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Sample records for d1 overexpression p53

  1. Tobacco, alcohol, and p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, Mary Beth; Neugut, Alfred I; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Waye, Jerome; Harpaz, Noam; Hibshoosh, Hanina

    2003-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is commonly mutated in colorectal cancer. While the effect of p53 mutations on colorectal cancer prognosis has been heavily studied, less is known about how epidemiologic risk factors relate to p53 status, particularly in early colorectal neoplasia prior to clinically invasive colorectal cancer (including adenomas, carcinoma in situ (CIS), and intramucosal carcinoma). We examined p53 status, as measured by protein overexpression, in 157 cases with early colorectal neoplasia selected from three New York City colonoscopy clinics. After collecting paraffin-embedded tissue blocks, immunohistochemistry was performed using an anti-p53 monoclonal mouse IgG 2 a [BP53-12-1] antibody. We analyzed whether p53 status was different for risk factors for colorectal neoplasia relative to a polyp-free control group (n = 508). p53 overexpression was found in 10.3%, 21.7%, and 34.9%, of adenomatous polyps, CIS, and intramucosal cases, respectively. Over 90% of the tumors with p53 overexpression were located in the distal colon and rectum. Heavy cigarette smoking (30+ years) was associated with cases not overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1–2.9) but not with those cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.4–2.6). Heavy beer consumption (8+ bottles per week) was associated with cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.3–12.0) but not with cases without p53 overexpression (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 0.7–3.7). Our findings that p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia may be positively associated with alcohol intake and inversely associated with cigarette smoking are consistent with those of several studies of p53 expression and invasive cancer, and suggest that there may be relationships of smoking and alcohol with p53 early in the adenoma to carcinoma sequence

  2. Tobacco, alcohol, and p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansukhani Mahesh

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p53 tumor suppressor gene is commonly mutated in colorectal cancer. While the effect of p53 mutations on colorectal cancer prognosis has been heavily studied, less is known about how epidemiologic risk factors relate to p53 status, particularly in early colorectal neoplasia prior to clinically invasive colorectal cancer (including adenomas, carcinoma in situ (CIS, and intramucosal carcinoma. Methods We examined p53 status, as measured by protein overexpression, in 157 cases with early colorectal neoplasia selected from three New York City colonoscopy clinics. After collecting paraffin-embedded tissue blocks, immunohistochemistry was performed using an anti-p53 monoclonal mouse IgG2a [BP53-12-1] antibody. We analyzed whether p53 status was different for risk factors for colorectal neoplasia relative to a polyp-free control group (n = 508. Results p53 overexpression was found in 10.3%, 21.7%, and 34.9%, of adenomatous polyps, CIS, and intramucosal cases, respectively. Over 90% of the tumors with p53 overexpression were located in the distal colon and rectum. Heavy cigarette smoking (30+ years was associated with cases not overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1–2.9 but not with those cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.4–2.6. Heavy beer consumption (8+ bottles per week was associated with cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.3–12.0 but not with cases without p53 overexpression (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 0.7–3.7. Conclusion Our findings that p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia may be positively associated with alcohol intake and inversely associated with cigarette smoking are consistent with those of several studies of p53 expression and invasive cancer, and suggest that there may be relationships of smoking and alcohol with p53 early in the adenoma to carcinoma sequence.

  3. Mutations in p53, p53 protein overexpression and breast cancer survival

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rössner ml., Pavel; Gammon, M. D.; Zhang, Y.J.; Terry, M. B.; Hibshoosh, H.; Memeo, L.; Mansukhani, M.; Long, CH.M.; Gabrowski, G.; Agrawal, M.; Kalra, T.S.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Neugut, A. I.; Santella, R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9B (2009), s. 3847-3857 ISSN 1582-1838 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Breast cancer * p53 mutations * Survival Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2009

  4. Immunological and Clinical Effects of Vaccines Targeting p53-Overexpressing Malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, R.; Leffers, N.; van der Burg, S. H.; Melief, C. J.; Daemen, T.; Nijman, H. W.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 50% of human malignancies carry p53 mutations, which makes it a potential antigenic target for cancer immunotherapy. Adoptive transfer with p53-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) and CD4(+) T-helper cells eradicates p53-overexpressing tumors in mice. Furthermore, p53 antibodies and

  5. P53 overexpression and outcome of radiation therapy in head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Ah; Choi, Ihl Bhong; Kang, Ki Mun; Jang, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Mi; Park, Kyung Shin; Kim, Young Shin; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Seung Ho; Kim, Hyung Tae

    1999-01-01

    Experimental studies have implicated the wild type p53 in cellular response to radiation. Whether altered p53 function can lead to changes in clinical radiocurability remains an area of ongoing study. This study was performed to investigate whether any correlation between change of p53 and outcome of curative radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancers. Immunohistochemical analysis with a mouse monoclonal antibody (D0-7) specific for human p53 was used to detect to overexpression of protein in formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor sample from 55 head and neck cancer patients treated with curative radiation therapy (median dose of 7020 cGy) from February 1988 to March 1996 at St. Mary's Hospital. Overexpression of p53 was correlated with locoregional control and survival using Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression multivariate analysis was performed that included all clinical variables and status of p53 expression. Thirty-seven (67.2%) patients showed overexpression of p53 by immunohistochemical staining in their tumor. One hundred percent of oral cavity, 76% of laryngeal, 66.7% of oropharyngeal, 66.7% of hypopharyngeal cancer showed p53 overexpression (p=0.05). The status of p53 had significant relationship with stage of disease (p=0.03) and history of smoking (p=0.001). The overexpression of p53 was not predictive of response rate to radiation therapy. The locoregional control was not significantly affected by p53 status. Overexpression of p53 didn't have any prognostic implication for disease free survival and overall survival. Primary site and stage of disease were significant prognostic factors for survival. The p53 overexpression as detected by immunohistochemical staining had significant correlation with stage, primary site of disease and smoking habit of patients. The p53 overexpression didn't have any predictive value for outcome of curative radiation therapy in a group of head and neck cancers

  6. Overexpression of p53 in Nigerian breast cancers and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to determine the expression of p53 protein as well as the relationship with oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) proteins. Methodology: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples of diagnosed invasive breast cancer were obtained from the Department of Anatomic and ...

  7. The LIM-only protein FHL2 mediates ras-induced transformation through cyclin D1 and p53 pathways.

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    Charlotte Labalette

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Four and a half LIM-only protein 2 (FHL2 has been implicated in multiple signaling pathways that regulate cell growth and tissue homeostasis. We reported previously that FHL2 regulates cyclin D1 expression and that immortalized FHL2-null mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs display reduced levels of cyclin D1 and low proliferative activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we address the contribution of FHL2 in cell transformation by investigating the effects of oncogenic Ras in FHL2-null context. We show that H-RasV12 provokes cell cycle arrest accompanied by accumulation of p53 and p16(INK4a in immortalized FHL2(-/- MEFs. These features contrast sharply with Ras transforming activity in wild type cell lines. We further show that establishment of FHL2-null cell lines differs from conventional immortalization scheme by retaining functional p19(ARF/p53 checkpoint that is required for cell cycle arrest imposed by Ras. However, after serial passages of Ras-expressing FHL2(-/- cells, dramatic increase in the levels of D-type cyclins and Rb phosphorylation correlates with the onset of cell proliferation and transformation without disrupting the p19(ARF/p53 pathway. Interestingly, primary FHL2-null cells overexpressing cyclin D1 undergo a classical immortalization process leading to loss of the p19(ARF/p53 checkpoint and susceptibility to Ras transformation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings uncover a novel aspect of cellular responses to mitogenic stimulation and illustrate a critical role of FHL2 in the signalling network that implicates Ras, cyclin D1 and p53.

  8. p53 Over-expression and p53 mutations in colon carcinomas: Relation to dietary risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuil, D.W.; Kampman, E.; Kraats, A.A. van; Balder, H.F.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, P. van 't

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that dietary factors may differently affect p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways to colon cancer. Results of such studies may depend on the method used to assess p53 status. This case-control study of 185 colon-cancer cases and 259 controls examines this

  9. Overexpression of p53, MDM2 proteins in some atr radiation-induced skin ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Qingyang; Gao Yabing; Wang Dewen; Cui Yufang; Zhao Po; Yang Zhixiang; Zhou Jie

    2000-01-01

    An animal model of radiation-induced skin ulcer was set up with 140 rats, which were locally irradiated with 35-55 Gy γ-rays. The pathological changes were observed for 1 year. Immunohistochemical studies were performed in 72 rat radiation skin ulcer specimens using anti-p53 and anti-MDM2 proteins polyclonal antibodies. The results showed that the positive rate for overexpression of p53 protein was 9.7%, and for that of MDM2 was 19.4%. The overexpression of p53 was mainly seen in the nuclei of activated squamous epithelial cells, and in fibroblasts, endotheliocytes in deeper part of the skin ulcers. The overexpression of MDM2 had the same localizations. It is suggested that the changes of p53 and MDM2, genes and proteins, may be related to the cancer transformation and poor healing of radiation-induced skin ulcers

  10. Dendrosomal nanocurcumin and p53 overexpression synergistically trigger apoptosis in glioblastoma cells

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    Reihaneh Keshavarz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Glioblastoma is the most lethal tumor of the central nervous system. Here, we aimed to evaluate the effects of exogenous delivery of p53 and a nanoformulation of curcumin called dendrosomal curcumin (DNC, alone and in combination, on glioblastoma tumor cells. Materials and Methods: MTT assay was exploited to measure the viability of U87-MG cells against DNC treatment. Cells were separately subjected to DNC treatment and transfected with p53-containing vector and then were co-exposed to DNC and p53 overexpression. Annexin-V-FLUOS staining followed by flow cytometry and real-time PCR were applied to examine apoptosis and analyze the expression levels of the genes involved in cell cycle and oncogenesis, respectively. Results: The results of cell viability assay through MTT indicated that DNC inhibits the proliferation of U87-MG cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Apoptosis evaluation revealed that p53 overexpression accompanied by DNC treatment can act in a synergistic manner to significantly enhance the number of apoptotic cells (90% compared with their application alone (15% and 38% for p53 overexpression and DNC, respectively. Also, real-time PCR data showed that the concomitant exposure of cells to both DNC and p53 overexpression leads to an enhanced expression of GADD45 and a reduced expression of NF-κB and c-Myc. Conclusion: The findings of the current study suggest that our combination strategy, which merges two detached gene (p53 and drug (curcumin delivery systems into an integrated platform, may represent huge potential as a novel and efficient modality for glioblastoma treatment.

  11. Dendrosomal nanocurcumin and p53 overexpression synergistically trigger apoptosis in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Reihaneh; Bakhshinejad, Babak; Babashah, Sadegh; Baghi, Narges; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastoma is the most lethal tumor of the central nervous system. Here, we aimed to evaluate the effects of exogenous delivery of p53 and a nanoformulation of curcumin called dendrosomal curcumin (DNC), alone and in combination, on glioblastoma tumor cells. MTT assay was exploited to measure the viability of U87-MG cells against DNC treatment. Cells were separately subjected to DNC treatment and transfected with p53-containing vector and then were co-exposed to DNC and p53 overexpression[A GA1][B2]. Annexin-V-FLUOS staining followed by flow cytometry and real-time PCR were applied to examine apoptosis and analyze the expression levels of the genes involved in cell cycle and oncogenesis, respectively. The results of cell viability assay through MTT indicated that DNC inhibits the proliferation of U87-MG cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Apoptosis evaluation revealed that p53 overexpression accompanied by DNC treatment can act in a synergistic manner to significantly enhance the number of apoptotic cells (90%) compared with their application alone (15% and 38% for p53 overexpression and DNC, respectively). Also, real-time PCR data showed that the concomitant exposure of cells to both DNC and p53 overexpression leads to an enhanced expression of GADD45 and a reduced expression of NF-κB and c-Myc. The findings of the current study suggest that our combination strategy, which merges two detached gene (p53) and drug (curcumin) delivery systems into an integrated platform, may represent huge potential as a novel and efficient modality for glioblastoma treatment.

  12. P53 mutation analysis of colorectal liver metastases : Relation to actual survival, angiogenic status, and p53 overexpression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, KP; Gouw, ASH; Peeters, PMJG; Bulthuis, M; Menkema, L; Porte, RJ; Slooff, MJH; van Goor, H; van den Berg, Anke

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate TP53 mutations with angiogenic status of the tumor and prognosis after liver surgery in patients with colorectal liver metastases and to correlate immunohistochemical staining of p53 protein with TP53 gene mutations. Experimental Design: Tumors of 44 patients with surgically

  13. P53 overexpression in head and neck carcinoma and radiotherapy results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awwad, Saif; Jaros, Evelyn; Somes, James; Lunec, John

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: P53 gene mutations are the common genetic changes encountered in human cancers, and there is extensive evidence that the P53 status may determine tumor response to therapy. This study was carried out to investigate whether there is any correlation between accumulation (overexpression) of P53 protein and poor prognosis in patients with head and neck carcinomas treated with radical radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-nine patients with head and neck carcinomas who were diagnosed and treated in 1989-90 with curative radiotherapy were studied retrospectively. Paraffin sections from archival material were studied using immunohistochemical staining (IHC) with mouse monoclonal antibodies (D0-7) to human P53 protein. Univariate and multivariate analysis of loco-regional tumor control and patient survival were performed on possible prognostic factors. Results: Forty-two (53%) patients showed positive IHC staining in their tumors. Fifty-three percent of the laryngeal, 64% of the oropharyngeal, and 43% of the oral cavity carcinomas showed P53 overexpression. All tumor specimens with vascular, lymphatic, and/or sarcolemmal invasion showed P53 overexpression. The proportion of tumor-stained nuclei was higher in the poorly differentiated than in the well and moderately differentiated tumors (p < 0.05), but there was no correlation with the patient overall or disease-free 5-year actuarial survival. There was no difference in the 5-year actuarial survival and disease-free survival between patients with P53 immunostaining in their tumors and those with no immunostaining (59% vs. 65% and 57% vs. 51%, respectively). The TNM tumor stage was the most significant prognostic factor with 5-year actuarial survival of 87% for early and 14% for late stages (p << 0.0001). There was a significant correlation between immunostaining and history of smoking (p = 0.02). Conclusion: The data demonstrate that the P53 accumulation as detected by immunohistochemical staining in a

  14. DNA hypermethylation, Her-2/neu overexpression and p53 mutations in ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qinghua; Deftereos, Georgios; Hawes, Stephen E; Stern, Joshua E; Willner, Julia B; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Xi, Longfu; Drescher, Charles; Urban, Nicole; Kiviat, Nancy

    2008-11-01

    To define patterns of aberrant DNA methylation, p53 mutation and Her-2/neu overexpression in tissues from benign (n=29), malignant (n=100), and border line malignant ovaries (n=10), as compared to normal (n=68) ovarian tissues. Further, to explore the relationship between the presence of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in ovarian cancers, and assess the association between epigenetic changes and clinical stage of malignancy at presentation and response to therapy. The methylation status of 23 genes that were previously reported associated with various epithelial malignancies was assessed in normal and abnormal ovarian tissues by methylation-specific PCR. The presence of p53 mutation (n=82 cases) and Her-2/neu overexpression (n=51 cases) were assessed by DNA sequencing and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Methylation of four genes (MINT31, HIC1, RASSF1, and CABIN1) was significantly associated with ovarian cancer but not other ovarian pathology. Her-2/neu overexpression was associated with aberrant methylation of three genes (MINT31, RASSF1, and CDH13), although aberrant methylation was not associated with p53 mutations. Methylation of RASSF1 and HIC1 was more frequent in early compared to late stage ovarian cancer, while methylation of CABIN1 and RASSF1 was associated with response to chemotherapy. DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes is a frequent event in ovarian cancer, and in some cases is associated with Her-2/neu overexpression. Methylation of CABIN1 and RASSF1 may have the utility to predict response to therapy.

