carbon isotope composition of CO2-rich inclusions in cumulate-forming mantle minerals from Stromboli volcano (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, Mimma Emanuela; Grassa, Fausto; Martelli, Mauro; Renzulli, Alberto; Rizzo, Andrea Luca

    2017-10-01

    We report on measurements of concentration and carbon isotope composition (δ13CCO2) of CO2 trapped in fluid inclusions of olivine and clinopyroxene crystals separated from San Bartolo ultramafic cumulate Xenoliths (SBX) formed at mantle depth (i.e., beneath a shallow Moho supposed to be at 14.8 km). These cumulates, erupted about 2 ka ago at Stromboli volcano (Italy), have been already investigated by Martelli et al. (2014) mainly for Sr-Nd isotopes and for their noble gases geochemistry. The concentration of CO2 varies of one order of magnitude from 3.8·10- 8 mol g- 1 to 4.8·10- 7 mol g- 1, with δ13C values between - 2.8‰ and - 1.5‰ vs V-PDB. These values overlap the range of measurements performed in the crater gases emitted at Stromboli (- 2.5‰ residence within the volcano plumbing system. Such δ13C values are higher than those commonly reported for MORB-like upper mantle (- 8 ÷ - 4‰) and likely reflect the source contamination of the local mantle wedge by CO2 coming from the decarbonation of the sediments carried by the subducting Ionian slab with a contribution of organic carbon up to 7%.

  17. Technical note: An inverse method to relate organic carbon reactivity to isotope composition from serial oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Hemingway

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Serial oxidation coupled with stable carbon and radiocarbon analysis of sequentially evolved CO2 is a promising method to characterize the relationship between organic carbon (OC chemical composition, source, and residence time in the environment. However, observed decay profiles depend on experimental conditions and oxidation pathway. It is therefore necessary to properly assess serial oxidation kinetics before utilizing decay profiles as a measure of OC reactivity. We present a regularized inverse method to estimate the distribution of OC activation energy (E, a proxy for bond strength, using serial oxidation. Here, we apply this method to ramped temperature pyrolysis or oxidation (RPO analysis but note that this approach is broadly applicable to any serial oxidation technique. RPO analysis directly compares thermal reactivity to isotope composition by determining the E range for OC decaying within each temperature interval over which CO2 is collected. By analyzing a decarbonated test sample at multiple masses and oven ramp rates, we show that OC decay during RPO analysis follows a superposition of parallel first-order kinetics and that resulting E distributions are independent of experimental conditions. We therefore propose the E distribution as a novel proxy to describe OC thermal reactivity and suggest that E vs. isotope relationships can provide new insight into the compositional controls on OC source and residence time.

  18. Technical note: An inverse method to relate organic carbon reactivity to isotope composition from serial oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Jordon D.; Rothman, Daniel H.; Rosengard, Sarah Z.; Galy, Valier V.

    2017-11-01

    Serial oxidation coupled with stable carbon and radiocarbon analysis of sequentially evolved CO2 is a promising method to characterize the relationship between organic carbon (OC) chemical composition, source, and residence time in the environment. However, observed decay profiles depend on experimental conditions and oxidation pathway. It is therefore necessary to properly assess serial oxidation kinetics before utilizing decay profiles as a measure of OC reactivity. We present a regularized inverse method to estimate the distribution of OC activation energy (E), a proxy for bond strength, using serial oxidation. Here, we apply this method to ramped temperature pyrolysis or oxidation (RPO) analysis but note that this approach is broadly applicable to any serial oxidation technique. RPO analysis directly compares thermal reactivity to isotope composition by determining the E range for OC decaying within each temperature interval over which CO2 is collected. By analyzing a decarbonated test sample at multiple masses and oven ramp rates, we show that OC decay during RPO analysis follows a superposition of parallel first-order kinetics and that resulting E distributions are independent of experimental conditions. We therefore propose the E distribution as a novel proxy to describe OC thermal reactivity and suggest that E vs. isotope relationships can provide new insight into the compositional controls on OC source and residence time.

  19. What Trajectory for Energy Transition? The Genealogy of the Energy Transition Law and its Positioning with regard to Pre-existing Scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criqui, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The many lively debates that preceded -and still fuel- discussion of the 'Energy Transition and Green Growth' bill attest to the importance of that law for many French citizens and economic actors. Without going back over the debate on the feasibility or realism of the law's objectives, to which Futuribles contributed through its web site in late September, it is possible to put these matters into some perspective, as Patrick Criqui does here, by reminding us of the genealogy of the bill and the various future scenarios that were developed during the French National Debate on Energy Transition of 2013 before the bill passed into law. Criqui reminds us of the possible scenarios discussed, grouped as they were around four major energy trajectories: 'Energy-saving', 'Efficiency', 'Diversity' and 'Decarbonization'. Among these, the most important sources of divergence were over the level of reduction of energy consumption by 2050 and the relative parts to be played by nuclear power and renewable energies. Basing himself on the target figures included in the bill, Patrick Criqui identifies the image of the future towards which, on the face of it, the law points -namely, the 'Efficiency' trajectory- even if, as he very rightly emphasizes, its implementation will definitely be a dynamic affair, incorporating the various adaptations that might turn out to be necessary between now and 2050. (author)

  20. Pathways of low carbon transition at the lowest cost. Pathways of low carbon transition in France at the lowest cost - Dynamics and average abatement costs (MACC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrissin Fabert, Baptiste; Foussard, Alexis

    2016-11-01

    The objective to divide greenhouse gas emissions in France by a factor four by 2050 implies the mobilisation at the lowest cost of the whole set of known sources of reduction of emissions in all economic sectors. In this context, this report is based on a methodology (D-CAM in French for dynamics - average abatement costs, MACC in English for Medium Abatement Cost Curves) which relies on a theoretical business-as-usual scenario, on a database on the potential, rate of development, and cost of mobilizable sources, and on a dynamic model of cost minimisation. The MACC tool is used to explore, for each sector, scenarios of de-carbonation which allow objectives of reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to be reached at different time horizons. An aggregated approach of this tool modifies the distribution of efforts of emission reduction between sectors with respect to a sector-based approach. Thus, a macro-assessment of low carbon transition does not reveal any obvious over-cost with respect to the business-as-usual scenario. A second document is a Power Point presentation which contains the same information, curves and graphs

  1. Defining climate change scenario characteristics with a phase space of cumulative primary energy and carbon intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Justin; Dowlatabadi, Hadi

    2018-02-01

    Climate change modeling relies on projections of future greenhouse gas emissions and other phenomena leading to changes in planetary radiative forcing. Scenarios of socio-technical development consistent with end-of-century forcing levels are commonly produced by integrated assessment models. However, outlooks for forcing from fossil energy combustion can also be presented and defined in terms of two essential components: total energy use this century and the carbon intensity of that energy. This formulation allows a phase space diagram to succinctly describe a broad range of possible outcomes for carbon emissions from the future energy system. In the following paper, we demonstrate this phase space method with the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) as used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). The resulting RCP phase space is applied to map IPCC Working Group III (WGIII) reference case ‘no policy’ scenarios. Once these scenarios are described as coordinates in the phase space, data mining techniques can readily distill their core features. Accordingly, we conduct a k-means cluster analysis to distinguish the shared outlooks of these scenarios for oil, gas and coal resource use. As a whole, the AR5 database depicts a transition toward re-carbonization, where a world without climate policy inevitably leads to an energy supply with increasing carbon intensity. This orientation runs counter to the experienced ‘dynamics as usual’ of gradual decarbonization, suggesting climate change targets outlined in the Paris Accord are more readily achievable than projected to date.

  2. Technology mix alternatives with high shares of wind power and photovoltaics—case study for Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubi, Ghassan

    2011-01-01

    The shift to a low carbon society is an issue of highest priority in the EU. For electricity generation, such a target counts with three main alternatives: renewable energies, nuclear power and carbon capture and storage. This paper focuses on the renewables’ alternative. Due to resource availability, a technology mix with a high share of PV and wind power is gaining increasing interest as a major solution for several EU member states and in part for the EU collectively to achieve decarbonization and energy security with acceptable costs. Due to their intermittency, the integration of high shares of PV and wind power in the electricity supply is challenging. This paper presents a techno-economic assessment of technology mix alternatives with a high share of PV and wind power in Spain, as an example. Thereby, the focus is on the option of increasing wind curtailment versus substituting rigid baseload generation in favor of the more flexible gas turbines and combined cycle gas turbines. - Highlights: ► The potential of power generation from renewable energy resources in the EU is illustrated. ► The LEC of the different technologies considered is calculated for today and future scenarios. ► An excel-based model for the technology mix assessment is applied using Spanish data. ► Technology mix alternatives with a high share of PV and wind power are assessed. ► The focus is on increasing wind curtailment vs. relying on more flexible power generation units.

  3. More homogeneous wind conditions under strong climate change decrease the potential for inter-state balancing of electricity in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohland, Jan; Reyers, Mark; Weber, Juliane; Witthaut, Dirk

    2017-11-01

    Limiting anthropogenic climate change requires the fast decarbonization of the electricity system. Renewable electricity generation is determined by the weather and is hence subject to climate change. We simulate the operation of a coarse-scale fully renewable European electricity system based on downscaled high-resolution climate data from EURO-CORDEX. Following a high-emission pathway (RCP8.5), we find a robust but modest increase (up to 7 %) of backup energy in Europe through the end of the 21st century. The absolute increase in the backup energy is almost independent of potential grid expansion, leading to the paradoxical effect that relative impacts of climate change increase in a highly interconnected European system. The increase is rooted in more homogeneous wind conditions over Europe resulting in intensified simultaneous generation shortfalls. Individual country contributions to European generation shortfall increase by up to 9 TWh yr-1, reflecting an increase of up to 4 %. Our results are strengthened by comparison with a large CMIP5 ensemble using an approach based on circulation weather types.

  4. Preference of e-Bike by Women in India–a Niche Market for Auto Manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Alamelu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing urbanization with climate change, global warming issues and the related need to decarbonize the economy, is forcing urgency for identifying the alternate source for the global adoption and sustainable scalable solutions. The country’s demographic and road patterns and its natural resources availability provide enormous scope for the electric bike industry. As per the “Navigant Research Report”, it is predicted that by 2018, the sales of electric vehicles in India will shoot up by 17 percent. 1.1 million electric vehicles will be targeted within next five years. A recent study on the environment impact of e-bikes with other forms of transportation found that e-bikes are about 18 times more energy consumption than SUV, 13 times than a sedan, 6 times more than rail transit, and it is having considered as an innovated conventional bicycle. It is a frugal innovation strategy which provide safe carbon free environment, and moreover a part of health rehabilitation programmes. It is required that societal, economic and political and infrastructure systems integrate together to balance the energy environment. With this potential, the era of electric bike started its new avenues on the roads of India specifically focusing on Indian women. To develop this viewpoint, the present study focuses on the preference of e-bike among the women in Madurai city.

  5. Evolution of air quality in Santiago: The role of mobility and lessons from the science-policy interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gallardo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, urbanization constitutes a major and growing driver of global change and a distinctive feature of the Anthropocene. Thus, urban development paths present opportunities for technological and societal transformations towards energy efficiency and decarbonization, with benefits for both greenhouse gas (GHG and air pollution mitigation. This requires a better understanding of the intertwined dynamics of urban energy and land use, emissions, demographics, governance, and societal and biophysical processes. In this study, we address several characteristics of urbanization in Santiago (33.5°S, 70.5°W, 500 m a.s.l., the capital city of Chile. Specifically, we focus on the multiple links between mobility and air quality, describe the evolution of these two aspects over the past 30 years, and review the role scientific knowledge has played in policy-making. We show evidence of how technological measures (e.g., fuel quality, three-way catalytic converters, diesel particle filters have been successful in decreasing coarse mode aerosol (PM10 concentrations in Santiago despite increasing urbanization (e.g., population, motorization, urban sprawl. However, we also show that such measures will likely be insufficient if behavioral changes do not achieve an increase in the use of public transportation. Our investigation seeks to inform urban development in the Anthropocene, and our results may be useful for other developing countries, particularly in Latin America and the Caribbean where more than 80% of the population is urban.

  6. Information report published in application of article 145 of the Regulation on the behalf of the Commission for sustainable development and land planning about the transition to carbon-free world. Nr 3305

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanteguet, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    In a first chapter, this report proposes an overview of the world climate negotiation process within the COPs: structuring of the climate regime in Rio, a very slow process, a victory of market for quota over tax, the emergence of new climate geopolitics, and difficult climate governance. The second part outlines that the transition towards a de-carbonated world is not negotiable any longer because of the reality of climate change and of its consequences, and of a necessary alternative approach in front of an acknowledged failure. The third part highlights the different ways of a transition towards a more sustainable model by negotiation: evolution towards a new governance, a necessary transformation of the energy system, the assignment of a carbon price, to put the support to fossil energies into question again, to implement innovating financing means as a keystone of an ambitious agreement, to define more sustainable and more carbon saving policies (in urban planning, in production, in agriculture), to preserve and restore carbon sinks, and to territorialize climate again. The second part reports several hearings, and the content of the discussion within the Commission

  7. A reduced-form approach for representing the impacts of wind and solar PV deployment on the structure and operation of the electricity system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Nils; Strubegger, Manfred; McPherson, Madeleine; Parkinson, Simon C.; Krey, Volker; Sullivan, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    In many climate change mitigation scenarios, integrated assessment models of the energy and climate systems rely heavily on renewable energy technologies with variable and uncertain generation, such as wind and solar PV, to achieve substantial decarbonization of the electricity sector. However, these models often include very little temporal resolution and thus have difficulty in representing the integration costs that arise from mismatches between electricity supply and demand. The global integrated assessment model, MESSAGE, has been updated to explicitly model the trade-offs between variable renewable energy (VRE) deployment and its impacts on the electricity system, including the implications for electricity curtailment, backup capacity, and system flexibility. These impacts have been parameterized using a reduced-form approach, which allows VRE integration impacts to be quantified on a regional basis. In addition, thermoelectric technologies were updated to include two modes of operation, baseload and flexible, to better account for the cost, efficiency, and availability penalties associated with flexible operation. In this paper, the modeling approach used in MESSAGE is explained and the implications for VRE deployment in mitigation scenarios are assessed. Three important stylized facts associated with integrating high VRE shares are successfully reproduced by our modeling approach: (1) the significant reduction in the utilization of non-VRE power plants; (2) the diminishing role for traditional baseload generators, such as nuclear and coal, and the transition to more flexible technologies; and (3) the importance of electricity storage and hydrogen electrolysis in facilitating the deployment of VRE.

  8. Climate change : we are at risk : interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, D.; Wiebe, J.

    2003-06-01

    Between November 2002 and May 2003 the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry travelled across Canada to hear the views of farmer organizations, rural associations, ecotourism groups and environmental organizations regarding concerns about climate change and the impact it may have on the agriculture and forestry sectors and rural communities. The Committee also examined potential adaptation strategies focusing on primary production, practices, technologies, ecosystems and other related areas. Farmers and forest operators are already facing changes in market conditions, domestic regulations, trade policies and technology. This interim report expressed the concerns of farmers and forest operators. It includes a review of the Saguenay flood of 1996, the Red River flood of 1997, the ice storm of 1998, and droughts since 1999. It also includes a discussion on climate change and its biophysical and economic effects on agriculture, forestry, water resources, rural communities, and Aboriginal communities. This interim report also briefly outlines the Kyoto Protocol, the emissions trading system, and the decarbonization of global energy systems. It emphasized the need for integrated research and government policies and programs that encourage adaptation to climate change. The final report will be released in October 2003 and will provide specific recommendations to ensure that Canada responds to the concerns of farmers and forest operators and to ensure continued prosperity in these sectors. refs., figs

  9. IFREMER-ADEME colloquium 'Offshore renewable energies: offshore wind energy - sea currents and waves. Collection of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    This document contains programme and abstracts of contributions presented during a colloquium. These contributions first addresses the context, and regulatory and economic aspects of offshore wind and sea energy: specificities related to the Public Maritime Domain for the implantation of offshore wind turbines, economy of sea energies within a perspective of de-carbonation of the world energy sector, case of offshore wind turbines and assessment of economic impacts of the implantation of sea renewable energy production units, financing stakes for offshore wind energy projects. A second set of contribution addresses the state-of -the-art and feedbacks for offshore wind energy installations. The third set addresses the assessment of resource potential, measurements, models and production prediction for offshore wind energy: case of French coasts, use of radar for remote sensing, wind climatology modelling, data acquisition for wind farm and data processing. The fourth set of contributions addresses the state-of-the-art, feedback, and R and D for sea current energy, while the fifth one addressed the same aspects for sea wave energy. Technology, installations, maintenance and storage in the field of wind energy are then addressed, and the last set deals with environmental and social-economical impacts of sea renewable energies

  10. Comparing carbon capture and storage (CCS) with concentrating solar power (CSP): Potentials, costs, risks, and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilliestam, Johan; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.; Patt, Anthony G.

    2012-01-01

    Coal power coupled with Carbon [Dioxide] Capture and Storage (CCS), and Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) technologies are often included in the portfolio of climate change mitigation options intended to decarbonize electricity systems. Both of these technologies can provide baseload electricity, are in early stages of maturity, and have benefits, costs, and obstacles. We compare and contrast CCS applied to coal-fired power plants with CSP. At present, both technologies are more expensive than existing electricity-generating options, but costs should decrease with large-scale deployment, especially in the case of CSP. For CCS, technological challenges still remain, storage risks must be clarified, and regulatory and legal uncertainties remain. For CSP, current challenges include electricity transmission and business models for a rapid and extensive expansion of high-voltage transmission lines. The need for international cooperation may impede CSP expansion in Europe. Highlights: ► Both technologies could provide low-carbon base load power. ► Both technologies require new networks, for either CO 2 or power transmission. ► CSP is closer to being a viable technology ready for pervasive diffusion. ► The costs associated with market saturation would be lower for CSP. ► The regulatory changes required for CSP diffusion are somewhat greater than for CCS.

  11. Material constraints related to storage of future European renewable electricity surpluses with CO_2 methanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meylan, Frédéric D.; Moreau, Vincent; Erkman, Suren

    2016-01-01

    The main challenges associated with a growing production of renewable electricity are intermittency and dispersion. Intermittency generates spikes in production, which need to be curtailed when exceeding consumption. Dispersion means electricity has to be transported over long distances between production and consumption sites. In the Directive 2009/28/EC, the European Commission recommends sustainable and effective measures to prevent curtailments and facilitate transportation of renewable electricity. This article explores the material constraints of storing and transporting surplus renewable electricity by conversion into synthetic methane. Europe is considered for its mix of energy technologies, data availability and multiple energy pathways to 2050. Results show that the requirements for key materials and land remain relatively low, respecting the recommendations of the EU Commission. By 2050, more than 6 million tons of carbon dioxide might be transformed into methane annually within the EU. The efficiency of renewable power methane production is also compared to the natural process of converting solar into chemical energy (i.e. photosynthesis), both capturing and reenergizing carbon dioxide. Overall, the production of renewable methane (including carbon dioxide capture) is more efficient and less material intensive than the production of biofuels derived from photosynthesis and biomass conversion. - Highlights: •The potential of methanation to store renewable electricity surpluses is assessed. •Material constraints are relatively low. •Biogenic CO_2 will probably be insufficient. •Production of renewable power methane is more efficient than conventional biofuels. •Renewable power methane can help decarbonizing the global energy sector.

  12. The sustainability of ethanol production from sugarcane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldemberg, Jose; Coelho, Suani Teixeira; Guardabassi, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    The rapid expansion of ethanol production from sugarcane in Brazil has raised a number of questions regarding its negative consequences and sustainability. Positive impacts are the elimination of lead compounds from gasoline and the reduction of noxious emissions. There is also the reduction of CO 2 emissions, since sugarcane ethanol requires only a small amount of fossil fuels for its production, being thus a renewable fuel. These positive impacts are particularly noticeable in the air quality improvement of metropolitan areas but also in rural areas where mechanized harvesting of green cane is being introduced, eliminating the burning of sugarcane. Negative impacts such as future large-scale ethanol production from sugarcane might lead to the destruction or damage of high-biodiversity areas, deforestation, degradation or damaging of soils through the use of chemicals and soil decarbonization, water resources contamination or depletion, competition between food and fuel production decreasing food security and a worsening of labor conditions on the fields. These questions are discussed here, with the purpose of clarifying the sustainability aspects of ethanol production from sugarcane mainly in Sao Paulo State, where more than 60% of Brazil's sugarcane plantations are located and are responsible for 62% of ethanol production. (author)

  13. From macroeconomics of energy-climate policies to the convergence between climate and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathy, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    After a brief presentation of her research curriculum, an indication of her various publications and contributions to conferences, the author presents her expertise works and her participation to national and international projects such as: Fairness in the post-2030 climatic regime, Towards an energetic autonomy in island and isolated territories, scenarios under a carbon constraint, comparative analysis of tools of implementation of multilateral agreements on the environment, mechanism for a clean development and domestic measures, Deep De-carbonation Pathway Project or DDPP, EncilowCarb engaging civil society in low carbon scenarios, climate and development or how to re-conciliate environmental constraints and national development policies, Developmental additionnality of the Clean Development Mechanism and public aid to development. In the next part, she proposes an overview of her research works by distinguishing two directions: a macro-economic analysis of climate policies integrating second raw elements (Imaclim-R France), and strategies of struggle against climate change integrated into development policies. In a third part, she discusses research perspectives regarding energy transition and natural resources, mankind in the energy transition, and the citizen (scenarios, democracy and energy transition) [fr

  14. Parametric study of variable renewable energy integration in Europe: Advantages and costs of transmission grid extensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaber, Katrin; Steinke, Florian; Mühlich, Pascal; Hamacher, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Wind and solar energy will play an important role in the decarbonization of the European electricity generation. However, high shares of these variable renewable energies (VREs) challenge the power system considerably due to their temporal fluctuations and geographical dispersion. In this paper, we systematically analyze transmission grid extensions as an integration measure for VREs in Europe. We show the effects of grid extensions for fundamental properties of the power system as a function of the penetration and mix of wind and solar energy. Backup capacity requirements and overproduction are reduced with a powerful overlay transmission grid. We determine the costs of the grid extensions in dependence of the VRE penetration and mix and find that the grid integration costs remain below 25% of the VRE investment costs for all conceivable VRE configurations. Furthermore, robust design features of future power systems in terms of grid geometry and flexibility requirements for backup technologies are identified. We apply a spatially and temporally highly resolved techno-economic model of the European power system for our analysis. - Highlights: ► Quantification of the advantages and costs of a European overlay transmission grid. ► Grid integration costs for VREs in Europe remain below 6€/MWh. ► Application of a detailed power system model to a wide parameter space.

  15. Electric transition(s) - What Europe and markets have been unable to tell you

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Jean-Pierre; Percebois, Jacques; Mestrallet, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    In an interview, one of the authors proposes an assessment of 20 years of liberalisation of the electric power sector and market: no technological innovation like in the telecommunication sector, disturbance of market operation, high subsidies awarded to renewable sources, emergence of stranded costs. He also explains that electricity is not a product like others (it is a strategic product), the importance of time (a power plant lifetime is often more than 40 years), and that the digital revolution will probably change the deal. He explains why France is an exception in the production of clean electric power. As 40 per cent of power production is based on coal, he discusses what could be an efficient measure to reduce this share. Then, an article proposes a review of the book. It outlines the contradiction between approach by or for the market, reports the different failures noticed by the author regarding power markets and utilities. It describes how the authors promote deregulation and prefer Hayek to Keynes. It finally discusses the two electric transitions which are existing within the European electric power system: the end of public services and the de-carbonation of power generation

  16. The climate challenge - Objective: 2 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouzel, Jean; Debroise, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The authors propose a synthesis of current knowledge on past and future evolutions of climate. The first part addresses what is sure. The authors present and comment data published by the IPCC which show that global warming is certain. They present methods of investigation used by experts, scientists and researchers to identify and understand the past evolutions of climate on Earth, and then describe these evolutions. They describe the greenhouse gas effect and show that mankind is responsible for climate change, and comment the evolution of the debate on climate change at the international level and in France. The second part addresses predictions for tomorrow. The authors describe the consequences of climate change for ice floes, glaciers, seas, marine life and biodiversity, and of course for society and human life, and show how the French landscape is already modified by climate change. The third part addresses the issue of a de-carbonated or low-carbon future. The authors recall and present the various past and current international negotiations, outline recent positive evolutions in the commitment of countries, and give an overview of the various possibilities to mitigate global warming by the development of a low carbon economy (renewable energies, sustainable buildings, energy transition for industries). The last parts address the adaptation to climate change and French perspectives in relationship with the French environment policy

  17. Detailed Modelling of the Deep Decarbonisation Scenarios with Demand Response Technologies in the Heating and Cooling Sector: A Case Study for Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Calise

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Energy policies accompanying the transition towards a sustainable development process must be supported by technical analyses in which future energy scenarios are modeled and evaluated. This paper analyzes possible decarbonization scenarios in Italy for the year 2050. They envisage high electrification of transports and residential buildings, high use of renewable energies, and a modal shift towards public transport. The energy scenarios are evaluated using a software program, EnergyPLAN, starting from a reference model developed for the year 2014. Special attention has been given to the modeling of data that are unavailable in the literature, such as the time profile of heating and cooling demands, obtained with the degree-days method and validated by elaborating the results of the modeling of the residential building stock, this latter was dynamically simulated in TRNSYS. The results show that to obtain a significant decrease of greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuel consumption, it is necessary not only to promote a deeper penetration of renewable sources, but also their integration with other technologies (cogeneration, trigeneration, power-to-heat systems, thermal storage, vehicle-to-grid operations. In fact, renewables technologies alone can raise some critical issues, such as excess and/or shortage of electricity production and non-sustainable exploitation of biomass.

