WorldWideScience

Sample records for debris discs continuous

  1. On Grain Dynamics in Debris Discs: Continuous Outward Flows and Embedded Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Ing-Guey

    2009-01-01

    This study employed grain dynamic models to examine the density distribution of debris discs, and discussed the effects of the collisional time-intervals of asteroidal bodies, the maximum grain sizes, and the chemical compositions of the dust grains of the models, in order to find out whether a steady out-moving flow with an 1/R profile could be formed. The results showed that a model with new grains every 100 years, a smaller maximum grain size, and a composition C400 has the best fit to the 1/R profile because: (1) the grains have larger values of beta on average,therefore, they can be blown out easily; (2) the new grains are generated frequently enough to replace those have been blown out. With the above two conditions, some other models can have a steady out-moving flow with an approximate 1/R profile. However, those models in which new grains are generated every 1000 years have density distributions far from the profile of a continuous out-moving flow. Moreover, the analysis on the signatures of planets ...

  2. Clumps and Axisymmetric Features in Debris Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Ing-Guey

    2013-01-01

    This paper studied the structures of debris discs, focusing on the conditions that can form an axisymmetric-looking outer disc from systems with inner clumps. The main conclusion was that as long as the dominated dust grains are smaller than the blowout size, it is easy to form an axisymmetric-looking outer debris disc, which is part of a quasi-steady state of the whole system. This quasi-steady state is established through the balance between grain generations and a continuous out-going grain flow. Assuming there is an event that starts planetesimal collisions and the corresponding grain generations, this balance can be approached in a few thousand years. This result suggested that a quasi-steady-state picture could solve the possible mass budget problem of Vega's outer debris disc.

  3. Atomic gas in debris discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Antonio S.; Barlow, M. J.; Crawford, I. A.; Casassus, S.

    2017-04-01

    We have conducted a search for optical circumstellar absorption lines in the spectra of 16 debris disc host stars. None of the stars in our sample showed signs of emission line activity in either Hα, Ca II or Na I, confirming their more evolved nature. Four stars were found to exhibit narrow absorption features near the cores of the photospheric Ca II and Na I D lines (when Na I D data were available). We analyse the characteristics of these spectral features to determine whether they are of circumstellar or interstellar origins. The strongest evidence for circumstellar gas is seen in the spectrum of HD 110058, which is known to host a debris disc observed close to edge-on. This is consistent with a recent ALMA detection of molecular gas in this debris disc, which shows many similarities to the β Pictoris system.

  4. Debris disc formation induced by planetary growth

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Several hundred stars older than 10 million years have been observed to have infrared excesses. These observations are explained by dust grains formed by the collisional fragmentation of hidden planetesimals. Such dusty planetesimal discs are known as debris discs. In a dynamically cold planetesimal disc, collisional coagulation of planetesimals produces planetary embryos which then stir the surrounding leftover planetesimals. Thus, the collisional fragmentation of planetesimals that results from planet formation forms a debris disc. We aim to determine the properties of the underlying planetesimals in debris discs by numerically modelling the coagulation and fragmentation of planetesimal populations. The brightness and temporal evolution of debris discs depend on the radial distribution of planetesimal discs, the location of their inner and outer edges, their total mass, and the size of planetesimals in the disc. We find that a radially narrow planetesimal disc is most likely to result in a debris disc that ...

  5. Debris Discs: Modeling/theory review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébault, P.

    2012-03-01

    An impressive amount of photometric, spectroscopic and imaging observations of circumstellar debris discs has been accumulated over the past 3 decades, revealing that they come in all shapes and flavours, from young post-planet-formation systems like Beta-Pic to much older ones like Vega. What we see in these systems are small grains, which are probably only the tip of the iceberg of a vast population of larger (undetectable) collisionally-eroding bodies, leftover from the planet-formation process. Understanding the spatial structure, physical properties, origin and evolution of this dust is of crucial importance, as it is our only window into what is going on in these systems. Dust can be used as a tracer of the distribution of their collisional progenitors and of possible hidden massive pertubers, but can also allow to derive valuable information about the disc's total mass, size distribution or chemical composition. I will review the state of the art in numerical models of debris disc, and present some important issues that are explored by current modelling efforts: planet-disc interactions, link between cold (i.e. Herschel-observed) and hot discs, effect of binarity, transient versus continuous processes, etc. I will finally present some possible perspectives for the development of future models.

  6. Post-Main Sequence Evolution of Debris Discs

    OpenAIRE

    Bonsor, Amy; Wyatt, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The population of debris discs on the main sequence is well constrained, however very little is known about debris discs around evolved stars. In this work we provide a theoretical framework that considers the effects of stellar evolution on debris discs; firstly considering the evolution of an individual disc from the main sequence through to the white dwarf phase, then extending this to the known population of debris discs around main sequence A stars. It is found that discs around evolved ...

  7. Signatures of massive collisions in debris discs

    CERN Document Server

    Kral, Quentin; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Boccaletti, Anthony; Charnoz, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Violent stochastic collisional events have been invoked as a possible explanation for some debris discs displaying pronounced asymmetries or having a great luminosity excess. So far, no thorough modelling of the consequences of such events has been carried out, mainly because of the extreme numerical challenge of coupling the dynamical and collisional evolution of dust. We perform the first fully self-consistent modelling of the aftermath of massive breakups in debris discs. We follow the collisional and dynamical evolution of dust released after the breakup of a Ceres-sized body at 6 AU from its central star. We investigate the duration, magnitude and spatial structure of the signature left by such a violent event, as well as its observational detectability. We use the recently developed LIDT-DD code (Kral et al., 2013), which handles the coupled collisional and dynamical evolution of debris discs. The main focus is placed on the complex interplay between destructive collisions, Keplerian dynamics and radiat...

  8. Review of gas and dust in debris discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Q.

    2016-12-01

    This proceeding summarises a talk given on the state-of-the-art of debris disc modelling. We first review the basics of debris disc physics, which is followed by a short overview of the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling dust and gas in debris disc systems.

  9. Review of gas and dust in debris discs

    OpenAIRE

    Kral, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    This proceeding summarises a talk given on the state-of-the-art of debris disc modelling. We first review the basics of debris disc physics, which is followed by a short overview of the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling dust and gas in debris disc systems.

  10. Review of gas and dust in debris discs

    CERN Document Server

    Kral, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    This proceeding summarises a talk given on the state-of-the-art of debris disc modelling. We first review the basics of debris disc physics, which is followed by a short overview of the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling dust and gas in debris disc systems.

  11. The debris disc around HIP 17439

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüppler, Christian; Löhne, Torsten; Krivov, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme DUNES the debris disc around the K2 V star HIP 17439 was observed. In PACS images the disc emission is spatially clearly extended. A simultaneous analysis of photometric observations and radial brightness profiles from the resolved images provides valuable hints for the disc structure. In an analytical model we adopted power laws for the size and radial distribution of the circumstellar dust and tested two different scenarios: (1) a broad dust ring with a radial extent of about 200AU, (2) two independent dust rings separated by a gap of several tens of AU. Both models fit the spectral energy distribution and the radial profiles quite well. In case (1) the parameters found are consistent with dust stemming from an outer planetesimal belt at ~140AU and strong transport mechanisms that drag the particles inward. Model (2) would imply two planetesimal belts, producing a narrow inner and wider outer distribution of dust.

  12. Post-Main Sequence Evolution of Debris Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Bonsor, Amy

    2010-01-01

    The population of debris discs on the main sequence is well constrained, however very little is known about debris discs around evolved stars. In this work we provide a theoretical framework that considers the effects of stellar evolution on debris discs; firstly considering the evolution of an individual disc from the main sequence through to the white dwarf phase, then extending this to the known population of debris discs around main sequence A stars. It is found that discs around evolved stars are harder to detect than on the main sequence. In the context of our models discs should be detectable with Herschel or Alma on the giant branch, subject to the uncertain effect of sublimation on the discs. The best chances are for hot young white dwarfs, fitting nicely with the observations e.g the helix nebula (Su et al. 2007) and 9 systems presented by Chu & Bilikova.

  13. Feasibility of transit photometry of nearby debris discs

    CERN Document Server

    Zeegers, S T; Kalas, P

    2014-01-01

    Dust in debris discs is constantly replenished by collisions between larger objects. In this paper, we investigate a method to detect these collisions. We generate models based on recent results on the Fomalhaut debris disc, where we simulate a background star transiting behind the disc, due to the proper motion of Fomalhaut. By simulating the expanding dust clouds caused by the collisions in the debris disc, we investigate whether it is possible to observe changes in the brightness of the background star. We conclude that in the case of the Fomalhaut debris disc, changes in the optical depth can be observed, with values of the optical depth ranging from $10^{-0.5}$ for the densest dust clouds to $10^{-8}$ for the most diffuse clouds with respect to the background optical depth of $\\sim1.2\\times10^{-3}$.

  14. Debris Discs and Connection to Exoplanets: Herschel Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, J. S.

    2012-03-01

    Debris discs are an exciting science area that has been opened up by Herschel through deep far-infrared observations. Key Projects cover disc evolution from the early stages when planets form (GASPS) and onwards to discs hosted by stars even older than the Solar System (GT, DUNES, DEBRIS). New categories are being discovered, including very cold cometary belts and unusual types of dust grain, and new connections are being made for systems of low-mass stars and planets. I will review these discoveries in the context of our ideas on how planetesimal belts from and evolve.

  15. Alignment in star-debris disc systems seen by Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Greaves, J S; Thureau, N; Eiroa, C; Marshall, J P; Maldonado, J; Matthews, B C; Olofsson, G; Barlow, M J; Moro-Martin, A; Sibthorpe, B; Absil, O; Ardila, D R; Booth, M; Broekhoven-Fiene, H; Brown, D J A; Cameron, A Collier; del Burgo, C; Di Francesco, J; Duchene, G; Eisloffel, J; Ertel, S; Holland, W S; Horner, J; Kalas, P; Kavelaars, J J; Lestrade, J -F; Vican, L; Wilner, D J; Wolf, S; Wyatt, M C

    2013-01-01

    Many nearby main-sequence stars have been searched for debris using the far-infrared Herschel satellite, within the DEBRIS, DUNES and Guaranteed-Time Key Projects. We discuss here 11 stars of spectral types A to M where the stellar inclination is known and can be compared to that of the spatially-resolved dust belts. The discs are found to be well aligned with the stellar equators, as in the case of the Sun's Kuiper belt, and unlike many close-in planets seen in transit surveys. The ensemble of stars here can be fitted with a star-disc tilt of ~<10 degrees. These results suggest that proposed mechanisms for tilting the star or disc in fact operate rarely. A few systems also host imaged planets, whose orbits at tens of AU are aligned with the debris discs, contrary to what might be expected in models where external perturbers induce tilts.

  16. Alignment in star-debris disc systems seen by Herschel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, J. S.; Kennedy, G. M.; Thureau, N.; Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Maldonado, J.; Matthews, B. C.; Olofsson, G.; Barlow, M. J.; Moro-Martín, A.; Sibthorpe, B.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D. R.; Booth, M.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Brown, D. J. A.; Cameron, A. Collier; del Burgo, C.; Di Francesco, J.; Eislöffel, J.; Duchêne, G.; Ertel, S.; Holland, W. S.; Horner, J.; Kalas, P.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Vican, L.; Wilner, D. J.; Wolf, S.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2014-02-01

    Many nearby main-sequence stars have been searched for debris using the far-infrared Herschel satellite, within the DEBRIS, DUNES and Guaranteed-Time Key Projects. We discuss here 11 stars of spectral types A-M where the stellar inclination is known and can be compared to that of the spatially resolved dust belts. The discs are found to be well aligned with the stellar equators, as in the case of the Sun's Kuiper belt, and unlike many close-in planets seen in transit surveys. The ensemble of stars here can be fitted with a star-disc tilt of ≲ 10°. These results suggest that proposed mechanisms for tilting the star or disc in fact operate rarely. A few systems also host imaged planets, whose orbits at tens of au are aligned with the debris discs, contrary to what might be expected in models where external perturbers induce tilts.

  17. Magnetic white dwarfs with debris discs

    CERN Document Server

    Külebi, Baybars; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo; Isern, Jordi; García-Berro, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    It has long been accepted that a possible mechanism for explaining the existence of magnetic white dwarfs is the merger of a binary white dwarf system, as there are viable mechanisms for producing sustainable magnetic fields within the merger product. However, the lack of rapid rotators in the magnetic white dwarf population has been always considered a problematic issue of this scenario. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations show that in mergers in which the two white dwarfs have different masses a disc around the central compact object is formed. If the central object is magnetized it can interact with the disc through its magnetosphere. The torque applied by the disc changes the spin of the star, whereas the transferred angular momentum from the star to the disc determines the properties of the disc. In this work we build a model for the disc evolution under the effect of magnetic accretion, and for the angular momentum evolution of the star, which can be compared with the observations. Our model pre...

  18. Resolving debris discs in the far-infrared: early highlights from the DEBRIS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, Brenda; Kennedy, Grant; Phillips, Neil; Churcher, Laura; Duchêne, Gaspard; Greaves, Jane; Lestrade, Jean-Francois; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Wyatt, Mark; Bastien, Pierre; Biggs, Andy; Bouvier, Jerome; Butner, Harold; Dent, Bill; Di Francesco, James; Eislöffel, Jochen; Graham, James; Harvey, Paul; Hauschildt, Peter; Holland, Wayne; Horner, Jonti; Ibar, Eduardo; Ivison, Rob; Johnstone, Doug; Kalas, Paul; Kavelaars, JJ; Rodriguez, David; Udry, Stephane; van der Werf, Paul; Wilner, David; Zuckerman, Ben

    2010-01-01

    We present results from the earliest observations of DEBRIS, a Herschel Key Programme to conduct a volume- and flux-limited survey for debris discs in A-type through M-type stars. PACS images (from chop/nod or scan-mode observations) at 100 and 160 micron are presented toward two A-type stars and one F-type star: beta Leo, beta UMa and eta Corvi. All three stars are known disc hosts. Herschel spatially resolves the dust emission around all three stars (marginally, in the case of beta UMa), providing new information about discs as close as 11 pc with sizes comparable to that of the Solar System. We have combined these data with existing flux density measurements of the discs to refine the SEDs and derive estimates of the fractional luminosities, temperatures and radii of the discs.

  19. Evolution from protoplanetary to debris discs: The transition disc around HD 166191

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, G M; Lisse, C M; Ménard, F; Sitko, M L; Wyatt, M C; Bayliss, D D R; DeMeo, F E; Crawford, K B; Kim, D L; Rudy, R J; Russell, R W; Sibthorpe, B; Skinner, M A; Zhou, G

    2013-01-01

    HD 166191 has been identified by several studies as hosting a rare and extremely bright warm debris disc with an additional outer cool disc component. However, an alternative interpretation is that the star hosts a disc that is currently in transition between a full gas disc and a largely gas-free debris disc. With the help of new optical to mid-IR spectra and Herschel imaging, we argue that the latter interpretation is supported in several ways: i) we show that HD 166191 is co-moving with the ~4 Myr-old Herbig Ae star HD 163296, suggesting that the two have the same age, ii) the disc spectrum of HD 166191 is well matched by a standard radiative transfer model of a gaseous protoplanetary disc with an inner hole, and iii) the HD 166191 mid-IR silicate feature is more consistent with similarly primordial objects. We note some potential issues with the debris disc interpretation that should be considered for such extreme objects, whose lifetime at the current brightness is mush shorter than the stellar age, or i...

  20. The magnetorotational instability in debris-disc gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Quentin; Latter, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Debris discs are commonly swathed in gas, which can be observed in UV, in fine structure lines in FIR, and in resolved maps of CO emission. Carbon and oxygen are overabundant in such gas, but it is severely depleted in hydrogen. As a consequence, its ionization fraction is remarkably high, suggesting that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes could be important. In particular, the gas may be subject to the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and indeed, recent modelling of β Pictoris requires an anomalous viscosity to explain the gas's observed radial structure. In this paper, we explore the possibility that the MRI is active in debris-disc gas and responsible for the observed mass transport. We find that non-ideal MHD and dust-gas interactions play a subdominant role, and that linear instability is viable at certain radii. However, owing to low gas densities, the outer parts of the disc could be stabilized by a weak ambient magnetic field, though it is difficult to constrain such a field. Even if the MRI is stabilized by too strong a field, a magnetocentrifugal wind may be launched in its place, and this could lead to equivalent (non-turbulent) transport. Numerical simulations of the vertically stratified MRI in conditions appropriate to the debris-disc gas should be able to determine the nature of the characteristic behaviour at different radii, and decide on the importance of the MRI (and MHD more generally) on the evolution of these discs.

  1. Density waves in debris discs and galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2011-01-01

    We study the linear perturbations of collisionless near-Keplerian discs that have a ring-like structure. Such systems are models for debris discs around stars and the stellar discs surrounding supermassive black holes at the centres of galaxies. Using a finite-element method, we solve the linearized collisionless Boltzmann equation and Poisson's equation for a wide range of disc masses and rms orbital eccentricities to obtain the eigenfrequencies and shapes of normal modes. We find that these discs can support large-scale `slow' modes, in which the frequency is proportional to the disc mass. Slow modes are present for arbitrarily small disc mass so long as the self-gravity of the disc is the dominant source of apsidal precession. We find that slow modes are of two general types: parent modes and hybrid child modes, the latter arising from resonant interactions between parent modes and singular van Kampen modes. The most prominent slow modes have azimuthal wavenumbers $m=1$ and $m=2$. We illustrate how slow mo...

  2. The dust grain size - stellar luminosity trend in debris discs

    CERN Document Server

    Pawellek, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The cross section of material in debris discs is thought to be dominated by the smallest grains that can still stay in bound orbits despite the repelling action of stellar radiation pressure. Thus the minimum (and typical) grain size $s_\\text{min}$ is expected to be close to the radiation pressure blowout size $s_\\text{blow}$. Yet a recent analysis of a sample of Herschel-resolved debris discs showed the ratio $s_\\text{min}/s_\\text{blow}$ to systematically decrease with the stellar luminosity from about ten for solar-type stars to nearly unity in the discs around the most luminous A-type stars. Here we explore this trend in more detail, checking how significant it is and seeking to find possible explanations. We show that the trend is robust to variation of the composition and porosity of dust particles. For any assumed grain properties and stellar parameters, we suggest a recipe of how to estimate the "true" radius of a spatially unresolved debris disc, based solely on its spectral energy distribution. The r...

  3. Collisional processes and size distribution in spatially extended debris discs

    CERN Document Server

    Thebault, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    We present a new multi-annulus code for the study of collisionally evolving extended debris discs. We first aim to confirm results obtained for a single-annulus system, namely that the size distribution in "real" debris discs always departs from the theoretical collisional equilibrium $dN\\proptoR^{-3.5}dR$ power law, especially in the crucial size range of observable particles (<1cm), where it displays a characteristic wavy pattern. We also aim at studying how debris discs density distributions, scattered light luminosity profiles, and SEDs are affected by the coupled effect of collisions and radial mixing due to radiation pressure affected small grains. The size distribution evolution is modeled from micron-sized grains to 50km-sized bodies. The model takes into account the crucial influence of radiation pressure-affected small grains. We consider the collisional evolution of a fiducial a=120AU radius disc with an initial surface density in $\\Sigma(a)\\propto a^{\\alpha}$. We show that the system's radial e...

  4. Mass transfer between debris discs during close stellar encounters

    CERN Document Server

    Jilkova, Lucie; Hammer, Michael; Zwart, Simon Portegies

    2016-01-01

    We study mass transfers between debris discs during stellar encounters. We carried out numerical simulations of close flybys of two stars, one of which has a disc of planetesimals represented by test particles. We explored the parameter space of the encounters, varying the mass ratio of the two stars, their pericentre and eccentricity of the encounter, and its geometry. We find that particles are transferred to the other star from a restricted radial range in the disc and the limiting radii of this transfer region depend on the parameters of the encounter. We derive an approximate analytic description of the inner radius of the region. The efficiency of the mass transfer generally decreases with increasing encounter pericentre and increasing mass of the star initially possessing the disc. Depending on the parameters of the encounter, the transfer particles have a specific distributions in the space of orbital elements (semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and argument of pericentre) around their new hos...

  5. Dust production in debris discs: constraints on the smallest grains

    CERN Document Server

    Thebault, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The surface energy constraint puts a limit on the smallest fragment $s_{surf}$ that can be produced after a collision. Based on analytical considerations, this mechanism has been recently identified as been potentially able to prevent the production of small dust grains in debris discs and cut off their size distribution at sizes larger than the blow-out size. We numerically investigate the importance of this effect to find under which conditions it can leave a signature in the small-size end of a disc's particle size distribution (PSD). An important part of this work is to map out, in a disc at steady-state, what is the most likely collisional origin for micron-sized grains, in terms of the sizes of their collisional progenitors. We implement, for the first time, the surface energy constraint into a collisional evolution code. We consider a debris disc extending from 50 to 100AU and 2 different stellar types. We also consider two levels of stirring in the disc: dynamically "hot" (e=0.075) and "cold" (e=0.01)...

  6. A young hierarchical triple system harbouring a candidate debris disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, N. R.; Schlieder, J. E.; Olofsson, J.; Johnston, K. G.; Henning, Th.

    2013-09-01

    We report the detection of a wide young hierarchical triple system where the primary has a candidate debris disc. The primary, TYC 5241-986-1 A, is a known Tycho star which we classify as a late-K star with emission in the X-ray, near- and far-ultraviolet (UV) and Hα suggestive of youth. Its proper motion, photometric distance (65-105 pc) and radial velocity lead us to associate the system with the broadly defined Local Association of young stars but not specifically with any young moving group. The presence of weak lithium absorption and X-ray and calcium H and K emission support an age in the 20 to ˜125 Myr range. The secondary is a pair of M4.5 ± 0.5 dwarfs with near- and far-UV and Hα emission separated by approximately 1 arcsec (˜65-105 au projected separation) which lie of 145 arcsec (9200-15200 au) from the primary. The primary has a Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) 22 μm excess and follow-up Herschel observations also detect an excess at 70 μm. The excess emissions are indicative of a 100-175 K debris disc. We also explore the possibility that this excess could be due to a coincident background galaxy and conclude that this is unlikely. Debris discs are extremely rare around stars older than 15 Myr, hence if the excess is caused by a disc this is an extremely novel system.

  7. Collisional modelling of the debris disc around HIP 17439

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüppler, Ch.; Löhne, T.; Krivov, A. V.; Ertel, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Eiroa, C.

    2014-07-01

    We present an analysis of the debris disc around the nearby K2 V star HIP 17439. In the context of the Herschel DUNES key programme, the disc was observed and spatially resolved in the far-IR with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE instruments. In a previous study, we assumed that the size and radial distribution of the circumstellar dust are independent power laws. There, several scenarios capable of explaining the observations were suggested after exploring a very broad range of possible model parameters. In this paper, we perform a follow-up in-depth collisional modelling of these scenarios to further distinguish between them. In our models we consider collisions, direct radiation pressure, and drag forces, which are the actual physical processes operating in debris discs. We find that all scenarios discussed in the first paper are physically reasonable and can reproduce the observed spectral energy distribution along with the PACS surface brightness profiles reasonably well. In one model, the dust is produced beyond 120 au in a narrow planetesimal belt and is transported inwards by Poynting-Robertson and stellar wind drag. Good agreement with the observed radial profiles would require stellar winds by about an order of magnitude stronger than the solar value, which is not confirmed - although not ruled out - by observations. Another model consists of two spatially separated planetesimal belts, a warm inner and a cold outer one. This scenario would probably imply the presence of planets clearing the gap between the two components. Finally, we show qualitatively that the observations can be explained by assuming the dust is produced in a single, but broad planetesimal disc with a surface density of solids rising outwards, as expected for an extended disc that experiences a natural inside-out collisional depletion. Prospects of distinguishing between the competing scenarios by future observations are discussed.

  8. The magnetorotational instability in debris-disc gas

    CERN Document Server

    Kral, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Debris discs are commonly swathed in gas which can be observed in UV, in fine structure lines in FIR, and in resolved maps of CO emission. Carbon and oxygen are overabundant in such gas, but it is severely depleted in hydrogen. As a consequence, its ionisation fraction is remarkably high, suggesting magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes may be important. In particular, the gas may be subject to the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and indeed recent modelling of $\\beta$ Pictoris requires an anomalous viscosity to explain the gas's observed radial structure. In this paper we explore the possibility that the MRI is active in debris-disc gas and responsible for the observed mass transport. We find that non-ideal MHD and dust-gas interactions play a subdominant role, and that linear instability is viable at certain radii. However, owing to low gas densities, the outer parts of the disc could be stabilised by a weak ambient magnetic field, though it is difficult to constrain such a field. Even if the MRI is stabi...

  9. Collisional modelling of the AU Microscopii debris disc

    CERN Document Server

    Schüppler, Ch; Krivov, A V; Ertel, S; Marshall, J P; Wolf, S; Wyatt, M C; Augereau, J -C; Metchev, S A

    2015-01-01

    The spatially resolved AU Mic debris disc is among the most famous and best-studied debris discs. We aim at a comprehensive understanding of the dust production and the dynamics of the disc objects with in depth collisional modelling including stellar radiative and corpuscular forces. Our models are compared to a suite of observational data for thermal and scattered light emission, ranging from the ALMA radial surface brightness profile at 1.3mm to polarisation measurements in the visible. Most of the data can be reproduced with a planetesimal belt having an outer edge at around 40au and subsequent inward transport of dust by stellar winds. A low dynamical excitation of the planetesimals with eccentricities up to 0.03 is preferred. The radial width of the planetesimal belt cannot be constrained tightly. Belts that are 5au and 17au wide, as well as a broad 44au-wide belt are consistent with observations. All models show surface density profiles increasing with distance from the star as inferred from observatio...

  10. Collisional modelling of the debris disc around HIP 17439

    CERN Document Server

    Schüppler, Ch; Krivov, A V; Ertel, S; Marshall, J P; Eiroa, C

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the debris disc around the nearby K2 V star HIP 17439. In the context of the Herschel DUNES key programme the disc was observed and spatially resolved in the far-IR with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE instruments. In a first model, Ertel et al. (2014) assumed the size and radial distribution of the circumstellar dust to be independent power laws. There, by exploring a very broad range of possible model parameters several scenarios capable of explaining the observations were suggested. In this paper, we perform a follow-up in-depth collisional modelling of these scenarios trying to further distinguish between them. In our models we consider collisions, direct radiation pressure, and drag forces, i.e. the actual physical processes operating in debris discs. We find that all scenarios discussed in Ertel et al. are physically sensible and can reproduce the observed SED along with the PACS surface brightness profiles reasonably well. In one model, the dust is produced beyond 120au in a narro...

  11. Exoplanet recycling in massive white-dwarf debris discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lieshout, Rik

    2017-06-01

    When a star evolves into a white dwarf, the planetary system it hosts can become unstable. Planets in such systems may then be scattered onto star-grazing orbits, leading to their tidal disruption as they pass within the white dwarf’s Roche limit. We study the massive, compact debris discs that may arrise from this process using a combination of analytical estimates and numerical modelling. The discs are gravitationally unstable, resulting in an enhanced effective viscosity due to angular momentum transport associated with self-gravity wakes. For disc masses greater than ~1026 g (corresponding to progenitor objects comparable to the Galilean moons), viscous spreading dominates over Poynting-Robertson drag in the outer parts of the disc. In such massive discs, mass is transported both in- and outwards. When the outward-flowing material spreads beyond the Roche limit, it coagulates into new (minor) planets in a process analogous to the ongoing formation of Saturn’s innermost moonlets. This process recycles a substantial fraction of the original disc mass (tens of percents), with the bulk of the mass locked in a single large body orbitting in a 2:1 mean-motion resonance with the Roche limit. As such, the recycling of a tidally disrupted super-Earth could yield an Earth-mass planet on a 10--20 hr orbit. For white dwarfs with a temperature below 6000-7000 K (corresponding to a cooling age of >1--2 Gyr), this orbit is located in the white dwarf’s habitable zone. The recycling process also creates a string of smaller bodies just outside the Roche limit. These may account for the collection of minor planets postulated to orbit white dwarf WD 1145+017.

  12. A young hierarchical triple system harbouring a candidate debris disc

    CERN Document Server

    Deacon, N R; Olofsson, J; Johnston, K G; Henning, Th

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection of a wide young hierarchical triple system where the primary has a candidate debris disc. The primary, TYC 5241-986-1 A, is a known Tycho star which we classify as a late-K star with emission in the X-ray, near and far-UV and H\\alpha\\ suggestive of youth. Its proper motion, photometric distance (65-105 pc) and radial velocity lead us to associate the system with the broadly defined Local Association of young stars but not specifically with any young moving group. The presence of weak lithium absorption and X-ray and calcium H and K emission support an age in the 20 to ~125 Myr range. The secondary is a pair of M4.5+-0.5 dwarfs with near and far UV and H\\alpha\\ emission separated by approximately 1 arcsec (~65-105 AU projected separation) which lie 145 arcsec (9200-15200 AU) from the primary. The primary has a WISE 22 micron excess and follow-up Herschel observations also detect an excess at 70 micron. The excess emissions are indicative of a 100-175 K debris disc. We also explore the p...

  13. Herschel Observations of Debris Discs Orbiting Planet-hosting Subgiants

    CERN Document Server

    Bonsor, Amy; Wyatt, Mark C; Johnson, John A; Sibthorpe, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Debris discs are commonly detected orbiting main-sequence stars, yet little is known regarding their fate as the star evolves to become a giant. Recent observations of radial velocity detected planets orbiting giant stars highlight this population and its importance for probing, for example, the population of planetary systems orbiting intermediate mass stars. Our Herschel survey observed a subset of the Johnson et al program subgiants, finding that 4/36 exhibit excess emission thought to indicate debris, of which 3/19 are planet-hosting stars and 1/17 are stars with no current planet detections. Given the small numbers involved, there is no evidence that the disc detection rate around stars with planets is different to that around stars without planets. Our detections provide a clear indication that large quantities of dusty material can survive the stars' main-sequence lifetime and be detected on the subgiant branch, with important implications for the evolution of planetary systems and observations of poll...

  14. The unseen planets of double belt debris disc systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Andrew; Bonsor, Amy; Kral, Quentin; Matthews, Elisabeth

    2016-10-01

    The gap between two component debris discs is often taken to be carved by intervening planets scattering away the remnant planetesimals. We employ N-body simulations to determine how the time needed to clear the gap depends on the location of the gap and the mass of the planets. We invert this relation, and provide an equation for the minimum planet mass, and another for the expected number of such planets, that must be present to produce an observed gap for a star of a given age. We show how this can be combined with upper limits on the planetary system from direct imaging non-detections (such as with GPI or SPHERE) to produce approximate knowledge of the planetary system.

  15. Collisions and drag in debris discs with eccentric parent belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhne, T.; Krivov, A. V.; Kirchschlager, F.; Sende, J. A.; Wolf, S.

    2017-08-01

    Context. High-resolution images of circumstellar debris discs reveal off-centred rings that indicate past or ongoing perturbation, possibly caused by secular gravitational interaction with unseen stellar or substellar companions. The purely dynamical aspects of this departure from radial symmetry are well understood. However, the observed dust is subject to additional forces and effects, most notably collisions and drag. Aims: To complement the studies of dynamics, we therefore aim to understand how the addition of collisional evolution and drag forces creates new asymmetries and strengthens or overrides existing ones. Methods: We augmented our existing numerical code Analysis of Collisional Evolution (ACE) by an azimuthal dimension, the longitude of periapse. A set of fiducial discs with global eccentricities ranging from 0 to 0.4 was evolved over gigayear timescales. Size distribution and spatial variation of dust were analysed and interpreted. We discuss the basic impact of belt eccentricity on spectral energy distributions and images. Results: We find features imposed on characteristic timescales. First, radiation pressure defines size cut-offs that differ between periapse and apoapse, resulting in an asymmetric halo. The differences in size distribution make the observable asymmetry of the halo depend on wavelength. Second, collisional equilibrium prefers smaller grains on the apastron side of the parent belt, reducing the effect of pericentre glow and the overall asymmetry. Third, Poynting-Robertson drag fills the region interior to an eccentric belt such that the apastron side is more tenuous. Interpretation and prediction of the appearance in scattered light is problematic when spatial and size distribution are coupled.

  16. The impact of initial conditions in N-body simulations of debris discs

    CERN Document Server

    Thilliez, E

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations are a crucial tool to understand the relationship between debris discs and planetary companions. However, simulations throughout the literature have been conducted with various initial conditions often with little or no justification. In this paper, we aim to study the dependence on the initial conditions of N-body simulations modelling the interaction between a massive and eccentric planet on an exterior debris disc. To achieve this, we first classify three broad approaches used in the literature and provide some physical context for when each category should be used. We then run a series of N-body simulations, that include radiation forces acting on small grains, with varying initial conditions across the three categories. We test the influence of the initial parent body belt width, eccentricity, and alignment with the planet on the resulting debris disc structure and compare the final peak emission location, disc width and offset of synthetic disc images produced with a radiative tran...

  17. A WISE-based search for debris discs amongst M dwarfs in nearby, young, moving groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, A. S.; Jeffries, R. D.

    2017-07-01

    We present a search for debris discs amongst M-dwarf members of nearby, young (5-150 Myr) moving groups (MGs) using infrared (IR) photometry, primarily from the Wide Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). A catalogue of 100 MG M dwarfs that have suitable WISE data is compiled, and 19 of these are found to have significant IR excess emission at 22 μm. Our search is likely to be complete for discs where the ratio of flux from the disc to flux from the star fd/f* > 10-3. The spectral energy distributions are supplemented with Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) photometry and data at longer wavelengths, and fitted with simple disc models to characterize the IR excesses. There is a bimodal distribution - 12 targets have W1 - W4 > 3, corresponding to fd/f* > 0.02, and are likely to be gas-rich, primordial discs. The remaining seven targets have W1 - W4 < 1 (fd/f* ≲ 10-3) and include three objects with previously known or suspected debris discs and four new debris disc candidates that are all members of the Beta Pic MG. All of the IR excesses are identified in stars that are likely members of MGs with age <30 Myr. The detected debris disc frequency falls from 13 ± 5 per cent to <7 per cent (at 95 per cent confidence) for objects younger or older than 30 Myr, respectively. This provides evidence for the evolution of debris discs on this time-scale and does not support models where the maximum of debris disc emission occurs much later in lower mass stars.

  18. The influence of dust grain porosity on the analysis of debris disc observations

    CERN Document Server

    Brunngräber, Robert; Kirchschlager, Florian; Ertel, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Debris discs are often modelled assuming compact dust grains, but more and more evidence for the presence of porous grains is found. We aim at quantifying the systematic errors introduced when modelling debris discs composed of porous dust with a disc model assuming spherical, compact grains. We calculate the optical dust properties derived via the fast, but simple effective medium theory. The theoretical lower boundary of the size distribution -- the so-called 'blowout size' -- is compared in the cases of compact and porous grains. Finally, we simulate observations of hypothetical debris discs with different porosities and feed them into a fitting procedure using only compact grains. The deviations of the results for compact grains from the original model based on porous grains are analysed. We find that the blowout size increases with increasing grain porosity up to a factor of two. An analytical approximation function for the blowout size as a function of porosity and stellar luminosity is derived. The ana...

  19. Interpreting the extended emission around three nearby debris disc host stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. P.; Kirchschlager, F.; Ertel, S.; Augereau, J.-C.; Kennedy, G. M.; Booth, M.; Wolf, S.; Montesinos, B.; Eiroa, C.; Matthews, B.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Cool debris discs are a relic of the planetesimal formation process around their host star, analogous to the solar system's Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. As such, they can be used as a proxy to probe the origin and formation of planetary systems like our own. Aims: The Herschel open time key programmes "DUst around NEarby Stars" (DUNES) and "Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre" (DEBRIS) observed many nearby, sun-like stars at far-infrared wavelengths seeking to detect and characterize the emission from their circumstellar dust. Excess emission attributable to the presence of dust was identified from around ~20% of stars. Herschel's high angular resolution (~7'' FWHM at 100 μm) provided the capacity for resolving debris belts around nearby stars with radial extents comparable to the solar system (50-100 au). Methods: As part of the DUNES and DEBRIS surveys, we obtained observations of three debris disc stars, HIP 22263 (HD 30495), HIP 62207 (HD 110897), and HIP 72848 (HD 131511), at far-infrared wavelengths with the Herschel PACS instrument. Combining these new images and photometry with ancilliary data from the literature, we undertook simultaneous multi-wavelength modelling of the discs' radial profiles and spectral energy distributions using three different methodologies: single annulus, modified black body, and a radiative transfer code. Results: We present the first far-infrared spatially resolved images of these discs and new single-component debris disc models. We characterize the capacity of the models to reproduce the disc parameters based on marginally resolved emission through analysis of two sets of simulated systems (based on the HIP 22263 and HIP 62207 data) with the noise levels typical of the Herschel images. We find that the input parameter values are recovered well at noise levels attained in the observations presented here.

  20. Numerical predictions for planets in the debris discs of HD 202628 and HD 207129

    CERN Document Server

    Thilliez, E

    2016-01-01

    Resolved debris disc images can exhibit a range of radial and azimuthal structures, including gaps and rings, which can result from planetary companions shaping the disc by their gravitational influence. Currently there are no tools available to determine the architecture of potential companions from disc observations. Recent work by Rodigas et al. (2014) presents how one can estimate the maximum mass and minimum semi major axis of a hidden planet empirically from the width of the disc in scattered light. In this work, we use the predictions of Rodigas et al. applied to two debris discs HD 202628 and HD 207129. We aim to test if the predicted orbits of the planets can explain the features of their debris disc, such as eccentricity and sharp inner edge. We first run dynamical simulations using the predicted planetary parameters of Rodigas et al., and then numerically search for better parameters. Using a modified N-body code including radiation forces, we perform simulations over a broad range of planet parame...

  1. Searching for signatures of planet formation in stars with circumstellar debris discs

    CERN Document Server

    Maldonado, J; Villaver, E; Montesinos, B; Mora, A

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) Tentative correlations between the presence of dusty debris discs and low-mass planets have been presented. In parallel, detailed chemical abundance studies have reported different trends between samples of planet and non-planet hosts. We determine in a homogeneous way the metallicity, and abundances of a sample of 251 stars including stars with known debris discs, with debris discs and planets, and only with planets. Stars with debris discs and planets have the same [Fe/H] behaviour as stars hosting planets, and they also show a similar -Tc trend. Different behaviour in the -Tc trend is found between the samples of stars without planets and the samples of planet hosts. In particular, when considering only refractory elements, negative slopes are shown in cool giant planet hosts, whilst positive ones are shown in stars hosting low-mass planets. Stars hosting exclusively close-in giant planets show higher metallicities and positive -Tc slope. A search for correlations between the -Tc slopes and the ...

  2. Interpreting the extended emission around three nearby debris disc host stars

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Jonathan P; Ertel, S; Augereau, J -C; Kennedy, G M; Booth, M; Wolf, S; Montesinos, B; Eiroa, C; Matthews, B

    2014-01-01

    Cool debris discs are a relic of the planetesimal formation process around their host star, analogous to the solar system's Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. As such, they can be used as a proxy to probe the origin and formation of planetary systems like our own. The Herschel Open Time Key Programmes "DUst around NEarby Stars" (DUNES) and "Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre" (DEBRIS) observed many nearby, sun-like stars at far-infrared wavelengths seeking to detect and characterize the emission from their circumstellar dust. Excess emission attributable to the presence of dust was identified from around $\\sim$ 20% of stars. Herschel's high angular resolution ($\\sim$ 7" FWHM at 100 $\\mu$m) provided the capacity for resolving debris belts around nearby stars with radial extents comparable to the solar system (50 to 100 au). As part of the DUNES and DEBRIS surveys, we obtained observations of three debris disc stars, HIP 22263 (HD 30495), HIP 62207 (HD 110897), and HIP 72848 (HD 1315...

  3. Stirring in massive, young debris discs from spatially resolved Herschel images

    CERN Document Server

    Moór, A; Ábrahám, P; Apai, D; Balog, Z; Grady, C; Henning, Th; Juhász, A; Kiss, Cs; Krivov, A V; Pawellek, N; Szabó, Gy M

    2014-01-01

    A significant fraction of main-sequence stars are encircled by dusty debris discs, where the short-lived dust particles are replenished through collisions between planetesimals. Most destructive collisions occur when the orbits of smaller bodies are dynamically stirred up, either by the gravitational effect of locally formed Pluto-sized planetesimals (self-stirring scenario), or via secular perturbation caused by an inner giant planet (planetary stirring). The relative importance of these scenarios in debris systems is unknown. Here we present new Herschel Space Observatory imagery of 11 discs selected from the most massive and extended known debris systems. All discs were found to be extended at far-infrared wavelengths, five of them being resolved for the first time. We evaluated the feasibility of the self-stirring scenario by comparing the measured disc sizes with the predictions of the model calculated for the ages of our targets. We concluded that the self-stirring explanation works for seven discs. How...

  4. Accretion of Phobos and Deimos in an extended debris disc stirred by transient moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Pascal; Charnoz, Sebastien; Dunseath, Kevin M.; Terao-Dunseath, Mariko; Trinh, Antony; Hyodo, Ryuki; Genda, Hidenori; Toupin, Stéven

    2016-08-01

    Phobos and Deimos, the two small satellites of Mars, are thought either to be asteroids captured by the planet or to have formed in a disc of debris surrounding Mars following a giant impact. Both scenarios, however, have been unable to account for the current Mars system. Here we use numerical simulations to suggest that Phobos and Deimos accreted from the outer portion of a debris disc formed after a giant impact on Mars. In our simulations, larger moons form from material in the denser inner disc and migrate outwards due to gravitational interactions with the disc. The resulting orbital resonances spread outwards and gather dispersed outer disc debris, facilitating accretion into two satellites of sizes similar to Phobos and Deimos. The larger inner moons fall back to Mars after about 5 million years due to the tidal pull of the planet, after which the two outer satellites evolve into Phobos- and Deimos-like orbits. The proposed scenario can explain why Mars has two small satellites instead of one large moon. Our model predicts that Phobos and Deimos are composed of a mixture of material from Mars and the impactor.

  5. The influence of dust grain porosity on the analysis of debris disc observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunngräber, Robert; Wolf, Sebastian; Kirchschlager, Florian; Ertel, Steve

    2017-02-01

    Debris discs are often modelled assuming compact dust grains, but more and more evidence for the presence of porous grains is found. We aim at quantifying the systematic errors introduced when modelling debris discs composed of porous dust with a disc model assuming spherical, compact grains. We calculate the optical dust properties derived via the fast, but simple effective medium theory. The theoretical lower boundary of the size distribution - the so-called `blowout size' - is compared in the cases of compact and porous grains. Finally, we simulate observations of hypothetical debris discs with different porosities and feed them into a fitting procedure using only compact grains. The deviations of the results for compact grains from the original model based on porous grains are analysed. We find that the blowout size increases with increasing grain porosity up to a factor of 2. An analytical approximation function for the blowout size as a function of porosity and stellar luminosity is derived. The analysis of the geometrical disc set-up, when constrained by radial profiles, is barely affected by the porosity. However, the determined minimum grain size and the slope of the grain size distribution derived using compact grains are significantly overestimated. Thus, the unexpectedly high ratio of minimum grain size to blowout size found by previous studies using compact grains can be partially described by dust grain porosity, although the effect is not strong enough to completely explain the trend.

  6. A new code to study structures in collisionally active, perturbed debris discs. Application to binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Thebault, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Debris discs are traditionally studied using two distinct types of numerical models: statistical particle-in-a-box codes to study their collisional and size distribution evolution, and dynamical N-body models to study their spatial structure. The absence of collisions from N-body codes is in particular a major shortcoming, as collisional processes are expected to significantly alter the results obtained from pure N-body runs. We present a new numerical model, to study the spatial structure of perturbed debris discs at dynamical and collisional steady-state. We focus on the competing effects between gravitational perturbations by a massive body (planet or star), collisional production of small grains, and radiation pressure placing these grains in possibly dynamically unstable regions. We consider a disc of parent bodies at dynamical steady-state, from which small radiation-pressure-affected grains are released in a series of runs, each corresponding to a different orbital position of the perturber, where part...

  7. Resolved Imaging of the HD191089 Debris Disc

    CERN Document Server

    Churcher, Laura J; Smith, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Two thirds of the F star members of the 12 Myr old Beta Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG) show significant excess emission in the mid-infrared, several million years after the expected dispersal of the protoplanetary disc. Theoretical models of planet formation suggest that this peak in the mid-infrared emission could be due to the formation of Pluto-sized bodies in the disc, which ignite the collisional cascade and enhance the production of small dust. Here we present resolved mid-infrared imaging of the disc of HD191089 (F5V in the BPMG) and consider its implications for the state of planet formation in this system. HD191089 was observed at 18.3 microns using T-ReCS on Gemini South and the images were compared to models of the disc to constrain the radial distribution of the dust. The emission observed at $18.3\\umu m$ is shown to be significantly extended beyond the PSF at a position angle of 80 degrees. This is the first time dust emission has been resolved around HD191089. Modelling indicates that the emission...

  8. Incidence of debris discs around FGK stars in the solar neighbourhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesinos, B.; Eiroa, C.; Krivov, A. V.; Marshall, J. P.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Liseau, R.; Mora, A.; Maldonado, J.; Wolf, S.; Ertel, S.; Bayo, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Heras, A. M.; Fridlund, M.; Danchi, W. C.; Solano, E.; Kirchschlager, F.; del Burgo, C.; Montes, D.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Debris discs are a consequence of the planet formation process and constitute the fingerprints of planetesimal systems. Their counterparts in the solar system are the asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts. Aims: The aim of this paper is to provide robust numbers for the incidence of debris discs around FGK stars in the solar neighbourhood. Methods: The full sample of 177 FGK stars with d ≤ 20 pc proposed for the DUst around NEarby Stars (DUNES) survey is presented. Herschel/PACS observations at 100 and 160 μm were obtained, and were complemented in some cases with data at 70 μm and at 250, 350, and 500 μm SPIRE photometry. The 123 objects observed by the DUNES collaboration were presented in a previous paper. The remaining 54 stars, shared with the Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in IR and Sub-mm (DEBRIS) consortium and observed by them, and the combined full sample are studied in this paper. The incidence of debris discs per spectral type is analysed and put into context together with other parameters of the sample, like metallicity, rotation and activity, and age. Results: The subsample of 105 stars with d ≤ 15 pc containing 23 F, 33 G, and 49 K stars is complete for F stars, almost complete for G stars, and contains a substantial number of K stars from which we draw solid conclusions on objects of this spectral type. The incidence rates of debris discs per spectral type are 0.26+0.21-0.14 (6 objects with excesses out of 23 F stars), 0.21+0.17-0.11 (7 out of 33 G stars), and 0.200.14-0.09 (10 out of 49 K stars); the fraction for all three spectral types together is 0.22+0.08-0.07 (23 out of 105 stars). The uncertainties correspond to a 95% confidence level. The medians of the upper limits of Ldust/L∗ for each spectral type are 7.8 × 10-7 (F), 1.4 × 10-6 (G), and 2.2 × 10-6 (K); the lowest values are around 4.0 × 10-7. The incidence of debris discs is similar for active (young) and inactive (old) stars. The fractional luminosity

  9. Incidence of debris discs around FGK stars in the solar neighbourhood

    CERN Document Server

    Montesinos, B; Krivov, A V; Marshall, J P; Pilbratt, G L; Liseau, R; Mora, A; Maldonado, J; Wolf, S; Ertel, S; Bayo, A; Augereau, J -C; Heras, A M; Fridlund, M; Danchi, W C; Solano, E; Kirchschlager, F; del Burgo, C; Montes, D

    2016-01-01

    Debris discs are a consequence of the planet formation process and constitute the fingerprints of planetesimal systems. Their solar system's counterparts are the asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts. The aim of this paper is to provide robust numbers for the incidence of debris discs around FGK stars in the solar neighbourhood. The full sample of 177 FGK stars with d<20 pc proposed for the DUNES survey is presented. Herschel/PACS observations at 100 and 160 micron complemented with data at 70 micron, and at 250, 350 and 500 micron SPIRE photometry, were obtained. The 123 objects observed by the DUNES collaboration were presented in a previous paper. The remaining 54 stars, shared with the DEBRIS consortium and observed by them, and the combined full sample are studied in this paper. The incidence of debris discs per spectral type is analysed and put into context together with other parameters of the sample, like metallicity, rotation and activity, and age. The subsample of 105 stars with d<15 pc containi...

  10. Predicting the incidence of planets and debris discs as a function of stellar mass

    CERN Document Server

    Greaves, J S

    2010-01-01

    The mass of solids in a young circumstellar disc may be the key factor in its efficiency in building planetesimals and planetary cores, and dust observed around young T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars can be used as a proxy for this initial solid content. The dust-mass distributions are taken from recent millimetre-wavelength data and fitted using survival analysis to take into account upper limits, and threshold disc-masses for building planets and belts of comets are estimated. Amongst A-stars, 20% gas giant and 55% debris disc systems are predicted, in good agreement with observations. For M-stars, the predicted and observed planet-frequencies agree at ~2-3%, and this low incidence is explained by a lack of massive discs. However, debris is predicted around approx. 14% of M-stars, while only ~2% such systems have so far been found. This suggests that deeper searches such as with Herschel and SCUBA-2 may find a cold disc population previously missed around these low-luminosity stars. Also, an estimate of the effi...

  11. Modelling the Inner Debris Disc of HR 8799

    CERN Document Server

    Contro, B; Wittenmyer, R A; Marshall, J P; Hinse, T C

    2016-01-01

    In many ways, the HR 8799 planetary system strongly resembles our own. It features four giant planets and two debris belts, analogues to the Asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts. Here, we present the results of dynamical simulations of HR 8799's inner debris belt, to study its structure and collisional environment. Our results suggest that HR 8799's inner belt is highly structured, with gaps between regions of dynamical stability. The belt is likely constrained between sharp inner and outer edges, located at ~6 and ~8 au, respectively. Its inner edge coincides with a broad gap cleared by the 4:1 mean-motion resonance with HR 8799e. Within the belt, planetesimals are undergoing a process of collisional attrition like that observed in the Asteroid belt. However, whilst the mean collision velocity in the Asteroid belt exceeds 5 km/s, the majority of collisions within HR 8799's inner belt occur with velocities of order 1.2 km/s, or less. Despite this, they remain sufficiently energetic to be destructive - giving a...

  12. Modelling the inner debris disc of HR 8799

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contro, B.; Horner, J.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Marshall, J. P.; Hinse, T. C.

    2016-11-01

    In many ways, the HR 8799 planetary system strongly resembles our own. It features four giant planets and two debris belts, analogues to the Asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts. Here, we present the results of dynamical simulations of HR8799's inner debris belt, to study its structure and collisional environment. Our results suggest that HR 8799's inner belt is highly structured, with gaps between regions of dynamical stability. The belt is likely constrained between sharp inner and outer edges, located at ˜6 and ˜8 au, respectively. Its inner edge coincides with a broad gap cleared by the 4:1 mean-motion resonance with HR 8799e. Within the belt, planetesimals are undergoing a process of collisional attrition like that observed in the Asteroid belt. However, whilst the mean collision velocity in the Asteroid belt exceeds 5 km s-1, the majority of collisions within HR 8799's inner belt occur with velocities of order 1.2 km s-1, or less. Despite this, they remain sufficiently energetic to be destructive - giving a source for the warm dust detected in the system. Interior to the inner belt, test particles remain dynamically unstirred, aside from narrow bands excited by distant high-order resonances with HR 8799e. This lack of stirring is consistent with earlier thermal modelling of HR 8799's infrared excess, which predicted little dust inside 6 au. The inner system is sufficiently stable and unstirred that the formation of telluric planets is feasible, although such planets would doubtless be subject to a punitive impact regime, given the intense collisional grinding required in the inner belt to generate the observed infrared excess.

  13. Observations vs theory: from metallicity correlations of exoplanets and debris discs to HL Tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayakshin, Sergei V.

    2015-12-01

    Boley et al (2010) and Nayakshin (2010) proposed Tidal Downsizing (TD), a new hypothesis for forming all types of planets. Gas fragments born by gravitational disc instability at ~ 100 AU migrate inwards rapidly, with some becoming hot Jupiters. Grain sedimentation inside the fragments makes rocky cores. These cores are future Earths and Super Earths, leaved behind when most of the migrating fragments are tidally disrupted.TD can now be tested against data in detail thanks to a numerical population synthesis model (Nayakshin and Fletcher 2015). TD scenario is fundamentally different from Core Accretion (CA), with sub-Saturn planets and debris discs born in gas fragment disruptions, and not vice versa. I therefore find robust observational differences between CA and TD despite uncertainties inherent in any population synthesis. Here I use metallicity correlations of all sorts to test the model. In TD, the only population that correlates with metallicity (Z) of the host strongly is that of moderately massive gas giants interior to a few AU from the host. Super-Earths and debris discs correlate in mass but not in numbers with Z; very massive gas giants, brown dwarfs and directly imaged gas giants are neutral to Z. Fragment self-destruction by core feedback explains simultaneously the core mass function roll-over at ~20 Earth masses, the rapid formation of suspected planets in HL Tau, and the paucity of directly imaged gas giants. Debris discs and gas giants do not correlate in TD, as observed.I argue that TD does a better job in accounting for many of the observed properties of exoplanets and planetary debris than CA. I finish with observational predictions that can distinguish TD from Core Accretion in the near future.

  14. The debris disc of solar analogue τ Ceti: Herschel observations and dynamical simulations of the proposed multiplanet system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawler, S.M.; Di Francesco, J.; Kennedy, G.M.; Sibthorpe, B.; Booth, M.; Vandenbussche, B.; Matthews, B.C.; Holland, W.S.; Greaves, J.; Wilner, D.J.; Tuomi, M.; Blommaert, J.A.D.L.; de Vries, B.L.; Dominik, C.; Fridlund, M.; Gear, W.; Heras, A.M.; Ivison, R.; Olofsson, G.

    2014-01-01

    τ Ceti is a nearby, mature G-type star very similar to our Sun, with a massive Kuiper Belt analogue and possible multiplanet system that has been compared to our Solar system. We present Herschel Space Observatory images of the debris disc, finding the disc is resolved at 70 μm and 160 μm, and margi

  15. Effect of continuous lumbar traction on the size of herniated disc material in lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Bulent; Gunduz, Osman Hakan; Ozoran, Kursat; Bostanoglu, Sevinc

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the effects of continuous lumbar traction in patients with lumbar disc herniation on clinical findings, and size of the herniated disc measured by computed tomography (CT). In this prospective, randomized, controlled study, 46 patients with lumbar disc herniation were included, and randomized into two groups as the traction group (24 patients), and the control group (22 patients). The traction group was given a physical therapy program and continuous lumbar traction. The control group was given the same physical therapy program without traction, for the same duration of time. Data for the clinical symptoms and signs were collected before and after the treatment together with calculation of a herniation index, from the CT images that showed the size of the herniated disc material. In the traction group, most of the clinical findings significantly improved with treatment. Size of the herniated disc material in CT decreased significantly only in the traction group. In the traction group the herniation index decreased from 276.6+/-129.6 to 212.5+/-84.3 with treatment (p0.05). Patients with greater herniations tended to respond better to traction. In conclusion, lumbar traction is both effective in improving symptoms and clinical findings in patients with lumbar disc herniation and also in decreasing the size of the herniated disc material as measured by CT.

  16. A self-consistent model for the evolution of the gas produced in the debris disc of β Pictoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Q.; Wyatt, M.; Carswell, R. F.; Pringle, J. E.; Matrà, L.; Juhász, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a self-consistent model for the evolution of gas produced in the debris disc of β Pictoris. Our model proposes that atomic carbon and oxygen are created from the photodissociation of CO, which is itself released from volatile-rich bodies in the debris disc due to grain-grain collisions or photodesorption. While the CO lasts less than one orbit, the atomic gas evolves by viscous spreading resulting in an accretion disc inside the parent belt and a decretion disc outside. The temperature, ionization fraction and population levels of carbon and oxygen are followed with the photodissociation region model CLOUDY, which is coupled to a dynamical viscous α model. We present new gas observations of β Pic, of C I observed with Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment and O I observed with Herschel, and show that these along with published C II and CO observations can all be explained with this new model. Our model requires a viscosity α > 0.1, similar to that found in sufficiently ionized discs of other astronomical objects; we propose that the magnetorotational instability is at play in this highly ionized and dilute medium. This new model can be tested from its predictions for high-resolution ALMA observations of C I. We also constrain the water content of the planetesimals in β Pic. The scenario proposed here might be at play in all debris discs and this model could be used more generally on all discs with C, O or CO detections.

  17. A WISE-based search for debris discs amongst M-dwarfs in nearby, young, moving groups

    CERN Document Server

    Binks, Alex S

    2016-01-01

    We present a search for debris discs amongst M-dwarf members of nearby, young (5-150 Myr) moving groups (MGs) using infrared (IR) photometry, primarily from the Wide Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). A catalogue of 100 MG M-dwarfs that have suitable WISE data is compiled and 19 of these are found to have significant IR excess emission at 22$\\mu$m. Our search is likely to be complete for discs where the ratio of flux from the disc to flux from the star $f_{\\rm d}/f_{*} > 10^{-3}$. The spectral energy distributions are supplemented with 2MASS photometry and data at longer wavelengths and fitted with simple disc models to characterise the IR excesses. There is a bimodal distribution -- twelve targets have $W1-W4 > 3$, corresponding to $f_{\\rm d}/f_{*} > 0.02$ and are likely to be gas-rich, primordial discs. The remaining seven targets have $W1-W4 < 1$ ($f_{\\rm d}/f_{*} \\lesssim 10^{-3}$) and include three objects with previously known or suspected debris discs and four new debris disc candidates that are all m...

