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Sample records for danish-chinese collaboration project

  1. Wind energy development in China (WED) — The Danish-Chinese collaboration project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhao; Rosenberg, H.; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the large scale bilateral development program- the Danish-Chinese wind energy development program (WED). The paper starts with overview of electric energy production and consumption in the two counties with special focus on wind energy status. Next, the detailed objectives...

  2. Collaborative Contracting in Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suprapto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Project practitioners have increasingly recognized the importance of collaborative relationships to ensure successful executions of projects. However, the ability to sustain and consistenly drive real collaborative attitudes and behavior for achieving the desired outcomes remains of enduring

  3. Advanced engineering environment collaboration project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamph, Jane Ann; Pomplun, Alan R.; Kiba, Grant W.; Dutra, Edward G.; Dankiewicz, Robert J.; Marburger, Scot J.

    2008-12-01

    The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a model for an engineering design and communications system that will enhance project collaboration throughout the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) worked together on a prototype project to evaluate the suitability of a portion of PTC's Windchill 9.0 suite of data management, design and collaboration tools as the basis for an AEE. The AEE project team implemented Windchill 9.0 development servers in both classified and unclassified domains and used them to test and evaluate the Windchill tool suite relative to the needs of the NWC using weapons project use cases. A primary deliverable was the development of a new real time collaborative desktop design and engineering process using PDMLink (data management tool), Pro/Engineer (mechanical computer aided design tool) and ProductView Lite (visualization tool). Additional project activities included evaluations of PTC's electrical computer aided design, visualization, and engineering calculations applications. This report documents the AEE project work to share information and lessons learned with other NWC sites. It also provides PTC with recommendations for improving their products for NWC applications.

  4. Advanced engineering environment collaboration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamph, Jane Ann; Pomplun, Alan R.; Kiba, Grant W.; Dutra, Edward G.; Dankiewicz, Robert J.; Marburger, Scot J.

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a model for an engineering design and communications system that will enhance project collaboration throughout the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) worked together on a prototype project to evaluate the suitability of a portion of PTC's Windchill 9.0 suite of data management, design and collaboration tools as the basis for an AEE. The AEE project team implemented Windchill 9.0 development servers in both classified and unclassified domains and used them to test and evaluate the Windchill tool suite relative to the needs of the NWC using weapons project use cases. A primary deliverable was the development of a new real time collaborative desktop design and engineering process using PDMLink (data management tool), Pro/Engineer (mechanical computer aided design tool) and ProductView Lite (visualization tool). Additional project activities included evaluations of PTC's electrical computer aided design, visualization, and engineering calculations applications. This report documents the AEE project work to share information and lessons learned with other NWC sites. It also provides PTC with recommendations for improving their products for NWC applications

  5. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) demonstrating using predictive computational...

  6. On Services for Collaborative Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollus, Martin; Jansson, Kim; Karvonen, Iris; Uoti, Mikko; Riikonen, Heli

    This paper presents an approach for collaborative project management. The focus is on the support of collaboration, communication and trust. Several project management tools exist for monitoring and control the performance of project tasks. However, support of important intangible assets is more difficult to find. In the paper a leadership approach is identified as a management means and the use of new IT technology, especially social media for support of leadership in project management is discussed.

  7. Collaborative Elder Abuse Prevention Project Quarterly Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Garry L.

    The Texas Department of Human Services, in collaboration with 13 other public and private organizations, co-sponsored a statewide collaborative elder abuse prevention project, to prevent abuse of elderly and disabled adults. The goal of this project is to develop a comprehensive, long-range plan for the prevention of elder abuse, a method for…

  8. Configurable Project Collaboration Portal, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SplashNote Systems is proposing to develop a more effective and innovative approach to project collaboration in distributed teams. The proposed system uniquely gives...

  9. Project Learning and Virtual Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fibiger, Bo; Nielsen, Janni; Sorensen, Elsebeth

    2005-01-01

    to the modularity and flexibility that characterize the study and allow admission of part-time students, full-time students and students who only sign up for one accredited module. The methodology will be illustrated through empirical snapshots from selected modules in the start-up phase, and the focus...... will be directed towards problems experienced by the students. From an analytical perspective, the paper will identify and discuss fundamental problems related to the organization, flexibility, and implementation of project pedagogy online. MIL is organized around ICT and Learning and the study theme focuses...... on ICT and Learning. In addition, MIL provides a learning space where practice is under constant negotiation and reconstruction as an inherent, integrated part of the learning process. Consequently, we argue that MIL may be seen as an example of best practice in blended learning....

  10. Fostering Radical Collaboration: The OCUL Collaborative Futures Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Ervin-Ward

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper was first given as a poster presentation at the Ontario Library Association Super Conference in 2016. Building on decades of successful cooperative work, the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL Collaborative Futures project aims to select and implement a shared next-generation library services platform (LSP, to manage and preserve print resources in a sustainable system, and to effectively and efficiently use a shared system for the management of electronic and print resources. Phase One of this project was completed in Summer 2015. This is its story. Cet article a été présenté pour la première fois comme une présentation d’affiches à la Super Conference de l’Association des bibliothèques de l’Ontario en 2016. Basant sur des décennies de collaboration réussie, le projet Collaborative Futures du Conseil des bibliothèques universitaires de l’Ontario vise à sélectionner et à mettre en oeuvre une plate-forme des services de bibliothèque de dernière génération, à gérer et à préserver des ressources imprimées dans un système viable, et à utiliser efficacement un système partagé pour la gestion des ressources imprimées et numériques. La première phase de ce projet a été complétée pendant l’été 2015. Ceci est son histoire.

  11. National Storage Laboratory: a collaborative research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Robert A.; Hulen, Harry; Watson, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    The grand challenges of science and industry that are driving computing and communications have created corresponding challenges in information storage and retrieval. An industry-led collaborative project has been organized to investigate technology for storage systems that will be the future repositories of national information assets. Industry participants are IBM Federal Systems Company, Ampex Recording Systems Corporation, General Atomics DISCOS Division, IBM ADSTAR, Maximum Strategy Corporation, Network Systems Corporation, and Zitel Corporation. Industry members of the collaborative project are funding their own participation. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory through its National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) will participate in the project as the operational site and provider of applications. The expected result is the creation of a National Storage Laboratory to serve as a prototype and demonstration facility. It is expected that this prototype will represent a significant advance in the technology for distributed storage systems capable of handling gigabyte-class files at gigabit-per-second data rates. Specifically, the collaboration expects to make significant advances in hardware, software, and systems technology in four areas of need, (1) network-attached high performance storage; (2) multiple, dynamic, distributed storage hierarchies; (3) layered access to storage system services; and (4) storage system management.

  12. CERAPP: Collaborative estrogen receptor activity prediction project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Kamel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Rybacka, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    ). Risk assessors need tools to prioritize chemicals for evaluation in costly in vivo tests, for instance, within the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. oBjectives: We describe a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project...... States and Europe to predict ER activity of a common set of 32,464 chemical structures. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models and docking approaches were employed, mostly using a common training set of 1,677 chemical structures provided by the U.S. EPA, to build a total of 40 categorical......: Individual model scores ranged from 0.69 to 0.85, showing high prediction reliabilities. Out of the 32,464 chemicals, the consensus model predicted 4,001 chemicals (12.3%) as high priority actives and 6,742 potential actives (20.8%) to be considered for further testing. conclusion: This project demonstrated...

  13. Managing Operating Procedures in Distributed Collaborative Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hool, A.; Beuzelin Ollivier, M.-G.; Roubert, F.

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, large distributed collaborative projects have become very prominent in scientific research, allowing exchanges between laboratories located in different institutions and countries and between various domains of competence. Particularly the work on nanotoxicity - a field which has only been under investigation for a few years and is still lacking regulatory framework - highlighted the need for well-controlled methods, as well as rules for the handling and disposal of used materials. To obtain comparable and reproducible results of experiments conducted in a distributed context, the standardisation and proper documentation of the applied methods is crucial. The European project NanoDiaRA, whose aim is to develop nanoparticles and biomarkers for the early diagnosis of inflammatory disease, faces this situation as it involves 15 European partners and brings together different scientific cultures and professional backgrounds. Protocols especially developed for Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and a management system were designed and implemented within the NanoDiaRA project to fulfil those needs. The main goals were the establishment of standardised Standard Operating Procedures assuring transparency and reproducibility and the provision of access to these protocols to every project partner, as well as their clear allocation to carry out precise measurements and production steps.

  14. Managing Operating Procedures in Distributed Collaborative Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hool, A; Ollivier, M-G Beuzelin; Roubert, F

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, large distributed collaborative projects have become very prominent in scientific research, allowing exchanges between laboratories located in different institutions and countries and between various domains of competence. Particularly the work on nanotoxicity – a field which has only been under investigation for a few years and is still lacking regulatory framework – highlighted the need for well-controlled methods, as well as rules for the handling and disposal of used materials. To obtain comparable and reproducible results of experiments conducted in a distributed context, the standardisation and proper documentation of the applied methods is crucial. The European project NanoDiaRA, whose aim is to develop nanoparticles and biomarkers for the early diagnosis of inflammatory disease, faces this situation as it involves 15 European partners and brings together different scientific cultures and professional backgrounds. Protocols especially developed for Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and a management system were designed and implemented within the NanoDiaRA project to fulfil those needs. The main goals were the establishment of standardised Standard Operating Procedures assuring transparency and reproducibility and the provision of access to these protocols to every project partner, as well as their clear allocation to carry out precise measurements and production steps.

  15. Persuading Collaboration: Analysing Persuasion in Online Collaboration Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McHugh, Ronan; Larsen, Birger

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose that online collaborative production sites can be fruitfully analysed in terms of the general theoretical framework of Persuasive Design. OpenStreetMap and The Pirate Bay are used as examples of collaborative production sites. Results of a quantitative analysis of persuas...

  16. NSDD LBNL Isotopes Project Collaboration Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, R. B. [Isotopes Project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA (United States)

    2013-08-15

    The Isotopes Project group currently consists of five scientists and a postdoctoral student. It also leads the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF) collaboration consisting of over 20 scientists at ten universities and laboratories. The group is responsible for the evaluation of mass chains in the region 21-30. EGAF evaluations: The Isotope Project's primary effort is to measure and evaluate neutron capture {gamma}-ray cross section data for all stable and selected radioactive isotopes. These data include prompt and delayed {gamma}-ray cross sections, {delta}{sub {gamma}}, total thermal radiative neutron cross sections, {delta}{sub 0}, and neutron separation energies, S{sub n}. The first EGAF elemental {gamma}-ray cross section library was published as the result of an IAEA CRP and the neutron separation energies were supplied to the Atomic Mass Evaluation project for inclusion in their most recent evaluation. EGAF is being updated with new experiments on enriched isotopes using the Budapest and Munich FRM II guided neutron beam facilities. New measurements have been performed on the isotopes {sup 151,153}Eu, {sup 155,157}Gd, {sup 180,182,183,184,186}W, {sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. Additional measurements have been approved for 2013 on {sup 70,72,73,74,76}Ge, {sup 90,91,92,94,96}Zr, and {sup 238}U.

  17. Online Project Management for Dynamic e-Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia RUSU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Today's collaborative projects demand efficient and productive software application tools for the workplace that will bring remote teams together to get the work done. Dynamic e-collaboration is a necessity for virtual relations and business agreements. It depends on two distinct factors: trust and need. This paper presents a way to manage remote teams using a web application developed with ColMap model of project management in an IT company. The information exposed and shared applications with partners in collaborative projects are based on RBAC. Group collaboration and management software has been proven to successfully manage and coordinate projects.

  18. International and interlaboratory collaboration on Neutron Science Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    For effectiveness of facility development for Neutron Science Projects at JAERI, international and interlaboratory collaborations have been extensively planned and promoted, especially in the areas of accelerator and target technology. Here status of two collaborations relevant to a spallation neutron target development is highlighted from those collaborations. The two collaborations are experiments on BNL-AGS spallation target simulation and PSI materials irradiation. Both are planned to start in spring of 1997. (author)

  19. Enhancing Integrative Motivation: The Japanese-American Collaborative Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Fumie

    2016-01-01

    The Collaborative Learning Project is a language exchange program in which American and Japanese university students have the opportunity to interact with native speakers over the course of a three-week period. This paper reports the outcomes of the Collaborative Learning Project in terms of its effectiveness in fulfilling student expectations and…

  20. Selecting the right collaborative components in a construction project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohnstedt, Kristian Ditlev; Wandahl, Søren

    2018-01-01

    Regardless of context and scope, collaboration is consistently attributed to be an essential determinant of success in construction projects. Researches have long been concerned with the issue of poor collaboration, but situational determination of collaborative components has been overlooked....... The questionnaire was distributed electronically to 440 respondents; after sorting a total of 288 valid responses were obtained. The result is a set of components in a model of structures of collaboration that facilitates a more efficient and effective situational collaboration (EESC), it is denoted as target areas...... structured in type of contract, party and component....

  1. Collaboration and Virtualization in Large Information Systems Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Ioan NITCHI

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A project is evolving through different phases from idea and conception until the experiments, implementation and maintenance. The globalization, the Internet, the Web and the mobile computing changed many human activities, and in this respect, the realization of the Information System (IS projects. The projects are growing, the teams are geographically distributed, and the users are heterogeneous. In this respect, the realization of the large Information Technology (IT projects needs to use collaborative technologies. The distribution of the team, the users' heterogeneity and the project complexity determines the virtualization. This paper is an overview of these aspects for large IT projects. It shortly present a general framework developed by the authors for collaborative systems in general and adapted to collaborative project management. The general considerations are illustrated on the case of a large IT project in which the authors were involved.

  2. Project Administration Techniques for Successful Classroom Collaborative Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryder, LeeAnne Giannone

    1991-01-01

    Focuses on the collaborative writing done for a large report or proposal over a period of several weeks or months in a business writing course. Discusses short-term writing projects and nonwriting tasks for project administration, meeting management, student/instructor conference, project planning and time estimates, and oral presentations. (PRA)

  3. Governance mode choice in collaborative Ph.D. projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salimi, N.; Bekkers, R.N.A.; Frenken, K.

    2015-01-01

    Joint Ph.D. projects are a prominent form of research collaboration, connecting universities to firms and public research organizations. When entering into such collaborations, partners need to make choices regarding a project’s governance. This paper investigates how a university and its partners

  4. Governance mode choice in collaborative PhD projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salimi, N.; Bekkers, R.N.A.; Frenken, K.

    2013-01-01

    Joint PhD projects are a promising form of research collaboration, connecting universities to firms and public research organizations. Entering into such collaborations, however, requires decisions in terms of governance. This paper investigates how a university and its partners govern such

  5. Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Librarian Involvement in Grant Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Marci D.; Cordell, Sigrid Anderson; Joque, Justin; MacEachern, Mark P.; Song, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Librarians are excellent research collaborators, although librarian participation is not usually considered, thereby making access to research funds difficult. The University of Michigan Library became involved in the university's novel funding program, MCubed, which supported innovative interdisciplinary research on campus, primarily by funding…

  6. NASA Remediation Technology Collaboration Development Task, Overview and Project Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, James G.

    2014-01-01

    An overview presentation of NASA's Remediation Technology Collaboration Development Task including the following project summaries: in situ groundwater monitor, in situ chemical oxidation, in situ bioremediation, horizontal multi-port well, and high resolution site characterization.

  7. Evaluation on Collaborative Satisfaction for Project Management Team in Integrated Project Delivery Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Li, Y.; Wu, Q.

    2013-05-01

    Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) is a newly-developed project delivery approach for construction projects, and the level of collaboration of project management team is crucial to the success of its implementation. Existing research has shown that collaborative satisfaction is one of the key indicators of team collaboration. By reviewing the literature on team collaborative satisfaction and taking into consideration the characteristics of IPD projects, this paper summarizes the factors that influence collaborative satisfaction of IPD project management team. Based on these factors, this research develops a fuzzy linguistic method to effectively evaluate the level of team collaborative satisfaction, in which the authors adopted the 2-tuple linguistic variables and 2-tuple linguistic hybrid average operators to enhance the objectivity and accuracy of the evaluation. The paper demonstrates the practicality and effectiveness of the method through carrying out a case study with the method.

  8. Skate Genome Project: Cyber-Enabled Bioinformatics Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Skate Genome Project, a pilot project of the North East Cyber infrastructure Consortium, aims to produce a draft genome sequence of Leucoraja erinacea, the Little Skate. The pilot project was designed to also develop expertise in large scale collaborations across the NECC region. An overview of the bioinformatics and infrastructure challenges faced during the first year of the project will be presented. Results to date and lessons learned from the perspective of a bioinformatics core will be highlighted.

  9. Intercultural Education in Primary School: A Collaborative Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marta; Araújo e Sá, Maria Helena; Simões, Ana Raquel

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present and discuss a collaborative project on intercultural education developed by a group of educational partners. The group was made up of 12 people representing different institutions in the community, namely primary schools, cultural and social associations and the local council. The project takes an intercultural approach…

  10. Collaborative learning and cyber-cooperation in multidisciplinary projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijenga, J.C.; Siepe, A.H.M.; Yu, L.E.; Wang, C.H.

    2003-01-01

    In order to stimulate international cooperation in collaborative learning, a pilot project was initiated in which students from different disciplines (3 TU/e departments), at different Universities (TU/e and the National University of Singapore) worked together on a project, using information

  11. The PACA Project : Pro-Am Collaborative Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2014-04-01

    The Pro-Am Collaborative Astronomy (PACA) project is the next stage of evolution of the paradigm developed for the observational campaign of C/2012 S1 or C/ISON. Four different phases of collaboration are identified, and illustrate the integration of scientific investigations with amateur astronomer community via observations, and models; and the rapid dissemination of the results via a multitude of social media for rapid global access. The success of the paradigm shift in scientific research is now implemented in other comet observing campaigns. Both communities (scientific and amateur astronomers) benefit from these collective, collaborative partnerships; while outreach is the instantaneous deliverable that provides both a framework for future data analyses and the dissemination of the results. While PACA identifies a collaborative approach to pro-am collaborations, given the volume of data generated for each campaign, new ways of rapid data analysis, mining access and storage are needed.

  12. A Framework on Collaboration: an Interdisciplinary Project across Multiple Colleges

    OpenAIRE

    Andis Kwan; Lin Leung; Xiangdong Li; Michael Anshel

    2007-01-01

    The order of complexity in carrying out collaborative research at multiple campuses poses a challenge to standard knowledge management systems. In this paper, we present a collaboration framework in which computer science students work in partnership with computer scientists, mathematicians and physicists on an emerging field of research, quantum information science. We first develop a few heuristic criteria to determine the rationale that makes project a successful one. We then demonstrate t...

  13. Managing collaboration across boundaries in health information technology projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrety, Karin; Dalley, Andrew; McLoughlin, Ian; Wilson, Rob; Yu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    One reason that it is so difficult to build electronic systems for collecting and sharing health information is that their design and implementation requires clear goals and a great deal of collaboration among people from diverse social and occupational worlds. This paper uses empirical examples from two Australian health informatics projects to illustrate the importance of boundary objects and boundary spanning activities in facilitating the high degree of collaboration required for the design and implementation of workable systems.

  14. CooMan - a global collaborative project management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, J.M. de; Palma, S.

    1994-01-01

    Project Coordination and Management have long been recognized as an area with growing problems and unsatisfactory solutions. Conciliating flexibility with target achievements is historically the main problem to face. The difficulties have been growing at more than linear ratio with the size and complexity of the Projects being developed in the present days. The HEP communities suffer additional challenges because of the distributed nature of the collaborations, the novelty of each project; and the less authoritarian form of leadership and management of team and individual. This prevents the adoption of more centralized focus on decision. CooMan intends to be a Global Collaborative Project Management System. This paper discusses the basic aspects of the concepts involved, outlining how task coordination, acts of speech, and World-Wide hyper media can be used to support project management activities. A distributed tool to implement such proposition is described, and a first prototype is presented

  15. Architectures of adaptive integration in large collaborative projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lois Wright Morton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Collaborations to address complex societal problems associated with managing human-natural systems often require large teams comprised of scientists from multiple disciplines. For many such problems, large-scale, transdisciplinary projects whose members include scientists, stakeholders, and other professionals are necessary. The success of very large, transdisciplinary projects can be facilitated by attending to the diversity of types of collaboration that inevitably occur within them. As projects progress and evolve, the resulting dynamic collaborative heterogeneity within them constitutes architectures of adaptive integration (AAI. Management that acknowledges this dynamic and fosters and promotes awareness of it within a project can better facilitate the creativity and innovation required to address problems from a systems perspective. In successful large projects, AAI (1 functionally meets objectives and goals, (2 uses disciplinary expertise and concurrently bridges many disciplines, (3 has mechanisms to enable connection, (4 delineates boundaries to keep focus but retain flexibility, (5 continuously monitors and adapts, and (6 encourages project-wide awareness. These principles are illustrated using as case studies three large climate change and agriculture projects funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture-National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

  16. Defining collaborative elements in an effective and efficient collaboration in a construction project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohnstedt, Kristian Ditlev; Wandahl, Søren

    2018-01-01

    Professional organizations, companies, educational and research institutions of the construction industry and the government have been driving initiatives and participated in the debate on the future of the construction industry. The state has participated in the construction industry development...... through experimental construction projects and debates and, on this basis, demanded and released guidelines for public and publicly funded construction projects. In the quest of defining collaborative elements, previous efforts have been reviewed, thus, identifying most successful initiatives and the used...... collaborative elements. These elements will be included in a study where they will go through a verification process. The themes derived from a contraction of the identified aspects in collaboration through the past two decades in the Danish construction industry were examined to conclude on which of the themes...

  17. Collaborative Writing to Enhance Academic Writing Development through Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robayo Lun, Alma Milena; Hernandez Ortiz, Luz Stella

    2013-01-01

    Advanced students at university level struggle with many aspects of academic writing in English as a foreign language. The purpose of this article is to report on an investigation aimed at analyzing what collaborative writing through project work tells us about students' academic writing development at the tertiary level. The compositions written…

  18. Conflict from Teamwork in Project-Based Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lim Ha; Chen, Ching-Huei

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the conflict occurring during teamwork among college seniors in project-based collaborative learning in a capstone course. It found that conflict emerged with poor communication, task management, and work allocation; unequal treatments among classmates; egocentricity; a clash of values; and lack of responsibility and…

  19. Project-Based Learning in Geotechnics: Cooperative versus Collaborative Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Lopes, Margarida; Macedo, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Since 2007/2008 project-based learning models have been used to deliver two fundamental courses on Geotechnics in University of Aveiro, Portugal. These models have evolved and have encompassed either cooperative or collaborative teamwork. Using data collected in five editions of each course (Soil Mechanics I and Soil Mechanics II), the different…

  20. Collaborative Learning in Advanced Supply Systems: The KLASS Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ed; Carter, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    The Knowledge and Learning in Advanced Supply Systems (KLASS) project developed collaborative learning networks of suppliers in the British automotive and aerospace industries. Methods included face-to-face and distance learning, work toward National Vocational Qualifications, and diagnostic workshops for senior managers on improving quality,…

  1. Collaboration Networks in Applied Conservation Projects across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nita, Andreea; Rozylowicz, Laurentiu; Manolache, Steluta; Ciocănea, Cristiana Maria; Miu, Iulia Viorica; Popescu, Viorel Dan

    2016-01-01

    The main funding instrument for implementing EU policies on nature conservation and supporting environmental and climate action is the LIFE Nature programme, established by the European Commission in 1992. LIFE Nature projects (>1400 awarded) are applied conservation projects in which partnerships between institutions are critical for successful conservation outcomes, yet little is known about the structure of collaborative networks within and between EU countries. The aim of our study is to understand the nature of collaboration in LIFE Nature projects using a novel application of social network theory at two levels: (1) collaboration between countries, and (2) collaboration within countries using six case studies: Western Europe (United Kingdom and Netherlands), Eastern Europe (Romania and Latvia) and Southern Europe (Greece and Portugal). Using data on 1261 projects financed between 1996 and 2013, we found that Italy was the most successful country not only in terms of awarded number of projects, but also in terms of overall influence being by far the most influent country in the European LIFE Nature network, having the highest eigenvector (0.989) and degree centrality (0.177). Another key player in the network is Netherlands, which ensures a fast communication flow with other network members (closeness-0.318) by staying connected with the most active countries. Although Western European countries have higher centrality scores than most of the Eastern European countries, our results showed that overall there is a lower tendency to create partnerships between different organization categories. Also, the comparisons of the six case studies indicates significant differences in regards to the pattern of creating partnerships, providing valuable information on collaboration on EU nature conservation. This study represents a starting point in predicting the formation of future partnerships within LIFE Nature programme, suggesting ways to improve transnational

  2. The TackSHS project - a collaborative H2020 project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteve Fernandez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available TackSHS is a new research project funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme. It aims to improve our understanding of second-hand tobacco smoke and e-cigarette emissions and find ways of tackling the health burden caused by exposure to them. Within a fast changing environment, the project will try to elucidate the comprehensive impact that SHS and e-cigarette aerosols have on respiratory health of the European population and how health impacts vary according to socio-economic parameters with particular emphasis on specific vulnerable groups such as patients suffering from chronic lung diseases.

  3. Tools and Workflows for Collaborating on Static Website Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin Newson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Static website generators have seen a significant increase in popularity in recent years, offering many advantages over their dynamic counterparts. While these generators were typically used for blogs, they have grown in usage for other web-based projects, including documentation, conference websites, and image collections. However, because of their technical complexity, these tools can be inaccessible to content creators depending on their level of technical skill and comfort with web development technologies. Drawing from experience with a collaborative static website project, this article will provide an overview of static website generators, review different tools available for managing content, and explore workflows and best practices for collaborating with teams on static website projects.

  4. Collaborative Project-Based Learning: An Integrative Science and Technological Education Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baser, Derya; Ozden, M. Yasar; Karaarslan, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Blending collaborative learning and project-based learning (PBL) based on Wolff (2003) design categories, students interacted in a learning environment where they developed their technology integration practices as well as their technological and collaborative skills. Purpose: The study aims to understand how seventh grade students…

  5. A Framework on Collaboration: an Interdisciplinary Project across Multiple Colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andis Kwan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The order of complexity in carrying out collaborative research at multiple campuses poses a challenge to standard knowledge management systems. In this paper, we present a collaboration framework in which computer science students work in partnership with computer scientists, mathematicians and physicists on an emerging field of research, quantum information science. We first develop a few heuristic criteria to determine the rationale that makes project a successful one. We then demonstrate that our knowledge management systems produce publishable results and grant proposals within our framework.

  6. Governing innovation projects in firms: The role of competition between innovation projects and interdepartmental collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Iferd, Younes; Schubert, Torben

    2017-01-01

    The existing literature shows that interdepartmental collaboration within companies en-hances innovativeness due to easier access to and integration of knowledge spread over dispersed actors. As companies are well aware of these benefits they also use competi-tion between innovation projects to organize their innovation projects. Such competitive mechanisms have often been regarded as problematic because of their adverse effects on collaboration and knowledge sharing. At the same time, they h...

  7. Automatic tools for enhancing the collaborative experience in large projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourilkov, D; Rodriquez, J L

    2014-01-01

    With the explosion of big data in many fields, the efficient management of knowledge about all aspects of the data analysis gains in importance. A key feature of collaboration in large scale projects is keeping a log of what is being done and how - for private use, reuse, and for sharing selected parts with collaborators and peers, often distributed geographically on an increasingly global scale. Even better if the log is automatically created on the fly while the scientist or software developer is working in a habitual way, without the need for extra efforts. This saves time and enables a team to do more with the same resources. The CODESH - COllaborative DEvelopment SHell - and CAVES - Collaborative Analysis Versioning Environment System projects address this problem in a novel way. They build on the concepts of virtual states and transitions to enhance the collaborative experience by providing automatic persistent virtual logbooks. CAVES is designed for sessions of distributed data analysis using the popular ROOT framework, while CODESH generalizes the approach for any type of work on the command line in typical UNIX shells like bash or tcsh. Repositories of sessions can be configured dynamically to record and make available the knowledge accumulated in the course of a scientific or software endeavor. Access can be controlled to define logbooks of private sessions or sessions shared within or between collaborating groups. A typical use case is building working scalable systems for analysis of Petascale volumes of data as encountered in the LHC experiments. Our approach is general enough to find applications in many fields.

  8. Collaboration on HiPER EU FP7 Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Yong Joo; Han, Jae Min; Nam, Sung Mo; Chung, Chin Man; Lim, Chang Hwan; Cha, Yong Ho; Kwon, Duck Hee

    2011-06-01

    European Union started the HiPER project to establish a laser fusion research facility for energy production in Europe. Feasibility study and conceptual design has been performed for 2 years from 2005 and based on this study HiPER preparatory phase project has been proposed in 2007 as a EU FP7 project by 10 European countries and approved by EC. The project started in April of 2008 officially for 36 months until April of 2011. HiPER is a unique pure civilian laser fusion research facility and supported by ESFRI road map. KAERI has been participating HiPER from the feasibility study phase and still collaborating with HiPER EU FP7 project officially with the funding from the Korean government. Through this technical collaboration, participation in the joint experiments at large laser facilities has been possible and infrastructure of scientists exchange has been established Although the EU FP7 HiPER preparatory phase project ends at April of 2011 (actually it is extended until 2013 without further budget allocation fm EC) the total HiPER programme is planned to continue for more than 10 more years until the construction and commission of the fusion reactor. And KAERI also continue to participate in the HiPER programme in the future until the end of the programme

  9. Can we combine symptom scales for collaborative research projects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyne, John P

    2012-02-01

    Collaborative research projects have the potential to answer important research questions, which may otherwise require huge resources, funding, and time to complete. There are several scales for measuring psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, with the Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS), Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS), and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) being among the most commonly used. High quality research efforts have used these three scales in different projects, and in order to merge study efforts, some means of combining data from these scales may be necessary. We reviewed correlations in published studies for these three scales, finding them to be highly correlated, however on comparison of the three scales there were considerable clinical differences between them. The paper discusses potential methods for combining the scales in collaborative research, including use of the recently developed standardised remission criteria for schizophrenia.

  10. Collaborative Systems Biology Projects for the Military Medical Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalatoris, Jeffrey J; Scheerer, Julia B; Lebeda, Frank J

    2017-09-01

    This pilot study was conducted to examine, for the first time, the ongoing systems biology research and development projects within the laboratories and centers of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC). The analysis has provided an understanding of the breadth of systems biology activities, resources, and collaborations across all USAMRMC subordinate laboratories. The Systems Biology Collaboration Center at USAMRMC issued a survey regarding systems biology research projects to the eight U.S.-based USAMRMC laboratories and centers in August 2016. This survey included a data call worksheet to gather self-identified project and programmatic information. The general topics focused on the investigators and their projects, on the project's research areas, on omics and other large data types being collected and stored, on the analytical or computational tools being used, and on identifying intramural (i.e., USAMRMC) and extramural collaborations. Among seven of the eight laboratories, 62 unique systems biology studies were funded and active during the final quarter of fiscal year 2016. Of 29 preselected medical Research Task Areas, 20 were associated with these studies, some of which were applicable to two or more Research Task Areas. Overall, studies were categorized among six general types of objectives: biological mechanisms of disease, risk of/susceptibility to injury or disease, innate mechanisms of healing, diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, and host/patient responses to vaccines, and therapeutic strategies including host responses to therapies. We identified eight types of omics studies and four types of study subjects. Studies were categorized on a scale of increasing complexity from single study subject/single omics technology studies (23/62) to studies integrating results across two study subject types and two or more omics technologies (13/62). Investigators at seven USAMRMC laboratories had collaborations with systems biology experts

  11. Barriers and Facilitators of Collaborative Management in Technological Innovation Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Regina Hierro Parolin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about innovation tend to a more systemic and cooperative approach in which those networks focused on scientific and technological development are considered. This article aims to identify the barriers and facilitators in the collaborative management process of technological innovation projects and a study has been carried out by the cooperation action for innovation with 17 industries in Brazil. The primary evidence refers to the crucial role of project managers when leading the structural demands, and clarity on the relevance of the communication of strategic guidelines among the organizations involved for the achievement of the results in the industries.

  12. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom; Patwardhan, Ardan; Scheres, Sjors; Topf, Maya; Roseman, Alan; Winn, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed

  13. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Patwardhan, Ardan [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Scheres, Sjors [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Topf, Maya [University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Roseman, Alan [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Winn, Martyn, E-mail: martyn.winn@stfc.ac.uk [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed.

  14. International collaborative fire modeling project (ICFMP). Summary of benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roewekamp, Marina; Klein-Hessling, Walter; Dreisbach, Jason; McGrattan, Kevin; Miles, Stewart; Plys, Martin; Riese, Olaf

    2008-09-01

    This document was developed in the frame of the 'International Collaborative Project to Evaluate Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant Applications' (ICFMP). The objective of this collaborative project is to share the knowledge and resources of various organizations to evaluate and improve the state of the art of fire models for use in nuclear power plant fire safety, fire hazard analysis and fire risk assessment. The project is divided into two phases. The objective of the first phase is to evaluate the capabilities of current fire models for fire safety analysis in nuclear power plants. The second phase will extend the validation database of those models and implement beneficial improvements to the models that are identified in the first phase of ICFMP. In the first phase, more than 20 expert institutions from six countries were represented in the collaborative project. This Summary Report gives an overview on the results of the first phase of the international collaborative project. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the capability of fire models to analyze a variety of fire scenarios typical for nuclear power plants (NPP). The evaluation of the capability of fire models to analyze these scenarios was conducted through a series of in total five international Benchmark Exercises. Different types of models were used by the participating expert institutions from five countries. The technical information that will be useful for fire model users, developers and further experts is summarized in this document. More detailed information is provided in the corresponding technical reference documents for the ICFMP Benchmark Exercises No. 1 to 5. The objective of these exercises was not to compare the capabilities and strengths of specific models, address issues specific to a model, nor to recommend specific models over others. This document is not intended to provide guidance to users of fire models. Guidance on the use of fire models is currently being

  15. Key Success Factors and Guidance for International Collaborative Design Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robby Soetanto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the built environment (BE sector, the co-creation process of design demands understanding of requirements (as viewed by parties involved, mobilisation of tacit knowledge, negotiation, and complex exchange of information. The need to collaborate over distance has further exacerbated the complexity of the process, and, in itself, represents a significant challenge for BE professionals who are increasingly expected to undertake this process within globally distributed virtual teams. The research aims to identify key success factors and develop guidance for international collaborative design projects, via the implementation of collaborative design courses in UK and Canadian universities over three academic years. Questionnaire surveys, focus groups, observation of online meetings, personal reflections provided data for the analysis. The findings reveal the significance of the perceived risk of collaboration and a difference in preferred communication mode between architects and civil/structural engineers. These findings suggest the impact of training in the subject discipline, and that the opportunity for co-located working has helped the development of trust. The guidance is aimed at BE educators who wish to implement this activity in their courses.

  16. Proposal for a project agreement with ISTC - Crystal Clear Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns a project agreement with the ISTC entitled "Development of the Detector Production Technology for a New Generation of Positron Emission Tomographs to be used in Medecine and Pharmacology" to be executed in co-operation with the Crystal Clear Collaboration. For the reasons set out in this document, the Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a project agreement with ISTC for a total amount of 775 000 US dollars. The European Union party in ISTC will co-fund the project up to a total of 525 000 US dollars. CERN's contribution will not exceed 250 000 US dollars. At the present rate of exchange this is equivalent to approximately 430 000 Swiss francs

  17. Collaborative online projects for English language learners in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas-Arellanes, Fatima E.; Knox, Carolyn; Rivas, Carmen

    2013-12-01

    This paper summarizes how collaborative online projects (COPs) are used to facilitate science content-area learning for English Learners of Hispanic origin. This is a Mexico-USA partnership project funded by the National Science Foundation. A COP is a 10-week thematic science unit, completely online, and bilingual (Spanish and English) designed to provide collaborative learning experiences with culturally and linguistically relevant science instruction in an interactive and multimodal learning environment. Units are integrated with explicit instructional lessons that include: (a) hands-on and laboratory activities, (b) interactive materials and interactive games with immediate feedback, (c) animated video tutorials, (d) discussion forums where students exchange scientific learning across classrooms in the USA and in Mexico, and (e) summative and formative assessments. Thematic units have been aligned to U.S. National Science Education Standards and are under current revisions for alignment to the Common Core State Standards. Training materials for the teachers have been integrated into the project website to facilitate self-paced and independent learning. Preliminary findings of our pre-experimental study with a sample of 53 students (81 % ELs), distributed across three different groups, resulted in a 21 % statistically significant points increase from pretest to posttest assessments of science content learning, t( 52) = 11.07, p = .000.

  18. [Collaborative projects with academia for regulatory science studies on biomarkers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Maekawa, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers are useful tools to be utilized as indicators/predictors of disease severity and drug responsiveness/safety, and thus are expected to promote efficient drug development and to accelerate proper use of approved drugs. Many academic achievements have been reported, but only a small number of biomarkers are used in clinical trials and drug treatments. Regulatory sciences on biomarkers for their secure development and proper qualification are necessary to facilitate their practical application. We started to collaborate with Tohoku University and Nagoya City University for sample quality, biomarker identification, evaluation of their usage, and making guidances. In this short review, scheme and progress of these projects are introduced.

  19. Early screening for dyslexia--a collaborative pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, S; Becker, T; Boys, M; Davies, S; Noton, H

    2001-01-01

    An ongoing collaborative project, currently being piloted in 12 Wiltshire primary schools, is described. The aim is to provide a means of identifying potentially dyslexic children by the end of Key Stage 1 (Year 2) with a view to early intervention. The causal links identified by research between phonological skills and literacy development are taken as the theoretical basis of an initial screening procedure, and an intervention package is implemented for identified children. Those demonstrating persistent difficulties one year later are further assessed over a school term using an assessment package designed to identify those children showing a dyslexic profile. Further intervention is then planned and implemented.

  20. Phebus FP: organisation of the project and international collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tattegrain, A.; Hardt, P. von der

    1992-01-01

    PHEBUS Fission Product (FP) Research Programme developed from the initial French design study into a European project, and further into an international programme by agreements with overseas partners during the past two years. The programme is supervised by a Steering Committee which reviews the technical-scientific options and the results. The executive body under the Committee, the Project Group, includes a Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and Commission of the European Communities (CEC) manager as well as three (CEA) project leaders for design and manufacture, experiment operation, and interpretation of test results. The Steering Committee can request expertise from the two working groups the Analytical Group (SAWG) (elaborating test objectives, carrying out reactor calculations and test precalculations) and the Technical Group (TG) (assessing the designs proposed and the results obtained by the Project Group). A third group looks into financial aspects of the CEA-CEC contract only. The two working groups, SAWG and TG, play an important role in the exchange of information and of expertise between all partners. The paper reviews the internal Project organisation and the collaboration network, inside the European Community and through CEA overseas. (author)

  1. Training Students in Distributed Collaboration: Experiences from Two Pilot Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkvold, Bjorn Erik; Line, Lars

    Distributed collaboration supported by different forms of information and communication technologies (ICT) is becoming increasingly widespread. Effective realization of technology supported, distributed collaboration requires learning and careful attention to both technological and organizational aspects of the collaboration. Despite increasing…

  2. Collaborative Tracking of Image Features Based on Projective Invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinwei

    -mode sensors for improving the flexibility and robustness of the system. From the experimental results during three field tests for the LASOIS system, we observed that most of the errors in the image processing algorithm are caused by the incorrect feature tracking. This dissertation addresses the feature tracking problem in image sequences acquired from cameras. Despite many alternatives to feature tracking problem, iterative least squares solution solving the optical flow equation has been the most popular approach used by many in the field. This dissertation attempts to leverage the former efforts to enhance feature tracking methods by introducing a view geometric constraint to the tracking problem, which provides collaboration among features. In contrast to alternative geometry based methods, the proposed approach provides an online solution to optical flow estimation in a collaborative fashion by exploiting Horn and Schunck flow estimation regularized by view geometric constraints. Proposed collaborative tracker estimates the motion of a feature based on the geometry of the scene and how the other features are moving. Alternative to this approach, a new closed form solution to tracking that combines the image appearance with the view geometry is also introduced. We particularly use invariants in the projective coordinates and conjecture that the traditional appearance solution can be significantly improved using view geometry. The geometric constraint is introduced by defining a new optical flow equation which exploits the scene geometry from a set drawn from tracked features. At the end of each tracking loop the quality of the tracked features is judged using both appearance similarity and geometric consistency. Our experiments demonstrate robust tracking performance even when the features are occluded or they undergo appearance changes due to projective deformation of the template. The proposed collaborative tracking method is also tested in the visual navigation

  3. Bringing nursing science to the classroom: a collaborative project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reams, Susan; Bashford, Carol

    2009-01-01

    This project resulted as a collaborative effort on the part of a public school system and nursing faculty. The fifth grade student population utilized in this study focused on the skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, and nervous systems as part of their school system's existing science and health curriculum. The intent of the study was to evaluate the impact on student learning outcomes as a result of nursing-focused, science-based, hands-on experiential activities provided by nursing faculty in the public school setting. An assessment tool was created for pretesting and posttesting to evaluate learning outcomes resulting from the intervention. Over a two day period, six classes consisting of 25 to 30 students each were divided into three equal small groups and rotated among three interactive stations. Students explored the normal function of the digestive system, heart, lungs, and skin. Improvement in learning using the pretest and posttest assessment tools were documented.

  4. Does working with industry come at a price? A study of doctoral candidates’ performance in collaborative vs. non-collaborative Ph.D. projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salimi, Negin; Bekkers, Rudi; Frenken, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative Ph.D. projects between university and industry constitute an important aspect of university–industry collaboration, yet has remained under-researched thus far. The specific question this paper asks is how collaborative Ph.D. projects perform compared to non-collaborative Ph.D.

  5. A Data Specification for Software Project Performance Measures: Results of a Collaboration on Performance Measurement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kasunic, Mark

    2008-01-01

    ... between completed projects. These terms and definitions were developed using a collaborative, consensus-based approach involving the Software Engineering Institute's Software Engineering Process Management program and service...

  6. The collaborative ec project ReCosy - 16203

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, Bernhard; Buckau, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    The Collaborative Project (CP) ReCosy (Redox Controlling Systems) was established in 2008. It falls within the EURATOM program and is implemented within the European Commission's 7. Framework Program. Main objectives of CP ReCosy are the sound understanding of redox phenomena controlling the long-term release/retention of radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal and providing tools to apply the results to Performance Assessment/Safety Case. Although redox is not a new geochemical problem, different questions are still not resolved and thus raised by implementers and scientists. Radionuclide redox transformations on minerals are considered to be decisive scenarios in various FEP lists. 32 institutions from 13 European countries contribute to the 4-years CP by i) development of advanced analytical tools, ii) investigations of processes responsible for redox control (thermodynamically and kinetically controlled processes, surface reactions and microbial processes), iii) provision of required data on redox controlling processes, and iv) response of the disposal systems to external/internal disturbances. Systems which are investigated comprise simple very well defined ones under controlled laboratory conditions, complex laboratory systems, near-natural systems in the laboratory, real systems, and near-field systems controlled spent nuclear fuel. The scientific results of the CP ReCosy are reported during annual workshops (AW). The first AW took place in February 10-12, 2009. The scientific contributions underwent a peer review and are published in the form of workshop proceedings together with scientific-technical overview papers of the different project work packages. The present paper summarizes the main results obtained after the first year of ReCosy. The status during the project preparation phase of the CP ReCosy is published elsewhere. (authors)

  7. Collaboration, Intragroup Conflict, and Social Skills in Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dabae; Huh, Yeol; Reigeluth, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    This case study was conducted in two high school classrooms that utilized collaborative project-based learning (PBL). Collaboration is an important instructional strategy, especially used in conjunction with PBL, and is an essential learning outcome for the twenty-first century. This study examined how collaboration can be achieved as a learning…

  8. Inter-organizational collaboration projects in the public sector: a balance between integration and demarcation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfström, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    For several years, the development of the Swedish public sector has been accompanied by a discussion about inter-organizational collaboration, which has been examined in several national experiments. The experience, however, indicates significant difficulties in implementing collaboration in local authorities' regular activities. This article argues that organizing inter-organizational collaboration in projects tends to be counterproductive, since the purpose of this collaboration is to increase the integration of local authorities. This article is based on case studies of three different collaboration projects. Each project is analyzed in relation to the way collaboration is organized within the project and how the relationship to the local authorities' activities is designed. The outcome of these studies shows that while collaboration projects increase integration between the responsible authorities, the integration stays within the projects. This is due to the fact that the projects were designed as units separate from the responsible authorities. As a result, the collaboration that occurs in the projects is not implemented in the local authorities' activities, and the viability of the increased integration of different responsible authorities does not extend beyond the projects. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. FEBEX: An example of a major international collaborative project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulibarri, A.M.; Olmo, C. del; Huertas, F.

    1996-01-01

    There are many similarities in the high-level waste (HLW) disposal programmes in Switzerland and Spain. In both cases, alternative crystalline and sedimentary host rocks are currently under investigation, options for disposal of both vitrified reprocessing waste and spent fuel are considered and repository designs utilize massive engineered barriers. For the case of HLW disposal in a granite rock, the reference engineered barrier system (EBS) concepts are almost identical. The waste, in its steel fabrication container, is sealed in a massive steel canister which is emplaced horizontally in drilled tunnels. The canister is surrounded by a highly compacted bentonite backfill. Individual components of this waste package have been tested in isolation or on a small scale, but the aim of the full-scale engineered barrier experiment is to examine some properties of a real size system in a realistic natural environment. FEBEX was proposed by ENRESA and the experimental studies at Grimsel are run as an ENRESA/NAGRA collaboration. The field experiments are, however, only one component of a project which includes a large-scale laboratory 'mockup' and supporting materials tests and modelling. FEBEX, as a whole, is sponsored by the European Union as part of the 'Nuclear Fission Safety' research programme (the Swiss component being supported by the Bundesamt fur Bildung und Wissenschaft)

  10. D4SCIENCE-II - Report on inter-projects coordination and collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Castelli, Donatella; Zoppi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    This deliverable reports on the collaborations with other FP7 projects and R&D programmes established by D4Science-II from the beginning of the project until July 2010. The collaborations described are of different nature, as they range from purely technical exchanges involving mutual exploitation of technologies to the sharing of e- Infrastructure resources and to the joint organization of networking and dissemination events. The deliverable presents these collaborations clustered into: (i) ...

  11. Evaluating Types of Students' Interactions in a Wiki-Based Collaborative Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofieva, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Wiki technology has been promoted as a collaborative software platform. This study investigates interactions that occur in a wiki-based collaborative learning project. The study draws on interaction literature and investigates the types of interactions with which students are engaged in wiki-based group projects, clusters that reflect online…

  12. Characterizing Cross-Professional Collaboration in Research and Development Projects in Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenke, Wouter; van Driel, Jan H.; Geijsel, Femke P.; Sligte, Henk W.; Volman, Monique L. L.

    2016-01-01

    Collaboration between practitioners and researchers can increasingly be observed in research and development (R&D) projects in secondary schools. This article presents an analysis of cross-professional collaboration between teachers, school leaders and educational researchers and/or advisers as part of R&D projects in terms of three…

  13. Collaborative Planning: Cooking up an Inclusive Service-Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonati, Michelle L.

    2018-01-01

    Collaborative planning between special education teachers and general education teachers that focuses on curriculum, instruction, and assessment can improve learning outcomes for students with and without disabilities. Service-learning is a teaching practice that can provide a flexible approach for teachers to collaboratively plan to meet the…

  14. Promoting Collaboration in a Project-Based E-Learning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Kyparisia; Boubouka, Maria

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the value of collaboration scripts for promoting metacognitive knowledge in a project-based e-learning context. In an empirical study, 82 students worked individually and in groups on a project using the e-learning environment MyProject, in which the life cycle of a project is inherent. Students followed a particular…

  15. Facilities management innovation in public-private collaborations: Danish ESCO projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia; Jensen, Jesper Ole; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to investigate how Facilities Management (FM) units navigate Energy Service Company (ESCO) collaborations, here defined as examples of public collaborative innovation within the context of FM. The driving motivation is to inform and inspire internal FM units of local...... institutions on how to navigate and manage collaboration of different, intra- and inter-organisational actors throughout ESCO projects.......The purpose of the article is to investigate how Facilities Management (FM) units navigate Energy Service Company (ESCO) collaborations, here defined as examples of public collaborative innovation within the context of FM. The driving motivation is to inform and inspire internal FM units of local...

  16. Does working with industry come at a price? : a study of doctoral candidates' performance in collaborative vs. non-collaborative PhD projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salimi, N.; Bekkers, R.N.A.; Frenken, K.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing involvement of industry in academic research raised concerns whether university-industry projects actually meet the same academic standards as university projects in-house. Looking at the academic output and impact of collaborative versus non-collaborative Ph.D. projects at Eindhoven

  17. Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores collaboration between library media educators and regular classroom teachers. The article focuses on the context of the issue, positions on the issue, the impact of collaboration, and how to implement effective collaboration into the school system. Various books and professional journals are used to support conclusions…

  18. RMS: a platform for managing cross-disciplinary and multi-institutional research project collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jake; Apperson-Hansen, Carolyn; Pelfrey, Clara M; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2014-11-30

    Cross-institutional cross-disciplinary collaboration has become a trend as researchers move toward building more productive and innovative teams for scientific research. Research collaboration is significantly changing the organizational structure and strategies used in the clinical and translational science domain. However, due to the obstacles of diverse administrative structures, differences in area of expertise, and communication barriers, establishing and managing a cross-institutional research project is still a challenging task. We address these challenges by creating an integrated informatics platform to reduce the barriers to biomedical research collaboration. The Request Management System (RMS) is an informatics infrastructure designed to transform a patchwork of expertise and resources into an integrated support network. The RMS facilitates investigators' initiation of new collaborative projects and supports the management of the collaboration process. In RMS, experts and their knowledge areas are categorized and managed structurally to provide consistent service. A role-based collaborative workflow is tightly integrated with domain experts and services to streamline and monitor the life-cycle of a research project. The RMS has so far tracked over 1,500 investigators with over 4,800 tasks. The research network based on the data collected in RMS illustrated that the investigators' collaborative projects increased close to 3 times from 2009 to 2012. Our experience with RMS indicates that the platform reduces barriers for cross-institutional collaboration of biomedical research projects. Building a new generation of infrastructure to enhance cross-disciplinary and multi-institutional collaboration has become an important yet challenging task. In this paper, we share the experience of developing and utilizing a collaborative project management system. The results of this study demonstrate that a web-based integrated informatics platform can facilitate and

  19. A web-based online collaboration platform for formulating engineering design projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varikuti, Sainath

    Effective communication and collaboration among students, faculty and industrial sponsors play a vital role while formulating and solving engineering design projects. With the advent in the web technology, online platforms and systems have been proposed to facilitate interactions and collaboration among different stakeholders in the context of senior design projects. However, there are noticeable gaps in the literature with respect to understanding the effects of online collaboration platforms for formulating engineering design projects. Most of the existing literature is focused on exploring the utility of online platforms on activities after the problem is defined and teams are formed. Also, there is a lack of mechanisms and tools to guide the project formation phase in senior design projects, which makes it challenging for students and faculty to collaboratively develop and refine project ideas and to establish appropriate teams. In this thesis a web-based online collaboration platform is designed and implemented to share, discuss and obtain feedback on project ideas and to facilitate collaboration among students and faculty prior to the start of the semester. The goal of this thesis is to understand the impact of an online collaboration platform for formulating engineering design projects, and how a web-based online collaboration platform affects the amount of interactions among stakeholders during the early phases of design process. A survey measuring the amount of interactions among students and faculty is administered. Initial findings show a marked improvement in the students' ability to share project ideas and form teams with other students and faculty. Students found the online platform simple to use. The suggestions for improving the tool generally included features that were not necessarily design specific, indicating that the underlying concept of this collaborative platform provides a strong basis and can be extended for future online platforms

  20. Harnessing the Power of Technologies to Manage Collaborative e-Learning Projects in Dispersed Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosper, Maree Veroncia; McNeill, Margot Anne; Woo, Karen

    2010-01-01

    "The impact of web-based lecture technologies on current and future practice in learning and teaching" was a collaborative project across four Australian universities, funded by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC). The project was both exploratory and developmental in nature and according to the project's external…

  1. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Collaborative Computer-Intensive Projects in an Undergraduate Psychometrics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchard, Kimberly A.; Pace, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate psychometrics classes often use computer-intensive active learning projects. However, little research has examined active learning or computer-intensive projects in psychometrics courses. We describe two computer-intensive collaborative learning projects used to teach the design and evaluation of psychological tests. Course…

  2. Dimensions of Problem Based Learning--Dialogue and Online Collaboration in Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen,, Lars Birch; Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche

    2013-01-01

    The article contributes to the discussions on problem based learning and project work, building on and reflecting the experiences of the authors. Four perspectives are emphasized as central to a contemporary approach to problem- and project-based learning: the exploration of problems, projects as a method, online collaboration, and the dialogic…

  3. Students as agents – connecting faculty with industry and creating collaborative projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte Bjerregaard

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative projects between partners in the building industry and students constitute important means for addressing more advanced parts of the CDIO Syllabus 4. In this paper an existing internship program is revised in order to enhance collaboration between industry and faculty...

  4. Characterizing cross-professional collaboration in research and development projects in secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenke, W.; van Driel, J.H.; Geijsel, F.P.; Sligte, H.W.; Volman, M.L.L.

    2016-01-01

    Collaboration between practitioners and researchers can increasingly be observed in research and development (R&D) projects in secondary schools. This article presents an analysis of cross-professional collaboration between teachers, school leaders and educational researchers and/or advisers as part

  5. Proactive behaviour may lead to failure in virtual project-based collaborative learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Hertzum, Morten

    2005-01-01

    This paper argues that proactive behaviour, caused by high engagement and motivation of the learners, may lead to failure of collaborative learning. By examining empirical data from real-world text-only virtual negotiations between dispersed participants engaged in project-based collaborative...