  18. Economic competitiveness of off-peak hydrogen production today - A European comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansilla, C.; Dautremont, S.; Louyrette, J.; Albou, S.; Bourasseau, C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen has a wide range of applications. In view of the environmental benefits, hydrogen can be produced by de-carbonized means. When alkaline electrolysis is the selected process, extra value is offered by flexible operation that could bring both; an opportunity to reduce the cost of hydrogen produced (by consuming electricity during off-peak hours, and stopping the process during peak hours) and also a complementary tool to help balancing of the electric system. This paper assesses the profitability of market-driven operation for three different markets: France, Germany and Spain, with an analysis on the spot market. The market that exhibits the biggest potential in terms of profitability thanks to flexible operation is the French one, for each studied year. France is also the country that has the smallest installed renewable capacity amongst three considered countries. The gain on the hydrogen production cost allowed by the optimization is less than 3%. Hence, market-driven operation does not seem highly favourable to valorize fluctuating hydrogen production, when only the market price opportunities are considered. The balancing tool provided by the electrolysis system needs to be specifically valorized, in order to make flexible operation profitable. (authors)

  19. Nuclear energy: Between global electricity demand, worldwide decarbonisation imperativeness, and planetary environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prăvălie, Remus; Bandoc, Georgeta

    2018-03-01

    For decades, nuclear energy has been considered an important option for ensuring global energy security, and it has recently started being promoted as a solution for climate change mitigation. However, nuclear power remains highly controversial due to its associated risks - nuclear accidents and problematic radioactive waste management. This review aims to assess the viability of global nuclear energy economically (energy-wise), climatically and environmentally. To this end, the nuclear sector's energy- and climate-related advantages were explored alongside the downsides that mainly relate to radioactive pollution. Economically, it was found that nuclear energy is still an important power source in many countries around the world. Climatically, nuclear power is a low-carbon technology and can therefore be a viable option for the decarbonization of the world's major economies over the following decades, if coupled with other large-scale strategies such as renewable energies. These benefits are however outweighed by the radioactive danger associated to nuclear power plants, either in the context of the nuclear accidents that have already occurred or in that of the large amounts of long-lived nuclear waste that have been growing for decades and that represent a significant environmental and societal threat. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Magmatic-like fluid source of the Chingshui geothermal field, NE Taiwan evidenced by carbonate clumped-isotope paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Chia; Song, Sheng-Rong; Wang, Pei-Ling; Wu, Chung-Che; Mii, Horng-Sheng; MacDonald, John; Shen, Chuan-Chou; John, Cédric M.

    2017-11-01

    The Chingshui geothermal field, a moderate-temperature and water-dominated hydrothermal system, was the site of the first geothermal power plant in Taiwan. Many geological, geophysical and geochemical studies using more than 21 drilled wells have been performed since the 1960s. However, there are still controversies regarding the heat and fluid sources due to the tectonically complicated geological setting. To clarify the heat and fluid sources, we analyzed clumped isotopes with carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of calcite scaling in geothermal wells and veins on outcrops and calculated the δ18O values of the source fluids. Two populations of δ18O values were calculated: -5.8 ± 0.8‰ VSMOW from scaling in the well and -1.0 ± 1.6‰ to 10.0 ± 1.3‰ VSMOW from outcropping calcite veins, indicative of meteoric and magmatic fluid sources, respectively. Meanwhile, two hydrothermal reservoirs at different depths have been identified by magnetotelluric (MT) imaging with micro-seismicity underneath this area. As a result, we propose a two-reservoir model: the shallow reservoir provides fluids from meteoric water for the scaling sampled from wells, whereas the deep reservoir provides magmatic fluids from deep marble decarbonization recorded in outcropping calcite veins.

  1. Energy and sustainability: a global view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldemberg, J.

    1995-01-01

    A discussion is made of the conflicting concepts of sustainable development, focusing primarily on energy resources, as viewed by economists and environmentalists. According to the 'preservationist' view we 'borrow' the Earth from generations to come and have no right to use exhaustible resources. According to 'developmentalists' natural resources are either infinite or can be substituted by alternatives so there is no real problem of exhaustion of resources. It is shown that a compromise between such extreme positions is being forced by the heightened concerns for environmental protection. Outstanding among them are the problems of climate changes resulting from CO 2 (carbon dioxide) emissions from fossil fuel combustion. The energy consumed at present by industrialized and developing countries, and their projections to the year 2020 will be presented as well as the serious environmental consequences of a 'business-as-usual' scenario. These consequences will be much harder to cope with in the developing countries. Carbon emissions will be shown to increase with population, GDP and the 'energy intensity' of the economy. The 'decarbonization' trends of the present economies will be related to the decrease in total fertility rate and 'energy intensity' which is linked to technological advances in energy conservation and structural changes. Mechanisms to accelerate such trends will be discussed as well as financial mechanisms to pay for it, such as carbon taxes. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  2. Uptake of uranium from sea water by microalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Takashi; Horikoshi, Takao; Nakajima, Akira

    1978-01-01

    The uptake of uranium from aqueous systems especially from sea water by various microalgae was investigated. The freshwater microalgae, Chlorella regularis, Scenedesmus bijuga, Scenedesmus chloreloides, Scenedesmus obliquus, Chlamydomonas angulosa, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, accumulated relatively large amounts of uranium from the solution containing uranium only. The concentration factors of the above mentioned algae were: Chlorella regularis 3930, Chlamydomonas 2330 - 3400, Scenedesmus 803 - 1920. The uptake of uranium from sea water by Chlorella regularis was inhibited markedly by the co-existence of carbonate ions. Chlorella cells could take up a great quantity of uranium from decarbonated sea water. The uptake of uranium was affected by the pH of sea water, and the amount of uranium absorbed was maximum at pH 5. The experiment was carried out to screen marine microalgae which have the ability to accumulate a large amount of uranium from sea water. The uptake of uranium from sea water by marine microalgae of different species turned out to be in the following decreasing order: Synechococcus > Chlamydomonas >> Chlorella > Dunaliella > Platymonas > Calothrix > Porphyridium. The amount of uranium absorbed differed markedly with different species of marine microalgae. (author)

  3. Strategies of petroleum companies facing climate change issues; Strategies des compagnies petrolieres face a la problematique du changement climatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervais, St.

    2005-05-01

    The oil industry is particularly concerned with the issue of climate change. The implementation of Greenhouse Gases (GHG) reduction policies can be perceived as an additional environmental constraint for the management of the production chain. It is also represents a first step towards a possible decarbonization of the economy. In the long-term, the fight against global warming calls thus into question the activity level of petroleum companies. Confronted with this, still uncertain, new environmental deal, some petroleum multinationals adopt proactive behaviors, e.g. with voluntary commitments to reduce GHG emissions, or with investments in alternative technologies. First of all, we present the potential economic impacts of the Kyoto Protocol on oil industry. Then, we conduct a comparative analysis of the 'Kyoto risk' for the five largest multinationals of this sector according to their activities and their geographical implantations. Then, for the purpose to interpreting proactive strategies of firms such as BP and Shell, we examine various explanations including 'win-win', public image and the response to broad societal needs. This leads us to formalize the proactive behavior as an anticipatory management of carbon contestability, particularly perceptible in financial markets. Lastly, we try to justify economically investments of companies in the field of alternative energy sources and technologies through the lens of real options theory and by a management of the exhaustible fossil resources. (author)

  4. The Value of a Valuation Perspective for Theorizing about Social Change and Climate Change: A Study on Carbon Pricing in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Engels

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This study combines three purposes: to advance a valuation perspective for theorizing about social change and climate change; to contribute to the general debate on pricing as the dominant policy to meet climate mitigation goals; to improve our understanding of potential decarbonization processes in China. We apply a valuation perspective to an in-depth case study of an emerging carbon market in Hubei Province in Central China. The study builds on original data collected during field trips to Hubei (2014, 2015 and additional documents covering recent developments in the Chinese carbon market. It shows how putting a price on carbon in China emerges as the outcome of a long-term cultural and institutional process in which China's high-carbon growth model is increasingly contested. We emphasize the work that was required before a carbon price could emerge as a market price, and focus on the uncertainty that needed to be overcome in the complex multilevel Chinese system. We suggest that China's introduction of low-carbon policies are a side effect of other political, economic and social pressures, and that it is largely facilitated because such policies are consistent with many other changes that are occurring simultaneously both in the Chinese context and globally.

  5. Uptake of uranium from sea water by Synechococcus elongatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikoshi, Takao; Nakajima, Akira; Sakaguchi, Takashi

    1979-01-01

    Basic features of the uranium uptake by Synechococcus elongatus, and the factors affecting it were examined. Synechococcus elongatus was grown in Roux flasks containing 1 liter of culture solution in light (20,000 lux) and with aeration at 30 deg C. Synechococcus cells in the linear growth phase were collected by centrifugation at 6,000 x g for 5 minutes, washed with sea water, and used for the uranium-uptake experiments. The uptake of uranium from sea water containing 1 ppm of the element was strongly affected by the pH of sea water. The optimum uptake was at pH 5. Presence of carbonate ions markedly inhibited and decarbonation of sea water greatly enhanced the uptake. Absorption of uranium by Synechococcus cells was initially rapid, and reached a plateau within 24 hours. The uranium accumulation capacity of Synechococcus cells was increased by heat treatment, the capacity of scalded cells being about twice as much as that of living cells. Most of the uranium absorbed by Synechococcus was found in the inner space of the cells, and only a small amount was present in the cell walls. (Kaihara, S.)

  6. California Power-to-Gas and Power-to-Hydrogen Near-Term Business Case Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichman, Josh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Flexible operation of electrolysis systems represents an opportunity to reduce the cost of hydrogen for a variety of end-uses while also supporting grid operations and thereby enabling greater renewable penetration. California is an ideal location to realize that value on account of growing renewable capacity and markets for hydrogen as a fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) fuel, refineries, and other end-uses. Shifting the production of hydrogen to avoid high cost electricity and participation in utility and system operator markets along with installing renewable generation to avoid utility charges and increase revenue from the Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) program can result in around $2.5/kg (21%) reduction in the production and delivery cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. This reduction can be achieved without impacting the consumers of hydrogen. Additionally, future strategies for reducing hydrogen cost were explored and include lower cost of capital, participation in the Renewable Fuel Standard program, capital cost reduction, and increased LCFS value. Each must be achieved independently and could each contribute to further reductions. Using the assumptions in this study found a 29% reduction in cost if all future strategies are realized. Flexible hydrogen production can simultaneously improve the performance and decarbonize multiple energy sectors. The lessons learned from this study should be used to understand near-term cost drivers and to support longer-term research activities to further improve cost effectiveness of grid integrated electrolysis systems.

  7. National Deployment of Domestic Geothermal Heat Pump Technology: Observations on the UK Experience 1995–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Rees

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Uptake of geothermal heat pump technology in the UK and corresponding development of a domestic installation industry has progressed significantly in the last decade. This paper summarizes the growth process and reviews the research that has been specifically concerned with conditions in the UK. We discuss the driving forces behind these developments and some of the supporting policy initiatives that have been implemented. Publically funded national trials were completed to assess the performance and acceptance of the technology and validate design and installation standards. We comment on both the technical and non-technical findings of the trials and the related academic research and their relevance to standards development. A number of technical issues can be identified—some of which may be particular to the UK—and we suggest a number of research and development questions that need to be addressed further. Current national support for the technology relies solely on a tariff mechanism and it is uncertain that this will be effective enough to ensure sufficient growth to meet the national renewable heat target in 2020. A broader package of support that includes mandatory measures applied to future housing development and retrofit may be necessary to ensure long-term plans for national deployment and decarbonization of heat are achieved. Industry needs to demonstrate that efficiency standards can be assured, capital costs reduced in the medium-term and that national training schemes are effective.

  8. I-tese newsletter - Number 13 - Summer 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popiolek, Nathalie; Devezeaux, Jean-Guy; Bernard, Herve; Behar, Christophe; Birraux, Claude; Cesarsky, Catherine; Sabourin, Didier; Imbach, Juliette; Le Duigou, Alain

    2011-01-01

    The first part of this issue reports a meeting (the third I-tese Day which took place in June 2011), the theme of which was the way to boost innovation towards a less carbonated economy, or how to pass from fundamental science to the market. Several topics have been addressed: the definition, nature and impacts of innovation, innovation in the field of energy (role of public authorities, of the relationship between actors, and of education). The texts of some contributions are proposed. They dealt with the CEA's contribution to innovation in the field of energy, with management as a tool to promote innovation, with innovation challenging fears and risks, with the role of research, with the way I-tese takes innovation into account in its research activities, with a competitive analysis of the biomass-to-liquid sector, with the application of real options theory to the R and D investment for tomorrow's nuclear, with the relationship between technical innovation and social acceptability (in the case of hydrogen within the AIDHY project). Then, articles discuss a macro-economic theoretical approach of R and D subsidies for de-carbonated energetic technologies, and the end of the HyFrance project for the development of hydrogen markets

  9. Strategies of petroleum companies facing climate change issues; Strategies des compagnies petrolieres face a la problematique du changement climatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervais, St

    2005-05-01

    The oil industry is particularly concerned with the issue of climate change. The implementation of Greenhouse Gases (GHG) reduction policies can be perceived as an additional environmental constraint for the management of the production chain. It is also represents a first step towards a possible decarbonization of the economy. In the long-term, the fight against global warming calls thus into question the activity level of petroleum companies. Confronted with this, still uncertain, new environmental deal, some petroleum multinationals adopt proactive behaviors, e.g. with voluntary commitments to reduce GHG emissions, or with investments in alternative technologies. First of all, we present the potential economic impacts of the Kyoto Protocol on oil industry. Then, we conduct a comparative analysis of the 'Kyoto risk' for the five largest multinationals of this sector according to their activities and their geographical implantations. Then, for the purpose to interpreting proactive strategies of firms such as BP and Shell, we examine various explanations including 'win-win', public image and the response to broad societal needs. This leads us to formalize the proactive behavior as an anticipatory management of carbon contestability, particularly perceptible in financial markets. Lastly, we try to justify economically investments of companies in the field of alternative energy sources and technologies through the lens of real options theory and by a management of the exhaustible fossil resources. (author)

  10. Novel pathways for fuels and lubricants from biomass optimized using life-cycle greenhouse gas assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R.; Sreekumar, Sanil; Gunbas, Gorkem; Gokhale, Amit A.; Scown, Corinne D.; Toste, F. Dean; Bell, Alexis T.

    2015-01-01

    Decarbonizing the transportation sector is critical to achieving global climate change mitigation. Although biofuels will play an important role in conventional gasoline and diesel applications, bioderived solutions are particularly important in jet fuels and lubricants, for which no other viable renewable alternatives exist. Producing compounds for jet fuel and lubricant base oil applications often requires upgrading fermentation products, such as alcohols and ketones, to reach the appropriate molecular-weight range. Ketones possess both electrophilic and nucleophilic functionality, which allows them to be used as building blocks similar to alkenes and aromatics in a petroleum refining complex. Here, we develop a method for selectively upgrading biomass-derived alkyl methyl ketones with >95% yields into trimer condensates, which can then be hydrodeoxygenated in near-quantitative yields to give a new class of cycloalkane compounds. The basic chemistry developed here can be tailored for aviation fuels as well as lubricants by changing the production strategy. We also demonstrate that a sugarcane biorefinery could use natural synergies between various routes to produce a mixture of lubricant base oils and jet fuels that achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80%. PMID:26056307

  11. Exploring the EU ETS beyond 2020. A first assessment of the EU Commission's proposal for Phase IV of the EU ETS (2021-2030). COPEC Research Program: the Coordination of EU Policies on Energy and CO2 with the EU ETS by 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalard, Matthieu; Alberola, Emilie; Afriat, Marion; Vaidyula, Manasvini; Dahan, Lara; Cail, Sylvain; Cassisa, Cyril; Keramidas, Kimon; Coussy, Paula; Portenart, Philomene

    2015-11-01

    This report, written in partnership with I4CE and IFPen, provides the first complete and comprehensive assessment of the EU Commission's proposal and its coherence with the 2030 Framework for Climate and Energy policies, demonstrating that: 1 - Re-calibrating the EU ETS requires considering its interactions with complementary climate and energy policies by 2030. Interactions between different policies may induce additional costs vis-a-vis an optimal transition to a low-carbon economy. 2 - Introducing the Market Stability Reserve is necessary to support the ambition of the EU ETS. Guaranteeing MSR effectiveness calls for a governing framework to be established before 2030. 3 - The free allocation mechanism for Phase IV requires more flexible and targeted allocation to sectors most exposed to carbon leakage risk. 4 - Expanding the EU ETS scope with the inclusion of the road transport sector may not necessarily be the most cost-effective way to achieve the GHG 2030 target. 5 - Considering the large scale of ETS auction revenues by 2030, the use of ETS proceeds by the European Commission and by Member States constitutes an increasingly relevant funding source to support decarbonization efforts in non-ETS sectors and to finance R and D in low carbon technologies

  12. Financial risk and the transition to a low-carbon economy. Towards a carbon stress testing framework - Working Paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenet, Hugues; Thomae, Jakob; Janci, Didier; Dupre, Stan; Hubert, Romain; Robins, Nick; Cruickshank, Peter

    2015-07-01

    On July 27 at Moody's in New York, 2 deg. Investing Initiative launched the report 'Financial risk and the transition to a low-carbon economy' in partnership with UNEP Inquiry and I4CE. The report reviews the main approaches to assessing carbon risk along the investment chain and discusses barriers to its integration in decision making. The report identifies two categories of climate-related financial risks to financial institutions: risks arising from physical climate change and 'carbon risk' which arise from the transition to a low-carbon economy following one of the possible decarbonization pathways. The authors show that to date, risk factors resulting from climate change and the transition to a low-carbon economy are generally not taken into consideration by mainstream risk assessment and management frameworks; there are multiple reasons for this. The report reviews a number of 'climate and carbon stress test' initiatives that suggest the materiality of these risks along the investment chain. The materiality of these risks for financial institutions and the financial system remains unclear. Financial regulators and policy makers, notably in France, the United Kingdom, and at the G20 level have nevertheless started responding to the issue

  13. Low-Carbon Warehousing: Examining Impacts of Building and Intra-Logistics Design Options on Energy Demand and the CO2 Emissions of Logistics Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Freis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Logistics centers contribute to CO2 emissions in the building and logistics sector and therefore share a responsibility to decarbonize not only the supply chain. Synergy effects in both building and intra-logistics should be considered as suitable levers to lower energy demand and related CO2 emissions. This research develops firs t with a systemic approach an integrated analytical model for energy calculation and reference building models for different types of logistics centers to provide basic knowledge and a methodological framework for planners and managers to aid in the selection of different intra-logistics and building design options for optimum energy efficiency. It then determines the energy demand in reference building models and performs parameter studies to examine interrelations and impacts of design options for intra-logistics, building technology, and building skin on energy demand. It combines these to optimized reference building models to show the extent to which energy and CO2 emission savings can be reached. The results show that it is possible to significantly lower CO2 emissions. However, there are clear differences between the different types of logistics centers and the impacts of different design options.

  14. A sunny future: expert elicitation of China's solar photovoltaic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Long T.; Branstetter, Lee; Azevedo, Inês L.

    2018-03-01

    China has emerged as the global manufacturing center for solar photovoltaic (PV) products. Chinese firms have entered all stages of the supply chain, producing most of the installed solar modules around the world. Meanwhile, production costs are at record lows. The decisions that Chinese solar producers make today will influence the path for the solar industry and its role towards de-carbonization of global energy systems in the years to come. However, to date, there have been no assessments of the future costs and efficiency of solar PV systems produced by the Chinese PV industry. We perform an expert elicitation to assess the technological and non-technological factors that led to the success of China’s silicon PV industry as well as likely future costs and performance. Experts evaluated key metrics such as efficiency, costs, and commercial viability of 17 silicon and non-silicon solar PV technologies by 2030. Silicon-based technologies will continue to be the mainstream product for large-scale electricity generation application in the near future, with module efficiency reaching as high as 23% and production cost as low as 0.24/W. The levelized cost of electricity for solar will be around 34/MWh, allowing solar PV to be competitive with traditional energy resources like coal. The industry’s future developments may be affected by overinvestment, overcapacity, and singular short-term focus.

  15. Thematic outlook. Technical outlook for the fuel-cell research network (PACo). October 23, 2001 update, no. 2; Veille thematique. La veille technique pour le reseau PACo. Actualisation du 23 octobre 2001, no. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-10-01

    This report brings together a compilation of abstracts of articles about some recent research works carried out in the domain of fuel cells, transportation systems, hydrogen production and energy in general: Japan foresees 10 million of clean vehicles from now to 2010; the fuel cell: a new clean and efficient energy source; development of biogas production units for fuel cells; thermodynamic analysis of an hydrogen-supplied proton conductive SOFC; materials for the high temperature reduction of oxygen in a SOFC; stability of of SOFC components; LaSrMnO metal interface for SOFCs; oxygen ion transport in SOFCs; test of a fuel cell-powered bus in 2002; comparative study of fuels for the on-board hydrogen production; electricity and hydrogen cogeneration from natural gas without emission; solar thermal decarbonization of natural gas; IFC patent: self-thermal reformer of gas fuel for a fuel cell system; some considerations about water electrolysis from a solution of sodium hydroxide; hydrogen production from high temperature water; a more compact and efficient wind turbine. (J.S.)

  16. The load shift potential of plug-in electric vehicles with different amounts of charging infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnann, Till; Klingler, Anna-Lena; Kühnbach, Matthias

    2018-06-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles are the currently favoured option to decarbonize the passenger car sector. However, a decarbonisation is only possible with electricity from renewable energies and plug-in electric vehicles might cause peak loads if they started to charge at the same time. Both these issues could be solved with coordinated load shifting (demand response). Previous studies analyzed this research question by focusing on private vehicles with domestic and work charging infrastructure. This study additionally includes the important early adopter group of commercial fleet vehicles and reflects the impact of domestic, commercial, work and public charging. For this purpose, two models are combined. In a comparison of three scenarios, we find that charging of commercial vehicles does not inflict evening load peaks in the same magnitude as purely domestic charging of private cars does. Also for private cars, charging at work occurs during the day and may reduce the necessity of load shifting while public charging plays a less important role in total charging demand as well as load shifting potential. Nonetheless, demand response reduces the system load by about 2.2 GW or 2.8% when domestic and work charging are considered compared to a scenario with only domestic charging.

  17. Cooperation of research and economy for renewable energies and energy efficiency. Contributions; Zusammenarbeit von Forschung und Wirtschaft fuer Erneuerbare Energien und Energieeffizienz. Beitraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczepanski, Petra; Wunschick, Franziska; Martin, Niklas [comps.

    2013-04-15

    The following topics were dealt with: Energy efficiency as driver of economy, green economy, system techniques for photovoltaics and decentral energy systems, energy research at Bosch, portfolio of possible kinds of cooperation of the FVEE-member institutes with industry, efficiency potentials by the new main energy carriers sun and wind, renewable energies and energy efficiency, photovoltaics technology centers for the advanced technology transfer from institutes to the PV industry, thin-film photovoltaics, offshore wind energy and sea energy usage, research requirement at the future rotor, the status of the energy transformation process from the view of the FVEE, geothermal heat supply of metropoles on the example of Berlin, challenges in the research for low-temperature solar thermal energy, efficient refrigeration techniques and solar cooling, suitedness of combined heat and power and heat pumps for the balance of the fluctuating electric-power supply, key role of the current nets in the further decarbonization of the electric-power supply, new battery systems between research and application, the use of biomethane, water electrolysis and regenerative gases as key factors for the energy-system transformation, thermal energy storage, future energy.optimized buildings, energy concepts for cities and region, bridging the information gap on energy efficiency in buildings, integration of electromobiles in the Smart Grid. (HSI)

  18. The assessment of global thermo-energy performances of existing district heating systems optimized by harnessing renewable energy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şoimoşan, Teodora M.; Danku, Gelu; Felseghi, Raluca A.