  18. Herschel discovery of a new class of cold, faint debris discs

    CERN Document Server

    Eiroa, C; Mora, A; Krivov, A V; Montesinos, B; Absil, O; Ardila, D; Arevalo, M; Augereau, J -Ch; Bayo, A; Danchi, W; del Burgo, C; Ertel, S; Fridlund, M; Gonzalez-Garcıa, B M; Heras, A M; Lebreton, J; Liseau, R; Maldonado, J; Meeus, G; Montes, D; Pilbratt, G L; Roberge, A; Sanz-Forcada, J; Stapelfeldt, K; Thebault, P; White, G J; Wolf, S

    2011-01-01

    We present Herschel PACS 100 and 160 micron observations of the solar-type stars alpha Men, HD 88230 and HD 210277, which form part of the FGK stars sample of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme (OTKP) DUNES (DUst around NEarby S tars). Our observations show small infrared excesses at 160 micron for all three stars. HD 210277 also shows a small excess at 100 micron, while the 100 micron fluxes of alpha Men and HD 88230 agree with the stellar photospheric predictions. We attribute these infrared excesses to a new class of cold, faint debris discs. alpha Men and HD 88230 are spatially resolved in the PACS 160 micron images, while HD 210277 is point-like at that wavelength. The projected linear sizes of the extended emission lie in the range from ~ 115 to ~ 250 AU. The estimated black body temperatures from the 100 and 160 micron fluxes are $\\lesssim$ 22 K, while the fractional luminosity of the cold dust is Ldust/Lstar ~ 10E-6, close to the luminosity of the Solar-System's Kuiper belt. These debris discs are t...

  19. Double-ringed debris discs could be the work of eccentric planets: explaining the strange morphology of HD 107146

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the general interaction between an eccentric planet and a coplanar debris disc of the same mass, using analytical theory and n-body simulations. Such an interaction could result from a planet-planet scattering or merging event. We show that when the planet mass is comparable to that of the disc, the former is often circularised with little change to its semimajor axis. The secular effect of such a planet can cause debris to apsidally anti-align with the planet's orbit (the opposite of what may be naively expected), leading to the counter-intuitive result that a low-mass planet may clear a larger region of debris than a higher-mass body would. The interaction generally results in a double-ringed debris disc, which is comparable to those observed in HD 107146 and HD 92945. As an example we apply our results to HD 107146, and show that the disc's morphology and surface brightness profile can be well-reproduced if the disc is interacting with an eccentric planet of comparable mass (~10-100 Earth ma...

  20. UHMWPE wear debris and tissue reactions are reduced for contemporary designs of lumbar total disc replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veruva, Sai Y; Lanman, Todd H; Isaza, Jorge E; MacDonald, Daniel W; Kurtz, Steven M; Steinbeck, Marla J

    2015-03-01

    Lumbar total disc replacement (L-TDR) is a procedure used to relieve back pain and maintain mobility. Contemporary metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) L-TDRs were developed to address wear performance concerns about historical designs, but wear debris generation and periprosthetic tissue reactions for these newer implants have not been determined. The purpose of this study was to determine (1) whether periprosthetic ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear debris and biological responses were present in tissues from revised contemporary MoP L-TDRs that contain conventional cores fabricated from γ-inert-sterilized UHMWPE; (2) how fixed- versus mobile-bearing design affected UHMWPE wear particle number, shape, and size; and (3) how these wear particle characteristics compare with historical MoP L-TDRs that contain cores fabricated from γ-air-sterilized UHMWPE. We evaluated periprosthetic tissues from 11 patients who received eight fixed-bearing ProDisc-L and four mobile-bearing CHARITÉ contemporary L-TDRs with a mean implantation time of 4.1 and 2.7 years, respectively. Histologic analysis of tissues was performed to assess biological responses and polarized light microscopy was used to quantify number and size/shape characteristics of UHMWPE wear particles from the fixed- and mobile-bearing devices. Comparisons were made to previously reported particle data for historical L-TDRs. Five of seven (71%) fixed-bearing and one of four mobile-bearing L-TDR patient tissues contained at least 4 particles/mm(2) wear with associated macrophage infiltration. Tissues with wear debris were highly vascularized, whereas those without debris were more necrotic. Given the samples available, the tissue around mobile-bearing L-TDR was observed to contain 87% more, 11% rounder, and 11% less-elongated wear debris compared with tissues around fixed-bearing devices; however, there were no significant differences. Compared with historical L-TDRs, UHMWPE particle number and

  1. Severe impingement of lumbar disc replacements increases the functional biological activity of polyethylene wear debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Ryan M; Macdonald, Daniel W; Kurtz, Steven M; Steinbeck, Marla J

    2013-06-05

    Wear, oxidation, and particularly rim impingement damage of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene total disc replacement components have been observed following surgical revision. However, neither in vitro testing nor retrieval-based evidence has shown the effect(s) of impingement on the characteristics of polyethylene wear debris. Thus, we sought to determine (1) differences in polyethylene particle size, shape, number, or biological activity that correspond to mild or severe rim impingement and (2) in an analysis of all total disc replacements, regardless of impingement classification, whether there are correlations between the extent of regional damage and the characteristics of polyethylene wear debris. The extent of dome and rim damage was characterized for eleven retrieved polyethylene cores obtained at revision surgery after an average duration of implantation of 9.7 years (range, 4.6 to 16.1 years). Polyethylene wear debris was isolated from periprosthetic tissues with use of nitric acid and was imaged with use of environmental scanning electron microscopy. Subsequently, particle size, shape, number, biological activity, and chronic inflammation scores were determined. Grouping of particles by size ranges that represented high biological relevance (<0.1 to 1-μm particles), intermediate biological relevance (1 to 10-μm particles), and low biological relevance (>10-μm particles) revealed an increased volume fraction of particles in the <0.1 to 1-μm and 1 to 10-μm size ranges in the mild-impingement cohort as compared with the severe-impingement cohort. The increased volume fractions resulted in a higher specific biological activity per unit particle volume in the mild-impingement cohort than in the severe-impingement cohort. However, functional biological activity, which is normalized by particle volume (mm3/g of tissue), was significantly higher in the severe-impingement cohort. This increase was due to a larger volume of particles in all three size

  2. Severe Impingement of Lumbar Disc Replacements Increases the Functional Biological Activity of Polyethylene Wear Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Ryan M.; MacDonald, Daniel W.; Kurtz, Steven M.; Steinbeck, Marla J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Wear, oxidation, and particularly rim impingement damage of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene total disc replacement components have been observed following surgical revision. However, neither in vitro testing nor retrieval-based evidence has shown the effect(s) of impingement on the characteristics of polyethylene wear debris. Thus, we sought to determine (1) differences in polyethylene particle size, shape, number, or biological activity that correspond to mild or severe rim impingement and (2) in an analysis of all total disc replacements, regardless of impingement classification, whether there are correlations between the extent of regional damage and the characteristics of polyethylene wear debris. Methods: The extent of dome and rim damage was characterized for eleven retrieved polyethylene cores obtained at revision surgery after an average duration of implantation of 9.7 years (range, 4.6 to 16.1 years). Polyethylene wear debris was isolated from periprosthetic tissues with use of nitric acid and was imaged with use of environmental scanning electron microscopy. Subsequently, particle size, shape, number, biological activity, and chronic inflammation scores were determined. Results: Grouping of particles by size ranges that represented high biological relevance (10-μm particles) revealed an increased volume fraction of particles in the <0.1 to 1-μm and 1 to 10-μm size ranges in the mild-impingement cohort as compared with the severe-impingement cohort. The increased volume fractions resulted in a higher specific biological activity per unit particle volume in the mild-impingement cohort than in the severe-impingement cohort. However, functional biological activity, which is normalized by particle volume (mm3/g of tissue), was significantly higher in the severe-impingement cohort. This increase was due to a larger volume of particles in all three size ranges. In both cohorts, the functional biological activity correlated with the

  3. Prize of the best thesis 2015: Study of debris discs through state-of-the-art numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Q.; Thébault, P.

    2015-12-01

    This proceeding summarises the thesis entitled ``Study of debris discs with a new generation numerical model'' by Quentin Kral, for which he obtained the prize of the best thesis in 2015. The thesis brought major contributions to the field of debris disc modelling. The main achievement is to have created, almost ex-nihilo, the first truly self-consistent numerical model able to simultaneously follow the coupled collisional and dynamical evolutions of debris discs. Such a code has been thought as being the ``Holy Grail'' of disc modellers for the past decade, and while several codes with partial dynamics/collisions coupling have been presented, the code developed in this thesis, called ``LIDT-DD'' is the first to achieve a full coupling. The LIDT-DD model, which is the first of a new-generation of fully self-consistent debris disc models is able to handle both planetesimals and dust and create new fragments after each collision. The main idea of LIDT-DD development was to merge into one code two approaches that were so far used separately in disc modelling, that is, an N-body algorithm to investigate the dynamics, and a statistical scheme to explore the collisional evolution. This complex scheme is not straightforward to develop as there are major difficulties to overcome: 1) collisions in debris discs are highly destructive and produce clouds of small fragments after each single impact, 2) the smallest (and most numerous) of these fragments have a strongly size-dependent dynamics because of the radiation pressure, and 3) the dust usually observed in discs is precisely these smallest grains. These extreme constraints had so far prevented all previous attempts at developing self-consistent disc models to succeed. The thesis contains many examples of the use of LIDT-DD that are not yet published but the case of the collision between two asteroid-like bodies is studied in detail. In particular, LIDT-DD is able to predict the different stages that should be observed

  4. Comets as a possible source of nanodust in the Solar System cloud and in planetary debris discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid

    2017-05-01

    Comets, comet-like objects and their fragments are the most plausible source for the dust in both the inner heliosphere and planetary debris discs around other stars. The smallest size of dust particles in debris discs is not known and recent observational results suggest that the size distribution of the dust extends down to sizes of a few nanometres or a few tens of nanometres. In the Solar System, electric field measurements from spacecraft observe events that are explained with high-velocity impacts of nanometre-sized dust. In some planetary debris discs an observed mid- to near-infrared emission supposedly results from hot dust located in the vicinity of the star. And the observed emission is characteristic of dust of sizes a few tens of nanometres. Rosetta observations, on the other hand, provide little information on the presence of nanodust near comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This article describes why this is not in contradiction to the observations of nanodust in the heliosphere and in planetary debris discs. The direct ejection of nanodust from the nucleus of the comet would not contribute significantly to the observed nanodust fluxes. We discuss a scenario that nanodust forms in the interplanetary dust cloud through the high-velocity collision process in the interplanetary medium for which the production rates are highest near the Sun. Likewise, fragmentation by collisions occurs near the star in planetary debris discs. The collisional fragmentation process in the inner Solar System occurs at similar velocities to those of the collisional evolution in the interstellar medium. A question for future studies is whether there is a common magic size of the smallest collision fragments and what determines this size. This article is part of the themed issue 'Cometary science after Rosetta'.

  5. Comets as a possible source of nanodust in the Solar System cloud and in planetary debris discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid

    2017-07-13

    Comets, comet-like objects and their fragments are the most plausible source for the dust in both the inner heliosphere and planetary debris discs around other stars. The smallest size of dust particles in debris discs is not known and recent observational results suggest that the size distribution of the dust extends down to sizes of a few nanometres or a few tens of nanometres. In the Solar System, electric field measurements from spacecraft observe events that are explained with high-velocity impacts of nanometre-sized dust. In some planetary debris discs an observed mid- to near-infrared emission supposedly results from hot dust located in the vicinity of the star. And the observed emission is characteristic of dust of sizes a few tens of nanometres. Rosetta observations, on the other hand, provide little information on the presence of nanodust near comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This article describes why this is not in contradiction to the observations of nanodust in the heliosphere and in planetary debris discs. The direct ejection of nanodust from the nucleus of the comet would not contribute significantly to the observed nanodust fluxes. We discuss a scenario that nanodust forms in the interplanetary dust cloud through the high-velocity collision process in the interplanetary medium for which the production rates are highest near the Sun. Likewise, fragmentation by collisions occurs near the star in planetary debris discs. The collisional fragmentation process in the inner Solar System occurs at similar velocities to those of the collisional evolution in the interstellar medium. A question for future studies is whether there is a common magic size of the smallest collision fragments and what determines this size.This article is part of the themed issue 'Cometary science after Rosetta'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Warm dusty discs: Exploring the A star 24um debris population

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, R

    2010-01-01

    (Abridged) Studies of debris discs have shown that most systems are analogous to the EKB. In this study we aim to determine how many IRAS 25um excesses towards A stars are real, and investigate where the dust lies. We observe with TIMMI2, VISIR, Michelle and TReCS a sample of A and B-type main sequence stars reported as having mid-IR excess. We constrain the location of the debris through combined modelling of the emission spectrum and a modelling technique designed to constrain the radial extent of emission in mid-IR imaging. We independently confirm the presence of warm dust around 3 of the candidates: HD3003, HD80950 and eta Tel. For the binary HD3003 a stability analysis indicates the dust is either circumstellar and lying at ~4 AU with the binary orbiting at >14AU, or the dust lies in an unstable location; there is some evidence for temporal evolution of its excess emission on a ~20 year timescale. For 7 of the targets we present quantitative limits on the location of dust around the star. We demonstrate...

  7. LIDT-DD: A new self-consistent debris disc model including radiation pressure and coupling collisional and dynamical evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kral, Quentin; Charnoz, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    In most current debris disc models, the dynamical and the collisional evolutions are studied separately, with N-body and statistical codes, respectively, because of stringent computational constraints. We present here LIDT-DD, the first code able to mix both approaches in a fully self-consistent way. Our aim is for it to be generic enough so as to be applied to any astrophysical cases where we expect dynamics and collisions to be deeply interlocked with one another: planets in discs, violent massive breakups, destabilized planetesimal belts, exozodiacal discs, etc. The code takes its basic architecture from the LIDT3D algorithm developed by Charnoz et al.(2012) for protoplanetary discs, but has been strongly modified and updated in order to handle the very constraining specificities of debris discs physics: high-velocity fragmenting collisions, radiation-pressure affected orbits, absence of gas, etc. In LIDT-DD, grains of a given size at a given location in a disc are grouped into "super-particles", whose orb...

  8. A self-consistent model for the evolution of the gas produced in the debris disc of $\\beta$ Pictoris

    CERN Document Server

    Kral, Quentin; Carswell, Robert; Pringle, Jim; Matra, Luca; Juhasz, Attila

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a self-consistent model for the evolution of gas produced in the debris disc of $\\beta$ Pictoris. Our model proposes that atomic carbon and oxygen are created from the photodissociation of CO, which is itself released from volatile-rich bodies in the debris disc due to grain-grain collisions or photodesorption. While the CO lasts less than one orbit, the atomic gas evolves by viscous spreading resulting in an accretion disc inside the parent belt and a decretion disc outside. The temperature, ionisation fraction and population levels of carbon and oxygen are followed with the photodissociation region model Cloudy, which is coupled to a dynamical viscous $\\alpha$ model. We present new gas observations of $\\beta$ Pic, of C I observed with APEX and O I observed with Herschel, and show that these along with published C II and CO observations can all be explained with this new model. Our model requires a viscosity $\\alpha$ > 0.1, similar to that found in sufficiently ionised discs of other astr...

  9. The History of the Solar System's Debris Disc: Observable Properties of the Kuiper Belt

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, Mark; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Moro-Martín, Amaya; Levison, Harold F

    2009-01-01

    The Nice model of Gomes et al. (2005) suggests that the migration of the giant planets caused a planetesimal clearing event which led to the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) at 880 Myr. Here we investigate the IR emission from the Kuiper belt during the history of the Solar System as described by the Nice model. We describe a method for easily converting the results of n-body planetesimal simulations into observational properties (assuming black-body grains and a single size distribution) and further modify this method to improve its realism (using realistic grain properties and a three-phase size distribution). We compare our results with observed debris discs and evaluate the plausibility of detecting an LHB-like process in extrasolar systems. Recent surveys have shown that 4% of stars exhibit 24 um excess and 16% exhibit 70 um excess. We show that the Solar System would have been amongst the brightest of these systems before the LHB at both 24 and 70 um. We find a significant increase in 24 um emission during ...

  10. Origin and evolution of two-component debris discs and an application to the q$^1$ Eridani system

    CERN Document Server

    Schüppler, Christian; Löhne, Torsten; Booth, Mark; Kirchschlager, Florian; Wolf, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Many debris discs reveal a two-component structure, with an outer Kuiper-belt analogue and a warm inner component whose origin is still a matter of debate. One possibility is that warm emission stems from an "asteroid belt" closer in to the star. We consider a scenario in which a set of giant planets is formed in an initially extended planetesimal disc. These planets carve a broad gap around their orbits, splitting up the disc into the outer and the inner belts. After the gas dispersal, both belts undergo collisional evolution in a steady-state regime. This scenario is explored with detailed collisional simulations involving realistic physics to describe a long-term collisional depletion of the two-component disc. We find that the inner disc may be able to retain larger amounts of material at older ages than thought before on the basis of simplified analytic models. We show that the proposed scenario is consistent with a suite of thermal emission and scattered light observational data for a bright two-tempera...

  11. Matched Template Signal Processing for Continuous Wave Laser Tracking of Space Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S.; Ward, R.; Roberts, L.; Fleddermann, R.; Francis, S.; McClellend, D.; Shaddock, D.; Smith, C.

    2016-09-01

    The build up of space junk in Earth's orbit space is a growing concern as it shares the same orbit as many currently active satellites. As the number of objects increase in these orbits, the likelihood of collisions between satellites and debris will increase [1]. The eventual goal is to be able to maneuver space debris to avoid such collisions. We at SERC aim to accomplish this by using ground based laser facilities that are already being used to track space debris orbit. One potential method to maneuver space debris is using continuous wave lasers and applying photon pressure on the debris and attempt to change the orbit. However most current laser ranging facilities operates using pulsed lasers where a pulse of light is sent out and the time taken for the pulse to return back to the telescope is measured after being reflected by the target. If space debris maneuvering is carried out with a continuous wave laser then two laser sources need to be used for ranging and maneuvering. The aim of this research is to develop a laser ranging system that is compatible with the continuous wave laser; using the same laser source to simultaneously track and maneuver space debris. We aim to accomplish this by modulating the outgoing laser light with pseudo random noise (PRN) codes, time tagging the outgoing light, and utilising a matched filter at the receiver end to extract the various orbital information of the debris.

  12. Periprosthetic UHMWPE Wear Debris Induces Inflammation, Vascularization, and Innervation After Total Disc Replacement in the Lumbar Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veruva, Sai Y; Lanman, Todd H; Isaza, Jorge E; Freeman, Theresa A; Kurtz, Steven M; Steinbeck, Marla J

    2017-05-01

    The pathophysiology and mechanisms driving the generation of unintended pain after total disc replacement (TDR) remain unexplored. Ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear debris from TDRs is known to induce inflammation, which may result in pain. The purpose of this study was to determine whether (1) periprosthetic UHMWPE wear debris induces immune responses that lead to the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin (IL)-1ß, the vascularization factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor-bb (PDGFbb), and the innervation/pain factors, nerve growth factor (NGF) and substance P; (2) the number of macrophages is associated with the production of the aforementioned factors; (3) the wear debris-induced inflammatory pathogenesis involves an increase in vascularization and associated innervation. Periprosthetic tissues from our collection of 11 patients with contemporary TDRs were evaluated using polarized light microscopy to quantify UHMWPE wear particles. The major reason for revision (mean implantation time of 3 years [range, 1-6 years]) was pain. For control subjects, biopsy samples from four patients with degenerative disc disease with severe pain and autopsy samples from three normal patients with no history of back pain were also investigated. Immunohistochemistry and histology were used to identify secretory factors, macrophages, and blood vessels. Immunostained serial sections were imaged at ×200 magnification and using MATLAB and NIH ImageJ, a threshold was determined for each factor and used to quantify positive staining normalized to tissue sectional area. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare results from different patient groups, whereas the Spearman Rho test was used to determine correlations. Significance was based on p < 0.05. The mean percent area of all six inflammatory, vascularization, and innervation factors was higher in TDR tissues when compared with normal disc

  13. Another one grinds the dust: Variability of the planetary debris disc at the white dwarf SDSS J104341.53+085558.2

    CERN Document Server

    Manser, Christopher J; Koester, Detlev; Marsh, Thomas R; Southworth, John

    2016-01-01

    We report nine years of optical spectroscopy of the metal-polluted white dwarf SDSS J104341.53+085558.2, which presents morphological variations of the line profiles of the 8600 \\AA\\ Ca II triplet emission from the gaseous component of its debris disc. Similar changes in the shape of the Ca II triplet have also been observed in two other systems that host a gaseous disc, and are likely related to the same mechanism. We report the Mg, Si, and Ca abundances of the debris detected in the photosphere of SDSS J1043+0855, place upper limits on O and Fe, and derive an accretion rate of (2.5 - 12)x$10^8$ g/s, consistent with those found in other systems with detected debris discs. The Mg/Si ratio and the upper limit on the Fe/Si ratio of the accreted material broadly agree with those found for the crust of the Earth. We also review the range of variability observed among white dwarfs with planetary debris discs.

  14. Movement analysis on steel wire rope of continuous conveyor with disc-tube assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUAN Li-jun; SHI Shu-lin; REN Li-yi

    2004-01-01

    The steel wire rope of continuous conveyor with disc-tube assembly is droved by the driving wheel. When the driving wheel rotates, the gear is combined to the connection disc in turn, promoting the connection disc to move in succession. Turning the whirling torque of driving wheel into the straight-line traction force. When the steel wire rope is winded by the driving wheel some winded along the circumference, others winded along the straight line. Used motion subject law, this article analyses the change of the velocity and the acceleration of the steel wire rope in the straight movement, and observe the mathematics' model of velocity and acceleration.

  15. CO mass upper limits in the Fomalhaut ring - the importance of NLTE excitation in debris discs and future prospects with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Matrà, L; Wyatt, M C; Dent, W R F

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, gas has been observed in an increasing number of debris discs, though its nature remains to be determined. Here, we analyse CO molecular excitation in optically thin debris discs, and search ALMA Cycle-0 data for CO J=3-2 emission in the Fomalhaut ring. No significant line emission is observed; we set a 3-$\\sigma$ upper limit on the integrated line flux of 0.16 Jy km s$^{-1}$. We show a significant dependency of the CO excitation on the density of collisional partners $n$, on the gas kinetic temperature $T_k$ and on the ambient radiation field $J$, suggesting that assumptions widely used for protoplanetary discs (e.g. LTE) do not necessarily apply to their low density debris counterparts. When applied to the Fomalhaut ring, we consider a primordial origin scenario where H$_2$ dominates collisional excitation of CO, and a secondary origin scenario dominated by e$^-$ and H$_2$O. In either scenario, we obtain a strict upper limit on the CO mass of 4.9 $\\times$ 10$^{-4}$ M$_{\\oplus}$. This arises...

  16. The visual binary AG Tri in $\\beta$ Pictoris Association: can a debris disc cause very different rotation periods of its components?

    CERN Document Server

    Messina, Sergio; Artemenko, Svetlana; Bailey, John I; Savushkin, Alexander; Nelson, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    We measure the photometric rotation periods of the components of multiple systems in young stellar associations to investigate the causes of the observed rotation period dispersion. We present the case of the wide binary AG Tri in the 23-Myr young beta Pictoris Association consisting of K4 + M1 dwarfs. Our multi-band, multi-season photometric monitoring allowed us to measure the rotation periods of both components P_A = 12.4d and P_B = 4.66d, to detect a prominent magnetic activity in the photosphere, likely responsible for the measured radial velocity variations, and for the first time, a flare event on the M1 component AG Tri B. We investigate either the possibility that the faster rotating component may have suffered an enhanced primordial disc dispersal, starting its PMS spin-up earlier than the slower rotating component, or the possibility that the formation of a debris disc may have prevented AG Tri A from gaining part of the angular momentum from the accreting disc.

  17. A near-infrared interferometric survey of debris disc stars. II. CHARA/FLUOR observations of six early-type dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Absil, O; Merand, A; Augereau, J -C; Foresto, V Coude du; Defrere, D; Kervella, P; Aufdenberg, J P; Desort, M; Ehrenreich, D; Lagrange, A -M; Montagnier, G; Olofsson, J; Brummelaar, T A ten; McAlister, H A; Sturmann, J; Sturmann, L; Turner, N H

    2008-01-01

    High-precision interferometric observations of six early-type main sequence stars known to harbour cold debris discs have been obtained in the near-infrared K band with the FLUOR instrument at the CHARA Array. The measured squared visibilities are compared to the expected visibility of the stellar photospheres based on theoretical photospheric models taking into account rotational distortion, searching for potential visibility reduction at short baselines due to circumstellar emission. Our observations bring to light the presence of resolved circumstellar emission around one of the six target stars (zeta Aql) at the 5 sigma level. The morphology of the emission source cannot be directly constrained because of the sparse spatial frequency sampling of our interferometric data. Using complementary adaptive optics observations and radial velocity measurements, we find that the presence of a low-mass companion is a likely origin for the excess emission. The potential companion has a K-band contrast of four magnitu...

  18. Continuous quality inspection in hard disc drive manufacturing: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yupa Lorkanchanakul

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the continuous sampling plan CSP-100 that was developed from the continuous sampling plans CSP-1, CSP-4 and CSP-C. The objective of this paper is to apply the continuous sampling plan for the new CSP-100 plan proving a reduction in the delivery inspection time compared to the single lot sampling plan (SSP while maintaining the same or greater quality conformance. This CSP-100 was studied in Hard Disc Drive manufacturing. The parameters used in the CSP-100 plan are as follows; i (the number of consecutive conforming units, f (the sampling frequency of partial number in 100% inspected units and c (the acceptance number. CSP-100 computes four performance measures, Average Fraction Inspected (AFI, Average Outgoing Quality (AOQ, Lot Acceptance Rate (LAR and Defective Parts Per Million (DPPM. The advantage of this CSP-100 plan is not only to reduce the inspection time but also prove higher productivity numbers when compared with SSP. The verified results of using the CSP-100 plan proved a reduced inspection time of 6,722,702 minutes or 15% compared to SSP. CSP-100 also eliminates the work stations and transportation processes due to the inspection area and inspectors are no longer required. The Function Out of Box Audit (FOBA is introduced to monitor the CSP-100 performance. The FOBA audit results confirm that the CSP-100 maintains the same good quality level as the SSP. The excellent results of implementing the CSP-100 show a reduction in the inspection cost by 3,693,730.04 baht or 60.40% compared to SSP, as well as the additional cost savings by no longer needing to purchase a new tester; a savings of ~44 million baht. The CSP-100 plan also eliminates the issue of delayed delivery that is part of the SSP process. Moreover it is a better choice in inspecting the continuous quality process in Hard Disc Drive manufacturing.

  19. ALMA observations of the η Corvi debris disc: inward scattering of CO-rich exocomets by a chain of 3-30 M⊕ planets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, S.; Wyatt, M. C.; Panić, O.; Matrà, L.; Kennedy, G. M.; Bonsor, A.; Kral, Q.; Dent, W. R. F.; Duchene, G.; Wilner, D.; Lisse, C. M.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Matthews, B.

    2017-03-01

    While most of the known debris discs present cold dust at tens of astronomical unit (au), a few young systems exhibit hot dust analogous to the Zodiacal dust. η Corvi is particularly interesting as it is old and it has both, with its hot dust significantly exceeding the maximum luminosity of an in situ collisional cascade. Previous work suggested that this system could be undergoing an event similar to the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) soon after or during a dynamical instability. Here, we present ALMA observations of η Corvi with a resolution of 1.2 arcsec (∼22 au) to study its outer belt. The continuum emission is consistent with an axisymmetric belt, with a mean radius of 152 au and radial full width at half-maximum of 46 au, which is too narrow compared to models of inward scattering of an LHB-like scenario. Instead, the hot dust could be explained as material passed inwards in a rather stable planetary configuration. We also report a 4σ detection of CO at ∼20 au. CO could be released in situ from icy planetesimals being passed in when crossing the H2O or CO2 ice lines. Finally, we place constraints on hidden planets in the disc. If a planet is sculpting the disc's inner edge, this should be orbiting at 75-100 au, with a mass of 3-30 M⊕ and an eccentricity <0.08. Such a planet would be able to clear its chaotic zone on a time-scale shorter than the age of the system and scatter material inwards from the outer belt to the inner regions, thus feeding the hot dust.

  20. Evaluation of apical extrusion of debris and irrigant using two new reciprocating and one continuous rotation single file systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurudutt Nayak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Apical extrusion of debris and irrigants during cleaning and shaping of the root canal is one of the main causes of periapical inflammation and postoperative flare-ups. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively measure the amount of debris and irrigants extruded apically in single rooted canals using two reciprocating and one rotary single file nickel-titanium instrumentation systems.Sixty human mandibular premolars, randomly assigned to three groups (n = 20 were instrumented using two reciprocating (Reciproc and Wave One and one rotary (One Shape single-file nickel-titanium systems. Bidistilled water was used as irrigant with traditional needle irrigation delivery system. Eppendorf tubes were used as test apparatus for collection of debris and irrigant. The volume of extruded irrigant was collected and quantified via 0.1-mL increment measure supplied on the disposable plastic insulin syringe. The liquid inside the tubes was dried and the mean weight of debris was assessed using an electronic microbalance. The data were statistically analysed using Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test and Mann Whitney U test with Bonferroni adjustment. P-values less than 0.05 were considered significant.The Reciproc file system produced significantly more debris compared with OneShape file system (P0.05. Extrusion of irrigant was statistically insignificant irrespective of the instrument or instrumentation technique used (P >0.05.Although all systems caused apical extrusion of debris and irrigant, continuous rotary instrumentation was associated with less extrusion as compared with the use of reciprocating file systems.

  1. ALMA observations of the $\\eta$ Corvi debris disc: inward scattering of CO-rich exocomets by a chain of 3-30 M$_\\oplus$ planets?

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, S; Panic, O; Matra, L; Kennedy, G M; Bonsor, A; Kral, Q; Dent, W R F; Duchene, G; Wilner, D; Lisse, C M; Lestrade, J -F; Matthews, B

    2016-01-01

    While most of the known debris discs present cold dust at tens of AU, a few young systems exhibit hot dust analogous to the Zodiacal dust. $\\eta$ Corvi is particularly interesting as it is old and it has both, with its hot dust significantly exceeding the maximum luminosity of an in-situ collisional cascade. Previous work suggested that this system could be undergoing an event similar to the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) soon after or during a dynamical instability. Here we present ALMA observations of $\\eta$ Corvi with a resolution of 1."2 (~22au) to study its outer belt. The continuum emission is consistent with an axisymmetric belt, with a mean radius of 152au and radial FWHM of 46au, which is too narrow compared to models of inward scattering of an LHB-like scenario. Instead, the hot dust could be explained as material passed inwards in a rather stable planetary configuration. We also report a 4sigma detection of CO at ~ 20au. CO could be released in situ from icy planetesimals being passed in when crossin...

  2. Interactive videodisc and compact disc-interactive for ophthalmic basic science and continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folberg, R; Dickinson, L K; Christiansen, R A; Huntley, J S; Lind, D G

    1993-06-01

    The authors designed and implemented a complete curriculum in ophthalmic pathology using IBM- and Macintosh-based interactive videodisc (IVD) technology. They also redesigned a portion of this curriculum for a new television-based platform, compact disc-interactive (CD-I). The following issues were addressed: curriculum design, instructional design, the assembly of illustrations and the ownership of such materials, the generation of computer-based medical art and animation, and programming. The issue of academic credit for faculty participating in this effort also was considered. The computer-based IVD program provides the following features: (1) rapid access to thousands of high-quality illustrations with the option of superimposing graphic labels and text directly over pictures; (2) the ability to view enlargements of photographs; (3) an online glossary to view definition of terms coupled with high-quality photographs; and (4) a dynamic introduction to pathophysiology using interactive animation sequences. The authors were able to incorporate the same interactive features into the CD-I version. High-quality medical illustrations can be used effectively on the CD-I platform. Computer-based multimedia workstations are relatively expensive for personal use but may be useful if the equipment can be shared in a learning center or library. Compared with interactive computer-based solutions, consumer-oriented television-based technology such as CD-I is a relatively inexpensive vehicle for providing continuing medical education programs intended for use in the individual practitioner's office or home.

  3. Comparison of a continuous ultrasonic irrigation device and conventional needle irrigation in the removal of root canal debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tyson O; Sedgley, Christine M

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare a continuous ultrasonic irrigation device (VPro StreamClean System [VSS], Vista Dental Products, Racine, WI) with conventional needle irrigation when used as a final irrigation procedure to debride the apical region of the root canal. The null hypothesis that there is no difference was tested. Root canals of matched pairs (N = 20) of extracted human teeth were prepared to an apical size of 36/.04 using Profile series 29/.04 rotary files (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK) with 6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) irrigation. One tooth of each pair was randomly assigned to receive final irrigation with either VSS or conventional needle irrigation. The gauge of the needle (#30), the irrigation cycles (ie, 5 mL NaOCl, 5 mL 15% EDTA, and 5 mL NaOCl), the irrigant flow rate (5 mL/min), and needle depth placement (1 mm from the working length [WL]) were experimental constants. Serial sections were obtained at 1 and 3 mm from the WL, stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and viewed at 100× magnification for the presence of debris. The percentage of debris in the canal lumen after VSS or conventional needle irrigation was compared by using the Wilcoxon matched pairs test. There was significantly less debris in the VSS group compared with the conventional needle irrigation group at the 1-mm level (1.50% [VSS] vs 9.90% [conventional needle irrigation], P = .0001) and the 3-mm level (0.45% [VSS] vs 5.16% [conventional needle irrigation], P = .0014). The null hypothesis was rejected. Final irrigation with the VSS compared with conventional needle irrigation delivery resulted in significantly less debris present in root canals at 1 and 3 mm from the WL. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Planets, debris and their host metallicity correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations of debris discs, believed to be made up of remnant planetesimals, brought a number of surprises. Debris disc presence does not correlate with the host star's metallicity, and may anti-correlate with the presence of gas giant planets. These observations contradict both assumptions and predictions of the highly successful Core Accretion model of planet formation. Here we explore predictions of the alternative Tidal Downsizing (TD) scenario of planet formation. In TD, small planets and planetesimal debris is made only when gas fragments, predecessors of giant planets, are tidally disrupted. We show that these disruptions are rare in discs around high metallicity stars but release more debris per disruption than their low [M/H] analogs. This predicts no simple relation between debris disc presence and host star's [M/H], as observed. A detected gas giant planet implies in TD that its predecessor fragment was not disputed, potentially explaining why DDs are less likely to be found around stars w...

  5. Modeling debris-covered glaciers: response to steady debris deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Leif S.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2016-05-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are common in rapidly eroding alpine landscapes. When thicker than a few centimeters, surface debris suppresses melt rates. If continuous debris cover is present, ablation rates can be significantly reduced leading to increases in glacier length. In order to quantify feedbacks in the debris-glacier-climate system, we developed a 2-D long-valley numerical glacier model that includes englacial and supraglacial debris advection. We ran 120 simulations on a linear bed profile in which a hypothetical steady state debris-free glacier responds to a step increase of surface debris deposition. Simulated glaciers advance to steady states in which ice accumulation equals ice ablation, and debris input equals debris loss from the glacier terminus. Our model and parameter selections can produce 2-fold increases in glacier length. Debris flux onto the glacier and the relationship between debris thickness and melt rate strongly control glacier length. Debris deposited near the equilibrium-line altitude, where ice discharge is high, results in the greatest glacier extension when other debris-related variables are held constant. Debris deposited near the equilibrium-line altitude re-emerges high in the ablation zone and therefore impacts melt rate over a greater fraction of the glacier surface. Continuous debris cover reduces ice discharge gradients, ice thickness gradients, and velocity gradients relative to initial debris-free glaciers. Debris-forced glacier extension decreases the ratio of accumulation zone to total glacier area (AAR). Our simulations reproduce the "general trends" between debris cover, AARs, and glacier surface velocity patterns from modern debris-covered glaciers. We provide a quantitative, theoretical foundation to interpret the effect of debris cover on the moraine record, and to assess the effects of climate change on debris-covered glaciers.

  6. Orbital Debris-Debris Collision Avoidance

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, James; Marshall, William; Levit, Creon

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using a medium-powered (5kW) ground-based laser combined with a ground-based telescope to prevent collisions between debris objects in low-Earth orbit (LEO), for which there is no current, effective mitigation strategy. The scheme utilizes photon pressure alone as a means to perturb the orbit of a debris object. Applied over multiple engagements, this alters the debris orbit sufficiently to reduce the risk of an upcoming conjunction. We employ standard assumptions for atmospheric conditions and the resulting beam propagation. Using case studies designed to represent the properties (e.g. area and mass) of the current debris population, we show that one could significantly reduce the risk of more than half of all debris-debris collisions using only one such laser/telescope facility. We speculate on whether this could mitigate the debris fragmentation rate such that it falls below the natural debris re-entry rate due to atmospheric drag, and thus whether continuous long-term ope...

  7. A near-infrared interferometric survey of debris-disc stars. IV. An unbiased sample of 92 southern stars observed in H-band with VLTI/PIONIER

    CERN Document Server

    Ertel, Steve; Defrere, Denis; Bouquin, Jean-Baptiste Le; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Marion, Lindsay; Blind, Nicolas; Bonsor, Amy; Bryden, Geoffrey; Lebreton, Jeremy; Milli, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Context. Detecting and characterizing circumstellar dust is a way to study the architecture and evolution of planetary systems. Cold dust in debris disks only traces the outer regions. Warm and hot exozodiacal dust needs to be studied in order to trace regions close to the habitable zone. Aims. We aim to determine the prevalence and to constrain the properties of hot exozodiacal dust around nearby main-sequence stars. Methods. We search a magnitude limited (H < 5) sample of 92 stars for bright exozodiacal dust using our VLTI visitor instrument PIONIER in the H-band. We derive statistics of the detection rate with respect to parameters such as the stellar spectral type and age or the presence of a debris disk in the outer regions of the systems. We derive more robust statistics by combining our sample with the results from our CHARA/FLUOR survey in the K-band. In addition, our spectrally dispersed data allows us to put constraints on the emission mechanism and the dust properties in the detected systems. Re...

  8. A near-infrared interferometric survey of debris-disc stars. III. First statistics based on 42 stars observed with CHARA/FLUOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absil, O.; Defrère, D.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Di Folco, E.; Mérand, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Ertel, S.; Hanot, C.; Kervella, P.; Mollier, B.; Scott, N.; Che, X.; Monnier, J. D.; Thureau, N.; Tuthill, P. G.; ten Brummelaar, T. A.; McAlister, H. A.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Dust is expected to be ubiquitous in extrasolar planetary systems owing to the dynamical activity of minor bodies. Inner dust populations are, however, still poorly known because of the high contrast and small angular separation with respect to their host star, and yet, a proper characterisation of exozodiacal dust is mandatory for the design of future Earth-like planet imaging missions. Aims: We aim to determine the level of near-infrared exozodiacal dust emission around a sample of 42 nearby main sequence stars with spectral types ranging from A to K and to investigate its correlation with various stellar parameters and with the presence of cold dust belts. Methods: We use high-precision K-band visibilities obtained with the FLUOR interferometer on the shortest baseline of the CHARA array. The calibrated visibilities are compared with the expected visibility of the stellar photosphere to assess whether there is an additional, fully resolved circumstellar emission source. Results: Near-infrared circumstellar emission amounting to about 1% of the stellar flux is detected around 13 of our 42 target stars. Follow-up observations showed that one of them (eps Cep) is associated with a stellar companion, while another one was detected around what turned out to be a giant star (kap CrB). The remaining 11 excesses found around single main sequence stars are most probably associated with hot circumstellar dust, yielding an overall occurrence rate of 28+8-6 for our (biased) sample. We show that the occurrence rate of bright exozodiacal discs correlates with spectral type, K-band excesses being more frequent around A-type stars. It also correlates with the presence of detectable far-infrared excess emission in the case of solar-type stars. Conclusions: This study provides new insight into the phenomenon of bright exozodiacal discs, showing that hot dust populations are probably linked to outer dust reservoirs in the case of solar-type stars. For A-type stars, no

  9. Dynamic analysis and numerical experiments for balancing of the continuous single-disc and single-span rotor-bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aiming; Cheng, Xiaohan; Meng, Guoying; Xia, Yun; Wo, Lei; Wang, Ziyi

    2017-03-01

    Identification of rotor unbalance is critical for normal operation of rotating machinery. The single-disc and single-span rotor, as the most fundamental rotor-bearing system, has attracted research attention over a long time. In this paper, the continuous single-disc and single-span rotor is modeled as a homogeneous and elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam, and the forces applied by bearings and disc on the shaft are considered as point forces. A fourth-order non-homogeneous partial differential equation set with homogeneous boundary condition is solved for analytical solution, which expresses the unbalance response as a function of position, rotor unbalance and the stiffness and damping coefficients of bearings. Based on this analytical method, a novel Measurement Point Vector Method (MPVM) is proposed to identify rotor unbalance while operating. Only a measured unbalance response registered for four selected cross-sections of the rotor-shaft under steady-state operating conditions is needed when using the method. Numerical simulation shows that the detection error of the proposed method is very small when measurement error is negligible. The proposed method provides an efficient way for rotor balancing without test runs and external excitations.

  10. Debris Engine: A Potential Thruster for Space Debris Removal

    CERN Document Server

    Lan, Lei; Baoyin, Hexi

    2015-01-01

    We present a design concept for a space engine that can continuously remove the orbit debris by using the debris as a propellant. Space robotic cleaner is adopted to capture the targeting debris and to transfer them into the engine. Debris with larger size is first disintegrated into small pieces by using a mechanical method. The planetary ball mill is then adopted to grind the pieces into micrometer or smaller powder. The energy needed in this process is get from the nuclear and solar power. By the effect of gamma-ray photoelectric or the behavior of tangently rub of tungsten needles, the debris powered is charged. This behavior can be used to speed up the movement of powder in a tandem electrostatic particle accelerator. By ejecting the high-temperture and high-pressure charged powered from the nozzle of the engine,the continuously thrust is obtained. This thrust can be used to perform orbital maneuver and debris rendezvous for the spacecraft and robotic cleaner. The ejected charged particle will be blown a...

  11. Enabling Large-body Active Debris Removal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Research suggests that: (1) orbital debris has reached an unstable point whereby, even with no future launches, the amount of debris will continue to grow through...

  12. Far-infrared and sub-millimetre surveys of circumstellar discs.

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Stars of all ages and evolutionary stages are seen to be surrounded by discs of matieral. during the formation of a stellar system the stars are orbited by a massive protoplanetary disc composed of interstellar gas and dust, in which planet formation occurs. Betewwen 1 and 10 Myr the protoplanetary disc disperses, leaving behind the newly formed system of planets and smaller bodies. The remaining material which has not formed into planets is referred to as a debris disc. Even though the inter...

  13. Radiation from optically thin accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tylenda, R. (Polska Akademia Nauk, Torun. Pracownia Astrofizyki)

    1981-01-01

    Accretion discs in cataclysmic variables with low rates of mass transfer, M < or approx. 10/sup 16/g s/sup -1/, have outer regions optically thin in continuum. A simple approach that allows one to calculate the radiation spectra from such discs is presented. A great number of disc models has been obtained in order to study the influence of various parameters (accretion rate, outer radius of the disc, inclination angle, mass of the accreting degenerate dwarf, viscosity parameter) of discs on the outgoing continuous spectra, emission lines and the UBV colours.

  14. Variations in debris distribution and thickness on Himalayan debris-covered glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Morgan; Rowan, Ann; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram; Quincey, Duncan; Glasser, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Many Himalayan glaciers are characterised by extensive supraglacial debris coverage; in Nepal 33% of glaciers exhibit a continuous layer of debris covering their ablation areas. The presence of such a debris layer modulates a glacier's response to climatic change. However, the impact of this modulation is poorly constrained due to inadequate quantification of the impact of supraglacial debris on glacier surface energy balance. Few data exist to describe spatial and temporal variations in parameters such as debris thickness, albedo and surface roughness in energy balance calculations. Consequently, improved understanding of how debris affects Himalayan glacier ablation requires the assessment of surface energy balance model sensitivity to spatial and temporal variability in these parameters. Measurements of debris thickness, surface temperature, reflectance and roughness were collected across Khumbu Glacier during the pre- and post-monsoon seasons of 2014 and 2015. The extent of the spatial variation in each of these parameters are currently being incorporated into a point-based glacier surface energy balance model (CMB-RES, Collier et al., 2014, The Cryosphere), applied on a pixel-by-pixel basis to the glacier surface, to ascertain the sensitivity of glacier surface energy balance and ablation values to these debris parameters. A time series of debris thickness maps have been produced for Khumbu Glacier over a 15-year period (2000-2015) using Mihalcea et al.'s (2008, Cold Reg. Sci. Technol.) method, which utilised multi-temporal ASTER thermal imagery and our in situ debris surface temperature and thickness measurements. Change detection between these maps allowed the identification of variations in debris thickness that could be compared to discrete measurements, glacier surface velocity and morphology of the debris-covered area. Debris thickness was found to vary spatially between 0.1 and 4 metres within each debris thickness map, and temporally on the order of 1

  15. The Fate of Debris in the Pluto-Charon System

    CERN Document Server

    Smullen, Rachel A

    2016-01-01

    The Pluto-Charon system has come into sharper focus following the fly by of New Horizons. We use N-body simulations to probe the unique dynamical history of this binary dwarf planet system. We follow the evolution of the debris disc that might have formed during the Charon-forming giant impact. First, we note that in-situ formation of the four circumbinary moons is extremely difficult if Charon undergoes eccentric tidal evolution. We track collisions of disc debris with Charon, estimating that hundreds to hundreds of thousands of visible craters might arise from 0.3-5 km radius bodies. New Horizons data suggesting a dearth of these small craters may place constraints on the disc properties. While tidal heating will erase some of the cratering history, both tidal and radiogenic heating may also make it possible to differentiate disc debris craters from Kuiper belt object craters. We also track the debris ejected from the Pluto-Charon system into the Solar System; while most of this debris is ultimately lost fr...

  16. Space Debris Research Activities In China In 2007

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ming

    2008-01-01

    @@ The year 2007 was important for us to carry out the Eleventh Five-Year Space Debris Research Action Plan. Through the unremitting efforts of all space debris project research groups, we completed the space debris research projects in 2007 successfully, among which we made the substantive progress in many projects, which has laid a good foundation for the continuous research in the future.

  17. An Assessment of the Current LEO Debris Environment and the Need for Active Debris Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2010-01-01

    The anti-satellite test on the Fengun-1 C weather satellite in early 2007 and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 in 2009 dramatically altered the landscape of the human-made orbital debris environment in the low Earth orbit (LEO). The two events generated approximately 5500 fragments large enough to be tracked by the U.S. Space Surveillance Network. Those fragments account for more than 60% increase to the debris population in LEO. However, even before the ASAT test, model analyses already indicated that the debris population (for those larger than 10 cm) in LEO had reached a point where the population would continue to increase, due to collisions among existing objects, even without any future launches. The conclusion implies that as satellites continue to be launched and unexpected breakup events continue to occur, commonly-adopted mitigation measures will not be able to stop the collision-driven population growth. To remediate the debris environment in LEO, active debris removal must be considered. This presentation will provide an updated assessment of the debris environment after the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 collision, an analysis of several future environment projections based on different scenarios, and a projection of collision activities in LEO in the near future. The need to use active debris removal to stabilize future debris environment will be demonstrated and the effectiveness of various active debris removal strategies will be quantified.

  18. Broken discs: warp propagation in accretion discs

    OpenAIRE

    Nixon, Chris; King, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We simulate the viscous evolution of an accretion disc around a spinning black hole. In general any such disc is misaligned, and warped by the Lense-Thirring effect. Unlike previous studies we use effective viscosities constrained to be consistent with the internal fluid dynamics of the disc. We find that nonlinear fluid effects, which reduce the effective viscosities in warped regions, can promote the breaking of the disc into two distinct planes. This occurs when the Shakura & Sunyaev dimen...

  19. Exocometary gas in the HD 181327 debris ring

    OpenAIRE

    Marino, S; Matra, L.; Stark, C.; Wyatt, M. C.; Casassus, S.; Kennedy, G.; Rodriguez, D; Zuckerman, B.; Perez, S.; Dent, W. R. F.; Kuchner, M.; Hughes, A.M.; Schneider, G.; Steele, A; Roberge, A.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of observations have shown that gaseous debris discs are not an exception. However, until now we only knew of cases around A stars. Here we present the first detection of 12CO (2-1) disc emission around an F star, HD 181327, obtained with ALMA observations at 1.3 mm. The continuum and CO emission are resolved into an axisymmetric disc with ring-like morphology. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method coupled with radiative transfer calculations we study the dust and CO ma...

  20. The maximum rotation of a galactic disc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottema, R

    1997-01-01

    The observed stellar velocity dispersions of galactic discs show that the maximum rotation of a disc is on average 63% of the observed maximum rotation. This criterion can, however, not be applied to small or low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies because such systems show, in general, a continuously

  1. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-07-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs, we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age-velocity dispersion relation of the solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that are radially constant and agree with observations of galactic thin discs. GMCs are also capable of significantly delaying bar formation. The amount of spiral-induced radial migration agrees with what is required for the metallicity distribution of the Snhd. However, in our standard models, the outward-migrating populations are not hot enough vertically to create thick discs. Thick discs can form in models with high baryon fractions, but the corresponding bars are too long, the young stellar populations too hot and the discs flare considerably.

  2. Debris flows: behavior and hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Debris flows are water-laden masses of soil and fragmented rock that rush down mountainsides, funnel into stream channels, entrain objects in their paths, and form lobate deposits when they spill onto valley floors. Because they have volumetric sediment concentrations that exceed 40 percent, maximum speeds that surpass 10 m/s, and sizes that can range up to ~109 m3, debris flows can denude slopes, bury floodplains, and devastate people and property. Computational models can accurately represent the physics of debris-flow initiation, motion and deposition by simulating evolution of flow mass and momentum while accounting for interactions of debris' solid and fluid constituents. The use of physically based models for hazard forecasting can be limited by imprecise knowledge of initial and boundary conditions and material properties, however. Therefore, empirical methods continue to play an important role in debris-flow hazard assessment.

  3. "Effectiveness of continuous vertebral resonant oscillation using the POLD method in the treatment of lumbar disc hernia". A randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Díaz, Juan Vicente; Arias-Buría, José Luis; Lopez-Gordo, Estrella; Lopez Gordo, Sandra; Oyarzún, Alejandra P Aros

    2015-06-01

    This study analyses the efficacy of manual oscillatory therapy, following the POLD technique, for acute Lumbar Disc Hernia (LDH) and compares it to usual treatment. A randomised, controlled, triple-blind pilot clinical trial. The sample of 30 patients was divided into two homogeneous groups to receive usual treatment (A) or treatment with the POLD technique (B). We analysed range of motion and subjective variables such as the severity (visual analogue pain scale (VAS)) and extension of the pain. With the application of POLD therapy, patients presented significant changes on range of motion (forward flexion with p POLD Method was shown to be an effective manual therapy approach for reducing the severity and irradiation of the pain in LDH patients with sciatica, and more efficient than usual treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Herschel-PACS observation of gas lines from the disc around HD141569A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thi, Wing-Fai; Pinte, Christophe; Pantin, Eric; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Ménard, Francois; Martin-Zaidi, Claire; Woitke, Peter; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo; Kamp, Inga; Carmona, Andres; Sandell, Goran; Eiroa, Carlos; Dent, William; Montesinos, Benjamin; Aresu, Giambattista; Meijerink, Rowin; Spaans, Marco; White, Glenn; Ardila, David; Lebreton, Jeremy; Mendigutia, Ignacio; Brittain, Sean

    2013-01-01

    At the distance of ˜ 99-116 pc, HD141569A is one of the nearest HerbigAe stars that is surrounded by a tenuous disc, probably in transition between a massive primordial disc and a debris disc. We observed the fine-structure lines of O I at 63 and 145 μm , and the C II line at 157 μm with the PACS in

  5. Rare complications of osteolysis and periprosthetic tissue reactions after hybrid and non-hybrid total disc replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veruva, Sai Y; Lanman, Todd H; Hanzlik, Josa A; Kurtz, Steven M; Steinbeck, Marla J

    2015-05-01

    Few complications have been reported for lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) and hybrid TDR fixations. This study evaluated retrieved implants and periprosthetic tissue reactions for two cases of osteolysis following disc arthroplasty with ProDisc-L prostheses. Implants were examined for wear and surface damage, and tissues for inflammation, polyethylene wear debris (polarized light microscopy) and metal debris (energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). Despite initial good surgical outcomes, osteolytic cysts were noted in both patients at vertebrae adjacent to the implants. For the hybrid TDR case, heterotopic ossification and tissue necrosis due to wear-induced inflammation were observed. In contrast, the non-hybrid implant showed signs of abrasion and impingement, and inflammation was observed in tissue regions with metal and polyethylene wear debris. In both cases, wear debris and inflammation may have contributed to osteolysis. Surgeons using ProDisc prostheses should be aware of these rare complications.

  6. Lubrication regimes in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, A; Shepherd, D E T

    2007-08-01

    A number of total disc arthroplasty devices have been developed. Some concern has been expressed that wear may be a potential failure mode for these devices, as has been seen with hip arthroplasty. The aim of this paper was to investigate the lubrication regimes that occur in lumbar total disc arthroplasty devices. The disc arthroplasty was modelled as a ball-and-socket joint. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory was used to calculate the minimum film thickness of the fluid between the bearing surfaces. The lubrication regime was then determined for different material combinations, size of implant, and trunk velocity. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination operate with a boundary lubrication regime. A ceramic-ceramic material combination has the potential to operate with fluid-film lubrication. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination are likely to generate wear debris. In future, it is worth considering a ceramic-ceramic material combination as this is likely to reduce wear.

  7. 中医牵引配合正骨手法治疗腰椎间盘突出症%Combination of continuous mechanical traction with TCM manipulations of bong-setting for prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡迪; 任睿双

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe therapeutic effect of combination of continuous mechanical traction with manip-ulations of bong-setting in TCM for prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc in order to alleviate pain of patients with lumbar intervertebral disc and improve their quality of life. Methods In random number table sampling method, 100 patients with prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc who were treated in our hospital over a period from June,2014 to June,2015 were selected as subjects and were divided into experimental group and control group(in each group,n =50)in double-blind control method. All selected patients in the two groups were treated by using TCM bone-setting manipulation therapy first and then those 50 patients in the experimental group were treated by using TCM continuous mechanical traction therapy additionally. The therapeutic effect of the two regimens and alleviation of pain of the pa-tients in the two groups were observed and compared. Results All patients in the two groups achieved varied degrees of improvement in therapeutic effect,while the therapeutic effect and alleviation of pain of those patients in the experi-mental group were more significant(P < 0. 05). Conclusion The therapeutic effect of combination of continuous me-chanical traction with TCM manipulations of bong-setting for prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc was more signifi-cant. It can alleviate pain of the patients effectively and improve their quality of life.%目的:为了减轻腰椎间盘突出症患者的痛苦并提高其生活质量,分析和探讨治疗过程中选取中医牵引配合正骨手法治疗的价值和意义。方法按照随机数字表的方法选取100例于2014年6月—2015年6月来我院就诊的腰椎间盘突出症患者作为研究对象并遵照双盲对照原则分为试验组和对照组各50例,入组的所有患者同时给予中医正骨手法进行治疗,其中试验组患者同时给予中医牵引治疗,比较不同治疗方案

  8. Dynamos in accretion discs

    OpenAIRE

    Brandenburg, A.; von Rekowski, B.

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that accretion discs in young stellar objects may have hot coronae that are heated by magnetic reconnection. This is a consequence of the magneto-rotational instability driving turbulence in the disc. Magnetic reconnection away from the midplane leads to heating of the corona which, in turn, contributes to driving disc winds.

  9. The Fate of Debris in the Pluto-Charon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smullen, Rachel A.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2017-01-01

    The Pluto-Charon system has come into sharper focus following the fly by of New Horizons. We use N-body simulations to probe the unique dynamical history of this binary dwarf planet system. We follow the evolution of the debris disc that might have formed during the Charon-forming giant impact. First, we note that in-situ formation of the four circumbinary moons is extremely difficult if Charon undergoes eccentric tidal evolution. We track collisions of disc debris with Charon, estimating that hundreds to hundreds of thousands of visible craters might arise from 0.3-5 km radius bodies. New Horizons data suggesting a dearth of these small craters may place constraints on the disc properties. While tidal heating will erase some of the cratering history, both tidal and radiogenic heating may also make it possible to differentiate disc debris craters from Kuiper belt object craters. We also track the debris ejected from the Pluto-Charon system into the Solar System; while most of this debris is ultimately lost from the Solar System, a few tens of 10-30 km radius bodies could survive as a Pluto-Charon collisional family. Most are plutinos in the 3:2 resonance with Neptune, while a small number populate nearby resonances. We show that migration of the giant planets early in the Solar System's history would not destroy this collisional family. Finally, we suggest that identification of such a family would likely need to be based on composition as they show minimal clustering in relevant orbital parameters.