  15. Overexpression of SKI Oncoprotein Leads to p53 Degradation through Regulation of MDM2 Protein Sumoylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Boxiao; Sun, Yin; Huang, Jiaoti

    2012-01-01

    Protooncogene Ski was identified based on its ability to transform avian fibroblasts in vitro. In support of its oncogenic activity, SKI was found to be overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, although the exact molecular mechanism(s) responsible for its oncogenic activity is not fully understood. We found that SKI can negatively regulate p53 by decreasing its level through up-regulation of MDM2 activity, which is mediated by the ability of SKI to enhance sumoylation of MDM2. This stimulation of MDM2 sumoylation is accomplished through a direct interaction of SKI with SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2, Ubc9, resulting in enhanced thioester bond formation and mono-sumoylation of Ubc9. A mutant SKI defective in transformation fails to increase p53 ubiquitination and is unable to increase MDM2 levels and to increase mono-sumoylation of Ubc9, suggesting that the ability of SKI to enhance Ubc9 activity is essential for its transforming function. These results established a detailed molecular mechanism that underlies the ability of SKI to cause cellular transformation while unraveling a novel connection between sumoylation and tumorigenesis, providing potential new therapeutic targets for cancer. PMID:22411991

  16. Overexpression of SKI oncoprotein leads to p53 degradation through regulation of MDM2 protein sumoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Boxiao; Sun, Yin; Huang, Jiaoti

    2012-04-27

    Protooncogene Ski was identified based on its ability to transform avian fibroblasts in vitro. In support of its oncogenic activity, SKI was found to be overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, although the exact molecular mechanism(s) responsible for its oncogenic activity is not fully understood. We found that SKI can negatively regulate p53 by decreasing its level through up-regulation of MDM2 activity, which is mediated by the ability of SKI to enhance sumoylation of MDM2. This stimulation of MDM2 sumoylation is accomplished through a direct interaction of SKI with SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2, Ubc9, resulting in enhanced thioester bond formation and mono-sumoylation of Ubc9. A mutant SKI defective in transformation fails to increase p53 ubiquitination and is unable to increase MDM2 levels and to increase mono-sumoylation of Ubc9, suggesting that the ability of SKI to enhance Ubc9 activity is essential for its transforming function. These results established a detailed molecular mechanism that underlies the ability of SKI to cause cellular transformation while unraveling a novel connection between sumoylation and tumorigenesis, providing potential new therapeutic targets for cancer.

  17. Apoptosis, proliferation and p53, cyclin D1, and retinoblastoma gene expression in relation to radiation response in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moonen, Luc; Ong, Francisca; Gallee, Maarten; Verheij, Marcel; Horenblas, Simon; Hart, Augustinus A.M.; Bartelink, Harry

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the apoptotic index, the Ki67 index, and the expression of the p53, cyclin D1, and retinoblastoma genes correlate with local control, overall survival, and time to distant metastases in invasive bladder cancer treated with external beam radiation. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded pretreatment biopsies from 83 patients with invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder were scored morphologically for apoptosis and immunohistochemically for Ki67, p53, cyclin D1, and retinoblastoma gene expression. Survival analysis methods were used to assess overall survival, local control, and freedom from distant metastases. A multiple proportional hazard (PH) regression analysis was performed to study the prognostic value of the above mentioned biologic parameters (all divided into two categories, except Ki67) in addition to classical prognostic factors such as T stage, histologic grade, multifocality of the tumor, and completeness of transurethral resection. All patients were treated with external beam radiation as sole treatment. Median follow-up for the 19 patients still living was 7.5 years. Results: Apoptotic index varied from 0% to 3.4% with a mean of 0.8% and a median of 0.6%. Ki67 index varied from 0% to 60% with a mean of 14% and a median of 12%. P53 protein was detectable in 61% of the tumors. Overexpression of cyclin D1 was observed in 39% of the tumors and loss of retinoblastoma protein in 23% of the tumors. High Ki67 index was found to be significantly associated with p53 expression (p=0.04) and cyclin D1 overexpression (p=0.023). Cyclin D1 overexpression was found more often in Rb-positive tumors than in Rb-negative tumors (p=0.006). Other associations between the markers are less clear. Biologic markers were not correlated with T stage or grade. In the PH analysis local control was found to be significantly better for tumors with wild-type p53 (p=0.028). Also, tumors with an apoptotic index above the median value (0

  18. Overexpression of 15-lipoxygenase-1 induces growth arrest through phosphorylation of p53 in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Sik; Baek, Seung Joon; Bottone, Frank G; Sali, Tina; Eling, Thomas E

    2005-09-01

    To investigate the function of 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LOX-1) in human colorectal cancer, we overexpressed 15-LOX-1 in HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells. Clones expressing the highest levels of 15-LOX-1 displayed reduced viability compared with the HCT-116-Vector control cells. Further, by cell cycle gene array analyses, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 and MDM2 genes were up-regulated in 15-LOX-1-overexpressing cells. The induction of p21(WAF1/CIP1) and MDM2 were linked to activation of p53 by 15-LOX-1, as there was a dramatic induction of phosphorylated p53 (Ser15) in 15-LOX-1-overesxpressing cells. However, the 15-LOX-1 metabolites 13(S)-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid and 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid failed to induce phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15, and the 15-LOX-1 inhibitor PD146176 did not inhibit the phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 in 15-LOX-1-overexpressing cells. Nonetheless, the growth-inhibitory effects of 15-LOX-1 were p53 dependent, as 15-LOX-1 overexpression had no effect on cell growth in p53 (-/-) HCT-116 cells. Finally, treatment of HCT-116-15-LOX-1 cells with different kinase inhibitors suggested that the effects of 15-LOX-1 on p53 phosphorylation and activation were due to effects on DNA-dependent protein kinase. Collectively, these findings suggest a new mechanism to explain the biological activity of 15-LOX-1, where 15-LOX plays a stoichiometric role in activating a DNA-dependent protein kinase-dependent pathway that leads to p53-dependent growth arrest.

  19. p53 Protein overexpression in cholangiocarcinoma arising in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, P M; Ryder, S D; Portmann, B; Ramage, J K; Naoumov, N V; Williams, R

    1996-01-01

    The protein encoded by the p53 tumour suppressor gene plays an important part in the regulation of cell growth. Abnormalities of this gene represent one of the most common genetic changes in the development of human cancers. This study investigated the expression of p53 protein in cholangiocarcinoma arising in association with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Of the 14 patients with cholangiocarcinoma studied, 13 had underlying PSC. The expression of p53 protein was detected immunohistochemically in paraffin wax embedded liver specimens, after microwave pretreatment. The expression of p53 protein was shown in the cholangiocarcinoma tissue of 11 of 14 (78.5%) patients. In five of 10 patients, the accumulation of p53 protein highlighted the presence of neoplastic cells in biliary tissue separate from the main tumour. These cells were mainly located in the septal bile ducts or in the accessory glands, or both, but occasionally also in large portal areas at the periphery of nerves and lymphatics, and in one case in the mucosa of an extrahepatic bile duct. No p53 protein was detectable in liver tissue obtained at the time of transplantation in 15 patients with PSC but not cholangiocarcinoma. These results show that cholangiocarcinoma development in PSC is commonly associated with abnormalities of p53 and that these occur at a late stage in the development of the malignant process. Staining for p53 protein could represent an additional criterion for the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma development in patients with PSC. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8801209

  20. Cyclin E mRNA overexpression in epithelial ovarian cancers: inverse correlation with p53 protein accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawasaki, T; Shigemasa, K; Shiroyama, Y; Kusuda, T; Fujii, T; Parmley, T H; O'Brien, T J; Ohama, K

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between cyclin E mRNA overexpression and p53 protein accumulation in epithelial ovarian cancers. mRNA was isolated and cDNA was prepared from 36 epithelial ovarian tumors (three adenomas, three low malignant potential tumors, and 30 carcinomas), and six normal ovaries. The cyclin E mRNA expression levels relative to an internal control, beta-tubulin, were determined by semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Cyclin E and p53 protein expression in ovarian cancer tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry using the same series of samples. Fisher exact test of significance and an unpaired t test were used for statistical analysis. Considerable levels of cyclin E mRNA were detected in all normal ovaries and ovarian tumor samples examined by semiquantitative PCR amplification. mRNA levels of cyclin E were significantly higher in nine of 30 (30%) ovarian cancers compared with those in normal ovaries. The immunohistochemical expression of cyclin E protein was confirmed in the nuclei of tumor cells in 13 of 30 (43%) ovarian cancers. p53 protein accumulation was detected in 12 of 30 (40%) ovarian cancers examined. There was a significant inverse correlation between cyclin E mRNA overexpression and p53 protein accumulation (P ovarian cancers without p53 protein accumulation. Cyclin E might have an important effect on the development of a limited number of ovarian cancers.

  1. Concurrent overexpression of serum p53 mutation related with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Saez, Juan-Bosco; Gómez-Biondi, Victoria; Santamaría-Rodriguez, Germán; Dominguez-Villar, Margarita; Amaya-Vidal, Antonio; Lorenzo-Peñuelas, Antonio; Senra-Varela, Avelino

    2010-06-04

    In the province of Cadiz (Spain), the adjusted mortality rate for gastric cancer in the coastal town of Barbate is 10/100.000 inhabitants, whereas in the inland town of Ubrique, the rate is twice as high. The rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection (H. pylori antibodies) in the normal population was 54% in Ubrique, but only 32% in Barbate. In the two decades since its original discovery, p53 has found a singularly prominent place in our understanding of human gastric cancer and H. pylori cause accumulation of reactive oxygen species in the mucosa compartment. This study was designed to compare serum levels of p53 in a population characterized by high mortality due to stomach cancer and a high prevalence of H. pylori infection and another population in which mortality from this cause and the prevalence of H. pylori infection are low. 319 subjects from the low mortality population and 308 from the high mortality population were studied, as were 71 patients with stomach cancer. We measured serum immunoglobulin G antibody to H. pylori and serum mutant p53 protein and ceruloplasmin. The difference between the two populations in the prevalence of H. pylori infection was significant (p Serum concentration of ceruloplasmin was significantly higher in seropositive with elevated mutant p53 protein than in seronegative with normal levels of p53 (p serum mutant p53 protein. Such information can significantly increase our basic knowledge in molecular pathology of gastric cancer and protection against H. pylori infection.

  2. Immunohistochemical study of p53 overexpression in radiation-induced colon cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Kazunori; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Mokarim, A.; Matsuzaki, Sumihiro; Ito, Masahiro; Sekine, Ichiro.

    1998-01-01

    The expressions of p53 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were studied immunohistochemically from paraffin sections of 7 cases (9 lesions) of radiation-induced colon cancer and 42 cases of spontaneous colon cancer. Age distribution of radiation-induced and spontaneous colon cancer were 68.1 years (range, 56 to 77 years) and 67.4 years (range, 31 to 85 years), respectively. Among the radiation-induced colon cancers, there were 3 lesions of mucinous carcinoma (33%), a much higher than found for spontaneous mucinous cancer. Immunohistochemically, p53 protein expression was detected in 7/9 (78%) of radiation-induced cancers and in 23/42 (55%) of spontaneous colon cancers. χ 2 analysis found no significant differences between radiation-induced and spontaneous colon cancers in age distribution or p53-positive staining for frequency, histopathology, or Dukes'' classification. In radiation colitis around the cancers including aberrant crypts, spotted p53 staining and abnormal and scattered PCNA-positive staining were observed. In histologically normal cells, p53 staining was almost absent and PCNA-positive staining was regularly observed in the lower half of the crypt. In radiation colitis including aberrant glands, cellular proliferation increased and spotted p53 expression was observed. This study suggests that radiation colitis and aberrant glands might possess malignant potential and deeply associate with carcinogenesis of radiation-induced colon cancer. (author)

  3. Cdk5 phosphorylates non-genotoxically overexpressed p53 following inhibition of PP2A to induce cell cycle arrest/apoptosis and inhibits tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Ratna

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 is the most studied tumor suppressor and its overexpression may or may not cause cell death depending upon the genetic background of the cells. p53 is degraded by human papillomavirus (HPV E6 protein in cervical carcinoma. Several stress activated kinases are known to phosphorylate p53 and, among them cyclin dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is one of the kinase studied in neuronal cell system. Recently, the involvement of Cdk5 in phosphorylating p53 has been shown in certain cancer types. Phosphorylation at specific serine residues in p53 is essential for it to cause cell growth inhibition. Activation of p53 under non stress conditions is poorly understood. Therefore, the activation of p53 and detection of upstream kinases that phosphorylate non-genotoxically overexpressed p53 will be of therapeutic importance for cancer treatment. Results To determine the non-genotoxic effect of p53; Tet-On system was utilized and p53 inducible HPV-positive HeLa cells were developed. p53 overexpression in HPV-positive cells did not induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. However, we demonstrate that overexpressed p53 can be activated to upregulate p21 and Bax which causes G2 arrest and apoptosis, by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A. Additionally, we report that the upstream kinase cyclin dependent kinase 5 interacts with p53 to phosphorylate it at Serine20 and Serine46 residues thereby promoting its recruitment on p21 and bax promoters. Upregulation and translocation of Bax causes apoptosis through intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Interestingly, overexpressed activated p53 specifically inhibits cell-growth and causes regression in vivo tumor growth as well. Conclusion Present study details the mechanism of activation of p53 and puts forth the possibility of p53 gene therapy to work in HPV positive cervical carcinoma.

  4. Concurrent overexpression of serum p53 mutation related with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo-Peñuelas Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aims In the province of Cadiz (Spain, the adjusted mortality rate for gastric cancer in the coastal town of Barbate is 10/100.000 inhabitants, whereas in the inland town of Ubrique, the rate is twice as high. The rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection (H. pylori antibodies in the normal population was 54% in Ubrique, but only 32% in Barbate. In the two decades since its original discovery, p53 has found a singularly prominent place in our understanding of human gastric cancer and H. pylori cause accumulation of reactive oxygen species in the mucosa compartment. This study was designed to compare serum levels of p53 in a population characterized by high mortality due to stomach cancer and a high prevalence of H. pylori infection and another population in which mortality from this cause and the prevalence of H. pylori infection are low. Materials and methods 319 subjects from the low mortality population and 308 from the high mortality population were studied, as were 71 patients with stomach cancer. We measured serum immunoglobulin G antibody to H. pylori and serum mutant p53 protein and ceruloplasmin. Results The difference between the two populations in the prevalence of H. pylori infection was significant (p Conclusions There is a significant association between infection with H. pylori, elevated titers of H. pylori antibodies, and positivity for serum mutant p53 protein. Such information can significantly increase our basic knowledge in molecular pathology of gastric cancer and protection against H. pylori infection.

  5. Lack of cyclin D1 overexpression in gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, P.; Craanen, M. E.; van Diest, P. J.; Dekker, W.; Tytgat, G. N.

    2000-01-01

    Cyclin D1 overexpression was examined in early gastric carcinomas and precursor lesions with the following aims; (1) to assess the chronology of cyclin D1 overexpression in various stages of gastric carcinogenesis, (2) to correlate cyclin D1 overexpression with the Lauren type, the grade of

  6. Immunohistochemical overexpression of p16 and p53 in uterine serous carcinoma and ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa-Vottero, Andres G; Malpica, Anais; Deavers, Michael T; Broaddus, Russell; Nuovo, Gerard J; Silva, Elvio G

    2007-07-01

    The immunohistochemical expression pattern of p16 in biopsy samples has been useful as part of a panel to distinguish adenocarcinomas arising from the endometrium from those arising from the endocervix. However, no information is available on the expression of p16 in uterine serous carcinoma (USC) or ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma that could be used for diagnostic purposes. Here, we retrospectively analyzed the immunohistochemical expression of p16 in 11 cases of USC (5 pure and 6 mixed with endometrioid adenocarcinoma) and 10 cases of ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma and compared p16 expression with that of p53 in the same samples. p16 was strongly expressed by 100% of tumor cells in all 11 uterine specimens and in 5 of the 10 ovarian specimens; of the other 5 ovarian specimens, 4 showed strong positivity in 20% to 80% of tumor cells, and 1 case showed only weak expression. Positivity for p53 was strong and diffuse (100% of tumor cells) in 5 uterine tumors and in 3 ovarian tumors. p53 expression in 6 of the uterine specimens and 7 of the ovarian specimens was present in fewer tumor cells, of weak intensity, or both. We also performed human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA in situ hybridization in 4 uterine pure serous carcinomas; all 4 were negative. The negative results were confirmed by reverse transcriptase in situ polymerase chain reaction. We conclude that p16, owing to its diffuse expression in USC, should not be interpreted as indicating cervical origin or HPV-induced carcinogenesis; however, p16 may be a better marker (albeit unspecific) than p53 for identifying USC. The overexpression of p16 in USC is unrelated to HPV. Further studies are necessary to determine whether p16 expression is useful in the differential diagnosis of ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma.