    2017-12-01

    Within the thermo-energy optimization process of an existing heating system, the increase of the system's energy efficiency and speeding-up the transition to green energy use are pursued. The concept of multi-energy district heating system, with high harnessing levels of the renewable energy sources (RES) in order to produce heat, is expected to be the key-element in the future urban energy infrastructure, due to the important role it can have in the strategies of optimizing and decarbonizing the existing district heating systems. The issues that arise are related to the efficient integration of different technologies of harnessing renewable energy sources in the energy mix and to the increase of the participation levels of RES, respectively. For the holistic modeling of the district heating system, the concept of the energy hub was used, where the synergy of different primary forms of entered energy provides the system a high degree energy security and flexibility in operation. The optimization of energy flows within the energy hub allows the optimization of the thermo-energy district system in order to approach the dual concept of smart city & smart energy.

  19. Progress in thermal comfort research over the last twenty years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dear, R J; Akimoto, T; Arens, E A; Brager, G; Candido, C; Cheong, K W D; Li, B; Nishihara, N; Sekhar, S C; Tanabe, S; Toftum, J; Zhang, H; Zhu, Y

    2013-12-01

    Climate change and the urgency of decarbonizing the built environment are driving technological innovation in the way we deliver thermal comfort to occupants. These changes, in turn, seem to be setting the directions for contemporary thermal comfort research. This article presents a literature review of major changes, developments, and trends in the field of thermal comfort research over the last 20 years. One of the main paradigm shift was the fundamental conceptual reorientation that has taken place in thermal comfort thinking over the last 20 years; a shift away from the physically based determinism of Fanger's comfort model toward the mainstream and acceptance of the adaptive comfort model. Another noticeable shift has been from the undesirable toward the desirable qualities of air movement. Additionally, sophisticated models covering the physics and physiology of the human body were developed, driven by the continuous challenge to model thermal comfort at the same anatomical resolution and to combine these localized signals into a coherent, global thermal perception. Finally, the demand for ever increasing building energy efficiency is pushing technological innovation in the way we deliver comfortable indoor environments. These trends, in turn, continue setting the directions for contemporary thermal comfort research for the next decades. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [Synthesis and characteristics of porous hydroxyapatite bioceramics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jinlong; Zhang, Zhenxi; Jiang, Dazong

    2002-06-01

    The macroporous structure of human bone allows the ingrowth of the soft tissues and organic cells into the bone matrix, profits the development and metabolism of bone tissue, and adapts the bone to the change of load. There is great requirement for artificial biomimic porous bioactive ceramics with the similar structure of bone tissue that can be used clinically for repairing lost bone. Fine hydroxyapatite (HAp) powder produced by wet chemical reaction was mixed with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), polyvinyl alcohol, methyl cellulose or other pores-making materials to form green cake. After drying at low temperature (below 100 degrees C) and decarbonizing at about 300 degrees C-400 degrees C, the spongy ceramic block was sintered at high temperature, thus, macroporous HAp bioceramic with interconnected pores and reasonable porosity and pore-diameter was manufactured. This kind of porous HAp bioceramics were intrinsically osteoinductive to a certain degree, but its outstanding property was that they can absorb human bone morphogenetic proteins and other bone growth factors to form composites, so that the macroporous HAp bioactive ceramic has appropriate feasibility for clinical application. From the point of biomedical application, the recent developments in synthesis and characteristics investigation of macroporous HAp are reviewed in this paper.

  1. Global Emissions of Nitrous Oxide: Key Source Sectors, their Future Activities and Technical Opportunities for Emission Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiwarter, W.; Höglund-Isaksson, L.; Klimont, Z.; Schöpp, W.; Amann, M.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrous oxide originates primarily from natural biogeochemical processes, but its atmospheric concentrations have been strongly affected by human activities. According to IPCC, it is the third largest contributor to the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (after carbon dioxide and methane). Deep decarbonization scenarios, which are able to constrain global temperature increase within 1.5°C, require strategies to cut methane and nitrous oxide emissions on top of phasing out carbon dioxide emissions. Employing the Greenhouse gas and Air pollution INteractions and Synergies (GAINS) model, we have estimated global emissions of nitrous oxide until 2050. Using explicitly defined emission reduction technologies we demonstrate that, by 2030, about 26% ± 9% of the emissions can be avoided assuming full implementation of currently existing reduction technologies. Nearly a quarter of this mitigation can be achieved at marginal costs lower than 10 Euro/t CO2-eq with the chemical industry sector offering important reductions. Overall, the largest emitter of nitrous oxide, agriculture, also provides the largest emission abatement potentials. Emission reduction may be achieved by precision farming methods (variable rate technology) as well as by agrochemistry (nitrification inhibitors). Regionally, the largest emission reductions are achievable where intensive agriculture and industry are prevalent (production and application of mineral fertilizers): Centrally Planned Asia including China, North and Latin America, and South Asia including India. Further deep cuts in nitrous oxide emissions will require extending reduction efforts beyond strictly technological solutions, i.e., considering behavioral changes, including widespread adoption of "healthy diets" minimizing excess protein consumption.

  2. Super oil cracking update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulraney, D.

    1997-01-01

    The conversion of residual fuel oil to usable middle distillates was discussed. The residue conversion processing paths are usually based on separation, carbon rejection, or hydrogen addition principles. Super Oil Cracking (SOC) uses a slurry catalyst system in a new, tubular reactor to achieve high levels of hydrothermal conversion. SOC can upgrade a variety of heavy, high metals residue feedstocks with high yields of middle distillates. The SOC products can also be further treated into feedstocks for FCC or hydrocracking. The SOC process can be incorporated easily into a refinery to obtain incremental residue conversion directly. It can also be integrated with other residue processes, acting as a demetallization and decarbonization step which results in enhanced overall conversion. The relative rate of coke formation and its handling are distinguishing characteristics between residue upgrading technologies. The SOC process operates at higher temperatures that other residue hydrocracking processes resulting in higher rates of thermal decomposition, thus preventing coke formation. SOC process can operate as a stand-alone upgrader or can be integrated with other bottoms processing steps to extend the refiner's range of options for increasing bottoms conversion.3 tabs., 14 figs

  3. Promoting Decentralized Sustainable Energy Systems in Different Supply Scenarios: The Role of Autarky Aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Ecker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of decentralized renewable energy systems is of crucial importance for the decarbonization of energy generation worldwide. Purchase decisions regarding innovative energy systems depend to some extent on consumers’ perception of the systems’ degree of autarky. We assumed that, in addition to the energetic perspective, consumers associate other non-energetic facets such as independence, autonomy, self-sufficiency, or control with the concept of autarky. These psychological facets of autarky were expected to contribute to purchase decisions. In Study 1, participants (N = 168 evaluated three future energy supply scenarios. The scenarios varied regarding their range of autarky (household/neighborhood/small town, but the individually realized degree of energetic autarky did not vary. Participants reported a higher willingness to pay in connection with a higher perceived psychological autarky for the Household Scenario. Study 1’s findings were confirmed by Study 2, in which qualitative interviews (N = 13 also revealed that participants favored the Household Scenario on several points. These evaluations were driven by the anticipated psychological facets of autarky that is the subjective perception of being independent, autonomous, self-sufficient, energy secure, and of control. To promote an adoption of renewable energy systems, these psychological autarky facets need to be addressed. Enabling the people to self-determine, control, and secure their energy provision even in complex organizational settings in such a manner is likely to increase their acceptance and therefore foster the required social transition as a whole.

  4. Effects of Low-Carbon Technologies and End-Use Electrification on Energy-Related Greenhouse Gases Mitigation in China by 2050

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Guo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Greenhouse gas emissions in China have been increasing in line with its energy consumption and economic growth. Major means for energy-related greenhouse gases mitigation in the foreseeable future are transition to less carbon intensive energy supplies and structural changes in energy consumption. In this paper, a bottom-up model is built to examine typical projected scenarios for energy supply and demand, with which trends of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by 2050 can be analyzed. Results show that low-carbon technologies remain essential contributors to reducing emissions and altering emissions trends up to 2050. By pushing the limit of current practicality, emissions reduction can reach 20 to 28 percent and the advent of carbon peaking could shift from 2040 to 2030. In addition, the effect of electrification at end-use sectors is studied. Results show that electrifying transport could reduce emissions and bring the advent of carbon peaking forward, but the effect is less significant compared with low-carbon technologies. Moreover, it implies the importance of decarbonizing power supply before electrifying end-use sectors.

  5. Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels. Influence of Crude Oil Price and Technology Maturity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzola, Pierpaolo; Morrison, Geoff; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Cuenot, Francois; Ghandi, Abbas; Fulton, Lewis

    2013-07-01

    This study examines the production costs of a range of transport fuels and energy carriers under varying crude oil price assumptions and technology market maturation levels. An engineering ''bottom-up'' approach is used to estimate the effect of the input cost of oil and of various technological assumptions on the finished price of these fuels. In total, the production costs of 20 fuels are examined for crude oil prices between USD 60 and USD 150 per barrel. Some fuel pathways can be competitive with oil as their production, transport and storage technology matures, and as oil price increases. Rising oil prices will offer new opportunities to switch to alternative fuels for transport, to diversify the energy mix of the transport sector, and to reduce the exposure of the whole system to price volatility and potential distuption of supply. In a time of uncertainty about the leading vehicle technology to decarbonize the transport sector, looking at the fuel cost brings key information to be considered to keep mobility affordable yet sustainable.

  6. Climate-society feedbacks and the avoidance of dangerous climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, A. J.; Leedal, D. T.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2012-09-01

    The growth in anthropogenic CO2 emissions experienced since the onset of the Industrial Revolution is the most important disturbance operating on the Earth's climate system. To avoid dangerous climate change, future greenhouse-gas emissions will have to deviate from business-as-usual trajectories. This implies that feedback links need to exist between climate change and societal actions. Here, we show that, consciously or otherwise, these feedbacks can be represented by linking global mean temperature change to the growth dynamics of CO2 emissions. We show that the global growth of new renewable sources of energy post-1990 represents a climate-society feedback of ~0.25%yr-1 per degree increase in global mean temperature. We also show that to fulfil the outcomes negotiated in Durban in 2011, society will have to become ~ 50 times more responsive to global mean temperature change than it has been since 1990. If global energy use continues to grow as it has done historically then this would result in amplification of the long-term endogenous rate of decarbonization from -0.6%yr-1 to ~-13%yr-1. It is apparent that modest levels of feedback sensitivity pay large dividends in avoiding climate change but that the marginal return on this effort diminishes rapidly as the required feedback strength increases.

  7. Impacts of nationally determined contributions on 2030 global greenhouse gas emissions: uncertainty analysis and distribution of emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benveniste, Hélène; Boucher, Olivier; Guivarch, Céline; Le Treut, Hervé; Criqui, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), submitted by Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change before and after the 21st Conference of Parties, summarize domestic objectives for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions for the 2025-2030 time horizon. In the absence, for now, of detailed guidelines for the format of NDCs, ancillary data are needed to interpret some NDCs and project GHG emissions in 2030. Here, we provide an analysis of uncertainty sources and their impacts on 2030 global GHG emissions based on the sole and full achievement of the NDCs. We estimate that NDCs project into 56.8-66.5 Gt CO2eq yr-1 emissions in 2030 (90% confidence interval), which is higher than previous estimates, and with a larger uncertainty range. Despite these uncertainties, NDCs robustly shift GHG emissions towards emerging and developing countries and reduce international inequalities in per capita GHG emissions. Finally, we stress that current NDCs imply larger emissions reduction rates after 2030 than during the 2010-2030 period if long-term temperature goals are to be fulfilled. Our results highlight four requirements for the forthcoming ‘climate regime’: a clearer framework regarding future NDCs’ design, an increasing participation of emerging and developing countries in the global mitigation effort, an ambitious update mechanism in order to avoid hardly feasible decarbonization rates after 2030 and an anticipation of steep decreases in global emissions after 2030.

  8. I-tese Newsletter No. 21 Spring 2014. Quarterly newsletter of the Institute of Technique-Economics of Energetic Systems for scientists, managers, supervisors and decision-makers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devezeaux, Jean-Guy; Fabreguettes, Vincent; Gabriel, Sophie; Hache, Emmanuel; Hooge, Sophie; Kokshagina, Olga; Labussiere, Olivier; Le Masson, Pascal; Levillain, Kevin; Monnet, Antoine; Popiolek, Nathalie; Thais, Francoise; Weil, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    A first article presents and comments the energetic scenarios proposed by the ANCRE (Alliance Nationale de Coordination de la Recherche pour l'Energie) which gathers all French research institutions involved in the field of energy: reinforced sobriety (energy saving, energy efficiency, development of renewable energies), de-carbonation by electricity (energy efficiency, renewable and nuclear electricity), diversified vectors (local dimension, heat recovery, bio-energies, energy efficiency), nuclear and renewable, and trend (reference scenario corresponding to the present trend). Results are briefly discussed, notably in terms of primary and final energy consumption, of evolution of energy consumption per sector. Scenarios are assessed in terms of investment, of jobs, of impact on households, of energy independence and foreign trade, of impacts on the environment. A second article addresses the issue of the future of territories in the energy transition policy. A third article discusses why and how to develop generic technologies within the CEA (the authors discuss the contributions of an approach based on theories and methods of contemporary design)

  9. Nuclear energy is part of the solution to struggle against climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudon, Valerie; Jouette, Isabelle; Le Ngoc, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This document is the contribution of the SFEN to the preparation of the Paris Conference on Climate (COP21). It is based on various scenarios proposed by the IEA and assessments made by different work groups of the IPCC. This contribution outlines that the world will need all low-carbon energies, notably nuclear energy. It outlines that, in 35 years of time, 80 pc of electricity will have to be low-carbon electricity, that the situation is complex as CO 2 emission must be decreased while facing basic needs of humanity, that the IPCC identifies three types of low-carbon electricity (renewable, nuclear and CCS for carbon capture and sequestration), and that the electrification of uses is an efficient vector for de-carbonation. It also outlines that we must at once use available low-carbon energies: 70 pc of the carbon budget has already been spent; nuclear energy is an industrial, available, low-carbon and efficient solution; nuclear energy is the first low-carbon electricity source in OECD countries; nuclear energy is a solution to support growth in emerging countries; nuclear energy will keep on being an asset to reduce CO 2 emissions. The last part outlines that every country should be able to access an as large as possible portfolio of low-carbon technologies, and that nuclear energy is an opportunity to meet this challenge

  10. India: an emerging nuclear giant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc, Boris

    2015-01-01

    After having recalled that India has always been interested in nuclear energy, this article outlines that this country is suffering from an increasing air pollution with noticeable impacts on health (thousands of deaths per year due to pollution), and, even though its CO 2 emissions have very much increased during the past decades, its governments want to rely on nuclear energy to face climatic challenges. The article also outlines that the country is facing increasing energy needs when about 300 millions of inhabitants do not have access to electricity. New sources of energy production must then be developed, preferably de-carbonated sources (hydraulic, wind, nuclear, solar, so on). Therefore, progress must be made to reduce the share of fossil energy. The author proposes a brief presentation of the Indian nuclear programme, with its 20 existing reactors and 6 reactors under construction. A strategy has been defined to exploit as many PWRs as possible, to introduce fourth generation reactors, and to use a thorium fuelled reactor. The framework of the French-Indian partnership is briefly presented, and the involvements of AREVA for the construction of six EPRs, and of the CEA for the development of fourth generation reactors are evoked

  11. Renewable energy investment: Policy and market impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, Wolf Heinrich; Szolgayová, Jana; Fuss, Sabine; Obersteiner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Feedback of decisions to the market: large companies can have an impact on prices in the market. ► Multiple uncertainties: analysis of uncertainties emanating from both markets and environment. ► Policy analysis: impact of uncertainty about the durability of feed-in tariffs. -- Abstract: The liberalization of electricity markets in recent years has enhanced competition among power-generating firms facing uncertain decisions of competitors and thus uncertain prices. At the same time, promoting renewable energy has been a key ingredient in energy policy seeking to de-carbonize the energy mix. Public incentives for companies to invest in renewable technologies range from feed-in tariffs, to investment subsidies, tax credits, portfolio requirements and certificate systems. We use a real options model in discrete time with lumpy multiple investments to analyze the decisions of an electricity producer to invest into new power generating capacity, to select the type of technology and to optimize its operation under price uncertainty and with market effects. We account for both the specific characteristics of renewables and the market effects of investment decisions. The prices are determined endogenously by the supply of electricity in the market and by exogenous electricity price uncertainty. The framework is used to analyze energy policy, as well as the reaction of producers to uncertainty in the political and regulatory framework. In this way, we are able to compare different policies to foster investment into renewables and analyze their impacts on the market.

  12. Thermal behaviour of chrome shavings and of sludges recovered after digestion of tanned solid wastes with calcium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahiri, S.; Albizane, A.; Messaoudi, A.; Azzi, M.; Bennazha, J.; Younssi, S. Alami; Bouhria, M.

    2007-01-01

    The thermal behaviour of chrome shavings and of sludges recovered after digestion of tanned wastes with Ca(OH) 2 was studied. Ashes obtained after incineration of wastes at various temperatures were analysed by X-ray diffraction and EDX method. The main crystallized phases present in the ash obtained at 600 deg. C are Cr 2 O 3 and NaCl. The diffractograms revealed an increase in the intensities of the chromium oxide peaks and a very notable decrease of the amount of sodium chloride at 1100 deg. C. EDX analysis revealed a total disappearance of the chlorine peak at this temperature. Scanning electron micrographs show that the waste lost its fibrous aspect when the temperature increases. Formation of aggregates was noted after 550 deg. C. Combustion of organic matters and decarbonation phenomenon are the main stages observed on GTA and DTA curves of sludges. These phenomena are, respectively, exothermic and endothermic. The diffractogram of sludges recorded at 550 deg. C, in the presence of a constant oxygen surplus, revealed the presence of CaCrO 4 and CaCO 3

  13. Designing a Model for the Glogbal Energy System—GENeSYS-MOD: An Application of the Open-Source Energy Modeling System (OSeMOSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Löffler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a path for the global energy system up to 2050, presenting a new application of the open-source energy modeling system (OSeMOSYS to the community. It allows quite disaggregate energy and emission analysis: Global Energy System Model (GENeSYS-MOD uses a system of linear equations of the energy system to search for lowest-cost solutions for a secure energy supply, given externally defined constraints, mainly in terms of CO2-emissions. The general algebraic modeling system (GAMS version of OSeMOSYS is updated to the newest version and, in addition, extended and enhanced to include e.g., a modal split for transport, an improved trading system, and changes to storages. The model can be scaled from small-scale applications, e.g., a company, to cover the global energy system. The paper also includes an application of GENeSYS-MOD to analyze decarbonization scenarios at the global level, broken down into 10 regions. Its main focus is on interdependencies between traditionally segregated sectors: electricity, transportation, and heating; which are all included in the model. Model calculations suggests that in order to achieve the 1.5–2 °C target, a combination of renewable energy sources provides the lowest-cost solution, solar photovoltaic being the dominant source. Average costs of electricity generation in 2050 are about 4 €cents/kWh (excluding infrastructure and transportation costs.

  14. No reason to wait

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malloch Brown, M.

    2006-01-01

    Global warming is not the only problem now facing mankind, but it is one of the most serious with which humanity has ever been confronted. Others such as overpopulation - as predicted by Malthus in the 19th century did not occur as forecast. Water shortages, already plaguing many regions of the world, may also probably be tackled successfully. There are however cases where civilizations such as those of Easter Island and some large Mayan Yucatan settlements have perished as a result of overexploiting natural resources. With global warming we are again testing the limits of the carrying capacity of the environment on which we depend, changing the composition of the atmosphere with unknown consequences. The jury is still out on whether civilisation will survive it. The irony is that we know precisely what is causing global warming: the massive injection of gases from human activities into the atmosphere, mainly CO 2 (carbon dioxide) from the burning of fossil fuels. The solution is therefore clear: to reduce such emissions, we must 'decarbonize' the present energy system. This, of course, is more easily said than done, because the extraordinary progress witnessed in the 20th century was based essentially on the large-scale, widespread use of fossil fuels. Coal, oil and gas became essential for mobility, electricity generation, heat production and all kinds of chemical and industrial products

  15. Information report issued in application of the article 146 of the Regulation by the Commission for finances, general economy and budget control about the cost of the early closure of nuclear reactors: the example of Fessenheim - Nr 2233

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goua, Marc; Mariton, Herve

    2014-01-01

    The first part of this report discusses the early closures of nuclear power stations for matters of energy policy. It comments how the reduction of the nuclear share in the electric mix would lead to the early closure of about twenty reactors, i.e. two reactors a year. It also notices that the future of the nuclear stock could better be an extension of its exploitation beyond 40 and even 50 years. The authors discuss the fact that the bill project on energy transition for a green growth modifies the legal framework for the closure of a nuclear plant. They state that no technical reason leads to the choice of the Fessenheim site for a closure: it significantly contributes to the de-carbonated electricity production, its age has only a symbolic meaning as it never has been so safe, the ASN authorized the operation of two reactors for ten additional years, and the investments prescribed by the ASN and achieved by the operator guarantee the highest level of safety. The second part of this report addresses and discusses the various issues associated with the costs of an early closure of a nuclear plant: cost for the community, impact on jobs, and loss of earnings for the operator which will result in compensation paid by the State

  16. Pluri-annual programming of energy (PPE): an escalation policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perves, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Concerning the pluri-annual programming of energy for the 2018-2023 period, the French government proposes to accelerate the deployment of wind and solar energies in order to reach 43.000 - 49.200 MW globally in 2023. To compare wind and solar energies totaled 16.500 MW in 2015. The 2023 level will represent around 70% of the today's nuclear power production. This energy policy will require a huge investment of 60 billions euros by 2023. It appears that offshore wind energy is not favoured because of its important costs and this acceleration will imply more wind turbines installed on land which can have a negative impact on the environment. Furthermore wind and solar energies will require other sources of energy to compensate seasonal effects, the back-up energy may be nuclear but it would increase the kWh cost because nuclear energy will be under-used. The gain in CO_2 will be null because the electricity production in France is largely de-carbonized thanks to the use of nuclear energy. A more progressive deployment of renewable energies in the French energy mix is recommended. (A.C.)

  17. Thermogravimetric analysis-mass spectrometry (TG-MS) of selected Chinese palygorskites-Implications for structural water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Hongfei; Yang, Jing; Frost, Ray L.

    2011-01-01

    Four Chinese palygorskites clay minerals have been analysed by thermogravimetric analysis-mass spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The structural water of the palygorskite dehydrates in the temperature range of 30-625 o C, as shown in the thermogravimetric analysis and mass spectrometric curves. The mass spectrometric curves combined the differential thermogravimetric curves enable the detailed determination of the main dehydration steps. The results show that the dehydration occurs in four main steps: (a) elimination of interparticle water and partial zeolitic water at below 110 o C, (b) release of the rest part of zeolitic water from the structural layer of palygorskite at about 160 o C, (c) dehydration of one part of bound water at about 340 o C and (d) loss of the rest part of bound water at around 450 o C. The temperatures of dehydration of the palygorskite minerals are found to be influenced by the geological environment and the amount and kind of impurities. The evolved gases in the decomposition process are various because of the different amounts and kind of impurities. It is also found that decarbonization takes place at around 600 o C due to the decomposition of calcite and dolomite impurities in these minerals. It is evident by the mass spectrometric curve that the water is given out from the samples and carbon dioxide originates from the impurity calcite and dolomite.

