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Sample records for danish neonatal intensive

  1. Nosocomial infection in a Danish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anne L; Reinholdt, Jes; Jensen, Anders Mørup

    2009-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence and identify independent risk factors for nosocomial infections in a Danish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and to compare these findings with international results. METHODS: The study was performed prospectively from January 1, 2005 to December...... 31, 2005 in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen. Specific criteria for blood stream infection and respiratory tract infection adapted for neonates in our ward were worked out. RESULTS: Six hundred and eighty-three patients were included. The overall incidence of nosocomial...... and respiratory tract infection, and central venous catheter and parenteral nutrition risk factors for first time blood stream infection. CONCLUSION: This first prospective study of nosocomial infection in a Danish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit found an overall incidence of 8.8/1000 hospital days, which is low...

  2. First outbreak with MRSA in a Danish neonatal intensive care unit: risk factors and control procedures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicte Grenness Utke Ramsing

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the study was to describe demographic and clinical characteristics and outbreak handling of a large methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU in Denmark June 25(th-August 8(th 2008, and to identify risk factors for MRSA transmission. METHODS: Data were collected retrospectively from medical records and the Danish Neobase database. All MRSA isolates obtained from neonates, relatives and NICU health care workers (HCW as well as environmental cultures were typed. RESULTS: During the 46 day outbreak period, 102 neonates were admitted to the two neonatal wards. Ninety-nine neonates were subsequently sampled, and 32 neonates (32% from 25 families were colonized with MRSA (spa-type t127, SCCmec V, PVL negative. Thirteen family members from 11 of those families (44% and two of 161 HCWs (1% were colonized with the same MRSA. No one was infected. Five environmental cultures were MRSA positive. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (nCPAP treatment (p = 0.006 and Caesarean section (p = 0.016 were independent risk factors for MRSA acquisition, whereas days of exposure to MRSA was a risk factors in the unadjusted analysis (p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: MRSA transmission occurs with high frequency in the NICU during hospitalization with unidentified MRSA neonates. Caesarean section and nCPAP treatment were identified as risk factors for MRSA colonization. The MRSA outbreak was controlled through infection control procedures.

  3. First outbreak with MRSA in a danish neonatal intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsing, Benedicte Grenness Utke; Arpi, Magnus; Andersen, Erik Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe demographic and clinical characteristics and outbreak handling of a large methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Denmark June 25(th)-August 8(th) 2008, and to identify risk factors for MRSA...

  4. Retinopathy of prematurity in a Danish neonatal intensive care unit, 1985-1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arrøe, M; Peitersen, Birgit

    1993-01-01

    , or mode of delivery. Significant difference was found in gestational age, asphyxia, intensive treatment and complications. Particularly infants with ROP born with gestational age 27 to 29 weeks needed prolonged and more intensive treatment than infants without ROP. Infants with ROP had more frequently...

  5. The Danish Intensive Care Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Møller, Morten Hylander; Nielsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. STUDY POPULATION: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID) was established in 2007...... and includes virtually all ICU admissions in Denmark since 2005. The DID obtains data from the Danish National Registry of Patients, with complete follow-up through the Danish Civil Registration System. MAIN VARIABLES: For each ICU admission, the DID includes data on the date and time of ICU admission, type...

  6. Retinopathy of prematurity: review of a seven-year period in a Danish neonatal intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arrøe, M; Peitersen, Birgit

    1994-01-01

    . Significant differences were found between infants with and without ROP for: birth weight, gestational age, Apgar score at 1 min, resuscitation, ventilator treatment, duration of supplementary oxygen, severe complications in the neonatal period and sequels from the central nervous system. Statistical analysis...

  7. The Danish Intensive Care Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiansen CF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Christian Fynbo Christiansen,1 Morten Hylander Møller,2 Henrik Nielsen,1 Steffen Christensen3 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 2Department of Intensive Care 4131, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 3Department of Intensive Care, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Aim of database: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. Study population: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID was established in 2007 and includes virtually all ICU admissions in Denmark since 2005. The DID obtains data from the Danish National Registry of Patients, with complete follow-up through the Danish Civil Registration System. Main variables: For each ICU admission, the DID includes data on the date and time of ICU admission, type of admission, organ supportive treatments, date and time of discharge, status at discharge, and mortality up to 90 days after admission. Descriptive variables include age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index score, and, since 2010, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS II. The variables are recorded with 90%–100% completeness in the recent years, except for SAPS II score, which is 73%–76% complete. The DID currently includes five quality indicators. Process indicators include out-of-hour discharge and transfer to other ICUs for capacity reasons. Outcome indicators include ICU readmission within 48 hours and standardized mortality ratios for death within 30 days after admission using case-mix adjustment (initially using age, sex, and comorbidity level, and, since 2013, using SAPS II for all patients and for patients with septic shock. Descriptive data: The DID currently includes 335,564 ICU admissions during 2005–2015 (average 31,958 ICU admissions per year. Conclusion: The DID provides a

  8. Predictors of early neonatal mortality at a neonatal intensive care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    Predictors of early neonatal mortality at a neonatal intensive care unit of a specialized referral teaching hospital in. Ethiopia. Bogale Worku1, Assaye Kassie2, Amha Mekasha1, Birkneh Tilahun1, Alemayehu Worku3. Abstract. Background: The larger fraction of infant mortality is that of neonatal; and early neonatal death is ...

  9. Breastfeeding support in neonatal intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Bojesen, Susanne Norby; Kronborg, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    parents to stay overnight; 2 units had short restrictions on parents' presence. Five NICUs had integrated postpartum care for mothers. Breastfeeding policies, written guidelines, and systematic breastfeeding training for the staff were common in most NICUs. Seventeen NICUs recommended starting breast milk......-feeding was restricted. Conclusions: The Danish NICUs described the support of breastfeeding as a high priority, which was reflected in the recommended policies for breast milk pumping, skin-to-skin contact, and the parents' presence in the NICU, as well as in the restricted use of bottle-feeding. However, support......Background: The incidence of breastfeeding of preterm infants is affected by the support provided at the hospital and in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). However, policies and guidelines promoting breastfeeding vary both nationally and internationally. Objectives: The aim of this survey...

  10. Antimicrobial therapy in neonatal intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Tzialla, C.; Borghesi, A.; Serra, G.; Stronati, M.; Corsello, G.

    2015-01-01

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and in industrialized countries about 1% of neonates are exposed to antibiotic therapy. Sepsis has often nonspecific signs and symptoms and empiric antimicrobial therapy is promptly initiated in high risk of sepsis or symptomatic infants. However continued us...

  11. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  12. Digital radiography in intensive neonatal care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlo, L.; Bighi, S.; Cervi, P.N.; Lupi, L.; Vita, G.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report their experience with the routinary use of a computerized digital radiography system in Intensive Neonatal Care department. The conventional screen-film system is replaced by photostimulable imaging plates, which are scanned during processing by a laser providing the digital image. The latter is subsequently processable on high-resolution monitors. Over a 6-month period 86 examinations were performed with this method in Intensive Neonatal Care; good technical results were obtained. The use of digital radiography in intensive neonatal care is extremely promising for it allows high-quality images to be obtained, and radiation dose and number of acquisitions to be reduced. Finally, work stations allow both selective visualization of different body structures and their magnification

  13. Microbes causing severe neonatal septicemia in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Khashana, Abdelmoneim

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the most challenging neonatal disease in developing countries despite the progress in the neonatal management. The aim of the study is to demonstrate the most common organisms causing severe neonatal sepsis in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit. The study conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit (ICU) unit of pediatric department in Suez Canal University Hospital in the period from December 2013 to November 2014.Blood cultures showed the growth of Escherichia coli...

  14. Arrhythmia in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrawi, Nadia; Hegazy, Ranya A; Tokovic, Edisa; Lotfy, Wael; Mahmoud, Fadia; Aly, Hany

    2009-04-01

    A random sample of 457 neonates was prospectively studied in order to identify the incidence, common types, and risk factors for arrhythmias in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A 12-lead EKG was studied in all neonates (n = 457). A total of 139 Holter studies was done in every fourth baby with a normal EKG (n = 100) and in all babies with an abnormal EKG (n = 39). Of the 100 infants who were thought to be arrhythmia-free by EKG, nine infants demonstrated an arrhythmia on Holter studies. When we correlated screening results with maternal, obstetrical, and neonatal risk factors; arrhythmias were significantly associated with male gender, more mature gestational age, lower glucose levels, maternal smoking, high umbilical artery lines, and the use of the nebulized beta-2 adrenergic treatment, whereas umbilical venous lines and dopamine infusion did not relate to arrhythmia. We conclude that arrhythmias are more common in the NICU than in the general neonatal population. Compared to Holter monitoring, the sensitivity of the EKG was only 89%.

  15. Ethical challenges in neonatal intensive care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandås, Maria; Fredriksen, Sven-Tore D

    2015-12-01

    Neonatal nurses report a great deal of ethical challenges in their everyday work. Seemingly trivial everyday choices nurses make are no more value-neutral than life-and-death choices. Everyday ethical challenges should also be recognized as ethical dilemmas in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to investigate which types of ethical challenges neonatal nurses experience in their day-to-day care for critically ill newborns. Data were collected through semi-structured qualitative in-depth interviews. Phenomenological-hermeneutic analysis was applied to interpret the data. Six nurses from neonatal intensive care units at two Norwegian hospitals were interviewed on-site. The study is designed to comply with Ethical Guidelines for Nursing Research in the Nordic Countries and the Helsinki declaration. Findings suggest that nurses experience a diverse range of everyday ethical challenges related to challenging interactions with parents and colleagues, emotional strain, protecting the vulnerable infant, finding the balance between sensitivity and authority, ensuring continuity of treatment, and miscommunication and professional disagreement. A major finding in this study is how different agents involved in caring for the newborn experience their realities differently. When these realities collide, ethical challenges arise. Findings suggest that acting in the best interests of the child becomes more difficult in situations involving many agents with different perceptions of reality. The study presents new aspects which increases knowledge and understanding of the reality of nursing in a neonatal intensive care unit, while also demanding increased research in this field of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Breastfeeding support in neonatal intensive care: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Bojesen, Susanne Norby; Kronborg, Hanne; Hallström, Inger

    2012-08-01

    The incidence of breastfeeding of preterm infants is affected by the support provided at the hospital and in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). However, policies and guidelines promoting breastfeeding vary both nationally and internationally. The aim of this survey was to describe breastfeeding support in Danish NICUs, where approximately 98% of mothers initiate lactation. A national survey of all 19 Danish NICUs was conducted in 2009. Four NICUs were at designated Baby-Friendly hospitals, and 5 had a lactation consultant. In all NICUs, it was possible for some parents to stay overnight; 2 units had short restrictions on parents' presence. Five NICUs had integrated postpartum care for mothers. Breastfeeding policies, written guidelines, and systematic breastfeeding training for the staff were common in most NICUs. Seventeen NICUs recommended starting breast milk expression within 6 hours after birth, and mothers were encouraged to double pump. Most NICUs aimed to initiate skin-to-skin contact the first time the parents were in the NICU, and daily skin-to-skin contact was estimated to last for 2-4 hours in 63% and 4-8 hours in 37% of the units. The use of bottle-feeding was restricted. The Danish NICUs described the support of breastfeeding as a high priority, which was reflected in the recommended policies for breast milk pumping, skin-to-skin contact, and the parents' presence in the NICU, as well as in the restricted use of bottle-feeding. However, support varied between units, and not all units supported optimal breastfeeding.

  17. Hospital Infections in Neonatal Intensive Therapy Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cancio

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hospital infections are the most frequent and important complications occurring in hospitalized patients. The concern is greater when the affected hospital infection are neonates admitted to intensive care units where the risk increases due to factors such as prematurity, low birth weight, types of procedures adopted and susceptibility due to their immature immune system. The prevention and control measures involve detection of hospital infection, development of norms of standardization, collaboration with the training of all health professionals, achieving control of antibiotic prescription and technical support for hospital administration. 

  18. Guidelines for Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy (PDT) from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Guldager, Henrik; Rewers, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is a common procedure in intensive care. This guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM) describes indications and contraindications, timing, complications...... compared to surgical tracheostomy, anaesthesia and technique, decannulation strategy, as well as training and education....

  19. [Hospital infections in neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durisić, Jasna; Marković-Denić, Ljiljana; Ilić, Slobodanka; Ramadani, Ruzdi

    2005-01-01

    Sick newborn babies in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) are at increased risk for hospital-acquired infections (HI). The aim of our study was to determine the incidence and localization of neonatal hospital infections in NICU. A prospective, six-month study was carried out in a NICU. All patients hospitalized in NICU longer then 48 hours were examined according to their basic descriptive-epidemiological characteristics and the incidence of all hospital-acquired infections (diagnosed using CDC criteria) were accounted for. The incidence of patients with HI was 46.1% while the incidence of HI was 57.2%. On the basis of patients' records in the NICU, the incidence of HI was 43.9 per 1000 patient-hospital days. Patients with HI were hospitalized significantly longer in NICU than patients without HI (t=9.2 DF=267 p<0.001). In terms of localization of HI, a large number of patients had pneumonia--74.7% (115/154), followed by sepsis (37/154), while two had meningitis. This study suggests that it is necessary to maintain continuous surveillance of HI in NICU, as well as infection control measures, which are also very beneficial.

  20. Safety of milrinone use in neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Samiee-Zafarghandy; S.R. Raman (Sudha R.); J.N. van den Anker (John); K. McHutchison (Kerstin); C.P. Hornik; R.H. Clark; P.B. Smith; D.K. Benjamin (Daniel K.); K. Berezny (Katherine); J. Barrett (Jeffrey); E.V. Capparelli (Edmund); M. Cohen-Wolkowiez (Michael); G.L. Kearns (Greg); M. Laughon (Matthew); A. Muelenaer (Andre); T. Michael O'Shea; I.M. Paul (Ian M.); K. Wade (Kelly); T.J. Walsh (Thomas J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Milrinone use in the neonatal intensive care unit has increased over the last 10. years despite a paucity of published safety data in infants. We sought to determine the safety of milrinone therapy among infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. Methods: We conducted a

  1. Probiotics in neonatal intensive care - back to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Girish; Rao, Shripada; Patole, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Survival of extremely preterm and critically ill neonates has improved significantly over the last few decades following advances in neonatal intensive care. These include antenatal glucocorticoids, surfactant, continuous positive airway pressure support, advanced gentle modes of ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide. Probiotic supplementation is a recent significant milestone in the history of neonatal intensive care. Very few, if any, interventions match the ability of probiotics to significantly reduce the risk of death and definite necrotising enterocolitis while facilitating enteral feeds in high-risk preterm neonates. Probiotics also have a potential to benefit neonates with surgical conditions with significant gastrointestinal morbidity. Current evidence for the benefits of probiotic supplementation for neonates in an intensive care unit is reviewed. The mechanisms for the benefits of probiotics in this population are discussed, and guidelines for clinicians are provided in the context of the regulatory framework in Australia. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  2. Radiation doses to neonates requiring intensive care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.; Dellagrammaticas, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    Radiological investigations have become accepted as an important part of the range of facilities required to support severely ill newborn babies. Since the infants are so small, many of the examinations are virtually ''whole-body'' irradiations and it was thought that the total doses received might be appreciable. A group of such babies admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Sheffield over a six-month period have been studied. X-ray exposure factors used for each examination have been noted and total skin, gonad and bone marrow doses calculated, supplemented by measurements on phantoms. It is concluded that in most cases doses received are of the same order as those received over the same period from natural background radiation and probably less than those received from prenatal obstetric radiography, so that the additional risks from the diagnostic exposure are small. The highest doses are received in CT scans and barium examinations and it is recommended that the need for these should be carefully considered. (author)

  3. Empowerment of parents in the neonatal intensive care unit by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parents of infants who are admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) need to be empowered to improve bonding, attachment and care-giving skills. Neonatal nurses play a critical role in the empowerment of such parents, but often find it difficult due to a lack of clarity on how it has to be done. A qualitative contextual ...

  4. Study of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia in Neonatal Intensive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), over a period of 1 year and who required mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours were enrolled consecutively into the study. Diagnosis of VAP was made by the guidelines given by National Nosocomial infection Surveillance System (NNIS, 1996).

  5. Birth Tourism and Neonatal Intensive Care: A Children's Hospital Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhael, Michel; Cleary, John P; Dhar, Vijay; Chen, Yanjun; Nguyen, Danh V; Chang, Anthony C

    2016-12-01

    Objective  The aim of this article is to examine characteristics of birth tourism (BT) neonates admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods  This was a retrospective review over 3 years; BT cases were identified, and relevant perinatal, medical, social, and financial data were collected and compared with 100 randomly selected non-birth tourism neonates. Results  A total of 46 BT neonates were identified. They were more likely to be born to older women (34 vs. 29 years; p  impacts on families, health care system, and society. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Communication with parents in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzalesi, Marcello; Aite, Lucia

    2011-10-01

    The psycho-relational problems in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) are complex and multifaceted and have only recently been properly addressed. Some specific factors make communication in NICU particularly problematic; the baby's clinical condition, the emotional and working conditions of the medical staff, the emotional state of the parents and the setting of the NICU and the interaction of multiple professional figures with the parents. The purpose of communication in NICUs is not only to inform parents of their child's clinical condition; the medical and nursing staff must also educate and guide parents so that they can actively participate in caring for their child and become true "partners" with the medical team in the decision-making process. Furthermore, the staff must also use their communication skills to understand and contain the anxieties and emotions of parents, supporting and comforting them through the most critical moments of their child's illness and possibly even bereavement. Given the number and complexity of the interpersonal exchanges that take place in the NICU, the risk of misunderstanding, misinterpretation and conflict is high. One could say that the interpersonal aspect is an area where the risk of iatrogenesis is elevated. It is recognized that poor staff-family interactions not only reflect negatively on the baby's care and are a source of distress and discontent for the parents, but are also a major cause of medico-legal litigation and increase the incidence of "burnout". Therefore, specific training of the staff in communication is essential if the optimal results, obtained through modern technology, are not to be invalidated.

  7. Nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2012-08-24

    Aug 24, 2012 ... hospitalization, as well as increased cost of treatment in both developed and resource-poor countries.2 .... searchers- who conducted logistic regression analysis of identified risk factors associated with ... A historical perspective of the epidemiology of patho- gens responsible for neonatal nosocomial ...

  8. Prescribing errors in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Machado,Ana Paula Cezar; Tomich,Catharina Somerlate Franco; Osme,Simone Franco; Ferreira,Daniela Marques de Lima Mota; Mendonça,Maria Angélica Oliveira; Pinto,Rogério Melo Costa; Penha-Silva,Nilson; Abdallah,Vânia Olivetti Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pediatric patients, especially those admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (ICU), are highly vulnerable to medication errors. This study aimed to measure the prescription error rate in a university hospital neonatal ICU and to identify susceptible patients, types of errors, and the medicines involved. The variables related to medicines prescribed were compared to the Neofax prescription protocol. The study enrolled 150 newborns and analyzed 489 prescription order forms, with 1...

  9. Neonatal doses from X ray examinations by birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, K.; Akahane, K.; Aota, T.; Hada, M.; Takano, Y.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and type of X ray examinations performed on neonates classified according to their birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In this study, the radiology records of 2408 neonates who were admitted to the NICU of Oita Prefectural Hospital between January 1994 and September 1999 were investigated. This study revealed that the neonates with earlier gestational ages and lower birth weights required longer NICU stays and more frequent X ray examinations made using a mobile X ray unit. The average number of X ray examinations performed on neonates of less than 750 g birth weight was 26 films per neonate. In regard to computed tomography and fluoroscopy, no significant relationship was found between the birth weight and number of X rays. This study revealed that the entrance-surface dose per neonate was dependent upon the birth weight, while the maximum dose was not dependent upon the birth weight. The average neonatal dose in the NICU was predominantly from computed tomography and fluoroscopy. The individual dose varied widely among neonates. (author)

  10. Neonatal doses from X ray examinations by birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, K.; Akahane, K.; Aota, T.; Hada, M.; Takano, Y.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and type of X ray examinations performed on neonates classified according to their birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In this study, the radiology records of 2408 neonates who were admitted to the NICU of Oita Prefectural Hospital between January 1994 and September 1999 were investigated. This study revealed that the neonates with earlier gestational ages and lower birth weights required longer NICU stays and more frequent X ray examinations made using a mobile X ray unit. The average number of X ray examinations performed on neonates of less than 750 g birth weight was 26 films per neonate. In regard to computed tomography and fluoroscopy, no significant relationship was found between the birth weight and number of X rays. This study revealed that the entrance-surface dose per neonate was dependent upon the birth weight, while the maximum dose was not dependent upon the birth weight. The average neonatal dose in the NICU was predominantly from computed tomography and fluoroscopy. The individual dose varied widely among neonates. (author)

  11. [Sedation and analgesia practices among Spanish neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Alvarez, A; Carbajal, R; Courtois, E; Pertega-Diaz, S; Muñiz-Garcia, J; Anand, K J S

    2015-08-01

    Pain management and sedation is a priority in neonatal intensive care units. A study was designed with the aim of determining current clinical practice as regards sedation and analgesia in neonatal intensive care units in Spain, as well as to identify factors associated with the use of sedative and analgesic drugs. A multicenter, observational, longitudinal and prospective study. Thirty neonatal units participated and included 468 neonates. Of these, 198 (42,3%) received sedatives or analgesics. A total of 19 different drugs were used during the study period, and the most used was fentanyl. Only fentanyl, midazolam, morphine and paracetamol were used in at least 20% of the neonates who received sedatives and/or analgesics. In infusions, 14 different drug prescriptions were used, with the most frequent being fentanyl and the combination of fentanyl and midazolam. The variables associated with receiving sedation and/or analgesia were, to have required invasive ventilation (P3 (P=.023; OR=2.26), the existence of pain evaluation guides in the unit (Pneonates admitted to intensive care units receive sedatives or analgesics. There is significant variation between Spanish neonatal units as regards sedation and analgesia prescribing. Our results provide evidence on the "state of the art", and could serve as the basis of preparing clinical practice guidelines at a national level. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Nursing in neonatal intensive care: the look of the families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Gramazio Soares

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Exploratory, qualitative and descriptive study aimed at identifying the perception of the Neonatal Nursing of mothers and / or parents of newborns in intensive care. Data were collected from May to July/2012, with seven couples of parents and two mothers of neonates hospitalized in intensive care, through semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed from categories. The results showed that parents see the nurse as responsible for the health of humanized night-watch; perceive nursing as a substitute for maternal care; relate negative feelings about the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and perceive the technical skill as a care factor. Despite the short contact of parents with nursing at the venue of the study, it was possible that parents recognize the figure of the nurse emphasize the humanization of care, but do not realize managerial skills and use of scientific knowledge in nursing practice.

  13. Nursing staff requirements for neonatal intensive care.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, S; Whelan, A; Weindling, A M; Cooke, R W

    1993-01-01

    A study to estimate the number of nursing staff required for neonatal nursing was undertaken. Certain nursing tasks, such as transporting any infant, caring for the dying infant, and looking after the very unstable infant required continuous attention by one nurse (5.5 whole time equivalent (wte) nurses for each cot). The stable ventilated infant required 10.5 nursing hours each day-that is, 2.4 wte/cot. Infants with intravenous infusions, but not ventilated, required only slightly less nursi...

  14. Identifying futility in a neonatal intensive care unit setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, Shabih; Nair, Arun K; Pai, Mangalore G; Al-Khusaiby, Saleh M

    2005-06-01

    Caring for infants born with lesions that are either incompatible with life or conditions that will not allow meaningful survival is an ethical dilemma. Provision of intensive ineffective care to these infants may be labeled as "futile care" which can consume a major proportion of total hospital expenditure. We conducted the present study to look at the extent of futility in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) setting. All neonates with lesion either incompatible with life or conditions that will not allow meaningful survival admitted during April 2003 to September 2003 in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Royal Hospital, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman, were reviewed to identify futility. Bed days were used as surrogate for extent of futile care and resource consumption. A total of 355 infants were admitted to the NICU during the study period representing 4452 consecutive patient bed days. Twenty-five infants fulfilled the criteria of futility. Total length of stay of futile group was 317 (7.1%) days as compared to 4153 (92.8%) days in the non-futile group. The bed occupancy for futile care cases was less than 8% of all the NICU beds suggesting only a small proportion of resource consumption. Based on this, expecting cost savings from further limiting futile care in neonates is not warranted and is negligible. Ethically, we are assured that the majority of the care provided to our sick neonates are appropriate.

  15. Improved nurse-parent communication in neonatal intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Janne; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Egerod, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and adjust systematic implementation of guided family-centred care in a neonatal intensive care unit. BACKGROUND: Family-centred care is valued in neonatal intensive care units internationally, but innovative strategies are needed to realise the principles. Guided...... of a busy neonatal care unit. Promoting practice uptake was initially underestimated, but nurse guided family-centred care training was improved by increasing the visibility of the study in the unit, demonstrating intervention progress to the nurses and assuring a sense of ownership among nurse leaders...... family-centred care was developed to facilitate person-centred communication by bridging the gap between theory and practice in family-centred care. Main mechanisms of guided family-centred care are structured dialogue, reflection and person-centred communication. DESIGN: Qualitative and quantitative...

  16. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units regional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Abril, A.; Terrón, A.; Boschi, C.; Gómez, M.

    2007-11-01

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed.

  17. A danish national cohort study on neonatal outcome in singleton pregnancies with placenta previa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Lone N; Pinborg, Anja; Lidegaard, Ojvind

    2012-01-01

    . Main outcome measures. Gestational age, birthweight, Apgar score after 5min, stillbirth, neonatal mortality and admittance to neonatal intensive care unit. Results. The incidence of placenta previa in Denmark was 0.54% in 2006. Neonates born after pregnancies with placenta previa had a higher risk...... of being born at a gestational age below 37 weeks (OR 8.6; 95% CI 7.5-9.9), having Apgar score =7 at 5 min (OR 2.7; 95% CI 2.0-3.7), being transferred to neonatal intensive care unit (OR 4.3; 95% CI 3.8-4.9) and for stillbirth and neonatal mortality combined (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.1-3.0), compared to neonates...... born in pregnancies without placenta previa. No increased risk of being small-for-gestational age was found (OR 1.0; 95% CI 1.0-1.2). Conclusion. When adjusting for confounders neonates born after pregnancies with placenta previa had a significantly higher risk of being born preterm, having a low Apgar...

  18. Physical Therapy Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eilish; Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these interventions is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  19. Neonatal intensive care unit: Reservoirs of Nosocomial pathogens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvement in the care and treatment of neonates had contributed to their increased survival. Nosocomial infection remains an important problem in intensive care units. Hospital wards had been shown to act as reservoirs of pathogenic microorganisms associated with infection. To assess the prevalence of pathogenic ...

  20. Economic implications of neonatal intensive care unit collaborative quality improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogowski, JA; Horbar, JD; Plsek, PE; Baker, LS; Deterding, J; Edwards, WH; Hocker, J; Kantak, AD; Lewallen, P; Lewis, W; Lewit, E; McCarroll, CJ; Mujsce, D; Payne, NR; Shiono, P; Soll, RF; Leahy, K

    Objective. To make measurable improvements in the quality and cost of neonatal intensive care using a multidisciplinary collaborative quality improvement model. Design. Interventional study. Data on treatment costs were collected for infants with birth weight 501 to 1500 g for the period of January

  1. Mothers of Pre-Term Infants in Neonate Intensive Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this study, eight mothers of pre-term infants under the care of nursing staff and neonatologists in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Children's Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, were observed and interviewed about their birth experience and their images of themselves as mothers during their stay. Patterns and themes in the…

  2. Neonatal anthropometrics and correlation to childhood obesity--data from the Danish Children's Obesity Clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Bille, Dorthe Sadowa; Nässlund, Ida

    2013-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Recent evidence has demonstrated the prenatal initiation of childhood obesity as epidemiological studies and animal studies have illustrated the effect of the intrauterine milieu for subsequent development of childhood obesity. This study investigates the relationship between severe...... childhood obesity and the preceding in utero conditions expressed by birth weight and birth length, birth-weight-for-gestational-age and neonatal ponderal index in a Danish cohort of 1,171 severely obese children (median age 11.48 years, range 3.13 to 17.98 years) with a mean body mass index...... that the prenatal period can be considered as a potential window of opportunity for prevention of childhood overweight and obesity and anthropological measurements may in theory be used to help identify neonates at high risk for developing childhood obesity....

  3. Acinetobacter meningitis: acquired infection in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, M E; Hart, C A

    1982-01-01

    A cluster of 4 cases of meningitis due to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus var anitratus occurred during a 5-day period in a neonatal intensive care unit. Three of the infants were preterm and all had a history of other medical problems. Initiation of intravenous therapy with carbenicillin was accompanied by clinical recovery and a bacteriological cure. Intensive bacteriological investigation failed to show a common source for the infections.

  4. Causes of Neonatal Mortality in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Taleghani Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hossein Zeinalzadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal survival is one of the most important challenges today. Over 99% of neonatal mortalities occur in the developing countries, and epidemiologic studies emphasize on this issue in the developed countries, as well. In this study, we attempted to investigate the causes of neonatal mortality in Taleghani Hospital, Tabriz, Iran.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we studied causes of neonatal mortality in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of Taleghani Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, during 2013-2014. Data collection was performed by the head nurse and treating physician using a pre-designed questionnaire. Most of the data were extracted from the neonatal records. Information regarding maternal underlying diseases and health care during pregnancy was extracted from mothers' records.Results: A total of 891 neonates were admitted to NICU of Taleghani Hospital of Tabriz, Iran, during 2013-2014, 68 (7.5% of whom died. Among these cases, 37 (%54.4 were male, 29 (29.4% were extremely low birth weight, and 16 (23.5% weighed more than 2.5 kg. The main causes of mortality were congenital anomalies (35.3%, prematurity (26.5%, and sepsis (10.3%, respectively.Conclusion: Congenital anomaly is the most common cause of mortality, and the pattern of death is changing from preventable diseases to unavoidable mortalities

  5. Acute kidney injury in neonatal intensive care: Medicines involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safina, A I; Daminova, M A; Abdullina, G A

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in neonates in the intensive care units and neonatal intensive care (NICU) according Plotz et al. ranges from 8% to 22% [3]. According to Andreoli, neonatal death due to AKI in NICU amounts up to 10-61% [1]. It should be in the reasons of AKI emphasize.The role of certain drugs, which are widely used in modern neonatology: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antibiotics (aminoglycosides, glycopeptides, carbapenems, 3rd generation cephalosporins), furosemide, enalapril, in contributing to AKI should be emphasized [2]. To identify risk factors for acute kidney injury in neonates in intensive care units and intensive care. We performed a prospective observational case-control study of full-term newborns who were treated in the intensive care unit and neonatal intensive care of the "Children's city hospital №1" Kazan and NICU №3 "Children's Republican Clinical Hospital" in 2011-2014 years.The study included 86 term infants in critical condition, who were hospitalized to the NICU on the first days of life, - the main group. The main criterion of AKI in neonates according to neonatal AKIN classification (2011) is a serum creatinine concentration ≥1.5 mg/dL. We subdivided the main group into two subgroups:subgroup I, AKI+ consisted of 12 term infants in critical condition with the serum creatinine level ≥ 1,5 mg/dL at the age of not younger than 48 hours after birth, which was 14% of all full-term newborns who were at the NICU;subgroup II, AKI- consisted of 74 term infants in critical condition with the serum creatinine level arithmetic means (M) with, standard deviation (σ) and standard error of the mean (m) according to standard formulas. All children were admitted to primary and emergency care with subsequent transfer to the NICU at 1-2 days of life and further treatment in the department of pathology of newborns (DPN). The duration of hospitalization of infants at the NICU for the main group averaged 5,9

  6. Danish Guidelines 2015 for percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy in the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Guldager, Henrik; Rewers, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is a common procedure in intensive care. This updated Danish national guideline describes indications, contraindications and complications, and gives recommendations for timing, anaesthesia, and technique, use of fibre bronchoscopy and ultrasound guidance...

  7. End of life in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Moura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Death at the beginning of life is tragic but not uncommon in neonatal intensive care units. In Portugal, few studies have examined the circumstances surrounding the final moments of neonates. We evaluated the care given to neonates and their families in terminal situations and the changes that had occurred one decade later. DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed 256 charts in a retrospective chart review of neonatal deaths between two periods (1992-1995 and 2002-2005 in a level III neonatal intensive care unit. RESULTS: Our results show differences in the care of dying infants between the two periods. The analysis of the 2002-2005 cohort four years revealed more withholding and withdrawing of therapeutic activities and more effective pain and distress relief; however, on the final day of life, 95.7% of the infants received invasive ventilatory support, 76.3% received antibiotics, 58.1% received inotropics, and 25.8% received no opioid or sedative administration. The 2002-2005 cohort had more spiritual advisor solicitation, a higher number of relatives with permission to freely visit and more clinical meetings with neonatologists. Interventions by parents, healthcare providers and ethics committees during decision-making were not documented in any of the charts. Only eight written orders regarding therapeutic limitations and the adoption of palliative care were documented; seven (87.5% were from the 2002-2005 cohort. Parental presence during death was more frequent in the latter four years (2002-2005 cohort, but only 21.5% of the parents wanted to be present at that moment. CONCLUSION: Despite an increase in the withholding and withdrawing of therapeutic activities and improvements in pain management and family support, many neonates still receive curative and aggressive practices at the end of life.

  8. Conflicts of conscience in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Natalie J; Austin, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Limited knowledge of the experiences of conflicts of conscience found in nursing literature. To explore the individual experiences of a conflict of conscience for neonatal nurses in Alberta. Interpretive description was selected to help situate the findings in a meaningful clinical context. Participants and research context: Five interviews with neonatal nurses working in Neonatal Intensive Care Units throughout Alberta. Ethical consideration: Ethics approval from the Health Research Ethics Board at the University of Alberta. Three common themes emerged from the interviews: the unforgettable conflict with pain and suffering, finding the nurse's voice, and the unique proximity of nurses. The nurses described a conflict of conscience when the neonate in their care experienced undermanaged pain and unnecessary suffering. During these experiences, they felt guilty, sad, hopeless, and powerless when they were unable to follow their conscience. Informal ways to follow their conscience were employed before declaration of conscientious objection was considered. This study highlights the vital importance of respecting a conflict of conscience to maintain the moral integrity of neonatal nurses and exposes the complexities of conscientious objection.

  9. Pain management of neonatal intensive care units in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Mio; Yokoo, Kyoko

    2013-04-01

    To describe current neonatal pain management and individual and organizational factors that can improve neonatal pain practice from the viewpoints of both head nurses and head neonatologists in Japan. An anonymous questionnaire was sent to general perinatal maternal and child medical centres that had level 3 units across Japan. A total of 61 of 89 head nurses and 54 of 89 head neonatologists replied. The responses of head nurses and head neonatologists were almost the same. More than 60% of units (head nurses, 65%; head neonatologists, 61%) did not use pain scales, and about 63% units (both head nurses and head neonatologists) had no rules for health care professionals on the best methods for implementing pain relief for painful diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Only 17% of head nurses and 24% of head neonatologists considered that nurses and physicians in their units collaborated in pain management, and units (both head nurses and head neonatologists) had written guidelines for their unit on neonatal pain management. This study suggested that Japanese neonatal intensive care units need national guidelines for pain management, and these might improve collaboration between nurses and physicians in minimizing neonatal pain. © 2013 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  10. Prevention of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Paolo; De Luca, Daniele; Stronati, Mauro; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Ruffinazzi, Giulia; Luparia, Martina; Tavella, Elena; Boano, Elena; Castagnola, Elio; Mostert, Michael; Farina, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes a huge burden of morbidity and mortality and includes bloodstream, urine, cerebrospinal, peritoneal, and lung infections as well as infections starting from burns and wounds, or from any other usually sterile sites. It is associated with cytokine - and biomediator-induced disorders of respiratory, hemodynamic, and metabolic processes. Neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit feature many specific risk factors for bacterial and fungal sepsis. Loss of gut commensals such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli spp., as occurs with prolonged antibiotic treatments, delayed enteral feeding, or nursing in incubators, translates into proliferation of pathogenic microflora and abnormal gut colonization. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment do not protect septic neonates form the risk of late neurodevelopmental impairment in the survivors. Thus prevention of bacterial and fungal infection is crucial in these settings of unique patients. In this view, improving neonatal management is a key step, and this includes promotion of breast-feeding and hygiene measures, adoption of a cautious central venous catheter policy, enhancement of the enteric microbiota composition with the supplementation of probiotics, and medical stewardship concerning H2 blockers with restriction of their use. Additional measures may include the use of lactoferrin, fluconazole, and nystatin and specific measures to prevent ventilator associated pneumonia. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Parents' views about infant pain in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Linda S; Allen, Alison; Cox, Susanne; Winter, Ira

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe parents' perceptions and feelings about their infant's pain experience and pain care in the neonatal intensive care unit. Thematic content analysis was used to encode the qualitative information contained in parents' written comments on a questionnaire about their views on infant pain and pain care. The questionnaire was completed by 257 parents from 9 neonatal units in the United Kingdom (n = 196) and 2 neonatal units in the United States (n = 61). Parents' comments indicated that they saw medical procedures as the major source of their infant's pain, wanted more information, and generally desired more involvement in this aspect of their infant's care. Parents' comments indicated that their infant's pain affected them emotionally and that they worried about their future relationship with their infant. Parents also articulated specific ways in which health care professionals could assist them and their infants in coping with neonatal intensive care unit-related pain. The findings from this study expand knowledge about how parents understand and respond to the difficult situation in which their newborn infant is subjected to essential but painful procedures. The findings provide direction for research and clinical practice interventions aimed at: 1) helping parents to gain knowledge and correct their misperceptions; 2) engaging parents in meaningful dialog about their concerns and preferences for involvement; and 3) helping parents to develop effective coping strategies to reduce psychologic distress related to their infant's pain.

  12. Determination of Noise Level and Its Sources in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Neonatal Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Jahangir Blourchian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Neonatal intensive care units (NICU different sound intensities and frequencies are produced from different sources, which may exert undesirable physiological effects on the infants. The aim of this study was to determine the noise level and its sources in the NICU and neonatal ward of Al-Zahra Hospital of Rasht, Iran. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the intensity of the sounds generated by the internal and external sources in the NICU and neonatal ward was measured using a sound level meter device. The sound produced by each of the sources was individually calculated. Data were analyzed performing descriptive and analytical statistics, using SPSS version 19. Results: The mean noise levels in six rooms and a hallway during morning, afternoon and night shifts with the electromechanical devices turned on were 61.67±4.5, 61.32±4.32 and 60.71±4.56 dB, respectively. Moreover, with the devices tuned off the mean noise levels during morning, afternoon and evening shifts were 64.97±2.6, 60.6±1.29 and 57.91±4.73 dB, respectively. The differences between the mean noise levels in the neonatal wards (standard noise level=45 dB during each shift with the electromechanical devices turned on and off were statistically significant (P=0.002 and P

  13. ISO 9001 in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitner, Gad; Nadir, Erez; Feldman, Michael; Yurman, Shmuel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the process for approving and certifying a neonatal intensive care unit to ISO 9001 standards. The process started with the department head's decision to improve services quality before deciding to achieve ISO 9001 certification. Department processes were mapped and quality management mechanisms were developed. Process control and performance measurements were defined and implemented to monitor the daily work. A service satisfaction review was conducted to get feedback from families. In total, 28 processes and related work instructions were defined. Process yields showed service improvements. Family satisfaction improved. The paper is based on preparing only one neonatal intensive care unit to the ISO 9001 standard. The case study should act as an incentive for hospital managers aiming to improve service quality based on the ISO 9001 standard. ISO 9001 is becoming a recommended tool to improve clinical service quality.

  14. Needs assessment to improve neonatal intensive care in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, K J; Kowalkowski, M A; Treviño, R; Cabrera-Meza, G; Thomas, E J; Kaplan, H C; Profit, J

    2015-08-01

    At the time of the research, Dr Weiss was a clinical fellow in neonatal-perinatal medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital. Dr Profit was on faculty at Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology. He held a secondary appointment in the Department of Medicine, Section of Health Services Research and conducted his research at the VA Health Services Research and Development Center of Excellence where he collaborated with Dr Kowalkowski.: Improving the quality of neonatal intensive care is an important health policy priority in Mexico. A formal assessment of barriers and priorities for quality improvement has not been undertaken. To provide guidance to providers and policy makers with regard to addressing opportunities for better care delivery in Mexican neonatal intensive care units. To conduct a needs assessment regarding improvement of quality of neonatal intensive care delivery in Mexico. Spanish-language survey administered to a volunteer sample of Mexican neonatal care providers attending a large paediatric conference in Mexico in June 2011. Survey domains included institutional context of quality improvement, barriers, priorities, safety culture, and respondents' characteristics. Results were analysed using descriptive analyses of frequencies, proportions and percentage positive response (PPR) rates. Of 91 respondents, the majority identified neonatology as their primary specialty (n = 48, 65%) and were physicians (n = 55, 73%). Generally, providers expressed a desire to improve quality of care (PPR 69%) but reported notable deterrents. Respondents (n, %) identified family inability to pay (38, 48%), overcrowded work areas (38, 44%), insufficient financial reimbursement (25, 36%), lack of availability of nurses (26, 30%), ancillary staff (25, 29%), and subspecialists (22, 25%) as the principal barriers. Respiratory care (27, 39%)--reduction of mechanical ventilation and

  15. Status of neonatal intensive care units in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal mortality in India accounts for 50% of infant mortality, which has declined to 84/1000 live births. There is no prenatal care for over 50% of pregnant women, and over 80% deliver at home in unsafe and unsanitary conditions. Those women who do deliver in health facilities are unable to receive intensive neonatal care when necessary. Level I and Level II neonatal care is unavailable in most health facilities in India, and in most developing countries. There is a need in India for Level III care units also. The establishment of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs in India and developing countries would require space and location, finances, equipment, staff, protocols of care, and infection control measures. Neonatal mortality could be reduced by initially adding NICUs at a few key hospitals. The recommendation is for 30 NICU beds per million population. Each bed would require 50 square feet per cradle and proper climate control. Funds would have to be diverted from adult care. The largest expenses would be in equipment purchase, maintenance, and repair. Trained technicians would be required to operate and monitor the sophisticated ventilators and incubators. The nurse-patient ratio should be 1:1 and 1:2 for other infants. Training mothers to work in the NICUs would help ease the problems of trained nursing staff shortages. Protocols need not be highly technical; they could include the substitution of radiant warmers and room heaters for expensive incubators, the provision of breast milk, and the reduction of invasive procedures such as venipuncture and intubation. Nocosomial infections should be reduced by vacuum cleaning and wet mopping with a disinfectant twice a day, changing disinfectants periodically, maintaining mops to avoid infection, decontamination of linen, daily changing of tubing, and cleaning and sterilizing oxygen hoods and resuscitation equipment, and maintaining an iatrogenic infection record book, which could be used to

  16. Physical activity intensity and subclinical atherosclerosis in Danish adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ried-Larsen, M; Grøntved, Anders; Froberg, K

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the associations between physical activity (PA), cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and intima media thickness (IMT) or stiffness. This was a population-based cross-sectional study (n = 336) of Danish adolescents [mean age (standard deviation, SD): 15.6 (0.4) years]. PA in...

  17. Birth and Neonatal Outcomes following Opioid Use in Pregnancy: A Danish Population-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Nørgaard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Few population-based data exist on birth outcomes in women who received opioid maintenance treatment during pregnancy. We therefore examined adverse birth outcomes in women exposed to methadone or buprenorphine during pregnancy and the risk of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS among neonates exposed to buprenorphine, methadone, and/or heroin in utero. Patients and Methods This study included all female Danish residents with a live birth or a stillbirth from 1997 to 211. We identified the study population, use of opioids and opioid substitution treatment, birth outcomes, and NAS through medical registers. Birth outcomes included preterm birth (born before 38th gestational week, low-birth weight (LBW (<2,500 g, restricted to term births, small for gestational age (SGA (weight <2 standard deviations from the sex- and gestational-week-specific mean, congenital malformations, and stillbirths. We used log-binomial regression to estimate the prevalence ratio (PR for birth outcomes. Results Among 95,172 pregnancies in a total of 571,823 women, we identified 557 pregnancies exposed to buprenorphine, methadone, and/or heroin (167 to buprenorphine, 197 to methadone, 28 to self-reported heroin, and 165 to combinations. Compared with nonexposed pregnancies, prenatal opioid use was associated with greater prevalence of preterm birth (PR of 2.8 (95% confidence interval (CI, 2.3–3.4, LBW among infants born at term (PR of 4.3 (95% CI, 3.0–6.1, and being SGA (PR of 2.7 (95% CI, 1.9–4.3. Restricting the analyses to women who smoked slightly lowered these estimates. The prevalence of congenital malformations was 8.3% in opioid-exposed women compared with 4.2% in nonexposed women (PR of 2.0 (95% CI, 1.5–2.6. The risk of NAS ranged from 7% in neonates exposed to buprenorphine only to 55% in neonates exposed to methadone only or to opioid combinations. Conclusion The maternal use of buprenorphine and methadone during pregnancy was associated with

  18. Validation of Greek Versions of the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale and Premature Infant Pain Profile in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysakopoulou, Christina; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Lianou, Loukia; Bozas, Evangelos; Zannikos, Kirikas; Matziou, Vasiliki

    2017-09-22

    The Neonatal Infant Pain Scale and the Premature Infant Pain Profile have been used widely in neonatal intensive care units for pain assessment. This study reports the evaluation and validation of these scales in full-term newborns who were hospitalized in two Greek neonatal intensive care units. Evaluation and validation of the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale and the Premature Infant Pain Profile in full-term newborns who were hospitalized in two Greek neonatal intensive care units. A cross-sectional study. Two neonatal intensive care units at a large General Children's Hospital in Greece. A total of 81 full-term newborns. This cross-sectional study was conducted in two neonatal intensive care units at a large General Children's Hospital in Greece. We studied 81 full-term newborns, who were exposed to various painful routine procedures. A single measurement was taken from each neonate. Two observers were present during each procedure and evaluated pain using both the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale and Premature Infant Pain Profile. Internal consistency coefficient Cronbach's α, internal class agreement coefficient, and κ factor were appropriately measured. The weighting of the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale and Premature Infant Pain Profile pointed out an excellent coherence between the two scales and agreement among the researchers. The internal consistency coefficient Cronbach's α was >.8 and the internal class agreement coefficient was >.98 for both scales, which indicates an excellent consistency between scales. The κ factor for Neonatal Infant Pain Scale was >.73 and for the Premature Infant Pain Profile it was >.6, which indicates a significant agreement among investigators. The Neonatal Infant Pain Scale and Premature Infant Pain Profile were successfully adjusted in Greek standards with reliability between the scales and among the researchers. Moreover, they constitute reliable tools for the evaluation of neonatal procedural pain in full-term newborns in Greece

  19. Postpartum depression on the neonatal intensive care unit: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahirkheli NN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Noor N Tahirkheli,1 Amanda S Cherry,1 Alayna P Tackett,2 Mary Anne McCaffree,3 Stephen R Gillaspy11Section of General and Community Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA; 2Department of Psychology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA; 3Section of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: As the most common complication of childbirth affecting 10%–15% of women, postpartum depression (PPD goes vastly undetected and untreated, inflicting long-term consequences on both mother and child. Studies consistently show that mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU experience PPD at higher rates with more elevated symptomatology than mothers of healthy infants. Although there has been increased awareness regarding the overall prevalence of PPD and recognition of the need for health care providers to address this health issue, there has not been adequate attention to PPD in the context of the NICU. This review will focus on an overview of PPD and psychological morbidities, the prevalence of PPD in mothers of infants admitted to NICU, associated risk factors, potential PPD screening measures, promising intervention programs, the role of NICU health care providers in addressing PPD in the NICU, and suggested future research directions.Keywords: neonatal intensive care unit, postpartum depression, mothers

  20. Exchange Transfusion in the Treatment of Neonatal Septic Shock: A Ten-Year Experience in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Pugni, Lorenza; Ronchi, Andrea; Bizzarri, Bianca; Consonni, Dario; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Ghirardi, Beatrice; Fumagalli, Monica; Ghirardello, Stefano; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Septic shock, occurring in about 1% of neonates hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), is a major cause of death in the neonatal period. In the 1980s and 90s, exchange transfusion (ET) was reported by some authors to be effective in the treatment of neonatal sepsis and septic shock. The main aim of this retrospective study was to compare the mortality rate of neonates with septic shock treated only with standard care therapy (ScT group) with the mortality rate of those treated w...

  1. Radiation Dose to Newborns in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahreyni Toossi, M. T.; Malekzadeh, M.

    2012-01-01

    With the increase of X-ray use for medical diagnostic purposes, knowing the given doses is necessary in patients for comparison with reference levels. The concept of reference doses or diagnostic reference levels has been developed as a practical aid in the optimization of patient protection in diagnostic radiology. To assess the radiation doses to neonates from diagnostic radiography (chest and abdomen). This study has been carried out in the neonatal intensive care unit of a province in Iran. Entrance surface dose was measured directly with thermoluminescent dosimeters. The population included 195 neonates admitted for a diagnostic radiography, in eight NICUs of different hospital types. The mean entrance surface dose for chest and abdomen examinations were 76.3 μGy and 61.5 μGy, respectively. Diagnostic reference levels for neonate in NICUs of the province were 88 μGy for chest and 98 μGy for abdomen examinations that were slightly higher than other studies. Risk of death due to radiation cancer incidence of abdomens examination was equal to 1.88 × 10 -6 for male and 4.43 × 10 -6 for female. For chest X-ray, it was equal to 2.54 × 10 -6 for male and 1.17 × 10 -5 for female patients. Diagnostic reference levels for neonates in our province were slightly higher than values reported by other studies such as European national diagnostic reference levels and the NRPB reference dose. The main reason was related to using a high mAs and a low kVp applied in most departments and also a low focus film distance. Probably lack of collimation also affected some exams in the NICUs.

  2. Prescribing errors in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Cezar Machado

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pediatric patients, especially those admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (ICU, are highly vulnerable to medication errors. This study aimed to measure the prescription error rate in a university hospital neonatal ICU and to identify susceptible patients, types of errors, and the medicines involved. The variables related to medicines prescribed were compared to the Neofax prescription protocol. The study enrolled 150 newborns and analyzed 489 prescription order forms, with 1,491 medication items, corresponding to 46 drugs. Prescription error rate was 43.5%. Errors were found in dosage, intervals, diluents, and infusion time, distributed across 7 therapeutic classes. Errors were more frequent in preterm newborns. Diluent and dosing were the most frequent sources of errors. The therapeutic classes most involved in errors were antimicrobial agents and drugs that act on the nervous and cardiovascular systems.

  3. Prescribing errors in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Ana Paula Cezar; Tomich, Catharina Somerlate Franco; Osme, Simone Franco; Ferreira, Daniela Marques de Lima Mota; Mendonça, Maria Angélica Oliveira; Pinto, Rogério Melo Costa; Penha-Silva, Nilson; Abdallah, Vânia Olivetti Steffen

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric patients, especially those admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (ICU), are highly vulnerable to medication errors. This study aimed to measure the prescription error rate in a university hospital neonatal ICU and to identify susceptible patients, types of errors, and the medicines involved. The variables related to medicines prescribed were compared to the Neofax prescription protocol. The study enrolled 150 newborns and analyzed 489 prescription order forms, with 1,491 medication items, corresponding to 46 drugs. Prescription error rate was 43.5%. Errors were found in dosage, intervals, diluents, and infusion time, distributed across 7 therapeutic classes. Errors were more frequent in preterm newborns. Diluent and dosing were the most frequent sources of errors. The therapeutic classes most involved in errors were antimicrobial agents and drugs that act on the nervous and cardiovascular systems.

  4. Modes of death in neonatal intensive care units.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Finan, E

    2006-04-01

    With the ever-increasing availability of aggressive medical treatment and technical support, neonatologists are offered an increasing ability to prolong life. While "end-of-life" decisions within NICUs have been studied internationally, there is limited data available for Ireland. Through the auspices of the Irish Faculty of Paediatrics 2002 Neonatal Mortality Ouestionnaire, decisions made around the time of death in Irish Neonatal Intensive Care Units were examined. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 96% (n=25). One hundred and eighty seven deaths were reported for 2002. Information pertaining to the mode of death was available in 53% of cases. Seventy seven percent of those paediatricians who answered this question, reported either withdrawing or withholding treatment in babies thought to have a hopeless outcome, with the greatest proportion of these deaths occurring in premature infants (n=30) and babies with congenital defects (n=40).

  5. High-intensity light-emitting diode vs fluorescent tubes for intensive phototherapy in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbiny, Hanan S; Youssef, Doaa M; Sherbini, Ahmad S; El-Behedy, Rabab; Sherief, Laila M

    2016-05-01

    Special blue fluorescent tubes are recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) as the most effective light source for lowering serum bilirubin. A high-intensity light-emitting diode ('super LED') could render intensive phototherapy more effective than the above conventional methods. This study compared the efficacy and safety of a high-intensity light-emitting diode bed vs conventional intensive phototherapy with triple fluorescent tube units as a rescue treatment for severe unconjugated neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia. This was a randomised, prospective trial. Two hundred jaundiced neonates ≥ 35 weeks gestation who met the criteria for intensive phototherapy as per AAP guidelines were randomly assigned to be treated either with triple fluorescent tube units (group 1, n = 100) or a super LED bed (group 2, n = 100). The outcome was the avoidance of exchange transfusion by successful control of hyperbilirubinaemia. Statistically significant higher success rates of intensive phototherapy were achieved among neonates treated with super LED (group 2) than in those treated conventionally (group 1) (87% vs 64%, P = 0.003). Significantly higher 'bilirubin decline' rates were reported in both haemolytic and non-haemolytic subgroups treated with the super LED bed compared with a similar sub-population in the conventionally treated group. Comparable numbers of neonates in both groups developed rebound jaundice (8% vs 10% of groups 1 and 2, respectively). Side-effects were mild in both groups, but higher rates of hyperthermia (12% vs 0%, P = 0.03), dehydration (8% vs 2%, P = 0.26) and skin rash (39% vs 1%, P = 0.002) were reported in the fluorescent tubes-treated group compared with the LED group. Super LED is a safe rescue treatment for severe neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia, and its implementation may reduce the need for exchange transfusion.

  6. An agent based architecture for high-risk neonate management at neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malak, Jaleh Shoshtarian; Safdari, Reza; Zeraati, Hojjat; Nayeri, Fatemeh Sadat; Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Farajollah, Seide Sedighe Seied

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, the use of new tools and technologies has decreased the neonatal mortality rate. Despite the positive effect of using these technologies, the decisions are complex and uncertain in critical conditions when the neonate is preterm or has a low birth weight or malformations. There is a need to automate the high-risk neonate management process by creating real-time and more precise decision support tools. To create a collaborative and real-time environment to manage neonates with critical conditions at the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) and to overcome high-risk neonate management weaknesses by applying a multi agent based analysis and design methodology as a new solution for NICU management. This study was a basic research for medical informatics method development that was carried out in 2017. The requirement analysis was done by reviewing articles on NICU Decision Support Systems. PubMed, Science Direct, and IEEE databases were searched. Only English articles published after 1990 were included; also, a needs assessment was done by reviewing the extracted features and current processes at the NICU environment where the research was conducted. We analyzed the requirements and identified the main system roles (agents) and interactions by a comparative study of existing NICU decision support systems. The Universal Multi Agent Platform (UMAP) was applied to implement a prototype of our multi agent based high-risk neonate management architecture. Local environment agents interacted inside a container and each container interacted with external resources, including other NICU systems and consultation centers. In the NICU container, the main identified agents were reception, monitoring, NICU registry, and outcome prediction, which interacted with human agents including nurses and physicians. Managing patients at the NICU units requires online data collection, real-time collaboration, and management of many components. Multi agent systems are applied as

  7. [Risk factors for neonatal pulmonary hemorrhage in the neonatal intensive care unit of a municipal hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jie; Hei, Ming-Yan; Huang, Xi-Lin; Li, Xiao-Ping

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the risk factors for neonatal pulmonary hemorrhage (NPH) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a municipal hospital, and to provide a basis for the early identification and treatment of NPH. A total of 112 neonates who were admitted to the NICU of Shaoyang Central Hospital of Hunan Province and diagnosed with NPH were enrolled as the case group. A nested case-control method was used to select, as a control group (n=224), the neonates who underwent the treatment with an assisted mechanical ventilator and did not experience pulmonary hemorrhage. Univariate analysis and unconditional logistic regression analysis were used to identify the high risk factors for NPH. The univariate analysis showed that compared with the control group, the case group had significantly higher incidence rates of gestational diabetes and cholestasis in mothers, cesarean delivery, gestational age <34 weeks, 5-minute Apgar score ≤5, birth weight <2 500 g, heart failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) before the development of NPH, partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen (oxygenation index, OI) ≤100, and a reduction in mean platelet volume. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that DIC, heart failure, and OI ≤100 were independent risk factors for NPH (OR=33.975, 3.975, 1.818 respectively; P<0.05). Heart failure, OI ≤100, and DIC are risk factors for the development of NPH in the NICU of the municipal hospital.

  8. Magnetic fields in a neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aasen, S.E.; Johansson, A.; Cristensen, T.

    1995-06-01

    In this study the magnetic flux density in and around the infant incubators of a neonatal intensive care unit were registered and mapped. The mean 50 Hz magnetic flux densities in an incubator was typically in the region 0.2 - l μT, with maximum values around 1.5μT. The field levels are quite varying dependent on type of incubator, position in the incubator, position of the electronic surveillance and treatment equipment and the position of the 220 V main plugs. 8 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Relationship-based care in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    At St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center in Paterson, New Jersey, implementation of the Relationship-Based Care (RBC) model of care delivery and enculturation of the philosophy of care embodied in Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring (Watson, 2007) improved patient outcomes and supported quality nursing care across the continuum of care in our organization. The ability of staff nurses to create an atmosphere of professional inquiry that places patients and families at the center of practice supported implementation of RBC in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

  10. Quality improvement in radiography in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loovere, Linda; Boyle, Elaine M; Blatz, Susan; Bowslaugh, Marion; Kereliuk, Marilyn; Paes, Bosco

    2008-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to ensure that X-rays performed consistently adhere to established technological quality standards and are achieved without compromising patient care while minimizing exposure risks. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether educational sessions targeting areas deemed suboptimal would facilitate improvement. A retrospective, 1-week review of all neonatal X-rays and documentation of clinical information on X-ray requisitions (n = 132) was completed in a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), by a single observer. Standards for X-ray evaluation were defined a priori based on radiographic principles and essential documented medical information for correct interpretation. Targeted areas for improvement were identified and addressed through brief educational sessions and printed pamphlets. The review was repeated after recommendations were implemented, 1 month (n = 93) and 1 year (n = 76) later. Improvements were evident in both the completion of X-ray requisitions and image quality. In particular, there was a statistically significant improvement in requisition legibility (P = 0.019), completeness of the medical history (P artifacts obscuring views (P educational sessions. A neonatal X-ray audit is a simple, effective way to evaluate radiographic technique and encourage provision of basic clinical information for diagnostic interpretation by radiologists and neonatologists. As well, structured, collaborative educational sessions between radiology and neonatology staff appear to be a successful and sustainable method to effect overall improvement.

  11. Factors associated with mortality in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Emília Cavalcante Valença Fernandes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To describe the factors associated with mortality of newborns hospitalized in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the period from 2012 to 2015. Methods: This was a descriptive, quantitative study of secondary data, correlated with the causes of death and hospitalization according to classification by ICD-10.  The categorical variables were presented in absolute and relative frequencies, with measurements of central tendency and dispersion. Evaluation of the factors associated with neonatal death was made by the logit model of analysis with correction of robust errors by the statistical program Stata 12.0, considering values of p<0.05 and interval of confidence of 95%.  Results: Of the 563 newborns, 58.6% were of the male sex; 89.0% were early newborns, 73.0% were premature. 181 newborns died (32.3%. The main causes of hospitalization were: difficulties during birth, conditions of birth and immaturity (45.0%, pathologies associated with the respiratory system (21.1%, congenital malformations (9.7%. The main causes of death were: septicemia of the NB (40.4%, respiratory discomfort of the NB (22.4%. The significant associations for mortality were the use of ventilatory supports: Mechanical Ventilation (p=0.001, Hallo (p=0.000, CPAP (p=0.000, VNI (p=0.005. Conclusions: The major risk factors for neonatal mortality were associated with septicemia and use of mechanical ventilation.

  12. Bloodstream Infections in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sah Ižpek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the pattern of bloodstream infections (BSIs and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU.Material and Method: Positive hemoculture of neonates diagnosed with nosocomial sepsis from March 2011 to March 2014 in the NICU of Diyarbakir Maternity and Children%u2019s Hospital, in the southeastern region of Anatolia, Turkey, were retrospectively reviewed. Results: A total of 148 pathogens were isolated in 142 neonates. The most common microorganisms isolated were Klebsiella pneumoniae (40.5% and Acinetobacter baumannii (29.7% which was a result of a hospital outbreak. Multi-drug resistant (MDR strains accounted for 20.0% of K. pneumoniae isolates and 93.2% of A. baumannii isolates. The sepsis-attributable mortality rate was higher in cases infected with MDR strains than in cases infected without MDR strains or Candida spp (24% vs. 9.7%, p=0.032. Discussion: In our unit, BSIs were more often caused by Gram negative bacteria. BSIs caused by MDR strains were associated with a higher rate of sepsis-attributable mortality.

  13. Family-centered bereavement practices in Danish intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Kaldan, Gudrun; Coombs, Maureen

    2018-01-01

    : Self-administered computerized cross-sectional nation-wide survey of Danish ICUs. RESULTS: Nurses at 46 of 48 (96%) ICUs in Denmark responded. Bereavement care at the time of patient death included viewing the patient in ICU (100%), and in the hospital mortuary (59%). Information about hospital...... of death, a letter of condolence, a phone call to the family, referral to a priest or clergyman, or referral to other counseling. Although many interventions were common, there were variations within the elements offered. Nurses and physicians were the most consistent health care staff involved...

  14. Automated detection of medication administration errors in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Kirkendall, Eric S; Hall, Eric S; Ni, Yizhao; Lingren, Todd; Kaiser, Megan; Lingren, Nataline; Zhai, Haijun; Solti, Imre; Melton, Kristin

    2015-10-01

    To improve neonatal patient safety through automated detection of medication administration errors (MAEs) in high alert medications including narcotics, vasoactive medication, intravenous fluids, parenteral nutrition, and insulin using the electronic health record (EHR); to evaluate rates of MAEs in neonatal care; and to compare the performance of computerized algorithms to traditional incident reporting for error detection. We developed novel computerized algorithms to identify MAEs within the EHR of all neonatal patients treated in a level four neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in 2011 and 2012. We evaluated the rates and types of MAEs identified by the automated algorithms and compared their performance to incident reporting. Performance was evaluated by physician chart review. In the combined 2011 and 2012 NICU data sets, the automated algorithms identified MAEs at the following rates: fentanyl, 0.4% (4 errors/1005 fentanyl administration records); morphine, 0.3% (11/4009); dobutamine, 0 (0/10); and milrinone, 0.3% (5/1925). We found higher MAE rates for other vasoactive medications including: dopamine, 11.6% (5/43); epinephrine, 10.0% (289/2890); and vasopressin, 12.8% (54/421). Fluid administration error rates were similar: intravenous fluids, 3.2% (273/8567); parenteral nutrition, 3.2% (649/20124); and lipid administration, 1.3% (203/15227). We also found 13 insulin administration errors with a resulting rate of 2.9% (13/456). MAE rates were higher for medications that were adjusted frequently and fluids administered concurrently. The algorithms identified many previously unidentified errors, demonstrating significantly better sensitivity (82% vs. 5%) and precision (70% vs. 50%) than incident reporting for error recognition. Automated detection of medication administration errors through the EHR is feasible and performs better than currently used incident reporting systems. Automated algorithms may be useful for real-time error identification and

  15. [Epidemiology of nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Heladia; Martínez-Muñoz, Angeles Nahima; Peregrino-Bejarano, Leoncio

    2014-01-01

    Newborns who are admitted to neonatal intensive care units are at a high risk for the development of a nosocomial infection. The purpose of this study was to record the incidence and the type of nosocomial infections, the isolated microorganisms and the susceptibility profile of these newborns in a neonatal intensive care unit. A descriptive, prospective, longitudinal study was conducted over a 1-year period. Out of 113 newborns with nosocomial infection, demographic variables, antibiotic use prior to admission, central venous catheter use, type of nosocomial infection, isolated microorganism and susceptibility profile were recorded. One hundred and forty nine nosocomial infection episodes were recorded, with an incidence of 37.7 × 100 discharges and an incidence density rate of 25.6 × 1000 patient-days. The most common nosocomial infections were central venous catheter colonization related bacteremia (35.5 %) and sepsis (28.8 %). The most common microorganisms were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (43.4 %) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (21 %), out of which 97.3 % were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producers. The incidence of nosocomial infection was similar to that reported in developing countries. Central venous catheter colonization-related bacteremia and gram-positive bacteria were the most common nosocomial infection and causative microorganisms, respectively.