  7. Overexpressed ubiquitin ligase Cullin7 in breast cancer promotes cell proliferation and invasion via down-regulating p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hongsheng [Department of Histology and Embryology, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808, Guangdong (China); Wu, Fenping [The 7th People’s Hospital of Chengdu, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Wang, Yan [The Second School of Clinical Medicine, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808, Guangdong (China); Yan, Chong [School of Pharmacy, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808, Guangdong (China); Su, Wenmei, E-mail: wenmeisutg@126.com [Oncology of Affiliated Hospital Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524000, Guangdong (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Cullin7 is overexpressed in human breast cancer samples. • Cullin7 stimulated proliferation and invasion of breast cancer cells. • Inhibition of p53 contributes to Cullin7-induced proliferation and invasion. - Abstract: Ubiquitin ligase Cullin7 has been identified as an oncogene in some malignant diseases such as choriocarcinoma and neuroblastoma. However, the role of Cullin7 in breast cancer carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we compared Cullin7 protein levels in breast cancer tissues with normal breast tissues and identified significantly higher expression of Cullin7 protein in breast cancer specimens. By overexpressing Cullin7 in breast cancer cells HCC1937, we found that Cullin7 could promote cell growth and invasion in vitro. In contrast, the cell growth and invasion was inhibited by silencing Cullin7 in breast cancer cell BT474. Moreover, we demonstrated that Cullin7 promoted breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion via down-regulating p53 expression. Thus, our study provided evidence that Cullin7 functions as a novel oncogene in breast cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer management.

  8. Overexpressed ubiquitin ligase Cullin7 in breast cancer promotes cell proliferation and invasion via down-regulating p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hongsheng; Wu, Fenping; Wang, Yan; Yan, Chong; Su, Wenmei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Cullin7 is overexpressed in human breast cancer samples. • Cullin7 stimulated proliferation and invasion of breast cancer cells. • Inhibition of p53 contributes to Cullin7-induced proliferation and invasion. - Abstract: Ubiquitin ligase Cullin7 has been identified as an oncogene in some malignant diseases such as choriocarcinoma and neuroblastoma. However, the role of Cullin7 in breast cancer carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we compared Cullin7 protein levels in breast cancer tissues with normal breast tissues and identified significantly higher expression of Cullin7 protein in breast cancer specimens. By overexpressing Cullin7 in breast cancer cells HCC1937, we found that Cullin7 could promote cell growth and invasion in vitro. In contrast, the cell growth and invasion was inhibited by silencing Cullin7 in breast cancer cell BT474. Moreover, we demonstrated that Cullin7 promoted breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion via down-regulating p53 expression. Thus, our study provided evidence that Cullin7 functions as a novel oncogene in breast cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer management

  9. Differential expression of cyclin D1, Ki‑67, pRb, and p53 in psoriatic skin lesions and normal skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Ae; Ryu, Young Wook; Kwon, Jun Il; Choe, Mi Sun; Jung, Jin Woong; Cho, Jae We

    2018-01-01

    Psoriasis is a hyperproliferative inflammatory skin disease; therefore, it is highly likely that psoriatic skin lesions may transform into malignancies. However, malignant transformation is not common. We performed immunohistochemical studies using anti‑cyclin D1, anti‑cyclin E, anti‑pRb, anti‑p53, anti‑p16INK4a, and anti‑Ki‑67 antibodies in normal skin, psoriatic epidermal tissue, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissue. Furthermore, western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining were performed to ascertain differences in cyclin D1, cyclin E, pRb, and Ki‑67 expression before and after treatment for psoriasis. Cyclin D1 expression was higher in chronic psoriatic lesions than that in normal epidermis. Psoriasis lesions showed a strong intensity of positive nuclear staining for cyclin D1 among several normally stained nuclei in the basal layer. Cyclin E expression in psoriasis was stronger in the granular and spinous layer than in the normal epidermis. Expression levels of pRb and p53 were found to be higher in the psoriasis group compared with the normal epidermis. Total basal layer cell counts for p53WT expression were found to be significantly higher in the psoriasis group compared with the normal group. However, p16 expression was very weak in the normal and psoriasis groups compared with that in the SCC group. Ki‑67 immunoreactivity was significantly higher in psoriasis compared with normal epidermis and was similar with that in the SCC group. According to immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analysis, the expression levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, pRb, and Ki‑67 in psoriasis lesions decreased after treatment and were similar with those in the normal group. Thus, increased expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E may be involved in cell cycle progression in psoriatic epidermis, and pRb and p53 may play important roles in the prevention of malignant transformation under the hyperproliferative state in psoriasis.

  10. No evidence for functional inactivation of wild-type p53 protein by MDM2 overexpression in gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, P.; Craanen, M. E.; Dekker, W.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    Inactivation of wild-type p53 during gastric carcinogenesis is usually caused by mutations within exons 5-8 of the p53 gene leading to mutated, usually immunohistochemically detectable p53 proteins. However, functional inactivation of wild-type p53, mimicking mutational inactivation, may also result

  11. Overexpression of P53 protein and local hGH, IGF-I, IGFBP-3, IGFBP-2 and PRL secretion by human breast cancer explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewicz, Tomasz; Ryś, Janusz; Wójtowicz, Anna; Stochmal, Ewa; Jach, Robert; Krzysiek, Józef; Gregoraszczuk, Ewa; Huras, Hubert; Dziadek, Olivia

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in concert with insulin-like binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), insulin-like binding protein 2 (IGFBP-2), human growth hormone (GH) and P53 protein is involved in autocrine/paracrine growth signaling pathways as an adaptive response to environmental stimuli. The study evaluated the local secretion of PRL, hGH, IGF-I, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 by breast cancer tissue explants in relation to the overexpression of P53 protein in breast cancer tissue. Breast cancer explants were obtained during radical mastectomies. The overexpression of P53 protein was assessed immunohistochemically using monoclonal antibody (DAKO, Anti-Human P53 protein, clone DO-7); the results of the reaction were stratified into 5 groups. The lack of P53 protein overexpression was defined as 0% of cells that overexpressed P53 protein. IGF-I, IGFBP-3, IGFBP-2, and hGH levels were measured with RIA kits, and prolactin was measured with the MEIA kit. The local secretion of hGH by tumour explants - presenting a positive immunohistochemical reaction (IHCR) to the product of P53 gene - was twice as high as those with no IHCR to product of P53 gene; the opposite was noted in the case of IGF-I, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 secretion. In both cases, the level of hGH, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 secretion did not correlate with the ratio of cells overexpressing P53 protein. There was a significant decrease in local, basic IGFBP-2 secretion along with an increased ratio of cells with positive IHCR to product of P53 gene. Furthermore, local PRL secretion was not correlated with the ratio of cells overexpressing P53 protein in breast cancer tissue. Prolactin also exerts no influence on IGF-I secretion. Our results may suggest the presence of local hGH/IGF-I feedback in breast tissue as well as the possibility of P53/hGH/IGF-I/IGFBP-3 but not P53/PRL/IGF-I axis.

  12. Overexpression of cyclin D1 indicates a poor prognosis in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michalides, R. J.; van Veelen, N. M.; Kristel, P. M.; Hart, A. A.; Loftus, B. M.; Hilgers, F. J.; Balm, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the overexpression of cyclin D1 and p53 as a prognostic marker of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and to investigate whether deregulation of these genes is associated with an unfavorable course of disease. Retrospective study. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor

  13. UbcH10 overexpression in human lung carcinomas and its correlation with EGFR and p53 mutational status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Malapelle, Umberto; Berlingieri, Maria Teresa; Bellevicine, Claudio; Sepe, Romina; Federico, Antonella; Rocco, Danilo; Galgani, Mario; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Fusco, Alfredo; Troncone, Giancarlo

    2013-03-01

    UbcH10 codes for the cancer related E2 Ubiquitin Conjugating Enzyme, an enzymatic molecule with a key role in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Current studies have suggested a critical role of UbcH10 in a variety of malignancies, including human thyroid, breast, ovarian and colorectal carcinomas. The aim of this study has been to extend the analysis of UbcH10 expression to lung cancer. This neoplasia represents one of the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide, and new tools for an accurate diagnosis/prognosis are needed. The expression levels of UbcH10 were analysed in human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) by quantitative RT-PCR and tissue microarray immunohistochemistry, and these values were correlated with the clinicopathological features of the patients affected by NSCLC. Our results demonstrate that UbcH10 is overexpressed in NSCLC compared to the normal lung tissue. Moreover, UbcH10 expression is significantly higher in squamous cell and large cell carcinomas than in adenocarcinomas, and directly and inversely correlated with the mutational status of p53 and EGFR, respectively. The suppression of UbcH10 expression by RNAi resulted in a drastic reduction of proliferation and migration abilities of lung carcinoma cell lines. These results, taken together, indicate that UbcH10 overexpression has a critical role in lung carcinogenesis, and the evaluation of UbcH10 expression levels may be a new tool for the characterisation of NSCLC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CD8 T-cell responses against cyclin B1 in breast cancer patients with tumors overexpressing p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Baek; Andersen, Rikke Sick; Svane, Inge Marie

    2009-01-01

    CD8 T-cell response against at least one of the peptides; strongest reactivity was detected against the CB9L2 peptide. Because the level of cyclin B1 has been shown to be influenced by the level of p53, which in turn is elevated in cancer cells because of point mutation, we analyzed the level of p53...... protein in biopsies from the patients by immune histochemistry. Combined data showed that anti-cyclin B1 reactivity was predominantly detected in patients with tumors characterized by elevated expression of p53. Interestingly, no reactivity was detected against six peptides derived from the p53 protein....... CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the notion of cyclin B1 as a prominent target for immunologic recognition in cancer patients harboring p53-mutated cancer cells. Because mutation of p53 is one of the most frequent genetic alterations in human cancers, this suggests that immunotherapy based on targeting of cyclin...

  15. Overexpression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene product in primary lung adenocarcinomas is associated with cigarette smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, W. H.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Goodman, S. N.; Slebos, R. J.; Polak, M.; Baas, I. O.; Rodenhuis, S.; Hruban, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are frequently observed in primary lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting that these mutations are critical events in the malignant transformation of airway cells. These mutations are often associated with stabilization of the p53 gene product, resulting in the

  16. Different TP53 mutants in p53 overexpressed epithelial ovarian carcinoma can be associated both with altered and unaltered glycolytic and apoptotic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoun, Stephanie; Atallah, David; Tahtouh, Roula; Alaaeddine, Nada; Moubarak, Malak; Khaddage, Abir; Ayoub, Eliane Nasr; Chahine, George; Hilal, George

    2018-01-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor and key regulator of glycolysis in cancer cells, however highly mutated in tumors. In ovarian cancer, studies concerning p53 mutations focus on the DNA binding domain since the majority of hotspot mutations affects this region. Yet, mutations in other regions such as the proline rich domain may also affect the protein's expression and activity. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of various positions of mutations in TP53 gene on glycolysis, apoptosis and transcription of p53 target genes. Mutations frequency and their effect on p53 expression were assessed by PCR-SSCP, sequencing and immunohistochemistry on 30 ovarian cancer biopsies. Six tumors were cultured, as well as SK-OV-3, OVCAR-3 and Igrov-1. SK-OV-3 cells were transfected with 2 TP53 mutants. p53 transcriptional activity was assayed by qPCR, apoptosis by flow cytometry and glycolysis by glucose and lactate measurements, with quantification of glycolytic enzymes expression. Our results showed a high frequency of the P72R mutant, associated with p53 overexpression in the ovarian biopsies. However, P72R mutant cells showed similar apoptosis and glycolysis as WT cells. DNA binding domain mutations decreased the transcriptional activity of the protein and increased glucose consumption and lactate production. Despite the overexpression of the P72R mutated protein in the biopsies, it showed a similar apoptotic activity and glucose regulation ability as WT p53. Knowing that p53 expression status is used for chemotherapeutic approaches and prognosis in ovarian cancer, the results obtained highlight the importance of locating TP53 mutations.

  17. Cyclin D1 overexpression modulates radiation-induced G1 arrest and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, M.; Borek, C.; Schmidt, E.V.; Pardo, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    apoptosis following irradiation. Immunoprecipitation and western blot showed increased levels of p53, p21/WAF1 in the cyclinD1 overexpression cells following irradiation, and the amount of cyclinD1 protein was unchanged in asynchronized cyclin D1-transfected REC, but 2-4-fold increase was detected in synchronized cyclin D1-transfected REC. Meanwhile PCNA remained unchanged or slightly decreased.in Both asynchronized and synchronized cyclin D1-transfected REC. Conclusion Taken together, the above results suggest that the overexpression of cyclin D1 in REC partially overcomes the block to G1-S progression that normally occurs when the parental REC are exposure to irradiation. Apoptosis was detected at low levels in untransfected REC or mock-transfected REC, increase in cyclin D1-transfected REC following 5, 10 Gy irradiation. Western blot showed increased levels of p53, p21/WAF1 in cyclin D1 transfected-REC more than mock-transfected REC, there was no detectable difference in levels of PCNA expression prior to or after irradiation in both cyclin D1-transfected REC and mock-transfected REC. Immunoprecipitation showed no significant increase in levels of cyclin D1 expression after irradiation in asynchronized cyclin D1-transfected REC, but 2-4 fold increase levels of cyclin D1 expression in synchronized transfected-cyclin D1 REC. Further experimentation is underway to characterize these

  18. Deregulation of p53 and RB Transcriptional Control Leads to Overexpression of DNA Methyltransferases in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-An Tang

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: This study provides cell and clinical evidence that p53 and RB pathways transcriptionally repress DNMT expression. Normal expression of DNMT3A, RB and MDM2 proteins can be a biomarker for good prognosis in lung cancer.

  19. Urinary bladder lesions after the chernobyl accident. Immunohistochemical assessment of p53, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclin D1 and p21[sup WAF1/Cip1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanenko, A.; Zaparin, W.; Vinnichenko, W.; Vozianov, A. (Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)); Lee, C.C.R.; Yamamoto, Shinji; Hori, Taka-aki; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Fukushima, Shoji

    1999-02-01

    During the 11-year period subsequent to the Chernobyl accident, the incidence of urinary bladder cancer in Ukraine has increased from 26.2 to 36.1 per 100,000 population. Cesium-137 ([sup 137]Cs) accounts for 80-90% of the incorporated radioactivity in this population, which has been exposed to long-term, low-dose ionizing radiation, and 80% of the more labile pool of cesium is excreted via the urine. The present study was performed to evaluate the histopathological features and the immunohistochemical status of p53, p21[sup WAF1/Cip1], cyclin D1 and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) in urinary bladder mucosa of 55 males (49-92 years old) with benign prostatic hyperplasia who underwent surgery in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1995 and 1996. Group I (28 patients) inhabiting radiocontaminated areas of the country, group II (17 patients) from Kiev city with less radiocontamination and a control group III (10 patients) living in so-called ''clean'' areas of Ukraine were compared. In groups I and II, an increase in multiple areas of moderate or severe dysplasia or carcinoma in situ was seen in 42 (93%) of 45 cases. In addition, two small transitional cell carcinomas were found in one patient in each of groups I and II. Nuclear accumulation of p53, PCNA, cyclin D1, and to a lesser extent p21[sup WAF1/Cip1], was significantly increased in both groups I and II as compared with the control group III, indicating possible transformation events or enhancement of repair activities, that may precede the defect in the regulatory pathway itself, at least in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Our results suggest that early malignant transformation is taking place in the bladder urothelium of people in the radiocontaminated areas of Ukraine and that this could possibly lead sometime in the future to an increased incidence of urinary bladder cancer. (author)

  20. [Evaluation of two-tier grading system and significance of p53 protein over-expression in ovarian serous carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Du, Juan; Zhang, Chun-yu; Xie, Qiao-ting; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Cong-rong

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the two-tier MDACC grading system for ovarian serous carcinoma by comparing with the WHO grading system, and to investigate the role of p53 immunostaining in ovarian serous carcinoma grading. 72 cases ovarian serous carcinoma of ovary were graded basing on the MDACC and WHO grading systems, respectively. Statistic analyses were made for the relationship between the data obtained from two grading systems and their clinical significance. All the cases were examined immunohistochemically by using antibody against p53 protein and the immunohistochemistry findings were analyzed with the two grading systems and clinical parameters. There was a good correlation between the MDACC and WHO grading system (r=0.543, P=0.000). Neither system has a definite relationship with the disease-free survival time (P=0.170 vs. P=0.075), cytoreduction (P=0.478 vs. P=0.120), and the curative effect of platinum-based chemotherapy (P=0.418 vs. P=0.403). However, compared with the WHO grading system, MDACC grading system has a better correlation with tumor stage (P=0.041 vs. P=0.002), 3-year disease-free survival rate (P=0.077 vs. P=0.004), overall survival time (P=0.080 vs. P=0.046), and p53 immunohistochemistry results (P=0.334 vs. P=0.035). No significant difference was found between p53 immunohistochemistry results with other clinical characteristics and prognostic factors. Compared with the WHO system, the MDACC system showed a better prognostic value and was more likely correlated with the novel dualistic model for ovarian serous carcinogenesis. Although p53 immunostaining was valuable in assisting MDACC grading, it should be cautious to use it alone as an independent indicator in predicting the prognosis of ovarian serous carcinoma.