  10. The fate of debris in the Pluto-Charon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smullen, Rachel A.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2017-04-01

    The Pluto-Charon system has come into sharper focus following the flyby of New Horizons. We use N-body simulations to probe the unique dynamical history of this binary dwarf planet system. We follow the evolution of the debris disc that might have formed during the Charon-forming giant impact. First, we note that in situ formation of the four circumbinary moons is extremely difficult if Charon undergoes eccentric tidal evolution. We track collisions of disc debris with Charon, estimating that hundreds to hundreds of thousands of visible craters might arise from 0.3-5 km radius bodies. New Horizons data suggesting a dearth of these small craters may place constraints on the disc properties. While tidal heating will erase some of the cratering history, both tidal and radiogenic heating may also make it possible to differentiate disc debris craters from Kuiper belt object craters. We also track the debris ejected from the Pluto-Charon system into the Solar system; while most of this debris is ultimately lost from the Solar system, a few tens of 10-30 km radius bodies could survive as a Pluto-Charon collisional family. Most are plutinos in the 3:2 resonance with Neptune, while a small number populate nearby resonances. We show that migration of the giant planets early in the Solar system's history would not destroy this collisional family. Finally, we suggest that identification of such a family would likely need to be based on composition as they show minimal clustering in relevant orbital parameters.

  11. The inner cavity of the circumnuclear disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, M.; Morris, M. R.; Frank, A.; Carroll-Nellenback, J. J.; Duschl, W. J.

    2016-06-01

    The circumnuclear disc (CND) orbiting the Galaxy's central black hole is a reservoir of material that can ultimately provide energy through accretion, or form stars in the presence of the black hole, as evidenced by the stellar cluster that is presently located at the CND's centre. In this paper, we report the results of a computational study of the dynamics of the CND. The results lead us to question two paradigms that are prevalent in previous research on the Galactic Centre. The first is that the disc's inner cavity is maintained by the interaction of the central stellar cluster's strong winds with the disc's inner rim, and secondly, that the presence of unstable clumps in the disc implies that the CND is a transient feature. Our simulations show that, in the absence of a magnetic field, the interaction of the wind with the inner disc rim actually leads to a filling of the inner cavity within a few orbital time-scales, contrary to previous expectations. However, including the effects of magnetic fields stabilizes the inner disc rim against rapid inward migration. Furthermore, this interaction causes instabilities that continuously create clumps that are individually unstable against tidal shearing. Thus the occurrence of such unstable clumps does not necessarily mean that the disc is itself a transient phenomenon. The next steps in this investigation are to explore the effect of the magnetorotational instability on the disc evolution and to test whether the results presented here persist for longer time-scales than those considered here.

  12. COTELS project (4) : structural investigation of solidified debris in MCCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhdanov, V.; Vasilyev, Y.; Kolodeshnikov, A.; Cherepnin, Y. [National Nuclear Center, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan). Inst. of Atomic Energy; Sakaki, Isao; Nagasaka, Hideo [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Systems Safety Dept.

    2000-05-01

    Cross section of concrete trap along with solidified debris tested in COTELS test B/C, in which the interaction among core melt, water and concrete was simulated, were structurally investigated. In 6 tests out of 10 tests, particulate debris bed was formed above continuous ingot debris. The size distribution of the particulate debris was well correlated by Rosin-Rammler equation. Large amount of smallest diameter particles was obtained due to the entrainment of molten corium, decomposed concrete and oxidation of metallic components in corium associated with molten core concrete interaction (MCCI) generated gas. The upper region of the solidified debris included more concrete compositions. The concrete erosion depth, concrete degradation condition and the structure of solidified debris were evaluated to clarify the basic difference between COTELS and former tests results. Concrete erosion depth was less than that observed in MACE, WETCOR, SWISS tests. The major differences of COTELS results compared with the former test results were: 1) absence of strong adhesion of crust to melt trap side wall: 2) water penetration into debris through both eroded side wall and channels inside ingot debris: 3) absence of large void inside ingot debris: and 4) formation of pebble bed below ingot debris. All of these promoted the suppression of MCCI. (orig.)

  13. Debris disks and the search for life in the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cataldi, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Circumstellar debris disks are the extrasolar analogues of the asteroid belt and the Kuiper belt. They consist of comets and leftover planetesimals that continuously collide and produce circumstellar dust that can be observed as infrared excess or in resolved imaging. As an obvious outcome of the planet formation process, debris disks can help us constrain planet formation theories and learn about the history of our own solar system. This thesis presents observational studies of secondary gas in debris disks. It also discusses the astrobiological potential of debris disks created during impact events onto exoplanets.

  14. Optimum design of inhomogeneous rotating discs under secondary creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farshi, Behrooz [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16846 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Farshi@iust.ac.ir; Bidabadi, Jalal [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16846 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    Rotating discs commonly used in the aerospace industry often operate under high mechanical stresses due to centrifugal forces, while subject to high temperature gradients. High stresses and temperatures lead to creep in such rotating disc applications. This problem is particularly important in turbine discs under continuous operation. Since such discs are subject to secondary creep effects during most of their useful lives, it is important that they be optimized for minimum weight for the steady-state creep stresses. In this investigation, by considering the variable physical properties of the rotating disc materials under a high temperature gradient, a procedure for weight minimization for the steady-state creep stresses is proposed. The method aims to design the disc thickness profile so as to have minimum weight while the equivalent secondary creep stresses of the rotating disc under a high temperature gradient at all points simultaneously approach but do not exceed an allowable stress. An example is given to illustrate the method.

  15. Black hole accretion discs

    CERN Document Server

    Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This is an introduction to models of accretion discs around black holes. After a presentation of the non-relativistic equations describing the structure and evolution of geometrically thin accretion discs we discuss their steady-state solutions and compare them to observation. Next we describe in detail the thermal-viscous disc instability model and its application to dwarf novae for which it was designed and its X-ray irradiated-disc version which explains the soft X--ray transients, i.e. outbursting black-hole low-mass X-ray binaries. We then turn to the role of advection in accretion flow onto black holes illustrating its action and importance with a toy model describing both ADAFs and slim discs. We conclude with a presentation of the general-relativistic formalism describing accretion discs in the Kerr space-time.

  16. MHD disc winds

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, J

    2006-01-01

    This is a doctorate level lecture on the physics of accretion discs driving magnetically self-confined jets, usually referred to in the literature as disc winds. I will first review the governing magnetohydrodynamic equations and then discuss their physical content. At that level, necessary conditions to drive jets from keplerian accretion discs can already be derived. These conditions are validated with self-similar calculations of accretion-ejection structures. In a second part, I will critically discuss the biases introduced when using self-similarity as well as some other questions such as: Are these systems really unstable? Can a standard accretion disc provide the conditions to launch jets in its innermost parts? What is the difference between X-winds and disc-winds? Finally, the magnetic interaction between a protostar and its circumstellar disc will be discussed with a focus on stellar spin down.

  17. Debris-flow generation from recently burned watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of the erosional response of 95 recently burned drainage basins in Colorado, New Mexico and southern California to storm rainfall provides information on the conditions that result in fire-related debris flows. Debris flows were produced from only 37 of 95 (~40 percent) basins examined; the remaining basins produced either sediment-laden streamflow or no discernable response. Debris flows were thus not the prevalent response of the burned basins. The debris flows that did occur were most frequently the initial response to significant rainfall events. Although some hillslopes continued to erode and supply material to channels in response to subsequent rainfall events, debris flows were produced from only one burned basin following the initial erosive event. Within individual basins, debris flows initiated through both runoff and infiltration-triggered processes. The fact that not all burned basins produced debris flows suggests that specific geologic and geomorphic conditions may control the generation of fire-related debris flows. The factors that best distinguish between debris-flow producing drainages and those that produced sediment-laden streamflow are drainage-basin morphology and lithology, and the presence or absence of water-repellent soils. Basins underlain by sedimentary rocks were most likely to produce debris flows that contain large material, and sand- and gravel-dominated flows were generated primarily from terrain underlain by decomposed granite. Basin-area and relief thresholds define the morphologic conditions under which both types of debris flows occur. Debris flows containing large material are more likely to be produced from basins without water-repellent soils than from basins with water repellency. The occurrence of sand-and gravel-dominated debris flows depends on the presence of water-repellent soils.

  18. Black hole accretion discs

    OpenAIRE

    Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This is an introduction to models of accretion discs around black holes. After a presentation of the non-relativistic equations describing the structure and evolution of geometrically thin accretion discs we discuss their steady-state solutions and compare them to observation. Next we describe in detail the thermal-viscous disc instability model and its application to dwarf novae for which it was designed and its X-ray irradiated-disc version which explains the soft X--ray transients, i.e. ou...

  19. Strategy for mitigation of marine debris: analysis of sources and composition of marine debris in northern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Fan-Jun; Huang, Hsiang-Wen

    2014-06-15

    Six sites (two sites for each of rocky shores, sandy beaches, and fishing ports) in northern Taiwan were selected to investigate the amount and density of marine debris in each of the four seasons and after spring and neap tides from 2012 to 2013. The results indicate that marine debris was higher on rocky shores than sandy beaches and fishing ports. There is no significant difference between season and tide. The dominant debris was plastic-type, followed by polystyrene. The majority of debris originated from recreational activities, followed from ocean/waterway activities. The results suggest that the following actions are needed: (1) continue and reinforce the plastic-limit policy; (2) increase the cleaning frequency at rocky shores; (3) promote marine environmental education, with a goal of debris-free coasts; (4) recycle fishing gear and to turn that gear into energy; and (5) coordinate between agencies to establish a mechanism to monitor debris.

  20. Special Report Debris - Race

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Marine debris degrades ocean habitats, endangers marine and coastal wildlife, causes navigation hazards, results in economic losses to industry and governments, and...

  1. Disaster Debris Recovery Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 3,500 composting facilities, demolition contractors, haulers, transfer...

  2. Planetesimals in Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Youdin, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    Planetesimals form in gas-rich protoplanetary disks around young stars. However, protoplanetary disks fade in about 10 Myr. The planetesimals (and also many of the planets) left behind are too dim to study directly. Fortunately, collisions between planetesimals produce dusty debris disks. These debris disks trace the processes of terrestrial planet formation for 100 Myr and of exoplanetary system evolution out to 10 Gyr. This chapter begins with a summary of planetesimal formation as a prelude to the epoch of planetesimal destruction. Our review of debris disks covers the key issues, including dust production and dynamics, needed to understand the observations. Our discussion of extrasolar debris keeps an eye on similarities to and differences from Solar System dust.

  3. Roll Call Debris - Race

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Marine debris degrades ocean habitats, endangers marine and coastal wildlife, causes navigation hazards, results in economic losses to industry and governments, and...

  4. LEGACY - EOP Marine Debris

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data contains towed diver surveys of and weights of marine debris removed from the near shore environments of the NWHI.

  5. Fleet Debris Levels

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Marine debris degrades ocean habitats, endangers marine and coastal wildlife, causes navigation hazards, results in economic losses to industry and governments, and...

  6. Characterization of Debris from the DebriSat Hypervelocity Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, M.; Kleespies, J.; Patankar, K.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Krisko, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    The DebriSat project is an effort by NASA and the DoD to update the standard break-up model for objects in orbit. The DebriSat object, a 56 kg representative LEO satellite, was subjected to a hypervelocity impact in April 2014. For the hypervelocity test, the representative satellite was suspended within a "soft-catch" arena formed by polyurethane foam panels to minimize the interactions between the debris generated from the hypervelocity impact and the metallic walls of the test chamber. After the impact, the foam panels and debris not caught by the panels were collected and shipped to the University of Florida where the project has now advanced to the debris characterization stage. The characterization effort has been divided into debris collection, measurement, and cataloguing. Debris collection and cataloguing involves the retrieval of debris from the foam panels and cataloguing the debris in a database. Debris collection is a three-step process: removal of loose debris fragments from the surface of the foam panels; X-ray imaging to identify/locate debris fragments embedded within the foam panel; extraction of the embedded debris fragments identified during the X-ray imaging process. As debris fragments are collected, they are catalogued into a database specifically designed for this project. Measurement involves determination of size, mass, shape, material, and other physical properties and well as images of the fragment. Cataloguing involves a assigning a unique identifier for each fragment along with the characterization information.

  7. Space Debris & its Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Sourabh; Arora, Nishant

    2012-07-01

    Space debris has become a growing concern in recent years, since collisions at orbital velocities can be highly damaging to functioning satellites and can also produce even more space debris in the process. Some spacecraft, like the International Space Station, are now armored to deal with this hazard but armor and mitigation measures can be prohibitively costly when trying to protect satellites or human spaceflight vehicles like the shuttle. This paper describes the current orbital debris environment, outline its main sources, and identify mitigation measures to reduce orbital debris growth by controlling these sources. We studied the literature on the topic Space Debris. We have proposed some methods to solve this problem of space debris. We have also highlighted the shortcomings of already proposed methods by space experts and we have proposed some modification in those methods. Some of them can be very effective in the process of mitigation of space debris, but some of them need some modification. Recently proposed methods by space experts are maneuver, shielding of space elevator with the foil, vaporizing or redirecting of space debris back to earth with the help of laser, use of aerogel as a protective layer, construction of large junkyards around international space station, use of electrodynamics tether & the latest method proposed is the use of nano satellites in the clearing of the space debris. Limitations of the already proposed methods are as follows: - Maneuvering can't be the final solution to our problem as it is the act of self-defence. - Shielding can't be done on the parts like solar panels and optical devices. - Vaporizing or redirecting of space debris can affect the human life on earth if it is not done in proper manner. - Aerogel has a threshold limit up to which it can bear (resist) the impact of collision. - Large junkyards can be effective only for large sized debris. In this paper we propose: A. The Use of Nano Tubes by creating a mesh

  8. Reconstructing the star formation history of the Milky Way disc(s) from chemical abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snaith, O.; Haywood, M.; Di Matteo, P.; Lehnert, M. D.; Combes, F.; Katz, D.; Gómez, A.

    2015-06-01

    We develop a chemical evolution model to study the star formation history of the Milky Way. Our model assumes that the Milky Way has formed from a closed-box-like system in the inner regions, while the outer parts of the disc have experienced some accretion. Unlike the usual procedure, we do not fix the star formation prescription (e.g. Kennicutt law) to reproduce the chemical abundance trends. Instead, we fit the abundance trends with age to recover the star formation history of the Galaxy. Our method enables us to recover the star formation history of the Milky Way in the first Gyrs with unprecedented accuracy in the inner (R 9-10 kpc) discs, as sampled in the solar vicinity. We show that half the stellar mass formed during the thick-disc phase in the inner galaxy during the first 4-5 Gyr. This phase was followed by a significant dip in star formation activity (at 8-9 Gyr) and a period of roughly constant lower-level star formation for the remaining 8 Gyr. The thick-disc phase has produced as many metals in 4 Gyr as the thin-disc phase in the remaining 8 Gyr. Our results suggest that a closed-box model is able to fit all the available constraints in the inner disc. A closed-box system is qualitatively equivalent to a regime where the accretion rate maintains a high gas fraction in the inner disc at high redshift. In these conditions the SFR is mainly governed by the high turbulence of the interstellar medium. By z ~ 1 it is possible that most of the accretion takes place in the outer disc, while the star formation activity in the inner disc is mostly sustained by the gas that is not consumed during the thick-disc phase and the continuous ejecta from earlier generations of stars. The outer disc follows a star formation history very similar to that of the inner disc, although initiated at z ~ 2, about 2 Gyr before the onset of the thin-disc formation in the inner disc.

  9. The maximum rotation of a galactic disc

    CERN Document Server

    Bottema, R

    1997-01-01

    The observed stellar velocity dispersions of galactic discs show that the maximum rotation of a disc is on average 63% of the observed maximum rotation. This criterion can, however, not be applied to small or low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies because such systems show, in general, a continuously rising rotation curve until the outermost measured radial position. That is why a general relation has been derived, giving the maximum rotation for a disc depending on the luminosity, surface brightness, and colour of the disc. As a physical basis of this relation serves an adopted fixed mass-to-light ratio as a function of colour. That functionality is consistent with results from population synthesis models and its absolute value is determined from the observed stellar velocity dispersions. The derived maximum disc rotation is compared with a number of observed maximum rotations, clearly demonstrating the need for appreciable amounts of dark matter in the disc region and even more so for LSB galaxies. Matters h...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... implant). 872.3970 Section 872.3970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3970 Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc...

  11. Optic disc oedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Kromann; Hamann, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Optic disc oedema describes the nonspecific, localized swelling of the optic nerve head regardless of aetiology. Therefore, differentiating among the various aetiologies depends on a thorough history and knowledge of the clinical characteristics of the underlying conditions. Papilloedema strictly...... refers to optic disc oedema as a consequence of elevated intracranial pressure. It is usually a bilateral condition and visual function is preserved until late. Optic disc oedema caused by an anterior optic neuropathy is usually unilateral and accompanied by the loss of visual function....

  12. The effect of radiative feedback on disc fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Anthony; Stamatellos, Dimitris

    2017-02-01

    Protostellar discs may become massive enough to fragment producing secondary low-mass objects: planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We study the effect of radiative feedback from such newly formed secondary objects using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We compare the results of simulations without any radiative feedback from secondary objects with those where two types of radiative feedback are considered: (i) continuous and (ii) episodic. We find that (i) continuous radiative feedback stabilizes the disc and suppresses further fragmentation, reducing the number of secondary objects formed; (ii) episodic feedback from secondary objects heats and stabilizes the disc when the outburst occurs, but shortly after the outburst stops, the disc becomes unstable and fragments again. However, fewer secondary objects are formed compared to the case without radiative feedback. We also find that the mass growth of secondary objects is mildly suppressed due to the effect of their radiative feedback. However, their mass growth also depends on where they form in the disc and on their subsequent interactions, such that their final masses are not drastically different from the case without radiative feedback. We find that the masses of secondary objects formed by disc fragmentation are from a few MJ to a few 0.1 M⊙. Planets formed by fragmentation tend to be ejected from the disc. We conclude that planetary-mass objects on wide orbits (wide-orbit planets) are unlikely to form by disc fragmentation. Nevertheless, disc fragmentation may be a significant source of free-floating planets and brown dwarfs.

  13. Evolution of accretion disc flow in cataclysmic variables. 3. Outburst properties of constant and uniform-. cap alpha. model discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, D.N.C.; Faulkner, J. (Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA (USA); California Univ., Santa Cruz (USA). Board of Studies in Astronomy and Astrophysics); Papaloizou, J. (Queen Mary Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Applied Mathematics)

    1985-01-01

    The investigation of accretion disc models relevant to cataclysmic-variable systems is continued. This paper examines the stability and evolution of some simple accretion disc models in which the viscosity is prescribed by an ad hoc uniform-..cap alpha.. model. It is primarily concerned with systems in which the mass-input rate from the secondary to the disc around the primary is assumed to be constant. However, initial calculations with variable mass-input rates are also performed. The time-dependent visual magnitude light-curves are constructed for cataclysmic binaries with a range of disc size, primary mass, mass-input rate, and magnitude of viscosity.

  14. Biobjective planning of an active debris removal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madakat, Dalal; Morio, Jérôme; Vanderpooten, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The growth of the orbital debris population has been a concern to the international space community for several years. Recent studies have shown that the debris environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO, defined as the region up to 2000 km altitude) has reached a point where the debris population will continue to increase even if all future launches are suspended. As the orbits of these objects often overlap the trajectories of satellites, debris create a potential collision risk. However, several studies show that about 5 objects per year should be removed in order to keep the future LEO environment stable. In this article, we propose a biobjective time dependent traveling salesman problem (BiTDTSP) model for the problem of optimally removing debris and use a branch and bound approach to deal with it.

  15. Artificial Disc Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise Cervical ... disc is the soft cushioning structure located between the individual bones of the spine, called “vertebra.” It is made of cartilage-like tissue and ...

  16. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    CERN Document Server

    Aumer, Michael; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age velocity dispersion relation of the Solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that ...

  17. Orbital Debris Observations with WFCAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bold, Matthew; Cross, Nick; Irwin, Mike; Kendrick, Richard; Kerr, Thomas; Lederer, Susan; Mann, Robert; Sutorius, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope has been operating for 35 years on the summit of Mauna Kea as a premier Infrared astronomical facility. In its 35th year the telescope has been turned over to a new operating group consisting of University of Arizona, University of Hawaii and the LM Advanced Technology Center. UKIRT will continue its astronomical mission with a portion of observing time dedicated to orbital debris and Near Earth Object detection and characterization. During the past 10 years the UKIRT Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) has been performing large area astronomical surveys in the J, H and K bands. The data for these surveys have been reduced by the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit in Cambridge, England and archived by the Wide Field Astronomy Unit in Edinburgh, Scotland. During January and February of 2014 the Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) was used to scan through the geostationary satellite belt detecting operational satellites as well as nearby debris. Accurate photometric and astrometric parameters have been developed by CASU for each of the detections and all data has been archived by WFAU.

  18. Space Debris Mitigation Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of national and international space debris mitigation guides is to promote the preservation of near-Earth space for applications and exploration missions far into the future. To accomplish this objective, the accumulation of objects, particularly in long-lived orbits, must be eliminated or curtailed.

  19. Laser-Induced Forward Transfer-printing of focused ion beam pre-machined crystalline magneto-optic yttrium iron garnet micro-discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sones, C L; Feinaeugle, M; Sposito, A; Gholipour, B; Eason, R W

    2012-07-02

    We present femtosecond laser-induced forward transfer of focused ion beam pre-machined discs of crystalline magneto-optic yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films. Debris-free circular micro-discs with smooth edges and surface uniformity have been successfully printed. The crystalline nature of the printed micro-discs has not been altered by the LIFT printing process, as was confirmed via micro-Raman measurements.

  20. Chemical Classification of Space Debris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunlai; ZUO Wei; LIU Jianjun; OUYANG Ziyuan

    2004-01-01

    Space debris, here referring to all non-operating orbital objects, has steadily increased in number so that it has become a potential barrier to the exploration of space. The ever-increasing number of space debris pieces in space has created an increasingly threatening hazard to all on-the-orbit spacecraft, and all future space exploration activities have to be designed and operated with respect to the increasing threat posed by space debris. Generally, space debris is classified as large, medium and small debris pieces based on their sizes. The large debris piece is easily catalogued, but medium to small debris pieces are very difficult to track and also quite different in damage mechanisms from the large ones. In this paper, a scheme of chemical classification of space debris is developed. In our scheme, the first-order classification is employed to divide space debris into two groups: natural micrometeoroids and artificial space debris.The second-order classification is based on their chemical patterns and compositions. The natural micrometeoroids are further divided into three types, namely maric, metal and phyllosilicate micrometeorites, while the artificial space debris is divided into seven types, which are polymers, non-metal debris, metals and their alloys, oxides, sulphides and their analogs, halides and carbides. Of the latter seven types, some can also be further divided into several sub-types. Chemical classification of space debris is very useful for the study of the chemical damage mechanism of small debris pieces, and also is of great significance in constraining the origin and source of space debris and assessing their impact on spacecraft and human space activities.

  1. The far-infrared behaviour of Herbig Ae/Be discs: Herschel PACS photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pascual, N; Meeus, G; Marshall, J P; Mendigutía, I; Sandell, G

    2016-01-01

    Herbig Ae/Be objects are pre-main sequence stars surrounded by gas- and dust-rich circumstellar discs. These objects are in the throes of star and planet formation, and their characterisation informs us of the processes and outcomes of planet formation processes around intermediate mass stars. Here we analyse the spectral energy distributions of disc host stars observed by the Herschel Open Time Key Programme `Gas in Protoplanetary Systems'. We present Herschel/PACS far-infrared imaging observations of 22 Herbig Ae/Bes and 5 debris discs, combined with ancillary photometry spanning ultraviolet to sub-millimetre wavelengths. From these measurements we determine the diagnostics of disc evolution, along with the total excess, in three regimes spanning near-, mid-, and far-infrared wavelengths. Using appropriate statistical tests, these diagnostics are examined for correlations. We find that the far-infrared flux, where the disc becomes optically thin, is correlated with the millimetre flux, which provides a meas...

  2. Far-infrared and sub-millimetre surveys of circumstellar discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, N. M.

    2011-06-01

    Stars of all ages and evolutionary stages are seen to be surrounded by discs of material. During the formation of a stellar system the stars are orbited by a massive protoplanetary disc composed of interstellar gas and dust, in which planet formation occurs. Between 1 and 10 Myr the protoplanetary disc disperses, leaving behind the newly formed system of planets and smaller bodies. The remaining material which has not formed into planets is referred to as a debris disc. Even though the interstellar dust grains from the protoplanetary disc have long been removed from the system, debris discs can contain large quantities of dust due to collisions between larger bodies and cometary activity. Such dust can be detected by its thermal emission. This thesis focuses on observational studies at far-infrared and sub-millimetre wavelengths of debris discs and the late stages of protoplanetary disc evolution. An overview of surveys for debris discs performed to date is presented, highlighting the limitations and statistical biases. The motivation, design and sample selection for two large surveys for debris discs around nearby stars, with the Herschel space observatory and the SCUBA-2 sub-millimetre camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, are described. The combination of a uniform observational strategy, longer wavelengths than previous surveys, and a large, clearly chosen sample - unbiased by stellar properties - will allow robust statistical conclusions of how the incidence and properties of debris discs depend on system parameters such as stellar mass, age, metallicity, binarity, and the presence of planets. As a precursor to the Herschel and SCUBA-2 surveys, a volume-limited sample of 130 A type star systems was surveyed using observations at 24 and 70 μm from the Spitzer space telescope. Stellar photosphere fluxes at 24 and 70 μm, which were required to determine the presence of emission from dust, were predicted by fitting model flux distributions to optical and

  3. The Northern arc of ɛ Eridani's Debris Ring as seen by ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Mark; Dent, William R. F.; Jordán, Andrés; Lestrade, Jean-François; Hales, Antonio S.; Wyatt, Mark C.; Casassus, Simon; Ertel, Steve; Greaves, Jane S.; Kennedy, Grant M.; Matrà, Luca; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Villard, Eric

    2017-08-01

    We present the first Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the closest known extrasolar debris disc. This disc orbits the star ε Eri, a K-type star just 3.2 pc away. Due to the proximity of the star, the entire disc cannot fit within the ALMA field of view. Therefore, the observations have been centred 18″ North of the star, providing us with a clear detection of the Northern arc of the ring, at a wavelength of 1.3 mm. The observed disc emission is found to be narrow with a width of just 11-13 AU. The fractional disc width we find is comparable to that of the Solar system's Kuiper Belt and makes this one of the narrowest debris discs known. If the inner and outer edges are due to resonances with a planet then this planet likely has a semi-major axis of 48 AU. We find tentative evidence for clumps in the ring, although there is a strong chance that at least one is a background galaxy. We confirm, at much higher significance, the previous detection of an unresolved emission at the star that is above the level of the photosphere and attribute this excess to stellar chromospheric emission.

  4. Orbital debris issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, D. J.

    Orbital debris issues fall into three major topics: Environment Definition, Spacecraft Hazard, and Space Object Management. The major issue under Environment Definition is defining the debris flux for sizes smaller (10 cm in diameter) than those tracked by the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Sources for this size debris are fragmentation of larger objects, either by explosion or collision, and solid rocket motor products. Modeling of these sources can predict fluxes in low Earth orbit which are greater than the meteoroid environment. Techniques to measure the environment in the size interval between 1 mm and 10 cm are being developed, including the use of telescopes and radar both on the ground and in space. Some impact sensors designed to detect meteoroids may have detected solid rocket motor products. Once the environment is defined, it can be combined with hypervelocity impact data and damage criteria to evaluate the Spacecraft Hazard. Shielding may be required to obtain an acceptable damage level. Space Object Management includes techniques to control the environment and the desired policy to effectively minimize the hazard to spacecraft. One control technique - reducing the likelihood of future explosions in space - has already been implemented by NASA. The effectiveness of other techniques has yet to be evaluated.

  5. Controlling the Growth of Future LEO Debris Populations with Active Debris Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J.-C.; Johnson, N. L.; Hill, N. M.

    2008-01-01

    Active debris removal (ADR) was suggested as a potential means to remediate the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment as early as the 1980s. The reasons ADR has not become practical are due to its technical difficulties and the high cost associated with the approach. However, as the LEO debris populations continue to increase, ADR may be the only option to preserve the near-Earth environment for future generations. An initial study was completed in 2007 to demonstrate that a simple ADR target selection criterion could be developed to reduce the future debris population growth. The present paper summarizes a comprehensive study based on more realistic simulation scenarios, including fragments generated from the 2007 Fengyun-1C event, mitigation measures, and other target selection options. The simulations were based on the NASA long-term orbital debris projection model, LEGEND. A scenario, where at the end of mission lifetimes, spacecraft and upper stages were moved to 25-year decay orbits, was adopted as the baseline environment for comparison. Different annual removal rates and different ADR target selection criteria were tested, and the resulting 200-year future environment projections were compared with the baseline scenario. Results of this parametric study indicate that (1) an effective removal strategy can be developed based on the mass and collision probability of each object as the selection criterion, and (2) the LEO environment can be stabilized in the next 200 years with an ADR removal rate of five objects per year.

  6. Frisbee - the first artificial cervical disc of 3RD generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Büttner-Janz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The current cervical disc arthroplasty is limited by postoperative facet joint arthritis, heterotopic ossification and segmental kyphosis. The total Frisbee disc, which has an upper convex/concave non-spherical surface and a lower flat sliding surface, is a new approach for improved outcomes. Prior to clinical application, safety and suitability tests are required. METHODS: The Frisbee is the first 3rd generation disc according to a new classification of total disc because it can precisely mimic the segmental ROM, including the soft limitation of axial rotation. The ISO 18192-1 test was carried out to determine the rate of wear debris. A FE model was used to assess the safety of prosthetic components. In the sagittal plane several variables to determine the most favorable lordotic angle were evaluated. RESULTS: Two angled prosthetic plates are safer than one sliding angled core to prevent the displacement. The lordosis of 7° of the Frisbee leads to kyphosis of no more than 2° without reduction of the ROM. The wear rate of the Frisbee is five times smaller compared to an FDA-approved disc with a spherical sliding surface. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the test results, the clinical application of Frisbee can now be studied. The postoperative kyphosis observed with other devices is not an issue with the Frisbee design. Physiological ROM is combined with the significant reduction of wear debris. For these reasons the Frisbee has the potential to provide a better balanced segmental loading reducing the degeneration of the joint surface and heterotopic ossification.

  7. Innervation of ''painful'' lumbar discs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, MH; Marani, E; Thomeer, RTWM; Groen, GJ

    1997-01-01

    Study Design. The authors investigated the innervation of discographically confirmed degenerated and ''painful'' human intervertebral discs. Objective. To determine the type and distribution patterns of nerve fibers present in degenerated human intervertebral discs. Summary of Background Data. The i

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study in Dachshund: Identification of a Major Locus Affecting Intervertebral Disc Calcification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette Sloth; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Proschowsky, Helle Friis;

    2011-01-01

    Intervertebral disc calcification and herniation commonly affects Dachshund where the predisposition is caused by an early onset degenerative process resulting in disc calcification. A continuous spectrum of disc degeneration is seen within and among clog breeds, suggesting a multifactorial...... with intervertebral disc calcification in Dachshund through a genome-wide association (GWA) study. Based on thorough radiographic examinations, 48 cases with >= 6 disc calcifications or surgically treated for disc herniation and 46 controls with 0-1 disc calcifications were identified. GWA using the Illumina Canine......HD BeadChip identified a locus on chromosome 12 from 36.8 to 38.6 Mb with 36 markers reaching genome-wide significance (P-genome = 0.00001-0.026). This study suggests that a major locus on chromosome 12 harbors genetic variations affecting the development of intervertebral disc calcification in Dachshund....

  9. 阵性泥石流运动与堆积的欧拉-拉格朗日模型——Ⅰ.理论%An Euler-Lagrangian model for non-continuous debris flow:I.Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪晋仁; 廖谦; 曲轶众; 章书成

    2000-01-01

    自然界中的泥石流具有突发性和非恒定性的特点.为了模拟典型泥石流现象,在流团模型的基础上,进一步完善了基于欧拉-拉格朗日(E-L)观点的PIC(ParcelInCell)算法,细化了流元结构,建立了能够模拟典型阵性泥石流发生、运动和堆积的准结构两相流模型.求解该模型不仅可以模拟泥石流运动过程,而且可以对泥石流的堆积过程、停积形态、冲刷特征及泥石流中多组分颗粒的分选特征进行定量描述.%A new model based on conceptual two-phase flow and PIC numerical solution method is developed to simulate natural debris flow of paroxysmal and unsteady characteristics.By combing the conventional Euler and Lagrange methods,the E-Lmodel can be used for description of the whole process of the typical debris flow in greater details through the elements.The present model is also proper for describing the sediment sorting accompanied with erosion and depositional processes.

  10. Orbital debris hazard insights from spacecraft anomalies studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Darren S.

    2016-09-01

    Since the dawning of the space age space operators have been tallying spacecraft anomalies and failures then using these insights to improve the space systems and operations. As space systems improved and their lifetimes increased, the anomaly and failure modes have multiplied. Primary triggers for space anomalies and failures include design issues, space environmental effects, and satellite operations. Attempts to correlate anomalies to the orbital debris environment have started as early as the mid-1990's. Early attempts showed tens of anomalies correlated well to altitudes where the cataloged debris population was the highest. However, due to the complexity of tracing debris impacts to mission anomalies, these analyses were found to be insufficient to prove causation. After the fragmentation of the Chinese Feng-Yun satellite in 2007, it was hypothesized that the nontrackable fragments causing anomalies in LEO would have increased significantly from this event. As a result, debris-induced anomalies should have gone up measurably in the vicinity of this breakup. Again, the analysis provided some subtle evidence of debris-induced anomalies but it was not convincing. The continued difficulty in linking debris flux to satellite anomalies and failures prompted the creation of a series of spacecraft anomalies and failure workshops to investigate the identified shortfalls. These gatherings have produced insights into why this process is not straightforward. Summaries of these studies and workshops are presented and observations made about how to create solutions for anomaly attribution, especially as it relates to debris-induced spacecraft anomalies and failures.

  11. DEBRIS FLOWS AND HYPERCONCENTRATED STREAMFLOWS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Gerald F.

    1986-01-01

    Examination of recent debris-flow and hyperconcentrated-streamflow events in the western United States reveals (1) the topographic, geologic, hydrologic, and vegetative conditions that affect initiation of debris flows and (2) the wide ranging climatic conditions that can trigger debris flows. Recognition of these physiographic and climatic conditions has aided development of preliminary methods for hazard evaluation. Recent developments in the application of electronic data gathering, transmitting, and processing systems shows potential for real-time hazard warning.

  12. Numerical search for a potential planet sculpting the young disc of HD 115600

    CERN Document Server

    Thilliez, E

    2016-01-01

    Radial and azimuthal features (such as disc offsets and eccentric rings) seen in high resolution images of debris discs, provide us with the unique opportunity of finding potential planetary companions which betray their presence by gravitationally sculpting such asymmetric features. The young debris disc around HD 115600, imaged recently by the Gemini Planet Imager, is such a disc with an eccentricity 0.1

  13. How do accretion discs break?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Suzan

    2016-07-01

    Accretion discs are common in binary systems, and they are often found to be misaligned with respect to the binary orbit. The gravitational torque from a companion induces nodal precession in misaligned disc orbits. In this study, we first calculate whether this precession is strong enough to overcome the internal disc torques communicating angular momentum. We compare the disc precession torque with the disc viscous torque to determine whether the disc should warp or break. For typical parameters precession wins: the disc breaks into distinct planes that precess effectively independently. To check our analytical findings, we perform 3D hydrodynamical numerical simulations using the PHANTOM smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, and confirm that disc breaking is widespread and enhances accretion on to the central object. For some inclinations, the disc goes through strong Kozai cycles. Disc breaking promotes markedly enhanced and variable accretion and potentially produces high-energy particles or radiation through shocks. This would have significant implications for all binary systems: e.g. accretion outbursts in X-ray binaries and fuelling supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. The behaviour we have discussed in this work is relevant to a variety of astrophysical systems, for example X-ray binaries, where the disc plane may be tilted by radiation warping, SMBH binaries, where accretion of misaligned gas can create effectively random inclinations and protostellar binaries, where a disc may be misaligned by a variety of effects such as binary capture/exchange, accretion after binary formation.

  14. Tracing Planets in Circumstellar Discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uribe Ana L.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Planets are assumed to form in circumstellar discs around young stellar objects. The additional gravitational potential of a planet perturbs the disc and leads to characteristic structures, i.e. spiral waves and gaps, in the disc density profile. We perform a large-scale parameter study on the observability of these planet-induced structures in circumstellar discs in the (submm wavelength range for the Atacama Large (SubMillimeter Array (ALMA. On the basis of hydrodynamical and magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of star-disc-planet models we calculate the disc temperature structure and (submm images of these systems. These are used to derive simulated ALMA maps. Because appropriate objects are frequent in the Taurus-Auriga region, we focus on a distance of 140 pc and a declination of ≈ 20°. The explored range of star-disc-planet configurations consists of six hydrodynamical simulations (including magnetic fields and different planet masses, nine disc sizes with outer radii ranging from 9 AU to 225 AU, 15 total disc masses in the range between 2.67·10-7 M⊙ and 4.10·10-2 M⊙, six different central stars and two different grain size distributions, resulting in 10 000 disc models. At almost all scales and in particular down to a scale of a few AU, ALMA is able to trace disc structures induced by planet-disc interaction or the influence of magnetic fields in the wavelength range between 0.4...2.0 mm. In most cases, the optimum angular resolution is limited by the sensitivity of ALMA. However, within the range of typical masses of protoplane tary discs (0.1 M⊙...0.001 M⊙ the disc mass has a minor impact on the observability. At the distance of 140 pc it is possible to resolve discs down to 2.67·10-6 M⊙ and trace gaps in discs with 2.67·10-4 M⊙ with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than three. In general, it is more likely to trace planet-induced gaps in magneto-hydrodynamical disc models, because gaps are wider in the presence of

  15. Evolution of Protoplanetary Discs with Magnetically Driven Disc Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Takeru K; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Crida, Aurélien; Guillot, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the evolution of protoplanetary discs (PPDs hereafter) with magnetically driven disc winds and viscous heating. Methods: We consider an initially massive disc with ~0.1 Msun to track the evolution from the early stage of PPDs. We solve the time evolution of surface density and temperature by taking into account viscous heating and the loss of the mass and the angular momentum by the disc winds within the framework of a standard alpha model for accretion discs. Our model parameters, turbulent viscosity, disc wind mass loss, and disc wind torque, which are adopted from local magnetohydrodynamical simulations and constrained by the global energetics of the gravitational accretion, largely depends on the physical condition of PPDs, particularly on the evolution of the vertical magnetic flux in weakly ionized PPDs. Results: Although there are still uncertainties concerning the evolution of the vertical magnetic flux remaining, surface densities show a large variety, depending on the combinatio...

  16. Counter-Rotating Accretion Discs

    OpenAIRE

    Dyda, Sergei; Lovelace, Richard V. E.; Ustyugova, Galina V.; Romanova, Marina M.; Koldoba, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Counter-rotating discs can arise from the accretion of a counter-rotating gas cloud onto the surface of an existing co-rotating disc or from the counter-rotating gas moving radially inward to the outer edge of an existing disc. At the interface, the two components mix to produce gas or plasma with zero net angular momentum which tends to free-fall towards the disc center. We discuss high-resolution axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of a viscous counter-rotating disc for cases where the tw...

  17. Recent advances in modeling landslides and debris flows

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Landslides and debris flows belong to the most dangerous natural hazards in many parts of the world. Despite intensive research, these events continue to result in human suffering, property losses, and environmental degradation every year. Better understanding of the mechanisms and processes of landslides and debris flows will help make reliable predictions, develop mitigation strategies and reduce vulnerability of infrastructure. This book presents contributions to the workshop on Recent Developments in the Analysis, Monitoring and Forecast of Landslides and Debris Flow, in Vienna, Austria, September 9, 2013. The contributions cover a broad spectrum of topics from material behavior, physical modelling over numerical simulation to applications and case studies. The workshop is a joint event of three research projects funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Program: MUMOLADE (Multiscale modelling of landslides and debris flows, www.mumolade.com), REVENUES (Numerical Analysis of Slopes with V...

  18. Space debris executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.; Judd, O.; Naka, R.F.

    1996-09-01

    Spacecraft, boosters, and fragments are potential hazards to space vehicles, and it is argued that collisions between them could produce a cascade that could preclude activity in LEO in 25 to 50 years. That has generated pressure for constraints on military space operations, so the AF SAB performed a study of technical aspects of the debris problem. The Study was independent of the efforts of the Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) as well as those of and NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), which is the principal advocate for cascades and constraints. Most work on space debris has been performed by AFSPC and JSC, so the Study was in part an assessment of their efforts, in which both have been cooperative. The Study identified the main disagreements and quantified their impacts. It resolved some issues and provided bounds for the rest. It treated radar and optical observations; launch, explosion, and decay rates; and the number and distribution of fragments from explosions and collisions. That made it possible to address hazard to manned spacecraft at low altitudes and the possibility of cascading at higher altitudes, both of which now appear less likely.

  19. Vibration analysis of atomising discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, H; Ouyang, H, E-mail: H.Ouyang@liverpool.ac.u [Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-01

    The centrifugal atomisation of metallic melts using a spinning disc is an important process for powder production and spray deposition. In the manufacturing process the high-temperature melt flows down to the surface of the atomising disc spinning at very high speed. It is observed that there is a hydraulic jump of the melt flow prior to atomisation. In this paper, the dynamic model of the atomising disc as a spinning Kirchhoff plate with this hydraulic jump is established. The flowing melt is modelled as moving mass and weight force in the radial direction. Using a Galerkin method, it is found that the vibration properties of the atomising disc vary with the disc clamping ratio. The amplitude of the vibration is largely raised when the clamping ratio is smaller than the critical jump radius ratio. It is also found that the disc vibration is non-stationary before becoming steady and the amplitude decreases with increasing disc speed.

  20. Discs in misaligned binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rawiraswattana, Krisada; Goodwin, Simon P

    2016-01-01

    We perform SPH simulations to study precession and changes in alignment between the circumprimary disc and the binary orbit in misaligned binary systems. We find that the precession process can be described by the rigid-disc approximation, where the disc is considered as a rigid body interacting with the binary companion only gravitationally. Precession also causes change in alignment between the rotational axis of the disc and the spin axis of the primary star. This type of alignment is of great important for explaining the origin of spin-orbit misaligned planetary systems. However, we find that the rigid-disc approximation fails to describe changes in alignment between the disc and the binary orbit. This is because the alignment process is a consequence of interactions that involve the fluidity of the disc, such as the tidal interaction and the encounter interaction. Furthermore, simulation results show that there are not only alignment processes, which bring the components towards alignment, but also anti-...

  1. Space Debris Mitigation CONOPS Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Yoshikawa, T. (2003). Space debris capture by a joint compliance controlled robot . Paper presented at the Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics , 2003. AIM...80 Robotic Arm ............................................................................................................. 80 Tethers...than 10 centimeters 79 xi Figure 34 Robotic Arm Space Debris Removal Servicer with Joint Compliance Control82 Figure 35 Prototype of brush

  2. Space debris; challenges and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Beurden, E.; Prins, C.

    2013-01-01

    Space debris has been a hot topic for the last few decades, ever since the space industry started growing exponentially. Everyone agrees that space debris is a growing problem and the saturation point has almost been reached. With a big risk of a chain reaction, called the Kessler syndrome, billions

  3. BSAC standardized disc susceptibility testing method (version 11).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, R A; Andrews, J M

    2012-12-01

    This article highlights key amendments incorporated into version 11 of the BSAC standardized disc susceptibility testing method, available as Supplementary data at JAC Online (http://jac.oxfordjournals.org/) and on the BSAC web site (http://bsac.org.uk/susceptibility/guidelines-standardized-disc-susceptibility-testing-method/). The basic disc susceptibility testing method remains unchanged, but there have been a number of alterations to the interpretive criteria for certain organism/drug combinations due to continuing harmonization with the EUCAST MIC breakpoints and constant efforts to improve the reliability and clinical applicability of the guidance.

  4. The effect of radiative feedback on disc fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Mercer, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Protostellar discs may become massive enough to fragment producing secondary low-mass objects: planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We study the effect of radiative feedback from such newly-formed secondary objects using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We compare the results of simulations without any radiative feedback from secondary objects with those where two types of radiative feedback are considered: (i) continuous, and (ii) episodic. We find that: (i) continuous radiative feedback stabilizes the disc and suppresses further fragmentation, reducing the number secondary objects formed; (ii) episodic feedback from secondary objects heats and stabilises the disc when the outburst occurs, but shortly after the outburst stops, the disc becomes unstable and fragments again. However, fewer secondary objects are formed compared to the the case without radiative feedback. We also find that the mass growth of secondary objects is mildly suppressed due to the effect of their radiative feedback. However, th...

  5. Space debris: modeling and detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, C.; Lorenz, J.; Radtke, J.; Kebschull, C.; Horstmann, A.; Stoll, E.

    2017-01-01

    High precision orbit determination is required for the detection and removal of space debris. Knowledge of the distribution of debris objects in orbit is necessary for orbit determination by active or passive sensors. The results can be used to investigate the orbits on which objects of a certain size at a certain frequency can be found. The knowledge of the orbital distribution of the objects as well as their properties in accordance with sensor performance models provide the basis for estimating the expected detection rates. Comprehensive modeling of the space debris environment is required for this. This paper provides an overview of the current state of knowledge about the space debris environment. In particular non-cataloged small objects are evaluated. Furthermore, improvements concerning the update of the current space debris model are addressed. The model of the space debris environment is based on the simulation of historical events, such as fragmentations due to explosions and collisions that actually occurred in Earth orbits. The orbital distribution of debris is simulated by propagating the orbits considering all perturbing forces up to a reference epoch. The modeled object population is compared with measured data and validated. The model provides a statistical distribution of space objects, according to their size and number. This distribution is based on the correct consideration of orbital mechanics. This allows for a realistic description of the space debris environment. Subsequently, a realistic prediction can be provided concerning the question, how many pieces of debris can be expected on certain orbits. To validate the model, a software tool has been developed which allows the simulation of the observation behavior of ground-based or space-based sensors. Thus, it is possible to compare the results of published measurement data with simulated detections. This tool can also be used for the simulation of sensor measurement campaigns. It is

  6. An Introduction to Space Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2008-04-01

    Space debris is any human-made object in orbit that no longer serves a useful purpose, including defunct satellites, discarded equipment and rocket stages, and fragments from the breakup of satellites and rocket stages. It is a concern because--due to its very high speed in orbit--even relatively small pieces can damage or destroy satellites in a collision. Since debris at high altitudes can stay in orbit for decades or longer, it accumulates as more is produced and the risk of collisions with satellites grows. Since there is currently no effective way to remove large amounts of debris from orbit, controlling the production of debris is essential for preserving the long-term use of space. Today there are 860 active satellites in orbit, supporting a wide range of civil and military uses. The 50 years of space activity since the launch of Sputnik 1 has also resulted in well over half a million pieces of orbiting debris larger than 1 cm in size. There are two main sources of space debris: (1) routine space activity and the accidental breakup of satellites and stages placed in orbit by such activity, and (2) the testing or use of destructive anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons that physically collide with satellites at high speed. The international community is attempting to reduce the first category by developing strict guidelines to limit the debris created as a result of routine space activities. However, the destruction of a single large spy satellite by an ASAT weapon could double the total amount of large debris in low earth orbit, and there are currently no international restrictions on these systems. This talk will give an introduction to what's in space, the origins of space debris, efforts to stem its growth, the threat it poses to satellites in orbit, and the long-term evolution of the debris population.

  7. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc...

  8. Accretion Discs in Blazars

    OpenAIRE

    Jolley, E. J. D.; Kuncic, Z.; Bicknell, G. V.; Wagner, S.(Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117, Heidelberg, Germany)

    2009-01-01

    The characteristic properties of blazars (rapid variability, strong polarization, high brightness) are widely attributed to a powerful relativistic jet oriented close to our line of sight. Despite the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) being strongly jet-dominated, a "big blue bump" has been recently detected in sources known as flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). These new data provide a unique opportunity to observationally test coupled jet-disc accretion models in these extreme sources....

  9. Iliac artery pseudoaneurysm after lumbar disc hernia operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Atay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar disc herniation surgery is usually performed through a posterior approach. Vascular injuries can be counted among the complications. 39 years old male patient had lower extremity pain which has started after lumbar disc herniation surgery and continued for a month. Iliac arterial pseudoaneurysm has been detected in computerized tomography. It was successfully treated with vascular surgery [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 5-7

  10. Total disc replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, J-M; Boissière, L

    2014-02-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) (partial disc replacement will not be described) has been used in the lumbar spine since the 1980s, and more recently in the cervical spine. Although the biomechanical concepts are the same and both are inserted through an anterior approach, lumbar TDR is conventionally indicated for chronic low back pain, whereas cervical TDR is used for soft discal hernia resulting in cervicobrachial neuralgia. The insertion technique must be rigorous, with precise centering in the disc space, taking account of vascular anatomy, which is more complex in the lumbar region, particularly proximally to L5-S1. All of the numerous studies, including prospective randomized comparative trials, have demonstrated non-inferiority to fusion, or even short-term superiority regarding speed of improvement. The main implant-related complication is bridging heterotopic ossification with resulting loss of range of motion and increased rates of adjacent segment degeneration, although with an incidence lower than after arthrodesis. A sufficiently long follow-up, which has not yet been reached, will be necessary to establish definitively an advantage for TDR, particularly in the cervical spine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Apsidal precession, disc breaking and viscosity in warped discs

    CERN Document Server

    Nealon, Rebecca; Price, Daniel J; King, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the importance of general relativistic apsidal precession in warped black hole accretion discs by comparing three - dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations in which this effect is first neglected, and then included. If apsidal precession is neglected, we confirm the results of an earlier magnetohydrodynamic simulation which made this assumption, showing that at least in this case the $\\alpha$ viscosity model produces very similar results to those of simulations where angular momentum transport is due to the magnetorotational instability. Including apsidal precession significantly changes the predicted disc evolution. For moderately inclined discs thick enough that tilt is transported by bending waves, we find a disc tilt which is nonzero at the inner disc edge and oscillates with radius, consistent with published analytic results. For larger inclinations we find disc breaking.

  12. Mechanics of Actuated Disc Cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkhoda, Sevda; Detournay, Emmanuel

    2017-02-01

    This paper investigates the mechanics of an actuated disc cutter with the objective of determining the average forces acting on the disc as a function of the parameters characterizing its motion. The specific problem considered is that of a disc cutter revolving off-centrically at constant angular velocity around a secondary axis rigidly attached to a cartridge, which is moving at constant velocity and undercutting rock at a constant depth. This model represents an idealization of a technology that has been implemented in a number of hard rock mechanical excavators with the goal of reducing the average thrust force to be provided by the excavation equipment. By assuming perfect conformance of the rock with the actuated disc as well as a prescribed motion of the disc (perfectly rigid machine), the evolution of the contact surface between the disc and the rock during one actuation of the disc can be computed. Coupled with simple cutter/rock interaction models that embody either a ductile or a brittle mode of fragmentation, these kinematical considerations lead to an estimate of the average force on the cartridge and of the partitioning of the energy imparted by the disc to the rock between the actuation mechanism of the disc and the translation of the cartridge on which the actuated disc is attached.

  13. Estrogens and the intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja-Agius, J; Muscat-Baron, Y; Brincat, M P

    2009-09-01

    Intervertebral discs are an integral part of the vertebral column. It has been shown that menopause has a negative effect on bone and on intervertebral discs. Estrogen has a beneficial effect of preserving the health of collagen-containing tissues, including the intervertebral disc. The intervertebral disc allows for mobility of the spine, and maintains a uniform stress distribution of the area of the vertebral endplates. Also, the disc influences spinal height. The disc tissue is adapted for this biomechanical function. The function of the spine is impaired if there is a loss of disc tissue. Narrowing of the disc space due to degeneration of intervertebral discs is associated with a significantly increased risk of vertebral fractures. Estrogen should be seen as the first-choice therapy for bones and other collagen-rich tissues, such as intervertebral discs, because it maintains homeostasis of the bone-remodelling unit. Unlike bisphosphonates, estrogen is unique in its ability to regenerate bone collagen after its disintegration, apart from suppressing osteoclastic activity. Besides, there is insufficient data on deterioration in bone qualities and micro-cracks in patients on long-term bisphosphonates.

  14. Problems of Small Debris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Zelentsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the exploration of outer space (as of 1/1 2011 6853 was launched spacecraft (SC are successful 6264, representing 95% of the total number of starts. The most intensively exploited space Russia (USSR (3701 starts, 94% successful, USA (2774 starts, 90% successful, China (234 starts, 96% successful and India (89 starts, 90% successful. A small part of running the spacecraft returned to Earth (manned spacecraft and transport, and the rest remained in orbit. Some of them are descended from orbit and burned up in the atmosphere, the rest remained in the OCP and turned into space debris (SD.The composition of the Cabinet is diverse: finish the job spacecraft; boosters and the last stage of launch vehicles left in orbit after SC injection; technological waste arising during the opening drop-down structures and fragments of the destroyed spacecraft. The resulting explosion orbital SD forms ellipsoidal region which orbits blasted object. Then, as a result of precession, is the distribution of objects in orbit explosion exploding spacecraft.The whole Cabinet is divided into two factions: the observed (larger than 100 mm and not observed (less than 100 mm. Observed debris katalogalizirovan and 0.2% of the total number of SD, there was no SD is the bulk - 99.8%.SC meeting working with a fragment observed SD predictable and due to changes in altitude spacecraft avoids a possible meeting. Contact spacecraft with large fragment lead to disaster (which took place at a meeting of the Russian communications satellite "Cosmos-2251" and the American machine "Iridium". Meeting with small SD is not predictable, especially if it was formed by an explosion or collision fragments together. Orbit that KM is not predictable, and the speed can be up to 10 km / s. Meeting with small particle SD no less dangerous for the spacecraft. The impact speed of spacecraft with space debris particles can reach up to 10 ... 15 km / s at such speeds the breakdown probability thin

  15. A Comparison of the SOCIT and DebriSat Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausay, Erick; Blake, Brandon; Boyle, Colleen; Cornejo, Alex; Horn, Alexa; Palma, Kirsten; Pistella, Frank; Sato, Taishi; Todd, Naromi; Zimmerman, Jeffrey; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, Marlon; Huynh, Thomas; Opiela, John; Krisko, Paula H.; Cowardin, Heather

    2017-01-01

    challenges DebriSat has encountered thus far and how they were addressed. Accomplishing DebriSat's goal of collecting 90% of the debris, which constitutes well over 100,000 fragments, required addressing many challenges stemming from the very large number of fragments. One of these challenges arose in identifying the foam-embedded fragments. DebriSat addressed this by X-raying all of the panels once the loose debris were removed, and applying a detection algorithm developed in-house to automate the embedded fragment identification process. It is easy to see how the amount of data being compiled would be outstanding. Creating an efficient way to catalog each fragment, as well as archiving the data for reproducibility also posed a great challenge for DebriSat. Barcodes to label each fragment were introduced with the foresight that once the characterization process began, the datasheet for each fragment would have to be accessed again quickly and efficiently. The DebriSat experiment has benefited significantly by leveraging lessons learned from the SOCIT experiment along with the technological advancements that have occurred during the time between the experiments. The two experiments represent two ages of satellite technology and, together, demonstrate the continuous efforts to improve the experimental techniques for fragmentation debris characterization.

  16. Circumstellar Debris Disks: Diagnosing the Unseen Perturber

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvold, Erika R; Vican, Laura; Farr, Will M

    2016-01-01

    The first indication of the presence of a circumstellar debris disk is usually the detection of excess infrared emission from the population of small dust grains orbiting the star. This dust is short-lived, requiring continual replenishment, and indicating that the disk must be excited by an unseen perturber. Previous theoretical studies have demonstrated that an eccentric planet orbiting interior to the disk will stir the larger bodies in the belt and produce dust via interparticle collisions. However, motivated by recent observations, we explore another possible mechanism for heating a debris disk: a stellar-mass perturber orbiting exterior to and inclined to the disk and exciting the disk particles' eccentricities and inclinations via the Kozai-Lidov mechanism. We explore the consequences of an exterior perturber on the evolution of a debris disk using secular analysis and collisional N-body simulations. We demonstrate that a Kozai-Lidov excited disk can generate a dust disk via collisions and we compare t...

  17. Active Space Debris Removal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele GUERRA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the space era, more than 5000 launches have been carried out, each carrying satellites for many disparate uses, such as Earth observation or communication. Thus, the space environment has become congested and the problem of space debris is now generating some concerns in the space community due to our long-lived belief that “space is big”. In the last few years, solutions to this problem have been proposed, one of those is Active Space Debris Removal: this method will reduce the increasing debris growth and permit future sustainable space activities. The main idea of the method proposed below is a drag augmentation system: use a system capable of putting an expanded foam on a debris which will increase the area-to-mass ratio to increase the natural atmospheric drag and solar pressure. The drag augmentation system proposed here requires a docking system; the debris will be pushed to its release height and then, after un-docking, an uncontrolled re-entry takes place ending with a burn up of the object and the foam in the atmosphere within a given time frame. The method requires an efficient way to change the orbit between two debris. The present paper analyses such a system in combination with an Electric Propulsion system, and emphasizes the choice of using two satellites to remove five effective rockets bodies debris within a year.