  16. [Recommendations for analgesia and sedation in neonatal intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawicz, Marcin

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to present recommendations, relevant to the management of neonates and infants aged 0-1 years, treated in intensive care settings. They include general principles and recommendations for pain and sedation assessment, sedation and pain management and advice on the use of pharmacological strategies. The bolus (on demand) administration of sedative agents should be avoided because of increased risk of cardiovascular depression and/or neurological complications. Midazolam administration time should be limited to 72 hours because of tachyphylaxis, and the possibility of development of a withdrawal syndrome and neurological complications (grade A, LOE 1b). The level of sedation and pain should be regularly assessed and documented, using presented scales; the COMFORT scale is preferred. Opioids, given in continuous infusion, are the drugs of choice for neonatal sedation. To avoid withdrawal syndrome, the total doses and time of administration of sedative agents should be limited. Methadone is a drug of choice in the treatment of a withdrawal (Grade B, LOE 2). Intravenous ketamine is recommended, when short-term sedation/anaesthesia is required (Grade C, LOE 3) for painful and/or stressful intensive care procedures. (Grade C, LOE 2). Muscle relaxants should be used for endotracheal intubation and in the situations when mechanical ventilation is not possible due to maximal respiratory effort of the patient.

  17. Magnetic fields in a neonatal intensive care unit; Magnetiske felt i en neonatal intensivavdeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aasen, S.E.; Johansson, A. [Trondheim Univ. (Norway). Inst. for Fysikk; Bratlid, D. [Trondheim Regional Hospital (Norway); Cristensen, T. [Statens Straalevern, Oesteraas (Norway)

    1995-06-01

    In this study the magnetic flux density in and around the infant incubators of a neonatal intensive care unit were registered and mapped. The mean 50 Hz magnetic flux densities in an incubator was typically in the region 0.2 - l {mu}T, with maximum values around 1.5{mu}T. The field levels are quite varying dependent on type of incubator, position in the incubator, position of the electronic surveillance and treatment equipment and the position of the 220 V main plugs. 8 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Non benign neonatal arrhythmias observed in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundak, Ahmet Afşin; Dilli, Dilek; Karagöl, Belma; Karadağ, Nilgün; Zenciroğlu, Ayşegül; Okumuş, Nurullah; Doğan, Vehbi; Uzunalıç, Nuran

    2013-07-01

    To analyze non benign neonatal arrhythmias (NA) observed in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). From June 2006 through July 2011, newborns admitted to the NICU for NA or diagnosed as NA after hospitalization were evaluated retrospectively. The newborns with non benign NA were included in the study. During the study period, the incidence of non-benign NA was 0.7 % (n = 55/7880). The mean age at diagnosis was 16.7 ± 1.8 d ranging from 1 d to 90 d. The most common type was supraventricular arrhythmia (SVT) with an incidence of 0.3 %. Univariate analyses showed that there were significant differences between the survived and died infants according types of congenital heart disease (CHD), electrolyte imbalance, and arrhythmias. The mortality rates were higher among infants with obstructive type left-to right shunt and common mixing type CHD. The most dangerous type of electrolyte imbalance was hyperkalemia. Many arrhythmias could not be noticed at neonatal period even in NICU, implying that it is increasingly important for the physician to be aware of the etiology, development, and natural history of these arrhythmias.

  19. Neonatal Outcomes of Rh-Negative Pregnancies in a Tertiary Level Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacham

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Rhesus incompatibility is a preventable cause for severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, hydrops fetalis and still births. The prevalence of the Rh-negative blood group among Indian woman varies from 2% - 10%. Despite declining the incidence of Rhesus incompatibility, due to availability of anti-D immunoglobulin, and improved antenatal care of the Rh-negative pregnant woman, it still accounts for a significant proportion of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and neuro-morbidity. The prevalence of Rh-negative women having Rh-positive neonates is 60%. Objectives This study aimed to estimate the incidence of Rh iso-immunization and evaluate the outcomes of Rh iso-immunized neonates. Methods This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary level neonatal intensive care unit, Princess Esra hospital, Deccan college of medical sciences, Hyderabad, Telangana, India. Consecutive intramural and extramural neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care unit with the Rh-negative mother’s blood group and hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled. Neonates born to Rh+ve mothers were excluded. Neonatal gestational age, birth weight, age at admission, duration of phototherapy, duration of hospitalization, neonatal examination and investigations were recorded in a predesigned, pretested performa. Results A total of 90 neonates were born to Rh-negative mothers, of which 70% (63 had the Rh-positive blood group and 30% had the Rh-negative blood group. Of these 63 neonates, 48 (76.2% had hyperbilirubinemia and 43 neonates (68.3% had significant hyperbilirubinemia (total serum bilirubin > 15mg/dL. Among them, 2%, 75% and 23% were born to primi, multi and grandmutli, respectively. Also, 14.5% of the neonates were large for dates (LFD, 75% appropriate for dates (AFD and 10.5% were small for dates (SFD. Premature and SFD neonates had higher incidence of hyperbilirubinemia. Significantly higher incidence of jaundice occurred within 72 hours of life. The mean

  20. Sedation and analgesia practices in neonatal intensive care units (EUROPAIN): results from a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Eriksson, Mats; Courtois, Emilie; Boyle, Elaine; Avila-Alvarez, Alejandro; Andersen, Randi Dovland; Sarafidis, Kosmas; Polkki, Tarja; Matos, Cristina; Lago, Paola; Papadouri, Thalia; Montalto, Simon Attard; Ilmoja, Mari-Liis; Simons, Sinno; Tameliene, Rasa; van Overmeire, Bart; Berger, Angelika; Dobrzanska, Anna; Schroth, Michael; Bergqvist, Lena; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Trinkl, Anna; Deindl, Philipp; Wald, Martin; Rigo, Vincent; Dussart, Anneliese; Dierckx, Elke; Coppens, Sophie; Kiilsapaa, Birgit; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Metsäranta, Marjo; Nikolajev, Kari; Saarela, Timo; Peltoniemi, Outi; Tammela, Outi; Lehtonen, Liisa; Savagner, Christophe; Sevestre, Anna; Alexandre, Cénéric; Bouchon-Guedj, Nathalie; Saumureau, Simone; Grosse, Camille; Jouvencel, Philippe; Ramful, Duksha; Clamadieu, Catherine; Mourdie, Julien; Montcho, Yannis; Cambonie, Gilles; Di Maio, Massimo; Patural, Hugues; Asrtuc, Dominique; Norbert, Karine; Bouchera, Kassis; Lang, Mathieu; Galene Gromez, Sophie; Hamon, Isabelle; Nolent, Paul; Ntwari, René-Christian; Lallemant, Carine; Chary Tardy, Anne Cécile; Pelluau, Sonia; Roue, Jean Michel; Picaud, Jean Charles; Camelio, Aurélie; Tourneux, Pierre; Saint-Faust, Marie; Morville, Patrice; David, Alexandra; Theret, Bernard; Frédérique, Martin; Topf, Georg; Menendez-Castro, Ricardo; Fujiwara-Pichler, Erhard; Deeg, Karl Heinz; Anatolitou, Fani; Baroutis, George; Papazafeiratou, Chrissoulan; Giannakopoulou, Christine; Baltogianni, Maria; Delivoria, Varvara; Sterpi, Magdalena; Saklamaki-Kontou, Melpomeni; Dimitriou, Gabriel; Charitou, Antonia; Thomaidou, Agathi; Chatziioannidis, Ilias; Salvanos, Iraklis; Pirelli, Anna; Poggiani, Carlo; Fasolato, Valeria; Cristofori, Gloria; Gomirato, Serena; Allegro, Antonella; Alfiero, Michela; Biban, Paolo; Bertolini, Alessandra; Golin, Rosanna; Franco, Elena; Molinaro, Grazia; Federica, Visintini; Rossini, Roberto; Garetti, Elisabetta; Faraoni, Maddalena; Dani, Carlo; Germini, Cristina; Braguglia, Annabella; Benigni, Gina; Azzali, Adriano; Santa, Barresi; Romoli, Raffaella; Carrera, Giuseppe; Miria, Natile; Savant, Patrizia; Cossu, Maria Antonia; Giancarlo, Gargano; Cassar, Robert; Bos, Annelis; van Kaam, Anton; Brouwer, Mieke; van Lingen, Richard; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto; Sivertsen, Wiebke; Nakstad, Britt; Solhjell, Kari; Flagstad, Gro; Salvesen, Bodil; Nessestrand, Ingunn A. M.; Nordhov, Marianne; Anderssen, Sven-Harald; Wasland, Kristin; Danielsen, Kåre; Kristoffersen, Laila Marie; Ytterdahl Bergland, Unni; Borghild Stornes, Randi; Andresen, Jannicke; Solberg, Rønnaug; Hochnowski, Kristoffer; Terpinska, Ewa; Kociszewska-Najman, Bozena; Melka, Andrzej; Głuszczak, Ewa; Niezgoda, Anna; Borszewska-Kornacka, Maria Katarzyna; Witwicki, Jacek M.; Korbal, Piotr; Ramos, Helena; Garcia, Pedro; Machado, Cidália; Clemente, Fátima; Costa, Miguel; Trindade, Cristina; Salazar, Anabela; Martins Barroso, Laura; Resende, Cristine; Afonso, Maria Eulàlia; Torres, Jacinto; Maciel, Paula; Nunes, José Luis; Neve Dos Santos, Vera Alexandra; Melgar Bonis, Ana; Euba Lopez, Aintzane; Tapia Collados, Caridad; Jesus Ripalda, María; Solis Sanchez, Gonzalo; Martin Parra, Belén; Botet, Francesc; Fernandez Trisac, Jose Luis; Elorza Fernandez, María Dolores; Arriaga Redondo, María; Bargallo Ailagas, Eva; Saenz, Pilar; Lopez Ortego, Paloma; Ventura, Purificación; Galve, Zenaida; Perez Ocon, Amaya; Crespo Suarez, Pilar; Dianez Vega, Gloria; San Feliciano, Laura; Herranz Carillo, Gloria; Esteban Diez, Inés; Reyné, Mar; Garcia Borau, María José; de Las Cuevas, Isabel; Couce, María L.; González Carrasco, Ersilia; Montoro Exposito, Aurora; Concheiro Guisan, Ana; Luna Lagares, Salud; Sanchez Redondo, Maria Dolores; Hellström Westas, Lena; Moren, Stefan; Norman, Elisabeth; Olsson, Emma; Åberg, Emma; Printz, Gordana; Turner, Mark; McBride, Tim; Bomont, Robert; Webb, Delyth; Saladi, Murthy; Thirumurugan, Arumugavelu; Brooke, Nigel; Skene, Caryl; Bilolikar, Harsha; Noble, Vibert; Vora, Amish; Thompson, Fiona; Deorukhkar, Anjum; El-Refee, Sherif; McIntyre, John; Millman, Guy; Reed, Joanne; Babirecki, Matthew; Kumar, Dev; Yadav, Mahesh; O'Brien, Margaret; Gasiorowski, Edward Robert; Rawlingson, Chris; Shastri, Aravind; Tibby, Shane; Walsh, Sandra; Azzopardi, Denis; Soe, Aung; MaCrae, Duncan; Eyre, Elizabeth; Menon, Gopi; Gupta, Samir; James, Anitha; Surana, Pinki; Adams, Eleri; Wolf, Andrew; Maxwell, Nicola; Wagstaff, Miles; Mann, Rebecca; Kumar, Yadlapalli; Quinn, Michael; Jones Dyson, Steve; Mannix, Paul; Morris, Kevin; Ewer, Andrew; Gurusamy, Kalyana; Deshpande, Sanjeev; Alexander, John; Blake, Kathryn; Kumar, Siva; Oddie, Sam; Ohadike, Pamela; McKechnie, Liz; Gibson, David; Shirsalkar, Anand; Suryanarayanan, Balaji; Hubbard, Marie; Lal, Mithilesh; Ali, Imdad; Shah, Divyen; Sketchley, Suzanne; Gupta, Richa; Schofield, Joanne; Ezzat, Medhat; Mupanemunda, Richard; Gallagher, Andrew; Kronsberg, Shari

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonates who are in pain or are stressed during care in the intensive care unit (ICU) are often given sedation or analgesia. We investigated the current use of sedation or analgesia in neonatal ICUs (NICUs) in European countries. Methods EUROPAIN (EUROpean Pain Audit In Neonates) was a

  1. Obstetrical and neonatal outcomes in women following gastric bypass: a Danish national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlac, Janne Foss; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel; Lidegaard, Ojvind

    2014-05-01

    To assess obstetrical and neonatal outcomes in women following gastric bypass, compared with adipose women without surgery and with a normal weight control population. Historical controlled cohort study. Denmark. All women undergoing gastric bypass during the period 1996-2011, and subsequently giving birth. Obstetrical and neonatal outcomes in women without gastric bypass matched on age, parity, plurality, year, and body mass index, and normal weight women. In 415 women giving birth after gastric bypass we found significantly more women with hypertension in pregnancy; relative risk (RR) 2.5 (95% confidence interval 1.3-5.0), gestational diabetes; RR = 6.9 (3.5-13.5), and acute abdominal pain during pregnancy; RR = 4.7 (2.9-7.8) compared with normal weight controls. Compared with women with similar body mass index, they had a lower incidence of preeclampsia and emergency cesarean sections, and their children a lower incidence of asphyxia; RR = 0.4 (0.2-0.8). Their children were on average 212 g smaller than newborn of normal weight mothers, and 319 g smaller than newborn of adipose controls, and had significantly more admissions to neonatal intensive care unit compared with newborn of normal weight mothers; RR = 1.5 (1.1-2.0). Gastric bypass may reduce the risk of preeclampsia, emergency cesarean section, and perinatal asphyxia, compared with adipose women without surgery. Compared with normal weight controls women who had had a gastric bypass had a higher risk of hypertension, gestational diabetes, and acute abdominal pain during pregnancy and their children a lower birthweight and higher incidence of admittance to neonatal intensive care. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  2. The Effect of Mother's Voice on Arterial Blood Sampling Induced Pain in Neonates Hospitalized in Neonate Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarmnejad, Elham; Sarhangi, Forogh; Javadi, Mahrooz; Rejeh, Nahid

    2015-04-19

    Due to devastating effects of pain in neonates, it is very important to ease it though safe and feasible methods. This study was to determine the effect of familiar auditory stimuli on the arterial blood sampling (ABS) induced pain in term neonates. This study was done on 30 newborns hospitalized in neonate intensive care unit (NICU) of a hospital in Tehran. Research samples were selected by using convenience sampling and randomly divided into two groups of control and test. In the test group, the recorded mothers' voices were played for the newborns before and after blood sampling procedure. Then, pain measures were recorded 10 minutes before, during and 10 minutes after blood collection based on Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS); then the pain level changes were reviewed and studied. The findings showed significant differences between the control and test groups that indicating the effect of mother's voice on reducing the pain of neonates during the ABS (ppain in the term neonates.

  3. Quality improvement in radiography in a neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loovere, L.; Boyle, E.M.; Blatz, S.; Bowslaugh, M.; Kereliuk, M.; Paes, B.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to ensure that X-rays performed consistently adhere to established technological quality standards and are achieved without compromising patient care while minimizing exposure risks. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether educational sessions targeting areas deemed suboptimal would facilitate improvement. A retrospective, 1-week review of all neonatal X-rays and documentation of clinical information on X-ray requisitions (n = 132) was completed in a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), by a single observer. Standards for X-ray evaluation were defined a priori based on radiographic principles and essential documented medical information for correct interpretation. Targeted areas for improvement were identified and addressed through brief educational sessions and printed pamphlets. The review was repeated after recommendations were implemented. 1 month (n = 93) and 1 year (n = 76) later. Improvements were evident in both the completion of X-ray requisitions and image quality. In particular, there was a statistically significant improvement in requisition legibility (P = 0.019), completeness of the medical history (P < 0.001), reduction in X-ray rotation (P < 0.001), collimation to the specific area of interest (P <0.001), gonadal shielding (P < 0.001), and decrease in monitor leads or artifacts obscuring views (P < 0.001). These improvements were sustained both 1 month and 1 year following the educational sessions. A neonatal X-ray audit is a simple, effective way to evaluate radiographic technique and encourage provision of basic clinical information for diagnostic interpretation by radiologists and neonatologists. As well, structured, collaborative educational sessions between radiology and neonatology staff appear to be a successful and sustainable method to effect overall improvement. (author)

  4. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Layout and Nurses' Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doede, Megan; Trinkoff, Alison M; Gurses, Ayse P

    2018-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) remain one of the few areas in hospitals that still use an open bay (OPBY) design for patient stays greater than 24 hr, housing multiple infants, staff, and families in one large room. This creates high noise levels, contributes to the spread of infection, and affords families little privacy. These problems have given rise to the single-family room NICU. This represents a significant change in the care environment for nurses. This literature review answers the question: When compared to OPBY layout, how does a single family room layout impact neonatal nurses' work? Thirteen studies published between 2006 and 2015 were located. Many studies reported both positive and negative effects on nurses' work and were therefore sorted by their cited advantages and disadvantages. Advantages included improved quality of the physical environment; improved quality of patient care; improved parent interaction; and improvements in nurse job satisfaction, stress, and burnout. Disadvantages included decreased interaction among the NICU patient care team, increased nurse workload, decreased visibility on the unit, and difficult interactions with family. This review suggests that single-family room NICUs introduce a complex situation in which trade-offs occur for nurses, most prominently the trade-off between visibility and privacy. Additionally, the literature is clear on what elements of nurses' work are impacted, but how the built environment influences these elements, and how these elements interact during nurses' work, is not as well understood. The current level of research and directions for future research are also discussed.

  5. Adolescent parenting in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstock, Amanda; van Manen, Michael

    2014-12-01

    This review presents data from studies that report on adolescent parents as part of larger neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) parent populations, as well as studies where adolescent parents are given central consideration. A systematic search for English publications from 1990 onward relevant to adolescent parenting in the NICU was conducted. Most studies reporting on adolescent parents focus on parental stress or parenting practices in the NICU. A few studies examine parent-staff communication, parental needs, and parent intervention programs. One study presents a qualitative examination of teenage mothers' experiences in the NICU. Areas for further research include experiences of younger adolescent parents, adolescent fathers, and same-sex partners; issues unique to adolescent parents; and support programs for adolescent parents in the NICU. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sound transmission into incubators in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, A; Cooper-Peel, C; Vos, P

    1999-01-01

    To measure the attenuation of sound by modern incubators. LEQ, LMAX, LPEAK, and frequency distribution were measured simultaneously inside and outside two recent model incubators. The attenuation of sound (outside minus inside) was 15 to 18 dBA with the motor off and 4 to 8 dBA with the motor on. There was a significant difference between incubators in their attenuation of sound. Octave band analysis showed attenuation in frequency bands of > 31.5 Hz with the motor off. With the motor on, the sound level inside the incubator was higher than outside at frequency bands of incubators reduces "averaged" sound exposure to levels near those recommended for the neonatal intensive care unit. Lower frequency sounds are louder inside the incubator and arise from the incubator motor.

  7. [Infection prevention and control in neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Elisiane; Lorenzini, Elisiane; da Costa, Tatiane Costa; da Silva, Eveline Franco

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to identify the knowledge of the nursing team of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) on infection control, identijfying the factors that facilitate or hinder the prevention and control of Healthcare Associated Infections (HICAI). A descriptive study using a qualitative research method conducted with three nurses and 15 nurse technicians, who work in a NICU of a charitable organization, in southern Brazil. It became evident that the nursing staff had great knowledge about the factors that facilitate the prevention and control of HCAI in NICU, the most important factor being proper hand hygiene. Among the factors that hinder infection prevention and control are to overcrowding and excessive workload. The efficient performance of the nursing staff is an important part of the strategy for prevention and control of HCAI.

  8. Respiratory changes related to prematurity in neonatal intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francieli Cristina Krey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify respiratory clinical changes in preterm newborns hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Methods: this is a documentary research with 145 medical records by an instrument with sociodemographic variables of preterm newborns and their mothers. Results: most of the newborn were male, 66.9% were born surgically, 64.8% were moderately premature, and the birth weights were between 1,500 and 2,500 grams. Among the respiratory changes, there were early respiratory dysfunction, hyaline membrane, and apnea. There was the prevalence of women in preterm labor (42.8%, water breaking (32.4% and pre-eclampsia (20.7% among others were found to be related to obstetric factors related to prematurity. Conclusion: a high incidence of preterm births was observed, with significant respiratory changes.

  9. Participatory Action Research in the Field of Neonatal Intensive Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Betty; Johannessen, Helle; Fenger-Grøn, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    (PAR) as a method to improve NICUs' service for fathers. Our goal is to develop a father-friendly NICU where both the needs of fathers and mothers are met using an approach based on PAR that involves fathers, mothers, interdisciplinary healthcare professionals, and managers. DESIGN AND METHODS...... of the father friendly NICU. CONCLUSIONS: This paper contributed new knowledge of how PAR can be used to ensure that participants engaged in the field are involved in the entire process; consequently, this will ensure that the changes are feasible and sustainable.......BACKGROUND: In neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) health care professionals typically give most of their attention to the infants and the mothers while many fathers feel uncertain and have an unmet need for support and guidance. This paper describes and discusses participatory action research...

  10. Respiratory Distress in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Retrospective Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Annagur

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the demographic characteristics of the newborns with respiratory difficulties, frequency of neonatal disease, analyze of the prognostic factors and effectiveness of treatment who were hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. Methods: In this study, file records of the newborns who were hospitalized in NICU of Meram Medical School were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Of the 771 newborns, 225 who admitted due to respiratory distress in 2008 and of the 692 newborns, 282 who admitted due to respiratory distress in 2009. Mean birth weight was 1954±972 gr in 2008, and 2140±1009 gr in 2009. Mean pregnancy weeks were 32,4±5,0 in 2008 and 33,4±4,9 in 2009. Diagnosis of patients were sepsis (77,8%, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS (40,4%, pneumothorax (20,9%, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA (12,4%, meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS (6,2%, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH (5,3%, pneumonia (3,6%, retinopathy of prematurely (ROP (3,1%, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD (2,7% and transient tachypne of newborn (TTN (2,2% in 2008. In 2009, percentage of the diagnosis was 69,5% sepsis, 33,3% RDS, 17,0% PDA, 16,0% pneumothorax, 10,3% pneumonia, 8,2% IVH, 6% TTN, 5,3% BPD, 3,2% MAS and 3,2% ROP. 33.7% of the patients were died in 2009 and 43,6% of them in 2008. Conclusion: The newborns with respiratory distress who admitted to the hospital must be evaluated according to the pregnancy week, way of birth and accompanying problems during first examination and convenient transportation of the ones who need to be cared in advanced center where an intensive care support can be applied to decrease mortality and morbidity of newborns distress. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(2.000: 90-97

  11. Exposure assessment of neonates in israel to x-ray radiation during hospitalization at neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, H.

    2005-03-01

    Nowadays nearly 10% of all births in western countries are premature. In the last decade, there has been an increase of 45% in the number of neonates that were born in Israel. At the same time, the survival of neonates, especially those with very low birth weight, VLBW, (less than 1,500 gr), has increased dramatically. Diagnostic radiology plays an important role in the assessment and treatment of neonates requiring intensive care. During their prolonged and complex hospitalization, these infants are exposed to multiple radiographic examinations involving X-ray radiation. The extent of the examinations that the infant undergoes depends on its birth weight, gestational age and its medical problems, where most of the treatment effort is focused especially on VLBW neonates. Most of the diagnostic X-ray examinations taken during the hospitalization of neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) consist of imaging of the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems, namely, the chest and abdomen. The imaging process is done using mobile X-ray units located at the NICUs. Due to their long hospitalization periods and complex medical condition, all neonates, and neonates with VLBW in particular, are exposed to a much higher level of diagnostic radiation, compared to normal newborns. The goal of this research was to assess the extent of the exposure of neonates in Israel to X-ray radiation during their hospitalization at the neonatal intensive care unit. Five NICUs, located at different geographical zones in Israel and treating 20% of all newborns in Israel every year, participated in this research. The research was conducted in three phases: Phase I: Collection of information on radiographic techniques and exposure parameters (e.g. kV, mAs, focus to skin distance (FSD), examination borders). 499 X-ray examinations (from 157 neonates) were evaluated for necessary and unnecessary exposure of the neonate's organs to X-ray radiation during these examinations. Phase II

  12. Instrumentation and implementation of pain evaluation scale in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz,Cibele Thomé da; Stumm,Eniva Miladi Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:Premature neonates admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Units receive approximately 130 to 234 manipulations every 24h, being many of them painful approaches. So, nursing team education and instrumentation are important for pain evaluation with a validated scale, which is excellence and safety assurance for patients’ care. In light of the above, our objective was to describe how instrumentation of the nursing team of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit was ca...

  13. Instrumentation and implementation of pain evaluation scale in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, Cibele Thomé da; Stumm, Eniva Miladi Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:Premature neonates admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Units receive approximately 130 to 234 manipulations every 24h, being many of them painful approaches. So, nursing team education and instrumentation are important for pain evaluation with a validated scale, which is excellence and safety assurance for patients’ care. In light of the above, our objective was to describe how instrumentation of the nursing team of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit was carried ...

  14. Analysis of neonatal sepsis in one neonatal intensive care unit for 6 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Chun

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the newborn, particularly in preterm. The objective of this study was to analyze the incidence rate, causative pathogens and clinical features of neonatal sepsis in one neonatal intensive care unit (NICU for 6 years. Methods : This study was retrospectively performed to review the clinical and laboratory characteristics including sex, gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, length of hospitalization, length of total parenteral nutrition, presence of central venous catheter, underlying diseases, laboratory findings, microorganisms isolated from blood culture, complications and mortality in 175 patients between January 2003 and December 2008. Results : 1 Sepsis was present in 175 of 3,747 infants for 6 years. There were more gram-positive organisms. 2 The gram-negatives were more prevalent in preterm. There were no significant differences of other clinical features between two groups. 3 Underlying diseases were found in 73.7%, and the most common disease was cardiovascular disease. The most common organisms of gram-positives and gram-negatives were methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and Serratia marcescens. 4 There was statistically significant difference on platelet counts between two groups (P&lt;0.05. 5 Complications were found in 18.3% and septic shock was the most common. MRSA was the most common pathogen in sepsis with complication. 6 The mortality rate was 7.4%. 7 There were differences in monthly blood stream infection/ 1,000 patient-days. Conclusion : The studies about the factors that can influence neonatal sepsis will contribute to decrease the infection rates in NICUs.

  15. Pharmacological approaches to the management of pain in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, K J S

    2007-05-01

    Effective and consistent management of neonatal pain remains a controversial issue. Premature infants are repeatedly subjected to painful tests and procedures or suffer painful conditions when they are most vulnerable. With different mechanisms transducing various types of pain the practice of 'one-drug fits all' becomes questionable. Clinicians must use the latest non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies for effective management of neonatal pain, distress, or agitation. Pharmacologic strategies for dealing with neonatal pain in the neonatal intensive care unit are described. Opioid therapy, once considered the mainstay for neonatal analgesia, may not be as effective as previously thought. Morphine infusions do not alter the neurological outcomes of preterm neonates and may not be effective against acute pain. Alternative approaches with methadone, ketamine, or local anesthetics should be considered. Clinicians must understand the contextual circumstances underlying pain in individual neonates and tailor therapy accordingly, using the most current evidence related to neonatal pain assessment and management.

  16. [Ventilator associated pneumonia in a neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izelo-Flores, Dassaev; Solórzano-Santos, Fortino; Miranda-Novales, María Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    The studies that describe risk factors for the development of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in newborn infants report dissimilar information, possibly related to the type of intensive care unit and population included. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for the development of VAP in a neonatal intensive-care unit. Case-control study. Patients with the diagnosis of VAP were classified as cases and compared with two controls of the same gestational age, weight, and diagnosis at admission. We analysed the data using descriptive and inferential statistics: chi-squared test, Student's t-test, odds-ratio, 95 % confidence interval and logistic regression analysis. A total of 45 cases and 90 controls were analysed. The risk factors statistically significant in the univariate analysis were: previous episode of sepsis, reintubation, airway malformation, exclusive parenteral nutrition, and days of mechanical ventilation. In the logistic regression analysis we obtained these data: reintubation (OR 41.26, CI 95 % 11.9-158.4, p = 0.001), airway malformation (OR 19.5, CI 95 % 1.34-282.3, p = 0.029), and days of mechanical ventilation (OR 8.9, CI 95 % 1.9-40.8, p = 0.005). These were the only risk factors independently associated to VAP. Of the significant risk factors, it is possible to intervene in reintubation events, by securing the endotracheal cannula with an adequate fixation, mobilize the patient ensuring safety, and follow a decannulation protocol to reduce ventilation days.

  17. Catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatal intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hyun Lee

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheters (CVCs are regularly used in intensive care units, and catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI remains a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections, particularly in preterm infants. Increased survival rate of extremely-low-birth-weight infants can be partly attributed to routine practice of CVC placement. The most common types of CVCs used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs include umbilical venous catheters, peripherally inserted central catheters, and tunneled catheters. CRBSI is defined as a laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (BSI with either a positive catheter tip culture or a positive blood culture drawn from the CVC. BSIs most frequently result from pathogens such as gram-positive cocci, coagulase-negative staphylococci , and sometimes gram-negative organisms. CRBSIs are usually associated with several risk factors, including prolonged catheter placement, femoral access, low birth weight, and young gestational age. Most NICUs have a strategy for catheter insertion and maintenance designed to decrease CRBSIs. Specific interventions slightly differ between NICUs, particularly with regard to the types of disinfectants used for hand hygiene and appropriate skin care for the infant. In conclusion, infection rates can be reduced by the application of strict protocols for the placement and maintenance of CVCs and the education of NICU physicians and nurses.

  18. A prospective study of pain experience in a neonatal intensive care unit of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengying; Shi, Xiaoyan; Chen, Yinhua; Cao, Zhaolan; Cheng, Rui; Xu, Yuxiang; Liu, Li; Li, Xiaonan

    2012-10-01

    To assess pain burden in neonates during their hospitalization in China and thus provide evidence for the necessity of neonatal pain management. The Neonatal Facial Coding System was used to evaluate pain in neonates. We prospectively collected data of all painful procedures performed on 108 neonates (term, 62; preterm, 46) recruited from admission to discharge in a neonatal intensive care unit of a university-affiliated hospital in China. We found that during hospitalization each preterm and term neonate was exposed to a median of 100.0 (range, 11 to 544) and 56.5 (range, 12 to 249) painful procedures, respectively. Most of the painful procedures were performed within the first 3 days. Preterm neonates, especially those born at 28 and 29 weeks' gestational age, experienced more pain than those born at 30 weeks' gestation or later (Ppainful procedures, tracheal aspiration was the most frequently performed on preterm neonates, and intravenous cannulation was the most common for term neonates. Moreover, tracheal intubations and femoral venous puncture were found to be the most painful. Notably, none of the painful procedures was accompanied by analgesia. Neonates, particularly preterm neonates, were exposed to numerous invasive painful procedures without appropriate analgesia in hospitals in China. The potential long-term impacts of poorly treated pain in neonates call for a change in pediatric practice in China and in countries with similar practices.

  19. The importance of parents in the neonatal intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercília Guimarães

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The premature birth and the hospitalization in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU are potential risk factors for the development and behavior of the newborn, as has been shown in recent studies. Premature birth of an infant is a distressing event for the family. Several feelings are experienced by parents during hospitalization of their baby in the NICU. Feelings of guilt, rejection, stress and anxiety are common. Also the attachment processes have the potential to be disrupted or delayed as a result of the initial separation of the premature newborn and the mother after the admission to the NICU. Added to these difficulties, there is the distortion of infant’s “ideal image”, created by the family, in contrast with the real image of the preterm. This relationship-based family-centered approach, the Neonatal Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP, promotes the idea that infants and their families are collaborators in developing an individualized program to maximize physical, mental, and emotional growth and health and to improve long-term outcomes for the high risk newborns. The presence of parents in NICUs and their involvement caring their babies, in a family centered care philosophy, is vital to improve the outcome of their infants and the relationships within each family. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  20. Lesions requiring wound management in a central tertiary neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszes, Angéla; Tálosi, Gyula; Máder, Krisztina; Orvos, Hajnalka; Kemény, Lajos; Csoma, Zsanett Renáta

    2017-04-01

    Most of the skin disorders that occur in neonatal intensive care units are due in part to the immaturity and vulnerability of the neonatal skin. Various iatrogenic diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are also conducive to iatrogenic damage. This study was to review the neonates admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit who needed wound management, and to assess the most common skin injuries and wounds, and their aetiology. Data were extracted from medical records of neonates who needed wound management in our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit between January 31, 2012 and January 31, 2013. Information about gestational age, sex, birth weight, area of involvement, wound aetiology, and therapy were collected. Among the 211 neonates observed, wound management was required in 10 cases of diaper dermatitis, 7 epidermal stripping, 6 extravasation injuries, 5 pressure ulcers, 1 surgical wound and infection, 1 thermal burn, and 5 other lesions. International guidelines in neonatal wound care practice are not available, and further research concerns are clearly needed. Dressings and antiseptic agents should be chosen with great care for application to neonates, with particular attention to the prevention of adverse events in this sensitive population. Team work among dermatologists, neonatologists and nurses is crucial for the successful treatment of neonates.

  1. A gap between Need and Reality: Neonatal Nursing Staff Requirements on a German Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Patry, Christian; Schindler, Monika; Reinhard, Julia; Hien, Steffen; Demirakca, Süha; Böhler, Thomas; Schaible, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recently, new staffing rules for neonatal nurses in intensive care units (ICU) were issued in Germany, using categories of care of the British Association of Perinatal Medicine as blueprint. Neonates on intensive care require a nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:1, on intensive surveillance (high dependency care) of 1:2. No requirements exist for special care, transitional care, and pediatric ICU patients. Using these rules, nursing staff requirement was calculated over a period of 31 consecutive da...

  2. The assessment of parental stress and support in the neonatal intensive care unit using the Parent Stress Scale - Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Melanie; Chur-Hansen, Anna; Winefield, Helen; Stanners, Melinda

    2015-09-01

    Parental stress in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has been reported, however identifying modifiable stress factors and looking for demographic parent factors related to stress has not been well researched. This study aims to identify the most stressful elements for parents in the neonatal intensive care unit. Parents of babies in an Australian neonatal intensive care unit (N=73) completed both the Parent Stress Scale - Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and a survey of parent and baby demographic and support experience variables (Parent Survey) over an 18-month period. Older parental age, very premature birth and twin birth were significantly associated with a higher Parent Stress Scale - Neonatal Intensive Care Unit score. Having a high score in the Relationship and Parental Role scale was strongly associated with attendance at the parent support group. These results indicate the variables associated with stress and this knowledge can be used by teams within hospitals to provide better supportive emotional care for parents. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Communicative strategies in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, A; Bertino, E; Tonetto, P; Giuliani, F; Varalda, A; Di Nicola, P; Cester, E; Occhi, L; Forno, M; Quadrino, S; Fabris, C

    2010-10-01

    Counseling is a professional intervention based on skills to communicate and to build relationships. The project 'Not alone', related to counseling at our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, is aimed to let counseling become a 'shared culture' for all the care givers. The first essential aspect is to form the ability of counseling through periodic courses for all professionals of the department (physicians, nurses, and physiotherapists). In our department, a professional counselor is present assisting the medical staff in direct counseling. The counselor's intervention allows a better parent orientation in the situation. A more effective sharing of these rules also facilitates the communication among parents and medical staff. Periodic meetings are established among the medical staff, in which the professional counselor discusses difficult situations to share possible communicative strategies. We wanted to have not only a common communicative style, but also common subjects, independent from the characteristics of each of us. Individuals are often faced with diverse situations. For every setting that we more frequently face in communication (for example the first interview with a parent of a very preterm infant) we have built an 'algorithm' that follows a pattern: (1) information always given; (2) frequent questions from parents; and (3) frequent difficulties in the communication. We also need to record important moments, for instance the 'case history of the communication': in fact it would be desirable to have the case history, a sheet dedicated to important communications that are absolutely to be shared with other professionals.

  4. Missed Opportunities for Sedation and Pain Management at a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, India

    OpenAIRE

    Kothari, Shikha Y.; Dongara, Ashish R.; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M.; Phatak, Ajay G.; Nimbalkar, Archana S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) undergo a multitude of painful and stressful procedures during the first days of life. Stress from this pain can lead to neurodevelopmental problems that manifest in later childhood and should be prevented. Objective To determine the number of painful procedures performed per day for each neonate, to verify documentation of painful procedures performed, and to, subsequently, note missed opportunities for providing pain ...

  5. Nursing diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Ana Paula de Souza; Silva,Maria de Lourdes Costa da; Souza,Nilba Lima de; Mota,Gabriela Miranda; França,Débora Feitosa de

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to elaborate the Nursing Diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a neonatal intensive care unit and characterize the profile of the neonates and their mothers.METHOD: a cross-sectional and quantitative study, with a sample of 41 neonates. A physical examination and consultation of the hospital records were undertaken, using an instrument. The elaboration of the Nursing Diagnoses followed a process of diagnostic inference and was based on the North American Nursing Diagnosis Associati...

  6. Patterns of admission and factors associated with neonatal mortality among neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demisse AG

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abayneh Girma Demisse, Fentahun Alemu, Mahlet Abayneh Gizaw, Zemene Tigabu School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Introduction: The neonatal period is a highly vulnerable time for an infant completing many of the physiologic adjustments required for life outside the uterus. As a result, there are high rates of morbidity and mortality. The three major causes of mortality in developing countries include prematurity, infection, and perinatal asphyxia. The aim of this study was to identify the patterns of neonatal admission and factors associated with mortality among neonates admitted at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU of University of Gondar Hospital.Materials and methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted among all admitted neonates in the NICU of University of Gondar referral hospital from December 1, 2015 to August 31, 2016. Information was extracted retrospectively during admission from patient records and death certificates, using a pretested questionnaire. The data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20, and p-values <0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results: A total of 769 neonates was included in the study. There were 448 (58.3% male neonates, and 398 (51.8% neonates were rural residents. More than two-thirds of the 587 deliveries (76.3% were performed in tertiary hospitals. Neonatal morbidity included hypothermia 546 (71%, sepsis 522 (67.9%, prematurity 250 (34.9%, polycythemia 242 (31.5%, hypoglycemia 142 (18.5, meconium aspiration syndrome 113 (14.7%, and perinatal asphyxia 96 (12.5%. The overall mortality was 110 (14.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.9–16.9 of which 69 (62.7% deaths occurred in the first 24 hours of age. In the multivariate analysis, mortality was associated with perinatal asphyxia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 5.97; 95% CI: 3.06–11.64, instrumental delivery (AOR: 2.99; 95% CI: 1.08–8.31, and early onset

  7. Should euthanasia be legal? An international survey of neonatal intensive care units staff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuttini, M.; Casotto, V.; Kaminski, M.; Beaufort, I.D. de; Berbik, I.; Hansen, G.; Kollee, L.A.A.; Kucinskas, A.; Lenoir, S.; Levin, A.V.; Orzalesi, M.; Persson, J.; Rebagliato, M.; Reid, M.; Saracci, R.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present the views of a representative sample of neonatal doctors and nurses in 10 European countries on the moral acceptability of active euthanasia and its legal regulation. DESIGN: A total of 142 neonatal intensive care units were recruited by census (in the Netherlands, Sweden,

  8. Clinical User Experience Testing of Ambient Lighting for Neonatal Intensive Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, P.R.; Visser, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Believed to the first application of its kind in the UK, Philips hasinstalled dynamic and ambient LED lighting in the recently extendedNeonatal Intensive Care Unit, (NICU), at St Michael’s Hospital, Bristol. The neonatal facility was redeveloped in late 2011 with a newICU built next to an existing

  9. Perceptions of parents, nurses, and physicians on neonatal intensive care practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latour, Jos M.; Hazelzet, Jan A.; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2010-01-01

    To identify satisfaction with neonatal intensive care as viewed by parents and healthcare professionals and to explore similarities and differences between parents and healthcare professionals. A 3-round Delphi method to identify neonatal care issues (round 1) and to determine the importance of

  10. Perceptions of parents, nurses, and physicians on neonatal intensive care practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Latour (Jos); J.A. Hazelzet (Jan); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); J.B. van Goudoever (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To identify satisfaction with neonatal intensive care as viewed by parents and healthcare professionals and to explore similarities and differences between parents and healthcare professionals. STUDY DESIGN: A 3-round Delphi method to identify neonatal care issues (round 1)

  11. Evaluation of pentavalent rotavirus vaccination in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrall, Samuel; Doll, Margaret K; Nhan, Charles; Gonzales, Milagros; Perreault, Thérèse; Lamer, Philippe; Quach, Caroline

    2015-09-22

    Preterm infants are at highest risk for severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. While rotavirus vaccination is recommended for age-eligible, clinically stable preterm infants, controversy exists regarding vaccination of these infants during hospitalization. The objectives of this study were to examine tolerance of pentavalent rotavirus vaccination (RV5) among hospitalized infants and nosocomial rotavirus transmission in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) at two urban hospitals. A retrospective, medical chart review of patients receiving RV5 vaccine was conducted to examine clinical histories of vaccine recipients. Average risk differences of gastrointestinal complications were estimated between the three days prior and up to four weeks following RV5 vaccination. A generalized linear regression model was used to examine the association between days since RV5 administration and daily feeding totals, using fixed effects to account for individual-level clustering. Rates of nosocomial rotavirus from active surveillance were compared between pre- and post-NICU-based vaccination periods. From July 1, 2011 to March 30, 2013, RV5 vaccination was initiated for 102 NICU patients. No changes in the average risk of gastrointestinal complications or daily feeding among participants overall were detected following RV5 administration. Rates of nosocomial rotavirus were similar during the periods before and after NICU-based vaccination. On average, RV5 appeared to be well tolerated among vaccine recipients, with no increase in nosocomial rotavirus transmission observed following NICU-based rotavirus vaccination. While the benefits of a RV5 NICU-based vaccination program for otherwise eligible preterm infants seem to outweigh the possible risk of vaccine virus transmission, further studies are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacterial diversity in two Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krissi M Hewitt

    Full Text Available Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs are particularly susceptible to opportunistic infection. Infected infants have high mortality rates, and survivors often suffer life-long neurological disorders. The causes of many NICU infections go undiagnosed, and there is debate as to the importance of inanimate hospital environments (IHEs in the spread of infections. We used culture-independent next-generation sequencing to survey bacterial diversity in two San Diego NICUs and to track the sources of microbes in these environments. Thirty IHE samples were collected from two Level-Three NICU facilities. We extracted DNA from these samples and amplified the bacterial small subunit (16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence using 'universal' barcoded primers. The purified PCR products were pooled into a single reaction for pyrosequencing, and the data were analyzed using QIIME. On average, we detected 93+/-39 (mean +/- standard deviation bacterial genera per sample in NICU IHEs. Many of the bacterial genera included known opportunistic pathogens, and many were skin-associated (e.g., Propionibacterium. In one NICU, we also detected fecal coliform bacteria (Enterobacteriales in a high proportion of the surface samples. Comparison of these NICU-derived sequences to previously published high-throughput 16S rRNA amplicon studies of other indoor environments (offices, restrooms and healthcare facilities, as well as human- and soil-associated environments, found the majority of the NICU samples to be similar to typical building surface and air samples, with the notable exception of the IHEs which were dominated by Enterobacteriaceae. Our findings provide evidence that NICU IHEs harbor a high diversity of human-associated bacteria and demonstrate the potential utility of molecular methods for identifying and tracking bacterial diversity in NICUs.

  13. Nosocomial infections in a Dutch neonatal intensive care unit: surveillance study with definitions for infection specifically adapted for neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwet, W. C.; Kaiser, A. M.; van Elburg, R. M.; Berkhof, J.; Fetter, W. P. F.; Parlevliet, G. A.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M. J. E.

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of nosocomial infection in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) is high compared with other wards. However, no definitions for hospital-acquired infection are available for NICUs. The aim of this study was to measure the incidence of such infections and to identify risk factors in the

  14. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Morbidity and Mortality for Preterm Neonates Admitted to a Tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsel, Courtney; Keller, Rebecca; Kuo, Chia-Ling; Campbell, Winston A; Hussain, Naveed

    2017-10-25

    The objective of this study was to assess whether in-hospital morbidity or mortality differed by race/ethnicity for preterm neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In a retrospective cohort study, preterm infants, preterm (VPT) infants, preterm neonates were identified; 153 were excluded leaving 4802 for analysis. After controlling covariates that were chosen a priori, there was no difference across REGs for IHM (all between-race comparison p values > 0.0125). There was a significant difference in RDS among Black neonates (BNs) (aOR 0.57, 95% CI 0.45-0.73; p  0.0125). In the VPT cohort sub-analysis, BNs experienced a significant 59% reduction in IHM compared to WNs (BNs aOR 0.41, 95% CI 0.22-0.73; p = 0.003). MNs experienced a 46% reduction in ROP compared to WNs (aOR 0.54, 95% CI 0.35-0.81; p = 0.004). There was no difference in RDS, IVH, or NEC in very preterm infants across REGs (all between comparison p values > 0.0125). In preterm neonates, in-hospital mortality does not significantly differ across racial and ethnic groups. However, in very preterm infants, in-hospital mortality for Black neonates is improved. There are morbidity differences (RDS, ROP) seen among racial/ethnic groups.

  15. Practice patterns of physiotherapists in neonatal intensive care units: A national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Chokshi, Tejas; Alaparthi, Gopala Krishna; Krishnan, Shyam; Vaishali, K.; Zulfeequer, C.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine practice pattern of physiotherapists in the neonatal intensive care units (ICUs) in India with regards to cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular physiotherapy. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted across India, in which 285 questionnaires were sent via e-mail to physiotherapists working in neonatal intensive care units. Results: A total of 139 completed questionnaires were returned with a response rate of 48.7%, with a majority of responses from Kar...

  16. Hospitalization of a child in the Neonatal Intensive Care – parents’ experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopeć Agnieszka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Significant progress in the perinatal and intensive care therapy resulted in a meaningful increase of survival of extremely immature, and burdened with severe diseases neonates. Although infants are the patients of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, the needs of their parents should also be noticed and realized. The aim of the study was the analysis of the parents’ experiences of children hospitalized in the NICU.

  17. Clinical Competence and Its Related Factors of Nurses in Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirlashari, Jila; Qommi, Robabeh; Nariman, Shahin; Bahrani, Nasser; Begjani, Jamaloddin

    2016-12-01

    Introduction: Clinical competence of nurses working in the neonatal intensive care units together with advancements in medical science and technology increased the survival rate of newborns that need specialized care. To ensure the quality of care and provide the safety of patients, evaluating the clinical competence of nurses seems necessary. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical competence of nurses in the neonatal intensive care units. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 117 nurses working in the neonatal intensive care units of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected by census method. The research tool was Development of Competency Inventory for Registered Nurses questionnaire which completed by self-assessment. The mean clinical competence scores of participants categorized into 3 levels: weak: 273. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13 using the Pearson correlation coefficient, t-test and Chi-square test. Results: The highest levels of competence were related to critical thinking and research attitude and interpersonal relationships, and the lowest level was related to training and mentoring. There was a direct statistically significant relationship between marital status, employment status, level of interest in working in the neonatal intensive-care units and the clinical competence of nurses. Conclusion: Since the clinical competence of nurses in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units is vital, some variables such as interest in the nursing profession, employment status, the neonatal intensive theoretical and practical training courses and the amount of overtime working hours should be taken into consideration.

  18. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  19. The impact of architectural design upon the environmental sound and light exposure of neonates who require intensive care: an evaluation of the Boekelheide Neonatal Intensive Care Nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, D C; Akram Khan, M; Munson, D P; Reid, E J; Helseth, C C; Buggy, J

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the differences in environmental sound, illumination and physiological parameters in the Boekelheide Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (BNICU), which was designed to comply with current recommendations and standards, as compared with a conventional neonatal intensive care unit (CNICU). Prospectively designed observational study. Median sound levels in the unoccupied BNICU (37.6 dBA) were lower than the CNICU (42.1 dBA, P<0.001). Median levels of minimum (6.4 vs 48.4 lux, P<0.05) and maximum illumination (357 vs 402 lux, P<0.05) were lower in the BNICU. A group of six neonates delivered at 32 weeks gestation showed significantly less periodic breathing (14 vs 21%) and awake time (17.6 vs 29.3%) in the BNICU as compared to the CNICU. Light and sound were both significantly reduced in the BNICU. Care in the BNICU was associated with improved physiological parameters.

  20. The first occurrence of a CTX-M ESBL-producing Escherichia coli outbreak mediated by mother to neonate transmission in an Irish neonatal intensive care unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Ciara

    2017-01-05

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) comprise part of the normal vaginal microflora. Transfer from mother to neonate can occur during delivery resulting, sometimes, in neonatal bacterial disease. Here, we aim to report the first outbreak of CTX-M ESBL-producing E. coli with evidence of mother-to-neonate transmission in an Irish neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) followed by patient-to-patient transmission.

  1. Accuracy of temporal artery thermometry in neonatal intensive care infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gail; Flannery-Bergey, Diane; Randall-Rollins, Kris; Curry, Diane; Rowe, Sandra; Teague, Megan; Tuininga, Cynthia; Schroeder, Sharon

    2011-02-01

    To determine the accuracy of temporal artery and axillary temperatures and the discomfort level of stable neonates during temperature measurement. Convenience sample of neonates between the ages of 32 and 40 weeks' gestation cared for in an isolette or crib. A method-comparison design was used to compare different methods for noninvasive temperature monitoring (infra-red temporal artery; axillary electronic) to core body temperatures (indwelling rectal probe). Bias and precision of test temperature devices (temporal artery; axillary). Bias and precision for the temporal artery and axillary devices were 0.30 ± 0.44 and 0.28 ± 0.33, respectively. Analysis of variance found significant differences between both temporal and axillary temperatures compared to rectal temperatures (P measurement were significantly greater with axillary than increases after temporal artery temperature measurement (P = .03). This study found that body temperature measured with the temporal artery thermometer was similar to temperatures obtained with an axillary thermometer in stable, afebrile neonates. The use of temporal artery thermometry appears to be an acceptable approach for noninvasive temperature measurement in neonates, which causes less discomfort in neonates.

  2. Radiation dose in the neonatal intensive care unit of Antoine Beclere Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebreton, C.; Rehel, J. L.; Aubert, B.; Musset, D.

    2006-07-01

    As part of a program aiming a better knowledge of the medical exposure of the french population and in the frame of the principle of optimisation, a study of radiation doses to neonates was carried out in neonatal intensive care unit of Antoine Beclere hospital. From March to August 2005, entrance surface dose (ESD) received by 63 neonates classified according the their weight (184 X-ray examinations) was measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) during examination. The mean ESD ESD per exposure was found between 20 and 37 {mu}Gy according to the weight of neonates. The newborn of less than 1000 g at birth have a mean of 20 X-ray examinations. Above 1000 g the number of X-ray examinations was between 5 and 8.5. During their stay in neonatal intensive care unit, the total ESD of neonates was from 500 {mu}Gy for the smallest Neonates (<1000 g) and the other respectively. Results indicate that neonate exposition, is very small compared with french and international data. ESD was significantly lower than the french reference level of 80 {mu}Gy. (Author)

  3. Neonatal Sepsis”: Bacteria & their Susceptibility Pattern towards Antibiotics in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Chandra Madhur; Agrawal, Ravi Prakash; Sharan, Hariom; Kumar, Bijay; Sharma, Deepti; Bhatia, Santokh Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neonatal sepsis is one of the most common causes of neonatal mortality and morbidity, particularly in the developing countries. Its causative bacteria and their respective sensitivity patterns are different in each hospital and region. The objective of this study was to determine the causative bacteria and pattern of susceptibility to antibiotics in NICU of a tertiary care centre, which in turn may help in implementation of empirical therapy.

  4. Systematic review of qualitative studies exploring parental experiences in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Maghaireh, Dua'a Fayiz; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim; Chan, Chong Mei; Piaw, Chua Yan; Al Kawafha, Mariam Mofleh

    2016-10-01

    To determine the feasibility and utility of a thematic analysis approach to synthesising qualitative evidence about parental experiences in the neonatal intensive care unit. Admission of infants to the neonatal intensive care unit is usually an unexpected event for parents who can cause them to experience psychosocial difficulties. A qualitative systematic review is the best method for exploring these parents' experiences regarding this type of admission. Systematic review. Qualitative studies in peer-reviewed journals aimed at understanding parental experiences regarding infant neonatal intensive care unit admission were identified in six electronic databases. Three reviewers selected relevant articles and assessed the quality of the methodological studies using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. A thematic analysis approach was used to identify the most common themes in the studies describing parental experiences in the neonatal intensive care unit. A total of eighty articles were identified; nine studies were included in this review. Four studies used semistructured interviews, three used interviews, one used self-reporting and one used both focus group and interview methodologies. Common themes across parents' experiences were the stress of hospitalisation, alteration in parenting roles and the impact of infant hospitalisation on psychological health. Having an infant hospitalised in the neonatal intensive care unit is a stressful experience for parents. This experience is the result of exposure to different stressors related to the infant's condition, an alteration in parenting roles or the neonatal intensive care unit environment and staffing. These parents suffered negative psychological effects, experienced an interrupted development of a healthy parent-infant attachment and/or felt parental role alteration. The study's findings are crucial for neonatal intensive care unit nurses to develop intervention strategies and programmes that help parents to

  5. Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Low Birth Weight Neonates at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Retrospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Lee, Wei-Te; Chen, Hsiu-Lin

    2017-02-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is one of the most common healthcare-associated infections among ventilated patients. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and risk factors for the development of VAP in intubated low birth weight (LBW) neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit. LBW infants (neonatal intensive care unit of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital from January 2005 to December 2009 were enrolled. We retrospectively analyzed perinatal and neonatal data of the enrolled intubated LBW infants by chart review. Six hundred and five LBW infants were analyzed. One hundred and fourteen of the infants were intubated for >48 hours, 15 (13.2%) of whom had VAP. Of these 15 patients, the average age at onset of VAP was 24.0 ± 11.2 days, the average postmenstrual age was 30.6 ± 1.8 weeks, and the mean gestational age was 27.1 ± 2.3 weeks, which was significantly lower than the mean gestational age in the group without VAP (30.2 ± 3.5 weeks). The mean birth body weight was 944.4 ± 268.4 g in the VAP group and 1340.1 ± 455.4 g in the group without VAP (p 48 hours in our neonatal intensive care unit. VAP most frequently occurred at a postmenstrual age of 30-32 weeks in this study. Longer duration of tube placement and parenteral nutrition were found in the VAP group. Early removal of the endotracheal tube and adequate enteral nutrition may decrease the occurrence of VAP in LBW infants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Pain coping strategies: Neonatal intensive care unit survivors in adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzewinkel, C.J. van; Been, J.V.; Dielemane, J.P.; Katgert, T.; Boelen-van der Loo, T.; Pal, S.M. van der; Dijk, M. van; Kramer, P.W.; Andriessena, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on long-term consequences of preterm birth on pain coping later in life are limited. Aim The aim of this study was to assess whether gestational age, birth weight and neonatal disease severity have an effect on the pain coping strategy in adolescents born preterm or with low birth

  7. Parental satisfaction in the traditional system of neonatal intensive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To assess the parental satisfaction with traditional systems of NICU care in a public sector hospital and to identify the areas that ... A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview the parents of the neonates on the day of discharge. Fifteen ... as a superior authority, many voiced their desire for doctors to be.

  8. The profile of indications for radiography in the Neonatal Intensive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Radiography is a key diagnostic tool in paediatric care. A pro-active approach (including the use of radiography) is required to ensure e ective management of these patients. Taking into account the widely documented harmful e ects of ionising radiation and the small organ masses of neonates, the number of ...

  9. The profile of indications for radiography in the Neonatal Intensive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Radiography is a key diagnostic tool in paediatric care. A pro-active approach (including the use of radiography) is required to ensure e.ective management of these patients. Taking into account the widely documented harmful e.ects of ionising radiation and the small organ masses of neonates, the number of ...

  10. The BRACELET Study: surveys of mortality in UK neonatal and paediatric intensive care trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Platt Martin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subject of death and bereavement in the context of randomised controlled trials in neonatal or paediatric intensive care is under-researched. The objectives of this phase of the Bereavement and RAndomised ControlLEd Trials (BRACELET Study were to determine trial activity in UK neonatal and paediatric intensive care (2002-06; numbers of deaths before hospital discharge; and variation in mortality across intensive care units and trials and to determine whether bereavement support policies were available within trials. These are essential prerequisites to considering the implications of future policies and practice subsequent to bereavement following a child's enrolment in a trial. Methods The units survey involved neonatal units providing level 2 or 3 care, and paediatric units providing level II care or above; the trials survey involved trials where allocation was randomized and interventions were delivered to intensive care patients, or to parents but designed to affect patient outcomes. Results Information was available from 191/220 (87% neonatal units (149 level 2 or 3 care; and 28/32 (88% paediatric units. 90/177 (51% eligible responding units participated in one or more trial (76 neonatal, 14 paediatric and 54 neonatal units and 6 paediatric units witnessed at least one death. 50 trials were identified (36 neonatal, 14 paediatric. 3,137 babies were enrolled in neonatal trials, 210 children in paediatric trials. Deaths ranged 0-278 (median [IQR interquartile range] 2 [1, 14.5] per neonatal trial, 0-4 (median [IQR] 1 [0, 2.5] per paediatric trial. 534 (16% participants died post-enrolment: 522 (17% in neonatal trials, 12 (6% in paediatric trials. Trial participants ranged 1-236 (median [IQR] 21.5 [8, 39.8] per neonatal unit, 1-53 (median [IQR] 11.5 [2.3, 33.8] per paediatric unit. Deaths ranged 0-37 (median [IQR] 3.5 [0.3, 8.8] per neonatal unit, 0-7 (median [IQR] 0.5 [0, 1.8] per paediatric unit. Three trials had a

  11. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Melissa U.; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent source of infections affecting premature and critically ill infants in neonatal intensive care units. Neonates are particularly vulnerable to colonization and infection with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and many studies have attempted to identify risk factors that predispose certain infants to its acquisition in order to discover potential areas for clinical intervention. In addition, epidemiologic assessment of transmi...

  12. STRESS AND SELF EFFICACY AMONG NURSES IN NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNITS

    OpenAIRE

    Rehab Hani Elkazaz; Abeer Elsayed Berma

    2017-01-01

    Stress is one of the main factors affecting one's efficiency as well as staff health and quality of nursing services. Neonatal units can be stressful environments for nurses, infants and families as well. Since there is no evidence in this regard in Egypt. Aim of the study: to determine the relationship between stress and self-efficacy among staff nurses in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) in Port Said. Method: This was a descriptive correlation study including thirty three nurses wor...

  13. Ventilator-associated Pneumonia in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Due to Chryseobacterium indologenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonello, Vicente S; Daht, Priscila; Polli, Janaína; Gross, Milton; Colvero, Maurício

    2017-12-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia represents one of the most common nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units, increasing morbidity and mortality and associated costs. The authors report the case of a neonatal patient with ventilator-associated pneumonia secondary to Chryseobacterium indologenes and a review of the literature. The most effective empiric treatment for C. indologenes infection remains unclear due to limited data in the literature, and therefore, therapy should be adjusted in accordance with the result of the susceptibility profile.

  14. The Study of Nosocomial Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, A prospective study in Northwest Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Bagher Hosseini; Babak Abdinia; Mohammad Ahangarzadeh Rezaee; Shahram Abdoli oskouie

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nosocomial infections are an important cause of mortality in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Therefore, in this study, the incidence and prevalence of nosocomial infections were determined in NICUs of the three largest neonatal centers in northwest Iran, and the causative bacteria were identified in order to provide potential solutions to control the infections in these hospitals. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive-prospective study in which the cases of nosocomia...

  15. Antibiotic use and misuse in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Nidhi; Cotten, C Michael; Smith, P Brian

    2012-03-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes significant morbidity and mortality, especially in preterm infants. Clinicians are compelled to treat with empiric antibiotics at the first signs of suspected sepsis. Broad-spectrum antibiotics and prolonged treatment with empiric antibiotics are associated with adverse outcomes. Most common neonatal pathogens are susceptible to narrow-spectrum antibiotics. The choice of antibiotic and duration of empiric treatment are strongly associated with center-based risk factors. Clinicians should treat with short courses of narrow-spectrum antibiotics whenever possible, choosing the antibiotics and treatment duration to balance the risks of potentially untreated sepsis against the adverse effects of treatment in infants with sterile cultures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A simple high-dose gentamicin regimen showed no side effects among neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Anne Sofie; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Dalegaard, Mette Correll

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment of infections in neonates with gentamicin is a balance between optimising bactericidal effect and minimising adverse effects. Previously, at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Kolding Hospital, Denmark, neonates suspected of having infections were treated daily...... infection. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Danish Data Protection Agency (2008-58-0035)....

  17. [The emotions of caregivers in neonatal and paediatric intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birsan, Sandrine; Guichoux, Julie; Rodriguez, Marie-Pierre; Brissaud, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    When treating a child hospitalised in a neonatal or paediatric unit, the emotions of the child's parents are of particular concern for the caregivers. The emotional experience of the nursing teams, however, is rarely taken into account, despite it having an impact on the quality of the support. Group discussion and individual reflection around professionals' emotions is essential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Pain coping strategies: Neonatal intensive care unit survivors in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ganzewinkel, Christ-Jan; Been, Jasper V; Dieleman, Jeanne P; Katgert, Titia; Boelen-van der Loo, Tera; van der Pal, Sylvia M; van Dijk, Monique; Kramer, Boris W; Andriessen, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Data on long-term consequences of preterm birth on pain coping later in life are limited. To assess whether gestational age, birth weight and neonatal disease severity have effect on pain coping style in adolescents born preterm or with low birth weight. Observational, longitudinal study (Project On Preterm and SGA-infants, POPS-19). We analyzed data of 537 adolescents at the age of 19 years, who were born at a gestational age pain coping questionnaire (PCQ) that assesses pain coping strategies in three higher-order factors: approach ("to deal with pain"), problem-focused avoidance ("to disengage from pain") and emotion-focused avoidance ("expression of pain"). Furthermore, their pain coping effectiveness, pain controllability and emotional reactions to pain were assessed. All participants completed an IQ test. Univariate analysis showed no significant correlation between length of stay, sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis and any of the higher-order factors. Approach was only correlated with IQ. Problem-focused avoidance was, in the multiple regression analysis (including gestational age, IVH and IQ), only correlated with IQ. For emotion-focused avoidance (including birth weight, SGA, IVH, respiratory support and IQ) three independent predictors remained: IVH was positively correlated, while respiratory support and IQ were negatively correlated with emotion-focused avoidance. Early neonatal characteristics and neonatal disease severity have limited effect on pain coping style in adolescence. Higher IQ was associated with the use of adaptive coping strategies, while maladaptive strategies were used less. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Wideband acoustic immittance for assessing middle ear functioning for preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandel Gouws

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary aim of newborn hearing screening is to detect permanent hearing loss. Because otoacoustic emissions (OAEs and automated auditory brainstem response (AABR are sensitive to hearing loss, they are often used as screening tools. On the other hand, false-positive results are most often because of transient outer- and middle ear conditions. Wideband acoustic immittance (WAI, which includes physical measures known as reflectance and absorbance, has shown potential for accurate assessment of middle ear function in young infants. Objective: The main objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of WAI as a diagnostic tool for assessing middle ear functioning in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU designed for premature and ill neonates. A further objective was to indicate the difference between the reflectance values of tones and click stimuli. Method: Fifty-six at-risk neonates (30 male and 26 female, with a mean age at testing of 35.6 weeks (range: 32–37 weeks and a standard deviation of 1.6 from three private hospitals, who passed both the distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE and AABR tests, were evaluated prior to discharge from the NICU. Neonates who presented with abnormal DPOAE and AABR results were excluded from the study. WAI was measured by using chirp and tone stimuli. In addition to reflectance, the reflectance area index (RAI values were calculated. Results: Both tone and chirp stimuli indicated high-power reflectance values below a frequency of 1.5 kHz. Median reflectance reached a minimum of 0.67 at 1 kHz – 2 kHz but increased to 0.7 below 1 kHz and 0.72 above 2 kHz for the tone stimuli. For chirp stimuli, the median reflectance reached a minimum of 0.51 at 1 kHz – 2 kHz but increased to 0.68 below 1 kHz and decreased to 0.5 above 2 kHz. A comparison between the present study and previous studies on WAI indicated a substantial variability across all frequency ranges

  20. Erros medicamentosos em unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal Medication errors in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bandeira de Melo Escovedo Lerner

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a incidência e o tipo de erros médicos em uma unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal e a relação entre o erro e o estado clínico do paciente. MÉTODOS: Revisamos os prontuários médicos, durante os primeiros 7 dias de hospitalização, de todos os recém-nascidos de alto risco admitidos por um período de 3 meses. RESULTADOS: Setenta e três pacientes foram admitidos durante o período de estudo. A média de peso de nascimento foi de 2.140 g (640-5.020 g, e a idade gestacional média foi de 34 semanas (25-40 semanas. Dos 73 prontuários analisados, 40 (55% apresentaram um ou mais erros. Um total de 365 dias de hospitalização foi analisado, e 95 erros médicos foram detectados (um erro por 3,9 dias de hospitalização. O erro mais freqüente esteve associado com uso de medicamentos (84,2%. Uso de procedimentos terapêuticos (medicamentos, fototerapia, etc. sem prescrição adequada no prontuário do paciente (erro de comissão representou 7,4% dos erros, e a incidência de erros de omissão foi de 8,4%. A incidência de erros médicos foi significativamente maior em recém-nascidos com idade gestacional menor. CONCLUSÕES: A incidência de erros no cuidado de recém-nascidos de alto risco é elevada. Deve-se incentivar estratégias para melhorar a educação de profissionais da saúde envolvidos no cuidado e o desenvolvimento da cultura local, divulgando algoritmos claros e acessíveis para orientar o comportamento quando há ocorrência de erros.OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and type of medical errors in a newborn intensive care unit and the relationship between the error and the patient's clinical status. METHODS: We reviewed the medical charts, during the first 7 days of hospitalization, of all high-risk newborn infants admitted for a period of 3 months. RESULTS: Seventy-three patients were admitted during the study period. Their mean birth weight was 2,140 g (640-5,020 g and mean gestational age was 34

  1. Parental involvement and kangaroo care in European neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Losacco, Valentina; Maraschini, Alice

    2012-01-01

    To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out.......To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out....