  1. Automated Quantitative Analysis of p53, Cyclin D1, Ki67 and pERK Expression in Breast Carcinoma Does Not Differ from Expert Pathologist Scoring and Correlates with Clinico-Pathological Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cass, Jamaica D. [Division of Cancer Biology and Genetics, Cancer Research Institute, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6 (Canada); Varma, Sonal [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6 (Canada); Day, Andrew G. [Kingston General Hospital, Kingston K7L 2V7 (Canada); Sangrar, Waheed [Division of Cancer Biology and Genetics, Cancer Research Institute, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6 (Canada); Rajput, Ashish B. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6 (Canada); Raptis, Leda H.; Squire, Jeremy [Division of Cancer Biology and Genetics, Cancer Research Institute, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6 (Canada); Madarnas, Yolanda [Department of Oncology, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6 (Canada); SenGupta, Sandip K. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6 (Canada); Elliott, Bruce E., E-mail: elliottb@queensu.ca [Division of Cancer Biology and Genetics, Cancer Research Institute, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6 (Canada); Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2012-07-18

    There is critical need for improved biomarker assessment platforms which integrate traditional pathological parameters (TNM stage, grade and ER/PR/HER2 status) with molecular profiling, to better define prognostic subgroups or systemic treatment response. One roadblock is the lack of semi-quantitative methods which reliably measure biomarker expression. Our study assesses reliability of automated immunohistochemistry (IHC) scoring compared to manual scoring of five selected biomarkers in a tissue microarray (TMA) of 63 human breast cancer cases, and correlates these markers with clinico-pathological data. TMA slides were scanned into an Ariol Imaging System, and histologic (H) scores (% positive tumor area x staining intensity 0–3) were calculated using trained algorithms. H scores for all five biomarkers concurred with pathologists’ scores, based on Pearson correlation coefficients (0.80–0.90) for continuous data and Kappa statistics (0.55–0.92) for positive vs. negative stain. Using continuous data, significant association of pERK expression with absence of LVI (p = 0.005) and lymph node negativity (p = 0.002) was observed. p53 over-expression, characteristic of dysfunctional p53 in cancer, and Ki67 were associated with high grade (p = 0.032 and 0.0007, respectively). Cyclin D1 correlated inversely with ER/PR/HER2-ve (triple negative) tumors (p = 0.0002). Thus automated quantitation of immunostaining concurs with pathologists’ scoring, and provides meaningful associations with clinico-pathological data.

  2. Matrine inhibits diethylnitrosamine-induced HCC proliferation in rats through inducing apoptosis via p53, Bax-dependent caspase-3 activation pathway and down-regulating MLCK overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Yu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells is one of the leading causes of liver cancer mortality in humans. The inhibiting effects of matrine on HCC cell proliferation have been studied, but the mechanism of that inhibition has not been fully elucidated. Since, apoptosis plays an important role in HCC cell proliferation. We examined the apoptosis-inducing effect of matrine on tumor cells. Western blot analysis of p53, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) revealed that matrine induced tumor cell apoptosis by controlling anoikis. It activated p53, Bax-dependent caspase-3 and blocked the ECM-integrin mediated cell survival pathway through down-regulating MLCK over-expression in the liver of rats with diethyl nitrosamine (DENA)-induced HCC. Our results suggest that matrine can inhibit the proliferation of HCC cells through inducing tumor cell apoptosis via activation of the p53 pathway and inhibition of MLCK overexpression. Matrine may thus be used as a potentially promising reagent to inhibit HCC cell proliferation and MLCK may be a novel target for the treatment of HCC.

  3. Reduction of the tumorigenic potential of human retinoblastoma cell lines by TFF1 overexpression involves p53/caspase signaling and miR-18a regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Maike; Große-Kreul, Jan; Wirtz, Janina Jasmin; Beier, Manfred; Stephan, Harald; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Metz, Klaus; Dünker, Nicole

    2017-08-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides have been shown to play a pivotal role in oncogenic transformation, tumorigenesis and metastasis by changing cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion behavior of various cancer cell lines. In the study presented, we investigated the effect of TFF1 overexpression on cell growth, viability, migration and tumorigenicity of different retinoblastoma (RB) cell lines. Transient TFF1 overexpression significantly increases RB cell apoptosis levels. Stable, lentiviral TFF1 overexpression likewise decreases RB cell viability, proliferation and growth and significantly increases apoptosis as revealed by WST-1 assays, BrdU and DAPI cell counts. TFF1-induced apoptosis is executed via cleaved caspase-3 activation as revealed by caspase blockage experiments and caspase-3 immunocytochemistry. Results from pG13-luciferase reporter assays and Western blot analyses indicate that TFF1-induced apoptosis is mediated through transcriptional activity of p53 with concurrently downregulated miR-18a expression. In ovo chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays revealed that TFF1 overexpression significantly decreases the size of tumors forming from Y79 and RB355 cells and reduces the migration potential of RB355 cells. Differentially expressed genes and pathways involved in cancer progression were identified after TFF1 overexpression in Y79 cells by gene expression array analysis, underlining the effects on reduced tumorigenicity. TFF1 knockdown in RBL30 cells revealed caspase-3/7-independent apoptosis induction, but no changes on cell proliferation level. In summary, the in vitro and in vivo data demonstrate for the first time a tumor suppressor function of TFF1 in RB cells which is at least partly mediated by p53 activation and miR-18a downregulation. © 2017 UICC.

  4. In squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva, overexpression of p53 is a late event and neither p53 nor mdm2 expression is a useful marker to predict lymph node metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emanuels, AG; Koudstaal, J; Burger, MPM; Hollema, H

    To offer more tailored treatment to individual patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the vulval more accurate prediction of lymph node metastases is required. As p53 and mdm2 are genes known to be involved in the development of other tumours, we studied expression of p53 and mdm2 in

  5. P53 gene mutations in pituitary carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Yoshinori; Jin, Long; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Kovacs, Kalman; Roncaroli, Federico; Lloyd, Ricard V

    2007-01-01

    Although p53 overexpression detected by immunohistochemistry has been reported in pituitary adenomas and carcinomas, genetic mutations in the p53 gene have not been previously detected in these tumors. We analyzed a series of eight pituitary adenomas and six pituitary carcinomas by immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction amplification, and sequencing of p53 exon 5 through exon 8 for genetic mutations. Three carcinomas showed more than 20% expression of p53 protein in the tumor cells. One of these tumors with 60% overexpression of p53 protein had a mutation in codon 248, a common "hot spot" for p53 mutation, while the other carcinoma with 90% overexpression of p53 protein had a mutation in codon 135. All adenomas were negative for p53 mutations and had 15% of the cells expressing the p53 protein. Analysis of control tumors including four lung carcinomas with proven p53 mutations also had greater than 85% of the tumor cells overexpressing p53 protein. Two breast carcinoma cell lines with known p53 mutations, MBA-MD 231 and MBA-MD-486, also showed greater than 85% of the tumor cells overexpressing p53. These results show that p53 mutations are present in a subset of pituitary carcinomas and are usually associated with a high percentage of tumor cells overexpressing the p53 protein.

  6. Nicotine induces cell proliferation in association with cyclin D1 up-regulation and inhibits cell differentiation in association with p53 regulation in a murine pre-osteoblastic cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Norimichi; Tomaru, Yasuhisa; Koshikiya, Noboru; Nojima, Junya; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Sakata, Yasuaki; Kobayashi, Akio; Yoda, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that nicotine critically affects bone metabolism. Many studies have examined the effects of nicotine on proliferation and differentiation, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We examined cell cycle regulators involved in the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Nicotine induced cell proliferation in association with p53 down-regulation and cyclin D1 up-regulation. In differentiated cells, nicotine reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation in dose-dependent manners. Furthermore, p53 expression was sustained in nicotine-treated cells during differentiation. These findings indicate that nicotine promotes the cell cycle and inhibits differentiation in association with p53 regulation in pre-osteoblastic cells

  7. Combination of arabinogalactan and curcumin induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells in vitro and inhibits tumor growth via overexpression of p53 level in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtaderi, Hassan; Sepehri, Houri; Attari, Farnoosh

    2017-04-01

    Increased mortality associated with breast cancer in women has spurred the studies to develop new drugs. Arabinogalactan (AG) and curcumin (Cur) are two natural products broadly explored in cancer therapy. Our major goal in the current study was to assess anticancer properties of combination these reagents in vitro on human breast cancer cells and in vivo utilizing animal model of breast cancer. We evaluated cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and protein expression in vitro on MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. For in vivo studies, murine breast cancer cells were implanted into BALB/c mice. Thereafter, volume of the developing tumor was calculated and expression of Ki67 and p53 proteins was evaluated to analyze cell proliferation and apoptosis. Combination of AG and Cur significantly decreased cell growth in human breast cancer cells without any significant effect on normal cell growth. This combination could increase cell population in sub-G1 phase, which was indicative of apoptosis. Western blotting showed that the combination of AG and Cur significantly increased Bax/Bcl2 ratio as well as cleaved-caspase3 level in MDA-MB-231 cells. Combination of AG and Cur promoted apoptosis by increasing ROS level, changing mitochondrial membrane and reduction of glutathione. In addition, in vivo studies in mouse showed that this combination could inhibit the progression of breast tumors through over-expression of p53 and reduction of Ki67 levels. Our findings suggest that the combination of AG and Cur is of great potential to induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Skp2B overexpression alters a prohibitin-p53 axis and the transcription of PAPP-A, the protease of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Chander

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the degradation of prohibitin by the SCF(Skp2B ubiquitin ligase results in a defect in the activity of p53. We also reported that MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice develop mammary gland tumors that are characterized by an increased proteolytic cleavage of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4, an inhibitor of IGF signaling. However, whether a link exists between a defect in p53 activity and proteolysis of IGFBP-4 was not established.We analyzed the levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A, the protease of IGFBP-4, in MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice and found that PAPP-A levels are elevated. Further, we found a p53 binding site in intron 1 of the PAPP-A gene and that both wild type and mutant p53 bind to this site. However, binding of wild type p53 results in the transcriptional repression of PAPP-A, while binding of mutant p53 results in the transcriptional activation of PAPP-A. Since MMTV-Skp2B mice express wild type p53 and yet show elevated levels of PAPP-A, at first, these observations appeared contradictory. However, further analysis revealed that the defect in p53 activity in Skp2B overexpressing cells does not only abolish the activity of wild type of p53 but actually mimics that of mutant p53. Our results suggest that in absence of prohibitin, the half-life of p53 is increased and like mutant p53, the conformation of p53 is denatured.These observations revealed a novel function of prohibitin as a chaperone of p53. Further, they suggest that binding of denatured p53 in intron 1 causes an enhancer effect and increases the transcription of PAPP-A. Therefore, these findings indicate that the defect in p53 function and the increased proteolysis of IGFBP-4, we had observed, represent two components of the same pathway, which contributes to the oncogenic function of Skp2B.

  9. Survival of ovarian cancer patients overexpressing the tumour antigen p53 is diminished in case of MHC class I down-regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, Ninke; Lambeck, Annechien J. A.; de Graeff, Pauline; Bijlsma, Astrid Y.; Daemen, Toos; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Nijman, Hans W.

    Objectives. The adaptive immune system seems to play an essential role in the natural course of ovarian cancer. Aim of this study was to establish whether disease-specific survival for patients expressing the tumour antigen p53 is influenced by MHC class I expression or the presence of p53

  10. Survival of ovarian cancer patients overexpressing the tumour antigen p53 is diminished in case of MHC class I down-regulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, N.; Lambeck, A.J.A.; Graeff, P. de; Bijlsma, A.Y.; Daemen, T.; Zee, A.G. van der; Nijman, H.W.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The adaptive immune system seems to play an essential role in the natural course of ovarian cancer. Aim of this study was to establish whether disease-specific survival for patients expressing the tumour antigen p53 is influenced by MHC class I expression or the presence of p53

  11. Hypermethylation of the 5′ CpG island of the p14ARF flanking exon 1β in human colorectal cancer displaying a restricted pattern of p53 overexpression concomitant with increased MDM2 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyiraneza Christine

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that inactivation of p14ARF, a tumor suppressor central to regulating p53 protein stability through interaction with the MDM2 oncoprotein, abrogates p53 activity in human tumors retaining the wild-type TP53 gene. Differences in expression of tumor suppressor genes are frequently associated with cancer. We previously reported on a pattern of restricted p53 immunohistochemical overexpression significantly associated with microsatellite instability (MSI, low TP53 mutation frequency, and MDM2 overexpression in colorectal cancers (CRCs. In this study, we investigated whether p14ARF alterations could be a mechanism for disabling the p53 pathway in this subgroup of CRCs. Results Detailed maps of the alterations in the p14ARF gene were determined in a cohort of 98 CRCs to detect both nucleotide and copy-number changes. Methylation-specific PCR combined with bisulfite sequencing was used to evaluate the prevalence and distribution of p14ARF methylation. p14ARF alterations were then correlated with MSI status, TP53 mutations, and immunohistochemical expression of p53 and MDM2. The frequency of p14ARF mutations was extremely low (1/98; 1%, whereas coexistence of methylated and unmethylated alleles in both tumors and normal colon mucosa was common (91/98; 93%. Only seven of ninety-eight tumors (7% had a distinct pattern of methylation compared with normal colon mucosa. Evaluation of the prevalence and distribution of p14ARF promoter methylation in a region containing 27 CpG sites in 35 patients showed a range of methylated CpG sites in tumors (0 to 25 (95% CI 1 to 13 versus 0 to 17 (95% CI 0 to 2 in adjacent colon mucosa (P = 0.004. Hypermethylation of the p14ARF promoter was significantly correlated with the restricted p53 overexpression pattern (P = 0.03, and MDM2 overexpression (P = 0.02, independently of MSI phenotype. Although no significant correlation between p14ARF methylation and TP53 mutational

  12. Different TP53 mutants in p53 overexpressed epithelial ovarian carcinoma can be associated both with altered and unaltered glycolytic and apoptotic profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Antoun, Stephanie; Atallah, David; Tahtouh, Roula; Alaaeddine, Nada; Moubarak, Malak; Khaddage, Abir; Ayoub, Eliane Nasr; Chahine, George; Hilal, George

    2018-01-01

    Background p53 is a tumor suppressor and key regulator of glycolysis in cancer cells, however highly mutated in tumors. In ovarian cancer, studies concerning p53 mutations focus on the DNA binding domain since the majority of hotspot mutations affects this region. Yet, mutations in other regions such as the proline rich domain may also affect the protein’s expression and activity. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of various positions of mutations in TP53 gene on glycolysis, ...

  13. Prognostic implications of molecular and immunohistochemical profiles of the Rb and p53 cell cycle regulatory pathways in primary non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Louise

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: Many studies have highlighted the aberrant expression and prognostic significance of individual proteins in either the Rb (particularly cyclin D1, p16INK4A, and pRb) or the p53 (p53 and p21Waf1) pathways in non-small cell lung cancer. We hypothesize that cumulative abnormalities within each and between these pathways would have significant prognostic potential regarding survival. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Our study population consisted of 106 consecutive surgically resected cases of predominantly early-stage non-small cell lung cancer from the National Cancer Institute-Mayo Clinic series, and assessment of proteins involved both immunohistochemical (cyclin D1, p21Waf1, pRb, p16INK4A, and p53) and mutational analysis (p53) in relationship to staging and survival. RESULTS: Cyclin D1 overexpression was noted in 48% of the tumors, p16INK4A negative in 53%, pRb negative in 17%, p53 immunopositive in 50%, p53 mutation frequency in 48%, and p21(Waf1) overexpression in 47%, none with prognostic significance. Cyclin D1 overexpression in pRb-negative tumors revealed a significantly worse prognosis with a mean survival of 2.3 years (P = 0.004). A simultaneous p53 mutation dramatically reduced the mean survival time to 0.9 years (P = 0.007). Cyclin D1 overexpression with either a p53 mutation or a p53 overexpression was also associated with a significantly poorer prognosis (P = 0.0033 and 0.0063, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Some cumulative abnormalities in the Rb and p53 pathways (e.g., cyclin D1 overexpression and p53 mutations) significantly cooperate to predict a poor prognosis; however, the complexity of the cell cycle protein interaction in any given tumor warrants caution in interpreting survival results when specific protein abnormalities are taken in isolation.