  6. Collaboration by design - on the use of value modeling in social innovation projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weigand, H.

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, many innovation projects are based on the collaboration of multiple parties to cocreate value. Unfortunately, the collaboration is not always without problems, not the least when financial and legal concerns come into the picture. Value modeling approaches such as e3-value have proven to

  7. Using Wikis to Investigate Communication, Collaboration and Engagement in Capstone Engineering Design Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthoud, L.; Gliddon, J.

    2018-01-01

    In today's global Aerospace industry, virtual workspaces are commonly used for collaboration between geographically distributed multidisciplinary teams. This study investigated the use of wikis to look at communication, collaboration and engagement in 'Capstone' team design projects at the end of an engineering degree. Wikis were set up for teams…

  8. Collaborative decision-making on wind power projects based on AHP method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, A.; Proştean, G.; Tămăşilă, M.; Vârtosu, A.

    2017-01-01

    The complexity of projects implementation in Renewable Energy Sources (RES) requires finding collaborative alliances between suppliers and project developers in RES. Links activities in supply chain in RES, respectively, transportation of heavy components, processing orders to purchase quality raw materials, storage and materials handling, packaging, and other complex activities requiring a logistics system collaboratively to be permanently dimensioned properly selected and monitored. Requirements imposed by stringency of wind power energy projects implementation inevitably involves constraints in infrastructure, implementation and logistics. Thus, following an extensive research in RES project, to eliminate these constraints were identified alternative collaboration to provide feasible solutions on different levels of performance. The paper presents a critical analysis of different collaboration alternatives in supply chain for RES projects, selecting the ones most suitable for particular situations by using decision-making method Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). The role of AHP method was to formulate a decision model by which can be establish the collaboration alternative choice through mathematical calculation to reduce the impact created by constraints encountered. The solution provided through AHP provides a framework for detecting optimal alternative collaboration between suppliers and project developers in RES and avoids some breaks in the chain by resizing safety buffers for leveling orders in RES projects.

  9. The collaborative project on European sodium fast reactor (CP ESFR project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, Gian-Luigi

    2010-01-01

    The paper summarizes the key characteristics of the four years large Collaborative Project on European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP ESFR - 2009-2012); the CP ESFR follows the 6th FP project named 'Roadmap for a European Innovative SOdium cooled FAst Reactor - EISOFAR' further identifying, organizing and implementing a significant part of the needed R and D effort. The paper also gives insights concerning the so called 'working horses' cores and systems which are provided by CEA and AREVA and that will be used as a basis to test the performances and assess the pertinence of innovative solutions. The CP ESFR merges the contribution of 25 European partners (EU + CH); it will be performed under the aegis of the 7th Euratom FP under the Area - Advanced Nuclear Systems with a refund from the European Commission. It will be a key component of the European Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNE TP) and its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA). The inputs for the project are the key research goals for fourth generation of European sodium cooled fast reactors which can be summarized as follows: an improved safety with in particular the achievement of a robust architecture vis-a-vis of abnormal situations and the robustness of the safety demonstrations; the guarantee of a financial risk similar to that of the other means of energy production; a flexible and robust management of nuclear materials and especially waste reduction through Minor Actinides burning

  10. Computer-Mediated Collaborative Projects: Processes for Enhancing Group Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin-Bryant, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    Groups are a fundamental part of the business world. Yet, as companies continue to expand internationally, a major challenge lies in promoting effective communication among employees who work in varying time zones. Global expansion often requires group collaboration through computer systems. Computer-mediated groups lead to different communicative…

  11. Challenging EME's to learn through collaborative improvement projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, H.G.A.; Cagliano, Raffaella; Caniato, Federico; Kaltoft, Rasmus; Steendahl Nielsen, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    Continuous Improvement is a consolidated concept in theory and practice, mainly in the context of a single organisation. Within the increasingly turbulent and uncertain environment the concept of Continuous Improvement should be transferred and extended to the level of collaborative continuous

  12. International funding opportunities for ideas of collaboration projects in OOHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilin, Corina

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is presenting the exploratory workshop organized by the OOHP Master team in December 2011, which opened paths for theoretical knowledge and for collaboration with researchers having international prestige. Also, the paper presents funding opportunities available in national grants, and the strategy chosen by the team to prepare a two-step access to funds.

  13. The Collaborative Teacher Inquiry Project: A Purposeful Professional Development Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Limin; McDougall, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The transition from Grade 8 to Grade 9 is particularly difficult for students who were not very successful in mathematics in Grade 8. Research into ways to improve this transition as well as improve the teaching practices at the Applied level will be helpful for teachers, administrators, and policy makers. The Collaborative Teacher Inquiry Project…

  14. Collaboration in River Basin Management: The Great Rivers Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, S.; Vridhachalam, M.; Tomala-Reyes, A.; Guerra, A.; Chu, H.; Eckman, B.

    2008-12-01

    The health of the world's freshwater ecosystems is fundamental to the health of people, plants and animals around the world. The sustainable use of the world's freshwater resources is recognized as one of the most urgent challenges facing society today. An estimated 1.3 billion people currently lack access to safe drinking water, an issue the United Nations specifically includes in its recently published Millennium Development Goals. IBM is collaborating with The Nature Conservancy and the Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (SAGE) at the University of Wisconsin, Madison to build a Modeling Collaboration Framework and Decision Support System (DSS) designed to help policy makers and a variety of stakeholders (farmers, fish and wildlife managers, hydropower operators, et al.) to assess, come to consensus, and act on land use decisions representing effective compromises between human use and ecosystem preservation/restoration efforts. Initially focused on Brazil's Paraguay-Parana, China's Yangtze, and the Mississippi Basin in the US, the DSS integrates data and models from a wide variety of environmental sectors, including water balance, water quality, carbon balance, crop production, hydropower, and biodiversity. In this presentation we focus on the collaboration aspects of the DSS. The DSS is an open environment tool that allows scientists, policy makers, politicians, land owners, and anyone who desires to take ownership of their actions in support of the environment to work together to that end. The DSS supports a range of features that empower such a community to collaboratively work together. Supported collaboration mediums include peer reviews, live chat, static comments, and Web 2.0 functionality such as tagging. In addition, we are building a 3-D virtual world component which will allow users to experience and share system results, first-hand. Models and simulation results may be annotated with free-text comments and tags, whether unique or

  15. The Collaborative Project Owner in Theory and Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Signe Hedeboe; Svejvig, Per

    is complex characterized by information asymmetry and potential mistrust. Studies also show that top managers may actually be reluctant to play an active role during the project life cycle. In this paper, we examine how the involvement of project owners unfolds in the project process, when given explicit...

  16. Efficient Triple Helix collaboration fostering local niche innovation projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Radziwon, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Collaboration between universities and their local stakeholders is becoming a key success factor for the growth of regional entrepreneurial ecosystems. Efficient energy solutions are often facing challenges in innovation diffusion, which is in contrast to the growing demand for providing answers...... the entire innovation process. The selected case offers insights of how and why such initiative could emerge, as well as discusses its implications for future technological innovations and in particular those that are about to emerge in regional entrepreneurial ecosystems. Networking, win...

  17. Adopt-a-Nonprofit: A Project in Persuasion and Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Lee A.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a project for professional writing classes that teaches effective persuasive writing, as teams of students research local nonprofit or campus service organizations, design projects to address their groups' main needs, and write solicitation letters for donations or volunteers. Discusses potential problems and how students benefit. (SR)

  18. The Maddison Project : collaborative research on historical national accounts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, Jutta; van Zanden, Jan Luiten

    The Maddison Project, initiated in March 2010 by a group of close colleagues of Angus Maddison, aims to develop an effective way of cooperation between scholars to continue Maddison’s work on measuring economic performance in the world economy. This paper is a first product of the project. Its goal

  19. The Maddison Project: collaborative research on historical national accounts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, Jutta; van Zanden, Jan Luiten

    2014-01-01

    The Maddison Project, initiated in March 2010 by a group of close colleagues of Angus Maddison, aims to develop an effective system of cooperation between scholars to continue Maddison's work on measuring economic performance in the world economy. This article is a first product of the project. Its

  20. The Human Genome Project: An Imperative for International Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is the Human Genome Project which aims to decipher the totality of the human genetic information. The historical background, the objectives, international cooperation, ethical discussion, and the role of UNESCO are included. (KR)

  1. Ambiguous Capture: Collaborative Capitalism and the Meningitis Vaccine Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Janice

    2016-01-01

    The primary health care approach advanced at Alma Ata to address social determinants of health was replaced by selective health care a year later at Bellagio. Subsequently, immunization was endorsed as a cost-effective technical intervention to combat targeted infectious diseases. Multilateral efforts to collaborate on immunization as a universal public health good ambiguously capture the interests of the world's governments as well as private, public, and not-for-profit institutions. Global assemblages of scientists, governments, industry and nongovernmental organizations now work in public-private partnerships to develop and make essential vaccines accessible, with vaccines marketed as single fix solutions for global health. Drawing from ethnographic fieldwork in France and Burkina Faso that followed the development, regulation, and implementation of the group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine for sub-Saharan Africa, in this article I describe events during and after the development of MenAfriVac. A technological success narrative steeped in collaborative capitalist rhetoric disguises neglected health care systems.

  2. Ambiguous Capture: Collaborative Capitalism and the Meningitis Vaccine Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Janice

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The primary health care approach advanced at Alma Ata to address social determinants of health was replaced by selective health care a year later at Bellagio. Subsequently, immunization was endorsed as a cost-effective technical intervention to combat targeted infectious diseases. Multilateral efforts to collaborate on immunization as a universal public health good ambiguously capture the interests of the world’s governments as well as private, public, and not-for-profit institutions. Global assemblages of scientists, governments, industry and nongovernmental organizations now work in public-private partnerships to develop and make essential vaccines accessible, with vaccines marketed as single fix solutions for global health. Drawing from ethnographic fieldwork in France and Burkina Faso that followed the development, regulation, and implementation of the group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine for sub-Saharan Africa, in this article I describe events during and after the development of MenAfriVac. A technological success narrative steeped in collaborative capitalist rhetoric disguises neglected health care systems. PMID:27027575

  3. Halden Reactor Project activities, achievements and international collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesenack, W.

    2003-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the Halden Project research programme related to fuel testing. An overview of ongoing tests on WWER fuel performance is also included. The ongoing and planned experiments containing WWER-related fuels and materials - Irradiation of Standard and Modified WWER Fuel (IFA-503) and Corrosion Testing of Different Cladding Alloys (IFA-638) - are presented. The future experiments involving WWER fuel and cladding types foreseen in of the Halden Reactor Project programme are given

  4. A three-year teacher research–to–practice collaborative professional development project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilton, Annette; Hilton, Geoff; Zeuschner, Michael

    The theme is successful implementation of a research-to-practice collaborative teacher professional development project aimed at enhancing the teaching and learning of proportional reasoning. The objectives are to outline the project goals, provide an overview of the key research findings regardi...

  5. Collaborations between Multicultural Educators and Archivists: Engaging Students with Multicultural History through Archival Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    When multicultural educators and archivists collaborate to design projects that engage students with multicultural history through archival research, students can learn in-depth research skills with primary source documents, creatively share their knowledge, and, on a broader level, engage with their local community history. The projects shared in…

  6. A collaborative archaeological research and conservation project for Moriori carved trees (rakau momori), Rekohu (Chatham Island)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, I.; Maxwell, J.

    2011-01-01

    In January-February 2010 a conservation and site-recording project began on Rekohu (Chatham Island) to locate, assess and digitally scan archaeological carved trees known as rakau momori ('dendroglyphs'). This paper briefly considers earlier work on carved trees before reporting preliminary and anticipated outcomes from our recent collaborative rakau momori archaeological project. 14 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. A Collaborative Media Production Project on Human Rights: Bridging Everyday and Media Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydari, Nazan; Kara, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of media institutions and universities as spaces of knowledge productions, development of "critical media pedagogy" becomes crucial for the establishment of a responsible and ethical media environment. Drawing from the collaborative project of The First Step into Human Rights: I do not do it!--A Short Film Project on…

  8. Collaborative Teaching and Learning through Multi-Institutional Integrated Group Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Suzanna K.; Carlo, Héctor J.

    2013-01-01

    This teaching brief describes an innovative multi-institutional initiative through which integrated student groups from different courses collaborate on a common course project. In this integrated group project, students are asked to design a decentralized manufacturing organization for a company that will manufacture industrial Proton-Exchange…

  9. National Writing Project's Multimodal Literacies and Teacher Collaboration: Enhanced Student Learning on Global Social Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Kalpana; Hood, Caleb

    2016-01-01

    Iyengar and Hood, both teacher consultants with the San Antonio Writing Project (SAWP), and instructors of an undergraduate society and social issues class, collaborated to enhance their undergraduate students' writing experiences using the National Writing Project model (Lieberman & Wood, 2003). Iyengar and Hood used strategies such as…

  10. Virtual Teaming and Collaboration Technology: A Study of Influences on Virtual Project Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broils, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to explore the relationships between the independent variables, contextual factors for virtual teams and collaboration technology, and the dependent variable, virtual project outcomes. The problem leading to the need for the study is a lower success rate for virtual projects compared to…

  11. Boundary Crossing in R&D Projects in Schools: Learning through Cross-Professional Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenke, Wouter; van Driel, Jan; Geijsel, Femke P.; Volman, Monique L. L.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Context: School leaders, teachers, and researchers are increasingly involved in collaborative research and development (R&D) projects in schools, which encourage crossing boundaries between the fields of school and research. It is not clear, however, what and how professionals in these projects learn through cross-professional…

  12. A Pilot Study: Facilitating Cross-Cultural Understanding with Project-Based Collaborative Learning in an Online Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadiev, Rustam; Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated three aspects: how project-based collaborative learning facilitates cross-cultural understanding; how students perceive project-based collaborative learning implementation in a collaborative cyber community (3C) online environment; and what types of communication among students are used. A qualitative case study approach…

  13. Collaborative Management of Complex Major Construction Projects: AnyLogic-Based Simulation Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex supply chain system collaborative management of major construction projects effectively integrates the different participants in the construction project. This paper establishes a simulation model based on AnyLogic to reveal the collaborative elements in the complex supply chain management system and the modes of action as well as the transmission problems of the intent information. Thus it is promoting the participants to become an organism with coordinated development and coevolution. This study can help improve the efficiency and management of the complex system of major construction projects.

  14. Value concepts and value based collaboration in building projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2005-01-01

    Value has in recent years become a popular term in management theory and practice in general as well as in economic theory and architectural management. This paper attempts to clarify the various uses and meanings of concepts of value/values. Six different value concepts are identified. The ori......-gin and use of value concepts in classic and modern economic theory and in management theory is outlined. The question of objectivity and subjectivity is discussed in relation to economic value and customer value. Value creation is put in relation to development in products and processes and a number...... of design strategies are identified. The concept and methods of value based management and collaboration is discussed in this context. The paper is mainly theoretical and based on work during a MBA study in 2002-04 as well as many years of experience as building client and facilities manager....

  15. Towards a Collaborative Open Environment of Project-Centred Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bongio, Aldo; van Bruggen, Jan; Ceri, Stefano

    Nowadays, engineering studies are characterized by high mobility of students, lecturers and workforce and by the dynamics of multinational companies where “classes” or “students’ teams” composed of persons with different competencies and backgrounds, working together in projects to solve complex ...... environment. This paper proposes a COOPER framework and shows its approaches to address the various research challenges. This work is partially supported by EU/IST FP6 STREP project COOPER (contract number IST-2005-027073).......Nowadays, engineering studies are characterized by high mobility of students, lecturers and workforce and by the dynamics of multinational companies where “classes” or “students’ teams” composed of persons with different competencies and backgrounds, working together in projects to solve complex...

  16. Project-based Collaborative learning in distance education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Bajard, Christine; Helbo, Jan

    2004-01-01

    ) programme indicates, however, that adjustments are required in transforming the on-campus model to distance education. The main problem is that while project work is an excellent regulator of the learning process for on-campus students, this does not seem to be the case for off-campus students. Consequently......This article describes the experiences drawn from an experiment in transferring positive experience with a project-organised on-campus engineering programme to a technology supported distance education programme. Three years of experience with the Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII......, didactic adjustments have been made based on feedback, in particular from evaluation questionnaires. This process has been very constructive in approaching the goal: a successful model for project organized learning in distance education....

  17. Project-based learning with international collaboration for training biomedical engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shankar

    2011-01-01

    Training biomedical engineers while effectively keeping up with the fast paced scientific breakthroughs and the growth in technical innovations poses arduous challenges for educators. Traditional pedagogical methods are employed for coping with the increasing demands in biomedical engineering (BME) training and continuous improvements have been attempted with some success. Project-based learning (PBL) is an academic effort that challenges students by making them carry out interdisciplinary projects aimed at accomplishing a wide range of student learning outcomes. PBL has been shown to be effective in the medical field and has been adopted by other fields including engineering. The impact of globalization in healthcare appears to be steadily increasing which necessitates the inclusion of awareness of relevant international activities in the curriculum. Numerous difficulties are encountered when the formation of a collaborative team is tried, and additional difficulties occur as the collaboration team is extended to international partners. Understanding and agreement of responsibilities becomes somewhat complex and hence the collaborative project has to be planned and executed with clear understanding by all partners and participants. A model for training BME students by adopting PBL with international collaboration is proposed. The results of previous BME project work with international collaboration fit partially into the model. There were many logistic issues and constraints; however, the collaborative projects themselves greatly enhanced the student learning outcomes. This PBL type of learning experience tends to promote long term retention of multidisciplinary material and foster high-order cognitive activities such as analysis, synthesis and evaluation. In addition to introducing the students to experiences encountered in the real-life workforce, the proposed approach enhances developing professional contracts and global networking. In conclusion, despite

  18. Knowledge collaborative incentive based on inter-organizational cooperative innovation of project-based supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangdong Wu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Within project-based supply chain inter-organizational cooperative innovation, the achievement of project value-adding reflects by factors such as project-based organizational effect level, the relationship between project cooperative innovation objectives etc. The purpose is to provide a reliable reference for the contractor reasonably allocate the effect level and resources between the knowledge input and innovation stage and realize the knowledge collaboration for project-based supply chain. Design/methodology/approach: Based on the assumption of equal cooperation between project-based organizations, from the view of maximizing project value-adding and the relationship of effect cost between knowledge input and innovation stage in consideration, the knowledge collaborative incentive model for project-based supply chain inter-organizational cooperative innovation was established, and solved through the first-order and second-order approach, then the digital simulation and example analysis were presented. Findings: The results show that, the project management enterprise resorted to adjust project knowledge collaboration incentive intensity and implemented knowledge input-innovation coordinative incentive strategy, not only could achieve project value-adding maximization, but also could realize net earnings Pareto improvement between project management enterprise and contractor. Research limitations/implications: To simplify the knowledge flow among project-based organizations, the knowledge flow in the model hypothesis is presented as knowledge input and knowledge innovation stage, thus it may affect the final analysis results. Originality/value: In construction project practice, knowledge is become more and more important to achieve project value-adding. The research can provide a theoretical guideline for the project-based organizations, such as the contractor, the owner, especially how to utilize their core knowledge.

  19. A Collaborative Writing Project Using the Worldwide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Allen; Essex, Christopher

    A student in a distance education course, as part of a midterm project, set out to build a Web site that had written communication as its main focus. The Web site, "The Global Campfire," was modeled on the old Appalachian tradition of the "Story Tree," where a storyteller begins a story and allows group members to add to it.…

  20. International collaboration in SSC (or any $4 billion scientific project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the author discusses the superconducting supercollider. This is a project that costs U.S. $4.4 billion. The author spends a short time giving the motivation (which is a scientific motivation) and also giving the idea of how it is possible, with U.S. deficits

  1. The Digital Life History Project: Intergenerational Collaborative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loe, Meika

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the Digital Life History Project, a 10-week "lab" linked to a course on aging, in which students and community-dwelling elders work together to create a short digital story honoring the elder's life. After two interview sessions, the pair works together to produce a 3- to 5-minute digital life story narrated by the elder.…

  2. Student-Teacher Collaboration: A Skateboard Project that Really Rocks!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tim

    2005-01-01

    As a teacher, the author gets his biggest charge from seeing students' eyes light up when he asks them a question related to a topic on which they are the experts and he is the novice. Skateboarding provides a prime example. Since most of his students have a personal interest and involvement in skateboarding, he introduced a skateboard project to…

  3. Project-Based Collaborative Learning in Distance Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Bajard, C.; Helbo, Jan

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the experiences drawn from an experiment in transferring positive experience with a project-organised on-campus engineering programme to a technology supported distance education programme. Three years of experience with the Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII)......, didactic adjustments have been made based on feedback, in particular from evaluation questionnaires. This process has been very constructive in approaching the goal: a successful model for project organized learning in distance education.......) programme indicates, however, that adjustments are required in transforming the on-campus model to distance education. The main problem is that while project work is an excellent regulator of the learning process for on-campus students, this does not seem to be the case for off-campus students. Consequently......This article describes the experiences drawn from an experiment in transferring positive experience with a project-organised on-campus engineering programme to a technology supported distance education programme. Three years of experience with the Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII...

  4. Interdisciplinary Project Experiences: Collaboration between Majors and Non-Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarkusky, Debra L.; Toman, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    Students in computer science and information technology should be engaged in solving real-world problems received from government and industry as well as those that expose them to various areas of application. In this paper, we discuss interdisciplinary project experiences between majors and non-majors that offered a creative and innovative…

  5. uCollaborator: Framework for STEM Project Collaboration among Geographically-Dispersed Student/Faculty Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Stephen M.; Rodriguez, Walter E.; Carstens, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for facilitating communication among STEM project teams that are geographically dispersed in synchronous or asynchronous online courses. The framework has been developed to: (a) improve how engineering and technology students and faculty work with collocated and geographically-dispersed teams; and (b) to connect the…

  6. ICT support for students’ collaboration in problem and project based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Ryberg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports and analyses quantitative and qualitative data from a study, which seeks a better understanding of how students use various technologies to support their project collaboration activities in a problem and project based learning environment. More generally the aim of the study......, and the present paper, is to shed light on students’ technology practices within higher education – particularly in relation to problem and project based learning....

  7. Developing collaborative person-centred practice: a pilot project on a palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Pippa; Weaver, Lynda; Gravelle, Debbie; Thibault, Hélène

    2007-02-01

    Maximizing interprofessional collaborative patient-centred practice holds promise for improving patient care and creating satisfying work roles. In Canada's evolving health care system, there are demands for increased efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and quality improvement. Interprofessional collaboration warrants re-examination because maximizing interprofessional collaboration, especially nurse-physician collaboration, holds promise for improving patient care and creating satisfying work roles. A palliative care team seized the opportunity to pilot a different approach to patient and family care when faced with a reduction in medical staff. Grounded in a collaborative patient-centred practice approach, the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association's National Model to Guide Hospice Palliative Care (2002), and outcomes from program retreats and workgroups, a collaborative person-centred model of care was developed for a 12-bed pilot project. Preliminary findings show that the pilot project team perceived some specific benefits in continuity of care and interprofessional collaboration, while the presence of the physician was reduced to an average of 3.82 hours on the pilot wing, compared with 8 hours on the non-pilot wings. This pilot study suggests that a person-centred model, when focused on the physician-nurse dyad, may offer improved efficiency, job satisfaction and continuity of care on a palliative care unit. Incorporating all team members and developing strategies to successfully expand the model across the whole unit are the next challenges. Further research into the impact of these changes on the health care professionals, management and patients and families is essential.

  8. The role of relationships in collaborative partnership success: Lessons from the Alaska Fourth R project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Claire V; Exner-Cortens, Deinera; Siebold, Wendi; Moore, Kami; Grassgreen, Lori; Owen, Patricia; Rausch, Ann; Rosier, Mollie

    2018-04-01

    Collaborative partnerships are critical to achieving health equity. As such, it is important to understand what contributes to the success of such partnerships. This paper describes the Alaska Fourth R collaborative, a multisectoral group of agencies (including education, health and human services, the violence against women sector, the governor's council on domestic violence, and an external evaluator) that successfully planned, implemented and evaluated a multi-focus health education program statewide. The purpose of this paper was to explore the ways in which seven pre-identified factors contributed to the successful achievement of the collaborative's goals. This project was grounded in community-based research principles, and collectively, the group chose to use Roussos and Fawcett's (2000) seven-factor model as the basis for the project. Using this model as a guide, semi-structured interviews were conducted with five leaders from the key organizations in the collaborative. In interviews, stakeholders described how each of the seven factors functioned in the Alaska collaborative to contribute to project success, with a particular focus on the critical role of relationships. Three specific relationship facets emerged as cross-cutting themes: flexibility, transparency, and prioritization. In sum, taking the time to build deep and authentic relationships, and then developing a shared vision and mission within the context of relationships that are flexible, transparent and prioritized, provided a strong foundation for future success in this collaborative. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Disease Management of Early Childhood Caries: ECC Collaborative Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Man Wai; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Lieberman, Martin; Lee, Jessica Y; Scoville, Richard; Hannon, Cindy; Maramaldi, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, the standard of care for early childhood caries (ECC) has been primarily surgical and restorative treatment with little emphasis on preventing and managing the disease itself. It is now recognized that surgical treatment alone does not address the underlying etiology of the disease. Despite costly surgeries and reparative treatment, the onset and progression of caries are likely to continue. A successful rebalance of risk and protective factors may prevent, slow down, or even arrest dental caries and its progression. An 18-month risk-based chronic disease management (DM) approach to address ECC in preschool children was implemented as a quality improvement (QI) collaborative by seven teams of oral health care providers across the United States. In the aggregate, fewer DM children experienced new cavitation, pain, and referrals to the operating room (OR) for restorative treatment compared to baseline historical controls. The teams found that QI methods facilitated adoption of the DM approach and resulted in improved care to patients and better outcomes overall. Despite these successes, the wide scale adoption and spread of the DM approach may be limited unless health policy and payment reforms are enacted to compensate providers for implementing DM protocols in their practice.

  10. Disease Management of Early Childhood Caries: ECC Collaborative Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Wai Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the standard of care for early childhood caries (ECC has been primarily surgical and restorative treatment with little emphasis on preventing and managing the disease itself. It is now recognized that surgical treatment alone does not address the underlying etiology of the disease. Despite costly surgeries and reparative treatment, the onset and progression of caries are likely to continue. A successful rebalance of risk and protective factors may prevent, slow down, or even arrest dental caries and its progression. An 18-month risk-based chronic disease management (DM approach to address ECC in preschool children was implemented as a quality improvement (QI collaborative by seven teams of oral health care providers across the United States. In the aggregate, fewer DM children experienced new cavitation, pain, and referrals to the operating room (OR for restorative treatment compared to baseline historical controls. The teams found that QI methods facilitated adoption of the DM approach and resulted in improved care to patients and better outcomes overall. Despite these successes, the wide scale adoption and spread of the DM approach may be limited unless health policy and payment reforms are enacted to compensate providers for implementing DM protocols in their practice.

  11. From innovation to implementation - SME collaboration in student projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bridgwood, Ian

    The Center for Bachelor of Engineering Studies at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU Diplom) [1] provides B.Eng. programs with the Conceive Design Implement and Operate framework [2] as a central element. Courses are designed to be a source of innovation, particularly in relation to small a...... and medium sized enterprises (SME) in the region. The project based courses teach students to undertake the analysis, design and implementation of systems which are relevant to and in cooperation with SMEs....

  12. IT Mangement for Transforming Local Government - a Danish Collaborative Practice Research Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Agger Nielsen, Jeppe

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the methodology and preliminary findings from an on-going Danish collaborative practice research project concerning IT-Management in Transformational e-Government - DISIMIT. The ambition of the DISIMIT project is to improve IT management in local governments...... (municipalities) and to contribute with knowledge about IT-Management to the IS literature in general and to the e-government literature in particular. The paper reports on the process of conducting collaborative practice research and the selected findings from the empirical research activities. Up till now...... of eGovernment maturity and diagnosed the six main challenges faced by local governments in their efforts of realizing transformational e-Government. From these challenges, the project chose three challenges to investigate further according to the principles from Collaborative Practice Research...

  13. A Social Contract for University-Industry Collaboration: A Case of Project-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Tero

    This study determines a social contract for a form of university-industry collaboration to a project-based learning environment in close collaboration with industry. The author's previous studies on moral conflicts in a project-based learning (PjBL) environment and his 5-year engagement in the PjBL environment are used as background knowledge, and John Rawls' veil of ignorance is used as a method in the contract formulation. Fair and impartial treatment of actors is strived for with the contract which constitutes of sets of obligations for each party, students, clients, and university (instructors) in the chosen project course. With the contract fair and impartial treatment of actors is strived for and the most dilemmatic moral conflicts are tried to be avoided. The forming of the social contract is evaluated, and implications for research and collaborations in practice are offered.

  14. Collaboration and Crisis in Mega Projects: A Study in Cross Corporate Culture Conflict and its Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Smits

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Projects typically involve multiple partners coming together to form a temporary project organization that manages project execution. Partners begin their relationship with soaring aspirations to collaborate but as they move through the project’s various phases and they experience friction, especially those related to cultural clashes, their noble aspirations succumb to creeping, if not full blown, crisis. This, in turn, creates lost relationality and compromised execution. Thus, the question: How can project partners manage the integration of differing corporate cultures and work processes to produce the most effective and efficient outcomes?  Using the mega project of the Panama Canal Expansion Program, the authors explore how a multicultural project organization moved from dysfunctional relationality to synergistic, self-reinforcing, collaboration. A “Collabyrinth” (Smits, 2013 model explores how participants learned to collaborate in a holding environment saturated with layers of complex cultural difference.  The Collabyrinth is composed of six comingling elements: (1 Conflicting Conditions, (2 Submarining, (3 Seeking Consent, (4 Storytelling, (5 Crafting Reciprocal Relations, (6 Synergizing. Certain aspects of crisis management are employed to explain intra-collabyrinth dynamics. Those aspects are: (1 Coming of the Forerunners, (2 Acuteness in the Now, (3 Resolution Seeking, and (4 Constructing Relationality. Specific examples of the collabyrinth journey are provided and recommendations are made to harness the positive power of cross-corporate culture collaboration.

  15. Discovering beaten paths in collaborative ontology-engineering projects using Markov chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walk, Simon; Singer, Philipp; Strohmaier, Markus; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A; Noy, Natalya F

    2014-10-01

    Biomedical taxonomies, thesauri and ontologies in the form of the International Classification of Diseases as a taxonomy or the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus as an OWL-based ontology, play a critical role in acquiring, representing and processing information about human health. With increasing adoption and relevance, biomedical ontologies have also significantly increased in size. For example, the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, which is currently under active development by the World Health Organization contains nearly 50,000 classes representing a vast variety of different diseases and causes of death. This evolution in terms of size was accompanied by an evolution in the way ontologies are engineered. Because no single individual has the expertise to develop such large-scale ontologies, ontology-engineering projects have evolved from small-scale efforts involving just a few domain experts to large-scale projects that require effective collaboration between dozens or even hundreds of experts, practitioners and other stakeholders. Understanding the way these different stakeholders collaborate will enable us to improve editing environments that support such collaborations. In this paper, we uncover how large ontology-engineering projects, such as the International Classification of Diseases in its 11th revision, unfold by analyzing usage logs of five different biomedical ontology-engineering projects of varying sizes and scopes using Markov chains. We discover intriguing interaction patterns (e.g., which properties users frequently change after specific given ones) that suggest that large collaborative ontology-engineering projects are governed by a few general principles that determine and drive development. From our analysis, we identify commonalities and differences between different projects that have implications for project managers, ontology editors, developers and contributors working on collaborative ontology

  16. Discovering Beaten Paths in Collaborative Ontology-Engineering Projects using Markov Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walk, Simon; Singer, Philipp; Strohmaier, Markus; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A.; Noy, Natalya F.

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical taxonomies, thesauri and ontologies in the form of the International Classification of Diseases as a taxonomy or the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus as an OWL-based ontology, play a critical role in acquiring, representing and processing information about human health. With increasing adoption and relevance, biomedical ontologies have also significantly increased in size. For example, the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, which is currently under active development by the World Health Organization contains nearly 50, 000 classes representing a vast variety of different diseases and causes of death. This evolution in terms of size was accompanied by an evolution in the way ontologies are engineered. Because no single individual has the expertise to develop such large-scale ontologies, ontology-engineering projects have evolved from small-scale efforts involving just a few domain experts to large-scale projects that require effective collaboration between dozens or even hundreds of experts, practitioners and other stakeholders. Understanding the way these different stakeholders collaborate will enable us to improve editing environments that support such collaborations. In this paper, we uncover how large ontology-engineering projects, such as the International Classification of Diseases in its 11th revision, unfold by analyzing usage logs of five different biomedical ontology-engineering projects of varying sizes and scopes using Markov chains. We discover intriguing interaction patterns (e.g., which properties users frequently change after specific given ones) that suggest that large collaborative ontology-engineering projects are governed by a few general principles that determine and drive development. From our analysis, we identify commonalities and differences between different projects that have implications for project managers, ontology editors, developers and contributors working on collaborative ontology

  17. Project-organized collaborative learning in distance engineering education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Bajard, C.; Helbo, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Transferring a successful on-campus project-organized learning method to distance continued education is complicated by the fact, that the target group as well as the learning environment and forms of communication are fundamentally different. The Master of Industrial Information Technology...... distance education has been selected for experiments with utilization of new information and commu-nication technology and didactic adjustments to make this transfer from on-campus to off-campus a successful endeavor. The adjustments, as well as the assessment of their effect, are based on a system......-atic monitoring and evaluation of the first year, and subsequent reflections by students and teachers....

  18. Enabling remote access to projects in a large collaborative environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pais, V.F.; Balme, S.; Akpangny, H.S.; Iannone, F.; Strand, P.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of the Integrated Tokamak Modelling Task Force, a large number of software projects are made available to the task force members, including developers and end-users. This has been achieved through a combination of tools and technologies. The front-end is represented by a Java based portal system exposing a PHP project management system, GForge. These two applications are linked by a single sign-on mechanism, Shibboleth , and through secure HTTP request rewriting, where appropriate. Furthermore, the underlying storage facility is an OpenAFS distributed file system and the user base comes from both a network information server and an LDAP directory. Security mechanisms are those of a distributed system, with multiple access points and protocols used for reading and writing data. The present paper presents the challenges of integrating these different technologies and programming languages into a single, working, application presented to its users as a web portal. Chaining of the tools is explored through the user perspective, with an in-depth overview of the background transitions between the various systems involved with regard to security requirements for the front-end nodes and the policies as seen by the users.

  19. Enabling remote access to projects in a large collaborative environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pais, V. [INFLPR National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele (Romania); Balme, S. [CEA Cadarache, IRFM, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Iannonec, F. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Strand, P. [Department of Radio and Space Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Goteborg (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    In the context of the Integrated Tokamak Modeling Task Force, a large number of software projects are made available to the task force members, including developers and end-users. This has been achieved through a combination of tools and technologies. The front-end is represented by a Java based portal system exposing a PHP project management system, Gforge. These two applications are linked by a single sign-on mechanism, Shibboleth, and through secure HTTP request rewriting, where appropriate. Furthermore, the underlying storage facility is an OpenAFS distributed file system and the user base comes from both a network information server and an LDAP directory. Security mechanisms are those of a distributed system, with multiple access points and protocols used for reading and writing data. This document presents the challenges of integrating these different technologies and programming languages into a single, working, application presented to its users as a web portal. The chaining of the tools is explored through the user perspective, with an in-depth overview of the background transitions between the various systems involved with regard to security requirements for the front-end nodes and the policies as seen by the users. This document is composed of a poster and its abstract. (authors)

  20. Enabling remote access to projects in a large collaborative environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pais, V.F., E-mail: pvf2005@gmail.co [Laser Department, National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG-36, Bucharest 077125, Association EURATOM/MEdC (Romania); Balme, S.; Akpangny, H.S. [Association EURATOM CEA/IRFM CEA-Cadarache (France); Iannone, F. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R.ENEA Frascati, via E.Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Strand, P. [Department of Radio and Space Science, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goteborg (Sweden)

    2010-07-15

    In the context of the Integrated Tokamak Modelling Task Force, a large number of software projects are made available to the task force members, including developers and end-users. This has been achieved through a combination of tools and technologies. The front-end is represented by a Java based portal system exposing a PHP project management system, GForge. These two applications are linked by a single sign-on mechanism, Shibboleth , and through secure HTTP request rewriting, where appropriate. Furthermore, the underlying storage facility is an OpenAFS distributed file system and the user base comes from both a network information server and an LDAP directory. Security mechanisms are those of a distributed system, with multiple access points and protocols used for reading and writing data. The present paper presents the challenges of integrating these different technologies and programming languages into a single, working, application presented to its users as a web portal. Chaining of the tools is explored through the user perspective, with an in-depth overview of the background transitions between the various systems involved with regard to security requirements for the front-end nodes and the policies as seen by the users.

  1. The power of knowledge in collaborative projects across North and South

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Madsen, Lene Møller

    This paper studies outcome of collaboration between universities in Africa and Scandinavia. The African higher education landscape is a product of the colonial powers and subsequent uneven development leading to an academic dependency as argued by a number of African researchers. Today, many...... in the paper, where we (i) explores how North-driven projects approach knowledge as universal and transferable and thereby ignore diversity and local historical context; (ii) analyses the cultural production of African academics and methodological hegemony in collaborative projects; (iii) concludes...

  2. A Path to Successful Energy Retrofits: Early Collaboration through Integrated Project Delivery Teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrish, Kristen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This document guides you through a process for the early design phases of retrofit projects to help you mitigate frustrations commonly experienced by building owners and designers. It outlines the value of forming an integrated project delivery team and developing a communication and information-sharing infrastructure that fosters collaboration. This guide does not present a complete process for designing an energy retrofit for a building. Instead, it focuses on the early design phase tasks related to developing and selecting energy efficiency measures (EEMs) that benefit from collaboration, and highlights the resulting advantages.

  3. Collaborative project to co-ordinate care for patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennerley, Dorothy; Bolas, Robert; Bourne, Jennifer; Branson, Kathy; Cavenagh, Penny; Chappell, Pam; Collins, Gwen; Coveney, Nick; Day, Nicole; Hardman, Mary; Hayter, Sue; Fenner, Pam; Jones, Jennifer; Jordan, Siobhan; Noble, Brendon; Osbourne, Sarah; Smith, Carol; Wigens, Lynn

    2011-05-01

    Health leaders from across Suffolk joined together in a collaborative action-learning project to identify ways of offering more productive and personalised care for patients with dementia and their carers. The project revealed a range of factors necessary for success, notably professional collaboration and effective facilitation. The outcome was a range of evidenced-based recommendations to improve care and efficiency, as well as ensuring that the quality, innovation, productivity and prevention (QIPP) agenda was met. The lessons can be applied not just in dementia care, but to other long-term and complex care situations.

  4. ISS-NIH Collaborative Programme: final report of the projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    In July 2003, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the United States of America and the Istituto Superiore di Sanita (ISS) of Italy signed an agreement aimed at strengthening the ongoing research cooperation between USA and Italy. Over the years, the programme was able to create new partnerships and to foster the establishment of innovative synergies, the exchange of young researcher, and the merging of the best available skills, talents and know-how in different fields of biomedical sciences. This book contains the final report of the projects of the scientific cooperation between the two Countries. The report consists of two parts (in Italian and English) divided into four sections: Cancer, Neuroscience, Cardiovascular diseases, Infectious diseases [it

  5. A Descriptive Account of an Inter-Professional Collaborative Leadership Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura MacPhee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A collaborative project between an academic healthcare faculty and a professional development director resulted in the design, delivery and evaluation of an inter-professional collaborative leadership workshop with ongoing leadership development activities. The workshop attendees were five inter-professional teams from one large, urban cancer care center in Taipei, Taiwan. The workshop included didactic instruction complemented with team discussions and interactive exercises. Continued practice was encouraged, such as appreciative inquiry exercises and rotated team leadership. Evaluation involved the use of a cross-culturally validated collaborative practice tool and follow-up interviews and focus groups. Although the formal workshop was a 1-day session, continued organizational support and systematic approaches to collaborative leadership practice in clinical settings were necessary components for transfer of learning from the workshop to real life. This paper will include an overview of the foundational leadership concepts covered in the workshop. The instructional strategies, evaluation methods and outcomes will be discussed. The limitations and strengths of this collaborative leadership project will be provided, as well as future plans for a collaborative leadership development program.

  6. Identification of Tools and Techniques to Enhance Interdisciplinary Collaboration During Design and Construction Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Yolanda; Silverman, Susan R; Evans, Jennie

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect the perceptions of design professionals and clinicians regarding design process success strategies and elements of interprofessional engagement and communication during healthcare design and construction projects. Additional objectives were to gather best practices to maximize clinician engagement and provide tools and techniques to improve interdisciplinary collaboration for future projects. Strategies are needed to enhance the design and construction process and create interactions that benefit not only the project but the individuals working to see its completion. Meaningful interprofessional collaboration is essential to any healthcare design project and making sure the various players communicate is a critical element. This was a qualitative study conducted via an online survey. Respondents included architects, construction managers, interior designers, and healthcare personnel who had recently been involved in a building renovation or new construction project for a healthcare facility. Responses to open-ended questions were analyzed for themes, and descriptive statistics were used to provide insight into participant demographics. Information on the impressions, perceptions, and opportunities related to clinician involvement in design projects was collected from nurses, architects, interior designers, and construction managers. Qualitative analysis revealed themes of clinician input, organizational dynamics, and a variety of communication strategies to be the most frequently mentioned elements of successful interprofessional collaboration. This study validates the need to include clinician input in the design process, to consider the importance of organizational dynamics on design team functioning, and to incorporate effective communication strategies during design and construction projects.

  7. Socialisme ou Barbarie: From Castoriadis’ Project of Individual and Collective Autonomy to the Collaborative Commons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Papadimitropoulos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I examine the content of socialism in the work of Cornelius Castoriadis in its potential relation to the current emergence of collaborative commons. I begin by analysing Castoriadis’ conceptualisation of socialism, as crystallised in the project of individual and collective autonomy, which was initially demonstrated in the journal Socialisme ou Barbarie (1949-1965 and evolved thereafter in his later writings. I continue by briefly presenting some basic points of criticism, after which I explore the potential compatibility of Castoriadis’ political project with the prospect of market socialism, as the latter emerges today in the form of collaborative commons. I argue, in particular, that collaborative commons echo Castoriadis’ conception of socialism in several respects. Finally, I critically develop a series of proposals made by Vasilis Kostakis and Michel Bauwens that could provide fertile ground for further discussion on the prospect of the commons.

  8. Final Report Collaborative Project: Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Frank [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Dennis, John [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); MacCready, Parker [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Whitney, Michael M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

  9. Collaborative Project: Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Frank [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Dennis, John [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); MacCready, Parker [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Whitney, Michael [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-10-20

    This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

  10. A Collaborative Action Research Project towards Embedding ESD within the Higher Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián, Gisela

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present a collaborative action research project conducted at the University of Southampton with the aim to promote curriculum and professional development in education for sustainable development (ESD) and learn from everyday practices of academics. Design/methodology/approach: An action research approach guided by…

  11. Collaborative Learning Using a Project across Multiple Business Courses: A Cognitive Load and Knowledge Convergence Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Sandeep; Chandra, Aruna; Harper, Jeffrey S.; Sweetin, Vernon

    2015-01-01

    Four business professors at a state university in the Midwestern United States launched a collaborative learning project grounded in cognitive learning theory and knowledge convergence theory with the objective of assessing student learning gains in cross-functional knowledge (CFK), course-related knowledge (CRK), and overall satisfaction with…

  12. Promoting the Role of Occupational Therapy in School-Based Collaboration: Outcome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This evidence-based project provided a professional development opportunity for educators to enhance the awareness of school-based occupational therapy and promote a collaborative approach when supporting student participation in daily learning tasks. Through asynchronous web-based delivery, participants viewed five narrated PowerPoint…

  13. Networking support for collaborative virtual reality projects in national, european and international context

    OpenAIRE

    Hommes, F.; Pless, E.

    2004-01-01

    The report describes experiences from networking support for two three years virtual reality projects. Networking requirements depending on the virtual reality environment and the planned distributed scenarios are specified and verified in the real network. Networking problems especially due to the collaborative, distributed character of interaction via the Internet are presented.

  14. Knowledge Translation of Interprofessional Collaborative Patient-Centred Practice: The Working Together Project Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Colla J.; Archibald, Douglas; Stodel, Emma; Chambers, Larry W.; Hall, Pippa

    2008-01-01

    The Working Together (WT) project involved the design and delivery of an online learning resource for healthcare teams in long-term care (LTC) so that knowledge regarding interprofessional collaborative patient-centred practice (ICPCP) could be readily accessed and then transferred to the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to better…

  15. Harbin Institute of Technology collaborative base project at APS of Argonne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Liu, L. L.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the progress of Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT) collaborative base project, which was launched at Argonne National Laboratory in 2010, will be presented. The staff and students from HIT involved in advanced technological developments, which included tomography, high energy PDF, diffraction and scattering, and inelastic scattering techniques in APS to study structures changes of minerals and materials under high pressure conditions.

  16. Collaborative Complexities: Co-Authorship, Voice, and African American Rhetoric in Oral History Community Literacy Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobman, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    This co-authored article describes a community literacy oral history project involving 14 undergraduate students. It is intellectually situated at the intersection of writing studies, oral history, and African American rhetoric and distinguished by two features: 1) we were a combined team of 20 collaborators, and 2) our narrator, Frank Gilyard,…

  17. Re-Placing the Arts in Elementary School Curricula: An Interdisciplinary, Collaborative Action Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Allen; Riley, Jorge-Ayn

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative action research project aimed at deliberately "re-placing" art in the elementary curriculum through targeted planning, implementation, and assessment of an art integrated unit in an urban 4th grade classroom. Findings and implications should be relevant to elementary teachers, administrators, art specialists,…

  18. Observational study to mitigate seismic risks in mines: a new Japanese-South African collaborative project

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Durrheim, RJ

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Mining-induced earthquakes pose a hazard to workers in deep South African mines, while natural earthquakes pose a hazard to people living close to plate boundaries. Researchers introduce a 5-year Japanese-South African collaborative project entitled...

  19. Interdisciplinary collaboration within project-level NEPA teams in the US Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Freeman; Marc J. Stern; Michael Mortimer; Dale J. Blahna; Lee K. Cerveny

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary teamwork has become a foundation of natural resources planning and management in the US. Yet, we know little about the degree of interdisciplinary collaboration of natural resource planning teams. We conducted 10 case studies of Forest Service NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) teams working on projects related to the 2005 Travel Management Rule...

  20. The link class project : Collaborative virtual teams between Peru and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivos Rossini, L.M.; Rincon, Sandra; Rutkowski, Anne-Francoise

    2015-01-01

    The Link Class Project presented in this article provides an example of established collaborative group activities to negotiate and build a report together in virtual teams composed of students at Universidad ESAN, Lima (Peru) and Tilburg University, Tilburg (Netherlands). It further analyzes the

  1. The Hemingway Project: A Collaborative School-based Program for Teacher Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Shannon K.; And Others

    At Weber State University (Utah), teacher educators have collaborated with English faculty to design a pilot program (Hemingway Project) which serves as an initial effort to restructure the teacher education program. The program, funded by the Hemingway Foundation, is intended to provide greater integration of the university experience with actual…

  2. Comenius Project: Are e-Learning Collaborations of High School Students across Europe in Maths Possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonovits, Reinhard; McElroy, Jim; O'Loughlin, James; Townsend, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The overall aim of the project is to allow for the collaboration of high school students of different European countries on small, selected maths topics. This involves the use of technology, student mobility and English language competency. Benefits are also expected to accrue to teachers of mathematics by providing the opportunity to work with…

  3. Live Storybook Outcomes of Pilot Multidisciplinary Elementary Earth Science Collaborative Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeffing, C.; Pierson, R.

    2017-12-01

    Live Storybook Outcomes of pilot multidisciplinary elementary earth science collaborative project Anchoring phenomena leading to student led investigations are key to applying the NGSS standards in the classroom. This project employs the GLOBE elementary storybook, Discoveries at Willow Creek, as an inspiration and operational framework for a collaborative pilot project engaging 4th grade students in asking questions, collecting relevant data, and using analytical tools to document and understand natural phenomena. The Institute of Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), a GLOBE Partner, the Outdoor Campus, an informal educational outdoor learning facility managed by South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks, University of Sioux Falls, and All City Elementary, Sioux Falls are collaborating partners in this project. The Discoveries at Willow Creek storyline introduces young students to the scientific process, and models how they can apply science and engineering practices (SEPs) to discover and understand the Earth system in which they live. One innovation associated with this project is the formal engagement of elementary students in a global citizen science program (for all ages), GLOBE Observer, and engaging them in data collection using GLOBE Observer's Cloud and Mosquito Habitat Mapper apps. As modeled by the fictional students from Willow Creek, the 4th grade students will identify their 3 study sites at the Outdoor Campus, keep a journal, and record observations. The students will repeat their investigations at the Outdoor Campus to document and track change over time. Students will be introduced to "big data" in a manageable way, as they see their observations populate GLOBE's map-based data visualization and . Our research design recognizes the comfort and familiarity factor of literacy activities in the elementary classroom for students and teachers alike, and postulates that connecting a science education project to an engaging storybook text will contribute to a

  4. How Ontologies are Made: Studying the Hidden Social Dynamics Behind Collaborative Ontology Engineering Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmaier, Markus; Walk, Simon; Pöschko, Jan; Lamprecht, Daniel; Tudorache, Tania; Nyulas, Csongor; Musen, Mark A; Noy, Natalya F

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, evaluation methods in the field of semantic technologies have focused on the end result of ontology engineering efforts, mainly, on evaluating ontologies and their corresponding qualities and characteristics. This focus has led to the development of a whole arsenal of ontology-evaluation techniques that investigate the quality of ontologies as a product . In this paper, we aim to shed light on the process of ontology engineering construction by introducing and applying a set of measures to analyze hidden social dynamics. We argue that especially for ontologies which are constructed collaboratively, understanding the social processes that have led to its construction is critical not only in understanding but consequently also in evaluating the ontology. With the work presented in this paper, we aim to expose the texture of collaborative ontology engineering processes that is otherwise left invisible. Using historical change-log data, we unveil qualitative differences and commonalities between different collaborative ontology engineering projects. Explaining and understanding these differences will help us to better comprehend the role and importance of social factors in collaborative ontology engineering projects. We hope that our analysis will spur a new line of evaluation techniques that view ontologies not as the static result of deliberations among domain experts, but as a dynamic, collaborative and iterative process that needs to be understood, evaluated and managed in itself. We believe that advances in this direction would help our community to expand the existing arsenal of ontology evaluation techniques towards more holistic approaches.

  5. How Ontologies are Made: Studying the Hidden Social Dynamics Behind Collaborative Ontology Engineering Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmaier, Markus; Walk, Simon; Pöschko, Jan; Lamprecht, Daniel; Tudorache, Tania; Nyulas, Csongor; Musen, Mark A.; Noy, Natalya F.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, evaluation methods in the field of semantic technologies have focused on the end result of ontology engineering efforts, mainly, on evaluating ontologies and their corresponding qualities and characteristics. This focus has led to the development of a whole arsenal of ontology-evaluation techniques that investigate the quality of ontologies as a product. In this paper, we aim to shed light on the process of ontology engineering construction by introducing and applying a set of measures to analyze hidden social dynamics. We argue that especially for ontologies which are constructed collaboratively, understanding the social processes that have led to its construction is critical not only in understanding but consequently also in evaluating the ontology. With the work presented in this paper, we aim to expose the texture of collaborative ontology engineering processes that is otherwise left invisible. Using historical change-log data, we unveil qualitative differences and commonalities between different collaborative ontology engineering projects. Explaining and understanding these differences will help us to better comprehend the role and importance of social factors in collaborative ontology engineering projects. We hope that our analysis will spur a new line of evaluation techniques that view ontologies not as the static result of deliberations among domain experts, but as a dynamic, collaborative and iterative process that needs to be understood, evaluated and managed in itself. We believe that advances in this direction would help our community to expand the existing arsenal of ontology evaluation techniques towards more holistic approaches. PMID:24311994

  6. Evaluation of a collaborative project to develop sustainable healthcare education in eight UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, S C; Mortimer, F

    2017-09-01

    Environmental change poses pressing challenges to public health and calls for profound and far-reaching changes to policy and practice across communities and health systems. Medical schools can act as a seedbed where knowledge, skills and innovation to address environmental challenges can be developed through innovative and collaborative approaches. The objectives of this study were to (1) explore drivers and challenges of collaboration for educational development between and within medical schools; (2) evaluate the effectiveness of a range of pedagogies for sustainable healthcare education; and (3) identify effective strategies to facilitate the renewal of medical curricula to address evolving health challenges. Participatory action research. Medical school teams participated in a nine-month collaborative project, including a one-day seminar to learn about sustainable healthcare education and develop a project plan. After the seminar, teams were supported to develop, deliver and evaluate new teaching at their medical school. New teaching was introduced at seven medical schools. A variety of pedagogies were represented. Collaboration between schools motivated and informed participants. The main challenges faced related to time pressures. Educators and students commented that new teaching was enjoyable and effective at improving knowledge and skills. Collaborative working supported educators to develop and implement new teaching sessions rapidly and effectively. Collaboration can help to build educators' confidence and capacity in a new area of education development. Different forms of collaboration may be appropriate for different circumstances and at different stages of education development. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. NASA Human Health and Performance Center: Open innovation successes and collaborative projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Elizabeth E.; Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-11-01

    In May 2007, what was then the Space Life Sciences Directorate published the 2007 Space Life Sciences Strategy for Human Space Exploration, setting the course for development and implementation of new business models and significant advances in external collaboration over the next five years. The strategy was updated on the basis of these accomplishments and reissued as the NASA Human Health and Performance Strategy in 2012, and continues to drive new approaches to innovation for the directorate. This short paper describes the successful execution of the strategy, driving organizational change through open innovation efforts and collaborative projects, including efforts of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC).