  2. Human Milk Management Redesign: Improving Quality and Safety and Reducing Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurse Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settle, Margaret Doyle; Coakley, Amanda Bulette; Annese, Christine Donahue

    2017-02-01

    Human milk provides superior nutritional value for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit and is the enteral feeding of choice. Our hospital used the system engineering initiative for patient safety model to evaluate the human milk management system in our neonatal intensive care unit. Nurses described the previous process in a negative way, fraught with opportunities for error, increased stress for nurses, and the need to be away from the bedside and their patients. The redesigned process improved the quality and safety of human milk management and created time for the nurses to spend with their patients.

  3. [Study on antibiotic resistance ofEscherichia coliandEnterococcuscolonized in intestine of neonates from neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X F; Liu, Z J; Chen, X; Li, J; Cui, Z G; Kan, B; Ma, J R; Cui, J H

    2017-09-10

    Objective: To understand the antibiotic resistance of bacteria colonized in intestine of the neonates from neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and provide evidence to guide clinical antibiotic treatment. Methods: From May, 2014 to May, 2015, a total of 572 stool samples were collected from the neonates of NICU in our hospital. Escherichia coli and Enterococcus were detected with VITEK-2 system. Results: A total of 328 strains of E. coli and 243 strains of Enterococcus were isolated respectively in this study. The 199 strains of E. coli selected for drug susceptibility test showed lower resistant rate to imipenem, ertapenem, amikacin, nitrofurantoin, ranging from 0.50 % to 3.52 % and showed higher resistant rate to ampicillin, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and cefazolin, ranging from 54.27 % to 84.92 % . No meropenem resistant strainsere were found. The percentage of ESBLs production strains was 45 % . The multi drug resistance test showed that 34.6 % of the strains were resistant to four antibiotics. Three strains were resistant to seven antibiotics. The 243 strains of Enterococcus showed lower resistant rate to quinupristin/dalfopristin, nitrofurantoin, streptomycin, ranging from 0.41 % to 4.53 % and showed higher resistant rate to ampicillin, benzylpenicillin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, gentamicin and erythromycin, ranging from 70.78 % to 91.77 % . No strains which were resistant to tigecycline, vancomycin, rina thiazole amine/ketone were found. The multi drug-resistance test showed that 86.5 % of the strains were resistant to five antibiotics. Conclusions: According to the analysis of the 199 strains of E. coli and 243 strains of Enterococcus isolated from the neonates, we found that the resistance of intestinal bacteria in the neonates was very serious, showing multi drug resistance. It is necessary to use antibiotics according to the drug susceptibility test results in clinical treatment.

  4. Student experiences in the neonatal intensive care unit: addendum to neonatal physical therapy competencies and clinical training models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, Mary Jane; Sweeney, Jane K; Dannemiller, Lisa; Heriza, Carolyn B

    2010-01-01

    To describe the appropriate experience for entry-level physical therapist students in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Care for infants in the NICU represents a subspecialty within pediatric physical therapy delivered in a very complex environment. Recommendations for designing student educational experiences related to the NICU are provided. Supervised observation is the appropriate level of NICU experience for physical therapy students. Observation in the NICU cannot be used to demonstrate entry-level clinical competency defined as managing 100% patient caseload in the setting. Additional closely supervised experiences with older, less fragile infants and children in neonatal follow-up clinics and pediatric wards can provide opportunities for entry-level physical therapist students interested in pediatrics to participate in examination and intervention with young children.

  5. Sedation and analgesia practices in neonatal intensive care units (EUROPAIN): results from a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Eriksson, Mats; Courtois, Emilie; Boyle, Elaine; Avila-Alvarez, Alejandro; Andersen, Randi Dovland; Sarafidis, Kosmas; Polkki, Tarja; Matos, Cristina; Lago, Paola; Papadouri, Thalia; Montalto, Simon Attard; Ilmoja, Mari-Liis; Simons, Sinno; Tameliene, Rasa; van Overmeire, Bart; Berger, Angelika; Dobrzanska, Anna; Schroth, Michael; Bergqvist, Lena; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S

    2015-10-01

    Neonates who are in pain or are stressed during care in the intensive care unit (ICU) are often given sedation or analgesia. We investigated the current use of sedation or analgesia in neonatal ICUs (NICUs) in European countries. EUROPAIN (EUROpean Pain Audit In Neonates) was a prospective cohort study of the management of sedation and analgesia in patients in NICUs. All neonates admitted to NICUs during 1 month were included in this study. Data on demographics, methods of respiration, use of continuous or intermittent sedation, analgesia, or neuromuscular blockers, pain assessments, and drug withdrawal syndromes were gathered during the first 28 days of admission to NICUs. Multivariable linear regression models and propensity scores were used to assess the association between duration of tracheal ventilation (TV) and exposure to opioids, sedatives-hypnotics, or general anaesthetics in neonates (O-SH-GA). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01694745. From Oct 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013, 6680 neonates were enrolled in 243 NICUs in 18 European countries. Mean gestational age of these neonates was 35.0 weeks (SD 4.6) and birthweight was 2384 g (1007). 2142 (32%) neonates were given TV, 1496 (22%) non-invasive ventilation (NIV), and 3042 (46%) were kept on spontaneous ventilation (SV). 1746 (82%), 266 (18%), and 282 (9%) neonates in the TV, NIV, and SV groups, respectively, were given sedation or analgesia as a continuous infusion, intermittent doses, or both (panalgesia was 89.3% (70.0-100) for neonates in the TV group. Opioids were given to 1764 (26%) of 6680 neonates and to 1589 (74%) of 2142 neonates in the TV group. Midazolam was given to 576 (9%) of 6680 neonates and 536 (25%) neonates of 2142 neonates in the TV group. 542 (25%) neonates in the TV group were given neuromuscular blockers, which were administered as continuous infusions to 146 (7%) of these neonates. Pain assessments were recorded in 1250 (58%) of 2138, 672 (45%) of 1493, and

  6. Family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Tahereh; Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sabet Sarvestani, Raheleh; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-10-01

    The concept of family- centered care in neonatal intensive care unit has changed drastically in protracted years and has been used in various contexts differently. Since we require clarity in our understanding, we aimed to analyze this concept. This study was done on the basis of developmental approach of Rodgers's concept analysis. We reviewed the existing literature in Science direct, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Iran Medex databases from 1980 to 2012. The keywords were family-centered care, family-oriented care, and neonatal intensive care unit. After all, 59 out of 244 English and Persian articles and books (more than 20%) were selected. The attributes of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit were recognized as care taking of family (assessment of family and its needs, providing family needs), equal family participation (participation in care planning, decision making, and providing care from routine to special ones), collaboration (inter-professional collaboration with family, family involvement in regulating and implementing care plans), regarding family's respect and dignity (importance of families' differences, recognizing families' tendencies), and knowledge transformation (information sharing between healthcare workers and family, complete information sharing according to family learning style). Besides, the recognized antecedents were professional and management-organizational factors. Finally, the consequences included benefits related to neonate, family, and organization. The findings revealed that family centered-care was a comprehensive and holistic caring approach in neonatal intensive care. Therefore, it is highly recommended to change the current care approach and philosophy and provide facilities for conducting family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit. 

  7. The burden of venipuncture pain in neonatal intensive care units: EPIPPAIN 2, a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, Emilie; Cimerman, Patricia; Dubuche, Valérie; Goiset, Marie-France; Orfèvre, Claire; Lagarde, Audrey; Sgaggero, Betty; Guiot, Céline; Goussot, Mélanie; Huraux, Etienne; Nanquette, Marie-Christine; Butel, Céline; Ferreira, Anne-Marie; Lacoste, Sylvie; Séjourné, Sandrine; Jolly, Valérie; Lajoie, Gladys; Maillard, Valérie; Guedj, Romain; Chappuy, Hélène; Carbajal, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    Newborns in intensive care units (ICUs) undergo numerous painful procedures including venipunctures. Skin-breaking procedures have been associated with adverse neurodevelopment long-term effects in very preterm neonates. The venipuncture frequency and its real bedside pain management treatment are not well known in this setting. To describe venipuncture frequency, its pain intensity, and the analgesic approach in ICU newborns; to determine the factors associated with the lack of preprocedural analgesia and with a high pain score during venipuncture. Further analysis of EPIPPAIN 2 (Epidemiology of Procedural Pain In Neonates), which is a descriptive prospective epidemiologic study. All 16 neonatal and pediatric ICUs in the Paris region in France. All newborns in the ICU with a maximum corrected age under 45 weeks of gestation on admission who had at least one venipuncture during the study period. Data on all venipunctures, their pain score assessed with the DAN scale and their corresponding analgesic therapies were prospectively collected. The inclusion period lasted six weeks, from June 2, 2011, to July 12, 2011. Newborns were followed from their admission to the 14th day of their ICU stay or discharge, whichever occurred first. 495 newborns who underwent venipunctures were included. The mean (SD) gestational age was 33.0 (4.4) weeks and duration of participation was 8.0 (4.5) days. A total of 257 (51.9%) neonates were very preterm (neonate during the study period was 3.8 (2.8; 1-19) for all neonates and 4.1 (2.9; 1-17) for neonates pain scores were significantly associated with absence of parents during procedures, surgery during the study period, and higher number of attempts. Venipuncture is very frequent in preterm and term neonates in the ICUs. 76% were performed with preprocedural analgesia. Strategies to reduce the number of attempts and to promote parental presence seem necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Practice patterns of physiotherapists in neonatal intensive care units: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Tejas; Alaparthi, Gopala Krishna; Krishnan, Shyam; Vaishali, K; Zulfeequer, C P

    2013-11-01

    To determine practice pattern of physiotherapists in the neonatal intensive care units (ICUs) in India with regards to cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular physiotherapy. A cross-sectional survey was conducted across India, in which 285 questionnaires were sent via e-mail to physiotherapists working in neonatal intensive care units. A total of 139 completed questionnaires were returned with a response rate of 48.7%, with a majority of responses from Karnataka, Maharashtra and Gujarat. More than 90% of physiotherapists performed chest physiotherapy in neonatal ICUs. Chest physiotherapy assessment predominantly focused on vital parameter assessment (86%) and in treatment predominantly focused on percussion (74.1%), vibration (75.5%), chest manipulation (73.3%), postural drainage (67.6%) and suction (65.4%). In neuromuscular physiotherapy more than 60% of physiotherapists used positioning, and parent education, whereas more than 45% focused on passive range of motion exercise and therapeutic handling. The practice pattern of physiotherapists for neonates in neonatal intensive care units involves both chest physiotherapy as well neuromuscular physiotherapy. Chest physiotherapy assessment focused mainly on vital parameter assessment (heart rate, respiratory rate and partial pressure of oxygen saturation SpO2). Treatment focused on airway clearance techniques including percussion, vibration, postural drainage and airway suction. In neuromuscular physiotherapy most physiotherapists focused on parent education and passive range of motion exercise, therapeutic handling, as well as positioning.

  9. Clinical benefits, costs, and cost-effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profit, Jochen; Lee, Diana; Zupancic, John A; Papile, LuAnn; Gutierrez, Cristina; Goldie, Sue J; Gonzalez-Pier, Eduardo; Salomon, Joshua A

    2010-12-14

    Neonatal intensive care improves survival, but is associated with high costs and disability amongst survivors. Recent health reform in Mexico launched a new subsidized insurance program, necessitating informed choices on the different interventions that might be covered by the program, including neonatal intensive care. The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical outcomes, costs, and cost-effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in Mexico. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a decision analytic model of health and economic outcomes following preterm birth. Model parameters governing health outcomes were estimated from Mexican vital registration and hospital discharge databases, supplemented with meta-analyses and systematic reviews from the published literature. Costs were estimated on the basis of data provided by the Ministry of Health in Mexico and World Health Organization price lists, supplemented with published studies from other countries as needed. The model estimated changes in clinical outcomes, life expectancy, disability-free life expectancy, lifetime costs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for neonatal intensive care compared to no intensive care. Uncertainty around the results was characterized using one-way sensitivity analyses and a multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis. In the base-case analysis, neonatal intensive care for infants born at 24-26, 27-29, and 30-33 weeks gestational age prolonged life expectancy by 28, 43, and 34 years and averted 9, 15, and 12 DALYs, at incremental costs per infant of US$11,400, US$9,500, and US$3,000, respectively, compared to an alternative of no intensive care. The ICERs of neonatal intensive care at 24-26, 27-29, and 30-33 weeks were US$1,200, US$650, and US$240, per DALY averted, respectively. The findings were robust to variation in parameter values over wide ranges in sensitivity analyses. Incremental cost

  10. Clinical benefits, costs, and cost-effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Profit

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal intensive care improves survival, but is associated with high costs and disability amongst survivors. Recent health reform in Mexico launched a new subsidized insurance program, necessitating informed choices on the different interventions that might be covered by the program, including neonatal intensive care. The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical outcomes, costs, and cost-effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in Mexico.A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a decision analytic model of health and economic outcomes following preterm birth. Model parameters governing health outcomes were estimated from Mexican vital registration and hospital discharge databases, supplemented with meta-analyses and systematic reviews from the published literature. Costs were estimated on the basis of data provided by the Ministry of Health in Mexico and World Health Organization price lists, supplemented with published studies from other countries as needed. The model estimated changes in clinical outcomes, life expectancy, disability-free life expectancy, lifetime costs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs for neonatal intensive care compared to no intensive care. Uncertainty around the results was characterized using one-way sensitivity analyses and a multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis. In the base-case analysis, neonatal intensive care for infants born at 24-26, 27-29, and 30-33 weeks gestational age prolonged life expectancy by 28, 43, and 34 years and averted 9, 15, and 12 DALYs, at incremental costs per infant of US$11,400, US$9,500, and US$3,000, respectively, compared to an alternative of no intensive care. The ICERs of neonatal intensive care at 24-26, 27-29, and 30-33 weeks were US$1,200, US$650, and US$240, per DALY averted, respectively. The findings were robust to variation in parameter values over wide ranges in sensitivity analyses

  11. Clinical Benefits, Costs, and Cost-Effectiveness of Neonatal Intensive Care in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profit, Jochen; Lee, Diana; Zupancic, John A.; Papile, LuAnn; Gutierrez, Cristina; Goldie, Sue J.; Gonzalez-Pier, Eduardo; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Neonatal intensive care improves survival, but is associated with high costs and disability amongst survivors. Recent health reform in Mexico launched a new subsidized insurance program, necessitating informed choices on the different interventions that might be covered by the program, including neonatal intensive care. The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical outcomes, costs, and cost-effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in Mexico. Methods and Findings A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a decision analytic model of health and economic outcomes following preterm birth. Model parameters governing health outcomes were estimated from Mexican vital registration and hospital discharge databases, supplemented with meta-analyses and systematic reviews from the published literature. Costs were estimated on the basis of data provided by the Ministry of Health in Mexico and World Health Organization price lists, supplemented with published studies from other countries as needed. The model estimated changes in clinical outcomes, life expectancy, disability-free life expectancy, lifetime costs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for neonatal intensive care compared to no intensive care. Uncertainty around the results was characterized using one-way sensitivity analyses and a multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis. In the base-case analysis, neonatal intensive care for infants born at 24–26, 27–29, and 30–33 weeks gestational age prolonged life expectancy by 28, 43, and 34 years and averted 9, 15, and 12 DALYs, at incremental costs per infant of US$11,400, US$9,500, and US$3,000, respectively, compared to an alternative of no intensive care. The ICERs of neonatal intensive care at 24–26, 27–29, and 30–33 weeks were US$1,200, US$650, and US$240, per DALY averted, respectively. The findings were robust to variation in parameter values over wide ranges in

  12. Blood transfusion reactions in two neonatal intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Jair Ortiz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Given the advances in neonatology have increased survival of premature infants, an increase in transfusions and thus their effects. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional observational study. We included neonates transfused with 2 red blood units in infants of Popayan for a year. We register demographic data, laboratory and hemodynamic before, during and in the first 24 hours post transfusion and adverse reactions. Results: The prevalence of transfusion was 17.3%. 50% were children, the average age at which transfusion was performed was 22 days, the average weight was 1350 g., Mean gestational age 30 weeks, 71% of the children had sepsis. 96.8% had a transfusion event, 85.5% had adverse reactions: metabolic rate 45.1% and 21% overload. Considering the attribution definite reaction was determined by 35.5%. Significant association was found (p

  13. Comparison the effect of Quran and lullaby on heart rate changes of hospitalized neonates in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taheri L

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Maintain a normal heart rate in newborns in intensive care unit is an important goal in neonatal care. Non-pharmaceutical interventions in this area are important. The current study was conducted aimed to determine the effect of Quran and lullaby on heart rate changes of hospitalized neonates in NICU.  Materials and Method: The current clinical trial study was done on 78 hospitalized newborns in neonatal intensive care unit in one of the hospitals in Jahrom in 2013-2014. Newborns were selected through convenience sampling and then were randomly allocated to three groups, Quran, Lullaby and control groups. The newborne in two intervention groups listened to lullaby or Quran via headphones during 3 days and daily for 20 minutes and in control group, headphone was laid without voice for newborns. The heart rate of newborns was recorded immediately before the interventuion, 10 and 20 minutes after the starting the intervention and finally 20 minutes after the completion of it. Data were analyzed through SPSS 19 using Greenhouse - Geisser test, ANOVA and repeated measures ANOVA.  Results: The mean of heart rate of neonates in lullaby group, Quran and control groups before the intervention was respectively 135.7 ± 6.15, 140.56 ± 14.97 and 132.21 ± 25.21 that the difference between them was not statistically significant, but the mean change of their heart rate was significantly lower in twentieth minute in the second day in lullaby group (126.67 ± 11.22 in compare with control group (134.31±18.31 and Quran group (138.81 ± 19.12 (P = 0.016.  Conclusion: With attention to the effect of lullaby in the second day on decreas the heart rate changes, this method can be used in the neonatal intensive care unit. Also, according to the healing effects of Quran, more research in this area is recommended.

  14. Effect of Intensive Phototherapy and Exchange Transfusion on Copper, Zinc and Magnesium Serum Levels in Neonates with Indirect Hyperbilirubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Azeem El-Mazary

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMany studies reported that copper, zinc and magnesium play important roles in the pathogenesis and development of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Exchange transfusion and intensive phototherapy are known two modalities of therapy for severe neonatal hyper bilirubinemia, but the effect of them on those trace elements is unknown.Materials and MethodsCopper, Zinc and Magnesium serum levels were measured before and after treatment with intensive phototherapy and exchange transfusion in full term neonates with indirect hyperbilirubinemia admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of Minia and Sohag University hospitals, Egypt, during 2014-2016 and comparison with normal healthy neonates was done.ResultsThere were significant higher copper and magnesium and lower zinc serum levels in neonates with indirect hyperbilirubinemia than controls before and after intensive phototherapy. These levels were significantly changed after exchange transfusion to be comparable with controls. Significant positive correlations between the total bilirubin levels and hemoglobin, copper, and magnesium serum levels and significant negative correlations with serum zinc levels were present. There were no significant correlations between maternal and neonatal copper, zinc or magnesium serum levels.ConclusionNeonates with indirect hyperbilirubinemia had significant higher copper and magnesium and lower zinc serum levels than healthy neonates which were not related to their maternal serum levels. Intensive phototherapy had no effect on their levels while exchange transfusion changed these levels to be comparable with that of normal healthy neonates.

  15. Health-related quality of life for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, R D; Kinsman, H I; Donohue, P K

    2012-12-01

    When discussing the benefits and burdens of medical interventions for critically ill infants, clinicians and families are challenged to weigh the uncertainties of treatment success with infant pain and suffering. Concrete measures of infant suffering or quality of life, which could inform infant care and decision-making are lacking. Although consistent and reliable health-related quality of life (HRQOL) definitions and measures have been extensively developed for adults and older children, they have not been relevant to neonates or infants. Advancing HRQOL research methodology is an objective of Healthy People 2020. This paper will review the evidence and practices relevant to HRQOL with a focus on intensive care and pediatric settings. We will highlight existing HRQOL measures, which could be adapted for neonates and existing neonatal intensive care unit measures and practices, which could inform new measures of HRQOL.

  16. Risk factors for nosocomial infections in selected neonatal intensive care units in Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Mario A; Efird, Meica M; Lozano, Juan M; Bose, Carl L; Rojas, María X; Rondón, Martín A; Ruiz, Gloria; Piñeros, Juan G; Rojas, Catherine; Robayo, Guillermo; Hoyos, Angela; Gosendi, Maria H; Cruz, Hernan; O'Shea, Michael; Leon, Angela

    2005-08-01

    This study was designed to identify risk factors for nosocomial infections among infants admitted into eight neonatal intensive care units in Colombia. Knowledge of modifiable risk factors could be used to guide the design of interventions to prevent the problem. Data were collected prospectively from eight neonatal units. Nosocomial infection was defined as culture-proven infection diagnosed after 72 hours of hospitalization, resulting in treatment with antibiotics for >3 days. Associations were expressed as odds ratios. Logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. From a total of 1504 eligible infants, 80 were treated for 127 episodes of nosocomial infection. Logistic regression analysis identified the combined exposure to postnatal steroids and H2-blockers, and use of oral gastric tubes for enteral nutrition as risk factors significantly associated with nosocomial infection. Nosocomial infections in Colombian neonatal intensive care units were associated with modifiable risk factors including use of postnatal steroids and H2-blockers.

  17. Estimating Length of Stay by Patient Type in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Henry C; Bennett, Mihoko V; Schulman, Joseph; Gould, Jeffrey B; Profit, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    Objective Develop length of stay prediction models for neonatal intensive care unit patients. Study Design We used data from 2008 to 2010 to construct length of stay models for neonates admitted within 1 day of age to neonatal intensive care units and surviving to discharge home. Results Our sample included 23,551 patients. Median length of stay was 79 days when birth weight was g. Risk factors for longer length of stay varied by weight. Units with shorter length of stay for one weight group had shorter lengths of stay for other groups. Conclusion Risk models for comparative assessments of length of stay need to appropriately account for weight, particularly considering the cutoff of 1,500 g. Refining prediction may benefit counseling of families and health care systems to efficiently allocate resources. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. The Mortality Rate of Nosocomial Infection in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Taleghani Educational and Treatment Center, Tabriz, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Parvin Abbasian; Mariye Mahmoodi Yegane; Mina karimi; Faezeh Ahmadi; khadijeh Pazani; Zohreh Tahmasbi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives : Information about nosocomial infections (NIs) is necessary for both appropriate management and establishment of preventative measures in hospitals. Neonates admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are at high-risk of developing nosocomial infection. The aim of this study was to determine the mortality rate of nosocomial infections and the distribution of pathogens among newborns who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit in Taleghani educatio...

  19. The continuous glucose monitoring sensor in neonatal intensive care

    OpenAIRE

    Beardsall, K; Ogilvy-Stuart, A; Ahluwalia, J; Thompson, M; Dunger, D

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of continuous glucose monitoring in the very low birthweight baby requiring intensive care, as these infants are known to be at high risk of abnormalities of glucose control.

  20. Frequency, causes and outcome of neonates with respiratory distress admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, National Institute of Child Health, Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Arit; Haider, Nighat; Khoso, Zubair Ahmed; Shaikh, Abdul Sattar

    2015-07-01

    To determine the frequency, aetiology and outcome of respiratory distress in neonates in intensive care unit. The descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, National Institute of Child Health, Karachi, from October 2009 to March 2010. It comprised neonates aged day 0 to 28 who were admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The neonates were screened first for respiratory distress and presence of one or more signs and symptoms. History, examination and investigations were carried out to find out various aetiologies of respiratory distress. Outcome was measured in terms of discharge and death. Data was analysed using SPSS12. Of the 205 neonates in the study, 120(58.6%) were boys and 85(41.4%) were girls The overall mean age was 70.58±110.02 hours and the mean gestational age was 36.32±2.72 weeks while the mean weight was 2.41±2.4kg. Respiratory rate >60/min was found in all (100%) the neonates. In terms of signs and symptoms, 125(60.9%) had grunting, 205(100%) had subcostal retractions and nasal flaring, and 81(40%) had cyanosis. The aetiologies observed were birth asphyxia, sepsis, transient tachypnoea of the newborn, pneumonia, meconium aspiration syndrome and respiratory distress syndrome in 22(10.75%), 37(18.05%), 29(14.1%), 36(17.6%), 34(16.7%) and 47(23.0%) neonates respectively. The incidence of neonates with respiratory distress was 68(33.3%). The frequency of respiratory distress among the neonates was high, while mortality was high in neonates with respiratory distress, especially in pre-term and low birthweight neonates. Early diagnosis and management is important for better outcome.

  1. Parent experiences of communication with healthcare professionals in neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Janne; Lundqvist, Pia

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this review are to explore parents' experiences of communication with healthcare professionals and to identify the meaningfulness of communication to parents in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).More specifically, the objectives are to identify....

  2. Noise levels in a neonatal intensive care unit in the Cape metropole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Continuous noise exposure is potentially harmful to infants\\' auditory systems and wellbeing. Although the effects of noise on infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) have been well researched overseas, limited studies have been conducted in South Africa. Aim. To conduct a detailed noise assessment ...

  3. Physical Therapy Observation and Assessment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eilish; Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Observation and Assessment section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy assessments presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these assessments is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  4. Congenital Stridor as seen in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prospective study was carried out to determine the prevalent causes and management of congenital stridor in a referral neonatal intensive care unit of Assir Central Hospital, Abha, Saudi Arabia, between 1996 and 1999. Forty cases consisting of 25 males and 15 females were identified during the period .

  5. Neonatal Intensive-Care Unit Graduates Show Persistent Difficulties in an Intradimensional Shift Card Sort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, Phyllis M.; Brooks, Patricia J.; Rossi, Vanessa; Karmel, Bernard Z.; Gardner, Judith M.; Flory, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal intensive-care unit (NICU) graduates, a group at risk for attention problems and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, performed an intradimensional shift card sort at 34, 42, 51, and 60 months to assess executive function and to examine effects of individual risk factors. In the "silly" game, children sorted cards…

  6. Parents' Experiences during Their Infant's Transition from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to Home: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Sharon W.; Spillet, Marydee A.; Cronin, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Limited literature exists which examines how parents of infants hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) transition from their infant's NICU hospital stay to home. This study examines the question, "What are the experiences of parents during their infant's transition from the NICU to home?" Grounded theory methods served as the…

  7. Specialty-based, voluntary incident reporting in neonatal intensive care: description of 4846 incident reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, C.; van Lingen, R. A.; Klip, H.; Fetter, W. P. F.; van der Schaaf, T. W.; Molendijk, H. A.; Kok, J. H.; te Pas, E.; Pas, H.; van der Starre, C.; Bloemendaal, E.; Lopes Cardozo, R. H.; Molenaar, A. M.; Giezen, A.; Maat, H. E.; Molendijk, A.; Lavrijssen, S.; Mulder, A. L. M.; de Kleine, M. J. K.; Koolen, A. M. P.; Schellekens, M.; Verlaan, W.; Vrancken, S.; Schotman, L.; van der Zwaan, A.; van der Tuijn, Y.; Tibboel, D.; Kollen, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the characteristics of incidents reported after introduction of a voluntary, non-punitive incident reporting system for neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the Netherlands; and to investigate which types of reported incident pose the highest risk to patients in the NICU.

  8. The prevalence of feeding problems in children formerly treated in a neonatal intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, M.; ter Horst, H. J.; Groen, H.; Nieuwenhuis, T.; Bos, A. F.; van Dijk, M. W. G.

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of oral feeding problems in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) graduates at 1 to 2 years, and to identify clinical risk factors during NICU admission. STUDY DESIGN: Observational cohort study of 378 children, who received level III/IV NICU care for 4 days or

  9. European neonatal intensive care nursing research priorities: an e-Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielenga, Joke M.; Tume, Lyvonne N.; Latour, Jos M.; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and prioritise neonatal intensive care nursing research topics across Europe using an e-Delphi technique. An e-Delphi technique with three questionnaire rounds was performed. Qualitative responses of round one were analysed by content analysis and research statements

  10. European neonatal intensive care nursing research priorities: An e-delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Wielenga (Joke); L.N. Tume (Lyvonne); J.M. Latour (Jos); A. van den Hoogen (Agnes)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective This study aimed to identify and prioritise neonatal intensive care nursing research topics across Europe using an e-Delphi technique.Design An e-Delphi technique with three questionnaire rounds was performed. Qualitative responses of round one were analysed by content analysis

  11. European neonatal intensive care nursing research priorities : an e-Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielenga, Joke M; Tume, Lyvonne N; Latour, Jos M; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to identify and prioritise neonatal intensive care nursing research topics across Europe using an e-Delphi technique. DESIGN: An e-Delphi technique with three questionnaire rounds was performed. Qualitative responses of round one were analysed by content analysis and

  12. [Risk factors for nosocomial infection in a level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Heladia; Torres-Gutiérrez, Javier; Peregrino-Bejarano, Leoncio; Cruz-Castañeda, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major and a frequent problem in neonatal intensive care units and increase morbidity, mortality, and costs. The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit. Nested case control study. Records from patients were registered: gestational age, sex, birth weight, central venous catheter and other devices, congenital malformations, surgeries, mechanical ventilation, steroid use, H2 blockers, length of stay in neonatal intensive care unit, type of infection, and etiological agent. We studied 188 cases with nosocomial infections and 192 controls without nosocomial infections. The most frequent infection was sepsis (34.8%) and coagulase negative Staphylococcus was the principal etiological agent (37.2%). The risk factors associated with nosocomial infection were central venous catheter (OR: 7.3; 95% CI: 2.3-22.8), duration of neonatal intensive care unit stay>14 days (OR: 3.4; 95% CI: 1.7-6.7), H2 blockers (OR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.2-4.2), number of surgeries≥2 (OR: 3; 95% CI: 1.1-7.9) and mechanical ventilation>7 days (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1-4.2). Some risk factors associated to nosocomial infections in this study are similar to those found previously, with the exception of the number of surgeries that was not reported in previous studies.

  13. [The role of the psychologist with a death in neonatal and paediatric intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birsan, Sandrine; Rodriguez, Marie-Pierre; Brissaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The psychologist within a neonatal and paediatric intensive care unit intervenes in accordance with the condition of the patient and those at whom their services are aimed. The psychological practice in this particular context comprises certain specificities. As the child nears the end of life the psychologist must find his place within the unit and adapt his care to the needs expressed.

  14. On-ward observations in neonatal intensive care : Towards safer supplemental oxygen & IV therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Eijk, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on supplemental oxygen therapy and intrave nous (IV) therapy in neonatal intensive care. Both therapies are essential, but potentially dangerous for (preterm) newborn infants. Supplemental oxygen therapy refers to the therapy where a gas mixture with >21% of oxy gen is

  15. Irradiance levels of phototherapy devices : A national study in Dutch neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, Christian V.; Van't Klooster, S. J.; Krummel-Lorenz, B; Vreman, Hendrik J.; Dijk, Peter H.; Benders, M. J.N.L.; Buijs, J.; Dudink, J.; Van Imhoff, Deirdre E.; Laarman, Céleste R.; Liem, Kian D.; van Lingen, R. A.; Lopriore, E.; Mulder, A. L M; Toledo-Eppinga, L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to determine whether irradiance levels of phototherapy (PT) devices in Dutch neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) increased between 2008 and 2013. Study Design: Irradiance of all types of PT devices, used in combination with incubators, was measured with a

  16. Irradiance levels of phototherapy devices : A national study in Dutch neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, C. V.; van't Klooster, S. J.; Lorenz, K.; Vreman, H. J.; Dijk, P. H.

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to determine whether irradiance levels of phototherapy (PT) devices in Dutch neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) increased between 2008 and 2013. STUDY DESIGN: Irradiance of all types of PT devices, used in combination with incubators, was measured with a

  17. In-line filters in central venous catheters in a neonatal intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoogen, A; Krediet, TG; Uiterwaal, CSPM; Bolenius, JFGA; Gerards, LJ; Fleer, A

    Nosocomial sepsis remains an important cause of morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Central venous catheters (CVCs) and parenteral nutrition (TPN) are major risk factors. In-line filters in the intravenous (IV) administration sets prevent the infusion of particles, which may reduce

  18. Clinical management issues of coagulase-negative staphylococcal sepsis in the neonatal intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemels, M.A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Nosocomial sepsis is a major cause of morbidity in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), with coagulase-negative staphylococci (CONS) generally reported to be the most frequent causative micro-organisms. There is substantial evidence for the association between CONS sepsis and indwelling

  19. Brief Report: Incidence of and Risk Factors for Autistic Disorder in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Ohtani, Yasuyo; Ornitz, Edward; Kuriya, Norikazu; Murakami, Yoshihiko; Fukuda, Seiichi; Hashimoto, Takeo; Yamashita, Fumio

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the incidence of autistic disorder (AD) among 5,271 children in a neonatal intensive care unit in Japan found that 18 children were later diagnosed with AD, an incidence more than twice as high as previously reported. Children with AD had a significantly higher history of the meconium aspiration syndrome than the controls. (Author/DB)

  20. The perception of partnership between parents of premature infants and nurses in neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Anne; Larsen, Palle; Weis, Janne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify how parents of premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and nurses perceive their partnership.The review questions are: how do parents of premature infants and nurses perceive their partnership during hospita...

  1. Disposable diapers decrease the incidence of neonatal infections compared to cloth diapers in a level II neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, M Chowdary; Tandur, Baswaraj; Sharma, Deepak; Murki, Srinivas

    2015-08-01

    To study whether disposable diapers decrease the incidence of neonatal infections compared with cloth diapers in a level II neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). All neonates admitted to the NICU and having duration of stay >48 h were enrolled. Those babies with signs and symptoms of infection were screened with septic screen and/or blood culture. The primary outcome of the study was incidence of probable sepsis. Of 253 babies enrolled in the study period, probable sepsis was present in 101 (39.9%) infants in the total study group and was higher in cloth diaper group as compared with disposable diaper group (p = 0.01). For an average NICU stay of 6 days, cloth diapers would cost Rs. 241 vs. Rs. 162 for disposable diaper for any infant. Usage of disposable diapers decrease the incidence of probable sepsis in babies admitted to NICU. It is also cost effective to use disposable diapers in the NICU. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Nursing diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana Paula de Souza; da Silva, Maria de Lourdes Costa; de Souza, Nilba Lima; Mota, Gabriela Miranda; de França, Débora Feitosa

    2014-01-01

    to elaborate the Nursing Diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a neonatal intensive care unit and characterize the profile of the neonates and their mothers. a cross-sectional and quantitative study, with a sample of 41 neonates. A physical examination and consultation of the hospital records were undertaken, using an instrument. The elaboration of the Nursing Diagnoses followed a process of diagnostic inference and was based on the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association 2012-2014. the mothers were around 25 years old, had a low average number of pre-natal consultations, and various complications during the pregnancy; and the newborns were predominantly premature and with very low birth weights. Five Nursing Diagnoses predominated, and all the neonates presented Risk of Shock and Risk of fluid volume imbalance. the Nursing Diagnoses of the neonates with sepsis can guide the formulating of specific assistential plans. The study contributes to the generation of new knowledge and found various relationships between the Nursing Diagnoses and the variables selected in the characterization of the neonates, which deserve to be elucidated in greater detail based on further research on the issue.

  3. Nursing diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula de Souza Santos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to elaborate the Nursing Diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a neonatal intensive care unit and characterize the profile of the neonates and their mothers.METHOD: a cross-sectional and quantitative study, with a sample of 41 neonates. A physical examination and consultation of the hospital records were undertaken, using an instrument. The elaboration of the Nursing Diagnoses followed a process of diagnostic inference and was based on the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association 2012-2014.RESULTS: the mothers were around 25 years old, had a low average number of pre-natal consultations, and various complications during the pregnancy; and the newborns were predominantly premature and with very low birth weights. Five Nursing Diagnoses predominated, and all the neonates presented Risk of Shock and Risk of fluid volume imbalance.CONCLUSION: the Nursing Diagnoses of the neonates with sepsis can guide the formulating of specific assistential plans. The study contributes to the generation of new knowledge and found various relationships between the Nursing Diagnoses and the variables selected in the characterization of the neonates, which deserve to be elucidated in greater detail based on further research on the issue.

  4. Surveillance and Isolation of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnam, Katherine M

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes 1.4 million (36%) neonatal deaths annually. Staphylococcus aureus (SA), a common skin pathogen, remains the second leading cause of late-onset sepsis in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a resistant strain of SA, has created a significant global communicable health risk, especially in the NICU. To examine evidence related to NICU infection control practices surrounding MRSA surveillance, identification, and isolation in response to the clinical question, "What strategies should be universally implemented in the NICU to identify and prevent the spread of MRSA?" Databases were examined for articles on the topical area of MRSA in the neonate. Key terms were used to streamline the search, resulting in 20 primary works and 3 guideline/consensus statements considered imperative in response to the clinical questions. Hand hygiene remains the cornerstone to sound infection control practice. Colonization often leads to systemic infection, with smaller neonates at greatest risk. Hospital infection control compliance has improved outcomes. MRSA surveillance has reduced horizontal spread. No universal, specific recommendations exist to guide surveillance and management of MRSA in the NICU. Standardized guidelines with procedures for hand hygiene, patient surveillance and isolation, and patient cohorting with recommended staffing patterns should guide practice in the NICU. Both MRSA culture and polymerase chain reaction effectively identify positive patients. Decolonization practices are not yet clear. Evaluation of standard isolation practices versus outbreak response and approaches to neonatal decolonization should be evaluated for efficacy, safety, and resistance.

  5. High load of multi-drug resistant nosocomial neonatal pathogens carried by cockroaches in a neonatal intensive care unit at Tikur Anbessa specialized hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Tilahun, Birkneh; Worku, Bogale; Tachbele, Erdaw; Terefe, Simegn; Kloos, Helmut; Legesse, Worku

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cockroaches have been described as potential vectors for various pathogens for decades; although studies from neonatal intensive care units are scarce. This study assessed the vector potential of cockroaches (identified as Blatella germanica) in a neonatal intensive care unit setup in Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods A total of 400 Blatella germanica roaches were aseptically collected for five consecutive months. Standard laboratory procedures were us...

  6. Incidence of Candida species colonization in neonatal intensive care unit at Riyadh Hospital, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S. Alhussaini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candida species are important hospital-acquired pathogens in infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. This study was performed in the NICU of Saudi Arabian Hospital, Riyadh region, KSA to analyze patterns of neonatal Candida colonization as well as to determine the potential risk factors.Methods: Weekly surveillance fungal cultures of anal area, oral cavity, umbilicus and ear canal of neonates were performed from birth until their discharge from the hospital. Colonization was analyzed for timing, site, species, birth weight and gestational age. Potential environmental reservoirs and hands of health care workers (HCWs were also cultured monthly for fungi. Antifungal susceptibility of the identified isolates was also determined.Results: One hundred subjects have been recruited in this study. The overall colonization rate was 51%. Early colonization was found in 27 (27% neonates whereas 24 (24% neonates were lately colonized during their stay in NICU. Colonization was more in preterm neonates than in full and post term. Perianal area and oral cavity were the most frequent colonized sites. C. albicans was the main spp. (58.8% isolated from the neonates followed by C. tropicalis (17.6%, C. glabrata (15.6%, and C. krusei (2%. Of the 51 isolated Candida spp., 68.6% were sensitive to fluconazole, 80% to itraconazole and 64.7% to ketoconazole, while only 33% were sensitive to amphotericin B.Conclusion: Candida has emerged as a common cause of infections in infants admitted to NICU, and C. albicans is the most commonly isolated candidal species. Neonatal infections caused by non- albicans species occur at a later age during their stay in NICU.

  7. Clinical User Experience Testing of Ambient Lighting for Neonatal Intensive Care

    OpenAIRE

    Simons, P.R.; Visser, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Believed to the first application of its kind in the UK, Philips hasinstalled dynamic and ambient LED lighting in the recently extendedNeonatal Intensive Care Unit, (NICU), at St Michael’s Hospital, Bristol. The neonatal facility was redeveloped in late 2011 with a newICU built next to an existing ICU. This provides the opportunity tomake comparisons between old and new ICU. Philips Research has conducted a clinical user experience trial to assess nurse’s reactions tothe two ICUs. A 3 week us...

  8. Does a mother singing to her premature baby affect feeding in the neonatal intensive care unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, Hugh; Eisenfeld, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that premature neonates exposed to music have reduced symptoms of stress, faster weight gain, and shorter neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) stays. This pilot study attempted to measure contingent effects of mothers' singing during feedings. Mothers sang to their babies during 2 of 4 feedings on 2 consecutive days, logging songs they sang, and subjectively evaluating each feeding. Infants' heart and respiration rates were recorded as well as duration of feeding and volume of fluid taken orally; feeding velocity and percent of feeding goal were calculated. In paired t tests, no significant benefits or deterrents assignable to the singing were observed.

  9. Heel blood sampling in European neonatal intensive care units: compliance with pain management guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Losacco, Valentina; Cuttini, Marina; Greisen, Gorm

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the use of heel blood sampling and non-pharmacological analgesia in a large representative sample of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in eight European countries, and compare their self-reported practices with evidence-based recommendations. Methods Information on use...... and France were the most likely, and Belgium and Spain the least likely to employ recommended combinations of evidence-based pain management measures. Conclusions Heel puncture is a common procedure in preterm neonates, but pain appears inadequately treated in many units and countries. Better compliance...

  10. European neonatal intensive care nursing research priorities: an e-Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielenga, Joke M; Tume, Lyvonne N; Latour, Jos M; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and prioritise neonatal intensive care nursing research topics across Europe using an e-Delphi technique. An e-Delphi technique with three questionnaire rounds was performed. Qualitative responses of round one were analysed by content analysis and research statements were generated to be ranged on importance on a scale of 1-6 (not important to most important). Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in 17 European countries. NICU clinical nurses, managers, educators and researchers (n=75). None. A list of 43 research statements in eight domains. The six highest ranking statements (≥5.0 mean score) were related to prevention and reduction of pain (mean 5.49; SD 1.07), medication errors (mean 5.20; SD 1.13), end-of-life care (mean 5.05; SD 1.18), needs of parents and family (mean 5.04; SD 1.23), implementing evidence into nursing practice (mean 5.02; SD 1.03), and pain assessment (mean 5.02; SD 1.11). The research domains were prioritised and ranked: (1) pain and stress; (2) family centred care; (3) clinical nursing care practices; (4) quality and safety; (5) ethics; (6) respiratory and ventilation; (7) infection and inflammation; and (8) professional issues in neonatal intensive care nursing. The results of this study might support developing a nursing research strategy for the nursing section of the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care. In addition, this may promote more European researcher collaboratives for neonatal nursing research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Ultrasound guidance for central vascular access in the neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Sofyani Khouloud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Percutaneous central venous cannulation (CVC in infants and children is a challenging procedure, and it is usually achieved with a blinded, external landmark-guided technique. Recent guidelines from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE recommend the use of ultrasound guidance for central venous catheterization in children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this method in a pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit, assessing the number of attempts, access time (skin to vein, incidence of complication, and the ease of use for central venous access in the neonatal age group. Methods: After approval by the local departmental ethical committee, we evaluated an ultrasound-guided method over a period of 6 months in 20 critically ill patients requiring central venous access in a pediatric intensive care unit and a neonatal intensive care unit (median age 9 (0-204 months and weight 9.3 (1.9-60 kg. Cannulation was performed after locating the puncture site with the aid of an ultrasound device (8 MHz transducer, Vividi General Electrics® Burroughs, USA covered by a sterile sheath. Outcome measures included successful insertion rate, number of attempts, access time, and incidence of complications. Results: Cannulation of the central vein was 100% successful in all patients. The right femoral vein was preferred in 60% of the cases. The vein was entered on the first attempt in 75% of all patients, and the median number of attempts was 1. The median access time (skin to vein for all patients was 64.5 s. No arterial punctures or hematomas occurred using the ultrasound technique. Conclusions: In a sample of critically ill patients from a pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit, ultrasound-guided CVC compared with published reports on traditional technique required fewer attempts and less time. It improved the overall success rate, minimized the occurrence of complications during vein cannulation and was easy to apply in

  12. Evaluation of Nutritional Status in a Teaching Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Rafati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extrauterine growth restriction remains a common and serious problem in newborns especially who are small, immature, and critically ill. Very low birth weight infants (VLBW had 97% and 40% growth failure at 36 weeks and 18-22 months post-conceptual age respectively. The postnatal development of premature infants is critically dependent on an adequate nutritional intake that mimics a similar gestational stage. Deficient protein or amino acid administration over an extended period may cause significant growth delay or morbidity in VLBW infants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate current nutritional status in the neonatal intensive care unit in a teaching hospital. Methods: During this prospective observational study, the nutritional status of 100 consecutive critically ill neonates were evaluated by anthropometric and biochemical parameters in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit. Their demographic characteristics (weight, height and head circumference, energy source (dextrose and lipid and protein were recorded in the first, 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th days of admission and blood samples were obtained to measure serum albumin and prealbumin. The amount of calorie and protein were calculated for all of preterm and term neonates and compared to standard means separately. Results: The calorie and amino acids did not meet in the majority of the preterm and term neonates and mean daily parenteral calorie intake was 30% or lower than daily requirements based on neonates’ weight. Mortality rate was significantly higher in neonates with lower serum albumin and severity of malnutrition but not with serum prealbumin concentration. Conclusion: Infants were studied did not receive their whole of daily calorie and protein requirements and it is recommended early and enough administration of calorie source (dextrose, lipids and amino acids. Prealbumin was a more benefit biochemical parameter than albumin to evaluate short term nutrition

  13. Pattern of Blood Stream Infections within Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Mohammed Kishk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Blood stream infection (BSI is a common problem of newborn in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs. Monitoring neonatal infections is increasingly regarded as an important contributor to safe and high-quality healthcare. It results in high mortality rate and serious complications. So, our aim was to determine the incidence and the pattern of BSIs in the NICU of Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, and to determine its impact on hospitalization, mortality, and morbidity. Methods. This study was a prospective one in which all neonates admitted to the NICUs in Suez Canal University hospital between January, 2013 and June 2013 were enrolled. Blood stream infections were monitored prospectively. The health care associated infection rate, mortality rate, causative organism, and risk factors were studied. Results. A total of 317 neonates were admitted to the NICU with a mortality rate of 36.0%. During this study period, 115/317 (36.3% developed clinical signs of sepsis and were confirmed as BSIs by blood culture in only 90 neonates with 97 isolates. The total mean length of stay was significantly longer among infected than noninfected neonates (34.5 ± 18.3 and 10.8 ± 9.9 days, resp., P value < 0.001. The overall mortality rates among infected and noninfected neonates were 38.9% and 34.8%, respectively, with a significant difference. Klebsiella spp. were the most common pathogen (27.8% followed by Pseudomonas (21.6% and Staphylococcus aureus (15.4%. Conclusion. The rate of BSIs in NICU at Suez Canal University Hospital was relatively high with high mortality rate (36.0%.

  14. Missed Opportunities for Sedation and Pain Management at a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Shikha Y; Dongara, Ashish R; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M; Phatak, Ajay G; Nimbalkar, Archana S

    2016-01-01

    Neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) undergo a multitude of painful and stressful procedures during the first days of life. Stress from this pain can lead to neurodevelopmental problems that manifest in later childhood and should be prevented. To determine the number of painful procedures performed per day for each neonate, to verify documentation of painful procedures performed, and to, subsequently, note missed opportunities for providing pain relief to neonates. We conducted a cross-sectional study at a level III NICU located in a rural part of western India. A total of 69 neonates admitted for more than 24 h were included. Twenty-nine neonates were directly observed for a total of 24 h each, and another 40 neonatal records were retrospectively reviewed for the neonate's first 7 days of admission. All stressful and painful procedures performed on the neonate were recorded. Also recorded were any pharmaceutical pain relief agents or central nervous system depressants administered to the neonate before or at the time of the procedures. Average nurse-patient ratio was also calculated. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. A documentation deficit of 2.2% was observed. The average nurse-patient ratio was 1.53:1. A total of 13711 procedures were recorded, yielding 44.1 (38.1 stressful, 3.8 mildly painful, and 2.2 moderately painful) procedures per patient day. Common stressful procedures were position changing (2501) and temperature recording (2208). Common mildly and moderately painful procedures were heel prick (757) and endotracheal suctioning (526), respectively. Use of pharmacological agents coincided with 33.48% of the procedures. The choice of drug and time of administration were inappropriate, indicating that the pharmacological agents were intended not for pain relief but rather for a coexisting pathology or as sedation from ventilation with no analgesia. Stressful procedures are common in the NICU; mildly and moderately

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus is present in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homaira, Nusrat; Sheils, Joanne; Stelzer-Braid, Sacha; Lui, Kei; Oie, Ju-Lee; Snelling, Tom; Jaffe, Adam; Rawlinson, William

    2016-02-01

    Nosocomial transmission of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) occurs in children within the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). During peak community RSV transmission, three swabs were collected from the nose, hand and personal clothing of visitors and health care workers (HCW) in NICU once every week for eight weeks. Nasal swabs were collected from every third neonate and from any neonate clinically suspected of having a respiratory infection. Environmental sampling of high touch areas was done once during the study period. All swabs were tested for RSV using real time RT-PCR. There were 173 (519 total) and 109 (327 total) swabs, each of nose, hand and dress from 84 HCWs and 80 visitors respectively and 81 nasal swabs from 55 neonates collected. Thirty five environmental swabs from surfaces of the beds, side tables, counter tops, chairs, tables and computers were collected. Overall 1% of nasal swabs from each of HCWs, visitors and neonates, 4% of dress specimens from visitors and 9% of environmental swabs were positive for RSV-RNA. The results suggest that though the risk for RSV in the NICU remains low, personnel clothing are contaminated with RSV-RNA and may have a role in transmission. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. eHealth interventions for parents in neonatal intensive care units: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Justine; Delahunty-Pike, Alannah; Anwar Siani, Sheren; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha

    2017-12-01

    As technology becomes increasingly more advanced, particularly video technology and interactive learning platforms, some neonatal intensive care units are embracing electronic health (eHealth) technologies to enhance and expand their family-centered care environments. Despite the emergence of eHealth, there has been a lack of systematic evaluation of its effectiveness thus far. To examine the effect of eHealth interventions used in neonatal intensive care units on parent-related and infant outcomes. This review considered studies that included parents or primary caregivers of infants requiring care in a neonatal intensive care unit. This review considered studies that evaluated any eHealth interventions in neonatal intensive care units, including education (e.g. web-based platforms, mobile applications); communication (e.g. videos, SMS or text messaging), or a combination of both. Comparators included no eHealth interventions and/or standard care. Experimental and epidemiological study designs including randomized controlled trials, non-randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental, before and after studies, prospective and retrospective cohort studies, case-control studies, and analytical cross sectional studies were considered. This review considered studies that included parent-related outcomes (use and acceptance, stress/anxiety, confidence, financial impact, satisfaction and technical issues) and neonatal outcomes (length of stay, postmenstrual age at discharge, parental presence and visits). A systematic search was undertaken across four databases to retrieve published studies in English from inception to November 18, 2016. Critical appraisal was undertaken by two independent reviewers using standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute System for the Unified Management, Assessment and Review of Information (JBI-SUMARI). Quantitative data were extracted from included studies independently by two reviewers using the

  17. Optimizing nurse capacity in a teaching hospital neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokangul, Ali; Akcan, Serap; Narli, Mufide

    2017-06-01

    Patients in intensive care units need special attention. Therefore, nurses are one of the most important resources in a neonatal intensive care unit. These nurses are required to have highly specialized training. The random number of patient arrivals, rejections, or transfers due to lack of capacity (such as nurse, equipment, bed etc.) and the random length of stays, make advanced knowledge of the optimal nurse a requirement, for levels of the unit behave as a stochastic process. This stochastic nature creates difficulties in finding optimal nurse staffing levels. In this paper, a stochastic approximation which is based on the required nurse: patient ratio and the number of patients in a neonatal intensive care unit of a teaching hospital, has been developed. First, a meta-model was built to generate simulation results under various numbers of nurses. Then, those experimented data were used to obtain the mathematical relationship between inputs (number of nurses at each level) and performance measures (admission number, occupation rate, and satisfaction rate) using statistical regression analysis. Finally, several integer nonlinear mathematical models were proposed to find optimal nurse capacity subject to the targeted levels on multiple performance measures. The proposed approximation was applied to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a large hospital and the obtained results were investigated.

  18. Cerebral oxygenation as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy in neonatal intensive care: correlation with arterial oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Carol Lu; Oei, Ju Lee; Lui, Kei; Schindler, Timothy

    2017-07-01

    To assess correlation between cerebral oxygenation (rScO 2 ), as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and arterial oxygenation (PaO 2 ), as measured by arterial blood gases, in preterm neonates. Preterm neonates interpretation of NIRS values in neonatal intensive care, and further evaluation is needed to determine the applicability of NIRS to management of preterm infants. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity of Danish versus other European bacterial isolates from intensive care and hematology/oncology units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A; Høiby, Niels; Friis, H M

    1995-01-01

    The prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of bacteria collected consecutively from medical and surgical intensive care units (ICUs) and from hematology/oncology units in nine hospitals in Denmark were determined and compared to data collected simultaneously in 12 other European countries...... frequent in other European countries than Denmark. In general the Danish isolates were more sensitive to antibiotics than the European isolates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  20. Cluster of Candida parapsilosis primary bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit

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    Carmem Lúcia P. da Silva

    Full Text Available Candida parapsilosis is an increasingly important bloodstream pathogen in neonatal intensive care units (NICU. We investigated a cluster of bloodstream infections in a NICU to determine whether nosocomial transmission occurred. During a 3-day period, 3 premature infants hospitalized in the same unit presented with sepsis caused by C. parapsilosis. Electrophoretic karyotype of the organisms was performed by using pulsed field gel electrophoresis in a countour-clamped homogeneous electric field system. The isolate from 1 newborn could not be typed, and the isolates from the remaining 2 infants had identical patterns. All 3 cases are described. We conclude that nosocomial transmission of C. parapsilosis occurred and that neonates under intensive care may represent a risk group for this pathogen.

  1. Cluster of Candida parapsilosis primary bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Carmem Lúcia P. da

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida parapsilosis is an increasingly important bloodstream pathogen in neonatal intensive care units (NICU. We investigated a cluster of bloodstream infections in a NICU to determine whether nosocomial transmission occurred. During a 3-day period, 3 premature infants hospitalized in the same unit presented with sepsis caused by C. parapsilosis. Electrophoretic karyotype of the organisms was performed by using pulsed field gel electrophoresis in a countour-clamped homogeneous electric field system. The isolate from 1 newborn could not be typed, and the isolates from the remaining 2 infants had identical patterns. All 3 cases are described. We conclude that nosocomial transmission of C. parapsilosis occurred and that neonates under intensive care may represent a risk group for this pathogen.

  2. Missed Opportunities for Sedation and Pain Management at a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, India

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    Shikha Yashwant Kothari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:Neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU undergo a multitude of painful and stressful procedures during the first days of life. Stress from this pain can lead to neurodevelopmental problems that manifest in later childhood and should be prevented.Objective:To determine the number of painful procedures performed per day for each neonate, to verify documentation of painful procedures performed, and to, subsequently, note missed opportunities for providing pain relief to neonates.Methods:We conducted a cross-sectional study at a level III NICUlocated in a rural part of western India. A total of 69 neonates admitted for more than 24 hours were included.Twenty-nine neonates were directly observedfor a total of 24 hours each, and another 40 neonatal records were retrospectively reviewed for the neonate’s first 7 days of admission. All stressful and painful procedures performed on the neonate were recorded.Also recorded were any pharmaceutical pain relief agents or central nervous system depressants administered to the neonate before or at the time of the procedures. Averagenurse: patient ratio was also calculated. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics.Results: A documentation deficit of 2.2% was observed. The average nurse: patient ratio was 1.53:1. A total of 13711 procedures were recorded, yielding 44.1 (38.1 stressful, 3.8 mildly painful and 2.2 moderately painful procedures per patient-day. Common stressful procedures were position changing (2501 and temperature recording (2208. Common mildly and moderately painful procedures were heel prick (757 and endotracheal suctioning (526 respectively. Use of pharmacological agents coincided with 33.48% of the procedures. The choice of drug and time of administration were inappropriate, indicating that the pharmacological agents were intended not for pain relief but rather for a coexisting pathology or as sedation from ventilation with no analgesia.Conclusion: Stressful

  3. Parents’ experiences of communication with neonatal intensive-care unit staff: an interview study

    OpenAIRE

    Wigert, Helena; Dellenmark Blom, Michaela; Bry, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Background An infant’s admission to a neonatal intensive-care unit (NICU) inevitably causes the parents emotional stress. Communication between parents and NICU staff is an essential part of the support offered to the parents and can reduce their emotional stress. The aim of this study was to describe parents’ experiences of communication with NICU staff. Methods A hermeneutic lifeworld interview study was performed with 18 families whose children were treated in the level III NICU at a unive...

  4. [Pantoea agglomerans: a new pathogen at the neonatal intensive care unit?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segado-Arenas, Antonio; Alonso-Ojembarrena, Almudena; Lubián-López, Simón P; García-Tapia, Ana M

    2012-08-01

    Late-onset sepsis is very frequent among preterm infants and cases due to Gram negative pathogens have elevated morbidity and mortality. Pantoea agglomerans is a Gram negative organism which has been rarely reported causing disease in humans. We present a case of P. agglomerans late-onset fulminant sepsis in a preterm newborn at a neonatal intensive care unit. Up to date none P. agglomerans sepsis has been reported among this population in our country.

  5. Neonatal Intensive Care Units Nurses’ Attitude Toward Advantages and Disadvantages of Open vs Closed Endotracheal Suction

    OpenAIRE

    Valizadeh, Leila; Janani, Raheleh; Janani, Leila; Galechi, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The vital issue of protecting the airway and maintaining ventilation in preterm infants makes tracheal suctioning an important procedure. The decision to use closed or open endotracheal suction method depends on the clinical status of infants and the nurses’ skills and preferences. Objectives: The current study aimed to compare the two methods based on the perceptions of the nurses working in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). Patients and Methods: A comparative-descriptive stu...

  6. Nosocomial spread of a Staphylococcus capitis strain with heteroresistance to vancomycin in a neonatal intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwet, Wil C.; Debets-Ossenkopp, Yvette J.; Reinders, Erik; Kapi, Maria; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.; van Elburg, Ruurd M.; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.

    2002-01-01

    A premature infant in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) developed a bloodstream infection caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) sensitive to vancomycin. The infection persisted for 3 weeks, despite therapy with vancomycin and replacement of all intravenous catheters. The neonate died

  7. Radiation doses and risks to neonates undergoing radiographic examinations in intensive care units in Tunisia

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    Abir Bouaoun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the radiation doses to neonates from diagnostic radiography in order to derive the local diagnostic reference levels (LDRLs for optimisation purposes.Methods: This study was carried out in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU of  two hospitals in Tunis. 134 babies, with weights ranging from 635 g to 6680 g, performed chest-abdomen X-ray examinations. Neonates were categorized into groups of birth weight. For each X-ray examination, patient data and exposure parameters were recorded. Dose area product (DAP was measured and entrance surface dose (ESD was estimated. Effective dose was calculated from the Monte Carlo simulation software PCXMC.Results: DAP values increased with neonatal weight and demonstrated a wide variation (5.0 - 43.0 mGy.cm2, mean 23.4 mGy.cm2 for patient weight from 600 g to 4000 g. A wide variation was also observed for ESD (14 - 93 μGy, mean 55.2 μGy. The LDRLs expressed in term of DAP were estimated to be 17.6 mGy.cm2 and 29.1 mGy.cm2 for the first and the second NICU, respectively. In terms of effective dose, the average value was about 31.6 μSv per single radiological examination. The results show the necessity to use a standardized protocol with high voltage technique combined to lower current time product (mAs values and an adapted collimation which could lead to further reductions in the neonatal doses. Conclusion: This study presents the LDRLs and the effective doses for neonates in two NICUs and demonstrates the necessity to optimize patient protection for this category of patient.

  8. Incidence of acute kidney injury in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Doaa; Abd-Elrahman, Hadeel; Shehab, Mohamed M; Abd-Elrheem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) over a six-month period from September 2011 to March 2012. This prospective study was performed on 250 neonates admitted to the NICU at the Children's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University. All neonates were subjected to detailed history taking, including pre-natal, natal and post-natal history, with stress on symptoms suggestive of AKI. All neonates were examined thoroughly and the following investigations were performed: Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine, sodium, potassium, calcium, complete blood count, C-reactive protein, arterial blood gases, urine sodium and urine creatinine. AKI was diagnosed in 27 cases (10.8%), including 12 females and 15 males. 40.7% of the AKI cases were born after full-term pregnancy while 59.3% were pre-term babies. 29.6% of the AKI cases had oliguria, and there was male sex predominance, with a male-female ratio of 1.3:1. The cause of AKI was pre-renal in 96.3% and intrinsic renal in 3.7% of the cases. The predisposing factors for AKI were sepsis in 63% of the cases, respiratory distress syndrome in 55.6%, mechanical ventilation in 51.9%, peri-natal asphyxia in 18.5%, dehydration in 14.8%, surgical operation in 11.1%, congenital heart disease in 7.4%, sub-galeal hematoma in 3.7%, polycythemia in 3.7% and intra-ventricular hemorrhage in 3.7% of the cases. Our data suggest that pre-renal failure was the most common form of AKI in our patients. Early recognition of risk factors such as sepsis, peri-natal asphyxia or peri-operative problems and rapid effective treatment of contributing conditions will reduce the incidence of AKI in the neonatal period.

  9. Infección neonatal: comportamiento en una unidad de cuidados intensivos Neonatal infection: behavior in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmany Franco Argote

    2010-12-01

    presenting with sepsis seen in the neonatal intensive services of the "America Arias" Gynecology and Obstetrics Hospital for 2 years. METHODS. A quantitative, observational, descriptive and retrospective research was carried out. Universe included 214 neonates. Study variables were: neonatal conditions, clinical sepsis manifestations, severity, humoral alterations and a history of intervention procedures. Some variables were combined founding the p-value to comparison in neonates with non-severe or with severe sepsis. RESULTS. In study group the prematurity, low birth weight and retarded intrauterine growth achieved a 49.1%, 42,1% and 18,7%, respectively. The 72.9% of patients had severe sepsis. The commonest clinical manifestations were the tachypnea (69.2% and a slow capillary filling (57.9%. The more frequent humoral alteration was the metabolic acidosis (63.6% and the umbilical catheterization was the commonest intervention procedure (21.5%, metabolic acidosis and neutrophilia and respiratory assistance with umbilical catheterization (21 % or epicutaneous (20.6%. The p-value was of 0.001 among patients with non-severe sepsis and the patients with severe sepsis in all combinations of intervention and non-significant in the combination of low birth weight-retarded intrauterine growth (IURG. CONCLUSIONS. There was predominance of prematurity, severe sepsis, tachypnea, umbilical catheterization and metabolic acidosis. The differences among the patients with non-severe sepsis and those with severe sepsis were significant in all the intervention combinations and of neonatal condition, but not in the combination of low birth weight-IURG.

  10. [Equivalent continuous noise level in neonatal intensive care unit associated to burnout syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Galindo, A P; Camargo Caicedo, Y; Vélez-Pereira, A M

    2015-01-01

    Noise levels in neonatal intensive care units allow the appearance of symptoms associated with burnout such as stress, irritability, fatigue and emotional instability on health care personnel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the equivalent continuous noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit and compare the results with noise levels associated with the occurrence of burnout syndrome on the care team. Continuous sampling was conducted for 20 days using a type I sound level meter on the unit. The maximum, the ninetieth percentile and the equivalent continuous noise level (Leq) values were recorded. Noise level is reported in the range of 51.4-77.6 decibels A (dBA) with an average of 64 dBA, 100.6 dBA maximum, and average background noise from 57.9 dBA. Noise levels exceed the standards suggested for neonatal intensive care units, are close to maximum values referred for noise exposure in the occupational standards and to noise levels associated with the onset of burnout; thus allowing to infer the probability of occurrence of high levels of noise present in the unit on the development of burnout in caregivers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  11. [Nursing interventions on the physical environment of Neonatal Intensive Care Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel Capó Rn, I

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to analyse nursing interventions regarding noise and lighting that influence neurodevelopment of the preterm infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. A review of the literature was performed using the databases: Cuiden Plus, PubMed, IBECS and Cochrane Library Plus. The inclusion and exclusion criteria were established in accordance with the objectives and limits used in each database. Of the 35 articles used, most were descriptive quantitative studies based on the measurement of sound pressure levels and lighting in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units. The countries included in this study are Brazil and the United States, and the variables analysed were the recording the times of light and noise. Based on the high levels of light and noise recorded in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units, nursing interventions that should be carried out to reduce them are described. The evidence indicates that after the implementation of these interventions, the high levels of both environmental stimuli are reduced significantly. Despite the extensive literature published on this problem, the levels of light and noise continue to exceed the recommended limits. Therefore, nurses need to increase and enhance their efforts in this environment, in order to positively influence neurodevelopment of premature newborn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  12. A RESEARCH ON ACCIDENTS RISKS AND CAUSES IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNITS

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    Haluk Tanrıverdi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to demonstrate the relationship between the qualifications of neonatal intensive care units of hospitals (physical conditions, standard applications, employee qualifications and use of personal protective equipment and work related causes and risks, employee related causes and risks when occupational accidents occur. Accordingly, a survey was prepared and was made among 105 nurses working in 3 public and 3 private hospital's neonatal intensive care units, in the January of 2010. The survey consists of questions about the qualifications of neonatal intensive care units, work related causes and risks, and employee related causes and risks. From the regression analysis conducted, it has been found that confirmed hypotheses in several studies in the literature were not significant in this study. The sub-dimensions in which relationships has been found show that the improvement of the physical environment in workplace, the improvement of the employee qualifications and standard applications can reduce the rate of occupational accidents. According to the results of this study management should take care of the organizational factors besides to improvement of the physical environment in workplace, the improvement of the employee qualifications and standard applications.