  18. Thermal decomposition of hydrotalcite-like compounds studied by a novel tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Ramirez, Javier; Abello, Sonia

    2006-01-01

    For the first time, we report on the application of a tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) as a novel technique to investigate the thermal decomposition of hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlcs) in air. Experiments were performed in the temperature range of 323-973 K with Mg-Al, Ni-Al, and Co-Al-HTlcs. The TEOM technique measures mass changes based on inertial forces, presenting important advantages over conventional thermogravimetric analyzers, such as the very rapid time response and the well-defined flow pattern. In general terms, excellent agreement between TEOM, TGA, and DTA techniques during HTlc decomposition was obtained. Interestingly, transition temperatures in the TEOM were lower than in TGA and DTA, particularly for removal of interlayer water but also for dehydroxylation of the brucite-like layers and decarbonation. This was attributed to the flow-through operation in the tapered element of the TEOM as compared to the recognized gas stagnancy and bypass in sample crucibles of conventional thermogravimetric analyzers. Our results conclude that the TEOM technique is suitable for temperature-programmed studies. However, due to its operation principle, blank runs are required in contrast to the more automatic operation in commercial thermogravimetric units. Besides, a careful sample loading and packing in the micro-reactor is essential for reproducible results

  19. Using algae and submerged calcifying water flora for treating neutral to alkaline uranium-contaminated water; Verwendung von Algen und submersen kalzifizierenden Wasserpflanzen zur Aufbereitung neutraler bis basischer uranhaltiger Waesser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dienemann, C.; Dienemann, H.; Stolz, L.; Dudel, E.G. [TU Dresden (DE). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Oekologie und Umweltschutz, Tharandt (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Elimination of uranium from neutral to alkaline water is a complex technical process involving decarbonation, usually with HCl, followed by uranium removal by adding alkaline substances. In passive water treatment systems, uranium species - which often consist of a combination of oxidation and reduction stages - are not sufficiently considered. Algae and submerged water plants provide a natural alternative. They remove carbon dioxides or hydrogen carbonate, depending on the species, thus reducting the concentrations of the carbonate species. As the uranium species in alkaline water are coupled on the one hand to the carbonate species and on the other hand on the earth alkali metals, algae and submerged calcifying water plants are an excellent preliminary stage as a supplement to conventional passive water treatment systems. For a quantification of this effect, laboratory experiments were made with Cladophara spec. and with uranium concentrations of 100, 250 and 1000 {mu}g U.L{sup -1} at pH 8.3. The pH was adjusted with NaOH resp. Na2CO3 resulting in different uranium species. After 20 minutes, there was a difference in self-absorption between the different species (higher uranium concentration for NaOH than for Na2CO3), which was no longer observeable after 24 h. On the basis of data on the biomass development of macrophytic algae (Cladophora and Microspora) in a flowing river section near Neuensalz/Vogtland district, the final dimensions of a purification stage of this type are assessed. (orig.)

  20. Using algae and submerged calcifying water flora for treating neutral to alkaline uranium-contaminated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienemann, C.; Dienemann, H.; Stolz, L.; Dudel, E.G.

    2005-01-01

    Elimination of uranium from neutral to alkaline water is a complex technical process involving decarbonation, usually with HCl, followed by uranium removal by adding alkaline substances. In passive water treatment systems, uranium species - which often consist of a combination of oxidation and reduction stages - are not sufficiently considered. Algae and submerged water plants provide a natural alternative. They remove carbon dioxides or hydrogen carbonate, depending on the species, thus reducting the concentrations of the carbonate species. As the uranium species in alkaline water are coupled on the one hand to the carbonate species and on the other hand on the earth alkali metals, algae and submerged calcifying water plants are an excellent preliminary stage as a supplement to conventional passive water treatment systems. For a quantification of this effect, laboratory experiments were made with Cladophara spec. and with uranium concentrations of 100, 250 and 1000 μg U.L -1 at pH 8.3. The pH was adjusted with NaOH resp. Na2CO3 resulting in different uranium species. After 20 minutes, there was a difference in self-absorption between the different species (higher uranium concentration for NaOH than for Na2CO3), which was no longer observeable after 24 h. On the basis of data on the biomass development of macrophytic algae (Cladophora and Microspora) in a flowing river section near Neuensalz/Vogtland district, the final dimensions of a purification stage of this type are assessed. (orig.)

  1. Energy Policy is Technology Politics The Hydrogen Energy Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl-Jochen Winter

    2006-01-01

    Germany's energy supply status shows both an accumulation of unsatisfactory sustainabilities putting the nation's energy security at risk, and a hopeful sign: The nation's supply dependency on foreign sources and the accordingly unavoidable price dictate the nation suffers under is almost life risking; the technological skill, however, of the nation's researchers, engineers, and industry materializes in a good percentage of the indigenous and the world's energy conversion technology market. Exemplified with the up and coming hydrogen energy economy this paper tries to advocate the 21. century energy credo: energy policy is energy technology politics! Energy source thinking and acting is 19. and 20. century, energy efficient conversion technology thinking and acting is 21. century. Hydrogen energy is on the verge of becoming the centre-field of world energy interest. Hydrogen energy is key for the de-carbonization and, thus, sustainabilization of fossil fuels, and as a storage and transport means for the introduction of so far un-operational huge renewable sources into the world energy market. - What is most important is hydrogen's thermodynamic ability to exergize the energy scheme: hydrogen makes more technical work (exergy) out of less primary energy! Hydrogen adds value. Hydrogen energy and, in particular, hydrogen energy technologies, are to become part of Germany's national energy identity; accordingly, national energy policy as energy technology politics needs to grow in the nation's awareness as common sense! Otherwise Germany seems ill-equipped energetically, and its well-being hangs in the balance. (author)

  2. Techno-economic analysis of lignite fuelled IGCC with CO{sub 2} capture. Comparing fluidized bed and entrained flow gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guangjian; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Haiying [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with pre-combustion capture of CO{sub 2} represent one of the most promising options for generating low-cost decarbonized power using bituminous coals. This work systematically quantify the effect of coal rank on the efficiency and economics of IGCC systems with CO2 capture and storage (CCS), with a special focus on comparison of systems using fluidized-bed gasifier (U-GAS) and entrained flow gasifier (Shell). It was found that the Shell IGCCs are little affect by low rank coal after pre-drying in terms of thermal efficiency and the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) is only increase by 2-6% for lignite cases with and without CCS compared with bituminous coal cases. The specific CO{sub 2} emissions of U-GAS gasifier based lignite fuelled IGCC with CCS is 198 g/kWhe, almost two times of shell gasifier cases, mainly due to lower carbon conversion in the gasifier and the higher methane in the raw gas of gasifier. However, the total capital cost and COE of U-Gas IGCCs are 15-20% less than that of Shell IGCCs because of lower capital cost of gasifier, coal drying units and air separate units per kWe.

  3. Global environment assessment survey by advancing the energy demand and supply structure. 4; Energy jukyu kozo kodoka chikyu kankyo eikyo chosa. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the energy demand and supply structure in Japan, the international trend of approaches to global warming problems and the mitigation options to global warming in the energy related sectors have been surveyed. For the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, an Ad-hoc Group has discussed relevant topics after the 1st conference of the Parties. Meetings of the Group primarily focused on what objectives to set for the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in and in and after 2000. IPCC completed their Technical Paper in November 1996 in which technologies and measures to reduce GHG emissions and to enhance GHG sinks were analyzed and evaluated in various aspects. This Paper discusses about each sector of institutional buildings sector, transport sector, industrial sector, and energy supply sector. Especially, in the energy supply sector, promising approaches to reduce future emission include more efficient conversion of fossil fuels, switching to low-carbon fossil fuels, decarbonization of flue gas and fuels, CO2 storage, switching to nuclear energy, and switching to renewable sources of energy. 5 refs., 2 figs., 14 tabs.

  4. Long-term greenhouse gas emission and petroleum reduction goals: Evolutionary pathways for the light-duty vehicle sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kromer, Matthew A.; Bandivadekar, Anup; Evans, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    To meet long-term environmental and energy security goals, the United States must reduce petroleum use in the light-duty vehicle fleet by 70% and greenhouse gas emissions by a factor of ten compared to business-as-usual growth projections for the year 2050. A wedge-based approach was used to quantify the scope of the problem in real terms, and to develop options for meeting mid-century targets. Four mitigation mechanisms were considered: (1) improvements in near-term vehicle technologies; (2) emphasis on low-carbon biofuels; (3) de-carbonization of the electric grid; and (4) demand-side travel-reduction initiatives. Projections from previous studies were used to characterize the potential of individual mitigation mechanisms, which were then integrated into a light-duty vehicle fleet model; particular emphasis was given to systemic constraints on scale and rates of change. Based on these projections, two different greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation implementation plans were considered ('evolutionary' and 'aggressive'). Fleet model projections indicate that both the evolutionary and aggressive approaches can effectively end US dependence on foreign oil, but achieving an 80% GHG reduction requires changes that extend significantly beyond even the aggressive case, which was projected to achieve a 65% reduction.

  5. California-Specific Power-to-Hydrogen and Power-to-Gas Business Case Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichman, Joshua D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-12

    Flexible operation of electrolysis systems represents an opportunity to reduce the cost of hydrogen for a variety of end-uses while also supporting grid operations and thereby enabling greater renewable penetration. California is an ideal location to realize that value on account of growing renewable capacity and markets for hydrogen as a fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) fuel, refineries, and other end-uses. Shifting the production of hydrogen to avoid high cost electricity and participation in utility and system operator markets along with installing renewable generation to avoid utility charges and increase revenue from the Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) program can result in around $2.5/kg (21%) reduction in the production and delivery cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. This reduction can be achieved without impacting the consumers of hydrogen. Additionally, future strategies for reducing hydrogen cost were explored and include lower cost of capital, participation in the Renewable Fuel Standard program, capital cost reduction, and increased LCFS value. Each must be achieved independently and could each contribute to further reductions. Using the assumptions in this study found a 29% reduction in cost if all future strategies are realized. Flexible hydrogen production can simultaneously improve the performance and decarbonize multiple energy sectors. The lessons learned from this study should be used to understand near-term cost drivers and to support longer-term research activities to further improve cost effectiveness of grid integrated electrolysis systems.

  6. Avoiding Dangerous Anthropogenic Interference with the Climate System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, K. [Department of Geosciences, Penn State, PA (United States); Hall, M. [Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Kim, Seung-Rae [Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Bradford, D.F. [Department of Economics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Oppenheimer, M. [Woodrow Wilson School and Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Robertson Hall 448, Princeton, NJ, 08544 (United States)

    2005-12-01

    The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change calls for the avoidance of 'dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system'. Among the many plausible choices, dangerous interference with the climate system may be interpreted as anthropogenic radiative forcing causing distinct and widespread climate change impacts such as a widespread demise of coral reefs or a disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet. The geological record and numerical models suggest that limiting global warming below critical temperature thresholds significantly reduces the likelihood of these eventualities. Here we analyze economically optimal policies that may ensure this risk-reduction. Reducing the risk of a widespread coral reef demise implies drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions within decades. Virtually unchecked greenhouse gas emissions to date (combined with the inertia of the coupled natural and human systems) may have already committed future societies to a widespread demise of coral reefs. Policies to reduce the risk of a West Antarctic ice sheet disintegration allow for a smoother decarbonization of the economy within a century and may well increase consumption in the long run.

  7. The Deployment of Low Carbon Technologies in Energy Intensive Industries: A Macroeconomic Analysis for Europe, China and India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Nabernegg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrial processes currently contribute 40% to global CO2 emissions and therefore substantial increases in industrial energy efficiency are required for reaching the 2 °C target. We assess the macroeconomic effects of deploying low carbon technologies in six energy intensive industrial sectors (Petroleum, Iron and Steel, Non-metallic Minerals, Paper and Pulp, Chemicals, and Electricity in Europe, China and India in 2030. By combining the GAINS technology model with a macroeconomic computable general equilibrium model, we find that output in energy intensive industries declines in Europe by 6% in total, while output increases in China by 11% and in India by 13%. The opposite output effects emerge because low carbon technologies lead to cost savings in China and India but not in Europe. Consequently, the competitiveness of energy intensive industries is improved in China and India relative to Europe, leading to higher exports to Europe. In all regions, the decarbonization of electricity plays the dominant role for mitigation. We find a rebound effect in China and India, in the size of 42% and 34% CO2 reduction, respectively, but not in Europe. Our results indicate that the range of considered low-carbon technology options is not competitive in the European industrial sectors. To foster breakthrough low carbon technologies and maintain industrial competitiveness, targeted technology policy is therefore needed to supplement carbon pricing.

  8. The High Field Path to Practical Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumgaard, Robert; Whyte, D.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z.; Brunner, D.; Sorbom, B.; Marmar, E.; Minervini, J.; Bonoli, P.; Irby, J.; Labombard, B.; Terry, J.; Vieira, R.; Wukitch, S.

    2017-10-01

    We propose a faster, lower cost development path for fusion energy enabled by high temperature superconductors, devices at high magnetic field, innovative technologies and modern approaches to technology development. Timeliness, scale, and economic-viability are the drivers for fusion energy to combat climate change and aid economic development. The opportunities provided by high-temperature superconductors, innovative engineering and physics, and new organizational structures identified over the last few years open new possibilities for realizing practical fusion energy that could meet mid-century de-carbonization needs. We discuss re-factoring the fusion energy development path with an emphasis on concrete risk retirement strategies utilizing a modular approach based on the high-field tokamak that leverages the broader tokamak physics understanding of confinement, stability, and operational limits. Elements of this plan include development of high-temperature superconductor magnets, simplified immersion blankets, advanced long-leg divertors, a compact divertor test tokamak, efficient current drive, modular construction, and demountable magnet joints. An R&D plan culminating in the construction of an integrated pilot plant and test facility modeled on the ARC concept is presented.

  9. Energy contribution to Latin American INDCs: Analyzing sub-regional trends with a TIMES model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postic, Sebastien; Selosse, Sandrine; Maïzi, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Central and South America and the Caribbean countries share energy and climate features that are quite different from the rest of the world, including a highly renewable energy mix and very high renewable energy potentials, along with high deforestation and degradation rates which call for regional answers to regional issues. This paper assesses the impact of national contributions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change using an energy prospective model from the MarkAl/TIMES family. This approach enables a bottom-up comparison between past pledges (Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions) and the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) agreed on at COP21. Long-term economic optimization leads to decarbonizing the power sector even in the absence of climate constraints. Stringent climate policies as modeled here achieve emission reductions of 40% below the current baseline by 2050. NDCs produce stronger emission reductions than NAMAs at regional scale; however, the first contributor to emission reductions in absolute terms in Latin America is the Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land-Use (AFOLU) sector, not energy. - Highlights: • We analyze energy-bound climate mitigation in Latin America with a bottom-up model. • We derive five policy scenarios based on past and current pledges to the UNFCCC. • Despite a clean BAU power mix, the region can cut emissions by up to 40% by 2050. • INDCs lead to stronger emission reductions than former NAMAs. • Energy-only measures would overlook significant abatement potential in AFOLU.

  10. Promoting Decentralized Sustainable Energy Systems in Different Supply Scenarios: The Role of Autarky Aspiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, Franz, E-mail: franz.ecker@psychologie.uni-freiburg.de [Cognition, Action and Sustainability Unit, Department of Psychology, Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Hahnel, Ulf J. J. [Consumer Decision and Sustainable Behavior Lab, Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Spada, Hans [Cognition, Action and Sustainability Unit, Department of Psychology, Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-07-10

    The development of decentralized renewable energy systems is of crucial importance for the decarbonization of energy generation worldwide. Purchase decisions regarding innovative energy systems depend to some extent on consumers’ perception of the systems’ degree of autarky. We assumed that, in addition to the energetic perspective, consumers associate other non-energetic facets such as independence, autonomy, self-sufficiency, or control with the concept of autarky. These psychological facets of autarky were expected to contribute to purchase decisions. In Study 1, participants (N = 168) evaluated three future energy supply scenarios. The scenarios varied regarding their range of autarky (household/neighborhood/small town), but the individually realized degree of energetic autarky did not vary. Participants reported a higher willingness to pay in connection with a higher perceived psychological autarky for the Household Scenario. Study 1’s findings were confirmed by Study 2, in which qualitative interviews (N = 13) also revealed that participants favored the Household Scenario on several points. These evaluations were driven by the anticipated psychological facets of autarky that is the subjective perception of being independent, autonomous, self-sufficient, energy secure, and of control. To promote an adoption of renewable energy systems, these psychological autarky facets need to be addressed. Enabling the people to self-determine, control, and secure their energy provision even in complex organizational settings in such a manner is likely to increase their acceptance and therefore foster the required social transition as a whole.

  11. Fault lubrication during earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Toro, G; Han, R; Hirose, T; De Paola, N; Nielsen, S; Mizoguchi, K; Ferri, F; Cocco, M; Shimamoto, T

    2011-03-24

    The determination of rock friction at seismic slip rates (about 1 m s(-1)) is of paramount importance in earthquake mechanics, as fault friction controls the stress drop, the mechanical work and the frictional heat generated during slip. Given the difficulty in determining friction by seismological methods, elucidating constraints are derived from experimental studies. Here we review a large set of published and unpublished experiments (∼300) performed in rotary shear apparatus at slip rates of 0.1-2.6 m s(-1). The experiments indicate a significant decrease in friction (of up to one order of magnitude), which we term fault lubrication, both for cohesive (silicate-built, quartz-built and carbonate-built) rocks and non-cohesive rocks (clay-rich, anhydrite, gypsum and dolomite gouges) typical of crustal seismogenic sources. The available mechanical work and the associated temperature rise in the slipping zone trigger a number of physicochemical processes (gelification, decarbonation and dehydration reactions, melting and so on) whose products are responsible for fault lubrication. The similarity between (1) experimental and natural fault products and (2) mechanical work measures resulting from these laboratory experiments and seismological estimates suggests that it is reasonable to extrapolate experimental data to conditions typical of earthquake nucleation depths (7-15 km). It seems that faults are lubricated during earthquakes, irrespective of the fault rock composition and of the specific weakening mechanism involved.

  12. Method and apparatus for condensing radioactive rare gases by means of use of ejector and selective adsorption and desorption process including cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Toshio; Tsuda, Koji; Watanabe, Yukio; Miharada, Hassui; Tani, Akira.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To recover rare gases in waste gases at one stage as high density as possible while effectively utilizing adsorption beds. Structure: The waste gases pass through an ejector and are subject to treatment of dehumidification and decarbonization in a pretreatment station, after which the gases enter a first low temperature adsorption bed through a heat exchanger and a first valve. If breaking should occur in the first adsorption bed, the waste gases would be introduced into a second adsorption bed for adsorption treatment. The first adsorption bed, which has completed adsorption, is heated to a regenerative temperature while adsorption is being performed at the second adsorption bed, and degases containing rare gases are recycled through a second and third valves and are mixed into raw waste gases by the action of the ejector. After the above adsorption and desorption have been repeated several times by alternately using the first and second adsorption bed the adsorption bed is heated to a temperature lower than the regenerative temperature to recycle the desorption gases to feed and then heated to the regenerative temperature, and the desorbed rare gases are fed to the succeeding system through a pump. (Yoshihara, H.)

  13. Designing low-carbon power systems for Great Britain in 2050 that are robust to the spatiotemporal and inter-annual variability of weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyringer, Marianne; Price, James; Fais, Birgit; Li, Pei-Hao; Sharp, Ed

    2018-05-01

    The design of cost-effective power systems with high shares of variable renewable energy (VRE) technologies requires a modelling approach that simultaneously represents the whole energy system combined with the spatiotemporal and inter-annual variability of VRE. Here, we soft-link a long-term energy system model, which explores new energy system configurations from years to decades, with a high spatial and temporal resolution power system model that captures VRE variability from hours to years. Applying this methodology to Great Britain for 2050, we find that VRE-focused power system design is highly sensitive to the inter-annual variability of weather and that planning based on a single year can lead to operational inadequacy and failure to meet long-term decarbonization objectives. However, some insights do emerge that are relatively stable to weather-year. Reinforcement of the transmission system consistently leads to a decrease in system costs while electricity storage and flexible generation, needed to integrate VRE into the system, are generally deployed close to demand centres.

  14. “Goodness itself must change” – Anthroponomy in an age of socially-caused, planetary environmental change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendik-Keymer Jeremy David

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Given the reality of socially-caused, planetary-scaled, environmental change, how – if at all – should our ethical concepts change? It has been a hallmark of environmental literature in recent years to insist that they should or even must. It will be argued that, yes, our ethical concepts should change by exploring the changes needed for the core ethical concept of goodness. Goodness, it will be argued, must change to reflect a change in priority from personal intentions to the right relation between an agent and the collective to which he/she belongs. This relation, which is called herein the civic relation, centers on taking responsibility for the structure which produces unintentional, aggregate effects at the level of planetary ecology. Examples include a fossil fuel-based infrastructure, isolationist nationalism that undercuts international climate agreements to decarbonize energy, and the lack of a political forum to respect the rights of future generations. More generally, goodness according to the civic relation must express an anthroponomic orientation to life – a sustained, life-long attempt to build the practice of the collective self-regulation of humankind as a whole. Of the many consequences of this meta-ethical change in goodness, one is that it addresses the banality of evil today.

  15. Thermal and structural characterization of synthetic and natural nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofronia, Ancuta M; Baies, Radu; Anghel, Elena M; Marinescu, Cornelia A; Tanasescu, Speranta

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the thermal stability on heating and to obtain the processing parameters of synthetic and bone-derived hydroxyapatite over temperatures between room temperature and 1400°C by thermal analysis (thermogravimetry (TG)/differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermo-mechanical analysis-TMA). Structural and surface modifications related to samples origin and calcination temperature were investigated by Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and BET method. FTIR spectra indicated that the organic constituents and carbonate are no longer present in the natural sample calcined at 800°C. Raman spectra highlighted the decomposition products of the hydroxyapatite. The calcination treatment modifies the processes kinetics of the synthetic samples, being able to isolate lattice water desorption processes of decarbonization and the dehydroxylation processes. Shrinkage of calcined synthetic sample increases by 10% compared to uncalcined synthetic powder. From the TMA correlated with TG analysis and heat capacity data it can be concluded that sintering temperature of the synthetic samples should be chosen in the temperature range of the onset of dehydroxylation and the temperature at which oxyapatite decomposition begins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. I-tese newsletter - Number 13 - Summer 2011; La lettre de l'I-tese - Numero 13 - Ete 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popiolek, Nathalie; Devezeaux, Jean-Guy; Bernard, Herve; Behar, Christophe; Birraux, Claude; Cesarsky, Catherine; Sabourin, Didier; Imbach, Juliette; Le Duigou, Alain

    2011-07-01

    The first part of this issue reports a meeting (the third I-tese Day which took place in June 2011), the theme of which was the way to boost innovation towards a less carbonated economy, or how to pass from fundamental science to the market. Several topics have been addressed: the definition, nature and impacts of innovation, innovation in the field of energy (role of public authorities, of the relationship between actors, and of education). The texts of some contributions are proposed. They dealt with the CEA's contribution to innovation in the field of energy, with management as a tool to promote innovation, with innovation challenging fears and risks, with the role of research, with the way I-tese takes innovation into account in its research activities, with a competitive analysis of the biomass-to-liquid sector, with the application of real options theory to the R and D investment for tomorrow's nuclear, with the relationship between technical innovation and social acceptability (in the case of hydrogen within the AIDHY project). Then, articles discuss a macro-economic theoretical approach of R and D subsidies for de-carbonated energetic technologies, and the end of the HyFrance project for the development of hydrogen markets

  17. Zero emission targets as long-term global goals for climate protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogelj, Joeri; Riahi, Keywan; Schaeffer, Michiel; Hare, William; Meinshausen, Malte; Knutti, Reto; Alcamo, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Recently, assessments have robustly linked stabilization of global-mean temperature rise to the necessity of limiting the total amount of emitted carbon-dioxide (CO 2 ). Halting global warming thus requires virtually zero annual CO 2 emissions at some point. Policymakers have now incorporated this concept in the negotiating text for a new global climate agreement, but confusion remains about concepts like carbon neutrality, climate neutrality, full decarbonization, and net zero carbon or net zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Here we clarify these concepts, discuss their appropriateness to serve as a long-term global benchmark for achieving temperature targets, and provide a detailed quantification. We find that with current pledges and for a likely (>66%) chance of staying below 2 °C, the scenario literature suggests net zero CO 2 emissions between 2060 and 2070, with net negative CO 2 emissions thereafter. Because of residual non-CO 2 emissions, net zero is always reached later for total GHG emissions than for CO 2 . Net zero emissions targets are a useful focal point for policy, linking a global temperature target and socio-economic pathways to a necessary long-term limit on cumulative CO 2 emissions. (letter)

  18. The retirement cliff: Power plant lives and their policy implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, David C.; Fischbeck, Paul S.; Páez, Antonio R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines more than a century of U.S. power plant additions and retirements in conjunction with several decades of utility capital investment data. While policy analyses often invoke assumptions of power plant book life, relatively little analysis has focused on the physical life of power-generating assets. The average age of the U.S. generator fleet has increased significantly over time despite continued investment, in part because more recent investment has tended to focus on shorter-lived assets. This may be due in part to risk-averse power sector investors and lenders responding rationally to regulatory uncertainty in a deregulated market environment. Power plant retirement trends suggest that the pace of retirements will increase significantly in the decade after 2030 for most reasonable estimates of physical life. These capital investment trends have important consequences for carbon policy and highlight the importance of including consideration of the longer term—particularly when evaluating more significant decarbonization policies. - Highlights: • Many policy analyses neglect the physical lives of power plants. • A large database of U.S. power plant additions and retirements is examined. • The average age of power plants has steadily increased despite growing investment. • Long-term CO 2 reduction strategies are challenged by increases in plant retirements.