  14. A Comparative Analysis of Biomarker Expression and Molecular Subtypes of Pure Ductal Carcinoma In Situ and Invasive Breast Carcinoma by Image Analysis: Relationship of the Subtypes with Histologic Grade, Ki67, p53 Overexpression, and DNA Ploidy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venetia R. Sarode

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of data regarding molecular subtypes of pure ductal carcinoma in situ (pDCIS. We evaluated the expression of ER, PR, HER2, Ki67, and p53 and DNA ploidy in 118 pDCIS and 100 invasive breast carcinomas (IBCAs by routine IHC and classified them according to molecular subtypes. Quantification of biomarkers and DNA ploidy was performed by image analysis. Expression of ER, PR, and high ki67 was more frequent in pDCIS compared to IBCA. High-grade tumors had lower ER and PR expression, high Ki67, overexpression of HER2 and p53, and DNA aneuploidy. Luminal A and HER2 subtypes were more common in pDCIS, and triple negative was more prevalent in IBCA. In both groups, HER2 and triple negative subtypes were characterized by high ki67, overexpression of p53, and DNA aneuploidy compared to luminal subtypes. Molecular subtypes of IBCA are distinct from those of pDCIS. Invasion is characterized by change in phenotype in some tumors.

  15. A small molecule drug promoting miRNA processing induces alternative splicing of MdmX transcript and rescues p53 activity in human cancer cells overexpressing MdmX protein.

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    Georgios Valianatos

    Full Text Available MdmX overexpression contributes to the development of cancer by inhibiting tumor suppressor p53. A switch in the alternative splicing of MdmX transcript, leading to the inclusion of exon 6, has been identified as the primary mechanism responsible for increased MdmX protein levels in human cancers, including melanoma. However, there are no approved drugs, which could translate these new findings into clinical applications. We analyzed the anti-melanoma activity of enoxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic inhibiting the growth of some human cancers in vitro and in vivo by promoting miRNA maturation. We found that enoxacin inhibited the growth and viability of human melanoma cell lines much stronger than a structurally related fluoroquinolone ofloxacin, which only weakly modulates miRNA processing. A microarray analysis identified a set of miRNAs significantly dysregulated in enoxacin-treated A375 melanoma cells. They had the potential to target multiple signaling pathways required for cancer cell growth, among them the RNA splicing. Recent studies showed that interfering with cellular splicing machinery can result in MdmX downregulation in cancer cells. We, therefore, hypothesized that enoxacin could, by modulating miRNAs targeting splicing machinery, activate p53 in melanoma cells overexpressing MdmX. We found that enoxacin and ciprofloxacin, a related fluoroquinolone capable of promoting microRNA processing, but not ofloxacin, strongly activated wild type p53-dependent transcription in A375 melanoma without causing significant DNA damage. On the molecular level, the drugs promoted MdmX exon 6 skipping, leading to a dose-dependent downregulation of MdmX. Not only in melanoma, but also in MCF7 breast carcinoma and A2780 ovarian carcinoma cells overexpressing MdmX. Together, our results suggest that some clinically approved fluoroquinolones could potentially be repurposed as activators of p53 tumor suppressor in cancers overexpressing Mdm

  16. p53 expression in sweat gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernat, W; Woźniak, L

    1996-01-01

    We analyzed the expression of p53 in 74 cutaneous adnexal tumors, with enhancement of the detection by incubation of the slides in the microwave. The immunostaining in benign tumors was almost uniformly negative as we found p53-positivity only in one poroma, one nodular hidradenoma, and one case of syringocystadenoma papilliferum (amongst 13 spiradenomas, 9 cylindromas, 12 nodular hidradenomas, 7 poromas, 6 syringomas, 7 syringocystadenomas papilliferum, 2 papillary tubular adenomas and 4 chondroid syringomas). These results contrasted with the widespread p53 overexpression, which was revealed in the sweat gland carcinomas. All spiradenocarcinomas (3), malignant nodular hidradenoma (1), apocrine hidradenocarcinoma (1), and malignant syringoadenoma (1) showed a strong reaction to anti-p53 antibody. Two of three eccrine hidradenocarcinomas, and two of three porocarcinomas presented p53 overexpression, whereas in one case of malignant cylindroma and adenoid cystic carcinoma we did not find p53-positivity. The results of the study indicate an important role, that p53 protein plays in the malignant sweat gland tumors in comparison to their benign counterparts, but reveal that its overexpression may also occur in the reactive and benign neoplastic processes.

  17. iASPP is over-expressed in human non-small cell lung cancer and regulates the proliferation of lung cancer cells through a p53 associated pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jinfeng; Xie, Fei; Zhang, Lijian; Jiang, Wen G

    2010-01-01

    iASPP is a key inhibitor of tumour suppressor p53 and is found to be up-regulated in certain malignant conditions. The present study investigated the expression of iASPP in clinical lung cancer, a leading cancer type in the world, and the biological impact of this molecule on lung cancer cells. iASPP protein levels in lung cancer tissues were evaluated using an immunohistochemical method. In vitro, iASPP gene expression was suppressed with a lentvirus-mediated shRNA method and the biological impact after knocking down iASSP on lung cancer cell lines was investigated in connection with the p53 expression status. We showed here that the expression of iASPP was significantly higher in lung cancer tissues compared with the adjacent normal tissues. iASPP shRNA treatment resulted in a down-regulation of iASPP in lung cancer cells. There was a subsequent reduction of cell proliferation of the two lung tumour cell lines A459 and 95D both of which had wild-type p53 expression. In contrast, reduction of iASPP in H1229 cells, a cell with little p53 expression, had no impact on its growth rate. iASPP regulates the proliferation and motility of lung cancer cells. This effect is intimately associated with the p53 pathway. Together with the pattern of the over-expression in clinical lung cancers, it is concluded that iASPP plays an pivotal role in the progression of lung cancer and is a potential target for lung cancer therapy

  18. Cyclin D1 overexpression, cell cycle progression and radiosensitivity in MBP cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Lijun; Yu Zengliang

    2000-11-01

    Clones that exhibited a minimum of 7-8 fold cyclin D1 level above the parent cell lines or the vector control were obtained after transfected with the entire coding sequence of human 1.1 kb cyclin D1 cDNA. Studies showed that there was no significant difference in Radiosensitivity between over-expressing cyclin D1 and control cultures from either mouse or human origin. Using flow cytometry to access cell cycle distribution in the exponentially growth cultures of MCF10F-D1-21 and MCF10F-V-3, it was found that there was a 50 percent increase in the proportion of G2/M phase cells and 5.3 percent decrease in the proportion of G0/G1 phase cells in MCF10F-D1-21 comparing with MCF10F-V-3, though they were with the same proportion of cells in S phase

  19. Immunohistochemical detection of p53 protein in ameloblastoma types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Sissy, N A

    1999-05-01

    Overexpression of p53 protein in unicystic ameloblastoma (uAB) is denser than in the conventional ameloblastoma (cAB) type, indicating increased wild type p53--suppressing the growth potential of uAB and denoting the early event of neoplastic transformation, probably of a previous odontogenic cyst. Overexpression of p53 in borderline cAB and malignant ameloblastoma (mAB) types might reflect a mutational p53 protein playing an oncogenic role, promoting tumour growth. Overexpression of p53 protein could be a valid screening method for predicting underlying malignant genetic changes in AB types, through increased frequency of immunoreactive cells or increased staining density.

  20. Immunofluorometric assay of p53 protein versus sequencing of p53 exons 5 to 9 for the detection of p53 abnormalities in ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lianidou, E S; Levesque, M A; Katsaros, D; Angelopoulou, K; Yu, H; Genta, F; Arisio, R; Massobrio, M; Bharaj, B; Diamandis, E P

    1999-01-01

    p53 alteration, detected as mutation of the p53 gene or as accumulation of mutant p53 protein, is a common feature of most malignancies, including ovarian carcinoma, and may identify patients with unfavorable prognosis and resistance to chemotherapy. Tumor tissues from 55 patients with well or poorly differentiated (grades 1 or 3) primary epithelial ovarian carcinoma were assessed both for p53 protein overexpression by a sensitive time-resolved immunofluorometric assay employing DO-1 and CM-1 antibodies, and for genetic p53 abnormalities by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified exons 5 to 9. Sixteen p53 mutations (29%), including 3 deletions causing frameshifts as well as one nonsense and 12 missense point mutations were found in all exons except exon 9. Overexpression of p53 protein, defined as a concentration exceeding the 75th percentile, was found in 15 cases (27%), 10 of which had missense mutations (P p53-negative by immunoassay. Both p53 mutation (P = 0.04) and p53 protein accumulation (P p53 mutation was more closely related to grade 3 lesions (P = 0.04) and serous histotype (P = 0.01). These results indicate that p53 protein accumulation correlates well with missense point mutation in carcinoma of the ovary and, together with other evidence that p53 abnormality may be prognostic of outcome in this disease, suggest that the immunoassay of p53 protein may have clinical value.

  1. Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma with Cyclin D1 overexpression: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquino Gabriella

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peripheral T-cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are generally considered aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, because of poor natural outcome and response to therapy. They show a complex karyotype without any specific genetic hallmark. We report a case of peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified with heterogeneous nuclear Cyclin D1 immunohistochemical overexpression, due to gene copy gain, a phenomenon similar to that observed in Mantle Cell Lymphoma characterized by t(11;14(q13;q32. In this case report we underline the diagnostic pitfall rapresented by Cyclin D1 immunoistochemical overexpression in a T-cell lymphoma. Several pitfalls could lead to misinterpretation of diagnosis, therefore, we underlined the need to integrate the classical histology and immunohistochemistry with molecular tests as clonality or Fluorescence in situ hybridization. Virtual slide The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1117747619703769

  2. Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma with Cyclin D1 overexpression: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Gabriella; Franco, Renato; Ronconi, Fioravante; Anniciello, Annamaria; Russo, Luigi; De Chiara, Annarosaria; Panico, Luigi

    2012-07-06

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are generally considered aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, because of poor natural outcome and response to therapy. They show a complex karyotype without any specific genetic hallmark. We report a case of peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified with heterogeneous nuclear cyclin D1 immunohistochemical overexpression, due to gene copy gain, a phenomenon similar to that observed in mantle cell lymphoma characterized by t(11;14)(q13;q32). In this case report we underline the diagnostic pitfall represented by cyclin D1 immunohistochemical overexpression in a T-cell lymphoma. Several pitfalls could lead to misinterpretation of diagnosis, therefore, we underlined the need to integrate the classical histology and immunohistochemistry with molecular tests as clonality or fluorescence in situ hybridization. The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1117747619703769.

  3. Primary hyperparathyroidism caused by parathyroid-targeted overexpression of cyclin D1 in transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Imanishi, Yasuo; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Yoshimoto, Katsuhiko; Schipani, Ernestina; Mallya, Sanjay; Papanikolaou, Alexandros; Kifor, Olga; Tokura, Takehiko; Sablosky, Marilyn; Ledgard, Felicia; Gronowicz, Gloria; Wang, Timothy C.; Schmidt, Emmett V.; Hall, Charles; Brown, Edward M.

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between abnormal cell proliferation and aberrant control of hormonal secretion is a fundamental and poorly understood issue in endocrine cell neoplasia. Transgenic mice with parathyroid-targeted overexpression of the cyclin D1 oncogene, modeling a gene rearrangement found in human tumors, were created to determine whether a primary defect in this cell-cycle regulator can cause an abnormal relationship between serum calcium and parathyroid hormone response, as is typical of hu...

  4. OTUD5 regulates p53 stability by deubiquitinating p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judong Luo

    Full Text Available The p53 tumour suppressor protein is a transcription factor that prevents oncogenic progression by activating the expression of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest genes in stressed cells. The stability of p53 is tightly regulated by ubiquitin-dependent degradation, driven mainly by its negative regulators ubiquitin ligase MDM2.In this study, we have identified OTUD5 as a DUB that interacts with and deubiquitinates p53. OTUD5 forms a direct complex with p53 and controls level of ubiquitination. The function of OTUD5 is required to allow the rapid activation of p53-dependent transcription and a p53-dependent apoptosis in response to DNA damage stress.As a novel deubiquitinating enzyme for p53, OTUD5 is required for the stabilization and the activation of a p53 response.

  5. Cyclin D1 overexpression increases susceptibility to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide induced dysplasia and neoplasia in murine squamous oral epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkey, Jonathan F.; Buchberger, Glenn; Saucier, Kirsten; Patel, Salony M.; Eisenberg, Ellen; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Michaylira, Carmen; Rustgi, Anil K.; Mallya, Sanjay M.

    2009-01-01

    The cyclin D1 oncogene is frequently amplified/overexpressed in oral squamous cell carcinomas. Mice with overexpression of cyclin D1 targeted to the stratified squamous epithelia of the tongue, esophagus and forestomach develop a phenotype of epithelial dysplasia at these sites. In this study, we examined the effect cyclin D1 overexpression on susceptibility of mice to carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, using 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO), an established potent oral carcinogen in mice. Cyclin D1 overexpressing mice and non-transgenic littermates were administered 4NQO (20 ppm or 50 ppm in the drinking water) for 8 weeks and monitored for an additional 16 weeks. Histopathological analyses of the tongue revealed significantly higher severity of dysplasia in the cyclin D1 overexpression mice, compared with non-transgenic controls and with untreated controls. Moreover, only the cyclin D1 overexpression mice developed neoplastic lesions in the oro-esophageal epithelia. Examination of the dysplastic and neoplastic lesions reveled abnormal proliferation. Our findings suggest that cyclin D1 overexpression enhances susceptibility to carcinogen-induced oral tumorigenesis. These results underscore the importance of cyclin D1 in the process of oral neoplastic development. Further, they emphasize the value of this transgenic model to study the pathogenesis of oral precancer and cancer and establish it as a model system to test candidate agents for chemoprevention of upper aero-digestive cancer. PMID:19263437

  6. Cyclin D1 overexpression associated with activation of STAT3 in oral carcinoma patients from South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak Roshan, V G; Sinto, M S; Thomas, Shaji; Kannan, S

    2018-01-01

    Our previous study showed that overexpression of cyclin D1 protein is associated with poor prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. Regarding the alteration in the transactivating pathway regulating cyclin D1 expression is still unclear in OSCC from our population. The major objective of this study is to understand the alteration associated with the transactivation pathway regulating the cyclin D1 overexpression in OSCC patients from our population. Alteration in the transactivation pathway regulating cyclin D1 expression was evaluated in tumor sample from OSCC patients. The findings were further validated using in vitro knockdown model in OSCC cell line. Results from the patients' samples showed that the Phospho-STAT3 has a significant association with cyclin D1 overexpression in OSCC tumor samples. Further knockdown in vitro studies using SCC66 showed a significant correlation between STAT3 and cyclin D1 in OSCC. The results from this study showed that in our population the cyclin D1 overexpression is associated with hyperactivation of STAT3 pathway. Our previous result has shown that the cyclin D1 protein overexpression is associated with poor prognosis in OSCC patients. Hence, STAT3 pathway will be better target for the patients with increased cyclin D1 in OSCC patients from our population.