  8. It takes two to tango : Investigating the antecedents and consequences of effective collaboration between designers and managers in innovation projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabeau, K.E.

    2016-01-01

    Designers are increasingly playing a strategic role in innovation projects. They can do this, amongst others, by more effectively collaborating with the managers of these projects. This thesis investigates the antecedents and consequences of effective collaboration between designers and managers in

  9. Preventing Elder Abuse: The Texas Plan for a Coordinated Service Delivery System. Collaborative Elder Abuse Prevention Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Garry L.

    The Texas Department of Human Services, in collaboration with 13 other public and private organizations, co-sponsored a statewide Collaborative Elder Abuse Prevention project. The goal of this project is to develop a comprehensive, long-range plan for the prevention of elder abuse, a method for achieving a coordinated service delivery system for…

  10. Collaborative School Innovation Project as a Pivot for Teachers' Professional Development: The Case of Acharnes' Second Chance School in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsarou, Eleni; Tsafos, Vassilis

    2008-01-01

    A collaborative school innovation project is explored as a pivot for the professional development of the teachers involved. The Second Chance School (SCS) of Acharnes in Greece constitutes such a collaborative innovative project, regarding the underlying theory of multiliteracies, its decentralised character, respect for student individuality, and…

  11. Monitoring of Space and Earth electromagnetic environment by MAGDAS project: Collaboration with IKIR - Introduction to ICSWSE/MAGDAS project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikawa Akimasa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For study of coupling processes in the Solar-Terrestrial System, International Center for Space Weather Science and Education (ICSWSE, Kyushu University has developed a real time magnetic data acquisition system (the MAGDAS project around the world. The number of observational sites is increasing every year with the collaboration of host countries. Now at this time, the MAGDAS Project has installed 78 real time magnetometers – so it is the largest magnetometer array in the world. The history of global observation at Kyushu University is over 30 years and number of developed observational sites is over 140. Especially, Collaboration between IKIR is extended back to 1990's. Now a time, we are operating Flux-gate magnetometer and FM-CW Radar. It is one of most important collaboration for space weather monitoring. By using MAGDAS data, ICSWSE produces many types of space weather index, such as EE-index (for monitoring long tern and shot term variation of equatorial electrojet, Pc5 index (for monitoring solar-wind velocity and high energy electron flux, Sq-index (for monitoring global change of ionospheric low and middle latitudinal current system, and Pc3 index (for monitoring of plasma density variation at low latitudes. In this report, we will introduce recent development of MAGDAS/ICSWSE Indexes project and topics for new open policy for MAGDAS data will be also discussed.

  12. Monitoring of Space and Earth electromagnetic environment by MAGDAS project: Collaboration with IKIR - Introduction to ICSWSE/MAGDAS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Akimasa; Fujimoto, Akiko; Ikeda, Akihiro; Uozumi, Teiji; Abe, Shuji

    2017-10-01

    For study of coupling processes in the Solar-Terrestrial System, International Center for Space Weather Science and Education (ICSWSE), Kyushu University has developed a real time magnetic data acquisition system (the MAGDAS project) around the world. The number of observational sites is increasing every year with the collaboration of host countries. Now at this time, the MAGDAS Project has installed 78 real time magnetometers - so it is the largest magnetometer array in the world. The history of global observation at Kyushu University is over 30 years and number of developed observational sites is over 140. Especially, Collaboration between IKIR is extended back to 1990's. Now a time, we are operating Flux-gate magnetometer and FM-CW Radar. It is one of most important collaboration for space weather monitoring. By using MAGDAS data, ICSWSE produces many types of space weather index, such as EE-index (for monitoring long tern and shot term variation of equatorial electrojet), Pc5 index (for monitoring solar-wind velocity and high energy electron flux), Sq-index (for monitoring global change of ionospheric low and middle latitudinal current system), and Pc3 index (for monitoring of plasma density variation at low latitudes). In this report, we will introduce recent development of MAGDAS/ICSWSE Indexes project and topics for new open policy for MAGDAS data will be also discussed.

  13. NASA Human Health and Performance Center: Open Innovation Successes and Collaborative Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.

    2014-01-01

    In May 2007, what was then the Space Life Sciences Directorate published the 2007 Space Life Sciences Strategy for Human Space Exploration, which resulted in the development and implementation of new business models and significant advances in external collaboration over the next five years. The strategy was updated on the basis of these accomplishments and reissued as the NASA Human Health and Performance Strategy in 2012, and continues to drive new approaches to innovation for the directorate. This short paper describes the open innovation successes and collaborative projects developed over this timeframe, including the efforts of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC), which was established to advance human health and performance innovations for spaceflight and societal benefit via collaboration in new markets.

  14. Insights into the use and affordances of social and collaborative applications for student projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omolola Ola Bankole

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of social and collaborative computing has the potential of assisting learning and improving the ability to work together as part of a team. Team work is a graduate attribute that students need to acquire before transitioning from university into the workplace. The aim of this exploratory research was to provide insights into the use of social and collaborative applications by Computer Science students, and the emergent affordances student project teams have created with the use of these applications. It answers the questions: What elearning platforms or applications do students use to collaborate for team projects? What technology affordance draws students to use these applications? This study adopts affordance theory as the theoretical framework. Two types of content analysis: conventional content analysis and summative content analysis were used to analyse the data. Data was gathered using a pre-designed questionnaire with the teams during the first semester of 2016. Findings show that the university’s elearning platform is utilised for some of their courses; however students seem to prefer free and open source platforms. Student project teams used applications such as WhatsApp, Telegram, Dropbox, Google Drive, Google Docs, as well as email messages, to work jointly, and were successfully able to complete their team projects. Four types of technology affordances: communicative-affordance, document share-affordance, course resource-affordance, and integrity-affordance, were identified as being relevant.

  15. The Comparative Study of Collaborative Learning and SDLC Model to develop IT Group Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorapak Pukdesree

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this research were to compare the attitudes of learners between applying SDLC model with collaborative learning and typical SDLC model and to develop electronic courseware as group projects. The research was a quasi-experimental research. The populations of the research were students who took Computer Organization and Architecture course in the academic year 2015. There were 38 students who participated to the research. The participants were divided voluntary into two groups including an experimental group with 28 students using SDLC model with collaborative learning and a control group with 10 students using typical SDLC model. The research instruments were attitude questionnaire, semi-structured interview and self-assessment questionnaire. The collected data was analysed by arithmetic mean, standard deviation, and independent sample t-test. The results of the questionnaire revealed that the attitudes of the learners using collaborative learning and SDLC model were statistically significant difference between the mean score for experimental group and control group at a significance level of 0.05. The independent statistical analyses were significantly different between the two groups at a significance level of 0.05. The results of the interviewing revealed that most of the learners had the corresponding opinions that collaborative learning was very useful with highest level of their attitudes comparing with the previous methodology. Learners had left some feedbacks that collaborative learning should be applied to other courses.

  16. ON EXPERIENCE OF THE COLLABORATION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM PODIO IMPLEMENTATION IN THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii V. Semenets

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Information Technologies role in the medical university management is analyzed. The importance of the application of the electronic document management in the medical universities is shown. The implementation capabilities of the electronic document management system within a cloud services are shown. A Podio collaboration and project management cloud service features overview is presented. The methodology of the Podio capabilities usage to the medical university task management solving is developed. An approaches to the Podio Workspaces and Applications development for the faculties collaboration and project management in the departments of the medical universities are presented. The examples of the Podio features usage to the work-flow automation of the information-analytical and hardware and software support departments of the Ternopil State Medical University named after I. Ja. Horbachevsky are shown.

  17. Mastering data-intensive collaboration and decision making research and practical applications in the dicode project

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book reports on cutting-edge research carried out within the context of the EU-funded Dicode project, which aims at facilitating and augmenting collaboration and decision making in data-intensive and cognitively complex settings. Whenever appropriate, Dicode builds on prominent high-performance computing paradigms and large data processing technologies to meaningfully search, analyze, and aggregate data from diverse, extremely large, and rapidly evolving sources. The Dicode approach and services are fully explained, and particular emphasis is placed on deepening insights regarding the exploitation of big data, as well as on collaboration and issues relating to sense-making support. Building on current advances, the solution developed in the Dicode project brings together the reasoning capabilities of both the machine and humans. It can be viewed as an innovative “workbench” incorporating and orchestrating a set of interoperable services that reduce the data intensiveness and complexity overload at cr...

  18. Team collaborative innovation management based on primary pipes automatic welding project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Wang Dong; Zhang Ke

    2012-01-01

    The welding quality of primary pipe directly affects the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Primary pipe automatic welding, first of its kind in China, is a complex systematic project involving many facets, such as design, manufacturing, material, and on-site construction. A R and D team was formed by China Guangdong Nuclear Power Engineering Co., Ltd. (CNPEC) together with other domestic nuclear power design institutes, and manufacturing and construction enterprises. According to the characteristics of nuclear power plant construction, and adopting team collaborative innovation management mode, through project co-ordination, resources allocation and building production, education and research collaborative innovation platform, CNPEC successfully developed the primary pipe automatic welding technique which has been widely applied to the construction of nuclear power plant, creating considerable economic benefits. (authors)

  19. The Comparative Study of Collaborative Learning and SDLC Model to develop IT Group Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Sorapak Pukdesree

    2017-01-01

    The main objectives of this research were to compare the attitudes of learners between applying SDLC model with collaborative learning and typical SDLC model and to develop electronic courseware as group projects. The research was a quasi-experimental research. The populations of the research were students who took Computer Organization and Architecture course in the academic year 2015. There were 38 students who participated to the research. The participants were divided voluntary into two g...

  20. The Link Class Project: Collaborative virtual teams between Peru and The Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Mariella Olivos Rossini; Sandra Rincón; Anne-Francoise Rutkowski

    2015-01-01

    The Link Class Project presented in this article provides an example of established collaborative group activities to negotiate and build a report together in virtual teams composed of students at Universidad ESAN, Lima (Peru) and Tilburg University, Tilburg (Netherlands). It further analyzes the effects of a campus based internationalization strategy supported by the use of technology. Based on previous experiences with virtual classrooms, the authors adhere to the ancient Chinese philosophe...

  1. Boosting innovation in the water sector - The role and lessons learned from collaborative projects

    OpenAIRE

    Alegre, H.; Coelho, S.T.; Feliciano, J.; Matos, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    A key worldwide challenge in most sectors is to boost the effective adoption of innovation, as underpinned by the new European Union research programme Horizon 2020, which focuses on increasing innovation in Europe from 2014 to 2020. This is particularly relevant in the water sector, often perceived as conservative and averse to change. This paper discusses the role that collaborative knowledge-transfer projects can play in effectively rolling out R&D in the water industry. LNEC (Laboratório ...

  2. Project-focused activity and knowledge tracker: a unified data analysis, collaboration, and workflow tool for medicinal chemistry project teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodney, Marian D; Brosius, Arthur D; Gregory, Tracy; Heck, Steven D; Klug-McLeod, Jacquelyn L; Poss, Christopher S

    2009-12-01

    Advances in the field of drug discovery have brought an explosion in the quantity of data available to medicinal chemists and other project team members. New strategies and systems are needed to help these scientists to efficiently gather, organize, analyze, annotate, and share data about potential new drug molecules of interest to their project teams. Herein we describe a suite of integrated services and end-user applications that facilitate these activities throughout the medicinal chemistry design cycle. The Automated Data Presentation (ADP) and Virtual Compound Profiler (VCP) processes automate the gathering, organization, and storage of real and virtual molecules, respectively, and associated data. The Project-Focused Activity and Knowledge Tracker (PFAKT) provides a unified data analysis and collaboration environment, enhancing decision-making, improving team communication, and increasing efficiency.

  3. Collaborative Engagement Approaches For Delivering Sustainable Infrastructure Projects In The AEC Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetola, Alaba

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The public sector has traditionally financed and operated infrastructure projects using resources from taxes and various levies (e.g. fuel taxes, road user charges. However, the rapid increase in human population growth coupled with extended globalisation complexities and associated social/political/economic challenges have placed new demands on the purveyors and operators of infrastructure projects. The importance of delivering quality infrastructure has been underlined by the United Nations declaration of the Millennium Development Goals; as has the provision of ‘adequate’ basic structures and facilities necessary for the well-being of urban populations in developing countries. Thus, in an effort to finance developing countries’ infrastructure needs, most countries have adopted some form of public-private collaboration strategy. This paper critically reviews these collaborative engagement approaches, identifies and highlights 10 critical themes that need to be appropriately captured and aligned to existing business models in order to successfully deliver sustainable infrastructure projects. Research findings show that infrastructure services can be delivered in many ways, and through various routes. For example, a purely public approach can cause problems such as slow and ineffective decision-making, inefficient organisational and institutional augmentation, and lack of competition and inefficiency (collectively known as government failure. On the other hand, adopting a purely private approach can cause problems such as inequalities in the distribution of infrastructure services (known as market failure. Thus, to overcome both government and market failures, a collaborative approach is advocated which incorporates the strengths of both of these polarised positions.

  4. Redox phenomena controlling systems - a 7. framework programme collaborative project (2008-2012)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this EURATOM collaborative project is to understand Redox phenomena controlling the long-term release/retention of radionuclides (ReCosy programme) in nuclear waste disposal and to provide tools to apply the results to safety assessment. The project has been organized into 6 task forces: 1) implications of Redox for safety, 2) development of Redox determination methods, 3) Redox response of defined and near-natural systems, 4) Redox reactions of radionuclides, 5) Redox processes in radionuclide transport, and 6) Redox reactions affecting the spent fuel source-term

  5. Study of Collaborative Management for Transportation Construction Project Based on BIM Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianhua, Liu; Genchuan, Luo; Daiquan, Liu; Wenlei, Li; Bowen, Feng

    2018-03-01

    Abstract. Building Information Modeling(BIM) is a building modeling technology based on the relevant information data of the construction project. It is an advanced technology and management concept, which is widely used in the whole life cycle process of planning, design, construction and operation. Based on BIM technology, transportation construction project collaborative management can have better communication through authenticity simulation and architectural visualization and can obtain the basic and real-time information such as project schedule, engineering quality, cost and environmental impact etc. The main services of highway construction management are integrated on the unified BIM platform for collaborative management to realize information intercommunication and exchange, to change the isolated situation of information in the past, and improve the level of information management. The final BIM model is integrated not only for the information management of project and the integration of preliminary documents and design drawings, but also for the automatic generation of completion data and final accounts, which covers the whole life cycle of traffic construction projects and lays a good foundation for smart highway construction.

  6. Collaborative Learning with Sustainability-driven Projects: A Summary of the EPS@ISEP Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Fernando Silva

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the collaborative learning environment, aligned with the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, provided by the European Project Semester (EPS. EPS is a one semester capstone project programme offered by eighteen European engineering schools as part of their student ex-change programme portfolio. In this international programme, students are organized in teams, grouping individuals from diverse academic backgrounds and nationalities. The teams, after choosing a project proposal, become fully responsible for the conduction of their projects. By default, project proposals refer to open multidisciplinary real problems. The purpose of the project is to expose students to problems of a greater dimension and complexity than those faced throughout the degree programme as well as to put them in con-tact with the so-called real world, in opposition to the academic world. EPS provides an integrated framework for undertaking capstone projects, which is focused on multicultural and multidisciplinary teamwork, communication, problem-solving, creativity, leadership, entrepreneurship, ethical reasoning and global contextual analysis. Specifically, the design and development of sustainable systems for growing food allow students not only to reach the described objectives, but to foster sustainable development practices. As a re-sult, we recommend the adoption of this category of projects within EPS for the benefit of engineering students and of the society as a whole.

  7. Empowering Students in Information Literacy Practices Using a Collaborative Digital Library for School Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrizah Abdullah

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the affordances that a collaborative digital library (CDL can bring to bear on supporting information literacy practices in the digital information environment. It suggests that the digital library can contribute to student empowerment in information literacy practices while searching, using and collaboratively building the digital library resources. To illustrate this, the authors have been experimenting with the implementation of an integrated information literacy model based on Eisenberg and Berkowitz’ Big 6 Model and describes the CDL features in association with the information literacy dimensions in this model. The CDL focuses on the project-based learning approach to conduct students’ project, which supports specific information behaviors that underpin research and learning such as information seeking, browsing, encountering, foraging, sharing, gathering, filtering, and using. Findings regarding teachers’ reception of the digital library are encouraging as they feel the relevance of the digital library to the current requirement of the students’ project and its potential to entrench information and resource study skills through project-based learning.

  8. Collaborative Visualization Project: shared-technology learning environments for science learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pea, Roy D.; Gomez, Louis M.

    1993-01-01

    Project-enhanced science learning (PESL) provides students with opportunities for `cognitive apprenticeships' in authentic scientific inquiry using computers for data-collection and analysis. Student teams work on projects with teacher guidance to develop and apply their understanding of science concepts and skills. We are applying advanced computing and communications technologies to augment and transform PESL at-a-distance (beyond the boundaries of the individual school), which is limited today to asynchronous, text-only networking and unsuitable for collaborative science learning involving shared access to multimedia resources such as data, graphs, tables, pictures, and audio-video communication. Our work creates user technology (a Collaborative Science Workbench providing PESL design support and shared synchronous document views, program, and data access; a Science Learning Resource Directory for easy access to resources including two-way video links to collaborators, mentors, museum exhibits, media-rich resources such as scientific visualization graphics), and refine enabling technologies (audiovisual and shared-data telephony, networking) for this PESL niche. We characterize participation scenarios for using these resources and we discuss national networked access to science education expertise.

  9. Developing a general practice library: a collaborative project between a GP and librarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, D; Rossall, H

    2001-12-01

    The authors report on a self-completed questionnaire study from a North Yorkshire based general practice regarding the information needs of its clinicians. The work was carried out with a particular focus on the practice library, and the findings identified that a new approach to maintaining and developing the library was needed. The literature regarding the information needs of primary care clinicians and the role of practice libraries is considered, and compared to those of the clinicians at the practice. Discussion follows on how a collaborative project was set up between the practice and a librarian based at the local NHS Trust library in order to improve the existing practice library. Difficulties encountered and issues unique to the project are explored, including training implications presented by the implementation of electronic resources. Marketing activities implemented are discussed, how the library will operate in its new capacity, and how ongoing support and maintenance of the library will be carried out. It is concluded that although scepticism still exists regarding librarian involvement in practice libraries, collaboration between clinicians and librarians is an effective approach to the successful development and maintenance of a practice library, and recommendations are therefore made for similar collaborative work.

  10. Promoting Socially Shared Metacognitive Regulation in Collaborative Project-Based Learning: A Framework for the Design of Structured Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongho; Lim, Cheolil

    2018-01-01

    Despite the emergence of collaborative project-based learning in higher education settings, how it can be supported has received little attention. We noted the positive impact of socially shared metacognitive regulation on students' collaboration processes. The purpose of this study was to present a framework for the design and implementation of…

  11. Do project management and network governance contribute to inter-organisational collaboration in primary care? A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepman, Sanneke; Valentijn, Pim; Bruijnzeels, Marc; Maaijen, Marlies; de Bakker, Dinny; Batenburg, Ronald; de Bont, Antoinette

    2018-06-07

    The need for organisational development in primary care has increased as it is accepted as a means of curbing rising costs and responding to demographic transitions. It is only within such inter-organisational networks that small-scale practices can offer treatment to complex patients and continuity of care. The aim of this paper is to explore, through the experience of professionals and patients, whether, and how, project management and network governance can improve the outcomes of projects which promote inter-organisational collaboration in primary care. This paper describes a study of projects aimed at improving inter-organisational collaboration in Dutch primary care. The projects' success in project management and network governance was monitored by interviewing project leaders and board members on the one hand, and improvement in the collaboration by surveying professionals and patients on the other. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were applied to assess the projects. These were analysed, finally, using multi-level models in order to account for the variation in the projects, professionals and patients. Successful network governance was associated positively with the professionals' satisfaction with the collaboration; but not with improvements in the quality of care as experienced by patients. Neither patients nor professionals perceived successful project management as associated with the outcomes of the collaboration projects. This study shows that network governance in particular makes a difference to the outcomes of inter-organisational collaboration in primary care. However, project management is not a predictor for successful inter-organisational collaboration in primary care.

  12. Academic and Institutional Review Board Collaboration to Ensure Ethical Conduct of Doctor of Nursing Practice Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Jan M; Conley, Virginia; Williams, Janet K; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Countryman, Michele

    2015-07-01

    Navigating the regulations to protect human subjects and private health information for Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) projects can be a formidable task for students, faculty, and the institutional review board (IRB). Key stakeholders from the University of Iowa College of Nursing and the Human Subjects Office developed a standardized process for DNP students to follow, using a decision algorithm, a student orientation to the human subjects review process conducted by faculty and IRB chairs and staff, and a brief Human Subjects Research Determination form. Over 2 years, 109 students completed the process, and 96.3% of their projects were deemed not to be human subjects research. Every student submitted documentation of adherence to the standardized process. Less time was spent by students, faculty, and the IRB in preparing and processing review requests. The interprofessional collaboration resulted in a streamlined process for the timely review of DNP projects. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Project Adopsys as an example of international collaboration in the field of photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoric, Nenad; Livshits, Irina; Urbach, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Tendencies of international cooperation in engineering education became very visible during recent years. We demonstrate this statement on one currently running EU project ADOPSYS in the field of optical design, which is an important part of engineering education in photonics. This example shows the importance of the input from different countries and organizations - both from industry and academia. Seven universities and eight optical companies are involved in the project ADOPSYS. Sharing experience of Academia education activity we provide new international type of education "free-of borders". We are going to discuss the key enable technology - PHOTONICS, which is widely used in modern society. Engineering science became very international. For communicating between people from different countries the English language is now used almost exclusively. For a fruitful collaboration between people from different nations, in multi-national projects, tolerance and respect are required between people of different political, cultural, educational backgrounds.

  14. Developing Communicative and Cultural Competences in Portuguese through an Online Collaborative Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cristina Revheim Cunha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lessons should provide opportunities to use language in relevant ways. Cultural awareness is essential, as studying a language implies learning its cultural values. ACTFL advocates that cultural understanding is vital to prepare students for the demands of today’s globalized world. The U.S. Dept. of Education National Education Technology Plan (2010 claims that learning by technology “prepares them [students] to be more productive members of a globally competitive workforce”(p. xi. In order to promote a communicative experience with a cultural focus, the concepts of collaboration and autonomy were applied in a project where students used a Brazilian website and learned about the importance of a community tradition called Amigo Secreto. Students write personal descriptions and interact online. On the last day of class, students describe their secret friends and the class must guess who they are. The objectives are for students to work collaboratively, use authentic language and improve cultural knowledge.

  15. The ESA Hubble 15th Anniversary Campaign: A Trans-European collaboration project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoulias, Manolis; Christensen, Lars Lindberg; Kornmesser, Martin

    2006-08-01

    On April 24th 2005, NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope had been in orbit for 15 years. The anniversary was celebrated by ESA with the production of an 83 min. scientific movie and a 120 pages book, both titled ``Hubble, 15 years of discovery''. In order to cross language and distribution barriers a network of 16 translators and 22 partners from more than 10 countries was established. The DVD was distributed in approximately 700,000 copies throughout Europe. The project was amongst the largest of its kind with respect to collaboration, distribution and audience impact. It clearly demonstrated how international collaboration can produce effective cross-cultural educational and outreach products for astronomy.

  16. Spanish collaboration in the OECD Halden Reactor Project research on Gadolinia Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, M. I.; Jenssen, H. K.; Munoz-Reja, C.; Tverberg, T.

    2011-01-01

    Safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants benefit from research and development advances and related technical solutions. One research platform is the OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP), HRP is a joint undertaking of national organisations in 18 countries sponsoring a jointly financed programme under the auspices of the OECD-Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). As a member state, Spain is participating HRP research programs with ENUSA as partner in the fuel research programs. Various experiments are developed and performed also by providing materials, ENUSA collaborates with HRP on various experiments investigating the fuel behaviour, especially on Gd-bearing fuel. 20 years of successful collaboration between HRP and ENUSA is continuing with promising and results to ensure and enhance the safe operation of the Spanish and all other NPPs in the world. (Author) 12 refs.

  17. Boosting innovation in the water sector--the role and lessons learned from collaborative projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, H; Coelho, S T; Feliciano, J F; Matos, R

    2015-01-01

    A key worldwide challenge in most sectors is to boost the effective adoption of innovation, as underpinned by the new European Union research programme Horizon 2020, which focuses on increasing innovation in Europe from 2014 to 2020. This is particularly relevant in the water sector, often perceived as conservative and averse to change. This paper discusses the role that collaborative knowledge-transfer projects can play in effectively rolling out R&D in the water industry. LNEC (Laboratório Nacional de Engenharia Civil) has designed a structured model based on a phased programme and a network of utilities and researchers. The paper presents the core principles, the rationale, the model and methods used, and the theoretical background, as well as the project's impact, outcomes and products. The discussion highlights the lessons learnt and provides a formal analysis of the advantages of focusing on middle management as an effective entry point, even if innovation is needed across the organization. Making training materials, guidelines, use cases, data and software publicly available after the project's end has proven to have a decisive multiplying effect. The paper also argues in favour of the collaborative model as a basis for R&D sustainability, and details on-going and planned developments.

  18. Collaborative learning environments and collective creation in 3 weeks bside project experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Javier Rodríguez Sánchez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This  paper proposes  a  socio-critical review  and  reflection  related to collaborative learning environment as pedagogical agent and its relationship with artistic-practice communities of collective creativity. The main goal of this research is to introduce the case study 3 weeks bside project experience (3WBPE, from now on. Through participatory action research and the analysis of different concepts and their practical and theoretical aspects. In the framework of an education self-manage- ment development universe, the project pro- cess is based on a collaborative learning. It is focused on the constructions of a common discourse about the idea of territory that is represented in a publication and site specific exhibition. 3WBPE allowed setting up stanc- es that suggest a social interaction transfer related to construction of belong, participa- tion and transformation environment, ques- tion a teacher role or collective creation of a project, emphasizing the importance of pro- cess as a goal, beyond of culture artifact pro- ductions. It was dealt with dialog structures, where a social harmony supposed a personal and common reflection space about author’s stance, nigh socio-culture environments and the bond within the education, arts and visu- al culture focused in the horizontal and flexi- ble work capacity, that proposes a collabora- tive learning environment settings.

  19. Collaboration Across Professional Boundaries – The Emergence of Interpretation Drift and the Collective Creation of Project Jargon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mika Yasuoka

    2015-01-01

    research suggested a numbers of support systems that seek to diminish differences, understand others’ social worlds and achieve mutual understanding. However, interestingly, the cases introduced in this paper indicate that a key in such collaboration support resides in the collective creation process...... empirical collaborative design cases, we address the interpretation drift of common terms as an unavoidable integral aspect of the design process, and the ongoing collective creation of local languages or project jargon during the collaboration period as facilitators to enable collaborators to work beyond...

  20. Librarians as Part of Cross-Disciplinary, Multi-Institutional Team Projects: Experiences from the VIVO Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Norton, Hannah F.; Auten, Beth; Davis, Valrie I.; Holmes, Kristi L.; Johnson, Margeaux; Tennant, Michele R.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-disciplinary, team-based collaboration is essential for addressing today’s complex research questions, and librarians are increasingly entering into such collaborations. This study identifies skills needed as librarians integrate into cross-disciplinary teams, based on the experiences of librarians involved in the development and implementation of VIVO, a research discovery and collaboration platform. Participants discussed the challenges, skills gained, and lessons learned throughout the project. Their responses were analyzed in the light of the science of team science literature, and factors affecting collaboration on the VIVO team were identified. Skills in inclusive thinking, communication, perseverance, adaptability, and leadership were found to be essential. PMID:23833333

  1. Connecting biology and organic chemistry introductory laboratory courses through a collaborative research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltax, Ariana L; Armanious, Stephanie; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S; Pontrello, Jason K

    2015-01-01

    Modern research often requires collaboration of experts in fields, such as math, chemistry, biology, physics, and computer science to develop unique solutions to common problems. Traditional introductory undergraduate laboratory curricula in the sciences often do not emphasize connections possible between the various disciplines. We designed an interdisciplinary, medically relevant, project intended to help students see connections between chemistry and biology. Second term organic chemistry laboratory students designed and synthesized potential polymer inhibitors or inducers of polyglutamine protein aggregation. The use of novel target compounds added the uncertainty of scientific research to the project. Biology laboratory students then tested the novel potential pharmaceuticals in Huntington's disease model assays, using in vitro polyglutamine peptide aggregation and in vivo lethality studies in Drosophila. Students read articles from the primary literature describing the system from both chemical and biological perspectives. Assessment revealed that students emerged from both courses with a deeper understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of biology and chemistry and a heightened interest in basic research. The design of this collaborative project for introductory biology and organic chemistry labs demonstrated how the local interests and expertise at a university can be drawn from to create an effective way to integrate these introductory courses. Rather than simply presenting a series of experiments to be replicated, we hope that our efforts will inspire other scientists to think about how some aspect of authentic work can be brought into their own courses, and we also welcome additional collaborations to extend the scope of the scientific exploration. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  2. Interaction enablers, drivers and barriers of collaborative innovation projects between small firms and academia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filip, Diane; Hansen, Bettina Dencker; Frølunde, Thea Thorsgaard

    2016-01-01

    drivers, and main barriers. Our three major findings relate to the phases of a structured program, elements of collaborative innovation projects, and the facilitation of interaction at two levels, i.e. meta-level and micro-level, by two types of brokers. The operator of the regional program facilitates...... types of brokers acting at two different levels have proven to be useful in overcoming some of the classical barriers firms face when interacting with academia. Essentially, the gap between the world of business and the world of academia has been mitigated by the structured and formalized interactions...

  3. Stennis Space Center Salinity Drifter Project. A Collaborative Project with Hancock High School, Kiln, MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalcic, Maria; Turowski, Mark; Hall, Callie

    2010-01-01

    Presentation topics include: importance of salinity of coastal waters, habitat switching algorithm, habitat switching module, salinity estimates from Landsat for Sabine Calcasieu Basin, percent of time inundated in 2006, salinity data, prototyping the system, system as packaged for field tests, salinity probe and casing, opening for water flow, cellular antenna used to transmit data, preparing to launch, system is launched in the Pearl River at Stennis Space Center, data are transmitted to Twitter by cell phone modem every 15 minutes, Google spreadsheet I used to import the data from the Twitter feed and to compute salinity (from conductivity) and display charts of salinity and temperature, results are uploaded to NASA's Applied Science and Technology Project Office Webpage.

  4. LP DAAC MEaSUREs Project Artifact Tracking Via the NASA Earthdata Collaboration Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) is a NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) DAAC that supports selected EOS Community non-standard data products such as the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Emissivity Database (GED), and also supports NASA Earth Science programs such as Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) to contribute in providing long-term, consistent, and mature data products. As described in The LP DAAC Project Lifecycle Plan (Daucsavage, J.; Bennett, S., 2014), key elements within the Project Inception Phase fuse knowledge between NASA stakeholders, data producers, and NASA data providers. To support and deliver excellence for NASA data stewardship, and to accommodate long-tail data preservation with Community and MEaSUREs products, the LP DAAC is utilizing NASA's own Earthdata Collaboration Environment to bridge stakeholder communication divides. By leveraging a NASA supported platform, this poster describes how the Atlassian Confluence software combined with a NASA URS/Earthdata support can maintain each project's members, status, documentation, and artifact checklist. Furthermore, this solution provides a gateway for project communities to become familiar with NASA clients, as well as educating the project's NASA DAAC Scientists for NASA client distribution.

  5. WINDS (KIZUNA)-based Collaborative e-Learning Project in Thailand, Malaysia and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisanaga, Makoto; Takahashi, Shin; Kameyama, Keisuke; Fukui, Yukio; Kitawaki, Nobuhiko

    The expanding digital divide deprives students in developing countries with opportunities for education. Advanced countries have the ability to enhance those opportunities. For this study, the authors set up and tested a remote lecture system using a commercial communication satellite beginning in 2002. This project attempted to solve issues in remote lecture systems using conventional satellite systems, and to build up a real-time collaborative lecture delivery system using a new satellite, called the Wideband InterNetworking engineering test and Demonstration Satellite (WINDS). This work proposes a remote education system using satellites, enabling the issues raised in the pilot experiments to be solved. Principal outcomes in this project include improvements of the quality of image and sound, and the communication delay. The authors also demonstrate the usefulness of WINDS in the education field.

  6. Collaborative Projects Weaving Indigenous and Western Science, Knowledge and Perspectives in Climate Change Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Chase, M.; Brunacini, J.; Spellman, K.

    2017-12-01

    The "Reaching Arctic Communities Facing Climate Change" and "Feedbacks and Impacts of A Warming Arctic: Engaging Learners in STEM Using GLOBE and NASA Assets" projects are examples of Indigenous and western science communities' collaborative efforts in braiding multiple perspectives and methods in climate change education. Lessons being learned and applied in these projects include the need to invite and engage members of the indigenous and scientific communities in the beginning as a project is being proposed or formulated; the need for negotiated space in the project and activities where opportunity to present and access both knowledge systems is equitable, recognizes and validates each knowledge and method, and considers the use of pedagogical practices including pace/rhythm and instructional approach most suitable to the target audience. For example with Indigenous audiences/participants, it is important to follow local Indigenous protocol to start an event and/or use a resource that highlights the current experience or voices of Indigenous people with climate change. For mixed audience groups, it is critical to have personal introductions at the beginning of an event so that each participant is given an opportunity and encouraged to voice their ideas and opinions starting with how they want to introduce themselves and thus begin to establish a welcoming and collegial atmosphere for dialog. It is also important to communicate climate science in humanistic terms, that people and communities are affected not just the environment or economies. These collaborative partnerships produce mutual benefits including increased awareness and understanding of personal connections to climate change impacts; opportunities for cultural enrichment; opportunities for accessing elder knowledge which is highly valued as well as science, education and communication tools that are needed in working together in addressing issues and making communities resilient and adaptive.

  7. Roles for Agent Assistants in Field Science: Understanding Personal Projects and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancey, William J.

    2003-01-01

    A human-centered approach to computer systems design involves reframing analysis in terms of the people interacting with each other. The primary concern is not how people can interact with computers, but how shall we design work systems (facilities, tools, roles, and procedures) to help people pursue their personal projects, as they work independently and collaboratively? Two case studies provide empirical requirements. First, an analysis of astronaut interactions with CapCom on Earth during one traverse of Apollo 17 shows what kind of information was conveyed and what might be automated today. A variety of agent and robotic technologies are proposed that deal with recurrent problems in communication and coordination during the analyzed traverse. Second, an analysis of biologists and a geologist working at Haughton Crater in the High Canadian Arctic reveals how work interactions between people involve independent personal projects, sensitively coordinated for mutual benefit. In both cases, an agent or robotic system's role would be to assist people, rather than collaborating, because today's computer systems lack the identity and purpose that consciousness provides.

  8. The Proteomics Stock Market Project. A Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration in Biochemistry and Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Heath; Cox, James R.

    2004-04-01

    Students taking courses in different disciplines can work together to add unique elements to their educational experience. A model for this type of pedagogical approach has been established in the Proteomics Stock Market Project, a collaborative effort between instructors and students in the Department of Chemistry and Department of Management, Marketing, and Business Administration at Murray State University. Stage I involved biochemistry students investigating the topic of proteomics and choosing companies for potential investment based only on scientific investigation. Marketing and management students completed Stage II and provided an investment analysis on the companies selected in Stage I. In Stage III, the biochemistry students focused on a particular company and investigated a protein-based therapeutic product. Blackboard software was utilized in each stage of the project to facilitate the exchange of information and electronic documents. This project was designed to give biochemistry students an appreciation for the emerging field of proteomics and the marketing and management students a flavor for real-world applications of business principles. During the project, students were exposed to ideas and concepts not typically covered in their courses. With this involvement, the students had the opportunity to gain a broader perspective of course content compared to a more traditional curriculum.

  9. OPEN RADIATION: a collaborative project for radioactivity measurement in the environment by the public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François; Allain, E.; Baumont, G.; Berthelot, N.; Clairand, I.; Couvez, C.; Darley, G.; Henry, B.; Jolivet, T.; Laroche, P.; Lebau-Livé, A.; Lejeune, V.; Miss, J.; Monange, W.; Quéinnec, F.; Richet, Y.; Simon, C.; Trompier, F.; Vayron, F.

    2017-09-01

    After the Fukushima accident, initiatives emerged from the public to carry out themselves measurements of the radioactivity in the environment with various devices, among which smartphones, and to share data and experiences through collaborative tools and social networks. Such measurements have two major interests, on the one hand, to enable each individual of the public to assess his own risk regarding the radioactivity and, on the other hand, to provide "real time" data from the field at various locations, especially in the early phase of an emergency situation, which could be very useful for the emergency management. The objective of the OPENRADIATION project is to offer to the public the opportunity to be an actor for measurements of the radioactivity in the environment using connected dosimetric applications on smartphones. The challenge is to operate such a system on a sustainable basis in peaceful time and be useful in case of emergency. In "peaceful situation", this project is based on a collaborative approach with the aim to get complementary data to the existing ones, to consolidate the radiation background, to generate alerts in case of problem and to provide education & training and enhanced pedagogical approaches for a clear understanding of measures for the public. In case of emergency situation, data will be available "spontaneously" from the field in "real time" providing an opportunity for the emergency management and the communication with the public. … The practical objective is i) to develop a website centralising data from various systems/dosimeters, providing dose maps with raw and filtered data and creating dedicated areas for specific initiatives and exchanges of data and ii) to develop a data acquisition protocol and a dosimetric application using a connected dosimeter with a bluetooth connection. This project is conducted within a partnership between organisms' representative of the scientific community and associations to create links

  10. Scaffolding Wiki-Supported Collaborative Learning for Small-Group Projects and Whole-Class Collaborative Knowledge Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C-Y.; Reigeluth, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    While educators value wikis' potential, wikis may fail to support collaborative constructive learning without careful scaffolding. This article proposes literature-based instructional methods, revised based on two expert instructors' input, presents the collected empirical evidence on the effects of these methods and proposes directions for future…

  11. Project WEST: Fostering Scientific Inquiry and Collaborations From K Through Gray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsey, H. S.; Chapman, D. S.

    2007-12-01

    WEST (Water, the Environment, Science and Teaching) is a science education and outreach program at the University of Utah. WEST partners graduate students in the sciences with K-12 teachers to enhance inquiry- based science teaching in the Salt Lake City urban area. WEST has capitalized on the expertise of faculty and graduate students, scientists from state and federal agencies, local advocacy groups, and K-12 teachers to develop several placed-based scientific field projects for K-12 students. University members provide science content and ideas; state and federal researchers provide practical application and, often times, financial support; advocacy groups provide a tie to the community, and teachers provide a conduit for translating complex science concepts to students. These collaborations are built around a mutual interest in science education and anthropogenic influences on the quality and quantity of water resources critical to life in the arid West. Participants are relied upon to bring their unique perspective to each of the projects in order to meet a number of criteria: 1) projects should involve students in the entire scientific process from developing a hypothesis, making observations, data collection and analysis, 2) projects should be place-based and address interactions of water, the environment and society, and 3) projects should be directly tied to state education standards at appropriate grade levels. Examples of these projects include a water-quality study of Great Salt Lake where students participated in a research project on the lake. Students learned about navigation tools, collected and examined brine shrimp, and measured sulfide and chlorophyll concentrations as indicators of anthropogenic influences to Great Salt Lake. Hydrologists from the University of Utah and U.S. Geological Survey helped design this project and the Utah Dept. of Environmental Quality provided critical funds and supplies. In another project, students were involved in

  12. Marine Research Infrastructure collaboration in the COOPLUS project framework - Promoting synergies for marine ecosystems studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranzoli, L.; Best, M.; Embriaco, D.; Favali, P.; Juniper, K.; Lo Bue, N.; Lara-Lopez, A.; Materia, P.; Ó Conchubhair, D.; O'Rourke, E.; Proctor, R.; Weller, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding effects on marine ecosystems of multiple drivers at various scales; from regional such as climate and ocean circulation, to local, such as seafloor gas emissions and harmful underwater noise, requires long time-series of integrated and standardised datasets. Large-scale research infrastructures for ocean observation are able to provide such time-series for a variety of ocean process physical parameters (mass and energy exchanges among surface, water column and benthic boundary layer) that constitute important and necessary measures of environmental conditions and change/development over time. Information deduced from these data is essential for the study, modelling and prediction of marine ecosystems changes and can reveal and potentially confirm deterioration and threats. The COOPLUS European Commission project brings together research infrastructures with the aim of coordinating multilateral cooperation among RIs and identifying common priorities, actions, instruments, resources. COOPLUS will produce a Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA) which will be a shared roadmap for mid to long-term collaboration. In particular, marine RIs collaborating in COOPLUS, namely the European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water column Observatory: EMSO (Europe), the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI, USA), Ocean Networks Canada (ONC), and the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS, Australia), can represent a source of important data for researchers of marine ecosystems. The RIs can then, in turn, receive suggestions from researchers for implementing new measurements and stimulating cross-cutting collaborations and data integration and standardisation from their user community. This poster provides a description of EMSO, OOI, ONC and IMOS for the benefit of marine ecosystem studies and presents examples of where the analyses of time-series have revealed noteworthy environmental conditions, temporal trends and events.

  13. A Collaborative Disability Studies-based Undergraduate Art Project at Two Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Derby

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we discuss research findings from a collaborative visual arts curricular unit on ableism, which we implemented in non-Disability Studies undergraduate courses at two universities during the 2012-2013 academic year. Our project builds on previous research in which we (Derby, 2015, in press; Karr & Weida, 2013 began adding Disability Studies arts pedagogy to our undergraduate coursework. For this project, we developed a shared unit, which we implemented in a general freshman seminar course, an introductory art teaching methods course, and an upper level art education course on applied technology. Utilizing a pedagogy of transformation, we engaged students with shared resources, including lectures, readings, and videos on Disability Studies and ableism; the project culminated with each student producing and exhibiting both an artwork and an artist's statement. After reviewing the literature and describing the project and research methods, we provide a nuanced discussion of the data, especially the artwork. The data indicate that our students, who were previously unexposed to ableism, conceptualized ableism at least on an elementary level, with many students demonstrating advanced conceptualization of ableism in one or more of three categories. Our findings suggest that integrating Disability Studies into non-Disability Studies curricula on a small scale can be useful, but that results are limited by the complexities of disability. The success of the project indicates that incorporating Disability Studies into standard curricula through a pedagogy of transformation can reach typical college students who are unfamiliar with Disability Studies concepts.

  14. European commission - 7th framework programme. The collaborative project on European sodium fast reactor (CP ESFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, G.L.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes the key characteristics of the four years large Collaborative Project on European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP ESFR - 2009-2012); the CP ESFR follows the 6th FP project named 'Roadmap for a European Innovative SOdium cooled FAst Reactor - EISOFAR' further identifying, organizing and implementing a significant part of the needed R and D effort. The CP ESFR merges the contribution of 25 european partners; it will be realized under the aegis of the 7th FP under the Area - Advanced Nuclear Systems with a refund from the European Commission of 5.8 M euro (11.55 M euro total budget). It will be a key component of the European Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNE TP) and its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA). The inputs for the project are the key research goals for fourth generation of European sodium cooled fast reactors which can be summarized as follow: an improved safety with in particular the achievement of a robust architecture vis a vis of abnormal situations and the robustness of the safety demonstrations; the guarantee of a financial risk comparable to that of the other means of energy production; a flexible and robust management of the nuclear materials and especially the waste reduction through the Minor Actinides burning. (author)

  15. Impact of International Collaborative Project on Cultural Competence among Occupational Therapy Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Sood OTD, OTR/L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapy (OT educators recognize a need to ensure that OT students are culturally competent. The researchers developed the International Collaborative Project on Cultural Competence (ICPCC to help students understand the impact of cultural context on client care. Entry-level MOT students from a university in the US (N = 18 collaborated with BOT students (N = 4 and advanced MOT students (N = 9 from two universities in India using an online course management system WebCT. The study explored the impact of the ICPCC on OT students’ cultural competence and discusses students’ perceptions of culture on the OT process. The Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Health Care Professionals Revised© measured students’ cultural competence at baseline and immediately after participation in the ICPCC. Qualitative data was collected using a Self-Reflection Form. There was an increase in the cultural competence scores among all three groups of students after participating in the ICPCC at p value < .05. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data analysis: meaning of the term culture, impact of cultural on client- centered practice, and impact of cultural on OT outcomes. OT students recognized the role that cultural differences play in OT evaluation and intervention.

  16. Stimuli of Collaboration in Product Development: A Case Study in a Project Manufacturing Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jääskeläinen Aki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There is already a wide acceptance on the importance of involving supplier and customer companies in product development. Decent understanding prevails on the relationship-oriented approach to product development including various collaboration forms. However, there is less research on the factors explaining the decision of attending to joint product development. In addition, less studies have examined the integrated role of both suppliers and customers in product development initiatives. This study searches answers to the following research questions: 1. What is the role of different actors in product development initiatives? 2. What factors motivate suppliers and customers to participate in product development? The research is carried out as an in-depth qualitative single case study in a large project manufacturing company. It takes the perspective of a focal company striving for product improvements. The first part of the empirical study consists of 15 semi-structured interviews. The second part includes two discursive workshops and builds upon the results of the interviews. This study contributes to the existing research by explaining the challenges and conditions facilitating joint product development with supplier and purchaser companies. The results highlight the role of customers in improving the effectiveness of product development. As a practical contribution, the paper reports the application of workshop method as a facilitator of collaboration between supplier, purchaser (focal company and customer companies.

  17. Rancang Bangun Aplikasi “Collaborative Project Scheduler” Berbasis Mobile Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Agung Oka Widiarsana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kegagalan pencapaian target pada proyek dapat terjadi karena kurangnya perencanaan serta lemahnya pengawasan di dalam proses pengerjaan proyek. Perkembangan teknologi saat ini khususnya web memungkinkan untuk mengembangkan aplikasi manajemen proyek berbasisweb.Collaborative Project Scheduler merupakan sistem manajemen proyek berbasis websederhana, sehingga mudah untuk dipahami dan secara umum sesuai standar konsep manajemen proyek dapat membantu pengguna dalam menangani proyek. Aplikasi dikembangkan menggunakan HTML5, dengan konsep responsive design sehingga aplikasi dapat diakses dengan berbagai perangkat. Pertukaran data pada aplikasi ditunjang dengan AJAX Push sehingga pertukaran data komunikasi seperti chat akan bersifat realtime. Aplikasi dilengkapi dengan beberapa fitur komunikasi sehingga dapat menunjang keperluan komunikasi individual maupun kelompok di dalam proses pengerjaan proyek.Pengujian menggunakan kuesioner yang berisi serangkaian pernyataan mengenai kepuasan penggunaan dan penilaian aplikasi yang diisi oleh 36 responden memberikan persentasi hasil 95,37% yang termasuk pada kategori sangat baik. Kata kunci: Manajemen Proyek, Aplikasi Kolaborasi, ResponsiveWebsite, AJAXPush, HTML5

  18. UniFlex A WWW-environment for project-based collaborative learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2003-01-01

    technical maintenance. Web interfaces for all type of users are developed to ease information and document upload, user administration and more. The product is used at Aalborg University open distance education for "Master of Industrial Information technology" (MII) and "Master in Mobile Information......Increasing demands for remote on-line education are changing the way teaching and learning is performed. New behavior in using pedagogy and supporting technology is needed to drive the learning process. To facilitate the use of services for selected activities to participants in on-line education......, a web site named UniFlex (University Flexible learning) has been developed and brought into use. The site is a comprehensive set of bookmarks including course taking, upload/download, and - of special significance - collaborative on-line project work. UniFlex has been developed to meet the requirement...

  19. Proliferation Resistance and Material Type considerations within the Collaborative Project for a European Sodium Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renda, Guido; Alim, Fatih; Cojazzi, Giacomo GM.

    2015-01-01

    The collaborative project for a European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP‑ESFR) is an international project where 25 European partners developed Research & Development solutions and concepts for a European sodium fast reactor. The project was funded by the 7. European Union Framework Programme and covered topics such as the reactor architectures and components, the fuel, the fuel element and the fuel cycle, and the safety concepts. Within sub‑project 3, dedicated to safety, a task addressed proliferation resistance considerations. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR and PP) Evaluation Methodology has been selected as the general framework for this work, complemented by punctual aspects of the IAEA‑INPRO Proliferation Resistance methodology and other literature studies - in particular for material type characterization. The activity has been carried out taking the GIF PR and PP Evaluation Methodology and its Addendum as the general guideline for identifying potential nuclear material diversion targets. The targets proliferation attractiveness has been analyzed in terms of the suitability of the targets’ nuclear material as the basis for its use in nuclear explosives. To this aim the PR and PP Fissile Material Type measure was supplemented by other literature studies, whose related metrics have been applied to the nuclear material items present in the considered core alternatives. This paper will firstly summarize the main ESFR design aspects relevant for PR following the structure of the GIF PR and PP White Paper template. An analysis on proliferation targets is then discussed, with emphasis on their characterization from a nuclear material point of view. Finally, a high‑level ESFR PR analysis according to the four main proliferation strategies identified by the GIF PR and PP Evaluation Methodology (concealed diversion, concealed misuse, breakout, clandestine production in clandestine facilities) is

  20. New Dimensions of The PACA (Pro-Am Collaborative Astronomy) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    The Pro-Am Collaborative Astronomy (PACA) project evolved from the observational campaign of comet C/2012 S1 or C/ISON in 2013 to pro-am observing campaigns and polarimetric exploration in 2017. These include support of observing campaigns of current comets, legacy data, historical comets, planets, solar corona; and interconnected with social media, data and citizen scientists. A four dimensional framework has been developed to ensure the success of each unique PACA observing campaign, starting with identification of key science observations; creation of a global core observer network, utilizing the latest in technology and finally development of outreach and citizen science programs. A set of shareable documents addressing observational strategies; consistent standards for data; data access, use, and storage, to align with the needs of professional observers. Several interesting results emerged from the synergistic inclusion of both social media and amateur astronomers: (1) the establishment of a network of astronomers and related professionals, that can be galvanized into action on short notice to support observing campaigns; (2) assist in various science investigations pertinent to the campaign; (3) provide an alert-sounding mechanism should the need arise; (4) immediate outreach and dissemination of results via our media/blogger members; (5) provide a forum for discussions between the imagers and modelers to help strategize the observing campaign for maximum benefit. One of the challenges faced by all aspects of the PACA Project is how to archive and mine the volume of data generated for each campaign - and a potential citizen science project. I will highlight key aspects of past PACA campaigns: C/2013 A1 (C/SidingSpring) ; 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG), target for ESA/Rosetta mission; and our current campaign PACA_PolNet, a multi-site polarimetric network to observe the Total Solar Eclipse on 21 August 2017, in partnership with the project Citizen CATE.

  1. Ethical principles for project collaboration between academic professionals or institutions and the biomedical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riis P

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Povl Riis Age Forum, State Board for Research and Age Policies, Odense, DenmarkAbstract: Ethics in biomedical research cannot be defined by etymology, and need a semantic definition based on national and contemporary values. In a Nordic cultural and historic context, key values are solidarity with one's fellow man, equality, truth, justice, responsibility, freedom, and professionalism. In contemporary medical research, such ethics are further subgrouped into research ethics, researcher ethics, societal ethics, and distributive ethics. Lately, public and academic debates have addressed the necessary strengthening of the ethical concerns and interests of patients and society. Despite considerable progress, common ethical definitions and control systems still lack uniformity or indeed do not exist. Among the cooperative partners involved, the pharmaceutical industry have preserved an important role. The same is true for the overall judgments reflected by the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice, leading peer-reviewed journals, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics for developing nations, and the latest global initiative, the Singapore Statement on Research Integrity. To help both institutions and countries, it will be valuable to include the following information in academia–industry protocols before starting a project: international authorship names; fixed agendas and time schedules for project meetings; chairperson shifts, meeting reports, and project plan changes; future author memberships; equal blinding and data distribution from disciplinary groups; an equal plan for exchange of project manuscripts at the proofing stage; contractual descriptions of all procedures, disagreements, publishing rights, prevention, and controls for suspected dishonesty; and a detailed description of who is doing what in the working process.Keywords: ethics, collaboration, academia, biomedical industry

  2. Mind the Gap: Lessons from the UK to Brazil about the Roles of TTOs throughout Collaborative R&D Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The literature about collaboration for innovation has reported fundamental activities performed by intermediaries. In this paper, universities’ technology transfer offices (TTOs are placed as intermediaries between academic research and the industry. Our study focuses on collaborative research and development (R&D projects between universities and industry in order to understand the roles of TTOs throughout the whole duration of the project. The main aim of this paper is to identify the roles of TTOs throughout collaborative R&D projects and suggest some lessons for Brazilian TTOs based on the experience of the United Kingdom. Through qualitative case studies in the United Kingdom and Brazil, the analyses show that both TTOs performed critical activities for collaborative R&D projects. Similar activities at both TTOs were the management of partnerships in terms of negotiating contracts and the protection and licensing of intellectual property. Findings also show that the search for partners in the beginning of the project, the pacifier role of the TTO to help mutual understanding, and the active commercialisation of academic research to external partners happened only in the UK case, which may generate implications for TTOs in Brazil.

  3. Update of the INPRO Collaborative Project, Proliferation Resistance and Safeguard ability Assessment (Prosta) Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H. L.; Kwon, E. H.; Ahn, S. K.; Ko, W. I.; Kim, H. D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The objectives of the INPRO Collaborative Project, Proliferation Resistance and Safeguard ability Assessment (PROSA) Tools are to make the INPRO proliferation resistance (PR) assessment methodology simpler and easier to use, to allow for different users and depths of analysis, to demonstrate the value and its usefulness of the refined assessment methodology to potential users, through a test with a reference case, and to provide input to a revision of the INPRO PR assessment manual. A summary of the project is described herein, including the procedure of PR assessment process and a case study using a SFR metal fuel manufacturing facility (SFMF) which is currently in the conceptual design phase at KAERI. The PROSA process with questionnaire approach is simpler and easier to perform that the original INPRO PR methodology with qualitative scale from 'weak' to 'very strong' to be determined by expert judgment. The PROSA process can be applied from the early stage of design showing the relationship of PR assessment to the SBD process.