  18. The earth orbiting space debris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The space debris population is similar to the asteroid belt, since it is subject to a process of high-velocity mutual collisions that affects the long-term evolution of its size distribution. Presently, more than 10 000 artificial debris particles with diameters larger than 10 cm (and more than 300 000 with diameters larger than 1 cm are orbiting the Earth, and are monitored and studied by a large network of sensors around the Earth. Many objects of different kind compose the space debris population, produced by different source mechanisms ranging from high energy fragmentation of large spacecraft to slow diffusion of liquid metal. The impact against a space debris is a serious risk that every spacecraft must face now and it can be evaluated with ad-hoc algorithms. The long term evolution of the whole debris population is studied with computer models allowing the simulation of all the known source and sink mechanisms. One of these codes is described in this paper and the evolution of the debris environment over the next 100 years, under different traffic scenarios, is shown, pointing out the possible measures to mitigate the growth of the orbital debris population. .

  19. Heat distribution in disc brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenda, Frantisek; Soukup, Josef; Kampo, Jan

    2016-06-01

    This article is deals by the thermal analysis of the disc brake with floating caliper. The issue is solved by numerically. The half 2D model is used for solution in program ADINA 8.8. Two brake discs without the ventilation are solved. One disc is made from cast iron and the second is made from stainless steel. Both materials are an isotropic. By acting the pressure force on the brake pads will be pressing the pads to the brake disc. Speed will be reduced (slowing down). On the contact surface generates the heat, which the disc and pads heats. In the next part of article is comparison the maximum temperature at the time of braking. The temperatures of both materials for brake disc (gray cast iron, stainless steel) are compares. The heat flux during braking for the both materials is shown.

  20. Observations of Herbig Ae/Be stars with Herschel/PACS : The atomic and molecular contents of their protoplanetary discs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeus, G.; Montesinos, B.; Mendigutia, I.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W. F.; Eiroa, C.; Grady, C. A.; Mathews, G.; Sandell, G.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Brittain, S.; Dent, W. R. F.; Howard, C.; Menard, F.; Pinte, C.; Roberge, A.; Vandenbussche, B.; Williams, J. P.

    We observed a sample of 20 representative Herbig Ae/Be stars and 5 A-type debris discs with PACS onboard Herschel, as part of the GAS in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS) project. The observations were done in spectroscopic mode, and cover the far-infrared lines of [OI], [CII], CO, CH+, H2O, and OH. We

  1. Geomorphology and dynamics of supraglacial debris covers in the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deline, P.; Gardent, M.; Kirkbride, M. P.; Le Roy, M.; Martin, B.

    2012-04-01

    In the alpine regions of France and NW Italy, many glaciers of a variety of sizes are at least partly debris-covered, but these have received less scientific research than clean glaciers. During the present period of glacier shrinkage - the area of glacier cover in France has reduced by 26% over the last 40 years -, growing debris cover needs to be understood as an influence on continuing retreat, with consequences for natural hazards, water resources and tourism. We present the results of a combined ongoing study of an inventory of debris-covered glaciers in France with site-specific studies of c. 12 glaciers of contrasting types, in order to understand spatial and temporal changes in supraglacial debris cover. Our specific aims are: 1. To understand the geomorphology of debris-covers and their formation, investigating the types of debris cover in relation to formative processes including extraglacial supply and development during transport. 2. To document the changing extents of supraglacial debris covers, using historical documents and aerial photographs. 3. To interpret areal changes in terms of glaciological and topographical controls on different glacier and debris cover types (catchment morphology, glacier structure, mass balance history, and rock wall collapse magnitude and frequency). 4. To understand the effect of debris cover on glacier dynamics and geomorphological evolution, related to insulation-related modifications to AAR, long profiles, and length changes on both short and long timescales. This includes investigation of the characteristics of debris-covered glacier depositional systems resulting from their modified dynamics.

  2. Dynamics of warped accretion discs

    OpenAIRE

    Tremaine, Scott; Davis, Shane W.

    2013-01-01

    Accretion discs are present around both stellar-mass black holes in X-ray binaries and supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. A wide variety of circumstantial evidence implies that many of these discs are warped. The standard Bardeen--Petterson model attributes the shape of the warp to the competition between Lense--Thirring torque from the central black hole and viscous angular-momentum transport within the disc. We show that this description is incomplete, and that torques from...

  3. Highlights of Recent Research Activities at the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J - C.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) was established at the NASA Johnson Space Center in 1979. The ODPO has initiated and led major orbital debris research activities over the past 38 years, including developing the first set of the NASA orbital debris mitigation requirements in 1995 and supporting the establishment of the U.S. Government Orbital Debris Mitigation Standard Practices in 2001. This paper is an overview of the recent ODPO research activities, ranging from ground-based and in-situ measurements, to laboratory tests, and to engineering and long-term orbital debris environment modeling. These activities highlight the ODPO's commitment to continuously improve the orbital debris environment definition to better protect current and future space missions from the low Earth orbit to the geosynchronous Earth orbit regions.

  4. The mechanism of changes in the surface layer of grey cast iron automotive brake disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Polak

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to create a model, describing the run of tribological processes in the surface layer of grey cast iron automotive brake discs. Grey cast iron discs mating with non-asbestos organic brake pads were chosen for the investigations, as the most widely used materials in car brakes. Samples for surface analysis were prepared from disc operating in stand and road conditions. Stand tests were pin-on-disc kind. Operating parameters for the stand tests were chosen on the basis of results of our earlier research. Topography of brake disc surface was evaluated by surface roughness measurements. The surface layer was examined with use of metallography and scanning electron microscopy. In order to differentiate structures of grey cast iron brake discs SE and BSE modes were used in scanning electron microscopy. Chemical investigations of samples were done by X-ray analysis linked with SEM. Studies showed influence of grey cast iron structures on tribological processes taking place in a brake friction pair. The surface layer of grey cast iron discs was described and features and functions of separated structures were presented. On the basis of the obtained results a physical model of friction mechanism was created. Special attention was paid to the influence of graphite on the run of tribological processes and mechanism of compaction and removal of wear debris.

  5. Numbered nasal discs for waterfowl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartonek, J.C.; Dane, C.W.

    1964-01-01

    Numbered nasal discs were successfully used in studies requiring large numbers of individually marked waterfowl. The procedure for constructing these discs is outlined. Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) with 5/8-inch discs, and canvasback (Aythya valisineria) and redhead (A. americana) with 3/4-inch discs can be individually identified up to 50 and 80 yards, respectively, with a gunstock-mounted, 20-power spotting scope. The particular value of these markers is their durability, the number of combinations possible, and the apparent absence of behavioral or mortality influence among such species as the blue-winged teal.

  6. Debris flow hazards and risks on Cheekye Fan, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, M.

    2009-04-01

    Natural hazard and risk assessments hinge fundamentally on a detailed understanding of the relationship between frequency and magnitude of the hazardous process under investigation. When information is sought from the deep past (i.e. several thousand years), continuous event records do not exist and the researcher has to rely on proxy data to develop the F-M model. Such work is often prohibitively expensive and few well researched examples for mass movement are available worldwide. Cheekye fan is a desirable location for land development and has a depth and breadth of previous research unprecedented on any debris flow fan in Canada. We pursued two principal strains of research to formulate a reliable frequency-magnitude relationship. The first focuses on stratigraphic analyses combined with radiometric dating and dendrochronology to reconstruct a comprehensive picture of Holocene debris flow activity. The second approach examines hydrological limitations of rock avalanche evolution into debris flows through either entrainment of saturated sediments or by failure of a landslide-generated dam and upstream impoundment. We thus hypothesize that debris flows from Cheekye River can be separated into two quasi homogenous populations: those that are typically triggered by relatively small debris avalanches, slumps or rock falls or simply by progressive bulking of in-stream erodible sediments; and those that are thought to result from transformation of rock avalanches. Our work suggests that debris flows exceeding some 3 million cubic metres in volume are unlikely to reach Cheekye fan due to limited water available to fully fluidize a rock avalanche. This analysis has also demonstrated that in order to arrive at reasonable estimates for the frequency and magnitude of debris flows on a complex alluvial fan, significant multidisciplinary efforts are required. As a second step in the analysis, we model the design debris flow using a two-dimensional debris flow runout model

  7. 14 CFR 417.211 - Debris analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Debris analysis. 417.211 Section 417.211... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.211 Debris analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a debris analysis. For an orbital or suborbital launch, a debris...

  8. Novel structural components of the ventral disc and lateral crest in Giardia intestinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari D Hagen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Giardia intestinalis is a ubiquitous parasitic protist that is the causative agent of giardiasis, one of the most common protozoan diarrheal diseases in the world. Giardia trophozoites attach to the intestinal epithelium using a specialized and elaborate microtubule structure, the ventral disc. Surrounding the ventral disc is a less characterized putatively contractile structure, the lateral crest, which forms a continuous perimeter seal with the substrate. A better understanding of ventral disc and lateral crest structure, conformational dynamics, and biogenesis is critical for understanding the mechanism of giardial attachment to the host. To determine the components comprising the ventral disc and lateral crest, we used shotgun proteomics to identify proteins in a preparation of isolated ventral discs. Candidate disc-associated proteins, or DAPs, were GFP-tagged using a ligation-independent high-throughput cloning method. Based on disc localization, we identified eighteen novel DAPs, which more than doubles the number of known disc-associated proteins. Ten of the novel DAPs are associated with the lateral crest or outer edge of the disc, and are the first confirmed components of this structure. Using Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP with representative novel DAP::GFP strains we found that the newly identified DAPs tested did not recover after photobleaching and are therefore structural components of the ventral disc or lateral crest. Functional analyses of the novel DAPs will be central toward understanding the mechanism of ventral disc-mediated attachment and the mechanism of disc biogenesis during cell division. Since attachment of Giardia to the intestine via the ventral disc is essential for pathogenesis, it is possible that some proteins comprising the disc could be potential drug targets if their loss or disruption interfered with disc biogenesis or function, preventing attachment.

  9. Counter-Orbiting Tidal Debris as the Origin of the MW DoS

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlowski, Marcel S

    2011-01-01

    The Milky Way satellite galaxies show a phase-space distribution that is not expected from the standard scenario of galaxy formation. This is a strong hint at them being of tidal origin, which would naturally explain their spacial distribution in a disc of satellites. It is shown that also their orbital directions can be reproduced with the debris of galaxy collisions. Both co- and counter-orbiting satellites are formed naturally in merger and fly-by interactions.

  10. Counter-orbiting tidal debris as the origin of the MW DoS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlowski M.S.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Milky Way satellite galaxies show a phase-space distribution that is not expected from the standard scenario of galaxy formation. This is a strong hint at them being of tidal origin, which would naturally explain their spacial distribution in a disc of satellites. It is shown that also their orbital directions can be reproduced with the debris of galaxy collisions. Both co- and counter-orbiting satellites are formed naturally in merger and fly-by interactions.

  11. Effects of basal debris on glacier flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Neal R; Cohen, Denis; Hooyer, Thomas S; Fischer, Urs H; Jackson, Miriam; Moore, Peter L; Lappegard, Gaute; Kohler, Jack

    2003-07-04

    Glacier movement is resisted partially by debris, either within glaciers or under glaciers in water-saturated layers. In experiments beneath a thick, sliding glacier, ice containing 2 to 11% debris exerted shear traction of 60 to 200 kilopascals on a smooth rock bed, comparable to the total shear traction beneath glaciers and contrary to the usual assumption that debris-bed friction is negligible. Imposed pore-water pressure that was 60 to 100% of the normal stress in a subglacial debris layer reduced shear traction on the debris sufficiently to halt its deformation and cause slip of ice over the debris. Slip resistance was thus less than debris shearing resistance.

  12. Optic disc drusen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fledelius, Hans C

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine long-term data on optic disc drusen (ODD) from an outpatient hospital series that indicated more cases with advanced visual field constriction than is apparent from other clinical reports. The underlying pathophysiology is discussed, also with regard to enlarged blind spot...... neurosurgery for an arachnoid cyst. CONCLUSIONS: We found more cases of marked visual field constriction than reported in other clinical series. A few such cases appeared acute and vascular, but the main trend was clinically quiet over time. All 49 patients could manage visually in daily life....

  13. [Temporomandibular joint disc surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potier, J; Maes, J-M; Nicot, R; Dumousseau, T; Cotelle, M; Ferri, J

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are a common disease and may be responsible for major functional and painful repercussions. Treatment is not consensual. The literature highlights the role of conservative treatments (physiotherapy, analgesics, splints) in a first attempt. Minimally invasive surgical techniques (arthroscopy, arthrocentesis) have developed rapidly in recent decades. They have proven effective and reliable, especially in patients suffering from irreducible or reducible anterior disc dislocation or presenting with arthopathies. The goal of our work was to make an update about disk surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Relativistic Disc lines

    CERN Document Server

    Fabian, A C; Parker, M L

    2014-01-01

    Broad emission lines, particularly broad iron-K lines, are now commonly seen in the X-ray spectra of luminous AGN and Galactic black hole binaries. Sensitive NuSTAR spectra over the energy range of 3-78 keV and high frequency reverberation spectra now confirm that these are relativistic disc lines produced by coronal irradiation of the innermost accretion flow around rapidly spinning black holes. General relativistic effects are essential in explaining the observations. Recent results are briefly reviewed here.

  15. NASA Orbital Debris Baseline Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has created high fidelity populations of the debris environment. The populations include objects of 1 cm and larger in Low Earth Orbit through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. They were designed for the purpose of assisting debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment is derived directly from the newest ORDEM model populations which include a background derived from LEGEND, as well as specific events such as the Chinese ASAT test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, the RORSAT sodium-potassium droplet releases, and other miscellaneous events. It is the most realistic ODPO debris population to date. In this paper we present the populations in chart form. We describe derivations of the background population and the specific populations added on. We validate our 1 cm and larger Low Earth Orbit population against SSN, Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  16. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Recovery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations,...

  17. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Landfills

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations,...

  18. Novel localized heating technique on centrifugal microfluidic disc with wireless temperature monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Karunan; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Cho, Jongman

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of centrifugal microfluidic disc suggest the need for electrical interface in the disc to perform active biomedical assays. In this paper, we have demonstrated an active application powered by the energy harvested from the rotation of the centrifugal microfluidic disc. A novel integration of power harvester disc onto centrifugal microfluidic disc to perform localized heating technique is the main idea of our paper. The power harvester disc utilizing electromagnetic induction mechanism generates electrical energy from the rotation of the disc. This contributes to the heat generation by the embedded heater on the localized heating disc. The main characteristic observed in our experiment is the heating pattern in relative to the rotation of the disc. The heating pattern is monitored wirelessly with a digital temperature sensing system also embedded on the disc. Maximum temperature achieved is 82 °C at rotational speed of 2000 RPM. The technique proves to be effective for continuous heating without the need to stop the centrifugal motion of the disc.

  19. Collisional Grooming of Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchner, Marc J

    2009-01-01

    Debris disk images show clumps, rings, warps, and other structures, many of which have been interpreted as perturbations from hidden planets. But so far, no models of these structures have properly accounted for collisions between dust grains. We have developed new steady-state 3D models of debris disks that self-consistently incorporate grain-grain collisions. We summarize our algorithm and use it to illustrate how collisions interact with resonant trapping in the presence of a planet.

  20. Hydraulic System Wear Debris Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-03

    drawn. Each one-=L sample was drawn with a clean plastic pipette of one-mL capacity. The samples were placed in clean Ferrogram preparation bottles ...and from cavities in a block which held linear seals into sampling bottles . Several photographs of this debris , which was deposited on Ferro- grams...silicon in the glass overshadowed the elements of the wear debris . To overcome this difficulty, the Ferrogram should be pre- pared on a carbon-filled

  1. Grand Challenges in Protoplanetary Disc Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Ilee, John D.; Forgan, Duncan H.; Facchini, Stefano; Price, Daniel J.; Boneberg, Dominika M.; Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Gonzalez, Jean-François; Hutchison, Mark A.; Kamp, Inga; Laibe, Guillaume; Lyra, Wladimir; Meru, Farzana; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Panić, Olja; Rice, Ken; Suzuki, Takeru; Teague, Richard; Walsh, Catherine; Woitke, Peter; Community authors

    2016-10-01

    The Protoplanetary Discussions conference-held in Edinburgh, UK, from 2016 March 7th-11th-included several open sessions led by participants. This paper reports on the discussions collectively concerned with the multi-physics modelling of protoplanetary discs, including the self-consistent calculation of gas and dust dynamics, radiative transfer, and chemistry. After a short introduction to each of these disciplines in isolation, we identify a series of burning questions and grand challenges associated with their continuing development and integration. We then discuss potential pathways towards solving these challenges, grouped by strategical, technical, and collaborative developments. This paper is not intended to be a review, but rather to motivate and direct future research and collaboration across typically distinct fields based on community-driven input, to encourage further progress in our understanding of circumstellar and protoplanetary discs.

  2. Rapid planetesimal formation in turbulent circumstellar discs

    CERN Document Server

    Johansen, Anders; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Klahr, Hubert; Henning, Thomas; Youdin, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The initial stages of planet formation in circumstellar gas discs proceed via dust grains that collide and build up larger and larger bodies (Safronov 1969). How this process continues from metre-sized boulders to kilometre-scale planetesimals is a major unsolved problem (Dominik et al. 2007): boulders stick together poorly (Benz 2000), and spiral into the protostar in a few hundred orbits due to a head wind from the slower rotating gas (Weidenschilling 1977). Gravitational collapse of the solid component has been suggested to overcome this barrier (Safronov 1969, Goldreich & Ward 1973, Youdin & Shu 2002). Even low levels of turbulence, however, inhibit sedimentation of solids to a sufficiently dense midplane layer (Weidenschilling & Cuzzi 1993, Dominik et al. 2007), but turbulence must be present to explain observed gas accretion in protostellar discs (Hartmann 1998). Here we report the discovery of efficient gravitational collapse of boulders in locally overdense regions in the midplane. The bou...

  3. Removing Orbital Debris with Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude R; Bradford, Brian; George, E Victor; Libby, Stephen B; Liedahl, Duane A; Marcovici, Bogdan; Olivier, Scot S; Pleasance, Lyn D; Reilly, James P; Rubenchik, Alexander; Strafford, David N; Valley, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Orbital debris in low Earth orbit (LEO) are now sufficiently dense that the use of LEO space is threatened by runaway collisional cascading. A problem predicted more than thirty years ago, the threat from debris larger than about 1 cm demands serious attention. A promising proposed solution uses a high power pulsed laser system on the Earth to make plasma jets on the objects, slowing them slightly, and causing them to re-enter and burn up in the atmosphere. In this paper, we reassess this approach in light of recent advances in low-cost, light-weight modular design for large mirrors, calculations of laser-induced orbit changes and in design of repetitive, multi-kilojoule lasers, that build on inertial fusion research. These advances now suggest that laser orbital debris removal (LODR) is the most cost-effective way to mitigate the debris problem. No other solutions have been proposed that address the whole problem of large and small debris. A LODR system will have multiple uses beyond debris removal. Internat...

  4. Exocometary gas in the HD 181327 debris ring

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, S; Stark, C; Wyatt, M C; Casassus, S; Kennedy, G; Rodriguez, D; Zuckerman, B; Perez, S; Dent, W R F; Kuchner, M; Hughes, A M; Schneider, G; Steele, A; Roberge, A; Donaldson, J; Nesvold, E

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of observations have shown that gaseous debris discs are not an exception. However, until now we only knew of cases around A stars. Here we present the first detection of 12CO (2-1) disc emission around an F star, HD 181327, obtained with ALMA observations at 1.3 mm. The continuum and CO emission are resolved into an axisymmetric disc with ring-like morphology. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method coupled with radiative transfer calculations we study the dust and CO mass distribution. We find the dust is distributed in a ring with a radius of 86.0 +- 0.4 AU and a radial width of 23.2 +- 1.0 AU. At this frequency the ring radius is smaller than in the optical, revealing grain size segregation expected due to radiation pressure. We also report on the detection of low level continuum emission beyond the main ring out to ~200 AU. We model the CO emission in the non-LTE regime and we find that the CO is co-located with the dust, with a total CO gas mass ranging between 1.2x10^-6 Mearth and ...

  5. Star formation in accretion discs: from the Galactic center to active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, S.; Zahn, J.-P.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Keplerian accretion discs around massive black holes (MBHs) are gravitationally unstable beyond a few hundredths of a parsec, and they should collapse to form stars. It has indeed been shown recently that an accretion/star formation episode took place a few million years ago in the Galactic center (GC). This raises the question of how the disc can survive in AGN and quasars and continue to transport matter towards the black hole. Aims: We study the accretion/star formation process in quasars and AGN with one aim in mind: to show that a spectrum similar to the observed one can be produced by the disc. Methods: We compute models of stationary accretion discs that are either continuous or clumpy. Continuous discs must be maintained in a state of marginal stability so that the rate of star formation remains modest and the disc is not immediately destroyed. The disc then requires additional heating and additional transport of angular momentum. In clumpy discs, the momentum transport is provided by cloud interactions. Results: Non-viscous heating can be provided by stellar illumination, but in the case of continuous discs, even momentum transport by supernovae is insufficient for sustaining a marginal state, except at the very periphery of the disc. In clumpy discs it is possible to account for the required accretion rate through interactions between clouds, but this model is unsatisfactory because its parameters are tightly constrained without any physical justification. Conclusions: Finally one must appeal to non-stationary discs with intermittent accretion episodes like those that occurred in the GC, but such a model is probably not applicable either to luminous high redshift quasars or to radio-loud quasars.

  6. Accretion discs trapped near corotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Angelo, C.R.; Spruit, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    We show that discs accreting on to the magnetosphere of a rotating star can end up in a trapped state, in which the inner edge of the disc stays near the corotation radius, even at low and varying accretion rates. The accretion in these trapped states can be steady or cyclic; we explore these states

  7. The physics of debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in theory and experimentation motivate a thorough reassessment of the physics of debris flows. Analyses of flows of dry, granular solids and solid-fluid mixtures provide a foundation for a comprehensive debris flow theory, and experiments provide data that reveal the strengths and limitations of theoretical models. Both debris flow materials and dry granular materials can sustain shear stresses while remaining static; both can deform in a slow, tranquil mode characterized by enduring, frictional grain contacts; and both can flow in a more rapid, agitated mode characterized by brief, inelastic grain collisions. In debris flows, however, pore fluid that is highly viscous and nearly incompressible, composed of water with suspended silt and clay, can strongly mediate intergranular friction and collisions. Grain friction, grain collisions, and viscous fluid flow may transfer significant momentum simultaneously. Both the vibrational kinetic energy of solid grains (measured by a quantity termed the granular temperature) and the pressure of the intervening pore fluid facilitate motion of grains past one another, thereby enhancing debris flow mobility. Granular temperature arises from conversion of flow translational energy to grain vibrational energy, a process that depends on shear rates, grain properties, boundary conditions, and the ambient fluid viscosity and pressure. Pore fluid pressures that exceed static equilibrium pressures result from local or global debris contraction. Like larger, natural debris flows, experimental debris flows of ???10 m3 of poorly sorted, water-saturated sediment invariably move as an unsteady surge or series of surges. Measurements at the base of experimental flows show that coarse-grained surge fronts have little or no pore fluid pressure. In contrast, finer-grained, thoroughly saturated debris behind surge fronts is nearly liquefied by high pore pressure, which persists owing to the great compressibility and moderate

  8. Intraoral micro-identification discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, R W

    1991-12-01

    Intraoral micro-identification discs have recently been utilized to provide a more permanent method of personal identification. A wafer of plastic or metal with a surface area of 2.5 to 5 mm2 and carrying identifying numbers and/or letters (indicia) is bonded to the buccal enamel surface of the posterior teeth. Personal identification can occur after the I.D. disc is identified and the indicia is read. Reading of photoreduced indicia requires the aid of a microscope subsequent to the removal of the microdisc. In situ reading of disc indicia is possible using low power handheld magnifiers if the size of the indicia approximates 0.3 mm. Computerization is an integral part of non-custom alpha/numeric type designs, but a custom disc carries a name, address, and other specific information unique to the manufacturer. The use of a computer improves access to the database and it decreases the amount of data placed on the disc. Microdisc bases may be fabricated using a mylar type plastic or they may be manufactured from a stainless steel blank. Plastic discs are constructed with an internal sandwich containing the photo-reduced indicia. Metal discs are marked with a photochemical etch or engraved with a computer driven YAG laser. Attachment of the disc to the enamel surface is accomplished by conventional etching and bonding techniques and are typically bonded to the buccal surface of the maxillary first permanent molar or the second primary molar. Clear composite bonding material covers the disc so that salivary contamination does not result in degradation of the indicia. Orthodontic style discs with a mesh back carry laser written information that may be cemented with conventional orthodontic bonding cement. Standardization of the indicia and overall design is considered to be an important aspect of patient and professional acceptance.

  9. Evolution of protoplanetary discs with magnetically driven disc winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Ogihara, Masahiro; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Crida, Aurélien; Guillot, Tristan

    2016-12-01

    Aims: We investigate the evolution of protoplanetary discs (PPDs) with magnetically driven disc winds and viscous heating. Methods: We considered an initially massive disc with 0.1 M⊙ to track the evolution from the early stage of PPDs. We solved the time evolution of surface density and temperature by taking into account viscous heating and the loss of mass and angular momentum by the disc winds within the framework of a standard α model for accretion discs. Our model parameters, turbulent viscosity, disc wind mass-loss, and disc wind torque, which were adopted from local magnetohydrodynamical simulations and constrained by the global energetics of the gravitational accretion, largely depends on the physical condition of PPDs, particularly on the evolution of the vertical magnetic flux in weakly ionized PPDs. Results: Although there are still uncertainties concerning the evolution of the vertical magnetic flux that remains, the surface densities show a large variety, depending on the combination of these three parameters, some of which are very different from the surface density expected from the standard accretion. When a PPD is in a wind-driven accretion state with the preserved vertical magnetic field, the radial dependence of the surface density can be positive in the inner region migration of protoplanets. Conclusions: The variety of our calculated PPDs should yield a wide variety of exoplanet systems.

  10. An enhanced temperature index model for debris-covered glaciers accounting for thickness effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenzo, M; Pellicciotti, F; Mabillard, J; Reid, T; Brock, B W

    2016-08-01

    strem curve. Its large number of parameters might be a limitation, but we show that the model is transferable in time and space to a second glacier with little loss of performance. We thus suggest that the new DETI model can be included in continuous mass balance models of debris-covered glaciers, because of its limited data requirements. As such, we expect its application to lead to an improvement in simulations of the debris-covered glacier response to climate in comparison with models that simply recalibrate empirical parameters to prescribe a constant across glacier reduction in melt.

  11. An enhanced temperature index model for debris-covered glaciers accounting for thickness effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenzo, M.; Pellicciotti, F.; Mabillard, J.; Reid, T.; Brock, B. W.

    2016-08-01

    strem curve. Its large number of parameters might be a limitation, but we show that the model is transferable in time and space to a second glacier with little loss of performance. We thus suggest that the new DETI model can be included in continuous mass balance models of debris-covered glaciers, because of its limited data requirements. As such, we expect its application to lead to an improvement in simulations of the debris-covered glacier response to climate in comparison with models that simply recalibrate empirical parameters to prescribe a constant across glacier reduction in melt.

  12. Space Debris Environment Remediation Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Klinkrad, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    Long-term projections of the space debris environment indicate that even drastic measures, such as an immediate, complete halt of launch and release activities, will not result in a stable environment of man-made space objects. Collision events between already existing space hardware will within a few decades start to dominate the debris population, and result in a net increase of the space debris population, also in size regimes which may cause further catastrophic collisions. Such a collisional cascading will ultimately lead to a run-away situation ("Kessler syndrome"), with no further possibility of human intervention. The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) has been investigating the status and the stability of the space debris environment in several studies by first looking into space traffic management possibilities and then investigating means of mitigating the creation of space debris. In an ongoing activity, an IAA study group looks at ways of active space debris environment remediation. In contrast to the former mitigation study, the current activity concentrates on the active removal of small and large objects, such as defunct spacecraft, orbital stages, and mission-related objects, which serve as a latent mass reservoir that fuels initial catastrophic collisions and later collisional cascading. The paper will outline different mass removal concepts, e.g. based on directed energy, tethers (momentum exchange or electrodynamic), aerodynamic drag augmentation, solar sails, auxiliary propulsion units, retarding surfaces, or on-orbit capture. Apart from physical principles of the proposed concepts, their applicability to different orbital regimes, and their effectiveness concerning mass removal efficiency will be analyzed. The IAA activity on space debris environment remediation is a truly international project which involves more than 23 contributing authors from 9 different nations.

  13. Adaptive optics for laser space debris removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennet, Francis; Conan, Rodolphe; D'Orgeville, Celine; Dawson, Murray; Paulin, Nicolas; Price, Ian; Rigaut, Francois; Ritchie, Ian; Smith, Craig; Uhlendorf, Kristina

    2012-07-01

    Space debris in low Earth orbit below 1500km is becoming an increasing threat to satellites and spacecrafts. Radar and laser tracking are currently used to monitor the orbits of thousands of space debris and active satellites are able to use this information to manoeuvre out of the way of a predicted collision. However, many satellites are not able to manoeuvre and debris-on debris collisions are becoming a signicant contributor to the growing space debris population. The removal of the space debris from orbit is the preferred and more denitive solution. Space debris removal may be achieved through laser ablation, whereby a high power laser corrected with an adaptive optics system could, in theory, allow ablation of the debris surface and so impart a remote thrust on the targeted object. The goal of this is to avoid collisions between space debris to prevent an exponential increase in the number of space debris objects. We are developing an experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of laser ablation for space debris removal. This laser ablation demonstrator utilises a pulsed sodium laser to probe the atmosphere ahead of the space debris and the sun re ection of the space debris is used to provide atmospheric tip{tilt information. A deformable mirror is then shaped to correct an infrared laser beam on the uplink path to the debris. We present here the design and the expected performance of the system.

  14. Variable Emission from a Gaseous Disc around a Metal-Polluted White Dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, David J; Koester, Detlev; Raddi, Roberto; Breedt, Elmé; Southworth, John; Parsons, Steven G

    2014-01-01

    We present the discovery of strongly variable emission lines from a gaseous disc around the DA white dwarf SDSS J1617+1620, a star previously found to have an infrared excess indicative of a dusty debris disc formed by the tidal disruption of a rocky planetary body. Time-series spectroscopy obtained during the period 2006-2014 has shown the appearance of strong double-peaked Ca II emission lines in 2008. The lines were weak, at best, during earlier observations, and monotonically faded through the remainder of our monitoring. Our observations represent unambiguous evidence for short-term variability in the debris environment of evolved planetary systems. Possible explanations for this extraordinary variability include the impact onto the dusty disc of either a single small rocky planetesimal, or of material from a highly eccentric debris tail. The increase in flux from the emission lines is sufficient that similar events could be detected in the broadband photometry of ongoing and future large-area time domai...

  15. Coevolution of Binaries and Gaseous Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Fleming, David P

    2016-01-01

    The recent discoveries of circumbinary planets by $\\it Kepler$ raise questions for contemporary planet formation models. Understanding how these planets form requires characterizing their formation environment, the circumbinary protoplanetary disc, and how the disc and binary interact and change as a result. The central binary excites resonances in the surrounding protoplanetary disc that drive evolution in both the binary orbital elements and in the disc. To probe how these interactions impact binary eccentricity and disc structure evolution, N-body smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of gaseous protoplanetary discs surrounding binaries based on Kepler 38 were run for $10^4$ binary periods for several initial binary eccentricities. We find that nearly circular binaries weakly couple to the disc via a parametric instability and excite disc eccentricity growth. Eccentric binaries strongly couple to the disc causing eccentricity growth for both the disc and binary. Discs around sufficiently eccentri...

  16. Spinning disc atomisation process: Modelling and computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Sisoev, Grigory; Shikhmurzaev, Yulii

    2016-11-01

    The atomisation of liquids using a spinning disc (SDA), where the centrifugal force is used to generate a continuous flow, with the liquid eventually disintegrating into drops which, on solidification, become particles, is a key element in many technologies. Examples of such technologies range from powder manufacturing in metallurgy to various biomedical applications. In order to be able to control the SDA process, it is necessary to understand it as a whole, from the feeding of the liquid and the wave pattern developing on the disc to the disintegration of the liquid film into filaments and these into drops. The SDA process has been the subject of a number of experimental studies and some elements of it, notably the film on a spinning disc and the dynamics of the jets streaming out from it, have been investigated theoretically. However, to date there have been no studies of the process as a whole, including, most importantly, the transition zone where the film that has already developed a certain wave pattern disintegrates into jets that spiral out. The present work reports some results of an ongoing project aimed at producing a definitive map of regimes occurring in the SDA process and their outcome.

  17. Hydroplaning and submarine debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blasio, Fabio V.; Engvik, Lars; Harbitz, Carl B.; ElverhøI, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Examination of submarine clastic deposits along the continental margins reveals the remnants of holocenic or older debris flows with run-out distances up to hundreds of kilometers. Laboratory experiments on subaqueous debris flows, where typically one tenth of a cubic meter of material is dropped down a flume, also show high velocities and long run-out distances compared to subaerial debris flows. Moreover, they show the tendency of the head of the flow to run out ahead of the rest of the body. The experiments reveal the possible clue to the mechanism of long run-out. This mechanism, called hydroplaning, begins as the dynamic pressure at the front of the debris flow becomes of the order of the pressure exerted by the weight of the sediment. In such conditions a layer of water can intrude under the sediment with a lubrication effect and a decrease in the resistance forces between the sediment and the seabed. A physical-mathematical model of hydroplaning is presented and investigated numerically. The model is applied to both laboratory- and field-scale debris flows. Agreement with laboratory experiments makes us confident in the extrapolation of our model to natural flows and shows that long run-out distances can be naturally attained.

  18. A review of modern challenges in fire debris analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baerncopf, Jamie; Hutches, Katherine

    2014-11-01

    The continually-evolving field of fire debris analysis presents challenges to examiners on a regular basis. This article combines an overview of the scientific literature with novel samples that illustrate the current issues faced by fire debris examiners. Unusual liquids that contradict current classification schemes are discussed, as are complex matrices with noteworthy interferences. The matrix effects range from inherent interferences to the degradation of ignitable liquids. Finally, non-routine analyses are discussed, including the analysis of vegetable and lubricating oils and novel ignition methods. Through open discussion of complex samples and individual experiences, the problems in fire debris analysis can be overcome, resulting in the production of accurate and authoritative information.

  19. Multiple Space Debris Collecting Mission -- Optimal Mission Planning

    CERN Document Server

    Cerf, Max

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of planning successive Space Debris Collecting missions so that they can be achieved at minimal cost by a generic vehicle. The problem mixes combinatorial optimization to select and order the debris among a list of candidates, and continuous optimization to fix the rendezvous dates and to define the minimum fuel orbital maneuvers. The solution method proposed consists in three stages. Firstly the orbital transfer problem is simplified by considering a generic transfer strategy suited either to a high thrust or a low thrust vehicle. A response surface modelling is built by solving the reduced problem for all pairs of debris and for discretized dates, and storing the results in cost matrices. Secondly a simulated annealing algorithm is applied to find the optimal mission planning. The cost function is assessed by interpolation on the response surface based on the cost matrices. This allows the convergence of the simulated algorithm in a limited computation time, yielding an opti...

  20. Numerical modelling of floating debris in the world's oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, L C-M; Greer, S D; Borrero, J C

    2012-03-01

    A global ocean circulation model is coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking model to simulate 30 years of input, transport and accumulation of floating debris in the world ocean. Using both terrestrial and maritime inputs, the modelling results clearly show the formation of five accumulation zones in the subtropical latitudes of the major ocean basins. The relative size and concentration of each clearly illustrate the dominance of the accumulation zones in the northern hemisphere, while smaller seas surrounded by densely populated areas are also shown to have a high concentration of floating debris. We also determine the relative contribution of different source regions to the total amount of material in a particular accumulation zone. This study provides a framework for describing the transport, distribution and accumulation of floating marine debris and can be continuously updated and adapted to assess scenarios reflecting changes in the production and disposal of plastic worldwide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stability of self-gravitating discs under irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, W K M; Mamatsashvili, G R; Lodato, G; Clarke, C J

    2011-01-01

    Self-gravity becomes competitive as an angular momentum transport process in accretion discs at large radii, where the temperature is low enough that external irradiation likely contributes to the thermal balance. Irradiation is known to weaken the strength of disc self-gravity, and can suppress it entirely if the disc is maintained above the threshold for linear instability. However, its impact on the susceptibility of the disc to fragmentation is less clear. We use two-dimensional numerical simulations to investigate the evolution of self-gravitating discs as a function of the local cooling time and strength of irradiation. In the regime where the disc does not fragment, we show that local thermal equilibrium continues to determine the stress - which can be represented as an effective viscous alpha - out to very long cooling times (at least 240 dynamical times). In this regime, the power spectrum of the perturbations is uniquely set by the effective viscous alpha and not by the cooling rate. Fragmentation o...

  2. Daughter Fragmentation is Unlikely To Occur in Self-Gravitating Circumstellar Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Forgan, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Circumstellar discs are thought to be self-gravitating at very early times. If the disc is relatively cool, extended and accreting sufficiently rapidly, it can fragment into bound objects of order a few Jupiter masses and upwards. Given that the fragment's initial angular momentum is non-zero, and it will continue to accrete angular momentum from the surrounding circumstellar disc, we should expect that the fragment will also possess a relatively massive disc at early times. Therefore, we can ask: is disc fragmentation a hierarchical process? Or, can a disc fragment go on to produce its own self-gravitating circumfragmentary disc that produces daughter fragments? We investigate this using a set of nested 1D self-gravitating disc models. We calculate the radial structure of a marginally stable, self-gravitating circumstellar disc, and compute its propensity to fragmentation. We use this data to construct the local fragment properties at this radius. For each circumstellar disc model that results in fragmentati...

  3. Intervertebral disc (IVD): Structure, degeneration, repair and regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whatley, Benjamin R.; Wen Xuejun, E-mail: xjwen@clemson.edu

    2012-02-01

    Low back pain affects a large portion of the population, resulting in high care costs for therapy and treatment. One primary cause of low back pain is the degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) resulting in the compression of the spinal nerves and adjacent vertebrae. Exact causes of degeneration are unknown, but it is thought that natural aging, and both biological and genetic factors may play a significant role in the degenerative process. Conventional methods to alleviate low back pain include spinal fusion and artificial disc replacement. Traditional treatments through spinal fusion may eliminate pain yet do not restore disc function and lead to further degeneration of adjacent levels by altering disc biomechanics and natural kinematics. Recently, artificial IVD replacements have started to gain interest, with two IVD implants currently approved in the United States. Although these implants facilitate the preservation of motions and disc space height, they are unable to sustain compressive forces due to their lack of elasticity. In addition, the implants may produce wear debris that can cause osteolysis and other deleterious effects. As an alternative to these conventional approaches, tissue engineered IVD constructs offer the advantage of biointegration while preserving the essential attributes of natural motion and disc space restoration. There is a great need for the development of tissue engineered scaffolds that simulate the natural 3D morphology and microenvironment of the targeted tissue. Scaffolds should facilitate biological transport to satisfy nutrition and waste removal requirements within the IVD. The discrete tissue architectures of the nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) have posed great challenges to IVD tissue engineering. Current attempts have not been able to satisfy the biological functions and/or mechanical properties of native tissue. Therefore, these current scaffolds are far from satisfactory. This review highlights the

  4. Involvement of wound and climacteric ethylene in ripening avocado discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrett, D A; Laties, G G

    1991-10-01

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill. cv Hass) discs (3 mm thick) ripened in approximately 72 hours when maintained in a flow of moist air and resembled ripe fruit in texture and taste. Ethylene evolution by discs of early and midseason fruit was characterized by two distinct components, viz. wound ethylene, peaking at approximately 18 hours, and climacteric ethylene, rising to a peak at approximately 72 hours. A commensurate respiratory stimulation accompanied each ethylene peak. Aminoethoxyvinyl glycine (AVG) given consecutively, at once and at 24 hours following disc preparation, prevented wound and climacteric respiration peaks, virtually all ethylene production, and ripening. When AVG was administered for the first 24 hours only, respiratory stimulation and softening (ripening) were retarded by at least a day. When AVG was added solely after the first 24 hours, ripening proceeded as in untreated discs, although climacteric ethylene and respiration were diminished. Propylene given together with AVG led to ripening under all circumstances. 2,5-Norbornadiene given continuously stimulated wound ethylene production, and it inhibited climacteric ethylene evolution, the augmentation of ethylene-forming enzyme activity normally associated with climacteric ethylene, and ripening. 2,5-Norbornadiene given at 24 hours fully inhibited ripening. When intact fruit were pulsed with ethylene for 24 hours before discs were prepared therefrom, the respiration rate, ethylene-forming enzyme activity buildup, and rate of ethylene production were all subsequently enhanced. The evidence suggests that ethylene is involved in all phases of disc ripening. In this view, wound ethylene in discs accelerates events that normally take place over an extended period throughout the lag phase in intact fruit, and climacteric ethylene serves the same ripening function in discs and intact fruit alike.

  5. Estimating gas accretion in disc galaxies using the Kennicutt-Schmidt law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraternali, Filippo; Tomassetti, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    We show how the existence of a relation between the star formation rate (SFR) and the gas density, i.e. the KennicuttSchmidt law, implies a continuous accretion of fresh gas from the environment into the discs of spiral galaxies. We present a method to derive the gas infall rate in a galaxy disc as

  6. Debris-flow observations in the Zermatt Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    related slide and fall processes, increasingly large amounts of loose sediment are delivered into debris-flow systems. Extensive till, scree slopes and rock glaciers represent the principal and extensive sediment sources for debris flows which are commonly triggered at elevations between 2000 and 3000 m asl. Here, high annual and daily thermal ranges favour frost weathering and regolith production delivered to scree slopes. Slope angles in the initiation zones range from 27 to 41° and are dominated by permafrost in all of the catchments. Debris flows are triggered either through the wetting of material continuously delivered by the permafrost body to the channel or due to release at the rock glacier fronts during exceptional water input. The wetting typically occurs during rainstorms, but debris flows at these sites also happen when sediment shear resistance is reduced by the melting of ice particles, by snow melting and/or a combination of both. In the Dorfbach torrent near Randa, WSL operates an automated debris-flow observation station, measuring the typical parameters such as flow heights and velocities since several years. As part of an interdisciplinary project on data acquisition and numerical modelling of debris flows for hazard mapping, we monitor several other debris-flow prone torrents in the valley and combine these data with observations of ongoing processes in the headwater of the catchments. Several debris-flow events in some of the torrents could be observed and measured in the last years. Total volume, discharge per surge, frontal speed, run out length and impact on the inhabited fans varied considerably. Typically one first event cluster is dominated by snow melting controlled conditions starting late May until end of June and a second cluster are the rainstorm dominated events in midsummer. The largest events are expected in late summer or in fall, when long-lasting advective precipitation events over several days prevail.

  7. Accretion discs trapped near corotation

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, C.R.; Spruit, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    We show that discs accreting on to the magnetosphere of a rotating star can end up in a trapped state, in which the inner edge of the disc stays near the corotation radius, even at low and varying accretion rates. The accretion in these trapped states can be steady or cyclic; we explore these states over a wide range of parameter space. We find two distinct regions of instability: one related to the buildup and release of mass in the disc outside corotation, and the other to mass storage with...

  8. Fractal Structure of Debris Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong; LIU Jingjing; HU Kaiheng; CHEN Xiaoqing

    2007-01-01

    One of the most remarkable characteristics of debris flow is the competence for supporting boulders on the surface of flow, which strongly suggests that there should be some structure in the fluid body. This paper analyzed the grain compositions from various samples of debris flows and then revealed the fractal structure. Specifically, the fractality holds in three domains that can be respectively identified as the slurry, matrix, and the coarse content. Furthermore, the matrix fractal, which distinguishes debris flow from other kinds of flows, involves a hierarchical structure in the sense that it might contain ever increasing grains while the total range of grain size increases. It provides a possible mechanism for the boulder suspension.

  9. The Role of Discs in the Collapse and Fragmentation of Prestellar Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, O; Hubber, D A

    2015-01-01

    Disc fragmentation provides an important mechanism for producing low mass stars in prestellar cores. Here, we describe Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations which show how populations of prestellar cores evolve into stars. We find the observed masses and multiplicities of stars can be recovered under certain conditions. First, protostellar feedback from a star must be episodic. The continuous accretion of disc material on to a central protostar results in local temperatures which are too high for disc fragmentation. If, however, the accretion occurs in intense outbursts, separated by a downtime of $\\sim10^4\\,\\mathrm{years}$, gravitational instabilities can develop and the disc can fragment. Second, a significant amount of the cores' internal kinetic energy should be in solenoidal turbulent modes. Cores with less than a third of their kinetic energy in solenoidal modes have insufficient angular momentum to form fragmenting discs. In the absence of discs, cores can fragment but results in a top heavy dist...

  10. 94 Ceti: a triple star with a planet and dust disc

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegert, J; de Miera, F Cruz-Saenz

    2016-01-01

    94 Ceti is a triple star system with a circumprimary gas giant planet and far-infrared excess. Such excesses around main sequence stars are likely due to debris discs, and are considered as signposts of planetary systems and, therefore, provide important insights into the configuration and evolution of the planetary system. Consequently, in order to learn more about the 94 Ceti system, we aim to precisely model the dust emission to fit its observed SED and to simulate its orbital dynamics. We interpret our APEX bolometric observations and complement them with archived Spitzer and Herschel bolometric data to explore the stellar excess and to map out background sources in the fields. Dynamical simulations and 3D radiative transfer calculations were used to constrain the debris disc configurations and model the dust emission. The best fit dust disc model for 94 Ceti implies a circumbinary disc around the secondary pair, limited by dynamics to radii smaller than 40 AU and with a grain size power-law distribution ...

  11. 94 Ceti: a triple star with a planet and dust disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, J.; Faramaz, V.; Cruz-Saenz de Miera, F.

    2016-10-01

    94 Ceti is a triple star system with a circumprimary gas giant planet and far-infrared excess. Such excesses around main sequence stars are likely due to debris discs, and are considered as signposts of planetary systems and, therefore, provide important insights into the configuration and evolution of the planetary system. Consequently, to learn more about the 94 Ceti system, we aim to model the dust emission precisely to fit its observed spectral energy distribution and to simulate its orbital dynamics. We interpret our APEX bolometric observations and complement them with archived Spitzer and Herschel bolometric data to explore the stellar excess and to map out background sources in the fields. Dynamical simulations and 3D radiative transfer calculations were used to constrain the debris disc configurations and model the dust emission. The best-fitting dust disc model for 94 Ceti implies a circumbinary disc around the secondary pair, limited by dynamics to radii smaller than 40 au and with a grain-size power-law distribution of ˜a-3.5. This model exhibits a dust-to-star luminosity ratio of 4.6 ± 0.4 × 10-6. The system is dynamically stable and N-body symplectic simulation results are consistent with semi-analytical equations that describe orbits in binary systems. In the observations, we also find tentative evidence of a circumtertiary ring that could be edge-on.

  12. The Herschel Cold Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspar, Andras

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel "DUst around NEarby Stars (DUNES)" survey has found a number of debris disk candidates that are apparently very cold, with temperatures near 22K. It has proven difficult to fit their spectral energy distributions with conventional models for debris disks. Given this issue we carefully examine the alternative explanation, that the detections arise from confusion with IR cirrus and/or background galaxies that are not physically associated with the foreground star. We find that such an explanation is consistent with all of these detections.

  13. Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act legally establishes the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Marine Debris Program. The...

  14. Space Debris Elimination (SpaDE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The amount of debris in low Earth orbit (LEO) has increased rapidly over the last twenty years. This prevalence of debris increases the likelihood of cascading...

  15. An Evolution Model of Space Debris Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Various types of models including engineering models andevolution models have been developed to understand space debris environment since 1960s. Evolution model, consisting of a set of supporting models such as Launch Model, Breakup Model and Atmosphere Model, can reliably predicts the evolution of space debris environment. Of these supporting models, Breakup Model is employed to describe the distribution of debris and debris cloud during a explosion or collision case which is one of the main factors affecting the amount of total space debris. An analytical orbit debris environment model referred to as the “Particles-In-Boxes" model has been introduced. By regarding the orbit debris as the freedom particles running in the huge volume, the sources and sinks mechanism is established. Then the PIB model is expanded to the case of multiple-species in multiple-tier system. Combined with breakup model, the evolution of orbit debris environment is predicted.

  16. NASA Orbital Debris Requirements and Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Limitation of orbital debris accumulation is an international and national concern, reflectedin NASA debris limitation requirements. These requirements will be reviewed, along with some practices that can be employed to achieve the requirements.

  17. DebriSat Project Update and Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, M.; Krisko, P. H.

    2016-01-01

    DebriSat Reporting Topics: DebriSat Fragment Analysis Calendar; Near-term Fragment Extraction Strategy; Fragment Characterization and Database; HVI (High-Velocity Impact) Considerations; Requirements Document.

  18. Eclipse mapping of accretion discs

    CERN Document Server

    Baptista, R

    2000-01-01

    The eclipse mapping method is an inversion technique that makes use of the information contained in eclipse light curves to probe the structure, the spectrum and the time evolution of accretion discs. In this review I present the basics of the method and discuss its different implementations. I summarize the most important results obtained to date and discuss how they have helped to improve our understanding of accretion physics, from testing the theoretical radial brightness temperature distribution and measuring mass accretion rates to showing the evolution of the structure of a dwarf novae disc through its outburst cycle, from isolating the spectrum of a disc wind to revealing the geometry of disc spiral shocks. I end with an outline of the future prospects.

  19. Vortex migration in protoplanetary discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaloizou John C. B.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vortices embedded in protoplanetary discs can act as obstacles to the unperturbed disc flow. The resulting velocity perturbations propagate away from the vortex in the form of density waves that transport angular momentum. Any asymmetry between the inner and the outer density wave means that the region around the vortex has to change its angular momentum. We find that this leads to orbital migration of the vortex. Asymmetric waves always arise except in the case of a disc with constant pressure, for isothermal as well as non-isothermal discs. Depending on the size and strength of the vortex, the resulting migration time scales can be as short as a few thousand orbits.

  20. Modelling Neutral Hydrogen Discs of Spiral Galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林伟鹏; 洪碧海

    2002-01-01

    We present an analytical model of a neutral hydrogen disc in a spiral galaxy. The gas disc of the spiral galaxy isassumed to have an exponential surface density profile and to be ionized by the cosmic ultraviolet background.To compare with observations, we consider the disc position angle and inclination angle for a line of sight goingthrough the galaxy disc. The HI column densities depend on the strength of ionizing field and disc position andinclination. The model was applied to NGC 3198 and the results were compared with observational data. TheHI disc profile at large disc radii can be tested by further HI observations using radio telescopes with a largeraperture than the present facilities. This HI disc model can be used to predict quasar absorption line systems bygalaxy discs if quasar lines of sight go through the discs.

  1. Numerical search for a potential planet sculpting the young disc of HD 115600

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilliez, E.; Maddison, S. T.

    2017-01-01

    Radial and azimuthal features (such as disc offsets and eccentric rings) seen in high-resolution images of debris discs provide us with the unique opportunity of finding potential planetary companions that betray their presence by gravitationally sculpting such asymmetric features. The young debris disc around HD 115600, imaged recently by the Gemini Planet Imager, is such a disc with an eccentricity e ˜ 0.1-0.2 and a projected offset from the star of ˜4 au. Using our modified N-body code that incorporates radiation forces, we first aim to determine the orbit of a hidden planetary companion potentially responsible for shaping the disc. We run a suite of simulations covering a broad range of planetary parameters using a Monte Carlo Markov Chain sampling method and create synthetic images from which we extract the geometric disc parameters to be compared with the observed and model-derived quantities. We then repeat the study using a traditional grid to explore the planetary parameter space and then aim to compare the efficiency of both sampling methods. We find a planet of 7.8 MJ orbiting at 30 au with an eccentricity of e = 0.2 to be the best fit to the observations of HD 115600. Technically, such planet has a contrast detectable by direct imaging, however the system's orientation does not favour such detection. In this study, at equal number of explored planetary configurations, the Monte Carlo Markov Chain not only converges faster but provides a better fit than a traditional grid.

  2. Photon Bubbles in Accretion Discs

    OpenAIRE

    Gammie, Charles F.

    1998-01-01

    We show that radiation dominated accretion discs are likely to suffer from a ``photon bubble'' instability similar to that described by Arons in the context of accretion onto neutron star polar caps. The instability requires a magnetic field for its existence. In an asymptotic regime appropriate to accretion discs, we find that the overstable modes obey the remarkably simple dispersion relation \\omega^2 = -i g k F(B,k). Here g is the vertical gravitational acceleration, B the magnetic field, ...

  3. Self-gravitating accretion discs

    OpenAIRE

    Lodato, G.

    2008-01-01

    I review recent progresses in the dynamics and the evolution of self-gravitating accretion discs. Accretion discs are a fundamental component of several astrophysical systems on very diverse scales, and can be found around supermassive black holes in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), and also in our Galaxy around stellar mass compact objects and around young stars. Notwithstanding the specific differences arising from such diversity in physical extent, all these systems share a common feature whe...

  4. A Search for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American...Examples are the results from the European Space Debris Facility in the Canary Islands, MODEST (the Michigan orbital DEbris Survey Telescope at Cerro ...filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American

  5. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  6. Applying Knowledge from Terrestrial Debris-Covered Glaciers to Constrain the Evolution of Martian Debris-Covered Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutnik, M. R.; Pathare, A. V.; Todd, C.; Waddington, E.; Christian, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    We will discuss the application of terrestrial knowledge on debris emplacement, the effects of debris on glacier-surface topography, debris transport by ice flow, deformation of debris-laden ice, and atmosphere-glacier feedbacks to Mars ice.

  7. Resonances in retrograde circumbinary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the interaction of an eccentric binary with a circular coplanar circumbinary disc that rotates in a retrograde sense with respect to the binary. In the circular binary case, no Lindblad resonances lie within the disc and no Lindblad resonant torques are produced, as was previously known. By analytic means, we show that when the binary orbit is eccentric, there exist components of the gravitational potential of the binary which rotate in a retrograde sense to the binary orbit and so rotate progradely with respect to this disc, allowing a resonant interaction to occur between the binary and the disc. The resulting resonant torques distinctly alter the disc response from the circular binary case. We describe results of three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to explore this effect and categorise the response of the disc in terms of modes whose strengths vary as a function of binary mass ratio and eccentricity. These mode strengths are weak compared to the largest mode strengths expected in the prog...

  8. Lumbar disc excision through fenestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwan S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Lumbar disc herniation often causes sciatica. Many different techniques have been advocated with the aim of least possible damage to other structures while dealing with prolapsed disc surgically in the properly selected and indicated cases. Methods : Twenty six patients with clinical symptoms and signs of prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc having radiological correlation by MRI study were subjected to disc excision by interlaminar fenestration method. Results : The assessment at follow-up showed excellent results in 17 patients, good in 6 patients, fair in 2 patients and poor in 1 patient. The mean preoperative and postoperative Visual Analogue Scores were 9.34 ±0.84 and 2.19 ±0.84 on scale of 0-10 respectively. These were statistically significant (p value< 0.001, paired t test. No significant complications were recorded. Conclusion : Procedures of interlaminar fenestration and open disc excision under direct vision offers sufficient adequate exposure for lumbar disc excision with a smaller incision, lesser morbidity, shorter convalescence, early return to work and comparable overall results in the centers where recent laser and endoscopy facilities are not available.

  9. Counter-Rotating Accretion Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Dyda, Sergei; Ustyugova, Galina V; Romanova, Marina M; Koldoba, Alexander V

    2014-01-01

    Counter-rotating discs can arise from the accretion of a counter-rotating gas cloud onto the surface of an existing co-rotating disc or from the counter-rotating gas moving radially inward to the outer edge of an existing disc. At the interface, the two components mix to produce gas or plasma with zero net angular momentum which tends to free-fall towards the disc center. We discuss high-resolution axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of a viscous counter-rotating disc for cases where the two components are vertically separated and radially separated. The viscosity is described by an isotropic $\\alpha-$viscosity including all terms in the viscous stress tensor. For the vertically separated components a shear layer forms between them. The middle of this layer free-falls to the disk center. The accretion rates are increased by factors $\\sim 10^2-10^4$ over that of a conventional disc rotating in one direction with the same viscosity. The vertical width of the shear layer and the accretion rate are strongly dep...

  10. Direct thermal imaging of circumstellar discs and exo-planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantin, Eric; Siebenmorgen, Ralf; Cavarroc, Celine; Sterzik, Michael F.