  19. Climate change : we are at risk : interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, D.; Wiebe, J.

    2003-06-01

    Between November 2002 and May 2003 the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry travelled across Canada to hear the views of farmer organizations, rural associations, ecotourism groups and environmental organizations regarding concerns about climate change and the impact it may have on the agriculture and forestry sectors and rural communities. The Committee also examined potential adaptation strategies focusing on primary production, practices, technologies, ecosystems and other related areas. Farmers and forest operators are already facing changes in market conditions, domestic regulations, trade policies and technology. This interim report expressed the concerns of farmers and forest operators. It includes a review of the Saguenay flood of 1996, the Red River flood of 1997, the ice storm of 1998, and droughts since 1999. It also includes a discussion on climate change and its biophysical and economic effects on agriculture, forestry, water resources, rural communities, and Aboriginal communities. This interim report also briefly outlines the Kyoto Protocol, the emissions trading system, and the decarbonization of global energy systems. It emphasized the need for integrated research and government policies and programs that encourage adaptation to climate change. The final report will be released in October 2003 and will provide specific recommendations to ensure that Canada responds to the concerns of farmers and forest operators and to ensure continued prosperity in these sectors. refs., figs.

  20. CO_2 capture with solid sorbent: CFD model of an innovative reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barelli, L.; Bidini, G.; Gallorini, F.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new reactor solution based on rotating fixed beds was presented. • The preliminary design of the reactor was approached. • A CFD model of the reactor, including CO_2 capture kinetic, was developed. • The CFD model is validated with experimental results. • Sorbent exploitation increasing is possible thanks to the new reactor. - Abstract: In future decarbonization scenarios, CCS with particular reference to post-combustion technologies will be an important option also for energy intensive industries. Nevertheless, today CCS systems are rarely installed due to high energy and cost penalties of current technology based on chemical scrubbing with amine solvent. Therefore, innovative solutions based on new/optimized solvents, sorbents, membranes and new process designs, are R&D priorities. Regarding the CO_2 capture through solid sorbents, a new reactor solution based on rotating fixed beds is presented in this paper. In order to design the innovative system, a suitable CFD model was developed considering also the kinetic capture process. The model was validated with experimental results obtained by the authors in previous research activities, showing a potential reduction of energy penalties respect to current technologies. In the future, the model will be used to identify the control logic of the innovative reactor in order to verify improvements in terms of sorbent exploitation and reduction of system energy consumption.

  1. Anthropocene Dialogues: Decoupling Economic Prosperity from Carbon Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewksbury, J.; Kohm, K.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropocene magazine is a new science magazine produced by Future Earth. Its mission is to bring together the world's leading scientists, technologists, and creatives to explore on-the-ground stories of sustainability science in action. For AGU 2017, Anthropocene magazine will stage an "Anthropocene Dialogue" based on its July 2017 issue. Anthropocene Dialogues are panel discussions about the successes and challenges of transformative science-policy collaborations by leading science journalists, researchers, and practitioners. The focus of this dialogue is: What are the scientific and technological innovations that drive the decarbonization of economies—from plugging artificial intelligence into electrical grids to new experiments in solar geoengineering. Panelist include: Robert Jackson of the Global Carbon Project discussing the historic decoupling of carbon emissions from GDP, Oliver Morton of The Economist speaking on how geoengineering can be a key element of a decoupling process; Robinson Meyer of The Atlantic outlining a coal "retirement plan" based on supply side economics; Wayt Gibbs of Scientific American tackling the quintessential question, How much energy will the world need? and Mark Harris of IEEE Spectrum looking at new experiments in artificial intelligence that could pull fossil fuels out of electrical grids, factories, data centers, and transit systems. For more information on these stories, visit: anthropocenemagazine.org/in-print/. Free sample copies of the magazine will be available at the session.

  2. An innovative process for simultaneous removal of CO2 and SO2 from flue gas of a power plant by energy integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Y.S.; Li, Y.; Li, Q.; Jiang, J.; Zhang, Z.X.

    2009-01-01

    With the fast development of the society, the amount of carbon dioxide has been increased enormously in the atmosphere all over the world, which has already endangered the survival of human being. More and more people or organizations are studying new technologies to reduce the cost of capturing CO 2 . The recovery and sequestration of CO 2 from flue gas of the power plant is regarded as a feasible way to mitigate the greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, the process of recovering carbon dioxide by chemical absorption with monoethanolamine (MEA) in industry was emphatically described in this paper. Based on energy integration, a coupled process was proposed which included MEA absorption of CO 2 and SO 2 , and the heat recovery from the flue gas's waste heat recovery unit and compressor inter-stage cooling unit. Compared the innovative process with an original process, 9% of thermal energy could be reduced in the new flowsheet. Meanwhile decarbonization and desulphurization could be carried on in the absorber simultaneously without the usual wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD) system. An exergy analysis model was established and validated by the literature data with a deviation less than 5.40%. The exergy results indicated that the exergy loss of the improved process was 15.48-20.75% less than that of the original one, which proved that the innovative process was reasonable and effective from the perspective of energy utilization.

  3. Reaching a 1.5°C target: socio-technical challenges for a rapid transition to low-carbon electricity systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Nick; Darby, Sarah J; Grünewald, Philipp; McKenna, Eoghan; Ford, Rebecca

    2018-05-13

    A 1.5°C global average target implies that we should no longer focus on merely incremental emissions reductions from the electricity system, but rather on fundamentally re-envisaging a system that, sooner rather than later, becomes carbon free. Many low-carbon technologies are surpassing mainstream predictions for both uptake and cost reduction. Their deployment is beginning to be disruptive within established systems. 'Smart technologies' are being developed to address emerging challenges of system integration, but their rates of future deployment remain uncertain. We argue that transition towards a system that can fully displace carbon generation sources will require expanding the focus of our efforts beyond technical solutions. Recognizing that change has social and technical dimensions, and that these interact strongly, we set out a socio-technical review that covers electricity infrastructure, citizens, business models and governance. It describes some of the socio-technical challenges that need to be addressed for the successful transition of the existing electricity systems. We conclude that a socio-technical understanding of electricity system transitions offers new and better insights into the potential and challenges for rapid decarbonization.This article is part of the theme issue 'The Paris Agreement: understanding the physical and social challenges for a warming world of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  4. Smart Energy Systems and Energy Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duic, N.

    2016-01-01

    Transition to decarbonized energy systems is becoming more attractive with fall of investment costs of renewables and volatile prices and political insecurity of fossil fuels. Improving energy efficiency, especially of buildings and transport, is important, but due to long life of buildings, it will be a slow way of decarbonization. The renewable energy resources are bountiful, especially wind and solar, while integrating them into current energy systems is proving to be a challenge. Solar has reached grid parity making it cheapest electricity source for retail customers in most of the World, creating new prosumer markets. It has started to reach cost parity in sunny countries, and soon solar energy will be cheapest everywhere. The limit of cheap and easy integration for wind is around 20% of yearly electricity generation, while a combined wind and solar may reach 30%. Going any further asks for implementation of completely free energy markets (involving day ahead, intraday and various reserve and ancillary services markets), demand response, coupling of wholesale and retail energy prices, and it involves integration between electricity, heat, water and transport systems. The cheapest and simplest way of increasing further the penetration of renewables is integrating power and heating/cooling systems through the use of district heating and cooling (which may be centrally controlled and may have significant heat storage capacity), since power to heat technologies are excellent for demand response. District cooling is of particular importance to historic cities that want to remove split systems from their facades. In countries with low heat demand water supply system may be used to increase the penetration of renewables, by using water at higher potential energy as storage media, or in dry climates desalination and stored water may be used for those purposes, and reversible hydro may be used as balancing technology. Electrification of personal car transport allows

  5. Multistage hydrothermal silicification and Fe-Tl-As-Sb-Ge-REE enrichment in the Red Dog Zn-Pb-Ag district, northern Alaska: Geochemistry, origin, and exploration applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, J.F.; Kelley, K.D.; Anderson, V.M.; Clark, J.L.; Ayuso, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Geochemical analyses of major, trace, and rare earth elements (REE) in more than 200 samples of variably silicified and altered wall rocks, massive and banded sulfide, silica rock, and sulfide-rich and unmineralized barite were obtained from the Main, Aqqaluk, and Anarraaq deposits in the Red Dog Zn-Pb-Ag district of northern Alaska. Detailed lithogeochemical profiles for two drill cores at Aqqaluk display an antithetic relationship between SiO2/Al2O3 and TiO2/Zr which, together with textural information, suggest preferential silicification of carbonate-bearing sediments. Data for both drill cores also show generally high Tl, Sb, As, and Ge and uniformly positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* > 1.0). Similar high Tl, Sb, As, Ge, and Eu/Eu* values are present in the footwall and shallow hanging wall of Zn-Pb-Ag sulfide intervals at Anarraaq but are not as widely dispersed. Net chemical changes for altered wall rocks in the district, on the basis of average Al-normalized data relative to unaltered black shales of the host Kuna Formation, include large enrichments (>50%) of Fe, Ba, Eu, V, S, Co, Zn, Pb, Tl, As, Sb, and Ge at both Red Dog and Anarraaq, Si at Red Dog, and Sr, U, and Se at Anarraaq. Large depletions (>50%) are evident for Ca at both Red Dog and Anarraaq, for Mg, P, and Y at Red Dog, and for Na at Anarraaq. At both Red Dog and Anarraaq, wall-rock alteration removed calcite and minor dolomite during hydrothermal decarbonation reactions and introduced Si, Eu, and Ge during silicification. Sulfidation reactions deposited Fe, S, Co, Zn, Pb, Tl, As, and Sb; barite mineralization introduced Ba, S, and Sr. Light REE and U were mobilized locally. This alteration and mineralization occurred during Mississippi an hydrothermal events that predated the Middle Jurassic-Cretaceous Brookian orogeny. Early hydrothermal silicification at Red Dog took place prior to or during massive sulfide mineralization, on the basis of the dominantly planar nature of Zn-Pb veins, which suggests

  6. Energy in the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. J.; Caldeira, K.; Cao, L.; Hoffert, M.

    2012-12-01

    Human interference in Earth's natural systems is fueled by ever-increasing consumption of fossil energy. The energy we consume has enabled exponential growth of human population and economic wealth by expanding access to basic goods and services such as food, medicine, light, sanitation and refrigeration, as well as more advanced technologies such as transport and communication. In turn, population growth and economic development drive demand for even more energy. By 2050, it is expected that global energy demand will double to more than 30 TW. Unfortunately, the modern energy system is largely dependent on fossil fuels, and the CO2 released by burning of these fuels is the primary cause of anthropogenic climate change. As human civilization has expanded, primary energy sources have become progressively less carbon intensive, transitioning from the use of unsustainably harvested biomass to coal, oil and then natural gas. However, tremendous growth in the quantity of energy energy consumption in the industrial era has caused rapid growth of CO2 emissions. Limiting these emissions to avoid the more severe impacts of climate change while also meeting future demand for energy will require continuing the process of decarbonization by making a planetary-scale transition to largely carbon-emission-free energy technologies. In 2004, Pacala and Socolow proposed that such a transition could be achieved by stabilizing emissions at then-current levels for 50 years and then decreasing emissions by 2% per year afterward. They divided the task of stabilization into "wedges" that would grow linearly from zero to 1 gigatonne of carbon emissions avoided per year (GtC/y; 1 Gt = 10^12 kg) over 50 years, and asserted that deploying 7 wedges offset the growth of emissions and put us on a trajectory to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration at 500 ppm if emissions decreased sharply in the second half of the 21st century. However, in light of the growth of emissions since 2004, new

  7. Potential for deserts to supply reliable renewable electric power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labordena, Mercè; Lilliestam, Johan

    2015-04-01

    To avoid dangerous climate change, the electricity systems must be decarbonized by mid-century. The world has sufficient renewable electricity resources for complete power sector decarbonization, but an expansion of renewables poses several challenges for the electricity systems. First, wind and solar PV power are intermittent and supply-controlled, making it difficult to securely integrate this fluctuating generation into the power systems. Consequently, power sources that are both renewable and dispatchable, such as biomass, hydro and concentrating solar power (CSP), are particularly important. Second, renewable power has a low power density and needs vast areas of land, which is problematic both due to cost reasons and due to land-use conflicts, in particular with agriculture. Renewable and dispatchable technologies that can be built in sparsely inhabited regions or on land with low competition with agriculture would therefore be especially valuable; this land-use competition greatly limits the potential for hydro and biomass electricity. Deserts, however, are precisely such low-competition land, and are at the same time the most suited places for CSP generation, but this option would necessitate long transmission lines from remote places in the deserts to the demand centers such as big cities. We therefore study the potential for fleets of CSP plants in the large deserts of the world to produce reliable and reasonable-cost renewable electricity for regions with high and/or rapidly increasing electricity demand and with a desert within or close to its borders. The regions in focus here are the European Union, North Africa and the Middle East, China and Australia. We conduct the analysis in three steps. First, we identify the best solar generation areas in the selected deserts using geographic information systems (GIS), and applying restrictions to minimize impact on biodiversity, soils, human heath, and land-use and land-cover change. Second, we identify

  8. Beyond the Numbers: Understanding the Transformation Induced by INDCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, Thomas; Pierfederici, Roberta; Waisman, Henri; Colombier, Michel; Bertram, Christoph; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Humpenoeder, Florian; Popp, Alexander; Edenhofer, Ottmar; Den Elzen, Michel; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Van Soest, Heleen; Paroussos, Leonidas; Fragkos, Panagiotis; Kainuma, Mikiko; Masui, Toshihiko; Oshiro, Ken; Akimoto, Keigo; Shoai Tehrani, Bianka; Sano, Fuminori; Oda, Junichiro; Clarke, Leon; Iyer, Gokul; Edmonds, Jae; TENG, Fei; FU, Sha; Kejun, Jiang; Koeberle, Alexandre C.; Szklo, Alexandre; Lucena, Andre F.P.; Portugal-Pereira, Joana; Rochedo, Pedro; Schaeffer, Roberto; Awasthy, Aayushi; Kumar Shrivastava, Manish; Mathur, Ritu; Rogelj, Joeri; Jewell, Jessica; Riahi, Keywan; Garg, Amit

    2015-10-01

    inefficient and unabated fossil fuel capacity online in 2030 to be coherent with a 2 degrees scenario. This highlights the risks of lock-in into a high carbon trajectory if action is not strengthened quickly. Post-Paris policy efforts need to stimulate technology innovation, deployment and diffusion in order to drive down costs in such sectors where insufficient progress is being seen. The INDCs imply a significant acceleration of climate action but as currently submitted may not be enough to keep the below 2 deg. C goal in reach. The Paris Agreement should establish a clear mechanism to allow the regular, predictable and timely revision of national contributions and the global framework. New contributions should be based on a vision for the deep decarbonization of national energy systems. The Paris agreement should foster the development of national deep decarbonization pathways around 2018

  9. Implementation of the Third Energy Package and Renewable Energy Sources on Croatian Liberalised Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toljan, I.

    2016-01-01

    The Croatian Third Energy Package was adopted in 2012 and its implementation in the previous period until today has accelerated changes in all areas of Croatian energy sector. The content of The EU's Third Energy Package was made in two directives and three regulations. Directives are implemented into national legislation of EU Member States (they choose the methods). Regulations are implemented directly in the entire EU. The main goal is to establish a unique electricity and gas market with market prices (or lower) and high safety and public service standards. Croatia began with incentives for generation from renewable energy sources in 2004 and by the end of this year, the first contract in that system (wind power plant Ravne on Pag island) will end. The question that presents itself is where and how will the owner sell electricity from now on. Current market suppliers as well as the new organisation in Croatian energy sector, Croatian Power Exchange, are both realistic options. Balancing market led by Croatian TSO is becoming bigger and participates in the business because of the higher amount of installed power connected to the power grid (mostly wind power plants). Can Croatian Transmission Operator still guarantee safe operational planning as before (the last blackout happened 10 years ago)? The existing electricity and gas market design doesn't satisfy its participants any more so an adjustment to new facts of a free market is necessary (power exchange, no more stimulations for renewable sources). What changes should be made in legislation so that the free market can develop and be harmonised with the European market? Decarbonization and digitalisation are a base of European energy policy but they are still waiting for a wider and stronger application in Croatia, is the current legislation enough? With these analysis the paper contributes to the learnings about the implementation of The Third Energy Package in Croatia and a unique energy policy in the EU.(author).

  10. RUSTEC: Greening Europe's energy supply by developing Russia's renewable energy potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boute, Anatole; Willems, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The North-West of Russia is characterized by a large renewable energy resource base in geographic proximity to the EU. At the same time, EU Member States are bound by mandatory renewable energy targets which could prove to be costly to achieve in the current budgetary context and which often face strong local opposition. Directive 2009/28/EC on Renewable Energy makes it possible for Member States to achieve their targets by importing electricity produced from renewable energy sources from non-EU countries. So far, most attention has been on the Mediterranean Solar Plan or Desertec. An EU–Russia Renewable Energy Plan or RUSTEC – being based on onshore wind/biomass/hydro energy and on-land interconnection, rather than solar power and subsea lines – could present a cost-efficient and short-term complement to Desertec. This article examines the political, geopolitical, economic, social and legal challenges and opportunities of exporting “green” energy from Russia to the EU. It argues that EU–Russian cooperation in the renewable energy field would present a win-win situation: Member States could achieve their targets on the basis of Russia's renewable energy potential, while Russia could begin to develop a national renewable energy industry without risking potential price increases for domestic consumers—a concern of great political sensitivity in Russia. - Highlights: ► Russia has a huge renewable energy potential in geographic proximity to the EU. ► This potential could help the EU decarbonize its electricity supply at least cost.► EU–Russia green energy export is a win-win situation but lacks political attention.► RUSTEC could be a short-term and cost-efficient complement to Desertec. ► RUSTEC would diversify EU energy imports/Russian exports and stimulate innovation.

  11. Evaluating the Cost, Safety, and Proliferation Risks of Small Floating Nuclear Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Michael J; Abdulla, Ahmed; Morgan, M Granger

    2017-11-01

    It is hard to see how our energy system can be decarbonized if the world abandons nuclear power, but equally hard to introduce the technology in nonnuclear energy states. This is especially true in countries with limited technical, institutional, and regulatory capabilities, where safety and proliferation concerns are acute. Given the need to achieve serious emissions mitigation by mid-century, and the multidecadal effort required to develop robust nuclear governance institutions, we must look to other models that might facilitate nuclear plant deployment while mitigating the technology's risks. One such deployment paradigm is the build-own-operate-return model. Because returning small land-based reactors containing spent fuel is infeasible, we evaluate the cost, safety, and proliferation risks of a system in which small modular reactors are manufactured in a factory, and then deployed to a customer nation on a floating platform. This floating small modular reactor would be owned and operated by a single entity and returned unopened to the developed state for refueling. We developed a decision model that allows for a comparison of floating and land-based alternatives considering key International Atomic Energy Agency plant-siting criteria. Abandoning onsite refueling is beneficial, and floating reactors built in a central facility can potentially reduce the risk of cost overruns and the consequences of accidents. However, if the floating platform must be built to military-grade specifications, then the cost would be much higher than a land-based system. The analysis tool presented is flexible, and can assist planners in determining the scope of risks and uncertainty associated with different deployment options. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  12. H2 Mobilite France - Study for a Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle national deployment plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    'Mobilite Hydrogene France', a consortium of private and public stakeholders, united by the French Association for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells (AFHYPAC), launched a study in July 2013 to evaluate the potential of Hydrogen and Fuel Cells in French transport. The results provide true perspectives of a deployment plan for the national territory. This French study was implemented in parallel with various initiatives initiated in other European countries (Germany, UK, Denmark, The Netherlands, Sweden..). It was funded by the participants themselves and by the European Union under the HIT (Hydrogen Infrastructure for Transport) framework. On the basis of shared economic data, synchronised deployment scenarios for vehicles and refuelling stations were developed. These showed the environmental, economic and societal benefits of a transition towards Hydrogen Mobility. Hydrogen Mobility appears as a key factor of the Energy Transition. It can make a significant contribution to emission reduction of the transport sector. The established plan of the Consortium proposes an ambitious deployment in France of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles, together with refuelling stations by 2030. This plan starts today, with as a first step, a progressive deployment of captive fleets. Like in other countries initiatives worldwide, the success of this deployment in France is a function of combined commitments and efforts by private industrial companies and public stakeholders (at both national and regional level). The main challenge now is in the adaptation of the regulatory frameworks and the implementation of funding, within the coordination of the European Union. The consortium is committed to implement The consortium first deployments in French early adopter territories that have embraced already the strategy of a sustainable and de-carbonized mobility

  13. Advanced Reactor Systems and Future Energy Market Needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magwood, W.; Keppler, J.H.; Paillere, Henri; ); Gogan, K.; Ben Naceur, K.; Baritaud, M.; ); Shropshire, D.; ); Wilmshurst, N.; Janssens, A.; Janes, J.; Urdal, H.; Finan, A.; Cubbage, A.; Stoltz, M.; Toni, J. de; Wasylyk, A.; Ivens, R.; Paramonov, D.; Franceschini, F.; Mundy, Th.; Kuran, S.; Edwards, L.; Kamide, H.; Hwang, I.; Hittner, D.; ); Levesque, C.; LeBlanc, D.; Redmond, E.; Rayment, F.; Faudon, V.; Finan, A.; Gauche, F.

    2017-04-01

    It is clear that future nuclear systems will operate in an environment that will be very different from the electricity systems that accompanied the fast deployment of nuclear power plants in the 1970's and 1980's. As countries fulfil their commitment to de-carbonise their energy systems, low-carbon sources of electricity and in particular variable renewables, will take large shares of the overall generation capacities. This is challenging since in most cases, the timescale for nuclear technology development is far greater than the speed at which markets and policy/regulation frameworks can change. Nuclear energy, which in OECD countries is still the largest source of low-carbon electricity, has a major role to play as a low-carbon dispatchable technology. In its 2 degree scenarios, the International Energy Agency (IEA) projects that nuclear capacity globally could reach over 900 GW by 2050, with a share of electricity generation rising from less than 11% today to about 16%. Nuclear energy could also play a role in the decarbonization of the heat sector, by targeting non-electric applications. The workshop discussed how energy systems are evolving towards low-carbon systems, what the future of energy market needs are, the changing regulatory framework from both the point of view of safety requirements and environmental constraints, and how reactor developers are taking these into account in their designs. In terms of technology, the scope covered all advanced reactor systems under development today, including evolutionary light water reactors (LWRs), small modular reactors (SMRs) - whether LWR technology-based or not, and Generation IV (Gen IV) systems. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) of the workshop

  14. Promotion of electricity from renewable energy in Europe post 2020. The economic benefits of cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuersch, Michaela; Lindenberger, Dietmar

    2013-08-15

    In Europe, the availability of renewable energies, especially from sun and wind, differs significantly across regions. Consequently, cooperation in the deployment of renewable energy among European countries potentially yields substantial efficiency gains. However, in order to achieve the 2020 renewable energy targets for electricity, Member States of the European Union almost purely rely on domestic production. For the period after 2020, a European renewable energy target has not yet been defined, but decarbonization pathways outlined in the Roadmap of the European Commission include renewable energy shares of electricity generation to be 50-60% by 2030. Therefore, we analyze the benefits of cooperation compared to continuing with national renewable energy support after 2020. We use a large-scale dynamic investment and dispatch model of the European electricity system and find that compared to a 2030 CO{sub 2}-only target (-40% compared to 1990 emission levels), electricity system costs increase by 5 to 7% when a European-wide renewable energy target for electricity generation (of around 55%) is additionally implemented. However, these additional costs are lower by 41 to 45% compared to the additional electricity system costs which would arise if the renewable energy target was reached through national support systems (without cooperation). Furthermore, we find that the cooperation gains (i.e., the cost reduction achieved by cooperation) are quite robust: They decrease only slightly when interconnectors are not further extended (compared to today) and depend only slightly on assumptions about investment cost developments of renewable energy technologies. With regard to the practical implementation of cooperation, however, unclear administrative issues and questions concerning the fair sharing of costs and benefits between the Member States represent major obstacles that need to be tackled in order to reach renewable energy targets at the lowest costs possible.