  13. Incidence and nature of medication errors in neonatal intensive care with strategies to improve safety - A review of the current literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chedoe, Indra; Molendijk, Harry A.; Dittrich, Suzanne T. A. M.; Jansman, Frank G. A.; Harting, Johannes W.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; Taxis, Katja

    2007-01-01

    Neonates are highly vulnerable to medication errors because of their extensive exposure to medications in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the general lack of evidence on pharmacotherapeutic interventions in neonates and the lack of neonate-specific formulations. We searched PubMed and

  14. Nasogastric tube position and intragastric air collection in a neonatal intensive care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Jacoba Coby; Smit, Bert J; Mainous, Rosalie O

    2009-12-01

    For neonates receiving intensive care, nasogastric tube feeding is essential. Since nasogastric tube placement techniques are not well standardized and common verification methods can be unreliable, placement errors may lead to unsafe situations. In mechanically ventilated neonates and neonates on continuous positive airway pressure, malpositioning of the nasogastric tube may prevent excess air within the stomach to escape. In this study, we aimed to relate tube position to amount of air. The hypothesis was: the better the position of the tube, the smaller the amount of air in the stomach. A 1-year cohort of neonates in a level IIIc neonatal intensive care unit with a nasogastric tube. We retrospectively reviewed 326 radiographs and classified nasogastric tube position and gastric air. Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographic data. Kendal's tau statistic was applied to explore the relationship between nasogastric tube position and amount of gastric air. A Mann-Whitney U test was performed to confirm the differences in gastric air in neonates with Ch5 and Ch6 gastric tubes and neonates with Ch8 gastric tubes. One or both orifices of nasogastric tubes were in the esophagus in 7.1% of cases, tubes were curled up in the stomach in 35.3% of cases, and tube tips were beyond the pyloric sphincter in 5.5% of cases. Substantial or excessive air was found in 37.7% of cases. Kendal's tau value indicated that there was no significant correlation between nasogastric tube position and gastric air. The Mann-Whitney U value indicated that children with Ch5 and Ch6 gastric tubes had significantly more gastric air than children with Ch8 gastric tubes. Nasogastric tubes were malpositioned in nearly half of cases, and substantial or excessive air was found in more than one-third of cases. The hypothesis-the better the position of the tube, the smaller the amount of gastric air-was not confirmed by the data. However, a significant relationship was found between tube

  15. The effect of a multifaceted educational intervention on medication preparation and administration errors in neonatal intensive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chedoe, Indra; Molendijk, Harry; Hospes, Wobbe; Van den Heuvel, Edwin B.; Taxis, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of a multifaceted educational intervention on the incidence of medication preparation and administration errors in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Design Prospective study with a preintervention and postintervention measurement using direct observation. Setting

  16. Perceptions on pain management among Korean nurses in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ihn Sook; Park, Soon Mi; Lee, Jeon Ma; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Joohyun

    2014-12-01

    The present survey was conducted to investigate the perceptions among nurses of neonatal pain and the associated use of pharmacologic measures (PMs) and nonpharmacologic comfort measures (CMs) in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Pain perception, the necessity and actual use of PMs and CMs, and their relationships were investigated and compared according to nurses' positions, educational levels, the existence of guidelines, and prior education on neonatal pain management. Participants were 141 nurses from five NICUs at university hospitals. A questionnaire was developed by researchers based on previous studies of neonatal pain management and current practices in surveyed NICUs. Five-point Likert scales were used to assess nurses' perceptions of pain, the necessity of PMs and CMs, and their actual use in 29 painful procedures. The mean scores of perceived pain and the necessity of PMs and CMs were 3.68, 2.96, and 3.79 points, respectively. The actual use of PMs and CMs was 1.67 and 2.63 points, respectively. The perceived necessity of PMs correlated with the actual use of PMs (r = .316, p pain management resulted in a higher perception of the necessity of PMs. Korean nurses in NICUs often underestimate the necessity of pain relief measures and use few PMs or CMs. Therefore, systematic approaches to implement guidelines, such as adaptation of guidelines for each NICU, dissemination of guideline content to all NICU staff, and regular measurements of compliance with the guidelines, are recommended. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Use of the ketogenic diet in the neonatal intensive care unit-Safety and tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lindsey; Fecske, Erin; Salim, Mohammad; Hall, Ara

    2017-02-01

    Drug-resistant epilepsy poses a challenge in neonatal patients, especially those in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), who have various secondary comorbidities. We present results of four children with a history of drug-resistant epilepsy for whom a ketogenic diet was initiated and used in the NICU. A nonfasting induction into ketosis over 1-2 weeks was utilized, with gradual increases in the ketogenic ratio every 2-3 days. Data were collected retrospectively from a database, which included medical history, daily progress notes, relevant laboratory data, and imaging and diagnostic information. The ketogenic diet was well tolerated in all cases. The most common side effects observed were constipation, hypoglycemia, and weight loss. Serum β-hydroxybutyrate levels demonstrated improved reliability as a marker of ketosis when compared to urine ketones in this population. Perceived benefits to the infants included improved seizure control, increased alertness, and decreased need for invasive respiratory support. These cases demonstrate that the use of the ketogenic diet for treatment of neonatal encephalopathy and refractory epilepsy can be undertaken safely in the NICU and is well tolerated by carefully screened neonates and infants. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Risk factors for nosocomial infection in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit

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    Ana Carolina Vieira Costa Fernandes Távora

    Full Text Available This study was designed to describe the epidemiology and risk factors for nosocomial infection (NI in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. This study was a retrospective cohort from January to December, 2003. All neonates admitted to the NICU. Infection surveillance was conducted according to the NNIS, CDC. Chi-square test and logistic regression model were performed for statistical analyses. The study was conducted at a public, tertiary referral NICU of a teaching hospital in the Northeast of Brazil. A total of 948 medical records were reviewed. Overall NI incidence rate was 34%. The main neonatal NI was bloodstream infection (68.1%, with clinical sepsis accounting for 47.2%, and pneumonia was the second most common NI (8.6%. Multivariate analysis identified seven independent risk factors for NIs: birth weight, exposure to parenteral nutrition, percutaneous catheter, central venous catheter or mechanical ventilation, abruptio placentae and mother's sexually transmitted disease (STD. Neonates from mothers with STD or abruptio placentae, those weighing less than 1,500 g at birth or those who used invasive devices were at increased risk for acquiring NI.

  19. Risk factors for ventilator-associated pneumonia in neonatal intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Fumiko; Yoshinaga, Masami; Morita, Michiyo; Shibata, Yuriko; Yamada, Tomoyuki; Ooi, Yukimasa; Ukimura, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious complication in neonatal patients on mechanical ventilation. The objective of this study was to examine the incidence and risk factors associated with VAP, particularly in every 7-day versus every 14-day ventilator circuit changes, in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Seventy-one neonates hospitalized in the NICU were enrolled. First, the neonates were divided into groups with and without VAP. On univariate logistic regression analyses, prolonged mechanical ventilation, frequent re-intubation, low gestational age, and low birth weight (BW) were significant risk factors for VAP development. After adjustments for other variables, only BW <626 g was a significant independent predictor for VAP in NICU infants. Second, to examine the effect of the frequency of changing ventilator circuits on the incidence of VAP, circuit changes were compared between the every 7-day group and the every 14-day group. The incidence of VAP per 1000 ventilator days was 9.66 for the every 7-day group and 8.08 for the every 14-day group, and there was no significant difference between the 2 groups. BW <626 g was a significant independent predictor of VAP, and decreasing the frequency of ventilator circuit changes from every 7 days to 14 days had no adverse effect on the VAP rate in the NICU. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Discharge against Medical Advice at Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Gujarat, India

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    Bhanu Devpura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We explored reasons for discharged against medical advice (DAMA of neonates from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU through in-depth interviews of the parents/guardians. Methods. Of 456 babies admitted to NICU during April 2014 to March 2015, 116 babies were DAMA. Parents of randomly selected 50 babies of these 116, residing within 50 kilometers, were approached for in-depth interviews at their homes. Audio recordings were done and manually transcribed, analyzed in detail to explore common threads leading to DAMA. Basic demographic information of the newborns was retrieved from hospital records. Results. The prevalence of DAMA was 25.4%. Of 50 parents approached, 41 in-depth interviews were completed. Nonaffordability (38.6%, no improvement (14.6%, poor prognosis (12%, and inappropriate behavior of the patient relation office personnel (10.6% were major factors contributing to DAMA. Parents of 6.6% neonates wanted guarantee of survival and 5.3% parents reported poor behavior of nurses. No gender bias was observed related to DAMA. One-third of neonates (34.1% were DAMA on first day of admission. Conclusions. The issue of DAMA needs attention. Besides nonaffordability and clinical characteristics of the baby, communication (breaking bad news, counseling, etc. and lack of adequate infrastructure for relatives emerged as modifiable factors leading to DAMA.

  1. Discharge against Medical Advice at Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devpura, Bhanu; Bhadesia, Pranav; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar; Desai, Sandeep; Phatak, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Objective . We explored reasons for discharged against medical advice (DAMA) of neonates from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) through in-depth interviews of the parents/guardians. Methods . Of 456 babies admitted to NICU during April 2014 to March 2015, 116 babies were DAMA. Parents of randomly selected 50 babies of these 116, residing within 50 kilometers, were approached for in-depth interviews at their homes. Audio recordings were done and manually transcribed, analyzed in detail to explore common threads leading to DAMA. Basic demographic information of the newborns was retrieved from hospital records. Results . The prevalence of DAMA was 25.4%. Of 50 parents approached, 41 in-depth interviews were completed. Nonaffordability (38.6%), no improvement (14.6%), poor prognosis (12%), and inappropriate behavior of the patient relation office personnel (10.6%) were major factors contributing to DAMA. Parents of 6.6% neonates wanted guarantee of survival and 5.3% parents reported poor behavior of nurses. No gender bias was observed related to DAMA. One-third of neonates (34.1%) were DAMA on first day of admission. Conclusions . The issue of DAMA needs attention. Besides nonaffordability and clinical characteristics of the baby, communication (breaking bad news, counseling, etc.) and lack of adequate infrastructure for relatives emerged as modifiable factors leading to DAMA.

  2. Discharge against medical advice from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: 10 years experience at a University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Turkistani, Hatim K

    2013-05-01

    Discharging patients against medical advice is a problem of every age-group. However, because of their physiological vulnerability, the risk for the neonatal population is greater when discharged against medical advice (DAMA). This article is a study of the prevalence of the problem, the possible causes and/or risk factors. A retrospective review of 10 years of medical records of neonates discharged against medical advice from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at a university hospital. The overall prevalence of DAMA was 1.6%. Most of the 51 infants who were taken out of hospital against medical advice (AMA) were term (72.5%) with a mean gestational age of 37.78 ± 2.5 weeks, of normal birth weight, with a mean of 2736 ± 661 g, Saudis (96%), those delivered vaginally (69%), and those that were provisionally diagnosed with transient tachypnea of newborn (TTN) and/or query sepsis (49%). There was no difference between males and females (M/F = 1.2). There was an association between DAMA and the timing of DAMA (27.5% of DAMA at weekends and 67% of DAMA from May to October). DAMA of neonates is particularly critical. The causes and risk factors are many and difficult to predict. In addition to several other factors, its prevalence is influenced negatively by some socio-cultural beliefs.

  3. The lived experience of fathers of preterm infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a systematic review of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzi, Livio; Santoro, Elena

    2015-07-01

    To systematically review the experience of fathers of preterm infants hospitalised in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Family-centred care is more and more acknowledged in Neonatal Intensive Care Units, advocating for active engagement of both parents in the care journey. Nonetheless, fathers' Neonatal Intensive Care Unit experience has received limited research attention. Systematic review of qualitative studies. Four electronic databases (CINHAL, ISI Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus) were explored and studies published between 2000-2014 were included. Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) and Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) Critical Appraisal Tool for Qualitative Studies guidelines were adopted. Key themes were extracted and synthesised. Five main themes resuming fathers' experience of preterm birth and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit stay were identified from 14 studies. Themes were: emotional roller-coaster, paternal needs, coping strategies, self-representation and caregiving engagement. These dimensions were found to be dynamically shaped across three critical turning points: preterm birth, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit stay and at home. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit fathers of preterm infants experience ambivalence, a set of different needs and coping strategies. They modify their self-representations along the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit journey and needs specific nursing support and intervention to sustain caregiving engagement and transition to parenthood. A systematic and deepened understanding of preterms' fathers lived experience in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit would be helpful to inform nursing practice. Specific action priorities are suggested within the frame of family-centred care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Transition from an open-plan to a two-cot neonatal intensive care unit: a participatory action research approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Margaret; Gardner, Anne; Kecskes, Zsuzsoka; Kildea, Sue

    2017-07-01

    To facilitate staff transition from an open-plan to a two-cot neonatal intensive care unit design. In 2012, an Australian regional neonatal intensive care unit transitioned from an open-plan to a two-cot neonatal intensive care unit design. Research has reported single- and small-room neonatal intensive care unit design may negatively impact on the distances nurses walk, reducing the time they spend providing direct neonatal care. Studies have also reported nurses feel isolated and need additional support and education in such neonatal intensive care units. Staff highlighted their concerns regarding the impact of the new design on workflow and clinical practice. A participatory action research approach. A participatory action group titled the Change and Networking Group collaborated with staff over a four-year period (2009-2013) to facilitate the transition. The Change and Networking Group used a collaborative, cyclical process of planning, gathering data, taking action and reviewing the results to plan the next action. Data sources included meeting and workshop minutes, newsletters, feedback boards, subgroup reports and a staff satisfaction survey. The study findings include a description of (1) how the participatory action research cycles were used by the Change and Networking Group: providing examples of projects and strategies undertaken; and (2) evaluations of participatory action research methodology and Group by neonatal intensive care unit staff and Change and Networking members. This study has described the benefits of using participatory action research to facilitate staff transition from an open-plan to a two-cot neonatal intensive care unit design. Participatory action research methodology enabled the inclusion of staff to find solutions to design and clinical practice questions. Future research is required to assess the long-term effect of neonatal intensive care unit design on staff workload, maintaining and supporting a skilled workforce as well as

  5. Profile of newborns undergoing early stimulation in a neonatal intensive care unit

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    Karla Camila Lima de Souza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the profile of newborns undergoing early stimulation in a neonatal intensive care unit, characterizing the study population according to their neonatal variables and risk factors indicative for the early stimulation treatment. Methods: Cross-sectional and analytical study, held in a reference hospital of Fortaleza, in the period from February to March 2011, with sample consisting of 116 medical records of newborns indicated for the early stimulation treatment. The following variables were analyzed: weight, sex, gestational age, Apgar score, diagnosis of Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Intracranial Hemorrhage, use of mechanical ventilation and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. The variables were analyzed using Microsoft Excel™ 2007 software to obtain mean and mode. Results: Among the studied variables, there was a prevalence of low birth weight, prematurity and male newborns. According to the Apgar score, scores of 1st and 5th minutes showed increasing values. Regarding the studied pathologies, the Respiratory Distress Syndrome stands out as the most prevalent, followed by Intracranial Hemorrhage. Concerning the use of mechanical ventilation, CPAP was the most frequently indicated modality, followed by mechanical ventilation. Conclusion: The profile of newborns investigated in this study, which underwent early stimulation in a neonatal intensive care, is represented by male, premature, low weight and high rate of Apgar score at 1st and 5th minutes, with prevalence of respiratory distressand increased use of CPAP. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p523

  6. Nursing care of the newborn in a neonatal intensive care unit

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    Taysa Costa da Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the main measures of care for the newborn in the neonatal intensive care unit. Method: This is an integrative review, in which, it is possible to identify, analyze and synthesize research results with the inclusion of experimental and non-experimental studies. A total of 133 articles were collected. After reading titles, exclusion criteria and reading resumes, 10 were left, in which the sample was composed. Results: The selected publications were placed in 3 thematic categories: The importance of knowledge in nursing care, to the internal NB in ​​NICU; Nursing evaluation and care used for pain relief in NB; Main factors and adverse events that may lead to the hospitalization of the newborn and the increase of morbidity and mortality in an NICU. Conclusion: The analysis of the aforementioned study exposes the importance and main nursing care that can be administered in newborns in a NICU, so that the reduction of neonatal mortality can be provided. Descriptors: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit; Nursing care; Newborn.

  7. [Epidemiology of nosocomial bacterial infection in a neonatal intensive care unit in Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoulainine, F-M-R; Elidrissi, N-S; Chkil, G; Abba, F; Soraa, N; Chabaa, L; Amine, M; Aboussad, A

    2014-09-01

    In neonatal intensive care units, the incidence of nosocomial infection is high. This study aimed to determine the epidemiology of a nosocomial bacterial infection in the neonatal intensive care unit of Mohamed VI university hospital. A total of 702 newborns were included in this study. Of the 702 neonates studied, 91 had developed a nosocomial infection. The incidence rate was 13% and incidence density was 21.2 per 1000 patient-days. The types of infection were: bloodstream infections (89%), pneumonia (6.6%), meningitis (3.3%), and urinary tract infections (1.1%). Nosocomial infection was particularly frequent in cases of low birth weight, prematurity, young age at admission, umbilical venous catheter, and mechanical ventilation. Multiresistant bacteria included enterobacteria producing betalactamase (76.9%), especially enterobacteria that were dominated by Klebsiella pneumoniae (39.7%). The mortality rate was 52.7% in nosocomial infections, 19 (20.87%) of whom had septic shock. The results of this study show that nosocomial infection is an intrahospital health problem that could be remedied by a prevention strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. MRSA transmission on a neonatal intensive care unit: epidemiological and genome-based phylogenetic analyses.

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    Ulrich Nübel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA may cause prolonged outbreaks of infections in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs. While the specific factors favouring MRSA spread on neonatal wards are not well understood, colonized infants, their relatives, or health-care workers may all be sources for MRSA transmission. Whole-genome sequencing may provide a new tool for elucidating transmission pathways of MRSA at a local scale. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We applied whole-genome sequencing to trace MRSA spread in a NICU and performed a case-control study to identify risk factors for MRSA transmission. MRSA genomes had accumulated sequence variation sufficiently fast to reflect epidemiological linkage among individual patients, between infants and their mothers, and between infants and staff members, such that the relevance of individual nurses' nasal MRSA colonization for prolonged transmission could be evaluated. In addition to confirming previously reported risk factors, we identified an increased risk of transmission from infants with as yet unknown MRSA colonisation, in contrast to known MRSA-positive infants. CONCLUSIONS: The integration of epidemiological (temporal, spatial and genomic data enabled the phylogenetic testing of several hypotheses on specific MRSA transmission routes within a neonatal intensive-care unit. The pronounced risk of transmission emanating from undetected MRSA carriers suggested that increasing the frequency or speed of microbiological diagnostics could help to reduce transmission of MRSA.

  9. Operating Room Within the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit--Experience of a Medical Center in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Lei; Jeng, Suh-Fang; Tsao, Po-Nien; Chou, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Yi; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun

    2015-08-01

    Most neonates who reside in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and require surgery are transferred to the operating room (OR) or undergo bedside surgery. However, critically ill neonates who are transferred often encounter the risk of complications. An OR in our NICU was therefore launched in 2009. This study was to appraise the surgeries performed in the NICU OR and compare results with the traditional main OR outside the NICU. This was a retrospective study in the NICU of a tertiary center. Retrospective chart review was conducted for all neonates who underwent surgical procedures in the NICU OR and the main OR. The information regarding baseline characteristics, surgical procedures and duration, ventilator use, hypothermia, hyperglycemia, instrument dislocations, surgically related infection or complications, and outcomes was obtained. There were a total of 65 patients in this study, 37 in the NCIU OR group and 28 in the main OR group. The presurgical mean airway pressure and the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) were comparable between the two groups, but the postsurgical FiO2 was significantly lower in the NICU OR group (31.0%) than in the main OR group (40.9%; p = 0.027). Furthermore, the NICU OR group required a significantly shorter preoperation waiting time (34.4 minutes vs. 63.6 minutes, p = 0.001) and had a lower incidence of hypothermia than the main OR group (8.1% vs. 39.3%, p = 0.008). However, surgically related complications were similar between groups. The OR within the NICU may reduce the risk of complications during transportation and provide continuity of care to critically ill neonates. It also decreases the disturbance to other NICU patients during operation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Parent' s experiences and perceives at premature newborn in the neonatal intensive care unit

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    Klaudia Urbančič

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Text treats parent's experiences and perceives and the significant of their newborn premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit in the Ljubljana maternity hospital. Aim of health promotion, the significance of health education in health education counselling are presented. The purpose of this study was to introduction parent' s experiences and make an implementation in nursing practice. The advantage is represent by performing health education counselling for parents in intensive care unit permanently. Perceives of parents during living their newborn infant in neonatal intensive care unit are present on five concepts: perceive parents themselves, perceive their infant, perceive the staff and the intensive care setting and perceive their home setting. Results are showing statistic important differences between mothers and fathers at the time of deliver and at the time charging infant home. A questionare was used for collecting data. Process of development instrument is represent. Descriptive statistics and T-test was used for quantitative data analysed. Using method of internal consistent Chronbach alpha tested reliability of scales and mean differences in time are graf protrayed by 95% confident intervals. Results show statistical significant differences on all five concepts of parent's experiences. Methodological findings and reseaarch limitations are also present. Authoress positive evaluates the effect of health education counselling program and find out its positive effect on parent's critical thinking and contributes to quality assurance nursing.

  11. Retinopathy of prematurity practices: a national survey of Canadian Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Kourosh; Woodward, Mary Angela; Easterbrook, Bethany; Shivananda, Sandesh

    2018-01-02

    To examine current level three Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) practices related to ROP screening and treatment. A cross-sectional survey was sent to 29 level three NICU's across Canada to survey current screening inclusion criteria, treatment options, supportive care and post-screening events for ROP. 22/29 (76%) level three NICU's responded. Ten different ROP screening inclusion criteria were found to be in use with significant variation in gestational age and birth weight criteria. Many other national variations also exist regarding the supportive and procedural protocols surrounding ROP screening as well as mode of treatment for ROP. Despite national guidelines, significant variation in ROP screening inclusion criteria practices exist among neonatal units in Canada. Therefore, there is an urgent need for better evidence-based screening guidelines as well as a need to standardize supportive measures surrounding ROP screening and treatment.

  12. The Energy Costs of Prematurity and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU Experience

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    John B. C. Tan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Premature neonates are in an energy deficient state due to (1 oxygen desaturation and hypoxia events, (2 painful and stressful stimuli, (3 illness, and (4 neurodevelopmental energy requirements. Failure to correct energy deficiency in premature infants may lead to adverse effects such as neurodevelopmental delay and negative long-term metabolic and cardiovascular outcomes. The effects of energy dysregulation and the challenges that clinicians in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU face in meeting the premature infant’s metabolic demands are discussed. Specifically, the focus is on the effects of pain and stress on energy homeostasis. Energy deficiency is a complex problem and requires a multi-faceted solution to promote optimum development of premature infants.

  13. Nursing diagnoses identified during parent group meetings in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Vale, Ianê Nogueira; de Souza, Sandra Regina; Carmona, Elenice Valentim

    2005-01-01

    To identify nursing diagnoses in the reports of parents obtained during parent support group meetings in a neonatal intensive care unit. An explorative descriptive study using records obtained during 29 meetings over a period of 11 months with parents and family members. Six NANDA-approved nursing diagnoses were identified from parent group data: fear, risk for impaired parent/infant attachment, parental role conflict, risk for ineffective breastfeeding, impaired home maintenance, and risk for caregiver role strain. Diagnoses were not validated with parents. Support groups helped the parents express their thoughts and feelings and provided nurses with opportunities to identify nursing diagnoses and interventions. The identification of nursing diagnoses showed that nursing interventions that are focused on improved parent outcomes should be implemented for parents and other family members. Nursing care in neonatal units should focus on interventions for parents and other family members in addition to providing the necessary care of newborns.

  14. Expansion of the ten steps to successful breastfeeding into neonatal intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg; Häggkvist, Anna-Pia; Hansen, Mette Ness

    2012-01-01

    and infants: 1. The staff attitude to the mother must focus on the individual mother and her situation. 2. The facility must provide family-centered care, supported by the environment. 3. The health care system must ensure continuity of care, that is, continuity of pre-, peri-, and postnatal care and post......The World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative: Revised, Updated, and Expanded for Integrated Care (2009) identifies the need for expanding the guidelines originally developed for maternity units to include neonatal intensive care. For this purpose......-discharge care. The goal of the expert group is to create a final document, the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative for Neonatal Units, including standards and criteria for each of the 3 Guiding Principles, Ten Steps, and the Code; to develop tools for self-appraisal and monitoring compliance with the guidelines...

  15. Does neonatal pain management in intensive care units differ between night and day? An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedj, Romain; Danan, Claude; Daoud, Patrick; Zupan, Véronique; Renolleau, Sylvain; Zana, Elodie; Aizenfisz, Sophie; Lapillonne, Alexandre; de Saint Blanquat, Laure; Granier, Michèle; Durand, Philippe; Castela, Florence; Coursol, Anne; Hubert, Philippe; Cimerman, Patricia; Anand, K J S; Khoshnood, Babak; Carbajal, Ricardo

    2014-02-20

    To determine whether analgesic use for painful procedures performed in neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) differs during nights and days and during each of the 6 h period of the day. Conducted as part of the prospective observational Epidemiology of Painful Procedures in Neonates study which was designed to collect in real time and around-the-clock bedside data on all painful or stressful procedures. 13 NICUs and paediatric intensive care units in the Paris Region, France. All 430 neonates admitted to the participating units during a 6-week period between September 2005 and January 2006. During the first 14 days of admission, data were collected on all painful procedures and analgesic therapy. The five most frequent procedures representing 38 012 of all 42 413 (90%) painful procedures were analysed. Observational study. We compared the use of specific analgesic for procedures performed during each of the 6 h period of a day: morning (7:00 to 12:59), afternoon, early night and late night and during daytime (morning+afternoon) and night-time (early night+late night). 7724 of 38 012 (20.3%) painful procedures were carried out with a specific analgesic treatment. For morning, afternoon, early night and late night, respectively, the use of analgesic was 25.8%, 18.9%, 18.3% and 18%. The relative reduction of analgesia was 18.3%, p<0.01, between daytime and night-time and 28.8%, p<0.001, between morning and the rest of the day. Parental presence, nurses on 8 h shifts and written protocols for analgesia were associated with a decrease in this difference. The substantial differences in the use of analgesics around-the-clock may be questioned on quality of care grounds.

  16. Ambient Noise Levels in Acute Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a Tertiary Referral Hospital

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    Sonia R. B D'Souza

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advances in neonatal care have resulted in improved survival of neonates admitted to the intensive care of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. However, the NCU may be an inappropriate milieu, with presence of overwhelming stimuli, most potent being the continuous presence of noise in the ambience of the NICU. Aim and Objectives: To determine and describe the ambient noise levels in the acute NICU of a tertiary referral hospital. Material and Methods: The ambient noise, in this study was the background sound existing in the environment of the acute NICU of a tertiary referral hospital in South India. The ambient noise levels were analyzed by an audiologist and acoustical engineer using a standardized and calibrated Sound Level Meter (SLM i.e., the Hand Held Analyzer type 2250, Brüel and Kjær, Denmark on a weighted frequency A and reported as dB (A. Results: The ambient noise levels were timed measurements yielded by the SLM in terms of L eq, L as well as L exceeded the standard A 10 Aeqmax levels (Leq< 45 dB, L ≤ 50 dB, and Lmax ≤ 65 10 dB.The L eq ranged from 59.4 to 62.12 dB A. A Ventilators with alarms caused the maximum amount of ambient noise yielding a L Sound Pressure Level AF (SPL of 82.14 dB A. Conclusion: The study has found high levels of ambient noise in the acute NICU. Though there are several measures to reduce the ambient noise levels in the NICU, it is essential to raise awareness among health care personnel regarding the observed ambient noise levels and its effects on neonates admitted to the NICU.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a neonatal intensive care unit: molecular epidemiology and infection control measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivaro, Valeria; Di Popolo, Anna; Caprio, Alessandro; Lambiase, Antonietta; Di Resta, Mario; Borriello, Tonia; Scarcella, Alda; Triassi, Maria; Zarrilli, Raffaele

    2009-05-22

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a non-fermentative, gram-negative rod, is responsible for a wide variety of clinical syndromes in NICU patients, including sepsis, pneumonia, meningitis, diarrhea, conjunctivitis and skin infections. An increased number of infections and colonisations by P. aeruginosa has been observed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of our university hospital between 2005 and 2007. Hand disinfection compliance before and after an educational programme on hand hygiene was evaluated. Identification of microrganisms was performed using conventional methods. Antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by MIC microdilution. Genotyping was performed by PFGE analysis. The molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the NICU of the Federico II University hospital (Naples, Italy) and the infection control measures adopted to stop the spreading of P. aeruginosa in the ward were described. From July 2005 to June 2007, P. aeruginosa was isolated from 135 neonates and caused severe infections in 11 of them. Macrorestriction analysis of clinical isolates from 90 neonates identified 20 distinct genotypes, one major PFGE type (A) being isolated from 48 patients and responsible for 4 infections in 4 of them, four other distinct recurrent genotypes being isolated in 6 to 4 patients. Seven environmental strains were isolated from the hand of a nurse and from three sinks on two occasions, two of these showing PFGE profiles A and G identical to two clinical isolates responsible for infection. The successful control of the outbreak was achieved through implementation of active surveillance of healthcare-associated infections in the ward together with environmental microbiological sampling and an intense educational programme on hand disinfection among the staff members. P. aeruginosa infections in the NICU were caused by the cross-transmission of an epidemic clone in 4 neonates, and by the selection of sporadic clones in 7 others. An infection control programme

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a neonatal intensive care unit: molecular epidemiology and infection control measures

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    Triassi Maria

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a non-fermentative, gram-negative rod, is responsible for a wide variety of clinical syndromes in NICU patients, including sepsis, pneumonia, meningitis, diarrhea, conjunctivitis and skin infections. An increased number of infections and colonisations by P. aeruginosa has been observed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of our university hospital between 2005 and 2007. Methods Hand disinfection compliance before and after an educational programme on hand hygiene was evaluated. Identification of microrganisms was performed using conventional methods. Antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by MIC microdilution. Genotyping was performed by PFGE analysis. Results The molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the NICU of the Federico II University hospital (Naples, Italy and the infection control measures adopted to stop the spreading of P. aeruginosa in the ward were described. From July 2005 to June 2007, P. aeruginosa was isolated from 135 neonates and caused severe infections in 11 of them. Macrorestriction analysis of clinical isolates from 90 neonates identified 20 distinct genotypes, one major PFGE type (A being isolated from 48 patients and responsible for 4 infections in 4 of them, four other distinct recurrent genotypes being isolated in 6 to 4 patients. Seven environmental strains were isolated from the hand of a nurse and from three sinks on two occasions, two of these showing PFGE profiles A and G identical to two clinical isolates responsible for infection. The successful control of the outbreak was achieved through implementation of active surveillance of healthcare-associated infections in the ward together with environmental microbiological sampling and an intense educational programme on hand disinfection among the staff members. Conclusion P. aeruginosa infections in the NICU were caused by the cross-transmission of an epidemic clone in 4 neonates, and by the selection

  19. Comparison Study of Causes and Neonatal Mortality Rates of Newborns Admitted in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Al-Sadder Teaching Hospital in Al-Amara City, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Alsadi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEach year about 32.4 million of children are born with low birth weight, which is below the 10th percentile for their gestational ages; moreover, about fifteen million of them are premature. Actually, about 60% of neonatal deaths occur in low birth weight neonates related to their prematurity. This study aimed to determine the neonatal death rate and the most common causes of the hospital inborn admissions to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU.Materials and MethodsA descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in NICU, during two separated periods one in 2007 and the other during 2015. All consecutive live born babies from 1st of January to 31st of December of 2007 were included as 1st period studied and the second period from 1st of January to 31st of December 2015. The neonatal mortality rate (NMR, and causes of deaths in two years, were studied and compared.ResultsIn 1st period, the neonatal death rate in NICU was 27.2 %, while in 2nd period; it was 33.9%, which was higher. The commonest causes of neonatal death were the same but, the percentages were different and the leading causes of death from the higher frequencies down were hyaline membrane syndrome, birth asphyxia, congenital anomalies, meconium aspiration and others.ConclusionThe neonatal death rate in the NICU was higher in 2015, compared to 2007. This needs special efforts for strengthen the strategies of neonatal care and management at the time of delivery and even before and during intrauterine life through good antenatal care to improve the NICU outcome.

  20. Neonatal Vitamin D Levels in Relation to Risk of Overweight at 7 Years in the Danish D-Tect Case-Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla B.; Lundqvist, Marika; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D level in pregnancy may be associated with risk of overweight in the offspring later in life.Methods: In a case-cohort study based on Danish biobanks and registers we examined the association between 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OH)D) level at birth and overweight at 7 years. Cases...... of overweight (n = 871) were randomly selected among 7-year-old children from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register (CSHRR) with a BMI above the 90th percentile. The cohort (n = 1,311) was a random sample selected among all Danish children born during the same period. Neonatal 25(OH)D was measured...... in dried blood spots. Results: 25(OH)D3 exhibited the expected seasonal variation. Median level of 25(OH)D3 was 20.6 (11.9-33.3) nmol/l in the overweight group and 23.4 (13.5-34.3) nmol/l in the cohort. We found no association between neonatal 25(OH)D3 level and risk of overweight at age 7 years, neither...

  1. Length of time from extubation to cardiorespiratory death in neonatal intensive care patients and assessment of suitability for organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S; Kent, A L

    2014-01-01

    A common concern for parents when end of life decisions are made is the length of time their baby may take to die. Postcardiac death organ donation is now becoming more common, along with neonatal organ donation. The aim was to determine the length of time from extubation until cardiorespiratory death (CRD) in neonatal intensive care patients and consideration of potential organ donation. Retrospective review of medical records of neonates who died in a neonatal intensive care unit between 2000 and 2009. Data collected included gestation at birth, age at death, birth weight, reason for cessation of intensive care, inotrope and ventilation requirements, sedation and muscle relaxation prior to death, time from extubation to documented CRD. An assessment was made for potential suitability for consideration of organ donation with a gestation at birth ≥ 34 weeks and birth weight >2.0 kg. 117 neonates were included, median gestation 29 weeks and median birth weight 1220 grams. The median age at death was 4 days of age. The median time from discussing prognosis to death was 137 min. The median time from extubation to CRD was 30 min. Seven (6%) neonates were considered suitable for organ donation, and for these infants the median time from extubation to CRD was 120 min. Two neonates donated heart valves. This provides a guide for grieving parents on time frames for the interval between extubation and CRD. More accurate postextubation CRD times are required to determine likely potential for postcardiac death organ donation.

  2. Driving forces behind the increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity.A dynamic epidemiologic model of trends in Danish cardiovascular drug utilization.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    Background: In many Western countries cardiovascular treatment intensity (DDD/1000 inhabitants/day, DDD/TID) has grown substantially during the last decades. Changed drug utilization pattern - rather than population ageing - was hypothesized to be the main driving force behind the growth....... Objectives: To investigate the driving forces behind the increasing treatment prevalence of cardiovascular drugs, in particular statins, by means of a dynamic epidemiologic drug utilization model. Methods: Material: All Danish residents older than 20 years by January 1, 1996 (4.0 million inhabitants), were...... followed with respect to out-of-hospital redemptions of cardiovascular prescription drugs in the period 1996-2005. The impact of population ageing on cardiovascular treatment intensity was investigated by comparing crude and age/gender standardised intensities. Epidemiologic model: We developed a three...

  3. Nurses' attitudes and perceptions of pain assessment in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pölkki, Tarja; Korhonen, Anne; Laukkala, Helena; Saarela, Timo; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2010-03-01

    Pain assessment of premature infants continue to be ineffective. The problem may be partly because of misconceptions or lack of knowledge in the assessment of pain in children. This paper reports a study to describe nurses' attitudes towards and perceptions of pain assessment in neonatal intensive care and the demographic factors related to these attitudes and perceptions of pain. The participants consisted of 257 Finnish nurses who were recruited from all five of the country's university hospitals caring for the premature infants receiving intensive care or monitoring. We collected data by using a Likert-type questionnaire in spring 2006. The response rate was 71% from the represented population. Almost all (97%) of the nurses agreed that pain assessment in premature infants is important. However, over half (60%) of the respondents agreed that they could assess the premature infants pain reliably without pain scores. The respondents' perceptions of the premature infants' ability to sense and express pain indicated rather good knowledge of the topic. Nevertheless, one-fourth of the participants was unaware that a premature infant could be more sensitive in sensing pain than a full term counterpart. Education, work experience and the working unit were the demographic factors that were significantly related to the respondents' attitudes and perceptions. On average nurses' attitudes were positive towards the pain assessment in neonatal intensive care. However, there were some gaps in the knowledge concerning the respondents' perceptions of the items, which is a challenge to nursing and nursing education.

  4. Effect of a laboratory result pager on provider behavior in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, L; Stavroudis, Ta; Miller, Re; Lehmann, Hp; Lehmann, Cu

    2011-01-01

    A computerized laboratory result paging system (LRPS) that alerts providers about abnormal results ("push") may improve upon active laboratory result review ("pull"). However, implementing such a system in the intensive care setting may be hindered by low signal-to-noise ratio, which may lead to alert fatigue. To evaluate the impact of an LRPS in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Utilizing paper chart review, we tallied provider orders following an abnormal laboratory result before and after implementation of an LRPS. Orders were compared with a predefined set of appropriate orders for such an abnormal result. The likelihood of a provider response in the post-implementation period as compared to the pre-implementation period was analyzed using logistic regression. The provider responses were analyzed using logistic regression to control for potential confounders. The likelihood of a provider response to an abnormal laboratory result did not change significantly after implementation of an LRPS. (Odds Ratio 0.90, 95% CI 0.63-1.30, p-value 0.58) However, when providers did respond to an alert, the type of response was different. The proportion of repeat laboratory tests increased. (26/378 vs. 7/278, p-value = 0.02). Although the laboratory result pager altered healthcare provider behavior in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, it did not increase the overall likelihood of provider response.

  5. Moral distress within neonatal and paediatric intensive care units: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Trisha; Janvier, Annie; Gillam, Lynn; Davis, Peter G

    2016-08-01

    To review the literature on moral distress experienced by nursing and medical professionals within neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and paediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Pubmed, EBSCO (Academic Search Complete, CINAHL and Medline) and Scopus were searched using the terms neonat*, infant*, pediatric*, prematur* or preterm AND (moral distress OR moral responsibility OR moral dilemma OR conscience OR ethical confrontation) AND intensive care. 13 studies on moral distress published between January 1985 and March 2015 met our inclusion criteria. Fewer than half of those studies (6) were multidisciplinary, with a predominance of nursing staff responses across all studies. The most common themes identified were overly 'burdensome' and disproportionate use of technology perceived not to be in a patient's best interest, and powerlessness to act. Concepts of moral distress are expressed differently within nursing and medical literature. In nursing literature, nurses are often portrayed as victims, with physicians seen as the perpetrators instigating 'aggressive care'. Within medical literature moral distress is described in terms of dilemmas or ethical confrontations. Moral distress affects the care of patients in the NICU and PICU. Empirical data on multidisciplinary populations remain sparse, with inconsistent definitions and predominantly small sample sizes limiting generalisability of studies. Longitudinal data reflecting the views of all stakeholders, including parents, are required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Sacred Spaces: Religious and Secular Coping and Family Relationships in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brelsford, Gina M; Ramirez, Joshua; Veneman, Kristin; Doheny, Kim K

    2016-08-01

    Preterm birth is an unanticipated and stressful event for parents. In addition, the unfamiliar setting of the intensive care nursery necessitates strategies for coping. The primary study objective of this descriptive study was to determine whether secular and religious coping strategies were related to family functioning in the neonatal intensive care unit. Fifty-two parents of preterm (25-35 weeks' gestation) infants completed the Brief COPE (secular coping), the Brief RCOPE (religious coping), and the Family Environment Scale within 1 week of their infant's hospital admission. This descriptive study found that parents' religious and secular coping was significant in relation to family relationship functioning. Specifically, negative religious coping (ie, feeling abandoned or angry at God) was related to poorer family cohesion and use of denial. These findings have relevance for interventions focused toward enhancing effective coping for families. Further study of religious and secular coping strategies for neonatal intensive care unit families is warranted in a larger more diverse sample of family members.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outbreak in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Attributed to Hospital Tap Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicking Kinsey, Cara; Koirala, Samir; Solomon, Benjamin; Rosenberg, Jon; Robinson, Byron F; Neri, Antonio; Laufer Halpin, Alison; Arduino, Matthew J; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Noble-Wang, Judith; Chea, Nora; Gould, Carolyn V

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and colonization in a neonatal intensive care unit. DESIGN Infection control assessment, environmental evaluation, and case-control study. SETTING Newly built community-based hospital, 28-bed neonatal intensive care unit. PATIENTS Neonatal intensive care unit patients receiving care between June 1, 2013, and September 30, 2014. METHODS Case finding was performed through microbiology record review. Infection control observations, interviews, and environmental assessment were performed. A matched case-control study was conducted to identify risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection. Patient and environmental isolates were collected for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine strain relatedness. RESULTS In total, 31 cases were identified. Case clusters were temporally associated with absence of point-of-use filters on faucets in patient rooms. After adjusting for gestational age, case patients were more likely to have been in a room without a point-of-use filter (odds ratio [OR], 37.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.16-∞). Case patients had higher odds of exposure to peripherally inserted central catheters (OR, 7.20; 95% CI, 1.75-37.30) and invasive ventilation (OR, 5.79; 95% CI, 1.39-30.62). Of 42 environmental samples, 28 (67%) grew P. aeruginosa. Isolates from the 2 most recent case patients were indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis from water-related samples obtained from these case-patient rooms. CONCLUSIONS This outbreak was attributed to contaminated water. Interruption of the outbreak with point-of-use filters provided a short-term solution; however, eradication of P. aeruginosa in water and fixtures was necessary to protect patients. This outbreak highlights the importance of understanding the risks of stagnant water in healthcare facilities. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:801-808.

  8. Is there a role of palliative care in the neonatal intensive care unit in India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjiri P Dighe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in medical care have improved the survival of newborn babies born with various problems. Despite this death in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU is an inevitable reality. For babies who are not going to "get better," the health care team still has a duty to alleviate the physical suffering of the baby and to support the family. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to relieve the physical, psycho social, and spiritual suffering of patients and their families. Palliative care provision in the Indian NICU settings is almost nonexistent at present. In this paper we attempt to "build a case" for palliative care in the Indian NICU setting.

  9. Strategies for the prevention of hospital-acquired infections in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghesi, A; Stronati, M

    2008-04-01

    Nosocomial infections are among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections is based on strategies that aim to limit susceptibility to infections by enhancing host defences, interrupting transmission of organisms by healthcare workers and by promoting the judicious use of antimicrobials. Several strategies are available and include: hand hygiene practices; prevention of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections; judicious use of antimicrobials for therapy and prophylaxis; enhancement of host defences; skin care; and early enteral feeding with human milk.

  10. Noise at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and inside the incubator

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro,Eliana Moreira; Guinsburg,Ruth; Nabuco,Marco Antonio de Araujo; Kakehashi,Tereza Yoshiko

    2011-01-01

    The goal was to identify sound pressure level (SPL) at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and inside the incubator of a teaching hospital of a public university from São Paulo - SP, Brazil. SPL inside the NICU and the incubator were measured using four dosimeters in January/2010. SPL at the NICU varied from 52.6 dBA to 80.4 dBA and inside the incubator, from 45.4 dBA to 79.1 dBA. SPL both at the NICU and inside the incubator are above the recommended values, but levels were higher at the...

  11. Bonding with books: the parent-infant connection in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lynne J

    2013-01-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) experience one of the most stressful events of their lives. At times, they are unable to participate fully, if at all, in the care of their infant. Parents in the NICU have a need to participate in the care of their infant to attain the parental role. Parental reading to infants in the NICU is an intervention that can connect the parent and infant and offers a way for parents to participate in caregiving. This intervention may have many benefits and may positively affect the parent-infant relationship.

  12. [Ventilator-associated pneumonia among premature infants neonatal intensive care unit in China: a multicenter study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S J; Yan, S Y; Zhou, Y; Han, K L E E; Guo, W L; Xia, Q; Vibhuti, S P; Wang, J Z; Ji, S W; Yang, S H A H; Yang, S N; Shan, C; Liu, C Y; Yi, Z Z; Liu, R B; Lin, L; Wang, B; He, J Q; Li, Z L; Pan, Y; Guo, L; Chen, M X; Liu, X N; Zhou, Y; Li, L; Xiong, C Q; Qi, Q; Hei, X Y; Cao, J; Jiang, Y J; Zhang, M Y; Shoo, Y

    2017-03-02

    Objective: To investigate the incidence and pathogen distribution of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) among preterm infants admitted to level Ⅲ neonatal intensive care units (NICU) in China. Method: A prospective study was conducted in 25 level Ⅲ NICU, enrolling all preterm infants pneumonia (23 strains, 27.7%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10 strains, 12.0%). Conclusion: The incidence of VAP in China is similar to that in developed counties, with substantial variability in different NICU settings. More efforts are needed to monitor and evaluate the preventable factors associated with VAP and conduct interventions that could effectively reduce the occurrence of VAP.

  13. Symbolic interactionism and nurse-mother communication in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Lisa Marie

    2009-01-01

    The admission of an infant to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has the potential to cause significant stress for the mothers of these infants. Researchers have found that nurse-mother communication has the potential to either aid or hinder the mother's adaptation to the NICU environment. These communication patterns are relatively complex in nature and therefore warrant further investigation. Symbolic interactionism (SI) is a theoretical framework that offers the potential to direct such an investigation. The purpose of this article is to examine nurse-mother communication patterns in the NICU through the theoretical lens of SI.

  14. Spread of NDM-1-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Istanbul, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirel, Laurent; Yilmaz, Mesut; Istanbullu, Ayse; Arslan, Ferhat; Mert, Ali; Bernabeu, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-two consecutive carbapenem-resistant enterobacterial isolates were recovered from patients hospitalized between January and April 2013 in different units at a university hospital in Istanbul, Turkey. These were Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates producing the carbapenemases OXA-48, NDM-1, and KPC-2, Enterobacter cloacae isolates producing NDM-1, and Escherichia coli isolates producing OXA-48. Most of the OXA-48-producing K. pneumoniae and all the NDM-1-producing E. cloacae were clonally related. The NDM-1-producing E. cloacae isolates recovered from a single neonatal intensive care unit corresponded to a single cluster, highlighting the spread of that clone in that setting. PMID:24550328

  15. Barriers and facilitators to implementing the Baby-Friendly hospital initiative in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Britney; Semenic, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    To explore manager, educator, and clinical leader perceptions of barriers and facilitators to implementing Baby-Friendly practice in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Qualitative, descriptive design. Two university-affiliated level-III NICUs in Canada. A purposive sample of 10 medical and nursing managers, nurse educators, lactation consultants, and neonatal nurse practitioners. In-depth, semistructured interviews transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Participants valued breastfeeding and family-centered care yet identified numerous contextual barriers to Baby-Friendly care including infant health status, parent/infant separation, staff workloads and work patterns, gaps in staff knowledge and skills, and lack of continuity of breastfeeding support. Facilitators included breastfeeding education, breastfeeding champions, and interprofessional collaboration. Despite identifying numerous barriers, participants recognized the potential value of expanding the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) to the NICU setting. Recommendations include promoting BFHI as a facilitator of family-centered care, interdisciplinary staff education, increasing access to lactation consultants, and establishing a group of NICU champions dedicated to BFHI implementation. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  16. Clinical profile of newborns undergoing physical therapy in a neonatal intensive care unit

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    Graziela Ferreira Biazus

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: In neonatal therapy units, physical therapy is directed toward integral baby care. Objective: To describe the profile of newborns (NBs hospitalized in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. Methods: Retrospective documentary study with data collection from medical records from July 2011 to July 2013. The sample consisted of NBs who performed motor and respiratory therapy. Data were grouped into five categories according to birth weight (≤ 1000g, 1001-1500g, 1501-2000g, 2001-2500g, ≥ 2501g. Results: total of 1,884 newborns were admitted to the NICU within the stipulated period, 168 (13.9% underwent physical therapy. Of the 168 NBs who underwent physical therapy, 137 were born in the hospital (81.5% and 31 were transferred there (18.5%; 17 of these babies died during the neonatal hospital stay (10.1%. All newborns of the extremely low birth weight group (≤ 1000g required mechanical ventilation, 72.7% non-invasive ventilation and 16.6% high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. The occurrence of pneumothorax in the extremely low birth weight group was 13.8% and 16% in the group with birth weight 1001-1500g. Conclusion: Infants with low birth weight (<2500g constituted the profile of NBs who underwent physical therapy, which was directly related to higher incidence of death and pneumothorax, as well as increased use of mechanical and non-invasive ventilation.

  17. Epidemiology of nosocomial infections in selected neonatal intensive care units in Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Meica M; Rojas, Mario A; Lozano, Juan M; Bose, Carl L; Rojas, María X; Rondón, Martín A; Ruiz, Gloria; Piñeros, Juan G; Rojas, Catherine; Robayo, Guillermo; Hoyos, Angela; Gosendi, Maria E; Cruz, Hernan; Leon, Angela

    2005-08-01

    The epidemiology of nosocomial infections (NI) in neonatal intensive care units in developing countries has been poorly studied. We conducted a prospective study in selected neonatal units in Colombia, SA, to describe the incidence rate, causative organisms, and interinstitutional differences. Data were collected prospectively from February 20 to August 30, 2001 from eight neonatal units. NI was defined as culture-proven infection diagnosed after 72 h of hospitalization, resulting in treatment with antibiotics for >3 days. Linear regression models were used to describe associations between institutional variables and NI rates. A total of 1504 infants were hospitalized for more than 72 h, and therefore, at risk for NI. Of all, 127 infections were reported among 80 patients (5.3%). The incidence density rate was 6.2 per 1000 patient-days. Bloodstream infections accounted for 78% of NIs. Gram-negative organisms predominated over gram-positive organisms (55 vs 38%) and were prevalent in infants < or =2000 g (54%). The most common pathogens were Staphylococcus epidermidis (26%) and Klebsiella pneumonia (12%). Gram-negative organisms predominate in Colombia among infants <2000 g. The emergence of gram-negative organisms and their associated risk factors requires further study.

  18. Epidemiology of candidemia in neonatal intensive care units: a persistent public health problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovero, G; De Giglio, O; Montagna, O; Diella, G; Divenuto, F; Lopuzzo, M; Rutigliano, S; Laforgia, N; Caggiano, G; Montagna, M T

    2016-01-01

    Candidemia has become an increasingly important problem in infants hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs). Candida species are the third most common agents of late-onset infections in critically ill neonates and they are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. In this study we evaluated the epidemiology of Candida bloodstream infections in the NICU of an Italian university hospital during a 15-year period. Our specific aims were to analyze the change in species distribution and the vitro susceptibility of these yeasts to fluconazole (FCZ) and amphotericin B (AmB). A retrospective study of candidemia in the NICU of a university hospital in southern Italy, covering the years 2000-2014 was carried out. The isolates were identified using the VITEK2 yeast identification system and antifungal susceptibility was determined using the E-test method. Among the 57 patients with confirmed candidemia, 60% were males (n = 34 cases) and 82% (n = 47) had a gestational age of 24-32 weeks. Twenty-seven neonates (47%) had a very low birth weight (candidemia. Knowledge of the local epidemiological trends in Candida species isolated in blood cultures will facilitate therapeutic decision-making.

  19. Management of outbreaks of nosocomial pathogens in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    B. Ghirardi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of nosocomial pathogens are one of the most relevant problems in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. Many factors contribute to the onset of an epidemic, including virulence of the pathogen and vulnerability of the infants hospitalized in NICU. Outbreaks are often caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs. MDROs are defined as microorganisms, predominantly bacteria, that are resistant to one or more classes of antimicrobial agents. MDROs, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE and certain gram-negative bacilli (GNB, have important infection control implications. Once MDROs are introduced into a healthcare setting, transmission and persistence of the resistant strain is determined by the availability of vulnerable patients, selective pressure exerted by antimicrobial use, increased potential for transmission from larger numbers of infected or colonized patients (“colonization pressure”, and the impact of adherence to prevention efforts. Often, routine infection control measures are not enough to contain outbreaks, and additional control measures are needed, including implementation of hand hygiene, cohorting of infected/colonized infants, neonatal surveillance cultures, screening of healthcare workers and decolonization of neonates and/or healthcare workers in selected cases. In this review, we report the practices we developed in our NICU to contain an epidemic. These recommendations reflect the experience of the group, as well as the findings of the current literature.

  20. Admission clinicopathological data, length of stay, cost and mortality in an equine neonatal intensive care unit

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    M.N. Saulez

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary internists need to prognosticate patients quickly and accurately in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. This may depend on laboratory data collected on admission, the cost of hospitalisation, length of stay (LOS and mortality rate experienced in the NICU. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective study of 62 equine neonates admitted to a NICU of a private equine referral hospital to determine the prognostic value of venous clinicopathological data collected on admission before therapy, the cost of hospitalisation, LOS and mortality rate. The WBC count, total CO2 (TCO2 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were significantly higher (P < 0.05 and anion gap lower in survivors compared with nonsurvivors. A logistic regression model that included WBC count, hematocrit, albumin / globulin ratio, ALP, TCO2, potassium, sodium and lactate, was able to correctly predict mortality in 84 % of cases. Only anion gap proved to be an independent predictor of neonatal mortality in this study. In the study population, the overall mortality rate was 34 % with greatest mortality rates reported in the first 48 hours and again on day 6 of hospitalisation. Amongst the various clinical diagnoses, mortality was highest in foals after forced extraction during correction of dystocia. Median cost per day was higher for nonsurvivors while total cost was higher in survivors.

  1. Persistence of clones of coagulase-negative staphylococci among premature neonates in neonatal intensive care units: two-center study of bacterial genotyping and patient risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Vermont (Clementien); N.G. Hartwig (Nico); A. Fleer; P. de Man (Peter); R. de Groot (Ronald); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); J.N. van den Anker (John)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractFrom 1 January 1995 until 1 January 1996, we studied the molecular epidemiology of blood isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) of the Sophia Children's Hospital (SCH; Rotterdam, The Netherlands) and the

  2. Incidence of acute kidney injury in the neonatal intensive care unit

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    Doaa Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU over a six-month period from September 2011 to March 2012. This prospective study was performed on 250 neonates admitted to the NICU at the Children′s Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University. All neonates were subjected to detailed history taking, including pre-natal, natal and post-natal history, with stress on symptoms suggestive of AKI. All neonates were examined thoroughly and the following investigations were performed: Blood urea nitrogen (BUN, serum creatinine, sodium, potassium, calcium, complete blood count, C-reactive protein, arterial blood gases, urine sodium and urine creatinine. AKI was diagnosed in 27 cases (10.8%, including 12 females and 15 males. 40.7% of the AKI cases were born after full-term pregnancy while 59.3% were pre-term babies. 29.6% of the AKI cases had oliguria, and there was male sex predominance, with a male-female ratio of 1.3:1. The cause of AKI was pre-renal in 96.3% and intrinsic renal in 3.7% of the cases. The predisposing factors for AKI were sepsis in 63% of the cases, respiratory distress syndrome in 55.6%, mechanical ventilation in 51.9%, peri-natal asphyxia in 18.5%, dehydration in 14.8%, surgical operation in 11.1%, congenital heart disease in 7.4%, sub-galeal hematoma in 3.7%, polycythemia in 3.7% and intra-ventricular hemorrhage in 3.7% of the cases. Our data suggest that pre-renal failure was the most common form of AKI in our patients. Early recognition of risk factors such as sepsis, peri-natal asphyxia or peri-operative problems and rapid effective treatment of contributing conditions will reduce the incidence of AKI in the neonatal period.

  3. Intravenous midazolam infusion for sedation of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Eugene; Taddio, Anna; Ohlsson, Arne

    2017-01-31

    Proper sedation for neonates undergoing uncomfortable procedures may reduce stress and avoid complications. Midazolam is a short-acting benzodiazepine that is used increasingly in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). However, its effectiveness as a sedative in neonates has not been systematically evaluated. Primary objeciveTo assess the effectiveness of intravenous midazolam infusion for sedation, as evaluated by behavioural and/or physiological measurements of sedation levels, in critically ill neonates in the NICU. Secondary objectivesTo assess effects of intravenous midazolam infusion for sedation on complications including the following.1. Incidence of intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH)/periventricular leukomalacia (PVL).2. Mortality.3. Occurrence of adverse effects associated with the use of midazolam (hypotension, neurological abnormalities).4. Days of ventilation.5. Days of supplemental oxygen.6. Incidence of pneumothorax.7. Length of NICU stay (days).8. Long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. We selected for review randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of intravenous midazolam infusion for sedation in infants aged 28 days or younger. We abstracted data regarding the primary outcome of level of sedation. We assessed secondary outcomes such as intraventricular haemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, death, length of NICU stay and adverse effects associated with midazolam. When appropriate, we performed meta-analyses using risk ratios (RRs) and risk differences (RDs), and if the RD was statistically significant, we calculated the number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) or an additional harmful outcome (NNTH), along with their 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for categorical variables, and weighted mean differences (WMDs) for continuous variables. We assessed heterogeneity by performing the I-squared (I2) test. We included in the review three trials enrolling 148 neonates. We identified no new trials for this update

  4. Effect of using static ultrasound technique on peripherally inserted central catheters’ insertion success rate in neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Sheikhan-Sudani, Elaheh; Sadeghnia, Alireza; Talakoub, Sedigheh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Peripheral insertion of central catheters can be difficult in neonates. We compared the success rates of peripherally inserted central catheters by two methods of using static ultrasound and traditional technique (vein visualization and palpation) in neonates. Materials and Methods: In a prospective randomized, controlled trial, 52 neonates with birth weight lower than 1500 g in a level 3 neonatal intensive care unit were enrolled. Neonates were randomized to undergo peripherally inserted central catheter placement using a traditional technique (n = 27) versus static ultrasound-guided technique (n = 25). In the ultrasound group, vein localization was performed and the skin overlying the target vessel was marked. Insertion of catheter was then immediately performed. We recorded and compared success rates in the groups. Results: Success rate after the first attempt was 68% in ultrasound group and 60% in traditional group. These rates for the second attempt were 50% and 40%, respectively. The overall success rates after two attempts were 84% and 76% in ultrasound and traditional groups, retrospectively (P = 0.24). Conclusions: There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding PICC success rates, probably because in the present study, most of the subjects were premature neonates whose vasculature was visually detectable. PMID:25558263

  5. Analysis on the cause of eosinophilia in a neonatal intensive care unit

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    Jeoung Young Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Although eosinophilia is a common laboratory finding in many neonatal intensive care units (ICUs, its causative mechanisms remain obscure. We aimed to determine the causes of eosinophilia in the neonatal ICU environment. Methods : Serial eosinophil counts were determined weekly for 288 hospitalized, appropriately grown neonates. Infants were divided into four groups according to gestational age, and the incidence and etiologic factors of eosinophilia were retrospectively studied. Results : Absolute eosinophilia (&gt;700/mm3 was documented in 18% (52/288 of neonates. Twenty-two infants (42.3% exhibited mild eosinophilia (700-999 cells/mm3, 27 (51.9% exhibited moderate eosinophilia (1,000&#8211;2,999 cells/mm3, and 3 (5.8% exhibited severe eosinophilia (&gt;3,000 cells/mm3. Of the 288 infants studied, 54 suffered sepsis. Thirty of these 54 infants (55.6% showed eosinophilia, and 22 out of the remaining 234 infants (9% without sepsis showed eosinophilia, indicating that eosinophilia was more prevalent in the sepsis group (P&lt;0.05. All 5 infants suffering from bronchopulmonary dysplasia showed eosinophilia, and 47 out of the remaining 283 infants (16.7% without bronchopulmonary dysplasia showed eosinophilia. Thus, eosinophilia was more prevalent in the bronchopulmonary dysplasia group (P&lt;0.05. Furthermore, increased prevalence of eosinophilia was associated with respiratory distress syndrome, ventilator use, blood transfusion, and total parenteral nutrition (P&lt;0.05. Conclusion : Our results suggest that eosinophilia is influenced by sepsis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia, although it can also occur idiopathically at birth. Moreover, the potential role of eosinophils in conditions such as wound healing and fibrosis in sepsis or chronic lung disease may be a cause of eosinophilia.

  6. Interdisciplinary onsite team-based simulation training in the neonatal intensive care unit: a pilot report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D J W; Hermelin, R L; Kennedy, C S; Sharma, J

    2017-04-01

    Simulation training improves individual clinician confidence, performance and self-efficacy in resuscitation and procedural training experiences. The reality of resuscitation experiences in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is that they are team-accomplished events. However, limited data exist on team-based simulation training (TBST) in the NICU. We report the experience of TBST over a 4-year period. This is a retrospective report of 65 TBST events in a 71-bed Level IV NICU at a regional subspecialty children's hospital. Participants were more than 500 NICU staff, including neonatal/cardiac/surgical attendings, neonatal fellows, neonatal nurse practitioners, pediatric residents, registered nurses and respiratory therapists. Background work, common case scenarios, training objectives and learning opportunities were reported, along with discipline-specific, and team and system areas for improvement. Qualitative, subjective data were tracked and efforts at collecting quantitative, objective data are ongoing. Seventy-five TBST events were scheduled from November 2010 through December 2014; 10 of these were canceled. TBST events occurred both night (n=23) and day (n=42), and also on weekends (n=19), using high-fidelity (n=42) and low-fidelity (n=23) systems. Resuscitation team participants at each TBST were 12-30 providers and staff. The duration of each TBST event was 30-65 min including debriefing. Systems issues were identified and corrected, including problems activating the code pathway, issues using a pager activation system and confusion over resuscitation team roles and responsibilities. Educational needs were addressed, focused on topic areas that included arrhythmias and use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation. With appropriate planning and implementation, TBST is feasible and realistic in a busy NICU.

  7. Nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit during 16 years: 1997-2012

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    Jane Eire Urzedo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Surveillance of nosocomial infections (NIs is an essential part of quality patient care; however, there are few reports of National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN surveillance in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs and none in developing countries. The purpose of this study was to report the incidence of NIs, causative organisms, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in a large cohort of neonates admitted to the NICU during a 16-year period. Methods The patients were followed 5 times per week from birth to discharge or death, and epidemiological surveillance was conducted according to the NHSN. Results From January 1997 to December 2012, 4,615 neonates, representing 62,412 patient-days, were admitted to the NICU. The device-associated infection rates were as follows: 17.3 primary bloodstream infections per 1,000 central line-days and 3.2 pneumonia infections per 1,000 ventilator-days. A total of 1,182 microorganisms were isolated from sterile body site cultures in 902 neonates. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS (34.3% and Staphylococcus aureus (15.6% were the most common etiologic agents isolated from cultures. The incidences of oxacillin-resistant CoNS and Staphylococcus aureus were 86.4% and 28.3%, respectively. Conclusions The most important NI remains bloodstream infection with staphylococci as the predominant pathogens, observed at much higher rates than those reported in the literature. Multiresistant microorganisms, especially oxacillin-resistant staphylococci and gram-negative bacilli resistant to cephalosporin were frequently found. Furthermore, by promoting strict hygiene measures and meticulous care of the infected infants, the process itself of evaluating the causative organisms was valuable.