  4. Final Report Collaborative Project. Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Frank [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Dennis, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); MacCready, Parker [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Whitney, Michael [Univ. of Connecticut

    2015-11-20

    This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation. The main computational objectives were: 1. To develop computationally efficient, but physically based, parameterizations of estuary and continental shelf mixing processes for use in an Earth System Model (CESM). 2. To develop a two-way nested regional modeling framework in order to dynamically downscale the climate response of particular coastal ocean regions and to upscale the impact of the regional coastal processes to the global climate in an Earth System Model (CESM). 3. To develop computational infrastructure to enhance the efficiency of data transfer between specific sources and destinations, i.e., a point-to-point communication capability, (used in objective 1) within POP, the ocean component of CESM.

  5. What Are the Antecedents of Collaboration Intensity between Industry and Universities in Public Subsidized Projects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannito, Davide

    firms’ decision to engage in university-industry collaboration. This paper contribute to the antecedents of U-I collaboration by investigating whether a scientific oriented knowledge base is an important factor for explaining the intensity of collaborations. In line with the theory, we expect...... of citations, on the intensity of university industry collaboration, in terms of share of university collaborators. We control for program fixed effect and previous co-patenting with university. We expect a positive relationship between scientific orientation and intensity of collaboration with universities.......University-industry collaboration has attracted in the last decades an increasing attention both from scholars and public policy. An increasing number of national and European programs has been designed to increase public-private collaboration. The extensive literature on University Industry...

  6. TR32DB - Management of Research Data in a Collaborative, Interdisciplinary Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curdt, Constanze; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Waldhoff, Guido; Lang, Ulrich; Bareth, Georg

    2015-04-01

    The management of research data in a well-structured and documented manner is essential in the context of collaborative, interdisciplinary research environments (e.g. across various institutions). Consequently, set-up and use of a research data management (RDM) system like a data repository or project database is necessary. These systems should accompany and support scientists during the entire research life cycle (e.g. data collection, documentation, storage, archiving, sharing, publishing) and operate cross-disciplinary in interdisciplinary research projects. Challenges and problems of RDM are well-know. Consequently, the set-up of a user-friendly, well-documented, sustainable RDM system is essential, as well as user support and further assistance. In the framework of the Transregio Collaborative Research Centre 32 'Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation' (CRC/TR32), funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), a RDM system was self-designed and implemented. The CRC/TR32 project database (TR32DB, www.tr32db.de) is operating online since early 2008. The TR32DB handles all data, which are created by the involved project participants from several institutions (e.g. Universities of Cologne, Bonn, Aachen, and the Research Centre Jülich) and research fields (e.g. soil and plant sciences, hydrology, geography, geophysics, meteorology, remote sensing). Very heterogeneous research data are considered, which are resulting from field measurement campaigns, meteorological monitoring, remote sensing, laboratory studies and modelling approaches. Furthermore, outcomes like publications, conference contributions, PhD reports and corresponding images are regarded. The TR32DB project database is set-up in cooperation with the Regional Computing Centre of the University of Cologne (RRZK) and also located in this hardware environment. The TR32DB system architecture is composed of three main components: (i) a file-based data

  7. StarPals International Young Astronomers' Network Collaborative Projects for IYA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingan, Jessi

    2008-09-01

    StarPals is a nascent non-profit organization with the goal of providing opportunities for international collaboration between students of all ages within space science research. We believe that by encouraging an interest in the cosmos, the one thing that is truly Universal, from a young age, students will not only further their knowledge of and interest in science but will learn valuable teamwork and life skills. The goal is to foster respect, understanding and appreciation of cultural diversity among all StarPals participants, whether students, teachers, or mentors. StarPals aims to inspire students by providing opportunities in which, more than simply visualizing themselves as research scientists, they can actually become one. The technologies of robotic telescopes, videoconferencing, and online classrooms are expanding the possibilities like never before. In honor of IYA2009, StarPals would like to encourage 400 schools to participate on a global scale in astronomy/cosmology research on various concurrent projects. We will offer in-person or online workshops and training sessions to teach the teachers. We will be seeking publication in scientific journals for some student research. For our current project, the Double Stars Challenge, students use the robotic telescopes to take a series of four images of one of 30 double stars from a list furnished by the US Naval Observatory and then use MPO Canopus software to take distance and position angle measurements. StarPals provides students with hands-on training, telescope time, and software to complete the imaging and measuring. A paper will be drafted from our research data and submitted to the Journal of Double Star Observations. The kids who participate in this project may potentially be the youngest contributors to an article in a vetted scientific journal. Kids rapidly adapt and improve their computer skills operating these telescopes and discover for themselves that science is COOL!

  8. The sanitation value chain: its concept and new research collaboration project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funamizu, N.

    2017-03-01

    Sanitation is essential for promoting health, preventing environment pollution, conserving ecosystem, and recovering and recycling resources. Therefore, it can be said that sanitation is closely related to such current global issues as poverty, urban slum, conservation of ecosystem, and resources management. Namely, the question, “How can we handle the waste from 10 billion people in future?” is a global environmental problem to be solved. In developing world, population is growing rapidly especially in urban slums and they have still high under 5 mortality and poverty issues. It also reported that 2.4 billion people are still using unimproved sanitation facilities, including 946 million people who are still practicing open defecation in 2015 (UN, 2015). On the other hand, depopulation and aging are progressing especially in rural area of developed world. Based on the above mentioned background, new research project on sanitation value chain has started. This is a collaboration project with LIPI, RIHN (Research Institute of Humanity and Nature, Kyoto) and HU (Hokkaido University). The concept of the sanitation value chain and the brief summary of the project are discussed in the keynote presentation. The concept of sanitation value chain proposed in the project : The project is proposing new concept, Sanitation Value Chain, which has the following basic policies: 1) Put values of people/and community in the centre of discussion, and prepare sanitation system to drive this value chain; 2) Design the sanitation system by focusing on incentive for individual users and community; 3) Recognize a sanitation system as an integrated system with social and technical systems; 4) Design the sanitation system by making a good matching between social characteristics and prerequisites of the technologies. The goals of the research are 1) To propose the Sanitation Value Chain as a common solution for both developing and developed countries, 2) To show the validity of the

  9. Observational studies to mitigate seismic risks in mines: a new Japanese-South African collaborative research project

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Durrheim, RJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available and High Stress Mining, 6-8 October 2010, Santiago CHILE 1 Observational studies to mitigate seismic risks in mines: a new Japanese - South African collaborative research project R.J. Durrheim SATREPS*, CSIR Centre for Mining Innovation.... 3. To upgrade the South African national seismic network. The project is carried out under the auspices of the SATREPS (Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development) program "Countermeasures towards Global Issues through...

  10. The Collaborative Theatre-Making Project: A Space to Challenge, Explore and Re-Imagine Accepted Mythologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Lorna

    2013-01-01

    This short case study gives insight into a theatre-making project with young lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-identified people. The author reflects on the capacity of collaborative arts practice to open discussion around identity and allow space to re-imagine lived experience through metaphor and mythology. She focuses on the central role of the…

  11. Collaborative Action Research as a Tool for Generating Formative Feedback on Teachers' Classroom Assessment Practice: The KREST Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This paper sets out to explore science teachers' classroom assessment practices and outlines some of the tensions and synergies in changing assessment practices. It describes episodes from a collaborative action research project with science teachers designed to support the strengthening of classroom assessment practices--the King's Researching…

  12. Pilot Study on the Feasibility and Indicator Effects of Collaborative Online Projects on Science Learning for English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas-Arellanes, Fatima E.; Knox, Carolyn; Walden, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The 2006 National Science Board called for new strategies and instructional materials for teachers to better serve English Learners' (EL) needs. Bilingual Collaborative Online Projects in science were created to assist ELs' construction of science knowledge, facilitate academic English acquisition, and improve science learning. Two bilingual…

  13. Laboratory and project based learning in the compulsory course Biological Chemistry enhancing collaboration and technical communication between groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Bysted, Anette; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe how changes of laboratory training and project based learning were implemented in order to train the students in making a study design, basic laboratory skills, handling of data, technical communication, collaboration and presentation....

  14. Students' Evaluations of the Use of E-Learning in a Collaborative Project between Two South African Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohleder, Poul; Bozalek, Vivienne; Carolissen, Ronelle; Leibowitz, Brenda; Swartz, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Online learning is increasingly being used in Higher Education, with a number of advantages to online learning being identified. One of these advantages is the suggestion that online learning provides for equality of opportunity. This article reports on students' evaluations of the use of e-learning in a collaborative project between two South…

  15. Spanish collaboration in the OECD Halden Reactor Project research on Gadolinia Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, M.; Munoz-Reja, C.; Tverberg, T.; Jenssen, H. K.

    2010-01-01

    Safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants benefit from research and development advances and related technical solutions. One research platform is the OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP). HRP is a joint undertaking of national organisations in 18 countries sponsoring a jointly financed programme under the auspices of the OECD - Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). As a member state, Spain is participating HRP research programs with ENUSA as a partner in the fuel research programs. Improving the NPP operations, fuel cycles were designed to increase fuel burnup. Higher fuel burnup reduces the number of spent fuel assemblies and thus the costs of new fuel as well as the costs of back-end management. Higher burnup is reached either by prolonging the reactor cycles or by increasing the number of reactor cycles for the fuel in the core. Both ways entail additional requirements concerning fuel enrichment and burnable absorbers as additives and adjustments on the cladding material properties, such as mechanical treatment and chemical composition of the alloys. For these demands and needs ENUSA promotes the research on high burnup effects, gadolinium doped fuels and cladding material behaviour under irradiation. Various experiments, called IFA, are developed and performed also by providing materials. ENUSA collaborates with HRP on various experiments investigating the fuel densification and swelling, fission gas release, pressure limits on UO 2 and (U,Gd)O 2 fuels (IFA-504, -515, -636, -681); the cladding creep, lift-off, corrosion and hydrides on different tubing materials (IFA-567, -610, -638); instrumentation of the experiments, especially on pre-irradiated materials (IFA-533). These experiments are combined with model calculations to improve predictions for higher burnups and to maintain safety margins (IFA-515, -636, -681). Besides these unique in-pile experiments PIEs are performed as well on fuel and structural materials to complete the scope of these studies (IFA

  16. Managing collaborative design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sebastian, R.

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative design has been emerging in building projects everywhere. The more complex a building project becomes, the closer and more intensive collaboration between the design actors is required. This research focuses on collaborative design in the conceptual architecture design phase,

  17. WE-AB-213-01: AAPM Projects and Collaborations in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulman, A.

    2015-01-01

    AAPM projects and collaborations in Africa Adam Shulman (AA-SC Chair) The African Affairs Subcommittee (AA-SC) of the AAPM will present a multi-institutional approach to medical physics support in Africa. Current work to increase the quality of care and level of safety for the medical physics practice in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe will be presented, along with preliminary projects in Nigeria and Botswana. Because the task of addressing the needs of medical physics in countries across Africa is larger than one entity can accomplish on its own, the AA-SC has taken the approach of joining forces with multiple organizations such as Radiating Hope and TreatSafely (NGO’s), the IAEA, companies like BrainLab, Varian and Elekta, medical volunteers and academic institutions such as NYU and Washington University. Elements of current projects include: 1) Distance training and evaluation of the quality of contouring and treatment planning, teaching treatment planning and other subjects, and troubleshooting using modern telecommunications technology in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe; 2) Assistance in the transition from 2D to 3D in Senegal and Zimbabwe; 3) Assistance in the transition from 3D to IMRT using in-house compensators in Senegal; 4) Modernizing the cancer center in Senegal and increasing safety and; 5) Training on on 3D techniques in Ghana; 6) Assisting a teaching and training radiation oncology center to be built in Zimbabwe; 7) Working with the ISEP Program in Sub-Saharan Africa; 8) Creating instructional videos on linac commissioning; 9) Working on a possible collaboration to train physicists in Nigeria. Building on past achievements, the subcommittee seeks to make a larger impact on the continent, as the number and size of projects increases and more human resources become available. The State of Medical Physics Collaborations and Projects in Latin America Sandra Guzman (Peru) The lack of Medical Physicists (MP) in many Latin American (LA) countries leads to

  18. WE-AB-213-01: AAPM Projects and Collaborations in Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulman, A.

    2015-06-15

    AAPM projects and collaborations in Africa Adam Shulman (AA-SC Chair) The African Affairs Subcommittee (AA-SC) of the AAPM will present a multi-institutional approach to medical physics support in Africa. Current work to increase the quality of care and level of safety for the medical physics practice in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe will be presented, along with preliminary projects in Nigeria and Botswana. Because the task of addressing the needs of medical physics in countries across Africa is larger than one entity can accomplish on its own, the AA-SC has taken the approach of joining forces with multiple organizations such as Radiating Hope and TreatSafely (NGO’s), the IAEA, companies like BrainLab, Varian and Elekta, medical volunteers and academic institutions such as NYU and Washington University. Elements of current projects include: 1) Distance training and evaluation of the quality of contouring and treatment planning, teaching treatment planning and other subjects, and troubleshooting using modern telecommunications technology in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe; 2) Assistance in the transition from 2D to 3D in Senegal and Zimbabwe; 3) Assistance in the transition from 3D to IMRT using in-house compensators in Senegal; 4) Modernizing the cancer center in Senegal and increasing safety and; 5) Training on on 3D techniques in Ghana; 6) Assisting a teaching and training radiation oncology center to be built in Zimbabwe; 7) Working with the ISEP Program in Sub-Saharan Africa; 8) Creating instructional videos on linac commissioning; 9) Working on a possible collaboration to train physicists in Nigeria. Building on past achievements, the subcommittee seeks to make a larger impact on the continent, as the number and size of projects increases and more human resources become available. The State of Medical Physics Collaborations and Projects in Latin America Sandra Guzman (Peru) The lack of Medical Physicists (MP) in many Latin American (LA) countries leads to

  19. WE-AB-213-02: Status of Medical Physics Collaborations, and Projects in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, S.

    2015-06-15

    AAPM projects and collaborations in Africa Adam Shulman (AA-SC Chair) The African Affairs Subcommittee (AA-SC) of the AAPM will present a multi-institutional approach to medical physics support in Africa. Current work to increase the quality of care and level of safety for the medical physics practice in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe will be presented, along with preliminary projects in Nigeria and Botswana. Because the task of addressing the needs of medical physics in countries across Africa is larger than one entity can accomplish on its own, the AA-SC has taken the approach of joining forces with multiple organizations such as Radiating Hope and TreatSafely (NGO’s), the IAEA, companies like BrainLab, Varian and Elekta, medical volunteers and academic institutions such as NYU and Washington University. Elements of current projects include: 1) Distance training and evaluation of the quality of contouring and treatment planning, teaching treatment planning and other subjects, and troubleshooting using modern telecommunications technology in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe; 2) Assistance in the transition from 2D to 3D in Senegal and Zimbabwe; 3) Assistance in the transition from 3D to IMRT using in-house compensators in Senegal; 4) Modernizing the cancer center in Senegal and increasing safety and; 5) Training on on 3D techniques in Ghana; 6) Assisting a teaching and training radiation oncology center to be built in Zimbabwe; 7) Working with the ISEP Program in Sub-Saharan Africa; 8) Creating instructional videos on linac commissioning; 9) Working on a possible collaboration to train physicists in Nigeria. Building on past achievements, the subcommittee seeks to make a larger impact on the continent, as the number and size of projects increases and more human resources become available. The State of Medical Physics Collaborations and Projects in Latin America Sandra Guzman (Peru) The lack of Medical Physicists (MP) in many Latin American (LA) countries leads to

  20. WE-AB-213-02: Status of Medical Physics Collaborations, and Projects in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, S.

    2015-01-01

    AAPM projects and collaborations in Africa Adam Shulman (AA-SC Chair) The African Affairs Subcommittee (AA-SC) of the AAPM will present a multi-institutional approach to medical physics support in Africa. Current work to increase the quality of care and level of safety for the medical physics practice in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe will be presented, along with preliminary projects in Nigeria and Botswana. Because the task of addressing the needs of medical physics in countries across Africa is larger than one entity can accomplish on its own, the AA-SC has taken the approach of joining forces with multiple organizations such as Radiating Hope and TreatSafely (NGO’s), the IAEA, companies like BrainLab, Varian and Elekta, medical volunteers and academic institutions such as NYU and Washington University. Elements of current projects include: 1) Distance training and evaluation of the quality of contouring and treatment planning, teaching treatment planning and other subjects, and troubleshooting using modern telecommunications technology in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe; 2) Assistance in the transition from 2D to 3D in Senegal and Zimbabwe; 3) Assistance in the transition from 3D to IMRT using in-house compensators in Senegal; 4) Modernizing the cancer center in Senegal and increasing safety and; 5) Training on on 3D techniques in Ghana; 6) Assisting a teaching and training radiation oncology center to be built in Zimbabwe; 7) Working with the ISEP Program in Sub-Saharan Africa; 8) Creating instructional videos on linac commissioning; 9) Working on a possible collaboration to train physicists in Nigeria. Building on past achievements, the subcommittee seeks to make a larger impact on the continent, as the number and size of projects increases and more human resources become available. The State of Medical Physics Collaborations and Projects in Latin America Sandra Guzman (Peru) The lack of Medical Physicists (MP) in many Latin American (LA) countries leads to

  1. The MY NASA DATA Project: Tools and a Collaboration Space for Knowledge Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, L. H.; Alston, E. J.; Diones, D. D.; Moore, S. W.; Oots, P. C.; Phelps, C. S.

    2006-05-01

    The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center is charged with serving a wide user community that is interested in its large data holdings in the areas of Aerosols, Clouds, Radiation Budget, and Tropospheric Chemistry. Most of the data holdings, however, are in large files with specialized data formats. The MY NASA DATA (mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov) project began in 2004, as part of the NASA Research, Education, and Applications Solutions Network (REASoN), in order to open this important resource to a broader community including K-12 education and citizen scientists. MY NASA DATA (short for Mentoring and inquirY using NASA Data on Atmospheric and earth science for Teachers and Amateurs) consists of a web space that collects tools, lesson plans, and specially developed documentation to help the target audience more easily use the vast collection of NASA data about the Earth System. The core piece of the MY NASA DATA project is the creation of microsets (both static and custom) that make data easily accessible. The installation of a Live Access Server (LAS) greatly enhanced the ability for teachers, students, and citizen scientists to create and explore custom microsets of Earth System Science data. The LAS, which is an open source software tool using emerging data standards, also allows the MY NASA DATA team to make available data on other aspects of the Earth System from collaborating data centers. We are currently working with the Physical Oceanography DAAC at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to bring in several parameters describing the ocean. In addition, MY NASA DATA serves as a central space for the K-12 community to share resources. The site already includes a dozen User-contributed lesson plans. This year we will be focusing on the Citizen Science portion of the site, and will be welcoming user-contributed project ideas, as well as reports of completed projects. An e-mentor network has also been created to involve a wider community in

  2. Alternative movement : collaborative project has researchers looking to ceramic membranes to improve produced water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, P.

    2009-10-15

    Ceramic membranes have high chemical and thermal stability coupled with mechanical strength and are therefore used in a range of microfiltration, ultrafiltration and nanofiltration applications. This article described a new technology that involves the use of ceramic membranes in the treatment of produced water in thermal heavy oil recovery operations. The efficacy of advanced ceramic nano-membrane technology (CMT) is being examined in bench-scale experiments at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) in collaboration with the department of chemical and petroleum engineering at the University of Calgary. In one project, next-generation ceramic membrane technology is being used as part of the overall treatment process of produced water. The project is funded through a Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers fund and the Alberta Department of Energy. It is facilitated by the Petroleum Technology Alliance Canada in an effort to find cost-effective treatment solutions for recycling produced water for the conventional oil and gas industry. The key objective is to increase the amount of produced water that can be reused rather than disposed into deep saline aquifers. The research focuses on the pre-treatment of produced water and related salt impacted water by using ceramic membranes for the removal of organic compounds for beneficial reuse downstream. Ceramic membranes consist of a multilayer system and their performance depends on the separation and permeation properties of the membrane as well as its mechanical integrity. It was concluded that the CMT findings will be beneficial to the oil and gas industry in providing practical solutions for the challenging issues associated with de-oiling and produced water treatment. 2 figs.

  3. Collaborative Simulation and Testing of the Superconducting Dipole Prototype Magnet for the FAIR Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yinfeng; Zhu Zhe; Wu Weiyue; Xu Houchang

    2012-01-01

    The superconducting dipole prototype magnet of the collector ring for the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is an international cooperation project. The collaborative simulation and testing of the developed prototype magnet is presented in this paper. To evaluate the mechanical strength of the coil case during quench, a 3-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic (EM) model was developed based on the solid97 magnetic vector element in the ANSYS commercial software, which includes the air region, coil and yoke. EM analysis was carried out with a peak operating current at 278 A. Then, the solid97 element was transferred into the solid185 element, the coupled analysis was switched from electromagnetic to structural, and the finite element model for the coil case and glass-fiber reinforced composite (G10) spacers was established by the ANSYS Parametric Design Language based on the 3D model from the CATIA V5 software. However, to simulate the friction characteristics inside the coil case, the conta173 surface-to-surface contact element was established. The results for the coil case and G10 spacers show that they are safe and have sufficient strength, on the basis of testing in discharge and quench scenarios. (fusion engineering)

  4. International collaborative project to compare and track the nutritional composition of fast foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic diseases are the leading cause of premature death and disability in the world with over-nutrition a primary cause of diet-related ill health. Excess quantities of energy, saturated fat, sugar and salt derived from fast foods contribute importantly to this disease burden. Our objective is to collate and compare nutrient composition data for fast foods as a means of supporting improvements in product formulation. Methods/design Surveys of fast foods will be done in each participating country each year. Information on the nutrient composition for each product will be sought either through direct chemical analysis, from fast food companies, in-store materials or from company websites. Foods will be categorized into major groups for the primary analyses which will compare mean levels of saturated fat, sugar, sodium, energy and serving size at baseline and over time. Countries currently involved include Australia, New Zealand, France, UK, USA, India, Spain, China and Canada, with more anticipated to follow. Discussion This collaborative approach to the collation and sharing of data will enable low-cost tracking of fast food composition around the world. This project represents a significant step forward in the objective and transparent monitoring of industry and government commitments to improve the quality of fast foods.

  5. International collaborative project to compare and track the nutritional composition of fast foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    Chronic diseases are the leading cause of premature death and disability in the world with over-nutrition a primary cause of diet-related ill health. Excess quantities of energy, saturated fat, sugar and salt derived from fast foods contribute importantly to this disease burden. Our objective is to collate and compare nutrient composition data for fast foods as a means of supporting improvements in product formulation. Surveys of fast foods will be done in each participating country each year. Information on the nutrient composition for each product will be sought either through direct chemical analysis, from fast food companies, in-store materials or from company websites. Foods will be categorized into major groups for the primary analyses which will compare mean levels of saturated fat, sugar, sodium, energy and serving size at baseline and over time. Countries currently involved include Australia, New Zealand, France, UK, USA, India, Spain, China and Canada, with more anticipated to follow. This collaborative approach to the collation and sharing of data will enable low-cost tracking of fast food composition around the world. This project represents a significant step forward in the objective and transparent monitoring of industry and government commitments to improve the quality of fast foods.

  6. Collaboration, Participation and Technology: The San Joaquin Valley Cumulative Health Impacts Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K. London

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Community-university partnerships have been shown to produce significant value for both sets of partners by providing reciprocal learning opportunities, (rebuilding bonds of trust, and creating unique venues to formulate and apply research that responds to community interests and informs collaborative solutions to community problems. For such partnerships to be mutually empowering, certain design characteristics are necessary. These include mutual respect for different modes and expressions of knowledge, capacity-building for all parties, and an environment that promotes honest and constructive dialogue about the inevitable tensions associated with the interplay of power/knowledge. This article explores an innovative case of community-university partnerships through participatory action research involving a coalition of environmental justice and health advocates, the San Joaquin Valley Cumulative Health Impacts Project, and researchers affiliated with the University of California, Davis. In particular, we examine how participatory GIS and community mapping can promote co-learning and interdependent science. Keywords Community-based participatory research, environmental justice, Public Participation Geographic Information System

  7. The corrosion behaviour of stainless steels in natural seawater: results of an european collaborative project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotto, V.; Mollica, A. [Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 78 - Saint-Germain-en-Laye (France); Feron, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Direction des Technologies Avancees; Rogne, T.; Steinsmo, U. [Stiftelsen for Industriell og Teknisk Forskning (SINTEF), Trondheim (Norway); Compere, C.; Festy, D.; Audouard, J.P.; Taxen, C.; Thierry, D.

    1996-12-31

    One of the goals of the European collaborative Project `Marine Bio-film on Stainless steels: effects, monitoring and prevention`, started in 1992 and partially funded by the European Communities in the framework of the Marine Science and Technologies Program, was to give some conclusive and general remarks regarding the possible link, outlined in literature, between aerobic bio-film settlement and both the increased risk of localized corrosion onset and the propagation rate of ongoing localized corrosion on Stainless Steels. For this purpose several SS types of European production (austenitic and duplex), in form of tubes and plates, with and without artificial crevices preformed on their surfaces, have been exposed to flowing and quite seawater (flow rate from 0 to 1.5 m/s), at different marine stations (respectively located in the Mediterranean Sea, in the Eastern Atlantic, in the North and Baltic Seas) and the tests were repeated during each season of the year when seawater temperatures ranged from 6 up to 28 deg C. During each exposure, the SS free corrosion potentials were recorded. (authors).

  8. Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation Pilot Project. CIELO meeting, NEA Headquarters, 18-20 May 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattoon, Caleb; Brown, David; Trkov, Andrej; Plompen, Arjan; Hawari, Ayman I.; Roubtsov, Danila; Kim, Do Heon; Bauge, Eric; Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Kessedjian, Gregoire; Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Qian, Jing; Leal, Luiz Carlos; Chadwick, Mark; Herman, Michal Wladyslaw; White, Morgan C.; Cabellos, Oscar; Romain, Pascal; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Ichou, Raphaelle; Jacqmin, Robert; Hilaire, Stephane; Danon, Yaron; Ge, Zhigang; Malvagi, Fausto; Kahler, Albert C. Skip; Morillon, Benjamin; Mcnabb, Dennis P.; Oleynik, Dmitry S.; Wu, Haicheng; Marquez Damian, Jose Ignacio; Yokoyama, Kenji; Dunn, Michael; Cho, Young-Sik; Pignet, Sophie; Ignatyuk, Anatoly V.; Leeb, Helmut; Wang, Wenming; Ruan, Xichao

    2015-05-01

    WPEC subgroup 40-CIELO (Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organization) provides a new working paradigm to facilitate evaluated nuclear reaction data advances. It brings together experts from across the international nuclear reaction data community to identify and document discrepancies among existing evaluated data libraries, measured data, and model calculation interpretations, and aims to make progress in reconciling these discrepancies to create more accurate ENDF-formatted files. SG40-CIELO focusses on 6 important isotopes: "1H, "1"6O, "5"6Fe, "2"3"5","2"3"8U, "2"3"9Pu. This document is the proceedings of the CIELO meeting, held at the NEA Headquarters on 18-20 May 2015. It comprises all the available presentations (slides) given by the participants: A - CIELO project: - 1: Status of Cross Section Progress (M. Chadwick); - 2: Update on CIELO Related Measurements at RPI (Y. Danon); - 3: IAEA-NDS and the CIELO Project (A. Trkov); - 4: LANL Criticality Data Testing using CIELO Candidate Evaluations (S. Kahler); - 5: ENDF/B-VII.1 vs. CIELO (R. Cullen); B - O"1"6: - 6: n+"1"6O (A. Plompen); - 7: Resonance Evaluations for "1"6O for the CIELO Project (L. Leal); - 8: Validation of Leal and Hale O-16 Evaluations against FNS/JAEA Liquid Oxygen ToF Benchmark (I. Kodeli); - 9: Cierjacks 1968, Cierjacks 1980 and RPI 2015 (C.R. Lubitz); - 10: O"1"6 Items (C.R. Lubitz); C - Fe"5"6: - 11: Iron in fast neutron range, beta-0 evaluation for "5"6Fe (M. Herman); - 12: Data Evaluation at ORNL (L. Leal); - 13: IAEA-NDS and the CIELO Project Fe-56 (A. Trkov); - 14: The evaluation of experimental data in fast range for "5"6Fe (Z. Ge); D - H1 - 15: Reactivity effect of New Light and Heavy Water TSL on Critical Systems (J.I. Marquez); E - Big3: - 16: Resonance Evaluations of "2"3"5U for the CIELO Project (L. Leal); - 17: IAEA-NDS and the CIELO Project U-235 (A. Trkov); - 18: Status of "2"3"5U CIELO evaluation (B. Morillon); - 19: U"2"3"5 Items (C.R. Lubitz); - 20: Fission

  9. Types of treatment collaboration between conventional and alternative practitioners-results from a research project at a Danish MS hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard, Lasse; Haahr, Niels; Bjerre, Liv; Launsø, Laila

    2010-12-23

    More than 50% of People with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS) in Denmark use alternative treatment. Most of them combine alternative and conventional treatment, but PwMS often find that they engage in parallel courses of treatment between which there is no dialogue, coordination or synergy. For this reason the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Society conducted a research project to develop and examine different models for collaboration between conventional and alternative treatment providers. The empirical material consisted of 10 individual interviews with practitioners, a group interview with practitioners, a group interview with professional staff at the Danish Multiple Sclerosis hospital that provided the organisational framework for the project, interviews with 59 patients and written responses from participating treatment providers in connection with 29 practitioner-researcher seminars held during the period 2004-2010. Collaboration between researchers and the treatment team resulted in the development and examination of several models which describe the strengths and weaknesses of various types of collaboration. The models show that the various types of collaboration place different requirements on the degree of 1) mutual acknowledgement and understanding among practitioners and 2) flexibility and resources in the organizational framework. The analyses also point to the fact that the degree of patient activity must be considered in relation to a given type of collaboration. The relationship between integration and pluralism can contribute to a fruitful discussion in regards to the value of treatment collaboration. In addition to the many positive perspectives that characterise integration of different treatment modalities the project points to the importance of not overlooking the opportunities, values and potential inherent in a pluralistic ideal in the form of patients' own active efforts and the dynamism that can arise when the patient becomes a co-informant, co

  10. ENUSA-TECNATOM collaboration project: improvements to the system of inspection by UT's circular fresh fuel rod welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo, J.; Toral, M.; Moraleda, J.; Quinones, D.

    2014-01-01

    Enusa and Tecnatom have embarked on a road of technological and commercial collaboration that aims to firstly, the continuous improvement of the means of production of fuel from the factory in Juzbado, but uses the joint technological capital to diversify their business global opportunities. This collaboration has emerged a new line for control by UT of welding circular fresh fuel rod and the development of an equipment for sale to the CINF in Yibin fuel factory. The characteristics of these projects are presented in this paper. (Author)

  11. A Compound LAMS-MOODLE Environment to Support Collaborative Project-Based Learning: A Case Study with the Group Investigation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Giorgos

    2017-01-01

    Collaborative project-based learning is well established as a component of several courses in higher education, since it seems to motivate students and make them active in the learning process. Collaborative Project-Based Learning methods are demanded so that tutors become able to intervene and guide the students in flexible ways: by encouraging…

  12. The Society for Implementation Research Collaboration Instrument Review Project: a methodology to promote rigorous evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara C; Stanick, Cameo F; Martinez, Ruben G; Weiner, Bryan J; Kim, Mimi; Barwick, Melanie; Comtois, Katherine A

    2015-01-08

    Identification of psychometrically strong instruments for the field of implementation science is a high priority underscored in a recent National Institutes of Health working meeting (October 2013). Existing instrument reviews are limited in scope, methods, and findings. The Society for Implementation Research Collaboration Instrument Review Project's objectives address these limitations by identifying and applying a unique methodology to conduct a systematic and comprehensive review of quantitative instruments assessing constructs delineated in two of the field's most widely used frameworks, adopt a systematic search process (using standard search strings), and engage an international team of experts to assess the full range of psychometric criteria (reliability, construct and criterion validity). Although this work focuses on implementation of psychosocial interventions in mental health and health-care settings, the methodology and results will likely be useful across a broad spectrum of settings. This effort has culminated in a centralized online open-access repository of instruments depicting graphical head-to-head comparisons of their psychometric properties. This article describes the methodology and preliminary outcomes. The seven stages of the review, synthesis, and evaluation methodology include (1) setting the scope for the review, (2) identifying frameworks to organize and complete the review, (3) generating a search protocol for the literature review of constructs, (4) literature review of specific instruments, (5) development of an evidence-based assessment rating criteria, (6) data extraction and rating instrument quality by a task force of implementation experts to inform knowledge synthesis, and (7) the creation of a website repository. To date, this multi-faceted and collaborative search and synthesis methodology has identified over 420 instruments related to 34 constructs (total 48 including subconstructs) that are relevant to implementation

  13. Student use of a Learning Management System for group projects: A case study investigating interaction, collaboration, and knowledge construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonn, Steven D.

    Web-based Learning Management Systems (LMS) allow instructors and students to share instructional materials, make class announcements, submit and return course assignments, and communicate with each other online. Previous LMS-related research has focused on how these systems deliver and manage instructional content with little concern for how students' constructivist learning can be encouraged and facilitated. This study investigated how students use LMS to interact, collaborate, and construct knowledge within the context of a group project but without mediation by the instructor. The setting for this case study was students' use in one upper-level biology course of the local LMS within the context of a course-related group project, a mock National Institutes of Health grant proposal. Twenty-one groups (82 students) voluntarily elected to use the LMS, representing two-thirds of all students in the course. Students' peer-to-peer messages within the LMS, event logs, online surveys, focus group interviews, and instructor interviews were used in order to answer the study's overarching research question. The results indicate that students successfully used the LMS to interact and, to a significant extent, collaborate, but there was very little evidence of knowledge construction using the LMS technology. It is possible that the ease and availability of face-to-face meetings as well as problems and limitations with the technology were factors that influenced whether students' online basic interaction could be further distinguished as collaboration or knowledge construction. Despite these limitations, students found several tools and functions of the LMS useful for their online peer interaction and completion of their course project. Additionally, LMS designers and implementers are urged to consider previous literature on computer-supported collaborative learning environments in order to better facilitate independent group projects within these systems. Further research is

  14. Collaboration processes and perceived effectiveness of integrated care projects in primary care: a longitudinal mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn, Pim P; Ruwaard, Dirk; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; de Bont, Antoinette; Arends, Rosa Y; Bruijnzeels, Marc A

    2015-10-09

    Collaborative partnerships are considered an essential strategy for integrating local disjointed health and social services. Currently, little evidence is available on how integrated care arrangements between professionals and organisations are achieved through the evolution of collaboration processes over time. The first aim was to develop a typology of integrated care projects (ICPs) based on the final degree of integration as perceived by multiple stakeholders. The second aim was to study how types of integration differ in changes of collaboration processes over time and final perceived effectiveness. A longitudinal mixed-methods study design based on two data sources (surveys and interviews) was used to identify the perceived degree of integration and patterns in collaboration among 42 ICPs in primary care in The Netherlands. We used cluster analysis to identify distinct subgroups of ICPs based on the final perceived degree of integration from a professional, organisational and system perspective. With the use of ANOVAs, the subgroups were contrasted based on: 1) changes in collaboration processes over time (shared ambition, interests and mutual gains, relationship dynamics, organisational dynamics and process management) and 2) final perceived effectiveness (i.e. rated success) at the professional, organisational and system levels. The ICPs were classified into three subgroups with: 'United Integration Perspectives (UIP)', 'Disunited Integration Perspectives (DIP)' and 'Professional-oriented Integration Perspectives (PIP)'. ICPs within the UIP subgroup made the strongest increase in trust-based (mutual gains and relationship dynamics) as well as control-based (organisational dynamics and process management) collaboration processes and had the highest overall effectiveness rates. On the other hand, ICPs with the DIP subgroup decreased on collaboration processes and had the lowest overall effectiveness rates. ICPs within the PIP subgroup increased in control

  15. Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) - Year 5 : Annual Report for FY 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmorek, David R.; Porter, Marc; Pickard, Darcy; Wieckowski, Katherine

    2008-11-19

    The Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) is a coordinated effort to improve the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key monitoring and evaluation questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP was initiated by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) in October 2003. The project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC). CSMEP is a major effort of the federal state and Tribal fish and wildlife managers to develop regionally integrated monitoring and evaluation (M&E) across the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP has focused its work on five monitoring domains: status and trends monitoring of populations and action effectiveness monitoring of habitat, harvest, hatcheries, and the hydrosystem. CSMEP's specific goals are to: (1) interact with federal, state and tribal programmatic and technical entities responsible for M&E of fish and wildlife, to ensure that work plans developed and executed under this project are well integrated with ongoing work by these entities; (2) document, integrate, and make available existing monitoring data on listed salmon, steelhead, bull trout and other fish species of concern; (3) critically assess strengths and weaknesses of these data for answering key monitoring questions; and (4) collaboratively design, implement and evaluate improved M&E methods with other programmatic entities in the Pacific Northwest. During FY2008 CSMEP biologists continued their reviews of the strengths and weaknesses (S&W) of existing subbasin inventory data for addressing monitoring questions about population status and trends at different spatial and temporal scales. Work was focused on Lower Columbia Chinook and steelhead, Snake River fall Chinook, Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and steelhead, and Middle Columbia River Chinook and steelhead. These

  16. SFB754 - data management in large interdisciplinary collaborative research projects: what matters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrtens, Hela; Springer, Pina; Schirnick, Carsten; Schelten, Christiane K.

    2016-04-01

    , expeditions and projects. Such views are also frequently used for the website and reports by the SFB 754 scientific community. The concept of a joint approach initiated by large-scale projects and participating institutions in order to establish a single data management infrastructure has proven to be very successful. We have experienced a snowball-like propagation among marine researchers at GEOMAR and Kiel University, they continue to engage data management services well known from collaboration with SFB 754. But we also observe an ongoing demand for training of new junior (and senior) scientists and continuous need for adaption to new methods and techniques. Only a standardized and consistent data management warrants completeness and integrity of published research data related to their peer-reviewed journal publications in the long run. Based on our daily experience this is best achieved, if not only, by skilled and experienced staff in a dedicated data management team which persists beyond the funding period of research projects. It can effectively carry on and impact by continuous personal contact, consultation and training of researchers on-site. (This poster is linked to the presentation by Dr. Christiane K. Schelten)

  17. Strategies, Obstacles, and Attitudes: Student Collaboration in Information Seeking and Synthesis Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeder, Chris; Shah, Chirag

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: While group work that takes place in education contexts has been studied by researchers, student collaborative research behaviour has received less attention. This empirical case study examined the strategies that students use and the obstacles they encounter while working in collaborative information seeking contexts on an in-class…

  18. Group Tasks, Activities, Dynamics, and Interactions in Collaborative Robotics Projects with Elementary and Middle School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Timothy T.; Boecking, Melanie; Stone, Jennifer; Tiger, Erin Price; Gomez, Alvaro; Guillen, Adrienne; Arreguin, Analisa

    2014-01-01

    Robotics provide the opportunity for students to bring their individual interests, perspectives and areas of expertise together in order to work collaboratively on real-world science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) problems. This paper examines the nature of collaboration that manifests in groups of elementary and middle school…

  19. Students' online collaborative intention for group projects: Evidence from an extended version of the theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Eddie W L; Chu, Samuel K W

    2016-08-01

    Given the increasing use of web technology for teaching and learning, this study developed and examined an extended version of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model, which explained students' intention to collaborate online for their group projects. Results indicated that past experience predicted the three antecedents of intention, while past behaviour was predictive of subjective norm and perceived behavioural control. Moreover, the three antecedents (attitude towards e-collaboration, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control) were found to significantly predict e-collaborative intention. This study explored the use of the "remember" type of awareness (i.e. past experience) and evaluated the value of the "know" type of awareness (i.e. past behaviour) in the TPB model. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  20. Ischemic Stroke Profile, Risk Factors, and Outcomes in India: The Indo-US Collaborative Stroke Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylaja, P N; Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai; Kaul, Subhash; Srivastava, M V Padma; Khurana, Dheeraj; Schwamm, Lee H; Kesav, Praveen; Arora, Deepti; Pannu, Aman; Thankachan, Tijy K; Singhal, Aneesh B

    2018-01-01

    The Indo-US Collaborative Stroke Project was designed to characterize ischemic stroke across 5 high-volume academic tertiary hospitals in India. From January 2012 to August 2014, research coordinators and physician coinvestigators prospectively collected data on 2066 patients with ischemic stroke admitted <2 weeks after onset. Investigator training and supervision and data monitoring were conducted by the US site (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston). The mean age was 58.3±14.7 years, 67.2% men. The median admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 10 (interquartile range, 5-15) and 24.5% had National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≥16. Hypertension (60.8%), diabetes mellitus (35.7%), and tobacco use (32.2%, including bidi/smokeless tobacco) were common risk factors. Only 4% had atrial fibrillation. All patients underwent computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging; 81% had cerebrovascular imaging. Stroke etiologic subtypes were large artery (29.9%), cardiac (24.9%), small artery (14.2%), other definite (3.4%), and undetermined (27.6%, including 6.7% with incomplete evaluation). Intravenous or intra-arterial thrombolysis was administered in 13%. In-hospital mortality was 7.9%, and 48% achieved modified Rankin Scale score 0 to 2 at 90 days. On multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus predicted poor 3-month outcome and younger age, lower admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and small-artery etiology predicted excellent 3-month outcome. These comprehensive and novel clinical imaging data will prove useful in refining stroke guidelines and advancing stroke care in India. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Maternal risk factors for abnormal placental growth: The national collaborative perinatal project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholson Wanda K

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of maternal risk factors for abnormal placental growth have focused on placental weight and placental ratio as measures of placental growth. We sought to identify maternal risk factors for placental weight and two neglected dimensions of placental growth: placental thickness and chorionic plate area. Methods We conducted an analysis of 24,135 mother-placenta pairs enrolled in the National Collaborative Perinatal Project, a prospective cohort study of pregnancy and child health. We defined growth restriction as th percentile and hypertrophy as > 90th percentile for three placental growth dimensions: placental weight, placental thickness and chorionic plate area. We constructed parallel multinomial logistic regression analyses to identify (a predictors of restricted growth (vs. normal and (b predictors of hypertrophic growth (vs. normal. Results Black race was associated with an increased likelihood of growth restriction for placental weight, thickness and chorionic plate area, but was associated with a reduced likelihood of hypertrophy for these three placental growth dimensions. We observed an increased likelihood of growth restriction for placental weight and chorionic plate area among mothers with hypertensive disease at 24 weeks or beyond. Anemia was associated with a reduced likelihood of growth restriction for placental weight and chorionic plate area. Pre-pregnancy BMI and pregnancy weight gain were associated with a reduced likelihood of growth restriction and an increased likelihood of hypertrophy for all three dimensions of placental growth. Conclusion Maternal risk factors are either associated with placental growth restriction or placental hypertrophy not both. Our findings suggest that the placenta may have compensatory responses to certain maternal risk factors suggesting different underlying biological mechanisms.

  2. Types of treatment collaboration between conventional and alternative practitioners – results from a research project at a Danish MS hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Skovgaard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: More than 50% of the People with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS in Denmark use alternative treatment. Most of them combine alternative and conventional treatment, but PwMS often find that there is no dialogue, coordination or synergy between the parallel courses of treatment offered. For this reason the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Society conducted a research project to develop and examine different models for collaboration between conventional and alternative treatment providers. Materials and methods: Empirical material consist of individual interviews with practitioners, a group interview with practitioners, a group interview with professional staff at the Danish MS hospital that provided the organisational framework for the project, interviews with patients as well as written responses from participating treatment providers in connection with practitioner-researcher seminars held. Results: Collaboration between researchers and the treatment team resulted in the development examination of several models which describe the strengths and weaknesses of various types of collaboration. The models also show that the various types of collaboration place different requirements on the degree of 1 mutual acknowledgement and understanding among practitioners, 2 flexibility and resources in the organizational framework, and 3 patients' activities and own efforts, respectively.    Perspectives: The relationship between integration and pluralism can contribute to a fruitful discussion in regards to the value of treatment collaboration. In addition to the many positive perspectives the characterise integration of different treatment modalities the project points to the importance of not overlooking the opportunities, values and potential inherent in a pluralistic ideal in the form of patients' own active efforts and the dynamism that can arise when the patient becomes a co-informant, co-coordinator and/or co-integrator. 

  3. Types of treatment collaboration between conventional and alternative practitioners – results from a research project at a Danish MS hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Skovgaard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: More than 50% of the People with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS in Denmark use alternative treatment. Most of them combine alternative and conventional treatment, but PwMS often find that there is no dialogue, coordination or synergy between the parallel courses of treatment offered. For this reason the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Society conducted a research project to develop and examine different models for collaboration between conventional and alternative treatment providers. Materials and methods: Empirical material consist of individual interviews with practitioners, a group interview with practitioners, a group interview with professional staff at the Danish MS hospital that provided the organisational framework for the project, interviews with patients as well as written responses from participating treatment providers in connection with practitioner-researcher seminars held. Results: Collaboration between researchers and the treatment team resulted in the development examination of several models which describe the strengths and weaknesses of various types of collaboration. The models also show that the various types of collaboration place different requirements on the degree of 1 mutual acknowledgement and understanding among practitioners, 2 flexibility and resources in the organizational framework, and 3 patients' activities and own efforts, respectively.    Perspectives: The relationship between integration and pluralism can contribute to a fruitful discussion in regards to the value of treatment collaboration. In addition to the many positive perspectives the characterise integration of different treatment modalities the project points to the importance of not overlooking the opportunities, values and potential inherent in a pluralistic ideal in the form of patients' own active efforts and the dynamism that can arise when the patient becomes a co-informant, co-coordinator and/or co-integrator.

  4. SCIENCE TEACHERS’ INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIAL LEARNING RELATED TO IBSE IN A LARGE-SCALE, LONG- TERM, COLLABORATIVE TPD PROJECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Sillasen, Martin Krabbe

    2014-01-01

    It is acknowledged internationally that teachers’ Professional Development (TPD) is crucial for reforming science teaching. The Danish QUEST project is designed using widely agreed criteria for effective TPD: content focus, active learning, coherence, duration, collaborative activities and collec......It is acknowledged internationally that teachers’ Professional Development (TPD) is crucial for reforming science teaching. The Danish QUEST project is designed using widely agreed criteria for effective TPD: content focus, active learning, coherence, duration, collaborative activities...... and collective participation, and is organised on principles of situated learning in Professional Learning Communities (PLCs). QUEST-activities follow a rhythm of full day seminars followed by a period of collaborative inquiries locally. A major theme in the first year has been Inquiry Based Science Education......-on experiences and fewer including students’ minds-on. Teachers’ reflections indicate that many are positive towards QUEST seminars based on trying out activities directly applicable in the classroom. Case studies indicate a potentially more sustainable development, where the teachers collaboratively re...

  5. Y-STR analysis on DNA mixture samples--results of a collaborative project of the ENFSI DNA Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parson, Walther; Niederstätter, Harald; Lindinger, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    The ENFSI (European Network of Forensic Science Institutes) DNA Working Group undertook a collaborative project on Y-STR typing of DNA mixture samples that were centrally prepared and thoroughly tested prior to the shipment. Four commercial Y-STR typing kits (Y-Filer, Applied Biosystems, Foster C...... a laboratory-specific optimization process is indicated to reach a comparable sensitivity for the analysis of minute amounts of DNA....

  6. Final workshop proceedings of the collaborative project ''Crystalline ROCK retention processes''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabung, Thomas; Garcia, David; Montoya Vanessa; Molinero, Jorge (eds.)

    2014-07-01

    The present document is the proceedings of the Final Workshop of the EURATOM FP7 Collaborative Project CROCK (Crystalline Rock Retention Processes). The key driver for initiation the CP CROCK, identified by national Waste Management Organizations, is the undesired high uncertainty and the associated conservatism with respect to the radionuclide transport in the crystalline host-rock far-field around geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes.

  7. Match & Manage : The use of knowledge matching and project management to integrate knowledge in collaborative inbound open innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Lakemond, Nicolette; Bengtsson, Lars; Laursen, Keld; Tell, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Despite mounting evidence on the potential benefits of inbound open innovation, little is known about how firms purposefully manage inflows of knowledge. We investigate the use of two knowledge governance procedures—project management and knowledge matching—in collaborative inbound open innovation. Our findings suggest that, in addition to “knowledge-precursors,” which the literature on open innovation and absorptive capacity has shown to be important for the integration of external knowledge...

  8. JC2Sat-FF : An International Collaboration Nano-Sat Project Overview of the System Analyses and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, K.; van Mierlo, M.; Ng, A.; Shankar Kumar, B.; De Ruiter, A.; Komatsu, Y.; Horiguchi, H.; Hashimoto, H.

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces the Japan Canada Joint Collaboration Satellites - Formation Flying (JC2Sat-FF) project. JC2Sat-FF is a joint project between the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) with the end goal of building, launching and operating two 20kg- class nanosatellites for technical demonstration of formation flight (FF) using differential drag technique, relative navigation using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) dual band GPS receivers and far infra-red radiance measurement. A unique aspect of this project is that the two JC2Sats are developed by a united small team consisting of engineers and researchers from both agencies. Technical exchange in this international team gives stimulation to the members and generates a synergistic effect for the project.

  9. Collaboration in research and the influential factors in Golestan University of Medical Sciences research projects (2005-2007): an academic sample from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghei, Afsaneh; Qorbani, Mostafa; Rezapour, Aziz; Majdzadeh, Reza; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Asayesh, Hamid; Mansourian, Morteza; Noroozi, Mahdi; Jahahgir, Fereydoon

    2013-08-01

    Number of Iranian articles published in ISI journals has increased significantly in recent years.Despite the quantitative progress, studies performed in Iran represent low collaboration in research; therefore,we decided to evaluate collaboration in Golestan University of Medical Sciences (GOUMS) research projects. In this cross-sectional study, all GOUMS research projects that had got grants from the universitybetween 2005-2007 were studied. Among 107 research projects included in our study, 102 projects were evaluatedand checklists were completed. The researcher's questionnaire was sent to the principle investigators (n=46) of the projects and eventually 40 questionnaires were collected. The review of 102 research proposals shows that 10 projects (9.8%) have been performed in collaborationwith other organizations. Scientific outputs in these projects have been more than projects which wereconfined to the university (98% compare to 68%; p= 0.04). The total cost of the projects under study was a littlemore than 300,000 US$. In just 12 projects (11.8%) a part of the cost had been provided by organizations outsidethe university. About 50% of researchers declared that they had chosen their research topic based on their"personal interest". Only 1 project was performed by the demand of nongovernmental organizations and 12 researchersreported no collaboration in their activities. This study shows that collaboration in GOUMS research projects is low. Moreover, collaborationswith governmental and nongovernmental organizations are trivial. The scientific outputs in collaborativeresearch projects are much more than other projects.

  10. Texas Solar Collaboration DOE Rooftop Solar Challenge City of Houston Project Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronk, Jennifer [Houston Advanced Research Center, TX (United States)

    2013-02-14

    The City of Houston is committed to achieving a sustainable solar infrastructure. In 2008, Houston was named a United States Department of Energy (DOE) Solar America City. As a Solar America City, Houston teamed with the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), Sandia National Laboratory (Sandia), industry, and academia, to implement the Solar Houston Initiative and prepare the Solar Houston Plan. The Solar Houston initiative was focused on identifying and overcoming barriers associated with establishing a solar infrastructure that is incorporated into the City of Houston’s overall energy plan. A broad group of Houston area stakeholders, facilitated by HARC, came together to develop a comprehensive solar plan that went beyond technology to address barriers and establish demonstrations, public outreach, education programs and other activities. The plan included proposed scopes of work in four program areas: policies, solar integration, public outreach, and education. Through the support of the DOE SunShot Rooftop Solar Challenge (RSC) grant to the Texas Collaboration (San Antonio, Austin, and Hosuton), Houston has been able to implement several of the recommendations of the Solar Houston Plan. Specific recommendations that this project was able to support include; Working with the other Texas Solar America Cities (San Antonio and Austin), to harmonize permitting and inspection processes to simplify for installers and lower soft costs of installation; Participating in state level solar policy groups such as the Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association (TRIEA); Continued coordination with the local transmission and distribution utility (CenterPoint) and retail electric providers (REP); Identification of opportunities to improve permitting and interconnection; Providing training on PV systems to City inspectors; Educating the public by continuing outreach, training, and workshops, particularly using the the Green Building Resources Center; Evaluating methods of

  11. Designing an Academic Project Management Program: A Collaboration between a University and a PMI Chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Robin S.; Richardson, Sandra M.

    2011-01-01

    The demand for project management skills in industry is increasing resulting in a higher demand for project management educational programs. Universities are addressing industry demand by developing project management courses, degree offerings and certificate programs that focus on both technical and general project management skills. While…

  12. eDOC: A collaboration infrastructure to manage knowledge and information on nuclear projects and research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Craeynest, J.M.; Jacquemet, F.; Chermette, D.; Bonneau, S.