    2008-07-01

    The phase A study of a mid infrared imager and spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), called METIS, was endorsed in May 2008. Two key science drivers of METIS are: a) direct thermal imaging of exo-planets and b) characterization of circumstellar discs from the early proto-planetary to the late debris phase. Observations in the 10μm atmospheric window (N band) require a contrast ratio between stellar light and emitted photons from the exo-planet or the disc of ~ 105. At shorter wavelengths the contrast between star and reflected light from the planet-disc system exceeds >~ 107 posing technical challenges. By means of end-to-end detailed simulations we demonstrate that the superb spatial resolution of a 42m telescope in combination with stellar light rejection methods such as coronagraphic or differential imaging will allow detections at 10μm for a solar type system down to a star-planet separation of 0.1" and a mass limit for irradiated planets of 1 Jupiter (MJ) mass. In case of self-luminous planets observations are possible further out e.g. at the separation limit of JWST of ~ 0.7", METIS will detect planets >~5MJ. This allows to derive a census of all such exo-planets by means of thermal imaging in a volume limited sample of up to 6pc. In addition, METIS will provide the possibility to study the chemical composition of atmospheres of exo-planets using spectroscopy at moderate spectral resolution (λ/Δλ ~ 100) for the brightest targets. Based on detailed performance and sensitivity estimates, we demonstrate that a mid-infrared instrument on an ELT is perfectly suited to observe gravitationally created structures such as gaps in proto- and post- planetary discs, in a complementary way to space missions (e.g. JWST, SOFIA) and ALMA which can only probe the cold dust emission further out.

  11. Including the effects of debris cover in a distributed glacier energy balance model (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicciotti, F.; Reid, T.; Carenzo, M.; Brock, B. W.

    2010-12-01

    Distributed models of glacier energy balance, which make use of digital elevation models and extensive spatial data on local meteorology, have become very useful tools for predicting glacial ablation and runoff in recent years. They generally function by running a one-dimensional energy balance model at every point on a grid on the glacier surface - for each point in the grid the ablation is calculated based on the balance of heat fluxes at the ice-air boundary. However, one key component has been missing from distributed models to date, namely the effects of debris cover. Many glacier ablation zones are mantled in near-continuous blankets of rock debris, and debris-covered glaciers are important drivers of the water cycle in the European Alps, Andes and Himalayas. Moreover, debris covers have been seen to expand in recent years, so it is essential to assess exactly how the presence of debris may affect a glacier’s surface energy balance and potential responses to climate changes. The effects of a debris cover are complicated by the varying surface roughness, albedo and thermal properties of the debris in question, but generally a debris cover reduces glacier melt rate by insulating the glacier surface from direct solar radiation. Even on glaciers where the debris cover is not continuous, isolated patches of debris caused by rockfalls can affect the glacier evolution by introducing differential ablation across the glacier surface, thus creating ice-cored moraines that may persist after ‘clean’ parts of the glacier have wasted away. This paper presents the results of incorporating a one-dimensional ‘debris energy balance model’ called DEB-Model (Reid and Brock 2010) into a distributed melt model for Haut Glacier d’Arolla, Switzerland. DEB-Model numerically estimates debris surface temperature by considering the balance of heat fluxes at the air-debris interface, then calculates heat conduction through the debris in order to estimate melt rates at the

  12. High-density turbidity currents: Are they sandy debris flows?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Conventionally, turbidity currents are considered as fluidal flows in which sediment is supported by fluid turbulence, whereas debris flows are plastic flows in which sediment is supported by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The concept of high-density turbidity current refers to high-concentration, commonly non-turbulent, flows of fluids in which sediment is supported mainly by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The conventional wisdom that traction carpets with entrained turbulent clouds on top represent high-density turbidity currents is a misnomer because traction carpets are neither fluidal nor turbulent. Debris flows may also have entrained turbulent clouds on top. The traction carpet/debris flow and the overriding turbulent clouds are two separate entities in terms of flow rheology and sediment-support mechanism. In experimental and theoretical studies, which has linked massive sands and floating clasts to high-density turbidity currents, the term high-density turbidity current has actually been used for laminar flows. In alleviating this conceptual problem, sandy debris flow is suggested as a substitute for high-density turbidity current. Sandy debris flows represent a continuous spectrum of processes between cohesive and cohesionless debris flows. Commonly they are rheologically plastic. They may occur with or without entrained turbulent clouds on top. Their sediment-support mechanisms include matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. They are characterized by laminar flow conditions, a moderate to high grain concentration, and a low to moderate mud content. Although flows evolve and transform during the course of transport in density-stratified flows, the preserved features in a deposit are useful to decipher only the final stages of deposition. At present, there are no established criteria to decipher transport mechanism from the depositional record.

  13. Harnessing Adaptive Optics for Space Debris Collision Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovaro, A.; Bennet, F.; Copeland, M.; Rigaut, F.; d'Orgeville, C.; Grosse, D.

    2016-09-01

    Human kind's continued use of space depends upon minimising the build-up of debris in low Earth-orbit (LEO). Preventing collisions between satellites and debris is essential given that a single collision can generate thousands of new debris objects. However, in-orbit manoeuvring of satellites is extremely expensive and shortens their operational life. Adjusting the orbits of debris objects instead of satellites would shift the responsibility of collision avoidance away from satellite operators altogether, thereby offering a superior solution. The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the Australian National University, partnered with Electro Optic Systems (EOS) Space Systems, Lockheed Martin Corporation and the Space Environment Research Centre (SERC) Limited, are developing the Adaptive Optics Tracking and Pushing (AOTP) system. AOTP will be used to perturb the orbits of debris objects using photon pressure from a 10 kW IR laser beam launched from the 1.8 m telescope at Mount. Stromlo Observatory, Australia. Initial simulations predict that AOTP will be able to displace debris objects 10 cm in size by up to 100 m with several overhead passes. An operational demonstrator is planned for 2019. Turbulence will distort the laser beam as it propagates through the atmosphere, resulting in a lower photon flux on the target and reduced pointing accuracy. To mitigate these effects, adaptive optics (AO) will be used to apply wavefront correction to the beam prior to launch. A unique challenge in designing the AO system arises from the high slew rate needed to track objects in LEO, which in turn requires laser guide star AO for satisfactory wavefront correction. The optical design and results from simulations of estimated performance of AOTP will be presented. In particular, design considerations associated with the high-power laser will be detailed.

  14. An Experimental Study on the Nuclear Fuel Debris Filtering Efficiency Using Wire Debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joon-Kyoo; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Lee, Tae-Kwon; Park, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Jae-Ik [KEPCO NF, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    If this debris vibrates over a long period of time, the cladding tubes could wear out. Especially, the wire types of debris from the tools during the plant maintenance operations can induce worn hole or wear scar on the fuel rods and may be make severe damage. Most of failures due to debris are observed under the first grid from the bottom of fuel assembly. In order to mitigate this defect, the fuel vendor have developed various anti-debris grids, such as protective grid or debris filtering bottom grid, which is located just above the bottom nozzle. The vendors have performed the debris filtering test to evaluate the efficiency of these grids. KEPCO NF (KEPCO Nuclear fuel) also has carried out the debris filtering test for the fuel assembly with protective grid. Some major design parameters, such as the maximum debris passable size or grid axial location, which affect the debris filtering capacity are found out thorough the test. This paper will discuss the filtering efficiency according to the relative dimensions of wire debris specimens and the effects of the specimen dimensions through simulation tests. The relative dimensions could be useful to develop the debris filtering grid. This study discussed the filtering efficiency according to the relative dimensions of wire debris specimens through simulation tests. The wire debris is used since the debris is more useful to evaluate debris filtering efficiency.

  15. Star Surface Polluted by Planetary Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Looking at the chemical composition of stars that host planets, astronomers have found that while dwarf stars often show iron enrichment on their surface, giant stars do not. The astronomers think that the planetary debris falling onto the outer layer of the star produces a detectable effect in a dwarf star, but this pollution is diluted by the giant star and mixed into its interior. "It is a little bit like a Tiramisu or a Capuccino," says Luca Pasquini from ESO, lead-author of the paper reporting the results. "There is cocoa powder only on the top!' ESO PR Photo 29/07 ESO PR Photo 29/07 The Structure of Stars Just a few years after the discovery of the first exoplanet it became evident that planets are preferentially found around stars that are enriched in iron. Planet-hosting stars are on average almost twice as rich in metals than their counterparts with no planetary system. The immediate question is whether this richness in metals enhances planet formation, or whether it is caused by the presence of planets. The classic chicken and egg problem. In the first case, the stars would be metal-rich down to their centre. In the second case, debris from the planetary system would have polluted the star and only the external layers would be affected by this pollution. When observing stars and taking spectra, astronomers indeed only see the outer layers and can't make sure the whole star has the same composition. When planetary debris fall onto a star, the material will stay in the outer parts, polluting it and leaving traces in the spectra taken. A team of astronomers has decided to tackle this question by looking at a different kind of stars: red giants. These are stars that, as will the Sun in several billion years, have exhausted the hydrogen in their core. As a result, they have puffed up, becoming much larger and cooler. Looking at the distribution of metals in fourteen planet-hosting giants, the astronomers found that their distribution was rather different from

  16. Detecting debris flows using ground vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHusen, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    Debris flows are rapidly flowing mixtures of rock debris, mud, and water that originate on steep slopes. During and following volcanic eruptions, debris flows are among the most destructive and persistent hazards. Debris flows threaten lives and property not only on volcanoes but far downstream in valleys that drain volcanoes where they arrive suddenly and inundate entire valley bottoms. Debris flows can destroy vegetation and structures in their path, including bridges and buildings. Their deposits can cover roads and railways, smother crops, and fill stream channels, thereby reducing their flood-carrying capacity and navigability.

  17. Variability in rainfall threshold for debris flow after the Chi-Chi earthquake in central Taiwan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. L. SHIEH; Y. S. CHEN; Y. J. TSAI; J. H. WU

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze variability in rainfall threshold for debris flow (critical rainfall for debris flow triggering) after the ML 7.3 Chi-Chi earthquake in central Taiwan in 1999.Two study sites with different geological conditions were surveyed in the earthquake area. Streambed surveys were conducted to continuously monitor debris flows between 1999 and 2006. During the 7-year study period, every debris flow event was identified, and the streambed characterized. Results show that the rainfall threshold for debris flow was remarkably lower just after the Chi-ChiEarthquake, but gradually recovered. To date, this rainfall threshold is still lower than the original level prior to the earthquake. This variability in rainfall threshold is closely related to the amount of sediment material in the initiation area of debris flow, which increased rapidly due to landslides resulting from the earthquake. With the increase in sediment material, the rainfall threshold was lowered severely during the first year following the Chi-Chi earthquake. However, heavy rainfalls mobilized the sediment material, causing debris flows and transporting sediment downstream. With the decrease in sediment material, the rainfall threshold recovered gradually over time. Furthermore,debris flows occurred only in the subbasins that had sufficient sediment material to cause significant movement. Hence, these results confirm that the sediment material in the initiation area of debris flow is a crucial component of the rainfall threshold for debris flow.

  18. A Probabilistic View of Debris Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong; SU Pengcheng; CUI Peng; HU Kaiheng

    2008-01-01

    Most debris flows occur in valleys of area smaller than 50 km2. While associated with a valley, debris flow is by no means a full-valley event but originates from parts of the valley, i.e., the tributary sources. We propose that debris flow develops by extending from tributaries to the mainstream. The debris flow observed in the mainstream is the confluence of the tributary flows and the process of the confluence can be considered as a combination of the tributary elements. The frequency distribution of tributaries is found subject to the Weibull form (or its generalizations). And the same distribution form applies to the discharge of debris flow. Then the process of debris flow is related to the geometric structure of the valley. Moreover, viewed from a large scale of water system, all valleys are tributaries, which have been found to assume the same distribution. With each valley corresponding to a debris flow, the distribution can be taken as the frequency distribution of debris flow and therefore provides a quantitative description of the fact that debris flow is inclined to occur at valley of small size. Furthermore, different parameters appear in different regions, suggesting the regional differentials of debris flow potential. We can use the failure rate, instead of the size per se, to describe the risk of a valley of a given area. Finally we claim that the valleys of debris flow in different regions are in the similar episode of evolution.

  19. Herschel DUNES Observations of Cold Debris Disks Around Nearby Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, Aki; Eiroa, C.; DUNES Team

    2011-01-01

    The DUNES (DUst discs around NEarby Stars) Open Time Key Programme for the Herschel Space Observatory is a sensitivity-limited photometric survey for faint, cold debris disks around nearby FGK stars. It takes advantage of the PACS and SPIRE instruments to detect and characterize cold disks as faint as Ldust/Lstar 10-7 - 10-6, at dust temperatures around 30 - 40 K. Such systems are extrasolar analogues of Solar System's Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt (EKB). DUNES will observe a statistically significant, volume-limited (d Stars at larger distances (d DUNES sample has been observed to date. Our goal of detecting very faint, cold dust disks has been achieved; many disks are also spatially resolved. The unresolved disks show a variety of spectral energy distributions, some suggesting the presence of cold EKB-like dust rings. A number of previously unknown debris disks have been detected, including the coldest disks yet found. Preliminary results relating disk properties to the host star parameters will be shown.

  20. Prosthetic Lumbar disc replacement for degenerative disc disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Arvind

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical articulated device to replace intervertebral disc as a treatment for low back pain secondary to disc degeneration has emerged as a promising tool for selected patients. The potential advantages are prevention of adjacent segment degeneration, maintenance of mobility as well as avoidance of all the complications associated with fusion. The short-term results have been comparable to that of fusion, a few mid-term results have shown mixed outcome, but information on long-term results and performance are not available at present. The rationale for lumbar disc arthroplasty, indications, contraindications, the various artificial devices in the market and the concepts intrinsic to each of them, basic technique of insertion, complications are discussed and a brief summary of our experience with one of the devices is presented.

  1. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  2. The fast debris evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, H. G.; Swinerd, G. G.; Newland, R. J.; Saunders, A.

    2009-09-01

    The 'particles-in-a-box' (PIB) model introduced by Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] removed the need for computer-intensive Monte Carlo simulation to predict the gross characteristics of an evolving debris environment. The PIB model was described using a differential equation that allows the stability of the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment to be tested by a straightforward analysis of the equation's coefficients. As part of an ongoing research effort to investigate more efficient approaches to evolutionary modelling and to develop a suite of educational tools, a new PIB model has been developed. The model, entitled Fast Debris Evolution (FADE), employs a first-order differential equation to describe the rate at which new objects ⩾10 cm are added and removed from the environment. Whilst Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] based the collision theory for the PIB approach on collisions between gas particles and adopted specific values for the parameters of the model from a number of references, the form and coefficients of the FADE model equations can be inferred from the outputs of future projections produced by high-fidelity models, such as the DAMAGE model. The FADE model has been implemented as a client-side, web-based service using JavaScript embedded within a HTML document. Due to the simple nature of the algorithm, FADE can deliver the results of future projections immediately in a graphical format, with complete user-control over key simulation parameters. Historical and future projections for the ⩾10 cm LEO debris environment under a variety of different scenarios are possible, including business as usual, no future launches, post-mission disposal and remediation. A selection of results is presented with comparisons with predictions made using the DAMAGE environment model

  3. Prevention of thinning at disc center during rotary forging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Presents the simulation and analysis of the rotary forging of a disc using a finite element method, which re veals the thinning at the disc center is caused by higher radial and tangential tensile stresses resulting from the local loading of a rotary die and acting at the center of a workpiece, and proposes a new design of rotary die with a hole opened in its center to prevent the continuous occurrence of shortening in the axial direction and elongation in the tan gential and radial directions, and concludes from simulation results that the rotary die with a hole opened in its center is effective for prevention of thinning or cracking at the center of a disc during rotary forging.

  4. Analyses of the temporomandibular disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirman, R; Fricová, M; Horák, Z; Krystůfek, J; Konvicková, S; Mazánek, J

    2007-01-01

    This project is the beginning of a large research work with a goal to develop a new total replacement of temporomandibular (TM) joint. First aim of this work was to determine the relative displacement of the TM disc and the mandible during mouth opening. The movement of the TM disc was studied using a magnetic resonance imaging. Sagittal static images in revolved sections of the TM joint were obtained in various positions of jaw opening from 0 to 50 mm. The results provided a description of the TM disc displacements as a function of jaw opening. The displacements of the mandible and TM disc were about 16 mm and 10 mm respectively at mouth opening of 50 mm, maximum rotation of the mandible was 34s. The results of these measurements can be used for clinical diagnostics and also they were used as inputs for the follows finite element analysis (FEA). Second aim of this work was to create stress and strain analysis of TM joint using non-linear FEA. Complex of TM joint consists of mandibular disc, half skull and half mandible during normal jaw opening. The results illustrate the stress distributions in the TMJ during a normal jaw opening.

  5. Comparison of space debris estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.; Judd, O.P.; Naka, R.F.

    1996-10-01

    Debris is thought to be a hazard to space systems through impact and cascading. The current environment is assessed as not threatening to defense systems. Projected reductions in launch rates to LEO should delay concerns for centuries. There is agreement between AFSPC and NASA analyses on catalogs and collision rates, but not on fragmentation rates. Experiments in the laboratory, field, and space are consistent with AFSPC estimates of the number of fragments per collision. A more careful treatment of growth rates greatly reduces long-term stability issues. Space debris has not been shown to be an issue in coming centuries; thus, it does not appear necessary for the Air Force to take additional steps to mitigate it.

  6. Debris flow study in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrin Jaafar, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    The phenomenon of debris flow occurs in Malaysia occasionally. The topography of Peningsular Malysia is characterized by the central mountain ranges running from south to north. Several parts of hilly areas with steep slopes, combined with high saturation of soil strata that deliberately increase the pore water pressure underneath the hill slope. As a tropical country Malaysia has very high intensity rainfall which is triggered the landslide. In the study area where the debris flow are bound to occur, there are a few factors that contribute to this phenomenon such as high rainfall intensity, very steep slope which an inclination more than 35 degree and sandy clay soil type which is easily change to liquidity soil. This paper will discuss the study of rainfall, mechanism, modeling and design of mitigation measure to avoid repeated failure in future in same area.

  7. Black hole accretion disc impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Pihajoki, Pauli

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytic model for computing the luminosity and spectral evolution of flares caused by a supermassive black hole impacting the accretion disc of another supermassive black hole. Our model includes photon diffusion, emission from optically thin regions and relativistic corrections to the observed spectrum and time-scales. We test the observability of the impact scenario with a simulated population of quasars hosting supermassive black hole binaries. The results indicate that for a moderate binary mass ratio of 0.3, and impact distances of 100 primary Schwarzschild radii, the accretion disc impacts can be expected to equal or exceed the host quasar in brightness at observed wavelength {\\lambda} = 510 nm up to z = 0.6. We conclude that accretion disc impacts may function as an independent probe for supermassive black hole binaries. We release the code used for computing the model light curves to the community.

  8. DebriSat Laboratory Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-05

    Semiquantitative elemental composition. – Elemental mapping and line scans. • Fourier Transform Infrared ( FTIR ) spectroscopy – Identification of chemical...Transform Infrared ( FTIR ) spectroscopy – Nicolet 6700 spectrometer. – Harrick Scientific “praying mantis” diffuse reflectance accessory. • Qualitative...VIS-NIR Spectroscopy Dianna Alaan © The Aerospace Corporation 2015 DebriSat Laboratory Analyses 5 January, 2015 Paul M. Adams1, Zachary Lingley2

  9. Triggering conditions and mobility of debris flows associated to complex earthflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malet, J.-P.; Laigle, D.; Remaître, A.; Maquaire, O.

    2005-03-01

    Landslides on black marl slopes of the French Alps are, in most cases, complex catastrophic failures in which the initial structural slides transform into slow-moving earthflows. Under specific hydrological conditions, these earthflows can transform into debris flows. Due to their sediment volume and their high mobility, debris flow induced by landslides are far much dangerous than these resulting from continuous erosive processes. A fundamental point to correctly delineate the area exposed to debris flows on the alluvial fans is therefore to understand why and how some earthflows transform into debris flow while most of them stabilize. In this paper, a case of transformation from earthflow to debris flow is presented and analysed. An approach combining geomorphology, hydrology, geotechnics and rheology is adopted to model the debris flow initiation (failure stage) and its runout (postfailure stage). Using the Super-Sauze earthflow (Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, France) as a case study, the objective is to characterize the hydrological and mechanical conditions leading to debris flow initiation in such cohesive material. Results show a very good agreement between the observed runout distances and these calculated using the debris flow modeling code Cemagref 1-D. The deposit thickness in the depositional area and the velocities of the debris flows are also well reproduced. Furthermore, a dynamic slope stability analysis shows that conditions in the debris source area under average pore water pressures and moisture contents are close to failure. A small excess of water can therefore initiate failure. Seepage analysis is used to estimate the volume of debris that can be released for several hydroclimatic conditions. The failed volumes are then introduced in the Cemagref 1-D runout code to propose debris flow hazard scenarios. Results show that clayey earthflow can transform under 5-year return period rainfall conditions into 1-km runout debris flow of volumes ranging

  10. Coevolution of binaries and circumbinary gaseous discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David P.; Quinn, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    The recent discoveries of circumbinary planets by Kepler raise questions for contemporary planet formation models. Understanding how these planets form requires characterizing their formation environment, the circumbinary protoplanetary disc and how the disc and binary interact and change as a result. The central binary excites resonances in the surrounding protoplanetary disc which drive evolution in both the binary orbital elements and in the disc. To probe how these interactions impact binary eccentricity and disc structure evolution, N-body smooth particle hydrodynamics simulations of gaseous protoplanetary discs surrounding binaries based on Kepler 38 were run for 104 binary periods for several initial binary eccentricities. We find that nearly circular binaries weakly couple to the disc via a parametric instability and excite disc eccentricity growth. Eccentric binaries strongly couple to the disc causing eccentricity growth for both the disc and binary. Discs around sufficiently eccentric binaries which strongly couple to the disc develop an m = 1 spiral wave launched from the 1:3 eccentric outer Lindblad resonance which corresponds to an alignment of gas particle longitude of periastrons. All systems display binary semimajor axis decay due to dissipation from the viscous disc.

  11. Vertebral osteomyelitis without disc involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamani, I.; Syed, I.; Saifuddin, A. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com; Green, R.; MacSweeney, F

    2004-10-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis is most commonly due to pyogenic or granulomatous infection and typically results in the combined involvement of the intervertebral disc and adjacent vertebral bodies. Non-infective causes include the related conditions of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) syndrome. Occasionally, these conditions may present purely within the vertebral body, resulting in various combinations of vertebral marrow oedema and sclerosis, destructive lesions of the vertebral body and pathological vertebral collapse, thus mimicking neoplastic disease. This review illustrates the imaging features of vertebral osteomyelitis without disc involvement, with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings.

  12. Dead discs, unstable discs and the stars they surround

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Angelo Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Strong stellar magnetic fields significantly alter the behaviour of surrounding accretion discs. Recent work has demonstrated that at low accretion rates a large amount of mass can remain confined in the disc, contrary to the standard assumption that the magnetic field will expel the disc in an outflow (the “propeller regime”. These “dead discs” often become unstable, causing cycles of accretion onto the central star. Here I present the main predictions of this model, and argue that it provides a good explanation for the peculiar behaviour seen in several accreting sources with strong magnetic fields. I will focus in particular on three accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars: SAX J1808.4-3658, NGC 6440 X-2 and IGR J00291+5934. These sources all show low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations consistent with a variable accretion rate, as well as unusual outburst patterns that suggest gas is confined in the inner disc regions during quiescence.

  13. Star formation in accretion discs : from the Galactic Center to Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Collin, Suzy

    2007-01-01

    Keplerian accretion discs around massive black holes (MBHs) are gravitationally unstable beyond a few hundredths of parsec and should collapse to form stars. Indeed an accretion/star formation episode took place a few millions years ago in the Galactic Center (GC). This raises the question of how the disc can survive in AGN and quasars and continue to transport matter towards the black hole. We study the accretion/star formation process, with one aim in mind, to show that a spectrum similar to the observed AGN one can be produced by the disc. We compute models of stationary accretion discs, both continuous and clumpy. Continuous discs must be maintained in a state of marginal stability for the rate of star formation to remain modest, so they require additional heating and transport of angular momentum. Non-viscous heating can be provided by stellar illumination, but momentum transport by supernovae is insufficient to sustain a marginal state, except at the very periphery of the disc. In clumpy discs it is pos...

  14. Decimetre dust aggregates in protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Teiser, Jens; 10.1051/0004-6361/200912027

    2011-01-01

    The growth of planetesimals is an essential step in planet formation. Decimetre-size dust agglomerates mark a transition point in this growth process. In laboratory experiments we simulated the formation, evolution, and properties of decimetre-scale dusty bodies in protoplanetary discs. Small sub-mm size dust aggregates consisting of micron-size SiO$_2$ particles randomly interacted with dust targets of varying initial conditions in a continuous sequence of independent collisions. Impact velocities were 7.7 m/s on average and in the range expected for collisions with decimetre bodies in protoplanetary discs. The targets all evolved by forming dust \\emph{crusts} with up to several cm thickness and a unique filling factor of 31% $\\pm$3%. A part of the projectiles sticks directly. In addition, some projectile fragments slowly return to the target by gravity. All initially porous parts of the surface, i.e. built from the slowly returning fragments, are compacted and firmly attached to the underlying dust layers b...

  15. GASPS observations of Herbig Ae/Be stars with PACS/Herschel. The atomic and molecular content of their protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Meeus, G; Mendigutia, I; Kamp, I; Thi, W F

    2012-01-01

    We observed a sample of 20 representative Herbig Ae/Be stars and five A-type debris discs with PACS onboard of Herschel. The observations were done in spectroscopic mode, and cover far-IR lines of [OI], [CII], CO, CH+, H2O and OH. We have a [OI]63 micron detection rate of 100% for the Herbig Ae/Be and 0% for the debris discs. [OI]145 micron is only detected in 25%, CO J=18-17 in 45% (and less for higher J transitions) of the Herbig Ae/Be stars and for [CII] 157 micron, we often found spatially variable background contamination. We show the first detection of water in a Herbig Ae disc, HD 163296, which has a settled disc. Hydroxyl is detected as well in this disc. CH+, first seen in HD 100546, is now detected for the second time in a Herbig Ae star, HD 97048. We report fluxes for each line and use the observations as line diagnostics of the gas properties. Furthermore, we look for correlations between the strength of the emission lines and stellar or disc parameters, such as stellar luminosity, UV and X-ray fl...

  16. High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

    2009-10-30

    spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

  17. Photoevaporating transitional discs and molecular cloud cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Sui, Ning

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the evolution of photoevaporating protoplanetary discs including mass influx from molecular cloud cores. We examine the influence of cloud core properties on the formation and evolution of transitional discs. We use one-dimensional thin disc assumption and calculate the evolution of the protoplanetary disc. The effects of X-ray photoevaporation are also included. Our calculations suggest that most discs should experience the transitional disc phase within 10 Myr. The formation time of a gap and its initial location are functions of the properties of the cloud cores. In some circumstances, discs can open two gaps by photoevaporation alone. The two gaps form when the gas in the disc can expand to large radius and if the mass at large radius is sufficiently small. The surface density profile of the disc determines whether the two gaps can form. Since the structure of a disc is determined by the properties of a molecular cloud core, the core properties determine the formation of two gaps in the disc. We further find that even when the photoevaporation rate is reduced to 10 per cent of the standard value, two gaps can still form in the disc. The only difference is that the formation time is delayed.

  18. Radiation of accretion discs: the eclipses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.

    1984-05-01

    Light curves have been calculated for eclipses of the accretion disc in a cataclysmic binary. The Roche geometry of the cool component was taken into account and the stellar atmospheres were interpolated to provide the local spectrum of the radiation from the disc. The dependence of the light curve on the parameters of the disc is discussed.

  19. Face-on accretion onto a protoplanetary disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnen, T. P. G.; Pols, O. R.; Pelupessy, F. I.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Stars are generally born in clustered stellar environments, which can affect their subsequent evolution. An example of this environmental influence can be found in globular clusters (GCs) harbouring multiple stellar populations. An evolutionary scenario in which a second (and possibly higher order) population is formed by the accretion of chemically enriched material onto the low-mass stars in the initial GC population has been suggested to explain the multiple stellar populations. The idea, dubbed early disc accretion, is that the low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars sweep up gas expelled by the more massive stars of the same generation into their protoplanetary disc as they move through the cluster core. The same process could also occur, to a lesser extent, in embedded stellar systems that are less dense. Aims: Using assumptions that represent the (dynamical) conditions in a typical GC, we investigate whether a low-mass star of 0.4 M⊙ surrounded by a protoplanetary disc can accrete a sufficient amount of enriched material to account for the observed abundances in so-called second generation GC stars. In particular, we focus on the gas-loading rate onto the disc and star, as well as on the lifetime and stability of the disc. Methods: We perform simulations at multiple resolutions with two different smoothed particle hydrodynamics codes and compare the results. Each code uses a different implementation of the artificial viscosity. Results: We find that the gas-loading rate is about a factor of two smaller than the rate based on geometric arguments, because the effective cross-section of the disc is smaller than its surface area. Furthermore, the loading rate is consistent for both codes, irrespective of resolution. Although the disc gains mass in the high-resolution runs, it loses angular momentum on a timescale of 104 yr. Two effects determine the loss of (specific) angular momentum in our simulations: (1) continuous ram pressure stripping and (2

  20. Intervertebral disc degeneration in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergknut, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Back pain is common in both dogs and humans, and is often associated with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The IVDs are essential structures of the spine and degeneration can ultimately result in diseases such as IVD herniation or spinal instability. In order to design new treatments halting

  1. Electromagnetic Levitation of a Disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, R.; Neves, F.; de Andrade, R., Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching experiment that explores the levitation of a disc of ferromagnetic material in the presence of the magnetic field produced by a single electromagnet. In comparison to the classical experiment of the levitation of a sphere, the main advantage of the proposed laboratory bench is that the uniform magnetic field…

  2. Optical Disc Applications in Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Pamela Q. J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a variety of library applications of optical disc storage technology, including CD-ROM, digital videodisc, and WORM. Research and development projects at the Library of Congress, National Library of Medicine, and National Agricultural Library are described, products offered by library networks are reviewed, and activities in academic and…

  3. Electromagnetic Levitation of a Disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, R.; Neves, F.; de Andrade, R., Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching experiment that explores the levitation of a disc of ferromagnetic material in the presence of the magnetic field produced by a single electromagnet. In comparison to the classical experiment of the levitation of a sphere, the main advantage of the proposed laboratory bench is that the uniform magnetic field…

  4. Constraints on Slim Accretion Discs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Zhen-Yi; GU Wei-Min; LU Ju-Fu

    2008-01-01

    @@ We show that when the gravitational force in the vertical direction is correctly calculated, the well-known Sshaped sequence of thermal equilibrium solutions can be constructed only for small radii of black hole accretion flows, such that slim accretion discs can possibly exist only in the inner regions of these flows.

  5. Magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Salmeron, Roberto Aureliano; Salmeron, Raquel; Wardle, Mark

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the linear growth and vertical structure of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in weakly ionised, stratified accretion discs. The magnetic field is initially vertical and dust grains are assumed to have settled towards the midplane, so charges are carried by electrons and ions only. Solutions are obtained at representative radial locations from the central protostar for different choices of the initial magnetic field strength, sources of ionisation, and disc surface density. The MRI is active over a wide range of magnetic field strengths and fluid conditions in low conductivity discs. For the minimum-mass solar nebula model, incorporating cosmic ray ionisation, perturbations grow at 1 AU for B < 8 G. For a significant subset of these strengths (0.2 - 5 G), the growth rate is of order the ideal MHD rate (0.75 Omega). Similarly, when cosmic rays are assumed to be excluded from the disc by the winds emitted by the magnetically active protostar, unstable modes grow at this radius for B less...

  6. Tidal Dwarf Galaxies: Disc Formation at z=0

    CERN Document Server

    Lelli, Federico; Brinks, Elias; McGaugh, Stacy S

    2015-01-01

    Collisional debris around interacting and post-interacting galaxies often display condensations of gas and young stars that can potentially form gravitationally bound objects: Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs). We summarise recent results on TDGs, which are originally published in Lelli et al. (2015, A&A). We study a sample of six TDGs around three different interacting systems, using high-resolution HI observations from the Very Large Array. We find that the HI emission associated to TDGs can be described by rotating disc models. These discs, however, would have undergone less than one orbit since the time of the TDG formation, raising the question of whether they are in dynamical equilibrium. Assuming that TDGs are in dynamical equilibrium, we find that the ratio of dynamical mass to baryonic mass is consistent with one, implying that TDGs are devoid of dark matter. This is in line with the results of numerical simulations where tidal forces effectively segregate dark matter in the halo from baryonic matter i...

  7. Space Debris: il problema dei rifiuti spaziali

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Dussi

    2008-01-01

    Space Debris: the space garbage problemThe dramatic growth in space activities since 1957 has generated a large amount of “in-orbit garbage”, namely space-debris. Many of these are potentially dangerous for space vehicles and/or for the people on Earth. In an acceptable space security framework, amajor role is reserved to cooperative space debris monitoring in order to prevent and to mitigate the effects of the problem.

  8. Best Mitigation Paths To Effectively Reduce Earth's Orbital Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegman, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some ways to reduce the problem posed by debris in orbit around the Earth. It reviews the orbital debris environment, the near-term needs to minimize the Kessler syndrome, also known as collisional cascading, a survey of active orbital debris mitigation strategies, the best paths to actively remove orbital debris, and technologies that are required for active debris mitigation.

  9. Medium-term outcomes of artificial disc replacement for severe cervical disc narrowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hung Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Acceptable clinical outcome for treatment of severe cervical disc narrowing with cervical disc replacement technique has been performed in current study. Most patients maintained good postoperative mobility and no significant adjacent level degeneration were found. Cervical disc replacement may be applicable in treatment of severe cervical disc narrowing; however, longer follow-ups are required for ensuring the long-term efficacy of cervical disc replacement.

  10. Intervertebral disc calcifications in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beluffi, G; Fiori, P; Sileo, C

    2009-03-01

    This study was done to assess the presence of both asymptomatic and symptomatic intervertebral disc calcifications in a large paediatric population. We retrospectively reviewed the radiographs taken during the past 26 years in children (age 0-18 years) undergoing imaging of the spine or of other body segments in which the spine was adequately depicted, to determine possible intervertebral disc calcifications. The following clinical evaluation was extrapolated from the patients' charts: presence of spinal symptoms, history of trauma, suspected or clinically evident scoliosis, suspected or clinically evident syndromes, bone dysplasias, and pre- or postoperative chest or abdominal X-rays. We detected intervertebral disc calcifications in six patients only. Five calcifications were asymptomatic (one newborn baby with Patau syndrome; three patients studied to rule out scoliosis, hypochondroplasia and syndromic traits; one for dyspnoea due to sunflower seeds inhalation). Only one was symptomatic, with acute neck pain. Calcifications varied in number from one in one patient to two to five in the others. Apart from the calcification in the patient with cervical pain, all calcifications were asymptomatic and constituted an incidental finding (particularly those detected at the thoracic level in the patient studied for sunflower-seed inhalation). Calcification shapes were either linear or round. Our series confirms that intervertebral disc calcifications are a rare finding in childhood and should not be a source of concern: symptomatic calcifications tend to regress spontaneously within a short time with or without therapy and immobilisation, whereas asymptomatic calcifications may last for years but disappear before the age of 20 years. Only very few cases, such as those of medullary compression or severe dysphagia due to anterior herniation of cervical discs, may require surgical procedures.

  11. Disc degeneration: current surgical options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Schizas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain attributed to lumbar disc degeneration poses a serious challenge to physicians. Surgery may be indicated in selected cases following failure of appropriate conservative treatment. For decades, the only surgical option has been spinal fusion, but its results have been inconsistent. Some prospective trials show superiority over usual conservative measures while others fail to demonstrate its advantages. In an effort to improve results of fusion and to decrease the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration, total disc replacement techniques have been introduced and studied extensively. Short-term results have shown superiority over some fusion techniques. Mid-term results however tend to show that this approach yields results equivalent to those of spinal fusion. Nucleus replacement has gained some popularity initially, but evidence on its efficacy is scarce. Dynamic stabilisation, a technique involving less rigid implants than in spinal fusion and performed without the need for bone grafting, represents another surgical option. Evidence again is lacking on its superiority over other surgical strategies and conservative measures. Insertion of interspinous devices posteriorly, aiming at redistributing loads and relieving pain, has been used as an adjunct to disc removal surgery for disc herniation. To date however, there is no clear evidence on their efficacy. Minimally invasive intradiscal thermocoagulation techniques have also been tried, but evidence of their effectiveness is questioned. Surgery using novel biological solutions may be the future of discogenic pain treatment. Collaboration between clinicians and basic scientists in this multidisciplinary field will undoubtedly shape the future of treating symptomatic disc degeneration.

  12. Modeling debris-covered glaciers: extension due to steady debris input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Anderson

    2015-11-01

    Debris-forced glacier extension decreases the ratio of accumulation zone to total glacier area (AAR. The model reproduces first-order relationships between debris cover, AARs, and glacier surface velocities from glaciers in High Asia. We provide a quantitative, theoretical foundation to interpret the effect of debris cover on the moraine record, and to assess the effects of climate change on debris-covered glaciers.

  13. Mean Velocity Estimation of Viscous Debris Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongjuan Yang; Fangqiang Wei; Kaiheng Hu

    2014-01-01

    The mean velocity estimation of debris flows, especially viscous debris flows, is an impor-tant part in the debris flow dynamics research and in the design of control structures. In this study, theoretical equations for computing debris flow velocity with the one-phase flow assumption were re-viewed and used to analyze field data of viscous debris flows. Results show that the viscous debris flow is difficult to be classified as a Newtonian laminar flow, a Newtonian turbulent flow, a Bingham fluid, or a dilatant fluid in the strict sense. However, we can establish empirical formulas to compute its mean velocity following equations for Newtonian turbulent flows, because most viscous debris flows are tur-bulent. Factors that potentially influence debris flow velocity were chosen according to two-phase flow theories. Through correlation analysis and data fitting, two empirical formulas were proposed. In the first one, velocity is expressed as a function of clay content, flow depth and channel slope. In the second one, a coefficient representing the grain size nonuniformity is used instead of clay content. Both formu-las can give reasonable estimate of the mean velocity of the viscous debris flow.

  14. Space debris measurement program at Phillips Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Phan D.; Mcnutt, Ross T.

    1992-01-01

    Ground-based optical sensing was identified as a technique for measuring space debris complementary to radar in the critical debris size range of 1 to 10 cm. The Phillips Laboratory is building a staring optical sensor for space debris measurement and considering search and track optical measurement at additional sites. The staring sensor is implemented in collaboration with Wright Laboratory using the 2.5 m telescope at Wright Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio. The search and track sensor is designed to detect and track orbital debris in tasked orbits. A progress report and a discussion of sensor performance and search and track strategies will be given.

  15. Gradient Index in Wear Debris Image Collection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LVZhi-yong; GAOHui-liang; YANXin-ping

    2004-01-01

    In order to solve a problem of oil on-line monitoring, this instrument adopts a prinripium of self-focus lens of Gradieat index fiber( GRIN Len) to design optics system and magnetic circuit. For the magnetic circuit, the monitor can catch particle wear debris in oil. And for the optics circuit. GRIN Len can transfer image of debris to apparatus of gather image, e . g, CCD and camera. And the image of debris is transferred to computer for analyzing seize and physiognomy of debris. The character of the monitor is of micro weight, micro volume andcurve imaging And it is directly pluged into oil to catch image of wear particles.

  16. Impact of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China on subsequent long-term debris flow activities in the epicentral area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Zhang, L. M.

    2017-01-01

    The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake triggered the largest number of landslides among the recent strong earthquake events around the world. The loose landslide materials were retained on steep terrains and deep gullies. In the period from 2008 to 2015, numerous debris flows occurred during rainstorms along the Provincial Road 303 (PR303) near the epicentre of the earthquake, causing serious damage to the reconstructed highway. Approximately 5.24 × 106 m3 of debris-flow sediment was deposited shortly after the earthquake. This paper evaluates the evolution of the debris flows that occurred after the Wenchuan earthquake, which helps understand long-term landscape evolution and cascading effects in regions impacted by mega earthquakes. With the aid of a GIS platform combined with field investigations, we continuously tracked movements of the loose deposit materials in all the debris flow gullies along an 18 km reach of PR303 and the characteristics of the regional debris flows during several storms in the past seven years. This paper presents five important aspects of the evolution of debris flows: (1) supply of debris flow materials; (2) triggering rainfall; (3) initiation mechanisms and types of debris flows; (4) runout characteristics; and (5) elevated riverbed due to the deposited materials from the debris flows. The hillslope soil deposits gradually evolved into channel deposits and the solid materials in the channels moved towards the ravine mouth. Accordingly, channelized debris flows became dominant gradually. Due to the decreasing source material volume and changes in debris flow characteristics, the triggering rainfall tends to increase from 30 mm h- 1 in 2008 to 64 mm h- 1 in 2013, and the runout distance tends to decrease over time. The runout materials blocked the river and elevated the riverbed by at least 30 m in parts of the study area. The changes in the post-seismic debris flow activity can be categorized into three stages, i.e., active, unstable, and

  17. A comparison of glacier melt on debris-covered glaciers in the northern and southern Caucasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lambrecht

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The glacier coverage in the Caucasus Mountains underwent considerable changes during the last decades. In some regions, the observed reduction in glacier area is comparable to those in the European Alps and the extent of supra-glacial debris increased on many glaciers. Only a few glaciers in the Caucasus are monitored on a regular basis, while for most areas no continuous field measurements are available. In this study, regional differences of the conditions for glacier melt with a special focus on debris covered glacier tongues in the well-studied Adyl-su basin on the northern slope of the Caucasus Mountains (Russia is compared with the Zopkhito basin which has similar characteristics but is located on the southern slope in Georgia. The paper focuses on the effect of supra-glacial debris cover on glacier summer melt. There are systematic differences in the distribution and increase of the debris cover on the glaciers of the two basins. In the Adyl-su basin an extensive debris cover on the glacier tongues is common, however, only those glacier tongues that are positioned at the lowest elevations in the Zopkhito basin show a considerable extent of supra-glacial debris. The observed increase in debris cover is considerably stronger in the north. Field experiments show that thermal resistance of the debris cover in both basins is somewhat higher than in other glaciated regions of the world, but there is also a significant difference between the two regions. A simple ablation model accounting for the effect of debris cover on ice melt shows that melt rates are considerably higher in the northern basin despite a wider debris distribution. This difference between the two regions can be attributed to different meteorological conditions which are characterised by more frequent cloud cover and precipitation in the south. Furthermore ablation is strongly influenced by the occurrence of supra-glacial debris cover in both basins, reducing the total amount

  18. Planetary migration in weakly magnetized turbulent discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruteau, C.; Fromang, S.; Nelson, R. P.; Masset, F.

    2011-12-01

    In laminar viscous disc models, the migration of protoplanets embedded in their nascent protoplanetary discs may be directed inwards or outwards, depending on the relative magnitude of the Lindblad and corotation torques. The long-term evolution of the corotation torque is intimately related to diffusion processes inside the planet's horseshoe region. This communication examines the properties of the corotation torque in discs where magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence develops as a result of the magnetorotational instability (MRI), considering a weak initial toroidal magnetic field. We show that the differential Lindblad torque takes very similar values in MHD turbulent and laminar viscous discs, and there exists an unsaturated corotation torque in MHD turbulent discs.

  19. Effects of Panax ginseng-containing herbal plasters on compressed intervertebral discs in an in vivo rat tail model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow Daniel H K

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tienchi (Panax notoginseng has been used in conservative treatments for back pain as a major ingredient of many herbal medicines. This study aims to investigate the effects of a herbal medicine containing tienchi on compressed intervertebral discs in rats. Methods Using an in vivo rat tail model, intervertebral disc compression was simulated in the caudal 8–9 discs of 25 rats by continuous static compression (11 N for 2 weeks. An herbal medicine plaster (in which the major ingredient was tienchi was externally applied to the compressed disc (n=9 for three weeks, and held in place by an adhesive bandage, in animals in the Chinese Medicine (CM group. The effect of the bandage was evaluated in a separate placebo group (n=9, while no intervention with unrestricted motion was provided to rats in an additional control group (n=7. Disc structural properties were quantified by in vivo disc height measurement and in vitro morphological analysis. Results Disc height decreased after the application of compression (P P = 0.006 and placebo (P = 0.003 groups, but was maintained in the CM group (P = 0.494. No obvious differences in disc morphology were observed among the three groups (P = 0.896. Conclusion The tienchi-containing herbal plaster had no significant effect on the morphology of compressed discs, but maintained disc height in rats.

  20. The artificial disc: theory, design and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Q B; McCullen, G M; Higham, P A; Dumbleton, J H; Yuan, H A

    1996-06-01

    Low back pain is one of the most common medical conditions in the Western world. Disc degeneration, an inevitable process of aging, of variable rate and degree, is one of the major causes of low back pain. Currently, there are two major surgical interventions for treating conditions related to the degenerative disc: discectomy and fusion. Although discectomy and fusion produce a relatively good short-term clinical result in relieving pain, both these surgical treatments alter the biomechanics of the spine, possibly leading to further degeneration of the surrounding tissues and the discs at adjacent levels. Over the past 35 years, a tremendous effort has been made to develop an artificial disc to replace the degenerated disc. The goal is the restoration of the natural biomechanics of the segment after disc excision, thus relieving pain and preventing further degeneration at adjacent segments. However, the artificial disc faces a complex biomechanical environment which makes replication of the biomechanics difficult and long-term survival challenging to designs and materials. The purpose of this article is to examine the factors of importance in designing a disc replacement. Topics covered include the structure and function of the natural disc, the changes that occur with disc degeneration and existing methods of treatment for the degenerative spine. The progress in achieving a functional, long-lasting disc replacement is outlined.

  1. The properties of external accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pringle, J.E. (Space Telescope Science Inst., Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-02-15

    The properties of external accretion discs (discs with a central source of angular momentum) are explored both analytically and numerically. An illustrative example of the effect of a disc of material around a binary star on the stellar separation is considered. We consider a Greens-function-type solution in which an initial ring of matter is put in orbit around the central binary. We find that the solution splits temporally into three parts. First, the disc evolves as a standard accretion disc unaware of the inner boundary condition. Secondly, the disc interacts with the inner boundary and changes its character to become, thirdly, an outflowing disc which is propelled outwards by the source of angular momentum at the centre. (author).

  2. Twisted accretion discs: Pt. 5; Viscous evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Astrophysik)

    1990-08-15

    The time-dependence of accretion discs with orbits tilted out of the symmetry plane is studied. The effects of mass inflow modulation, and tilt variation at the disc outer edge, are examined for both circumbinary discs and for discs around compact objects. The appendices extend the numerical work to some analytic examples of tilt diffusion and external forcing effects. It is also shown that the disc must not be treated as a rigid tilted object if global angular momentum is to be conserved. These results are relevant to the problem of long-term periodicities of the light curves in Her X1 and {epsilon} Aur, the S-type symmetry of radio jets, warped gas discs in galaxies and polar rings in Neptune. Twisted discs may also arise in star-forming regions. (author).

  3. Three-level cervical disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St. Iencean Andrei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multilevel cervical degenerative disc disease is well known in the cervical spine pathology, with radicular syndromes or cervical myelopathy. One or two level cervical herniated disc is common in adult and multilevel cervical degenerative disc herniation is common in the elderly, with spinal stenosis, and have the same cause: the gradual degeneration of the disc. We report the case of a patient with two level cervical disc herniation (C4 – C5 and C5 – C6 treated by anterior cervical microdiscectomy both levels and fusion at C5 – C6; after five years the patient returned with left C7 radiculopathy and MRI provided the image of a left C6 – C7 disc herniation, he underwent an anterior microsurgical discectomy with rapid relief of symptoms. Three-level cervical herniated disc are rare in adults, and the anterior microdiscectomy with or without fusion solve this pathology.

  4. Sampling supraglacial debris thickness using terrestrial photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Lindsey; Mertes, Jordan

    2017-04-01

    The melt rate of debris-covered ice differs to that of clean ice primarily as a function of debris thickness. The spatial distribution of supraglacial debris thickness must therefore be known in order to understand how it is likely to impact glacier behaviour, and meltwater contribution to local hydrological resources and global sea level rise. However, practical means of determining debris cover thickness remain elusive. In this study we explore the utility of terrestrial photogrammetry to produce high resolution, scaled and texturized digital terrain models of debris cover exposures above ice cliffs as a means of quantifying and characterizing debris thickness. Two Nikon D5000 DSLRs with Tamron 100mm lenses were used to photograph a sample area of the Ngozumpa glacier in the Khumbu Himal of Nepal in April 2016. A Structure from Motion workflow using Agisoft Photoscan software was used to generate a surface models with debris thickness along the exposed cliffline were made from this scaled model, assuming that the ice surface at the debris-ice boundary is horizontal, and these data are compared to 50 manual point measurements along the same clifftops. We conclude that sufficiently high resolution photogrammetry, with precise scaling information, provides a useful means to determine debris thickness at clifftop exposures. The resolution of the possible measurements depends on image resolution, the accuracy of the ground control points and the computational capacity to generate centimetre scale surface models. Application of such techniques to sufficiently high resolution imagery from UAV-borne cameras may offer a powerful means of determining debris thickness distribution patterns over debris covered glacier termini.

  5. Preserving the Environment of Outer Space - Legal, Regulatory and Institutional Aspects of Active Orbital Debris Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankata Nyampong, Y. O.

    2012-01-01

    In view of the massive quantities of space debris already deposited in outer space, any effort aimed at guaranteeing the sustainability of mankind's access to outer space and the continued safety of space operations must not be limited exclusively to mitigating the creation of new debris, but must also focus on the active removal of existing pieces of debris from space (remediation) as a matter of necessity. Presently, technologies that will enable active debris removal (ADR) are only just emerging. As the technology develops, however, several legal, regulatory and institutional issues that may hinder the conduct of ADR activities must also be addressed. This paper highlights and explores some of the foregoing issues in an effort to draw international attention to these matters and ultimately to pave the way for the smooth conduct of ADR activities once the technology matures.

  6. Assessment and prediction of debris-flow hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Gerald F.; ,

    1993-01-01

    Study of debris-flow geomorphology and initiation mechanism has led to better understanding of debris-flow processes. This paper reviews how this understanding is used in current techniques for assessment and prediction of debris-flow hazards.

  7. Is the Sky Really Falling? An Overview of Orbital Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Orbital debris has been a prominent topic for a while, even before the movie Gravity came out. An anti-satellite test and a collision with an operational satellite both produced large highly-publicized debris clouds within recent years. While large objects like abandoned satellites and rocket bodies may be the most recognizable and identifiable concerns, a majority of the daily threat comes from the much more numerous smaller particles. In fact, small particle penetration continues to rank among the leading risks for manned space missions to the International Space Station and beyond. How much 'stuff' is up there, where did it come from, what harm can it do, and what is being done about it? These questions and more will be discussed.

  8. TREATMENT OF 29 CASES OF LUMBAR INTERVETEBRAL DISC PROTRUSION WITH GINGER-SEPARATED MOXIBUSTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Lixin; LI Wanting

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of ginger-separated moxibustion for treatment of lumbar intervertebrai disc prolapse. Methods: 29 Iumbar intervertebral disc protrusion patients including 21 males and 8 females were treated with ginger-separated moxibustion of Ashi-point and Jiaji (EX-B 2 , the affected region), 5 - 6 cones every time, once every other day, continuously for 5 times. Then the therapeutic effect was analyzed. Results: After treatment, of the 29 cases, 23(79.3% ) were cured, and the rest 6(20.7% ) experienced improvement. Conclusion: Ginger-separated moxibustion is fairly effective and safe in treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion.

  9. Centrifugally exhausting discs: an inverse process of disc-like accretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaburaki, O.

    1989-03-01

    A disc-like mass-loss process from rapidly rotating, highly magnetized objects is investigated. Such a disc may be considered as an inverse-type of magnetized accretion discs. The disc plasma flows out radially with the Alfven velocity while it rotates, in the main part of the disc, with Keplerian velocity. The magnetic stress transfers angular momentum from the central spinner to the disc. A considerable fraction of the rotational energy extracted in association with the angular momentum is liberated in the disc through the (effective) Joule dissipation. An almost self-consistent set of analytic expressions is proposed as a solution to the steady-state, resistive MHD equations which are fairly simplified by the assumption of thin disc. The possibility of finding such discs around young neutron stars is briefly discussed with reference to SN 1987A.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Debris Flow Force Caused by Climate Change and Its application to Check Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, S. D.; Jun, K.; JUN, B. H.; Lee, H. J.; TAK, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    Due to global warming, climate change cause a super hurricane and heavy rainfall frequently. Heavy rainfall cause by debris flow in mountainous terrains, and disasters by debris flow force have continuously increased. The purpose of this study is to analyze the characteristics of debris flow force acting on the check dam. The numerical approach to the debris flow force was performed by the Finite Difference Method (FDM) based on the erosion-deposition combination model including the equation of continuity, mass conservation, and momentum conservation. In order to investigate behavior of the debris flow force according to the variance of supplying water discharge and channel slope angle, a rectangular straight channel and one closed type check dam was set up for conducting numerical simulations. As the supply water discharges increase, the curve of the impact force by debris flow becomes unstable and fluctuation with high impact force occurred as time passes. And the peak impact force showed a steeper slope and appeared more quickly, the high impact force undergoes a fluctuation with high speed, and acting on the check dam. At the mountainous upstream, strong rainfall energy provoke a repeat erosion and deposition which results in debris flow force causing much damage along the check dam at the mountainous place. The analyses of the present study help provide information to predict future debris flow force and how to design for the check dam. This research was supported by a grant [MPSS-NH-2014-74] through the Disaster and Safety Management Institute funded by Ministry of Public Safety and Security of Korean government

  11. Reflectance Spectra of Space Debris in GEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildknecht, T.; Vannanti, A.; Krag, H.; Erd, C.

    The space debris environment in the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) region is mostly investigated by means of optical surveys. Such surveys revealed a considerable amount of debris in the size range of 10 centimeter to one meter. Some of these debris exhibit particularly high area-to-mass ratios as derived from the evolution of their orbits. In order to understand the nature and eventually the origin of these objects, observations allowing to derive physical characteristics like size, shape and material are required. Information on the shape and the attitude motion of a debris piece may be obtained by photometric light curves. The most promising technique to investigate the surface material properties is reflectance spectroscopy. This paper discusses preliminary results obtained from spectrometric observations of space debris in GEO. The observations were acquired at the 1-meter ESA Space Debris Telescope (ESASDT) on Tenerife with a low-resolution spectrograph in the wavelength range of 450-960 nm. The target objects were space debris of different types with brightness as small as magnitude 15. Some simple-shaped, intact "calibration objects" with known surface materials like the MSG-2 satellites were also observed. The spectra show shape variations expected to be caused by the different physical properties of the objects. The determination of the possible materials is still in a preliminary phase. Limitations of the acquisition process of the spectra and the subsequent analysis are discussed. Future steps planned for a better characterization of the debris from the observed data are briefly outlined.

  12. Himalayan glacier retreat delayed by debris cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherler, D.; Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Variable retreat rates and paucity of mass-balance data complicate a coherent picture of the current state and future fate of Himalayan glaciers. We report frontal changes and remotely-sensed surface velocities from >250 glaciers in the greater Himalayan realm (Hindu Kush, Karakoram, Himalaya, West Kunlun Shan) between 2000 and 2008 that provide evidence for widespread meltdown, which is obscured by debris cover. While debris-free glaciers in Tibet and other low-relief areas have been mainly retreating, debris-covered glaciers in high-relief areas, such as the central Himalaya, were mostly stagnating and in-situ down wasting but not retreating. Only Karakoram glaciers show no signs of stagnation or appreciable retreat, despite high debris cover, suggesting no recent mass loss. Our study shows that regional differences in topographic relief account for substantial differences in debris cover and thus retreat behaviour that need to be considered when comparing glacier retreat rates. The combination of melt rates lowered by debris cover and healthier glaciers in the strongly glaciated Karakoram slows down current glacier wastage in High Asia. Predictions of future water availability and global sea level have so far neglected the effect of debris cover on glacier melt rates and thus likely overestimate the speed of glacier meltdown in the Himalaya and other steep mountain ranges where debris covered glaciers are common.

  13. Estimates of current debris from flux models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Flux models that balance accuracy and simplicity are used to predict the growth of space debris to the present. Known and projected launch rates, decay models, and numerical integrations are used to predict distributions that closely resemble the current catalog-particularly in the regions containing most of the debris.

  14. CONCENTRATION AND VELOCITY OF DEBRIS FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangjun FEI; Peng CUI; Yong LI

    2002-01-01

    Debris flows in nature generally fall into three groups distinct in their grain composition: water-stone flow,or sub-viscous debris flow,dominated by coarse grains; muddy flow,dominated by fine grains;and viscous debris flow composed of grains in large range. Liquid-phase velocity and sedimentary delivery resistance of sub-viscous debris flow have been discussed based on the composition characters of sub-and high-viscous debris flows. It is revealed that the presence of fine grains plays a vital role in affecting resistance and average velocity,particularly when the volume fraction of grains in the flow is relatively high,i.e. Sv > 0.45. Grain-size distribution of viscous debris flow is characterized by a bimodal curve,which explains the properties like high density and low resistance gradient of debris flows. A calculation formula is finally put forward,which has to some extent overcome locality limits and achieved a good agreement with the field observations of debris flows in Southwest China.

  15. Effects of radiation and debris to SSPS

    OpenAIRE

    Utashima, Masayoshi; 歌島 昌由

    2004-01-01

    This paper studies effects of the radiation and space debris to the Space Solar Power Systems (SSPS). In the first half of the paper, the in-space transportation from low-Earth orbit to geostationary Earth orbit is studied in consideration of these effects. In the second half, the debris impacts to SSPS on geostationary Earth orbit are analyzed.