  8. The virtual neonate in The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: when twin number three adds up to error not imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Amir; Chulsky, Elena; Rubin, Robyn; Zohar, Daniel; Barak, Shay

    2014-09-01

    During the administrative admittance of extreme premature twin neonates to the Hospital Information System (HIS), at an Israeli government general hospital, a third virtual baby was mistakenly admitted in addition to the twins. The third virtual baby's records were in department occupancy and transactions were performed in the HIS, such as "admittance" to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), being appended to a mother as well as clinical orders. Once noticed, the records of the third virtual baby were merged in the system with the second correct twin (Baby II), whose records were also in the department occupancy list. An error occurred in the interface whilst merging the records, and patient demography was not updated for clinical orders for Baby II. As a result, all new clinical orders for Baby II carried the non existing third baby's identity. We emphasize that it is advisable to register all newborns as early on in life whilst still in the delivery room, with a permanent identification number as opposed to a temporary identification number to avoid any mismatching if patients records are to be merged or updated. Furthermore, steps that could help prevent such an event could be additional administrative staff to register newborns. However, we conclude, that it would be most helpful to introduce a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) system based on a permanent identity number. If any discrepancies in patient information are detected, an alarm will be triggered during transfer of the baby from the delivery room to the designated Department. A RFID receptor is located at the exit of the delivery room. While most literature available regarding Hospital Information Technology (HIT) and patient safety, mainly discusses mismatching of patients during medication and laboratory testing not much literature regarding the process of registering newborns as a source of patient mismatching has been found. The authors feel that there is a need to further investigate this

  9. Brainstem shape is affected by clinical course in the neonatal intensive care unit

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    Marcus Lo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The brainstem, critical for motor function, autonomic regulation, and many neurocognitive functions, undergoes rapid development from the third trimester. Accordingly, we hypothesized it would be vulnerable to insult during this period, and that a difficult clinical course in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU would affect development, and be reflected through atypical shape. Our study population consisted of 66 neonates – all inpatients from the NICU at Victoria Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre, ON, Canada, of which 45 entered the final analysis. The cohort varied in gestational age (GA and ranged from neurologically healthy to severely brain-injured. Structural MRI was used to quantify brainstem shape at term-equivalent age. From these images, brainstems were semi-automatically segmented and co-registered across subjects. The anterior-posterior dimensions on a sagittal maximum intensity projection were used as the basis for shape comparison. Factor analysis was used to summarize variation in shape and in clinical course to determine three shape factors and three clinical factors, and their relationship assessed using correlation. A factor driven by low GA and associated complications correlated with alterations in the posterior medulla, while a factor driven by complications independent of GA correlated with alterations in the midbrain. Additionally, single clinical measures most representative of their respective clinical factor (days in NICU; days on ventilation predicted the changes. Thus, different clinical courses in the NICU may have different effects on the shape of the brainstem, and may mediate some of the distinct neurodevelopmental profiles observed in premature and brain-injured neonates.

  10. Possible stressors in a neonatal intensive care unit at a university hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordão, Kamila Reis; Pinto, Lauriane de Assis Proença; Machado, Lucimer Rocha; Costa, Laetitia Braga Vasconcellos de Lima; Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate possible stressors to which newborns are exposed in the neonatal intensive care unit. Methods The levels of continuous noise were checked by a decibel meter positioned near the ear of the newborn, brightness was observed by a light meter positioned in the incubator in front of the newborn's eyes, and temperature was checked through the incubator display. The evaluations were performed in three periods of the day, with ten measurements taken at one-minute intervals during each shift for the subsequent statistical analysis. Results All shifts showed noise above acceptable levels. Morning (p incubators was within the normal temperature limits. Conclusion The noise, brightness and temperature intensities were not in accordance with regulatory standards and thus might be possible stressors to newborns. PMID:27626948

  11. Neonatal sepsis in Intensive Care Unit Neopediatric Hospital Santa Cruz - Rio Grande do Sul

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    Kéli Oliveira Dias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rationale and Objectives: The Hospital Infection (IH is a serious health care problem due to high incidence, mortality signifi cantly increased length of stay and high consumption of drugs. The identification of the transmission paths and causing microorganisms is essential for this prevention. Thus, there was a character study Transversal Prospective clinical, held at Neopediátrica Intensive Care Unit (ICU-NEO, Hospital Santa Cruz / RS, aiming to profi le the newborn patients (RNs admitted this sector with diagnosis of Sepsis, April-July 2010, identifying behaviors adopted by healthcare professionals facing the diagnosis of this pathology. Methods: newborns admitted to the ICU sector NEO-aged not more than 28 days old and have not been discharged from the time of their hospitalization, infectious pathology related hospitalization; Being notified by the Commission of Hospital Infection Control (HICC. Results: During the collection period, we found 48 patients admitted to the unit where 13 (27, 08% patients were reported by the institution CCIH suspected of IH. Of these, 7 (53,85% newborns diagnosed with neonatal sepsis and six patients with late neonatal sepsis. The relative frequency of positive blood cultures and collected in cases of suspected sepsis represented a 25% rate of success. Conclusions: It is hoped that the study generates refl ections on the theme, encouraging partnerships between the healthcare team and CCIH, aiming to improve the system, advocating for a more rapid and complete recovery of the patient. KEYWORDS Hospital infection. Intensive care unit neopediatric. Antibiotics.

  12. Noise level in a neonatal intensive care unit in Santa Marta - Colombia.

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    Garrido Galindo, Angélica Patricia; Camargo Caicedo, Yiniva; Velez-Pereira, Andres M

    2017-09-30

    The environment of neonatal intensive care units is influenced by numerous sources of noise emission, which contribute to raise the noise levels, and may cause hearing impairment and other physiological and psychological changes on the newborn, as well as problems with care staff. To evaluate the level and sources of noise in the neonatal intensive care unit. Sampled for 20 consecutive days every 60 seconds in A-weighting curves and fast mode with a Type I sound level meter. Recorded the average, maximum and minimum, and the 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles. The values are integrated into hours and work shift, and studied by analysis of variance. The sources were characterized in thirds of octaves. The average level was 64.00 ±3.62 dB(A), with maximum of 76.04 ±5.73 dB(A), minimum of 54.84 ±2.61dB(A), and background noise of 57.95 ±2.83 dB(A). We found four sources with levels between 16.8-63.3 dB(A). Statistical analysis showed significant differences between the hours and work shift, with higher values in the early hours of the day. The values presented exceed the standards suggested by several organizations. The sources identified and measured recorded high values in low frequencies.

  13. Routine application of lung ultrasonography in the neonatal intensive care unit

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    Chen, Shui-Wen; Fu, Wei; Liu, Jing; Wang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to study the features of lung ultrasonography (LUS) in lung disease and to evaluate the usefulness of LUS in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). All of 3405 neonates included in this study underwent an LUS examination. Diagnoses were based on medical history, clinical manifestation, laboratory examination, and signs on chest radiography (CR) and/or computed tomography (CT). A single expert physician performed all LUS examinations. There were 2658 cases (78.9%) with lung disease and 747 cases (21.9%) without lung disease. The main signs of neonates with lung disease on LUS were as follows: absence of A-lines, pleural-line abnormalities, interstitial syndrome, lung consolidation, air bronchograms, pulmonary edema, and lung pulse. These abnormal signs were reduced or eliminated on LUS as patient conditions improved. There were 81 cases that could not be diagnosed as lung disease by CR but were discovered as pneumonia, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), or transient tachypnea of newborn (TTN) on LUS. Likewise, 23 cases misdiagnosed as RDS by CR were diagnosed as TTN on LUS. Among 212 cases of long-term oxygen dependence (LTOD) that failed to yield signs of pulmonary edema and lung consolidation on CR, 103 cases showed abnormal signs on LUS. Among 747 cases without lung disease, B-lines of 713 neonates (95.4%) could be found within 3 days after birth, and 256 neonates (34.3%) could be observed from 3 days to 1 week after birth. B-lines of 19 cases could be detected from 1 to 2 weeks after birth. The longest time at which B-lines could still be observed was 19 days after birth. LUS has clinical value for the diagnosis of lung disease and the discrimination of causes of LTOP in premature infants, particularly for the diagnosis and identification of RDS and TTN. Moreover, LUS has additional advantages, including its lack of radiation exposure and its ability to noninvasively monitor treatment progress. Therefore, LUS should be

  14. Acupuncture in the neonatal intensive care unit-using ancient medicine to help today's babies: a review.

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    Chen, K L; Quah-Smith, I; Schmölzer, G M; Niemtzow, R; Oei, J L

    2017-07-01

    Acupuncture has been used for thousands of years in Eastern medicine for a variety of conditions and illnesses, including pain. Neonatal intensive care, on the other hand, is a relatively new branch of medicine that has emerged as the pivotal influence in increasing survival of critically ill newborn infants only within the last 50 years. Unfortunately, pain is an inevitable part of treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The control and prevention of pain remains a major issue for clinicians despite recognition and understanding of the myriad of short- and long-term problems that are associated with both pain and its treatment within the NICU environment. In this review, we examine the potential role of acupuncture to decrease and treat pain in babies requiring neonatal intensive care and discuss future therapeutic and research implications for the use of this ancient therapy within the modern environment of the NICU.

  15. Assessment of surfactant use in preterm infants as a marker of neonatal intensive care unit quality

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    Lorch Scott A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proposed neonatal quality measures have included structural measures such as average daily census, and outcome measures such as mortality and rates of complications of prematurity. However, process measures have remained largely unexamined. The objective of this research was to examine variation in surfactant use as a possible process measure of neonatal quality. Methods We obtained data on infants 30 to 34 weeks gestation admitted with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS within 48 hours of birth to 16 hospitals participating in the Pediatric Health Information Systems database from 2001-2006. Models were developed to describe hospital variation in surfactant use and identify patient and hospital predictors of use. Another cohort of all infants admitted within 24 hours of birth was used to obtain adjusted neonatal intensive care unit (NICU mortality rates. To assess the construct validity of surfactant use as a quality metric, adjusted hospital rates of mortality and surfactant use were compared using Kendall's tau. Results Of 3,633 infants, 46% received surfactant. For individual hospitals, the adjusted odds of surfactant use varied from 2.2 times greater to 5.9 times less than the hospital with the median adjusted odds of surfactant use. Increased annual admissions of extremely low birth weight infants to the NICU were associated with greater surfactant use (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.02-3.19. The correlation between adjusted hospital rates of surfactant use and in-hospital mortality was 0.37 (Kendall's tau p = 0.051. Conclusions Though results were encouraging, efforts to examine surfactant use in infants with RDS as a process measure reflecting quality of care revealed significant challenges. Difficulties related to adequate measurement including defining RDS using administrative data, accounting for care received prior to transfer, and adjusting for severity of illness will need to be addressed to improve the utility of this

  16. Should euthanasia be legal? An international survey of neonatal intensive care units staff.

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    Cuttini, M; Casotto, V; Kaminski, M; de Beaufort, I; Berbik, I; Hansen, G; Kollée, L; Kucinskas, A; Lenoir, S; Levin, A; Orzalesi, M; Persson, J; Rebagliato, M; Reid, M; Saracci, R

    2004-01-01

    To present the views of a representative sample of neonatal doctors and nurses in 10 European countries on the moral acceptability of active euthanasia and its legal regulation. A total of 142 neonatal intensive care units were recruited by census (in the Netherlands, Sweden, Hungary, and the Baltic countries) or random sampling (in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom); 1391 doctors and 3410 nurses completed an anonymous questionnaire (response rates 89% and 86% respectively). The staff opinion that the law in their country should be changed to allow active euthanasia "more than now". Active euthanasia appeared to be both acceptable and practiced in the Netherlands, France, and to a lesser extent Lithuania, and less acceptable in Sweden, Hungary, Italy, and Spain. More then half (53%) of the doctors in the Netherlands, but only a quarter (24%) in France felt that the law should be changed to allow active euthanasia "more than now". For 40% of French doctors, end of life issues should not be regulated by law. Being male, regular involvement in research, less than six years professional experience, and having ever participated in a decision of active euthanasia were positively associated with an opinion favouring relaxation of legal constraints. Having had children, religiousness, and believing in the absolute value of human life showed a negative association. Nurses were slightly more likely to consider active euthanasia acceptable in selected circumstances, and to feel that the law should be changed to allow it more than now. Opinions of health professionals vary widely between countries, and, even where neonatal euthanasia is already practiced, do not uniformly support its legalisation.

  17. Characterization of acoustic noise in a neonatal intensive care unit MRI system

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    Tkach, Jean A.; Li, Yu; Pratt, Ronald G.; Loew, Wolfgang; Daniels, Barret R.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Dumoulin, Charles L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Baroch, Kelly A. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Audiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Merhar, Stephanie L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, Perinatal Institute, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Kline-Fath, Beth M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-08-15

    To eliminate the medical risks and logistical challenges of transporting infants from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to the radiology department for magnetic resonance imaging, a small-footprint 1.5-T MRI scanner has been developed for neonatal imaging within the NICU. MRI is known to be noisy, and exposure to excessive acoustic noise has the potential to elicit physiological distress and impact development in the term and preterm infant. To measure and compare the acoustic noise properties of the NICU MRI system against those of a conventional 1.5-T MRI system. We performed sound pressure level measurements in the NICU MRI scanner and in a conventional adult-size whole-body 1.5-T MRI system. Sound pressure level measurements were made for six standard clinical MR imaging protocols. The average sound pressure level value, reported in unweighted (dB) and A-weighted (dBA) decibels for all six imaging pulse sequences, was 73.8 dB and 88 dBA for the NICU scanner, and 87 dB and 98.4 dBA for the conventional MRI scanner. The sound pressure level values measured on the NICU scanner for each of the six MR imaging pulse sequences were consistently and significantly (P = 0.03) lower, with an average difference of 14.2 dB (range 10-21 dB) and 11 dBA (range 5-18 dBA). The sound pressure level frequency response of the two MR systems showed a similar harmonic structure above 200 Hz for all imaging sequences. The amplitude, however, was appreciably lower for the NICU scanner, by as much as 30 dB, for frequencies below 200 Hz. The NICU MRI system is quieter than conventional MRI scanners, improving safety for the neonate and facilitating siting of the unit within the NICU. (orig.)

  18. Post-transfusional hepatitis in neonates hospitalized in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Hepatitis post-transfusional en neonatos encamados en una Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Neonatal

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    A. Ruiz-Extremera

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the significance of increased serum transaminase levels in neonates admitted to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and its relationship with blood transfusion. Methods: follow-up prospective study of 209 patients; 177 completed follow-up, of whom 129 were transfused and 48 were not; 57 were born after full gestation and 120 were born prematurely. The activity of serum levels of ALT, AST, and GGT was measured monthly up to six months of age, and until six months after the last transfusion. At the end of follow-up, and whenever an increase in serum transaminase levels was detected, the viral agents of hepatitis A, B, C, G, TT, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr, and herpes 1 and 2, and toxoplasma were studied. Viral serology was also carried out in mothers and in donors when children tested positive. Results: one hundred twenty nine neonates (73% received 461 U red blood cell transfusions (3.6 ± 3 U/patient. ALT levels increased in 54 (30.5% patients, of whom 46 (36% were transfused and eight (17% were not (p Objetivo: estudiar la importancia y significado del aumento de transaminasas en neonatos que ingresaron en una Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Neonatales y su relación con la transfusión sanguínea. Métodos: seguimiento prospectivo de 209 pacientes de los cuales 177 completaron el seguimiento: 129 transfundidos y 48 no transfundidos (57 nacidos a término y 120 prematuros. Se determinaron la ALT, AST y GGT mensualmente hasta los seis meses de edad y hasta los seis meses de la última transfusión. Al final del seguimiento y cuando había un aumento de transaminasas se investigó el virus de la hepatitis A, B, C, G, TT, citomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr, herpes 1-2 y toxoplasma. La serología viral también se estudió en todas las madres y en los niños positivos en sus donantes. Resultados: ciento veintinueve neonatos (73% recibieron 461 U/concentrados-hematíes (3,6 ± 3 U/paciente. Cincuenta y cuatro pacientes (30,5% presentaron

  19. Pain management in the neonatal intensive care unit: a national survey in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Paola; Guadagni, Annamaria; Merazzi, Daniele; Ancora, Gina; Bellieni, Carlo Valerio; Cavazza, Alessandra

    2005-11-01

    This study assessed current medical practice in preventative analgesia and sedation for invasive procedures in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) in Italy. A questionnaire was sent to level II and III Italian NICUs to investigate pain management, pharmacological treatment and the use of pain scores during invasive procedures. Main outcome measures were the extent to which analgesia and sedation are currently used for invasive procedures in Italian neonatal units. The rate of response to the questionnaire was 88%. Written guidelines were available on acute pain control in 25% of the NICUs, and on prolonged pain control in 50%. Routine use of preventative pharmacological and nonpharmacological measures for painful procedures ranged from 13% for elective tracheal intubation to 68% for chest tube insertion. Thirty-six percent of NICUs routinely use sedation with opioids for mechanical ventilation; 14% prevent distress and pain for tracheal suctioning, 44% for heel lancing, 50% for venepuncture and percutaneous venous catheter insertion; 58% use analgesia before lumbar puncture. Validated pain assessment scores were used by 19% of NICUs. The need for adequate analgesia is still underestimated. Further information on the safety of analgesics in neonatology is imperative, as is an adequate education of physicians and nurses on the use of pain control guidelines as part of the standard of care in the NICU.

  20. Best practices in healthcare services quality improvement in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU

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    Agapi Simeonidou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The global economic crisis has forced states to take some measures to consolidate healthcare systems and implement policies that are forming a safety net for the provision of high quality healthcare services. International clinical protocols and guidelines could be useful enough for every part of a healthcare system. The main purpose of this review is to present the framework of quality improvement in healthcare services, as it is implemented in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU in Νorthern Greece and worldwide. A literature review of papers on implementation of good practices, as well as the efforts for continuing quality improvement in NICUs worldwide was performed. Although much progress has been achieved in neonatal care through continuous improvement of the quality of care, certain elements of the process still need to be addressed. It is important that continuous improvement programmes are major part of the care delivered in NICUs, with the participation of personnel, in total, parents and hospital administration.

  1. Congenital tuberculosis and management of exposure in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaru-Soen, G; Savyon, M; Sadot, E; Schechner, V; Sivan, Y; Schwartz, D; Tarabeia, J; Amitai, Z; Yoabov, I; Carmeli, Y

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the management and outcome of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and paediatric ICU (PICU) exposure to a 26-day-old premature infant with congenital tuberculosis (TB). The infant's mother underwent chest X-ray (CXR) and sputum culture. Contacts of the infant were identified. Tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) were performed on 97 infants and children, 156 NICU and PICU visitors and 115 health care workers. The mother's sputum culture was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. No TST conversion occurred in the exposed NICU infants. All neonates received prophylactic isoniazid (INH). One exposed child in the PICU had TST conversion with normal CXR and completed 9 months of INH without developing active disease; 22 (14%) PICU and NICU visitors and 3 NICU personnel had TST conversion without evidence of disease. The sequence of events described here demonstrates the difficulty in diagnosis and management of TB in this age group. Transmission of TB in NICU and PICUs is unusual but can occur, and calls for a systematic approach to investigation of the exposed infants, family members and health care providers.

  2. The infant incubator in the neonatal intensive care unit: unresolved issues and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, Roberto; Porcella, Annalisa; Fanos, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    Since the 19th century, devices termed incubators were developed to maintain thermal stability in low birth weight (LBW) and sick newborns, thus improving their chances of survival. Remarkable progress has been made in the production of infant incubators, which are currently highly technological devices. However, they still need to be improved in many aspects. Regarding the temperature and humidity control, future incubators should minimize heat loss from the neonate and eddies around him/her. An unresolved issue is exposure to high noise levels in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Strategies aimed at modifying the behavior of NICU personnel, along with structural improvements in incubator design, are required to reduce noise exposure. Light environment should be taken into consideration in designing new models of incubators. In fact, ambient NICU illumination may cause visual pathway sequelae or possibly retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), while premature exposure to continuous lighting may adversely affect the rest-activity patterns of the newborn. Accordingly, both the use of incubator covers and circadian lighting in the NICU might attenuate these effects. The impact of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on infant health is still unclear. However, future incubators should be designed to minimize the EMF exposure of the newborn.

  3. Sound levels in a neonatal intensive care unit significantly exceeded recommendations, especially inside incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Johanna; de Suremain, Aurelie; Berne Audeoud, Frederique; Ego, Anne; Debillon, Thierry

    2017-12-01

    This study measured sound levels in a 2008 built French neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and compared them to the 2007 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendations. The ultimate aim was to identify factors that could influence noise levels. The study measured sound in 17 single or double rooms in the NICU. Two dosimeters were installed in each room, one inside and one outside the incubators, and these conducted measurements over a 24-hour period. The noise metrics measured were the equivalent continuous sound level (L eq ), the maximum noise level (L max ) and the noise level exceeded for 10% of the measurement period (L 10 ). The mean L eq , L 10 and L max were 60.4, 62.1 and 89.1 decibels (dBA), which exceeded the recommended levels of 45, 50 and 65 dBA (p incubator was significantly higher than in the room (+8 dBA, p incubators. A multipronged strategy is required to improve the sound environment and protect the neonates' sensory development. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Interdisciplinary Family Conferences to Improve Patient Experience in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

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    Trujillo, Jennifer A; Fernandez, Yesenia; Ghafoori, Lyla; Lok, Kristina; Valencia, Arwin

    2017-11-01

    Parents play a significant role in the development of their neonate. They can affect the length of stay in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and are seen as an integral part of the team. Parents are often put in positions where difficult decision making is required of them in the care of their critically ill child. Studies suggest that one way to improve the family's experience and to encourage their involvement is by establishing a formal and focused family conference. Therefore, the NICU social workers and the interdisciplinary team collaborated to formulate strategies to improve communication that would enhance current practice. As a new initiative, the team decided that holding an interdisciplinary family conference (IFC) within the first two weeks of a baby's NICU admission is critical for parental involvement of infants less than 32 weeks gestation and those with congenital birth anomalies. The team determined that the primary outcome measure would be family satisfaction scores from hospital surveys. Since the implementation of IFCs, satisfaction scores showed steady improvement. This quality improvement project demonstrated that IFCs are an integral part of the family-centered care approach in the NICU. IFCs foster partnerships with families to ensure their involvement in all aspects of patient care and improve their experience in the NICU. © 2017 National Association of Social Workers.

  5. Breaking down barriers: enabling care-by-parent in neonatal intensive care units in China.

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    Li, Xiao-Ying; Lee, Shoo; Yu, Hua-Feng; Ye, Xiang Y; Warre, Ruth; Liu, Xiang-Hong; Liu, Jian-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Denying parents access to their infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a standard practice in most hospitals across China. Visitation is not usually permitted or may be strictly limited, and NICU care for most neonates is provided by health-care professionals with little participation of the parents. An exception to this rule is the level 2 "Room-In" ward in Qilu Children's Hospital, Shandong University, where parents have 24-hour access to their infants and participate in providing care. This retrospective cohort study compared the outcomes of infants who were admitted to the NICU and remained there throughout their stay (NICU-NICU group, n=428), admitted to the NICU and then transferred to the Room-In ward (NICU-RIn group, n=1018), or admitted straight to the Room-In ward (RIn only group, n=629). There were no significant differences in the rates of nosocomial infection, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage, and retinopathy of prematurity between the NICU-NICU and NICU-RIn groups. The rate of necrotizing enterocolitis was significantly lower in the NICU-RIn group (P=0.04), while weight gain and duration of hospital stay were significantly higher (both Pneonatal care in China.

  6. The use of human milk in the neonatal intensive care unit: practices in Belgium and Luxembourg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossey, Veerle; Johansson, Anne-Britt; de Halleux, Virginie; Vanhole, Chris

    2012-08-01

    Human milk remains the preferred feeding for all infants, including premature and sick newborns. However, mother's milk is not sterile, and expressed milk can be a source of commensal and pathogenic microorganisms. Microbiological quality standards for the use of expressed human milk in hospitals are not available, unlike for donor or formula milk. To document current practices for the use of human milk in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) in Belgium and Luxembourg, both for mother's own milk and donor milk, a questionnaire was sent to all 20 neonatal units. Of the 19 units that completed the survey, 47% perform bacteriological testing of expressed milk. Applied bacterial count limits for the acceptable level of contamination differ among units, for both commensals and pathogens. Only six units have a device for pasteurizing milk at their disposal. Storage time in the refrigerator for fresh milk varies between 24 hours to 7 days before use. Access to donor milk is limited. Routines for handling of human milk differ widely among NICUs in Belgium and Luxembourg. An assessment of current issues through a structured survey is a useful tool in the development of best practice guidelines.

  7. Staff and parents are discriminators for outcomes in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Verena; Halstenberg, Katrin; Demel, Anja; Kirchberger, Valerie; Riedel, Rainer; Schlößer, Rolf; Wollny, Caroline; Woopen, Christiane; Kuntz, Ludwig; Roth, Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the associations between staff work characteristics, parents' experiences and a number of medical outcome measures. This explorative multicentre study took place in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) of five German university hospitals between 2009 and 2011. We assessed staff work characteristics by surveying 126 NICU nurses and 57 physicians and asked 214 parents about their relationships with staff. The outcome variables of 230 premature infants with birth weights of less than 1500 g were collected over a period of 18 months. We used analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression analyses for statistical purposes. We found differences in outcome measures between the NICUs, particularly parameters of respiratory support, weight gain and length of stay. When we controlled for the NICUs' baseline factors, perceptions of the relationship between staff and parents (empathy, p staff work characteristics (workload, p Staff and parents were discriminators for neonatal outcomes through perceptions of work characteristics and the relationship between staff and parents, respectively. Respiratory support and nutrition measures were particularly sensitive. This research has prompted a nationwide, multicentre study of 66 NICUs. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Nosocomial outbreak of Enterobacter gergoviae bacteraemia in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeswire, R; Thong, K L; Puthucheary, S D

    2003-04-01

    A nosocomial outbreak of bacteraemia, caused by Enterobacter gergoviae infected 11 babies, nine of whom were premature, and was investigated in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a general hospital in Johor Bahru, Malaysia. The strain that was isolated from the babies was also isolated from the dextrose saline used for the dilution of parenteral antibiotics and from the hands of a healthcare worker on duty in the nursery. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of Xba I-digested chromosomal DNA confirmed a possible cross-contamination of parenteral dextrose saline and the healthcare worker. Prompt and effective control measures were initiated within NICU and the nosocomial infection of E. gergoviae was brought to an abrupt end. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented outbreak of E. gergoviae in the NICU in a hospital in the state of Johor, Malaysia.

  9. Maternal Coping with Baby Hospitalization at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    Fabiana Pinheiro Ramos

    Full Text Available Abstract: Coping is defined by actions of self-regulation of emotions, cognitions, behaviors, and motivational orientation under stress. This study analyzed the maternal coping with hospitalization of premature and low birth weight infants at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU, using the Motivational Theory of Coping. A questionnaire, a scale and an interview were applied to 25 mothers three times between birth and hospital discharge. The results showed that the mothers’ first visit to the NICU had strong emotional impact; longer hospitalization periods were linked to the decrease in Delegation coping strategies. There was more Support Seeking after the hospital discharge. Multiparous mothers and those who had a job appeared to be more vulnerable to stress. Predominantly adaptive coping responses were identified, even among two mothers whose babies had died, including Self-Reliance strategies, which were mediated by religious beliefs.

  10. Parent Perspectives of Neonatal Intensive Care at the End-of-Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Erin R; Christian, Becky J; Hinds, Pamela S; Perna, Samuel J; Robinson, Cheryl; Day, Sara; Meneses, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive qualitative study explored parent experiences related to their infant's neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization, end-of-life care, and palliative care consultation. "Life and death in the NICU environment" emerged as the primary theme with the following categories: ups and downs of parenting in the NICU, decision-making challenges in the NICU, and parent support. Parents encountered challenges with areas for improvement for end-of-life and palliative care in the NICU. Further research is necessary to understand barriers with integrating palliative care and curative care in the NICU, and how NICU care affects bereavement and coping outcomes after infant death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aspiration and evaluation of gastric residuals in the neonatal intensive care unit: state of the science.

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    Parker, Leslie; Torrazza, Roberto Murgas; Li, Yuefeng; Talaga, Elizabeth; Shuster, Jonathan; Neu, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The routine aspiration of gastric residuals (GR) is considered standard care for critically ill infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Unfortunately, scant information exists regarding the risks and benefits associated with this common procedure. This article provides the state of the science regarding what is known about the routine aspiration and evaluation of GRs in the NICU focusing on the following issues: (1) the use of GRs for verification of feeding tube placement, (2) GRs as an indicator of gastric contents, (3) GRs as an indicator of feeding intolerance or necrotizing enterocolitis, (4) the association between GR volume and ventilator-associated pneumonia, (5) whether GRs should be discarded or refed, (6) the definition of an abnormal GR, and (7) the potential risks associated with aspiration and evaluation of GRs. Recommendations for further research and practice guidelines are also provided.

  12. Early prediction of cerebral palsy after neonatal intensive care using motor development trajectories in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitre, Nathalie L; Slaughter, James C; Aschner, Judy L

    2013-10-01

    Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients are at high risk for developmental disabilities such as cerebral palsy (CP). Early identification of CP is essential to effective rehabilitation, but diagnosis is often delayed, especially in preterm infants. We hypothesized that through the longitudinal evaluation of motor trajectories in the NICU follow-up clinic, we could distinguish infants who develop CP by 3 years of age. This was a retrospective study of 606 patients in the NICU Follow-up Clinic at Vanderbilt University with birth weight predictive of later CP (pprediction of CP diagnosis. Standardized assessments of motor milestones quantitatively predict the risk of CP in former NICU patients by 12 months, allowing for timely diagnosis, counseling and therapy in high-risk infants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlation of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Performance Across Multiple Measures of Quality of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profit, J; Zupancic, JAF; Gould, JB; Pietz, K; Kowalkowski, MA; Draper, D; Hysong, SJ; Petersen, LA

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether high performance on one measure of quality is associated with high performance on others and to develop a data-driven explanatory model of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) performance. Design We conducted a cross-sectional data analysis of a statewide perinatal care database. Risk-adjusted NICU ranks were computed for each of 8 measures of quality selected based on expert input. Correlations across measures were tested using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine whether underlying factors were driving the correlations. Setting Twenty-two regional NICUs in California. Patients In total, 5445 very low-birth-weight infants cared for between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2007. Main Outcomes Measures Pneumothorax, growth velocity, health care–associated infection, antenatal corticosteroid use, hypothermia during the first hour of life, chronic lung disease, mortality in the NICU, and discharge on any human breast milk. Results The NICUs varied substantially in their clinical performance across measures of quality. Of 28 unit-level correlations only 6 were significant (P quality measures were strong (ρ > .5) for 1 pair, moderate (.3 quality in this sample. Pneumothorax, mortality in the NICU, and antenatal corticosteroid use loaded on factor 1; growth velocity and health care–associated infection loaded on factor 2; chronic lung disease loaded on factor 3; and discharge on any human breast milk loaded on factor 4. Conclusion In this sample, the ability of individual measures of quality to explain overall quality of neonatal intensive care was modest. PMID:23403539

  14. Impact of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Admission on Bacterial Colonization of Donated Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmekkawi, Amir; O'Connor, Deborah L; Stone, Debbie; Yoon, Eugene W; Larocque, Michael; McGeer, Allison; Unger, Sharon

    2018-05-01

    Unpasteurized human donor milk typically contains a variety of bacteria. The impact of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission of the donor's infant and duration of lactation on bacterial contamination of human milk is unknown. Research aim: This study aimed (a) to describe the frequency/concentration of skin commensal bacteria and pathogens in unpasteurized human donor milk and (b) to assess the impact of NICU admission and (c) the duration of milk expression on bacterial colonization of donated milk. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study of human milk donated to the Rogers Hixon Ontario Human Milk Bank from January 2013 to June 2014. Milk samples from each donor were cultured every 2 weeks. The study included 198 donor mothers, of whom 63 had infants admitted to the NICU. Of 1,289 cultures obtained, 1,031 (80%) had detectable bacterial growth and 363 (28%) yielded bacterial growth in excess of 10 7 cfu/L, a local threshold for allowable bacteria prior to pasteurization. The mean (standard deviation) donation period per donor was 13.0 (7.5) weeks. Milk from mothers with NICU exposure had significantly higher concentrations of commensals, but not pathogens, at every time period compared with other mothers. For every 1-month increase in donation from all donors, the odds ratio of presence of any commensal in milk increased by 1.13 (95% confidence interval [1.03, 1.23]) and any pathogen by 1.31 (95% confidence interval [1.20, 1.43]). Commensal bacteria were more abundant in donor milk expressed from mothers exposed to neonatal intensive care. Bacterial contamination increased over the milk donation period.

  15. Parents perceptions of stress in a neonatal intensive care unit in Rwanda

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    Priscille Musabirema

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Having a newborn infant hospitalised in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU is an unexpected and stressful event for a family. A number of potential stressors to which family members of patients in these units may be exposed have been identified, although no studies about this issue have been conducted in Rwanda. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe and analyse parental perception of stress that resulted from having their infant admitted to a NICU in Kigali, Rwanda. Method: A quantitative survey was used to describe and analyse parents’ perceptions of stress when they had an infant admitted to a NICU. The Parental Stress Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit was used to measure the level of stress that those parents experienced. Results: The results indicated that parents experienced stress from having their infants cared for in a NICU. The most stressful events were the appearance and behaviour of the baby with a mean score of 4.02, whilst the subscale items related to sights and sounds were found to be the least significant source of stress for parents with a mean score of 2.51. In addition, the current study found that parents’ age, educational level, occupation, and infant birth weight were associated with parental stress. Conclusion: The study established that a range of factors was responsible for parental stress when a baby was cared for in a NICU. Identification of these factors could enable health professionals from a hospital in Kigali, Rwanda, to facilitate parents’ adjusting and coping.

  16. Cefepime restriction improves gram-negative overall resistance patterns in neonatal intensive care unit

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    Orlei Ribeiro de Araujo

    Full Text Available Antibiotic restriction can be useful in maintaining bacterial susceptibility. The objective of this study was verify if restriction of cefepime, the most frequently used cephalosporin in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, would ameliorate broad-spectrum susceptibility of Gram-negative isolates. Nine hundred and ninety-five premature and term newborns were divided into 3 cohorts, according to the prevalence of cefepime use in the unit: Group 1 (n=396 comprised patients admitted from January 2002 to December 2003, period in which cefepime was the most used broad-spectrum antibiotic. Patients in Group 2 (n=349 were admitted when piperacillin/tazobactam replaced cefepime (January to December 2004 and in Group 3 (n=250 when cefepime was reintroduced (January to September 2005. Meropenem was the alternative third-line antibiotic for all groups. Multiresistance was defined as resistance to 2 or more unrelated antibiotics, including necessarily a third or fourth generation cephalosporin, piperacillin/tazobactam or meropenem. Statistics involved Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and logrank tests, Kaplan-Meier analysis. Groups were comparable in length of stay, time of mechanical ventilation, gestational age and birth weight. Ninety-eight Gram-negative isolates were analyzed. Patients were more likely to remain free of multiresistant isolates by Kaplan-Meier analysis in Group 2 when compared to Group 1 (p=0.017 and Group 3 (p=0.003. There was also a significant difference in meropenem resistance rates. Cefepime has a greater propensity to select multiresistant Gram-negative pathogens than piperacillin/tazobactam and should not be used extensively in neonatal intensive care.

  17. Healthcare associated infections caused by coagulase-negative Staphylococci in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, André Ricardo Araujo; Simões, Maria Luiza Costa de Lima; Werneck, Lúcia dos Santos; Teixeira, Cristiane Henriques

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate infections related to health care caused by coagulase-negative Staphylococci in a neonatal intensive care unit by assessing antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and potentially effective antibiotic regimens. This was a retrospective descriptive study performed on a case series of healthcare-associated infections, and the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were evaluated. Newborns from other hospitals who were admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit in Rio de Janeiro between January 1, 2010, and June 30, 2012, were studied. In total, 765 patients were admitted, totaling 3,051 patient-days, and the incidence density of general infection was 18.9 per 1,000 patient-days. The rate of central venous catheter use was 71.6%, and the positive culture rate for all sites and all infections related to health care were 68.4%. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci were identified in 11 (19.2%) of 57 health care-related infections, and infections with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Candida sp. constituted 5 cases each. Of the 11 cases of coagulase-negative Staphylococci, 10 (90.9%) were primary bloodstream infections. The sensitivity of the coagulase-negative Staphylococci isolates to vancomycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, oxacillin and gentamycin was 100%, 81.8%, 72.7%, 27.2% and 22.2%, respectively. There were no deaths directly attributed to coagulase-negative Staphylococci infection. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci was the main agent identified in healthcare-associated infections, with low rates of infections related to central venous catheter. In hospitals with a high oxacillin resistance profile, similar to those included in this study, vancomycin may be used as an initial therapy, although clindamycin represents a viable alternative.

  18. A description of medication errors reported by pharmacists in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluk, Shane; Jaam, Myriam; Hazi, Fatima; Al Hail, Moza Sulaiman; El Kassem, Wessam; Khalifa, Hanan; Thomas, Binny; Abdul Rouf, Pallivalappila

    2017-02-01

    Background Patients in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are at an increased risk for medication errors. Objective The objective of this study is to describe the nature and setting of medication errors occurring in patients admitted to an NICU in Qatar based on a standard electronic system reported by pharmacists. Setting Neonatal intensive care unit, Doha, Qatar. Method This was a retrospective cross-sectional study on medication errors reported electronically by pharmacists in the NICU between January 1, 2014 and April 30, 2015. Main outcome measure Data collected included patient information, and incident details including error category, medications involved, and follow-up completed. Results A total of 201 NICU pharmacists-reported medication errors were submitted during the study period. All reported errors did not reach the patient and did not cause harm. Of the errors reported, 98.5% occurred in the prescribing phase of the medication process with 58.7% being due to calculation errors. Overall, 53 different medications were documented in error reports with the anti-infective agents being the most frequently cited. The majority of incidents indicated that the primary prescriber was contacted and the error was resolved before reaching the next phase of the medication process. Conclusion Medication errors reported by pharmacists occur most frequently in the prescribing phase of the medication process. Our data suggest that error reporting systems need to be specific to the population involved. Special attention should be paid to frequently used medications in the NICU as these were responsible for the greatest numbers of medication errors.

  19. MR signal intensity of the perirolandic cirtex in the neonate and infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korogi, Y. [Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Takahashi, M. [Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Sumi, M. [Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Hirai, T, [Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Sakamoto, Y. [Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Ikushima, I. [Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Miyayama, H. [Kumamoto Municipal Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Pathology

    1996-08-01

    Our purpose was to study the magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity of the perirolandic gyri perinatally and to correlate it with the histological findings in formalin-fixed brains, focusing on myelination. MRI of 20 neurologically normal neonates and infants, of 37-64 weeks postconception (PCA), were studied retrospectively. We reviewed four formalin-fixed brains of infants 37-46 weeks PCA microscopically. The posterior cortex of the precentral gyrus (P-PRE) and the anterior cortex of the postcentral gyrus (A-PST) had different signal intensity form the adjacent surrounding cortex. On T1-weighted images P-PRE and A-PST gave higher signal 41-44 weeks PCA; on T2-weighted images, they gave lower signal 37-51 weeks PCA. Histological examination revealed very little myelination of the nerve fibres within both the P-PRE and the A-PST, while considerable myelination was present in the internal capsule and central corona radiata. The changes in signal intensity in the perirolandic gyri may reflect not only the degree of myelination but also the more advanced development of the nerve cells, associated with rapid proliferation and formation of oligodendroglial cells, synapses and dendrites. They could be another important landmark for brain maturation. (orig.)

  20. Introduction of microsystems in a level 3 neonatal intensive care unit-an interprofessional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Helou, Salhab; Samiee-Zafarghandy, Samira; Fusch, Gerhard; Wahab, Muzafar Gani Abdul; Aliberti, Lynda; Bakry, Ahmad; Barnard, Deborah; Doucette, Joanne; El Gouhary, Enas; Marrin, Michael; Meyer, Carrie-Lynn; Mukerji, Amit; Nwebube, Anne; Pogorzelski, David; Pugh, Edward; Schattauer, Karen; Shah, Jay; Shivananda, Sandesh; Thomas, Sumesh; Twiss, Jennifer; Williams, Connie; Dutta, Sourabh; Fusch, Christoph

    2017-01-21

    Growth of neonatal intensive care units in number and size has raised questions towards ability to maintain continuity and quality of care. Structural organization of intensive care units is known as a key element for maintaining the quality of care of these fragile patients. The reconstruction of megaunits of intensive care to smaller care units within a single operational service might help with provision of safe and effective care. The clinical team and patient distribution lay out, admission and discharge criteria and interdisciplinary round model was reorganized to follow the microstructure philosophy. A working group met weekly to formulate the implementation planning, to review the adaptation and adjustment process and to ascertain the quality of implementation following the initiation of the microsystem model. In depth examination of microsystem model of care in this study, provides systematic evaluation of this model on variable aspects of health care. The individual projects of this trial can be source of solid evidence for guidance of future decisions on optimized model of care for the critically ill newborns. ClinicalTrial.gov, NCT02912780 . Retrospectively registered on 22 September 2016.

  1. High load of multi-drug resistant nosocomial neonatal pathogens carried by cockroaches in a neonatal intensive care unit at Tikur Anbessa specialized hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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    Tilahun Birkneh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cockroaches have been described as potential vectors for various pathogens for decades; although studies from neonatal intensive care units are scarce. This study assessed the vector potential of cockroaches (identified as Blatella germanica in a neonatal intensive care unit setup in Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods A total of 400 Blatella germanica roaches were aseptically collected for five consecutive months. Standard laboratory procedures were used to process the samples. Results From the external and gut homogenates, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter spp. Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter diversus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Providencia rettgeri, Klebsiella ozaenae, Enterobacter aeruginosa, Salmonella C1, Non Group A streptococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter spp. and Shigella flexneri were isolated. Multi-drug resistance was seen in all organisms. Resistance to up to all the 12 antimicrobials tested was observed in different pathogens. Conclusion Cockroaches could play a vector role for nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit and environmental control measures of these vectors is required to reduce the risk of infection. A high level of drug resistance pattern of the isolated pathogens was demonstrated.

  2. High load of multi-drug resistant nosocomial neonatal pathogens carried by cockroaches in a neonatal intensive care unit at Tikur Anbessa specialized hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilahun, Birkneh; Worku, Bogale; Tachbele, Erdaw; Terefe, Simegn; Kloos, Helmut; Legesse, Worku

    2012-03-16

    Cockroaches have been described as potential vectors for various pathogens for decades; although studies from neonatal intensive care units are scarce. This study assessed the vector potential of cockroaches (identified as Blatella germanica) in a neonatal intensive care unit setup in Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A total of 400 Blatella germanica roaches were aseptically collected for five consecutive months. Standard laboratory procedures were used to process the samples. From the external and gut homogenates, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter spp. Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter diversus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Providencia rettgeri, Klebsiella ozaenae, Enterobacter aeruginosa, Salmonella C1, Non Group A streptococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter spp. and Shigella flexneri were isolated. Multi-drug resistance was seen in all organisms. Resistance to up to all the 12 antimicrobials tested was observed in different pathogens. Cockroaches could play a vector role for nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit and environmental control measures of these vectors is required to reduce the risk of infection. A high level of drug resistance pattern of the isolated pathogens was demonstrated.

  3. The impact of a noise reduction quality improvement project upon sound levels in the open-unit-design neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W F

    2010-07-01

    To decrease measured sound levels in the neonatal intensive care unit through implementation of human factor and minor design modification strategies. Prospective time series. Two open-unit-design neonatal centers. Implementation of a coordinated program of noise reduction strategies did not result in any measurable improvement in levels of loudness or quiet. Two centers, using primarily human behavior noise reduction strategies, were unable to demonstrate measurable improvements in sound levels within the occupied open-unit-design neonatal intensive care unit.

  4. Bacterial nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care unit, Zagazig University Hospital, Egypt

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    Doaa Mohammed

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: High incidence rate of NI in neonates admitted to NICU was documented, particularly premature and low birth weight neonates. Early identification of NI and its risk factors remain the keys to successful management of this condition.

  5. Effects of single-family rooms on nurse-parent and nurse-infant interaction in neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivonen, Mirka; Lehtonen, Liisa; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Axelin, Anna

    Single-family rooms in neonatal intensive care unit can provide longer interaction between family and staff. On the other hand, separation in private rooms has been shown detrimental to child development if parents are not present. To examine the effects of single-family rooms on nurse-family, nurse-parent and nurse-infant interaction time in neonatal intensive care unit. A quantitative, comparative, observational study was conducted before and after a move to a neonatal intensive care unit with single-family rooms. A total of 194 observation hours were conducted before the move and 194h after the move. The differences were analyzed using a hierarchical linear mixed model. Nurses working in one neonatal intensive care unit were recruited to study. The duration and number of nurse-parent and nurse-infant interaction episodes were recorded. The nurse-family and the nurse-parent interaction were longer in the unit with single-family rooms compared with the unit before the move (mean 261 vs. 138min per shift, pintensive care unit with single-family rooms supported an increase in nurse-parent interaction time. Importantly, nurse-infant interaction time did not decrease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The perception of partnership between parents of premature infants and nurses in neonatal intensive care units: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brødsgaard, Anne; Larsen, Palle; Weis, Janne; Pedersen, Preben U

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this review is to identify how parents of premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and nurses perceive their partnership.The review questions are: how do parents of premature infants and nurses perceive their partnership during hospitalization in NICUs? What barriers and facilitators to partnership can be identified?

  7. Reliability of Reagent Strips for Semi-quantitative Measurement of Glucosuria in a Neonatal Intensive Care Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekhof, Jolita; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; van de Leur, Sjef; Kok, Joke H.; van Straaten, Irma H. L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glucosuria in preterm infants is often measured using a visually readable reagent strip, e.g., when monitoring total parenteral nutrition or during sepsis or when treating with corticosteroids. However, the specific circumstances in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), such as the use

  8. Reliability of reagent strips for semi-quantitative measurement of glucosuria in a neonatal intensive care setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekhof, Jolita; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; van de Leur, Sjef; Kok, Joke H.; van Straaten, Irma H. L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Glucosuria in preterm infants is often measured using a visually readable reagent strip, e.g., when monitoring total parenteral nutrition or during sepsis or when treating with corticosteroids. However, the specific circumstances in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), such as the use of diapers

  9. Correlation between risk factors during the neonatal period and appearance of retinopathy of prematurity in preterm infants in neonatal intensive care units in Alexandria, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Hadi AM

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed Mahmoud Abdel Hadi, Islam Shereen HamdyDepartment of Ophthalmology, Alexandria University Hospital, Alexandria, EgyptBackground: This study aimed to identify the main risk factors for development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP in neonatal intensive care units in Alexandria, Egypt, from January 2010 to January 2012.Methods: A prospective cohort study was undertaken in infants weighing < 1250 g and maternal postmenstrual age < 32 weeks if there was concern about prolonged exposure to oxygen. The main clinical outcomes were occurrence of any stage of ROP and in particular severe ROP. Perinatal variables considered were: birth weight, gestational age, gender, method of ventilation (nasal continuous airway pressure or intermittent mechanical ventilation, packed red blood cell and/or plasma transfusion, occurrence of sepsis, neonatal indirect hyperbilirubinemia, intraventricular hemorrhage, and patent ductus arteriosus. After obtaining informed consent from the parents, infants at risk were examined for ROP using indirect ophthalmoscopy, ie, RetCam II fundus photography.Results: The study included 152 infants of mean gestational age 31.02 weeks and mean birth weight 1.229 kg. Seventy-two cases (47.5% were male and 80 cases (52.5% were female. Of the cases screened, 100 (65.6% had no ROP, 52 had ROP of any stage (34.4%, and 27 (18% had stage 1, five (3.3% had stage 2, 17 (11.5% had stage 3, and three (1.6% had stage 4 disease. No infants had stage 5 ROP. Of all our cases with ROP, 15 (28.6% had prethreshold disease type 1 that required treatment, comprising 9.8% of all cases screened for ROP. Using stepwise logistic regression analysis, all risk factors studied were found to be significantly associated with the development of ROP, except for neonatal indirect hyperbilirubinemia. Severity of ROP was inversely proportional to birth weight and gestational age.Conclusion: ROP occurred in 34.4% of all infants screened in the neonatal intensive

  10. Skin-to-skin holding in the neonatal intensive care unit influences maternal milk volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, N M; Valentine, C J; Renfro, L; Burns, P; Ferlic, L

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of early initiation of skin-to-skin (STS) holding on lactation, we compared 24-hour milk volumes of mothers of ventilated low birth weight infants in an STS group to mothers in a non-STS control group. Mean 24-hour milk volumes at 2, 3, and 4 weeks after delivery of mothers participating in STS holding were compared with those of a retrospective control group from the 12-month period immediately preceding the introduction of STS holding in the neonatal intensive care unit. A repeated-measures analysis of variance adjusting for baseline volumes (1 week after delivery) was used to evaluate the difference in milk volumes between STS and control groups. Sixteen mothers initiated STS holding during the 2-month study period. Eight mothers met study criteria by initiating STS holding during the first 4 weeks after delivery. During a 2-week period the study group had a strong linear increase in milk volume in contrast to no indicative change of the control group's milk volume. STS holding of low birth weight infants initiated in the early intensive care phase can result in a significant increase in maternal milk volume, thereby overcoming the frequently seen insufficient lactation experienced by these mothers.

  11. Conceptual framework of knowledge management for ethical decision-making support in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frize, Monique; Yang, Lan; Walker, Robin C; O'Connor, Annette M

    2005-06-01

    This research is built on the belief that artificial intelligence estimations need to be integrated into clinical social context to create value for health-care decisions. In sophisticated neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), decisions to continue or discontinue aggressive treatment are an integral part of clinical practice. High-quality evidence supports clinical decision-making, and a decision-aid tool based on specific outcome information for individual NICU patients will provide significant support for parents and caregivers in making difficult "ethical" treatment decisions. In our approach, information on a newborn patient's likely outcomes is integrated with the physician's interpretation and parents' perspectives into codified knowledge. Context-sensitive content adaptation delivers personalized and customized information to a variety of users, from physicians to parents. The system provides structuralized knowledge translation and exchange between all participants in the decision, facilitating collaborative decision-making that involves parents at every stage on whether to initiate, continue, limit, or terminate intensive care for their infant.

  12. Comparison of Risk Factors in Necrotizing Enterocolitis among Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    Ferda Ozlu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Necrotizing enterocolitis is one of the important problems of premature infants. The incidence is about 1-5% in infants followed in neonatal care units and inversely related to gestational age and birth weight. Materials and Methods: In this study, 31 infants with necrotizing enterocolitis and 31 infants with similar gestational age and birth weight as control group hospitalized in Cukurova University Neonatal Care Unit between 1 January 2001-31 January 2004 were evaluated. Results: The incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis in this period was 1.4 (31/2214 admission. Mean gestational age was 30.5  3.2 weeks (25-36, mean birth weight was 1331  384 (730-2150 grams while 71% was younger than 32 gestational weeks and 67.7% was under 1500 grams. The signs of NEC were detected at a mean of 11.2  10. (2-38 days. Twenty-six (83.9% were being fed at the time of the necrotizing enterocolitis signs appeared. According to the Walsh and Kliegman classification, 19 (61.3% infants were in stage 1 (17 were 1a, 2 were 1b; 3 (9.6% infants were in stage 2a, 9 (%29.1 infants were in stage 3 (7 were in 3b. Blood culture was positive in 7 (%22.6 infants with predominance of gram negative microorganisms (5 infants. Eleven (%35.5 infants were exitus, 12 were discharged. Hypoxia, respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage and umbilical catheterization were significant risk factors in necrotizing enterocolitis . Thrombocytopenia, leucopenia and high C-reactive protein levels were significantly high in necrotizing enterocolitis group. Breast feeding is significantly high in control group. Conclusion: Necrotizing enterocolitis, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units. Early breast feeding with small amounts, increasing amount of milk slowly, antenatal steroids, caring hygiene rules can prevent the development of it. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 642-647

  13. The Study of Nosocomial Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, A prospective study in Northwest Iran

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    Mohammad Bagher Hosseini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nosocomial infections are an important cause of mortality in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs. Therefore, in this study, the incidence and prevalence of nosocomial infections were determined in NICUs of the three largest neonatal centers in northwest Iran, and the causative bacteria were identified in order to provide potential solutions to control the infections in these hospitals. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive-prospective study in which the cases of nosocomial infections were examined in the three largest hospitals in Tabriz in northwest Iran during 1 year (from June 2012 until May 2013 based on clinical findings, medical and nursing reports of patients, and laboratory results. Results: Of the 3129 patients hospitalized in NICUs of the three hospitals, 208 patients were diagnosed with nosocomial infections. The incidence rate of nosocomial infections was 11.34%.per 100 patient days with 52.4% bacteremia, 32.69% pneumonia, 5.77% urinary tract infections, 5.29% wound infections, and 3.85% necrotizing enterocolitis. There was a statistically significant relationship between invasive procedures (such as umbilical catheters, central venous catheters, surgery, and TPN and sepsis (P = 0.001. The relationships between urinary tract infection and urinary catheter (P = 0.000, and aggressive procedures (such as suctioning and intubation and pneumonia (P = 0.001 were also statistically significant. Conclusion: Incidence of nosocomial infections in premature and low birth weight newborns is considered as a health threat. The findings of this research reiterate the importance of giving further attention to prevention and control of nosocomial infections in the NICU.

  14. Core measures for developmentally supportive care in neonatal intensive care units: theory, precedence and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Mary; Gibbins, Sharyn; Hoath, Steven

    2009-10-01

    This paper is a discussion of evidence-based core measures for developmental care in neonatal intensive care units. Inconsistent definition, application and evaluation of developmental care have resulted in criticism of its scientific merit. The key concept guiding data organization in this paper is the United States of America's Joint Commission's concept of 'core measures' for evaluating and accrediting healthcare organizations. This concept is applied to five disease- and procedure-independent measures based on the Universe of Developmental Care model. Electronically accessible, peer reviewed studies on developmental care published in English were culled for data supporting the selected objective core measures between 1978 and 2008. The quality of evidence was based on a structured predetermined format that included three independent reviewers. Systematic reviews and randomized control trials were considered the strongest level of evidence. When unavailable, cohort, case control, consensus statements and qualitative methods were considered the strongest level of evidence for a particular clinical issue. Five core measure sets for evidence-based developmental care were evaluated: (1) protected sleep, (2) pain and stress assessment and management, (3) developmental activities of daily living, (4) family-centred care, and (5) the healing environment. These five categories reflect recurring themes that emerged from the literature review regarding developmentally supportive care and quality caring practices in neonatal populations. This practice model provides clear metrics for nursing actions having an impact on the hospital experience of infant-family dyads. Standardized disease-independent core measures for developmental care establish minimum evidence-based practice expectations and offer an objective basis for cross-institutional comparison of developmental care programmes.

  15. Breast milk banking: current opinion and practice in Australian neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Eva Y; Kecskés, Zsuzsoka; Abdel-Latif, Mohamed E

    2012-09-01

    To find out the knowledge and attitudes of health-care professionals (HCPs) in Australian neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) towards breast milk banking (BMBg) and pasteurised donated breast milk (PDBM). Cross-sectional structured survey of HCPs in all 25 NICUs in Australia. Response rate was 43.4% (n= 358 of 825). Participants included nurses and midwives (291, 81.3%) and the remainder were neonatologists and neonatal trainees (67, 18.7%). A variable number of HCPs agreed that PDBM would decrease the risk of necrotising enterocolitis (81%) and allergies (48.9%), 8.4% thought PDBM will carry risk of infections and 78.8% agreed that PDBM is preferable over formula, but only 67.5% thought that establishing breast milk banks (BMBs) are justifiable. Significant differences were found between doctors and nurses/midwives, with 19.4% of doctors compared with 5.8% of nurses/midwives agreed that PDBM carried an increased risk of infection. Although, over 90% of nurses/midwives and 70% of doctors agreed that the donation of breast milk is important, only 71% of nurses/midwives and 52.2% of doctors thought that setting up a BMB was justifiable. The opinions about BMBg differ widely between HCPs; however, the majority support the practice. HCPs had different knowledge gaps in regard to BMBg. Nurses/midwives positively view the practice of BMBg more strongly compared with neonatologists. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  16. Gap formation in Danish beech (Fagus sylvatica) forests of low management intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Eva; Vesterdal, Lars

    2006-01-01

    -based managed forest, soil solution was collected for 5 years and soil moisture measured in the fourth year after gap formation. Average NO3-N concentrations were significantly higher in the gaps (9.9 and 8.1 mg NO3-N l(-1), respectively) than under closed canopy (0.2 mg l(-1)). In the semi-natural forest....... In the semi-natural forest, advanced regeneration and lateral closure of the gap affected soil moisture levels in the gap in the last year of the study. Author Keywords: gaps; drainage fluxes; Fagus sylvatica L.; nitrate; soil moisture; soil solution; unmanaged forest ecosystems; WATBAL......Soil moisture content (0-90 cm depth) and nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations in soil solution (90 cm depth) were monitored after gap formation (diameter 15-18 m) in three Danish beech-dominated forests on nutrient-rich till soils. NO3-N drainage losses were estimated by the water balance model...

  17. Oseltamivir Pharmacokinetics and Clinical Experience in Neonates and Infants during an Outbreak of H1N1 Influenza A Virus Infection in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nika, Angela; Tsagris, Vasileios; Kapetanakis, Ioannis; Maltezou, Helena C.; Kafetzis, Dimitris A.; Tsolia, Maria N.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed oseltamivir pharmacokinetics have yet to be reported in neonates and infants; this group is at high risk of serious influenza-associated complications. Extrapolation of doses from older patients is complicated by rapid organ and drug-metabolizing enzyme maturation. A pharmacokinetic study has been conducted during an influenza A(H1N1) outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit. Each included patient provided 4 samples for oseltamivir and 4 samples for its active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed with NONMEM. Allometric weight scaling and maturation functions were added a priori to scale for size and age based on literature values. Nine neonates and infants were recruited. A physiologically parameterized pharmacokinetic model predicted typical day 1 area under the curve (AUC0-12) values of 1,966 and 2,484 μg · h/liter for neonates and infants of ≤37 weeks of postmenstrual age (PMA) and >37 weeks of PMA treated with 1 mg/kg of body weight and 2 mg/kg, respectively. The corresponding steady-state AUC0-12 values were 3,670 and 4,559 μg · h/liter. Premature neonates treated with 1 mg/kg and term babies treated with 2 mg/kg should have average oseltamivir carboxylate concentrations in a range similar to that for adults treated with 75 mg, corresponding to >200-fold above the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for influenza A(H1N1) from the start of therapy. PMID:22564835

  18. The Effect of Intensive Phototherapy on Management of Hyperbilirubinemia in Neonates with the Gestational Age of 34 Weeks and More

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Saboute

    2017-12-01

    Results: According to the results of this study, nonhemolytic jaundice was the most frequent cause of hyperbilirubinemia (82.19%. The mean bilirubin levels after 6 and 24 hours of intensive phototherapy were 4 and 6.2 mg/dl, respectively. Intensive phototherapy after 6 hours led to more significant reduction in the total bilirubin level of the neonates with total bilirubin level of higher than 14 mg/dl in comparison to those with the total bilirubin level of 14 mg/dl or less. The total bilirubin level was significantly decreased in all the groups after 6 and 24 hours of intensive phototherapy. Comparison of the rate of decrement of the total bilirubin level among the groups demonstrated that the neonates with ABO incompatibility showed the greatest decline after 6 and 24 hours of treatment (the rate of bilirubin decline: -5.16; P

  19. Repercussões do ruído na unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal Repercussion of noise in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Menossi Grecco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar as repercussões do ruído da unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal sobre as mães, recém-nascidos e interações com o filho e profissionais de saúde, a partir da percepção materna. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo transversal, realizado em unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal. A amostra constitui-se de 95 mães. Um formulário foi utilizado como instrumento de coleta de dados. Para análise dos dados utilizou-se estatística descritiva. RESULTADOS: Na percepção das mães o ruído da unidade traz repercussões sobre o neonato provocando agitação, choro, irritabilidade entre outros; desencadeia-lhe cefaléia, agitação e vontade de chorar, levando-a tocar menos e falar mais baixo com o filho. Referem dificuldade em manter sua atenção durante a interação com o profissional. CONCLUSÃO: As repercussões do ruído percebidas pela mãe tanto sobre si como para o seu filho, abrangem alterações comportamentais e físicas; associadas à dificuldade materna de manter a atenção ao interagir com o profissional de saúde.OBJECTIVE: To identify repercussion of noise in the neonatal intensive care unit on mothers, newborns and on interactions of neonates with healthcare professional from the mothers' perspective. METHODS: This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in the neonatal intensive care unit. The study population was composed by 95 mothers. Data were collected using formularies. The statistical analysis was descriptive. RESULTS: Mothers' perception of noise in the unit caused repercussion on neonates such as agitation, cry, irritability among other. Mothers' also reported to have headache, agitation and tendency to cry, which led them to touch less and speak softly with their babies. CONCLUSION: Repercussions of noise perceived by mothers on themselves and on babies' behavior and physical changes were associated with difficulties of mothers to keep attention and to interact with healthcare professionals.

  20. Expansion of the baby-friendly hospital initiative ten steps to successful breastfeeding into neonatal intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyqvist, Kerstin H; Häggkvist, Anna-Pia; Hansen, Mette N

    2013-01-01

    provision of antenatal information, that are specific to neonatal care. Facilitation of early, continuous, and prolonged skin-to-skin contact (kangaroo mother care), early initiation of breastfeeding, and mothers' access to breastfeeding support during the infants' whole hospital stay are important. Mother......In the World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund document Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative: Revised, Updated and Expanded for Integrated Care, neonatal care is mentioned as 1 area that would benefit from expansion of the original Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. The different...... situations faced by preterm and sick infants and their mothers, compared to healthy infants and their mothers, necessitate a specific breastfeeding policy for neonatal intensive care and require that health care professionals have knowledge and skills in lactation and breastfeeding support, including...

  1. Admission to dedicated pediatric cardiac intensive care units is associated with decreased resource use in neonatal cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joyce T; Wilkes, Jacob F; Menon, Shaji C; Tani, Lloyd Y; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Marino, Bradley S; Pinto, Nelangi M

    2018-02-21

    Neonates undergoing congenital heart surgery require highly specialized, resource-intensive care. Location of care and degree of specialization can vary between and within institutions. Using a multi-institutional cohort, we sought to determine whether location of admission is associated with an increase in health care costs, resource use and mortality. We retrospectively analyzed admission for neonates (ICU) with total hospital costs, mortality, and length of stay. Of 19,984 neonates (60% male) identified, 39% were initially admitted to a cardiac ICU (CICU), 48% to a neonatal ICU (NICU), and 13% to a pediatric ICU. In adjusted models, admission to a CICU versus NICU was associated with a $20,440 reduction in total hospital cost for infants aged 2 to 7 days at admission (P = .007) and a $23,700 reduction in total cost for infants aged 8 to 14 days at admission (P = .01). Initial admission to a CICU or pediatric ICU versus NICU at ICU length of stay and fewer days of mechanical ventilation. There was no difference in adjusted mortality by admission location. Admission to an ICU specializing in cardiac care is associated with significantly decreased hospital costs and more efficient resource use for neonates requiring cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Candidemia in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Retrospective, Observational Survey and Analysis of Literature Data

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    Giuseppina Caggiano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the epidemiology of Candida bloodstream infections in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of an Italian university hospital during a 9-year period as a means of quantifying the burden of infection and identifying emerging trends. Clinical data were searched for in the microbiological laboratory database. For comparative purposes, we performed a review of NICU candidemia. Forty-one candidemia cases were reviewed (overall incidence, 3.0 per 100 admissions. Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto (58.5% and C. albicans (34.1% were the most common species recovered. A variable drift through years was observed; in 2015, 75% of the cases were caused by non-albicans species. The duration of NICU hospitalization of patients with non-albicans was significantly longer than in those with C. albicans (median days, 10 versus 12. Patients with non-albicans species were more likely to have parenteral nutrition than those with C. albicans (96.3% versus 71.4%. Candida albicans was the dominant species in Europe and America (median, 55% and 60%; resp.; non-albicans species predominate in Asia (75%. Significant geographic variation is evident among cases of candidemia in different parts of the world, recognizing the importance of epidemiological data to facilitate the treatment.

  3. Antimicrobial resistance of bacterial pathogens in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Ahmed

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and relevant treatment options in a neonatal intensive care unit from January 2012 and June 2016. Out of the total 78 culture positive samples, Gram positive and Gram negative microorganisms were 26% and 74% respectively. Acinetobacter remained the predominant isolate (32.1% followed by Klebsiella species (18.0%. Most of the Gram positive isolates exhibited higher resistance to penicillin, cephalosporin, macrolides, gentamycin and quinolones. Gram positive isolates had sensitivity of 100% to linezolid, vancomycin, chloramphenicol followed by rifampicin (84%. In comparison to other commonly used antibiotics, sensitivity to these four medicines was statistically significant (p<0.05. Similarly, most of the Gram negative bacteria showed resistance to cephalosporin, aminoglycosides. About two-third cases showed resistant to meropenum, quinolones and combination preparation of piperacillin and tazobactam. Overall sensitivity among the Gram negative isolates was to polymixin B (100% and minocycline (97%, followed by colistin (83%. In comparison to other commonly used antibiotics, sensitivity to these three medicines was statistically significant (p<0.05.

  4. A reliable pain assessment tool for clinical assessment in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Kaye; Gillies, Donna; Harrison, Denise; Johnston, Linda; Nagy, Sue

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a clinician-friendly pain assessment tool for all groups of critically ill infants cared for in the specific neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) studied. A prospective study was undertaken to test the Pain Assessment Tool (PAT). Interrater reliability of the PAT score was assessed by two nurses who simultaneously determined an infant's PAT score. The PAT was validated against the CRIES score--crying, requires increased oxygen administration, increased vital signs, expression, sleeplessness--and the mother's assessment of her infant's discomfort using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The NICUs at two children's hospitals. Participants were 144 preterm and term infants. Infants on a ventilator and those who had undergone surgery were included. The interrater reliability of the PAT was .85 with a mean difference of 0.17 (standard deviation: 1.73). There was a strong correlation between the PAT and CRIES scores (r = 0.76) and a moderate correlation (.38) between the PAT score and the VAS scores of the infant's mother. The correlation coefficient between the PAT score and CRIES score was significant for all groups (p pain assessment measurement tool for all infants nursed in the NICU.