  7. p53 protein aggregation promotes platinum resistance in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang-Hartwich, Y; Soteras, M G; Lin, Z P; Holmberg, J; Sumi, N; Craveiro, V; Liang, M; Romanoff, E; Bingham, J; Garofalo, F; Alvero, A; Mor, G

    2015-07-01

    High-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC), the most lethal gynecological cancer, often leads to chemoresistant diseases. The p53 protein is a key transcriptional factor regulating cellular homeostasis. A majority of HGSOCs have inactive p53 because of genetic mutations. However, genetic mutation is not the only cause of p53 inactivation. The aggregation of p53 protein has been discovered in different types of cancers and may be responsible for impairing the normal transcriptional activation and pro-apoptotic functions of p53. We demonstrated that in a unique population of HGSOC cancer cells with cancer stem cell properties, p53 protein aggregation is associated with p53 inactivation and platinum resistance. When these cancer stem cells differentiated into their chemosensitive progeny, they lost tumor-initiating capacity and p53 aggregates. In addition to the association of p53 aggregation and chemoresistance in HGSOC cells, we further demonstrated that the overexpression of a p53-positive regulator, p14ARF, inhibited MDM2-mediated p53 degradation and led to the imbalance of p53 turnover that promoted the formation of p53 aggregates. With in vitro and in vivo models, we demonstrated that the inhibition of p14ARF could suppress p53 aggregation and sensitize cancer cells to platinum treatment. Moreover, by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry we discovered that the aggregated p53 may function uniquely by interacting with proteins that are critical for cancer cell survival and tumor progression. Our findings help us understand the poor chemoresponse of a subset of HGSOC patients and suggest p53 aggregation as a new marker for chemoresistance. Our findings also suggest that inhibiting p53 aggregation can reactivate p53 pro-apoptotic function. Therefore, p53 aggregation is a potential therapeutic target for reversing chemoresistance. This is paramount for improving ovarian cancer patients' responses to chemotherapy, and thus increasing their

  8. S100A4 interacts with p53 in the nucleus and promotes p53 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orre, L M; Panizza, E; Kaminskyy, V O; Vernet, E; Gräslund, T; Zhivotovsky, B; Lehtiö, J

    2013-12-05

    S100A4 is a small calcium-binding protein that is commonly overexpressed in a range of different tumor types, and it is widely accepted that S100A4 has an important role in the process of cancer metastasis. In vitro binding assays has shown that S100A4 interacts with the tumor suppressor protein p53, indicating that S100A4 may have additional roles in tumor development. In the present study, we show that endogenous S100A4 and p53 interact in complex samples, and that the interaction increases after inhibition of MDM2-dependent p53 degradation using Nutlin-3A. Further, using proximity ligation assay, we show that the interaction takes place in the cell nucleus. S100A4 knockdown experiments in two p53 wild-type cell lines, A549 and HeLa, resulted in stabilization of p53 protein, indicating that S100A4 is promoting p53 degradation. Finally, we demonstrate that S100A4 knockdown leads to p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Thus, our data add a new layer to the oncogenic properties of S100A4 through its inhibition of p53-dependent processes.

  9. Overexpression of BLCAP induces S phase arrest and apoptosis independent of p53 and NF-kappa B in human tongue carcinoma - BLCAP overexpression induces S phase arrest and apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Jun; Duan, Li; Fan, Mingwen; Yuan, Jianhuan; Wu, Xinxing

    Bladder cancer-associated protein gene (BLCAP) is a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene identified from the human bladder carcinoma. Our previous studies have shown that BLCAP overexpression could inhibit cell growth by inducing apoptosis in HeLa cells [Zuo Z, Zhao M, Liu J, Gao G, Wu X: Tumor

  10. Chemical Variations on the p53 Reactivation Theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. A. Ribeiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Among the tumor suppressor genes, p53 is one of the most studied. It is widely regarded as the “guardian of the genome”, playing a major role in carcinogenesis. In fact, direct inactivation of the TP53 gene occurs in more than 50% of malignancies, and in tumors that retain wild-type p53 status, its function is usually inactivated by overexpression of negative regulators (e.g., MDM2 and MDMX. Hence, restoring p53 function in cancer cells represents a valuable anticancer approach. In this review, we will present an updated overview of the most relevant small molecules developed to restore p53 function in cancer cells through inhibition of the p53-MDMs interaction, or direct targeting of wild-type p53 or mutated p53. In addition, optimization approaches used for the development of small molecules that have entered clinical trials will be presented.

  11. Targeted p53 activation by saRNA suppresses human bladder cancer cells growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenghe; Ge, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Qingsong; Chen, Zhong; Hu, Jia; Li, Fan; Ye, Zhangqun

    2016-03-25

    Previous study showed that dsP53-285 has the capacity to induce tumor suppressor gene p53 expression by targeting promoter in non-human primates' cells. And it is well known that TP53 gene is frequently mutant or inactivated in human bladder cancer. Hereby, whether this small RNA can activate the expression of wild-type p53 and inhibit human bladder cancer cells remains to be elucidated. Oligonucleotide and lentivirus were used to overexpress dsP53-285 and dsControl. Real-time PCR and western blot were used to detect genes' mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Cell proliferation assay, colony formation, flow cytometry, transwell assay and wound healing assay were performed to determine the effects on bladder cancer cells proliferation and migration/invasion in vitro. Animal models were carried out to analyze the effects on cells growth and metastasis in vivo. Transfection of dsP53-285 into human bladder cancer cell lines T24 and EJ readily activate wild-type p53 expression by targeting promoter. Moreover, dsP53-285 exhibited robust capacity to inhibit cells proliferation and colony formation, induce cells G0/G1 arrest, suppress migration and invasion. Besides, the Cyclin-CDK genes (Cyclin D1 and CDK4/6) were down-regulated and the EMT-associated genes (E-cadherin, β-catenin, ZEB1 and Vimentin) were also expressed inversely after dsP53-285 treatment. In addition, dsP53-285 could also significantly suppress the growth of bladder cancer xenografts and metastasis in nude mice. Most importantly, the anti-tumor effects mediated by dsP53-285 were mainly achieved by manipulating wild-type p53 expression. Our findings indicate that the dsP53-285 can upregulate wild-type p53 expression in human bladder cancer cells through RNA activation, and suppresses cells proliferation and metastasis in vitro and in vivo.

  12. CARMA3 is overexpressed in colon cancer and regulates NF-{kappa}B activity and cyclin D1 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Tingting; Wang, Zhenning; Xu, Yingying; Song, Yongxi; Wu, Jianhua [Department of General Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Xu, Huimian, E-mail: xuhuimianpaper@yahoo.com.cn [Department of General Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CARMA3 expression is elevated in colon cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CARMA3 promotes proliferation and cell cycle progression in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CARMA3 upregulates cyclinD1 through NF-{kappa}B activation. -- Abstract: CARMA3 was recently reported to be overexpressed in cancers and associated with the malignant behavior of cancer cells. However, the expression of CARMA3 and its biological roles in colon cancer have not been reported. In the present study, we analyzed the expression pattern of CARMA3 in colon cancer tissues and found that CARMA3 was overexpressed in 30.8% of colon cancer specimens. There was a significant association between CARMA3 overexpression and TNM stage (p = 0.0383), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0091) and Ki67 proliferation index (p = 0.0035). Furthermore, knockdown of CARMA3 expression in HT29 and HCT116 cells with high endogenous expression decreased cell proliferation and cell cycle progression while overexpression of CARMA3 in LoVo cell line promoted cell proliferation and facilitated cell cycle transition. Further analysis showed that CARMA3 knockdown downregulated and its overexpression upregulated cyclin D1 expression and phospho-Rb levels. In addition, we found that CARMA3 depletion inhibited p-I{kappa}B levels and NF-{kappa}B activity and its overexpression increased p-I{kappa}B expression and NF-{kappa}B activity. NF-{kappa}B inhibitor BAY 11-7082 reversed the role of CARMA3 on cyclin D1 upregulation. In conclusion, our study found that CARMA3 is overexpressed in colon cancers and contributes to malignant cell growth by facilitating cell cycle progression through NF-{kappa}B mediated upregulation of cyclin D1.

  13. CARMA3 is overexpressed in colon cancer and regulates NF-κB activity and cyclin D1 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Tingting; Wang, Zhenning; Xu, Yingying; Song, Yongxi; Wu, Jianhua; Xu, Huimian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► CARMA3 expression is elevated in colon cancers. ► CARMA3 promotes proliferation and cell cycle progression in colon cancer cells. ► CARMA3 upregulates cyclinD1 through NF-κB activation. -- Abstract: CARMA3 was recently reported to be overexpressed in cancers and associated with the malignant behavior of cancer cells. However, the expression of CARMA3 and its biological roles in colon cancer have not been reported. In the present study, we analyzed the expression pattern of CARMA3 in colon cancer tissues and found that CARMA3 was overexpressed in 30.8% of colon cancer specimens. There was a significant association between CARMA3 overexpression and TNM stage (p = 0.0383), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0091) and Ki67 proliferation index (p = 0.0035). Furthermore, knockdown of CARMA3 expression in HT29 and HCT116 cells with high endogenous expression decreased cell proliferation and cell cycle progression while overexpression of CARMA3 in LoVo cell line promoted cell proliferation and facilitated cell cycle transition. Further analysis showed that CARMA3 knockdown downregulated and its overexpression upregulated cyclin D1 expression and phospho-Rb levels. In addition, we found that CARMA3 depletion inhibited p-IκB levels and NF-κB activity and its overexpression increased p-IκB expression and NF-κB activity. NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082 reversed the role of CARMA3 on cyclin D1 upregulation. In conclusion, our study found that CARMA3 is overexpressed in colon cancers and contributes to malignant cell growth by facilitating cell cycle progression through NF-κB mediated upregulation of cyclin D1.

  14. P53 family members modulate the expression of PRODH, but not PRODH2, via intronic p53 response elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Raimondi

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p53 was previously shown to markedly up-regulate the expression of the PRODH gene, encoding the proline dehydrogenase (PRODH enzyme, which catalyzes the first step in proline degradation. Also PRODH2, which degrades 4-hydroxy-L-proline, a product of protein (e.g. collagen catabolism, was recently described as a p53 target. Here, we confirmed p53-dependent induction of endogenous PRODH in response to genotoxic damage in cell lines of different histological origin. We established that over-expression of TAp73β or TAp63β is sufficient to induce PRODH expression in p53-null cells and that PRODH expression parallels the modulation of endogenous p73 by genotoxic drugs in several cell lines. The p53, p63, and p73-dependent transcriptional activation was linked to specific intronic response elements (REs, among those predicted by bioinformatics tools and experimentally validated by a yeast-based transactivation assay. p53 occupancy measurements were validated in HCT116 and MCF7 human cell lines. Conversely, PRODH2 was not responsive to p63 nor p73 and, at best, could be considered a weak p53 target. In fact, minimal levels of PRODH2 transcript induction by genotoxic stress was observed exclusively in one of four p53 wild-type cell lines tested. Consistently, all predicted p53 REs in PRODH2 were poor matches to the p53 RE consensus and showed very weak responsiveness, only to p53, in the functional assay. Taken together, our results highlight that PRODH, but not PRODH2, expression is under the control of p53 family members, specifically p53 and p73. This supports a deeper link between proteins of the p53-family and metabolic pathways, as PRODH modulates the balance of proline and glutamate levels and those of their derivative alpha-keto-glutarate (α-KG under normal and pathological (tumor conditions.

  15. Predictive Role of p53 Protein as a Single Marker or Associated to Ki67 Antigen in Oral Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Montebugnoli, L.; Felicetti, L.; Gissi, D.B.; Cervellati, F.; Servidio, D.; Marchetti, C.; Prati, C.; Flamminio, F.; Foschini, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    p53 over-expression has been proposed as a reliable marker associated to oral carcinogenesis, although only about 50% of oral carcinomas (OSCC) are associated with p53 over-expression and even p53-negative lesions can progress to OSCC. The aim of the study was to determine whether the combination of p53 over-expression and p53 low-expression associated with Ki67 over-expression (high Ki67/p53 ratio) could lead to a more sensitive parameter. Immunohistochemical expression of Ki67 and p53 was m...

  16. Acquired radioresistance of cancer and the AKT/GSK3β/cyclin D1 overexpression cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Fractionated radiotherapy (RT) is widely used in cancer therapy for its advantages in the preservation of normal tissues. However, repopulation of surviving tumor cells during fractionated RT limits the efficacy of RT. In fact, repopulating tumors often acquire radioresistance and this is the major cause of failure of RT. We have recently demonstrated that human tumor cells acquire radioresistance when exposed to fractionated radiation (FR) of X-rays every 12 hours for 1 month. The acquired radioresistance was associated with overexpression of cyclin D1, a result of a series of molecular changes; constitutive activation of DNA-PK and AKT with concomitant down-regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) which results in suppression of cyclin D1 proteolysis. Aberrant cyclin D1 overexpression in S-phase induced DNA double strand breaks which activated DNA-PK and established the vicious cycle of cycling D1 overexpression. This overexpression of cyclin D1 is responsible for the radioresistance phenotype of long-term FR cells, since this phenotype was completely abrogated by treatment of FR cells by the AKT/PKB signaling inhibitor (API-2), an AKT inhibitor or by a Cdk4 inhibitor. Thus, targeting the AKT/GSK3β/cyclin D1/Cdk4 pathway can be an efficient modality to suppress acquired radioresistance of tumor cells. In this article, I overview the newly discovered molecular mechanisms underlying acquired radioresistance of tumor cells induced by FR, and propose a strategy for eradication of tumors using fractionated RT by overcoming tumor radioresistance. (author)

  17. Basaloid Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Subclassification into Basal, Ductal, and Mixed Subtypes Based on Comparison of Clinico-pathologic Features and Expression of p53, Cyclin D1, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, p16, and Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ja Cho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC is a rare variant of squamous cell carcinoma with distinct pathologic characteristics. The histogenesis of BSCC is not fully understood, and the cancer has been suggested to originate from a totipotent primitive cell in the basal cell layer of the surface epithelium or in the proximal duct of secretory glands. Methods Twenty-six cases of head and neck BSCC from Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea, reported during a 14-year-period were subclassified into basal, ductal, and mixed subtypes according to the expression of basal (cytokeratin [CK] 5/6, p63 or ductal markers (CK7, CK8/18. The cases were also subject to immunohistochemical study for CK19, p53, cyclin D1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and p16 and to in situ hybridization for human papillomavirus (HPV, and the results were clinico-pathologically compared. Results Mixed subtype (12 cases was the most common, and these cases showed hypopharyngeal predilection, older age, and higher expression of CK19, p53, and EGFR than other subtypes. The basal subtype (nine cases showed frequent comedo-necrosis and high expression of cyclin D1. The ductal subtype (five cases showed the lowest expression of p53, cyclin D1, and EGFR. A small number of p16- and/or HPV-positive cases were not restricted to one subtype. BSCC was the cause of death in 19 patients, and the average follow-up period for all patients was 79.5 months. Overall survival among the three subtypes was not significantly different. Conclusions The results of this study suggest a heterogeneous pathogenesis of head and neck BSCC. Each subtype showed variable histology and immunoprofiles, although the clinical implication of heterogeneity was not determined in this study.

  18. Analysis of p53- immunoreactivity in astrocytic brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkarenko T.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available P53 is an antioncogene with the frequently occured mutations in human tumor cells, leading to corresponding protein overexpression which can be detected by immunohistochemistry. Researches dedicated to the investigation of possibilities of using this technique gave controversial results. The authors investigated features of p53 protein expression in astrocytic brain tumors with different degrees of malignancy. Analyzed the relationship of the expression level of p53 by tumor cells with clinical parameters and Ki-67 proliferation index (PI as well. Tissues were collected from 52 cases with diagnosed astrocytic brain tumors. The sections were immunohistochemically stained with p53 and Ki-67. For each marker, 1000 tumor cells were counted and the ratio of positive tumor cells was calculated using software package ImageJ 1,47v. In normal brain tissue p53- expression was not identified. p53-immunoreactive tumor cells were detected in 25% (1/4 pilocytic astrocytomas, 33.3% (2/6 of diffuse astrocytomas, 53.8% (7/13 anaplastic astrocytomas, 58.6% (17/29 glioblastomas. A high proportion of p53-immunoreactive cells (> 30% was observed only in glioblastomas. The level of p53-imunoreactivity was not related to the age, gender and Grade WHO (p> 0,05. Spearman correlation coefficient between the relative quantity of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive nuclei showed weak direct correlation (0.023, but the one was not statistically significant (p> 0,05. The level of p53-imunoreactivity is not dependent from age and sex of patients, Grade (WHO and proliferative activity (p>0,05 but the high level of p53-immunoreactive cells (>30% is found in glioblastoma specimens only, that may be due to the accumulation of mutations in DNA of tumor cells. There is insignificant weak relationship between relative quantities of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive tumor cells (p>0,05.

  19. TRIM65 negatively regulates p53 through ubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Ma, Chengyuan [Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Zhou, Tong [Department of Endocrinology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Liu, Ying [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Sun, Luyao [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Yu, Zhenxiang, E-mail: zhenxiangyu2015@gmail.com [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China)

    2016-04-22

    Tripartite-motif protein family member 65 (TRIM65) is an important protein involved in white matter lesion. However, the role of TRIM65 in human cancer remains less understood. Through the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) gene alteration database, we found that TRIM65 is upregulated in a significant portion of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients. Our cell growth assay revealed that TRIM65 overexpression promotes cell proliferation, while knockdown of TRIM65 displays opposite effect. Mechanistically, TRIM65 binds to p53, one of the most critical tumor suppressors, and serves as an E3 ligase toward p53. Consequently, TRIM65 inactivates p53 through facilitating p53 poly-ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Notably, chemotherapeutic reagent cisplatin induction of p53 is markedly attenuated in response to ectopic expression of TRIM65. Cell growth inhibition by TRIM65 knockdown is more significant in p53 positive H460 than p53 negative H1299 cells, and knockdown of p53 in H460 cells also shows compromised cell growth inhibition by TRIM65 knockdown, indicating that p53 is required, at least in part, for TRIM65 function. Our findings demonstrate TRIM65 as a potential oncogenic protein, highly likely through p53 inactivation, and provide insight into development of novel approaches targeting TRIM65 for NSCLC treatment, and also overcoming chemotherapy resistance. - Highlights: • TRIM65 expression is elevated in NSCLC. • TRIM65 inactivates p53 through mediating p53 ubiquitination and degradation. • TRIM65 attenuates the response of NSCLC cells to cisplatin.