  15. Comparison of the hot-stamped boron-alloyed steel and the warm-stamped medium-Mn steel on microstructure and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaodong; Chang, Ying; Wang, Cunyu; Hu, Ping; Dong, Han

    2017-01-01

    The application of high strength steels (HSS) for automotive structural parts is an effective way to realize lightweight and enhance safety. Therefore, improvements in mechanical properties of HSS are needed. In the present study, the warm stamping process of the third generation automotive medium-Mn steel was discussed, the characteristics of martensitic transformation were investigated, as well as the microstructure and mechanical properties were analyzed, compared to the popular hot-stamped 22MnB5 steel in the automotive industry. The results are indicated as follows. Firstly, the quenching rate of the medium-Mn steel can be selected in a wide range based on its CCT curves, which is beneficial to the control of forming process. Secondly, the influence of stamping temperature and pressure on the M s temperature of the medium-Mn steel is not obvious and can be neglected, which is favorable to the even distribution of martensitic microstructure and mechanical properties. Thirdly, the phenomenon of decarbonization is hardly found on the surface of the warm-stamped medium-Mn steel, and the ultra-fine-grained microstructure is found inside the medium-Mn steel after warm stamping. Besides, the warm-stamped medium-Mn steel holds the better comprehensive properties, such as a lower yield ratio, higher total elongation and higher tear toughness than the hot-stamped 22MnB5 steel. Furthermore, an actual warm-stamped B-pillar of medium-Mn steel is stamped and ultra-fine-grained martensitic microstructure is obtained. The mechanical properties are evenly distributed. As a result, this paper proves that the warm-stamped medium-Mn steel part can meet the requirements of lightweight and crash safety, and is promising for the industrial production of automotive structural parts.

  16. The importance of grid integration for achievable greenhouse gas emissions reductions from alternative vehicle technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarroja, Brian; Shaffer, Brendan; Samuelsen, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Alternative vehicles must appropriately interface with the electric grid and renewable generation to contribute to decarbonization. This study investigates the impact of infrastructure configurations and management strategies on the vehicle–grid interface and vehicle greenhouse gas reduction potential with regard to California's Executive Order S-21-09 goal. Considered are battery electric vehicles, gasoline-fueled plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, hydrogen-fueled fuel cell vehicles, and plug-in hybrid fuel cell vehicles. Temporally resolved models of the electric grid, electric vehicle charging, hydrogen infrastructure, and vehicle powertrain simulations are integrated. For plug-in vehicles, consumer travel patterns can limit the greenhouse gas reductions without smart charging or energy storage. For fuel cell vehicles, the fuel production mix must be optimized for minimal greenhouse gas emissions. The plug-in hybrid fuel cell vehicle has the largest potential for emissions reduction due to smaller battery and fuel cells keeping efficiencies higher and meeting 86% of miles on electric travel keeping the hydrogen demand low. Energy storage is required to meet Executive Order S-21-09 goals in all cases. Meeting the goal requires renewable capacities of 205 GW for plug-in hybrid fuel cell vehicles and battery electric vehicle 100s, 255 GW for battery electric vehicle 200s, and 325 GW for fuel cell vehicles. - Highlights: • Consumer travel patterns limit greenhouse gas reductions with immediate charging. • Smart charging or energy storage are required for large greenhouse gas reductions. • Fuel cells as a plug-in vehicle range extender provided the most greenhouse gas reductions. • Energy storage is required to meet greenhouse gas goals regardless of vehicle type. • Smart charging reduces the required energy storage size for a given greenhouse gas goal

  17. Quantifying the Impacts of Large Scale Integration of Renewables in Indian Power Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Mishra, T.; Banerjee, R.

    2017-12-01

    India's power sector is responsible for nearly 37 percent of India's greenhouse gas emissions. For a fast emerging economy like India whose population and energy consumption are poised to rise rapidly in the coming decades, renewable energy can play a vital role in decarbonizing power sector. In this context, India has targeted 33-35 percent emission intensity reduction (with respect to 2005 levels) along with large scale renewable energy targets (100GW solar, 60GW wind, and 10GW biomass energy by 2022) in INDCs submitted at Paris agreement. But large scale integration of renewable energy is a complex process which faces a number of problems like capital intensiveness, matching intermittent loads with least storage capacity and reliability. In this context, this study attempts to assess the technical feasibility of integrating renewables into Indian electricity mix by 2022 and analyze its implications on power sector operations. This study uses TIMES, a bottom up energy optimization model with unit commitment and dispatch features. We model coal and gas fired units discretely with region-wise representation of wind and solar resources. The dispatch features are used for operational analysis of power plant units under ramp rate and minimum generation constraints. The study analyzes India's electricity sector transition for the year 2022 with three scenarios. The base case scenario (no RE addition) along with INDC scenario (with 100GW solar, 60GW wind, 10GW biomass) and low RE scenario (50GW solar, 30GW wind) have been created to analyze the implications of large scale integration of variable renewable energy. The results provide us insights on trade-offs involved in achieving mitigation targets and investment decisions involved. The study also examines operational reliability and flexibility requirements of the system for integrating renewables.

  18. Coal-fired Power Plants with Flexible Amine-based CCS and Co-located Wind Power: Environmental, Economic and Reliability Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Rubenka

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies provide a means to significantly reduce carbon emissions from the existing fleet of fossil-fired plants, and hence can facilitate a gradual transition from conventional to more sustainable sources of electric power. This is especially relevant for coal plants that have a CO2 emission rate that is roughly two times higher than that of natural gas plants. Of the different kinds of CCS technology available, post-combustion amine based CCS is the best developed and hence more suitable for retrofitting an existing coal plant. The high costs from operating CCS could be reduced by enabling flexible operation through amine storage or allowing partial capture of CO2 during high electricity prices. This flexibility is also found to improve the power plant's ramp capability, enabling it to offset the intermittency of renewable power sources. This thesis proposes a solution to problems associated with two promising technologies for decarbonizing the electric power system: the high costs of the energy penalty of CCS, and the intermittency and non-dispatchability of wind power. It explores the economic and technical feasibility of a hybrid system consisting of a coal plant retrofitted with a post-combustion-amine based CCS system equipped with the option to perform partial capture or amine storage, and a co-located wind farm. A techno-economic assessment of the performance of the hybrid system is carried out both from the perspective of the stakeholders (utility owners, investors, etc.) as well as that of the power system operator. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  19. Achieving deep reductions in US transport greenhouse gas emissions: Scenario analysis and policy implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCollum, David; Yang, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential for making deep cuts in US transportation greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the long-term (50-80% below 1990 levels by 2050). Scenarios are used to envision how such a significant decarbonization might be achieved through the application of advanced vehicle technologies and fuels, and various options for behavioral change. A Kaya framework that decomposes GHG emissions into the product of four major drivers is used to analyze emissions and mitigation options. In contrast to most previous studies, a relatively simple, easily adaptable modeling methodology is used which can incorporate insights from other modeling studies and organize them in a way that is easy for policymakers to understand. Also, a wider range of transportation subsectors is considered here-light- and heavy-duty vehicles, aviation, rail, marine, agriculture, off-road, and construction. This analysis investigates scenarios with multiple options (increased efficiency, lower-carbon fuels, and travel demand management) across the various subsectors and confirms the notion that there are no 'silver bullet' strategies for making deep cuts in transport GHGs. If substantial emission reductions are to be made, considerable action is needed on all fronts, and no subsectors can be ignored. Light-duty vehicles offer the greatest potential for emission reductions; however, while deep reductions in other subsectors are also possible, there are more limitations in the types of fuels and propulsion systems that can be used. In all cases travel demand management strategies are critical; deep emission cuts will not likely be possible without slowing growth in travel demand across all modes. Even though these scenarios represent only a small subset of the potential futures in which deep reductions might be achieved, they provide a sense of the magnitude of changes required in our transportation system and the need for early and aggressive action if long-term targets are to be met.

  20. Hydrogen energy - Abundant, efficient, clean: A debate over the energy-system-of-change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Carl-Jochen [International Association for Hydrogen Energy (IAHE), c/o ENERGON Carl-Jochen Winter e.K., Obere St.-Leonhardstr. 9, 88662 Ueberlingen (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Both secondary energies, electricity and hydrogen, have much in common: they are technology driven; both are produced from any available primary energy; once produced both are environmentally and climatically clean over the entire length of their respective conversion chains, from production to utilization; they are electrochemically interchangeable via electrolyses and fuel cells; both rely on each other, e.g., when electrolyzers and liquefiers need electricity or when electricity-providing low temperature fuel cells need hydrogen; in cases of secondary energy transport over longer distances they compete with each other; in combined fossil fuel cycles both hydrogen and electricity are produced in parallel exergetically highly efficiently; hydrogen in addition to electricity helps exergizing the energy system and, thus, maximizing the available technical work. There are dissimilarities, too: electricity transports information, hydrogen does not; hydrogen stores and transports energy, electricity does not (in macroeconomic terms). The most obvious dissimilarity is their market presence, both in capacities and in availability: Electricity is globally ubiquitous (almost), whilst hydrogen energy is still used in only selected industrial areas and in much smaller capacities. The article describes in 15 chapters, 33 figures, 3 tables, and 2 Annexes the up-and-coming hydrogen energy economy, its environmental and climatic relevance, its exergizing influence on the energy system, its effect on decarbonizing fossil fueled power plants, the introduction of the novel non-heat-engine-related electrochemical energy converter fuel cell in portable electronics, in stationary and mobile applications. Hydrogen guarantees environmentally and climatically clean transportation on land, in air and space, and at sea. Hydrogen facilitates the electrification of vehicles with practically no range limits. (author)

  1. Demonstration of CO2 Conversion to Synthetic Transport Fuel at Flue Gas Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George R. M. Dowson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A mixture of 1- and 2-butanol was produced using a stepwise synthesis starting with a methyl halide. The process included a carbon dioxide utilization step to produce an acetate salt which was then converted to the butanol isomers by Claisen condensation of the esterified acetate followed by hydrogenation of the resulting ethyl acetoacetate. Importantly, the CO2 utilization step uses dry, dilute carbon dioxide (12% CO2 in nitrogen similar to those found in post-combustion flue gases. The work has shown that the Grignard reagent has a slow rate of reaction with oxygen in comparison to carbon dioxide, meaning that the costly purification step usually associated with carbon capture technologies can be omitted using this direct capture-conversion technique. Butanol isomers are useful as direct drop-in replacement fuels for gasoline due to their high octane number, higher energy density, hydrophobicity, and low corrosivity in existing petrol engines. An energy analysis shows the process to be exothermic from methanol to butanol; however, energy is required to regenerate the active magnesium metal from the halide by-product. The methodology is important as it allows electrical energy, which is difficult to store using batteries over long periods of time, to be stored as a liquid fuel that fits entirely with the current liquid fuels infrastructure. This means that renewable, weather-dependent energy can be stored across seasons, for example, production in summer with consumption in winter. It also helps to avoid new fossil carbon entering the supply chain through the utilization of carbon dioxide that would otherwise be emitted. As methanol has also been shown to be commercially produced from CO2, this adds to the prospect of the general decarbonization of the transport fuels sector. Furthermore, as the conversion of CO2 to butanol requires significantly less hydrogen than CO2 to octanes, there is a potentially reduced burden on the so-called hydrogen

  2. Clarification of leachate from reclaimed ground by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Masao; Sawai, Teruko; Shimokawa, Toshinari; Sawai, Takeshi

    1985-01-01

    To decompose organic matters such as humic acid and fulvous acid in the leachate from reclaimed ground, an electron beam irradiation technique was examined because of availability of higher dose rate than a 60 Co γ-ray source. This paper describes results of the above-mentioned preliminary examination. Test water was collected from No.15 dumping site at the Tokyo Bay. Irradiation sample was prepared by filtration with a filter and decarbonation with sulfuric acid. Fulvous acid solution by eliminating humic acid was also served for the examination. Electron beam irradiation of the sample solution was made with a Van de Graaf accelerator by 1.5 MeV, 140 Gy/sec of irradiation condition and with a dynamitron by 2.0 MeV, 25 kGy/pass of the condition. It was clarified that oxygen bubbling velocity during the irradiation did not affect much for the decrease rate of total organic matters (TOC) within 0.5 to 3.0 1/min of an experimental condition. As for radiation doses and TOC decrease, TOC was decreased much for lower dose rate irradiation (Van de Graaf accelerator), lower initial TOC concentration, or addition of hydrogen peroxide. For the combined treatment of radiation and flocculation to aim at irradiation dose decrease, fulvous acid solution was served for the test. Lower dose irradiation with a 60 Co source showed better TOC elimination and it was concluded that combination with flocculation was effective for the dose reduction. It was also found experimentally that TOC decrease behavior by the both radiation source was different due to temperature effect and further study should be made for the development of the practical electron beam irradiation technique. (Takagi, S.)

  3. Advanced Demonstration and Test Reactor Options Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gehin, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Grandy, Christopher [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Qualls, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Croson, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Global efforts to address climate change will require large-scale decarbonization of energy production in the United States and elsewhere. Nuclear power already provides 20% of electricity production in the United States (U.S.) and is increasing in countries undergoing rapid growth around the world. Because reliable, grid-stabilizing, low emission electricity generation, energy security, and energy resource diversity will be increasingly valued, nuclear power’s share of electricity production has a potential to grow. In addition, there are non electricity applications (e.g., process heat, desalination, hydrogen production) that could be better served by advanced nuclear systems. Thus, the timely development, demonstration, and commercialization of advanced nuclear reactors could diversify the nuclear technologies available and offer attractive technology options to expand the impact of nuclear energy for electricity generation and non-electricity missions. The purpose of this planning study is to provide transparent and defensible technology options for a test and/or demonstration reactor(s) to be built to support public policy, innovation and long term commercialization within the context of the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) broader commitment to pursuing an “all of the above” clean energy strategy and associated time lines. This planning study includes identification of the key features and timing needed for advanced test or demonstration reactors to support research, development, and technology demonstration leading to the commercialization of power plants built upon these advanced reactor platforms. This planning study is consistent with the Congressional language contained within the fiscal year 2015 appropriation that directed the DOE to conduct a planning study to evaluate “advanced reactor technology options, capabilities, and requirements within the context of national needs and public policy to support innovation in nuclear energy

  4. Modelling the Baltic power system till 2050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumberga, Andra; Lauka, Dace; Barisa, Aiga; Blumberga, Dagnija

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A dynamic model was developed to evaluate changes in the energy system till 2050. • Wind energy has the potential to become dominant in the Baltic region. • Solar energy has the potential to become popular from 2025 till 2050. - Abstract: The European Union has given a long-term commitment towards a low-carbon society. Power sector is to play an important role in achieving ambitious emission reduction goals. This article presents results of a research aimed at evaluating development of the Baltic power system under current framework conditions. Special focus is put on renewable energy analysis to estimate the potential of power sector decarbonization. A dynamic energy-economy model was developed by applying system dynamics modelling approach in order to evaluate changes in the energy system till 2050. Underlying structure of the model is based on energy resource flows according to the national electricity mix of each Baltic State. The model calculates energy generation costs of each technology taking into account national support schemes. Based on cost estimation, the installed capacity of each energy resource is determined. Modelling results suggest that wind energy has the potential to become dominant in the Baltic region. This is explained by increasing competitiveness of wind-generated power price compared to fossil-fuel-based generation. Solar energy has the potential to become popular from 2025 onwards due to decreasing investment costs. The market share of other renewable electricity technologies, such as hydro and biomass, will continue to increase reaching maximum between 2020 and 2030. Biogas plants are still not expected to play considerable role in electricity generation.

  5. Demonstration of CO{sub 2} Conversion to Synthetic Transport Fuel at Flue Gas Concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowson, George R. M. [Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Styring, Peter, E-mail: p.styring@sheffield.ac.uk [Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); UK Centre for Carbon Dioxide Utilisation, Department of Chemistry, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-12

    A mixture of 1- and 2-butanol was produced using a stepwise synthesis starting with a methyl halide. The process included a carbon dioxide utilization step to produce an acetate salt which was then converted to the butanol isomers by Claisen condensation of the esterified acetate followed by hydrogenation of the resulting ethyl acetoacetate. Importantly, the CO{sub 2} utilization step uses dry, dilute carbon dioxide (12% CO{sub 2} in nitrogen) similar to those found in post-combustion flue gases. The work has shown that the Grignard reagent has a slow rate of reaction with oxygen in comparison to carbon dioxide, meaning that the costly purification step usually associated with carbon capture technologies can be omitted using this direct capture-conversion technique. Butanol isomers are useful as direct drop-in replacement fuels for gasoline due to their high octane number, higher energy density, hydrophobicity, and low corrosivity in existing petrol engines. An energy analysis shows the process to be exothermic from methanol to butanol; however, energy is required to regenerate the active magnesium metal from the halide by-product. The methodology is important as it allows electrical energy, which is difficult to store using batteries over long periods of time, to be stored as a liquid fuel that fits entirely with the current liquid fuels infrastructure. This means that renewable, weather-dependent energy can be stored across seasons, for example, production in summer with consumption in winter. It also helps to avoid new fossil carbon entering the supply chain through the utilization of carbon dioxide that would otherwise be emitted. As methanol has also been shown to be commercially produced from CO{sub 2}, this adds to the prospect of the general decarbonization of the transport fuels sector. Furthermore, as the conversion of CO{sub 2} to butanol requires significantly less hydrogen than CO{sub 2} to octanes, there is a potentially reduced burden on the so

  6. Federal research, development, and demonstration priorities for carbon dioxide removal in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Daniel L.; Amador, Giana; Funk, Jason; Mach, Katharine J.

    2018-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide removal (CDR) technologies may be critical to achieving deep decarbonization. Yet a lack of technical and commercial maturity of CDR technologies hinders potential deployment. Needs for commercialization span research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities, including development of new materials, reactors, and processes, and rigorous monitoring of a portfolio of demonstration projects. As a world leader in supporting science and engineering, the United States (US) can play an important role in reducing costs and clarifying the sustainable scale of CDR. To date, federal agencies have focused on voluntary or piecemeal CDR programs. Here, we present a synthesis of research and developement needs, relevant agency authority, barriers to coordination, and interventions to enhance RD&D across the federal government of the US. On the basis of agency authority and expertise, the Department of Energy, Department of Agriculture, Department of the Interior, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and National Science Foundation are most central to conducting research, funding projects, monitoring effects, and promulgating regulations. Key enablers for successful programs include embracing technological diversity and administrative efficiency, fostering agency buy-in, and achieving commercial deployment. Based on these criteria, the executive branch could effectively coordinate RD&D strategy through two complementary pathways: (1) renewing intra-agency commitment to CDR in five primary agencies, including both research and demonstration, and (2) coordinating research prioritization and outcomes across agencies, led by the Office of Science and Technology Policy and loosely based on the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Both pathways can be stimulated by executive order or Congressional mandate. Executive branch implementation can begin at any time; future Farm and Energy Bills provide legislative vehicles for enhancing programs.

  7. Chapter 10. Trees have Already been Invented: Carbon in Woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna B. Hecht

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the developed world, discussions of climate change mitigation and adaptation tend to focus on technological solutions such as decarbonizing electric grids and regulating emissions of methane, black carbon, and so on. However, an often overlooked strategy for reaching greenhouse gas reduction targets in much of the developing world is rooted, not in new technologies, but in vegetation management. Trees and other vegetation absorb carbon as they grow and release carbon when they are burnt, so landscapes function as carbon sinks and carbon storage sites when forests are growing, on one hand, and as carbon sources when forests are cleared, on the other. Since greenhouse gas emissions from such land use changes rival emissions from the entire transport sector, trees and vegetation are essential to efforts to slow and adapt to climate change. Under the right circumstances, vegetation recovery and its carbon uptake occur quickly. Moreover, carbon uptake can be strongly affected by human management of forests; the right kinds of management can improve rates of recovery and carbon sequestration substantially. This chapter reviews carbon dynamics in mature forests, secondary forests, agroforests and tree landscapes in urban areas to point out the variability of these systems and the potential for enhancing carbon uptake and storage. Furthermore, vegetation systems have many additional benefits in the form of other environmental services, such as improving livelihoods, subsistence insurance habitat, microclimates, and water systems. Finally, by managing forests better, we can also make significant contributions to climate justice because most global forests and forested landscapes are under the stewardship of small holders.

  8. Geochemical study of travertines along middle-lower Tiber valley (central Italy): genesis, palaeo-environmental and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustini, Francesca; Brilli, Mauro; Mancini, Marco

    2017-09-01

    Several travertine deposits dating to the Pleistocene outcrop along the Tiber valley between Orte and Rome. Mineralogically, they are mainly composed of calcite; various lithofacies (stromatolitic, phytoclastic, and massive) were identified and relatively wide ranges of carbon (δ13C -8.11 to +11.42‰ vs. VPDB) and oxygen (δ18O +22.74 to +27.71‰ vs. VSMOW) isotope compositions were measured. The isotope and chemical compositions of water and free gases, in some cases associated with the travertines, were also measured. Carbon isotope data show that several samples fall in the typical range of thermogenic travertine, i.e., linked to the addition of deep inorganic CO2. The oxygen isotope composition of the springs associated with the travertine deposits points to travertine precipitation by slightly thermal water of meteoric origin. In general, these travertines are in association with, or close to, mineralised groundwaters (with slightly acidic pH, low thermalism, and enrichment in sulphates or sodium chloride) and rich CO2 gas emissions, the origin of which may be linked to decarbonation reactions. The travertine bodies are locally connected with crustal structural lineaments favouring the circulation of ascending deep CO2-rich fluids. Conversely, some samples show isotopic connotations of meteogenic deposits, representing travertines formed mainly from soil biogenic or atmospheric carbon dioxide generally present in shallow groundwater or surface water. According to their morphology and isotope data, these travertines may be attributed to the sedimentary environment of waterfalls. These new geochemical and morphological data are integrated with those already available in the literature regarding the study area and contribute to shedding light on palaeo-environmental conditions in western-central Italy during the Quaternary.

  9. A dynamic programming approach for modeling low-carbon fuel technology adoption considering learning-by-doing effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yuche; Zhang, Yunteng; Fan, Yueyue; Hu, Kejia; Zhao, Jianyou

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic programming method is used in transportation fuel portfolio planning. • The learning effect in new fuel technology is endogenously modeled through an experience curve. • Cellulosic biofuels play critical role in de-carbonization transport sector in near term. • The initial 3–4 billion gallons production is critical to bring down cellulosic biofuels’ cost. • Large penetration of Zero Emission Vehicles will discourage development of cellulosic biofuels. - Abstract: Promoting the adoption of low-carbon technologies in the transportation fuel portfolio is an effective strategy to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector worldwide. However, as one of the most promising low-carbon fuels, cellulosic biofuel has not fully entered commercial production. Governments could provide guidance in developing cellulosic biofuel technologies, but no systematic approach has been proposed yet. We establish a dynamic programming framework for investigating time-dependent and adaptive decision-making processes to develop advanced fuel technologies. The learning-by-doing effect inherited in the technology development process is included in the framework. The proposed framework is applied in a case study to explore the most economical pathway for California to develop a solid cellulosic biofuel industry under its Low Carbon Fuel Standard. Our results show that cellulosic biofuel technology is playing a critical role in guaranteeing California’s 10% greenhouse gas emission reduction by 2020. Three to four billion gallons of cumulative production are needed to ensure that cellulosic biofuel is cost-competitive with petroleum-based fuels or conventional biofuels. Zero emission vehicle promoting policies will discourage the development of cellulosic biofuel. The proposed framework, with small adjustments, can also be applied to study new technology development in other energy sectors.

  10. Will the use of a carbon tax for revenue generation produce an incentive to continue carbon emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Moreno-Cruz, Juan; Caldeira, Ken

    2017-05-01

    Integrated assessment models are commonly used to generate optimal carbon prices based on an objective function that maximizes social welfare. Such models typically project an initially low carbon price that increases with time. This framework does not reflect the incentives of decision makers who are responsible for generating tax revenue. If a rising carbon price is to result in near-zero emissions, it must ultimately result in near-zero carbon tax revenue. That means that at some point, policy makers will be asked to increase the tax rate on carbon emissions to such an extent that carbon tax revenue will fall. Therefore, there is a risk that the use of a carbon tax to generate revenue could eventually create a perverse incentive to continue carbon emissions in order to provide a continued stream of carbon tax revenue. Using the Dynamic Integrated Climate Economy (DICE) model, we provide evidence that this risk is not a concern for the immediate future but that a revenue-generating carbon tax could create this perverse incentive as time goes on. This incentive becomes perverse at about year 2085 under the default configuration of DICE, but the timing depends on a range of factors including the cost of climate damages and the cost of decarbonizing the global energy system. While our study is based on a schematic model, it highlights the importance of considering a broader spectrum of incentives in studies using more comprehensive integrated assessment models. Our study demonstrates that the use of a carbon tax for revenue generation could potentially motivate implementation of such a tax today, but this source of revenue generation risks motivating continued carbon emissions far into the future.