  5. Salivary Cortisol Reactivity in Preterm Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörelius, Evalotte; He, Hong-Gu; Shorey, Shefaly

    2016-03-18

    Recently, more and more researchers have been using salivary cortisol reactivity to evaluate stress in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The aim of this integrative literature review was to summarize the evidence of interventions leading to a change in salivary cortisol from the baseline in preterm infants in the NICU. The electronic databases of PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched for relevant studies. The inclusion criteria were studies with preterm infants exposed to an intervention evaluated by salivary cortisol reactivity before discharge from the NICU, which were published in English. In total, 16 studies were included. Eye-screening examination and heel lance provoked an increase in the salivary cortisol level. Music, prone position, and co-bedding among twins decreased the salivary cortisol level. Several studies reported a low rate of successful saliva sampling or did not use control groups. Future studies need to focus on non-painful interventions in order to learn more about salivary cortisol regulation in preterm infants. Moreover, these studies should use study designs comprising homogenous gestational and postnatal age groups, control groups, and reliable analysis methods that are able to detect cortisol in small amounts of saliva.

  6. Focusing on patient safety in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias Chatziioannidis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Patient safety in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU environment is an under-researched area, but recently seems to get high priority on the healthcare quality agenda worldwide. NICU, as a highly sensitive and technological driven environment, signals the importance for awareness in causation of mistakes and accidents. Adverse events and near misses that comprise the majority of human errors, cause morbidity often with devastating results, even death. Likewise in other organizations, errors causes are multiple and complex. Other high reliability organizations, such as air force and nuclear industry, offer examples of how standardized/homogenized work and removal of systems weaknesses can minimize errors. It is widely accepted that medical errors can be explained based on personal and/or system approach. The impact/effect of medical errors can be reduced when thorough/causative identification approach is followed by detailed analysis of consequences and prevention measures. NICU’s medical and nursing staff should be familiar with patient safety language, implement best practices, and support safety culture, maximizing efforts for reducing errors. Furthermore, top management commitment and support in developing patient safety culture is essential in order to assure the achievement of the desirable organizational safety outcomes. The aim of the paper is to review patient safety issues in the NICU environment, focusing on development and implementation of strategies, enhancing high quality standards for health care.

  7. The role of intensive phototherapy in decreasing the need for exchange transfusion in neonatal jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edris, A.A.F.; Ghany, E.A.G.A.; Razek, A.R.A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of intensive phototherapy in reducing the need for exchange transfusion and the duration of phototherapy. Methods: The prospective study with historical controls was conducted at Cairo University Paediatric Hospital, from February to July 2012, and comprised 360 newborns with indirect hyperbilirubinaemia. The 183 subjects were treated with Bilisphere 360 (Bilisphere group) compared with 177 who had been treated with conventional phototherapy (control group). Both groups were subjected to complete clinical evaluation and laboratory investigations. Results: Bilisphere 360 decreased the need for exchange transfusion in 19 (10.4%) neonates of the Bilisphere group versus 130 (73.4%) of the control group (p<0.001); decreased the level of serum bilirubin as exchange transfusion (6.7 mg/dl (24.9%) in the subjects vs. 6.9 mg/dl (22.7%) in the controls); shortened the duration of phototherapy (2.7 days in the subjects, vs. 4.2 days in the controls; p<0.001). Conclusion: The use of Bilisphere 360 in the treatment of indirect pathological hyperbilirubinaemia is as effective as exchange transfusion in lowering Total Serum Bilirubin when its level is within 2-3 mg/dl (34-51umol/l) of the exchange level. Bilisphere 360 is effective in reducing needs for exchange transfusion and duration of phototherapy. (author)

  8. Happiness in the neonatal intensive care unit: Merits of ethnographic fieldwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jónína Einarsdóttir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research has focused on the destructive effects of distress on professionals who work in ethically complex wards such as neonatal intensive units (NICUs. This article examines the accounts of health professionals, including nurses, pediatricians and assistant nurses, of their work at a NICU in Iceland. The aim is to understand how health professionals, who work under stressful conditions in an ethically sensitive ward, can counteract the negative sides of work too such a degree that they experience happiness. The collection of data was based on the ethnographic fieldwork, and the methods used were participant observation and semi-structured interviews. The professionals evaluated their wellbeing in line with conventional definitions of happiness. Working with children and opportunities to help others, engage in social relations and experience professional pride contributed to their happiness at work. Nonetheless, they did not dismiss the difficult experiences, and when confronted with these the professionals negotiated their meanings and the goals and priorities of work. In contrast to the findings of much quantitative and survey-based research, the professionals attributed constructive meanings to stress and argued that the positive experiences at work buffered the negative ones. Research on happiness would benefit from multifaceted methodological and theoretical perspectives. Thanks to its openness to the unforeseen, controversial, contradictory, and ambiguous aspects of human life, ethnography can contribute to happiness research and research on job satisfaction.

  9. Noise at the neonatal intensive care unit and inside the incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Eliana Moreira; Guinsburg, Ruth; Nabuco, Marco Antonio de Araujo; Kakehashi, Tereza Yoshiko

    2011-01-01

    The goal was to identify sound pressure level (SPL) at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and inside the incubator of a teaching hospital of a public university from São Paulo - SP, Brazil. SPL inside the NICU and the incubator were measured using four dosimeters in January/2010. SPL at the NICU varied from 52.6 dBA to 80.4 dBA and inside the incubator, from 45.4 dBA to 79.1 dBA. SPL both at the NICU and inside the incubator are above the recommended values, but levels were higher at the NICU than inside the incubator. Although there are some specific factors related to SPL inside the incubator, the NICU and incubator acoustic features present a system: an increase/decrease in SPL at the NICU usually tends to increase/decrease SPL inside the incubator. The study points to the need for simultaneous monitoring of SPL at the NICU and inside the incubator.

  10. Reduction of noise in the neonatal intensive care unit using sound-activated noise meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Aubertin, C; Barrowman, N; Moreau, K; Dunn, S; Harrold, J

    2014-11-01

    To determine if sound-activated noise meters providing direct audit and visual feedback can reduce sound levels in a level 3 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Sound levels (in dB) were compared between a 2-month period with noise meters present but without visual signal fluctuation and a subsequent 2 months with the noise meters providing direct audit and visual feedback. There was a significant increase in the percentage of time the sound level in the NICU was below 50 dB across all patient care areas (9.9%, 8.9% and 7.3%). This improvement was not observed in the desk area where there are no admitted patients. There was no change in the percentage of time the NICU was below 45 or 55 dB. Sound-activated noise meters seem effective in reducing sound levels in patient care areas. Conversations may have moved to non-patient care areas preventing a similar change there. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. A six-month Serratia marcescens outbreak in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo, Áurea; González, Verónica; Aguayo, Josefa; Carreño, Concepción; Torres, María José; Jarana, Daniel; Artacho, María José; Jiménez, Francisco; Conde, Manuel; Aznar, Javier

    2016-12-01

    To investigate a Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) outbreak in a Neonatal Unit in a tertiary university hospital. Descriptive study of children admitted to the Unit with S. marcescens infection from November 2012 to March 2013. Conventional microbiological methods for clinical and environmental samples were used. The clonal relationship between all available isolates was established by molecular methods. A multidisciplinary team was formed, and preventive measures were taken. S. marcescens was isolated from 18 children. The overall attack rate was 12%, and the case fatality rate in the Intensive Care Unit was 23.5%. The most prevalent types of infections were pneumonia (6), conjunctivitis (6), and bloodstream infection (5). Clinical isolates and environmental isolates obtained from an incubator belonged to a unique clone. The clonal relationship between all S. marcescens strains helped us to identify the possible source of the outbreak. Isolation of S. marcescens from stored water in a container, and from the surface of an incubator after cleaning, suggests a possible environmental source as the outbreak origin, which has been perpetuated due to a failure of cleaning methods in the Unit. The strict hygiene and cleaning measures were the main factors that contributed to the end of the outbreak. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of music and multimodal stimulation on responses of premature infants in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, J M

    1998-01-01

    To assess the benefits of lullaby singing and multimodal stimulation on premature infants in neonatal intensive care, 40 infants in a Level III Newborn Intermediate Care Unit were divided into control (n = 20) and experimental (n = 20) groups by pair matching on the basis of gender, birthweight, gestational age at birth and severity of medical complications. Participants met these project criteria: (a) corrected gestational age > 32 weeks; (b) age since birth > 10 days; and (c) weight > 1700 g. All participants had been referred for developmental stimulation by the medical staff. Experimental infants received reciprocal, multimodal (ATVV) stimulation paired with line singing of Brahms' Lullaby. Stimulation was provided for 15-30 minutes, one or two times per week from referral to discharge. Dependent variables were (a) days to discharge, (b) weight gain/day, and (c) experimental infants' tolerance for stimulation. Results showed that music and multimodal stimulation significantly benefited females' days to discharge and increased weight gain/day for both males and females. Both male and female infants' tolerance for stimulation showed marked and steady increase across the stimulation intervals with females' tolerance increasing more rapidly than males.

  13. Through the Eyes of the User: Evaluating Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Megan E; Bushehri, Yousef; Lim, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    This article presents a pilot study that employed a user-centered methodology for evaluating and quantifying neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) designs based on the needs of the primary users. The design of NICUs has begun to shift from open-bay to single-family rooms. Both designs present unique advantages and challenges that impact babies, families, and caregivers. One NICU design was analyzed using the functional scenario (FS) analysis method. For the FS, users' needs were determined through literature review, interviews with NICU providers and parents, and a review of published design guidelines. Quantitative metrics were developed for each FS, so that characteristics of the NICU design could be analyzed to determine how successful they were in meeting the users' needs. The results were graphically represented to visualize the success and considerations of the design. A total of 23 FSs and 61 spatial metrics were developed. FSs for babies focused on infection prevention, minimizing exposure to environmental stimuli, and supporting enriching care activities. FSs for family members focused on direct access to the baby, and privacy and adequate space for daily activities. FSs for providers and caregivers focused on infection prevention, care activities, care zones, and visibility. Using an FS approach highlights design characteristics in the NICU that need to be addressed during the design process to more successfully meet the needs of the different users. Additionally, using this approach can inform design professionals' decision-making by presenting them with the design characteristics that impact the needs of the user groups.

  14. Cytomegalovirus Infection among Infants in California Neonatal Intensive Care Units, 2005–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzieri, Tatiana M.; Bialek, Stephanie R.; Bennett, Mihoko V.; Gould, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Assess the burden of congenital and perinatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease among infants hospitalized in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Methods CMV infection was defined as a report of positive CMV viral culture or PCR at any time since birth in an infant hospitalized in a NICU reporting to California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative during 2005–2010. Results 156 (1.7 per 1000) infants were reported with CMV infection, representing an estimated 5% of the expected number of live births with symptomatic CMV disease. Prevalence was higher among infants with younger gestational ages and lower birth weights. Infants with CMV infection had significantly longer hospital stays; 14 (9%) died. Conclusions Reported prevalence of CMV infection in NICUs represents a fraction of total expected disease burden from CMV in the newborn period, likely resulting from underdiagnosis and milder symptomatic cases that do not require NICU care. More complete ascertainment of infants with congenital CMV infection that would benefit from antiviral treatment may reduce the burden of CMV disease in this population. PMID:24334425

  15. Hand hygiene adherence according to World Health Organization Recommendations in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Santos Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: to evaluate the application of hand hygiene technique, according to the World Health Organization (WHO recommendations, in the neonatal intensive care unit, at a Maternity in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil. Methods: cross-sectional study. Hand hygiene technique by professional category and alcohol solution consumption were systematically registered. For this task an adapted instrument created by the WHO was used and applied using factsheets. The sample was taken from medical physicians, physiotherapists, nurses and nursing technicians. Results: hand hygiene adherence regarding WHO recommendations was deficient in terms of technique and in terms of frequency (adequate technique ranged from 0% to 13.3% between professional categories. Hand hygiene was frequently ignored (27% between physicians and 51.8% between nursing technicians. The moment right after touching surfaces next to patients was the most ignored one. Alcohol gel solution monthly use was only 35% of the expected value for the unit. Conclusions: despite the international investigations and efforts for better results, the adherence and compliance to the hand hygiene guidelines is still deficient and continues to be a major problem.

  16. Mothers' perceptions of family centred care in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Kenneth; Dixon, Annie; Smith, Chris; Dykes, Fiona; Flacking, Renee

    2014-10-01

    To explore mothers' perceptions of family centred care (FCC) in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in England. The qualitative experiences of 12 mothers from three NICUs in the UK were elicited using individual interviews. A thematic network analysis was conducted on the transcribed interviews A central global theme supported by a number of organizing themes were developed reflecting the views of the mothers and their experiences of FCC. A global theme of "Finding My Place" was identified, supported by six organizing themes: Mothering in Limbo; Deference to the Experts; Anxious Surveillance; Muted Relations, Power Struggles and Consistently Inconsistent. Mothers experienced a state of liminality and were acutely sensitive to power struggles, awkward relationships and inconsistencies in care. To try to maintain their equilibrium and protect their baby they formed deferential relationships with health professionals and remained in a state of anxious surveillance. This study illustrates that despite the rhetoric around the practice of FCC in NICUs, there was little in the mother's narratives to support this. It is of the utmost importance to minimize the consequences of the liminal experience, to improve staff-mother interactions and to facilitate mothers' opportunities to be primary caregivers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Disparities in Perinatal Quality Outcomes for Very Low Birth Weight Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Eileen T; Staiger, Douglas; Horbar, Jeffrey; Kenny, Michael J; Patrick, Thelma; Rogowski, Jeannette A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if hospital-level disparities in very low birth weight (VLBW) infant outcomes are explained by poorer hospital nursing characteristics. Data Sources Nurse survey and VLBW infant registry data. Study Design Retrospective study of 8,252 VLBW infants in 98 Vermont Oxford Network hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) nationally. NICUs were classified into three groups based on their percent of infants of black race. Two nurse-sensitive perinatal quality standards were studied: nosocomial infection and breast milk. Data Collection Primary nurse survey (N = 5,773, 77 percent response rate). Principal Findings VLBW infants born in high-black concentration hospitals had higher rates of infection and discharge without breast milk than VLBW infants born in low-black concentration hospitals. Nurse understaffing was higher and practice environments were worse in high-black as compared to low-black hospitals. NICU nursing features accounted for one-third to one-half of the hospital-level health disparities. Conclusions Poorer nursing characteristics contribute to disparities in VLBW infant outcomes in two nurse-sensitive perinatal quality standards. Improvements in nursing have potential to improve the quality of care for seven out of ten black VLBW infants who are born in high-black hospitals in this country. PMID:25250882

  18. Prevention of postpartum smoking relapse in mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R M; Merritt, T A; Goldstein, M R; Deming, D D; Slater, L E; Angeles, D M

    2012-05-01

    Approximately 40% of women who smoke tobacco quit smoking during pregnancy, yet up to 85% relapse after delivery. Those who resume smoking often do so by 2 to 8 weeks postpartum. Smoking mothers are more than twice as likely to quit breastfeeding by 10 weeks postpartum. The hospitalization of a newborn, while stressful, is an opportunity to emphasize the importance of a smoke-free environment for babies. Supporting maternal-infant bonding may reduce maternal stress and motivate mothers to remain smoke free and continue breastfeeding. The objective of this study was to reduce postpartum smoking relapse and prolong breastfeeding duration during the first 8 weeks postpartum in mothers who quit smoking just before or during pregnancy and have newborns admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). This study was an Institutional Review Board-approved prospective randomized clinical trial. After informed consent, mothers of newborns admitted to the NICU were randomized to a control or intervention group. Both groups received weekly encouragement to remain smoke free and routine breastfeeding support. Mothers in the intervention group were also given enhanced support for maternal-infant bonding including information about newborn behaviors, and were encouraged to frequently hold their babies skin-to-skin. More mothers were smoke free (81 vs 46%, Pbreastfeeding (86 vs 21%, Pprolonged duration of breastfeeding during the first 8 weeks postpartum.

  19. A prospective comparison of intestinal sonography and abdominal radiographs in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cicero T; Daneman, Alan; Navarro, Oscar M; Moineddin, Rahim; Levine, Daniel; Moore, Aideen M

    2013-11-01

    No study reported in the literature comprehensively compares findings on neonatal abdominal radiographs with sonography. To compare the findings on abdominal radiographs and sonograms in infants in intensive care, to better understand how the various intestinal gas patterns on radiographs relate to the spectrum of appearances on sonography and, second, to evaluate the ability of sonography to differentiate necrotizing enterocolitis from other intestinal pathology. We prospectively evaluated sonograms and radiographs, blinded to the other modality and to clinical information. Patients' charts were reviewed by a third blinded reader and used as a reference standard for diagnosis. We made associations between sonographic findings, radiographic intestinal gas patterns and clinical diagnoses. We included 75 infants with gestational ages between 23 weeks and 41 weeks. Sonographic abnormalities were present in infants with all radiographic intestinal gas patterns, including normal patterns. We only saw absent intestinal perfusion and fluid collections on sonography (suggesting intestinal necrosis and sealed perforation) in infants with intestinal dilatation with elongation on radiographs. Separation of intestinal loops on radiographs was most commonly caused by reasons other than intestinal wall thickening. Increased intestinal echogenicity or free fluid with echoes on sonography correlated with a diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis, whereas anechoic free fluid correlated with absence of necrotizing enterocolitis. Sonography is complementary to radiographs in infants with suspected intestinal pathology, with a spectrum of appearances seen on each modality. Some sonographic findings either strongly suggest necrotizing enterocolitis or supply evidence against this diagnosis.

  20. Salivary Cortisol Reactivity in Preterm Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care: An Integrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalotte Mörelius

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, more and more researchers have been using salivary cortisol reactivity to evaluate stress in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. The aim of this integrative literature review was to summarize the evidence of interventions leading to a change in salivary cortisol from the baseline in preterm infants in the NICU. The electronic databases of PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched for relevant studies. The inclusion criteria were studies with preterm infants exposed to an intervention evaluated by salivary cortisol reactivity before discharge from the NICU, which were published in English. In total, 16 studies were included. Eye-screening examination and heel lance provoked an increase in the salivary cortisol level. Music, prone position, and co-bedding among twins decreased the salivary cortisol level. Several studies reported a low rate of successful saliva sampling or did not use control groups. Future studies need to focus on non-painful interventions in order to learn more about salivary cortisol regulation in preterm infants. Moreover, these studies should use study designs comprising homogenous gestational and postnatal age groups, control groups, and reliable analysis methods that are able to detect cortisol in small amounts of saliva.

  1. End of life, death and dying in neonatal intensive care units in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, C A; González, S; Zambosco, G; Cancela, M J; Forero, L V; Venegas, M; Baquero, H; Lemus-Varela, L; Kattan, J; Wormald, F; Sola, A; Lantos, J

    2012-06-01

    Most analyses of end of life decisions in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) have come from Europe/English-speaking countries. Would decisions be different in Latin American NICUs? Therefore, we aim to evaluate the approach to dying infants/families in NICUs in Latin America. Multinational descriptive study of all deaths in babies born at >22 weeks in eight NICUs in five Latin American countries. Deaths were categorized as: (i) no Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) or life support offered; (ii) life support initiated but do not resuscitate (DNR) orders written or no CPR provided; (iii) full life support and CPR; and (iv) unclassifiable. There were 100 deaths, 81% in >27 weeks. Seventeen infants received no CPR/life support at birth, 10 died in DR and seven in NICU. There were 27 infants in group 2, 54 in group three and two in group 4. No baby had care withdrawn or care withdrawn/CPR withheld. Thirty-two infants had 'do not resuscitate' order. Decisions without parents' involvement in 15%, both parents present at death 24% and sedatives/narcotics documented 14%. Latin American NICUs differ from those in Northern Europe/English-speaking countries. More deaths are accompanied by full life support and CPR. DNR orders are rare. Withdrawal of life support is virtually non-existent. Latin American's doctors are more likely to make decisions without the objections of family about withholding life-sustaining treatment. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  2. Communicating with parents in neonatal intensive care units: The impact on parental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enke, Christian; Oliva Y Hausmann, Andrés; Miedaner, Felix; Roth, Bernhard; Woopen, Christiane

    2017-04-01

    To analyse stress in parents whose infants with very low birth weight have just concluded high-level care in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). More specifically, we aimed 1) to identify groups of parents in the NICU who are particularly at risk of experiencing stress, and 2) to explore the effects of clinical staffś communication on parental stress. Our multi-center-study evaluated views from 1277 parents about care for 923 infants in 66 German NICUs. Answers were linked with separately evaluated medical outcomes of the infants. Separate generalised mixed models estimated the influence of personal, medical and communication-related characteristics on specific parental stress. Parents of a younger age and those of infants with severe prognoses were more likely to experience stress. While empathetic communication as one aspect of staffś communication was shown as appropriate in reducing parental stress, an initial introduction and the quantity of information were only slightly associated with lower levels of stress. Results provide evidence for the need to involve parents empathetically from the beginning of their child's stay in the NICU. Staff in the NICU should communicate empathetically and help to reduce stress in parents particularly at risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of training on noise reduction in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calikusu Incekar, Mujde; Balci, Serap

    2017-07-01

    Noise, an environmental stimulus, is especially important in the neurobehavioral development of newborns and brain development of infants at high risk. Conditions in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) may cause certain sensory stimuli that are not appropriate for the development of newborns, especially preterm infants. This study was conducted in order to determine noise levels in the NICU and to evaluate the effect of training provided for noise control. This study was conducted as a pretest-posttest quasiexperimental design between September and November 2014 in a 30-bed NICU of a tertiary hospital in Istanbul. A sample group consisting of 30 people (26 nurses, 4 care workers). Noise measurement devices were used in the Training Program of Noise Control. Of the health professionals, 96.7% were women, 86.7% were nurses, and 63.3% were university graduates. Some 36.7% of the health professionals had worked within the unit for more than 5 years. Noise measurements of full implementations were made over three 24-h periods. Noise measurements were taken before and after the training on Monday, Friday, and Sunday. Noise levels after training diminished in all three measurements, and the decrease was found statistically significant (P Noise Control Training for health professionals who work in NICUs is an effective way of reducing noise. We recommend that this training should be given to NICU health professionals and noise levels should be determined through measurements at specific times. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Parental influence on clinical management during neonatal intensive care: a survey of US neonatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sean M; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D; Mally, Pradeep

    2013-08-01

    Family-centered care (FCC), which includes involving parents in conversations about medical management, is increasingly employed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Our aim was to determine which care decisions are discussed by neonatologists with families most frequently and the percentage of clinicians influenced by such conversations. Anonymous web-based survey provided to 2137 neonatologists assessing information sharing and parental involvement. Thousand and two neonatologists responded in which 893 fully completed the surveys. 88% practice FCC. Topics most frequently discussed with parents were blood transfusion, steroids for lung disease and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) surgery, each being reported and discussed by more than 90% of respondents. Many therapies, including aminoglycoisdes, total parenteral nutrition, and phototherapy, were discussed with parents by far fewer clinicians. Additionally, parents had most influence on clinicians in two categories, blood transfusion and steroids, with more than 70% reporting that their practice was influenced by parental opinion if communicated. For some topics, such as PDA surgery and central line placement, conversations impacted few clinicians. FCC appears to have an impact on NICU clinical decision-making processes, some more than others. Further investigation in this area may provide information on how to best communicate with families and run effective, efficient FCC rounds.

  5. Because of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezan Harman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the significant risk factor in the development of nosocomial Staphylococcal infections is bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureuscolonized in the nose of health personnel. The meticilin resistant S. aureus (MRSA was detected in the repeated blood cultures of two babies who had been followed for about 20 days in neonatal intensive care due to premature birth. Because of the failure to find the source in the assesment of the infants of whom MRSA reproduction continue, despite the appropriate treatment according to the results of antibiograms, examinations were performed fort he environment and the healtyh personnel. Cultures were taken from the total parenteral nutrition (TPN solution given to the babies. S. aureus growth was detected in the received culture. Therefore cultures were obtained from the places where there will be source in the division where TPN was prepared and nsal cultures were taken from the personnel. Because of growth of S. aureus only in the nasal cultures of the personnel, considering that the source was the personnel, the personnel were given the treatment of mupirocin pomad for five days, and during this period the work of the staff were replaced. There was not any growth in the TPN received at the and of the treatment an in the blood cultures of the patients. These facts showed us the necessity of making the necessary screening by considering the health personnel can also be the source in case of any S. aureus growth. [J Contemp Med 2016; 6(4.000: 382-384

  6. Becoming a father in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna de Souza Lima Marski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ematurity and low birth weight are prevalent cases of children hospitalized in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU in Brazil. The hospitalization of a child shortly after birth requires early separation from parents with ramifications for the development of maternity and paternity. This study has the objective to know the national and international scientific productions, published between 2007 and June 2012, addressing the aspects of becoming a father of a premature and/or low birth weight infant admitted in NICUs and to identify core promoters to the development of paternity in this situation. The results express lack of professional support to the father of the child born premature and/or with low birth weight hospitalized in NICUs, especially for disregarding the relationships with professionals. Such aspects were explored by the following thematic groups: Needs and contempt; Proximity; Transformation and every day life; Fathers and the NICU’s staff; and Paternity after hospital discharge. Relationships with professionals gain prominence as a hub for promoting fatherhood in this context with a view to comprehensive health care of children.

  7. The Mortality Rate of Nosocomial Infection in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU of Taleghani Educational and Treatment Center, Tabriz, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Abbasian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Information about nosocomial infections (NIs is necessary for both appropriate management and establishment of preventative measures in hospitals. Neonates admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU are at high-risk of developing nosocomial infection. The aim of this study was to determine the mortality rate of nosocomial infections and the distribution of pathogens among newborns who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit in Taleghani educational and treatment center, Tabriz. Material and Methods : This was a cross-sectional study. The sampling method was census. The inclusion criteria were dead infants who developed signs of infection after 48 hours of hospitalization and those who had symptoms at the admission were excluded. Data were collected through hospital records and were analyzed using Excel software. Results: From 904 infants admitted to NICU, 39 (4.3% acquired hospital infection. Mortality from nosocomial infections in NICU was 20.5% that was 12% of the total deaths. Coagulase-negative staphylococcal Cook (37.5% and Escherichia coli (25% were the most commonly identified agents among dead neonates. Conclusion: For more reduction in nosocomial infection and its mortality rate, mercury hygiene principles and also optimizing bed spaces are recommended. ​

  8. Fitness and Health Effects of Frequent Intense Training in 8-10-Year Old Danish Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Malte Nejst

    ) compared to children active in other sports. Paper III and IV described the long-term training effects of frequent intense small-sided ball games (SSG), interval running (IT) and circuit strength training (CST) for 8-10-year-old school children. Analysis of baseline-to-10-months change scores showed...... to CON and CST (SSG vs CON: 19 mg/cm2, 95%CI: 11-39, Ptraining resulted in higher change scores compared to CON in postural...... the intervention study demonstrate that significant structural and functional musculoskeletal adaptations can be achieved from well-controlled high-intensity training in a school-based setting, especially from 3x40 minutes of SSG and CST. The overall fitness effects of the low-volume training (5x12 minutes of SSG...

  9. Sedation and analgesia practices at Italian neonatal intensive care units: results from the EUROPAIN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Paola; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Baraldi, Eugenio; Pozzato, Roberta; Courtois, Emilie; Rambaud, Jérôme; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S; Carbajal, Ricardo

    2017-03-07

    We aimed to examine current bedside analgesia/sedation (A/S) and pain assessment (PA) practices in Italian neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in relation to the findings of an epidemiological European study and recently-introduced national guidelines. We analyzed the Italian data from the EUROPAIN (EUROpean-Pain-Audit-In-Neonates) prospective observational study on A/S practices that involved 6680 newborns admitted to tertiary-level NICUs in 18 European countries. Demographics, type of assisted ventilation, type and mode of A/S administration and PA were analyzed. Multivariate linear regression models were used to identify factors predicting A/S and PA practices. From October 1 st , 2012 to June 30 th , 2013, thirty Italian NICUs gathered data on 422 newborn: 131 on invasive ventilation (IV); 150 on noninvasive ventilation (NIV); and 141 on spontaneous ventilation (SV). A/S was documented for 35.3% of all infants admitted (86.3% IV; 17.3% NIV; 7.1% SV [p = 0.0001]), and varied considerably between NICUs (as reported in other European countries). Strong analgesics were used in 32.5% of cases, sedatives in 10.2%, mild analgesics in 3.8%. Fentanyl was used in 78.6% of cases, morphine in 8.4%, neuromuscular blockers in 5.3%, midazolam in 22.1%. The performance of PA was documented in 67.5% of all newborn (85.5% IV; 67.3% NIV; 51.1% SV [p = 0.001]). Illness severity, type of ventilation, bedside PA, and number of NICU beds were all factors associated with A/S use on multivariate analysis, while gestational age ≤ 32 weeks, and type of ventilation and presence of a pain team were associated with PA. We documented a generally widespread, but still highly variable use of A/S and PA at Italian NICUs, despite the diffusion of national guidelines. There is an urgent need to improve routine PA to enable customized pain and stress control (and prevention) in all infants. Clinical Trials.gov # NCT01694745 .

  10. The prevalence of and attitudes toward neonatal functional echocardiography use and training in the United States: a survey of neonatal intensive care unit medical directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachinger, S; Stansfield, R B; Ensing, G; Schumacher, R

    2014-01-01

    Internationally, neonatologists are increasingly performing functional echocardiography to evaluate the hemodynamic status and cardiac function in neonates. The purpose of this study was to describe the current prevalence of and attitudes toward the use and training of neonatologists in functional echocardiography in the United States. An anonymous survey was sent to United States neonatal intensive care unit medical directors. Neonatologists scored availability of echocardiography and attitudes toward the use and training of neonatologists in functional echocardiography. Response rate was 43.7% (247 of 565 surveys sent) and captured 95% of the neonatal-perinatal training programs. Nine percent of units had a functional echocardiography trained neonatologist; eight percent of the neonatal-perinatal training programs offered functional echocardiography training. There was no difference in the timely ability to obtain hemodynamic status with echocardiography in units compared by the presence of functional echocardiography trained neonatologists (mean = 3.13 vs. 2.67, p = 0.08) and fellowships (mean = 2.69 vs. 2.72, p = 0.85). Overall positive attitudes (mean = 14.6 ± 3.46) towards the training of neonatologists in functional echocardiography did not correlate with the perceived timely availability of echocardiography support (mean = 2.72 ± 1.43, r = -0.11, p = 0.1). Functional echocardiography use and training is not prevalent in the United States. There are positive attitudes toward the training of neonatologists in functional echocardiography that are independent of the presence of fellowships, neonatologists with echocardiography training, and the perceived availability of echocardiography support.

  11. Unique Patterns of Body Composition and Anthropometric Measurements During Maturation in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Neonates: Opportunities for Modifying Nutritional Therapy and Influencing Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algotar, Anushree; Shaikhkhalil, Ala K; Siler-Wurst, Kim; Sitaram, Swetha; Gulati, Ish; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R

    2018-01-01

    Body composition is an important predictor of long-term outcomes in neonates and may be altered by several factors. Innovative methods like air displacement plethysmography (ADP) can safely and reliably measure body composition, potentially assisting in individualization of nutrition therapy. 1) To characterize patterns of body composition change in convalescing neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and examine factors leading to variation. 2) To evaluate if the time interval between 2 measurements via ADP can detect significant changes. NICU infants underwent anthropometry and body composition measurements by ADP at 37.5±0.7 weeks (Time 1) and 41.0±0.7 weeks (Time 2) postmenstrual age. Nutrition data were recorded. Data were analyzed using paired t-tests and linear regression models, presented as mean±SE, median (IQR), or %. Twenty-two neonates (54% males, 32.2±0.9 weeks gestation) were evaluated with a median interval of 3.6 (2.9-4.0) weeks between studies. Mean weight and % body fat increased significantly. There was no significant difference between mean weight and mean % body fat compared with normal references. Abdominal girth increased and mid-arm circumference decreased (pcomposition can effectively assess nutrition status of fragile NICU infants. Although, an interval of 2.9-4.0 weeks between consecutive measurements detected significant changes in body composition, more frequent measurements are needed to determine nutrition factors responsible for body composition changes. © 2017 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. Skin-to-skin care in neonatal intensive care units in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Emma; Andersen, Lise Randi; Axelin, Anna

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the application of skin-to-skin care (SSC) in the Nordic countries, the existence of guidelines for SSC and the attitudes of neonatal staff towards SSC.......To investigate the application of skin-to-skin care (SSC) in the Nordic countries, the existence of guidelines for SSC and the attitudes of neonatal staff towards SSC....

  13. Transmission of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from breast milk in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastelum, Dawn Terashita; Dassey, David; Mascola, Laurene; Yasuda, Lori M

    2005-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become increasingly common in neonatal intensive care units and can lead to severe outcomes. Baby C, of a set of quadruplets, died of MRSA sepsis. The surviving siblings were colonized with MRSA. Expressed breast milk was fed to all infants; tested breast milk samples were all MRSA-positive. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis results of isolates from the infants and breast milk were indistinguishable.

  14. Assessment and management of pain in newborns hospitalized in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a cross-sectional study 1

    OpenAIRE

    Sposito, Nat?lia Pinheiro Braga; Rossato, Lisabelle Mariano; Bueno, Mariana; Kimura, Am?lia Fumiko; Costa, Taine; Guedes, Danila Maria Batista

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to determine the frequency of pain, to verify the measures adopted for pain relief during the first seven days of hospitalization in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and to identify the type and frequency of invasive procedures to which newborns are submitted. Method: cross-sectional retrospective study. Out of the 188 hospitalizations occurred during the 12-month period, 171 were included in the study. The data were collected from the charts and the presence of pain was...

  15. Assessing pain in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit: moving to a ‘brain-oriented’ approach

    OpenAIRE

    Holsti, Liisa; Grunau, Ruth E; Shany, Eilon

    2011-01-01

    Preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit undergo repeated exposure to procedural and ongoing pain. Early and long-term changes in pain processing, stress-response systems and development may result from cumulative early pain exposure. So that appropriate treatment can be given, accurate assessment of pain is vital, but is also complex because these infants' responses may differ from those of full-term infants. A variety of uni- and multidimensional assessment tools are available; h...

  16. Outbreak of Ampicillin/Piperacillin-Resistant Klebsiella Pneumoniae in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU): Investigation and Control Measures

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbri, Giuliana; Panico, Manuela; Dallolio, Laura; Suzzi, Roberta; Ciccia, Matilde; Sandri, Fabrizio; Farruggia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a frequent cause of infectious outbreaks in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs). The aim of this paper is to describe an outbreak occurred in a 13-bed NICU and the control measures adopted in order to interrupt the chain of transmission. We described the microbiological investigations, the NICU staff compliance to the infection control measures by means of a specifically designed check-list and the control measures adopted. Six cases of primary bloodstream infection...

  17. Occupational Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for a Neonate with Perinatal Stroke: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roan, Cecilia; Bell, Alison

    2017-08-01

    This case report describes an occupational therapy intervention based on synactive theory for a neonate born full-term with a diagnosis of perinatal stroke. Occupational therapy was provided 4-5 times a week for 3 weeks. The focus was improving infant state regulation and motor skills to support developmentally appropriate behaviors through environmental modifications, positioning, guided progression of sensory stimulation, and promotion of motor and postural skills. At discharge on day 24, the infant had improved state regulation, behavioral organization, and motor performance. Occupational therapy based on synactive theory was an effective therapeutic approach for improving the behavioral and motor organization of a full term infant diagnosed with perinatal stroke.

  18. The five-factor model of personality, work stress and professional quality of life in neonatal intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Peter

    2018-02-14

    The study aim was to determine the direct and indirect relations of the five-factor model of personality traits and work stress with professional quality of life in neonatal nurses. Neonatal intensive care nursing has positive and negative effects on neonatal nurses' psychological well-being. Although individual and situational factors interact to influence professional quality of life, there have been few studies of these relationships in neonatal nurses. A cross-sectional study conducted in 2016. Self-report questionnaires were used to measure professional quality of life (burnout, secondary traumatic stress and compassion satisfaction), five-factor model of personality traits (neuroticism, agreeableness, extraversion, conscientiousness and openness) and work stress (role ambiguity, role conflict and role overload). One hundred and forty (34%) of 405 eligible neonatal nurses provided the data. After controlling for work stress, neuroticism and agreeableness were related to burnout, neuroticism was related to secondary traumatic stress, and extraversion was related to compassion satisfaction. Work stress controlled for personality traits was related to burnout and secondary traumatic stress, but not to compassion satisfaction. Neuroticism moderated the effect of work stress on secondary traumatic stress and agreeableness and openness moderated the effect of work stress on compassion satisfaction. Work stress mediated the effect of neuroticism and extraversion on burnout and the effects of extraversion and conscientiousness on compassion satisfaction. Strategies to reduce work stress may not lessen burnout and secondary traumatic stress or increase compassion satisfaction in neonatal nurses who are prone to high neuroticism, low agreeableness and low extraversion. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Effects of Alternative Positioning on Preterm Infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madlinger-Lewis, Laura; Reynolds, Lauren; Zarem, Cori; Crapnell, Tara; Inder, Terrie; Pineda, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies that have investigated the developmental benefits of positioning in the neonatal intensive care unit. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a new, alternative positioning device compared to traditional positioning methods used with preterm infants. In this randomized, blinded clinical trial, one hundred preterm infants (born ≤32 weeks gestation) from a level III neonatal intensive care unit in the United States were enrolled at birth. Participants were randomized to be positioned in the alternative positioning device or to traditional positioning methods for their length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit. Infants were assessed using the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale at term equivalent age. Clinical and feeding outcomes were also captured. Linear and logistic regression were used to investigate differences in neurobehavioral outcome, feeding performance, and medical outcomes. Infants in the alternative positioning arm of the study demonstrated less asymmetry of reflex and motor responses on the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (p=0.04; Adjusted Mean Difference=0.90, 95% CI 0.05–1.75) than those positioned using traditional positioning methods. No other significant differences were observed. Reductions in asymmetry among preterm infants is an important benefit of alternative positioning, as symmetrical movement and responses are crucial for early development. However, it will be important to follow this sample of preterm infants to determine the effects of early positioning on neurodevelopmental outcome in childhood. PMID:24374602

  20. Acute kidney injury in preterm infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Vesna; Barišić, Nenad; Milanović, Borko; Doronjski, Aleksandra

    2014-11-01

    The factors that contribute to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) and treatment outcome among prematurely born neonates are not clearly understood. This retrospective study included 150 prematurely born neonates. AKI was defined as an increase of serum creatinine levels ≥0.3 mg/dl compared to basal values. The majority of neonates with AKI (94.8 %) had a body weight 5 on the first day of life, core body temperature hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, as well as a treatment with vancomycin or dopamine were independent risk factors for the development of AKI. After the groups of neonates with and without AKI were adjusted, the calculated risk ratio for a negative outcome of treatment (death) was 2.215 (CI 1.27-3.86) for neonates with AKI. Neonates with AKI had higher serum sodium levels in the third and fourth days of life. AKI is associated with high mortality in preterm neonates. It is very important to identify, as quickly as possible, all infants who are at high risk of developing AKI.

  1. Prevalence, causes and mental health impact of workplace bullying in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziioannidis, Ilias; Bascialla, Francesca Giuseppina; Chatzivalsama, Panagiota; Vouzas, Fotios; Mitsiakos, Georgios

    2018-02-24

    The aim of this study is to examine the prevalence, to report barriers and mental health impact of bullying behaviours and to analyse whether psychological support at work could affect victims of bullying in the healthcare workplace. Self-administered questionnaire survey. 20 in total neonatal intensive care units in 17 hospitals in Greece. 398 healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses). The questionnaire included information on demographic data, Negative Act Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) behaviour scale, data on sources of bullying, perpetrators profile, causal factors, actions taken and reasons for not reporting bullying, psychological support and 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) scores to investigate psychological distress. Prevalence of bullying measured by the NAQ-R was 53.1% for doctors and 53.6% for nurses. Victims of bullying differed from non-bullied in terms of gender and job experience, among demographic data. Crude NAQ-R score was found higher for female, young and inexperienced employees. Of those respondents who experienced bullying 44.9% self-labelled themselves as victims. Witnessing bullying of others was found 83.2%. Perpetrators were mainly females 45-64 years old, most likely being a supervisor/senior colleague. Common reasons for not reporting bullying was self-dealing and fear of consequences. Bullying was attributed to personality trait and management. Those who were bullied, self-labelled as a victim and witnessed bullying of others had higher GHQ-12 score. Moreover, psychological support at work had a favour effect on victims of bullying. Prevalence of bullying and witnessing were found extremely high, while half of victims did not consider themselves as sufferers. The mental health impact on victims and witnesses was severe and support at work was necessary to ensure good mental health status among employees. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights

  2. Environmental factors influencing biological rhythms in newborns: From neonatal intensive care units to home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Clarissa; Menna-Barreto, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Photic and non-photic environmental factors are suggested to modulate the development of circadian rhythms in infants. Our aim is to evaluate the development of biological rhythms (circadian or ultradian) in newborns in transition from Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) to home and along the first 6 months of life, to identify masking and entraining environment factors along development. Ten newborns were evaluated in their last week inside the NICU and in the first week after being delivered home; 6 babies were also followed until 6 months of corrected age. Activity, recorded with actimeters, wrist temperature and observed sleep and feeding behavior were recorded continuously along their last week inside the NICU and in the first week at home and also until 6 months of corrected age for the subjects who remained in the study. Sleep/wake and activity/rest cycle showed ultradian patterns and the sleep/wake was strongly influenced by the 3 h feeding schedule inside the NICU, while wrist temperature showed a circadian pattern that seemed no to be affected by environmental cycles. A circadian rhythm emerges for sleep/wake behavior in the first week at home, whereas the 3 h period vanishes. Both activity/rest and wrist temperature presented a sudden increase in the contribution of the circadian component immediately after babies were delivered home, also suggesting a masking effect of the NICU environment. We found a positive correlation of postconceptional age and the increase in the daily component of activity and temperature along the following 6 months, while feeding behavior became arrhythmic.

  3. Next-generation sequencing for diagnosis of rare diseases in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Hussein; Luco, Stephanie M.; Li, Rui; Bareke, Eric; Beaulieu, Chandree; Jarinova, Olga; Carson, Nancy; Nikkel, Sarah M.; Graham, Gail E.; Richer, Julie; Armour, Christine; Bulman, Dennis E.; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Geraghty, Michael; Lines, Matthew A.; Lacaze-Masmonteil, Thierry; Majewski, Jacek; Boycott, Kym M.; Dyment, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rare diseases often present in the first days and weeks of life and may require complex management in the setting of a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Exhaustive consultations and traditional genetic or metabolic investigations are costly and often fail to arrive at a final diagnosis when no recognizable syndrome is suspected. For this pilot project, we assessed the feasibility of next-generation sequencing as a tool to improve the diagnosis of rare diseases in newborns in the NICU. Methods: We retrospectively identified and prospectively recruited newborns and infants admitted to the NICU of the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario and the Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, who had been referred to the medical genetics or metabolics inpatient consult service and had features suggesting an underlying genetic or metabolic condition. DNA from the newborns and parents was enriched for a panel of clinically relevant genes and sequenced on a MiSeq sequencing platform (Illumina Inc.). The data were interpreted with a standard informatics pipeline and reported to care providers, who assessed the importance of genotype–phenotype correlations. Results: Of 20 newborns studied, 8 received a diagnosis on the basis of next-generation sequencing (diagnostic rate 40%). The diagnoses were renal tubular dysgenesis, SCN1A-related encephalopathy syndrome, myotubular myopathy, FTO deficiency syndrome, cranioectodermal dysplasia, congenital myasthenic syndrome, autosomal dominant intellectual disability syndrome type 7 and Denys–Drash syndrome. Interpretation: This pilot study highlighted the potential of next-generation sequencing to deliver molecular diagnoses rapidly with a high success rate. With broader use, this approach has the potential to alter health care delivery in the NICU. PMID:27241786

  4. Continuous non-contact vital sign monitoring in neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, Mauricio; Guazzi, Alessandro; Jorge, João; Davis, Sara; Watkinson, Peter; Green, Gabrielle; Shenvi, Asha; McCormick, Kenny; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2014-09-01

    Current technologies to allow continuous monitoring of vital signs in pre-term infants in the hospital require adhesive electrodes or sensors to be in direct contact with the patient. These can cause stress, pain, and also damage the fragile skin of the infants. It has been established previously that the colour and volume changes in superficial blood vessels during the cardiac cycle can be measured using a digital video camera and ambient light, making it possible to obtain estimates of heart rate or breathing rate. Most of the papers in the literature on non-contact vital sign monitoring report results on adult healthy human volunteers in controlled environments for short periods of time. The authors' current clinical study involves the continuous monitoring of pre-term infants, for at least four consecutive days each, in the high-dependency care area of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford. The authors have further developed their video-based, non-contact monitoring methods to obtain continuous estimates of heart rate, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation for infants nursed in incubators. In this Letter, it is shown that continuous estimates of these three parameters can be computed with an accuracy which is clinically useful. During stable sections with minimal infant motion, the mean absolute error between the camera-derived estimates of heart rate and the reference value derived from the ECG is similar to the mean absolute error between the ECG-derived value and the heart rate value from a pulse oximeter. Continuous non-contact vital sign monitoring in the NICU using ambient light is feasible, and the authors have shown that clinically important events such as a bradycardia accompanied by a major desaturation can be identified with their algorithms for processing the video signal.

  5. Refractory septic shock in children: a European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Luc; Ray, Samiran; Wilson, Clare; Remy, Solenn; Benissa, Mohamed Rida; Jansen, Nicolaas J G; Javouhey, Etienne; Peters, Mark J; Kneyber, Martin; De Luca, Daniele; Nadel, Simon; Schlapbach, Luregn Jan; Maclaren, Graeme; Tissieres, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Although overall paediatric septic shock mortality is decreasing, refractory septic shock (RSS) is still associated with high mortality. A definition for RSS is urgently needed to facilitate earlier identification and treatment. We aim to establish a European society of paediatric and neonatal intensive care (ESPNIC) experts' definition of paediatric RSS. We conducted a two-round Delphi study followed by an observational multicentre retrospective study. One hundred and fourteen paediatric intensivists answered a clinical case-based, two-round Delphi survey, identifying clinical items consistent with RSS. Multivariate analysis of these items in a development single-centre cohort (70 patients, 30 % mortality) facilitated development of RSS definitions based on either a bedside or computed severity score. Both scores were subsequently tested in a validation cohort (six centres, 424 patients, 11.6 % mortality). From the Delphi process, the draft definition included evidence of myocardial dysfunction and high blood lactate levels despite high vasopressor treatment. When assessed in the development population, each item was independently associated with the need for extracorporeal life support (ECLS) or death. Resultant bedside and computed septic shock scores had high discriminative power against the need for ECLS or death, with areas under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.920 (95 % CI 0.89-0.94), and 0.956 (95 % CI 0.93-0.97), respectively. RSS defined by a bedside score equal to or higher than 2 and a computed score equal to or higher than 3.5 was associated with a significant increase in mortality. This ESPNIC definition of RSS accurately identifies children with the most severe form of septic shock.

  6. Incidence, characteristics, and survival following cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the quaternary neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, Elizabeth E; Langeveld, Robert; Heimall, Lauren; Deveney, Alyson; Ades, Anne; Jensen, Erik A; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2017-01-01

    The contemporary characteristics and outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are poorly described. The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence, interventions, and outcomes of CPR in a quaternary referral NICU. Retrospective observational study of infants who received chest compressions for resuscitation in the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia NICU between April 1, 2011 and June 30, 2015. Patient, event, and survival characteristics were abstracted from the medical record and the hospital-wide resuscitation database. The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify patient and event factors associated with survival to discharge. There were 1.2 CPR events per 1000 patient days. CPR was performed in 113 of 5046 (2.2%) infants admitted to the NICU during the study period. The median duration of chest compressions was 2min (interquartile range 1, 6min). Adrenaline was administered in 34 (30%) CPR events. Of 113 infants with at least one CPR event, 69 (61%) survived to hospital discharge. Factors independently associated with decreased survival to hospital discharge were inotrope treatment prior to CPR (adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] 0.14, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.04, 0.54), and adrenaline administration during CPR (aOR 0.14, 95% CI 0.04, 0.50). Although it was not uncommon, the incidence of CPR was low (CPR and adrenaline administration during CPR were less likely to survive to hospital discharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Noise distribution of an incubator with nebulizer at a neonatal intensive care unit in southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H F; Chang, Y J

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the noise distribution and sources of peak noise inside an incubator with a nebulizer at a neonatal intensive care unit of a medical center in Southern Taiwan. Sound levels were monitored continuously with an electronic sound-meter for 24 hours daily over a one-week period. Three working hours (day, evening, and night hours) in the weekday and weekend (total 48 hours) were selected randomly from the one-week period of noise survey to observe peak noise at levels > or = 65 dBA. Results revealed that 24.8% of the total monitoring period had sound levels at or = 70 dBA. Furthermore, a total of 947 peak noises > or = 65 dBA were found within the 48 hours, of which 61.5% were in a range of 65-69 dBA, 24% of 70-74 dBA, 9.8% of 75-79 dBA, and 4.8% > or = 80 dBA. Human-related sources, equaling 79%, were the dominant peak noises. These noises included opening and closing doors, banging the incubator hood, conversation among staff, nursing activity inside the incubator, tearing and opening paper or bags, opening and closing trash can lids, and bumping metal carts or other apparatus. Nonhuman-related sources were 21% including alarms of monitors and running of the incubator motor. Results of this study showed that the noise distribution in the incubator with nebulizer was far above a protective limitation of 58 dBA, suggested by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 1974. However, most peak noises could be reduced by modification of staff behavior. Therefore, determinations of noise distribution and sources of peak noise in this study are useful for further noise reduction programs.

  8. Hand hygiene practices in a neonatal intensive care unit in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Amgbo; Enweronu-Laryea, Christabel C; Newman, Mercy J

    2009-06-01

    Compliance with hand hygiene recommendations is the most important measure in preventing health care-associated infections. The objective of this study was to assess the nature of patient contact and the hand hygiene practices of nurses and physicians in the neonatal intensive care unit in a tertiary hospital in Ghana. Unobtrusive observation of patient contact, hand hygiene practices, and hand washing technique among nurses and physicians attending randomly selected newborns for five hours daily for two weeks. Patient contact categorized as low-risk or high-risk. Hand hygiene practice before and after patient contact categorized as clean uncontaminated, clean recontaminated, new gloves, unchanged gloves. Compliance to alcohol rub use assessed. The patient to nurse/physician ratio varied from 9:1 to 12:1. There were 97 patient contacts of which 49 were high-risk and 48 low-risk. Most (73%) patient contacts were from nurses. Compliance to hand hygiene recommendations before versus after patient contact was 15.4% versus 38.5% for physicians and 14.1% versus 9.9% for nurses. Gloves were used for 60.8% patient contacts (85.7% high-risk, 35.4% low-risk); however, compliance to recommended procedure occurred in only 12.2% of high-risk contacts and none of the low-risk contacts. Gloves were not changed between patients in 43.7% of high-risk contacts and 88.2% of low-risk contacts. Hand washing protocol was generally followed. Alcohol hand rub was always available but was not used for hand hygiene. Hand hygiene compliance of physicians and nurses was low. Gloves and alcohol rub were not used according to recommended guidelines. Incorporating effective education programs that improve adherence to hand hygiene guidelines into the continuing education curriculum of health professionals is recommended.

  9. Quality Improvement of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Chou, An-Kuo; Chen, Yu-Lien; Chou, Hung-Chieh; Tsao, Po-Nien; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun

    2017-06-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) therapy is widely used in neonates, but the clinical practice varies. However, nursing practice differs among individuals, and an inappropriate application method may delay the respiratory therapy, influence the beneficial effect of NCPAP, and increase complications. We introduced a quality improvement project to expedite the application of NCPAP therapy and decrease the incidence of nasal trauma. A new strategy of mobile NCPAP cart with prepacked fixation kits and a written protocol was implemented from April 2006. All medical staff answered a questionnaire to assess their basic knowledge before and after intensive training. The records of the patients who were treated with NCPAP from October 2005 to November 2006 were reviewed. Fifty-nine medical staff were involved in the project, and their mean score for the questionnaire improved from 69.2 points to 98.3 points after training. From October 2005 to November 2006, 113 infants were recruited in total and 82 of them were admitted after the protocol was implemented. The NCPAP cart dramatically shortened the preparation time (from 520 seconds to 72 seconds) and the application time (from 468 seconds to 200 seconds). The use of the nursing protocol significantly decreased the incidence of nasal trauma in the study population (45.2% vs. 19.6%, p = 0.006), but not in infants with a birth weight of < 1000 g. Risk factors for nasal skin trauma included lower gestational age and birth weight, longer duration of NCPAP use, and lack of standardized nursing care. The mobile NCPAP cart with prepacked fixation kits is a practical way of expediting the initiation of NCPAP therapy. The written nursing protocol decreased the incidence of nasal trauma in infants, except for those with an extremely low birth weight. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Parents' experiences of communication with neonatal intensive-care unit staff: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigert, Helena; Dellenmark Blom, Michaela; Bry, Kristina

    2014-12-10

    An infant's admission to a neonatal intensive-care unit (NICU) inevitably causes the parents emotional stress. Communication between parents and NICU staff is an essential part of the support offered to the parents and can reduce their emotional stress. The aim of this study was to describe parents' experiences of communication with NICU staff. A hermeneutic lifeworld interview study was performed with 18 families whose children were treated in the level III NICU at a university hospital in Sweden. The interviews were analysed to gain an interpretation of the phenomenon of how parents in the NICU experienced their communication with the staff, in order to find new ways to understand their experience. Parents' experience of communication with the staff during their infant's stay at the NICU can be described by the main theme 'being given attention or ignored in their emotional situation'. The main theme derives from three themes; (1) meeting a fellow human being, (2) being included or excluded as a parent and (3) bearing unwanted responsibility. This study shows that parents experienced communication with the NICU staff as essential to their management of their situation. Attentive communication gives the parents relief in their trying circumstances. In contrast, lack of communication contributes to feelings of loneliness, abandonment and unwanted responsibility, which adds to the burden of an already difficult situation. The level of communication in meetings with staff can have a decisive influence on parents' experiences of the NICU. The staff should thus be reminded of their unique position to help parents handle their emotional difficulties. The organization should facilitate opportunities for good communication between parents and staff through training, staffing and the physical health care environment.

  11. Next-generation sequencing for diagnosis of rare diseases in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Hussein; Luco, Stephanie M; Li, Rui; Bareke, Eric; Beaulieu, Chandree; Jarinova, Olga; Carson, Nancy; Nikkel, Sarah M; Graham, Gail E; Richer, Julie; Armour, Christine; Bulman, Dennis E; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Geraghty, Michael; Lines, Matthew A; Lacaze-Masmonteil, Thierry; Majewski, Jacek; Boycott, Kym M; Dyment, David A

    2016-08-09

    Rare diseases often present in the first days and weeks of life and may require complex management in the setting of a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Exhaustive consultations and traditional genetic or metabolic investigations are costly and often fail to arrive at a final diagnosis when no recognizable syndrome is suspected. For this pilot project, we assessed the feasibility of next-generation sequencing as a tool to improve the diagnosis of rare diseases in newborns in the NICU. We retrospectively identified and prospectively recruited newborns and infants admitted to the NICU of the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario and the Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, who had been referred to the medical genetics or metabolics inpatient consult service and had features suggesting an underlying genetic or metabolic condition. DNA from the newborns and parents was enriched for a panel of clinically relevant genes and sequenced on a MiSeq sequencing platform (Illumina Inc.). The data were interpreted with a standard informatics pipeline and reported to care providers, who assessed the importance of genotype-phenotype correlations. Of 20 newborns studied, 8 received a diagnosis on the basis of next-generation sequencing (diagnostic rate 40%). The diagnoses were renal tubular dysgenesis, SCN1A-related encephalopathy syndrome, myotubular myopathy, FTO deficiency syndrome, cranioectodermal dysplasia, congenital myasthenic syndrome, autosomal dominant intellectual disability syndrome type 7 and Denys-Drash syndrome. This pilot study highlighted the potential of next-generation sequencing to deliver molecular diagnoses rapidly with a high success rate. With broader use, this approach has the potential to alter health care delivery in the NICU. © 2016 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  12. [Incidence of unplanned extubations in a neonatal intensive care unit. A before and after study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utrera Torres, M I; Moral Pumarega, M T; García Lara, N R; Melgar Bonís, A; Frías García, M E; Pallás Alonso, C R

    2014-05-01

    Unplanned extubations (UE) of mechanically ventilated newborns involves an undesirable increase in morbidity and mortality. A 2-stage study compared the frequency of UE in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit before and after the implementation of a program of preventive measures to decrease UE. A before and after prospective study included all mechanically ventilated newborns participating in the 2 stage study from May-December 2011 and June-December 2012. In stage 1, the rate of UE per 100 intubated patient days was calculated and the characteristics of unplanned extubated newborns, circumstances of UE occurrence and need for re-intubation were studied. Consequently, a program of preventive measures for UE was designed and implemented, with the same variables being analysed in stage 2. No differences were found in patient characteristics during the two stages. Stage 1, incidence of UE was 5/100 intubated patient days; Stage 2, 4.5 UE/100 intubated patient days (P=.657). In both stages, most UE occurred during patient handling with re-intubation incidence at 77.4% and 67.7%, respectively. The combined rate of both stages during summer months of July, August and September was 6.2 UE/100 intubation days, in contrast with the remaining months of both stages: UE incidence rate, 3.4 UE/100 intubation days (p=.043). The implementation of a preventive measures program did not significantly reduce the incidence of UE. The summer period showed the highest incidence of UE. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. [Respiratory syncytial virus outbreak in a tertiary hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Parejo, Carlos; Morillo García, Aurea; Lozano Domínguez, Carmen; Carreño Ochoa, Concepción; Aznar Martín, Javier; Conde Herrera, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Investigation and control of a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) outbreak that affected the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of a university hospital from October to December 2012. Cohort study of children admitted to the NICU. The infection attack rate was calculated. A descriptive analysis of the cases and a multivariate analysis was performed using the variables that were shown to be risk factors for RSV infection. Preventive measures taken were: contact isolation; hand hygiene training and observation; exclusivity of a health team of nurses and physicians for positive cases, restrictions on visitor numbers; surveillance RSV testing, and palivizumab prophylaxis. The outbreak had three epidemic waves and 20 positive cases out of a total of 48 children admitted. The overall attack rate was 42%. Half of positive cases were children, with a median age of 36 days (p25=22, p75=58). The independent risk factors for RSV infection were birth weight below 1000 grams (OR=23.5; P=.002) and to have another nosocomial infection the week before the diagnosis of RSV infection (OR=19.98; P=.016). It was an outbreak with a high number of cases, due to the delay in notification, prolonged RSV carrier status, and low adherence to hand hygiene practice, which favoured the cross-transmission of infection. The most effective preventive measures were direct observation of hand hygiene and supervision of isolation measures. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Distribution of congenital anomalies in a neonatal intensive care unit in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Arzu; Zenciroglu, Ayşegul; Hakan, Nilay; Karadag, Nilgun; Karagol, Belma Saygili; Aydin, Banu; Dilli, Dilek; Okumus, Nurullah; Beken, Serdar

    2014-07-01

    Congenital anomalies are one of the important reasons of mortality and morbidity in newborns. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence, distribution and the mortality of the congenital anomalies in a single neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) from Turkey. A retrospective analysis was performed between 2005 and 2012 in NICU using a computerized database. Variables including the type of anomaly, antenatal and postnatal history, gestational age, birth weight, consanguinity and other demographic, clinical and related laboratory variables were extracted from the computerized database using ICD-10 codes. Congenital anomalies were classified according to involved organ systems and also classified as single and multiple anomalies. A total of 1024 newborns with congenital anomaly (CA) (13.7%) were identified among the 7450 hospitalized newborns in NICU. The most affected system was the cardiovascular system (68.8%). Most of the anomalies (67.1%) were single anomalies. Of all, 59.4% had single major, 7.7% had single minor, 9% had single major plus single minor, 18.4% had multiple major and 2% had multiple minor anomalies. On the other hand, 96.3, 1.9, 0.1 and 1.7% of the newborns had malformation, deformation, disruption and dysplasia, respectively. Chromosomal analysis was only performed 24.8% of the newborns with CA and among them, 65.3% of these were in normal limits. The most frequently detected chromosomal abnormality was trisomy 21. Overall, mortality rate was 15.5% among the newborns with CA. In conclusion, the most common and mortal CA was cardio-vascular malformations in our hospital. The overall prevalence of cardio-vascular malformations among the newborn was higher than previously reported studies in Turkey. Further, studies with larger sample size are needed to determine CA in Turkey.

  15. Radiation Safety in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Too Little or Too Much Concern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chung Yu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available With rising numbers of extremely premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU who require multiple radiologic examinations for their complex medical conditions, concerns the risk of radiation exposure become a more prevalent issue. The biological effects from cumulative doses of both primary and secondary radiation can be particularly troubling for very premature babies due to their inherent sensitivity to both iatrogenic and environmental insults. Similarly, radiologic studies performed in the NICU pose potentially significant exposure risks to caretakers and to the families of patients often present in the NICU during these examinations. The purpose of this article is to critically review the available literature regarding current exposure rates in the NICU, address the validity of radiation exposure concerns, and suggest areas for improvement. With few exceptions, studies reveal that there were only low doses of radiation derived from any single radiographic examination in standard NICUs and that the radiation dosage used was in compliance with recommendations made by the Commission of European Communities (EC and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP. However, there were wide variations in the radiation dose per single examination (mean entrance skin doses ranged from 15 to 73.6 μGy and in the frequency (mean ranged from 3.2 to 31 examinations per infant of those examinations. Studies also reported low secondary exposure rates from scatter radiation to others present in the NICU during radiographic examinations. Key to limiting unnecessary radiation exposure in the NICU is the employment of proper radiation techniques and safety measures. Thus, adhering to recommendations made by the EC and ICRP can help to reduce the anxiety of patients' families and medical staff regarding their risks from the effects of ionizing radiation in the NICU.

  16. Time Series Analysis for Forecasting Hospital Census: Application to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capan, Muge; Hoover, Stephen; Jackson, Eric V; Paul, David; Locke, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of future patient census in hospital units is essential for patient safety, health outcomes, and resource planning. Forecasting census in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is particularly challenging due to limited ability to control the census and clinical trajectories. The fixed average census approach, using average census from previous year, is a forecasting alternative used in clinical practice, but has limitations due to census variations. Our objectives are to: (i) analyze the daily NICU census at a single health care facility and develop census forecasting models, (ii) explore models with and without patient data characteristics obtained at the time of admission, and (iii) evaluate accuracy of the models compared with the fixed average census approach. We used five years of retrospective daily NICU census data for model development (January 2008 - December 2012, N=1827 observations) and one year of data for validation (January - December 2013, N=365 observations). Best-fitting models of ARIMA and linear regression were applied to various 7-day prediction periods and compared using error statistics. The census showed a slightly increasing linear trend. Best fitting models included a non-seasonal model, ARIMA(1,0,0), seasonal ARIMA models, ARIMA(1,0,0)x(1,1,2)7 and ARIMA(2,1,4)x(1,1,2)14, as well as a seasonal linear regression model. Proposed forecasting models resulted on average in 36.49% improvement in forecasting accuracy compared with the fixed average census approach. Time series models provide higher prediction accuracy under different census conditions compared with the fixed average census approach. Presented methodology is easily applicable in clinical practice, can be generalized to other care settings, support short- and long-term census forecasting, and inform staff resource planning.

  17. Maintaining reduced noise levels in a resource-constrained neonatal intensive care unit by operant conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A; Denzil, S B; Linda, R; Josephine, P K; Nagapoornima, M; Suman Rao, P N; Swarna Rekha, A

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of operant conditioning in sustaining reduced noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Quasi-experimental study on quality of care. Level III NICU of a teaching hospital in south India. 26 staff employed in the NICU. (7 Doctors, 13 Nursing staff and 6 Nursing assistants). Operant conditioning of staff activity for 6 months. This method involves positive and negative reinforcement to condition the staff to modify noise generating activities. Comparing noise levels in decibel: A weighted [dB (A)] before conditioning with levels at 18 and 24 months after conditioning. Decibel: A weighted accounts for noise that is audible to human ears. Operant conditioning for 6 months sustains the reduced noise levels to within 62 dB in ventilator room 95% CI: 60.4 - 62.2 and isolation room (95% CI: 55.8 - 61.5). In the preterm room, noise can be maintained within 52 dB (95% CI: 50.8 - 52.6). This effect is statistically significant in all the rooms at 18 months (P = 0.001). At 24 months post conditioning there is a significant rebound of noise levels by 8.6, 6.7 and 9.9 dB in the ventilator, isolation and preterm room, respectively (P =0.001). Operant conditioning for 6 months was effective in sustaining reduced noise levels. At 18 months post conditioning, the noise levels were maintained within 62 dB (A), 60 dB (A) and 52 dB (A) in the ventilator, isolation and pre-term room, respectively. Conditioning needs to be repeated at 12 months in the ventilator room and at 18 months in the other rooms.