    2004-01-01

    After a brief recall of Knowledge Management issues and of the MKSM knowledge modelling method developed and used by the CEA, this paper focuses on the eDOC web collaboration platform designed to support a large range of cross-collaboration needs and a large spectrum of community types (from small units to large European Networks of Excellence). Online community members have different needs : knowing other members and their roles, accessing to reference information and documents, reviewing, annotating and publishing documents or sending information to all or part of members, being informed of events, scheduling shared jobs and manage tasks, discuss some questions using forums, etc. They also want to develop a common identity and portal look and structure customizations are very useful for that purpose. The Information System Department of the CEA has launched the eDOC project to supply a rapid demand growth for those tools. In the CEA, this demand is due to the growing importance and number of internal and external cross-collaborations and alliances with industrial and research partners. After a systematic evaluation campaign of both proprietary and open-source solutions, and after having defined the most pragmatic deployment strategy, we have chosen the Collaborative Portal Server (CPS) edited by Nuxeo. CPS is based on the Zope open-source object-oriented application server. Then we invested to improve functionalities and performances of CPS but also to design and implement a security policy adapted to different types of security requirements and information privacy levels. The eDOC web collaboration infrastructure is now used by 50 projects and this number keeps increasing. The main uses are internal documents repositories (to simplify classical 'Intranet' building and maintaining process) and information repositories (including documents but also events, news, calendar, conferences, etc.) for external collaborations. The 6th European research framework program

  13. Integrated care for patients with a stroke in the Netherlands: results and experiences from a national Breakthrough Collaborative Improvement project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M.N. Minkman

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This article considers the question if measurable improvements are achieved in the quality of care in stroke services by using a Breakthrough collaborative quality improvement model. Context of case: Despite the availability of explicit criteria, evidence based guidelines, national protocols and examples of best practices; stroke care in the Netherlands did not improve substantially yet. For that reason a national collaborative started in 2002 to improve integrated stroke care in 23 self selected stroke services. Data sources: Characteristics of sites, teams, aims and changes were assessed by using a questionnaire and monthly self-reports of teams. Progress in achieving significant quality improvement has been assessed on a five point Likert scale (IHI score. Case description: The stroke services (n=23 formed multidisciplinary teams, which worked together in a collaborative based on the IHI Breakthrough Series Model. Teams received instruction in quality improvement, reviewed self reported performance data, identified bottlenecks and improvement goals, and implemented “potentially better practices” based on criteria from the Edisse study, evidence based guidelines, own ideas and expert opinion. Conclusion and discussion: Quality of care has been improved in most participating stroke services. Eighty-seven percent of the teams have improved their care significantly on at least one topic. About 34% of the teams have achieved significant improvement on all aims within the time frame of the project. The project has contributed to the further development and spread of integrated stroke care in the Netherlands.

  14. SO-QT: Collaborative Tool to Project the Future Space Object Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupl, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Earth orbit gets increasingly congested, a challenge to space operators, both in governments and industry. We present a web tool that provides: 1) data on todays and the historic space object environments, by aggregating object-specific tracking data; and 2) future trends through a collaboration platform to collect information on planed launches. The collaborative platform enables experts to pool and compare their data in order to generate future launch scenarios. The tool is intended to support decision makers and mission designers while they investigate future missions and scholars as they develop strategies for space traffic management.

  15. Mechanisms underlying major investment projects in the Romanian public administration: strong and long term collaboration among stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tănăsescu Laurian Gabriel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the existing situation, in order to understand the mechanisms underlying investment projects financed from public funds in Romania, we analysed the following public sources of information: For projects implemented before 2007, we analysed data available on the Internet, including databases of international donors such as www.dgmarket.com, http://www.ted.europa.eu/, etc. We analysed data made available by the Public Procurement Electronic System through the portal http://data.gov.ro. The data set analysed includes over 8 million awarding contract notices. For the EU funded projects, we requested the Ministry of European Funds to offer us access to the relevant database (SMIS, which includes all the projects financed under the European funding programme 2007 – 2013 (projects implemented before 31.12.2015. Comparing data from all these sources leads to the conclusion that the information is coherent and represents a credible basis for our analysis. We found that 48% of all investment projects implemented in Romania in 2007 – 2016 and co-funded under European funds (in terms of the share of eligible expenses requested outsourcing services for the preparation of the project documentation needed to apply for funds; such expenses represent almost 3 % of the total eligible project expenses approved. Almost 36% (in terms of the share of eligible expenses of all investment projects implemented in Romania in 2007 – 2016 and co-funded under European funds, revealed a strong and long term relationship between the company that participates in the elaboration of the grant application and the beneficiary of funds. This collaboration continued throughout the implementation of the project. These companies delivered services / supplied goods / carried out construction works whose value exceeds 15 billion lei, which represents over 54% of the total eligible costs of the respective projects.

  16. Pre-service teachers’ meaning-making when collaboratively analysing video from school practice for the bachelor project at college

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2015-01-01

    The study follows a group of student teachers (STs) facilitated in collaboratively analysing video recordings of their school practice experiences, required for their bachelor projects. Their meaning-making is examined in terms of what they experienced as outcomes, how they constructed...... understanding and how their interpretation of classroom experiences developed. The findings reveal that the structured collaborative analysis supported the STs in a more nuanced consideration of concrete incidents and in reconstructing their experiences with a focus on student learning. They noted the benefit...... of the peer support and had a positive view of the structured approach. Additionally, they emphasised insights gained by starting from a fine-grained analysis of concrete problems encountered in their school practice before applying theory. They did, however, resort to more general abstractions...

  17. A Study on planning of the international collaboration foundation for the Advanced Nuclear Technology Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2005-03-15

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U.S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study aimed mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies, Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities, Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. and conducting the international cooperation, International cooperation activities for the INPRO. This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Futhermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems.

  18. Aligning Web-Based Tools to the Research Process Cycle: A Resource for Collaborative Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Geoffrey P.; Wright, Vivian H.

    2012-01-01

    Using John Creswell's Research Process Cycle as a framework, this article describes various web-based collaborative technologies useful for enhancing the organization and efficiency of educational research. Visualization tools (Cacoo) assist researchers in identifying a research problem. Resource storage tools (Delicious, Mendeley, EasyBib)…

  19. Human-Centred Design Workshops in Collaborative Strategic Design Projects: An Educational and Professional Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Andre; Sanders, Elizabeth B.-N.

    2013-01-01

    It has been found that the implementation of Human-centred Design (HCD) methods in the Fuzzy Front-End is not likely to lead to diversification in educational product planning exercises, where time lines are short and executors lack experience. Companies, interested to collaborate with Master-level Industrial Design students on strategic design…

  20. A Study on planning of the international collaboration foundation for the Advanced Nuclear Technology Development Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2005-03-01

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U.S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study aimed mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies, Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities, Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. and conducting the international cooperation, International cooperation activities for the INPRO. This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Futhermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems

  1. A Simulation-Based LED Design Project in Photonics Instruction Based on Industry-University Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S. -H.; Chen, M. -L.; Kuo, Y. -K.; Shen, Y. -C.

    2011-01-01

    In response to the growing industrial demand for light-emitting diode (LED) design professionals, based on industry-university collaboration in Taiwan, this paper develops a novel instructional approach: a simulation-based learning course with peer assessment to develop students' professional skills in LED design as required by industry as well as…

  2. Group monopolization & collaborative work: the making of a science video project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayme, B.; Roth, W.-M.; Reis, G.; Eijck, van M.W.

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT: In the present ethnographic case study, we investigate how monopolization emerges and is maintained during collaborative working situations in elementary science classroom tasks. Our analysis suggests that monopolization is achieved in part by the position of the students around the

  3. Connecting Biology and Organic Chemistry Introductory Laboratory Courses through a Collaborative Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltax, Ariana L.; Armanious, Stephanie; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S.; Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Modern research often requires collaboration of experts in fields, such as math, chemistry, biology, physics, and computer science to develop unique solutions to common problems. Traditional introductory undergraduate laboratory curricula in the sciences often do not emphasize connections possible between the various disciplines. We designed an…

  4. Implementing Verbal and Non-Verbal Activities in an Intercultural Collaboration Project for English Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kiyomi; Hirotani, Maki

    2015-01-01

    Technological development offers language teachers a myriad of options for collaborative activities. Learners, in turn, benefit from increased opportunities to interact with people who can speak their target language. Research has previously highlighted the importance of developing learners' intercultural competence through such activities. The…

  5. 2002 Report to Congress: Evaluating the Consensus Best Practices Developed through the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Collaborative Hazardous Waste Management Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report discusses a collaborative project initiated by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) to establish and evaluate a performance-based approach to management of hazardous wastes in the laboratories of academic research institutions.

  6. Rationale and methodology of a collaborative learning project in congenital cardiac care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Michael J; Lee, Eva K; Nicolson, Susan C; Pearson, Gail D; Witte, Madolin K; Huckaby, Jeryl; Gaies, Michael; Shekerdemian, Lara S; Mahle, William T

    2016-04-01

    Collaborative learning is a technique through which individuals or teams learn together by capitalizing on one another's knowledge, skills, resources, experience, and ideas. Clinicians providing congenital cardiac care may benefit from collaborative learning given the complexity of the patient population and team approach to patient care. Industrial system engineers first performed broad-based time-motion and process analyses of congenital cardiac care programs at 5 Pediatric Heart Network core centers. Rotating multidisciplinary team site visits to each center were completed to facilitate deep learning and information exchange. Through monthly conference calls and an in-person meeting, we determined that duration of mechanical ventilation following infant cardiac surgery was one key variation that could impact a number of clinical outcomes. This was underscored by one participating center's practice of early extubation in the majority of its patients. A consensus clinical practice guideline using collaborative learning was developed and implemented by multidisciplinary teams from the same 5 centers. The 1-year prospective initiative was completed in May 2015, and data analysis is under way. Collaborative learning that uses multidisciplinary team site visits and information sharing allows for rapid structured fact-finding and dissemination of expertise among institutions. System modeling and machine learning approaches objectively identify and prioritize focused areas for guideline development. The collaborative learning framework can potentially be applied to other components of congenital cardiac care and provide a complement to randomized clinical trials as a method to rapidly inform and improve the care of children with congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Community projects based on Art & Health: A collaboration between the Faculty of Fine Arts at the Complutense University of Madrid and Madrid city council's Madrid Salud Service

    OpenAIRE

    Ávila, Noemí; Orellana, Ana M.; Claver, María Dolores; Borrego Hernando, Olga; Antúnez, Noelia; García Cano, Marta; Segura del Pozo, Javier; Belver, Manuel H.; Martínez Cortés, Mercedes; Martínez, Catalina; Jambers, Brigitte; Cortés, Fátima; Yeves, Laura; Soto, María del Carmen; Saavedra Macías, Francisco Javier (Coordinador)

    2017-01-01

    In 2011 the Faculty of Fine Arts at the Complutense University of Madrid, and Madrid City Council's Health Promotion and Prevention Service (Madrid Salud Service) signed a collaboration agreement for developing joint projects and activities. This mutual collaboration agreement has generated an extremely active working network, in which university students supported by health service professionals plus Faculty academics and researchers have designed, and developed, community projects based on ...

  8. Exploring teachers' beliefs and knowledge about scientific inquiry and the nature of science: A collaborative action research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Xavier Eric

    Science curriculum reform goals espouse the need to foster and support the development of scientific literacy in students. Two critical goals of scientific literacy are students' engagement in, and developing more realistic conceptions about scientific inquiry (SI) and the nature of science (NOS). In order to promote the learning of these curriculum emphases, teachers themselves must possess beliefs and knowledge supportive of them. Collaborative action research is a viable form of curriculum and teacher development that can be used to support teachers in developing the requisite beliefs and knowledge that can promote these scientific literacy goals. This research study used a collective case study methodology to describe and interpret the views and actions of four teachers participating in a collaborative action research project. I explored the teachers' SI and NOS views throughout the project as they investigated ideas and theories, critically examined their current curricular practice, and implemented and reflected on these modified curricular practices. By the end of the research study, all participants had uniquely augmented their understanding of SI and NOS. The participants were better able to provide explanatory depth to some SI and NOS ideas; however, specific belief revision with respect to SI and NOS ideas was nominal. Furthermore, their idealized action research plans were not implemented to the extent that they were planned. Explanations for these findings include: impact of significant past educational experiences, prior understanding of SI and NOS, depth of content and pedagogical content knowledge of the discipline, and institutional and instructional constraints. Nonetheless, through participation in the collaborative action research process, the teachers developed professionally, personally, and socially. They identified many positive outcomes from participating in a collaborative action research project; however, they espoused constraints to

  9. Code Sharing and Collaboration: Experiences From the Scientist's Expert Assistant Project and Their Relevance to the Virtual Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korathkar, Anuradha; Grosvenor, Sandy; Jones, Jeremy; Li, Connie; Mackey, Jennifer; Neher, Ken; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In the Virtual Observatory (VO), software tools will perform the functions that have traditionally been performed by physical observatories and their instruments. These tools will not be adjuncts to VO functionality but will make up the very core of the VO. Consequently, the tradition of observatory and system independent tools serving a small user base is not valid for the VO. For the VO to succeed, we must improve software collaboration and code sharing between projects and groups. A significant goal of the Scientist's Expert Assistant (SEA) project has been promoting effective collaboration and code sharing among groups. During the past three years, the SEA project has been developing prototypes for new observation planning software tools and strategies. Initially funded by the Next Generation Space Telescope, parts of the SEA code have since been adopted by the Space Telescope Science Institute. SEA has also supplied code for the SIRTF (Space Infrared Telescope Facility) planning tools, and the JSky Open Source Java library. The potential benefits of sharing code are clear. The recipient gains functionality for considerably less cost. The provider gains additional developers working with their code. If enough users groups adopt a set of common code and tools, de facto standards can emerge (as demonstrated by the success of the FITS standard). Code sharing also raises a number of challenges related to the management of the code. In this talk, we will review our experiences with SEA--both successes and failures, and offer some lessons learned that might promote further successes in collaboration and re-use.

  10. The droso4schools project: Long-term scientist-teacher collaborations to promote science communication and education in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjai; DeMaine, Sophie; Heafield, Joshua; Bianchi, Lynne; Prokop, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Science communication is becoming an increasingly important part of a scientist's remit, and engaging with primary and secondary schools is one frequently chosen strategy. Here we argue that science communication in schools will be more effective if based on good understanding of the realities of school life, which can be achieved through structured participation and/or collaboration with teachers. For example, the Manchester Fly Facility advocates the use of the fruit fly Drosophila as an important research strategy for the discovery processes in the biomedical sciences. To communicate this concept also in schools, we developed the 'droso4schools' project as a refined form of scientist-teacher collaboration that embraces the expertise and interests of teachers. Within this project, we place university students as teaching assistants in university partner schools to collaborate with teachers and develop biology lessons with adjunct support materials. These lessons teach curriculum-relevant biology topics by making use of the profound conceptual understanding existing in Drosophila combined with parallel examples taken from human biology. By performing easy to implement experiments with flies, we bring living organisms into these lessons, thus endeavouring to further enhance the pupil's learning experience. In this way, we do not talk about flies but rather work with flies as powerful teaching tools to convey mainstream curriculum biology content, whilst also bringing across the relevance of Drosophila research. Through making these lessons freely available online, they have the potential to reach out to teachers and scientists worldwide. In this paper, we share our experiences and strategies to provide ideas for scientists engaging with schools, including the application of the droso4schools project as a paradigm for long-term school engagement which can be adapted also to other areas of science. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All

  11. Post internship student-industry collaborative projects - as vehicle for the realization of challenging parts of the CDIO syllabus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte Bjerregaard

    2014-01-01

    Architectural engineering the 5 month internship period is placed early in the curriculum, after 4 semesters of study. It is obviously more challenging to find industry internships for students that are at an early stage in their studies because they need more supervision. However the investment is worth...... the trouble because the post internship curriculum is provided with pedagogical means to address parts of the syllabus that are on an advanced level in the learning taxonomy. The interface between the internship period and post internship student-industry collaborative projects is an important point of focus...

  12. Exploring Collaborative and Community Based Planning in Tourism Case Study Sitia-Cavo Sidero Project

    OpenAIRE

    Katsouli, Penelope

    2007-01-01

    The present paper has explored the policy planning and development in emerging tourism settings in Sitia. Comprehensively, this study, in the name of sustainable development, focused on the extent of collaborative and community-based planning. For that reason exploratory research has been used; the context and the structure of this paper aimed to uncover the socially constructed reality of Sitia's stakeholders, within the dynamic environment, and respond to and questions. Therein significant ...

  13. Digital Hive Project: Prototyping a Collaborative Web Portal for the Explosive Ordnance Disposal Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    25 Ibid. 26 Mark Tovey, “Mass Collaboration, Open Source, and Social Entrepreneurship ,” in Collective Intelligence: Creating a Prosperous World at...Eduardo Salas and Stephen M. Fiore (Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2004), 108. 48 Alex Pukinskis, “Co-located Teams,” in Agile...dominated media where only consumption is possible. As a naturally occurring byproduct of human psychology , people have always held a desire to

  14. Collaborative efforts are needed to ensure proper knowledge dissemination of telemedicine projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Neel Kolthoff; Jensen, Lena Sundby; Kayser, Lars

    2014-01-01

    documented and disseminated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Public and private funds were contacted for information about telemedicine studies focusing on people residing in their homes. After an initial screening of titles and abstracts, 19 projects were identified. The managers of the projects were contacted......INTRODUCTION: Telemedicine is often seen as the solution to the challenge of providing health care for an increasing number of people with chronic conditions. Projects are often organised locally and based on the involvement of stakeholders with a wide range of backgrounds. It can be challenging...... to ensure that projects are based on previous experience and that they do not repeat previous studies. To better understand these challenges and current practice, we examined telemedicine projects funded in the 2008-2010 period to explore where, how and to what extent results from the projects were...

  15. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    The thesis data have been collected in the EU-sponsored project: Collaborative Improvement Tool for the Extended Manufacturing Enterprise, CO-IMPROVE. In this project four universities (Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands), two software vendors (Greece and Sweden) and three companies...... (Denmark, Italy and The Netherlands) each with three to five suppliers were involved. The CO-IMPROVE project and the thesis is based on “action research” and “action learning”. The main aim of the whole project is through actual involvement and actions make the researchers, companies and selected suppliers...... learn how to improve operations in (hopefully) a win-win like manner through collaboration....

  16. Financing Structures for CDM Projects in India and Capacity Building Options for EU-Indo Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Krey, Matthias; Michaelowa, Axel; Deodhar, Vinay

    2003-01-01

    The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) under the Kyoto Protocol to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) enables industrialized countries to meet a part of their emission reduction requirements through purchase of emission reduction credits from projects in developing countries. Various studies have concluded that India is likely to be one of the major countries supplying such projects. However, in order that a large number of high-quality CDM projects is developed and result ...

  17. Status of the Next European Dipole (NED) Activity of the Collaborated Accelerator Research in Europe (CARE) Project

    CERN Document Server

    Devred, Arnaud; Baynham, D Elwyn; Boutboul, T; Canfer, S; Chorowski, M; den Ouden, A; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Fessia, P; Fydrych, J; Félice, H; Greco, Michela; Greenhalgh, J; Leroy, D; Loveridge, P W; Michel, F; Oberli, L R; Pedrini, D; Polinski, J; Previtali, V; Quettier, L; Rifflet, J M; Rochford, J; Rondeaux, F; Sanz, S; Sgobba, Stefano; Sorbi, M; Toral-Fernandez, F; Van Weelderen, R; Vincent-Viry, O; Volpini, G; Védrine, P

    2005-01-01

    Plans for LHC upgrade and for the final focalization of linear colliders call for large aperture and/or high-performance dipole and quadrupole magnets that may be beyond the reach of conventional NbTi magnet technology. The Next European Dipole (NED) activity was launched on January 1st, 2004 to promote the development of high-performance, Nb$_{3}$Sn wires in collaboration with European industry (aiming at a non-copper critical current density of 1500 A/mm2 at 4.2 K and 15 T) and to assess the suitability of Nb$_{3}$Sn technology to the next generation of accelerator magnets (aiming at an aperture of 88 mm and a conductor peak field of 15 T). It is integrated within the Collaborated Accelerator Research in Europe (CARE) project, involves seven collaborators, and is partly funded by the European Union. We present here an overview of the NED activity and we report on the status of the various work packages it encompasses.

  18. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    -Doerr, 1996) and has been shown to have a positive effect to the outcome of collaborative R&D (Sampson, 2005). Anand & Khanna (2000), furthermore, hypothesized that research joint ventures are more ambiguous than marketing joint ventures and even more the licensing and showed that the effect of collaborative......Literature review: Collaborative experience has been shown to have a positive effect on the collaborative outcome in general (Anand & Khanna, 2000; Kale, Dyer & Singh, 2002). Furthermore, it has been linked to the ability to exploit the network of the firm for learning (Powell, Koput and Smith...... experience was largest the higher the hypothesized ambiguity. Theoretically contribution: This research project aims at contributing to existing literature by arguing, that collaborative experience is a moderating variable which moderates the effects on collaborative outcome from the level of complexity...

  19. Collaborative Environmental Projects in a Multicultural Society: Working from within Separate or Mutual Landscapes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Tali; Alkaher, Iris

    2010-01-01

    A multicultural socio-environmental project that is framed in the ideas of education for sustainability brought together Jew and Arab students was investigated to identify the participants' views of the program's objectives and their accomplishments. We investigated the project's strengths and weaknesses according to the participants' views and…

  20. Cooperative Learning in Graduate Student Projects: Comparing Synchronous versus Asynchronous Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative learning was applied in a graduate project management course to compare the effectiveness of asynchronous versus synchronous online team meetings. An experiment was constructed to allocate students to project teams while ensuring there was a balance of requisite skills, namely systems analysis and design along with HTML/Javascript…

  1. Collaborative Projects: A Study of Paired Work in a Malaysian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Examines the project work of university students in a TESOL (Teaching of English as a Second Language) program in Malaysia. Compares phonetics and phonology projects completed by students working in pairs with those completed by students alone and reports student attitudes and strategies. (Author/LRW)

  2. Experiential, Collaborative and Team Projects: Communication Audits in the MBA Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Claudia; Vroman, Margo; Stulz, Karin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the challenges and rewards of building a graduate level Managerial Communication course around an experiential communication audit project. The purpose of the project was to provide MBA (Master of Business Administration) students with exposure to the real world responsibilities and demands of working in a complex…

  3. Collaborative efforts are needed to ensure proper knowledge dissemination of telemedicine projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Neel Kolthoff; Jensen, Lena Sundby; Kayser, Lars

    2014-09-01

    Telemedicine is often seen as the solution to the challenge of providing health care for an increasing number of people with chronic conditions. Projects are often organised locally and based on the involvement of stakeholders with a wide range of backgrounds. It can be challenging to ensure that projects are based on previous experience and that they do not repeat previous studies. To better understand these challenges and current practice, we examined telemedicine projects funded in the 2008-2010 period to explore where, how and to what extent results from the projects were documented and disseminated. Public and private funds were contacted for information about telemedicine studies focusing on people residing in their homes. After an initial screening of titles and abstracts, 19 projects were identified. The managers of the projects were contacted and information about project results and dissemination were obtained. More than half of all projects were disseminated to professionals as well as to the public and used two-way communication. However, it was generally difficult to obtain an overview of the projects due to dynamic changes in names and scopes. We propose that the funding authorities require designs comprising proper evaluation models that will subsequently allow the investigators to publish their findings. Furthermore, a dissemination plan comprising both peers and other professions should be made mandatory. The investigators should ensure proper documentation and dissemination of changes both during and after the projects in order to ensure transparency, and national or international organisations should establish a database with relevant data fields. not relevant. not relevant.

  4. The SCIDIP-ES project - towards an international collaboration strategy for long term preservation of earth science data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, Andrew; Glaves, Helen; Marelli, Fulvio; Albani, Mirko; Tona, Calogera; Marketakis, Yannis; Tzitzikas, Yannis; Guarino, Raffaele; Giaretta, David; Di Giammatteo, Ugo

    2013-04-01

    The capability for long term preservation of earth science data is a key requirement to support on-going research and collaboration within and between many earth science disciplines. A number of critically important current research directions (e.g. understanding climate change, and ensuring sustainability of natural resources) rely on the preservation of data often collected over several decades in a form in which it can be accessed and used easily. Another key driver for strategic long term data preservation is that key research challenges (such as those described above) frequently require cross disciplinary research utilising raw and interpreted data from a number of earth science disciplines. Effective data preservation strategies can support this requirement for interoperability and collaboration, and thereby stimulate scientific innovation. The SCIDIP-ES project (EC FP7 grant agreement no. 283401) seeks to address these and other data preservation challenges by developing a Europe wide infrastructure for long term data preservation comprising appropriate software tools and infrastructure services to enable and promote long term preservation of earth science data. Because we define preservation in terms of continued usability of the digitally encoded information, the generic infrastructure services will allow a wide variety of data to be made usable by researchers from many different domains. This approach promotes international collaboration between researchers and will enable the cost for long-term usability across disciplines to be shared supporting the creation of strong business cases for the long term support of that data. This paper will describe our progress to date, including the results of community engagement and user consultation exercises designed to specify and scope the required tools and services. Our user engagement methodology, ensuring that we are capturing the views of a representative sample of institutional users, will be described. Key

  5. The Power of Collaboration: Experiences From the Educational Innovations Project and Implications for the Next Accreditation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, David B; Vasilias, Jerry; Clough, Lynn; Davis, Felicia; McDonald, Furman S; Reynolds, Eileen E; O'Malley, Cheryl W; Hinchey, Kevin T; Kirk, Lynne M; Gersoff, Andrew S; Clyburn, E Benjamin; Frohna, John G

    2014-09-01

    The Internal Medicine Educational Innovations Project (EIP) is a 10-year pilot project for innovating in accreditation, which involves annual reporting of information and less-restrictive requirements for a group of high-performing programs. The EIP program directors' experiences offer insight into the benefits and challenges of innovative approaches to accreditation as the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education transitions to the Next Accreditation System. We assessed participating program directors' perceptions of the EIP at the midpoint of the project's 10-year life span. We conducted telephone interviews with 15 of 18 current EIP programs (83% response rate) using a 19-item, open-ended, structured survey. Emerging themes were identified with content analysis. Respondents identified a number of the benefits from the EIP, most prominent among them, collaboration between programs (87%, 13 of 15) and culture change around quality improvement (47%, 7 of 15). The greatest benefit for residents was training in quality improvement methods (53%, 8 of 15), enhancing those residents' ability to become change agents in their future careers. Although the requirement for annual data reporting was identified by 60% (9 of 15) of program directors as the biggest challenge, respondents also considered it an important element for achieving progress on innovations. Program directors unanimously reported their ability to sustain innovation projects beyond the 10-year participation in EIP. The work of EIP was not viewed as "more work," but as "different work," which created a new mindset of continuous quality improvement in residency training. Lessons learned offer insight into the value of collaboration and opportunities to use accreditation to foster innovation.

  6. Opportunities Provided by the Design of a Website Focused on the Promotion of Collaborative Projects Within European IT Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru CAPATINA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Our paper emphasizes the opportunities provided both for the academic research and business partnerships by the design of a website which promotes the collaborative projects within European IT industry. From the academic perspective, the companies registered in the website database will represent the sample for different researches focused on cross-cultural interactions, intellectual capital components and competitive intelligence strategies. From the business perspective, the registration of the companies will allow the access to the list with all the potential future partners’ in the field of software development. In the first part of the paper dedicated to literature review, we highlighted the main types of IT collaborative projects; then, we presented the tools provided by the website that was designed in view to increase the awareness of the European IT companies. In the last part of the paper, we tested by means of chi-square statistical method the correlation between R&D investments and average length of time for software design in the case of a sample of 58 IT companies included in the database. We also revealed our future research intentions related to the domain of IT partnerships patterns.

  7. Proposal to amend a partner project agreement with ISTC for the CMS collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns an amendment to a partner project agreement with the ISTC, namely the Partner Project Agreement 1718p for "Technology Reliability Demonstration and Precise CMS Electromagnetic Calorimetry Performance at LHC on a Base of Specified Tungstate (PbWO4) Scintillation Crystals". This Partner Project was approved by Council on 17 December 1999 (cf. CERN/2312). For reasons set out in this document the Finance Committee is invited to authorise CERN to negotiate an amendment to the Partner Project Agreement 1718p. The purpose of the amendment is to increase the production rate of crystals through the acquisition, installation and commissioning of 33 additional crystal growth ovens for a total amount of 1 500 000 US dollars.

  8. Proposal for the extension of a partner project agreement with ISTC ? ATLAS collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the extension of the scope of work covered by a partner project agreement with the ISTC, namely Partner Project Agreement 1800p for Manufacturing, Assembly and Testing of the End-cap Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) for the ATLAS Experiment at the CERN LHC. This Partner Project Agreement was approved by Council on 23 June 2000 (c.f. draft minutes of the meeting CERN/2340/Draft). For reasons set out in this document the Finance Committee is invited to approve the extension of the scope of work covered by Partner Project Agreement 1800p to include the Manufacturing, Assembly and Testing of type C End-cap support rings for a total amount of 503 720 Swiss francs.

  9. Theme II Joint Work Plan -2017 Collaboration and Knowledge Sharing on Large-scale Demonstration Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang [World Resources Inst. (WRI), Washington, DC (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-25

    This effort is designed to expedite learnings from existing and planned large demonstration projects and their associated research through effective knowledge sharing among participants in the US and China.

  10. Programming PLCS under EPICS at the SNS Project : Further Experiences in Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. A. Gurd; W. H. Strong; J. D. Creel

    2003-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source being built in Tennessee by a partnership of six national laboratories. The control system components for the SNS were produced by personnel at the collaborating laboratories, by vendors of the equipment, and by commercial contractors. A number of different approaches were used to provide the programming for both the programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and the input-output controllers (IOCs) which were all based on the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). For conventional facilities, both the PLCs and the IOCs were programmed under a commercial contract. The PLCs for the high power radio frequency system (HPRF) were programmed by the vendors of the equipment, while the IOCs were programmed by the collaborating laboratory. Finally, while the IOCs for the cryogenic systems were programmed at Oak Ridge, three different approaches were used to produce the PLC programming: some were programmed at Oak Ridge, some at TJNAF, and some at vendor sites. This paper discusses the status of the PLCs in the control system and the integration challenges encountered in the various approaches

  11. Feasibility of a virtual learning collaborative to implement an obesity QI project in 29 pediatric practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Tamara; Morton, Michaela; Weissman, Mark; O'Brien, Ellen; Hamburger, Ellen; Hancock, Yolandra; Moon, Rachel Y

    2014-04-01

    Quality improvement (QI) activities are required to maintain board certification in pediatrics. However, because of lack of training and resources, pediatricians may feel overwhelmed by the need to implement QI activities. Pediatricians also face challenges when caring for overweight and obese children. To create a virtual (online) QI learning collaborative through which pediatric practices could easily develop and implement a continuous QI process. Prospective cohort. Pediatric practices that were part of the Children's National Health Network were invited to participate, with the option to receive continuing medical education and maintenance of certification credits. s) Practices conducted baseline and monthly chart audits, participated in educational webinars and selected monthly practice changes, using Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles. Practices reported activities monthly and periodic feedback was provided to practices about their performance. s) Improvement in (i) body mass index (BMI) percentile documentation, (ii) appropriate nutritional and activity counseling and (iii) follow-up management for high-risk patients. Twenty-nine practices (120 providers) participated, and 24 practices completed all program activities. Monthly chart audits demonstrated continuous improvement in documentation of BMI, abnormal weight diagnosis, nutrition and activity screening and counseling, weight-related health messages and follow-up management of overweight and obese patients. Impact of QI activities on visit duration and practice efficiency was minimal. A virtual learning collaborative was successful in providing a framework for pediatricians to implement a continuous QI process and achieve practice improvements. This format can be utilized to address multiple health issues.

  12. TANK FARM REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT AN EXERCISE IN TECHNICAL & REGULATORY COLLABORATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JARAYSI, M.N.

    2007-01-08

    The Tank Farm Remediation Technology Development Project at the Hanford Site focuses on waste storage tanks, pipelines and associated ancillary equipment that are part of the C-200 single-shell tank (SST) farm system located in the C Tank Farm. The purpose of the project is to obtain information on the implementation of a variety of closure activities and to answer questions on technical, operational and regulatory issues associated with closure.

  13. Multi-actor decision making using mixed reality technologies Urban projects and multi-actor collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Basile,, Maria; Ozdirlik, Burcu; Terrin,, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-01

    International audience; This paper is based on the results of an ongoing research project, IPCity, on the application of mixed reality technologies in urban environments. It questions the relevance of traditional language and communication medium such as drawings, perspectives and 3D models in the co-production of urban projects in multi-actor working environments. It then discusses the possible use of “mixed reality technologies” as alternative medium through five workshops organised within ...

  14. TANK FARM REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT AN EXERCISE IN TECHNICAL and REGULATORY COLLABORATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JARAYSI, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    The Tank Farm Remediation Technology Development Project at the Hanford Site focuses on waste storage tanks, pipelines and associated ancillary equipment that are part of the C-200 single-shell tank (SST) farm system located in the C Tank Farm. The purpose of the project is to obtain information on the implementation of a variety of closure activities and to answer questions on technical, operational and regulatory issues associated with closure

  15. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Helen Kerr

    2003-08-01

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making

  16. Cross-Cultural Collaboration as Community Growth and Integration: Children’s Music Projects in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Linklater

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper constitutes a reflective account of inclusive approaches in two children’s music projects, both aiming to foster group creativityalongside cross-cultural awareness and understanding. The first of these projects involved sharing songs composed by children and youngpeople from a special needs school in Mostar, Bosnia-Herzegovina, with a primary school choir in Edinburgh, Scotland. The second project, inSarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, focused on group song-writing and performance involving three groups of children from ethnically separated schools, alongside a choir from a school for children with visual impairments. On reflection, we discuss cross-cultural musical collaboration as an effective means of bringing children togetheracross social and cultural divides in order to share new experiences while building respect for differences. We hope projects such as these may represent the first step towards the ultimate goal of encouraging and nurturing more inclusive friendships between children who might not otherwise have opportunities to interact with each other.

  17. eDOC : A collaboration infrastructure to manage knowledge and information on nuclear projects and research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Craeynest, J.M.; Jacquemet, F.; Chermette, D.; Bonneau, S.

    2004-01-01

    One of EU's strategic goals was launched at Lisbon 2000 European summit: becoming the most competitive knowledge economy by 2010. In the field of nuclear technologies, we know that capitalizing knowledge and acquired experience is vital to preserve nuclear equipment's' safe use in the future. Knowledge Management encompasses various domains of business practices, relating to human resources management, information, information technologies, strategy, and accounting. Facing such complex issues, especially in R and D organizations, knowledge management cannot only stand on a few organizational or technical solutions. All functions must be involved to achieve those strategic objectives: management must find realistic incentives and inscribe Knowledge Management as a core management objective (just as Quality Insurance has been). Human Resources departments and education institutes can benefit from new technologies to improve training methods. Research units have to launch knowledge capitalization projects to retrieve, save and transfer critical knowledge, technical skills and know-how. An a-posteriori knowledge saving 'fireman-type' action must be done in the case of major events but we must promote an on-going capitalization effort as well and embed KM into projects and activities management methods. This effort during the project and afterwards is implemented through a perennial information system. This information system should provide a wide range of services for scientific publications and patents management, corporate or local knowledge bases and document repositories, project management and collaboration, rich media authoring, etc. Implementing virtual workspaces with eDOC Research and engineering activities are more and more cross-organizations funded and netlike organized. Furthermore, it is very difficult for project managers to deal with security constraints as they must share but protect knowledge as well. Before sharing information, teams have to share a

  18. Status report on the collaborative project on the sans of K-carrageenan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calix, V.S.

    2006-01-01

    In the 2001 Beijing workshop, the Philippines proposed studies on the SANS of a natural biopolymer carrageenan. Several studies were submitted which were reviewed and evaluated by the Japanese scientist (1). On the basis of the economic importance and support of the Philippine government, in addition to it satisfying the requirement of FNCA, the proposal was accepted to be conducted in collaboration with the Prof. M. Shibayama of ISSP-Tokyo University. Two studies were proposed by the Philippines: 1. Structural investigation of γ-irradiated K-carrageenan. 2. Structural investigation of K-carrageenan/PVP blend cross linked by γ-irradiation. The report discusses the progress of the different activities related to the proposed studies done in the Philippines and the one currently being undertaken under the MEXT Exchange Program at JAERI, Tokai by a researcher who joined the group of Prof. M. Shibayama. (author)

  19. An extensible and successful method of identifying collaborators for National Library of Medicine informationist projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeff D; Rambo, Neil H

    2015-07-01

    The New York University (NYU) Health Sciences Library used a new method to arrange in-depth discussions with basic science researchers. The objective was to identify collaborators for a new National Library of Medicine administrative supplement. The research took place at the NYU Health Sciences Library. Using the National Institutes of Health (NIH) RePORTER, forty-four researchers were identified and later contacted through individualized emails. Nine researchers responded to the email followed by six in-person or phone discussions. At the conclusion of this process, two researchers submitted applications for supplemental funding, and both of these applications were successful. This method confirmed these users could benefit from the skills and knowledge of health sciences librarians, but they are largely unaware of this.

  20. Collaborative Research: Robust Climate Projections and Stochastic Stability of Dynamical Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilya Zaliapin

    2011-10-12

    This project focused on conceptual exploration of El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability and sensitivity using a Delay Differential Equation developed in the project. We have (i) established the existence and continuous dependence of solutions of the model (ii) explored multiple models solutions, and the distribution of solutions extrema, and (iii) established and explored the phase locking phenomenon and the existence of multiple solutions for the same values of model parameters. In addition, we have applied to our model the concept of pullback attractor, which greatly facilitated predictive understanding of the nonlinear model's behavior.

  1. 'Cascading participation' and the role of teachers in a collaborative HIV and Aids curriculum development project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Scott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents findings of four Grade 6 teachers' involvement as facilitators of a participatory action research (PAR project conducted in three South African primary schools. Based on the results of Phase One research which indicated that Grade 6s learn about sexuality, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS from multiple sources, the Phase Two project designers developed a toolkit to help Life Orientation (LO teachers consult learners on what they know and how they want to be taught. In each school, a curriculum development group comprising the participating teacher, learners, parents and an HIV and Aids specialist worked to enhance the official HIV and Aids curriculum using the information gathered each week by the teacher. This dialogue between the study participants represents the culmination of what we describe as the project's 'cascading participation' research model, a term denoting the multiple levels of participant involvement in the study. Although theories of participation often depict a binary relationship between those with power and those without it, the implementation of this project shows how the official curriculum, cultural norms and low parent involvement can exert pressure at different levels to diminish teachers' ability to facilitate social and educational change.

  2. Summary of Industry-Academia Collaboration Projects on Cluster Ion Beam Process Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Isao; Toyoda, Noriaki; Matsuo, Jiro

    2008-01-01

    Processes employing clusters of ions comprised of a few hundred to many thousand atoms are now being developed into a new field of ion beam technology. Cluster-surface collisions produce important non-linear effects which are being applied to shallow junction formation, to etching and smoothing of semiconductors, metals, and dielectrics, to assisted formation of thin films with nano-scale accuracy, and to other surface modification applications. In 2000, a four year R and D project for development of industrial technology began in Japan under funding from the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). Subjects of the projects are in areas of equipment development, semiconductor surface processing, high accuracy surface processing and high-quality film formation. In 2002, another major cluster ion beam project which emphasized nano-technology applications has started under a contract from the Ministry of Economy and Technology for Industry (METI). This METI project involved development related to size-selected cluster ion beam equipment and processes, and development of GCIB processes for very high rate etching and for zero damage etching of magnetic materials and compound semiconductor materials. This paper describes summery of the results.

  3. A Subject Librarian's Guide to Collaborating on E-Science Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garritano, Jeremy R.; Carlson, Jake R.

    2009-01-01

    For liaison or subject librarians, entering into the emerging area of providing researchers with data services or partnering with them on cyberinfrastructure projects can be a daunting task. This article will provide some advice as to what to expect and how providing data services can be folded into other liaison duties. New skills for librarians…

  4. Collaboration, Pedagogy, and Media: Short-Term Summer Programs Emphasize Project Based and Social Emotional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Summer programs that experiment with combining media literacy and social-emotional learning can potentially affect students' academic performance. Based on a six-week program, working with rising eighth grade students in a low-income school district, this program allowed students to work on media projects while trying to develop stronger…

  5. Stakeholder Participation in REDD+ Readiness Activities for Three Collaborative Projects in Lao PDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saykham Boutthavong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A key challenge for reducing emission from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD in developing countries is to balance the power of various stakeholders in decision making. This study explores the forms of stakeholder participation in the implementation of three pilot projects in Laos, with a focus on who actually makes decisions on project activities. We found that stakeholder roles in making decisions were imbalanced. The central government and development partner organizations were the ones who actually fulfill the roles of decision-makers in most project activities. Although local communities were not the key stakeholders in decision making in most activities, their roles seem to have increased in the activities where participatory approaches were applied. Participation of the private sector, non-governmental organizations, academic and research institutes and mass organizations was limited. Opportunities to reach decision-makers regarding project activities came through service contract agreements. Our findings suggest that an understanding of who fulfills the key roles will support a decentralization of decision making by balancing power and redistributing the roles from dominant to weaker stakeholders. In addition, the private sector’s participation may enhance opportunities to harmonize their investments for supporting REDD+ development and reduce the negative impacts on the forests and the environment.

  6. Dimensions of problem based learning - dialogue and online collaboration in projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Lars Birch; Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche

    2013-01-01

    -based learning approach developed in Denmark historically and theoretically, and how it unfolds today discussed through a case of the Danish Master programme in ICT and Learning (MIL), focusing on changes in the roles of teachers as supervisors, and the involvement of students in course and project activities....

  7. Collaborative Learning in Architectural Education: Benefits of Combining Conventional Studio, Virtual Design Studio and Live Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carolina; Hudson, Roland; Niblock, Chantelle

    2018-01-01

    Combinations of Conventional Studio and Virtual Design Studio (VDS) have created valuable learning environments that take advantage of different instruments of communication and interaction. However, past experiences have reported limitations in regards to student engagement and motivation, especially when the studio projects encourage abstraction…

  8. A Practice-Centered Approach to Professional Development: Teacher-Librarian Collaboration in Capstone Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Violet H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a professional development initiative that targeted teams of teachers and librarians working with high school students on strengthening an inquiry approach to capstone projects. While much has been written about student-focused models for information search and use, little has been reported on how training for the…

  9. Communications and Collaboration Keep San Francisco VA Medical Center Project on Track

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federal Energy Management Program

    2001-01-01

    This case study about energy saving performance contacts (ESPCs) presents an overview of how the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in San Francisco established an ESPC contract and the benefits derived from it. The Federal Energy Management Program instituted these special contracts to help federal agencies finance energy-saving projects at their facilities

  10. Collaborative value creation and learning in innovation projects for a circular city

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oskam, Inge; Bossink, Bart; de Man, Ard-Pieter

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the concept of a circular economy, an industrial economy that is restorative or regenerative by intention and design, has gained increased attention of policy makers, industry and academics. Recently the number of innovation projects, set up by local governments, communities,

  11. Private Sector/Educator Collaboration: Project Improves Financial, Economic Literacy of America's Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Deborah C.; Chinadle, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    The Family Economics and Financial Education Project (FEFE) began in 2001 at Montana State University with an annual grant from Take Charge America, Inc., a credit counseling and debt management company headquartered in Phoenix, Arizona. FEFE's mission is to provide educators with curriculum materials and training to be effective teachers of…

  12. Ethical principles for project collaboration between academic professionals or institutions and the biomedical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, Povl

    2012-01-01

    Ethics in biomedical research cannot be defined by etymology, and need a semantic definition based on national and contemporary values. In a Nordic cultural and historic context, key values are solidarity with one's fellow man, equality, truth, justice, responsibility, freedom, and professionalism. In contemporary medical research, such ethics are further subgrouped into research ethics, researcher ethics, societal ethics, and distributive ethics. Lately, public and academic debates have addressed the necessary strengthening of the ethical concerns and interests of patients and society. Despite considerable progress, common ethical definitions and control systems still lack uniformity or indeed do not exist. Among the cooperative partners involved, the pharmaceutical industry have preserved an important role. The same is true for the overall judgments reflected by the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice, leading peer-reviewed journals, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics for developing nations, and the latest global initiative, the Singapore Statement on Research Integrity. To help both institutions and countries, it will be valuable to include the following information in academia-industry protocols before starting a project: international authorship names; fixed agendas and time schedules for project meetings; chairperson shifts, meeting reports, and project plan changes; future author memberships; equal blinding and data distribution from disciplinary groups; an equal plan for exchange of project manuscripts at the proofing stage; contractual descriptions of all procedures, disagreements, publishing rights, prevention, and controls for suspected dishonesty; and a detailed description of who is doing what in the working process.

  13. The Effects of Teacher and Teacher-librarian High-end Collaboration on Inquiry-based Project Reports and School Monthly Test Scores of Fifth-grade Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hai-Hon Chen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. The first purpose was to establish the high level collaboration of integrated instruction model between social studies teacher and teacher-librarian. The second purpose was to investigate the effects of high-end collaboration on the individual and groups’ inquiry-based project reports, as well as monthly test scores of fifth-grade students. A quasi-experimental method was adopted, two classes of elementary school fifth graders in Tainan Municipal city, T...

  14. Redox processes in the safety case of deep geological repositories of radioactive wastes. Contribution of the European RECOSY Collaborative Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duro, L.; Bruno, J.; Grivé, M.; Montoya, V.; Kienzler, B.; Altmaier, M.; Buckau, G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The RECOSY project produced results relevant for the Safety Case of nuclear disposal. • We classify the safety related features where RECOSY has contributed. • Redox processes effect the retention of radionuclides in all repository subsystems. - Abstract: Redox processes influence key geochemical characteristics controlling radionuclide behaviour in the near and far field of a nuclear waste repository. A sound understanding of redox related processes is therefore of high importance for developing a Safety Case, the collection of scientific, technical, administrative and managerial arguments and evidence in support of the safety of a disposal facility. This manuscript presents the contribution of the specific research on redox processes achieved within the EURATOM Collaborative Project RECOSY (REdox phenomena COntrolling SYstems) to the Safety Case of nuclear waste disposal facilities. Main objectives of RECOSY were related to the improved understanding of redox phenomena controlling the long-term release or retention of radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal and providing tools to apply the results to Performance Assessment and the Safety Case. The research developed during the project covered aspects of the near-field and the far-field aspects of the repository, including studies relevant for the rock formations considered in Europe as suitable for hosting an underground repository for radioactive wastes. It is the intention of this paper to highlight in which way the results obtained from RECOSY can feed the scientific process understanding needed for the stepwise development of the Safety Case associated with deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes

  15. Childhood Obesity Declines Project: An Effort of the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research to Explore Progress in Four Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauh, Tina J; Dawkins-Lyn, Nicola; Dooyema, Carrie; Harris, Carole; Jernigan, Jan; Kettel Khan, Laura; Ottley, Phyllis; Young-Hyman, Deborah

    2018-03-01

    Recent findings show that national childhood obesity prevalence overall is improving among some age groups, but that disparities continue to persist, particularly among populations that have historically been at higher risk of obesity and overweight. Over the past several years, many jurisdictions at the city or county level across the nation have also reported declines. Little evaluation has focused on understanding the factors that influence the implementation of efforts to reduce childhood obesity rates. This article summarizes the rationale, aims, and overall design of the Childhood Obesity Declines Project (COBD), which was the first of its kind to systematically study and document the what, how, when, and where of community-based obesity strategies in four distinct communities across the nation. COBD was initiated by the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR), was led by a subset of NCCOR advisors and a research team at ICF, and was guided by external advisors made up of researchers, decision makers, and other key stakeholders. The research team used an adapted version of the Systematic Screening and Assessment method to review and collect retrospective implementation data in four communities. COBD found that sites implemented strategies across the many levels and environments that impact children's well being (akin to the social-ecological framework), building a Culture of Health in their communities. COBD demonstrates how collaboratives of major funders with the support of other experts and key stakeholders, can help to accelerate progress in identifying and disseminating strategies that promote healthy eating and physical activity.

  16. Towards a social sustainability in higher education: Enhancing students’ solidarity and togetherness through collaborative projects in racially diverse learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet Ramohai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One key goal in the mission and vision statement of the University of the Free State is to recruit the best and most diverse students who work in solidarity and togetherness across social and historical divides. This goal is further echoed in the academic divisions’ own mission and vision statements which endeavour to ensure that the broader institutional goals are met. The Faculty of Education in this institution for instance, in accordance with the institution’s vision, has included in their vision statement issues of diversity and social transformation which foreground the Faculty’s commitment to produce teachers who show solidarity in their dealings with others. A question that is worth considering though is how these mission and vision statements can be implemented in practice by lecturers in their classes. In this paper I report on an action research project towards the realisation of the vision of togetherness and solidarity of the University of the Free State and the Faculty of Education, in which spaces are created for collaborative work for Honours classes. The results from this classroom practice indicate that students’ solidarity and togetherness in racially diverse learning environments can be enhanced through collaborative students’ work designed by lecturers.

  17. Investigating Appropriate Financing Methods in Collaborative Projects of Water and Wastewater with AHP Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vosoughi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A mix of public and private funding is employed worldwide to enable the construction of large public projects and even, in some cases, the work of public services. In this study, the selected methods of financing of participatory projects of water and water wastes were studied and prioritized. Questionnaires and comments of experts were used along with AHP decision-making and Expert Choice software. Different financing methods include: BOT and BOO and its types, the publication of bonds, foreign direct investment, the method of buyback, internal financing, current financing, development banks, Barter transactions, new tax resources and foreign financing. Results are shown and discussed and a final ranking is provided.

  18. The Cognitive Behavioral Assessment (CBA Project: Presentation and Proposal for International Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezio Sanavio

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The main aim of this paper is to describe almost 30 years of work on psychological assessment using CBA, a research team, and to propose collaboration with Latin countries. Methods: The acronym CBA stands for Cognitive Behavioural Assessment and indicates both an overall approach to clinical assessment and a series of tests. Five general principles formed the basis on which the team developed their questionnaires: (1 assessment is not a passive collection of information, but an active process similar to problem-solving; (2 horizontal integration of questionnaires with other assessment methods; (3 vertical integration and hierarchical structure of assessment questionnaires; (4 idiographic perspective; (5 computer support. Results: The paper briefly presents the most important tests: CBA-2.0, a broad-spectrum Battery for patients who need counselling and/or psychotherapy; CBA-H (Hospital for both in-patients and out-patients suffering from physical illnesses; CBA-SPORT for professional athletes; CBA-Y (young people for adolescents and young adults; CBD-VE (treatment benefits to assess the effectiveness of psychological treatment. Conclusion: These questionnaires have produced over 100 research works, published in Italian journals or presented in conferences. In the near future, we expect important, radical changes and hope to create an international research milieu.

  19. A Data Specification for Software Project Performance Measures: Results of a Collaboration on Performance Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    cycle Evolution of a system, product, service, project or other human-made entity from conception through retirement [ ISO 12207 ]. Logical line of...012 [ ISO 1995] International Organization for Standardization. ISO /IEC 12207 :1995—Information technology— Software life cycle processes. http...definitions, authors were asked to use or align with already existing standards such as those available through ISO and IEEE when possible. Literature

  20. Redefining the Poet as Healer: Valerie Gillies's Collaborative Role in the Edinburgh Marie Curie Hospice Quiet Room Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the poetic contribution of Valerie Gillies, Edinburgh Makar (or poet of the city) from 2005-2008, to the Edinburgh Marie Curie Hospice Quiet Room, a new contemplation space for patients, families, and staff. In collaboration with others, Gillies created a transitional space for the Quiet Room, centered on the display of her sonnet, "A Place Apart." This space functions to comfort visitors to the Quiet Room by relocating them in their surroundings and offering the solace provided by nature and history. With this project, her first as Edinburgh Makar, Gillies redefines the role of the poet as healer and advocates for newer forms of palliative care that focus on patients' spiritual and emotional, as well as physical, wellbeing.

  1. Persistent dysphonia in two performers affecting the singing and projected speaking voice: a report on a collaborative approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Janet

    2002-01-01

    The projected speaking voice and the singing voice are highly sensitive to external and internal influences, and teachers of spoken voice and singing are in a unique position to identify subtle and more serious vocal difficulties in their students. Persistent anomalies may herald early onset of changes in vocal fold structure, neurophysiological control, or emotional stability. Two cases are presented to illustrate the benefits of a collaborative approach to diagnosis and management. The first, a 21-year-old male drama and singing student with an abnormally high speaking voice and falsetto singing voice was found to have a psychogenic dysphonia referred to as "puberphonia" or "mutational falsetto". The second, a 34-year-old female alto with strained phonation and perceived stutter of the vocal folds was diagnosed with "adductor spasmodic dysphonia" or "focal laryngeal dystonia" of neurological origin.

  2. Training activities on radiation protection in nuclear medicine in the frame of the EURATOM FP7 collaborative project MADEIRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giussani, Augusto; Mattsson, Sören; Mikuž, Marko; Cantone, Marie Claire; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    MADEIRA was a Collaborative Project cofunded by the European Commission through the EURATOM Seventh Research Framework Programme. It was structured into four scientific work packages, and its aim was to optimize the efficacy and safety of 3D functional imaging in nuclear medicine and thereby to reduce the radiation exposures of the patients while keeping or even improving the quality of the diagnostic information. Additionally, a fifth work package was dedicated to training and dissemination activities, including the organization of specific training courses, as well as research exchange programs for young scientists. This manuscript summarizes the experience gained during the Training Courses, in particular the one devoted to aspects of radiation protection in nuclear medicine.

  3. Proposal for the Extension of a Project Agreement with ISTC - Crystal Clear Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This document concerns the extension of the scope of work covered by a project agreement with the ISTC, entitled "Development of the Detector Production Technology for a New Generation of Positron Emission Tomographs to be used in Medicine and Pharmacology" which was approved by Finance Committee on 19 September 2001 (CERN/FC/4478). For the reasons set out in this document, the Finance Committee is invited to approve the extension of the scope of work covered by the above project agreement for the optimisation of the technology for a total amount of 160 000 US dollars. This extension will be partially funded by two external sponsors (RAYTEST - DE and the UNIVERSITY OF LAUSANNE - CH) at the level of 90 000 US dollars. CERN's contribution, which will be funded by revenue generated by its technology transfer activities, will not exceed 70 000 US dollars. This extension will bring the total amount of the Project Agreement to 935 000 US dollars, of which CERN's total contribution will not exceed 320 000 US dollars...