  20. E2F-1-Induced p53-independent apoptosis in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Christian Henrik; Helin, K.; Sehested, M.

    1998-01-01

    involving increased apoptosis in the germinal epithelium. This effect was potentiated by simultaneous overexpression of DP-1. Testicular atrophy as a result of overexpression of E2F-1 and DP-1 is independent of functional p53, since p53-nullizygous transgenic mice overexpressing E2F-1 and DP-1 also suffered...

  1. Overexpression of cyclin D1 correlates with recurrence in a group of forty-seven operable squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michalides, R.; van Veelen, N.; Hart, A.; Loftus, B.; Wientjens, E.; Balm, A.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the prognostic significance of overexpression of cyclin D1 in 47 patients with surgically resected squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. Overexpression of cyclin D1 was detected immunohistochemically using an affinity-purified polyclonal antibody directed against the

  2. A surrogate p53 reporter in Drosophila reveals the interaction of eIF4E and p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corujo, G.; Campagno, R.; Rivera Pomar, R.; Ferrero, P.; Lu, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    eIF4E promotes translation upon binding the mRNA 5'cap and it is required for cell proliferation. p53 is a proapoptotic protein which is activated in response to DNA damage. There is evidence that suggests that eIF4E and p53 are connected in a mechanism that regulates their function. We propose a model for that such a mechanism to explain the equilibrium between apoptosis and cell proliferation. Our data shows a correlation between the overexpression of eIF4E and the suppression of apoptosis triggered by the overexpression of p53 in Drosophila imaginal discs. We also studied a reporter transgene which expresses GFP in response to p53 activation by gamma radiation. We could confirm that this p53 surrogate works in imaginal discs as well as in embryos. This provided us a tool to quantify the effect on the GFP signal by overexpression of eIF4E to confirm how these two proteins could interact in vivo. Our results suggest that p53 and eIF4E are indeed in an equilibrium that decides if a cell shall proliferate or die. (authors)

  3. The association between the p53/topoisomerase I and p53/ topoisomerase IIalpha immunophenotypes and the progression of ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Julia K; Grelewski, Piotr; Noga, Leszek; Rabczyński, Jerzy; Gryboś, Marian; Jeleń, Michał

    2012-01-01

    In in vitro studies it has been revealed that p53 protein expression might regulate topoisomerase I (topo I) and topoisomerase IIalpha (topo IIalpha) levels in tumor cells. So far, the association between the p53 protein and topo I and topo IIalpha expression and its impact on ovarian carcinoma progression has not been analyzed. The aim of the study was to examine the association between topo I and topo IIalpha expression and p53 protein overexpression with respect to the morphological features and progressive growth of ovarian tumors. The expression of the studied biomarkers was estimated by immunohistochemical staining in tumor sections from 136 malignant and 30 benign ovarian neoplasms. Significant differences for topo I, topo IIalpha and p53 expression between malignant and benign tumors were observed (p p53 protein was associated with advanced stages of ovarian carcinomas (p ovarian carcinomas, positive correlations between topo I and topo IIalpha, topo I and p53 and topo Ilalpha and p53 protein expression were revealed (p = 0.001). No relationship between the studied biomarkers was found in benign ovarian tumors (p > 0.05). p53/topo I and p53/topo IIalpha immunophenotypes were associated with advanced stages of ovarian carcinoma (p = 0.045 and p = 0.009, respectively), p53/topo IIalpha positive ovarian carcinomas were more frequently observed in high than in low tumor grades and the differences were only of borderline significance (p = 0.07). Current findings suggest that on the one hand, cooperation between topo I, topo IIalpha and p53 protein participates in the progressive growth of ovarian tumors. On the other hand, simultaneous expression of the studied proteins identifies the subgroup of ovarian cancers with aggressive biological features which might be considered in therapy.

  4. P53 and bcl-2 assessment in serous ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, J E; Sant Cassia, L J; Irwin, C J; Morris, A G; Rollason, T P

    2008-01-01

    The study objective was to determine the prognostic value of assessment of staining of p53 and bcl-2 in a well-selected group of serous ovarian carcinomas. Immunohistochemical detection was used to identify both p53 and bcl-2 positive tumors. One hundred thirty-two tumors were analyzed for positivity of staining, grade of staining intensity, and for p53 alone, percent expression rates. These were analyzed alongside traditional clinicopathologic parameters for their ability to predict overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and response to chemotherapy (CR). Univariate COX analysis revealed percent p53 expression (P = 0.012) and p53 grade (P = 0.01) to be significant predictors of DFS. Neither the p53 nor bcl-2 measurement parameters were found significant for OS or prediction of CR. On multivariate analysis, incorporating clinicopathologic parameters, p53 parameters did not retain independent significance for any outcome measure. As in primary reported studies, bcl-2 was not found to be of clear independent prognostic value in this group of ovarian tumors. If mutation of p53 and its consequent overexpression is an early event in ovarian tumorigenesis, then p53 assessment may prove useful prognostically in the assessment of either low-grade ovarian carcinomas, as a possible indicator for progression, or in early-stage ovarian tumors, as a marker of tumor aggression or likelihood of recurrence. p53 analysis of a larger group of stage I ovarian tumors would be desirable to further explain the potential association with DFS.

  5. Arginine methylation regulates the p53 response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Martin; Durant, Stephen T; Cho, Er-Chieh

    2008-01-01

    Activation of the p53 tumour suppressor protein in response to DNA damage leads to apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. Enzymatic modifications are widely believed to affect and regulate p53 activity. We describe here a level of post-translational control that has an important functional consequence...... on the p53 response. We show that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) 5, as a co-factor in a DNA damage responsive co-activator complex that interacts with p53, is responsible for methylating p53. Arginine methylation is regulated during the p53 response and affects the target gene specificity...... of p53. Furthermore, PRMT5 depletion triggers p53-dependent apoptosis. Thus, methylation on arginine residues is an underlying mechanism of control during the p53 response....

  6. UHRF2, another E3 ubiquitin ligase for p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Fangmin; Yang, Yan; Qian, Guanhua [Department of Cell Biology and Medical Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Duan, Changzhu, E-mail: duanchzhu@cqmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics of Ministry of Education, Faculty of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Cell Biology and Medical Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 associates with p53 in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 interacts with p53 through its SRA/YDG domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 ubiquitinates p53 in vivo and in vitro. -- Abstract: UHRF2, ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 2, is a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is involved in cell cycle and epigenetic regulation. UHRF2 interacts with multiple cell cycle proteins, including cyclins (A2, B1, D1, and E1), CDK2, and pRb; moreover, UHRF2 could ubiquitinate cyclin D1 and cyclin E1. Also, UHRF2 has been shown to be implicated in epigenetic regulation by associating with DNMTs, G9a, HDAC1, H3K9me2/3 and hemi-methylated DNA. We found that UHRF2 associates with tumor suppressor protein p53, and p53 is ubiquitinated by UHRF2 in vivo and in vitro. Given that both UHRF2 and p53 are involved in cell cycle regulation, this study may suggest a novel signaling pathway on cell proliferation.

  7. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Sara M. [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Quelle, Dawn E., E-mail: dawn-quelle@uiowa.edu [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Pathology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2014-12-23

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer.

  8. Prospective therapeutic applications of p53 inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, Andrei V.; Komarova, Elena A.

    2005-01-01

    p53, in addition to being a key cancer preventive factor, is also a determinant of cancer treatment side effects causing excessive apoptotic death in several normal tissues during cancer therapy. p53 inhibitory strategy has been suggested to protect normal tissues from chemo- and radiotherapy, and to treat other pathologies associated with stress-mediated activation of p53. This strategy was validated by isolation and testing of small molecule p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α that demonstrated broad tissue protecting capacity. However, in some normal tissues and tumors p53 plays protective role by inducing growth arrest and preventing cells from premature entrance into mitosis and death from mitotic catastrophe. Inhibition of this function of p53 can sensitize tumor cells to chemo- and radiotherapy, thus opening new potential application of p53 inhibitors and justifying the need in pharmacological agents targeting specifically either pro-apoptotic or growth arrest functions of p53

  9. P53-specific T cell responses in patients with malignant and benign ovarian tumors : Implications for p53 based immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Annechien; Leffers, Ninke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Sluiter, Wim; Hamming, Ineke; Klip, Harry; ten Hoor, Klaske; Esajas, Martha; van Oven, Magda; Drijfhout, Jan-Wouter; Platteel, Inge; Offringa, Rienk; Hollema, Harry; Melief, Kees; van der Burg, Sjoerd; van der Zee, Ate; Daemen, Toos; Nijman, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Despite intensive treatment, 70% of the ovarian cancer patients will develop recurrent disease, emphasizing the need for new approaches such as immunotherapy. A promising antigenic target for immunotherapy in ovarian cancer is the frequently overexpressed p53 protein. The aim of the study was to

  10. p53 mutations promote proteasomal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Moshe; Kotler, Eran

    2016-07-27

    p53 mutations occur very frequently in human cancer. Besides abrogating the tumour suppressive functions of wild-type p53, many of those mutations also acquire oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Augmentation of proteasome activity is now reported as a common gain-of-function mechanism shared by different p53 mutants, which promotes cancer resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

  11. A Unique Mdm2-Binding Mode of the 3-Pyrrolin-2-one- and 2-Furanone-Based Antagonists of the p53-Mdm2 Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surmiak, Ewa; Twarda-Clapa, Aleksandra; Zak, Krzysztof M.; Musielak, Bogdan; Tomala, Marcin D.; Kubica, Katarzyna; Grudnik, Przemyslaw; Madej, Mariusz; Jablonski, Mateusz; Potempa, Jan; Kalinowska-Tluscik, Justyna; Dömling, Alexander; Dubin, Grzegorz; Holak, Tad A.

    2016-01-01

    The p53 pathway is inactivated in almost all types of cancer by mutations in the p53 encoding gene or overexpression of the p53 negative regulators, Mdm2 and/or Mdmx. Restoration of the p53 function by inhibition of the p53-Mdm2/Mdmx interaction opens up a prospect for a nongenotoxic anticancer

  12. Biologic effect of exogenous wild p53 combined with irradiation on human melanoma cell lines with different p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Fengling; Zhang Hong; Li Wenjian; Liu Bing; Zhou Qingming; Duan Xin; Gao Qingxiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose irradiation on gene transfer efficiency and the effect of adenoviral-mediated exogenous P53 overexpression on apoptosis and radiosensitivity of radioresistant human melanoma cell lines A375(wild type p53)and WM983a(mutant type p53). Methods: Control vector, a replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vector containing a CMV promoter and green fluorescent protein (AdCMV-GFP), was used to transfect A375 cells and WM983a cells preirradiated with or without 1 Gy X-ray. The transduction efficiency of GFP gene was determined with fluorescence microscope directly. These two types of cells irradiated by 1 Gy X-ray were transfected with a replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vector carrying human wild p53 (AdCMV-p53), and mRNA level was detected by RT-PCR. The cell cycle delay and the expression of exogenous P53 were detected using flow cytometry (FCM) at different times after transfection. Tunel technique was used to detect cell apoptosis. The radiosensivity of A375 and WM983a cells after p53 transduction was analyzed by colony formation. Results: It is found that 1 Gy irradiation increased the gene transfection efficiency of A375 and WM983a cells. The expression of exogenous P53 was found to range from 60% to 80% among transfected cells during the first three days after transduction and then declined continuously down to the control level on day 10. G 1 cell cycle arrest was also observed after p53 gene transduction. WM983a cells transfected with p53 showed higher sensitivity to X-ray-induced cell killing than A375 cells. Conclusions: It is indicated that low dose of ionizing radiation can improve gene transfection efficiency of A375 and WM983a cells mediated by adenovirus vector. Althrough the overexpresion of exogenous p53 may not inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis of melanoma cell line A375 and WM983a irt vitro, the two cell lines are much more sensitive to cell death induced by irradiation. It is

  13. Overexpression of cyclin D1 induces the reprogramming of differentiated epidermal cells into stem cell-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Along; Yang, Leilei; Ma, Kui; Sun, Mengli; Li, Lei; Huang, Jin; Li, Yang; Zhang, Cuiping; Li, Haihong; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that Wnt/β-catenin is critical for dedifferentiation of differentiated epidermal cells. Cyclin D1 (CCND1) is a β-catenin target gene. In this study, we provide evidence that overexpression of CCND1 induces reprogramming of epidermal cells into stem cell-like cells. After introducing CCND1 gene into differentiated epidermal cells, we found that the large flat-shaped cells with a small nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio changed into small round-shaped cells with a large nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio. The expressions of CK10, β1-integrin, Oct4 and Nanog in CCND1 induced cells were remarkably higher than those in the control group (P cells exhibited a high colony-forming ability and a long-term proliferative potential. When the induced cells were implanted into a wound of laboratory animal model, the wound healing was accelerated. These results suggested that overexpression of CCND1 induced the reprogramming of differentiated epidermal cells into stem cell-like cells. This study may also offer a new approach to yield epidermal stem cells for wound repair and regeneration.

  14. The antagonism between MCT-1 and p53 affects the tumorigenic outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Tai-Du

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MCT-1 oncoprotein accelerates p53 protein degradation via a proteosome pathway. Synergistic promotion of the xenograft tumorigenicity has been demonstrated in circumstance of p53 loss alongside MCT-1 overexpression. However, the molecular regulation between MCT-1 and p53 in tumor development remains ambiguous. We speculate that MCT-1 may counteract p53 through the diverse mechanisms that determine the tumorigenic outcomes. Results MCT-1 has now identified as a novel target gene of p53 transcriptional regulation. MCT-1 promoter region contains the response elements reactive with wild-type p53 but not mutant p53. Functional p53 suppresses MCT-1 promoter activity and MCT-1 mRNA stability. In a negative feedback regulation, constitutively expressed MCT-1 decreases p53 promoter function and p53 mRNA stability. The apoptotic events are also significantly prevented by oncogenic MCT-1 in a p53-dependent or a p53-independent fashion, according to the genotoxic mechanism. Moreover, oncogenic MCT-1 promotes the tumorigenicity in mice xenografts of p53-null and p53-positive lung cancer cells. In support of the tumor growth are irrepressible by p53 reactivation in vivo, the inhibitors of p53 (MDM2, Pirh2, and Cop1 are constantly stimulated by MCT-1 oncoprotein. Conclusions The oppositions between MCT-1 and p53 are firstly confirmed at multistage processes that include transcription control, mRNA metabolism, and protein expression. MCT-1 oncogenicity can overcome p53 function that persistently advances the tumor development.

  15. Both p53-PUMA/NOXA-Bax-mitochondrion and p53-p21cip1 pathways are involved in the CDglyTK-mediated tumor cell suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhendong; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Libin; Tang, Aifa; Zhai, Qinna; Wen, Jianxiang; Yao, Li; Li, Pengfei

    2009-01-01

    CDglyTK fusion suicide gene has been well characterized to effectively kill tumor cells. However, the exact mechanism and downstream target genes are not fully understood. In our study, we found that CDglyTK/prodrug treatment works more efficiently in p53 wild-type (HONE1) cells than in p53 mutant (CNE1) cells. We then used adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system to either knockdown or overexpress p53 and its target genes in these cells. Consistent results showed that both p53-PUMA/NOXA/Bcl2-Bax and p53-p21 pathways contribute to the CDglyTK induced tumor cell suppression. Our work for the first time addressed the role of p53 related genes in the CDglyTK/prodrug system.