  18. The evaluation of cases with pneumothorax in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müsemma Karabel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Early diagnosis and treatment is essentialin reducing mortality in newborns with pneumothorax. Inthis study, newborns with a diagnosis of pneumothorax inneonatal intensive care unit of our hospital were evaluatedand aimed to increase the awareness of physicians.Methods: 12 cases with pneumothorax were evaluatedretrospectively. The gender, birth weight, gestational age,mode of delivery, the presence of underlying disease,pneumothorax localization, implementation of the surfactantand mechanical ventilation and existence or absenceof mortality were recorded.Results: During the study, pneumothorax was detected12 patients. Male/female ratio was 1.4. Eight of the patientshad born with cesarean delivery, the mean birthweight of cases was 2623±912 g and, 66.7% of caseswere term babies. Pneumothorax was observed in thefirst week of life in all patients and it occurred spontaneouslyin 4 patients. The frequency of bilateral pneumothoraxwas 41.7%. For the treatment, closed tube drainagewas performed in 9 patients. The overall mortality ratewas 66.7%. Half of the patients who died had congenitalanomalies such as diaphragmatic eventration (n=1,hydrocephalus (n=1, encephalocel (n=1, non-immunehydrops fetalis (n=1.Conclusion: Additional congenital anomalies, such asPDAs and persistent pulmonary hypertension were foundto be effective on mortality in neonates with pneumothorax.Although, it is a life-threatening condition, the emergencytreatment is life saving. Therefore, in patients withrisk factors, keeping pneumothorax in mind is also thefirst step of the treatment. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (3:289-292Key words: Newborn, respiratuar distress, pneumothorax,treatment, outcome

  19. Effects of the neonatal intensive care unit environment on preterm infant oral feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pickler RH

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rita H Pickler,1 Jacqueline M McGrath,2 Barbara A Reyna,3 Heather L Tubbs-Cooley,1 Al M Best4, Mary Lewis,3 Sharon Cone,3 Paul A Wetzel51Department of Patient Services, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 2School of Nursing, University of Connecticut and Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Hartford, CT, USA; 3VCU Medical Center, Children's Hospital of Richmond, Richmond, VA, USA; 4School of Dentistry, 5School of Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USAObjective: To examine the effect of neonatal intensive care unit environmental characteristics (perceived levels of light and sound, and time of day in open unit wards and single-family rooms (SFRs on oral feeding outcomes in preterm infants.Design: Data were collected at each scheduled oral feeding for 87 preterm infants from the first oral feeding until discharge. Data included the prescribed volume of feeding and the volume consumed, the infant's level of wakefulness before feeding, and the nurse's perception of light and sound.Results: Data were collected on 5111 feedings in the ward unit and 5802 in the SFR unit from feedings involving 87 preterm infants. Light and sound were rated significantly lower in the SFR (χ2 = 139 and 1654.8, respectively. Feeding times of 9 am, 12 noon, and 3 pm were associated with the highest perceived levels of light and sound, regardless of unit design (P < 0.0001. Moderate light levels and feeding times of 12, 3, and 6 am were associated with improved feeding outcomes. Infants consumed a greater proportion of their prescribed feeding volume when fed in the open ward and when awake before feeding.Conclusion: Further study on the clinical effects of unit design is needed, as is study on the effects of environmental stimuli, so that interventions can be appropriately developed and tailored for infants needing the most support for optimal development.Keywords: NICU design, clinical outcomes, environment

  20. Prevalence, causes and mental health impact of workplace bullying in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziioannidis, Ilias; Bascialla, Francesca Giuseppina; Chatzivalsama, Panagiota; Vouzas, Fotios; Mitsiakos, Georgios

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to examine the prevalence, to report barriers and mental health impact of bullying behaviours and to analyse whether psychological support at work could affect victims of bullying in the healthcare workplace. Design Self-administered questionnaire survey. Setting 20 in total neonatal intensive care units in 17 hospitals in Greece. Participants 398 healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses). Main outcome measures The questionnaire included information on demographic data, Negative Act Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) behaviour scale, data on sources of bullying, perpetrators profile, causal factors, actions taken and reasons for not reporting bullying, psychological support and 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) scores to investigate psychological distress. Results Prevalence of bullying measured by the NAQ-R was 53.1% for doctors and 53.6% for nurses. Victims of bullying differed from non-bullied in terms of gender and job experience, among demographic data. Crude NAQ-R score was found higher for female, young and inexperienced employees. Of those respondents who experienced bullying 44.9% self-labelled themselves as victims. Witnessing bullying of others was found 83.2%. Perpetrators were mainly females 45–64 years old, most likely being a supervisor/senior colleague. Common reasons for not reporting bullying was self-dealing and fear of consequences. Bullying was attributed to personality trait and management. Those who were bullied, self-labelled as a victim and witnessed bullying of others had higher GHQ-12 score. Moreover, psychological support at work had a favour effect on victims of bullying. Conclusions Prevalence of bullying and witnessing were found extremely high, while half of victims did not consider themselves as sufferers. The mental health impact on victims and witnesses was severe and support at work was necessary to ensure good mental health status among employees. PMID:29478015

  1. Iranian parent-staff communication and parental stress in the neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanpour, Marzieh; Alavi, Mousa; Azizi, Fatemeh; Als, Heidelise; Armanian, Amir Mohmmad

    2017-01-01

    The birth of an infant requiring hospitalization in the neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) uniformly is reported to be stressful for parents and family members. This study aimed to determine parent-staff communication in the NICU and its relationship to parent stress. Two hundred and three Iranian parents with preterm infants hospitalized in the NICU participated in this descriptive-correlational study. The participants were selected by the quota sampling method. Data collected included a three-part: questionnaire, the first part covered demographic parent and infant information, the second was the Parent-Staff Communication Scale (the score of which ranged from 0 to 180), and the third was the Parental Stress Scale (the score of which ranged from 0 to 102). Descriptive and inferential statistics including the Pearson's correlation coefficient test were applied to the data, using SPSS software Version 16. This study revealed that fathers and mothers' stress and communication scores were almost comparable and both higher than expected. The total mean score of the two main variables, i.e., parent-staff communication and parental stress were, respectively, 100.72 ± 18.89 and 75.26 ± 17.6. A significant inverse correlation was found between parental stress and parent-staff communication scores ( r = -0.144, P = 0.041). Based on this study finding showed that better parent-staff communication is related to lower parent stress scores, it is recommended that nurses and physicians receive specific skill training for the establishment of effective parent-staff communication. It is anticipated that such improved staff skills will help decrease parent stress and therewith likely promote parent and infant health in the NICU.

  2. Perceived Stress and Professional Quality of Life in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Amee A; Vankar, Jagdish R; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M; Phatak, Ajay G

    2015-11-01

    To study the levels of perceived stress in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses and its association with professional quality of life domains viz. compassion satisfaction, burnout and secondary trauma. In this multicenter, cross sectional study, data was collected by surveying 129 nurses from nine NICUs across six cities of Gujarat, India using demographic questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale (PSS14) and Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL5) during July to September 2013. Descriptive statistics, correlation coefficient and multiple regression were used for analysis. The mean (SD) age of participants was 28.37 (8.20) y. Most were single, satisfied with salary benefits and reported 'good' to 'excellent' relationships at work. The mean (SD) duration of duty hours was 8.12 (0.76) h and 43.6% were attending to more than 4 patients/shift. The mean (SD) perceived stress level was 22.19 (7.17) [Range: 3 to 39]. High compassion satisfaction, high burnout, and high secondary traumatic stress were reported by 25 (19.4%), 30 (23.3%) and 30 (23.3%) nurses respectively. PSS14 was negatively correlated with compassion satisfaction (r = -0.28) and positively correlated with burnout (r = 0.43) and secondary traumatic stress (r = 0.24). Most of the nurses (91, 70.5%) were identified as perceiving moderate to high stress. Professional quality of life domains correlated with perceived stress. There is further need to study domains influencing NICU nurses' professional QOL. Identifying stress and QOL issues in NICU nurses can help formulate relevant policies.

  3. Identification of surrogates and correlates of protection in protective immunity against Mycobacterium bovis infection induced in neonatal calves by vaccination with M. bovis BCG Pasteur and M. bovis BCG Danish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, J C; Thom, M L; McAulay, M; Mead, E; Vordermeier, H M; Clifford, D; Hewinson, R G; Villarreal-Ramos, B

    2011-03-01

    Vaccination of neonatal calves with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) induces a significant degree of protection against infection with virulent M. bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (bTB). We compared two strains of BCG, Pasteur and Danish, in order to confirm that the current European human vaccine strain (BCG Danish) induced protective immunity in calves, and we assessed immune responses to determine correlates of protection that could assist future vaccine evaluation in cattle. Both vaccine strains induced antigen (purified protein derivate [PPD])-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in whole-blood cultures. These responses were not significantly different for BCG Pasteur and BCG Danish and peaked at week 2 to 4 postvaccination. Vaccination with either BCG Danish or BCG Pasteur induced significant protection against bTB, with reductions in both lesion score and bacteriological burden evident in both groups of vaccinated calves compared with nonvaccinated control calves. Measurement of IFN-γ-expressing T lymphocytes postvaccination and postchallenge revealed both correlates and surrogates of protective efficacy. The frequency of central memory T lymphocytes present at 12 weeks postvaccination (at the time of M. bovis challenge) correlated significantly with protection. Conversely, the number of IFN-γ-expressing effector T cells present after M. bovis challenge was correlated with disease. These results demonstrate that vaccination of neonatal calves with either BCG Pasteur or BCG Danish induces protective immune responses against TB. In addition, we show that measurement of antigen-specific T lymphocyte populations may provide a reliable means for identifying protective vaccine candidates.

  4. Fluconazole Doses Used for Prophylaxis of Invasive Fungal Infection in Neonatal Intensive Care Units: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonart, Letícia Paula; Tonin, Fernanda Stumpf; Ferreira, Vinicius Lins; Tavares da Silva Penteado, Suelem; de Araújo Motta, Fábio; Pontarolo, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of different doses of fluconazole used for invasive prophylaxis of fungal infection in neonates. A systematic search was conducted with PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science. A manual search was performed as well. Only randomized controlled trials of neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) who received fluconazole prophylaxis for invasive fungal infection, regardless of the dose or therapeutic regimen, were included in this review. Data on baseline characteristics, outcomes incidence of proven invasive Candida infection, overall mortality, and invasive Candida infection-related mortality were extracted. Eleven studies were included in the review, with fluconazole doses of 3, 4, or 6?mg/kg. When the incidence of invasive Candida and invasive Candida-related mortality were considered as outcomes, the 3 and 6?mg/kg fluconazole doses were found to be statistically superior to placebo (OR, 5.48 [95% credible interval, 1.81-18.94] and 2.63 [1.18-7.02], respectively, and 15.32 [1.54-54.31] and 9.14 [1.26-142.7], respectively), but data for the 3 doses were not statistically significantly different. Use of the lowest fluconazole dose (3?mg/kg) should be recommended for Candida prophylaxis in neonates, given that increasing the fluconazole dose is not associated with higher efficacy and has greater potential for toxicity and increased cost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nursing clinical supervision project in a Neonatal Intensive Care and a Special Care Baby Unit: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Diana

    2015-04-17

    Clinical supervision is a process of guided reflective practice and is used in the areas of mental health and palliative care. However, within the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit setting, stressful situations may also arise, with no policies for nurses in regards to participation in clinical supervision. With critical incidents, complex family issues and loss of nursing expertise, clinical supervision could be a potential solution to this dilemma. The aims of the project were to investigate if any hospital policies supported clinical supervision. Specifically, the aims were: (i) to conduct an audit of nurses' knowledge on the topic of clinical supervision, (ii) to investigate if nurses were aware of, or had been involved in, any clinical supervision activities conducted in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit or a Special Care Baby Unit, and (iii) to investigate if records are maintained of any clinical supervision activities held. A three-phase approach was initiated for this project: a baseline audit, implementation of education sessions, and a follow-up audit using the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice programs. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Special Care Baby Unit have approximately 180 registered nurses working in the units where the project was conducted. The baseline audit included 37 nurses by convenience sampling and the follow-up audit included nine of these nurses. No policy on clinical supervision has been developed to support nurses in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Special Care Baby Unit. The baseline audit found that nurses described clinical supervision as educational and task orientated, and did not equate clinical supervision with a process that could be also described as "guided reflective practice". Following the education sessions, there was a better understanding of what clinical supervision entailed and the benefits that could lead to improved professional practice

  6. Fatores de risco para óbito em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal Risk factors for death in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    Luiz Fernando C. Nascimento

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO:Estimar fatores de risco para óbito durante internação em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal (UTIN por modelo logístico hierarquizado. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de estudo observacional, analítico e longitudinal com recém-nascidos internados na UTIN de um hospital universitário, no período de janeiro/2000 a dezembro/2003. A variável dependente foi óbito intra-hospitalar e as independentes foram variáveis antenatais, perinatais e pós-natais. Criou-se um modelo hierarquizado em três níveis. Realizada a análise bivariada, foram incluídas no modelo as que apresentavam pOBJECTIVE:To estimate the risk factors for mortality during hospitalization in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU using a hierarchical logistic model. METHODS:This longitudinal, observational and analytical study enrolled newborns admitted to the NICU from January/2001 to December/2003. The outcome analyzed was in-hospital death and the independent variables were prenatal, perinatal and postnatal factors. A hierarchical model with three levels was built. The variables with p<0.20 by bivariated analysis were included in the model and, after adjustment at the same level, variables with p<0.05 were maintained in the logistic model. Statistic analysis was performed by SPSS.10, software that estimated the accuracy of the model, adopting significance as p<0.05. RESULTS: Among 367 newborns included, 69 (18.8% died during hospital stay. The following risk factors comprised the hierarchical model of logistic regression and were significantly associated with death among the studied neonates: previous stillbirth, being first or second child, Apgar at five minutes below 7, preterm newborn and use of mechanical ventilation. This model had 86.9% of accuracy. CONCLUSIONS: The model obtained in this study has variables of the three hierarchical levels and might be used in Neonatal Intensive Care Units that share the same characteristic of the unit herein studied.

  7. Operating Room Within the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit—Experience of a Medical Center in Taiwan

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    Ya-Lei Wang

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: The OR within the NICU may reduce the risk of complications during transportation and provide continuity of care to critically ill neonates. It also decreases the disturbance to other NICU patients during operation.

  8. A prospective study on medication and total parenteral nutrition practices at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    Vijayakumar Arumugam

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: TPN and medication practices at the NICU should be highly monitored for avoiding medication errors, drug interactions, and mortality rate in neonates. The most effective method can be achieved when a clinical pharmacist become a part of it.

  9. Nosocomial bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit of a medical center: a three-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ya-Chun; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Wang, Jen-Hsien; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Lin, Hung-Chih; Su, Bai-Horng; Chiu, Hsiu-Hui

    2002-09-01

    Bloodstream infections are the most frequent nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units. This retrospective study surveyed the epidemiologic characteristics of nosocomial bloodstream infections which occurred in the neonatal intensive care unit from January 1, 1997 to December 31, 1999. The overall infection patient rate was 5.5% in the 3-year period, and the overall infection patient-day rate was 4.4 per 1000 patient-days. Low birth weight was a risk factor for bloodstream infections. The rate of infection for neonates with birth weight below 1000 g ranged from 36.6% to 45.8% (1997: 36.6%; 1998: 45.8% and 1999: 38.9%). The most common pathogens causing nosocomial bloodstream infection were: Staphylococcus aureus (18.5%) (with 92% oxacillin-resistant), Acinectobacter baumannii (16.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.9%), Escherichia coli (9.6%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.1%). The mortality due to nosocomial bloodstream infection was highest among gram-negative bacteria, especially with P. aeruginosa (45.5%). Therefore, surveillance of nosocomial bloodstream infection and successful strategies to decrease nosocomial bloodstream infection, such as infection control and optimal antibiotic use, are warranted.

  10. Serratia marcescens outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit: crucial role of implementing hand hygiene among external consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnani, Carlotta; Cocchi, Priscilla; Lega, Laura; Campana, Silvia; Biermann, Klaus Peter; Braggion, Cesare; Pecile, Patrizia; Chiappini, Elena; de Martino, Maurizio; Galli, Luisa

    2015-01-13

    Serratia marcescens represents an important pathogen involved in hospital acquired infections. Outbreaks are frequently reported and are difficult to eradicate. The aim of this study is to describe an outbreak of Serratia marcescens occurred from May to November 2012 in a neonatal intensive care unit, to discuss the control measures adopted, addressing the role of molecular biology in routine investigations during the outbreak. After an outbreak of Serratia marcescens involving 14 neonates, all admitted patients were screened for rectal and ocular carriage every two weeks. Extensive environmental sampling procedure and hand sampling of the staff were performed. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and molecular analysis of isolates were carried out. Effective hand hygiene measures involving all the external consultants has been implemented. Colonized and infected babies were cohorted. Dedicated staff was established to care for the colonized or infected babies. During the surveillance, 65 newborns were sampled obtaining 297 ocular and rectal swabs in five times. Thirty-four Serratia marcescens isolates were collected: 11 out of 34 strains were isolated from eyes, being the remaining 23 isolated from rectal swabs. Two patients presented symptomatic conjunctivitis. Environmental and hand sampling resulted negative. During the fifth sampling procedure no colonized or infected patients have been identified. Two different clones have been identified. Ocular and rectal colonization played an important role in spread of infections. Implementation of infection control measures, involving also external specialists, allowed to control a serious Serratia marcescens outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit.

  11. Is there an alternative to continuous opioid infusion for neonatal pain control? A preliminary report of parent/nurse-controlled analgesia in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Michelle L; Hainsworth, Keri; Simpson, Pippa M; Arca, Marjorie J; Uhing, Michael R; Varadarajan, Jaya; Weisman, Steven J

    2014-04-01

    Continuous opioid infusion (COI) remains the mainstay of analgesic therapy in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Parent/nurse-controlled analgesia (PNCA) has been accepted as safe and effective for pediatric patients, but few reports include use in neonates. This study sought to compare outcomes of PNCA and COI in postsurgical neonates and young infants. Twenty infants treated with morphine PNCA were retrospectively compared with 13 infants treated with fentanyl COI in a Midwestern pediatric hospital in the United States. Outcome measures included opioid consumption, pain scores, frequency of adverse events, and subsequent methadone use. The PNCA group (median 6.4 μg · kg(-1) · h(-1) morphine equivalents, range 0.0-31.4) received significantly less opioid (P < 0.001) than the COI group (median 40.0 μg · kg(-1) · h(-1) morphine equivalents; range 20.0-153.3), across postoperative days 0-3. Average daily pain scores (based on 0-10 scale) were low for both groups, but median scores differed nonetheless (0.8 PNCA vs 0.3 COI, P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the frequency of adverse events or methadone use. Results suggest PNCA may be a feasible and effective alternative to COI for pain management in postsurgical infants in the NICU. Results also suggest PNCA may provide more individualized care for this vulnerable population and in doing so, may potentially reduce opioid consumption; however, more studies are needed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Development of pediatric and neonatal intensive care units: results of a national survey (2000 - 2009)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    To understand the current situation and development of intensive care units for neonates and children (ICUs) in China. A form of survey was e-mailed to chief of each ICU who is one of the thirty five board members of Subspecialty group of Emergency Medicine Chinese Society of Pediatrics or Chinese Society of Emergency Medicine Pediatric Branch. The data from Jan. 1 to Nov. 30, 2009 were collected and compared with the first survey which was conducted during the year 2000(Group B). Thirty three of 35 (94.3%) hospitals responded. Among them, 25 were children's hospitals (Group A1), 8 were pediatric department of general hospitals (Group B). The total number of ICU beds accounted for 6.9% and 5.8% of total numbers of hospital beds in Group A1 and B respectively, increased 1.1 percent. The doctor to bed ratio in Group A1 and B were 0.5:1 and 0.75:1, nurse to bed ratio in Group A1 and B was 1.17:1 and 1.38:1. The monitor to bed ratio in Group A1 were 1.44:1, Group B were 0.74:1 and the ventilator to bed ratio in Group A1 were 0.64:1, Group B were 0.46:1. The percentage of blood gas analyzers, portable X-ray, bedside ultrasound which ICUs owned in Group A1 and B were 100% (25/25) vs. 60% (16/27), 96% (24/25) vs. 70% (19/27) and 88% (22/25) vs. 30% (8/27) separately. The percentage of surfactant therapy use, blood purification therapy, high frequency ventilation and ECMO in Group A1 and B were 96% (24/25) vs. 48% (13/27), 80% (20/25) vs. 22% (6/27), 84% (21/25) vs. 37% (10/27) and 20% (5/25) vs. 0%. The survival rate of ventilated patients in group A1 and B were 77.5% (6393/8245) vs. 63.4% (809/1276) separately, Group B was lower than Group A1 (P 1.5 - 2.5 kg were 93.7% (6836/7296) vs.84.1% (1890/2247), Group B were lower than group A1(P 90) patients in group A1 and A2 were 3616 (28.6%) and 639 (45.9%) respectively, Group A1 was lower than A2 (P = 0.000). The mean bed occupation rate of PICU in Group A1 and A2 were 127.1% (103.3% - 186.0%) vs. 90.91% (71.0% - 126

  13. Study of Characteristics, risk factors and outcome for Ventilator Associated Pneumonia in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit patient

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    Mehdi Moradi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP, developing in mechanically ventilated patients after 48 hours of mechanical ventilation, is the second most common nosocomial infection. Therefore, there is a vital need to study the etiology and risk factors associated with VAP in neonates.Methods: Neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, over a period of one year and who required mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours were enrolled consecutively into the study. Semi-quantitative assay of endotracheal aspirate was used for microbiological diagnoses of VAP. 105CFU/ml was taken as the cut off between evidence of pathological infection and colonization. The primary outcome measure was the development of VAP. Secondary outcome measures were length of mechanical ventilation, NICU length of stay, hospital cost, and death.Results: Thirty eight patients were enrolled (58% were boys and 42% were girls. 42% of neonates developed VAP. The most common VAP organisms identified were Acinetobacter baumanni (43%. On multiple regression analysis, duration of mechanical ventilation was associated with VAP (P=0.00. Patients with VAP had greater need for mechanical ventilation (18.7 vs 6 median days, longer NICU length of stay (39 vs 21.5 median days and higher total median hospital costs (79.5 vs 52 million rials than those without VAP. The mortality rate was not different between two groups.Conclusion: In mechanically ventilated neonates, those with VAP had a prolonged need for mechanical ventilation, a longer NICU stay, and a higher hospital costs. Longer mechanical ventilation was associated with an increased risk of developing VAP in these patients. Developing of VAP didn’t increase mortality in patients.

  14. [Risk factors related with ventilator-associated pneumonia in a neonatal intensive care therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Gamboa, Juan Pablo; Sandoval-Pérez, Bertha Alicia; Rodríguez-López, Ana Bertha; Torres-González, Marco Antonio; Barrera-de León, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) represents the second cause of nosocomial infections and it is associated with greater morbility, duration of mechanical ventilation (MV), and hospital stay. The objective was to determine factors related with VAP in neonates. Analytical transversal study including newborns admitted already intubated with at least 48 hours of MV or who were intubated in Neonatal Therapy. VAP was defined according to the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "those patients submitted to MV during at least 48 hours". We used inferential statistics for statistical analysis (chi squared, Mann-Whitney U test, and Kaplan-Meier estimator). 82 neonates were studied, out of which 27 developed VAP (33%). The median time to develop pneumonia was 6 days (range 5-11). The most commonly isolated germ was Escherichia coli (27%). Statistically significant variables were gestational age (p = 0.05), and the use of antacids at admission (p = 0.007). Patients with pneumonia had longer hospital stay (p = 0.001) and time with MV (p = 0.002). Of all the patients, 22 neonates died (27%), of which nine patients had VAP. Risk factors for VAP in neonates include lower gestational age, the use of antacids, and prolonged MV.

  15. Maternal and neonatal separation and mortality associated with concurrent admissions to intensive care units.

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    Ray, Joel G; Urquia, Marcelo L; Berger, Howard; Vermeulen, Marian J

    2012-12-11

    Concurrent admission of a mother and her newborn to separate intensive care units (herein referred to as co-ICU admission), possibly in different centres, can magnify family discord and stress. We examined the prevalence and predictors of mother-infant separation and mortality associated with co-ICU admissions. We completed a population-based study of all 1 023 978 singleton live births in Ontario between Apr. 1, 2002, and Mar. 31, 2010. We included data for maternal-infant pairs that had co-ICU admission (n = 1216), maternal ICU admission only (n = 897), neonatal ICU (NICU) admission only (n = 123 236) or no ICU admission (n = 898 629). The primary outcome measure was mother-infant separation because of interfacility transfer. The prevalence of co-ICU admissions was 1.2 per 1000 live births and was higher than maternal ICU admissions (0.9 per 1000). Maternal-newborn separation due to interfacility transfer was 30.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 26.9-35.3) times more common in the co-ICU group than in the no-ICU group and exceeded the prevalence in the maternal ICU group and NICU group. Short-term infant mortality (ICU group (18.1 per 1000 live births; maternal age-adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 27.8, 95% CI 18.2-42.6) than in the NICU group (7.6 per 1000; age-adjusted HR 11.5, 95% CI 10.4-12.7), relative to 0.7 per 1000 in the no-ICU group. Short-term maternal mortality (ICU group (15.6 per 1000; age-adjusted HR 328.7, 95% CI 191.2-565.2) than in the maternal ICU group (6.7 per 1000; age-adjusted HR 140.0, 95% CI 59.5-329.2) or the NICU group (0.2 per 1000; age-adjusted HR 4.6, 95% CI 2.8-7.4). Mother-infant pairs in the co-ICU group had the highest prevalence of separation due to interfacility transfer and the highest mortality compared with those in the maternal ICU and NICU groups.

  16. SUPPORTING PRETERM INFANT ATTACHMENT AND SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT: STAFF PERCEPTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohig, Aoife; Reulbach, Udo; Figuerdo, Ricardo; McCarthy, Anthony; McNicholas, Fiona; Molloy, Eleanor Joan

    2016-01-01

    The infant-parent relationship has been shown to be of particular significance to preterm infant socioemotional development. Supporting parents and infants in this process of developing their relationships is an integral part of neonatal intensive care; however, there is limited knowledge of NICU staff perceptions about this aspect of care. To explore NICU staff perceptions about attachment and socioemotional development of preterm infants, experience of training in this area and the emotional impact of their work. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of staff perceptions of the emotional experiences of parents and the developing parent-infant relationship in an NICU was conducted in a Level III NICU, after pilot testing, revision, and ethical approval. Fifty-seven (68%) of NICU staff responded to the survey. Respondents identified parents' emotional experiences such as "anxiety," "shock," "loss of control," and "lack of feelings of competence as parents" as highly prevalent. Infant cues of "responding to parent's voice" and "quieting-alerting" were ranked most highly; "crying" and "physiological changes" were ranked lowest. Preterm infant medical risk, maternal emotional state, and mental health are perceived to impact most highly on the developing relationship, as compared with infant state or behavior and socioeconomic factors. Fifty-three (93%) respondents felt confident, and 50 (87.8%) felt competent discussing their emotional experiences with parents. Fifty-four (95%) responded that attending to these areas was an integral part of their role; however, staff had seldom received education in this area. Respondents also perceived that specific psychological support for parents was lacking both during and after the infant's discharge. While all staff surveyed perceived the nature of their work to be emotionally stressful, there were differences among NICU staff disciplines and with years of experience in the NICU in terms of their perceptions about education in

  17. Concentrations and Sources of Airborne Particles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licina, Dusan; Bhangar, Seema; Brooks, Brandon; Baker, Robyn; Firek, Brian; Tang, Xiaochen; Morowitz, Michael J.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have underdeveloped immune systems, making them susceptible to adverse health consequences from air pollutant exposure. Little is known about the sources of indoor airborne particles that contribute to the exposure of premature infants in the NICU environment. In this study, we monitored the spatial and temporal variations of airborne particulate matter concentrations along with other indoor environmental parameters and human occupancy. The experiments were conducted over one year in a private-style NICU. The NICU was served by a central heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system equipped with an economizer and a high-efficiency particle filtration system. The following parameters were measured continuously during weekdays with 1-min resolution: particles larger than 0.3 μm resolved into 6 size groups, CO2 level, dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity, and presence or absence of occupants. Altogether, over sixteen periods of a few weeks each, measurements were conducted in rooms occupied with premature infants. In parallel, a second monitoring station was operated in a nearby hallway or at the local nurses’ station. The monitoring data suggest a strong link between indoor particle concentrations and human occupancy. Detected particle peaks from occupancy were clearly discernible among larger particles and imperceptible for submicron (0.3–1 μm) particles. The mean indoor particle mass concentrations averaged across the size range 0.3–10 μm during occupied periods was 1.9 μg/m3, approximately 2.5 times the concentration during unoccupied periods (0.8 μg/m3). Contributions of within-room emissions to total PM10 mass in the baby rooms averaged 37–81%. Near-room indoor emissions and outdoor sources contributed 18–59% and 1–5%, respectively. Airborne particle levels in the size range 1–10 μm showed strong dependence on human activities, indicating the importance of indoor

  18. Concentrations and Sources of Airborne Particles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

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    Dusan Licina

    Full Text Available Premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs have underdeveloped immune systems, making them susceptible to adverse health consequences from air pollutant exposure. Little is known about the sources of indoor airborne particles that contribute to the exposure of premature infants in the NICU environment. In this study, we monitored the spatial and temporal variations of airborne particulate matter concentrations along with other indoor environmental parameters and human occupancy. The experiments were conducted over one year in a private-style NICU. The NICU was served by a central heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC system equipped with an economizer and a high-efficiency particle filtration system. The following parameters were measured continuously during weekdays with 1-min resolution: particles larger than 0.3 μm resolved into 6 size groups, CO2 level, dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity, and presence or absence of occupants. Altogether, over sixteen periods of a few weeks each, measurements were conducted in rooms occupied with premature infants. In parallel, a second monitoring station was operated in a nearby hallway or at the local nurses' station. The monitoring data suggest a strong link between indoor particle concentrations and human occupancy. Detected particle peaks from occupancy were clearly discernible among larger particles and imperceptible for submicron (0.3-1 μm particles. The mean indoor particle mass concentrations averaged across the size range 0.3-10 μm during occupied periods was 1.9 μg/m3, approximately 2.5 times the concentration during unoccupied periods (0.8 μg/m3. Contributions of within-room emissions to total PM10 mass in the baby rooms averaged 37-81%. Near-room indoor emissions and outdoor sources contributed 18-59% and 1-5%, respectively. Airborne particle levels in the size range 1-10 μm showed strong dependence on human activities, indicating the importance of indoor

  19. Genomic Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

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    Taj Azarian

    Full Text Available Despite infection prevention efforts, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU patients remain at risk of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection. Modes of transmission for healthcare-associated (HA and community-associated (CA MRSA remain poorly understood and may vary by genotype, hindering the development of effective prevention and control strategies. From 2008-2010, all patients admitted to a level III NICU were screened for MRSA colonization, and all available isolates were spa-typed. Spa-type t008, the most prevalent CA- genotype in the United States, spa-type t045, a HA- related genotype, and a convenience sample of strains isolated from 2003-2011, underwent whole-genome sequencing and phylodynamic analysis. Patient risk factors were compared between colonized and noncolonized infants, and virulence and resistance genes compared between spa-type t008 and non-t008 strains. Epidemiological and genomic data were used to estimate MRSA importations and acquisitions through transmission reconstruction. MRSA colonization was identified in 9.1% (177/1940 of hospitalized infants and associated with low gestational age and birth weight. Among colonized infants, low gestational age was more common among those colonized with t008 strains. Our data suggest that approximately 70% of colonizations were the result of transmission events within the NICU, with the remainder likely to reflect importations of "outside" strains. While risk of transmission within the NICU was not affected by spa-type, patterns of acquisition and importation differed between t008 and t045 strains. Phylodynamic analysis showed the effective population size of spa-type t008 has been exponentially increasing in both community and hospital, with spa-type t008 strains possessed virulence genes not found among t045 strains; t045 strains, in contrast, appeared to be of more recent origin, with a possible hospital source. Our data highlight the importance of both intra

  20. Neonatal intensive care nursing curriculum challenges based on context, input, process, and product evaluation model: A qualitative study

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    Mansoureh Ashghali-Farahani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Weakness of curriculum development in nursing education results in lack of professional skills in graduates. This study was done on master's students in nursing to evaluate challenges of neonatal intensive care nursing curriculum based on context, input, process, and product (CIPP evaluation model. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with qualitative approach, which was completed according to the CIPP evaluation model. The study was conducted from May 2014 to April 2015. The research community included neonatal intensive care nursing master's students, the graduates, faculty members, neonatologists, nurses working in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, and mothers of infants who were hospitalized in such wards. Purposeful sampling was applied. Results: The data analysis showed that there were two main categories: “inappropriate infrastructure” and “unknown duties,” which influenced the context formation of NICU master's curriculum. The input was formed by five categories, including “biomedical approach,” “incomprehensive curriculum,” “lack of professional NICU nursing mentors,” “inappropriate admission process of NICU students,” and “lack of NICU skill labs.” Three categories were extracted in the process, including “more emphasize on theoretical education,” “the overlap of credits with each other and the inconsistency among the mentors,” and “ineffective assessment.” Finally, five categories were extracted in the product, including “preferring routine work instead of professional job,” “tendency to leave the job,” “clinical incompetency of graduates,” “the conflict between graduates and nursing staff expectations,” and “dissatisfaction of graduates.” Conclusions: Some changes are needed in NICU master's curriculum by considering the nursing experts' comments and evaluating the consequences of such program by them.

  1. Fathers' perceptions of the barriers and facilitators to their involvement with their newborn hospitalised in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, Nancy; Waitzer, Elana; Sherrard, Kathryn; Boisvert, Linda; Zelkowitz, Phyllis

    2013-02-01

    To explore what fathers perceive to be facilitators or barriers to their involvement with their infants. Fathers make unique and important contributions to the development of their infants. Fathers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit often feel that they have a limited role to play in their infant's care, and surveys suggest that they are not typically involved in infant caregiving. Paradoxically, qualitative studies have found that fathers do want to be involved, and their lack of involvement is an important source of stress. Qualitative descriptive. Eighteen fathers of infants, in the neonatal intensive care unit for at least one week, were interviewed and asked to describe what they perceived to be the barriers and facilitators to their involvement. Interviews were audio taped and transcribed, and the data was content analysed. Three major categories of barriers/facilitators were identified: (1) infant factors (size and health status, twin birth and infant feedback), (2) interpersonal factors (the rewards of and attitudes and beliefs regarding fatherhood; family management; previous experiences) and (3) neonatal intensive care unit environmental factors (physical and social). These factors could often be a barrier or facilitator to involvement depending on the context. This study provides insights into what factors influence involvement, and how nursing staff can support involvement and best meet fathers' needs. Nurses should explore the forms of involvement that a father desires, as well as the demands on their time, and determine what might be done to promote involvement. Fathers should be assisted to maximise the time that they do have with the infant. Nurses must provide clear and consistent information about whether and when caregiving is advisable, and they can explain and demonstrate how fathers can care for their infant. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. blaOXA-48 carrying clonal colistin resistant-carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in neonate intensive care unit, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Santosh Kumar; Gupta, Minakshi

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria resistant to colistin, a last resort antibiotic reflect the pre-antibiotic era. In this study, colistin resistance carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae (COL R - CRKP) strains from neonate's intensive care unit were evaluated. Molecular analysis showed that all the four colistin resistant K. pneumoniae isolates were clonally related with strong biofilm formation ability and harbored bla SHV-34 and bla OXA-48 genes. Our result suggested the need of proper surveillance and adequate infection control to limiting the spread of these organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Children’s intensive participation in sport and peer relations: Evidence from a Danish longitudinal school study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinto Romani, Annette

    2018-01-01

    In a Danish context, elite sports classes have been moved into the educational system. However, moving the selection of young sports talents into state schools conflicts with the spirit of the equality concept on which the Danish educational system is built. In the light of this debate......, it is relevant to address whether demanding training has a harmful or beneficial impact on pupils’ social life. Using a longitudinal dataset of 1,095 Danish pupils in the Municipality of Aalborg, this paper attempts to estimate the impact of sports participation on peer relations, considering different levels...... of sports dedication. Our results indicate that sports participation increases peer relations in sports, however less for pupils involved in ‘energy’ and especially ‘time’ demanding training. From a policy perspective, on the basis of our results, it can be argued that elite sports classes reduces pupils...

  4. Necrotising enterocolitis in preterm infants: epidemiology and antibiotic consumption in the Polish neonatology network neonatal intensive care units in 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga Wójkowska-Mach

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of necrotising enterocolitis (NEC, antibiotic consumption and the usefulness of microbiological tests in very low birth weight (VLBW Polish newborns.Prospective surveillance was performed in the year 2009 by local infection control teams. The study covered 910 infants hospitalized in six Polish neonatal intensive care units. Two kinds of indicators were used for the description of antibiotic usage: the duration of treatment (days of treatment, DOTs and the defined daily dose (DDD.NEC incidence was 8.7% and fatality rate was 19%. Chorioamnionitis, late gestational age and low birth weight were identified as risk factors for NEC. Catheterization, mechanical ventilation and other selected procedures were used considerably longer in newborns with NEC than in the remaining neonates. Total usage of antibiotics reached 2.9 DDDs or 1.437 days; the average use of drugs per case of NEC amounted to 0.47 DDD or 23.2 DOTs. The level of antibiotic usage was analysed with correlation to microbiological tests performed and it was non-significantly greater in the group of children with NEC in whom the tests were performed.A high risk of developing NEC is closely associated with VLBW and with inflammation of the amnion during labour. We observed no relationship between the consumption of antibiotics in neonates with NEC and positive results of microbiological testing indicating sepsis accompanying NEC or gut colonization with pathogens.

  5. Post-neonatal Tetanus in a PICU of a Developing Economy: Intensive Care Needs, Outcome and Predictors of Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angurana, Suresh Kumar; Jayashree, Muralidharan; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit; Nallasamy, Karthi

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) needs, outcome and predictors of mortality in post-neonatal tetanus. Review of 30 consecutive post-neonatal tetanus cases aged 1 months to 12 years admitted to a PICU in north India over a period of 10 years (January 2006 to December 2015). Chronic suppurative otitis media was the commonest portal of entry. All received tetanus toxoid, human tetanus immunoglobulin (HTIG) and appropriate antibiotics; 7 (23.3%) received intrathecal HTIG. Common complications were respiratory failure, rhabdomyolysis, autonomic dysfunction, acute kidney injury and healthcare-associated infections. PICU needs were as follows: ventilation; benzodiazepine, morphine and magnesium sulfate infusion; neuromuscular blockers, inotropes, tracheostomy and renal replacement therapy. Mortality rate was 40%; severity Grade IIIb, autonomic dysfunction, use of vasoactive drugs and those who did not receive intrathecal HTIG were significantly associated with mortality. Post-neonatal tetanus is associated with high mortality, and PICU needs include management of spasms, autonomic dysfunction and complications and cardiorespiratory support. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Clinical management of pain in the newborn: perception of nurses from the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Feital da Costa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: analisar a percepção dos enfermeiros acerca da clinica da dor no neonato na unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal Métodos: estudo descritivo, exploratório, de abordagem qualitativa, com dez enfermeiros da unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal do Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro aplicando um roteiro de entrevista semiestruturada para a coleta dos dados, e analisados conforme a analise de conteúdo na modalidade temática. Resultados: o entendimento do mecanismo da dor neonatal, qual não depende da formação completa da mielinização; a falta de verbalização do recém nascido e esse fato dificulta a avaliação da dor, contudo é preciso estar sensível a outros sinais fisiológicos e comportamentais como: a mimica facial, frequência cardíaca e respiratória, pressão arterial sistólica, a saturação de oxigênio, sudorese palmar e tônus vagal.  Conclusão: constitui uma pratica a ser repensada a utilização de protocolos e escalas para a avaliação dos indicadores de dor neonatal.

  7. Mercury, phthalates, and ionizing radiations in neonatal intensive care controls. Adverse effects and preventive measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarlenga, Mercedes; Somaruga, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Studies realized by important institutions in the world have demonstrated that the load of illnesses associated with environmental and occupational conditions are affected by the current generation, especially to the most vulnerable populations as are the newborn babies. In the present work, the effects of the mercury, the phthalates and the ionizing radiations on the neonates health are described [es

  8. Refractory septic shock in children : a European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morin, Luc; Ray, Samiran; Wilson, Clare; Remy, Solenn; Benissa, Mohamed Rida; Jansen, Nicolaas J. G.; Javouhey, Etienne; Peters, Mark J.; Kneyber, Martin; De Luca, Daniele; Nadel, Simon; Schlapbach, Luregn Jan; Maclaren, Graeme; Tissieres, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Although overall paediatric septic shock mortality is decreasing, refractory septic shock (RSS) is still associated with high mortality. A definition for RSS is urgently needed to facilitate earlier identification and treatment. We aim to establish a European society of paediatric and neonatal

  9. Frequency and Intensive Care Related Risk Factors of Pneumothorax in Ventilated Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Bhat Yellanthoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Relationships of mechanical ventilation to pneumothorax in neonates and care procedures in particular are rarely studied. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of selected ventilator variables and risk events to pneumothorax. Methods. Pneumothorax was defined as accumulation of air in pleural cavity as confirmed by chest radiograph. Relationship of ventilator mode, selected settings, and risk procedures prior to detection of pneumothorax was studied using matched controls. Results. Of 540 neonates receiving mechanical ventilation, 10 (1.85% were found to have pneumothorax. Respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, and pneumonia were the underlying lung pathology. Pneumothorax mostly (80% occurred within 48 hours of life. Among ventilated neonates, significantly higher percentage with pneumothorax received mandatory ventilation than controls (70% versus 20%; P20 cm H2O and overventilation were not significantly associated with pneumothorax. More cases than controls underwent care procedures in the preceding 3 hours of pneumothorax event. Mean airway pressure change (P=0.052 and endotracheal suctioning (P=0.05 were not significantly associated with pneumothorax. Reintubation (P=0.003, and bagging (P=0.015 were significantly associated with pneumothorax. Conclusion. Pneumothorax among ventilated neonates occurred at low frequency. Mandatory ventilation and selected care procedures in the preceding 3 hours had significant association.

  10. Materials on Nursing in the Clearinghouse: Bibliography #16, and Neonatal Intensive Care Units: Bibliography #17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Public Health Association, Springfield.

    The first of the two bibliographies in this document contains 38 entries on neonatal nursing, including books and journal articles (originally published from 1973 to 1986) dealing with such topics as high-risk pregnancy and delivery, home care of developmentally disabled newborns, and family dynamics. The second bibliography, titled "Neonatal…

  11. Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units: risk factors for progression to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akturk, Hacer; Sutcu, Murat; Somer, Ayper; Aydın, Derya; Cihan, Rukiye; Ozdemir, Aslı; Coban, Asuman; Ince, Zeynep; Citak, Agop; Salman, Nuran

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about factors associated with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections in pediatric patients, who are initally colonized with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. A retrospective case-control study was conducted involving pediatric and neonatal intensive care units throughout a five-year period (January 2010-December 2014). Clinical and microbiological data were extracted from Hospital Infection Control Committee reports and patients' medical records. Risk factors were assessed in carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonized patients who developed subsequent systemic infection (cases) and compared to carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonized patients who did not develop infection (controls). Throughout the study period, 2.6% of patients admitted to neonatal intensive care units and 3.6% of patients admitted to pediatric intensive care units had become colonized with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. After a mean of 10.6±1.9 days (median: 7 days, range: 2-38 days) following detection of colonization, 39.0% of the carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonized patients in pediatric intensive care units and 18.1% of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonized patients in neonatal intensive care units developed systemic carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infection. Types of systemic carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections included bacteremia (n=15, 62.5%), ventilator-associated pneumonia (n=4, 16.6%), ventriculitis (n=2, 8.3%), intraabdominal infections (n=2, 8.3%), and urinary tract infection (n=1, 4.1%). A logistic regression model including parameters found significant in univariate analysis of carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization and carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infection groups revealed underlying metabolic disease (OR: 10.1; 95% CI: 2.7-37.2), previous carbapenem use (OR: 10.1; 95% CI: 2.2-40.1), neutropenia (OR: 13.8; 95% CI: 3

  12. Intensity of delivery room resuscitation and neonatal outcomes in infants born at 33 to 36 weeks' gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S; Lyu, Y; Ye, X Y; Monterrosa, L; Shah, P S; Lee, S K

    2016-02-01

    Examine the relationship between delivery room resuscitation intensity and mortality, morbidities and resource use in late preterm infants. Retrospective cohort study of inborn infants born at 33 to 36 weeks' gestation and admitted to Canadian neonatal intensive care units during 2010 to 2013. The 13 619 infants were grouped according to delivery room resuscitation intensity: no or minimal resuscitation (64.5%); continuous positive airway pressure (10.2%); bag-mask ventilation (21.7%); endotracheal intubation (3.1%); and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (0.6%). Overall mortality, early mortality, respiratory distress, pneumothorax, late-onset sepsis and resource use increased with higher intensity resuscitation. Compared with no or minimal resuscitation, intubation and CPR were associated with increased odds of mortality (adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 50 (20 to 125) and 180 (63 to 518), respectively). Intubation or higher intensity delivery room resuscitation is associated with increased mortality, morbidities and resource use in late preterm infants. Extra intensive care is required for such infants, especially during the first week of life.

  13. Characteristics Associated With Preferences for Parent-Centered Decision Making in Neonatal Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Elliott Mark; Xie, Dawei; Cook, Noah; Coughlin, Katherine; Joffe, Steven

    2018-03-19

    Little is known about how characteristics of particular clinical decisions influence decision-making preferences by patients or their surrogates. A better understanding of the factors underlying preferences is essential to improve the quality of shared decision making. To identify the characteristics of particular decisions that are associated with parents' preferences for family- vs medical team-centered decision making across the spectrum of clinical decisions that arise in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This cross-sectional survey assessed parents' preferences for parent- vs medical team-centered decision making across 16 clinical decisions, along with parents' assessments of 7 characteristics of those decisions. Respondents included 136 parents of infants in 1 of 3 academically affiliated hospital NICUs in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from January 7 to July 8, 2016. Respondents represented a wide range of educational levels, employment status, and household income but were predominantly female (109 [80.1%]), white (68 [50.0%]) or African American (53 [39.0%]), and married (81 of 132 responding [61.4%]). Preferences for parent-centered decision making. For each decision characteristic (eg, urgency), multivariable analyses tested whether middle and high levels of that characteristic (compared with low levels) were associated with a preference for parent-centered decision making, resulting in 2 odds ratios (ORs) per decision characteristic. Among the 136 respondents (109 women [80.1%] and 27 men [19.9%]; median age, 30 years [range, 18-43 years]), preferences for parent-centered decision making were positively associated with decisions that involved big-picture goals (middle OR, 2.01 [99% CI, 0.83-4.86]; high OR, 3.38 [99% CI, 1.48-7.75]) and that had the potential to harm the infant (middle OR, 1.32 [99% CI, 0.84-2.08]; high OR, 2.62 [99% CI, 1.67-4.11]). In contrast, preferences for parent-centered decision making were inversely associated with the

  14. Infants born preterm, stress, and neurodevelopment in the neonatal intensive care unit: might music have an impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dane E; Patel, Aniruddh D

    2018-03-01

    The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) provides life-saving medical care for an increasing number of newborn infants each year. NICU care, while lifesaving, does have attendant consequences which can include repeated activation of the stress response and reduced maternal interaction, with possible negative long-term impacts on brain development. Here we present a neuroscientific framework for considering the impact of music on neurodevelopment in the NICU of infants born preterm and evaluate current literature on the use of music with this population to determine what is most reliably known of the physiological effects of music interventions. Using online academic databases we collected relevant, experimental studies aimed at determining effects of music listening in infants in the NICU. These articles were evaluated for methodological rigor, ranking the 10 most experimentally stringent as a representative sample. The selected literature seems to indicate that effects are present on the cardio-pulmonary system and behavior of neonates, although the relative effect size remains unclear. These findings indicate a need for more standardized longitudinal studies aimed at determining not only whether NICU music exposure has beneficial effects on the cardio-pulmonary system, but also on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, brain structures, and cognitive behavioral status of these children as well. Provides a neuroscience framework for considering how music might attenuate stress in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants. Considers how repeated stress may cause negative neurodevelopmental impacts in infants born preterm. Posits epigenetics can serve as a mechanistic pathway for music moderating the stress response. © 2018 Mac Keith Press.

  15. An outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection in a neonatal intensive care unit: investigation and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Eric J; Chopra, Teena; Abdel-Haq, Nahed; Preney, Katherine; Koo, Winston; Asmar, Basim I; Kaye, Keith S

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the mode of transmission of and assess control measures for an outbreak of carbapenem-resistant (multidrug-resistant) Acinetobacter baumannii infection involving 6 premature infants. An outbreak investigation based on medical record review was performed for each neonate during the outbreak (from November 2008 through January 2009) in conjunction with an infection control investigation. A 36-bed, level 3 neonatal intensive care unit in a university-affiliated teaching hospital in Detroit, Michigan. Specimens were obtained for surveillance cultures from all infants in the unit. In addition, geographic cohorting of affected infants and their nursing staff, contact isolation, re-emphasis of adherence to infection control practices, environmental cleaning, and use of educational modules were implemented to control the outbreak. Six infants (age, 10-197 days) with multidrug-resistant A. baumannii infection were identified. All 6 infants were premature (gestational age, 23-30 weeks) and had extremely low birth weights (birth weight, 1000 g or less). Conditions included conjunctivitis (2 infants), pneumonia (4 infants), and bacteremia (1 infant). One infant died of causes not attributed to infection with the organism; the remaining 5 infants were discharged home. All surveillance cultures of unaffected infants yielded negative results. The spread of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii infection was suspected to be due to staff members who spread the pathogen through close contact with infants. Clinical staff recognition of the importance of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii recovery from neonatal intensive care unit patients, geographic cohorting of infected patients, enhanced infection control practices, and staff education resulted in control of the spread of the organism.

  16. Triagem auditiva em recém-nascidos internados em UTI neonatal Hearing screening in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele M. L. Lima

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prevalência de alterações auditivas em recém-nascidos internados na unidade de terapia intensiva e cuidados intermediários do serviço de neonatologia do Centro de Assistência Integral à Saúde da Mulher, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, e analisar os fatores de risco associados. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 979 recém-nascidos no período de janeiro de 2000 a janeiro de 2003, utilizando-se a audiometria automática de tronco encefálico (AABR, com aparelho ALGO-2e color - Natus. O resultado foi considerado normal quando o recém-nascido apresentou resposta para 35 dBNA bilateralmente. Foi analisada a prevalência de AABR alterada e odds ratio com intervalo de confiança de 95% em análise bivariada. Para identificar os fatores de risco independentes para AABR alterada, foi feita análise múltipla com modelo de regressão logística. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de alteração no AABR foi de 10,2%, sendo 5,3% unilateral e 4,9% bilateral. Pela análise multivariada, observamos que: antecedente familiar (OR = 5,192; p = 0,016, malformação craniofacial (OR = 5,530; p OBJECTIVE: Investigate the prevalence of hearing impairment in newborns hospitalized at the Intensive and Intermediate Care Unit at the Women's Comprehensive Health Center Neonatology Service (UNICAMP and associated risk factors. METHODS: 979 newborn babies were assessed between January 2000 and January 2003, through automated auditory brainstem response (AABR (ALGO 2e color screener. The result was considered normal when the newborn showed response to a 35dBNA signal bilaterally. The prevalence of AABR impairment and the odds ratio were analyzed with a 95% confidence interval using bivariate analysis. To identify the independent risk factors for hearing alterations, multivariate analyses were used with logistic regression. RESULTS: The prevalence of AABR impairment was 10.2%, of which 5.3% was unilateral and 4.9% bilateral

  17. HOSPITAL INFECTIONS IN THE SETTING OF NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE: A CONTRIBUTION TO NURSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Bertolossi Marta de Araújo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: refletir sobre a infecção hospitalar nas utins a partir da análise da produção científica da enfermagem nacional e internacional acerca desta temática. Método: abordagem qualitativa a partir da revisão bibliográfica em base de dados. Resultados: Os dados analisados foram publicações dos últimos dez anos, em revistas indexadas nas bases de dados: Medline, Lilacs, Bdenf e Scielo. Após a busca com os descritores: “infecção hospitalar”; “neonatal”. em inglês: “infection”, “hospitalar” e “neonatologic foram encontradas 134 publicações das quais 28 se enquadravam no objetivo da pesquisa. Para análise das produções foi adotada a análise de conteúdo na modalidade temática, originando 3 categorias: a Fatores de risco para disseminação da infecção hospitalar; b Infecções comuns no cenário neonatal; c Assistência de enfermagem na prevenção da infecção hospitalar neonatal. Conclusão: Trata-se de uma temática fundamental na Assistência de enfermagem ao neonato nas Unidades de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal, contudo pouco explorada por enfermeiros. Descritores: Infecção hospitalar; Neonatal; Cuidado de enfermagem.

  18. Achondroplasia in the Premature Infant: An Elusive Diagnosis in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagen, Kimberly E; Blask, Anna R; Rubio, Eva I; Bulas, Dorothy I

    2017-01-01

    Achondroplasia is a difficult prenatal diagnosis to make before the late second and third trimester. We describe two cases where an infant was born prematurely with no overt signs of achondroplasia. Despite multiple chest and abdominal radiographs during the neonatal course, the diagnosis was not made until term equivalent age was reached. We retrospectively reviewed these two cases to highlight the elusive findings of achondroplasia in the premature infant.

  19. Achondroplasia in the Premature Infant: An Elusive Diagnosis in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Fagen, Kimberly E.; Blask, Anna R.; Rubio, Eva I.; Bulas, Dorothy I.

    2017-01-01

    Achondroplasia is a difficult prenatal diagnosis to make before the late second and third trimester. We describe two cases where an infant was born prematurely with no overt signs of achondroplasia. Despite multiple chest and abdominal radiographs during the neonatal course, the diagnosis was not made until term equivalent age was reached. We retrospectively reviewed these two cases to highlight the elusive findings of achondroplasia in the premature infant.

  20. Retinopathy of prematurity: results from 10 years in a single neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Coutinho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP is a vasoproliferative disorder of the retina of preterm newborns and is an important and preventable cause of visual impairment in childhood. This study aimed to assess the incidence and main risk factors associated with the development of ROP in the last 10 years at Hospital Prof. Doutor Fernando Fonseca in Lisbon, Portugal.Methods: Observational and retrospective study conducted between 2005 and 2014 at Hospital Prof. Doctor Fernando Fonseca. The study included newborns of gestational age < 32 weeks. We analyzed maternal, prenatal and neonatal factors associated with the development of ROP. Statistical analysis were performed with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS® software. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed and a multiple logistic regression model was carried out with a significance level α = 0.05.Results: 527 premature infants with a gestational age < 32 weeks were studied, of which 165 developed ROP. 60 of these patients needed treatment. In the univariate analysis, the risk factors for the development of ROP were maternal infection in pregnancy, low birth weight, low gestational age, low Apgar score at 5 minutes, need for oxygen therapy until the 28th day of life, a high score on the CRIB and SNAPPE2 scales, use of surfactant, respiratory distress syndrome, persistence of patent ductus arteriosus, peri-intraventricular hemorrhage and neonatal sepsis. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, risk factors for ROP were the presence of neonatal sepsis, respiratory distress syndrome, persistence of patent ductus arteriosus and a high score on the neonatal SNAPPE2 scale.Conclusions: We found a ROP incidence rate of 31.3%, with risk factors similar to those observed in other studies.

  1. Outbreak of Piv-3 in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Gemma Louise; Tapson, Helen; Davis, Jonathan; Gobin, Maya

    2017-03-01

    An outbreak of PIV-3 in a neonatal ICU was investigated using a retrospective cohort study. Risk of infection increased with lower birth weight and gestational age. Contact with sick visitor(s)/staff was not associated with infection (P = 0.212, P = 0.299). Transmission routes are difficult to identify, and the importance of visiting restrictions and sickness absence during outbreaks is recommended.

  2. Ruído no interior das incubadoras em unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal Ruido en el interior de las incubadoras en unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Neonatal Internal noise levels in neonatal intensive care unit incubators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Vendramini Peixoto

    2011-01-01

    equipos y conversaciones entre profesionales próximos a la incubadora. CONCLUSIONES: Los resultados evidenciaron que los NPS en el interior de las incubadoras están distantes de lo recomendado por los órganos reglamentadores. Con base en esos resultados, fueron desarrollados un protocolo y un programa educativo.OBJECTIVES: To identify levels of sound pressure level (NPS inside the incubator and the sources of noise in that microenvironment of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital. METHODS: Descriptive quantitative study, conducted in incubators for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital in São Paulo. The records were obtained by NPS dosimeter, totaling 261 hours, 48 hours of records of the sources producing noise. RESULTS: There were high NPS inside the incubators. Greater Leq levels were 79.7 dBA in room A, and 74.3 dBA in room B. The main sources of noise were: water circulation fan, maintaining open doors on the incubators during periods of care, equipment alarms, and conversation among professionals close to the incubator. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the NPS inside the incubator are far above those recommended by regulations. Based on these results, we developed a protocol and educational program.

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission and infections in a neonatal intensive care unit despite active surveillance cultures and decolonization: challenges for infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Victor O; Budd, Alicia; Wittig, Sara M; Ross, Tracy; Aucott, Susan W; Perl, Trish M; Carroll, Karen C; Milstone, Aaron M

    2014-04-01

    To characterize the epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and infections in a level IIIC neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and identify barriers to MRSA control. Retrospective cohort study in a university-affiliated NICU with an MRSA control program including weekly nares cultures of all neonates and admission nares cultures for neonates transferred from other hospitals or admitted from home. Medical records were reviewed to identify neonates with NICU-acquired MRSA colonization or infection between April 2007 and December 2011. Compliance with hand hygiene and an MRSA decolonization protocol were monitored. Relatedness of MRSA strains were assessed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Of 3,536 neonates, 74 (2.0%) had a culture grow MRSA, including 62 neonates with NICU-acquired MRSA. Nineteen of 74 neonates (26%) had an MRSA infection, including 8 who became infected before they were identified as MRSA colonized, and 11 of 66 colonized neonates (17%) developed a subsequent infection. Of the 37 neonates that underwent decolonization, 6 (16%) developed a subsequent infection, and 7 of 14 (50%) that remained in the NICU for 21 days or more became recolonized with MRSA. Using PFGE, there were 14 different strain types identified, with USA300 being the most common (31%). Current strategies to prevent infections-including active identification and decolonization of MRSA-colonized neonates-are inadequate because infants develop infections before being identified as colonized or after attempted decolonization. Future prevention efforts would benefit from improving detection of MRSA colonization, optimizing decolonization regimens, and identifying and interrupting reservoirs of transmission.

  4. Arrhythmias and Cardiac Bedside Monitoring in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Sherri L

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac physiology is unique in neonates and infants; there are several physiologic changes that occur in the first weeks of life. Important changes can be captured on the bedside monitor and provide vital data in a noninvasive way to providers. The importance of diligent observation cannot be overstated. Bedside monitoring has improved in the last decade, which has enhanced the ability to detect changes in heart rates and rhythms. The purpose here is to review cardiac physiology, describe those arrhythmias able to be observed on bedside monitors, and highlight heart rate changes that can be early signs of sepsis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Expansion of the baby-friendly hospital initiative ten steps to successful breastfeeding into neonatal intensive care: expert group recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyqvist, Kerstin H; Häggkvist, Anna-Pia; Hansen, Mette N; Kylberg, Elisabeth; Frandsen, Annemi L; Maastrup, Ragnhild; Ezeonodo, Aino; Hannula, Leena; Haiek, Laura N

    2013-08-01

    In the World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund document Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative: Revised, Updated and Expanded for Integrated Care, neonatal care is mentioned as 1 area that would benefit from expansion of the original Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. The different situations faced by preterm and sick infants and their mothers, compared to healthy infants and their mothers, necessitate a specific breastfeeding policy for neonatal intensive care and require that health care professionals have knowledge and skills in lactation and breastfeeding support, including provision of antenatal information, that are specific to neonatal care. Facilitation of early, continuous, and prolonged skin-to-skin contact (kangaroo mother care), early initiation of breastfeeding, and mothers' access to breastfeeding support during the infants' whole hospital stay are important. Mother's own milk or donor milk (when available) is the optimal nutrition. Efforts should be made to minimize parent-infant separation and facilitate parents' unrestricted presence with their infants. The initiation and continuation of breastfeeding should be guided only by infant competence and stability, using a semi-demand feeding regimen during the transition to exclusive breastfeeding. Pacifiers are appropriate during tube-feeding, for pain relief, and for calming infants. Nipple shields can be used for facilitating establishment of breastfeeding, but only after qualified support and attempts at the breast. Alternatives to bottles should be used until breastfeeding is well established. The discharge program should include adequate preparation of parents, information about access to lactation and breastfeeding support, both professional and peer support, and a plan for continued follow-up.

  6. Screening for hypoglycemia at the bedside in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU with the Abbott PCx glucose meter

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    Ismaila Afisi

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Point of care (POC glucose meters are routinely used as a screening tool for hypoglycemia in a neonatal setting. Glucose meters however, lack the same accuracy as laboratory instruments for glucose measurement. In this study we investigated potential reasons for this inaccuracy and established a cut off value for confirmatory testing. Methods In this prospective study, all patients in the neonatal intensive care unit who had a plasma glucose test ordered were eligible to participate. Demographic information, sample collection information (nine variables and a recent hematocrit value were recorded for each sample. Glucose measurements were taken at the bedside on the glucose meter (RN PCx as well as in the laboratory on both the glucose meter (LAB PCx and the laboratory analyzer (PG. Data were analyzed by simple and mixed-effects regression analysis and by analysis of a receiver operator characteristics (ROC curve. Results There were 475 samples analyzed from 132 patients. RN PCx values were higher than PG values (mean = 4.9%, while LAB PCx results were lower (mean = -5.2% than PG values. Only 31% of the difference between RN PCx – PG and 46% of the difference for LAB PCx – PG could be accounted for by the variables tested. The largest proportion of variance between PCx and PG measurements was explained by hematocrit (about 30% with a greater effect seen at glucose concentrations ≤4.0 mmol/L (≤72 mg/dL(48% and 40% for RN PCx and LAB PCx, respectively. The ROC analysis showed that for detection of all cases of hypoglycemia (PG Conclusion The large difference between glucose results obtained by PCx glucose meter compared to the laboratory analyzer can be explained in part by hematocrit and low glucose concentration. These results emphasize that the glucose meter is useful only as a screening device for neonatal hypoglycemia and that a screening cut off value must be established.

  7. Importance of physiotherapy/nursing multidisciplinary integration about update newborn position in the neonatal intensive care unit

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    Vanessa da Silva Neves Moreira Arakaki

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction The high-risk newborns may require long periods of hospitalization until they reach clinical stability for hospital discharge. Avoiding babies to be in only one body position may be an effective way to cause respiratory and neuro-psycho-motor benefits, comfort and preventing pressure ulcers.Objectives This study investigated the impact of physiotherapy/nursing integration in update on body positioning of the newborn in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.Methods A questionnaire was administered to nurses and nursing technicians of the neonatal unit of Maternity School of UFRJ and nurses of the Advanced Course in Neonatal Nursing from the same institution. Two classes were taught by the physical therapist of the sector and the questions answered before and after these lessons. It was also a brief characterization of professional participants of the study. We used the Student's t test to compare the correct answers before (PRE and after (POST the classes, considering p < 0.05.Results There was a significant increase in the degree of knowledge of nurses and nursing technicians when compared the responses before (nurses: 68.8%; technicians: 70.1% and after classes (nurses: 78.4 %; technicians: 88.9%. The nurses were less than five years of graduated (45% and little time of professional experience in neonatology (60%. Forty-seven percent of technicians had less than five years of training and 82% had less than 10 years of experience.Conclusion The use of training by the nursing staff was significant, showing the importance of multidisciplinary approach and the integration of knowledge in the search for a humanized and effective care.

  8. Efficacy of an infection control program in reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia in a Chinese neonatal intensive care unit.

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    Zhou, Qi; Lee, Shoo K; Jiang, Si-yuan; Chen, Chao; Kamaluddeen, Majeeda; Hu, Xiao-jing; Wang, Chuan-qing; Cao, Yun

    2013-11-01

    Measures employed in preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in developing countries are rarely reported. This study evaluates the efficacy of an infection control program in reducing VAP in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in China. All neonates who received mechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours and were hospitalized in the NICU for ≥5 days during 3 epochs were included. The hospital relocated to a new site during phase 2 and a bundle of comprehensive preventive measures against VAP were gradually implemented using the evidence-based practice for improving quality method. Research physicians recorded associated information of patients diagnosed with VAP. Of 491 patients receiving mechanical ventilation, 92 (18.7%) developed VAP corresponding to 27.33 per 1,000 ventilator-days. The rate decreased from 48.84 per 1,000 ventilator-days in phase 1 to 25.73 per 1,000 ventilator-days in phase 2 and further diminished to 18.50 per 1,000 ventilator-days in phase 3 (P neonates significantly decreased from 14.0% in phase 1 to 2.9% in phase 2 and 2.7% in phase 3 (P = .000). Gram-negative bacteria (95.5%) were the predominant organisms in VAP and Acinetobacter baumannii (65.2%) was the most frequently isolated microorganism. Implementing a multifaceted infection control program resulted in a significant reduction in VAP rate with long-term effects. Such interventions could be extended to other low-income countries. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Surveillance of ventilator-associated pneumonia in a neonatal intensive care unit: characteristics, risk factors, and outcome.