  4. Investigating the impacts of climate change on Chinese agriculture. China-UK collaboration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erda, Lin (ed.)

    2004-04-15

    The impact of climate change in China is expected to be considerable. A regional climate change model (PRECIS), developed by the UK's Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, was used to simulate China's climate and to develop climate change scenarios for the country. Results from this project suggest that, depending on the level of future emissions, the average temperature increase in China by the end of the 21st century may be between 3 and 4C.

  5. Overview of the Main Achievements of the FP7 EURATOM Collaborative Project ACSEPT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: • 4 consolidated flowsheets (r-SANEX, i-SANEX, 1c-SANEX, GANEX2); • 3 hots-tests, 1 spiked test (hydro); • A huge amount of work in organic synthesis and screening (hydro); • The best candidate ligand families considered as identified (hydro); • Relevant options for exhaustive electrolysis and actinide back-extraction from aluminum identified (pyro); • Relevant options for salt purification and waste conditioning (pyro); • Progresses in head-end steps; • Outputs for other FP7 projects; • High involvement in T&E issues; • High level of dissemination

  6. Mexico City air quality: Progress of an international collaborative project to define air quality management options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    Mexico City, faces a severe air pollution problem due to a combination of circumstances. The city is in a high mountain basin at a subtropical latitude. The basin setting inhibits dispersion of pollution and contributes to frequent wintertime thermal inversions which further trap pollutants near the surface. The elevation and latitude combine to provide plentiful sunshine which, in comparison to more northern latitudes, is enhanced in the UV radiation which drives atmospheric photochemistry to produce secondary pollutants such as ozone. The Area Metropolitana de la Ciudad de Mexico AMCW is defined to include the 16 delegations of the Federal District (D.F.) and 17 highly urbanized municipalities in the State of Mexico which border the D.F. The 1990 census (XI Censo General de Poblacion y Vivienda de 1990) records that slightly over 15 million people live in the AMCM. There are numerous other nearby communities which are in the airshed region of Mexico City, but which are not included in the definition and population of the AMCM. The Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative is one project that is examining the complex relationship between air pollution, economic growth, societal values, and air quality management policies. The project utilizes a systems approach including computer modeling, comprehensive measurement studies of Mexico City's air pollutants, environmental chemical reaction studies and socioeconomic analysis. Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA) and the Mexican Petroleum Institute are the designated lead institutions

  7. A collaborative network middleware project by Lambda Station, TeraPaths, and Phoebus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobyshev, A.; Bradley, S.; Crawford, M.; DeMar, P.; Katramatos, D.; Shroff, K.; Swany, M.; Yu, D.

    2010-01-01

    The TeraPaths, Lambda Station, and Phoebus projects, funded by the US Department of Energy, have successfully developed network middleware services that establish on-demand and manage true end-to-end, Quality-of-Service (QoS) aware, virtual network paths across multiple administrative network domains, select network paths and gracefully reroute traffic over these dynamic paths, and streamline traffic between packet and circuit networks using transparent gateways. These services improve network QoS and performance for applications, playing a critical role in the effective use of emerging dynamic circuit network services. They provide interfaces to applications, such as dCache SRM, translate network service requests into network device configurations, and coordinate with each other to setup up end-to-end network paths. The End Site Control Plane Subsystem (ESCPS) builds upon the success of the three projects by combining their individual capabilities into the next generation of network middleware. ESCPS addresses challenges such as cross-domain control plane signalling and interoperability, authentication and authorization in a Grid environment, topology discovery, and dynamic status tracking. The new network middleware will take full advantage of the perfSONAR monitoring infrastructure and the Inter-Domain Control plane efforts and will be deployed and fully vetted in the Large Hadron Collider data movement environment.

  8. The Future of Family Medicine: a collaborative project of the family medicine community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James C; Avant, Robert F; Bowman, Marjorie A; Bucholtz, John R; Dickinson, John R; Evans, Kenneth L; Green, Larry A; Henley, Douglas E; Jones, Warren A; Matheny, Samuel C; Nevin, Janice E; Panther, Sandra L; Puffer, James C; Roberts, Richard G; Rodgers, Denise V; Sherwood, Roger A; Stange, Kurt C; Weber, Cynthia W

    2004-01-01

    Recognizing fundamental flaws in the fragmented US health care systems and the potential of an integrative, generalist approach, the leadership of 7 national family medicine organizations initiated the Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project in 2002. The goal of the project was to develop a strategy to transform and renew the discipline of family medicine to meet the needs of patients in a changing health care environment. A national research study was conducted by independent research firms. Interviews and focus groups identified key issues for diverse constituencies, including patients, payers, residents, students, family physicians, and other clinicians. Subsequently, interviews were conducted with nationally representative samples of 9 key constituencies. Based in part on these data, 5 task forces addressed key issues to meet the project goal. A Project Leadership Committee synthesized the task force reports into the report presented here. The project identified core values, a New Model of practice, and a process for development, research, education, partnership, and change with great potential to transform the ability of family medicine to improve the health and health care of the nation. The proposed New Model of practice has the following characteristics: a patient-centered team approach; elimination of barriers to access; advanced information systems, including an electronic health record; redesigned, more functional offices; a focus on quality and outcomes; and enhanced practice finance. A unified communications strategy will be developed to promote the New Model of family medicine to multiple audiences. The study concluded that the discipline needs to oversee the training of family physicians who are committed to excellence, steeped in the core values of the discipline, competent to provide family medicine's basket of services within the New Model, and capable of adapting to varying patient needs and changing care technologies. Family medicine education

  9. European collaboration for improved monitoring of Icelandic volcanoes: Status of the FUTUREVOLC project after the initial 18 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Stéphanie; Parks, Michelle; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Vogfjörð, Kristín; Einarsdóttir, Heiðveig Maria; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnús; Kristinsson, Ingvar; Loughlin, Sue; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Hooper, Andrew; Kylling, Arve; Witham, Claire; Bean, Chris; Braiden, Aoife; Ripepe, Maurizio; Prata, Fred; Pétur Heiðarsson, Einar; Other Members Of The Futurevolc Team

    2014-05-01

    The FUTUREVOLC project funded by the European Union (FP7) is devoted to volcanic hazard assessment and establishing an integrated volcanological monitoring procedure through a European collaboration. To reach these objectives the project combines broad expertise from 26 partners from 10 countries, focusing on the four most active volcanoes of Iceland: Grímsvötn, Katla, Hekla and Bárdarbunga. The geological setting of Iceland, the high rate of eruptions and the various eruption styles make this country an optimal natural laboratory to study volcanic processes from crustal depths to the atmosphere. The project, which began on 1 October 2012, integrates advanced monitoring and analytical techniques in an innovative way, focusing on (i) detailed monitoring to improve our understanding of the seismic/magmatic unrest, in order to estimate the amount of magma available for an eruption and to provide early warnings (ii) the dynamics of magma in the conduit and a near real time estimation of the mass eruption rate and (iii) observing and modelling the plume dynamics. The project design considers effective collaboration between partners and aims for efficient cross-disciplinary workflows. A major step during the first 18 months of the project was the installation of additional equipment in the volcanic regions of Iceland to reinforce and complement the existing monitoring. The instruments include: seismometers, GPS stations, MultigGAS detectors, DOAS, infrasonic arrays, electric field sensors, radars, and optical particle sizers. Data streaming is designed to withstand extreme weather conditions. The FUTUREVOLC project has an open data policy for real and near-time data. Implementation of a data hub is currently under way, based on open access to data from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. Access to volcano monitoring data through a common interface will allow timely information on magma movements facilitated through combined analysis. A key part of the project is to

  10. Reproducibility in the Field: Transparency, Version Control and Collaboration on the Project Panormos Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strupler Néhémie

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Archaeological fieldwork is rarely considered reproducible in the sense of the ideal scientific method because of its destructive nature. But new digital technology now offers field practitioners a set of tools that can at least increase the transparency of the data-collection process as well as bring other benefits of an Open Science approach to archaeology. This article shares our perspectives, choices and experiences of piloting a set of tools (namely: ODK, Git, GitLab CE and R which can address reproducibility of fieldwork in the form of an intensive survey project in western Turkey, and highlights the potential consequences of Open Science approaches for archaeology as a whole.

  11. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James N. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States); McMurry, Peter H. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  12. The internet radiation oncology journal club - a multi-institutional collaborative education project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, Brian J.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Mendenhall, William M.; Recht, Abram; Hoppe, Richard T.; Grigsby, Perry W.; Turrisi, Andrew T.; Tepper, Joel E.; Roach, Mack; Larson, David A.; Withers, H. Rodney; Purdy, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The high volume of literature publication in radiation oncology poses a substantial selection and reading challenge. Busy health care providers may, from time to time, fail to identify and read important papers, resulting in delays in improvement of practice standards. Residency training programs have historically used journal clubs as a solution to this education challenge. In June 1995, radiation oncologists and scientists from nine institutions began the Internet Radiation Oncology Journal Club (IROJC) - a pilot project created to improve radiation oncology education worldwide by identifying noteworthy literature and stimulating an internet-based forum for literature discussion. Materials and Methods: The IROJC is a free-of-charge, moderated e-mailing list hosted by BIOSCI - a set of electronic communication forums used by biological scientists worldwide. Eleven radiation oncologists and scientists with internationally-recognized subspecialty expertise serve as IROJC editors. Each month, editors select noteworthy contemporary literature for inclusion. Selected references, often accompanied by editorial comments, are transmitted over the internet to IROJC readers. Readers request subscription by sending an e-mail message to biosci-server at net.bio.net, with 'subscribe radoncjc' in the body of the message. A website (www.bio.net/hypermail/RADIATION-ONCOLOGY), which includes an archive of back issues, is also available. Results: By February 1997, the IROJC's email-format enrollment numbered more than 670 readers from over 14 countries, its website was browsed by an average of 25 unique readers per week, and both figures were increasing steadily. An exciting online dialogue of literature- and practice-based comments and questions had emerged with increasing readership participation. Conclusion: Our pilot experience with the IROJC project has been promising. The observed increase in enrollment, website use, and readership discourse suggests

  13. Collaborative project. Ocean-atmosphere interaction from meso-to planetary-scale. Mechanisms, parameterization, and variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, Richard [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Bryan, Frank [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Tribbia, Joseph [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Park, Sungsu [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Dennis, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Saravanan, R. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Schneider, Niklas [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Kwon, Young-Oh [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-06-11

    This project aims to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving ocean mesoscale activity and the corresponding response in the atmosphere. The main computational objectives are; i) to perform and assess Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulations with the new Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) spectral element dynamical core; ii) use static mesh refinement to focus on oceanic fronts; iii) develop a new Earth System Modeling tool to investigate the atmospheric response to fronts by selectively filtering surface flux fields in the CESM coupler. The climate research objectives are 1) to improve the coupling of ocean fronts and the atmospheric boundary layer via investigations of dependency on model resolution and stability functions: 2) to understand and simulate the ensuing tropospheric response that has recently been documented in observations: and 3) to investigate the relationship of ocean frontal variability to low frequency climate variability and the accompanying storm tracks and extremes in high resolution simulations. This is a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of computational scientists, climate scientists and climate model developers. It specifically aims at DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

  14. The Effects of Teacher and Teacher-librarian High-end Collaboration on Inquiry-based Project Reports and School Monthly Test Scores of Fifth-grade Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Hon Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold. The first purpose was to establish the high level collaboration of integrated instruction model between social studies teacher and teacher-librarian. The second purpose was to investigate the effects of high-end collaboration on the individual and groups’ inquiry-based project reports, as well as monthly test scores of fifth-grade students. A quasi-experimental method was adopted, two classes of elementary school fifth graders in Tainan Municipal city, Taiwan were used as samples. Students were randomly assigned to experimental conditions by class. Twenty eight students of the experimental group were taught by the collaboration of social studies teacher and teacher-librarian; while 27 students of the controlled group were taught separately by teacher in didactic teaching method. Inquiry-Based Project Record, Inquiry-Based Project Rubrics, and school monthly test scores were used as instruments for collecting data. A t-test and correlation were used to analyze the data. The results indicate that: (1 High-end collaboration model between social studies teacher and teacher-librarian was established and implemented well in the classroom. (2There was a significant difference between the experimental group and the controlled group in individual and groups’ inquiry-based project reports. Students that were taught by the collaborative teachers got both higher inquiry-based project reports’ scores than those that were taught separately by the teachers. Experimental group’s students got higher school monthly test scores than controlled groups. Suggestions for teachers’ high-end collaboration and future researcher are provided in this paper.

  15. Developing geophysical monitoring at Mayon volcano, a collaborative project EOS-PHIVOLCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, D.; Laguerta, E.; Baloloy, A.; Valerio, R.; Marcial, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    Mayon is an openly-degassed volcano, producing mostly small, frequent eruptions, most recently in Aug-Sept 2006 and Dec 2009. Mayon volcano status is level 1 with low seismicity dominated mostly local and regional tectonic earthquakes with continuous emission of SO2 from its crater. A research collaboration between Earth Observatory of Singapore-NTU and Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) have been initiated in 2010 with effort to develop a multi-disciplinary monitoring system around Mayon includes geophysical monitoring, gas geochemical monitoring, and petrologic studies. Currently there are 4 broadband seismographs, 3 short period instruments, and 4 tiltmeters. These instruments will be telemetered to the Lignon Hill Volcano Observatory through radio and 3G broadband internet. We also make use of our self-made low-cost datalogger which has been operating since Jan 2011, performing continuous data acquisition with sampling rate of 20 minute/sample and transmitted through gsm network. First target of this monitoring system is to obtain continuous multi parameter data transmitted in real time to the observatory from different instruments. Tectonically, Mayon is located in the Oas Graben, a northwest-trending structural depression. Previous study using InSAR data, showing evidence of a left-lateral oblique slip movement of the fault North of Mayon. Understanding on what structures active deformation is occurring and how deformation signal is currently partitioned between tectonic and volcanic origin is a key for characterizing magma movement in the time of unrest. Preliminary analysis of the tangential components of tiltmeters (particularly the stations 5 and 7.5 NE from the volcano) shows gradual inflation movement over a few months period. The tangential components for tiltmeters are roughly perpendicular to the fault north of Mayon. This may suggest downward tilting of the graben in the northern side of Mayon. Another possibility is that

  16. The Quixote project: Collaborative and Open Quantum Chemistry data management in the Internet age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sam; de Castro, Pablo; Echenique, Pablo; Estrada, Jorge; Hanwell, Marcus D; Murray-Rust, Peter; Sherwood, Paul; Thomas, Jens; Townsend, Joe

    2011-10-14

    Computational Quantum Chemistry has developed into a powerful, efficient, reliable and increasingly routine tool for exploring the structure and properties of small to medium sized molecules. Many thousands of calculations are performed every day, some offering results which approach experimental accuracy. However, in contrast to other disciplines, such as crystallography, or bioinformatics, where standard formats and well-known, unified databases exist, this QC data is generally destined to remain locally held in files which are not designed to be machine-readable. Only a very small subset of these results will become accessible to the wider community through publication.In this paper we describe how the Quixote Project is developing the infrastructure required to convert output from a number of different molecular quantum chemistry packages to a common semantically rich, machine-readable format and to build respositories of QC results. Such an infrastructure offers benefits at many levels. The standardised representation of the results will facilitate software interoperability, for example making it easier for analysis tools to take data from different QC packages, and will also help with archival and deposition of results. The repository infrastructure, which is lightweight and built using Open software components, can be implemented at individual researcher, project, organisation or community level, offering the exciting possibility that in future many of these QC results can be made publically available, to be searched and interpreted just as crystallography and bioinformatics results are today.Although we believe that quantum chemists will appreciate the contribution the Quixote infrastructure can make to the organisation and and exchange of their results, we anticipate that greater rewards will come from enabling their results to be consumed by a wider community. As the respositories grow they will become a valuable source of chemical data for use by other

  17. The Quixote project: Collaborative and Open Quantum Chemistry data management in the Internet age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Sam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Computational Quantum Chemistry has developed into a powerful, efficient, reliable and increasingly routine tool for exploring the structure and properties of small to medium sized molecules. Many thousands of calculations are performed every day, some offering results which approach experimental accuracy. However, in contrast to other disciplines, such as crystallography, or bioinformatics, where standard formats and well-known, unified databases exist, this QC data is generally destined to remain locally held in files which are not designed to be machine-readable. Only a very small subset of these results will become accessible to the wider community through publication. In this paper we describe how the Quixote Project is developing the infrastructure required to convert output from a number of different molecular quantum chemistry packages to a common semantically rich, machine-readable format and to build respositories of QC results. Such an infrastructure offers benefits at many levels. The standardised representation of the results will facilitate software interoperability, for example making it easier for analysis tools to take data from different QC packages, and will also help with archival and deposition of results. The repository infrastructure, which is lightweight and built using Open software components, can be implemented at individual researcher, project, organisation or community level, offering the exciting possibility that in future many of these QC results can be made publically available, to be searched and interpreted just as crystallography and bioinformatics results are today. Although we believe that quantum chemists will appreciate the contribution the Quixote infrastructure can make to the organisation and and exchange of their results, we anticipate that greater rewards will come from enabling their results to be consumed by a wider community. As the respositories grow they will become a valuable source of

  18. Combustion of Waste Wood. Second phase of the collaboration project on waste wood combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Annika; Andersson, Christer; Eriksson, Jan; Hemstroem, Bengt; Jungstedt, Jenny; Kling, Aasa; Bahr, Bo von; Ekvall, Annika; Eskilsson, David; Tullin, Claes; Harnevie, Henrik; Sieurin, Jan; Keihaes, Juha; Mueller, Christian; Berg, Magnus; Wikman, Karin

    2003-08-01

    Combustion of waste wood has during the last decade increased dramatically and this has resulted in a number of Swedish plants using this fuel, e.g. Handeloe P11 (Norrkoeping) and ldbaecken P3 (Nykoeping), and yet other plants that are under construction (e.g. Nynaeshamn). The experience from these plants are that waste wood combustion results in a number of operational problems. To some extent these problems are different compared with the problems related to combustion of other biofuels but the situation is not directly comparable to waste incinerators. The problems are mainly related to slagging and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces and accelerated corrosion at relatively low temperature compared to the situation for ordinary biofuels. In some cases an increase in the emissions of specific substances can also result in difficulties to fulfil the EC-directive on waste combustion. Within previous projects the main problems related to combustion of waste wood have been identified and to some extent the cause of these problems has been clarified. One result of this reported investigation is a deeper understanding of the actual causes of these problems. However, the most important result is a number of recommendations for different measures on how to achieve disturbance-free combustion of waste wood. These recommendations actually summarises the most important possible solutions on how to achieve a disturbance-free operation and a lower maintenance cost for boilers combusting waste wood and can thereby be regarded as a short summery of the whole project: 1) Improving fuel quality by Improved sorting at the source and Sieving of the fuel -> Reducing the amount of metals and chlorine and Separation of fines and thereby reducing the amount of metals. 2) Combustion modifications by Avoiding reducing conditions at the heat exchanger surfaces -> Minimising slagging, fouling and corrosion. 3) Additives or co-combustion by Addition of sulphur with the fuel; Injection of

  19. Projet TECHNE : vers un apprentissage collaboratif dans une classe virtuelle bilingue TECHNE Project: Towards collaborative learning in bilingual virtual classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roisin Donohoe

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available La Communication Médiatisée par Ordinateur (CMO permet l’élargissement des frontières temporelles et spatiales de la salle de classe. Son exploitation pédagogique a donné naissance à de nombreux projets d’apprentissage des langues étrangères dont les fondements théoriques trouvent leurs origines dans les théories socioculturelles de l’apprentissage. La théorie de l’activité (TA, issue des travaux inspirés par Vygotsky, nous permet quant à elle de mieux appréhender le rôle de médiation que les outils et artefacts jouent dans un apprentissage collaboratif tout en fournissant un cadre de référence facilitant la description des processus en jeu au cours d’un tel apprentissage. TECHNE, projet de recherche-action conçu pour promouvoir un apprentissage collaboratif au sein de classes virtuelles et bilingues, s’inscrit dans une telle perspective. Après une description du projet, nous nous attachons à examiner certains des processus de collaboration en ligne que nous avons pu observer. Les résultats préliminaires d’une analyse quantitative des échanges effectués en ligne précèdent une étude qualitative d’échanges étalés sur plusieurs jours ou plusieurs heures. Nous formulons alors des axes de recherche future visant à mieux intégrer apprentissage de la langue et développement de compétences interculturelles et transversales.Computer Mediated Communication (CMC opens up the frontiers of the classroom. The use of CMC as a pedagogical tool has led to the creation of a number of language learning projects which call on the socio-cultural theories of learning. Activity Theory, originating from Vygotsky’s work, can help us to understand the mediation role of tools and artefacts in a collaborative learning environment while, at the same time supplying a framework for the description of the factors which come into play within such an environment. TECHNE, which was designed to promote collaborative learning

  20. Challenges in the Successful Research Management of a Collaborative EU Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikos, Dimitrios; Diomidous, Marianna; Mantas, John

    2012-03-01

    Successful research management requirements include; equal teamwork and efficient coordination, in order to increase the impact of the research outcomes and provide added value knowledge. Aim of this paper is to discuss the strategies that have been followed during the RN4CAST study, the largest nursing multi-country research project ever conducted in Europe. The paper focuses on the core research strategies rather than on the administrative activities, which are inevitably also required for the success of a large scale research. This paper is an extension of a conference presentation in the International Conference of the European Federation for Medical Informatics (MIE) 2011 in Oslo, and was subsequently published in the Studies in Health Technology and Informatics book series (IOS Press) under the title "Research management: the case of RN4CAST." Management of a multicountry nursing survey requires the use of common data collection tools, applicable to every context, research protocols supporting the scope of the research, data models for multi-country analyses and global dissemination strategies. Challenges that may be faced during the implementation of the study include the individualized confrontation of obstacles during data collection, the coherence of national procedures (for example permissions for data collection) in European level, and the challenge to gain information of added value for the EU, by aggregating the national survey results through a powerful data analysis model. Communication strategies are also discussed.

  1. InterScience and fusion: Projects, collaborations, and spin-offs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castracane, J.

    1995-01-01

    InterScience, Inc. is a small, high technology research and development company which participates in the mission of the fusion energy research program in a variety of ways. The company specializes in basic physics and advanced technologies applied to research and commercial opportunities. InterScience has numerous federal and private sponsors for research and development activities in plasma physics, electro-optics, materials science, electronics, and biomedical engineering. The company currently has several direct research and development projects which involve the assembly of diagnostic hardware for installation and operation at tokamak facilities both in the U.S. and abroad. In addition, the company works in a technical support capacity for both the magnetic and inertial confinement fusion programs. Successful participation in the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program has provided an avenue for the transfer of expertise from the fusion program to alternate agencies and research areas. Examples of this include fiberoptic sensors with data acquisition systems, advanced spectral imaging and image processing, fiberoptic imaging interferometry for biomedical instrumentation development and, micro-electro-mechanical systems

  2. Global Collaborative STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meabh Kelly, Susan; Smith, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Global Collaborative STEM Education, as the name suggests, simultaneously supports two sets of knowledge and skills. The first set is STEM -- science, technology, engineering and math. The other set of content knowledge and skills is that of global collaboration. Successful global partnerships require awareness of one's own culture, the biases embedded within that culture, as well as developing awareness of the collaborators' culture. Workforce skills fostered include open-mindedness, perseverance when faced with obstacles, and resourceful use of technological "bridges" to facilitate and sustain communication. In respect for the 2016 GIFT Workshop focus, Global Collaborative STEM Education projects dedicated to astronomy research will be presented. The projects represent different benchmarks within the Global Collaborative STEM Education continuum, culminating in an astronomy research experience that fully reflects how the global STEM workforce collaborates. To facilitate wider engagement in Global Collaborative STEM Education, project summaries, classroom resources and contact information for established international collaborative astronomy research projects will be disseminated.

  3. Tertiary Students' Intention to e-Collaborate for Group Projects: Exploring the Missing Link from an Extended Theory of Planned Behaviour Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Eddie W. L.; Chu, Samuel K. W.; Ma, Carol S. M.

    2016-01-01

    With the emergence of web technologies, students can conduct their group projects via virtual platforms, which enable online collaboration. However, students' lack of intention to use web technologies for conducting group work has recently been highlighted. Based on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), this paper developed and examined an…

  4. Banned antibacterial growth promoters in animal feed: Collaborative trial on the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method developed in the feedstuffs-radius project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poucke, C.V.; Dumoulin, F.; Yakkundi, S.; Situ, C.; Elliott, C.T.; Grutters, E.M.; Verheijen, R.; Schilt, R.; Eriksson, S.; Peteghem, C.V.

    2006-01-01

    A chemical confirmation method for the identification and quantification of five banned antibacterial growth promoters (AGPs) in animal feed was developed and in-house validated as part of the European Feedstuffs-RADIUS project [1]. To complete the validation process a collaborative trial was

  5. The Development of a Project-Based Collaborative Technical Writing Model Founded on Learner Feedback in a Tertiary Aeronautical Engineering Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatzl, Dietmar; Hassler, Wolfgang; Messnarz, Bernd; Fluhr, Holger

    2012-01-01

    The present article describes and evaluates collaborative interdisciplinary group projects initiated by content lecturers and an English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) instructor for the purpose of teaching technical writing skills in an aeronautical engineering degree program. The proposed technical writing model is assessed against the results of a…

  6. Using an Online Collaborative Project between American and Chinese Students to Develop ESL Teaching Skills, Cross-Cultural Awareness and Language Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Maria; Zhao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the potential of computer-mediated communication (CMC) tools to facilitate second language acquisition and develop English as a second language (ESL) teaching skills and cultural awareness. The paper describes a collaborative online project between students from China and the USA, who communicated using the…

  7. How does a Collaborative Community Affect Diverse Students' Engagement with an Open Source Software Project: A Pedagogical Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Becka S.

    Open Source Software (OSS) communities are homogenous and their lack of diversity is of concern to many within this field. This problem is becoming more pronounced as it is the practice of many technology companies to use OSS participation as a factor in the hiring process, disadvantaging those who are not a part of this community. We should expect that any field would have a population that reflects the general population given no constraints. The constraints within OSS are documented as being a hostile environment for women and minorities to participate in. Additionally OSS communities rely predominately on volunteers to create and maintain source code, documentation, and user interface as well as the organizational structure of the project. The volunteer nature of OSS projects creates a need for an ongoing pool of participants. This research addresses the lack of diversity along with the continual need for new members by developing a pedagogical paradigm that uses a collaborative environment to promote participation in an OSS project by diverse students. This collaborative environment used a Communities of Practice (CoP) framework to design the course, the indicators of which were used to operationalize the collaboration. The outcomes of this course not only benefit the students by providing them with skills necessary to continue participation and experience for getting a job, but also provide a diverse pool of volunteers for the OSS community. This diverse pool shows promise of creating a more diverse culture within OSS. In the development of this pedagogical paradigm this research looked primarily at student's perception of the importance of their group members and mentors provided to guide their participation in and contribution to an OSS community. These elements were used to facilitate the formation of a CoP. Self-efficacy was also used as a measure; an increase in self-efficacy is associated with the successful formation of a CoP. Finally the intent to

  8. The use of collaborative digital platforms in the perspective of shared administration. The MiraMap project in Turin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Coscia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper intends to illustrate an innovative approach to urban planning and shared Administration based on the use of collaborative digital platforms involving the Public Administration / citizen. This perspective is expressed in the MiraMap pilot project in Turin, in the District of Mirafiori Sud, which has been drawn up by a research group of the Politecnico di Torino. The project implements and develops a previous experience carried out in 2013 (Crowdmapping Mirafiori Sud, the main purpose of which was to determine whether the use of ICT could generate and support processes of social inclusion. Through the reading of the MiraMap process, of its objectives, of the methodology adopted, of its phases and lines of action, are highlighted the interdisciplinary and technical reasoning relative to: the structuring of relations with the institutions, in particular with the Public Administration, in the processes of planning and management of public space; the triggering of the processes of inclusion, participation and civic engagement; the identification of contributions that these trials can generate in the construction of a renewed urban governance. Lastly, this contribution outlines a possible methodology for monitoring and evaluation of ex-post impact, based on Community Impact Assessment/Evaluation (CIA/CIE, that evaluates in a descriptive manner the impacts - monetary and non-monetary - that have derived from the project in relation to the various actors involved. The use of ICT can foster the process of transparency and strengthen the accountability of the Public Administration, provided that the technology is an enabling factor and one of exclusion. The detailed analysis of the case provides ideas for reflection on this innovative approach: the citizen/PA relationship can contribute in the medium-long term to conveying positive socio-economic impacts on the territory, making the citizen more informed and involved and the Administration more

  9. 3D RECONSTRUCTION AND MODELING OF SUBTERRANEAN LANDSCAPES IN COLLABORATIVE MINING ARCHEOLOGY PROJECTS: TECHNIQUES, APPLICATIONS AND EXPERIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arles

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mining and underground archaeology are two domains of expertise where three-dimensional data take an important part in the associated researches. Up to now, archaeologists study mines and underground networks from line-plot surveys, cross-section of galleries, and from tool marks surveys. All this kind of information can be clearly recorded back from the field from threedimensional models with a more cautious and extensive approach. Besides, the volumes of the underground structures that are very important data to explain the mining activities are difficult to evaluate from "traditional" hand-made recordings. They can now be calculated more accurately from a 3D model. Finally, reconstructed scenes are a powerful tool as thinking aid to look back again to a structure in the office or in future times. And the recorded models, rendered photo-realistically, can also be used for cultural heritage documentation presenting inaccessible and sometimes dangerous places to the public. Nowadays, thanks to modern computer technologies and highly developed software tools paired with sophisticated digital camera equipment, complex photogrammetric processes are available for moderate costs for research teams. Recognizing these advantages the authors develop and utilize image-based workflows in order to document ancient mining monuments and underground sites as a basis for further historical and archaeological researches, performed in collaborative partnership during recent projects on medieval silver mines and preventive excavations of undergrounds in France.

  10. ACSEPT: a new FP7-Euratom Collaborative Project in the field of partitioning processes for advanced fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, Stephane; Touron, Emmanuel; Caravaca, Concha; Ekberg, Christian; Gaubert, Emmanuel; Hill, Clement

    2008-01-01

    Actinide recycling by separation and transmutation is considered worldwide and particularly in several European countries as one of the most promising strategies to reduce the inventory of radioactive waste, thus contributing to the sustainability of nuclear energy. Consistently with potentially viable recycling strategies, the Collaborative Project ACSEPT will provide a structured research and development framework to develop chemical separation processes compatible with fuel fabrication techniques, with a view to their future demonstration at the pilot level. Two strategies are proposed for the recycling of the actinides issuing from various forms of future nuclear fuels: -) their homogeneous recycling in mixed fuels via a prior group separation of the actinides and -) their heterogeneous recycling in targets or core blankets via their selective separation from fission products. Two major technologies are considered to meet these challenges: hydrometallurgical processes and pyrochemical processes. A training and education programme will also be implemented to share the knowledge among communities and generations so as to maintain the nuclear expertise at the fore-front of Europe. The challenging objectives of ACSEPT will be addressed by a multi-disciplinary consortium composed of European universities, nuclear research bodies and major industrial players. This consortium will generate fundamental improvements for the future design of a potential Advanced Processing Pilot Unit

  11. The California Alliance for Sustainability: A Collaborative Pilot Project to Build Regional Advocacy and Leadership for Sustainability Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, E. P.; Smith, G.; Cordero, E. C.; Santone, S.

    2012-12-01

    For Education for Sustainability (Efs) to have the presence in the K-12 curriculum that it arguably should, considerable obstacles must be overcome. Barriers include the role of high-stakes testing in marginalizing science and social studies and the lack of environmental and sustainability content in teacher education programs. The California Alliance for Sustainability (CASE), a collaborative 18-month project funded by the Clarence E. Heller Charitable Foundation, unites San José State University (SJSU) and Creative Change Educational Solutions (CCES) (http://www.creativechange.net/) to investigate and address potential barriers to Efs in San Francisco Bay area schools and regional teacher education programs and to document best practices for integrating sustainability into teachers' existing standards-based teaching. The overarching goal of the CASE project is to create a regional infrastructure of K-12 teachers and pre-service teacher educators who use EfS as a context for educational innovation and transformation, thus supplying a focused first step for investigating how Efs can be more broadly implemented in California's classrooms. This presentation will showcase the efforts of a pilot group of classroom teachers and teacher educators to bring EfS to their teaching. In summer 2012, the CASE Project provided 16 in-service teachers and 5 pre-service teacher education faculty from SJSU and California State University East Bay with a three-day professional development workshop. Practicing teachers and teacher educators experienced joint instruction in the content and pedagogy of sustainability though investigation of topics (e.g., Sustainable Communities, Ecological Footprint Analysis, Climate Change, Resource Use, Food Systems and Life Cycle Analysis) that offer broad connections to California standards in science and other disciplines. Sustainability concepts were also discussed as an engaging context for addressing the emerging Common Core and Next Generation

  12. A Comparison of Four Different Beach Profiling Techniques at St Leonards, Victoria - An Example of a Collaborative Stakeholder Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, N. L.; Miner, A. S.; Wynn, N.; Turner, D.

    2015-12-01

    Many beaches in Australia are under attack from shoreline erosion due rising sea levels and the action of waves. St Leonard's beach, a tourist town on the Victorian coastline, is of concern from this destructive erosion and the threat to the economic stability of the town. The major cause of erosion in this area is related to waves created from strong to gale force north to north-easterly winds. This in turn produces a northerly longshore current along with sediment suspension leading to a negative sediment budget. Ongoing and systematic monitoring of the shoreline movement is important to ensure the coast is understood and effectively managed now and into the future. Coastal land managers and agencies are required to find 'cost-effective' and 'fit-for-purpose' coastal monitoring methodologies which are affordable and efficient. This project forges a collaboration of stakeholders from academia, public sector land manager, local government and the private sector to compare four different methods of obtaining beach profiles. The four methods of obtaining beach profiles used for comparison are: 1. traditional survey method along transects using a total station theodolite, 2. traditional survey method along transects using a builder's grade laser level, 3. a small multi-rotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to produce a full 3D digital surface model of the study area, and 4. an experimental stationary device to produce a limited 3D model along a designated transect using terrestrial photogrammetric approach via a small GPS enabled camera. Assessment is made by comparing the method's precision, spatial coverage, expertise and equipment requirements/costs, preparation time, field acquisition time, number of people required in the field, post-acquisition processing time, and applicability for community use. Whilst is must be very clearly stated that all methods proved to be successful, the preliminary results of the "workflow and resourcing" assessment ranked the methods in

  13. "It's an Amazing Learning Curve to Be Part of the Project": Exploring Academic Identity in Collaborative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, Brenda; Ndebele, Clever; Winberg, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation into the role of academic identity within collaborative research in higher education in South Africa. The study was informed by the literature on academic identities, collaborative research and communities of practice. It was located within a multi-site study, with involvement of researcher collaborators…

  14. TORUS: Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes.Topical Collaboration for Nuclear Theory Project. Period: June 1, 2010 - May 31, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbanas, Goran [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Elster, Charlotte [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Escher, Jutta [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nunes, Filomena [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thompson, Ian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-28

    The work of this collaboration during its existence is summarized. The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration was to develop new methods that advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve direct reaction calculations. This multi-institution collaborative effort was and remains directly relevant to three areas of interest: the properties of nuclei far from stability, microscopic studies of nuclear input parameters for astrophysics, and microscopic nuclear reaction theory. The TORUS project focused on understanding the details of (d,p) reactions for neutron transfer to heavier nuclei. The bulk of the work fell into three areas: coupled channel theory, modeling (d,p) reactions with a Faddeev-AGS approach, and capture reactions.

  15. Korea-France collaboration for the preparation of joint proposal for the OECD project on the steam explosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jin Ho; Kim, H. D.; Kim, J. H.; Hong, S. W.; Min, B. T.; Park, I. K.

    2004-07-01

    There are some difficulties in design of the new reactor containment and in establishment of accident management strategy for operating reactors, since there exist a few phenomenological uncertainties in a steam explosion which occurs at the time of the interaction between the corium melt and coolant. So, the OECD/NEA recommended a research which could finalize the unsolved issues in a steam explosion and then an international collaborative research involving US, France, Germany, Japan and Korea, so called the SERENA (Steam Explosion Resolution for Nuclear Application) started in 2002. The first phase of this collaborative research is an analytical research and the second phase is planned to be an experimental research which will start in 2005. Korea and France agreed that both countries would cooperate in the second phase of the SERENA program at the specialist meetings and collaborative committee between the KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) and the CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique). This preparation research is performed in order to carry out the agreement between Korea and France and propose a collaborative research to the SERENA second phase. The contents of this research is to perform a collaborative research between Korea and France to propose an international collaborative research on a steam explosion research to the OECD. The scope includes the technical exchange for the construction of an international collaborative research and the preparation of a proposal for an international collaborative research for the OECD steam explosion program. Two steam explosion specialist meetings were held to discuss the technical issues in the TROI and KROTOS experiments. A formal accession and amendment agreement for the collaboration was contracted between the KAERI/KINS/CEA/IRSN. And the KAERI's capability to perform an international collaborative research was proved by advertizing the TROI test results to the USNRC/CSARP and JAERI. Also, the English

  16. Framework for Assessing Dynamic Nuclear Energy Systems for Sustainability: Final Report of the INPRO Collaborative Project GAINS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. As an integral part of Phase 2 of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), several collaborative projects (CPs) were established by INPRO members. The CP, 'Global Architecture of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Based on Thermal and Fast Reactors Including a Closed Fuel Cycle (GAINS)', was one of them. This CP was jointly implemented in 2008-2011 by Belgium, Canada, China, the Czech Republic, France, India, Italy, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, Slovakia, Ukraine, the United States of America and the European Commission

  17. 1{sup st} workshop proceedings of the collaborative project ''Crystalline rock retention processes'' (7th EC FP CP CROCK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabung, Thomas; Molinero, Jorge; Garcia, David; Montoya, Vanessa (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    The EURATOM 7th EC Framework Program Collaborative Project Crystalline ROCK retention processes (CROCK) started in January 2011 and extends over 2 and a half years. The key driver for initiation the CP CROCK, identified by national Waste Management Organizations, is the undesired high uncertainty and the associated conservatism with respect to the radionuclide transport in the crystalline host-rock far-field around geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes.

  18. Challenges Related to the Use of Liquid Metal and Molten Salt Coolants in Advanced Reactors. Report of the collaborative project COOL of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-05-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was launched in 2000, based on a resolution by the IAEA General Conference (GC(44)/RES/21). INPRO aims at helping to ensure that nuclear energy is available in the twenty-first century in a sustainable manner, and seeks to bring together all interested Member States, both technology holders and technology users, to jointly consider actions to achieve desired innovations. INPRO is taking care of the specific needs of developing countries. One of the aims of INPRO is to develop options for enhanced sustainability through promotion of technical and institutional innovations in nuclear energy technology through collaborative projects among IAEA Member States. Collaboration among INPRO members is fostered on selected innovative nuclear technologies to bridge technology gaps. Collaborative projects have been selected so that they complement other national and international R and D activities. The INPRO Collaborative Project COOL on Investigation of Technological Challenges Related to the Removal of Heat by Liquid Metal and Molten Salt Coolants from Reactor Cores Operating at High Temperatures investigated the technological challenges of cooling reactor cores that operate at high temperatures in advanced fast reactors, high temperature reactors and accelerator driven systems by using liquid metals and molten salts as coolants. The project was initiated in 2008 and was led by India; experts from Brazil, China, Germany, India, Italy and the Republic of Korea participated and provided chapters of this report. The INPRO Collaborative Project COOL addressed the following fields of research regarding liquid metal and molten salt coolants: (i) survey of thermophysical properties; (ii) experimental investigations and computational fluid dynamics studies on thermohydraulics, specifically pressure drop and heat transfer under different operating conditions; (iii) monitoring and control of coolant

  19. Collaborative sketching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin Wetterstrand

    2006-01-01

    Sketching is a most central activity with in most design projects. But what happens if we adopt the ideas of collaborative design and invite participants that are not trained to sketch in to the design process, how can they participate in this central activity? This paper offers an introduction to...... the design material has been used to co- author possible futures within the scope of design sessions....

  20. Managing sensitive phenotypic data and biomaterial in large-scale collaborative psychiatric genetic research projects: practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiroglu, S Y; Skrowny, D; Quade, M; Schwanke, J; Budde, M; Gullatz, V; Reich-Erkelenz, D; Jakob, J J; Falkai, P; Rienhoff, O; Helbing, K; Heilbronner, U; Schulze, T G

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale collaborative research will be a hallmark of future psychiatric genetic research. Ideally, both academic and non-academic institutions should be able to participate in such collaborations to allow for the establishment of very large samples in a straightforward manner. Any such endeavor requires an easy-to-implement information technology (IT) framework. Here we present the requirements for a centralized framework and describe how they can be met through a modular IT toolbox.

  1. Scientist-teacher collaboration: Integration of real data from a coastal wetland into a high school life science ecology-based research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Wendy L.

    Project G.R.O.W. is an ecology-based research project developed for high school biology students. The curriculum was designed based on how students learn and awareness of the nature of science and scientific practices so that students would design and carry out scientific investigations using real data from a local coastal wetland. This was a scientist-teacher collaboration between a CSULB biologist and high school biology teacher. Prior to implementing the three-week research project, students had multiple opportunities to practice building requisite skills via 55 lessons focusing on the nature of science, scientific practices, technology, Common Core State Standards of reading, writing, listening and speaking, and Next Generation Science Standards. Project G.R.O.W. culminated with student generated research papers and oral presentations. Outcomes reveal students struggle with constructing explanations and the use of Excel to create meaningful graphs. They showed gains in data organization, analysis, teamwork and aspects of the nature of science.

  2. Managing collaborative design

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian, R.

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative design has been emerging in building projects everywhere. The more complex a building project becomes, the closer and more intensive collaboration between the design actors is required. This research focuses on collaborative design in the conceptual architecture design phase, especially during the elaboration of the masterplan and the development of the preliminary building designs. This research is descriptive and has two aims. First, it aims at describing the characteristics a...

  3. Improving collaborative work and project management in a nuclear power plant design team: A human-centered design approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boy, Guy André; Jani, Gopal; Manera, Annalisa; Memmott, Matthew; Petrovic, Bojan; Rayad, Yassine; Stephane, Lucas; Suri, Neha

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a collaborative system, called SCORE, useful for a multi-disciplinary team designing a new nuclear power plant (NPP). It was developed during the first phase of the I 2 S-LWR project (Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor). SCORE enables the generation of design cards (DCs). A DC includes four main spaces (Boy, 2005): (1) a rationalization space where the various components of the system being designed (SBD) are described in terms of design rationale, integration and requirements; this space includes declarative and procedural descriptions and statements; (2) an activity space where the current version of the SBD is displayed; it includes static and dynamic features; this space enables SBD manipulation; (3) a structure space where the various components and their inter-relations are formally and declaratively described as systems of systems; (4) a function space where the various functions of the SBD are described in terms of procedural knowledge and dynamic processes involved; this space includes qualitative and quantitative physical and cognitive models. The rationalization space is informed using an adapted version of the QOC method (Questions, Options, Criteria), which was tested within the I 2 S-LWR design team. The activity space contains 3D models developed using AutoDesk Inventor, and transferred into the Unity game engine web player in order to facilitate integration within the DC spaces and enable intuitive manipulation of objects in the activity space. Two additional spaces were added: an instant messaging capability that allows design team members (DTMs) to exchange with one another on a DC; and a structured evaluation space. DCs are cooperatively created and refined by DTMs, and synthesized during periodic design meetings, the frequency of which may vary. Incrementally combining abstract explanations of designed elements and integration with their explicit visual representation improves mutual understanding among DTMs, and

  4. Recent progress in Open Data production and consumption - examples from a Governmental institute (SMHI) and a collaborative EU research project (SWITCH-ON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arheimer, Berit; Falkenroth, Esa

    2014-05-01

    The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) has a long tradition both in producing and consuming open data on a national, European and global scale. It is also promoting community building among water scientists in Europe by participating in and initiating collaborative projects. This presentation will exemplify the contemporary European movement imposed by the INSPIRE directive and the Open Data Strategy, by showing the progress in openness and shift in attitudes during the last decade when handling Research Data and Public Sector Information at a national European institute. Moreover, the presentation will inform about a recently started collaborative project (EU FP7 project No 603587) coordinated by SMHI and called SWITCH-ON http://water-switch-on.eu/. The project addresses water concerns and currently untapped potential of open data for improved water management across the EU. The overall goal of the project is to make use of open data, and add value to society by repurposing and refining data from various sources. SWITCH-ON will establish new forms of water research and facilitate the development of new products and services based on principles of sharing and community building in the water society. The SWITCH-ON objectives are to use open data for implementing: 1) an innovative spatial information platform with open data tailored for direct water assessments, 2) an entirely new form of collaborative research for water-related sciences, 3) fourteen new operational products and services dedicated to appointed end-users, 4) new business and knowledge to inform individual and collective decisions in line with the Europe's smart growth and environmental objectives. The presentation will discuss challenges, progress and opportunities with the open data strategy, based on the experiences from working both at a Governmental institute and being part of the global research community.

  5. The Search for Violacein-Producing Microbes to Combat Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis: A Collaborative Research Project between Secondary School and College Research Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larra Agate

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this citizen science–aided, college laboratory–based microbiology research project, secondary school students collaborate with college research students on an investigation centered around bacterial species in the local watershed. This study specifically investigated the prevalence of violacein-producing bacterial isolates, as violacein has been demonstrated as a potential bioremediation treatment for outbreaks of the worldwide invasive chytrid, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd. The impact of this invasion has been linked to widespread amphibian decline, and tracking of the spread of Bd is currently ongoing. Secondary school students participated in this research project by sterilely collecting water samples from a local watershed, documenting the samples, and completing the initial sample plating in a BSL1 environment. In the second phase of this project, trained college students working in courses and as research assistants in the academic year and summer term in a BSL2 laboratory facility were able to use physiological, biochemical, and molecular techniques to further identify individual isolates as well as characterize their properties. Collaboration between these learning spaces provides an increased interest in the community for environmentally relevant research projects and allows for an expansion of the research team to increase study robustness.

  6. HydroShare for iUTAH: Collaborative Publication, Interoperability, and Reuse of Hydrologic Data and Models for a Large, Interdisciplinary Water Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsburgh, J. S.; Jones, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Data and models used within the hydrologic science community are diverse. New research data and model repositories have succeeded in making data and models more accessible, but have been, in most cases, limited to particular types or classes of data or models and also lack the type of collaborative, and iterative functionality needed to enable shared data collection and modeling workflows. File sharing systems currently used within many scientific communities for private sharing of preliminary and intermediate data and modeling products do not support collaborative data capture, description, visualization, and annotation. More recently, hydrologic datasets and models have been cast as "social objects" that can be published, collaborated around, annotated, discovered, and accessed. Yet it can be difficult using existing software tools to achieve the kind of collaborative workflows and data/model reuse that many envision. HydroShare is a new, web-based system for sharing hydrologic data and models with specific functionality aimed at making collaboration easier and achieving new levels of interactive functionality and interoperability. Within HydroShare, we have developed new functionality for creating datasets, describing them with metadata, and sharing them with collaborators. HydroShare is enabled by a generic data model and content packaging scheme that supports describing and sharing diverse hydrologic datasets and models. Interoperability among the diverse types of data and models used by hydrologic scientists is achieved through the use of consistent storage, management, sharing, publication, and annotation within HydroShare. In this presentation, we highlight and demonstrate how the flexibility of HydroShare's data model and packaging scheme, HydroShare's access control and sharing functionality, and versioning and publication capabilities have enabled the sharing and publication of research datasets for a large, interdisciplinary water research project

  7. Analysis of patient organizations' needs and ICT use--The APTIC project in Spain to develop an online collaborative social network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Encuentra, Eulàlia; Gómez-Zúñiga, Beni; Guillamón, Noemí; Boixadós, Mercè; Armayones, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this first part of the APTIC (Patient Organisations and ICT) project is to design and run an online collaborative social network for paediatric patient organizations (PPOs). To analyse the needs of PPOs in Spain to identify opportunities to improve health services through the use of ICT. A convenience sample of staff from 35 PPOs (54.68% response rate) participated in a structured online survey and three focus groups (12 PPOs). Paediatric patient organizations' major needs are to provide accredited and managed information, increase personal support and assistance and promote joint commitment to health care. Moreover, PPOs believe in the Internet's potential to meet their needs and support their activities. Basic limitations to using the Internet are lack of knowledge and resources. The discussion of the data includes key elements of designing an online collaborative social network and reflections on health services provided. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Collaboration 'Engineerability'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn L.; de Vreede, Gert-Jan; Briggs, Robert O.; Sol, Henk G.

    Collaboration Engineering is an approach to create sustained collaboration support by designing collaborative work practices for high-value recurring tasks, and transferring those designs to practitioners to execute for themselves without ongoing support from collaboration professionals. A key

  9. Clinical validation of cutoff target ranges in newborn screening of metabolic disorders by tandem mass spectrometry : A worldwide collaborative project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McHugh, David M. S.; Cameron, Cynthia A.; Abdenur, Jose E.; Abdulrahman, Mahera; Adair, Ona; Al Nuaimi, Shahira Ahmed; Ahlman, Henrik; Allen, Jennifer J.; Antonozzi, Italo; Archer, Shaina; Au, Sylvia; Auray-Blais, Christiane; Baker, Mei; Bamforth, Fiona; Beckmann, Kinga; Pino, Gessi Bentz; Berberich, Stanton L.; Binard, Robert; Boemer, Francois; Bonham, Jim; Breen, Nancy N.; Bryant, Sandra C.; Caggana, Michele; Caldwell, S. Graham; Camilot, Marta; Campbell, Carlene; Carducci, Claudia; Cariappa, Rohit; Carlisle, Clover; Caruso, Ubaldo; Cassanello, Michela; Miren Castilla, Ane; Castineiras Ramos, Daisy E.; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Chandrasekar, Ram; Ramos, Alfredo Chardon; Cheillan, David; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Childs, Thomas A.; Chrastina, Petr; Sica, Yuri Cleverthon; Cocho de Juan, Jose Angel; Elena Colandre, Maria; Cornejo Espinoza, Veronica; Corso, Gaetano; Currier, Robert; Cyr, Denis; Czuczy, Noemi; D'Apolito, Oceania; Davis, Tim; de Sain-Van der Velden, Monique G.; Delgado Pecellin, Carmen; Di Gangi, Iole Maria; Di Stefano, Cristina Maria; Dotsikas, Yannis; Downing, Melanie; Downs, Stephen M.; Dy, Bonifacio; Dymerski, Mark; Rueda, Inmaculada; Elvers, Bert; Eaton, Roger; Eckerd, Barbara M.; El Mougy, Fatma; Eroh, Sarah; Espada, Mercedes; Evans, Catherine; Fawbush, Sandy; Fijolek, Kristel F.; Fisher, Lawrence; Franzson, Leifur; Frazier, Dianne M.; Garcia, Luciana R. C.; Garcia-Valdecasas Bermejo, Maria Sierra; Gavrilov, Dimitar; Gerace, Rosemarie; Giordano, Giuseppe; Irazabal, Yolanda Gonzalez; Greed, Lawrence C.; Grier, Robert; Grycki, Elyse; Gu, Xuefan; Gulamali-Majid, Fizza; Hagar, Arthur F.; Han, Lianshu; Hannon, W. Harry; Haslip, Christa; Hassan, Fayza Abdelhamid; He, Miao; Hietala, Amy; Himstedt, Leslie; Hoffman, Gary L.; Hoffman, William; Hoggatt, Philis; Hopkins, Patrick V.; Hougaard, David M.; Hughes, Kerie; Hunt, Patricia R.; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Hynes, June; Ibarra-Gonzalez, Isabel; Ingham, Cindy A.; Ivanova, Maria; Jacox, Ward B.; John, Catharine; Johnson, John P.; Jonsson, Jon J.; Karg, Eszter; Kasper, David; Klopper, Brenda; Katakouzinos, Dimitris; Khneisser, Issam; Knoll, Detlef; Kobayashi, Hirinori; Koneski, Ronald; Kozich, Viktor; Kouapei, Rasoul; Kohlmueller, Dirk; Kremensky, Ivo; la Marca, Giancarlo; Lavochkin, Marcia; Lee, Soo-Youn; Lehotay, Denis C.; Lemes, Aida; Lepage, Joyce; Lesko, Barbara; Lewis, Barry; Lim, Carol; Linard, Sharon; Lindner, Martin; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A.; Lorey, Fred; Loukas, Yannis L.; Luedtke, Julie; Maffitt, Neil; Magee, J. Fergall; Manning, Adrienne; Manos, Shawn; Marie, Sandrine; Hadachi, Sonia Marchezi; Marquardt, Gregg; Martin, Stephen J.; Matern, Dietrich; Gibson, Stephanie K. Mayfield; Mayne, Philip; McCallister, Tonya D.; McCann, Mark; McClure, Julie; McGill, James J.; McKeever, Christine D.; McNeilly, Barbara; Morrissey, Mark A.; Moutsatsou, Paraskevi; Mulcahy, Eleanor A.; Nikoloudis, Dimitris; Norgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Oglesbee, Devin; Oltarzewski, Mariusz; Ombrone, Daniela; Ojodu, Jelili; Papakonstantinou, Vagelis; Reoyo, Sherly Pardo; Park, Hyung-Doo; Pasquali, Marzia; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Patel, Pallavi; Pass, Kenneth A.; Peterson, Colleen; Pettersen, Rolf D.; Pitt, James J.; Poh, Sherry; Pollak, Arnold; Porter, Cory; Poston, Philip A.; Price, Ricky W.; Queijo, Cecilia; Quesada, Jonessy; Randell, Edward; Ranieri, Enzo; Raymond, Kimiyo; Reddic, John E.; Reuben, Alejandra; Ricciardi, Charla; Rinaldo, Piero; Rivera, Jeff D.; Roberts, Alicia; Rocha, Hugo; Roche, Geraldine; Greenberg, Cheryl Rochman; Egea Mellado, Jose Maria; Jess Juan-Fita, Maria; Ruiz, Consuelo; Ruoppolo, Margherita; Rutledge, S. Lane; Ryu, Euijung; Saban, Christine; Sahai, Inderneel; Salazar Garcia-Blanco, Maria Isabel; Santiago-Borrero, Pedro; Schenone, Andrea; Schoos, Roland; Schweitzer, Barb; Scott, Patricia; Seashore, Margretta R.; Seeterlin, Mary A.; Sesser, David E.; Sevier, Darrin W.; Shone, Scott M.; Sinclair, Graham; Skrinska, Victor A.; Stanley, Eleanor L.; Strovel, Erin T.; Jones, April L. Studinski; Sunny, Sherlykutty; Takats, Zoltan; Tanyalcin, Tijen; Teofoli, Francesca; Thompson, J. Robert; Tomashitis, Kathy; Domingos, Mouseline Torquado; Torres, Jasmin; Torres, Rosario; Tortorelli, Silvia; Turi, Sandor; Turner, Kimberley; Tzanakos, Nick; Valiente, Alf G.; Vallance, Hillary; Vela-Amieva, Marcela; Vilarinho, Laura; von Doebeln, Ulrika; Vincent, Marie-Francoise; Vorster, B. Chris; Watson, Michael S.; Webster, Dianne; Weiss, Sheila; Wilcken, Bridget; Wiley, Veronica; Williams, Sharon K.; Willis, Sharon A.; Woontner, Michael; Wright, Katherine; Yahyaoui, Raquel; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Yssel, Melissa; Zakowicz, Wendy M.