  16. Grain charging in protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Ilgner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Recent work identified a growth barrier for dust coagulation that originates in the electric repulsion between colliding particles. Depending on its charge state, dust material may have the potential to control key processes towards planet formation such as MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) turbulence and grain growth which are coupled in a two-way process. We quantify the grain charging at different stages of disc evolution and differentiate between two very extreme cases: compact spherical grains and aggregates with fractal dimension D_f = 2. Applying a simple chemical network that accounts for collisional charging of grains, we provide a semi-analytical solution. This allowed us to calculate the equilibrium population of grain charges and the ionisation fraction efficiently. The grain charging was evaluated for different dynamical environments ranging from static to non-stationary disc configurations. The results show that the adsorption/desorption of neutral gas-phase heavy metals, such as magnesium, effects the ...

  17. Superhumps, resonances and accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehurst, R.; King, A. (Leicester Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astronomy)

    1991-03-01

    The structure of accretion discs within binary systems is shown to be influenced by the excitation of resonances within the disc. Of particular importance is that near the 3:1 commensurability with the stars' orbit. This can be used to explain the superhump phenomenon of SU Ursae Majoris dwarf novae in superoutburst. This resonance can only appear for mass ratios which satisfy M{sub 2}/M{sub 1} < {approx equal} 0.25-0.33: for larger mass ratios the available resonances are weaker and of the wrong form to produce the superhump phenomenon. The mass-transfer stream is shown to be an important contributor to the growth rate of the resonance. (author).

  18. Eclipse mapping of accretion discs

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, Raymundo

    2000-01-01

    The eclipse mapping method is an inversion technique that makes use of the information contained in eclipse light curves to probe the structure, the spectrum and the time evolution of accretion discs. In this review I present the basics of the method and discuss its different implementations. I summarize the most important results obtained to date and discuss how they have helped to improve our understanding of accretion physics, from testing the theoretical radial brightness temperature dist...

  19. Development of the Space Debris Sensor (SDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, J.; Liou, J.-C.; Anz-Meador, P. D.; Corsaro, B.; Giovane, F.; Matney, M.; Christiansen, E.

    2017-01-01

    The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) is a NASA experiment scheduled to fly aboard the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2018. The SDS is the first flight demonstration of the Debris Resistive/Acoustic Grid Orbital NASA-Navy Sensor (DRAGONS) developed and matured at NASA Johnson Space Center's Orbital Debris Program Office. The DRAGONS concept combines several technologies to characterize the size, speed, direction, and density of small impacting objects. With a minimum two-year operational lifetime, SDS is anticipated to collect statistically significant information on orbital debris ranging from 50 microns to 500 microns in size. This paper describes the features of SDS and how data from the ISS mission may be used to update debris environment models. Results of hypervelocity impact testing during the development of SDS and the potential for improvement on future sensors at higher altitudes will be reviewed.

  20. Development of the Space Debris Sensor (SDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Joe; Liou, J. -C.; Anz-Meador, P.; Matney, M.; Christiansen, E.

    2017-01-01

    Debris Resistive/Acoustic Grid Orbital Navy-NASA Sensor (DRAGONS) is an impact sensor designed to detect and characterize collisions with small orbital debris: from 50 microns to greater than 1millimeter debris size detection; Characterizes debris size, speed, direction, and density. The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) is a flight demonstration of DRAGONS on the International Space Station: Approximately 1 square meter of detection area facing the ISS velocity vector; Minimum two year mission on Columbus External Payloads Facility (EPF); Minimal obstruction from ISS hardware; Development is nearing final checkout and integration with the ISS; Current launch schedule is SpaceX13, about September 2017, or SpaceX14, about Jan 2018.

  1. The debris-flow rheology myth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, R.M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Models that employ a fixed rheology cannot yield accurate interpretations or predictions of debris-flow motion, because the evolving behavior of debris flows is too complex to be represented by any rheological equation that uniquely relates stress and strain rate. Field observations and experimental data indicate that debris behavior can vary from nearly rigid to highly fluid as a consequence of temporal and spatial variations in pore-fluid pressure and mixture agitation. Moreover, behavior can vary if debris composition changes as a result of grain-size segregation and gain or loss of solid and fluid constituents in transit. An alternative to fixed-rheology models is provided by a Coulomb mixture theory model, which can represent variable interactions of solid and fluid constituents in heterogeneous debris-flow surges with high-friction, coarse-grained heads and low-friction, liquefied tails. ?? 2003 Millpress.

  2. The dispersal of protoplanetary discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercolano Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Protoplanetary discs are a natural consequence of the star formation process and as such are ubiquitous around low-mass stars. They are fundamental to planet formation as they hold the reservoir of material from which planets form. Their evolution and final dispersal and the timescales that regulate these process are therefore of particular interest. In this contribution I will review the observational evidence for the dispersal of discs being dominated by two timescales and for the final dispersal to occur quickly and from the inside out. I will discuss the current theoretical models, including X-ray photoevaporation, showing that the latter provides a natural explanation to the observed behaviour and review supporting and contrasting evidence. I will finally introduce a new mechanism based on the interaction between planet formation and photoevaporation that may explain a particular class of transition discs with large inner holes and high accretion rates that are problematic for photoevaporation models and planet formation models alone.

  3. Gas dynamics in tidal dwarf galaxies: disc formation at z=0

    CERN Document Server

    Lelli, F; Brinks, E; Bournaud, F; McGaugh, S S; Lisenfeld, U; Weilbacher, P M; Boquien, M; Revaz, Y; Braine, J; Koribalski, B S; Belles, P -E

    2015-01-01

    Tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) are recycled objects that form within the collisional debris of interacting/merging galaxies. They are expected to be devoid of non-baryonic dark matter, since they can form only from dissipative material ejected from the discs of the progenitor galaxies. We investigate the gas dynamics in a sample of six bona-fide TDGs around three interacting and post-interacting systems: NGC 4694, NGC 5291, and NGC 7252 ("Atoms for Peace"). For NGC 4694 and NGC 5291 we analyse existing HI data from the Very Large Array (VLA), while for NGC 7252 we present new HI observations from the Jansky VLA together with long-slit and integral-field optical spectroscopy. For all six TDGs, the HI emission can be described by rotating disc models. These HI discs, however, have undergone less than a full rotation since the time of the interaction/merger event, raising the question of whether they are in dynamical equilibrium. Assuming that these discs are in equilibrium, the inferred dynamical masses are consis...

  4. Formation of planetary debris discs around white dwarfs I: Tidal disruption of an extremely eccentric asteroid

    CERN Document Server

    Veras, Dimitri; Bonsor, Amy; Gaensicke, Boris T

    2014-01-01

    25%-50% of all white dwarfs (WDs) host observable and dynamically active remnant planetary systems based on the presence of close-in circumstellar dust and gas and photospheric metal pollution. Currently-accepted theoretical explanations for the origin of this matter include asteroids that survive the star's giant branch evolution at au-scale distances and are subsequently perturbed onto WD-grazing orbits following stellar mass loss. In this work we investigate the tidal disruption of these highly-eccentric (e > 0.98) asteroids as they approach and tidally disrupt around the WD. We analytically compute the disruption timescale and compare the result with fully self-consistent numerical simulations of rubble piles by using the N-body code PKDGRAV. We find that this timescale is highly dependent on the orbit's pericentre and largely independent of its semimajor axis. We establish that spherical asteroids readily break up and form highly eccentric collisionless rings, which do not accrete onto the WD without add...

  5. A near-infrared interferometric survey of debris-disc stars. V. PIONIER search for variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertel, S.; Defrère, D.; Absil, O.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Augereau, J.-C.; Berger, J.-P.; Blind, N.; Bonsor, A.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lebreton, J.; Marion, L.; Milli, J.; Olofsson, J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Extended circumstellar emission has been detected within a few 100 milli-arcsec around ≳10% of nearby main sequence stars using near-infrared interferometry. Follow-up observations using other techniques, should they yield similar results or non-detections, can provide strong constraints on the origin of the emission. They can also reveal the variability of the phenomenon. Aims: We aim to demonstrate the persistence of the phenomenon over the timescale of a few years and to search for variability of our previously detected excesses. Methods: Using Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI)/Precision Integrated Optics Near Infrared ExpeRiment (PIONIER) in H band we have carried out multi-epoch observations of the stars for which a near-infrared excess was previously detected using the same observation technique and instrument. The detection rates and distribution of the excesses from our original survey and the follow-up observations are compared statistically. A search for variability of the excesses in our time series is carried out based on the level of the broadband excesses. Results: In 12 of 16 follow-up observations, an excess is re-detected with a significance of > 2σ, and in 7 of 16 follow-up observations significant excess (> 3σ) is re-detected. We statistically demonstrate with very high confidence that the phenomenon persists for the majority of the systems. We also present the first detection of potential variability in two sources. Conclusions: We conclude that the phenomenon responsible for the excesses persists over the timescale of a few years for the majority of the systems. However, we also find that variability intrinsic to a target can cause it to have no significant excess at the time of a specific observation. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program IDs 088.C-0266, 089.C-0365, 090.C-0526, 091.C-0576, 091.C-0597, 094.C-0232, and commissioning data.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Circumstellar debris discs (Maldonado+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J.; Eiroa, C.; Villaver, E.; Montesinos, B.; Mora, A.

    2015-09-01

    The high-resolution spectra used in this work come from several spectrographs and telescopes and have already been used in some of our previous works (Maldonado et al., 2010, Cat. J/A+A/521/A12, 2012, Cat. J/A+A/541/A40, 2013, Cat. J/A+A/554/A84; Martinez-Arnaiz et al., 2010, Cat. J/A+A/520/A79), which can be consulted for details concerning the observing runs and the reduction procedure. Summarising, the data were taken with the following instruments: i) FOCES at the 2.2-m telescope of the Calar Alto observatory (CAHA, Almeria, Spain); ii) SARG at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG, 3.58m), La Palma (Canary Islands, Spain); iii) FIES at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT, 2.56m), La Palma; and iv) HERMES at the Mercator telescope (1.2m), also in La Palma. We used additional spectra from the public library "S4N" (Allende Prieto et al., 2004, Cat. J/A+A/420/183), which contains spectra taken with the 2d coude spectrograph at McDonald Observatory and the FEROS instrument at the ESO 1.52m telescope in La Silla; from the ESO/ST-ECF Science Archive Facility (http://archive.eso.org/cms/); and from the pipeline processed FEROS and HARPS data archive (http://archive.eso.org/wdb/wdb/eso/repro/form). (2 data files).

  7. A near-infrared interferometric survey of debris-disc stars. V. PIONIER search for variability

    CERN Document Server

    Ertel, S; Absil, O; Bouquin, J -B Le; Augereau, J -C; Berger, J -P; Blind, N; Bonsor, A; Lagrange, A -M; Lebreton, J; Marion, L; Milli, J; Olofsson, J

    2016-01-01

    Context: Extended circumstellar emission has been detected within a few 100 milli-arcsec around > 10% of nearby main sequence stars using near-infrared interferometry. Follow-up observations using other techniques, should they yield similar results or non-detections, can provide strong constraints on the origin of the emission. They can also reveal the variability of the phenomenon. Aims: We aim to demonstrate the persistence of the phenomenon over time scales of a few years and to search for variability of our previously detected excesses. Methods: Using VLTI/PIONIER in H band we have carried out multi-epoch observations of the stars for which a near-infrared excess was previously detected with the same observing technique and instrument. The detection rates and distribution of the excesses from our original survey and the follow-up observations are compared statistically. A search for variability of the excesses in our time series is carried out based on the level of the broadband excesses. Results: In 12 o...

  8. Erosion of steepland valleys by debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, J.D.; Dietrich, W.E.

    2006-01-01

    Episodic debris flows scour the rock beds of many steepland valleys. Along recent debris-flow runout paths in the western United States, we have observed evidence for bedrock lowering, primarily by the impact of large particles entrained in debris flows. This evidence may persist to the point at which debris-flow deposition occurs, commonly at slopes of less than ???0.03-0.10. We find that debris-flow-scoured valleys have a topographic signature that is fundamentally different from that predicted by bedrock river-incision models. Much of this difference results from the fact that local valley slope shows a tendency to decrease abruptly downstream of tributaries that contribute throughgoing debris flows. The degree of weathering of valley floor bedrock may also decrease abruptly downstream of such junctions. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesize that valley slope is adjusted to the long-term frequency of debris flows, and that valleys scoured by debris flows should not be modeled using conventional bedrock river-incision laws. We use field observations to justify one possible debris-flow incision model, whose lowering rate is proportional to the integral of solid inertial normal stresses from particle impacts along the flow and the number of upvalley debris-flow sources. The model predicts that increases in incision rate caused by increases in flow event frequency and length (as flows gain material) downvalley are balanced by rate reductions from reduced inertial normal stress at lower slopes, and stronger, less weathered bedrock. These adjustments lead to a spatially uniform lowering rate. Although the proposed expression leads to equilibrium long-profiles with the correct topographic signature, the crudeness with which the debris-flow dynamics are parameterized reveals that we are far from a validated debris-flow incision law. However, the vast extent of steepland valley networks above slopes of ???0.03-0.10 illustrates the need to understand debris

  9. Wear Debris Analysis:Fundamental Principle of Wear-Graphy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈铭; 王伟华; 殷勇辉; 王成焘

    2004-01-01

    A new wear-graphy technology was developed, which can simultaneously identify the shape and composition of wear debris, for both metals and non-metals.The fundamental principles of the wear-graphy system and its wear-gram system are discussed here.A method was developed to distribute wear debris on a slide uniformly to reduce overlapping of wear debris while smearing.The composition identification analyzes the wear debris using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) energy spectrum, infrared-thermal imaging and X-ray imaging technology.A wear debris analysis system based on database techniques is demonstrated, and a visible digitized wear-gram is acquired based on the information of wear debris with image collection and processing of the wear debris.The method gives the morphological characteristics of the wear debris, material composition identification of the wear debris, intelligent recognition of the wear debris, and storage and management of wear debris information.

  10. The Debris of Urban Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Sgarbi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available “Il Guasto” is an urban context, a place in the heart of the historic city of Bologna which is a mound of debris (resulting from the demolition of an important building, the Bentivoglio Family palace during a popular revolt in the 1506 on top of which a “public garden” was created 40 years ago. The garden is well known in Bologna as “Giardino del Guasto”. Underneath, in between the debris, an underground space (bunker was created to protect the citizen during the bombing of the second world war.The aim of the Design Studio of Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism, Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada, DSA Directed Studies Abroad (January 15th - April 13th, 2012, is to exercise creativity and design skills in an historical context bearing some negative connotations. A spell was cast on the site and the negative effects of this spell are still perceivable today after more than five hundred years. This makes us ponder upon the notions of permanence and durability (of architecture and ideas in the urban fabric and in the meanders of human memory. The site, centered on a garden, has been undergoing many changes in use, purpose and meaning and today still requires to be reimagined in the social context of the city and its famous university. [In the menu on the right, ARTICLE TOOLS, in "Supplementary Files" link you can download the .pdf presentations of Carleton University students, related to the workshop on Giardino del Guasto area, developed in Bologna in 2012].

  11. Sedimentology, Behavior, and Hazards of Debris Flows at Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, K.M.; Vallance, J.W.; Pringle, P.T.

    1995-01-01

    middle segments of flow waves that begin and end as flood surges. Proximally, through the bulking of poorly sorted volcaniclastic debris on the flanks of the volcano, flow waves expand rapidly in volume by transforming from water surges through hyperconcentrated stream flow (20 to 60 percent sediment by volume) to debris flow. Distally, the transformations occur more slowly in reverse order - from debris flow, to hyperconcentrated flow, and finally to normal streamflow with less than 20 percent sediment by volume. During runout of the largest noncohesive flows, hyperconcentrated flow has continued for as much as 40 to 70 kilometers. Lahars (volcanic debris flows and their deposits) have occurred frequently at Mount Rainier over the past several thousand years, and generally they have not clustered within discrete eruptive periods as at Mount St. Helens. An exception is a period of large noncohesive flows during and after construction of the modern summit cone. Deposits from lahar-runout flows, the hyperconcentrated distal phases of lahars, document the frequency and extent of noncohesive lahars. These deposits also record the following transformations of debris flows: (1) the direct, progressive dilution of debris flow to hyperconcentrated flow, (2) deposition of successively finer grained lobes of debris until only the hyperconcentrated tail of the flow remains to continue downstream, and (3) dewatering of coarse debris flow deposits to yield fine-grained debris flow or hyperconcentrated flow. Three planning or design case histories represent different lengths of postglacial time. Case I is representative of large, infrequent (500 to 1,000 years on average) cohesive debris flows. These flows need to be considered in long-term planning in valleys around the volcano. Case II generalizes the noncohesive debris flows of intermediate size and recurrence (100 to 500 years). This case is appropriate for consideration in some structural design. Case III flows are

  12. Debris disks: seeing dust, thinking of planetesimals and planets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander V.Krivov

    2010-01-01

    Debris disks are optically thin, almost gas-free dusty disks observed around a significant fraction of main-sequence stars older than about 10Myr. Since the circumstellar dust is short-lived, the very existence of these disks is considered as evidence that dust-producing planetesimals are still present in mature systems, in which planets have formed-or failed to form-a long time ago. It is inferred that these planetesimals orbit their host stars at asteroid to Kuiper-belt distances and continually supply fresh dust through mutual collisions. This review outlines observational techniques and results on debris disks, summarizes their essential physics and theoretical models, and then places them into the general context of planetary systems, uncovering interrelations between the disks, dust parent bodies, and planets. It is shown that debris disks can serve as tracers of planetesimals and planets and shed light on the planetesimal and planet formation processes that operated in these systems in the past.

  13. Space Debris Removal: A Game Theoretic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Klima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyse active space debris removal efforts from a strategic, game-theoretical perspective. Space debris is non-manoeuvrable, human-made objects orbiting Earth, which pose a significant threat to operational spacecraft. Active debris removal missions have been considered and investigated by different space agencies with the goal to protect valuable assets present in strategic orbital environments. An active debris removal mission is costly, but has a positive effect for all satellites in the same orbital band. This leads to a dilemma: each agency is faced with the choice between the individually costly action of debris removal, which has a positive impact on all players; or wait and hope that others jump in and do the ‘dirty’ work. The risk of the latter action is that, if everyone waits, the joint outcome will be catastrophic, leading to what in game theory is referred to as the ‘tragedy of the commons’. We introduce and thoroughly analyse this dilemma using empirical game theory and a space debris simulator. We consider two- and three-player settings, investigate the strategic properties and equilibria of the game and find that the cost/benefit ratio of debris removal strongly affects the game dynamics.

  14. Parameters that effect spine biomechanics following cervical disc replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Vijay K; Faizan, Ahmad; Palepu, Vivek; Bhattacharya, Sanghita

    2012-06-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) is expected to provide a more physiologic alternative to fusion. However, long-term clinical data proving the efficacy of the implants is lacking. Limited clinical data suggest somewhat of a disagreement between the in vitro biomechanical studies and in vivo assessments. This conceptual paper presents the potential biomechanical challenges affecting the TDR that should be addressed with a hope to improve the clinical outcomes and our understanding of the devices. Appropriate literature and our own research findings comparing the biomechanics of different disc designs are presented to highlight the need for additional investigations. The biomechanical effects of various surgical procedures are analyzed, reiterating the importance of parameters like preserving uncinate processes, disc placement and its orientation within the cervical spine. Moreover, the need for a 360° dynamic system for disc recipients who may experience whiplash injuries is explored. Probabilistic studies as performed already in the lumbar spine may explore high risk combinations of different parameters and explain the differences between "standard" biomechanical investigations and clinical studies. Development of a patient specific optimized finite element model that takes muscle forces into consideration may help resolve the discrepancies between biomechanics of TDR and the clinical studies. Factors affecting long-term performance such as bone remodeling, subsidence, and wear are elaborated. In vivo assessment of segmental spine motion has been, and continues to be, a challenge. In general, clinical studies while reporting the data have placed lesser emphasis on kinematics following intervertebral disc replacements. Evaluation of in vivo kinematics following TDR to analyze the quality and quantity of motion using stereoradiogrammetric technique may be needed.

  15. Project ORION: Orbital Debris Removal Using Ground-Based Sensors and Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    About 100,000 pieces of 1 to 10-cm debris in low-Earth orbit are too small to track reliably but large enough to cripple or destroy spacecraft. The ORION team studied the feasibility of removing the debris with ground-based laser impulses. Photoablation experiments were surveyed and applied to likely debris materials. Laser intensities needed for debris orbit modification call for pulses on the order of lOkJ or continuous wave lasers on the order of 1 MW. Adaptive optics are necessary to correct for atmospheric turbulence. Wavelength and pulse duration windows were found that limit beam degradation due to nonlinear atmospheric processes. Debris can be detected and located to within about 10 microrads with existing radar and passive optical technology. Fine targeting would be accomplished with laser illumination, which might also be used for detection. Bistatic detection with communications satellites may also be possible. We recommend that existing technology be used to demonstrate the concept at a loss of about $20 million. We calculate that an installation to clear altitudes up to 800 km of 1 to 10-cm debris over 2 years of operation would cost about $80 million. Clearing altitudes up to 1,500 km would take about 3 years and cost about $160 million.

  16. Landslide and debris-flow hazard analysis and prediction using GIS in Minamata Hougawachi area, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunxiang; Esaki, Tetsuro; Xie, Mowen; Qiu, Cheng

    2006-10-01

    On July 20, 2003, following a short duration of heavy rainfall, a debris-flow disaster occurred in the Minamata Hougawachi area, Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan. This disaster was triggered by a landslide. In order to assess the landslide and debris-flow hazard potential of this mountainous region, the study of historic landslides is critical. The objective of the study is to couple 3D slope-stability analysis models and 2D numerical simulation of debris flow within a geographical information systems in order to identity the potential landslide-hazard area. Based on field observations, the failure mechanism of the past landslide is analyzed and the mechanical parameters for 3D slope-stability analysis are calculated from the historic landslide. Then, to locate potential new landslides, the studied area is divided into slope units. Based on 3D slope-stability analysis models and on Monte Carlo simulation, the spots of potential landslides are identified. Finally, we propose a depth-averaged 2D numerical model, in which the debris and water mixture is assumed to be a uniform continuous, incompressible, unsteady Newtonian fluid. The method accurately models the historic debris flow. According to the 2D numerical simulation, the results of the debris-flow model, including the potentially inundated areas, are analyzed, and potentially affected houses, river and road are mapped.

  17. Current and Future Impact Risks from Small Debris to Operational Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Kessler, Don

    2011-01-01

    The collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 in 2009 signaled the potential onset of the collision cascade effect, commonly known as the "Kessler Syndrome", in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region. Recent numerical simulations have shown that the 10 cm and larger debris population in LEO will continue to increase even with a good implementation of the commonly-adopted mitigation measures. This increase is driven by collisions involving large and massive intacts, i.e., rocket bodies and spacecraft. Therefore, active debris removal (ADR) of large and massive intacts with high collision probabilities has been argued as a direct and effective means to remediate the environment in LEO. The major risk for operational satellites in the environment, however, comes from impacts with debris just above the threshold of the protection shields. In general, these are debris in the millimeter to centimeter size regime. Although impacts by these objects are insufficient to lead to catastrophic breakup of the entire vehicle, the damage is certainly severe enough to cause critical failure of the key instruments or the entire payload. The focus of this paper is to estimate the impact risks from 5 mm and 1 cm debris to active payloads in LEO (1) in the current environment and (2) in the future environment based on different projection scenarios, including ADR. The goal of the study is to quantify the benefits of ADR in reducing debris impact risks to operational satellites.

  18. Biomechanical study of intervertebral disc degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    González Guitiérrez, Ramiro Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Degeneration and age affect the biomechanics of the intervertebral disc, by reducing its stiffness, flexibility and shock absorption capacities against daily movement and spinal load. The biomechanical characterization of intervertebral discs is achieved by conducting mechanical testing to vertebra-disc-vertebra segments and applying axial, shear, bend and torsion loads, statically or dynamically, with load magnitudes corresponding to the physiological range. However, traditional testing does...

  19. DSC Study of Collagen in Disc Disease

    OpenAIRE

    S. Skrzyński; Sionkowska, A.; Marciniak, A.

    2009-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to estimate the effect of disc disease on the collagen helix-coil transition and morphology for tissue extracted from patients during surgical operation. Forty discs were obtained from patients with degenerative disc disease undergoing surgery for low back pain. The patients were in the age between 20 and 70 years old. The specimens were kept wet during DSC experiment. The data allow the comparison between thermal stability of collagen ti...

  20. Biomechanical study of intervertebral disc degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    González Guitiérrez, Ramiro Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Degeneration and age affect the biomechanics of the intervertebral disc, by reducing its stiffness, flexibility and shock absorption capacities against daily movement and spinal load. The biomechanical characterization of intervertebral discs is achieved by conducting mechanical testing to vertebra-disc-vertebra segments and applying axial, shear, bend and torsion loads, statically or dynamically, with load magnitudes corresponding to the physiological range. However, traditional testing does...

  1. The Roles of Discs for Planetary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yeh, L C; Yeh, Li-Chin; Jiang, Ing-Guey

    2007-01-01

    It is known that the discs are detected for some of the extra-solar planetary systems. It is also likely that there was a disc mixing with planets and small bodies while our Solar System was forming. From our recent results, we conclude that the discs play two roles: the gravity makes planetary systems more chaotic and the drag makes planetary systems more resonant.

  2. DISC1 genetics, biology and psychiatric illness

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are highly heritable, and in many individuals likely arise from the combined effects of genes and the environment. A substantial body of evidence points towards DISC1 being one of the genes that influence risk of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, and functional studies of DISC1 consequently have the potential to reveal much about the pathways that lead to major mental illness. Here, we review the evidence that DISC1 influences disease risk through effects u...

  3. POST Earthquake Debris Management - AN Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Raju

    Every year natural disasters, such as fires, floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, landslides, tsunami, and tornadoes, challenge various communities of the world. Earthquakes strike with varying degrees of severity and pose both short- and long-term challenges to public service providers. Earthquakes generate shock waves and displace the ground along fault lines. These seismic forces can bring down buildings and bridges in a localized area and damage buildings and other structures in a far wider area. Secondary damage from fires, explosions, and localized flooding from broken water pipes can increase the amount of debris. Earthquake debris includes building materials, personal property, and sediment from landslides. The management of this debris, as well as the waste generated during the reconstruction works, can place significant challenges on the national and local capacities. Debris removal is a major component of every post earthquake recovery operation. Much of the debris generated from earthquake is not hazardous. Soil, building material, and green waste, such as trees and shrubs, make up most of the volume of earthquake debris. These wastes not only create significant health problems and a very unpleasant living environment if not disposed of safely and appropriately, but also can subsequently impose economical burdens on the reconstruction phase. In practice, most of the debris may be either disposed of at landfill sites, reused as materials for construction or recycled into useful commodities Therefore, the debris clearance operation should focus on the geotechnical engineering approach as an important post earthquake issue to control the quality of the incoming flow of potential soil materials. In this paper, the importance of an emergency management perspective in this geotechnical approach that takes into account the different criteria related to the operation execution is proposed by highlighting the key issues concerning the handling of the construction

  4. Frequency and magnitude of debris flows on Cheekye River, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, M.; Friele, P.

    2010-01-01

    Natural hazard and risk assessments are predicated on a detailed understanding of the relationship between frequency and magnitude of the hazardous process under investigation. When information is sought from the deep past (i.e., several thousand years), continuous event records do not exist and the researcher has to rely on proxy data to develop the frequency-magnitude ( F- M) model. Such work is often prohibitively expensive and few well-researched examples for mass movement are available worldwide. The Cheekye fan is a desirable location for land development and has a depth and breadth of previous research unprecedented on any debris-flow fan in Canada. We pursued two principal strains of research to formulate a reliable F- M relationship. The first focuses on stratigraphic analyses combined with radiometric dating and dendrochronology to reconstruct a comprehensive picture of Holocene debris-flow activity. The second approach examines hydrological limitations of rock avalanche evolution into debris flows through either entrainment of saturated sediments or by failure of a landslide-generated dam and upstream impoundment. We thus hypothesize that debris flows from Cheekye River can be separated into two quasi-homogenous populations: those that are typically triggered by relatively small debris avalanches, slumps, or rock falls or simply by progressive bulking of in-stream erodible sediments; and those that are thought to result from transformation of rock avalanches. Our work suggests that debris flows exceeding some 3 million m 3 in volume are unlikely to reach the Cheekye fan as a result of limited water available to fully fluidize a rock avalanche. This analysis has also demonstrated that in order to arrive at reasonable estimates for the frequency and magnitude of debris flows on a complex alluvial fan significant multidisciplinary efforts are required. Without the significant precursor investigations and the additional efforts of this study, life and

  5. Seasonal trends in abundance and composition of marine debris in selected public beaches in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobilik, Julyus-Melvin; Ling, Teck-Yee; Husain, Mohd-Lokman Bin; Hassan, Ruhana

    2015-09-01

    The abundance and composition of marine debris were investigated at Saujana (in the state of Negeri Sembilan) and Batu Rakit (in the state of Terengganu) beaches during surveys conducted in December 2012 (northeast monsoon), May 2013 (intermediate monsoon) and July 2013 (southwest monsoon). A total of 4,682 items of debris weighing 231.4 kg were collected and sorted. Batu Rakit received substantially greater quantities of debris (815±717 items/km or 40.4±13.0 kg/km) compared to Saujana (745±444 items/km or 36.7±18.0 kg/km). Total debris item was more abundant during the southwest monsoon (SWM) (1,122±737 items/km) compared to the northeast monsoon (NEM) (825±593 items/ km) and the intermediate monsoon (IM) (394±4 items/km) seasons. Plastic category (88%) was the most numerous items collected and object items contributed 44.18% includes packaging, plastic fragments, cups, plastic shopping bags, plastic food wrapper, clear plastic bottles from the total debris items collected. Object items associated with common source (47%) were the highest debris accumulated, followed by terrestrial (30%) and marine (23%) sources. The high percentage of common and terrestrial sources during SWM season requires immediate action by marine environment stakeholders to develop and introduce strategies to reduce if not totally eliminates the marine debris in the marine environment. Awareness should be continued and focused on beach users and vessels' crew to alert them on the alarming accumulation rate of marine debris and its pathways into the marine environment.

  6. Predicting spatial distribution of postfire debris flows and potential consequences for native trout in headwater streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedell, Edwin R; Gresswell, Bob; McMahon, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and degradation and invasion of nonnative species have restricted the distribution of native trout. Many trout populations are limited to headwater streams where negative effects of predicted climate change, including reduced stream flow and increased risk of catastrophic fires, may further jeopardize their persistence. Headwater streams in steep terrain are especially susceptible to disturbance associated with postfire debris flows, which have led to local extirpation of trout populations in some systems. We conducted a reach-scale spatial analysis of debris-flow risk among 11 high-elevation watersheds of the Colorado Rocky Mountains occupied by isolated populations of Colorado River Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus). Stream reaches at high risk of disturbance by postfire debris flow were identified with the aid of a qualitative model based on 4 primary initiating and transport factors (hillslope gradient, flow accumulation pathways, channel gradient, and valley confinement). This model was coupled with a spatially continuous survey of trout distributions in these stream networks to assess the predicted extent of trout population disturbances related to debris flows. In the study systems, debris-flow potential was highest in the lower and middle reaches of most watersheds. Colorado River Cutthroat Trout occurred in areas of high postfire debris-flow risk, but they were never restricted to those areas. Postfire debris flows could extirpate trout from local reaches in these watersheds, but trout populations occupy refugia that should allow recolonization of interconnected, downstream reaches. Specific results of our study may not be universally applicable, but our risk assessment approach can be applied to assess postfire debris-flow risk for stream reaches in other watersheds.

  7. A Detailed Study of Debris Flow Source Areas in the Northern Colorado Front Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana-Morales, A.; Baum, R. L.; Godt, J.

    2014-12-01

    Nearly continuous, heavy rainfall occurred during 9-13 September 2013 causing flooding and widespread landslides and debris flows in the northern Colorado Front Range. Whereas many recent studies have identified erosion as the most common process leading to debris flows in the mountains of Colorado, nearly all of the debris flows mapped in this event began as small, shallow landslides. We mapped the boundaries of 415 September 2013 debris flows in the Eldorado Springs and Boulder 7.5-minute quadrangles using 0.5-m-resolution satellite imagery. We characterized the landslide source areas of six debris flows in the field as part of an effort to identify what factors controlled their locations. Four were on a dip slope in sedimentary rocks in the Pinebrook Hills area, near Boulder, and the other two were in granitic rocks near Gross Reservoir. Although we observed no obvious geomorphic differences between the source areas and surrounding non-landslide areas, we noted several characteristics that the source areas all had in common. Slopes of the source areas ranged from 28° to 35° and most occurred on planar or slightly concave slopes that were vegetated with grass, small shrubs, and sparse trees. The source areas were shallow, irregularly shaped, and elongated downslope: widths ranged from 4 to 9 m, lengths from 6 to 40 m and depths ranged from 0.7 to 1.2 m. Colluvium was the source material for all of the debris flows and bedrock was exposed in the basal surface of all of the source areas. We observed no evidence for concentrated surface runoff upslope from the sources. Local curvature and roughness of bedrock and surface topography, and depth distribution and heterogeneity of the colluvium appear to have controlled the specific locations of these shallow debris-flow source areas. The observed distribution and characteristics of the source areas help guide ongoing efforts to model initiation of the debris flows.

  8. Foraminal deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals in the thoracic spine: possible relationship with disc herniation and implications for surgical planning. Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, Sergio; Ciappetta, Pasquale; Guiducci, Antonio; Principi, Massimo; Missori, Paolo; Delfini, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    The authors report two cases of nodular calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition close to the thoracic neural foramen, which caused chronic radiculopathy. Preoperatively, the lesions were interpreted as calcified disc herniations. Both patients underwent surgery in which an extended transfacet pedicle-sparing approach was used. Incision of the posterior longitudinal ligament released soft degenerated material. In both cases, histological examination showed abundant degenerative debris along with CPPD crystals. Spinal CPPD deposition is a comparatively rare disease that almost invariably involves the posterior aspect of the spinal canal, typically the ligamentum flavum. The exceptional foraminal location of the lesions reported here, combined with the surgical findings, indicated that the CPPD crystals were deposited on a laterally herniated disc fragment. A distinctive feature in both cases was the soft consistency of the resected tissue. The consistency of the disc material and the location of the lesion in the axial plane (that is, median compared with lateral) are key factors in determining the optimal surgical approach to thoracic disc herniations. In describing consistency, terms such as "calcified" and "hard" have been used interchangeably in the literature. In the cases reported here, what appeared on computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies to be densely calcified lesions were shown intraoperatively to be soft herniations. The authors' experience underscores that not all densely calcified herniated discs are hard. Although detection of this discrepancy would have left surgical planning for the lateral disc herniations unchanged, it could have altered planning for centrally or centrolaterally located disc herniations.

  9. Accretion Discs Show Their True Colours

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Quasars are the brilliant cores of remote galaxies, at the hearts of which lie supermassive black holes that can generate enough power to outshine the Sun a trillion times. These mighty power sources are fuelled by interstellar gas, thought to be sucked into the hole from a surrounding 'accretion disc'. A paper in this week's issue of the journal Nature, partly based on observations collected with ESO's Very Large Telescope, verifies a long-standing prediction about the intensely luminous radiation emitted by these accretion discs. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 21/08 Uncovering the inner disc "Astronomers were puzzled by the fact that the best models of these discs couldn't quite be reconciled with some of the observations, in particular, with the fact that these discs did not appear as blue as they should be," explains lead-author Makoto Kishimoto. Such a discrepancy could be the signal that there was something very wrong with the models. With his colleagues, he investigated this discrepancy by studying the polarised light from six quasars. This enabled them to demonstrate that the disc spectrum is as blue as predicted. "The crucial observational difficulty here has been that the disc is surrounded by a much larger torus containing hot dust, whose light partly outshines that of the disc," says Kishimoto. "Because the light coming from the disc is scattered in the disc vicinity and thus polarised, by observing only polarised light from the quasars, one can uncover the buried light from the disc." In a similar way that a fisherman would wear polarised sunglasses to help get rid of the glare from the water surface and allow him to see more clearly under the water, the filter on the telescope allowed the astronomers to see beyond surrounding clouds of dust and gas to the blue colour of the disc in infrared light. The observations were done with the FORS and ISAAC instruments on one of the 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope, located in the Atacama

  10. DSC Study of Collagen in Disc Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Skrzyński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC has been used to estimate the effect of disc disease on the collagen helix-coil transition and morphology for tissue extracted from patients during surgical operation. Forty discs were obtained from patients with degenerative disc disease undergoing surgery for low back pain. The patients were in the age between 20 and 70 years old. The specimens were kept wet during DSC experiment. The data allow the comparison between thermal stability of collagen tissue from healthy patients and from patients suffering from disc disease. In the paper the comparison between thermal helix-coil transition for collagen fibers from patients suffering from disc disease and collagen fibers from healthy organisms has been discussed. The heating rate has an influence on the position on denaturation temperatures of collagen in disc tissues. Higher helix-coil transition temperature of collagen in degenerated disc suggests that additional intermolecular cross linking of collagen fibers occurs. Denaturation temperatures of collagen in degenerated male disc possess smaller values than in female ones. Disc disease induces changes in collagen structure and leads to formation of additional crosslinks between collagen fibers.

  11. Computing Decoupled Residuals for Compact Disc Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve Compact Disc Players playability regarding playing Compact Discs with surface faults, like scratches and fingerprints etc, the attention has been put on fault tolerant control schemes. Almost every of those methods are based on fault detection. The standard approach is to use...... a pair of residuals generated by Compact Disc Player. However, these residuals depend on the performance of position servos in the Compact Disc Player. In other publications of the same authors a pair of decoupled residuals is derived. However, the computation of these alternative residuals has been...

  12. Algorithms for the Computation of Debris Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matney, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Determining the risks from space debris involve a number of statistical calculations. These calculations inevitably involve assumptions about geometry - including the physical geometry of orbits and the geometry of non-spherical satellites. A number of tools have been developed in NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office to handle these calculations; many of which have never been published before. These include algorithms that are used in NASA's Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM 3.0, as well as other tools useful for computing orbital collision rates and ground casualty risks. This paper will present an introduction to these algorithms and the assumptions upon which they are based.

  13. Algorithms for the Computation of Debris Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matney, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    Determining the risks from space debris involve a number of statistical calculations. These calculations inevitably involve assumptions about geometry - including the physical geometry of orbits and the geometry of satellites. A number of tools have been developed in NASA’s Orbital Debris Program Office to handle these calculations; many of which have never been published before. These include algorithms that are used in NASA’s Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM 3.0, as well as other tools useful for computing orbital collision rates and ground casualty risks. This paper presents an introduction to these algorithms and the assumptions upon which they are based.

  14. Which design and biomaterial factors affect clinical wear performance of total disc replacements? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veruva, Sai Y; Steinbeck, Marla J; Toth, Jeffrey; Alexander, Dominik D; Kurtz, Steven M

    2014-12-01

    Total disc replacement was clinically introduced to reduce pain and preserve segmental motion of the lumbar and cervical spine. Previous case studies have reported on the wear and adverse local tissue reactions around artificial prostheses, but it is unclear how design and biomaterials affect clinical outcomes. Which design and material factors are associated with differences in clinical wear performance (implant wear and periprosthetic tissue response) of (1) lumbar and (2) cervical total disc replacements? We performed a systematic review on the topics of implant wear and periprosthetic tissue response using an advanced search in MEDLINE and Scopus electronic databases. Of the 340 references identified, 33 were retrieved for full-text evaluation, from which 16 papers met the inclusion criteria (12 on lumbar disc replacement and five on cervical disc replacement; one of the included studies reported on both lumbar and cervical disc replacement), which involved semiquantitative analysis of wear and adverse local tissue reactions along with a description of the device used. An additional three papers were located by searching bibliographies of key articles. There were seven case reports, three case series, two case-control studies, and seven analytical studies. The Methodological Index for Non-randomized Studies (MINORS) Scale was used to score case series and case-control studies, which yielded mean scores of 10.3 of 16 and 17.5 of 24, respectively. In general, the case series (three) and case-control (two) studies were of good quality. In lumbar regions, metal-on-polymer devices with mobile-bearing designs consistently generated small and large polymeric wear debris, triggering periprosthetic tissue activation of macrophages and giant cells, respectively. In the cervical regions, metal-on-polymer devices with fixed-bearing designs had similar outcomes. All metal-on-metal constructs tended to generate small metallic wear debris, which typically triggered an

  15. The influence of supraglacial debris cover variability on de-icing processes - examples from Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Sven; Benn, Douglas I.; Boston, Clare M.; Hawkins, Jack; Lehane, Niall E.; Lovell, Harold; Rooke, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Extensive supraglacial debris covers are widespread near the margins of many cold-based and polythermal surging and non-surging glaciers in Svalbard. Despite their importance for current glacier dynamics and a detailed understanding of how they will affect the de-icing of ice-marginal areas, little work has been carried out to shed light on the sedimentary processes operating in these debris covers. We here present data from five different forelands in Svalbard. In all five cases, surfaces within the debris cover can be regarded as stable where debris cover thickness exceeds that of the active layer; vegetation development and absence of buried ice exposures at the surface support this conclusion, although test pits and geophysical investigations have revealed the presence of buried ice at greater depths (> 1-3 m). These findings imply that even seemingly stable surfaces at present will be subject to change by de-icing in the future. Factors and processes that contribute towards a switch from temporarily stable to unstable conditions have been identified as: 1. The proximity to englacial or supraglacial meltwater channels. These channels enlarge due to thermo-erosion, which can lead to the eventual collapse of tunnel roofs and the sudden generation of linear instabilities in the system. Along such channels, ablation is enhanced compared to adjacent debris-covered ice, and continued thermo-erosion continuously exposes new areas of buried ice at the surface. This works in conjunction with 2. Debris flows that occur on all sloping ground and transfer material from stable to less stable (sloping) locations within the debris cover and eventually into supraglacial channels, from where material is then removed from the system. Several generations of debris flows have been identified in all five debris covers, strongly suggesting that these processes are episodic and that the loci of these processes switch. This in turn indicates that transfer of material by debris flows

  16. Evolution of linear warps in accretion discs and applications to protoplanetary discs in binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Foucart, Francois

    2014-01-01

    The existence of warped accretion discs is expected in a wide variety of astrophysical systems, including circumstellar discs in binaries and discs around binary protostars. A common feature of these discs is that they are perturbed by a misaligned external potential. In this paper, we study the long-term evolution of the disc warp and precession in the case of thick discs (with the dimensionless thickness $H/r$ larger than the viscosity parameter $\\alpha$) in which bending waves can propagate. For small warps, such discs undergo approximately rigid-body precession with a coherent global frequency. We derive the analytical expressions for the warp/twist profiles of the disc and the alignment timescale for a variety of disc models/parameters. Applying our results to circumbinary discs, we find that these discs align with the orbital plane of the binary on a timescale comparable to the global precession time of the disc, and typically much smaller than its viscous timescale. The development of parametric instab...

  17. Circumplanetary discs around young giant planets: a comparison between core-accretion and disc instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulágyi, J.; Mayer, L.; Quinn, T.

    2017-01-01

    Circumplanetary discs can be found around forming giant planets, regardless of whether core accretion or gravitational instability built the planet. We carried out state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations of the circumplanetary discs for both formation scenarios, using as similar initial conditions as possible to unveil possible intrinsic differences in the circumplanetary disc mass and temperature between the two formation mechanisms. We found that the circumplanetary discs' mass linearly scales with the circumstellar disc mass. Therefore, in an equally massive protoplanetary disc, the circumplanetary discs formed in the disc instability model can be only a factor of 8 more massive than their core-accretion counterparts. On the other hand, the bulk circumplanetary disc temperature differs by more than an order of magnitude between the two cases. The subdiscs around planets formed by gravitational instability have a characteristic temperature below 100 K, while the core-accretion circumplanetary discs are hot, with temperatures even greater than 1000 K when embedded in massive, optically thick protoplanetary discs. We explain how this difference can be understood as the natural result of the different formation mechanisms. We argue that the different temperatures should persist up to the point when a full-fledged gas giant forms via disc instability; hence, our result provides a convenient criterion for observations to distinguish between the two main formation scenarios by measuring the bulk temperature in the planet vicinity.

  18. [Standardized terminology for disc disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Pérez, M; Gil Sierra, A; Sánchez Martín, A; Gallego Gómez, P; Pereira Boo, D

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the terminology used to describe morphological alterations in the intervertebral discs. Radiologists must be able to communicate information about the type, location, and severity of these alterations to medical and surgical clinicians. It is crucial to use simple, standard, and unified terminology to ensure comprehension not only among radiologists but also with professionals from the different specialties for whom the radiology reports are written (fundamentally traumatologists and neurosurgeons). This terminology will help ensure a more accurate diagnosis and better patient management.

  19. Glacier Debris Cover Variation in the Hindu Kush and Karakoram Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroder, J.; Bishop, M.; Haritashya, U.; Olsenholler, J.; Bulley, H.; Sartan, J.

    2006-12-01

    Alpine glaciers in the Hindu Kush of Afghanistan and the Western Himalaya of Pakistan are heavily debris- covered and exhibit high spatial distribution and depth variability. This property of a glacier surface plays a major role in the energy balance and partially controls the ablation rate. Consequently as the GLIMS Regional Center for Southwest Asia, we wanted to determine if climate forcing and thinning glaciers would generate more debris cover that would have an influence on the mass- balance gradient. Therefore, we conducted a multi-temporal study of debris cover variation on selected glaciers using satellite imagery. Specifically, co-registered, multi-decadal satellite imagery (Landsat ETM, TM, MSS and ASTER) were orthorectified and overlaid, from which cloud-free, snow-free subareas of the glaciers were identified. Visual and quantitative comparisons were performed on 20 small glaciers and ice- cored rock glaciers in Afghanistan, and the Batura, Biafo, and Baltoro glaciers of the Karakoram, and Raikot and Buldar glaciers in the Nanga Parbat Himalaya in Pakistan. All subareas were classified using the ISODATA clustering algorithm. Comparison complexities caused by temporally irregular variations in satellite coverage through the ablation season make interpretation difficult. Nonetheless, our results indicate a general debris-cover increase through time, as would be expected in a climatic-warming scenario. For example, the small glaciers of the Hindu Kush are down-wasting and back-wasting where they are mostly clean ice, but where they are mostly debris covered the change is less visible. In the Karakoram multiple white-ice streams from ice falls flow down-glacier, interspersed with multiple high standing or ribbed medial moraines between. These medial moraines progressively converge down-glacier to form a continuous debris cover that itself looses its ribbed character and down-wastes into a chaotic terrain of hummocks, hollows, and supraglacial lakes. The

  20. RemoveDebris – Mission Analysis for a Low Cost Active Debris Removal Demonstration in 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Joffre, E; Forshaw, J.; Secretin, T; Reynaud, S.; Salmon, T; Aurelien, P; Aglietti, G.

    2015-01-01

    Contracted by the European Commission in the frame of the EU’s Seventh Framework Programme for Research (FP7), a wide European consortium has been working since 2013 towards the design of a low cost in-orbit demonstration called RemoveDEBRIS. With a targeted launch date in the second quarter of 2016, the RemoveDEBRIS mission aims at demonstrating key Active Debris Removal (ADR) technologies, including capture means (net and harpoon firing on a distant target), relative navigation techniques (...

  1. The structural evolution of galaxies with both thin and thick discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James

    2017-09-01

    We perform controlled N-body simulations of disc galaxies growing within live dark matter (DM) haloes to present-day galaxies that contain both thin and thick discs. We consider two types of models: (a) thick-disc initial conditions to which stars on near-circular orbits are continuously added over ∼10 Gyr, and (b) models in which the birth velocity dispersion of stars decreases continuously over the same time-scale. We show that both schemes produce double-exponential vertical profiles similar to that of the Milky Way (MW). We indicate how the spatial age structure of galaxies can be used to discriminate between scenarios. We show that the presence of a thick disc significantly alters and delays bar formation and thus makes possible models with a realistic bar and a high baryon-to-DM mass ratio in the central regions, as required by microlensing constraints. We examine how the radial mass distribution in stars and DM is affected by disc growth and non-axisymmetries. We discuss how bar buckling shapes the vertical age distribution of thin- and thick-disc stars in the bar region. The extent to which the combination of observationally motivated inside-out growth histories and cosmologically motivated dark halo properties leads to the spontaneous formation of non-axisymmetries that steer the models towards present-day MW-like galaxies is noteworthy.

  2. Standing Rankine-Hugoniot Shocks in Black Hole Accretion Discs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Wei-Min; LU Ju-Fu

    2004-01-01

    @@ We study the problem of standing shocks in viscous disc-like accretion flows around black holes. For the first time we parametrize such a flow with two physical constants, namely the specific angular momentum accreted by the black hole j and the energy quantity K. By providing the global dependence of shock formation in the j - K parameter space, we show that a significant parameter region can ensure solutions with Rankine-Hugoniot shocks; and that the possibilities of shock formation are the largest for inviscid flows, decreasing with increasing viscosity, and ceasing to exist for a strong enough viscosity. Our results support the view that the standing shock is an essential ingredient in black hole accretion discs and is a general phenomenon in astrophysics, and that there should be a continuous change from the properties of inviscid flows to those of viscous ones.

  3. The truncation of stellar discs A theoretical model

    CERN Document Server

    Battaner, E; Jiménez-Vicente, J

    1998-01-01

    The truncation of stellar discs is not abrupt but characterized by a continuous distancing from the exponential profile. There exists a truncation curve, $t(r)$, ending at a truncation radius, $r_t$. We present here a theoretical model in which it is assumed that the magnetic hypothesis explaining the flat rotation curve also explains the truncation. Once stars are born, the centripetal magnetic force previously acting on the progenitor gas cloud is suddenly interrupted, and stars must move to larger orbits or escape. The agreement between theoretical and observed truncation curves is very satisfactory. Parameters defining the disc gas rotation curve should therefore be related to those defining the truncation. It is predicted that rotation curves that quickly reach the asymptotic value $\\theta_0 = \\theta (r=\\infty)$ would have small truncation radii. On the contrary, $r_t$ and $\\theta_0$ itself, would be uncorrelated quantities.

  4. Minimum weight design of inhomogeneous rotating discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahed, Hamid [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farshi, Behrooz [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: farshi@iust.ac.ir; Bidabadi, Jalal [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2005-01-01

    There are numerous applications for gas turbine discs in the aerospace industry such as in turbojet engines. These discs normally work under high temperatures while subjected to high angular velocities. Minimizing the weight of such items in aerospace applications results in benefits such as low dead weights and lower costs. High speed of rotation causes large centrifugal forces in a disc and simultaneous application of high temperatures reduces disc material strength. Thus, the latter effects tend to increase deformations of the disc under the applied loads. In order to obtain a reliable disc analysis and arrive at the corresponding correct stress distribution, solutions should consider changes in material properties due to the temperature field throughout the disc. To achieve this goal, an inhomogeneous disc model with variable thickness is considered. Using the variable material properties method, stresses are obtained for the disc under rotation and a steady temperature field. In this paper this is done by modelling the rotating disc as a series of rings of different but constant properties. The optimum disc profile is arrived at by sequentially proportioning the thicknesses of each ring to satisfy the stress requirements. This method vis-a-vis a mathematical programming procedure for optimization shows several advantages. Firstly, it is simple iterative proportioning in each design cycle not requiring involved mathematical operations. Secondly, due to its simplicity it alleviates the necessity of certain simplifications that are common in so-called rigorous mathematical procedures. The results obtained, compared to those published in the literature show agreement and superiority. A further advantage of the proposed method is the independence of the end results from the initially assumed point in the iterative design routine, unlike most methods published so far.

  5. Search for the Data of Space Debris Initial Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping-Ping, Zhang; Bao-Jun, Pang

    Space debris environment model is one of the kernels of the research on space debris Space debris environment model is based on the data of space debris that is if we have the data of space debris orbit parameter we can determine the state of space debris distribution and then the spacecraft risk assessment can be executed Because numbers of small size space debris cannot be detected or observed we have not small size space debris data The short of small size space debris data leads to the engineering model inaccurate model needs to be updated while in the status of seriously short of data the model can not be updated in time In allusion to the problem of scarcity of data on the basis of modern computer arithmetic this paper is trying to search new data with old data and the results of the model is close to other engineering models Key words space debris data

  6. Debris ingestion by juvenile marine turtles: an underestimated problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Robson Guimarães; Andrades, Ryan; Boldrini, Marcillo Altoé; Martins, Agnaldo Silva

    2015-04-15

    Marine turtles are an iconic group of endangered animals threatened by debris ingestion. However, key aspects related to debris ingestion are still poorly known, including its effects on mortality and the original use of the ingested debris. Therefore, we analysed the impact of debris ingestion in 265 green turtles (Chelonia mydas) over a large geographical area and different habitats along the Brazilian coast. We determined the death rate due to debris ingestion and quantified the amount of debris that is sufficient to cause the death of juvenile green turtles. Additionally, we investigated the original use of the ingested debris. We found that a surprisingly small amount of debris was sufficient to block the digestive tract and cause death. We suggested that debris ingestion has a high death potential that may be masked by other causes of death. An expressive part of the ingested debris come from disposable and short-lived products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of an Inductance In-Line Oil Debris Sensor and Magnetic Plug Oil Debris Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Tuck, Roger; Showalter, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research was to compare the performance of an inductance in-line oil debris sensor and magnetic plug oil debris sensor when detecting transmission component health in the same system under the same operating conditions. Both sensors were installed in series in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig during tests performed on 5 gear sets (pinion/gear) when different levels of damage occurred on the gear teeth. Results of this analysis found both the inductance in-line oil debris sensor and magnetic plug oil debris sensor have benefits and limitations when detecting gearbox component damage.

  8. Herschel-PACS observation of gas lines from the disc around HD141569A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi, Wing-Fai; Pinte, Christophe; Pantin, Eric; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Ménard, Francois; Martin-Zaidi, Claire; Woitke, Peter; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo; Kamp, Inga; Carmona, Andres; Sandell, Goran; Eiroa, Carlos; Dent, William; Montesinos, Benjamin; Aresu, Giambattista; Meijerink, Rowin; Spaans, Marco; White, Glenn; Ardila, David; Lebreton, Jeremy; Mendigutia, Ignacio; Brittain, Sean

    2013-07-01

    At the distance of ˜ 99-116 pc, HD141569A is one of the nearest HerbigAe stars that is surrounded by a tenuous disc, probably in transition between a massive primordial disc and a debris disc. We observed the fine-structure lines of O I at 63 and 145 μm , and the C II line at 157 μm with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Telescope as part of the open-time large programme GASPS. We complemented the atomic line observations with Spitzer spectroscopic and photometric continuum data, ground-based VLT-VISIR image at 8.6 microns, and 12CO J=3-2 observations. We simultaneously modelled the continuum emission and the line fluxes with the Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code MCFOST and the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo to derive the disc gas and dust properties. We modelled the [O I] lines at 63 μm and at 145 μm, and the [C II] line at 157 μm. The models show that the oxygen lines are emitted from the inner disc around HD141569A, whereas the [C II] line emission is more extended. The CO submillimeter flux is emitted from the outer disc. Simultaneous modelling of the photometric and line data using a realistic disc structure suggests a dust mass derived from grains having a radius less than 1 mm of ˜ 2.1 × 10-7M⊙ and a total solid mass of 4.9 × 10-6 M⊙ . We constrained the PAH mass to be between 2 × 10-11 and 1.4 × 10-10 M⊙ depending on the size of the PAH. The associated PAH abundance is lower than those found in the interstellar medium by two to three orders of magnitude. The gas mass is a few 10-4M⊙. We constrained simultaneously the silicate dust grain, PAH, and gas mass in an evolved Herbig Ae disc. The uncertainty on the gas mass is large (around a factor 5) because the different gas tracers give estimates that do not agree with each other.

  9. Orbital Debris Shape Characterization Project Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Jessie

    2016-01-01

    I have been working on a project to further our understanding of orbital debris by helping create a new dataset previously too complex to be implemented in past orbital debris propagation models. I am doing this by creating documentation and 3D examples and illustrations of the shape categories. Earlier models assumed all orbital debris to be spherical aluminum fragments. My project will help expand our knowledge of shape populations to 6 categories: Straight Needle/Rod/Cylinder, Bent Needle/Rod/Cylinder, Flat Plate, Bent Plate, Nugget/Parallelepiped/Spheroid, and Flexible. The last category, Flexible, is still up for discussion and may be modified. These categories will be used to characterize fragments in the DebriSat experiment.

  10. New solutions for the space debris problem

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Joseph N

    2015-01-01

    Addressing a pressing issue in space policy, Pelton explores the new forms of technology that are being developed to actively remove the defunct space objects from orbit and analyzes their implications in the existing regime of international space law and public international law. This authoritative review covers the due diligence guidelines that nations are using to minimize the generation of new debris, mandates to de-orbit satellites at end of life, and innovative endeavours to remove non-functional satellites, upper stage rockets and other large debris from orbit under new institutional, financial and regulatory guidelines.  Commercial space services currently exceed 100 billion USD business per annum, but the alarming proliferation in the population of orbital debris in low, medium and geosynchronous satellite orbits poses a serious threat to all kinds of space assets and applications. There is a graver concern that the existing space debris will begin to collide in a cascading manner, generating furth...