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    Afjeh, Seyyed Abolfazl; Sabzehei, Mohammad Kazem; Karimi, Abdollah; Shiva, Farideh; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2012-09-01

    This study determined the incidence, characteristics, risk factors, and outcomes of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in newborns hospitalized in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Tehran, Iran. A prospective cohort study was carried out in the NICU of Mahdieh Hospital over a period of one year, from December 2008 to November 2009, on all neonates mechanically ventilated for more than 48 hours. VAP was diagnosed in accordance with the CDC definition of nosocomial pneumonias for patients younger than 12 months. Risk factors relevant to the development of VAP were studied. Multiple logistic and Cox regression analysis were performed to determine independent predictors for VAP and survival rate, respectively. There were 81 neonates enrolled. VAP occurred in 14 (17.3%), at a rate of 11.6/1000 days on the ventilator. Gram negative bacteria were the predominant etiologic agents. The most common bacterial isolates from the endotracheal aspirate were E. coli (21.4%), Klebsiella (21.4%), and Pseudomonas (14.1%). The only VAP predictor was sputum [odds ratio (OR) = 5.11, P = 0.02]. Mortality rate for VAP was 2/14 (14.3%). Duration of mechanical ventilation [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.96, P = 0.01], birth weight (HR = 0.81, P < 0.001), and purulent tracheal aspirate (HR = 0.25, P < 0.006) were independent predictors of overall survival. VAP occurs at a significant rate in mechanically ventilated newborns. Additional studies are needed to accurately determine the incidence and risk factors in order to develop effective preventive and therapeutic protocols.

  10. The contribution of maternal psychological functioning to infant length of stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    Cherry AS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Amanda S Cherry,1 Melissa R Mignogna,1 Angela Roddenberry Vaz,1 Carla Hetherington,2 Mary Anne McCaffree,2 Michael P Anderson,3 Stephen R Gillaspy1 1Section of General and Community Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, 2Neonatal Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma, College of Medicine, Oklahoma City, OK, 3Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, College of Public Health, Oklahoma City, OK, USA Objective: Assess maternal psychological functioning within the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU and its contribution to neonate length of stay (LOS in the NICU.Study design: Mothers of infants admitted to the NICU (n=111 were assessed regarding postpartum depression, postpartum social support, postpartum NICU stress, and maternal anxiety at 2 weeks postpartum. Illness severity was assessed with the Clinical Risk Index for Babies (CRIB.Results: Postpartum depression was not significantly correlated with LOS, but was significantly correlated with trait anxiety (r=0.620, which was significantly correlated with LOS (r=0.227. Among mothers with previous mental health history, substance abuse history and CRIB score were the best predictors of LOS. For mothers without a prior mental health issues, delivery type, stress associated with infant appearance, and CRIB scores were the best predictors of LOS. In this group, LOS was found to increase on average by 7.06 days per one unit increase in stress associated with infant appearance among mothers with the same delivery type and CRIB score.Conclusion: Significant correlations of trait anxiety, stress associated with infant appearance, and parental role with LOS support the tenet that postpartum psychological functioning can be associated with NICU LOS. Keywords: NICU, postpartum depression, postpartum anxiety, parental stress, CRIB

  11. Risks associated with suspected dysphagia in infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit in a South African public hospital

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    Jacoline Schoeman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. The prevalence of neonatal dysphagia is increasing, as medical advances contribute to the survival of critically ill and preterm infants. Additional factors such as low birth weight (LBW, gastro-oesoephageal reflux disorder, failure-to-thrive (FTT, and HIV may increase the complexity of dysphagia symptoms. Knowledge of context-specific risk factors for dysphagia may lead to an effective pathway of diagnosis and management in vulnerable neonates. Objective. To describe the feeding characteristics and categories of underlying medical conditions in infants of gestational age 24 - 42 weeks. Methods. The study was a retrospective review of 231 purposively selected medical and speech-language therapy records. Participants had a mean stay of 28.5 days in a neonatal intensive care unit in a peri-urban public hospital and were referred for a swallowing and feeding assessment. An existing seven-category framework for the classification of suspected dysphagia was used. Results. Most participants (90.0% presented with multiple medical conditions. Underlying neurological conditions (48.5% and feeding difficulties secondary to systemic illness (65.8% contributed mostly to suspected dysphagia in the sample. It was found that 71.0% of infants presented with feeding difficulties secondary to other conditions such as LBW and prematurity, highlighting the need for an expanded dysphagia classification framework. Conclusion. The results concur with the outcomes of previous studies and confirm the need for a unique classification framework in South Africa. Dysphagia is a complex condition and frequently cannot be attributed to a single risk factor.

  12. Sound reduction management in the neonatal intensive care unit for preterm or very low birth weight infants.

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    Almadhoob, Abdulraoof; Ohlsson, Arne

    2015-01-30

    Infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are subjected to stress, including sound of high intensity. The sound environment in the NICU is louder than most home or office environments and contains disturbing noises of short duration and at irregular intervals. There are competing auditory signals that frequently challenge preterm infants, staff and parents. The sound levels in NICUs often exceed the maximum acceptable level of 45 decibels (dB), recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Hearing impairment is diagnosed in 2% to 10% of preterm infants versus 0.1% of the general paediatric population. Noise may cause apnoea, hypoxaemia, alternation in oxygen saturation, and increased oxygen consumption secondary to elevated heart and respiratory rates and may, therefore, decrease the amount of calories available for growth. Elevated levels of speech are needed to overcome the noisy environment in the NICU, thereby increasing the negative impacts on staff, newborns, and their families. High noise levels are associated with an increased rate of errors and accidents, leading to decreased performance among staff. The aim of interventions included in this review is to reduce sound levels to 45 dB or less. This can be achieved by lowering the sound levels in an entire unit, treating the infant in a section of a NICU, in a 'private' room, or in incubators in which the sound levels are controlled, or reducing the sound levels that reaches the individual infant by using earmuffs or earplugs. By lowering the sound levels that reach the neonate, the resulting stress on the cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, and endocrine systems can be diminished, thereby promoting growth and reducing adverse neonatal outcomes. Primary objectiveTo determine the effects of sound reduction on growth and long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes of neonates. Secondary objectives1. To evaluate the effects of sound reduction on short-term medical outcomes (bronchopulmonary

  13. SOCIAL NETWORK AND SUPPORT FOR PARENTS OF PREMATURE INFANTS HOSPITALIZED IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT NEONATAL

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    Luciano Marques dos Santos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: conhecer a rede e o apoio social de pais de recém-nascidos prematuros hospitalizados na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal de um hospital público da Bahia e descrever como a rede e o apoio social atuam. Métodos: Trata-se de um estudo descritivo e qualitativo, aprovado por Comitê de Ética na Pesquisa e realizado com nove pais. Resultados: A Análise de Conteúdo demonstrou que os pais consideraram os profissionais de saúde atuantes na unidade neonatal e seu cuidado constante como uma rede e apoio social para o enfrentamento do processo de hospitalização. Por outro lado, estes pais consideraram a fé, a religião e/ou espiritualidade como elementos primordiais para a cura, conforto e segurança. Conclusão: É preciso entender a família como um sistema formado por subsistemas que interagem entre si e com uma rede de apoio maior, estabelecendo uma teia de relações sociais para enfrentar as demandas da doença e da hospitalização.

  14. Assessment and management of pain in newborns hospitalized in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a cross-sectional study

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    Natália Pinheiro Braga Sposito

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to determine the frequency of pain, to verify the measures adopted for pain relief during the first seven days of hospitalization in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and to identify the type and frequency of invasive procedures to which newborns are submitted. Method: cross-sectional retrospective study. Out of the 188 hospitalizations occurred during the 12-month period, 171 were included in the study. The data were collected from the charts and the presence of pain was analyzed based on the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale and on nursing notes suggestions of pain. For statistical analysis, the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences was used, and the significance level was set at 5%. Results: there was at least one record of pain in 50.3% of the hospitalizations, according to the pain scale adopted or nursing note. The newborns underwent a mean of 6.6 invasive procedures per day. Only 32.5% of the pain records resulted in the adoption of pharmacological or non-pharmacological intervention for pain relief. Conclusion: newborns are frequently exposed to pain and the low frequency of pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions reinforces the undertreatment of this condition.

  15. [DEVELOPMENTAL CARE IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT ACCORDING TO NEWBORN INDIVIDUALIZED DEVELOPMENTAL CARE AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (NIDCAP)].

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    Silberstein, Dalia; Litmanovitz, Ita

    2016-01-01

    During hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the brain of the preterm infant undergoes a particularly vulnerable and sensitive period of development. Brain development might be negatively influenced by direct injury as well as by complications of prematurity. Over the past few years, stress has come to be increasingly recognized as a potential risk factor. The NICU environment contains numerous stress factors due to maternal deprivation and over-stimulation, such as light, sound and pain, which conflict with the brain's developmental requirements. Developmental care is a caregiving approach that addresses the early developmental needs of the preterm infant as an integral component of quality neonatal care. NIDCAP (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program) is a comprehensive program that aims to reduce environmental stress, to support the infant's neuro-behavioral maturation and organization, and to promote early parent-infant relationships. The implementation of developmental care based on NIDCAP principles is a gradual, in-depth systems change process, which affects all aspects of care in the NICU. This review describes the theoretical basis of the NIDCAP approach, summarizes the scientific evidence and addresses some of the implications of the transition from a traditional to a developmental care NICU.

  16. A cluster of necrotizing enterocolitis in neonatal intensive care unit of one of the hospitals in Salerno, Italy

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    Maria Grazia Panico

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available From January to May 2012, a cluster of 12 cases of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC occurred in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of one of the Hospitals in Salerno, Italy. Six of twelve infants developed severe NEC (stage II – III. All cases, but one, were preterm of less than 37 week gestation (91.7%; five cases (41.7% had a very low birth weight (VLBW less than 1,500 g and five between 1500 g and 2500 g (Low birth weight - LBW. The main risk factors associated with NEC was central venous line. Klebsiella pneumoniae was isolated from the clinical samples of 10 cases, of which 9 (90% were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESβL producers. K. pneumoniae were also isolated from various sites of environmental samples, suggesting the causal role of this pathogen in the development of NEC in addition to other risk factors.We describe an outbreak of NEC in a tertiary care neonatal unit, along with the case-control study performed and microbiological investigation to identify noninfectious and infectious risk factors potentially involved in the outbreak.

  17. Effects of nesting and swaddling on the sleep duration of premature infants hospitalized in neonatal intensive care units

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    Zahra Abdeyazdan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, neonatal sleep is disrupted due to different factors. Due to the critical role of sleep in premature infants′ brain development, this study aimed to investigate the effect of nesting and swaddling on the sleep duration of premature infants hospitalized in NICUs. Materials and Methods: In a crossover clinical trial, 42 preterm infants who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to two groups of nest-swaddle and swaddle-nest. Sleep status was evaluated by observation and use of Prechtl′s criteria. Then, durations of total sleep time (TST and quiet sleep time (QST were recorded. Data were analyzed using repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: Mean values of TST and QST during nesting and also swaddling periods were significantly higher than in the control period in both groups (P < 0.001. Mean values of TST and QST in the swaddling period were higher than in the nesting period in both groups, However, these differences were not significant (P = 0.245. Conclusions: Both swaddling and nesting could significantly increase the duration of TST and QST, compared to the control. There were no significant differences between the effects of these interventions on TST and QST. Therefore, using any of these methods is suggested to improve infants′ quality of sleep in NICU, with respect to the ward policies.

  18. Parental Satisfaction of Traditional System of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Services in a Public Sector Hospital in North India

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    V Sankar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Traditional systems of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU care predispose parents to increased levels of stress and anxiety due to parental separation from their infant. Parental satisfaction, an indicator of the quality of care, is significantly compromised during prolonged NICU stay. The research is limited in developing countries. Objectives. To assess the parental satisfaction with traditional systems of NICU care in a public sector hospital and to identify the areas that need improvement and can be worked upon. Methods. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview the parents of the neonates on the day of discharge. Fifteen questions were categorised into four domains, namely interpersonal relationships with staff, parents’ involvement, staff competence and services offered by the health system. Parental satisfaction level was marked on a three-point Likert scale, 0 corresponding to highly dissatisfied, and 2 to completely satisfied for each of the 15 questions. Results. Out of 100 patients interviewed, communication was the chief determinant of their satisfaction. Parents expressed fair satisfaction levels with regard to the emotional support and encouragement received, but discontent at being unable to look after their own baby and breastfeed the baby. They were satisfied with the competence of the staff. Conclusion. The traditional system of NICU care was not satisfying for the parents in many aspects and changes in the form of family-centred care should be tried for greater parental satisfaction.

  19. Technical skills in paediatrics: a qualitative study of acquisition, attitudes and assumptions in the neonatal intensive care unit.

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    Bannister, Susan L; Hilliard, Robert I; Regehr, Glenn; Lingard, Lorelei

    2003-12-01

    While the effective acquisition of technical skills is essential for excellent paediatric care, little is known about how technical skills are learned in the paediatric setting. This study sought to describe and theorise the variables influencing technical skills acquisition in a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) inpatient setting. Using non-participant field methodology, paediatric residents and their teachers (nurses, respiratory therapists, neonatal staff and fellows) were observed at various times in the NICU for 8 weeks. Thirteen semistructured interviews with these teachers and learners and 1 focus group of additional learners were conducted and used to triangulate observational findings. Using a constant comparative process, field notes, interview and focus group transcripts were analysed by 2 researchers for emergent themes in the grounded theory tradition. Data sourced from over 90 hours of observation and 21 observed technical procedures, and both individual and group interviews are presented thematically. Dominant themes include: the nature, timing and purpose of feedback about technical procedures; opportunities to learn technical skills; multiple demands that intersect with technical procedure attempts; competing priorities, and teachers' and learners' differing perceptions. These themes interact to affect the learning environment. The NICU learning environment represents a complex interplay between competing priorities, learning opportunities and attributions about learners. This interplay must be understood if improvements to technical skills training in this domain are to be developed.

  20. Clinical Implications of Diffuse Excessive High Signal Intensity (DEHSI on Neonatal MRI in School Age Children Born Extremely Preterm.

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    Lina Broström

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain carried out during the neonatal period shows that 55-80% of extremely preterm infants display white matter diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI. Our aim was to study differences in developmental outcome at the age of 6.5 years in children born extremely preterm with and without DEHSI.This was a prospective cohort study of 83 children who were born in Stockholm, Sweden, between 2004 and 2007, born at gestational age of < 27 weeks + 0 days and who underwent an MRI scan of their brain at term equivalent age. The outcome measures at 6.5 years included testing 66 children with the modified Touwen neurology examination, the Movement Assessment Battery for Children 2, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition, Beery Visual-motor Integration test-Sixth Edition, and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Group-wise comparisons were done between children with and without DEHSI using Student t-test, Mann Whitney U test, Chi square test and regression analysis.DEHSI was detected in 39 (59% of the 66 children who were assessed at 6.5 years. The presence of DEHSI was not associated with mild neurological dysfunction, scores on M-ABC assessment, cognition, visual-motor integration, or behavior at 6.5 years.The presence of qualitatively defined DEHSI on neonatal MRI did not prove to be a useful predictor of long-term impairment in children born extremely preterm.

  1. Assessment and management of pain in newborns hospitalized in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a cross-sectional study 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposito, Natália Pinheiro Braga; Rossato, Lisabelle Mariano; Bueno, Mariana; Kimura, Amélia Fumiko; Costa, Taine; Guedes, Danila Maria Batista

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to determine the frequency of pain, to verify the measures adopted for pain relief during the first seven days of hospitalization in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and to identify the type and frequency of invasive procedures to which newborns are submitted. Method: cross-sectional retrospective study. Out of the 188 hospitalizations occurred during the 12-month period, 171 were included in the study. The data were collected from the charts and the presence of pain was analyzed based on the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale and on nursing notes suggestions of pain. For statistical analysis, the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences was used, and the significance level was set at 5%. Results: there was at least one record of pain in 50.3% of the hospitalizations, according to the pain scale adopted or nursing note. The newborns underwent a mean of 6.6 invasive procedures per day. Only 32.5% of the pain records resulted in the adoption of pharmacological or non-pharmacological intervention for pain relief. Conclusion: newborns are frequently exposed to pain and the low frequency of pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions reinforces the undertreatment of this condition. PMID:28902934

  2. Epidemiology and neonatal pain management of heelsticks in intensive care units: EPIPPAIN 2, a prospective observational study.

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    Courtois, Emilie; Droutman, Stéphanie; Magny, Jean-François; Merchaoui, Zied; Durrmeyer, Xavier; Roussel, Camille; Biran, Valérie; Eleni, Sergio; Vottier, Gaëlle; Renolleau, Sylvain; Desfrere, Luc; Castela, Florence; Boimond, Nicolas; Mellah, Djamel; Bolot, Pascal; Coursol, Anne; Brault, Dominique; Chappuy, Hélène; Cimerman, Patricia; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S; Carbajal, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    Heelstick is the most frequently performed skin-breaking procedure in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). There are no large multicenter studies describing the frequency and analgesic approaches used for heelsticks performed in NICUs. To describe the frequency of heelsticks and their analgesic management in newborns in the NICU. To determine the factors associated with the lack of specific preprocedural analgesia for this procedure. EPIPPAIN 2 (Epidemiology of Procedural PAin In Neonates) is a descriptive prospective epidemiologic study. All 16 NICUs in the Paris region in France. All newborns in the NICU with a maximum corrected age of 44 weeks +6 days of gestation on admission who had at least one heelstick during the study period were eligible for the study. The study included 562 newborns. Data on all heelsticks and their corresponding analgesic therapies were prospectively collected. The inclusion period lasted six weeks, from June 2, 2011 to July 12, 2011. Newborns were followed from their admission to the 14th day of their NICU stay or discharge, whichever occurred first. The mean (SD) gestational age was 33.3 (4.4) weeks and duration of participation was 7.5 (4.4) days. The mean (SD; range) of heelsticks per neonate was 16.0 (14.4; 1-86) during the study period. Of the 8995 heelsticks studied, 2379 (26.4%) were performed with continuous analgesia, 5236 (58.2%) with specific preprocedural analgesia. Overall, 6764 (75.2%) heelsticks were performed with analgesia (continuous and/or specific). In a multivariate model, the increased lack of preprocedural analgesia was associated with female sex, term birth, high illness severity, tracheal or noninvasive ventilation, parental absence and use of continuous sedation/analgesia. Heelstick was very frequently performed in NICUs. Although, most heelsticks were performed with analgesia, this was not systematic. The high frequency of this procedure and the known adverse effects of repetitive pain in neonates

  3. Determination the bacterial etiologies for sepsis in premature newborns admitted in neonatal intensive care unit

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    Nastaran Khosravi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial sepsis is a main cause of mortality and morbidity especially in preterm newborns. The aim of this study was to search the bacterial etiologies of neonatal sepsis in NICU admitted preterm neonates. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study had done in NICU of Ali Asghar Hospital, Tehran, Iran from March 2007 to March 2009. Seventy septicemic preterm newborns (<37 weeks were studied. At admission day, for blood culture, 1-2 ml of venous blood was drawn after swabbing the venipuncture site with alcohol. After centrifugation of blood samples, deposits were cultured on sheep blood agar and incubated in a candle jar at 37 °C for 48 h and followed by subcultured. Isolates were identified using standard techniques (Nima pouyesh, Iran. Type of isolated bacterial organisms determined. Its correlation with gestational age, birth weight, premature rupture of membranes (PROM and other variables determined we used the nonparametric two independent sample test, Mann-Whitney U test. Chi-square values (CI 95%, P< 0.05 were calculated for all categorical variables. P-value less than 0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: Of 70 studied septicemic preterm cases, 17 (10.6% cases had positive blood culture. Overall gram-negative organisms were more frequent than gram-positive organisms, Klebsiella (K. pneumoniae, Escherichia (E. coli and Staphylococcus (S. aureus organisms were the 3 common causes of bacterial sepsis in studied cases. Early onset sepsis produced by K. pneumonia (40%, E. coli (20% and S. aureus (20%. K. pneumonia, E. coli, S. aureus had equal incidence in late onset sepsis (26.8%. K. pneumonia was more frequent in early onset sepsis (P= 0.05, and in low birth weight (< 1500 g neonates (P= 0.005, and PROM (P= 0.05. Conclusion: Three causes for sepsis in premature newborns were determined: K. pneumonia, E. coli and S. aureus, it is so important for initial antibiotic treatment in admission day. Low birth weight

  4. Auditing Neonatal Intensive Care: Is PREM a Good Alternative to CRIB for Mortality Risk Adjustment in Premature Infants?

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    Guenther, Kilian; Vach, Werner; Kachel, Walter; Bruder, Ingo; Hentschel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Comparing outcomes at different neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) requires adjustment for intrinsic risk. The Clinical Risk Index for Babies (CRIB) is a widely used risk model, but it has been criticized for being affected by therapeutic decisions. The Prematurity Risk Evaluation Measure (PREM) is not supposed to be prone to treatment bias, but has not yet been validated. We aimed to validate the PREM, compare its accuracy to that of the original and modified versions of the CRIB and CRIB-II, and examine the congruence of risk categorization. Very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants with a gestational age (GA) auditing. It could be useful to combine scores. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. A simple inexpensive audio-visual reminder of infection control procedures on entry to a neonatal intensive care unit.

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    Taylor, R J; El-Kafrawy, U

    2012-11-01

    A novel audio-visual computerized infection control initiative was designed, installed and tested in the neonatal intensive care unit at a busy teaching hospital, with the primary aim of improving visitors' adherence to hand hygiene and infection control procedures. The system has proved to be reliable, self-administering, inexpensive, requires no prior education or training, is rapidly deployable and can be used immediately. A measurable improvement in visitors' handwashing technique and recall of infection control instructions was seen after introduction of this initiative. This system provides a new opportunity to educate and promote infection control measures to visitors. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Normative cultural values and the experiences of Mexican-American mothers in the neonatal intensive care unit.

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    Cleveland, Lisa M; Horner, Sharon D

    2012-04-01

    To explore the experiences of Mexican-American mothers who have had infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A convenience sample of 15 English-speaking, Mexican-American women was interviewed. The study used an exploratory qualitative approach. Data collection was conducted through audiotaped, transcribed, semistructured, individual interviews and field notes. The 5 normative cultural values for Latino families-(1) simpatia, (2) personalismo, (3) respeto, (4) familismo, and (5) fatalismo-were used as a sensitizing framework to guide data interpretation. The women's discussions of their NICU experiences clearly reflect the 5 normative Latino cultural values. Positive and negative exemplars of these values are provided as evidence. These findings can be used to inform nursing care provided for Mexican-American mothers and their infants by assisting nurses to customize care to meet the cultural needs of this population.

  7. Peritoneal dialysis in the neonatal intensive care unit. Management of acute renal failure after a severe subgaleal hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Kristi; Lail, Candace

    2007-08-01

    Acute renal failure is common in the neonatal intensive care unit but is often not recognized in its early phases, when it is potentially reversible. The typical patient with acute renal failure is premature, but many term infants are also at risk. One such group is those with severe bleeding, such as a subgaleal hemorrhage. In these cases, hypovolemia can quickly progress to ischemia, which affects many organs but has profound effects on the kidney. In term infants, acute renal failure is most commonly diagnosed in those with perinatal depression. This article presents a unique case of an infant with subgaleal and intracranial bleeding that resulted in acute renal failure requiring peritoneal dialysis in the hopes of the eventual restoration of kidney function.

  8. Parents, siblings and grandparents in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. A survey of policies in eight European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Gorm; Mirante, Nadia; Haumont, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    medical rounds and procedures followed the same pattern. A composite visiting score was computed using all the variables related to family visiting. Lower median values and larger variability were obtained for the southern countries, indicating more restrictive attitudes and lack of national policy......OBJECTIVE: To describe policies towards family visiting in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) and compare findings with those of a survey carried out 10 years earlier. METHODS: A questionnaire on early developmental care practices was mailed to 362 units in eight European countries (Sweden....... CONCLUSIONS: The presence of parents and other family members in European NICUs has improved over a 10-year period. Several barriers, however, are still in place, particularly in the South European countries....

  9. Infecção hospitalar em uma unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal do Sul do Brasil Nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit in South Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Dal-Bó

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a incidência e a epidemiologia da infecção hospitalar em recém-nascidos internados em unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal de um hospital no sul de Santa Catarina. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo de coorte prospectivo durante 1 ano, com 239 neonatos que permaneceram internados após 48 horas da admissão. Os critérios utilizados para diagnóstico de infecção estiveram de acordo com os preconizados pelo Center for Disease Control and Prevention e pela Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária. RESULTADOS: A incidência de infecção hospitalar foi de 45,8%, sendo a infecção primária na corrente sanguínea o principal motivo de internação (80,7%, seguida da pneumonia (6,7%. O Staphylococcus coagulase negativo foi o agente mais encontrado nas hemoculturas e como colonizante na unidade estudada. A prematuridade foi o motivo de internação prevalente. A taxa de mortalidade geral foi de 12,1%, e a mortalidade por infecção nosocomial foi de 33,8%. CONCLUSÕES : A incidência de infecção nosocomial na unidade estudada está acima da reportada por outros estudos nacionais, sendo a infecção primária na corrente sanguínea e a pneumonia os principais sítios de infecção hospitalar.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the incidence and epidemiology of nosocomial infection in newborns who were admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit in a hospital in south Santa Catarina, Brazil. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted for 1 year among 239 neonates who remained as in-patients 48 hours after admission. The criteria that were used to diagnose infection were in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Health Surveillance Agency. RESULTS: The incidence of nosocomial infection was 45.8%. The primary reasons for admission were primary bloodstream infection (80.7% and pneumonia (6.7%. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most commonly identified agent

  10. [GENETIC AND METABOLIC URGENCIES IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT: MAPLE SYRUP URINE DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez Rojas, Paola Liliana; Suarez Obando, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a hereditary disorder of branched chain amino/keto acid metabolism, caused by a decreased activity of the branched-chain alpha- ketoacid dehydrogenase complex (BCKAD), which leads to abnormal elevated plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) clinically manifested as a heavy burden for Central Nervous system. The toxic accumulation of substrates promotes the development of a severe and rapidly progressive neonatal encephalopathy if treatment is not immediately given. This disorder has a specific medical management in acute phase in order to minimize mortality and morbidity. For all those reasons, it is important to include the MSUD as a possible diagnosis in a encephalopathic newborn. We present a colombian newborn with classical MSUD with fatal outcome as an example of metabolic emergency and a differential diagnosis in the encephalopathic newborn. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  11. [Laser treatment for retinopathy of prematurity in neonatal intensive care units. Premature Eye Rescue Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maka, Erika; Imre, László; Somogyvári, Zsolt; Németh, János

    2015-02-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity is a leading cause of childhood blindness around the world. The Department of Ophthalmology at the Semmelweis University and the Peter Cerny Neonatal Emergency and Ambulance Service started an innovative Premature Eye Rescue Program to reduce the non-essential transport of premature babies suffering from retinopathy of prematurity. During the first 5 years 186 eyes of 93 premature babies were treated at the bedside with stage 3 retinopathy of prematurity in the primary hospitals. In this first 5-years period the authors reduced the number of transports of premature babies for laser treatment; 93 children avoided the unnecessary transport, saving altogether a distance of 21,930 kilometers for children, as well as the ambulance service. The Premature Eye Rescue Program offers a good and effective alternative for treatment of retinopathy in the primary hospitals. The authors propose the national extension of this program.

  12. Brain abscesses after Serratia marcescens infection on a neonatal intensive care unit: differences on serial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messerschmidt, A.; Olischar, M.; Pollak, A.; Birnbacher, R.; Prayer, D.

    2004-01-01

    Serratia are known to be a possible cause of severe cerebral infections in neonates. We describe imaging of three premature infants infected with Serratia marcescens. Born in the 31 st , 25 th and 28 th weeks of gestation, they presented with signs of septicaemia on postnatal days 9, 24 and 32. Initial sonography showed cysts in the first child, two areas with anechoic centre and echogenic rim in the second, and several echogenic areas in the third. Lesions were seen on CT, of low density in two cases and minimally increased density in the third. MRI in the first patient showed cysts with incomplete contrast enhancement of the lesions, while patient 2 showed five ring-enhancing fluid-containing lesions with thick walls. In the third patient two abscesses with contrast enhancement and several high-signal spots were seen. We discuss the pathophysiology of the lesions and the impact of the various imaging methods. (orig.)

  13. Deltoid muscle morphometry as an index of impaired skeletal muscularity in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassios, Theodore; Kaltsogianni, Ourania; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Hickey, Ann; Greenough, Anne

    2018-04-01

    We hypothesised that extremely premature infants would have decreased muscle mass at term-corrected age compared to term-born infants and that the degree of reduced muscle mass acquisition would correlate with the duration of invasive mechanical ventilation. The MRI brain scans of infants admitted in the neonatal unit at King's College Hospital between 1 January 2010 and 1 June 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. The coronal cross-sectional area of the left deltoid muscle (DCSA) was measured in 17 infants born atrophy. • The cross-sectional area of the deltoid muscle has been used to evaluate muscle atrophy in infants with a previous branchial plexus birth injury. What is New: • Premature infants studied at term exhibit lower cross-sectional area of the deltoid muscle than their term counterparts. • Prolonged mechanical ventilation could be associated with skeletal muscle impairment.

  14. Challenges for humanization of care in a surgical neonatal intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Lamego, Denyse T. C.; Deslandes, Suely F.; Moreira, Maria Elisabeth L.

    2005-01-01

    Este estudo analisa cuidados ambientais e relações de atendimento em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal Cirúrgica, refletindo sobre potencialidades e obstáculos para promoção de cuidado humanizado. A pesquisa, realizada em uma instituição de nível terciário, utilizou o método da observação participante enfocando, por cinco meses, relações profissional-bebê, profissional-responsável e mãe-bebê. Foram observadas rotinas contemplando condições ambientais e necessidades de bebês e famílias, e ...

  15. Brain abscesses after Serratia marcescens infection on a neonatal intensive care unit: differences on serial imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerschmidt, A.; Olischar, M.; Pollak, A.; Birnbacher, R. [Division of Neonatology and Intensive Care, Department of Paediatrics, University of Vienna, Wahringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Division of Radiology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna (Austria)

    2004-02-01

    Serratia are known to be a possible cause of severe cerebral infections in neonates. We describe imaging of three premature infants infected with Serratia marcescens. Born in the 31{sup st}, 25{sup th} and 28{sup th} weeks of gestation, they presented with signs of septicaemia on postnatal days 9, 24 and 32. Initial sonography showed cysts in the first child, two areas with anechoic centre and echogenic rim in the second, and several echogenic areas in the third. Lesions were seen on CT, of low density in two cases and minimally increased density in the third. MRI in the first patient showed cysts with incomplete contrast enhancement of the lesions, while patient 2 showed five ring-enhancing fluid-containing lesions with thick walls. In the third patient two abscesses with contrast enhancement and several high-signal spots were seen. We discuss the pathophysiology of the lesions and the impact of the various imaging methods. (orig.)

  16. [Adverse reactions by antibiotics in a pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit located in Bogotá, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejos, Alvaro

    2007-03-01

    Critical care patients have a high probability of presenting adverse drugs reactions because the polytherapy that they receive usually include schemes with two or more antibiotics. Most antibiotics have high toxicity risk, which can be potentialized when being associated with other drugs. Adverse reactions were detected and described in patients treated with antibiotics in a pediatric and neonatal intensive care. A follow up, descriptive and observational study of a cohort was made without control group. A daily follow-up was administered for a three month period for each patient. Causality was evaluated on the basis of the Naranjo scale. Eighty-five patients were included in the study, 36.5% from the neonatal intensive care unit and 63.5% from the pediatric clinic. Of twenty-seven antimicrobial medications administered, 97 adverse reactions were detected for 15 of these, in 37 patients (20 newborn and 17 older children). They were classified as mild (65%), moderate (35%) and serious (0). According to scale of Naranjo, 68% were possible, 32% probable, and defined, none. Based on laboratory test results, renal toxicity was detected in 38.1%, hematotoxicity in 24.7%,electrolytic abnormalities in 21.6% and hepatotoxicity in 15.5%. The distribution of adverse antibiotic reactions was as follows: gentamycine 20.6%, vancomycin 17.5%, amikacine 16.5%, ceftriaxone 15.5% and piperaciline tazobactam 13.4%. The proportion of adverse reactions was of 43.7%. 55.6% of antibiotics produced adverse reactions. A program of institutional pharmacovigilance coordinated by a medical pharmacologist or pharmaceutical chemist was recommended by these data.

  17. Risk factors for ventilator-associated pneumonia in the neonatal intensive care unit: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bin; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Xian; Huang, Ya-Ling; Gao, Yu-Shuang; Liu, Xiao; Li, Ying-Li; Qiu, Jing-Fu

    2014-04-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common and serious problem among mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care units (ICU), especially for the newborn. However, limited literatures have been reviewed to synthesize the finding of previous papers to investigate the risk factors for VAP although it has been a serious complication of mechanical ventilation (MV) with a high morbidity and mortality in the newborn. We performed this meta-analysis to extend previous knowledge for developing VAP prevention strategies by identifying the potential risk factors related to VAP in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The relevant literatures published up to July 2013 were searched in the databases of PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, and Web of Science. Three reviewers screened those literatures and extracted data according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria independently. A total of eight studies including 370 cases and 1,071 controls were identified. Ten risk factors were found to be related to neonatal VAP which were listed as follows in order by odds ratios (ORs): length of stay in NICU (OR 23.45), reintubation (OR 9.18), enteral feeding (OR 5.59), mechanical ventilation (OR 4.04), transfusion (OR 3.32), low birth weight (OR 3.16), premature infants (OR 2.66), parenteral nutrition (OR 2.30), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (OR 2.21), and tracheal intubation (OR 1.12). We identified ten variables as independent risk factors for the development of VAP: length of stay in NICU, reintubation, enteral feeding, mechanical ventilation, transfusion, low birth weight, premature infants, parenteral nutrition, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and tracheal intubation. Due to several limitations in the present study, further large and well-designed studies are needed to confirm the conclusion.

  18. Trends in nitrogen concentrations and load in 48 minor streams draining intensively farmed Danish catchments, 1990-2014. How can the observed trend be explained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windolf, Jørgen; Børgesen, Christen; Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte; Kronvang, Brian; Larsen, Søren E.; Tornbjerg, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    The total land-based nitrogen load to Danish coastal waters has decreased by 50% since 1990 through a reduction of the outlet of nitrogen from sewage point sources and diffuse sources. On a national scale nitrogen load from diffuse sources, has been reduced by 43% , mainly due to limitation of the amount of N input to different crops, rules for timing and application of manure, mandatory demands for catch crops and restoration of wetlands. The latter increasing the nitrogen retention capacity in surface waters. However, on a local scale huge variations exist in the reduction of the diffuse nitrogen load. Since 1990, an important part of the Danish national monitoring program on the aquatic environment (NOVANA) has been directed at quantifying the nitrogen concentrations and load in 48 minor streams draining small intensively farmed catchments. The 48 catchments have a mean size of 18 km2, farmed area constitutes more than 60% of the catchment area and the catchments have no significant outlets of sewage to the streams. The statistical trend results (based on a seasonal Mann-Kendall) from these 48 streams show a 9-65% reduction in the diffuse nitrogen load (mean: 48%). The large differences in trends in the diffuse N load are related to differences in catchment-specific variables such as nitrogen surpluses, nitrogen leaching from the root zone, hydrogeology and nitrogen retention in ground and surface waters.

  19. Danish Vernacular

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyams, Inger Louise Berling

    2014-01-01

    the beginning of Danish architecture as a professional discipline, there has also been a formation of a certain Danish vernacular. This paper explores how the teaching of and interest in Danish historical buildings could have marked the education of Danish architecture students. Through analysis of the drawings......Despite the number of internationally successful Danish architects like Jacobsen, Utzon and in recent years Ingels just to name a few, Danish architecture has always leaned greatly on international architectural history and theory. This is only natural for a small nation. However, since...

  20. Serotonin Transporter Gene ("SLC6A4") Methylation Associates with Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Stay and 3-month-old Temperament in Preterm Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montirosso, Rosario; Provenzi, Livio; Fumagalli, Monica; Sirgiovanni, Ida; Giorda, Roberto; Pozzoli, Uberto; Beri, Silvana; Menozzi, Giorgia; Tronick, Ed; Morandi, Francesco; Mosca, Fabio; Borgatti, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) stay are early adverse stressful experiences, which may result in an altered temperamental profile. The serotonin transporter gene ("SLC6A4"), which has been linked to infant temperament, is susceptible to epigenetic regulation associated with early stressful experience. This study…

  1. A Caenorhabditis elegans Host Model Correlates with Invasive Disease Caused by Staphylococcus aureus Recovered during an Outbreak in Neonatal Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyu Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caenorhabditis elegans has previously been used as a host model to determine the virulence of clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates. In the present study, methicillin-susceptible S aureus (MSSA strains associated with an outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU were investigated using the C elegans model.

  2. Effect of a vascular access team on central line-associated bloodstream infections in infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legemaat, Monique M; Jongerden, IP; van Rens, Roland M F P T; Zielman, Marjanne; van den Hoogen, Agnes|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/343075156

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the effect of a vascular access team on the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections in infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Web-of-Science and the Cochrane Library were searched until December 2013. STUDY

  3. Nível de ruído em unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal Nivel de ruido en una unidad de cuidados intensivos neonatal Noise level in neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Yoshiko Kakehashi

    2007-12-01

    los profesionales y familiares.OBJECTIVE: Determine noise levels in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and identify the sources of these noises. METHODS: Quantitative, descriptive and exploratory study, carried out in São Paulo. Data was collected in April and May of 2005. A dosimeter was used to record a total of 96 hours of measurements. Nine hours of observation were also conducted to identify sources of noise. RESULTS: Leq noise levels ranged from of 61.3 to 66.6 dBA and were higher on the weekends. Peak values ranged from 90.8 to 123.4 dBC and the highest values were recorded at night. The sources of the noise were: beeping noises from ventilators and heart rate monitors, conversations between health professional and others. CONCLUSION: The deleterious effects of high levels of noise on newborns and health professionals show the need for interventions in routines and professionals and families' conduct.

  4. Wrapping newborn infants in cloth and newspaper after delivery led to higher temperatures on arrival at the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Nitika; Das, Kunal; Patwal, Prachi; Pandita, Neerul; Gupta, Alpa

    2018-01-03

    Neonatal hypothermia is a preventable cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity, and wrapping neonates in newspaper sandwiched between cotton sheets is a simple intervention. This 2017 Indian pilot study tested the heat insulating property of sandwiched sheets. At birth, we randomised 100 neonates who were more than 32 weeks of gestation and needed neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) observation or care without a ventilator or bilevel positive airway pressure support into two groups of 50. The intervention and control groups were wrapped in two prewarmed sheets at birth that did or did not contain a layer of newspaper. Their axillary temperatures on arrival at the NICU and one hour after arrival were measured. Other environmental factors were similar. The neonates wrapped in the sandwiched sheets showed significantly higher temperatures on arrival at the NICU than the control group (35.9°C versus 35.4°C, p newspaper layer resulted in a higher body temperature on arrival at the NICU and after one hour. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Molecular typing of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1- and Enterotoxin A-producing methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolates from an outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, Franziska; Sanchini, Andrea; Strommenger, Birgit; Cuny, Christiane; Breier, Ann-Christin; Proquitté, Hans; Bührer, Christoph; Schenkel, Karl; Bätzing-Feigenbaum, Jörg; Greutelaers, Benedikt; Nübel, Ulrich; Gastmeier, Petra; Eckmanns, Tim; Werner, Guido

    2015-10-01

    Outbreaks of Staphylococcus aureus are common in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Usually they are documented for methicillin-resistant strains, while reports involving methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains are rare. In this study we report the epidemiological and molecular investigation of an MSSA outbreak in a NICU among preterm neonates. Infection control measures and interventions were commissioned by the Local Public Health Authority and supported by the Robert Koch Institute. To support epidemiological investigations molecular typing was done by spa-typing and Multilocus sequence typing; the relatedness of collected isolates was further elucidated by DNA SmaI-macrorestriction, microarray analysis and bacterial whole genome sequencing. A total of 213 neonates, 123 healthcare workers and 205 neonate parents were analyzed in the period November 2011 to November 2012. The outbreak strain was characterized as a MSSA spa-type t021, able to produce toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and Enterotoxin A. We identified seventeen neonates (of which two died from toxic shock syndrome), four healthcare workers and three parents putatively involved in the outbreak. Whole-genome sequencing permitted to exclude unrelated cases from the outbreak and to discuss the role of healthcare workers as a reservoir of S. aureus on the NICU. Genome comparisons also indicated the presence of the respective clone on the ward months before the first colonized/infected neonates were detected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF PRIMARY BLOODSTREAM INFECTIONS IN NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Ferreira Catarino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: descrever o perfil epidemiológico das infecções primárias de corrente sanguínea associadas ao cateter venoso central na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal de um hospital no Rio de Janeiro no ano de 2010. Método: estudo descritivo e retrospectivo. Foi elaborado um banco de dados no programa Epi_info para indexação dos dados e posterior análise. Resultados: 16 recém-nascidos (RN evoluíram para IPCS associadas ao CVC; 66,7% eram pré-termos e 92,3% receberam nutrição parenteral.  O cateter de inserção periférica foi o mais utilizado (55,6%, seguido do cateter umbilical venoso com 22,2%. Dos microrganismos isolados 42,8% eram Staphylococcus Coagulase Negativo, 28,5% eram Staphylococcus aureus e 14,2% eram Candida Albicans. Conclusão: Percebeu-se que condições relacionadas ao RN, à gestação e ao CVC são fatores que predispõem esta clientela, o que reforça a necessidade de programas específicos de prevenção e controle de IPCS.

  7. Bone conduction noise exposure via ventilators in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemizadeh Gol, Mohammad Abraham; Black, Angela; Sidman, James

    2015-10-01

    To demonstrate that neonatal ventilators can expose patients to high noise levels through bone conduction (BC) as well as air conduction (AC). Observational study. Three ventilators and various settings on a positive airway pressure machine (continuous, high bilevel, and low bilevel pressure) were tested. A sound level meter was used to measure the noise levels at a set distance from the ventilator to represent AC, on the ventilator circuit to represent BC at the alveolus, and within the ventilator circuit. The BC sound levels (74.1, 81.1, 86, 89.2 dBC) were significantly higher than the AC sound levels (72.8, 72.9, 70, 71.7 dBC) for the jet ventilator, continuous positive airway pressure setting, low bilevel setting, and high bilevel setting, respectively (P ventilator circuit ranged from 94.9 to 113.2 dBC depending on the machine/setting and was significantly louder than both AC or BC for all machines/settings (P ventilator dependent noise levels present on and within ventilation circuitry that could be presented to the infant via BC. NA © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Changes in the Incidence of Candidiasis in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliaga, Sofia; Clark, Reese H.; Laughon, Matthew; Walsh, Thomas J.; Hope, William W.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Kaufman, David; Arrieta, Antonio; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Neonatal invasive candidiasis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We describe the association between invasive candidiasis and changes in use of antifungal prophylaxis, empirical antifungal therapy, and broad-spectrum antibacterial antibiotics over time. METHODS: We examined data from 709 325 infants at 322 NICUs managed by the Pediatrix Medical Group from 1997 to 2010. We determined the cumulative incidence of invasive candidiasis and use of antifungal prophylaxis, broad-spectrum antibacterial antibiotics, and empirical antifungal therapy by year. RESULTS: We identified 2063 (0.3%) infants with 2101 episodes of invasive candidiasis. Over the study period, the annual incidence of invasive candidiasis decreased from 3.6 episodes per 1000 patients to 1.4 episodes per 1000 patients among all infants, from 24.2 to 11.6 episodes per 1000 patients among infants with a birth weight of 750–999 g, and from 82.7 to 23.8 episodes per 1000 patients among infants with a birth weight candidiasis in the NICU decreased over the 14-year study period. Increased use of fluconazole prophylaxis and empirical antifungal therapy, along with decreased use of broad-spectrum antibacterial antibiotics, may have contributed to this observation. PMID:24446441

  9. NURSING CARE WITH THE SKIN OF NEWBORN IN NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcineide Mendes de Sousa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Descrever o cuidado da equipe de enfermagem com a pele do neonato internado na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal e identificar, caso ocorram, as lesões que venham a surgir na pele desses RN. Método: Estudo qualitativo realizado em uma Maternidade Pública de Teresina–PI. Os sujeitos foram 16 profissionais da equipe de enfermagem. A produção dos dados ocorreu através de um roteiro de entrevista semi-estruturada, que, depois de transcritos, foram submetidas à análise categorial temática. Resultados: O estudo possibilitou descrever o cuidado de enfermagem à pele dos RN e as intervenções da equipe de enfermagem diante das lesões. Conclusão: Constatou-se que apesar do empenho da equipe de enfermagem em oferecer uma assistência com o menor risco para o paciente, a ocorrência de lesões na pele dos neonatos é uma realidade enfrentada por estes profissionais, devendo fazer parte de seu cotidiano reconhecê-las, preveni-las e tratá-las.

  10. THE IMPORTANCE OF NURSES IN THE HANDLING OF THE PICC IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jecilea Pereira Barbosa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Este estudo aborda a manutenção do Cateter Venoso Central de Inserção Periférica, sendo ela um dos episódios mais comuns utilizadas nas Unidades de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal, objetivando identificar as dificuldades encontradas pelo enfermeiro na manutenção desse cateter, de modo a contribuir para melhoria da assistência prestada ao recém-nascido. Para tanto, foi realizada uma pesquisa exploratória, descritiva, bibliográfica com abordagem qualitativa realizada na Biblioteca Virtual de Saúde (LILACS E BDENF.Após a coleta de dados foi realizada uma leitura exploratória, seletiva,critica e analise temática,emergindo as seguintes categorias:Principais dificuldades encontradas na manutenção do PICC e A importância do papel do enfermeiro na manutenção do PICC.Concluímos então que se faz necessário o conhecimento teórico prático do enfermeiro na implantação, manutenção e remoção do PICC reduzindo a dificuldade de utilização desse cateter para um tratamento de qualidade.

  11. INCIDENCE OF INFECTION ASSOCIATED TO CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETERS IN A NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Teixeira Reis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um estudo transversal e retrospectivo que objetivou  identificar o tipo de cateter venoso central (CVC mais utilizado na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal (UTIN de um hospital público universitário do estado do Rio de Janeiro, estratificado por peso de nascimento e apresentar as densidades de incidência de infecção associadas aos dispositivos.  Os dados foram coletados através de análise documental nos meses de junho e julho de 2008, referentes ao período de julho a dezembro de 2007, totalizando um registro de 712 cateteres-dia. Foi verificado o cateter central de inserção periférica (CCIP/PICC como o dispositivo mais utilizado na unidade, seguido do cateter venoso umbilical e da dissecção venosa. A densidade de incidência das infecções primárias da corrente sanguínea foi cerca de oito vezes maior nos recém-nascidos com peso ≤ 1.500g, sendo o cateter umbilical o dispositivo mais associado a essas infecções.

  12. A comparison of the bacteria found on the hands of 'homemakers' and neonatal intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, A E; Cimiotti, J; Della-Latta, P; Larson, E L

    2003-08-01

    This prevalence study was conducted to compare the counts, types and antimicrobial resistance profiles of bacterial flora on the hands of individuals in the community to that of nurses at a nearby university teaching hospital, with an intense hand hygiene regimen. Hand cultures were obtained from 204 individuals during a home visit and 119 nurses in two neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The mean total log counts of organisms were 5.73 and 5.24 for the homemakers [defined as the person (usually the mother) who is the primary person responsible for arranging childcare, cooking, cleaning etc] and nurse hands, respectively (Phands compared with the nurses (all Phands (Phands of nurses harboured significantly more S. epidermidis strains resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefazolin, clindamycin, erythromycin, and oxacillin and S. warneri resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefazolin, clindamycin, and oxacillin (Phands of homemakers (Phand flora of hospital personnel compared with homemakers. Moreover, the hands of homemakers may serve as community reservoirs for antimicrobial resistant strains of clinical importance.

  13. Incidence of infection for preterm twins cared for in cobedding in the neonatal intensive-care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMar, Kim; Dowling, Donna A

    2006-01-01

    To describe the incidence of infection in a group of cobedded preterm twin infants and compare it to the incidence of infection in a cohort of preterm twin infants cared for in the same institution prior to the onset of cobedding. Retrospective descriptive design. Tertiary, referral neonatal intensive-care unit in the Midwest. Preterm twin infants between 23 and 35 weeks gestational age. Data from 1997 to 2001 (cobedding) compared to data from 1992 to 1996 (no cobedding). Infection as evidenced by positive blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or urine culture or radiographic evidence of pneumonia or necrotizing enterocolitis. Independent samples t test found the cobedded and non-cobedded infants to be homogenous in demographic data. A 2-way analysis of variance demonstrated no significant effects for cobedded infants on number of sepsis evaluations or number of positive blood cultures. There was a statistically significant difference for number of positive blood cultures at discharge reflecting the increased number of positive blood cultures in the non-cobedded infants. Finally, there were no statistically significant differences found between cobedded and non-cobedded for the presence of pneumonia or necrotizing enterocolitis. Cobedding of preterm twins cared for in the intensive-care nursery was not associated with an increased incidence of infection. Prospective studies are needed on cobedding before a change in practice is implemented.

  14. The effectiveness of music on pain among preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pölkki, Tarja; Korhonen, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this review is to synthesize the best available evidence related to the effectiveness of music as pain relieving method among preterm infants during painful procedures in the neonatal intensive care unit.Review questions are: Among preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit, is music effective in reducing BACKGROUND: Preterm infants (i.e. babies born at or before 37 gestational weeks) compose a patient group of the most vulnerable to pain. Infants treated in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are exposed to a variety of painful procedures (e.g. heel prick, iv cannula insertion, endotracheal suctioning) and to environmental stress (e.g. noise, light). Simons et al., for example, described an average 14 +/- 4 painful procedures during the first 2 weeks of life within a period of 24 hours among 151 neonates. Many studies have shown that repeated and sustained pain can have direct and long-term consequences on the neurological and behavior-oriented development of the neonates during the rapid development phase of the central nervous system. Pain can cause detectable physiological, behavioral and hormonal changes and contribute to the altered development of the pain system during later childhood and adolescence. Instead, live music such as singing is excellent type of music when it is steady, constant, quiet, soothing and directed to the infants. Graven emphasizes that recorded sound should not replace human voice exposure in the NICU; therefore, health care providers should provide ample opportunity for the infant to hear parent's voices live, such as singing or humming, in interactions between the parent and the infant at the bedside.The AmericanAcademy of Pediatrics Committee on Environmental Health has recommended safe levels of sound, and these recommendations have been updated by an expert team of practitioners. Recommendations specify that continuous sound should not exceed an hourly equivalent sound level of 50 A-weighted decibels (d

  15. Reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia in neonatal intensive care unit using "VAP prevention Bundle": a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Seham F A; Sherbiny, Hanan S; Saleh, Safaa H; Elsaeed, Wafaa F; Elshafiey, Mona M; Siam, Ahmed G; Arafa, Mohamed A; Alghobashy, Ashgan A; Bendary, Eman A; Basset, Maha A A; Ismail, Sanaa M; Akeel, Nagwa E; Elsamad, Nahla A; Mokhtar, Wesam A; Gheith, Tarek

    2015-08-06

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious health care-associated infection, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. It also prolongs hospital stay and drives up hospital costs. Measures employed in preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia in developing countries are rarely reported. In this study we tried to assess the efficacy of our designed "VAP prevention bundle" in reducing VAP rate in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This prospective before-and-after study was conducted at university hospital NICU, all neonates who had mechanical ventilation for ≥ 48 h were eligible. VAP rates were evaluated before (phase-I) and after (phase-II) full implementation of comprehensive preventive measures specifically designed by our infection control team. Of 143 mechanically ventilated neonates, 73 patients developed VAP (51%) throughout the study period (2500 mechanical ventilation days). The rate of VAP was significantly reduced from 67.8% (42/62) corresponding to 36.4 VAP episodes/1000 mechanical ventilation days (MV days) in phase-I to 38.2% (31/81) corresponding to 23 VAP/1000 MV days (RR 0.565, 95% confidence interval 0.408-0.782, p = 0.0006) after VAP prevention bundle implementation (phase-II). Parallel significant reduction in MV days/case were documented in post-intervention period (21.50 ± 7.6 days in phase-I versus 10.36 ± 5.2 days in phase-II, p = 0.000). There were a trend toward reduction in NICU length of stay (23.9 ± 10.3 versus 22.8 ± 9.6 days, p = 0.56) and overall mortality (25% versus 17.3%, p = 0.215) between the two phases but didn't reach statistical significance. The commonest micro-organisms isolated throughout the study were gram-negative bacteria (63/66, 95.5%) particularly Klebsilla pneumonia (55/66, 83.4%). Implementation of multifaceted infection control bundle resulted in reduction of VAP rate, length of stay in our NICU.

  16. Evaluation of the Effect of Sociodemographic Characteristics on the Satisfaction of Mothers in Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Yılmaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient and parent satisfaction is a significant indicator for the evaluation of quality of care in healthcare systems. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of sociodemographic characteristics on the satisfaction of the parents of newborns admitted in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs in maternity and infant disease hospitals. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on 113 mothers with infants admitted in the NICU of a state hospital in Turkey during April 1-September 30, 2013.Data were collected using sociodemographic questionnaire and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL healthcare satisfaction scale. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics (mean and percentage, T-test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: In this study, mean score of maternal satisfaction with NICU services was 65.66±20.01. No statistically significant differences were observed between maternal age, PedsQL satisfaction subscales, and total score of satisfaction. Moreover, statistically significant associations were observed between the following variables: maternal training and total satisfaction, employment status and subscales of PedsQL, technical skills and general satisfaction, and social security status and emotional support. However, no statistically significant differences were observed between the sociodemographic characteristics of newborns, total score of satisfaction, and mean scores of PedsQL satisfaction subscales in mothers. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, level of maternal satisfaction with NICU services was higher than the international average. Therefore, it is recommended that NICU nurses offer sufficient emotional support for both mothers and neonates in this unit and allow mothers to stay with their infants during hospitalization. Furthermore, it is suggested that training programs be implemented on effective communication skills between nurses and patients.

  17. Incidence and Risk Factors of Retinopathy of Prematurity in Two Neonatal Intensive Care Units in North and South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Xun, Deng; Wang, Ya-Cong; Wang, Bin; Geng, Shao-Hui; Chen, Hui; Li, Yan-Tao; Li, Xiao-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the incidence and risk factors of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in two Neonatal Intensive Care Units in North and South of China, respectively. Methods: We studied data concerning 472 infants with gestational age (GA) ≤34 weeks or birth weight (BW) ≤2000 g who were admitted to the Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University and the Fourth Hospital of Shijiazhuang between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011. Clinical information about perinatal neonates was collected and was confirmed by reviewing medical charts. The incidence and severity of ROP were assessed in the screened population. Main outcome measures are the incidence and severity of ROP. The relationship of clinical risk factors and the development of ROP were analyzed. Results: The overall incidence of ROP was 12.7%, and the overall incidence of type 1 ROP was 2.3%; 9.4% of infants in Zhujiang Hospital had ROP compared to 15.0% infants in the Fourth Hospital of Shijiazhuang developed ROP, and the difference is statistically significant. ROP was significantly associated with GA (odds ratio [OR]: 0.77 [0.62–0.95], P = 0.015), BW (OR: 0.998 [0.996–0.999], P = 0.008), maternal supplemental oxygen administration before and during delivery (OR: 4.27 [1.21–15.10], P = 0.024) and preeclampsia (OR: 6.07 [1.73–21.36] P = 0.005). The risk factors for ROP are different in two hospitals. In Zhujiang Hospital, BW is the independent risk factors for ROP while GA, BW and preeclampsia in the Fourth Hospital in Shijiazhuang Conclusions: Retinopathy of prematurity incidence is different based on area. Incidence of ROP is still high in China. More efforts need to prevent ROP. PMID:25836612

  18. A psychologist-led educational intervention results in a sustained reduction in neonatal intensive care unit infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rostenberghe, Hans; Short, Jacki; Ramli, Noraida; Geok, Tan Beng; Subramaniam, Sivasangari; Che Yaakob, Che Anuar; Othman, Azizah; Ibrahim, Nor Rosidah; Ho, Jacqueline; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Hasan, Habsah

    2014-01-01

    Even though in the corporate world psychological science has been widely used, the formal use of evidence-based psychology in important areas of clinical medicine has been scanty at best. It was the aim of this study to determine the efficacy of a psychologist-led 2-week nurse educator training on the infection rate in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In 2007, six senior neonatal nurses underwent a training course focusing on the retrieval of evidence and knowledge of psychological principles that would allow them to share the evidence in such a way that evidence is effectively brought into practice. The course was led by a psychologist. The nurses created and delivered their own teaching modules, all focused on infection control. The rates of bacteremia, 2 years prior to intervention were analyzed and compared with the rate following the intervention for 3 years. The immediate output of the course included three teaching modules: hand washing, sterile procedures, and general measures to control infection. These modules were subsequently administered to the NICU nurses in regular structured continuous nursing education sessions. The psychological techniques taught in the course were applied. Bacteremia in the NICU significantly decreased in the year of the course and the subsequent years when compared to previous years (from more than 17 in 2005 and 2006 to less than 10 per 100 admissions to the NICU in 2008 and 2009). This study suggests that a psychologist-led course, followed by a structured CNE can lead to a sustainable reduction in infection rates in a NICU.

  19. Effectiveness of osteopathic manipulative treatment in neonatal intensive care units: protocol for a multicentre randomised clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerritelli, Francesco; Pizzolorusso, Gianfranco; Renzetti, Cinzia; D'Incecco, Carmine; Fusilli, Paola; Perri, Paolo Francesco; Tubaldi, Lucia; Barlafante, Gina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal care has been considered as one of the first priorities for improving quality of life in children. In 2010, 10% of babies were born prematurely influencing national healthcare policies, economic action plans and political decisions. The use of complementary medicine has been applied to the care of newborns. One previous study documented the positive effect of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) in reducing newborns’ length of stay (LOS). Aim of this multicentre randomised controlled trial is to examine the association between OMT and LOS across three neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Methods and analysis 690 preterm infants will be recruited from three secondary and tertiary NICUs from north and central Italy and allocated into two groups, using permuted-block randomisation. The two groups will receive standard medical care and OMT will be applied, twice a week, to the experimental group only. Outcome assessors will be blinded of study design and group allocation. The primary outcome is the mean difference in days between discharge and entry. Secondary outcomes are difference in daily weight gain, number of episodes of vomit, regurgitation, stooling, use of enema, time to full enteral feeding and NICU costs. Statistical analyses will take into account the intention-to-treat method. Missing data will be handled using last observation carried forward (LOCF) imputation technique. Ethics and dissemination Written informed consent will be obtained from parents or legal guardians at study enrolment. The trial has been approved by the ethical committee of Macerata hospital (n°22/int./CEI/27239) and it is under review by the other regional ethics committees. Results Dissemination of results from this trial will be through scientific medical journals and conferences. Trial registration This trial has been registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.org (identifier NCT01645137). PMID:23430598

  20. Benchmarking outcomes in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Cytogenetic and molecular diagnostic rates in a retrospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malam, Faheem; Hartley, Taila; Gillespie, Meredith K; Armour, Christine M; Bariciak, Erika; Graham, Gail E; Nikkel, Sarah M; Richer, Julie; Sawyer, Sarah L; Boycott, Kym M; Dyment, David A

    2017-05-09

    Genetic disease and congenital anomalies continue to be a leading cause of neonate mortality and morbidity. A genetic diagnosis in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) can be a challenge given the associated genetic heterogeneity and early stage of a disease. We set out to evaluate the outcomes of Medical Genetics consultation in the NICU in terms of cytogenetic and molecular diagnostic rates and impact on management. We retrospectively reviewed 132 charts from patients admitted to the NICU who received a Medical Genetics diagnostic evaluation over a 2 year period. Of the 132 patients reviewed, 26% (34/132) received a cytogenetic or molecular diagnosis based on the Medical Genetics diagnostic evaluation; only 10% (13/132) received a diagnosis during their admission. The additional 16% (21 patients) received their diagnosis following NICU discharge, but based on a genetic test initiated during hospital-stay. Mean time from NICU admission to confirmed diagnosis was 24 days. For those who received a genetic diagnosis, the information was considered beneficial for clinical management in all, and a direct change to medical management occurred for 12% (4/32). For those non-diagnosed infants seen in out-patient follow-up clinic, diagnoses were made in 8% (3/37). The diagnoses made post-discharge from the NICU comprised a greater number of Mendelian disorders and represent an opportunity to improve genetic care. The adoption of diagnostic tools, such as exome sequencing, used in parallel with traditional approaches will improve rate of diagnoses and will have a significant impact, in particular when the differential diagnosis is broad. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. [Evaluation of pain in a neonatal intensive care unit during endocrine-metabolic tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín Gabriel, M A; López Escobar, A; Galán Redondo, M; Fernández Moreno, I; Fernández Bule, I; del Cerro García, R; Llana Martín, I; de la Cruz Bértolo, J; Lora Pablos, D

    2008-10-01

    To determine whether the pain suffered during the endocrine metabolic test can be lowered by adding skin to skin care to the use of sucrose. To establish factors that may modify the feeling of pain and evaluate the parents opinion during the extraction. Controlled clinical trial. Two groups: group 1 (n= 27), skin to skin and sucrose, and group 2 (n=27), sucrose. The pain was measured with the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS) during the endocrine metabolic test. Patients on mechanical ventilation, with HIV III or IV and those who had been given sedative analgesics in the previous 24 hours were excluded. The average gestational age in group 1 was 35.1 +/- 3.5 weeks and 35.4 +/- 3.2 weeks for group 2. The NIPS in group 1 was 2.51 +/- 1.42 and 2.81 +/- 2.11 (NS) in group 2. On only one occasion was severe pain noticed (group 2). There was a tendency towards a higher NIPS with a higher gestational age (r=0.19) and a lower number of previous capillary (r= -0.06) and venous (r= -0.11) extractions. Group 1 parents thought that this practice contributed to decreasing their children's irritability and increased their trust in the care team. By adding skin to skin care to the sucrose during the endocrine metabolic test does not relieve the pain feeling. Parents in the skin to skin group thought that this practice contributed to decreasing their children's irritability and increased their trust in the care team.

  2. The Role of Post-Mortem MRI in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbetter, Kristen; Vesoulis, Zachary A.; White, Frances V.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Khanna, Geetika; Shimony, Joshua S.; Mathur, Amit M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Post-mortem examination can provide important information about the cause of death and play a significant role in the bereavement process. Autopsies reveal previous unknown medical problems approximately 20–30% of the time. A non-invasive MRI-based post-mortem examination (PM-MRI) may provide an alternative for families who do not consent to an autopsy. Study Design This study was a prospective observational study of recently expired neonates and infants. Subjects underwent a full body MRI scan (brain, chest, abdomen and pelvis) followed by conventional autopsy if the family desired to have one. MRI results were compared to autopsy findings and the ante mortem clinical diagnosis. A follow-up survey was conducted to investigate family perceptions of the PM-MRI process. Result Thirty-one infants underwent full PM-MRI. 19/31 (61%) of infants had complete agreement between the clinician’s impression and PM-MRI. Twenty-four infants also had conventional autopsy, with 14/24 (58%) infants having PM-MRI results consistent with autopsy findings. PM-MRI was superior at detection of free intraperitoneal/intrathoracic air and hepatic iron overload. Whole body PM-MRI did not have the resolution to detect focal/microscopic injury, vascular remodeling and some forms of brain injury. Of those families who remembered the PM-MRI findings, the majority felt that the information was useful. Conclusion PM-MRI studies may provide an important adjunct to conventional autopsy and a substitute when the latter is not possible for personal or religious reasons. Clinicians should be aware of, and communicate with the family, the resolution limits of the whole body PM-MRI to detect certain types of injury. PMID:27654494

  3. Factors Affecting the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Stay Duration in Very Low Birth Weight Premature Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Niknajad, Akram; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Sattarzadeh, Niloufar; Bashar Hashemi, Fazileh; Dezham Khoy Shahgholi, Farid

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Improved survival of very low birth weight (VLBW) premature infants requires urgent intensive care, professional nursing and medical care. On the other hand, long hospital stay period imposes emotional and economic burdens on the family and society. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the most important factors affecting their hospitalization duration to lessen unwanted outcomes of premature birth and to eliminate or relieve the problems. Methods: In a descri...

  4. Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Foglia, Elizabeth; Meier, Mary Dawn; Elward, Alexis

    2007-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the second most common hospital-acquired infection among pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Empiric therapy for VAP accounts for approximately 50% of antibiotic use in pediatric ICUs. VAP is associated with an excess of 3 days of mechanical ventilation among pediatric cardiothoracic surgery patients. The attributable mortality and excess length of ICU stay for patients with VAP have not been defined in matched case control studies. VAP is as...

  5. Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention trial: effect of aspirin on length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David; Rolnik, Daniel L; Syngelaki, Argyro; de Paco Matallana, Catalina; Machuca, Mirian; de Alvarado, Mercedes; Mastrodima, Sofia; Yi Tan, Min; Shearing, Siobhan; Persico, Nicola; Jani, Jacques C; Plasencia, Walter; Papaioannou, George; Molina, Francisca S; Poon, Liona C; Nicolaides, Kypros H

    2018-03-02

    Preeclampsia is a major pregnancy complication with adverse short- and long-term implications for both the mother and baby. Screening for preeclampsia at 11-13 weeks' gestation by a combination of maternal demographic characteristics and medical history with measurements of biomarkers can identify about 75% of women that develop preterm-preeclampsia with delivery at intensive care unit, which was one of the secondary outcomes, was not significantly affected (odds ratio 0.93, 95% confidence interval, 0.62-1.40). To examine the effect of prophylactic use of aspirin d