  11. Low-carbon electricity production through the implementation of photovoltaic panels in rooftops in urban environments: A case study for three cities in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazán, José; Rieradevall, Joan; Gabarrell, Xavier; Vázquez-Rowe, Ian

    2018-05-01

    Urban environments in Latin America must begin decarbonizing their activities to avoid increasing greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions rates due to their reliance on fossil fuel-based energy to support economic growth. In this context, cities in Latin America have high potential to convert sunlight into energy. Hence, the main objective of this study was to determine the potential of electricity self-sufficiency production and mitigation of GHG emissions in three medium-sized cities in Peru through the revalorization of underutilized rooftop areas in urban environments. Each city represented a distinct natural area of Peru: Pacific coast, Andean region and Amazon basin. More specifically, photovoltaic solar systems were the technology selected for implementation in these rooftop areas. Data on incident solar energy, temperature and energy consumption were collected. Thereafter, ArcGis10.3 was used to quantify the total usable area in the cities. A series of correction factors, including tilt, orientation or roof profiles were applied to attain an accurate value of usable area. Finally, Life Cycle Assessment was the methodology chosen to calculate the reduction of environmental impacts as compared to the current context of using electricity from the regional grids. Results showed that the cities assessed have the potential to obtain their entire current electricity demand for residential, commercial and public lighting purposes, augmenting energy security and resilience to intermittent natural disasters, with the support of decentralized storage systems. This approach would also translate into substantial reductions in terms of GHG emissions. Annual reductions in GHG emissions ranged from 112ton CO 2 eq in the city of Ayacucho to over 523kton CO 2 eq in Pucallpa, showing that cities in the Amazon basin would be the ones that benefit the most in terms of climate change mitigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Lavrion Pb-Zn-Fe-Cu-Ag detachment-related district (Attica, Greece): Structural control on hydrothermal flow and element transfer-deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Christophe; Tarantola, Alexandre; Vanderhaeghe, Olivier; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Rigaudier, Thomas; Photiades, Adonis; Morin, Denis; Alloucherie, Alison

    2017-10-01

    The impact of lithological heterogeneities on deformation, fluid flow and ore deposition is discussed based on the example of the Lavrion low-angle detachment partly accommodating gravitational collapse of the Hellenides orogenic belt in Greece. The Lavrion peninsula is characterised by a multiphase Pb-Zn-Fe-Cu-Ag ore system with a probable pre-concentration before subduction followed by progressive remobilisation and deposition coeval with the development of a low-angle ductile to brittle shear zone. The mylonitic marble below the detachment shear zone is composed of white layers of pure marble alternating with blue layers containing impurities (SiO2, Al2O3, carbonaceous material). Ductile mylonitic deformation is more pervasive in the less competent impure blue marble. We propose that localised deformation in the impure marble is associated with fluid circulation and dolomitisation, which in turn causes an increase in competence of these layers. Mineralised cataclastic zones, crosscutting the mylonitic fabric, are preferentially localised in the more competent dolomitic layers. Oxygen and carbon isotopic signatures of marble invaded by carbonate replacement deposits during ductile to ductile-brittle deformation are consistent with decarbonation coeval with the invasion of magmatic fluids. Mineralised cataclastic zones reflecting brittle deformation evolve from low 13C to low 18O signatures, interpreted as local interaction with carbonaceous material that trends toward the contribution of a surface-derived fluid. These features indicate that the Lavrion area records a complex deposition history influenced by the evolution of fluid reservoirs induced by the thermal and mechanical evolution of the marble nappe stack. Ore remobilisation and deposition associated with the activity of the low-angle detachment is (i) firstly related to the intrusion of the Plaka granodiorite leading to porphyry-type and carbonate replacement mineralisation during ductile

  13. Revolutions in energy input and material cycling in Earth history and human history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Timothy M.; Pichler, Peter-Paul; Weisz, Helga

    2016-04-01

    Major revolutions in energy capture have occurred in both Earth and human history, with each transition resulting in higher energy input, altered material cycles and major consequences for the internal organization of the respective systems. In Earth history, we identify the origin of anoxygenic photosynthesis, the origin of oxygenic photosynthesis, and land colonization by eukaryotic photosynthesizers as step changes in free energy input to the biosphere. In human history we focus on the Palaeolithic use of fire, the Neolithic revolution to farming, and the Industrial revolution as step changes in free energy input to human societies. In each case we try to quantify the resulting increase in energy input, and discuss the consequences for material cycling and for biological and social organization. For most of human history, energy use by humans was but a tiny fraction of the overall energy input to the biosphere, as would be expected for any heterotrophic species. However, the industrial revolution gave humans the capacity to push energy inputs towards planetary scales and by the end of the 20th century human energy use had reached a magnitude comparable to the biosphere. By distinguishing world regions and income brackets we show the unequal distribution in energy and material use among contemporary humans. Looking ahead, a prospective sustainability revolution will require scaling up new renewable and decarbonized energy technologies and the development of much more efficient material recycling systems - thus creating a more autotrophic social metabolism. Such a transition must also anticipate a level of social organization that can implement the changes in energy input and material cycling without losing the large achievements in standard of living and individual liberation associated with industrial societies.

  14. High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low-carbon futures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, James; Johnston, Josiah; Mileva, Ana; Fripp, Matthias; Hoffman, Ian; Petros-Good, Autumn; Blanco, Christian; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Decarbonizing electricity production is central to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Exploiting intermittent renewable energy resources demands power system planning models with high temporal and spatial resolution. We use a mixed-integer linear programming model – SWITCH – to analyze least-cost generation, storage, and transmission capacity expansion for western North America under various policy and cost scenarios. Current renewable portfolio standards are shown to be insufficient to meet emission reduction targets by 2030 without new policy. With stronger carbon policy consistent with a 450 ppm climate stabilization scenario, power sector emissions can be reduced to 54% of 1990 levels by 2030 using different portfolios of existing generation technologies. Under a range of resource cost scenarios, most coal power plants would be replaced by solar, wind, gas, and/or nuclear generation, with intermittent renewable sources providing at least 17% and as much as 29% of total power by 2030. The carbon price to induce these deep carbon emission reductions is high, but, assuming carbon price revenues are reinvested in the power sector, the cost of power is found to increase by at most 20% relative to business-as-usual projections. - Highlights: ► Intermittent generation necessitates high-resolution electric power system models. ► We apply the SWITCH planning model to the western North American grid. ► We explore carbon policy and resource cost scenarios through 2030. ► As the carbon price rises, coal generation is replaced with solar, wind, gas and/or nuclear generation ► A 450 ppm climate stabilization target can be met at a 20% or lower cost increase.

  15. Integrated life-cycle assessment of electricity-supply scenarios confirms global environmental benefit of low-carbon technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertwich, Edgar G; Gibon, Thomas; Bouman, Evert A; Arvesen, Anders; Suh, Sangwon; Heath, Garvin A; Bergesen, Joseph D; Ramirez, Andrea; Vega, Mabel I; Shi, Lei

    2015-05-19

    Decarbonization of electricity generation can support climate-change mitigation and presents an opportunity to address pollution resulting from fossil-fuel combustion. Generally, renewable technologies require higher initial investments in infrastructure than fossil-based power systems. To assess the tradeoffs of increased up-front emissions and reduced operational emissions, we present, to our knowledge, the first global, integrated life-cycle assessment (LCA) of long-term, wide-scale implementation of electricity generation from renewable sources (i.e., photovoltaic and solar thermal, wind, and hydropower) and of carbon dioxide capture and storage for fossil power generation. We compare emissions causing particulate matter exposure, freshwater ecotoxicity, freshwater eutrophication, and climate change for the climate-change-mitigation (BLUE Map) and business-as-usual (Baseline) scenarios of the International Energy Agency up to 2050. We use a vintage stock model to conduct an LCA of newly installed capacity year-by-year for each region, thus accounting for changes in the energy mix used to manufacture future power plants. Under the Baseline scenario, emissions of air and water pollutants more than double whereas the low-carbon technologies introduced in the BLUE Map scenario allow a doubling of electricity supply while stabilizing or even reducing pollution. Material requirements per unit generation for low-carbon technologies can be higher than for conventional fossil generation: 11-40 times more copper for photovoltaic systems and 6-14 times more iron for wind power plants. However, only two years of current global copper and one year of iron production will suffice to build a low-carbon energy system capable of supplying the world's electricity needs in 2050.

  16. Assessment of oxy-fuel, pre- and post-combustion-based carbon capture for future IGCC plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, Christian; Spliethoff, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hot gas cleanup is a highly favorable technology for all selected IGCC concepts. ► Proposed high pressure IGCC with membrane reactor enables direct CO 2 condensation. ► IGCC with OTM and carbonate looping enable significant synergy effects. ► Combining IGCC and oxy-fuel is technically challenging but energetically favorable. ► All selected IGCC concepts are able to realize CO 2 capture rates up to 99%. -- Abstract: Environmental damage due to the emission of greenhouse gases from conventional coal-based power plants is a growing concern. Various carbon capture strategies to minimize CO 2 emissions are currently being investigated. Unfortunately, the efficiency drop due to de-carbonization is still significant and the capture rate is limited. Therefore three future hard coal IGCC concepts are assessed here, applying emerging technologies and various carbon capture approaches. The advanced pre-combustion capture concept is based on hot gas clean-up, membrane-enhanced CO conversion and direct CO 2 condensation. The concept reached a net efficiency of 45.1% (LHV), representing an improvement of 6.46% compared to the conventional IGCC base case. The second IGCC concept, based on post-combustion capture via calcination–carbonation loops, hot gas clean-up and oxygen membranes, showed a net efficiency of 45.87% (LHV). The third IGCC concept applies hot gas clean-up and combustion of the unconverted fuel gas using pure oxygen. The oxygen is supplied by an integrated oxygen membrane. The combination of IGCC and oxy-fuel process reached a net efficiency of 45.74% (LHV). In addition to their increased efficiency, all of the concepts showed significantly improved carbon capture rates up to 99%, resulting in virtually carbon-free fossil power plants.

  17. Mountains of Our Future Earth: Defining Priorities for Mountain Research—A Synthesis From the 2015 Perth III Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin H. Gleeson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Perth conferences, held every 5 years in Perth, Scotland, bring together people who identify as mountain researchers and who are interested in issues related to global change in mountain social-ecological systems. These conferences provide an opportunity to evaluate the evolution of research directions within the mountain research community, as well as to identify research priorities. The Future Earth Strategic Research Agenda provides a useful framework for evaluating the mountain research community's progress toward addressing global change and sustainability challenges. Using a process originally set up to analyze contributions to the 2010 conference, the abstracts accepted for the 2015 conference in the context of the Future Earth framework were analyzed. This revealed a continued geographic underrepresentation in mountain research of Africa, Latin America, and South and Southeast Asia but a more even treatment of biophysical and social science themes than in 2010. It also showed that the Perth conference research community strongly focused on understanding system processes (the Dynamic Planet theme of the Future Earth research agenda. Despite the continued bias of conference contributions toward traditional observation- and conservation-oriented research, survey results indicate that conference participants clearly believe that transdisciplinary, transformative research is relevant to mountains. Of the 8 Future Earth focal challenges, those related to safeguarding natural assets, promoting sustainable land use, increasing resilience and understanding the water-energy-food nexus received considerable attention. The challenges related to sustainable consumption, decarbonizing socioeconomic systems, cities, and health were considerably less well represented, despite their relevance to mountain socioeconomic systems. Based on these findings, we outline a proposal for the future directions of mountain research.

  18. Report on the behalf of the Parliamentary Office for scientific and technological choices on the German energy turn: which lessons for the French energy transition? Volume I: report of the public hearing of the 25 September 2014. Nr 2440, Nr 176

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Deaut, Jean-Yves; Sido, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    This Parliamentary report first contains Power Point presentations proposed by different contributors (representatives of the German energy company, RWE, a French researcher, the chairwoman of the French-German Office for renewable energies, a representative of a German think tank, a French expert, a representative of ADEME, a representative of EON France, and two French researchers) on the objectives, difficulties and associated reform of the German energy turn, on the evolution of models of support to renewable energies in Germany, on the main challenges and evolution on the long term for the German energy turn (in terms of costs, de-carbonation, and European dimension), on the various challenges faced by this change in energy policy for Germany, on the French objectives in terms of renewable energy production and consumptions in the framework of energy transition with respect to the German experience, on a good idea to preserve and a bad idea to discard from the German experience, on the agenda and steering of nuclear station lifetime. After these contributions, the content of two round tables is reported. The first one addressed the objectives, difficulties and reforms associated with the German energy policy change, and the second one the lessons learned for the French energy transition. Interveners are representatives or members of public bodies, energy companies, research institutions, think tanks. They notably discuss the fast development of wind and photovoltaic energies, the regulatory evolution of the support system to renewable energies, challenges on a medium term for a low carbon electric system, the sustainability of the new energy system

  19. Asia's role in mitigating climate change: A technology and sector specific analysis with ReMIND-R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luderer, Gunnar; Pietzcker, Robert C.; Kriegler, Elmar; Haller, Markus; Bauer, Nico

    2012-01-01

    We use the ReMIND-R model to analyze the role of Asia in the context of a global effort to mitigate climate change. We introduce a novel method of secondary energy based mitigation shares, which allows us to quantify the economic mitigation potential of technologies in different regions and final energy carriers. The 2005 share of Asia in global CO 2 emissions amounts to 38%, and is projected to grow to 53% under business-as-usual until the end of the century. Asia also holds a large fraction of the global mitigation potential. A broad portfolio of technologies is deployed in the climate policy scenarios. We find that biomass in combination with CCS, other renewables, and end-use efficiency each make up a large fraction of the global mitigation potential, followed by nuclear and fossil CCS. We find considerable differences in decarbonization patterns across the final energy types electricity, heat and transport fuels. Regional differences in technology use are a function of differences in resource endowments, and structural differences in energy end use. Under climate policy, a substantial mitigation potential of non-biomass renewables emerges for China and other developing countries of Asia (OAS). Asia also accounts for the dominant share of the global mitigation potential of nuclear energy. In view of the substantial near term investments into new energy infrastructure in China and India, early adoption of climate policy prevents lock-in into carbon intensive infrastructure and thus leads to a much higher long-term mitigation potential. - Highlights: ► We develop a novel methodology for the attribution of emission reductions to technologies. ► Asia accounts for a substantial and increasing share of global CO 2 emissions. ► A broad portfolio of technologies contributes to emission reductions. ► Early action increases the long term mitigation potential of China and India.

  20. The production of hydrogen through the use of a 77 wt% Pd 23 wt% Ag membrane water gas shift reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberty N. Baloyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen as an energy carrier has the potential to decarbonize the energy sector. This work presents the application of a palladium-silver (Pd–Ag membrane-based reactor. The membrane reactor which is made from Pd–Ag film supported by porous stainless steel (PSS is evaluated for the production of hydrogen and the potential replacement of the current two-stage Water-Gas Shift (WGS reaction by a single stage reaction. The permeability of a 20 μm Pd–Ag membrane reactor was examined at 320 °C, 380 °C and 430 °C. The effect of continuous hydrogen exposure on the Pd–Ag membrane at high temperature and low temperature was examined to investigate the thermal stability and durability of the membrane. During continuous operation to determine thermal stability, the membrane reactor exhibited stable hydrogen permeation at 320 °C for 120 h and unstable hydrogen permeation at 430 °C was observed. For the WGS reaction, the reactor was loaded with Ferrochrome catalyst. The membrane showed the ability to produce high purity hydrogen, with a CO conversion and an H2 recovery of 84% and 88%, respectively. The membrane suffered from hydrogen embrittlement due to desorption and adsorption of hydrogen on the membrane surface. SEM analysis revealed cracks that occurred on the surface of the membrane after hydrogen exposure. XRD analysis revealed lattice expansion after hydrogen loading which suggests the occurrence of phase change from α-phase to the more brittle β-phase.

  1. Impact of battery weight and charging patterns on the economic and environmental benefits of plug-in hybrid vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiau, Ching-Shin Norman; Samaras, Constantine; Hauffe, Richard; Michalek, Jeremy J.

    2009-01-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) technology is receiving attention as an approach to reducing US dependency on foreign oil and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation sector. PHEVs require large batteries for energy storage, which affect vehicle cost, weight, and performance. We construct PHEV simulation models to account for the effects of additional batteries on fuel consumption, cost, and GHG emissions over a range of charging frequencies (distance traveled between charges). We find that when charged frequently, every 20 miles or less, using average US electricity, small-capacity PHEVs are less expensive and release fewer GHGs than hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) or conventional vehicles. For moderate charging intervals of 20-100 miles, PHEVs release fewer GHGs, but HEVs have lower lifetime costs. High fuel prices, low-cost batteries, or high carbon taxes combined with low-carbon electricity generation would make small-capacity PHEVs cost competitive for a wide range of drivers. In contrast, increased battery specific energy or carbon taxes without decarbonization of the electricity grid would have limited impact. Large-capacity PHEVs sized for 40 or more miles of electric-only travel do not offer the lowest lifetime cost in any scenario, although they could minimize GHG emissions for some drivers and provide potential to shift air pollutant emissions away from population centers. The tradeoffs identified in this analysis can provide a space for vehicle manufacturers, policymakers, and the public to identify optimal decisions for PHEV design, policy and use. Given the alignment of economic, environmental, and national security objectives, policies aimed at putting PHEVs on the road will likely be most effective if they focus on adoption of small-capacity PHEVs by urban drivers who can charge frequently.

  2. Contestation, contingency, and justice in the Nordic low-carbon energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K.

    2017-01-01

    The five Nordic countries have aggressive climate and energy policies in place and have already emerged to be leaders in renewable energy and energy efficiency. Denmark is renowned for its pioneering use of wind energy, Finland and Sweden bioenergy, Norway hydroelectricity and Iceland geothermal energy. All countries aim to be virtually “fossil free” by 2050. This study explores the Nordic energy transition through the lens of three interconnected research questions: How are they doing it? What challenges exist? And what broader lessons result for energy policy? The study firstly investigates the pathways necessary for these five countries to achieve their low-carbon goals. It argues that a concerted effort must be made to (1) promote decentralized and renewable forms of electricity supply; (2) shift to more sustainable forms of transport; (3) further improve the energy efficiency of residential and commercial buildings; and (4) adopt carbon capture and storage technologies for industry. However, the section that follows emphasizes some of the empirical barriers the Nordic transition must confront, namely political contestation, technological contingency, and social justice and recognition concerns. The study concludes with implications for what such historical progress, and future transition pathways, mean for both energy researchers and energy planners. - Highlights: • Nordic countries have strong energy and climate policies to be practically “fossil free” by 2050. • Decarbonization and transition pathways depend on renewable energy, efficiency, transport, and industry. • The Nordic transition remains contingent on further technological innovations and policy commitments. • It also raises energy justice issues concerning employment, public knowledge, and embodied emissions.

  3. An economic assessment of low carbon vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summerton, P. [Cambridge Econometrics CE, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Harrison, P. [European Climate Foundation ECF, Brussels (Belgium)] (eds.)

    2013-03-15

    The study aimed to analyse the economic impacts of decarbonizing light duty vehicles. As part of the study, the impacts of the European Commissions proposed 2020 CO2 regulation for cars and vans have been assessed. The analysis showed that a shift to low-carbon vehicles would increase spending on vehicle technology, therefore generating positive direct employment impacts, but potentially adding 1,000-1,100 euro to the capital cost of the average new car in 2020. However, these additional technology costs would be offset by fuel savings of around 400 euro per year, indicating an effective break-even point for drivers of approximately three years. At the EU level, the cost of running and maintaining the European car fleet would become 33-35 billion euro lower each year than in a 'do nothing scenario' by 2030, leading to positive economic impacts including indirect employment gains. Data on the cost of low carbon vehicle technologies has largely been sourced from the auto industry itself, with the study supported by a core working group including Nissan, GE, the European Association of Automotive Suppliers (CLEPA), and the European Storage Battery Manufacturers Association (Eurobat). Fuel price projections for the study were based on the IEA's World Energy Outlook, while technical modelling was carried out using the transport policy scoping tool SULTAN (developed by Ricardo-AEA for the European Commission) and the Road Vehicle Cost and Efficiency Calculation Framework, also developed by Ricardo-AEA. Macro-economic modelling was done using the E3ME model, which has previously been used for several European Commission and EU government impact assessments. This report focuses on efficient use of fossil fuels in internal combustion- and hybrid electric vehicles. It will be followed by a second report, which will focus on further reducing the use of fossil fuels by also substituting them with domestically produced energy carriers, such as electricity and

  4. Analysis of Fuel Cell Markets in Japan and the US: Experience Curve Development and Cost Reduction Disaggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Sarah J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sohn, Michael D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Fuel cells are both a longstanding and emerging technology for stationary and transportation applications, and their future use will likely be critical for the deep decarbonization of global energy systems. As we look into future applications, a key challenge for policy-makers and technology market forecasters who seek to track and/or accelerate their market adoption is the ability to forecast market costs of the fuel cells as technology innovations are incorporated into market products. Specifically, there is a need to estimate technology learning rates, which are rates of cost reduction versus production volume. Unfortunately, no literature exists for forecasting future learning rates for fuel cells. In this paper, we look retrospectively to estimate learning rates for two fuel cell deployment programs: (1) the micro-combined heat and power (CHP) program in Japan, and (2) the Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) in California. These two examples have a relatively broad set of historical market data and thus provide an informative and international comparison of distinct fuel cell technologies and government deployment programs. We develop a generalized procedure for disaggregating experience-curve cost-reductions in order to disaggregate the Japanese fuel cell micro-CHP market into its constituent components, and we derive and present a range of learning rates that may explain observed market trends. Finally, we explore the differences in the technology development ecosystem and market conditions that may have contributed to the observed differences in cost reduction and draw policy observations for the market adoption of future fuel cell technologies. The scientific and policy contributions of this paper are the first comparative experience curve analysis of past fuel cell technologies in two distinct markets, and the first quantitative comparison of a detailed cost model of fuel cell systems with actual market data. The resulting approach is applicable to

  5. The power within

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leer, S. [Arch Coal Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation discussed the outlook for world coal consumption. Coal, the world's fastest growing fuel source, is abundant, secure, and widely dispersed. The developing world will drive growth in the demand for coal. Coal electricity generating plants are being built around the globe. The United States will rely on coal for power production because its market share of natural gas cannot increase, its nuclear facilities are aging and too costly to replace, hydro power is geographically constrained, and renewable sources cannot meet baseload needs. As the dominant fuel source for electricity generation in North America, coal enables the production of low-cost electricity to improve the standard of living and global competitiveness, making the economics of coal use compelling. Coal is vital to the production of steel, for which emerging Asia has a vast appetite. In addition, coal is becoming increasingly clean and addressing global solutions to climate change. Carbon capture and storage will be essential to meet greenhouse gas reduction targets. Plug-in hybrids will likely be used to de-carbonize the transportation fleet, but this will increase off-peak demand for electricity. Coal can be made into transportation fuels and synthetic natural gas, which improves the potential energy security of the United States. Historically, the fuel source for power generators has changed every few years based on economic and political factors, including the recent concern about climate change, and these shifts could well continue. Switching from coal to gas would necessitate a tremendous new investment. Increasingly stringent regulation threatens coal-based power. 23 figs.

  6. Study of 4 trajectories of the DNTE. A pedagogic view of the 4 trajectories studied within the frame of the National Debate on Energy Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandjean, Alain; Blanchet, Emmanuel; Finidori, Esther

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this report is, while giving explicit explanations of key variables of the scenarios, to propose a clear and pedagogic analysis of public political measures and of their impact, as well as envisaged technologies for the four trajectories of energy transition defined within the frame of the French National Debate on Energy Transition (DBTE). After a presentation of these four trajectories (DEC for high demand and electricity-based de-carbonation, DIV for average demand and vector diversity, EFF for energy efficiency and vector diversification, and SOB for energy saving and phasing out nuclear), and a presentation of the analysis methodology, a chapter analyses the underlying differences between these scenarios in terms of innovation and standard of living, of final energy consumption, of geography, of development of heat pumps, and of air and sea transport. Technical corrections applied to scenarios are also described. Then, the report proposes a comparative analysis of the evolution of energy demand per sector (housing, office building, transports, industry, agriculture) according to the four different scenarios, a comparative analysis of the evolution of energy production per vector (electricity, gas networks, heat networks, biomass) with an assessment in terms of primary energy, a discussion of issues related to research, innovation and development of technologies, and a discussion of the evolution of consumptions of fossil energies and renewable energies, of the share of renewable energies in final consumption, and of the level of greenhouse gas emissions. The last part discusses some lessons learned from this comparative analysis. Other interesting scenarios (Negatep, Ancre Div, Ademe, Negawatt) are presented in appendix, as well as some graphical representations of the developed analysis

  7. Applying Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD) to Understand Nanogranular Fault Rock Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. A. F.; Demurtas, M.; Prior, D. J.; Di Toro, G.