  11. Remote sensing and characterization of anomalous debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, R.; Beavers, W.; Lambour, R.; Gaposchkin, E. M.; Kansky, J.; Stansbery, E.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of orbital debris data shows a band of anomalously high debris concentration in the altitude range between 800 and 1000 km. Analysis indicates that the origin is the leaking coolant fluid from nuclear power sources that powered a now defunct Soviet space-based series of ocean surveillance satellites. A project carried out to detect, track and characterize a sample of the anomalous debris is reported. The nature of the size and shape of the sample set, and the possibility of inferring the composition of the droplets were assessed. The technique used to detect, track and characterize the sample set is described and the results of the characterization analysis are presented. It is concluded that the nature of the debris is consistent with leaked Na-K fluid, although this cannot be proved with the remote sensing techniques used.

  12. CLUSTERING ANALYSIS OF DEBRIS-FLOW STREAMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Fan TSAI; Huai-Kuang TSAI; Cheng-Yan KAO

    2004-01-01

    The Chi-Chi earthquake in 1999 caused disastrous landslides, which triggered numerous debris flows and killed hundreds of people. A critical rainfall intensity line for each debris-flow stream is studied to prevent such a disaster. However, setting rainfall lines from incomplete data is difficult, so this study considered eight critical factors to group streams, such that streams within a cluster have similar rainfall lines. A genetic algorithm is applied to group 377 debris-flow streams selected from the center of an area affected by the Chi-Chi earthquake. These streams are grouped into seven clusters with different characteristics. The results reveal that the proposed method effectively groups debris-flow streams.

  13. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moór, Attila; Kóspál, Ágnes; Ábrahám, Péter; Juhász, Attila; Apai, Dániel; Csengeri, Timea; Grady, Carol; Henning, Thomas; Kiss, Csaba; Pascucci, Ilaria

    2013-07-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. So far only a very few debris disks with measurable gas component have been known. We carried out a survey with the APEX radio telescope to detect molecular gas at millimeter wavelengths in 28 infrared-luminous young debris disks, and discovered two new systems with substantial amount of CO. Motivated to understand the origin, physics, and evolutionary status of the gas in these systems we observed one of them, HD 21997, with ALMA and Herschel. Our results suggest that HD 21997 may be a hybrid system where secondary debris dust and residual primordial gas coexist. This poses a serious question to the current paradigm, since the age of the system (30 Myr) significantly exceeds model predictions for disk clearing and the ages of the oldest transitional disks.

  14. Methodology for optic disc localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos A. Leiva-Vasconcellos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of digital images in many areas of society is an activity that has reached a remarkable growth in recent years mainly due to the great development that has occurred in technology around the world. These images have a great use in many branches of medicine because they facilitate the diagnosis by specialists and thus help patients to be diagnosed long before symptoms of the disease begin to manifest. For Ophthalmology, one of the most used images are the digital retinography, If it is used properly will allow the occurrence of eye diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. One of the main elements shown on retinal images are the optic disc, the location and detection is of vital importance for working with different parts of the structure o f the eye. This paper proposes two techniques for locating the optic disc in retinal images based on the combination of multiple filters and applying logical operators. To test the algorithms diaretDB0v11 and DRIVE database were used , as a result of the tests are correctly located the 99.091 % of the images from both repo sitories, and were successfully detected 85 % and 87.143 % of images of DRIVE database and diaretDB0v11 respectively.

  15. Wear debris in cemented total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, M H; Salvati, E A; Buly, R L

    1991-03-01

    One of the most prevalent clinical problems in long-term follow up of total hip arthroplasty patients is loosening of prosthetic fixation. Factors contributing to mechanical failure of total hip reconstruction are complex and multiple. It has become increasingly apparent that wear debris from the prosthetic components may contribute significantly to this process. The authors summarize some of the current concepts concerning the detrimental effects of metallic debris in total hip arthroplasty.

  16. Expanding capabilities of the debris analysis workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, David B.; Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.; Shubert, Ann J.; Gerhart, Charlotte M.; Yates, Ken W.; Leake, Michael

    1996-10-01

    Determining the hazards from debris-generating events is a design and safety consideration for a number of space systems, both currently operating and planned. To meet these and other requirements, the United States Air Force (USAF) Phillips Laboratory (PL) Space Debris Research Program has developed a simulation software package called the Debris Analysis Workstation (DAW). This software provides an analysis capability for assessing a wide variety of debris hazards. DAW integrates several component debris analysis models and data visualization tools into a single analysis platform that meets the needs for Department of Defense space debris analysis, and is both user friendly and modular. This allows for studies to be performed expeditiously by analysts who are not debris experts. The current version of DAW includes models for spacecraft breakup, debris orbital lifetime, collision hazard risk assessment, and collision dispersion, as well as a satellite catalog database manager, a drag inclusive propagator, a graphical user interface, and data visualization routines. Together they provide capabilities to conduct several types of analyses, ranging from range safety assessments to satellite constellation risk assessment. Work is progressing to add new capabilities with the incorporation of additional models and improved designs. The existing tools are in their initial integrated form, but the 'glue' that will ultimately bring them together into an integrated system is an object oriented language layer scheduled to be added soon. Other candidate component models under consideration for incorporation include additional orbital propagators, error estimation routines, other dispersion models, and other breakup models. At present, DAW resides on a SUNR workstation, although future versions could be tailored for other platforms, depending on the need.

  17. DebriSat Pre Preshot Laboratory Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-27

    to be line of sight since witness plates protected by Whipple shield showed little change. LWIR spectral features from the deposited material are...Radhakrishnan Charles Griffice C. C. Wan UV -VIS-NIR Spectroscopy Dianna Alaan FIB/TEM Sample Preparation Miles Brodie © The Aerospace Corporation 2015 DebriSat...conditions responsible for the darkening. – UV -VIS-NIR-LWIR reflectance spectra were measured of post test debris for comparison with pre test

  18. A Simulation Model of Focus and Radial Servos in Compact Disc Players with Disc Surface Defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2004-01-01

    Compact Disc players have been on the market in more than two decades.As a consequence most of the control servo problems have been solved. A large remaining problem to solve is the handling of Compact Discs with severe surface defects like scratches and fingerprints. This paper introduces a method...... for making the design of controllers handling surface defects easier. A simulation model of Compact Disc players playing discs with surface defects is presented. The main novel element in the model is a model of the surface defects. That model is based on data from discs with surface defects. This model...

  19. Pore Water Pressure Contribution to Debris Flow Mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Deangeli

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Debris flows are very to extremely rapid flows of saturated granular soils. Two main types of debris flow are generally recognized: Open slope debris flows and channelized debris flows. The former is the results of some form of slope failures, the latter can develop along preexisting stream courses by the mobilization of previously deposited debris blanket. The problem to be addressed is the influence of the mode of initiation on the subsequent mechanism of propagation. In ...

  20. Direct Detection of Dark Matter Debris Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhlen, Michael; Spergel, David N

    2012-01-01

    Tidal stripping of dark matter from subhalos falling into the Milky Way produces narrow, cold tidal streams as well as more spatially extended "debris flows" in the form of shells, sheets, and plumes. Here we focus on the debris flow in the Via Lactea II simulation, and show that this incompletely phase-mixed material exhibits distinctive high-velocity behavior. Unlike tidal streams, which may not necessarily intersect the Earth's location, debris flow is spatially uniform at 8 kpc and thus guaranteed to be present in the dark matter flux incident on direct detection experiments. At Earth-frame velocities greater than 450 km/s, debris flow comprises more than half of the dark matter at the Sun's location, and up to 80% at even higher velocities. Therefore, debris flow is most important for experiments that are particularly sensitive to the high velocity tail of the dark matter distribution, such as searches for light or inelastic dark matter or experiments with directional sensitivity. We show that debris flo...

  1. Chaotic Dispersal of Tidal Debris

    CERN Document Server

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M; Valluri, Monica; Pearson, Sarah; Kupper, Andreas H W; Hogg, David W

    2015-01-01

    Several long, dynamically cold stellar streams have been observed around the Milky Way Galaxy, presumably formed from the tidal disruption of globular clusters. In integrable potentials---where all orbits are dynamically regular---tidal debris phase-mixes close to the orbit of the progenitor system. However, cosmological simulations of structure formation suggest that the Milky Way's dark matter halo is expected not to be fully integrable; an appreciable fraction of orbits will be chaotic. This paper examines the influence of chaos on the phase-space morphology of cold tidal streams. We find very stark results: Streams in chaotic regions look very different from those in regular regions. We find that streams (simulated using test particle ensembles of nearby orbits) can be sensitive to chaos on a much shorter time-scale than any standard prediction (from the Lyapunov or frequency-diffusion times). For example, on a weakly chaotic orbit with a chaotic timescale predicted to be >1000 orbital periods (>1000 Gyr)...

  2. Thin, thick and dark discs in LCDM

    CERN Document Server

    Read, J I; Agertz, O; Debattista, Victor P

    2008-01-01

    In a LCDM cosmology, the Milky Way accretes satellites into the stellar disc. We use cosmological simulations to assess the frequency of near disc plane and higher inclination accretion events, and collisionless simulations of satellite mergers to quantify the final state of the accreted material and the effect on the thin disc. On average, a Milky Way-sized galaxy has 1.5 subhalos with vmax>80km/s; 5 with vmax>60km/s; and 13 with vmax>40km/s merge at redshift z>1. A third of these merge at an impact angle 20 degrees) are twice as likely as low inclination ones. These lead to structures that closely resemble the recently discovered inner/outer stellar halos. They also do more damage to the Milky Way stellar disc creating a more pronounced flare, and warp; both long-lived and consistent with current observations. The most massive mergers (vmax > 80km/s) heat t he thin disc enough to produce a thick disc. These heated thin disc stars are essential for obtaining a thick disc as massive as that seen in the Milky ...

  3. Hygroviscoelasticity of the Human Intervertebral Disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    hernia - tion with age depends on the biochemical changes that occur in the material of the disc during its maturation process. However, a careful machanics...EFFORT One of the recurring pieces of information required in disc response is the intra- discal pressure when the spine is loaded axially. This

  4. Hydromagnetic Flow between Two Rotating Coaxial Discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Aleem Khan

    1970-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper relates to the steady flow of an electrically incompressible viscous fluid between two parallel coaxial rotating discs with a transverse magnetic field when the discs are rotating in the same direction with the same velocity and there is a source at the centre.

  5. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskola, Pasi J; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjaer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans....

  6. Requirements for an artificial intervertebral disc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelkamp, MF; van Donkelaar, CC; Veldhuizen, AG; van Horn, [No Value; Huyghe, JM; Verkerke, GJ

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is an important social and economic problem. Presently available artificial intervertebral discs (AIDs) are insufficient and the main surgical intervention is still spinal fusion. The objective of the present study is to present a list of requirements for the

  7. Feature Based Control of Compact Disc Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh

    Two servo control loops are used to keep the Optical Pick-up Unit focused and radially on the information track of the Compact Disc. These control servos have problems handling surface faults on the Compact Disc. In this Ph.D thesis a method is proposed to improve the handling of these surface...

  8. A search for passive protoplanetary discs in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchêne, Gaspard; Becker, Adam; Yang, Yizhe; Bouy, Hervé; De Rosa, Robert J.; Patience, Jennifer; Girard, Julien H.

    2017-08-01

    We conducted a 12-month monitoring campaign of 33 T Tauri stars (TTS) in Taurus. Our goal was to monitor objects that possess a disc but have a weak H α line, a common accretion tracer for young stars, in order to determine whether they host a passive circumstellar disc. We used medium-resolution optical spectroscopy to assess the accretion status of the objects and to measure the H α line. We found no convincing examples of passive discs: only transition disc and debris disc systems in our sample are non-accreting. Among accretors, we found no example of flickering accretion, leading to an upper limit of 2.2 per cent on the duty cycle of accretion gaps, assuming that all accreting TTS experience such events. When combining literature results with our observations, we found that the reliability of traditional H α-based criteria to test for accretion is high but imperfect, particularly for low-mass TTS. We found a significant correlation between stellar mass and the full width at 10 per cent of the peak (W10) of the H α line that does not seem to be related to variations in free-fall velocity. Finally, our data revealed a positive correlation between the H α equivalent width and its W10, indicative of a systematic modulation in the line profile whereby the high-velocity wings of the line are proportionally more enhanced than its core when the line luminosity increases. We argue that this supports the hypothesis that the mass accretion rate on the central star is correlated with the H α W10 through a common physical mechanism.

  9. Global analysis of anthropogenic debris ingestion by sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuyler, Qamar; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Wilcox, Chris; Townsend, Kathy

    2014-02-01

    Ingestion of marine debris can have lethal and sublethal effects on sea turtles and other wildlife. Although researchers have reported on ingestion of anthropogenic debris by marine turtles and implied incidences of debris ingestion have increased over time, there has not been a global synthesis of the phenomenon since 1985. Thus, we analyzed 37 studies published from 1985 to 2012 that report on data collected from before 1900 through 2011. Specifically, we investigated whether ingestion prevalence has changed over time, what types of debris are most commonly ingested, the geographic distribution of debris ingestion by marine turtles relative to global debris distribution, and which species and life-history stages are most likely to ingest debris. The probability of green (Chelonia mydas) and leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) ingesting debris increased significantly over time, and plastic was the most commonly ingested debris. Turtles in nearly all regions studied ingest debris, but the probability of ingestion was not related to modeled debris densities. Furthermore, smaller, oceanic-stage turtles were more likely to ingest debris than coastal foragers, whereas carnivorous species were less likely to ingest debris than herbivores or gelatinovores. Our results indicate oceanic leatherback turtles and green turtles are at the greatest risk of both lethal and sublethal effects from ingested marine debris. To reduce this risk, anthropogenic debris must be managed at a global level. © 2013 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of the Society for Conservation Biology.

  10. Simultaneous detection of multiple debris via a cascade of numerical evaluations and a voting scheme for lines in an image sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Koki; Ichimura, Naoyuki; Hanada, Toshiya

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a novel method to simultaneously detect multiple trajectories of space debris in an observation image sequence to establish a reliable model for space debris environment in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). The debris in GEO often appear faintly in image sequences due to the high altitude. A simple but steady way to detect such faint debris is to decrease a threshold value of binarization applied to an image sequence during preprocessing. However, a low threshold value of binarization leads to extracting a large number of objects other than debris that become obstacles to detect debris trajectories. In order to detect debris from binarized image frames with massive obstacles, this work proposes a method that utilizes a cascade of numerical evaluations and a voting scheme to evaluate characteristics of the line segments obtained by connecting two image objects in different image frames, which are the candidates of debris trajectories. In the proposed method, the line segments corresponding to objects other than debris are filtered out using three types of characteristics, namely displacement, direction, and continuity. First, the displacement and direction of debris motion are evaluated to remove irrelevant trajectories. Then, the continuity of the remaining line segments is checked to find debris by counting the number of image objects appearing on or close to the line segments. Since checking the continuity can be regarded as a voting scheme, the proposed cascade algorithm can take advantage of the properties of voting method such as the Hough transform, i.e., the robustness against heavy noises and clutters, and ability of detecting multiple trajectories simultaneously. The experimental tests using real image sequences obtained in a past observation campaign demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. On the reliability of protostellar disc mass measurements and the existence of fragmenting discs

    CERN Document Server

    Dunham, Michael M; Arce, Héctor G

    2014-01-01

    We couple non-magnetic, hydrodynamical simulations of collapsing protostellar cores with radiative transfer evolutionary models to generate synthetic observations. We then use these synthetic observations to investigate the extent to which a simple method for measuring protostellar disc masses used in the literature recovers the intrinsic masses of the discs formed in the simulations. We evaluate the effects of contamination from the surrounding core, partially resolving out the disc, optical depth, fixed assumed dust temperatures, inclination, and the dust opacity law. We show that the combination of these effects can lead to disc mass underestimates by up to factors of 2-3 at millimeter wavelengths and up to an order of magnitude or larger at submillimeter wavelengths. The optically thin portions of protostellar discs are generally cooler in the Class I stage than the Class 0 stage since Class I discs are typically larger and more optically thick, and thus more shielded. The observed disc mass distribution ...

  12. Twisted accretion discs: Pt. 4. Alignment in polytropic discs and low. cap alpha. limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S.

    1988-07-01

    Twisted thin accretion discs are of interest in explaining long-term periodicities in X-ray binaries, the eclipse in Epsilon Aurigae, and perhaps precessing radio jets and possible warped molecular outflows in star-forming regions. Earlier results used isothermal discs to determine the alignment radius, Rsub(a). Now we see how polytropic discs effect earlier results for discs around compact objects and around close binaries. We find that Rsub(a) for polytropic discs can be up to an order of magnitude larger, depending on the polytropic index, the viscosity parameter and the precession mechanism. There is little change in the earlier conclusion that the case for alignment in Her X-1 is marginal, while there is substantial alignment in epsilon Aur. A lower limit is put on ..cap alpha.. for isothermal discs, which is expected to hold for polytropic discs as well. A bound is put on the energy of the perturbed flows.

  13. About detection of precessing circumpulsar discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimani, Catia

    2016-08-01

    Detections of circumpulsar discs and planetary systems through electromagnetic observations appear quite rare. In the case of PSR 1931+24 and B0656+14, the hypothesis of a precessing disc penetrating the pulsar light cylinder is found consistent with radio and gamma observations from these stars. Disc self-occultation and precession may affect electromagnetic measurements. We investigate here under which conditions gravitational waves generated by circumpulsar disc precession may be detected by the proposed second-generation space interferometers DECI-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and Big Bang Observer. The characteristics of circumpulsar detectable precessing discs are estimated as a function of distance from the Solar system. Speculations on detection rates are presented.

  14. The formation of planets by disc fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatellos Dimitris

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available I discuss the role that disc fragmentation plays in the formation of gas giant and terrestrial planets, and how this relates to the formation of brown dwarfs and low-mass stars, and ultimately to the process of star formation. Protostellar discs may fragment, if they are massive enough and can cool fast enough, but most of the objects that form by fragmentation are brown dwarfs. It may be possible that planets also form, if the mass growth of a proto-fragment is stopped (e.g. if this fragment is ejected from the disc, or suppressed and even reversed (e.g by tidal stripping. I will discuss if it is possible to distinguish whether a planet has formed by disc fragmentation or core accretion, and mention of a few examples of observed exoplanets that are suggestive of formation by disc fragmentation.

  15. Lumbar disc cyst with contralateral radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Tourani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Disc cysts are uncommon intraspinal cystic lesions located in the ventrolateral epidural space. They communicate with the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc and cause symptoms by radicular compression. We report a unique case of lumbar disc cyst that was associated with disc herniation and contralateral radiculopathy. A 22 year old male presented with one month history of back-ache radiating to the left leg. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI showed L3-L4 disc herniation with annular tear and cystic lesion in the extradural space anterior to the thecal sac on right side, which increased in size over a period of 3 weeks. L3 laminectomy and bilateral discectomy and cyst excision was done with partial improvement of patients symptoms.

  16. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  17. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    CERN Document Server

    Salvesen, Greg; Simon, Jacob B; Begelman, Mitchell C

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao (Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.).

  19. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method.

  20. Angular momentum transport in protostellar discs

    CERN Document Server

    Salmeron, Roberto Aureliano; Wardle, M; Salmeron, Raquel; Konigl, Arieh; Wardle, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Angular momentum transport in protostellar discs can take place either radially, through turbulence induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI), or vertically, through the torque exerted by a large-scale magnetic field that threads the disc. Using semi-analytic and numerical results, we construct a model of steady-state discs that includes vertical transport by a centrifugally driven wind as well as MRI-induced turbulence. We present approximate criteria for the occurrence of either one of these mechanisms in an ambipolar diffusion-dominated disc. We derive ``strong field'' solutions in which the angular momentum transport is purely vertical and ``weak field'' solutions that are the stratified-disc analogues of the previously studied MRI channel modes; the latter are transformed into accretion solutions with predominantly radial angular-momentum transport when we implement a turbulent-stress prescription based on published results of numerical simulations. We also analyze ``intermediate field strength'...

  1. A globally complete map of supraglacial debris cover and a new toolkit for debris cover research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Sam; Pellicciotti, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    A growing canon of literature is focused on resolving the processes and implications of debris cover on glaciers. However, this work is often confined to a handful of glaciers that were likely selected based on criteria optimizing their suitability to test a specific hypothesis or logistical ease. The role of debris cover in a glacier system is likely to not go overlooked in forthcoming research, yet the magnitude of this role at a global scale has not yet been fully described. Here, we present a map of debris cover for all glacierized regions on Earth including the Greenland Ice Sheet using 30 m Landsat data. This dataset will begin to open a wider context to the high quality, localized findings from the debris-covered glacier research community and help inform large-scale modeling efforts. A global map of debris cover also facilitates analysis attempting to isolate first order geomorphological and climate controls of supraglacial debris production. Furthering the objective of expanding the inclusion of debris cover in forthcoming research, we also present an under development suite of open-source, Python based tools. Requiring minimal and often freely available input data, we have automated the mapping of: i) debris cover, ii) ice cliffs, iii) debris cover evolution over the Landsat era and iv) glacier flow instabilities from altered debris structures. At the present time, debris extent is the only globally complete quantity but with the expanding repository of high quality global datasets and further tool development minimizing manual tasks and computational cost, we foresee all of these tools being applied globally in the near future.

  2. Recognizing the importance of tropical forests in limiting rainfall-induced debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide concern for continuing loss of montane forest cover in the tropics usually focuses on adverse ecological consequences. Less recognized, but equally important to inhabitants of these affected regions, is an increasing susceptibility to rainfall-induced debris flows and t...

  3. Gravitoturbulence in magnetised protostellar discs

    CERN Document Server

    Riols, A

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational instability (GI) features in several aspects of protostellar disk evolution, most notably in angular momentum transport, fragmentation, and the outbursts exemplified by FU Ori and EX Lupi systems. The outer regions of protostellar discs may also be coupled to magnetic fields, which could then modify the development of GI. To understand the basic elements of their interaction, we perform local 2D ideal and resistive MHD simulations with an imposed toroidal field. In the regime of moderate plasma beta, we find that the system supports a hot gravito-turbulent state, characterised by considerable magnetic energy and stress and a surprisingly large Toomre parameter $Q~10$. This result has potential implications for disk structure, vertical thickness, ionisation, etc. Our simulations also reveal the existence of long-lived and dense `magnetic islands' or plasmoids. Lastly, we find that the presence of a magnetic field has little impact on the fragmentation criterion of the disk. Though our focus is on...

  4. Overview of the space debris environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshishnek, M. J.

    1995-03-01

    There is a component of the space environment that is man-made pollution, termed 'space debris' it exists at all inclinations and, primarily, at altitudes of roughly 350 km to 2000 km. The size of this debris ranges from several meters to a fraction of a micrometer in diameter, and the particle distribution follows an inverse power law, with the smaller size component far exceeding that of the larger. Debris is composed primarily of alumina from solid rocket motor exhausts, aluminum from spacecraft structures, and zinc and titanium oxides from thermal control coatings. The accepted model of the space debris environment is that of Kessler et al., a complex model that predicts the number of particles that will impact a surface as a function of altitude, inclination, solar cycle, and particle diameter, as well as their collision velocities. Recent data from LDEF has demonstrated both the accuracy and shortcomings of the Kessler model. Measured debris impactor fluxes are in good agreement with the model for ram surfaces. However, predictions of the model for other surfaces of a spacecraft are less accurate, most notably for the wake or trailing side. While the Kessler model is appropriate for long-term, average flux predictions, spatial-temporal impact fluxes measured on LDEF dramatically illustrated the presence of strong debris clouds that do not dissipate quickly in space and will encounter an orbiting spacecraft cyclically and repeatedly over its lifetime. LDEF data has also indicated the presence of debris in elliptical orbits, a fact not predicted by the Kessler model. This fact is responsible for the discrepancy between measured impact fluxes and predictions on trailing edge surfaces.

  5. Lumbar herniated disc: spontaneous regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Kasım Zafer

    2017-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a frequent condition that results in substantial disability and causes admission of patients to neurosurgery clinics. To evaluate and present the therapeutic outcomes in lumbar disc hernia (LDH) patients treated by means of a conservative approach, consisting of bed rest and medical therapy. Methods This retrospective cohort was carried out in the neurosurgery departments of hospitals in Kahramanmaraş city and 23 patients diagnosed with LDH at the levels of L3−L4, L4−L5 or L5−S1 were enrolled. Results The average age was 38.4 ± 8.0 and the chief complaint was low back pain and sciatica radiating to one or both lower extremities. Conservative treatment was administered. Neurological examination findings, durations of treatment and intervals until symptomatic recovery were recorded. Laségue tests and neurosensory examination revealed that mild neurological deficits existed in 16 of our patients. Previously, 5 patients had received physiotherapy and 7 patients had been on medical treatment. The number of patients with LDH at the level of L3−L4, L4−L5, and L5−S1 were 1, 13, and 9, respectively. All patients reported that they had benefit from medical treatment and bed rest, and radiologic improvement was observed simultaneously on MRI scans. The average duration until symptomatic recovery and/or regression of LDH symptoms was 13.6 ± 5.4 months (range: 5−22). Conclusions It should be kept in mind that lumbar disc hernias could regress with medical treatment and rest without surgery, and there should be an awareness that these patients could recover radiologically. This condition must be taken into account during decision making for surgical intervention in LDH patients devoid of indications for emergent surgery. PMID:28119770

  6. Generation of highly inclined protoplanetary discs through single stellar flybys

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang-Gruess, Meng

    2015-01-01

    We study the three-dimensional evolution of a viscous protoplanetary disc which is perturbed by a passing star on a parabolic orbit. The aim is to test whether a single stellar flyby is capable to excite significant disc inclinations which would favour the formation of so-called misaligned planets. We use smoothed particle hydrodynamics to study inclination, disc mass and angular momentum changes of the disc for passing stars with different masses. We explore different orbital configurations for the perturber's orbit to find the parameter spaces which allow significant disc inclination generation. Prograde inclined parabolic orbits are most destructive leading to significant disc mass and angular momentum loss. In the remaining disc, the final disc inclination is only below $20^\\circ$. This is due to the removal of disc particles which have experienced the strongest perturbing effects. Retrograde inclined parabolic orbits are less destructive and can generate disc inclinations up to $60^\\circ$. The final disc...

  7. RELATION BETWEEN PRECIPITATION AND INITIATION OF DEBRIS FLOWS IN THE JIANGJIA RAVINE,YUNNAN PROVINCE, SOUTHWEST CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zili FENG; Peng CUI; Xiaoqing CHEN; Jie CHEN

    2006-01-01

    In the Jiangjia Ravine, debris flows are often triggered by short-duration rainstorms frequently. To reveal the unique initiation process of debris flows, rainfall and debris flow initiation in an upstream area was continually observed. It is concluded that flash floods resulting from short-duration rainstorms play a key role in the initiation of debris flows. Surface runoff forms flash floods due to special topographic conditions. The flash floods mobilize the sediment deposits in the upper section of the branch gullies,hence, high density viscous debris flows initiate. The initiation of debris flows in the Jiangjia Ravine has a close relation with precipitation. Applying the Takahashi model of debris flow initiation, it is concluded that: to mobilize cohesive deposits in the gully bed the depth of flash floods must exceed a critical depth. This critical depth of floods makes the definition of thresholds of rainfall intensity possible. Considering the change in the initial infiltration rate at different initial water content of bank slopes, and the influence of antecedent precipitation on the initial water content, the relation between the thresholds of rainfall intensity and the antecedent precipitation show good agreement with the empirical relation established by previous research.

  8. Mixed debris treatment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, E.C. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Porter, C.L. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wallace, M.T. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-10-01

    August 18, 1992 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the final revised treatment standards for hazardous debris, including mixed debris. (1) Whereas previous standards had been concentration based, the revised standards are performance based. Debris must be treated prior to land disposal, using specific technologies from one or more of the following families of debris treatment technologies: Extraction, destruction, or immobilization. Seventeen specific technologies with generic application are discussed in the final rule. The existing capabilities and types of debris at the INEL were scrubbed against the debris rule to determine an overall treatment strategy. Seven types of debris were identified: combustible, porous, non-porous, inherently hazardous, HEPA filters, asbestos contaminated, and reactive metals contaminated debris. With the exception of debris contaminated with reactive metals treatment can be achieved utilizing existing facilities coupled with minor modifications.

  9. Linking social drivers of marine debris with actual marine debris on beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Chris; Grage, Anna; Campbell, Marnie L

    2012-08-01

    The drivers (social) and pressures (physical) of marine debris have typically been examined separately. We redress this by using social and beach surveys at nine Tasmanian beaches, across three coastlines and within three categories of urbanisation, to examine whether people acknowledge that their actions contribute to the issue of marine debris, and whether these social drivers are reflected in the amount of marine debris detected on beaches. A large proportion (75%) of survey participants do not litter at beaches; with age, gender, income and residency influencing littering behaviour. Thus, participants recognise that littering at beaches is a problem. This social trend was reflected in the small amounts of debris that were detected. Furthermore, the amount of debris was not statistically influenced by the degree of beach urbanisation, the coastline sampled, or the proximity to beach access points. By linking social and physical aspects of this issue, management outcomes can be improved.

  10. Methanol Along the Path from Envelope to Protoplanetary Disc

    CERN Document Server

    Drozdovskaya, Maria N; Visser, Ruud; Harsono, Daniel; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar methanol is considered to be a parent species of larger, more complex organic molecules. A physicochemical simulation of infalling parcels of matter is performed for a low-mass star-forming system to trace the chemical evolution from cloud to disc. An axisymmetric 2D semi-analytic model generates the time-dependent density and velocity distributions, and full continuum radiative transfer is performed to calculate the dust temperature and the UV radiation field at each position as a function of time. A comprehensive gas-grain chemical network is employed to compute the chemical abundances along infall trajectories. Two physical scenarios are studied, one in which the dominant disc growth mechanism is viscous spreading, and another in which continuous infall of matter prevails. The results show that the infall path influences the abundance of methanol entering each type of disc, ranging from complete loss of methanol to an enhancement by a factor of > 1 relative to the prestellar phase. Critical ch...

  11. Range of outward migration and influence of the disc's mass on the migration of giant planet cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsch, B.; Kley, W.

    2011-12-01

    Context. The migration of planets plays an important role in the early planet-formation process. An important problem has been that standard migration theories predict very rapid inward migration, which poses problems for population synthesis models. However, it has been shown recently that low-mass planets (20-30 MEarth) that are still embedded in the protoplanetary disc can migrate outwards under certain conditions. Simulations have been performed mostly for planets at given radii for a particular disc model. Aims: Here, we plan to extend previous work and consider different masses of the disc to quantify the influence of the physical disc conditions on planetary migration. The migration behaviour of the planets will be analysed for a variety of positions in the disc. Methods: We perform three-dimensional (3D) radiation hydrodynamical simulations of embedded planets in protoplanetary discs. We use the explicit-implicit 3D hydrodynamical code NIRVANA that includes full tensor viscosity, and implicit radiation transport. For planets on circular orbits at various locations we measure the radial dependence of the torques for three different planetary masses. Results: For all considered planet masses (20-30 MEarth) in this study we find outward migration within a limited radial range of the disc, typically from about 0.5 up to 1.5-2.5 aJup. Inside and outside this interval, migration is inward and given by the Lindblad value for large radii. Interestingly, the fastest outward migration occurs at a radius of about aJup for different disc and planet masses. Because outward migration stops at a certain location in the disc, there exists a zero-torque distance for planetary embryos, where they can continue to grow without moving too fast. For higher disc masses (Mdisc > 0.02 M⊙) convection ensues, which changes the structure of the disc and therefore the torque on the planet as well. Conclusions: Outward migration stops at different points in the disc for different

  12. Stellar irradiated discs and implications on migration of embedded planets II: accreting-discs

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsch, Bertram; Lega, Elena; Crida, Aurélien

    2014-01-01

    The strength and direction of migration of embedded low mass planets depends on the disc's structure. It has been shown that, in discs with viscous heating and radiative transport, the migration can be directed outwards. In this paper we investigate the influence of a constant dM/dt-flux through the disc, as well as the influence of the disc's metallicity on the disc's thermodynamics. We focus on dM/dt discs, which have a net mass flux through them. Utilizing the resulting disc structure, we determine the regions of outward migration in the disc. We perform numerical hydrosimulations of dM/dt discs with viscous heating, radiative cooling and stellar irradiation in 2D in the r-z-plane. We use the explicit/implicit hydrodynamical code FARGOCA that includes a full tensor viscosity and stellar irradiation, as well as a two temperature solver that includes radiation transport in the flux-limited diffusion approximation. The migration of embedded planets is studied by using torque formulae. For a disc of gas surfac...

  13. Autologous adipose stem cells and polylactide discs in the replacement of the rabbit temporomandibular joint disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahtiainen, Katja; Mauno, Jari; Ellä, Ville; Hagström, Jaana; Lindqvist, Christian; Miettinen, Susanna; Ylikomi, Timo; Kellomäki, Minna; Seppänen, Riitta

    2013-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc lacks functional replacement after discectomy. We investigated tissue-engineered bilayer polylactide (PLA) discs and autologous adipose stem cells (ASCs) as a potential replacement for the TMJ disc. These ASC discs were pre-cultured either in control or in differentiation medium, including transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 for one week. Prior to implantation, expression of fibrocartilaginous genes was measured by qRT-PCR. The control and differentiated ASC discs were implanted, respectively, in the right and left TMJs of rabbits for six (n = 5) and 12 months (n = 5). Thereafter, the excised TMJ areas were examined with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and histology. No signs of infection, inflammation or foreign body reactions were detected at histology, whereas chronic arthrosis and considerable condylar hypertrophy were observed in all operated joints at CBCT. The left condyle treated with the differentiated ASC discs appeared consistently smoother and more sclerotic than the right condyle. The ASC disc replacement resulted in dislocation and morphological changes in the rabbit TMJ. The ASC discs pre-treated with TGF-β1 enhanced the condylar integrity. While adverse tissue reactions were not shown, the authors suggest that with improved attachment and design, the PLA disc and biomaterial itself would hold potential for TMJ disc replacement. PMID:23720535

  14. The properties of discs around planets and brown dwarfs as evidence for disc fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Stamatellos, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Direct imaging searches have revealed many very low-mass objects, including a small number of planetary mass objects, as wide-orbit companions to young stars. The formation mechanism of these objects remains uncertain. In this paper we present the predictions of the disc fragmentation model regarding the properties of the discs around such low-mass objects. We find that the discs around objects that have formed by fragmentation in discs hosted by Sun-like stars (referred to as 'parent' discs and 'parent' stars) are more massive than expected from the ${M}_{\\rm disc}-M_*$ relation (which is derived for stars with masses $M_*>0.2 {\\rm M}_{\\odot}$). Accordingly, the accretion rates onto these objects are also higher than expected from the $\\dot{M}_*-M_*$ relation. Moreover there is no significant correlation between the mass of the brown dwarf or planet with the mass of its disc nor with the accretion rate from the disc onto it. The discs around objects that form by disc fragmentation have larger than expected m...

  15. Autologous adipose stem cells and polylactide discs in the replacement of the rabbit temporomandibular joint disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahtiainen, Katja; Mauno, Jari; Ellä, Ville; Hagström, Jaana; Lindqvist, Christian; Miettinen, Susanna; Ylikomi, Timo; Kellomäki, Minna; Seppänen, Riitta

    2013-08-06

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc lacks functional replacement after discectomy. We investigated tissue-engineered bilayer polylactide (PLA) discs and autologous adipose stem cells (ASCs) as a potential replacement for the TMJ disc. These ASC discs were pre-cultured either in control or in differentiation medium, including transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 for one week. Prior to implantation, expression of fibrocartilaginous genes was measured by qRT-PCR. The control and differentiated ASC discs were implanted, respectively, in the right and left TMJs of rabbits for six (n = 5) and 12 months (n = 5). Thereafter, the excised TMJ areas were examined with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and histology. No signs of infection, inflammation or foreign body reactions were detected at histology, whereas chronic arthrosis and considerable condylar hypertrophy were observed in all operated joints at CBCT. The left condyle treated with the differentiated ASC discs appeared consistently smoother and more sclerotic than the right condyle. The ASC disc replacement resulted in dislocation and morphological changes in the rabbit TMJ. The ASC discs pre-treated with TGF-β1 enhanced the condylar integrity. While adverse tissue reactions were not shown, the authors suggest that with improved attachment and design, the PLA disc and biomaterial itself would hold potential for TMJ disc replacement.

  16. Testing seismic amplitude source location for fast debris-flow detection at Illgraben, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Fabian; Burtin, Arnaud; McArdell, Brian W.; Hovius, Niels; Weder, Bianca; Turowski, Jens M.

    2017-06-01

    Heavy precipitation can mobilize tens to hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of sediment in steep Alpine torrents in a short time. The resulting debris flows (mixtures of water, sediment and boulders) move downstream with velocities of several meters per second and have a high destruction potential. Warning protocols for affected communities rely on raising awareness about the debris-flow threat, precipitation monitoring and rapid detection methods. The latter, in particular, is a challenge because debris-flow-prone torrents have their catchments in steep and inaccessible terrain, where instrumentation is difficult to install and maintain. Here we test amplitude source location (ASL) as a processing scheme for seismic network data for early warning purposes. We use debris-flow and noise seismograms from the Illgraben catchment, Switzerland, a torrent system which produces several debris-flow events per year. Automatic in situ detection is currently based on geophones mounted on concrete check dams and radar stage sensors suspended above the channel. The ASL approach has the advantage that it uses seismometers, which can be installed at more accessible locations where a stable connection to mobile phone networks is available for data communication. Our ASL processing uses time-averaged ground vibration amplitudes to estimate the location of the debris-flow front. Applied to continuous data streams, inversion of the seismic amplitude decay throughout the network is robust and efficient, requires no manual identification of seismic phase arrivals and eliminates the need for a local seismic velocity model. We apply the ASL technique to a small debris-flow event on 19 July 2011, which was captured with a temporary seismic monitoring network. The processing rapidly detects the debris-flow event half an hour before arrival at the outlet of the torrent and several minutes before detection by the in situ alarm system. An analysis of continuous seismic records furthermore

  17. Minimizing cryopreservation-induced loss of disc cell activity for storage of whole intervertebral discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCW Chan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Severe intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration often requires disc excision and spinal fusion, which leads to loss of spinal segment mobility. Implantation of an allograft disc or tissue engineered disc construct emerges as an alternative to artificial disc replacement for preserving the motion of the degenerated level. Establishment of a bank of cadaveric or engineered cryopreserved discs enables size matching, and facilitates clinical management. However, there is a lack of understanding of the behaviour of disc cells during cryopreservation, as well as how to maximize their survival, such that disc graft properties can be preserved. Here, we report on the effect of alterations in cooling rates, cryoprotective agents (CPAs, and duration of pre-cryopreservation incubation in CPA on cellular activity in whole porcine lumbar discs. Our results indicated that cooling rates of -0.3°C/min and -0.5°C /min resulted in the least loss of metabolic activity in nucleus pulposus (NP and annulus fibrosus (AF respectively, while metabolic activity is best maintained by using a combination of 10% dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO and 10% propylene-glycol (PG as CPA. By the use of such parameters, metabolic activity of the NP and the AF cells could be maintained at 70% and 45%, respectively, of that of the fresh tissue. Mechanical testing and histological evaluation showed no significant differences in mechanical properties or alterations in disc structure compared to fresh discs. Despite the limitations of the animal model, our findings provide a framework for establishing an applicable cryopreservation protocol for human disc allografts or tissue-engineered disc constructs.

  18. Migration and kinematics in growing disc galaxies with thin and thick discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2017-09-01

    We analyse disc heating and radial migration in N-body models of growing disc galaxies with thick and thin discs. Similar to thin-disc-only models, galaxies with appropriate non-axisymmetric structures reproduce observational constraints on radial disc heating in and migration to the Solar Neighbourhood (Snhd). The presence of thick discs can suppress non-axisymmetries and thus higher baryonic-to-dark matter fractions are required than in models that only have a thin disc. Models that are baryon dominated to roughly the Solar radius R0 are favoured, in agreement with data for the Milky Way. For inside-out growing discs, today's thick-disc stars at R0 are dominated by outwards migrators. Whether outwards migrators are vertically hotter than non-migrators depends on the radial gradient of the thick-disc vertical velocity dispersion. There is an effective upper boundary in angular momentum that thick-disc stars born in the centre of a galaxy can reach by migration, which explains the fading of the high [α/Fe] sequence outside R0. Our models compare well to Snhd kinematics from Radial Velocity Survey and Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution data. For such comparisons, it is important to take into account the azimuthal variation of kinematics at R ∼ R0 and biases from survey selection functions. The vertical heating of thin-disc stars by giant molecular clouds is only mildly affected by the presence of thick discs. Our models predict higher vertical velocity dispersions for the oldest stars than found in the Snhd age velocity dispersion relation, possibly because of measurement uncertainties or an underestimation of the number of old cold stars in our models.

  19. Debris mitigation techniques for petawatt-class lasers in high debris environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Schwarz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses debris mitigation techniques for two different kinds of debris sources that are found in the high-energy density community. The first debris source stems from the laser-target interaction and this debris can be mitigated by avoiding a direct line of sight to the debris source (e.g. by using a sacrificial fold mirror or by inserting a thin debris shield. Several thin film debris shields have been investigated and nitrocellulose was found to be the best suited. The second debris source originates from an external high-energy density driver or experiment. In our specific case, this is the Z accelerator, a Z-pinch machine that generates 2 MJ of x rays at 300 TW. The center section of the Z accelerator is an extremely violent environment which requires the development of novel debris mitigation approaches for backlighting with petawatt lasers. Two such approaches are presented in this paper. First, a self-closing focusing cone. In our facility, the focused beam on target is fully enclosed inside a solid focusing cone. In the first debris mitigation scenario, the last part of the cone has a “flapper” that should seal the cone when the pressure wave from the Z-pinch explosion hits it. In the second scenario, an enclosed target assembly is used, with the last part of the focusing cone connected to a “target can” which houses the laser target. The laser produced x rays for backlighting escape through a 3 mm diameter hole that is protected by an x-ray filter stack. Both techniques are discussed in detail and have been successfully tested on the Z accelerator.

  20. Structure of radiation dominated gravitoturbulent quasar discs

    CERN Document Server

    Shadmehri, Mohsen; Dib, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Self-gravitating accretion discs in a gravitoturbulent state, including radiation and gas pressures, are studied using a set of new analytical solutions. While the Toomre parameter of the disc remains close to its critical value for the onset of gravitational instability, the dimensionless stress parameter is uniquely determined from the thermal energy reservoir of the disc and its cooling rate. Our solutions are applicable to the accretion discs with dynamically important radiation pressure like in the quasars discs. We show that physical quantities of a gravitoturbulent disc in the presence of radiation are significantly modified compared to solutions with only gas pressure. We show that the dimensionless stress parameter is an increasing function of the radial distance so that its steepness strongly depends on the accretion rate. In a disc without radiation its slope is 4.5, however, we show that in the presence of radiation, it varies between 2 and 4.5 depending on the accretion rate and the central mass....

  1. Chemical separation of disc components using RAVE

    CERN Document Server

    Wojno, Jennifer; Steinmetz, Matthias; McMillan, Paul J; Matijevič, Gal; Binney, James; Wyse, Rosemary F G; Boeche, Corrado; Just, Andreas; Grebel, Eva K; Siebert, Arnaud; Bienaymé, Olivier; Gibson, Brad K; Zwitter, Tomaž; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Navarro, Julio F; Parker, Quentin A; Reid, Warren; Seabroke, George; Watson, Fred

    2016-01-01

    We present evidence from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey of chemically separated, kinematically distinct disc components in the solar neighbourhood. We apply probabilistic chemical selection criteria to separate our sample into $\\alpha$-low (`thin disc') and $\\alpha$-high (`thick disc') components. Using newly derived distances, which will be utilized in the upcoming RAVE DR5, we explore the kinematic trends as a function of metallicity for each of the disc components. For our thin disc stars, we find a negative trend in the mean rotational velocity ($V_{\\mathrm{\\phi}}$) as a function of iron abundance ([Fe/H]). We measure a positive trend in $\\partial V_{\\mathrm{\\phi}}$/$\\partial$[Fe/H] for the thick disc, consistent with results from high-resolution surveys. We also find differences between the chemical thin and thick discs in all three components of velocity dispersion. We discuss the implications of an $\\alpha$-low, metal-rich population originating from the inner Galaxy, where the orbits of ...

  2. Have proto-planetary discs formed planets?

    CERN Document Server

    Greaves, J S

    2010-01-01

    It has recently been noted that many discs around T Tauri stars appear to comprise only a few Jupiter-masses of gas and dust. Using millimetre surveys of discs within six local star-formation regions, we confirm this result, and find that only a few percent of young stars have enough circumstellar material to build gas giant planets, in standard core accretion models. Since the frequency of observed exo-planets is greater than this, there is a `missing mass' problem. As alternatives to simply adjusting the conversion of dust-flux to disc mass, we investigate three other classes of solution. Migration of planets could hypothetically sweep up the disc mass reservoir more efficiently, but trends in multi-planet systems do not support such a model, and theoretical models suggest that the gas accretion timescale is too short for migration to sweep the disc. Enhanced inner-disc mass reservoirs are possible, agreeing with predictions of disc evolution through self-gravity, but not adding to millimetre dust-flux as t...

  3. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gianluca; Vadalà; Fabrizio; Russo; Luca; Ambrosio; Mattia; Loppini; Vincenzo; Denaro

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments.Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers(e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration.

  4. Optically-thick accretion discs with advection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈林红; 吴枚; 尚仁成

    2002-01-01

    The structures of optically-thick accretion discs with radial advection have been investigated by the iteration and integration algorithms. The advective cooling term changes mostly the inner part of disc solution, and even results in an optically-thick advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF). Three distinct branches-the outer Shakura-Sunyaev disc (SSD), the inner ADAF and the middle transition layer-are found for a super-Eddington disc. The SSD-ADAF transition radius can be estimated as 18(M/ME)RG where RG is the Schwarzschild radius, M is the mass accretion rate and ME is the Eddington accretion rate. SSD solutions calculated with the iteration and integration methods are identical, while ADAF solutions obtained by these two methods differ greatly. Detailed algorithms and their differences have been analysed. The iteration algorithm is not self-consistent, since it implies that the dimensionless advection factor ξ is invariant, but in the inner ADAF region the variation of ξ is not negligible. The integration algorithm is always effective for the whole region of an optically-thick disc if the accretion rate is no smaller than 10-4ME. For optically-thin discs, the validity of these two algorithms is different. We suggest that the integration method be employed to calculate the global solution of a disc model without assuming ξ to be a constant. We also discuss its application to the emergent continuum spectrum in order to explain observational facts.

  5. The tidal disruption of protoplanetary accretion discs

    CERN Document Server

    Larwood, J D

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we revisit the problem of the tidal interaction occuring between a protostellar accretion disc and a secondary point mass following a parabolic trajectory. We model the disc response analytically and we compare our results with three-dimensional SPH simulations. Inviscid as well as viscous hydrodynamics is considered. We show that in a viscous system the response derived from inviscid considerations is predominant even for the highest estimates of an anomalous disc shear viscosity. The angular momentum lost from the disc during the encounter is derived from linear theory, for distant fly-bys, as well as the changes to the disc orientation expected in non-coplanar encounters. It is shown that the target discs can become warped and precess by a small amount during non-coplanar encounters. This small precession is shown to give rise to a relative tilt of the disc which is always more important for determining its final orientation than is the change to the orbital inclination. We discuss the implic...

  6. Intradiscal pressure measurements in normal discs, compressed discs and compressed discs treated with axial posterior disc distraction: an experimental study on the rabbit lumbar spine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guehring, Thorsten; Unglaub, Frank; Lorenz, Helga; Omlor, Georg; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Kroeber, Markus W

    2006-05-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) pressure measurement is an appropriate method for characterizing spinal loading conditions. However, there is no human or animal model that provides sufficient IVD pressure data. The aim of our study was to establish physiological pressure values in the rabbit lumbar spine and to determine whether temporary external disc compression and distraction were associated with pressure changes. Measurements were done using a microstructure-based fibreoptic sensor. Data were collected in five control rabbits (N, measurement lying prone at segment L3/4 at day 28), five rabbits with 28 days of axial compression (C, measurement at day 28) and three rabbits with 28 days of axial compression and following 28 days of axial distraction (D, measurement at day 56). Disc compression and distraction was verified by disc height in lateral radiographs. The controls (N) showed a level-related range between 0.25 MPa-0.45 MPa. The IVD pressure was highest at level L3/4 (0.42 MPa; range 0.38-0.45) with a decrease in both cranial and caudal adjacent segments. The result for C was a significant decrease in IVD pressure (0.31 MPa) when compared with controls (P=0.009). D showed slightly higher median IVD pressure (0.32 MPa) compared to C, but significantly lower levels when compared with N (P=0.037). Our results indicate a high range of physiological IVD pressure at different levels of the lumbar rabbit spine. Temporary disc compression reduces pressure when compared with controls. These data support the hypothesis that temporary external compression leads to moderate disc degeneration as a result of degradation of water-binding disc matrix or affected active pumping mechanisms of nutrients into the disc. A stabilization of IVD pressure in discs treated with temporary distraction was observed.

  7. Endoscopic anterior decompression in cervical disc disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yad Ram Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although microscopic anterior cervical discectomy with or without fusion are common surgical procedures for treatment of cervical herniated discs, loss of disc height, pseudarthrosis, and adjacent disc degeneration are some of the problems associated with it. This study is aimed to evaluate results of endoscopic microforaminotomy in cervical disc diseases. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of 50 patients of mono segmental soft or hard disc causing myeloradiculopathy was undertaken. A visual analogue scale (VAS for neck and arm pain and functional outcomes using the Nurick grading system were assessed. There were 28, 12, 8, and 2 patients at C5-6, C6-7, C4-5, and C3-4 levels disc diseases, respectively. Patients with two or more level disc, instabilities, disc extending more than half vertebral body height, and previous operation at the same segment were excluded. Results: Age ranged from 21 to 67 years. Average postoperative reduction in disc height, operating time, and blood loss was 1.1 mm, 110 minutes, and 30 ml, respectively. Average pre-operative VAS score for arm pain and Nurick grading was 7.6 and 2.7, which improved to 1.9 and 0.82, respectively. All patients improved; 1, 2, 3 grade improvement was seen in 10, 27, and 10 patients, respectively. There was no significant complication or any mortality. Conclusion: Although longer follow up of large number of patients is required, endoscopic microforaminotomy is a safe and an effective alternative to microscopic anterior discectomy with or without fusion.

  8. Protostellar disc formation enabled by removal of small dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Caselli, Paola; Li, Zhi-Yun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown that a realistic level of magnetization of dense molecular cloud cores can suppress the formation of a rotationally supported disc (RSD) through catastrophic magnetic braking in the axisymmetric ideal MHD limit. In this study, we present conditions for the formation of RSDs through non-ideal MHD effects computed self-consistently from an equilibrium chemical network. We find that removing from the standard MRN distribution the large population of very small grains (VSGs) of ˜ 10 Å to few 100 Å that dominate the coupling of the bulk neutral matter to the magnetic field increases the ambipolar diffusivity by ˜ 1-2 orders of magnitude at densities below 1010/cm-3. The enhanced ambipolar diffusion (AD) in the envelope reduces the amount of magnetic flux dragged by the collapse into the circumstellar disc-forming region. Therefore, magnetic braking is weakened and more angular momentum can be retained. With continuous high angular momentum inflow, RSDs of tens of au are able to form, survive, and even grow in size, depending on other parameters including cosmic ray ionization rate, magnetic field strength, and rotation speed. Some discs become self-gravitating and evolve into rings in our 2D (axisymmetric) simulations, which have the potential to fragment into (close) multiple systems in 3D. We conclude that disc formation in magnetized cores is highly sensitive to chemistry, especially to grain sizes. A moderate grain coagulation/growth to remove the large population of VSGs, either in the prestellar phase or during free-fall collapse, can greatly promote AD and help formation of tens of au RSDs.

  9. Determination of the intervertebral disc space from CT images of the lumbar spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korez, Robert; Å tern, Darko; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc are among the most common causes of low back pain, where for individuals with significant symptoms surgery may be needed. One of the interventions is the total disc replacement surgery, where the degenerated disc is replaced by an artificial implant. For designing implants with good bone contact and continuous force distribution, the morphology of the intervertebral disc space and vertebral body endplates is of considerable importance. In this study we propose a method for the determination of the intervertebral disc space from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images of the lumbar spine. The first step of the proposed method is the construction of a model of vertebral bodies in the lumbar spine. For this purpose, a chain of five elliptical cylinders is initialized in the 3D image and then deformed to resemble vertebral bodies by introducing 25 shape parameters. The parameters are obtained by aligning the chain to the vertebral bodies in the CT image according to image intensity and appearance information. The determination of the intervertebral disc space is finally achieved by finding the planes that fit the endplates of the obtained parametric 3D models, and placing points in the space between the planes of adjacent vertebrae that enable surface reconstruction of the intervertebral disc space. The morphometric analysis of images from 20 subjects yielded 11:3 +/- 2:6, 12:1 +/- 2:4, 12:8 +/- 2:0 and 12:9 +/- 2:7 cm3 in terms of L1-L2, L2-L3, L3-L4 and L4-L5 intervertebral disc space volume, respectively.

  10. Debris-flow mobilization from landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, R.M.; Reid, M.E.; LaHusen, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    Field observations, laboratory experiments, and theoretical analyses indicate that landslides mobilize to form debris flows by three processes: (a) widespread Coulomb failure within a sloping soil, rock, or sediment mass, (b) partial or complete liquefaction of the mass by high pore-fluid pressures, and (c) conversion of landslide translational energy to internal vibrational energy (i.e. granular temperature). These processes can operate independently, but in many circumstances they appear to operate simultaneously and synergistically. Early work on debris-flow mobilization described a similar interplay of processes but relied on mechanical models in which debris behavior was assumed to be fixed and governed by a Bingham or Bagnold rheology. In contrast, this review emphasizes models in which debris behavior evolves in response to changing pore pressures and granular temperatures. One-dimensional infinite-slope models provide insight by quantifying how pore pressures and granular temperatures can influence the transition from Coulomb failure to liquefaction. Analyses of multidimensional experiments reveal complications ignored in one-dimensional models and demonstrate that debris-flow mobilization may occur by at least two distinct modes in the field.

  11. Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A M; Barty, C P; Beach, R J; Erlandson, A C; Caird, J A

    2010-02-05

    The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called 'LIFE' laser system. Because a single 'LIFE' beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

  12. Space Debris Reentry Analysis Methods and Tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ziniu; HU Ruifeng; QU Xi; WANG Xiang; WU Zhe

    2011-01-01

    The reentry of uncontrolled spacecraft may be broken into many pieces of debris at an altitude in the range of 75-85 km.The surviving fragments could pose great hazard and risk to ground and people.In recent years,methods and tools for predicting and analyzing debris reentry and ground risk assessment have been studied and developed in National Aeronautics and Space Administration(NASA),European Space Agency(ESA) and other organizations,including the group of the present authors.This paper reviews the current progress on this topic of debris reentry briefly.We outline the Monte Carlo method for uncertainty analysis,breakup prediction,and parameters affecting survivability of debris.The existing analysis tools can be classified into two categories,i.e.the object-oriented and the spacecraft-oriented methods,the latter being more accurate than the first one.The past object-oriented tools include objects of only simple shapes.For more realistic simulation,here we present an object-oriented tool debris reentry and ablation prediction system(DRAPS) developed by the present authors,which introduces new object shapes to 15 types,as well as 51 predefined motions and relevant aerodynamic and aerothermal models.The aerodynamic and aerothermal models in DRAPS are validated using direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC) method.

  13. Wildfire-related debris-flow generation through episodic progressive sediment-bulking processes, western USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, S.H.; Gartner, J.E.; Parrett, C.; Parise, M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Debris-flow initiation processes on hillslopes recently burned by wildfire differ from those generally recognized on unburned, vegetated hillslopes. These differences result from fire-induced changes in the hydrologic response to rainfall events. In this study, detailed field and aerial photographic mapping, observations, and measurements of debris-flow events from three sites in the western U.S. are used to describe and evaluate the process of episodic progressive sediment bulking of storm runoff that leads to the generation of post-wildfire debris flows. Our data demonstrate the effects of material credibility, sediment availability on hillslopes and in channels, the degree of channel confinement, the formation of continuous channel incision, and the upslope contributing area and its gradient on the generation of flows and the magnitude of the response are demonstrated. ?? 2003 Millpress.