    Purpose: To achieve clinical validation of cutoff values for newborn screening by tandem mass spectrometry through a worldwide collaborative effort. Methods: Cumulative percentiles of amino acids and acylcarnitines in dried blood spots of approximately 25-30 million normal newborns and 10,742

  10. A leadership-as-practice perspective on design in architecture, engineering and construction projects: interaction analysis of a collaborative workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zerjav, Vedran; Hartmann, Timo; van Amstel, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an alternative perspective on the role of leadership in the context of collaborative practices in architecture, engineering and construction design. While most of current leadership literature is focused on outstanding individuals with abilities to influence others, the aim of

  11. Leveraging CRT Awareness in Creating Web-Based Projects through Use of Online Collaborative Learning for Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Hsueh-Hua

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the roles played by cloud computing technologies and social media in facilitating a learning community for online group collaborative learning, and particularly explores opportunities and challenges in leveraging culturally responsive teaching (CRT) awareness in educational technology. It describes implementation of a…

  12. It Takes a Village to Raise an Information Technology Project: Suggestions on Collaboration from Our 10-Community-College Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandgenett, Neal; Thiele, Levi; Pensabene, Tom; McPeak, Brad

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the collaborative evolution of the Midwest Center for Information Technology (MCIT)--which is a consortium of 10 different community colleges across the four states of Nebraska, Iowa, North Dakota, and South Dakota--that was established to improve information technology (IT) education across the region. MCIT has been funded…

  13. A Study of a Collaborative Instructional Project Informed by Systemic Functional Linguistic Theory: Report Writing in Elementary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisk, Maria Estela; Hodgson-Drysdale, Tracy; O'Connor, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the teaching of report writing in PreK-5 through the lens of systemic functional linguistics theory. Teachers were part of a university-public school collaboration that included professional development on teaching genres, text organization, and language features. Grounded in this knowledge, teachers explicitly taught report…

  14. 30 March 2009 - Representatives of the Danish Council for Independent Research Natural Sciences visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, Former Spokesperson P. Jenni and Transition Radiation Tracker Project Leader C. Rembser.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    30 March 2009 - Representatives of the Danish Council for Independent Research Natural Sciences visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, Former Spokesperson P. Jenni and Transition Radiation Tracker Project Leader C. Rembser.

  15. 28 May 2010 - Representatives of the Netherlands School of Public Administration guided in the ATLAS visitor centre by ATLAS Collaboration Member and NIKHEF G. Bobbink and ATLAS Magnet Project Leader H.ten Kate.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    28 May 2010 - Representatives of the Netherlands School of Public Administration guided in the ATLAS visitor centre by ATLAS Collaboration Member and NIKHEF G. Bobbink and ATLAS Magnet Project Leader H.ten Kate.

  16. Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement for the design, testing and prototyping of superconducting elements for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project and for the production of spare quadrupole magnets for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement for the design, testing and prototyping of superconducting elements for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project and for the production of spare quadrupole magnets for LHC

  17. Electronic Collaboration Logbook

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    At FNAL, we developed an Electronic Collaboration Logbook (ECL) application which is used by about 20 different collaborations, experiments and groups at FNAL. ECL is the latest iteration of the project formerly known as Control Room Logbook (CRL). We have been working on mobile (IOS and Android) clients for ECL. We will present history, current status and future plans of the project, as well as design, implementation and support solutions made by the project.

  18. Report of the collaboration project for research and development of sphere-pac fuel among JNC-PSI-NRG (1). Planning, fuel design, pin fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morihira, Masayuki; Ozawa, Takayuki; Tomita, Yutaka; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kihara, Yoshiyuki; Shigetome, Yoshiaki; Kohno, Shusaku

    2004-07-01

    The collaboration project concerning sphere-pac fuel among JNC, Swiss PSI (Paul Scherrer Institut) and Dutch NRG (Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group) is in progress. Final target of the project is comparative irradiation tests of sphere-pac fuel in the HFR (High Flux Reactor) in Petten in the Netherlands with pellet type fuel and vipack fuel. Total 16 fuel segments (8 pins) of these three types of fuel are planned to be irradiated. Two sphere-pac fuel segments contain 5%Np in addition to 20%Pu-MOX. Other segments contain no Np. The objective of the irradiation tests is to obtain the restructuring data in the early beginning of life for SPF as well as power-to-melt test data for the potential study of SPF. At the same time introduction of modeling technique for irradiation performance analysis, fuel design, fuel fabrication is also important objective for JNC. Fabrication of irradiation test pins was completed till May 2003 in PSI. After transportation of the fuel pins to Petten, two times of irradiation were performed in January to March in 2004 and now post irradiation tests are in progress. Later two irradiations will be done till the autumn in 2004. This report summarized the basic plan, fuel design, and fabrication of irradiation test pins concerning this collaboration project. (author)

  19. Collaboration of nuclear knowledge. Execution of science partnership project promoted by MEXT and repercussion effect obtained from the viewpoint of intellectual collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Sasagawa, Sumiko; Nakano, Koji

    2007-09-01

    The Fujioka Technical High School (FTHS) applied to the Science Partnership Project (SPP-2006), which was financially supported by the MEXT and promoted by the Japan Science and Technology Agency, and was approved the proposal entitled as 'Nuclear Technology and Its Future for Nuclear-Cite Neighboring Students'. FTHS decided to make intellectual linkage with Takasaki Branch, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and with Institute for Environmental Sciences, having with the following 5 menus. 1. Outline of nuclear energy. 2. Outline of radiation application and experimental practice. 3. Radiation and health for understanding the natural radiation and radioactivity. 4. Sightseeing of nuclear facilities around Tokai-mura. 5. Reporting of SPP activities. Adding to normal lectures listed above, the authors made several educational trials from the viewpoint of intellectual linkage. First is to verify the change of interest in students through lectures on nuclear, second is to reveal that which nuclear fields are interested by a majority of students, third is to make direct comparison of intellectual ability between the students and 5 specialists. Resultantly, if one teaches correctly the basic concept of nuclear energy and radiation application as learning inputs, aparting from his mind to nuclear and understanding ability of student increased 3 times than his background level. A comprehensive faculty of the students to the 5 specialists is 1/5 before making lecture but increased markedly to 1/2 after the lecture. A majority of students understand the matter of reprocessing, reactor accidents and food irradiation but understand poorly the location and name of the commercial nuclear power plant as well as the basic function of the power reactors. The latter is however recovered by the sightseeing of commercial power plants and fuel fabrication facilities located around Tokai-mura. Namely, to seeing is to believing. To teach a radiation application and a basic idea of nuclear

  20. North-south collaboration and capacity development in global health research in low- and middle-income countries - the ARCADE projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Salla; Marsden, Sophie; Diwan, Vishal; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2016-01-01

    Research capacity enhancement is needed in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) for improved health, wellbeing, and health systems' development. In this article, we discuss two capacity-building projects, the African/Asian Regional Capacity Development (ARCADE) in Health Systems and Services Research (HSSR) and Research on Social Determinants of Health (RSDH), implemented from 2011 to 2015. The two projects focussed on providing courses in HSSR and social determinants of health research, and on developing collaborations between universities, along with capacity in LMIC universities to manage research grant submissions, financing, and reporting. Both face-to-face and sustainable online teaching and learning resources were used in training at higher postgraduate levels (Masters and Doctoral level). We collated project meeting and discussion minutes along with project periodic reports and deliverables. We extracted key outcomes from these, reflected on these in discussions, and summarised them for this paper. Nearly 55 courses and modules were developed that were delivered to over 920 postgraduate students in Africa, Asia, and Europe. Junior researchers were mentored in presenting, developing, and delivering courses, and in preparing research proposals. In total, 60 collaborative funding proposals were prepared. The consortia also developed institutional capacity in research dissemination and grants management through webinars and workshops. ARCADE HSSR and ARCADE RSDH were comprehensive programmes, focussing on developing the research skills, knowledge, and capabilities of junior researchers. One of the main strengths of these programmes was the focus on network building amongst the partner institutions, where each partner brought skills, expertise, and diverse work cultures into the consortium. Through these efforts, the projects improved both the capacity of junior researchers and the research environment in Africa, Asia, and Europe.

  1. North–south collaboration and capacity development in global health research in low- and middle-income countries – the ARCADE projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salla Atkins

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research capacity enhancement is needed in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs for improved health, wellbeing, and health systems’ development. In this article, we discuss two capacity-building projects, the African/Asian Regional Capacity Development (ARCADE in Health Systems and Services Research (HSSR and Research on Social Determinants of Health (RSDH, implemented from 2011 to 2015. The two projects focussed on providing courses in HSSR and social determinants of health research, and on developing collaborations between universities, along with capacity in LMIC universities to manage research grant submissions, financing, and reporting. Both face-to-face and sustainable online teaching and learning resources were used in training at higher postgraduate levels (Masters and Doctoral level. Design: We collated project meeting and discussion minutes along with project periodic reports and deliverables. We extracted key outcomes from these, reflected on these in discussions, and summarised them for this paper. Results: Nearly 55 courses and modules were developed that were delivered to over 920 postgraduate students in Africa, Asia, and Europe. Junior researchers were mentored in presenting, developing, and delivering courses, and in preparing research proposals. In total, 60 collaborative funding proposals were prepared. The consortia also developed institutional capacity in research dissemination and grants management through webinars and workshops. Discussion: ARCADE HSSR and ARCADE RSDH were comprehensive programmes, focussing on developing the research skills, knowledge, and capabilities of junior researchers. One of the main strengths of these programmes was the focus on network building amongst the partner institutions, where each partner brought skills, expertise, and diverse work cultures into the consortium. Through these efforts, the projects improved both the capacity of junior researchers and the research

  2. Atomic parity non-conservation: the francium anapole project of the FrPNC collaboration at TRIUMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubin, S. [College of William and Mary, Dept. Physics (United States); Behr, J. A. [TRIUMF (Canada); Collister, R. [University of Manitoba, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Flambaum, V. V. [University of New South Wales, School of Physics (Australia); Gomez, E. [Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Instituto de Fisica (Mexico); Gwinner, G. [University of Manitoba, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Jackson, K. P. [TRIUMF (Canada); Melconian, D. [Texas A and M University, Cyclotron Institute (United States); Orozco, L. A., E-mail: lorozco@umd.edu [University of Maryland, JQI, Dept. of Physics, and NIST (United States); Pearson, M. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Sheng, D. [Princeton University (United States); Sprouse, G. D. [Stony Brook University, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Tandecki, M. [TRIUMF (Canada); Zhang, J. [University of Maryland, JQI, Dept. of Physics, and NIST (United States); Zhao, Y. [Shanxi University, State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices (China)

    2013-03-15

    We present a method for measuring the nuclear anapole in a string of francium isotopes. The anapole is a parity non-conserving electromagnetic moment that enables parity-forbidden transitions between ground state hyperfine levels of an atom. The experiment is run by the FrPNC collaboration and relies on a beam of artificially-produced francium from the ISAC facility at TRIUMF.

  3. Conceptualizing the role of multidisciplinarity and student perceptions of university-industry collaboration in project-based learning

    OpenAIRE

    Heikkinen, Juho

    2017-01-01

    Project-based learning has a long history, especially in the disciplines of computer science and engineering. This approach is used to offer students a realistic view of their discipline, and this experience can be enhanced with industrial involvement as companies bring their real world problems to projects. One recent trend in project-based learning is utilizing multidisciplinary teams, enabling students to contrast their skills and experience with students from other discipli...

  4. Collaborations in Open Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard

    2015-01-01

    This thesis researches automated services for professionals aiming at starting collaborative learning projects in open learning environments, such as MOOCs. It investigates the theoretical backgrounds of team formation for collaborative learning. Based on the outcomes, a model is developed

  5. Electronic Collaboration Logbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gysin, Suzanne; Mandrichenko, Igor; Podstavkov, Vladimir; Vittone, Margherita

    2012-01-01

    In HEP, scientific research is performed by large collaborations of organizations and individuals. The logbook of a scientific collaboration is an important part of the collaboration record. Often it contains experimental data. At Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), we developed an Electronic Collaboration Logbook (ECL) application, which is used by about 20 different collaborations, experiments and groups at FNAL. The ECL is the latest iteration of the project formerly known as the Control Room Logbook (CRL). We have been working on mobile (IOS and Android) clients for the ECL. We will present the history, current status and future plans of the project, as well as design, implementation and support solutions made by the project.

  6. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations in infant growth monitoring - a collaboration with WHO (partly RCA). Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This Coordinated Research Project (CRP) came about as an initiative to collaborate with the WHO Multicenter Growth Reference Study (MGRS) to generate new growth reference data for breastfed babies using stable isotopes. The WHO MRGS measures growth using anthropometric measurements (e.g. height and weight) in healthy infants and young children in different countries and continents. All participants are fed according to strict criteria regarding duration and frequency of breast-feeding. The MGRS' main goal is to develop a truly international growth standard to look at growth pattern of healthy breast-fed babies. Nevertheless, the composition of the growth (fat/lean tissue) and the nutrient intake that produced the standard growth were not originally included in the study. In order to address these and other important issues related to the baby's body composition and growth, a fruitful collaboration between the WHO and the IAEA has been established. The Agency technical experts and consultants will assist developing countries to carry out isotopic work to measure infant's growth using the in vivo kinetics technique. The objective of this CRP is to measure breast milk intake, using stable isotopes in a subgroup of breast-fed infants growing normally, and to assess their nutrient intakes. Furthermore, the results from the participating projects will provide new and valuable information on the nutrient requirement of healthy breast-fed babies, who were fed according to the WHO standard protocols

  7. Concerted Uranium Research in Europe (CURE): toward a collaborative project integrating dosimetry, epidemiology and radiobiology to study the effects of occupational uranium exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Olivier; Gomolka, Maria; Haylock, Richard; Blanchardon, Eric; Giussani, Augusto; Atkinson, Will; Baatout, Sarah; Bingham, Derek; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Tomasek, Ladislav; Ancelet, Sophie; Badie, Christophe; Bethel, Gary; Bertho, Jean-Marc; Bouet, Ségolène; Bull, Richard; Challeton-de Vathaire, Cécile; Cockerill, Rupert; Davesne, Estelle; Ebrahimian, Teni; Engels, Hilde; Gillies, Michael; Grellier, James; Grison, Stephane; Gueguen, Yann; Hornhardt, Sabine; Ibanez, Chrystelle; Kabacik, Sylwia; Kotik, Lukas; Kreuzer, Michaela; Lebacq, Anne Laure; Marsh, James; Nosske, Dietmar; O'Hagan, Jackie; Pernot, Eileen; Puncher, Matthew; Rage, Estelle; Riddell, Tony; Roy, Laurence; Samson, Eric; Souidi, Maamar; Turner, Michelle C; Zhivin, Sergey; Laurier, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    The potential health impacts of chronic exposures to uranium, as they occur in occupational settings, are not well characterized. Most epidemiological studies have been limited by small sample sizes, and a lack of harmonization of methods used to quantify radiation doses resulting from uranium exposure. Experimental studies have shown that uranium has biological effects, but their implications for human health are not clear. New studies that would combine the strengths of large, well-designed epidemiological datasets with those of state-of-the-art biological methods would help improve the characterization of the biological and health effects of occupational uranium exposure. The aim of the European Commission concerted action CURE (Concerted Uranium Research in Europe) was to develop protocols for such a future collaborative research project, in which dosimetry, epidemiology and biology would be integrated to better characterize the effects of occupational uranium exposure. These protocols were developed from existing European cohorts of workers exposed to uranium together with expertise in epidemiology, biology and dosimetry of CURE partner institutions. The preparatory work of CURE should allow a large scale collaborative project to be launched, in order to better characterize the effects of uranium exposure and more generally of alpha particles and low doses of ionizing radiation.

  8. A multilingual and multimodal approach to literacy teaching and learning in urban education: a collaborative inquiry project in an inner city elementary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntelioglou, Burcu Yaman; Fannin, Jennifer; Montanera, Mike; Cummins, Jim

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a collaborative inquiry project that explored teaching approaches that highlight the significance of multilingualism, multimodality, and multiliteracies in classrooms with high numbers of English language learners (ELLs). The research took place in an inner city elementary school with a large population of recently arrived and Canadian-born linguistically and culturally diverse students from Gambian, Indian, Mexican, Sri Lankan, Tibetan and Vietnamese backgrounds, as well as a recent wave of Roma students from Hungary. A high number of these students were from families with low-SES. The collaboration between two Grade 3 teachers and university-based researchers sought to create instructional approaches that would support students' academic engagement and literacy learning. In this paper, we described one of the projects that took place in this class, exploring how a descriptive writing unit could be implemented in a way that connected with students' lives and enabled them to use their home languages, through the creation of multiple texts, using creative writing, digital technologies, and drama pedagogy. This kind of multilingual and multimodal classroom practice changed the classroom dynamics and allowed the students access to identity positions of expertise, increasing their literacy investment, literacy engagement and learning.

  9. A multilingual and multimodal approach to literacy teaching and learning in urban education: a collaborative inquiry project in an urban inner city elementary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu eYaman Ntelioglou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents findings from a collaborative inquiry project that explored teaching approaches that highlight the significance of multilingualism, multimodality and multiliteracies in classrooms with high numbers of English language learners (ELLs. The research took place in an inner city elementary school with a large population of recently arrived and Canadian-born linguistically and culturally diverse students from Gambian, Indian, Mexican, Sri Lankan, Tibetan and Vietnamese backgrounds, as well as a recent wave of Roma students from Hungary. A high number of these students were from families with low-SES. The collaboration between two Grade 3 teachers and university-based researchers sought to create instructional approaches that would support students’ academic engagement and literacy learning. In this paper, we described one of the projects that took place in this class, exploring how a descriptive writing unit could be implemented in a way that connected with students’ lives and enabled them to use their home languages, through the creation of multiple texts, using creative writing, digital technologies and drama pedagogy. This kind of multilingual and multimodal classroom practice changed the classroom dynamics and allowed the students access to identity positions of expertise, increasing their literacy investment, literacy engagement and learning.

  10. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations in infant growth monitoring - a collaboration with WHO (partly RCA). Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This Coordinated Research Project (CRP) came about as an initiative to collaborate with the WHO Multicenter Growth Reference Study (MGRS) to generate new growth reference data for breastfed babies using stable isotopes. The WHO MRGS measures growth using anthropometric measurements (e.g. height and weight) in healthy infants and young children in different countries and continents. All participants are fed according to strict criteria regarding duration and frequency of breast-feeding. The MGRS' main goal is to develop a truly international growth standard to look at growth pattern of healthy breast-fed babies. Nevertheless, the composition of the growth (fat/lean tissue) and the nutrient intake that produced the standard growth were not originally included in the study. In order to address these and other important issues related to the baby's body composition and growth, a fruitful collaboration between the WHO and the IAEA has been established. The Agency technical experts and consultants will assist developing countries to carry out isotopic work to measure infant's growth using the in vivo kinetics technique. The objective of this CRP is to measure breast milk intake, using stable isotopes in a subgroup of breast-fed infants growing normally, and to assess their nutrient intakes. Furthermore, the results from the participating projects will provide new and valuable information on the nutrient requirement of healthy breast-fed babies, who were fed according to the WHO standard protocols.

  11. Nordic collaboration on the use of mass-spectrometers for the analysis of radioisotopes. NKS-project NORCMASS. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, P.; Nygren, U.; Appelblad, P.; Skipperud, L.; Sjoegren, A.; Greis, C.; Pettersson, Haekan

    2006-04-01

    This report cover an overview of the work performed during a three year (2003-2005) project initialized with the purpose of identifying and work on problems in isotope ratio and ultra trace measurements of primarily plutonium and uranium isotopes and 237 Np using ICPMS. The project also included an educational part aiming to describe fundamental aspects and practical steps for radioisotope measurements using ICP-MS. (au)

  12. Indico: CERN Collaboration Hub

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Indico development is also moving towards a broader collaboration where other institutes, hosting their own Indico instance, can contribute to the project in order make it a better and more complete tool.

  13. Metrics Are Needed for Collaborative Software Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Mohtashami

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for metrics for inter-organizational collaborative software development projects, encompassing management and technical concerns. In particular, metrics are needed that are aimed at the collaborative aspect itself, such as readiness for collaboration, the quality and/or the costs and benefits of collaboration in a specific ongoing project. We suggest questions and directions for such metrics, spanning the full lifespan of a collaborative project, from considering the suitability of collaboration through evaluating ongoing projects to final evaluation of the collaboration.

  14. The VeTOOLS Project: an example of how to strengthen collaboration between scientists and Civil Protections in disaster risk reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Joan; Bartolini, Stefania; Becerril, Laura

    2016-04-01

    VeTOOLS is a project funded by the European Commission's Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection department (ECHO), and aims at creating an integrated software platform specially designed to assess and manage volcanic risk. The project facilitates interaction and cooperation between scientists and Civil Protection Agencies in order to share, unify, and exchange procedures, methodologies and technologies to effectively reduce the impacts of volcanic disasters. The project aims at 1) improving and developing volcanic risk assessment and management capacities in active volcanic regions; 2) developing universal methodologies, scenario definitions, response strategies and alert protocols to cope with the full range of volcanic threats; 4) improving quantitative methods and tools for vulnerability and risk assessment; and 5) defining thresholds and protocols for civil protection. With these objectives, the VeTOOLS project points to two of the Sendai Framework resolutions for implementing it: i) Provide guidance on methodologies and standards for risk assessments, disaster risk modelling and the use of data; ii) Promote and support the availability and application of science and technology to decision-making, and offers a good example on how a close collaboration between science and civil protection is an effective way to contribute to DRR. European Commission ECHO Grant SI2.695524

  15. A collaborative project on the effects of coal quality on NO{sub x} emissions and carbon burnout in pulverised coal-fired utility boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilley, H.A.; O`Connor, M.; Stephenson, P.L.; Whitehouse, M.; Richards, D.G.; Hesselmann, G.; MacPhail, J.; Lockwood, F.C.; Williamson, J.; Williams, A.; Pourkashanian, M. [ETSU, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-01

    This paper describes a UK Department of Trade and Industry-supported collaborative project entitled `The Effects of Coal Quality on Emission of Oxides of Nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and Carbon Burnout in Pulverised Coal-fired Utility Boilers`. The project involved extensive collaboration between the UK power generators, boiler and burner manufacturers and research groups in both industry and academia, together with several of the world`s leading computational fluid dynamics (CFD) `software houses`. The prime objectives of the project were to assess the relationship between NO{sub x} emissions and carbon burnout and to develop and validate predictive tools for assessing coals. Experimental work was carried out on various laboratory-scale apparatus and on single burner test facilities ranging from 160 kW{sub th} to 40 MW{sub th} in size and measurements were obtained from full-scale 500 MW{sub e} utility boiler trials. This data and basic coal data were then used to develop mathematical models to predict full-scale boiler performance with respect to NO{sub x} emissions and carbon-in-ash. Results showed good correlations for NO{sub x} and carbon burnout when comparing data from full-scale and large-scale rig trials. Laboratory-scale tests were found to be useful but the influence of burner aerodynamics was more difficult to quantify. Modelling showed that predicted NO{sub x} emissions were encouragingly close to measured emissions but predicting carbon burnout was less successful. 24 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaboration: A pooling project of studies participating in the National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Hazel B.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Wright, Lauren B.; McGowan, Craig; Brook, Mark N.; McClain, Kathleen M.; Jones, Michael E.; Adami, Hans-Olov; Agnoli, Claudia; Baglietto, Laura; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Blot, William J.; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Butler, Lesley; Chen, Yu; Doody, Michele M.; Dossus, Laure; Eliassen, A. Heather; Giles, Graham G.; Gram, Inger T.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J.; Kirsh, Victoria A.; Kitahara, Cari M.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Larsson, Susanna C.; Lund, Eiliv; Ma, Huiyan; Merritt, Melissa A.; Milne, Roger L.; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Ozasa, Kotaro; Palmer, Julie R.; Peeters, Petra H.; Riboli, Elio; Rohan, Thomas E.; Sadakane, Atsuko; Sund, Malin; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Vatten, Lars; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Willett, Walter C.; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Sandler, Dale P.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cancer diagnosis among premenopausal women around the world. Unlike rates in postmenopausal women, incidence rates of advanced breast cancer have increased in recent decades for premenopausal women. Progress in identifying contributors to breast cancer risk among premenopausal women has been constrained by the limited numbers of premenopausal breast cancer cases in individual studies and resulting low statistical power to subcategorize exposures or to study specific subtypes. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaborative Group was established to facilitate cohort-based analyses of risk factors for premenopausal breast cancer by pooling individual-level data from studies participating in the United States National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium. This paper describes the Group, including the rationale for its initial aims related to pregnancy, obesity, and physical activity. We also describe the 20 cohort studies with data submitted to the Group by June 2016. The infrastructure developed for this work can be leveraged to support additional investigations. PMID:28600297

  17. Collaborative multimedia project for teaching the nervous system and pain to students of the Third year of Obligatory Secondary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David GONZÁLEZ JARA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Society is deeply immersed in a new paradigm where Information and Communication Technologies (ICT are modifying and conditioning the way which we interact with our surroundings and with our peers. All the facets of the world in which today’s citizen operates are gradually adapting to this new paradigm and yet, in many aspects, teaching remains firmly attached to the past and we teach twenty-first century students with the methodology used in the nineteenth century. The classic teaching methodology, with the teacher set up as the only and vital source of information, has been a complete failure for the teaching of certain topics whose contents are highly abstract and complex, as is the case with the topics being worked on by students of the third year of ESO (the period of compulsory secondary education in Spain on the subject of the nervous system. This research article applied an innovative collaborative methodology for learning in the classroom, backed up by ICTs; the objective is to improve the acquisition of knowledge and skills in students of the third year of secondary education, at a point where the students are facing one of the most complex topics amongst those explored in the subject of biology and geology. A multimedia CD has been prepared to this end, which, in combination with text, images, videos and interactive activities, together with the indispensable guidance of the teacher in the classroom, will allow students to work cooperatively, so as to understand and assimilate each part of the contents explored in the topic of the nervous system. Analysis of the results obtained after the application of this collaborative methodology showed a significant improvement in the academic performance of the students, showing better results than those obtained when the methodology used in the classroom was more classic in style.

  18. Performing of recent real scale cable fire experiments and presentation of the results in the frame of the international collaborative fire modeling project ICFMP. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosser, Dietmar; Riese, Olaf; Klingenberg, Mark

    2005-01-01

    As a part of the Fire Risk Research Program, the German iBMB (Institut fuer Baustoffe, Massivbau und Brandschutz) of Braunschweig University of Technology and GRS (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagenund Reaktorsicherheit mbH) are participating in an International Collaborative Fire Modeling Project (ICFMP) to assess and validate fire computer codes for nuclear power plant applications. This assessment is being conducted through benchmarking and validation exercises. The tests are simulating cable fires scenarios in a single compartment. The goal of the actual cable fire series is to investigate the effects of a natural fire to vertically routed cables (worst case) with different cable insulation material (PVC and FRNC). Another important aspect of cable fire is the risk of function failure. Therefore in the test series the short circuit and the conduction loss of cables are measured. This report includes a first description of the experimental results for test 1 - test 4 of the International Collaborative Fire Model Project conducted in December 2003 at the iBMB in Germany. The experimental data are reported on the International Collaborative Fire Model Project - Platform. The measured data shall be the basis for fire simulations. The tests show that the FRNC cables have significantly better characteristics in case of fire. No substantial flame spread takes place even in case of preheating. PVC cables could be ignited with a burner output of 50 kW, in contrary, the FRNC cables could be ignited at burner output of 150 kW. The preheating has a complex effect on the fire behavior of the cables. It may occur that gases are pyrolysed which are not ignited during the phase of preheating. These gases are transported from the cable surrounding and may leave the fire room. Short circuits occur first in case ''conductor to conductor'' and later in case ''conductor to tray''. The time periods until short circuits occur are strongly dependent on the preheating of the cables. In case of

  19. Reworking Practice through an AfL Project: An Analysis of Teachers' Collaborative Engagement with New Assessment Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, Hege; Nerland, Monika

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of Assessment for Learning (AfL) has travelled across countries, giving rise to a range of educational policy initiatives and school development projects. While researchers have focused on issues such as how formative assessment can support student learning and lead to more efficient classroom practices, less attention…

  20. HIV/AIDS in a Puerto Rican/Dominican Community: A Collaborative Project with a Botanical Shop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Melvin; Santiago, Jorge

    1998-01-01

    Presents an overview of the literature concerning HIV/AIDS in Latino communities in the United States and Puerto Rico. Discusses the presence of botanical shops (where herbal medicines and other healing paraphernalia can be purchased) in Latino culture. Describes Projecto Cooperacion, a project that utilized botanical shops as a means of…

  1. An Analysis of Collaborative Problem-Solving Mechanisms in Sponsored Projects: Applying the 5-Day Sprint Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raubenolt, Amy

    2016-01-01

    In May 2016, the office of Finance and Sponsored Projects at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital conducted a 5-day design sprint session to re-evaluate and redesign a flawed final reporting process within the department. The department sprint was modeled after the design sprint sessions that occur routinely in software…

  2. Fostering Learner Autonomy in English for Science: A Collaborative Digital Video Project in a Technological Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Christoph A.; Miller, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the syllabus design and implementation of an English for Science and Technology (EST) course at an English-medium university in Hong Kong. The course combined elements of project-based learning and a "pedagogy for multiliteracies" (New London Group, 1996) to produce a strong learner autonomy focus. A major component…

  3. The SHERPA project: Smart collaboration between humans and ground-aerial robots for improving rescuing activities in alpine environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marconi, L.; Melchiorri, C.; Beetz, M.; Pangercic, D.; Siegwart, R.; Leutenegger, S.; Carloni, Raffaella; Stramigioli, Stefano; Bruyninckx, H.; Doherty, P.; Kleiner, A.; Lippiello, V.; Finzi, A.; Siciliano, B.; Sala, A.; Tomatis, N.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to present the foreseen research activity of the European project “SHERPA‿ whose activities will start officially on February 1th 2013. The goal of SHERPA is to develop a mixed ground and aerial robotic platform to support search and rescue activities in a real-world hostile

  4. A Collaborative Project to Bridging the Gap between Basic and Clinical Teachers: The Opinion of Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Sentí

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The organization of medical curricula with a clear distinction between basic and clinical subjects makes it difficult for teachers to collaborate and teach students in an integrated way. We designed a new subject, Integrated Medicine, to overcome such limitations. Here, we describe the evaluation of the first three years of running the experience, as well as the opinion of the first group of students in their sixth year. Three cohorts of first-year medical students (n=158 and eight teachers, as well as a group of students of sixth year (n=41, participated in the experiment. Students worked following the problem-based learning approach. Their satisfaction, their subjective improvement of content knowledge in basic and clinical fields, and their belief about the accomplishment of educational objectives were evaluated. The results showed a high level of satisfaction, increased content knowledge, and improvement in solving problems, searching for relevant information, team working, and oral and written communication skills. Students of sixth year agreed that the subject helped them to better understand the clinical manifestations of disease, the diagnosis process, and therapeutic approaches. In conclusion, experiences such as Integrated Medicine may enhance the integration of knowledge by the joint work of basic and clinical teachers.

  5. Determinants of health and disability in ageing population: the COURAGE in Europe Project (collaborative research on ageing in Europe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Matilde; Chatterji, Somnath; Koskinen, Seppo; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Haro, Josep Maria; Frisoni, Giovanni; Frattura, Lucilla; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Beata; Gmurek, Michal; Serrano, Ramon; Finocchiaro, Carla

    2014-01-01

    COURAGE in Europe was a 3-year project involving 12 partners from four European countries and the World Health Organization. It was inspired by the pressing need to integrate international studies on disability and ageing in light of an innovative perspective based on a validated data-collection protocol. COURAGE in Europe Project collected data on the determinants of health and disability in an ageing population, with specific tools for the evaluation of the role of the built environment and social networks on health, disability, quality of life and well-being. The main survey was conducted by partners in Finland, Poland and Spain where the survey has been administered to a sample of 10,800 persons, which was completed in March 2012. The newly developed and validated COURAGE Protocol for Ageing Studies has proven to be a valid tool for collecting comparable data in ageing population, and the COURAGE in Europe Project has created valid and reliable scientific evidence, demonstrating cross-country comparability, for disability and ageing research and policy development. It is therefore recommended that future studies exploring determinants of health and disability in ageing use the COURAGE-derived methodology. COURAGE in Europe Project collected data on the determinants of health and disability in an ageing population, with specific tools for the evaluation of the role of built environment and social networks on health, disability quality of life and well-being. The COURAGE Protocol for Ageing Studies has proven to be a valid tool for collecting comparable data in the ageing population. The COURAGE in Europe Consortium recommends that future studies exploring determinants of health and disability in ageing use COURAGE-derived methodology. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Science teachers’ individual and social learning related to IBSE in the frames of a large-scale, long-term, collaborative TPD project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Sillasen, Martin

    of collaborative inquiries locally. A major theme in the first year has been Inquiry Based Science Education (IBSE) recommended as a focus to improve science education internationally. The research presented focuses on the participating teachers’ intertwined levels of individual and social learning. Data from...... repeated surveys and case studies reveal a positive attitude towards trying IBSE in the own classroom, however with the main part of the reflections focused on students’ hands-on experiences and fewer including students manipulating science ideas, like posing hypotheses. Teachers’ reflections indicate......It is acknowledged internationally that teachers’ Professional Development (TPD) is crucial for reforming science teaching. The Danish QUEST project (“Qualifying in-service Education of Science Teachers”) is designed using widely agreed criteria for effective TPD: content focus, active learning...

  7. Model program for the recruitment and preparation of high ability elementary mathematics/science teachers: A collaborative project among scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This teacher education program will provide a model for recruiting, educating and retaining high ability students to become mathematics and science lead teachers in elementary schools. The quality experiences and support provided these students will help them develop the knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide leadership for elementary mathematics and science programs. Students will have research experiences at the Ames Laboratory, high quality field experiences with nationally recognized mathematics and science teachers in local schools and opportunities to meaningfully connect these two experiences. This program, collaboratively designed and implemented by scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers, should provide a replicatable model for other teacher education institutions. In addition, materials developed for the project should help other laboratories interface more effectively with K-8 schools and help other teacher education programs incorporate real science and mathematics experience into their curriculum.

  8. DLESE Teaching Box Pilot Project: Developing a Replicable Model for Collaboratively Creating Innovative Instructional Sequences Using Exemplary Resources in the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingroff, M.

    2004-12-01

    Before the advent of digital libraries, it was difficult for teachers to find suitable high-quality resources to use in their teaching. Digital libraries such as DLESE have eased the task by making high quality resources more easily accessible and providing search mechanisms that allow teachers to 'fine tune' the criteria over which they search. Searches tend to return lists of resources with some contextualizing information. However, teachers who are teaching 'out of discipline' or who have minimal training in science often need additional support to know how to use and sequence them. The Teaching Box Pilot Project was developed to address these concerns, bringing together educators, scientists, and instructional designers in a partnership to build an online framework to fully support innovative units of instruction about the Earth system. Each box integrates DLESE resources and activities, teaching tips, standards, concepts, teaching outcomes, reviews, and assessment information. Online templates and best practice guidelines are being developed that will enable teachers to create their own boxes or customize existing ones. Two boxes have been developed so far, one on weather for high school students, and one on the evidence for plate tectonics for middle schoolers. The project has met with significant enthusiasm and interest, and we hope to expand it by involving individual teachers, school systems, pre-service programs, and universities in the development and use of teaching boxes. A key ingredient in the project's success has been the close collaboration between the partners, each of whom has brought unique experiences, perspectives, knowledge, and skills to the project. This first effort involved teachers in the San Francisco Bay area, the University of California Museum of Paleontology, San Francisco State University, U.S. Geological Survey, and DLESE. This poster will allow participants to explore one of the teaching boxes. We will discuss how the boxes were

  9. Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation Pilot Project - CIELO meeting, OECD Conference Centre, 9-11 May 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, Michal Wladyslaw; Cabellos De Francisco, Oscar; Trkov, Andrej; Bauge, Eric; Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Ignatyuk, Anatoly V.; Mcnabb, Dennis P.; Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Grudzevich, Oleg T.; Mattoon, Caleb; Brown, David; Chadwick, Mark; Roubtsov, Danila; Iwamoto, Osamu; Kahler, Albert C.; Diez De La Obra, Carlos Javier; Qian, Jing; Wu, Haicheng; Ruan, Xichao; Sobes, Vladimir; Rearden, Bradley T.; Yokoyama, Kenji; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Kodeli, Ivan-Alexander; Plompen, Arjan; White, Morgan C.; Leal, Luiz Carlos; Fiorito, Luca; Danon, Yaron; Romain, Pascal; Dunn, Michael; Zerovnik, Gasper; Morillon, Benjamin; Jacqmin, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The aim of WPEC subgroup 39 'Methods and approaches to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data files' is to provide criteria and practical approaches to use effectively the results of sensitivity analyses and cross section adjustments for feedback to evaluators and differential measurement experimentalists in order to improve the knowledge of neutron cross sections, uncertainties, and correlations to be used in a wide range of applications. WPEC subgroup 40-CIELO (Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organization) provides a new working paradigm to facilitate evaluated nuclear reaction data advances. It brings together experts from across the international nuclear reaction data community to identify and document discrepancies among existing evaluated data libraries, measured data, and model calculation interpretations, and aims to make progress in reconciling these discrepancies to create more accurate ENDF-formatted files. SG40-CIELO focusses on 6 important isotopes: "1H, "1"6O, "5"6Fe, "2"3"5","2"3"8U, "2"3"9Pu. This document is the proceedings of the 2016 SG40-CIELO meeting, followed by a joint SG39/SG40 session, held at the OECD Headquarters Conference Center, Paris, France, on 9-11 May 2016. It comprises all the available presentations (slides) given by the participants: A - SG40-CIELO meeting: - SG40-1: Status of Cross Section Progress for "2"3"5","8U, "2"3"9Pu, "5"6Fe, "1"6O (Mark CHADWICK); - SG40-2: Summary of IRMM (Arjan PLOMPEN); - SG40-2.1: Giorginis "1"6O(n,alpha) insights (Arjan PLOMPEN); - SG40-3: New Oxygen "1"6O Hale evaluation (Mark CHADWICK); - SG40-4: "1"6O and "5"6Fe Iron resonance region evaluations (Luiz LEAL); - SG40-5: Iron evaluation work at BNL, ORNL, and IAEA (Mike HERMAN); - SG40-6: Minor Fe isotopes (David BROWN); - SG40-7: Iron evaluation work at CIAE (Jing QIAN); - SG40-8: IAEA CIELO data testing relevant to "5"6Fe (Andre TRKOV); - SG40-9: CIELO data testing (Skip KAHLER

  10. Atomistic modelling of scattering data in the Collaborative Computational Project for Small Angle Scattering (CCP-SAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Stephen J; Wright, David W; Zhang, Hailiang; Brookes, Emre H; Chen, Jianhan; Irving, Thomas C; Krueger, Susan; Barlow, David J; Edler, Karen J; Scott, David J; Terrill, Nicholas J; King, Stephen M; Butler, Paul D; Curtis, Joseph E

    2016-12-01

    The capabilities of current computer simulations provide a unique opportunity to model small-angle scattering (SAS) data at the atomistic level, and to include other structural constraints ranging from molecular and atomistic energetics to crystallography, electron microscopy and NMR. This extends the capabilities of solution scattering and provides deeper insights into the physics and chemistry of the systems studied. Realizing this potential, however, requires integrating the experimental data with a new generation of modelling software. To achieve this, the CCP-SAS collaboration (http://www.ccpsas.org/) is developing open-source, high-throughput and user-friendly software for the atomistic and coarse-grained molecular modelling of scattering data. Robust state-of-the-art molecular simulation engines and molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo force fields provide constraints to the solution structure inferred from the small-angle scattering data, which incorporates the known physical chemistry of the system. The implementation of this software suite involves a tiered approach in which GenApp provides the deployment infrastructure for running applications on both standard and high-performance computing hardware, and SASSIE provides a workflow framework into which modules can be plugged to prepare structures, carry out simulations, calculate theoretical scattering data and compare results with experimental data. GenApp produces the accessible web-based front end termed SASSIE-web , and GenApp and SASSIE also make community SAS codes available. Applications are illustrated by case studies: (i) inter-domain flexibility in two- to six-domain proteins as exemplified by HIV-1 Gag, MASP and ubiquitin; (ii) the hinge conformation in human IgG2 and IgA1 antibodies; (iii) the complex formed between a hexameric protein Hfq and mRNA; and (iv) synthetic 'bottlebrush' polymers.

  11. Collaborative Cyber-infrastructures for the Management of the UNESCO-IGCP Research Project "Forecast of tephra fallout"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Cordoba, G.

    2009-04-01

    Tephra fallout following explosive volcanic eruptions produces several hazardous effects on inhabitants, infrastructure, and property and represents a serious threat for communities located around active volcanoes. In order to mitigate the effects on the surrounding areas, scientists and civil decision-making authorities need reliable short-term forecasts during episodes of eruptive crisis and long-term probabilistic maps to plan territorial policies and land use. Modelling, together with field studies and volcano monitoring, constitutes an indispensable tool to achieve these objectives. The UNESCO-IGCP research project proposal "Forecast of tephra fallout" has the aim to produce a series of tools capable to elaborate both short-term forecasts and long-term hazard assessments using the cutting-edge models for tephra transport and sedimentation. A special project website will be designed to supply a set of models, procedures and expertise to several Latino-American Institutes based in countries seriously threatened by this geo-hazard (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, and Nicaragua). This will proportionate to the final users a tool to elaborate short-term forecasts of tephra deposition on the ground, and determine airborne ash concentrations (a quantity of special relevance for aerial navigation safety) during eruptions and emergencies. The project web-site will have a public section and a password-protected area to exchange information and data among participants and, eventually, to allow remote execution of high-resolution mesoscale meteorological forecasts at the BSC facilities. The public website section will be updated periodically and will include sections describing the project objectives and achievements as well as the hazard maps for the investigated volcanoes, and will be linked to other relevant websites such as IAVCEI, IGCP, IUGS and UNESCO homepages. A part of the public section of the website will be devoted to disseminate achieved

  12. Management and minimisation of uncertainties and errors in numerical aerodynamics results of the German collaborative project MUNA

    CERN Document Server

    Barnewitz, Holger; Fritz, Willy; Thiele, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This volume reports results from the German research initiative MUNA (Management and Minimization of Errors and Uncertainties in Numerical Aerodynamics), which combined development activities of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), German universities and German aircraft industry. The main objective of this five year project was the development of methods and procedures aiming at reducing various types of uncertainties that are typical of numerical flow simulations. The activities were focused on methods for grid manipulation, techniques for increasing the simulation accuracy, sensors for turbulence modelling, methods for handling uncertainties of the geometry and grid deformation as well as stochastic methods for quantifying aleatoric uncertainties.

  13. Project-organized collaborative learning in distance engineering education in "Vill Anthology" (Eds.: Annette Lorentsen and Lone Dirckinck Holmfeldt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Bajard, C.; Helbo, Jan

    Transferring a successful on-campus project-organized learning method to distance continued education is complicated by the fact, that the target group as well as the learning environment and forms of communication are fundamentally different. The Master of Industrial Information Technology...... distance education has been selected for experiments with utilization of new information and commu-nication technology and didactic adjustments to make this transfer from on-campus to off-campus a successful endeavor. The adjustments, as well as the assessment of their effect, are based on a system......-atic monitoring and evaluation of the first year, and subsequent reflections by students and teachers....

  14. FY 1997 report of survey on the intellectual property in international collaboration research project; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (kokusai kyodo kenkyu ni okeru chiteki zaisanken ni tsuite no chosa hokokusho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    In promoting international collaboration research project, coordination of the patent system of each country which participants to the project belong to has broad implications in concluding the contract for the project. For example, in Japan, 100% of the patent belongs to the government for contrast or collaboration project with the government. While, in the USA, the patent developed by the private company belongs to the private company even for the contrast project. In Japan, the shared patent can not be transferred to the third party or implemented without agreement with the partner. While, in the USA, the shared patent can be transferred to the third party or implemented without agreement with the partner. Due to such a difference, some projects can not be established by ill coordination of intellectual property even when the meaning of the projects is well understood. In this survey, was investigated the outline of patent systems of major countries to study about what should well balanced treatment of intellectual property in international collaboration research project be in the future. 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Collaborative research: Accomplishments & potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsouyanni, Klea

    2008-01-01

    Although a substantial part of scientific research is collaborative and increasing globalization will probably lead to its increase, very few studies actually investigate the advantages, disadvantages, experiences and lessons learned from collaboration. In environmental epidemiology interdisciplinary collaboration is essential and the contrasting geographical patterns in exposure and disease make multi-location projects essential. This paper is based on a presentation given at the Annual Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology, Paris 2006, and is attempting to initiate a discussion on a framework for studying collaborative research. A review of the relevant literature showed that indeed collaborative research is rising, in some countries with impressive rates. However, there are substantial differences between countries in their outlook, need and respect for collaboration. In many situations collaborative publications receive more citations than those based on national authorship. The European Union is the most important host of collaborative research, mainly driven by the European Commission through the Framework Programmes. A critical assessment of the tools and trends of collaborative networks under FP6, showed that there was a need for a critical revision, which led to changes in FP7. In conclusion, it is useful to study the characteristics of collaborative research and set targets for the future. The added value for science and for the researchers involved may be assessed. The motivation for collaboration could be increased in the more developed countries. Particular ways to increase the efficiency and interaction in interdisciplinary and intercultural collaboration may be developed. We can work towards "the principles of collaborative research" in Environmental Epidemiology. PMID:18208596

  16. The FP7 collaborative project RECOSY - a comprehensive information management system for european disposal R and D (INMAN): a proposal for the next European framework program - 59397

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckau, Gunnar; ); Delos, Anne; Montoya, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The Collaborative Project Redox phenomena Controlling Systems (RECOSY) started in 2008 falls within the EURATOM program and is implemented within the 7. Framework Program. The main objective of ReCosy is the sound understanding of redox phenomena controlling the long-term release/retention of radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal providing tools to apply the results to Performance Assessment/Safety Case. Although redox is not a new issue, different questions are still not resolved, such as, redox processes in the long-term dissolution/ chemical transformation of the radioactive waste, waste packages and engineered barriers, and migration in the far-field, including which species are formed and their respective various retention mechanisms. In order to solve this questions, the project includes i) development of advanced analytical tools, ii) investigations of processes responsible for redox control (thermodynamically and kinetically controlled processes, surface reactions and microbial processes), iii) provision of required data on redox controlling processes, and iv) response to internal/external disturbances in disposal systems to internal/external disturbances. The work program of the project is structured along six Research and Technological Development work-packages. Specific Work-packages on knowledge management, education and training (WP7) and administrative management issues (WP8) are also included in the project. In WP1, the scientific state-of-the-art and its application to Performance Assessment/Safety Case is documented and regularly up-dated, based on the safety case of the ANDRA B2 cell. WP2 deals with the development and testing of redox determination methods using different type of electrodes

  17. CO2 Capture Project-An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project for Next Generation CO2 Separation, Capture and Geologic Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helen Kerr; Linda M. Curran

    2005-04-15

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) was a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, ENI, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union [DG RES & DG TREN], the Norwegian Research Council [Klimatek Program] and the U.S. Department of Energy [NETL]). The project objective was to develop new technologies that could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies were to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. Certain promising technology areas were increased in scope and the studies extended through 2004. The project budget was approximately $26.4 million over 4 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum cokes are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Pre

  18. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...... localities of tourism Greg Richards 11.Collaborative economy and destination marketing organizations: A systems approach Jonathan Day 12.Working within the Collaborative Tourist Economy: The complex crafting of work and meaning Jane Widtfeldt Meged and Mathilde Dissing Christensen PART - III Encounters...

  19. Information handling in collaborative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Collins

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available UK public policy makers have a growing interest in collaborative research, where academics work with public, private or third sector partners on a joint project which supports the partner’s aims. This paper reports on the findings of five case studies, looking at how information is sourced, managed, used and shared within collaborative research projects. It finds that researchers within collaborative projects have similar information management issues as are known to exist within academia more broadly, but that the specific conditions which govern research collaborations mean that interventions to improve or support information management must be carefully tailored.

  20. Genome3D: a UK collaborative project to annotate genomic sequences with predicted 3D structures based on SCOP and CATH domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tony E; Sillitoe, Ian; Andreeva, Antonina; Blundell, Tom L; Buchan, Daniel W A; Chothia, Cyrus; Cuff, Alison; Dana, Jose M; Filippis, Ioannis; Gough, Julian; Hunter, Sarah; Jones, David T; Kelley, Lawrence A; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Minneci, Federico; Mitchell, Alex; Murzin, Alexey G; Ochoa-Montaño, Bernardo; Rackham, Owen J L; Smith, James; Sternberg, Michael J E; Velankar, Sameer; Yeats, Corin; Orengo, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Genome3D, available at http://www.genome3d.eu, is a new collaborative project that integrates UK-based structural resources to provide a unique perspective on sequence-structure-function relationships. Leading structure prediction resources (DomSerf, FUGUE, Gene3D, pDomTHREADER, Phyre and SUPERFAMILY) provide annotations for UniProt sequences to indicate the locations of structural domains (structural annotations) and their 3D structures (structural models). Structural annotations and 3D model predictions are currently available for three model genomes (Homo sapiens, E. coli and baker's yeast), and the project will extend to other genomes in the near future. As these resources exploit different strategies for predicting structures, the main aim of Genome3D is to enable comparisons between all the resources so that biologists can see where predictions agree and are therefore more trusted. Furthermore, as these methods differ in whether they build their predictions using CATH or SCOP, Genome3D also contains the first official mapping between these two databases. This has identified pairs of similar superfamilies from the two resources at various degrees of consensus (532 bronze pairs, 527 silver pairs and 370 gold pairs).