    2017-12-01

    Nanoparticles (transparent foils with resolutions that can be below 10 nm. Therefore, the potential of TKD to understand deformation processes in nanoparticles is very high. We present results of TKD analysis performed on mixed calcite-dolomite gouges deformed in a rotary-shear apparatus at slip rates ranging from sub-seismic to co-seismic (30 µm/s to 1 m/s). Samples for TKD were prepared by argon ion slicing, a method that yields relatively large (104 µm2) electron transparent areas, as well as standard argon ion milling. Coupled TKD-EDS analysis allows quantification of elemental contents at a scale of tens of nanometers. Preliminary results show that at a slip velocity of 1 m/s, the localized slip zone that forms in the gouges during shearing is composed of recrystallized grains of calcite and Mg-calcite (the latter being a decarbonation product of dolomite) with an average grain size of c. 300 nm. Individual grains are characterized by relatively straight boundaries, and many triple and quadruple grain junctions are present. The nanogranular aggregates show a polygonised texture with absence of clear porosity and shape preferred orientation. Orientation data show a random distribution of the calcite c-axes. Further investigation will help to obtain new insights into the deformation mechanisms active during seismic faulting in carbonate-bearing faults. The integration of grain size, grain shape and crystallographic information into flow laws will help to describe and predict the rheological behaviour of carbonate faults during seismic sliding.

  8. Transparency and the Paris Agreement: driving ambitious action in the new climate regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deprez, Alexandra; Colombier, Michel; Spencer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    system, in particular an assessment of collective decarbonization progress, to act as an important complement to the current transparency system's purely country-level focus. (authors)

  9. Assimilation of carbonate country rock by the parent magma of the Panzhihua Fe-Ti-V deposit (SW China: Evidence from stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Ganino

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Panzhihua intrusion in southwest China is part of the Emeishan Large Igneous Province and host of a large Fe-Ti-V ore deposit. During emplacement of the main intrusion, multiple generations of mafic dykes invaded carbonate wall rocks, producing a large contact aureole. We measured the oxygen-isotope composition of the intrusions, their constituent minerals, and samples of the country rock. Magnetite and plagioclase from Panzhihua intrusion have δ18O values that are consistent with magmatic equilibrium, and formed from magmas with δ18O values that were 1–2‰ higher than expected in a mantle-derived magma. The unmetamorphosed country rock has high δ18O values, ranging from 13.2‰ (sandstone to 24.6–28.6‰ (dolomite. The skarns and marbles from the aureole have lower δ18O and δ13C values than their protolith suggesting interaction with fluids that were in exchange equilibrium with the adjacent mafic magmas and especially the numerous mafic dykes that intruded the aureole. This would explain the alteration of δ18O of the dykes which have significantly higher values than expected for a mantle-derived magma. Depending on the exact δ18O values assumed for the magma and contaminant, the amount of assimilation required to produce the elevated δ18O value of the Panzhihua intrusion was between 8 and 13.7 wt.%, assuming simple mixing. The exact mechanism of contamination is unclear but may involve a combination of assimilation of bulk country rock, mixing with a melt of the country rock and exchange with CO2-rich fluid derived from decarbonation of the marls and dolomites. These mechanisms, particularly the latter, were probably involved in the formation of the Fe-Ti-V ores.

  10. Carbonate metasomatism and CO2 lithosphere-asthenosphere degassing beneath the western Mediterranean: An integrated model arising from petrological and geophysical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frezzotti, Maria Luce; Peccerillo, Angelo; Panza, Giuliano

    2009-03-01

    We present an integrated petrological, geochemical, and geophysical model that offers an explanation for the present-day anomalously high non-volcanic deep (mantle derived) CO 2 emission in the Tyrrhenian region. We investigate how decarbonation or melting of carbonate-rich lithologies from a subducted lithosphere may affect the efficiency of carbon release in the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. We propose that melting of sediments and/or continental crust of the subducted Adriatic-Ionian (African) lithosphere at pressure greater than 4 GPa (130 km) may represent an efficient mean for carbon cycling into the upper mantle and into the exosphere in the Western Mediterranean area. Melting of carbonated lithologies, induced by the progressive rise of mantle temperatures behind the eastward retreating Adriatic-Ionian subducting plate, generates low fractions of carbonate-rich (hydrous-silicate) melts. Due to their low density and viscosity, such melts can migrate upward through the mantle, forming a carbonated partially molten CO 2 -rich mantle recorded by tomographic images in the depth range from 130 to 60 km. Upwelling in the mantle of carbonate-rich melts to depths less than 60 - 70 km, induces massive outgassing of CO 2 . Buoyancy forces, probably favored by fluid overpressures, are able to allow migration of CO 2 from the mantle to the surface, through deep lithospheric faults, and its accumulation beneath the Moho and within the lower crust. The present model may also explain CO 2 enrichment of the Etna active volcano. Deep CO 2 cycling is tentatively quantified in terms of conservative carbon mantle flux in the investigated area. (author)

  11. The link between a global 2 °C warming threshold and emissions in years 2020, 2050 and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntingford, Chris; Lowe, Jason A; Gohar, Laila K; Bowerman, Niel H A; Allen, Myles R; Raper, Sarah C B; Smith, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    In the Copenhagen Accord, nations agreed on the need to limit global warming to two degrees to avoid potentially dangerous climate change, while in policy circles negotiations have placed a particular emphasis on emissions in years 2020 and 2050. We investigate the link between the probability of global warming remaining below two degrees (above pre-industrial levels) right through to year 2500 and what this implies for emissions in years 2020 and 2050, and any long-term emissions floor. This is achieved by mapping out the consequences of alternative emissions trajectories, all in a probabilistic framework and with results placed in a simple-to-use set of graphics. The options available for carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO 2 e) emissions in years 2020 and 2050 are narrow if society wishes to stay, with a chance of more likely than not, below the 2 °C target. Since cumulative emissions of long-lived greenhouse gases, and particularly CO 2 , are a key determinant of peak warming, the consequence of being near the top of emissions in the allowable range for 2020 is reduced flexibility in emissions in 2050 and higher required rates of societal decarbonization. Alternatively, higher 2020 emissions can be considered as reducing the probability of limiting warming to 2 °C. We find that the level of the long-term emissions floor has a strong influence on allowed 2020 and 2050 emissions for two degrees of global warming at a given probability. We place our analysis in the context of emissions pledges for year 2020 made at the end of and since the 2009 COP15 negotiations in Copenhagen. (letter)

  12. Metamorphic P-T conditions and CO2 influx history of medium-grade metapelites from Karakorum, Trans-Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachan, Himanshu K.; Santosh, M.; Prakash, Divya; Kharya, Aditya; Chandra Singh, P.; Rai, Santosh K.

    2016-07-01

    The medium grade metapelites of Pangong-Tso area in the trans-Himalayan region underwent sillimanite-grade metamorphism initiated during the Cretaceous, associated with the collision of the Kohistan arc and the Indian plate with Asia. This paper present results from a petrological and fluid inclusion study to understand the metamorphic P-T conditions and fluid history of these rocks. The calculated phase equilibria in the Na2O-CaO-K2O-FeO-MgO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-TiO2 (NCKFMMnASHT) system suggest P-T conditions of 8 kbar and 650 °C for the peak metamorphic event. Primary fluid inclusions occur in staurolite and garnet, whereas quartz carries mostly secondary fluid inclusions. The trapped fluids in primary inclusions show initial melting temperatures in the range of -56.9 to -56.6 °C, suggesting nearly pure CO2 composition. The secondary fluids are of mixed carbonic-aqueous nature. The re-equilibrated inclusions show annular morphology as well as necking phenomena. The CO2 isochores for the primary inclusions indicate pressures of 6.1-6.7 kbar, suggesting that the CO2-rich fluids were trapped during post-peak exhumation of the rocks, or that synmetamorphic carbonic fluids underwent density reversal during isothermal decompression. The secondary CO2-H2O fluids must have been trapped during the late exhumation stage, as their isochores define further lower pressures of 4.8 kbar. The morphology of re-equilibrated fluid inclusions and the rapid decrease in pressure are consistent with a near-isothermal decompression trajectory following the peak metamorphism. The carbonic fluids were probably derived locally from decarbonation reactions of the associated carbonate rocks during metamorphism or from a deep-seated reservoir through Karakorum fault.

  13. Economic and technical aspects the decarbonisation of the heat sector; Wirtschaftliche und technische Aspekte der Dekarbonisierung des Waermesektors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrig, Kurt; Hoffmann, Clemens; Gerhardt, Norman [Fraunhofer IWES, Kassel (Germany); Schmidt, Dietrich; Schumacher, Patrick [Fraunhofer IBP, Stuttgart (Germany); Henning, Hans Martin; Palzer, Andreas [Fraunhofer ISE, Freiburg (Germany); Lechtenboehmer, Stefan [Wuppertal Institut fuer Klima, Umwelt, Energie GmbH, Wuppertal (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    The transformation of the energy system to a de-carbonized energy supply requires a coordinated interaction between the sectors electricity, heat and transport. Thereby, the coupling of the electricity sector with the heating sector is one of the key measures in the transformation. The inclusion of wind and solar energy in the grid can be optimized by exact feed in forecasts, the coupling to the heat sector by means of heat pumps and power-to-heat (heater) allows more flexibilisation of the demand side. This interaction is made possible by intelligent solutions of systems engineering and power management. The development of appropriate incentives, market mechanisms and business models is also required, to make this coupling also economic successful. The contribution present die 80% scenario for the year 2050 created in the research project ''Interaction RES electricity, heat and transport'' and gives examples of future requirements and developments on this topic. [German] Die Transformation des Energieversorgungssystems zu einer de-karbonisierten Energiebereitstellung bedingt ein koordiniertes Zusammenspiel der Sektoren Strom, Waerme und Verkehr. Dabei ist die Kopplung des Stromsektors mit dem Waermesektor eine der entscheidenden Massnahmen bei der Transformation. Die Aufnahme von Wind- und Sonnenenergie in das Netz kann durch genaue Einspeiseprognosen optimiert werden, die Kopplung zum Waermesektor mittels Waermepumpen und Power-to-Heat (Heizstab) ermoeglicht die weitere Flexibilisierung der Nachfrageseite. Diese Interaktion wird durch intelligente Loesungen der Systemtechnik fuer das Energie- und Netzmanagement ermoeglicht. Die Entwicklung von entsprechenden Anreizsystemen, Marktmechanismen und Geschaeftsmodellen ist ebenfalls erforderlich, um diese Kopplung auch wirtschaftlich erfolgreich zu gestalten. Der Beitrag stellt das im Forschungsvorhaben ''Interaktion EE-Strom, Waerme und Verkehr'' erstellte 80 %-Szenario fuer das

  14. Hydrogen in a global long-term perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quakernaat, J.

    1994-01-01

    For many countries, the hydrogen economy offers an operational objective for their long-term energy structure. At the end of the next century, the world will depend on the predominate use of carbon-free and carbon-neutral sources of energy, such as flow energy, energy from modern biomass, and safe nuclear energy. The direct and indirect costs involved in the use of traditional energy supplies will increase sharply in the process of time, so that the economic feasibility of a less intensive use of energy and the introduction of alternative energy supply systems will no longer be insurmountable problems. The supply and demand structures of energy will be optimally blended by the use of hydrogen and electricity, an almost ideal combination of secondary energy carriers. With these carriers, practically every centralized or decentralized, environmentally sound energy supply can be permanently maintained, both within and outside of industrialized, metropolitan areas. The economic development of developing countries will depend on the predominate use of relatively 'cheap' fossil energy carriers (coal, petroleum and natural gas), as well as on the accompanying energy supplies structures. Yet those countries as well, similar to the wealthy industrial countries, will have to start using the highly capital intensive and very energy efficient energy supply systems and energy consumption technologies. This requires innovative strategies that are aimed at compensating developing countries (temporarily) for their lack of purchasing power and knowledge infrastructure. The costs involved in the hydrogen chain are still too high, and the world energy prices are still too low for such a transfer to take place. The attention, however, will focus on drastic energy saving, decarbonization of fossil fuels, substitution to natural gas, the opening up of flow energy, biomass production, and the development of inherent, safe nuclear energy. 49 refs

  15. Nuclear energy is part of the solution to struggle against climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-05-01

    This document is a contribution to the preparation of the Paris COP21 conference. It recalls the main objectives of the Kyoto Protocol, and then states and discusses three main issues to reach these objectives: the world will need all low-carbon energies including nuclear energy (80 per cent of electricity must be low-carbon within 35 years; CO 2 emissions must be reduced while meeting humanity basic needs; the IPCC has identified three types of low-carbon electricity: renewable, nuclear, and based on carbon capture and sequestration; the electrification of uses is an efficient vector of de-carbonation), it is urgent to use available low-carbon energies right now (70 per cent of the carbon budget has already been consumed; nuclear energy is an available industrial low-carbon solution; nuclear energy is the first source of low-carbon electricity in OECD countries and this is an asset to be preserved to meet climate objectives; nuclear energy is a solution to support a low-carbon growth in emerging countries; nuclear energy will remain a stake to reduce CO 2 emissions), and each country should have access to the larger as possible portfolio of low-carbon technologies (very few scenarios succeed in remaining under the 2 degree C limit without nuclear; all national objectives and peculiarities must be integrated for each country joining the struggle against climate change; nuclear energy allows the reduction of CO 2 emissions while strengthening supply safety and economic safety; within 35 years, the technology portfolio will be larger due to the development of energy storage systems, renewable energies and fourth-generation reactors)

  16. The energy metabolism of megacities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchini, Angelo; Kennedy, Chris; Stewart, Iain; Mele, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy metabolism leads to a better management of energy use in megacities. • Insights on strategies to improve energy efficiency and reduce resource consumption. • We find a regionalization of energy flows and sectoral energy use. • Scaling law for energy Vs density suggests strategies for compact cities planning. • Supports development of models to reduce GHG emissions and increase resilience. - Abstract: Due to their sheer size and complexity, megacities are extreme examples in which both negative and positive aspects of urbanization co-exist and are amplified. Especially in emerging countries they are becoming the dominant paradigm of the future urbanization, representing a sustainability challenge both from the point of view of energy and resource consumption, and from the point of view of climate change adaptation and mitigation. In this paper we compare the energy metabolism in 27 of the world’s megacities including details of mobile and stationary energy consumption patterns, fuels used, as well as end-use patterns and electricity generation mix. Our results show that per capita total energy consumption scales with urban population density according to a power law characterized by the universal −3/4 scaling, pointing out that compact cities are more energy efficient with respect to dispersed cities. By comparing energy sources and sectoral end use, also focusing on electricity use and generation source, we found a significant regionalization of energy metabolism, and we discuss the implication for resilience, infrastructure planning, GHG emissions, and policies for infrastructure decarbonization. The comparison of the energy metabolism can lead to a more appropriate management of energy use patterns and electricity generation mix in megacities, giving insights on strategies to improve urban energy efficiency and reducing environmental pressure of megacities.

  17. The impact of the economic crisis and policy actions on GHG emissions from road transport in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrino, Natalia; Monzon, Andres

    2014-01-01

    Road traffic is the greatest contributor to the carbon footprint of the transport sector and reducing it has become one of the main targets of sustainable transport policies. An analysis of the main factors influencing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is essential for designing new energy- and environmentally efficient strategies for the road transport. This paper addresses this need by (i) identifying factors which influence the carbon footprint, including traffic activity, fuel economy and socioeconomic development; and (ii) proposing a methodological framework which uses Modified Laspeyres Index decomposition to analyze the effect of important drivers on the changes in emissions of road transport in Spain during the period from 1990 to 2010. The results demonstrate that the country's economic growth has been closely linked to the rise in GHG emissions. The innovative contribution of this paper is the special analysis of the changes in mobility patterns and GHG emissions during the economic crisis, when, for the first time, Spanish road traffic emissions decreased. The reduction of road transport and improved energy efficiency has been powerful contributors to this decrease, demonstrating the effectiveness of energy-saving measures. On the basis of this analysis, several tailored policy recommendations have been suggested for future implementation. - Highlights: • Drivers contributing to GHG emissions of road transport are identified and analyzed. • Decomposition analysis based on Modified Laspeyres Index (MLI) is applied to the Spanish case. • Economic crisis and changes in mobility patterns and GHG emissions are analyzed. • Policies for the decarbonization of road transport are recommended

  18. Supply chain management in view of climate change: an overview of possible impacts and the road ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K. Dasaklis

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper aims to provide a general overview of the impacts of climate change upon supply chains and to analyze the implications of climate change for supply chain management in terms of strategic and operational planning. A roadmap of fruitful research approaches is also presented. Design/methodology/approach: The paper makes use of a general review of the relevant literature and, based on a systematic categorization of the findings, looks for useful insights towards the issues of climate change and supply chain management. A framework is drawn for systematically assessing the impacts of climate change upon supply chains and their management, while making suggestions for future research. Findings and Originality/value: Supply chain networks run physical, operational and reputational risks attributed to climate change. Escalation in regulations, market forces and stakeholders’ pressures are paving the way for the decarbonization of supply chains with obvious implications for supply chain management. Supply chain managers should pay special attention to the impacts of climate change on supply chains and academics should further explore the interrelationships between climate change and supply chain design and operations. Research limitations/implications: Additional qualitative research based on grounded theory is suggested for validating and interconnecting the findings with empirical data. Practical implications: The paper provides several insights towards the issues of supply chain management in view of climate change and may serve as an initial basis for exploring future research directions by academics. Practitioners, especially those drafting value-creating supply chain agendas, may also find these insights useful for improving their managerial practices. Originality/value: By providing an original structured overview of the impacts of climate change upon supply chain design and operations management the paper substantiates the

  19. Comparison of the hot-stamped boron-alloyed steel and the warm-stamped medium-Mn steel on microstructure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaodong [School of Automotive Engineering, State Key Lab of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Chang, Ying, E-mail: yingc@dlut.edu.cn [School of Automotive Engineering, State Key Lab of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Cunyu [East China Branch of Central Iron & Steel Research Institute (CISRI), Beijing 100081 (China); Hu, Ping [School of Automotive Engineering, State Key Lab of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Dong, Han [East China Branch of Central Iron & Steel Research Institute (CISRI), Beijing 100081 (China)

    2017-01-02

    The application of high strength steels (HSS) for automotive structural parts is an effective way to realize lightweight and enhance safety. Therefore, improvements in mechanical properties of HSS are needed. In the present study, the warm stamping process of the third generation automotive medium-Mn steel was discussed, the characteristics of martensitic transformation were investigated, as well as the microstructure and mechanical properties were analyzed, compared to the popular hot-stamped 22MnB5 steel in the automotive industry. The results are indicated as follows. Firstly, the quenching rate of the medium-Mn steel can be selected in a wide range based on its CCT curves, which is beneficial to the control of forming process. Secondly, the influence of stamping temperature and pressure on the M{sub s} temperature of the medium-Mn steel is not obvious and can be neglected, which is favorable to the even distribution of martensitic microstructure and mechanical properties. Thirdly, the phenomenon of decarbonization is hardly found on the surface of the warm-stamped medium-Mn steel, and the ultra-fine-grained microstructure is found inside the medium-Mn steel after warm stamping. Besides, the warm-stamped medium-Mn steel holds the better comprehensive properties, such as a lower yield ratio, higher total elongation and higher tear toughness than the hot-stamped 22MnB5 steel. Furthermore, an actual warm-stamped B-pillar of medium-Mn steel is stamped and ultra-fine-grained martensitic microstructure is obtained. The mechanical properties are evenly distributed. As a result, this paper proves that the warm-stamped medium-Mn steel part can meet the requirements of lightweight and crash safety, and is promising for the industrial production of automotive structural parts.

  20. Lusatia and the coal conundrum: The lived experience of the German Energiewende

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, Tom; Müller, Katja

    2016-01-01

    The German Energiewende, or energy transition, is an ambitious suite of policy measures which aim to decarbonize the German economy and achieve an almost complete transition to an energy system based on renewable energy by mid-century. This article contends that the energy transition is also a social process. We develop a provisional local ethnography of the Energiewende, an account of the lived experience of this social process from the perspective of villagers in Atterwasch, Kerkwitz and Grabko, in the region of Lusatia in Eastern Germany. Their experiences are particularly salient, since their villages are facing demolition to make way for the expansion of the nearby Jänschwalde coal mine. The villagers’ struggle to defend their homes highlights a fundamental contradiction in the energy transition, sometimes referred to as the “coal conundrum”. The contest over the future of coal in Lusatia can be seen as a struggle to control key cultural ‘scripts’ or narratives, of home, belonging, ecological modernization, climate change, and democratic deficit. Our research suggests that any resolution of the coal conundrum, and effective implementation of the Energiewende, must be informed by an understanding of these scripts, and how they underpin the motivations and mentalities of different social actors. - Highlights: • The German energy transition is a social process as well as a set of policy measures. • Lusatia, in Eastern Germany, is a social laboratory of the Energiewende. • The contestation of coal in Lusatia is a struggle to control cultural ‘scripts'. • Home and belonging, ecological modernization, and climate change are key scripts. • More “energy democracy” would bolster the legitimacy of the energy transition.

  1. Towards the next generation of climate change assessment: learning from past experiences to inform a sustainable future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, K. J.; Field, C. B.

    2017-12-01

    Over decades, assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and many others has bolstered understanding of the climate problem: unequivocal warming, pervasive impacts, and serious risks from continued high emissions of heat-trapping gases. Societies are increasingly responding with early actions to decarbonize energy systems and prepare for impacts. This emerging era of climate solutions creates a need for new approaches to assessment that emphasize learning from ongoing real-world experiences and that help close the gap between aspirations and the pace of progress. Against this backdrop, the presentation will take stock of recent advances and challenges in assessment, especially drawing from analysis of climate change assessment. Four assessment priorities will be considered: (1) integrating diverse evidence including quantitative and qualitative results, (2) applying rigorous expert judgment in evaluating knowledge and uncertainties, (3) exploring widely ranging futures and their connections to ongoing choices and actions, and (4) incorporating interactions among experts and decision-makers in assessment processes. Across these assessment priorities, the presentation will critique both opportunities and pitfalls, outlining possibilities for future experimentation, innovation, and learning. It will evaluate, in particular, lessons from risk-based approaches; strategies for transparently acknowledging persistent uncertainties and contested priorities; ways to minimize biases and foster creativity in expert judgments; scenario-based assessment of surprises, deep uncertainties, and decision-making implications; and opportunities for broadening the conception of expertise and engaging different decision-makers and stakeholders. Overall, these approaches can advance assessment products and processes as a basis for sustained dialogue supporting decision-making.

  2. Pathways limiting warming to 1.5°C: a tale of turning around in no time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Bauer, Nico; Baumstark, Lavinia; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Popp, Alexander; Rogelj, Joeri; Strefler, Jessica; van Vuuren, Detlef P

    2018-05-13

    We explore the feasibility of limiting global warming to 1.5°C without overshoot and without the deployment of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) technologies. For this purpose, we perform a sensitivity analysis of four generic emissions reduction measures to identify a lower bound on future CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial processes. Final energy demand reductions and electrification of energy end uses as well as decarbonization of electricity and non-electric energy supply are all considered. We find the lower bound of cumulative fossil fuel and industry CO 2 emissions to be 570 GtCO 2 for the period 2016-2100, around 250 GtCO 2 lower than the lower end of available 1.5°C mitigation pathways generated with integrated assessment models. Estimates of 1.5°C-consistent CO 2 budgets are highly uncertain and range between 100 and 900 GtCO 2 from 2016 onwards. Based on our sensitivity analysis, limiting warming to 1.5°C will require CDR or terrestrial net carbon uptake if 1.5°C-consistent budgets are smaller than 650 GtCO 2 The earlier CDR is deployed, the more it neutralizes post-2020 emissions rather than producing net negative emissions. Nevertheless, if the 1.5°C budget is smaller than 550 GtCO 2 , temporary overshoot of the 1.5°C limit becomes unavoidable if CDR cannot be ramped up faster than to 4 GtCO 2 in 2040 and 10 GtCO 2 in 2050.This article is part of the theme issue 'The Paris Agreement: understanding the physical and social challenges for a warming world of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  3. Systematic Planning of Adaptation Options for Pluvial Flood Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babovic, Filip; Mijic, Ana; Madani, Kaveh

    2016-04-01

    Different elements of infrastructure and the built environment vary in their ability to quickly adapt to changing circumstances. Furthermore, many of the slowest, and often largest infrastructure adaptations, offer the greatest improvements to system performance. In the context of de-carbonation of individual buildings Brand (1995) identified six potential layers of adaptation based on their renewal times ranging from daily to multi-decadal time scales. Similar layers exist in urban areas with regards to Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) and pluvial flood risk. These layers range from appliances within buildings to changes in the larger urban form. Changes in low-level elements can be quickly implemented, but are limited in effectiveness, while larger interventions occur at a much slower pace but offer greater benefits as a part of systemic change. In the context of urban adaptation this multi-layered approach provides information on how to order urban adaptations. This information helps to identify potential pathways by priorit