  14. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    There are numerous methods of investigating intervertebral disc. Visualization methods are widely used in clinical practice. Histological, imunohistochemical and biochemical methods are more used in scientific research. We propose that a new spectroscopic investigation would be useful in determining intervertebral disc material, especially when no histological specimens are available. Purpose: to determine spectroscopic parameters of intervertebral disc material; to determine emission spectra common for all intervertebral discs; to create a background for further spectroscopic investigation where no histological specimen will be available. Material and Methods: 20 patients, 68 frozen sections of 20 μm thickness from operatively removed intervertebral disc hernia were excited by Nd:YAG microlaser STA-01-TH third harmonic 355 nm light throw 0, 1 mm fiber. Spectrophotometer OceanOptics USB2000 was used for spectra collection. Mathematical analysis of spectra was performed by ORIGIN multiple Gaussian peaks analysis. Results: In each specimen of disc hernia were found distinct maximal spectral peaks of 4 types supporting the histological evaluation of mixture content of the hernia. Fluorescence in the spectral regions 370-700 nm was detected in the disc hernias. The main spectral component was at 494 nm and the contribution of the components with the peak wavelength values at 388 nm, 412 nm and 435±5 nm were varying in the different groups of samples. In comparison to average spectrum of all cases, there are 4 groups of different spectral signatures in the region 400-500 nm in the patient groups, supporting a clinical data on different clinical features of the patients. Discussion and Conclusion: besides the classical open discectomy, new minimally invasive techniques of treating intervertebral disc emerge (PLDD). Intervertebral disc in these techniques is assessed by needle, no histological specimen is taken. Spectroscopic investigation via fiber optics through the

  15. Groups, cacti and framed little discs

    CERN Document Server

    Hepworth, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Let G be a topological group. Then the based loopspace of G is an algebra over the cacti operad, while the double loopspace of the classifying space of G is an algebra over the framed little discs operad. This paper shows that these two algebras are equivalent, in the sense that they are weakly equivalent E-algebras, where E is an operad weakly equivalent to both framed little discs and cacti. We recover the equivalence between cacti and framed little discs, and Menichi's isomorphism between the BV-algebras obtained by taking the homology of the loopspace of G and of the double loopspace of BG.

  16. Modeling and Thermal Analysis of Disc

    OpenAIRE

    Brake Praveena S; Lava Kumar M

    2014-01-01

    The disc brake is a device used for slowing or stopping the rotation of the vehicle. Number of times using the brake for vehicle leads to heat generation during braking event, such that disc brake undergoes breakage due to high Temperature. Disc brake model is done by CATIA and analysis is done by using ANSYS workbench. The main purpose of this project is to study the Thermal analysis of the Materials for the Aluminum, Grey Cast Iron, HSS M42, and HSS M2. A comparison between ...

  17. A lumbar disc surgery predictive score card.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finneson, B E

    1978-06-01

    A lumbar disc surgery predictive score card or questionnaire has been developed to assess potential candidates for excision of a herniated lumbar disc who have not previously undergone lumbar spine surgery. It is not designed to encompass patients who are being considered for other types of lumbar spine surgery, such as decompressive laminectomy or fusion. In an effort to make the "score card" usable by almost all physicians who are involved in lumbar disc surgery, only studies which have broad acceptance and are generally employed are included. Studies which have less widespread use such as electromyogram, discogram, venogram, special psychologic studies (MMPI, pain drawings) have been purposely excluded.

  18. Water fact sheet, history of landslides and debris flows at Mount Rainier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, K.M.; Vallance, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Many landslides and debris flows have originated from Mount Rainier since the retreat of glaciers from Puget Sound about 10,000 years ago. The recurrent instability is due to several factors--height of the steep-sided volcanic cone, frequent volcanic activity, continuous weakening of rock by steam and hot, chemical-laden water, and exposure of unstable areas as the mountains glaciers have receded. The landslide scars and deposits tell a fascinating story of the changing shape of the volcano. Landslides occur when part of the volcano "collapses" or fails and slides away from the rest of the volcano. The failed mass rapidly breaks up into a jumble of disaggregated pieces that flow at high velocity like a fluid. Clay and water in the debris cause further change to a liquid slurry known as a debris flow or mudflow. Volcanic debris flows are also widely known by the Indonesian term "lahar." Although the largest debris flows at Rainier form from landslides, many smaller flows are caused by volcanic eruptions, intense rainfall, and glacial-outburst floods.

  19. Debris and smear removal in flattened root canals after use of different irrigant agitation protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Eduardo Milani; Silva-Sousa, Yara T C; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião; Lorencetti, Karina Torales; Silva, Silvio Rocha Correa

    2012-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can be used to analyze the presence of debris and smear layer on the internal walls of root canal. This study evaluated the debris and smear removal in flattened root canals using SEM after use of different irrigant agitation protocols. Fifty mandibular incisors were distributed into five groups (n = 10) according to the irrigant agitation protocol used during chemomechanical preparation: conventional syringe irrigation with NaviTip needle (no activation), active scrubbing of irrigant with brush-covered NaviTip FX needle, manual dynamic irrigation, continuous passive ultrasonic irrigation, and apical negative pressure irrigation (EndoVac system). Canals were irrigated with 5 mL of 2.5% NaOCl at each change of instrument and received a final flush with 17% EDTA for 1 min. After instrumentation, the roots were split longitudinally and SEM micrographs at ×100 and ×1,000 were taken to evaluate the amount of debris and smear layer, respectively, in each third. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's post-hoc tests (α = 5%). Manual dynamic activation left significantly (p protocols, while ultrasonic irrigation and EndoVac were the most effective (p 0.05) either among the irrigant agitation protocols or between the protocol-canal third interactions. Although none of the irrigant agitation protocols completely removed debris and smear layer from flattened root canals, the machine-assisted agitation systems (ultrasound and EndoVac) removed more debris than the manual techniques.

  20. Numerical simulation of failure behavior of granular debris flows based on flume model tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Li, Ye-xun; Jia, Min-cai; Li, Cui-na

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the failure behaviors of debris flows were studied by flume model tests with artificial rainfall and numerical simulations (PFC(3D)). Model tests revealed that grain sizes distribution had profound effects on failure mode, and the failure in slope of medium sand started with cracks at crest and took the form of retrogressive toe sliding failure. With the increase of fine particles in soil, the failure mode of the slopes changed to fluidized flow. The discrete element method PFC(3D) can overcome the hypothesis of the traditional continuous medium mechanic and consider the simple characteristics of particle. Thus, a numerical simulations model considering liquid-solid coupled method has been developed to simulate the debris flow. Comparing the experimental results, the numerical simulation result indicated that the failure mode of the failure of medium sand slope was retrogressive toe sliding, and the failure of fine sand slope was fluidized sliding. The simulation result is consistent with the model test and theoretical analysis, and grain sizes distribution caused different failure behavior of granular debris flows. This research should be a guide to explore the theory of debris flow and to improve the prevention and reduction of debris flow.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Failure Behavior of Granular Debris Flows Based on Flume Model Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the failure behaviors of debris flows were studied by flume model tests with artificial rainfall and numerical simulations (PFC3D. Model tests revealed that grain sizes distribution had profound effects on failure mode, and the failure in slope of medium sand started with cracks at crest and took the form of retrogressive toe sliding failure. With the increase of fine particles in soil, the failure mode of the slopes changed to fluidized flow. The discrete element method PFC3D can overcome the hypothesis of the traditional continuous medium mechanic and consider the simple characteristics of particle. Thus, a numerical simulations model considering liquid-solid coupled method has been developed to simulate the debris flow. Comparing the experimental results, the numerical simulation result indicated that the failure mode of the failure of medium sand slope was retrogressive toe sliding, and the failure of fine sand slope was fluidized sliding. The simulation result is consistent with the model test and theoretical analysis, and grain sizes distribution caused different failure behavior of granular debris flows. This research should be a guide to explore the theory of debris flow and to improve the prevention and reduction of debris flow.

  2. GIS-based two-dimensional numerical simulation of rainfall-induced debris flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present a useful numerical method to simulate the propagation and deposition of debris flow across the three dimensional complex terrain. A depth-averaged two-dimensional numerical model is developed, in which the debris and water mixture is assumed to be continuous, incompressible, unsteady flow. The model is based on the continuity equations and Navier-Stokes equations. Raster grid networks of digital elevation model in GIS provide a uniform grid system to describe complex topography. As the raster grid can be used as the finite difference mesh, the continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically using the finite difference method. The numerical model is applied to simulate the rainfall-induced debris flow occurred in 20 July 2003, in Minamata City of southern Kyushu, Japan. The simulation reproduces the propagation and deposition and the results are in good agreement with the field investigation. The synthesis of numerical method and GIS makes possible the solution of debris flow over a realistic terrain, and can be used to estimate the flow range, and to define potentially hazardous areas for homes and road section.

  3. GIS-based two-dimensional numerical simulation of rainfall-induced debris flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Li, S.; Esaki, T.

    2008-02-01

    This paper aims to present a useful numerical method to simulate the propagation and deposition of debris flow across the three dimensional complex terrain. A depth-averaged two-dimensional numerical model is developed, in which the debris and water mixture is assumed to be continuous, incompressible, unsteady flow. The model is based on the continuity equations and Navier-Stokes equations. Raster grid networks of digital elevation model in GIS provide a uniform grid system to describe complex topography. As the raster grid can be used as the finite difference mesh, the continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically using the finite difference method. The numerical model is applied to simulate the rainfall-induced debris flow occurred in 20 July 2003, in Minamata City of southern Kyushu, Japan. The simulation reproduces the propagation and deposition and the results are in good agreement with the field investigation. The synthesis of numerical method and GIS makes possible the solution of debris flow over a realistic terrain, and can be used to estimate the flow range, and to define potentially hazardous areas for homes and road section.

  4. Stellar irradiated discs and implications on migration of embedded planets I: equilibrium discs

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsch, Bertram; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Kley, Willy; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The strength and direction of migration of low mass planets depends on the disc's thermodynamics. In discs where the viscous heating is balanced by radiative transport, the migration can be directed outwards, a process which extends the lifetime of growing planetary embryos. We investigate the influence of opacity and stellar irradiation on the disc thermodynamics. Utilizing the resulting disc structure, we determine the regions of outward migration. We perform two-dimensional numerical simulations of equilibrium discs with viscous heating, radiative cooling and stellar irradiation. We use the hydrodynamical code NIRVANA that includes a full tensor viscosity and stellar irradiation, as well as a two temperature solver that includes radiation transport in the flux-limited diffusion approximation. The migration is studied by using torque formulae. In the constant opacity case, we reproduce the analytical results of a black-body disc: the stellar irradiation dominates in the outer regions -- leading to flaring -...

  5. Investigation of the coatings applied onto brake discs on disc-brake pad pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kiliçaslan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available While braking, according to the severity of it, thermal, metallurgical, constructive and tribological occurrences emerge on the brake disc-pad interface. In this study, NiCr was sprayed as bonding layer onto the discs, one ofwhich was coated with Al2O3-TiO2 by plasma spray and the other was coated with NiCr-Cr3C2 by High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF. In addition, the discs were tested with inertia dynamometer according to SAE’s J2522 testing procedure. The measurements showed that although the pads of the coated discs were exposed to higher braking temperatures, friction coefficient of the disc coated with NiCr- Cr3C2 was obtained 6 % higher compared to the original disc.

  6. Operational Impact of Improved Space Tracking on Collision Avoidance in the Future LEO Space Debris Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibert, D.; Borgeson, D.; Peterson, G.; Jenkin, A.; Sorge, M.

    2010-09-01

    Even if global space policy successfully curtails on orbit explosions and ASAT demonstrations, studies indicate that the number of debris objects in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) will continue to grow solely from debris on debris collisions and debris generated from new launches. This study examines the threat posed by this growing space debris population over the next 30 years and how improvements in our space tracking capabilities can reduce the number of Collision Avoidance (COLA) maneuvers required keep the risk of operational satellite loss within tolerable limits. Particular focus is given to satellites operated by the Department of Defense (DoD) and Intelligence Community (IC) in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The following debris field and space tracking performance parameters were varied parametrically in the experiment to study the impact on the number of collision avoidance maneuvers required: - Debris Field Density (by year 2009, 2019, 2029, and 2039) - Quality of Track Update (starting 1 sigma error ellipsoid) - Future Propagator Accuracy (error ellipsoid growth rates - Special Perturbations in 3 axes) - Track Update Rate for Debris (stochastic) - Track Update Rate for Payloads (stochastic) Baseline values matching present day tracking performance for quality of track update, propagator accuracy, and track update rate were derived by analyzing updates to the unclassified Satellite Catalog (SatCat). Track update rates varied significantly for active payloads and debris and as such we used different models for the track update rates for military payloads and debris. The analysis was conducted using the System Effectiveness Analysis Simulation (SEAS) an agent based model developed by the United States Air Force Space Command’s Space and Missile Systems Center to evaluate the military utility of space systems. The future debris field was modeled by The Aerospace Corporation using a tool chain which models the growth of the 10cm+ debris field using high fidelity

  7. Burned-out discs stop hurting: fact or fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Tom; Kjaer, Per; Korsholm, Lars

    2008-01-01

    ). The risk for LBP during the past year attributed to black discs was 11%. CONCLUSION: The data could not support the hypothesis that severely degenerated discs are "burned out" and become less painful. People with black discs had a higher prevalence of LBP compared to those with grey or normal discs...

  8. Cervical disc arthroplasty with ProDisc-C artificial disc: 5-year radiographic follow-up results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan-bin; SUN Yu; ZHOU Fei-fei; LIU ZHONG-jun

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty is an alternative surgery to standard cervical decompression and fusion for disc degeneration.Different types of cervical disc prosthesis are used in China.The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiographic outcomes of cervical arthroplasty using the ProDisc-C prosthesis.Methods Radiographic evaluation,including static and dynamic flexion-extension lateral images,was performed at baseline and at final follow-up.Results Twenty six patients who had single-level ProDisc-C arthroplasty were followed up for a mean period of 63 months (56-76 months).The range of motion at the operated level was 9.3°±3.7° at baseline and 7.3°±3.5° at final follow-up,with a significant difference (P <0.05).Seventeen of 26 levels (65.4%) developed heterotopic ossification:three were classified as grade Ⅱ,13 were classified as grade Ⅲ,and 1 as grade Ⅳ,according to McAfee's classification.Forty nine adjacent segments were evaluated by lateral Ⅹ-ray and 18 (36.7%) segments developed adjacent segment degenerations.Conclusions ProDisc-C arthroplasty had acceptable radiographic results at 5-year follow-up.The range of motion was preserved.However,more than 60% of the patients developed heterotopic ossification.

  9. Amplification of postwildfire peak flow by debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, J. W.; McGuire, L. A.; Rengers, F. K.; Smith, J. B.; Staley, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    In burned steeplands, the peak depth and discharge of postwildfire runoff can substantially increase from the addition of debris. Yet methods to estimate the increase over water flow are lacking. We quantified the potential amplification of peak stage and discharge using video observations of postwildfire runoff, compiled data on postwildfire peak flow (Qp), and a physically based model. Comparison of flood and debris flow data with similar distributions in drainage area (A) and rainfall intensity (I) showed that the median runoff coefficient (C = Qp/AI) of debris flows is 50 times greater than that of floods. The striking increase in Qp can be explained using a fully predictive model that describes the additional flow resistance caused by the emergence of coarse-grained surge fronts. The model provides estimates of the amplification of peak depth, discharge, and shear stress needed for assessing postwildfire hazards and constraining models of bedrock incision.

  10. Parametric analysis: SOC meteoroid and debris protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The meteoroid and man made space debris environments of an Earth orbital manned space operations center are discussed. Protective shielding thickness and design configurations for providing given levels of no penetration probability were also calculated. Meteoroid/debris protection consists of a radiator/shield thickness, which is actually an outer skin, separated from the pressure wall, thickness by a distance. An ideal shield thickness, will, upon impact with a particle, cause both the particle and shield to vaporize, allowing a minimum amount of debris to impact the pressure wall itself. A shield which is too thick will crater on the outside, and release small particles of shield from the inside causing damage to the pressure wall. Inversely, if the shield is too thin, it will afford no protection, and the backup must provide all necessary protection. It was concluded that a double wall concept is most effective.

  11. Debris flow hazards mitigation--Mechanics, prediction, and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.-L.; Major, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Debris-Flow Hazards Mitigation: Mechanics, Prediction, and Assessment held in Chengdu, China, September 10-13, 2007. The papers cover a wide range of topics on debris-flow science and engineering, including the factors triggering debris flows, geomorphic effects, mechanics of debris flows (e.g., rheology, fluvial mechanisms, erosion and deposition processes), numerical modeling, various debris-flow experiments, landslide-induced debris flows, assessment of debris-flow hazards and risk, field observations and measurements, monitoring and alert systems, structural and non-structural countermeasures against debris-flow hazards and case studies. The papers reflect the latest devel-opments and advances in debris-flow research. Several studies discuss the development and appli-cation of Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) technologies in debris-flow hazard/risk assessment. Timely topics presented in a few papers also include the development of new or innovative techniques for debris-flow monitoring and alert systems, especially an infra-sound acoustic sensor for detecting debris flows. Many case studies illustrate a wide variety of debris-flow hazards and related phenomena as well as their hazardous effects on human activities and settlements.

  12. Medium-term outcomes of artificial disc replacement for severe cervical disc narrowing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-Hung Yeh; Che-Wei Hung; Cheng-Hsing Kao; Chien-Ming Chao

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine if theBryan cervical disc prosthesis could relieve objective neurological symptoms, signs, and restore mobility in patients with severe cervical disc narrowing. Methods:Clinical data of thirty-two patients underwentBryan cervical disc replacement has been collected fromApril2006 toFebruary2010.Severe cervical disc narrowing with gradeV disc degeneration were included in this study.Bryan cervical disc prostheses have been implanted through anterior approach.JapaneseOrthopedicsAssociation(JOA) score, visual analog scale, Odom’s scale, and flexion-extension radiological follow-ups were applied for evaluations. Results:A total of41Bryan disc prostheses from32 patients with an average follow-up duration of33.5 months(range23 to44 months) were evaluated.Clinical functions of patients were significantly improved.Preoperative averaged visual analog scale score of6.3±2.2 was decreased to1.3±1.2(at36 months,P<0.001), while preoperative averagedJOA score of14.4±1.2 was increased to16.3±0.9(at36 months,P<0.001).Thirty of32 patients received excellent to good outcomes inOdom’s scale.Averaged mobility was restored to(9.9±3.2)°at the last follow-up evaluation of36 months.No subsidence or migration of implant was identified. Conclusions:Acceptable clinical outcome for treatment of severe cervical disc narrowing with cervical disc replacement technique has been performed in current study.Most patients maintained good postoperative mobility and no significant adjacent level degeneration were found.Cervical disc replacement may be applicable in treatment of severe cervical disc narrowing; however, longer follow-ups are required for ensuring the long-term efficacy of cervical disc replacement.

  13. Effect of perturbations on debris-to-debris orbital transfers: A quantitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kartik; Hekma, Enne; Agrawal, Abhishek; Topputo, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the applicability of the Lambert solver (Izzo, 2014) for preliminary design of Multi-Target Active Debris Removal missions. Firstly, we computed ≈25 million debris-to-debris transfers using the Lambert solver for selected sets of debris objects in Low Earth Orbit, Geostationary Transfer Orbit, and Geosynchronous Orbit. Subsequently, we propagated the departure states of the Lambert transfers below selected ΔV cut-offs using the SGP4/SDP4 propagator (Vallado et al., 2006). We recorded the arrival position and velocity error vectors incurred by neglecting perturbations and analyzed the results for each orbital regime. Our results indicate that perturbations can play a significant role in determining the feasibility of debris-to-debris transfers. By using the Lambert solver and neglecting perturbations, the errors in the arrival position and velocity for individual legs can be large. The largest errors were obtained for transfers between debris objects in Sun-Synchronous Orbit (O (100) km error in magnitude of position vector and O (0.1) km/s error in magnitude of velocity vector). Hence, solely employing the Lambert solver to rank transfer legs could lead to incorrect choices for sequencing of multi-target trajectories. This is particularly relevant for transfers in Low Earth Orbit, where the effects of perturbations are the strongest.

  14. Debris flow, debris avalanche and flood hazards at and downstream from Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kevin M.; Vallance, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Mount Rainier volcano has produced many large debris flows and debris avalanches during the last 10,000 years. These flows have periodically traveled more than 100 kilometers from the volcano to inundate parts of the now-populated Puget Sound Lowland. Meteorological floods also have caused damage, but future effects will be partly mitigated by reservoirs. Mount Rainier presents the most severe flow risks of any volcano in the United States. Volcanic debris flows (lahars) are of two types: (1) cohesive, relatively high clay flows originating as debris avalanches, and (2) noncohesive flows with less clay that begin most commonly as meltwater surges. Three case histories represent important subpopulations of flows with known magnitudes and frequencies. The risks of each subpopulation may be considered for general planning and design. A regional map illustrates the extent of inundation by the case-history flows, the largest of which originated as debris avalanches and moved from Mount Rainier to Puget Sound. The paleohydrologic record of these past flows indicates the potential for inundation by future flows from the volcano. A map of the volcano and its immediate vicinity shows examples of smaller debris avalanches and debris flows in the 20th century.

  15. Axial T2* mapping in intervertebral discs: a new technique for assessment of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, Sven; Quirbach, Sebastian; Krause, Fabian G.; Benneker, Lorin M. [Inselspital, Berne University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Berne (Switzerland); Mamisch, Tallal C. [Inselspital, Berne University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Berne (Switzerland); Werlen, Stefan [Clinic Sonnenhof, Department of Radiology, Berne (Switzerland)

    2012-09-15

    To demonstrate the potential benefits of biochemical axial T2* mapping of intervertebral discs (IVDs) regarding the detection and grading of early stages of degenerative disc disease using 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a clinical setting. Ninety-three patients suffering from lumbar spine problems were examined using standard MRI protocols including an axial T2* mapping protocol. All discs were classified morphologically and grouped as ''healthy'' or ''abnormal''. Differences between groups were analysed regarding to the specific T2* pattern at different regions of interest (ROIs). Healthy intervertebral discs revealed a distinct cross-sectional T2* value profile: T2* values were significantly lower in the annulus fibrosus compared with the nucleus pulposus (P = 0.01). In abnormal IVDs, T2* values were significantly lower, especially towards the centre of the disc representing the expected decreased water content of the nucleus (P = 0.01). In herniated discs, ROIs within the nucleus pulposus and ROIs covering the annulus fibrosus showed decreased T2* values. Axial T2* mapping is effective to detect early stages of degenerative disc disease. There is a potential benefit of axial T2* mapping as a diagnostic tool, allowing the quantitative assessment of intervertebral disc degeneration. circle Axial T2* mapping effective in detecting early degenerative disc disease. (orig.)

  16. Treatment of lumbar disc herniation by percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) and modified PLDD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiao fei; Li, Hong zhi; Wu, Ru zhou; Sui, Yun xian

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To study the micro-invasive operative method and to compare the effect of treatment of PLDD and modified PLDD for Lumbar Disc Herniation. Method: Vaporized part of the nucleus pulposus in single or multiple point after acupuncture into lumbar disc, to reach the purpose of the decompression of the lumbar disc. Result: Among the 19 cases of the regular PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 63.2%, and among the 40 cases of the modified PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 82.5%. Conclusion: The modified PLDD has good effect on the treatment for lumbar disc herniation.

  17. Transradicular lumbar disc herniation: An extreme variant of intraradicular disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Manish K; Shimer, Adam L

    2015-01-01

    Intradural or intraradicular lumbar disc herniation (IDH) is a relatively rare condition often diagnosed intraoperatively. We encountered an extreme variant of IDH - a transradicular herniation as the disc material extruded through the lumbar nerve root through a split essentially transecting the nerve root. While failure to recognize intradural and intraradicular disc herniation can lead to failed back surgery, the variant described in the present case could lead to iatrogenic injury and complication if not recognized. A unique case of transradicular lumbar disc herniation in a 25-year-old patient is presented with the depiction of intraoperative images supplementing the text.

  18. CFD Analysis Of Straight Ventilated Disc Brake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil K

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Brakes are the key pieces of a vehicle that plays an active role in safety and performance of the system. The study of aerodynamic cooling of a disc brake in real working condition of vehicle is important in present situations. Brake discs get very hot quickly, so it should be dissipated properly through different modes of heat transfer. Contributions of these heat transfer modes are different in different type of problems. The cooling transfer rates are different in vane surface and frictional surface of a disc brake. Also the temperature varies in each small interval of braking time. So a transient problem simulation is important to study the cooling of a disc brake when a vehicle decelerates from a particular speed. ANSYS CFX tool is used for the simulation of this transient problem.

  19. Modeling and Thermal Analysis of Disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brake Praveena S

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The disc brake is a device used for slowing or stopping the rotation of the vehicle. Number of times using the brake for vehicle leads to heat generation during braking event, such that disc brake undergoes breakage due to high Temperature. Disc brake model is done by CATIA and analysis is done by using ANSYS workbench. The main purpose of this project is to study the Thermal analysis of the Materials for the Aluminum, Grey Cast Iron, HSS M42, and HSS M2. A comparison between the four materials for the Thermal values and material properties obtained from the Thermal analysis low thermal gradient material is preferred. Hence best suitable design, low thermal gradient material Grey cast iron is preferred for the Disc Brakes for better performance.

  20. Magnetic Field Amplification via Protostellar Disc Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dyda, Sergei; Ustyugova, Galina V; Koldoba, Alexander V; Wasserman, Ira

    2015-01-01

    We model the generation of a magnetic field in a protostellar disc using an \\alpha-dynamo and perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of a T Tauri star. We find that for small values of the dimensionless dynamo parameter $\\alpha_d$ the poloidal field grows exponentially at a rate ${\\sigma} \\propto {\\Omega}_K \\sqrt{\\alpha_d}$ , before saturating to a value $\\propto \\sqrt{\\alpha_d}$ . The dynamo excites dipole and octupole modes, but quadrupole modes are suppressed, because of the symmetries of the seed field. Initial seed fields too weak to launch MHD outflows are found to grow sufficiently to launch winds with observationally relevant mass fluxes of order $10^{-9} M_{\\odot}/\\rm{yr}$ for T Tauri stars. For large values of $\\alpha_d$ magnetic loops are generated over the entire disc. These quickly come to dominate the disc dynamics and cause the disc to break up due to the magnetic pressure.

  1. Thermal analysis on motorcycle disc brake geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. M. Zurin W., S.; Talib, R. J.; Ismail, N. I.

    2017-08-01

    Braking is a phase of slowing and stop the movement of motorcycle. During braking, the frictional heat was generated and the energy was ideally should be faster dissipated to surrounding to prevent the built up of the excessive temperature which may lead to brake fluid vaporization, thermoelastic deformation at the contact surface, material degradation and failure. In this paper, solid and ventilated type of motorcycle disc brake are being analyse using Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) software. The main focus of the analysis is the thermal behaviour during braking for solid and ventilated disc brake. A comparison between both geometries is being discussed to determine the better braking performance in term of temperature distribution. It is found that ventilated disc brake is having better braking performance in terms of heat transfer compare to solid disc.

  2. Stellar Wind Erosion of Protoplanetary Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Schnepf, Neesha R; Romanova, Marina

    2014-01-01

    An analytic model is developed for the erosion of protoplanetary gas discs by high velocity magnetized stellar winds. The winds are centrifugally driven from the surface of rapidly rotating, strongly magnetized young stars. The presence of the magnetic field in the wind leads to Reynolds numbers sufficiently large to cause a strongly turbulent wind/disk boundary layer which entrains and carries away the disc gas. The model uses the conservation of mass and momentum in the turbulent boundary layer. The time-scale for significant erosion depends on the disc accretion speed, accretion rate and on the wind mass loss rate. The time-scale is estimated to be ~2E6 yr. The stellar wind erosion may act in conjunction with photo-evaporation of the discs.

  3. Spiral shocks and accretion in discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruit, H.C.; Matsuda, T.; Inoue, M.; Sawada, K.

    1987-12-01

    Recent numerical and analytical results on disc-like accretion with shock waves as the only dissipation mechanism are compared. The global properties of the process are similar to those of the viscous (..cap alpha..) disc model, but precise values of the effective ..cap alpha.. value as a function of the accretion rate can be calculated. At low values of the ratio of specific heats (..gamma.. < 1.45) accretion is possible without radiative losses. Such adiabatic accretion can occur in practice at high accretion rates on to low mass objects and may be important in the formation of planets. Following previous authors, it is pointed out that non-axisymmetric perturbations in the outer parts of a disc increase in amplitude as they propagate in and cause spiral shocks more easily in a disc than perturbations originating in the inner parts.

  4. Eclipse Mapping: Astrotomography of Accretion Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Baptista, Raymundo

    2015-01-01

    The Eclipse Mapping Method is an indirect imaging technique that transforms the shape of the eclipse light curve into a map of the surface brightness distribution of the occulted regions. Three decades of application of this technique to the investigation of the structure, the spectrum and the time evolution of accretion discs around white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables have enriched our understanding of these accretion devices with a wealth of details such as (but not limited to) moving heating/cooling waves during outbursts in dwarf novae, tidally-induced spiral shocks of emitting gas with sub-Keplerian velocities, elliptical precessing discs associated to superhumps, and measurements of the radial run of the disc viscosity through the mapping of the disc flickering sources. This chapter reviews the principles of the method, discusses its performance, limitations, useful error propagation procedures, as well as highlights a selection of applications aimed at showing the possible scientific problems that ha...

  5. [Disc electrophoresis of collagen protein (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitmayr, P; Verzár, F

    1975-01-01

    The composition of proteins extracted from tendon collagen is investigated by disc electrophoresis. No qualitative differences can be demonstrated between young and old collagen. The action of formaldehyde and methionine on the tendons has no effect on the electrophoretic picture.

  6. Converging posterior distributions in space debris monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasanen, Sari [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Oulu, 90014 University of Oulu (Finland)], E-mail: sari.lasanen@oulu.fi

    2008-11-01

    Ground-based radars monitor the falling space debris in order to prevent collisions with spacecrafts and satellites. Experiments with European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) Scientific Association radars using new data acquisition equipment suitable for space debris detection have raised a question what happens to a Bayesian solution when the sampling frequency of the reflected signal is increased. Assuming slightly idealized measurements, we show that the posterior densities converge in this case. This shows that the sampling method suits well for the statistical inverse problem.

  7. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1977-07-19

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures.

  8. Density Estimations in Laboratory Debris Flow Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz de Oliveira, Gustavo; Kulisch, Helmut; Malcherek, Andreas; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2016-04-01

    Bulk density and its variation is an important physical quantity to estimate the solid-liquid fractions in two-phase debris flows. Here we present mass and flow depth measurements for experiments performed in a large-scale laboratory set up. Once the mixture is released and it moves down the inclined channel, measurements allow us to determine the bulk density evolution throughout the debris flow. Flow depths are determined by ultrasonic pulse reflection, and the mass is measured with a total normal force sensor. The data were obtained at 50 Hz. The initial two phase material was composed of 350 kg debris with water content of 40%. A very fine pebble with mean particle diameter of 3 mm, particle density of 2760 kg/m³ and bulk density of 1400 kg/m³ in dry condition was chosen as the solid material. Measurements reveal that the debris bulk density remains high from the head to the middle of the debris body whereas it drops substantially at the tail. This indicates lower water content at the tail, compared to the head and the middle portion of the debris body. This means that the solid and fluid fractions are varying strongly in a non-linear manner along the flow path, and from the head to the tail of the debris mass. Importantly, this spatial-temporal density variation plays a crucial role in determining the impact forces associated with the dynamics of the flow. Our setup allows for investigating different two phase material compositions, including large fluid fractions, with high resolutions. The considered experimental set up may enable us to transfer the observed phenomena to natural large-scale events. Furthermore, the measurement data allows evaluating results of numerical two-phase mass flow simulations. These experiments are parts of the project avaflow.org that intends to develop a GIS-based open source computational tool to describe wide spectrum of rapid geophysical mass flows, including avalanches and real two-phase debris flows down complex natural

  9. TRAC laboratory monitoring of Chernobyl radioactive debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigg, R.A.

    1986-06-09

    A severe accident occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant number 4 in the Soviet Union on April 25, 1986. An explosion released large amounts of radioactive debris, primarily fission products, to the atmosphere. As winds carried debris from the Soviet Union, scientists in Europe and the United States reported detecting fission product activities in air samples. Monitoring by the Tracking Radioactive Atmospheric Contaminants (TRAC) mobile laboratory showed concentrations in the Southeastern United States were well below those considered hazardous. This document provides details of this monitoring effort.

  10. Patterns In Debris Disks: No Planets Required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Debris disks like those around Fomalhaut and Beta Pictoris show striking dust patterns often attributed to hidden exoplanets. These patterns have been crucial for constraining the masses and orbits of these planets. But adding a bit of gas to our models of debris disks--too little gas to detect--seems to alter this interpretation. Small amounts of gas lead to new dynamical instabilities that may mimic the narrow eccentric rings and other structures planets would create in a gas-free disk. Can we still use dust patterns to find hidden exoplanets?

  11. Discrete Element Modelling of Floating Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, Samantha; Liang, Qiuhua; Parkin, Geoff; Large, Andy; Rouainia, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Flash flooding is characterised by high velocity flows which impact vulnerable catchments with little warning time and as such, result in complex flow dynamics which are difficult to replicate through modelling. The impacts of flash flooding can be made yet more severe by the transport of both natural and anthropogenic debris, ranging from tree trunks to vehicles, wheelie bins and even storage containers, the effects of which have been clearly evident during recent UK flooding. This cargo of debris can have wide reaching effects and result in actual flood impacts which diverge from those predicted. A build-up of debris may lead to partial channel blockage and potential flow rerouting through urban centres. Build-up at bridges and river structures also leads to increased hydraulic loading which may result in damage and possible structural failure. Predicting the impacts of debris transport; however, is difficult as conventional hydrodynamic modelling schemes do not intrinsically include floating debris within their calculations. Subsequently a new tool has been developed using an emerging approach, which incorporates debris transport through the coupling of two existing modelling techniques. A 1D hydrodynamic modelling scheme has here been coupled with a 2D discrete element scheme to form a new modelling tool which predicts the motion and flow-interaction of floating debris. Hydraulic forces arising from flow around the object are applied to instigate its motion. Likewise, an equivalent opposing force is applied to fluid cells, enabling backwater effects to be simulated. Shock capturing capabilities make the tool applicable to predicting the complex flow dynamics associated with flash flooding. The modelling scheme has been applied to experimental case studies where cylindrical wooden dowels are transported by a dam-break wave. These case studies enable validation of the tool's shock capturing capabilities and the coupling technique applied between the two numerical

  12. Debris Flow Dam Formation in Southeast Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zunlan; WU Jishan; GENG Xueyong

    2005-01-01

    Glaciers with their deposits abound in the alpine areas of Southeast Tibet. Large debris flows occur frequently from these deposits and form dams that block streams. In this paper, 3 events of large debris flows reported in Peilong Valley located in Southeast Tibet, and which resulted 2 blocking dams resulted, are discussed in details, focusing on the major factors controlling dam formation. The results shows that the first surge group caused by snow and ice avalanches, ice-lake breaks, and large-scale landslides, with a high peak discharge and high velocity, and an abundance of boulders, are most likely to form blocking dams.

  13. Massive thin accretion discs. Pt. 2; Polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laor, A.; Netzer, H. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)); Piran, T. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Racah Inst. of Physics)

    1990-02-15

    Thin accretion discs around massive black holes are believed to produce much of the observed optical-UV emission from AGN. Classical calculations predict that this radiation is highly polarized at large inclination angles, in contrast to observations of quasars and Seyfert galaxies. We have calculated the spectrum and polarization of such discs using an improved radiative transfer method with all the relevant opacity sources, and a full general relativistic treatment of the radiation propagation. (author).

  14. Lyman edges in AGN accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerny, B. (Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warsaw (Poland)); Pojmanski, G. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Obserwatorium Astronomiczne)

    1990-07-01

    We show that the basic difference in the two principal approaches to predictions of the Lyman edge in an accretion disc lies in the implicit assumption about the density of the radiating gas. Independent from the details, models predict a broad range of the edge sizes, both in absorption and in emission. Observed spectra do not exhibit any strong feature at 912 A but may still be consistent with an accretion disc mechanism if more advanced theory is developed. (author).

  15. The Annulus Property of Simple Holomorphic Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Zehmisch, Kai

    2010-01-01

    We show that any simple holomorphic disc admits the annulus property, i.e., each interior point is surrounded by an arbitrary small annulus consisting entirely of injective points. As an application we show that interior singularities of holomorphic discs can be resolved after slight perturbation of the involved almost complex structure. Moreover, for boundary points the analogue notion, the half-annulus property, is introduced and studied in detail.

  16. The annulus property of simple holomorphic discs

    OpenAIRE

    Zehmisch, Kai

    2013-01-01

    We show that any simple holomorphic disc admits the annulus property, i.e., each interior point is surrounded by an arbitrary small annulus consisting entirely of injective points. As an application we show that interior singularities of holomorphic discs can be resolved after slight perturbation of the almost complex structure. Moreover, for boundary points the analogue notion, the half-annulus property, is introduced and studied in detail.

  17. How to design a planetary system for different scattering outcomes: giant impact sweet spot, maximizing exocomets, scattered discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, M. C.; Bonsor, A.; Jackson, A. P.; Marino, S.; Shannon, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers the dynamics of the scattering of planetesimals or planetary embryos by a planet on a circumstellar orbit. We classify six regions in the planet's mass versus semimajor axis parameter space according to the dominant outcome for scattered objects: ejected, accreted, remaining, escaping, Oort Cloud, and depleted Oort Cloud. We use these outcomes to consider which planetary system architectures maximize the observability of specific signatures, given that signatures should be detected first around systems with optimal architectures (if such systems exist in nature). Giant impact debris is most readily detectable for 0.1-10 M⊕ planets at 1-5 au, depending on the detection method and spectral type. While A stars have putative giant impact debris at 4-6 au consistent with this sweet spot, that of FGK stars is typically ≪1 au contrary to expectations; an absence of 1-3 au giant impact debris could indicate a low frequency of terrestrial planets there. Three principles maximize the cometary influx from exo-Kuiper belts: a chain of closely separated planets interior to the belt, none of which is a Jupiter-like ejector; planet masses not increasing strongly with distance (for a net inward torque on comets); and ongoing replenishment of comets, possibly by embedded low-mass planets. A high Oort Cloud comet influx requires no ejectors and architectures that maximize the Oort Cloud population. Cold debris discs are usually considered classical Kuiper belt analogues. Here we consider the possibility of detecting scattered disc analogues, which could be betrayed by a broad radial profile and lack of small grains, as well as spherical 100-1000 au mini-Oort Clouds. Some implications for escaping planets around young stars, detached planets akin to Sedna, and the formation of super-Earths are also discussed.

  18. Enabling Large-body Active Debris Removal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Research suggests that: (1) orbital debris has reached the point that, even with no future launches, collisions among large-body debris will lead to unstable growth...

  19. Gene expression profile analysis of human intervertebral disc degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Kai Chen; Dajiang Wu; Xiaodong Zhu; Haijian Ni; Xianzhao Wei; Ningfang Mao; Yang Xie; Yunfei Niu; Ming Li

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we used microarray analysis to investigate the biogenesis and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration. The gene expression profiles of 37 disc tissue samples obtained from patients with herniated discs and degenerative disc disease collected by the National Cancer Institute Cooperative Tissue Network were analyzed. Differentially expressed genes between more and less degenerated discs were identified by significant analysis of microarray. A total of 555 genes were signi...

  20. Clumpy Disc and Bulge Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, J; Tissera, P; Michel-Dansac, L

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of hydrodynamical/Nbody controlled simulations of isolated gas rich galaxies that self-consistently include SN feedback and a detailed chemical evolution model, both tested in cosmological simulations. The initial conditions are motivated by the observed star forming galaxies at z ~ 2-3. We find that the presence of a multiphase interstellar media in our models promotes the growth of disc instability favouring the formation of clumps which in general, are not easily disrupted on timescales compared to the migration time. We show that stellar clumps migrate towards the central region and contribute to form a classical-like bulge with a Sersic index, n > 2. Our physically-motivated Supernova feedback has a mild influence on clump survival and evolution, partially limiting the mass growth of clumps as the energy released per Supernova event is increased, with the consequent flattening of the bulge profile. This regulation does not prevent the building of a classical-like bulge even for the most ...

  1. Radio Monitoring of Protoplanetary Discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubach, C.; Maddison, S. T.; Wright, C. M.; Wilner, D. J.; Lommen, D. J. P.; Koribalski, B.

    2017-01-01

    Protoplanetary disc systems observed at radio wavelengths often show excess emission above that expected from a simple extrapolation of thermal dust emission observed at short millimetre wavelengths. Monitoring the emission at radio wavelengths can be used to help disentangle the physical mechanisms responsible for this excess, including free-free emission from a wind or jet, and chromospheric emission associated with stellar activity. We present new results from a radio monitoring survey conducted with Australia Telescope Compact Array over the course of several years with observation intervals spanning days, months and years, where the flux variability of 11 T Tauri stars in the Chamaeleon and Lupus star forming regions was measured at 7 and 15 mm and 3 and 6 cm. Results show that for most sources are variable to some degree at 7 mm, indicating the presence of emission mechanisms other than thermal dust in some sources. Additionally, evidence of grain growth to cm-sized pebbles was found for some sources that also have signs of variable flux at 7 mm. We conclude that multiple processes contributing to the emission are common in T Tauri stars at 7 mm and beyond, and that a detection at a single epoch at radio wavelengths should not be used to determine all processes contributing to the emission.

  2. Controls on debris flow bulking in proglacial gully networks on Mount Rainier, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, N. T.; Meigs, A.; Grant, G. E.; Kennard, P.

    2012-12-01

    Conversion of floodwaters to debris flows due to sediment bulking continues to be a poorly understood phenomenon. This study examines the initiation zone of a series of six debris flows that originated in proglacial areas of catchments on the flank of Mount Rainier during one storm in 2006. One-meter spatial resolution aerial photographs and LiDAR DEMs acquired before and after the storm reveal the lack of a single mass failure to explain the debris flow deposits. Rather, the imagery show appreciable gully widening along reaches up to approximately 1.5 km in length. Based on gully discharges estimated from rainfall rates and estimates of sediment contribution from gully wall width change, we find that the sediment volumes contributed from gully walls are sufficient to bulk floodwaters up to debris flow concentrations. Points in gullies where width change began (upstream limit) in 2006 have a power law trend (R2 = 0.58) in terms of slope-drainage area. Reaches with noticeable width change, which we refer to as bulking reaches (BR), plot along a similar trend with greater drainage areas and gentler slopes. We then extracted slope and drainage area of all proglacial drainage networks to examine differences in morphology between debris flow basins (DFB) and non-debris flow basins (NDFB), hypothesizing that DFB would have a greater portion of their drainage networks with similar morphology to BR than NDFB. A comparison of total network length with greater slope and area than BR reveals that the two basins types are not statistically different. Lengths of the longest reaches with greater slope and drainage area than the BR trend, however, are statistically longer in DFB than in the NDFBs (p<0.05). These results suggest that debris flow initiation by sediment bulking does not operate as a simple threshold phenomenon in slope-area space. Instead debris flow initiation via bulking depends upon slope, drainage area, and gully length. We suspect the dependence on length

  3. Turbulent drag reduction through oscillating discs

    CERN Document Server

    Wise, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The changes of a turbulent channel flow subjected to oscillations of wall flush-mounted rigid discs are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number is $R_\\tau$=$180$, based on the friction velocity of the stationary-wall case and the half channel height. The primary effect of the wall forcing is the sustained reduction of wall-shear stress, which reaches a maximum of 20%. A parametric study on the disc diameter, maximum tip velocity, and oscillation period is presented, with the aim to identify the optimal parameters which guarantee maximum drag reduction and maximum net energy saving, computed by taking into account the power spent to actuate the discs. This may be positive and reaches 6%. The Rosenblat viscous pump flow is used to predict the power spent for disc motion in the turbulent channel flow and to estimate localized and transient regions over the disc surface subjected to the turbulent regenerative braking effect, for which the wall turbulence exerts work on the discs. The...

  4. The Diversity of Thick Galactic Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Kasparova, Anastasia V; Chilingarian, Igor V; Silchenko, Olga K; Moiseev, Alexey V; Borisov, Svyatoslav B

    2016-01-01

    Although thick stellar discs are detected in nearly all edge-on disc galaxies, their formation scenarios still remain a matter of debate. Due to observational difficulties, there is a lack of information about their stellar populations. Using the Russian 6-m telescope BTA we collected deep spectra of thick discs in three edge-on S0-a disc galaxies located in different environments: NGC4111 in a dense group, NGC4710 in the Virgo cluster, and NGC5422 in a sparse group. We see intermediate age (4-5 Gyr) metal rich ([Fe/H] $\\sim$ -0.2 - 0.0 dex) stellar populations in NGC4111 and NGC4710. On the other hand, NGC5422 does not harbour young stars, its disc is thick and old (10 Gyr), without evidence for a second component, and its $\\alpha$-element abundance suggests a 1.5-2 Gyr long formation epoch implying its formation at high redshift. Our results suggest the diversity of thick disc formation scenarios.

  5. Wet and Dry Tribological Behaviors of Circular Islandic Protrusion Patterns on M2 Steel Discs under Spinning Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hing-Yin MA; DONG Guangneng; LI Jian; MENG HUA; Chiu-Kam MOK

    2008-01-01

    Under spinning conditions, lubricant on islandic spot patterned M2 steel disc experiences centrifugal and tangential force components. Depending upon the relative position of the spots and the flow of lubricant, accumulation of lubricant in front of patterned islandic spots creates thrusting to mating part and subsequently reduces contact between the mating couple. Whilst wear debris is likely to be spun off the plateau of the spots to their neighbouring valleys so as to reduce wear.Hence, it gives favorable tribological characteristics. Aiming at verifying such mechanisms, studies were performed on M2 steel disc specimens slid with ASSAB 17 tool steel pin. The M2 steel disc specimens were respectively (I) machined with non-patterned (NP), (ii) etched to produce in-lined (INE) islandic patterns, and (iii) etched to produce staggered (STE) islandic spot patterns. Results indicated that the INE patterned discs gave most favorable wear characteristics, the NP of the worse characteristics whilst the STE ranged in the middle. However, the actual contact mechanism leads to the descending sequence of favorable friction behaviors nominally as: NP, INE and STE.

  6. Influence of fine sediment on the fluidity of debris flows

    OpenAIRE

    HOTTA, Norifumi; Kaneko, Takahiro; Iwata, Tomoyuki; Nishimoto, Haruo

    2013-01-01

    Debris flows include a great diversity of grain sizes with inherent features such as inverse grading, particle size segregation, and liquefaction of fine sediment. The liquefaction of fine sediment affects the fluidity of debris flows, although the behavior and influence of fine sediment in debris flows have not been examined sufficiently. This study used flume tests to detect the effect of fine sediment on the fluidity of laboratory debris flows consisting of particles with various diameters...

  7. Debris flow relationships in the Central Spanish Pyrenees

    OpenAIRE

    Beguería, S.; A. Lorente; Garcia-Ruiz, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Debris flows represent the most active geomorphic risk in mountainous areas, affecting infrastructures, human settlements and touristic resorts (Takahashi et al., 1981). For this reason, much effort has been put in assessing where debris flows occur and ranking the factors that trigger them, but also in defining two essential parameters in establishing debris flow hazards: what is the distance travelled by debris flows (especially the runout distance), and what is the volume of material carri...

  8. Identification of mechanisms for landslide type initiation of debris flows

    OpenAIRE

    Klubertanz, Georg; Laloui, Lyesse; Vulliet, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    The modelling of debris flow initiation in slopes is addressed in this paper. First, possible factors governing debris flow initiation are established. Then, a coupled hydro-mechanical model for deformable porous media with two pore fluids that is used to assess the problem of the debris flow initiation in slopes is briefly outlined. Various ways to identify failure and to approach the transition of the failed mass into a debris flow are discussed in the framework of small strain theory and e...

  9. CD, DVD, and Blu-Ray Disc Diffraction with a Laser Ray Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWeerd, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    A compact disc (CD) can be used as a diffraction grating, even though its track consists of a series of pits, not a continuous groove. Previous authors described how to measure the track spacing on a CD using an incident laser beam normal to the surface or one at an oblique angle. In both cases, the diffraction pattern was projected on a screen…

  10. CD, DVD, and Blu-Ray Disc Diffraction with a Laser Ray Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWeerd, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    A compact disc (CD) can be used as a diffraction grating, even though its track consists of a series of pits, not a continuous groove. Previous authors described how to measure the track spacing on a CD using an incident laser beam normal to the surface or one at an oblique angle. In both cases, the diffraction pattern was projected on a screen…

  11. Dynamic, six-axis stiffness matrix characteristics of the intact intervertebral disc and a disc replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsgrove, Timothy P; Gill, Harinderjit S; Miles, Anthony W; Gheduzzi, Sabina

    2015-11-01

    Thorough pre-testing is critical in assessing the likely in vivo performance of spinal devices prior to clinical use. However, there is a lack of data available concerning the dynamic testing of lumbar (porcine model) total disc replacements in all six axes under preload conditions. The aim of this study was to provide new data comparing porcine lumbar spinal specimen stiffness between the intact state and after the implantation of an unconstrained total disc replacement, in 6 degrees of freedom. The dynamic, stiffness matrix testing of six porcine lumbar isolated disc specimens was completed using triangle waves at a test frequency of 0.1 Hz. An axial preload of 500 N was applied during all testing. Specimens were tested both in the intact condition and after the implantation of the total disc replacement. Sixteen key stiffness terms were identified for the comparison of the intact and total disc replacement specimens, comprising the 6 principal stiffness terms and 10 key off-axis stiffness terms. The total disc replacement specimens were significantly different to the intact specimens in 12 of these key terms including all six principal stiffness terms. The implantation of the total disc replacement resulted in a mean reduction in the principal stiffness terms of 100%, 91%, and 98% in lateral bending, flexion-extension, and axial rotation, respectively. The novel findings of this study have demonstrated that the unconstrained, low-friction total disc replacement does not replicate the stiffness of the intact specimens. It is likely that other low-friction total disc replacements would produce similar results due to stiffness being actively minimised as part of the design of low-friction devices, without the introduction of stiffening elements or mechanisms to more accurately replicate the mechanical properties of the natural intervertebral disc. This study has demonstrated, for the first time, a method for the quantitative comparative mechanical function

  12. The role of disc self-gravity in circumbinary planet systems - I. Disc structure and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Matthew M.; Pierens, Arnaud; Nelson, Richard P.

    2017-03-01

    We present the results of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of self-gravitating circumbinary discs around binaries whose parameters match those of the circumbinary planet-hosting systems Kepler-16, Kepler-34 and Kepler-35. Previous work has shown that non-self-gravitating discs in these systems form an eccentric precessing inner cavity due to tidal truncation by the binary, and planets which form at large radii migrate until stalling at this cavity. Whilst this scenario appears to provide a natural explanation for the observed orbital locations of the circumbinary planets, previous simulations have failed to match the observed planet orbital parameters. The aim of this work is to examine the role of self-gravity in modifying circumbinary disc structure as a function of disc mass, prior to considering the evolution of embedded circumbinary planets. In agreement with previous work, we find that for disc masses between one and five times the minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN), disc self-gravity affects modest changes in the structure and evolution of circumbinary discs. Increasing the disc mass to 10 or 20 MMSN leads to two dramatic changes in disc structure. First, the scale of the inner cavity shrinks substantially, bringing its outer edge closer to the binary. Secondly, in addition to the eccentric inner cavity, additional precessing eccentric ring-like features develop in the outer regions of the discs. If planet formation starts early in the disc lifetime, these changes will have a significant impact on the formation and evolution of planets and precursor material.

  13. Conceptualizing an economically, legally, and politically viable active debris removal option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuelli, M.; Federico, G.; Loughman, J.; Prasad, D.; Chow, T.; Rathnasabapathy, M.

    2014-11-01

    It has become increasingly clear in recent years that the issue of space debris, particularly in low-Earth orbit, can no longer be ignored or simply mitigated. Orbital debris currently threatens safe space flight for both satellites and humans aboard the International Space Station. Additionally, orbital debris might impact Earth upon re-entry, endangering human lives and damaging the environment with toxic materials. In summary, orbital debris seriously jeopardizes the future not only of human presence in space, but also of human safety on Earth. While international efforts to mitigate the current situation and limit the creation of new debris are useful, recent studies predicting debris evolution have indicated that these will not be enough to ensure humanity's access to and use of the near-Earth environment in the long-term. Rather, active debris removal (ADR) must be pursued if we are to continue benefiting from and conducting space activities. While the concept of ADR is not new, it has not yet been implemented. This is not just because of the technical feasibility of such a scheme, but also because of the host of economic, legal/regulatory, and political issues associated with debris remediation. The costs of ADR are not insignificant and, in today's restrictive fiscal climate, are unlikely/to be covered by any single actor. Similarly, ADR concepts bring up many unresolved questions about liability, the protection of proprietary information, safety, and standards. In addition, because of the dual use nature of ADR technologies, any venture will necessarily require political considerations. Despite the many unanswered questions surrounding ADR, it is an endeavor worth pursuing if we are to continue relying on space activities for a variety of critical daily needs and services. Moreover, we cannot ignore the environmental implications that an unsustainable use of space will imply for life on Earth in the long run. This paper aims to explore some of these

  14. Uncertainties in Predicting Debris Flow Hazards Following Wildfire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyde, K.D.; Riley, Karin; Stoof, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Wildfire increases the probability of debris flows posing hazardous conditions where values-at-risk exist downstream of burned areas. Conditions and processes leading to postfire debris flows usually follow a general sequence defined here as the postfire debris flow hazard cascade: biophysical setti

  15. Monitoring the abundance of plastic debris in the marine environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryan, P.G.; Moore, C.J. C.J.; Franeker, van J.A.; Moloney, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Plastic debris has significant environmental and economic impacts in marine systems. Monitoring is crucial to assess the efficacy of measures implemented to reduce the abundance of plastic debris, but it is complicated by large spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the amounts of plastic debris and

  16. Provision, transport and deposition of debris in urban waterways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deonie Allen; Scott Arthur; Nicolas Wallerstien; Janice Blanc; Heather Haynes

    2015-01-01

    abstract The transport of woody debris from urban surfaces, through local urban waterways, to constriction and blockage risk locations is not well understood. Flume trials have identified debris and water-course dimensions as influential factors on debris movement, and large woody debris movement has been traced in the natural rural environment using time series photography, active transponders, and field surveys. Using novel passive transponder technology, small woody debris has been traced through an urban case study watercourse to establish key influential factors on urban debris transport. Through incorporating urban debris transport detail into the source and deposition process, a complete picture of urban debris transport can be created, supporting effective culvert and trash screen design, watercourse maintenance and blockage risk assessment. This case study highlights that factors beyond watercourse depth and velocity are influential in debris movement within an urban watercourse. Debris dimension and source location upstream are shown to significantly affect the potential for debris to reach a downstream constriction, illustrating a possible distance limitation in nuisance flow debris blockage risk.

  17. On the Solar System-Debris Disk Connecction

    OpenAIRE

    Moro-Martin, Amaya

    2007-01-01

    This paper emphasizes the connection between solar and extra-solar debris disks: how models and observations of the Solar System are helping us understand the debris disk phenomenon, and vice versa, how debris disks are helping us place our Solar System into context.

  18. ROGER a potential orbital space debris removal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Juergen; Bischof, Bernd; Foth, W.-O.; -J., J.; Günther

    The previous activities in the field of On Orbit Servicing studied in the 1990's included in partic-ular the capability of vehicles in GEO to capture and support satellites (mainly communication satellites) to enable repair and continuation of operations, and finally the controlled transfer the target into a permanent graveyard orbit. The specific capture tools for these applications were mostly based on robotic systems to capture and fix the target under specific dynamic constraints (e.g. slowly tumbling target) without damage, and to allow the stabilization, re-orientation and potential repair of the target and subsequent release or transport to the final disposal orbit. Due to the drastically increasing number of debris particularly in the Low Earth Orbits (SSO) the active debris removal is now necessary to counteract to the predicted debris production cascade (Kessler Syndrome), which means the pollution of the total sphere in low earth orbit and not only the SSO area. In most of the debris congresses it was recommended to start removal with the still integrated systems as soon as possible. In the case of large debris objects, the soft capture system can be replaced by a simpler and robust system able to operate from a safe distance to the target and flexible enough to capture and hold different types of targets such as deactivated and/or defective satellites, upper stages and big fragments. These nominally non -cooperative targets might be partially destroyed by the capture process, but the production of additional debris shall be avoided. A major argument for the commercial applications is a multi-target mission potential, which is possible at GEO because the transfer propellant requirement to the disposal orbit and the return to the orbit of the next potential target is relative low (orbits with similar inclination and altitude). The proposed ROGER system is designed as a spacecraft with rendezvous capabilities including inspection in the vicinity of the

  19. Europium-155 in Debris from Nuclear Weapons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarkrog, Asker; Lippert, Jørgen Emil

    1967-01-01

    The lithium-drifted germanium detector enables determination of europium-155 on a routine basis in environmental samples contaminated with debris from nuclear weapons. From measurements of europium-155, cesium-144, and strontium-90 in air filters collected between 1961 and 1966, the yield...

  20. Spacecraft Robustness to Orbital Debris: Guidelines & Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, S.; Legloire, D.; Tromba, A.; Tholot, M.; Nold, O.

    2013-09-01

    The ever increasing number of orbital debris has already led the space community to implement guidelines and requirements for "cleaner" and "safer" space operations as non-debris generating missions and end of mission disposal in order to get preserved orbits rid of space junks. It is nowadays well-known that man-made orbital debris impacts are now a higher threat than natural micro-meteoroids and that recent events intentionally or accidentally generated so many new debris that may initiate a cascade chain effect known as "the Kessler Syndrome" potentially jeopardizing the useful orbits.The main recommendations on satellite design is to demonstrate an acceptable Probability of Non-Penetration (PNP) with regard to small population (risks with the introduction of new of probability and criticality classification scales. * Examples of design risks assessment with regard to the specific MMOD impact risks. * Lessons learnt on robustness survivability of systems (materials, shieldings, rules) coming from other industrial domains (automotive, military vehicles) * Guidelines and Recommendations implementable on satellite systems and mechanical architecture.