  1. 4"t"h Annual workshop proceedings of the collaborative project ''Redox phenomena controlling systems'' (7"t"h EC FP CP RECOSY)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmaier, Marcus; Kienzler, Bernhard; Duro, Lara; Grive, Mireia; Montoya, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    The EURATOM 7"t"h EC Framework Program Collaborative Project REdox phenomena Controlling SYstems (RECOSY) started in April 2008 and extends over 4 years. Although redox is not a new geochemical issue, different questions are still not resolved. For this reason, main objectives of RECOSY project are a) the sound understanding of redox phenomena controlling the long-term release/retention of radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal, b) providing tools to apply the result to Performance Assessment/Safety Case, c) training of next generation and d) documentation and communication of the results. To this aim, the project set up a consortium of 32 Beneficiaries/Contractors and 6 Associated Groups. The consortium includes key European Research Institutes, Universities, National Waste Management Agencies and SMEs, from 13 EURATOM signatory states, Russia, Japan, Korea, USA and one European Joint Research Centre. The ReCosy concept is innovative in the scientific approach to the redox phenomena. It includes i) advanced analytical tools, ii) investigations of processes responsible for redox control (thermodynamically and kinetically controlled processes, surface reactions and microbial processes,..), iii) provision of required data on redox controlling processes, and iv) response to disturbances in disposal systems. The work program is structured along six RTD workpackages (WP1-6). They cover near-field and far field aspects as well as all relevant host-rocks considered in Europe. In WP1, the scientific state-of-the-art and its application to Performance Assessment/Safety Case is documented and regularly updated. WP2 focuses on development of redox determination methods. WP3 focuses on redox response of defined and near-natural systems. WP4 studies the redox reactions of radionuclides. WP5 focuses on Redox processes in radionuclide transport and WP6 deals with redox reactions affecting the spent fuel source-term. Specific workpackages on knowledge management, education and

  2. 4{sup th} Annual workshop proceedings of the collaborative project ''Redox phenomena controlling systems'' (7{sup th} EC FP CP RECOSY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmaier, Marcus; Kienzler, Bernhard; Duro, Lara; Grive, Mireia; Montoya, Vanessa (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    The EURATOM 7{sup th} EC Framework Program Collaborative Project REdox phenomena Controlling SYstems (RECOSY) started in April 2008 and extends over 4 years. Although redox is not a new geochemical issue, different questions are still not resolved. For this reason, main objectives of RECOSY project are a) the sound understanding of redox phenomena controlling the long-term release/retention of radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal, b) providing tools to apply the result to Performance Assessment/Safety Case, c) training of next generation and d) documentation and communication of the results. To this aim, the project set up a consortium of 32 Beneficiaries/Contractors and 6 Associated Groups. The consortium includes key European Research Institutes, Universities, National Waste Management Agencies and SMEs, from 13 EURATOM signatory states, Russia, Japan, Korea, USA and one European Joint Research Centre. The ReCosy concept is innovative in the scientific approach to the redox phenomena. It includes i) advanced analytical tools, ii) investigations of processes responsible for redox control (thermodynamically and kinetically controlled processes, surface reactions and microbial processes,..), iii) provision of required data on redox controlling processes, and iv) response to disturbances in disposal systems. The work program is structured along six RTD workpackages (WP1-6). They cover near-field and far field aspects as well as all relevant host-rocks considered in Europe. In WP1, the scientific state-of-the-art and its application to Performance Assessment/Safety Case is documented and regularly updated. WP2 focuses on development of redox determination methods. WP3 focuses on redox response of defined and near-natural systems. WP4 studies the redox reactions of radionuclides. WP5 focuses on Redox processes in radionuclide transport and WP6 deals with redox reactions affecting the spent fuel source-term. Specific workpackages on knowledge management, education

  3. Evaluating the impact of a community developed collaborative project for the prevention of early childhood caries: the Healthy Smile Happy Child project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Robert J; Edwards, Jeanette M; Brothwell, Douglas J; Yakiwchuk, Carol A; Bertone, Mary F; Mellon, Bernadette; Ward, Jennifer; Ellis, Marion; Hai-Santiago, Khalida; Lawrence, Herenia P; Moffatt, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the Healthy Smile Happy Child (HSHC) project, a community-developed initiative promoting early childhood oral health in Manitoba, Canada. Specific aims were to assess improvements in caregiver knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours relating to early childhood oral health, and the burden of early childhood caries (ECC) and severe ECC (S-ECC). A serial cross-sectional study design was selected to contrast findings following the Healthy Smile Happy Child (HSHC) campaign in four communities with the previous baseline data. One community was a remote First Nation in northern Manitoba and another was a rural First Nation in southern Manitoba. The other two communities were urban centres, one of which was located in northern Manitoba. A community-development approach was adopted for the project to foster community solutions to address ECC. Goals of the HSHC program were to promote the project in each community, use existing community-based programs and services to deliver the oral health promotion and ECC prevention activities, and recruit and train natural leaders to assist in program development and to deliver the ECC prevention program. The HSHC coordinator worked with communities to develop a comprehensive list of potential strategies to address ECC. Numerous activities occurred in each community to engage members and increase their knowledge of early childhood oral health and ultimately lead them to adopt preventive oral health practices for their young children. Children under 71 months of age and their primary caregivers participated in this follow-up study. A -value ≤0.05 was statistically significant. 319 children (mean age 38.2±18.6 months) and their primary caregivers participated. Significant improvements in caregiver knowledge and attitudes were observed following the HSHC campaign, including that baby teeth are important (98.8%), that decay involving primary teeth can impact on health (94.3%), and the importance of a dental

  4. A Novel Approach for Engaging Academia in Collaborative Projects with NASA through the X-Hab Academic Innovation Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Tracy R.; Gattuso, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    The X-Hab Academic Innovation Challenge, currently in its sixth year of execution, provides university students with the opportunity to be on the forefront of innovation. The X-Hab Challenge, for short, is designed to engage and retain students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). NASA identifies necessary technologies and studies for deep space missions and invites universities from around the country to develop concepts, prototypes, and lessons learned that will help shape future space missions and awards seed funds to design and produce functional products of interest as proposed by university teams according to their interests and expertise. Universities propose on a variety of projects suggested by NASA and are then judged on technical merit, academic integration, leveraged funding, and outreach. The universities assemble a multi-discipline team of students and advisors that invest months working together, developing concepts, and frequently producing working prototypes. Not only are students able to gain quality experience, working real world problems that have the possibility of be implemented, but they work closely with subject matter experts from NASA who guide them through an official engineering development process.

  5. ISS-NIH Collaborative Programme: final report of the projects; Programma di collaborazione ISS-NIH: relazioni conclusive dei progetti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    In July 2003, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the United States of America and the Istituto Superiore di Sanita (ISS) of Italy signed an agreement aimed at strengthening the ongoing research cooperation between USA and Italy. Over the years, the programme was able to create new partnerships and to foster the establishment of innovative synergies, the exchange of young researcher, and the merging of the best available skills, talents and know-how in different fields of biomedical sciences. This book contains the final report of the projects of the scientific cooperation between the two Countries. The report consists of two parts (in Italian and English) divided into four sections: Cancer, Neuroscience, Cardiovascular diseases, Infectious diseases. [Italian] Nel luglio 2003, i National Institutes of Health (NIH) americani e l'Istituto Superiore di Sanita (ISS) hanno firmato un accordo mirato a rafforzare la cooperazione scientifica tra Italia e USA. Nel corso degli anni il programma ha permesso di ampliare le collaborazioni e di promuovere nuove sinergie attraverso lo scambio di giovani ricercatori e la condivisione delle migliori competenze, conoscenze e capacita in diversi campi delle scienze biomediche. Questo volume contiene le relazioni finali dei progetti del programma di cooperazione scientifica tra i due Paesi. Il rapporto e articolato in due parti (in italiano e inglese) divise in quattro sezioni: Tumori, Neuroscienze, Malattie cardiovascolari, Malattie infettive.

  6. Prospects of international collaboration and knowledge transfer on project management and public relations in nuclear power engineering (economic aspect)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pysmenna, U.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper author deals with public consultations of the State Scientific Engineering Center of Control Systems and Emergency Response, Kiev. The following conclusions should be made: - Public consultations support and strengthen the positive image of nuclear energy projects, also by youth. - The public relations work which includes only occasional meetings or discussions of some problems is not effective. - Effective are the following facilities: - press releases in popular scientific and technical issues (now there are a few of such issues because of lack of financing) - career-guidance at all phases of education (to begin with secondary schools to post-graduate courses). It is well known that the economic situation in a country influences the functioning of electric energy market and efficiency of energy companies. The aim of our research is to find out the ways of further development of energy branch and what economic consequences the different changes in legislation and taxation systems can bring about. Great attention is paid to the activities of the producers of nuclear energy and regional energy supplying companies and the state of payments in electric energy market. Current research is being carried out to find out the ways of enlarging current assets, decreasing debts, also optimal equipment depreciation normative and main dependencies between some economic indexes and existing tariffs. All these tasks can be effectively solved using the. (author)

  7. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    that are emerging from them, and how governments are responding to these new challenges. In doing so, the book provides both theoretical and practical insights into the future of tourism in a world that is, paradoxically, becoming both increasingly collaborative and individualized. Table of Contents Preface 1.The...... collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...

  8. Working Collaboratively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holder, Anna; Lovett, George

    2009-01-01

    identified as a transformative global force of the last decade, most notably in knowledge and information publishing, communication and creation. This paper presents a structured conversation on changing understandings of collaboration, and the realities of collaborative methodology in architectural work...

  9. Technical Assistance and Changes in Nutrition and Physical Activity Practices in the National Early Care and Education Learning Collaboratives Project, 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappone, Alethea; Smith, Teresa M; Estabrooks, Paul A; Rasmussen, Cristy Geno; Blaser, Casey; Yaroch, Amy L

    2018-04-26

    The National Early Care and Education Learning Collaboratives Project (ECELC) aims to improve best practices in early care and education (ECE) programs in topic areas of the Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment in Child Care (NAP SACC). Technical assistance is a component of the ECELC, yet its effect on outcomes is unclear. Beyond dose and duration of technical assistance, limited research exists on characteristics of technical assistance that contribute to outcomes. The objective of this study was to identify and describe technical assistance characteristics and explore associations with NAP SACC outcomes. We collected data from 10 collaboratives comprising 84 ECE programs in 2 states in 2015-2016. The objective of technical assistance was to support programs in improving best practices. Technical assistance was provided to programs via on-site, telephone, or email and was tailored to program needs. We used a mixed-methods design to examine associations between technical assistance and NAP SACC outcomes. We used multiple regression analysis to assess quantitative data and qualitative comparative analysis to determine necessary and sufficient technical assistance conditions supporting NAP SACC outcomes. We also conducted a document review to describe technical assistance that referred conditions identified by the qualitative comparative analysis. Regression analyses detected an inverse relationship between changes in NAP SACC scores and hours of technical assistance. No clear pattern emerged in the qualitative comparative analysis, leaving no necessary and sufficient conditions. However, the qualitative comparative analysis identified feedback as a potentially important component of technical assistance, whereas resource sharing and frequent email were characteristics that seemed to reduce the likelihood of improved outcomes. Email and resource sharing were considered primarily general information rather than tailored technical assistance. Technical

  10. Technical Assistance and Changes in Nutrition and Physical Activity Practices in the National Early Care and Education Learning Collaboratives Project, 2015–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Teresa M.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Rasmussen, Cristy Geno; Blaser, Casey; Yaroch, Amy L

    2018-01-01

    Purpose and Objectives The National Early Care and Education Learning Collaboratives Project (ECELC) aims to improve best practices in early care and education (ECE) programs in topic areas of the Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment in Child Care (NAP SACC). Technical assistance is a component of the ECELC, yet its effect on outcomes is unclear. Beyond dose and duration of technical assistance, limited research exists on characteristics of technical assistance that contribute to outcomes. The objective of this study was to identify and describe technical assistance characteristics and explore associations with NAP SACC outcomes. Intervention Approach We collected data from 10 collaboratives comprising 84 ECE programs in 2 states in 2015–2016. The objective of technical assistance was to support programs in improving best practices. Technical assistance was provided to programs via on-site, telephone, or email and was tailored to program needs. Evaluation Methods We used a mixed-methods design to examine associations between technical assistance and NAP SACC outcomes. We used multiple regression analysis to assess quantitative data and qualitative comparative analysis to determine necessary and sufficient technical assistance conditions supporting NAP SACC outcomes. We also conducted a document review to describe technical assistance that referred conditions identified by the qualitative comparative analysis. Results Regression analyses detected an inverse relationship between changes in NAP SACC scores and hours of technical assistance. No clear pattern emerged in the qualitative comparative analysis, leaving no necessary and sufficient conditions. However, the qualitative comparative analysis identified feedback as a potentially important component of technical assistance, whereas resource sharing and frequent email were characteristics that seemed to reduce the likelihood of improved outcomes. Email and resource sharing were considered primarily

  11. The Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP) and the JEFF-3.3 radioactive decay data library: Combining international collaborative efforts on evaluated decay data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, Mark A.; Bersillon, Olivier

    2017-09-01

    The Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP), is an international collaboration of decay data evaluators formed with groups from France, Germany, USA, China, Romania, Russia, Spain and the UK, mainly from the metrology community. DDEP members have evaluated over 220 radionuclides, following an agreed upon methodology, including a peer review. Evaluations include all relevant parameters relating to the nuclear decay and the associated atomic processes. An important output of these evaluations are recommendations for new measurements, which can serve as a basis for future measurement programmes. Recently evaluated radionuclides include: 18F, 59Fe, 82Rb, 82Sr, 88Y, 90Y, 89Zr, 94mTc, 109Cd, 133Ba, 140Ba, 140La, 151Sm and 169Er. The DDEP recommended data have recently been incorporated into the JEFF-3.3 Radioactive Decay Data Library. Other sources of nuclear data include 900 or so radionuclides converted from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), 500 from two UK libraries (UKPADD6.12 and UKHEDD2.6), the IAEA Actinide Decay Data Library, with the remainder converted from the NUBASE evaluation of nuclear properties. Mean decay energies for a number of radionuclides determined from total absorption gamma-ray spectroscopy (TAGS) have also been included, as well as more recent European results from TAGS measurements performed at the University of Jyväskylä by groups from the University of Valencia, Spain and SUBATECH, the University of Nantes, France. The current status of the DDEP collaboration and the JEFF Radioactive Decay Data Library will be presented. Note to the reader: the pdf file has been changed on September 22, 2017.

  12. Collaborative project: research on strongly coupled plasmas. Final technical report for period July 15, 1998--July 14, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, Kenneth I.

    2002-01-01

    The main research accomplishments/findings of the project were the following: (1) Publication of an in-depth review article in Physics of Plasmas on the quasilocalized charge approximation (QLCA) in strongly coupled plasma physics and its application to a variety of Coulomb systems: the model one-component plasma in three and two dimensions, binary ionic mixtures, charged particle bilayers, and laboratory dusty plasmas. (2) In the strongly coupled Coulomb liquid phase, the physical basis of the QLCA, namely, the caging of particles trapped in slowly fluctuating local potential minima, is supported by molecular dynamics simulation of the classical three-dimensional one-component plasma. (3) The QLCA theory, when applied to the analysis of the collective modes in strongly coupled charged particle bilayers, predicts the existence of a remarkable long-wavelength energy gap in the out-of-phase excitation spectrum. More recent theoretical calculations based on the three principal frequency-moment sum rules reveal that the gap persists for arbitrary coupling strengths and over the entire classical to quantum domain all the way down to zero temperature. The existence of the energy gap has now been confirmed in a molecular dynamics simulation of the charged particle bilayer. (4) New compressibility and third-frequency-moment sum rules for multilayer plasmas were formulated and applied to the analysis of the dynamical structure function of charged particle bilayers and superlattices. (5) An equivalent of the Debye-Huckel weak coupling equilibrium theory for classical charged particle bilayer and superlattice plasmas was formulated. (6) The quadratic fluctuation-dissipation theorem (QFDT) for layered classical plasmas was formulated. (7) The QFDT was applied to a powerful kinetic theory-based description of the density-density response function and long-wavelength plasma mode behavior in strongly coupled two-dimensional Coulomb fluids in the weakly degenerate quantum domain

  13. White Paper on the Use of Team Calendars with the JIRA Issue Tracking System and Confluence Collaboration Tools for the xLPR Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasky, Hilda B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Williams, Paul T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, Bennett Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2012-09-01

    ORNL was tasked by xLPR project management to propose a team calendar for use within the xLPR consortium. Among various options that were considered, the approach judged by ORNL to best fit the needs of the xLPR project is presented in this document. The Atlassian Team Calendars plug-in used with the Confluence collaboration tool was recommended for several reasons, including the advantage that it provides for a tight integration between Confluence (found at https://xlpr.ornl.gov/wiki ) and xLPR s JIRA issue tracking system (found at https://xlpr.ornl.gov/jira ). This document is divided into two parts. The first part (Sections 1-6) consists of the white paper, which highlights some of the ways that Team Calendars can improve com mun ication between xLPR project managers, group leads, and team members when JIRA is applied for both issue tracking and change-management activities. Specific points emphasized herein are as follows: The Team Calendar application greatly enhances the added value that the JIRA and Confluence tools bring to the xLPR Project. The Team Calendar can improve com mun ication between xLPR project managers, group leads, and team members when JIRA is applied for both issue tracking and change-management activities. The Team Calendar works across different email tools such as Outlook 2011, Outlook 2010, Outlook 2007, Google Calendars and Mac s iCalendar to name a few. xLPR users can now access the wiki Confluence (with embedded Team Calendars) directly from JIRA without having to re-validate their login. The second part consists of an Annex (Section 7), which describes how users can subscribe to Team Calendars from different calendar applications. Specific instructions are given in the Annex that describe how to Import xLPR Team Calendar to Outlook Version Office 2010 Import xLPR Team Calendar to Outlook Version Office 2007 Subscribe to Team Calendar from Google Calendar The reader is directed to Section 4 for instructions on adding events to the

  14. System understanding as a basis for sustainable decision-making. A science - school collaboration within the Sparkling Science project "Traisen w3"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Michaela; Böck, Kerstin; Loach, Andreas; Scheikl, Sigrid; Zitek, Andreas; Heidenreich, Andrea; Kurz-Aigner, Roman; Schrittwieser, Martin; Muhar, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Equipping young people with the skills to participate successfully in increasingly complex environments and societies is a central issue of policy makers around the world. Only the understanding of complex socio-environmental systems establishes a basis for making decisions leading to sustainable development. However, OECD Pisa studies indicated, that only a low percentage of 15-year-old students was able to solve straightforward problems. Additionally, students get less interested in natural science education. In Austria "Sparkling Science" projects funded by the Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy in Austria target at integrating science with school learning by involving young people into scientific research for the purpose of developing new and engaging forms of interactive, meaningful learning. Within the Sparkling Science Project "Traisen.w3" scientists work together with 15 to 18-year-old students of an Austrian Secondary School over two years to identify and evaluate ecosystem services within the catchment of the river Traisen. One of the aims of the project is to foster system understanding of the youths by multi-modal school activities. To support the development of causal systems thinking, students developed qualitative causal models on processes in the catchment of the river Traisen with an interactive, hierarchically structured learning environment that was developed within the EU-FP7 project "DynaLearn" (http://www.dynalearn.eu) based on qualitative reasoning. Students worked in small groups and were encouraged to interlink entities, processes and simulate the results of the proposed interactions of hydrological, biological, ecological, spatial and societal elements. Within this setting collaborative problem solving competency through sharing knowledge, understanding and different perspectives was developed. Additionally, in several school workshops the ecosystem services concept was used as communication tool to show the

  15. Collaborative Project Work Development in a Virtual Environment with Low-Intermediate Undergraduate Colombian Students (Desarrollo de trabajo colaborativo en un ambiente virtual con estudiantes colombianos de pregrado de nivel intermedio-bajo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas Vacca, Yakelin

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory, descriptive, and interpretive study in which the roles of discussion boards, the students, the teacher, and the monitors were explored as they constructed a collaborative class project in a virtual environment. This research was conducted in the virtual program of a Colombian public university. Data were…

  16. CMS Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faridah Mohammad Idris; Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan Abdullah; Zainol Abidin Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: CMS Collaboration is an international scientific collaboration located at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Switzerland, dedicated in carried out research on experimental particle physics. Consisting of 179 institutions from 41 countries from all around the word, CMS Collaboration host a general purpose detector for example the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) for members in CMS Collaboration to conduct experiment from the collision of two proton beams accelerated to a speed of 8 TeV in the LHC ring. In this paper, we described how the CMS detector is used by the scientist in CMS Collaboration to reconstruct the most basic building of matter. (author)

  17. Collaborative Project: Building improved optimized parameter estimation algorithms to improve methane and nitrogen fluxes in a climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-11-29

    Soils in natural and managed ecosystems and wetlands are well known sources of methane, nitrous oxides, and reactive nitrogen gases, but the magnitudes of gas flux to the atmosphere are still poorly constrained. Thus, the reasons for the large increases in atmospheric concentrations of methane and nitrous oxide since the preindustrial time period are not well understood. The low atmospheric concentrations of methane and nitrous oxide, despite being more potent greenhouse gases than carbon dioxide, complicate empirical studies to provide explanations. In addition to climate concerns, the emissions of reactive nitrogen gases from soils are important to the changing nitrogen balance in the earth system, subject to human management, and may change substantially in the future. Thus improved modeling of the emission fluxes of these species from the land surface is important. Currently, there are emission modules for methane and some nitrogen species in the Community Earth System Model’s Community Land Model (CLM-ME/N); however, there are large uncertainties and problems in the simulations, resulting in coarse estimates. In this proposal, we seek to improve these emission modules by combining state-of-the-art process modules for emissions, available data, and new optimization methods. In earth science problems, we often have substantial data and knowledge of processes in disparate systems, and thus we need to combine data and a general process level understanding into a model for projections of future climate that are as accurate as possible. The best methodologies for optimization of parameters in earth system models are still being developed. In this proposal we will develop and apply surrogate algorithms that a) were especially developed for computationally expensive simulations like CLM-ME/N models; b) were (in the earlier surrogate optimization Stochastic RBF) demonstrated to perform very well on computationally expensive complex partial differential equations in

  18. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... and similar phenomena are among these collective innovations in tourism that are shaking the very bedrock of an industrial system that has been traditionally sustained along commercial value chains. To date there has been very little investigation of these trends, which have been inspired by, amongst other...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...

  19. Petroleum R and D collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, R.

    1995-01-01

    Conditions for collaboration in research and development (R and D) were developed based on a decision-tree analysis. A key requirement for effective R and D collaboration was stated to be the company's ability to internalize a significant portion of the benefits. This was seen as the principal factor that determined good collaborators and good industries for collaboration. It was noted that collaboration benefits can also be improved through R and D exchanges in collaborative associations. Simple decision-tree analysis tended to understate the advantages of collaboration. Portfolio risk reduction and inter-project synergies were significant additional advantages. Collaborative R and D was said to be the preferred route for the development of a broad base of petroleum-related technologies. 5 tabs., 2 figs

  20. Rural retention of new medical graduates from the Collaborative Project to Increase Production of Rural Doctors (CPIRD): a 12-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techakehakij, Win; Arora, Rajin

    2017-07-01

    Physician scarcity in rural areas is a major obstacle to healthcare access, leading to health inequity worldwide. In Thailand, a special recruitment program of medical education [Collaborative Project to Increase Production of Rural Doctors (CPIRD)] was initiated with four different medical training tracks. No previous research has examined the rural retention of new medical graduates across the CPIRD tracks, compared with those receiving conventional medical education (Normal track). This study examines the public retention of rural physicians from different tracks of entry. A retrospective study was conducted in new medical graduates who entered Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) hospitals from January 2003 to October 2014, and followed up until June 2015, using administrative data from the Personnel Administration Division, MoPH. The CPIRD registry database was used to identify physicians' tracks of entry. Survival analyses and multiple logistic regression analyses were applied to compare the annual retention and the probability of 3-year retention of rural physicians. Results clearly demonstrated a high rural retention of CPIRD medical graduates, compared with their Normal track peers, regarding both lower annual resignation (HR 0.456, P rural retention were revealed across the different CPIRD tracks. Evidence from this study can be used as part of the information to reshape the physician production policy to reduce health inequity in rural areas. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Collaboration and E-collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding student’s perception of collaboration and how collaboration is supported by ICT is important for its efficient use in the classroom. This article aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and how they use new technologies in collaborative group work. Furthermore......, it tries to measure the impact of technology on students’ satisfaction with collaboration outcomes. In particular, the study aims to address the following research questions: Which demographic information (e.g. gender and place of origin) is significant for collaboration and ecollaboration? and Which...... are the perceived factors that influence the students’ group performance? The findings of this study emphasize that there are gender and cultural differences with respect to the perception of e-collaboration. Furthermore, the article summarizes in a model the most significant factors influencing group performance....

  2. Exploring the Mechanisms of Knowledge Transfer in University-Industry Collaborations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Cappelen, Katja

    2014-01-01

    respondents have been involved in collaborative projects, such as student-industry cooperation or collaboration projects between scientists and businesses. This research shows that to secure real value adding through knowledge transfer in universityindustry collaboration projects, it is important...

  3. Innovative approaches to the Management of Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Wastes: Addressing the Challenges through International Collaboration with Project 'GRAPA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, A.J.; Ojovan, M.; O'Sullivan, P.; )

    2017-01-01

    There exists more than 250.000 tonnes of irradiated (and therefore radioactive) nuclear graphite (i-graphite) in the world, primarily as a result of the development of graphite-moderated power-reactor systems, initially for defence and subsequently for commercial purposes. Only a very small number of such plants have been dismantled and, for most cases, the final destiny of the irradiated graphite remains unresolved. Future high-temperature reactor programmes, such as the Chinese HTR-PM development, will produce more graphite and carbonaceous wastes from both structural components and the fuel pebbles (which are approximately 96% carbonaceous), the latter producing a continuous stream of so-called 'operational waste'. The problem of dismantling irradiated graphite reactor stacks, possibly distorted through neutron damage and in some cases degraded further by radiation-chemical attack by gaseous coolants, and then finding the appropriate treatments and final destiny of the material, has exercised both the European Union and the International Atomic Energy Agency for more than 25 years, seeking to address the different issues and available disposal solutions in different IAEA Member States. An IAEA collaborative research programme on treatment options has recently been completed, and an active group of international specialists in this area has now been established as part of the IAEA International Decommissioning Network under the envelope of Project 'GRAPA' (Irradiated Graphite Processing Approaches), which includes representatives from Belgium, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Lithuania, Rep. of Korea, Romania, Spain, Switzerland, Ukraine and the Russian Federation with direct responsibilities for various parts of the decommissioning and graphite-disposal process in a variety of reactor designs. Interest has also been expressed by colleagues from Sweden and Japan. Work is in progress on a number of topic areas where weaknesses in the

  4. Electronic construction collaboration system : phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This phase of the electronic collaboration project involved two major efforts: 1) implementation of AEC Sync (formerly known as Attolist), a web-based project management system (WPMS), on the Broadway Viaduct Bridge Project and the Iowa Falls Arch Br...

  5. Can Connecting and Collaborating with Industry Professionals and Community Partners through a Project-Based Initiative Create a Meaningful Learning and Leadership Experience for College Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Inman, Leslie Reese

    2012-01-01

    The author served as facilitator of a group of graphic design college students at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC). These students embarked on a collaborative, 24-hour+, work-around-the-clock, creative blitz and used design thinking to serve the needs of Dalewood Middle School in Chattanooga. Students collaborated with industry…

  6. "Her illness is a project we can work on together": developing a collaborative family-centered intervention model for newly diagnosed multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintell, David; Melito, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a model for intervening with families that are addressing a new diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in one member. The model is collaborative, integrative, and family-centered. It involves both working with the family collaboratively and providing strategies to promote greater collaboration within the family. The model integrates elements of crisis intervention theory, psycho-education, and family-centered approaches. The model was developed with families addressing MS, and was piloted with three families. The intervention was found to improve family members' ability to collaborate with each other. Such increased collaboration may enhance the family's ability to manage long-term illness more effectively, help the family address the impact of the illness on all family members, and generally improve the family's quality of life.

  7. Collaborative Hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Mariann

    The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee writing program is collaborative, not divisionary, as some, such as Jeanne Gunner, have suggested. Three terms are useful in understanding the relationships and ethics governing operations at Wisconsin-Milwaukee: (1) authority and collaboration; (2) hierarchical difference; (3) professional respect.…

  8. Remote Collaborative 3D Printing - Process Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    COLLABORATIVE 3D PRINTING - PROCESS INVESTIGATION Cody M. Reese, PE CAD MODEL PRINT MODEL PRINT PREVIEW PRINTED PART AERIAL VIRTUAL This...REMOTE COLLABORATIVE 3D PRINTING - PROCESS INVESTIGATION 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Cody M. Reese...release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The Remote Collaborative 3D Printing project is a collaboration between

  9. Collaboration between IPMA and PMRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgi Thor Ingason

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The International Project Management Association (IPMA was established by academics, research has always been acknowledged by IPMA and the association has supported research in different ways. We see it as our duty to share knowledge in project management, cooperate and facilitate cooperation between project management researchers and motivate project management researchers…and, by investigating specific areas, and thereby influencing the discipline. To achieve this we collaborate with other organisations that share our interest and I am glad to declare that IPMA will be collaborating with the journal Project Management Research and Practice.

  10. Collaborative Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Horst, Willem

    2014-01-01

    of the prototyping process, the actual prototype was used as a tool for communication or development, thus serving as a platform for the cross-fertilization of knowledge. In this way, collaborative prototyping leads to a better balance between functionality and usability; it translates usability problems into design......This paper presents an inductive study that shows how collaborative prototyping across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries can improve the overall prototyping process. Our combined action research and case study approach provides new insights into how collaborative prototyping...... can provide a platform for prototype-driven problem solving in early new product development (NPD). Our findings have important implications for how to facilitate multistakeholder collaboration in prototyping and problem solving, and more generally for how to organize collaborative and open innovation...

  11. Stakeholder collaboration and heritage management

    OpenAIRE

    Aas, C.; Ladkin, Adele; Fletcher, John

    2005-01-01

    This article examines a collaborative approach to the relationship between heritage management and tourism development in Luang Prabang, Laos. The purpose is to examine stakeholder collaboration and management roles, heritage tourism development, as well as the interdependence of the heritage conservation and tourism relationship. The research examines a UNESCO/Norwegian government project, which aiming to promote collaboration between heritage conservation and tourism through stakeholder inv...

  12. Formation of a collaborative society

    OpenAIRE

    Buřita, Ladislav; Ondryhal, Vojtěch

    2014-01-01

    The MilUNI knowledge portal, based on the knowledge base developed in ATOM software has been created at the authors' workplace with the aim to form a collaborative society of military universities. The analysis of the collaborative society concept is presented. The description of the MilUNI project is included. Some areas for university cooperation are proposed, as well as the measures facilitating the formation and development of the collaborative society.

  13. When industry & academia collaborate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopczak, L.R.; Fransoo, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Innovative "project-based courses" are bringing the business and academic worlds together to advance global supply chain management. By collaborating with universities to solve specific supply chain problems, companies not only benefit from the infusion of new ideas, but also gain access to a pool

  14. Collaborative engineering experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ir. Peter van Kollenburg; Dr. Ir. P. Mulders; Ir. Dick van Schenk Brill; Dr. Ir. G. Schouten; Dr. J. Ochs

    2000-01-01

    In the fall of 1999, an international integrated product development pilot project based on collaborative engineering was started with team members in two international teams from the United States, The Netherlands and Germany. Team members interacted using various Internet capabilities, including,

  15. Projectables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Troels A.; Merritt, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    CNC cutting machines have become essential tools for designers and architects enabling rapid prototyping, model-building and production of high quality components. Designers often cut from new materials, discarding the irregularly shaped remains. We introduce ProjecTables, a visual augmented...... reality system for interactive packing of model parts onto sheet materials. ProjecTables enables designers to (re)use scrap materials for CNC cutting that would have been previously thrown away, at the same time supporting aesthetic choices related to wood grain, avoiding surface blemishes, and other...... relevant material properties. We conducted evaluations of ProjecTables with design students from Aarhus School of Architecture, demonstrating that participants could quickly and easily place and orient model parts reducing material waste. Contextual interviews and ideation sessions led to a deeper...

  16. [Projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Shingo; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iseki, Hiroshi; Harada, Hiroshi Kasanuki Noboru; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Kitamori, Takehiko; Tei, Yuichi; Nakaoka, Ryusuke; Haishima, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Division of Medical Devices has been conducting the projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo. The TWIns has been studying to aim at establishment of preclinical evaluation methods by "Engineering Based Medicine", and established Regulatory Science Institute for Medical Devices. School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo has been studying to aim at establishment of assessment methodology for innovative minimally invasive therapeutic devices, materials, and nanobio diagnostic devices. This report reviews the exchanges of personnel, the implement systems and the research progress of these projects.

  17. Health Care Transformation Through Collaboration on Open-Source Informatics Projects: Integrating a Medical Applications Platform, Research Data Repository, and Patient Summarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Allison B; Wright, Adam; Wattanasin, Nich; Sittig, Dean F; Murphy, Shawn N

    2013-01-01

    Background The Strategic Health IT Advanced Research Projects (SHARP) program seeks to conquer well-understood challenges in medical informatics through breakthrough research. Two SHARP centers have found alignment in their methodological needs: (1) members of the National Center for Cognitive Informatics and Decision-making (NCCD) have developed knowledge bases to support problem-oriented summarizations of patient data, and (2) Substitutable Medical Apps, Reusable Technologies (SMART), which is a platform for reusable medical apps that can run on participating platforms connected to various electronic health records (EHR). Combining the work of these two centers will ensure wide dissemination of new methods for synthesized views of patient data. Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) is an NIH-funded clinical research data repository platform in use at over 100 sites worldwide. By also working with a co-occurring initiative to SMART-enabling i2b2, we can confidently write one app that can be used extremely broadly. Objective Our goal was to facilitate development of intuitive, problem-oriented views of the patient record using NCCD knowledge bases that would run in any EHR. To do this, we developed a collaboration between the two SHARPs and an NIH center, i2b2. Methods First, we implemented collaborative tools to connect researchers at three institutions. Next, we developed a patient summarization app using the SMART platform and a previously validated NCCD problem-medication linkage knowledge base derived from the National Drug File-Reference Terminology (NDF-RT). Finally, to SMART-enable i2b2, we implemented two new Web service “cells” that expose the SMART application programming interface (API), and we made changes to the Web interface of i2b2 to host a “carousel” of SMART apps. Results We deployed our SMART-based, NDF-RT-derived patient summarization app in this SMART-i2b2 container. It displays a problem-oriented view of

  18. Health care transformation through collaboration on open-source informatics projects: integrating a medical applications platform, research data repository, and patient summarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, Jeffrey G; McCoy, Allison B; Wright, Adam; Wattanasin, Nich; Sittig, Dean F; Murphy, Shawn N

    2013-05-30

    The Strategic Health IT Advanced Research Projects (SHARP) program seeks to conquer well-understood challenges in medical informatics through breakthrough research. Two SHARP centers have found alignment in their methodological needs: (1) members of the National Center for Cognitive Informatics and Decision-making (NCCD) have developed knowledge bases to support problem-oriented summarizations of patient data, and (2) Substitutable Medical Apps, Reusable Technologies (SMART), which is a platform for reusable medical apps that can run on participating platforms connected to various electronic health records (EHR). Combining the work of these two centers will ensure wide dissemination of new methods for synthesized views of patient data. Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) is an NIH-funded clinical research data repository platform in use at over 100 sites worldwide. By also working with a co-occurring initiative to SMART-enabling i2b2, we can confidently write one app that can be used extremely broadly. Our goal was to facilitate development of intuitive, problem-oriented views of the patient record using NCCD knowledge bases that would run in any EHR. To do this, we developed a collaboration between the two SHARPs and an NIH center, i2b2. First, we implemented collaborative tools to connect researchers at three institutions. Next, we developed a patient summarization app using the SMART platform and a previously validated NCCD problem-medication linkage knowledge base derived from the National Drug File-Reference Terminology (NDF-RT). Finally, to SMART-enable i2b2, we implemented two new Web service "cells" that expose the SMART application programming interface (API), and we made changes to the Web interface of i2b2 to host a "carousel" of SMART apps. We deployed our SMART-based, NDF-RT-derived patient summarization app in this SMART-i2b2 container. It displays a problem-oriented view of medications and presents a line-graph display of

  19. A collaborative project to improve identification and management of patients with chronic kidney disease in a primary care setting in Greater Manchester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, John; Harvey, Gill; Coleiro, Michelle; Butler, Brook; Barclay, Anna; Gwozdziewicz, Maciek; O'Donoghue, Donal; Hegarty, Janet

    2012-08-01

    Research has demonstrated a knowledge and practice gap in the identification and management of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In 2009, published data showed that general practices in Greater Manchester had a low detection rate for CKD. A 12-month improvement collaborative, supported by an evidence-informed implementation framework and financial incentives. 19 general practices from four primary care trusts within Greater Manchester. Number of recorded patients with CKD on practice registers; percentage of patients on registers achieving nationally agreed blood pressure targets. The collaborative commenced in September 2009 and involved three joint learning sessions, interspersed with practice level rapid improvement cycles, and supported by an implementation team from the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for Greater Manchester. At baseline, the 19 collaborative practices had 4185 patients on their CKD registers. At final data collection in September 2010, this figure had increased by 1324 to 5509. Blood pressure improved from 34% to 74% of patients on practice registers having a recorded blood pressure within recommended guidelines. Evidence-based improvement can be implemented in practice for chronic disease management. A collaborative approach has been successful in enabling teams to test and apply changes to identify patients and improve care. The model has proved to be more successful for some practices, suggesting a need to develop more context-sensitive approaches to implementation and actively manage the factors that influence the success of the collaborative.

  20. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach – The analysis is based on a multiple-case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new...... to the new phenomenon of fashion libraries and does not cover other types of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry (Swap-parties, etc.). Originality/value – The paper is one of the first attempts to examine new business models of collaborative consumption in general and the fashion library...... concept in particular. The study contributes to the discussions of whether and how fashion sharing and collaboration holds promise as a viable business model and as a means to promote sustainability....

  1. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach: The analysis is based on a multiple-­‐‑case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new...... to the new phenomenon of fashion libraries and does not cover other types of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry (Swap-­‐‑parties, etc.). Originality/value: The paper is one of the first attempts to examine new business models of collaborative consumption in general and the fashion library...... concept in particular. The study contributes to the discussions of whether and how fashion sharing and collaboration holds promise as a viable business model and as a means to promote sustainability....

  2. Reducing inequalities in health and access to health care in a rural Indian community: an India-Canada collaborative action research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Slim; Narayana, Delampady; Mohindra, Ks

    2011-11-08

    Inadequate public action in vulnerable communities is a major constraint for the health of poor and marginalized groups in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). The south Indian state of Kerala, known for relatively equitable provision of public resources, is no exception to the marginalization of vulnerable communities. In Kerala, women's lives are constrained by gender-based inequalities and certain indigenous groups are marginalized such that their health and welfare lag behind other social groups. The goal of this socially-engaged, action-research initiative was to reduce social inequalities in access to health care in a rural community. Specific objectives were: 1) design and implement a community-based health insurance scheme to reduce financial barriers to health care, 2) strengthen local governance in monitoring and evidence-based decision-making, and 3) develop an evidence base for appropriate health interventions. Health and social inequities have been masked by Kerala's overall progress. Key findings illustrated large inequalities between different social groups. Particularly disadvantaged are lower-caste women and Paniyas (a marginalized indigenous group), for whom inequalities exist across education, employment status, landholdings, and health. The most vulnerable populations are the least likely to receive state support, which has broader implications for the entire country. A community based health solidarity scheme (SNEHA), under the leadership of local women, was developed and implemented yielding some benefits to health equity in the community-although inclusion of the Paniyas has been a challenge. The Canadian-Indian action research team has worked collaboratively for over a decade. An initial focus on surveys and data analysis has transformed into a focus on socially engaged, participatory action research. Adapting to unanticipated external forces, maintaining a strong team in the rural village, retaining human resources capable of analyzing

  3. Development and assessment of an active strategy for the implementation of a collaborative care approach for depression in primary care (the INDI·i project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Enric; Palao, Diego; López-Cortacans, Germán; Caballero, Antonia; Cardoner, Narcís; Casaus, Pilar; Cavero, Myriam; Monreal, José Antonio; Pérez-Sola, Víctor; Cirera, Miquel; Loren, Maite; Bellerino, Eva; Tomé-Pires, Catarina; Palacios, Laura

    2017-12-13

    Primary care is the principal clinical setting for the management of depression. However, significant shortcomings have been detected in its diagnosis and clinical management, as well as in patient outcomes. We developed the INDI collaborative care model to improve the management of depression in primary care. This intervention has been favorably evaluated in terms of clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness in a clinical trial. Our aim is to bring this intervention from the scientific context into clinical practice. Objective: To test for the feasibility and impact of a strategy for implementing the INDI model for depression in primary care. A quasi-experiment conducted in primary care. Several areas will be established to implement the new program and other, comparable areas will serve as control group. The study constitutes the preliminary phase preceding generalization of the model in the Catalan public healthcare system. The target population of the intervention are patients with major depression. The implementation strategy will also involve healthcare professionals, primary care centers, as well as management departments and the healthcare organization itself in the geographical areas where the study will be conducted: Camp de Tarragona and Vallès Occidental (Catalonia). The INDI model is a program for improving the management of depression involving clinical, instructional, and organizational interventions including the participation of nurses as care managers, the efficacy and efficiency of which has been proven in a clinical trial. We will design an active implementation strategy for this model based on the PARIHS (Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services) framework. Qualitative and quantitative measures will be used to evaluate variables related to the successful implementation of the model: acceptability, utility, penetration, sustainability, and clinical impact. This project tests the transferability of a healthcare intervention

  4. Proliferation Resistance and Safeguards by Design: The Safeguardability Assessment Tool Provided by the INPRO Collaborative Project ''INPRO'' (Proliferation Resistance and Safeguardability Assessment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, E.; Chang, H.-L.; Phillips, J.R.; Listner, C.

    2015-01-01

    Since the INPRO Collaborative Project on Proliferation Resistance and Safeguardability Assessment Tools (PROSA) was launched in 2011, Member State experts have worked with the INPRO Section and the IAEA Department of Safeguards to develop a revised methodology for self-assessment of sustainability in the area of proliferation resistance of a nuclear energy system (NES). With the common understanding that there is ''no proliferation resistance without safeguards'' the revised approach emphasizes the evaluation of a new 'User Requirement' for ''safeguardability'', that combines metrics of effective and efficient implementation of IAEA Safeguards including ''Safeguards-by-Design'' principles. The assessment with safeguardability as the key issue has been devised as a linear process evaluating the NES against a ''Basic Principle'' in the area of proliferation resistance, answering fundamental questions related to safeguards: 1) Do a State's legal commitments, policies and practices provide credible assurance of the exclusively peaceful use of the NES, including a legal basis for verification activities by the IAEA? 2) Does design and operation of the NES facilitate the effective and efficient implementation of IAEA safeguards? To answer those questions, a questionnaire approach has been developed that clearly identifies gaps and weaknesses. Gaps include prospects for improvements and needs for research and development. In this context, the PROSA approach assesses the safeguardability of a NES using a layered ''Evaluation Questionnaire'' that defines Evaluation Parameters (EP), EP-related questions, Illustrative Tests and Screening Questions to present and structure the evidence of findings. An integral part of the assessment process is Safeguards-by-Design, the identification of potential diversion, misuse and concealment strategies (coarse diversion path

  5. Reducing inequalities in health and access to health care in a rural Indian community: an India-Canada collaborative action research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohindra KS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate public action in vulnerable communities is a major constraint for the health of poor and marginalized groups in low and middle-income countries (LMICs. The south Indian state of Kerala, known for relatively equitable provision of public resources, is no exception to the marginalization of vulnerable communities. In Kerala, women’s lives are constrained by gender-based inequalities and certain indigenous groups are marginalized such that their health and welfare lag behind other social groups. The research The goal of this socially-engaged, action-research initiative was to reduce social inequalities in access to health care in a rural community. Specific objectives were: 1 design and implement a community-based health insurance scheme to reduce financial barriers to health care, 2 strengthen local governance in monitoring and evidence-based decision-making, and 3 develop an evidence base for appropriate health interventions. Results and outcomes Health and social inequities have been masked by Kerala’s overall progress. Key findings illustrated large inequalities between different social groups. Particularly disadvantaged are lower-caste women and Paniyas (a marginalized indigenous group, for whom inequalities exist across education, employment status, landholdings, and health. The most vulnerable populations are the least likely to receive state support, which has broader implications for the entire country. A community based health solidarity scheme (SNEHA, under the leadership of local women, was developed and implemented yielding some benefits to health equity in the community—although inclusion of the Paniyas has been a challenge. The partnership The Canadian-Indian action research team has worked collaboratively for over a decade. An initial focus on surveys and data analysis has transformed into a focus on socially engaged, participatory action research. Challenges and successes Adapting to

  6. Monitoring Marcellus: A Case Study of a Collaborative Volunteer Monitoring Project to Document the Impact of Unconventional Shale Gas Extraction on Small Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candie C. Wilderman

    2016-05-01

    the credibility and usefulness of the data. Some lessons learned from this project include: The importance of strong and timely support to volunteers to ensure accurate reporting in real-time; the unique role that citizen scientists can play in a rural landscape where well sites are remote and government oversight is not practical; and the importance of customizing a PPSR operational model to fit the goals and scale of the project. Recommendations for continued collection and analysis of data include: 1 develop and implement an intentional study design to monitor those watersheds that now have baseline data once drilling begins, 2 target watersheds whose characteristics are under-represented in this dataset, 3 consider the analysis of additional parameters and the monitoring of high risk systems, 4 develop a central, user-friendly database for volunteers to submit their own data and receive preliminary analyses, and 5 partner with other volunteer data collectors to collaborate with data analysis and interpretation.

  7. Intercultural Collaboration Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gertsen, Martine Cardel; Søderberg, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to show how narrative methods provide useful tools for international business research. We do this by presenting a study of stories told about the collaboration between a Danish expatriate manager and his Chinese CEO in the Shanghai subsidiary of an MNE. First, we...... to elucidate intercultural collaboration processes by analyzing how each member of a dyad of interacting managers narrates the same chain of events. We show how the narratological concepts of peripeteia and anagnorisis are well suited to identifying focal points in their stories: situations where change...... follows their recognizing new dimensions of their conflicts, eventually furthering their collaboration. We explain how Greimas's actantial model is valuable when mapping differences between and changes in the narrators’ projects, alliances and oppositions in the course of their interaction. Thus, we make...

  8. The collaboration imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidumolu, Ram; Ellison, Jib; Whalen, John; Billman, Erin

    2014-04-01

    Addressing global sustainability challenges--including climate change, resource depletion, and ecosystem loss--is beyond the individual capabilities of even the largest companies. To tackle these threats, and unleash new value, companies and other stakeholders must collaborate in new ways that treat fragile and complex ecosystems as a whole. In this article, the authors draw on cases including the Latin American Water Funds Partnership, the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (led by Nike, Patagonia, and Walmart), and Action to Accelerate Recycling (a partnership between Alcoa, consumer packaged goods companies, and local governments, among others) to describe four new collaboration models that create shared value and address environmental protection across the value stream. Optimal collaborations focus on improving either business processes or outcomes. They start with a small group of key organizations, bring in project management expertise, link self-interest to shared interest, encourage productive competition, create quick wins, and, above all, build and maintain trust.

  9. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 32: A new era in international technical communication: American-Russian collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammia, Madelyn; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Keene, Michael L.; Burger, Robert H.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Until the recent dissolution of the Soviet Union, the Communist Party exerted a strict control of access to and dissemination of scientific and technical information (STI). This article presents models of the Soviet-style information society and the Western-style information society and discusses the effects of centralized governmental control of information on Russian technical communication practices. The effects of political control on technical communication are then used to interpret the results of a survey of Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the time devoted to technical communication, their collaborative writing practices and their attitudes toward collaboration, the kinds of technical documents they produce and use, their views regarding the appropriate content for an undergraduate technical communication course, and their use of computer technology. Finally, the implications of these findings for future collaboration between Russian and U.S. engineers and scientists are examined.

  10. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. XXXII - A new era in international technical communication: American-Russian collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammia, Madelyn; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Keene, Michael L.; Burger, Robert H.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Until the recent dissolution of the Soviet Union, the Communist Party exerted a strict control of access to and dissemination of scientific and technical information. This article presents models of the Soviet-style information society and the Western-style information society and discusses the effects of centralized governmental control of information on Russian technical communication practices. The effects of political control on technical communication are then used to interpret the results of a survey of Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the time devoted to technical communication, their collaborative writing practices and their attitudes toward collaboration, the kinds of technical documents they produce and use, their views regarding the appropriate content for an undergraduate technical communication course, and their use of computer technology. Finally, the implications of these findings for future collaboration between Russian and U.S. engineers and scientists are examined.

  11. Proactive Assessment for Collaboration Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa L. Ju

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a government–academia–industry joint training project that produces Vietnamese midlevel technical managers. To ensure collaboration success, a proactive assessment methodology was developed as a supplement to the conventional project management practices. In the postproject feedback, the funding agencies acknowledged that the project fulfilled its contractual obligations and achieved its objectives. The implementing university was pleased as it broke ground in this type of collaboration in Taiwan. The industrial partners, however, were not so sure about the effectiveness of this collaborative training endeavor because there were many skirmishes between company supervisors and Vietnamese interns caused by the interns’ self-interested perception and expectation. Consequently, a theoretical framework for predicting internship acceptance and preventing unfavorable perceptions was proposed to strengthen the proactive assessment methodology. Collaboration research, funding agencies, academia, and industry could all benefit from this study.

  12. Coordination processes in computer supported collaborative writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanselaar, G.; Erkens, Gijsbert; Jaspers, Jos; Prangsma, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    In the COSAR-project a computer-supported collaborative learning environment enables students to collaborate in writing an argumentative essay. The TC3 groupware environment (TC3: Text Composer, Computer supported and Collaborative) offers access to relevant information sources, a private notepad, a

  13. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    things, de-industrialization processes and post-capitalist forms of production and consumption, postmaterialism, the rise of the third sector and collaborative governance. Addressing that gap, this book explores the character, depth and breadth of these disruptions, the creative opportunities for tourism...... that are emerging from them, and how governments are responding to these new challenges. In doing so, the book provides both theoretical and practical insights into the future of tourism in a world that is, paradoxically, becoming both increasingly collaborative and individualized. Table of Contents Preface 1.The......This book employs an interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral lens to explore the collaborative dynamics that are currently disrupting, re-creating and transforming the production and consumption of tourism. House swapping, ridesharing, voluntourism, couchsurfing, dinner hosting, social enterprise...

  14. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy

  15. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    -organisational continuous improvement of their performance, relative to that of other EMEs. Developing a collaborative improvement relationship between companies is a protracted and complex process and, according to some surveys, the failure rate is as low as one to three. This failure rate is affected by a whole range...... of factors. The research presented in this thesis was aimed at identifying these factors and investigating their interplay and influence on the progress and success of the development of the collaborative improvement. This thesis presents our findings regarding the factors found, their interplay...

  16. Distance collaborations with industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, A.; Swyler, K.

    1998-06-01

    The college industry relationship has been identified as a key policy issue in Engineering Education. Collaborations between academic institutions and the industrial sector have a long history and a bright future. For Engineering and Engineering Technology programs in particular, industry has played a crucial role in many areas including advisement, financial support, and practical training of both faculty and students. Among the most important and intimate interactions are collaborative projects and formal cooperative education arrangements. Most recently, such collaborations have taken on a new dimension, as advances in technology have made possible meaningful technical collaboration at a distance. There are several obvious technology areas that have contributed significantly to this trend. Foremost is the ubiquitous presence of the Internet. Perhaps almost as important are advances in computer based imaging. Because visual images offer a compelling user experience, it affords greater knowledge transfer efficiency than other modes of delivery. Furthermore, the quality of the image appears to have a strongly correlated effect on insight. A good visualization facility offers both a means for communication and a shared information space for the subjects, which are among the essential features of both peer collaboration and distance learning.

  17. Influence of partner diversity on collaborative public R&D project outcomes: a study of application and commercialization of nanotechnologies in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Raesfeld Meijer, Ariane M.; Geurts, Petrus A.T.M.; Jansen, M.; Boshuizen, J.; Lüttge, Regina

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have indicated the importance of public R&D in the transfer and commercialization of nanotechnology. So far, few have focused on university–industry interaction and collaboration performance. In this study, we investigate the impact of technological diversity and value chain

  18. A framing approach to cross-disciplinary research collaboration: experiences from a large-scale research project on adaptive water management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewulf, A.; Francois, G.; Pahl-Wostl, C.; Taillieu, T.

    2007-01-01

    Although cross-disciplinary research collaboration is necessary to achieve a better understanding of how human and natural systems are dynamically linked, it often turns out to be very difficult in practice. We outline a framing approach to cross-disciplinary research that focuses on the different

  19. Future challenges for occupational health services can be prevented by proactive collaboration with the companies using the services: a participatory and reflection project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydell, Marie; Hildingh, Cathrine; Söderbom, Arne; Ziegert, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Background There is clearly a need for research in the field of occupational health service (OHS) for applying new perspectives. Proactive collaboration is needed between the OHSs and the companies. The customers of the companies using the services should be able to safeguard themselves from the health problems caused by the work environment through proactive collaboration with the OHSs. Objective The main purpose of this interdisciplinary study was to explore how the stakeholders reflected to create and agree on core values for future challenges in OHS, as seen from the perspectives of OHS professionals and customer companies. Methodology An action research process was conducted. This study was divided into three phases. In phase I, the data were collected from interviews and diaries of interdisciplinary occupational health professionals (n=12). A focus group that sampled the eight managers of the customer companies was also included. In phase II, a questionnaire was developed with 24 questions focusing on examining the future challenges for OHS. The questionnaire was sent to customer companies (n=116). In phase III, a scoping review was undertaken. Results Three categories emerged from the analysis: “Balancing complex situations” clarified the complexity regarding senior employees; “Working with a proactive approach” indicated the need for working with a new proactive approach supporting sustainable health; and “Collaborate internally and externally” showed good relationships between the customer and the OHS, which is a mutual responsibility to both the partners. Conclusion The results outlined that it is necessary to take action to apply new proactive health promotions, with a focus on workplace health promotion. The results also indicated that interventions for senior employees are of importance. This study was done in collaboration with the stakeholders from the occupational health care service center and the managers from the customer companies

  20. Future challenges for occupational health services can be prevented by proactive collaboration with the companies using the services: a participatory and reflection project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydell, Marie; Hildingh, Cathrine; Söderbom, Arne; Ziegert, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    There is clearly a need for research in the field of occupational health service (OHS) for applying new perspectives. Proactive collaboration is needed between the OHSs and the companies. The customers of the companies using the services should be able to safeguard themselves from the health problems caused by the work environment through proactive collaboration with the OHSs. The main purpose of this interdisciplinary study was to explore how the stakeholders reflected to create and agree on core values for future challenges in OHS, as seen from the perspectives of OHS professionals and customer companies. An action research process was conducted. This study was divided into three phases. In phase I, the data were collected from interviews and diaries of interdisciplinary occupational health professionals (n=12). A focus group that sampled the eight managers of the customer companies was also included. In phase II, a questionnaire was developed with 24 questions focusing on examining the future challenges for OHS. The questionnaire was sent to customer companies (n=116). In phase III, a scoping review was undertaken. Three categories emerged from the analysis: "Balancing complex situations" clarified the complexity regarding senior employees; "Working with a proactive approach" indicated the need for working with a new proactive approach supporting sustainable health; and "Collaborate internally and externally" showed good relationships between the customer and the OHS, which is a mutual responsibility to both the partners. The results outlined that it is necessary to take action to apply new proactive health promotions, with a focus on workplace health promotion. The results also indicated that interventions for senior employees are of importance. This study was done in collaboration with the stakeholders from the occupational health care service center and the managers from the customer companies. The use of a participatory research design, including close