  16. The p53-dependent radioadaptive response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    We already reported that conditioning exposures at low doses, or at low dose-rates, lowered radiation-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in cultured cells in vitro and in the spleens of mice in vivo. In this study, the aim was to characterize the p53-dependent radioadaptive response at the molecular level. We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 containing cells derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53-null. Cellular radiation sensitivities were determined with a colony-forming assay. The accumulation of p53, Hdm2, and iNOS was analyzed with Western blotting. The quantification of chromosomal aberrations was estimated by scoring dicentrics per cell. In wtp53 cells, it was demonstrated that the lack of p53 accumulation was coupled with the activation of Hdm2 after low dose irradiation (0.02 Gy). Although NO radicals were only minimally induced in wtp53 cells irradiated with a challenging irradiation (6 Gy) alone, NO radicals were seen to increase about 2-4 fold after challenging irradiation following a priming irradiation (0.02 Gy). Under similar irradiation conditions with a priming and challenging irradiation in wtp53 cells, induction of radioresistance and a depression of chromosomal aberrations were observed only in the absence of Pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor), RITA or Nutlin-3 (p53-Hdm2 interaction inhibitors), aminoguanidine (an iNOS inhibitor) and c-PTIO (an NO radical scavenger). On the other hand, in p53 dysfunctional cells, a radioadaptive response was not observed in the presence or absence of those inhibitors. Moreover, radioresistance developed when wtp53 cells were treated with ISDN (an NO generating agent) alone. These findings suggest that NO radicals are an initiator of the radioadaptive response acting through the activation of Hdm2 and the depression of p53 accumulations.

  17. and p53 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... cellular gene product or viral oncoprotein and wild- type p53 protein45. It has already been shown that the p53 protein can bind to cellular proteins, such as the mdm2 oncogene product and heat-shock protein. 70 and to several DNA tumor virus proteins, including SV40 T antigen and E1b protein from.

  18. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Zaika

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40. Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections.

  19. p53 gene mutations and expression of p53 and mdm2 proteins in invasive breast carcinoma. A comparative analysis with clinico-pathological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, T; Schneider-Stock, R; Rys, J; Niezabitowski, A; Roessner, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze p53 gene mutations and the expression of p53 and mdm2 proteins in 31 randomly selected invasive breast carcinomas. The results were then correlated with tumor grade, stage, estrogen receptor status, nodal status, and DNA ploidy. The expression of the proteins p53 and mdm2 was determined immunohistochemically using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material. Screening for p53 mutation involved analysis of the highly conserved regions of the p53 gene (exons 5-9) by the polymerase chain reaction/ single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique. PCR products with band shifts were directly sequenced. Immunohistochemical staining of p53 was positive in 9 cases (29.0%), only 2 of which showed a p53 gene mutation. These were identified as a C-->G transversion at the second position of codon 278 in exon 8 and an A-->G transition at the second position of codon 205 in exon 6. A third case with a mutation was observed (C-->T transition, position 1 of codon 250 in exon 7) that did not show p53 immunohistochemically. Of the 9 p53-positive tumors, 2 were moderately differentiated (grade II). The remaining tumors were poorly differentiated (7/9). By contrast, p53-negative carcinomas were well differentiated (grade I) in most cases (P = 0.02). DNA cytometry in 8 of the 9 p53-positive carcinomas revealed an aneuploid stem line. The majority of the p53-negative tumors were diploid (P = 0.01). Mdm2 oncoprotein was detected in 10 tumors (32.2%), 4 of which were p53-positive, including the 3 with mutations. The grading of the mdm2-positive tumors was moderate or poor, G1 carcinomas were always noted to be mdm2-negative (P = 0.04). Overexpression of p53 protein is a complex mechanism and does not merely indicate the detection of mutations in the p53 gene. This study has shown that p53 expression correlates with tumor grade and DNA ploidy. Mdm2 expression was also associated with the tumor grade. Immunohistological demonstration of the p53

  20. Associations between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Related Exposures and p53 Mutations in Breast Tumors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mordukhovich, I.; Rössner ml., Pavel; Terry, M. B.; Santella, R.; Zhang, Y.J.; Hibshoosh, H.; Memeo, L.; Mansukhani, M.; Long, CH.M.; Garbowski, G.; Agrawal, M.; Gaudet, M. M.; Steck, S. E.; Sagiv, S. K.; Eng, S. M.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Neugut, A. I.; Conway-Dorsey, K.; Gammon, M. D.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 4 (2010), s. 511-518 ISSN 0091-6765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : breast cancer * p53 mutation * p53 overexpression Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 6.087, year: 2010

  1. p53 in differentiation of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyama, Toshio; Ito, Takashi; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Hayashi, Yuzo; Dohi, Kiyohiko.

    1993-01-01

    P53 is a tumor suppressor gene with such a recessive nature and is inactivated in many carcinomas. DNA was extracted from 10 primary papillary adenocarcinomas and eight undifferentiated carcinomas of the thyroid, using three 5 μm sliced paraffin segments, and then amplified by PCR. The products were analyzed for mutations in the p53 gene exons 5 to 8 by the direct sequencing method and for allelic deletion by the RFLP method. In five human thyroid carcinomas, DNA was extracted from each tissue and analyzed. Mutations in the p53 gene exons 5 to 8 and p53 gene deletions were not detected in the 10 papillary adenocarcinomas, mutations were detected in seven of eight cases and allelic deletions was detected in three of the five cases examined. In each of the five cases which had both differentiated and undifferentiated tissues in the same tumor, p53 gene mutations were not detected in the differentiated tissues while mutations and gene deletions were detected in the undifferentiated sections. The p53 gene was analyzed using paraffin-embedded tissues by the combined use of the direct sequencing and PCR methods and by the RFLP method. It was found that the progression of human thyroid carcinoma is closely related to the p53 genetic changes. Furthermore, the analysis of differentiated and undifferentiated tissues in the same tumor showed that human undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas develop from differentiated carcinomas. (J.P.N.)

  2. miR-34 and p53: New Insights into a Complex Functional Relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Navarro

    Full Text Available miR-34, a tumor suppressor miRNA family transcriptionally activated by p53, is considered a critical mediator of p53 function. However, knockout of the mouse miR-34 family has little or no effect on the p53 response. The relative contribution of different miR-34 family members to p53 function or how much p53 relies on miR-34 in human cells is unclear. Here we show that miR-34a has a complex effect on the p53 response in human cells. In HCT116 cells miR-34a overexpression enhances p53 transcriptional activity, but the closely related family members, miR-34b and miR-34c, even when over-expressed, have little effect. Both TP53 itself and MDM4, a strong p53 transactivation inhibitor, are direct targets of miR-34a. The genes regulated by miR-34a also include four other post-translational inhibitors of p53. miR-34a overexpression leads to variable effects on p53 levels in p53-sufficient human cancer cell lines. In HCT116, miR-34a overexpression increases p53 protein levels and stability. About a quarter of all mRNAs that participate in the human p53 network bind to biotinylated miR-34a, suggesting that many are direct miR-34a targets. However, only about a fifth of the mRNAs that bind to miR-34a also bind to miR-34b or miR-34c. Two human cell lines knocked out for miR-34a have unimpaired p53-mediated responses to genotoxic stress, like mouse cells. The complex positive and negative effects of miR-34 on the p53 network suggest that rather than simply promoting the p53 response, miR-34a might act at a systems level to stabilize the robustness of the p53 response to genotoxic stress.

  3. Induction of p53-dependent and p53-independent cellular responses by topoisomerase 1 inhibitors.

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, A. C.; Brown, R.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that loss of p53 function in A2780 human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells confers increased clonogenic resistance to several DNA-damaging agents, but not to taxol or camptothecin. We have now extended these studies, comparing wild-type p53-expressing A2780 cells with isogenic derivatives transfected with a dominant negative mutant (143; val to ala) p53. We show that, as well as retaining equivalent clonogenic sensitivity to camptothecin, mutant p53 transfectants of A2780 ...

  4. Amplification of cyclin D1 in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and the prognostic value of chromosomal abnormalities and cyclin D1 overexpression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akervall, J. A.; Michalides, R. J.; Mineta, H.; Balm, A.; Borg, A.; Dictor, M. R.; Jin, Y.; Loftus, B.; Mertens, F.; Wennerberg, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    Abnormalities of chromosome band 11q13 are frequent in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). The oncogene CCND1 is located at 11q13 and encodes cyclin D1, a cell cycle-regulating protein. The authors investigated the clinical relevance and associations between amplification and

  5. Immunohistochemical detection of P53 and Mdm2 in vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola A Bakry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitiligo is a common depigmented skin disorder that is caused by selective destruction of melanocytes. It is generally accepted that the main function of melanin resides in the protection of skin cells against the deleterious effect of ultraviolet rays (UVRs. Association of vitiligo and skin cancer has been a subject of controversy. Occurrence of skin cancer in long-lasting vitiligo is rare despite multiple evidences of DNA damage in vitiliginous skin. Aim: To detect the expression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins in both depigmented and normally pigmented skin of vitiligo patients and to compare it to control subjects suffering from nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four patients with vitiligo and 30 age and sex-matched patients with nodulo-ulcerative basal cell carcinoma (BCC as a control group were selected. Both patients and control subjects had outdoor occupations. Skin biopsies were taken from each case and control subjects. Histopathological examination of Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections was done. Expression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins were examined immunohistochemically. Results: Both P53 and Mdm2 were strongly expressed in depigmented as well as normally pigmented skin of vitiligo patients. This expression involved the epidermis, skin adnexa and blood vessels with significant differences between cases and controls. Conclusions: The overexpression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins in both normally pigmented and depigmented skin of patients with vitiligo could contribute to the decreased occurrence of actinic damage and NMSC in these patients.

  6. P53 Gene Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sommer, Steve S

    2005-01-01

    .... The central hypothesis of this proposal is that variability in the patterns of p53 mutagensis in breast cancer reflects differences in exposures to different amounts and/or types of diverse environmental mutagens...

  7. Mutant p53 expression in fallopian tube epithelium drives cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Quartuccio, Suzanne M.; Karthikeyan, Subbulakshmi; Eddie, Sharon L.; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Ó hAinmhire, Eoghainín; Modi, Dimple A.; Wei, Jian-Jun; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer death among US women. Evidence supports the hypothesis that high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSC) may originate in the distal end of the fallopian tube. Although a heterogeneous disease, 96% of HGSC contain mutations in p53. In addition, the “p53 signature”, or overexpression of p53 protein (usually associated with mutation), is a potential precursor lesion of fallopian tube derived HGSC suggesting an essential role for p53 mutation in ea...

  8. Effects of chronic deoxynivalenol exposure on p53 heterozygous and p53 homozygous mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, G S; Coady, L; Curran, I; Caldwell, D; Armstrong, C; Aziz, S A; Nunnikhoven, A; Gannon, A M; Liston, V; Shenton, J; Mehta, R

    2016-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a secondary metabolite associated with Fusarium species pathogenic to important food crops. A two-year feeding study reported that DON was non-carcinogenic in B6C3F1 mice. The present study was conducted to further characterize the chronic effects of DON by exposing cancer-prone transgenic p53 heterozygous (p53+/-) male mice and p53 homozygous (p53+/+) male mice to 0, 1, 5, or 10 mg DON/kg in diet for 26 weeks. Gross and microscopic organ-specific neoplastic and non-neoplastic changes and expression profiles of key hepatic and renal genes were assessed. Few toxicologic differences between p53+/+ and p53+/- mice were observed, and no tumours were observed due to DON. The results indicated that DON was non-carcinogenic and that reduced expression of the p53 gene did not play a key role in responses to DON toxicity. The lack of inflammatory and proliferative lesions in mice may be attributed to the anorectic effects of DON, which resulted in dose-dependent reductions in body weight in p53+/+ and p53+/- mice. Hepatic and renal gene expression analyses confirmed that chronic exposure to DON was noninflammatory. The effects of 26-week DON exposure on p53+/+ and p53+/-mice were consistent with those previously seen in B6C3F1 mice exposed to DON for two years. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A designed inhibitor of p53 aggregation rescues p53 tumor-suppression in ovarian carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soragni, Alice; Janzen, Deanna M.; Johnson, Lisa M.; Lindgren, Anne G.; Nguyen, Anh Thai-Quynh; Tiourin, Ekaterina; Soriaga, Angela B.; Lu, Jing; Jiang, Lin; Faull, Kym F.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Memarzadeh, Sanaz; Eisenberg, David S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Half of all human cancers lose p53 function by missense mutations, with an unknown fraction of these containing p53 in a self-aggregated, amyloid-like state. Here we show that a cell-penetrating peptide, ReACp53, designed to inhibit p53 amyloid formation, rescues p53 function in cancer cell lines and in organoids derived from high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOC), an aggressive cancer characterized by ubiquitous p53 mutations. Rescued p53 behaves similarly to its wild-type counterpart in regulating target genes, reducing cell proliferation and increasing cell death. Intraperitoneal administration decreases tumor proliferation and shrinks xenografts in vivo. Our data show the effectiveness of targeting a specific aggregation defect of p53 and its potential applicability to HGSOCs. PMID:26748848

  10. Glycerol restores the p53 function in human lingual cancer cells bearing mutant p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Ichiro; Yane, Katsunari; Yuki, Kazue; Kanata, Hirokazu; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in p53, tumor suppressor gene, have recently been shown to have an impact on the clinical course of several human tumors, including head and neck cancers. The genetic status of the p53 gene has been focused on as the most important candidate among various cancer-related genes for prognosis-predictive assays of cancer therapy. We examined the restoration of radiation- or cisplatin (CDDP)-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in human lingual cancer cells. The results suggest that glycerol is effective in inducing a conformational change of p53 and restoring normal function of mutant p53, leading to enhanced radiosensitivity or chemosensitivity through the induction of apoptosis. We have also represented the same results in vivo as in vitro. Thus, this novel tool for enhancement of radiosensitivity or chemosensitivity in cancer cells bearing m p53 may be applicable for p53-targeted cancer therapy. (author)

  11. Heterologous Prime/Boost Immunization with p53-based Vaccines Combined with Toll-Like Receptor Stimulation Enhances Tumor Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Ishizaki, Hidenobu; Song, Guang-Yun; Srivastava, Tumul; Carroll, Kyla Driscoll; Shahabi, Vafa; Manuel, Edwin R.; Diamond, Don J.; Ellenhorn, Joshua D.I.

    2010-01-01

    The p53 gene product is overexpressed in ~50% of cancers, making it an ideal target for cancer immunotherapy. We previously demonstrated that a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vaccine expressing human p53 (MVA-p53) was moderately active when given as a homologous prime/boost in a human p53 knock in (Hupki) mouse model. We needed to improve upon the inefficient homologous boosting approach, because development of neutralizing immunity to the vaccine viral vector backbone suppresses its immunoge...

  12. Pigmentation, Melanocyte Colonization, and p53 Status in Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídia M. Frey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common neoplasm in the Caucasian population. Only a fraction of BCC exhibits pigmentation. Lack of melanocyte colonization has been suggested to be due to p53-inactivating mutations in the BCC cells interfering with the p53-proopiomelanocortin pathway and the production of alpha melanocyte-stimulating hormone in the tumor. To evaluate this, we determined tumor pigmentation as well as expression of melan-A and of p53 in 49 BCC tissues by means of immunohistochemistry. As expected, we observed a positive relation between tumor pigmentation and melan-A positive intra-tumoral melanocytes. Melanocyte colonization and, to a lesser extent, p53 overexpression showed intraindividual heterogeneity in larger tumors. p53 overexpression, which is indicative of p53 mutations, was not correlated to melanocyte colonization of BCC. Sequencing of exon 5–8 of the p53 gene in selected BCC cases revealed that colonization by melanocytes and BCC pigmentation is neither ablated by p53 mutations nor generally present in BCCs with wild-type p53.

  13. Pigmentation, Melanocyte Colonization, and p53 Status in Basal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, L. M.; Houben, R.; Brocker, E. B.

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common neoplasm in the Caucasian population. Only a fraction of BCC exhibits pigmentation. Lack of melanocyte colonization has been suggested to be due to p53-inactivating mutations in the BCC cells interfering with the p53-proopiomelanocortin pathway and the production of alpha melanocyte-stimulating hormone in the tumor. To evaluate this, we determined tumor pigmentation as well as expression of melan-A and of p53 in 49 BCC tissues by means of immunohistochemistry. As expected, we observed a positive relation between tumor pigmentation and melan-A positive intra-tumoral melanocytes. Melanocyte colonization and, to a lesser extent, p53 overexpression showed intraindividual heterogeneity in larger tumors. p53 overexpression, which is indicative of p53 mutations, was not correlated to melanocyte colonization of BCC. Sequencing of exon 5-8 of the p53 gene in selected BCC cases revealed that colonization by melanocytes and BCC pigmentation is neither ablated by p53 mutations nor generally present in BCCs with wild-type p53.

  14. UBR2 Enriched in p53 Deficient Mouse Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Exosome Promoted Gastric Cancer Progression via Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jiahui; Liang, Zhaofeng; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Huan; Li, Xia; Fu, Hailong; Zhang, Xu; Yan, Yongmin; Xu, Wenrong; Qian, Hui

    2017-11-01

    The deficiency or mutation of p53 has been linked to several types of cancers. The mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) is an important component in the tumor microenvironment, and exosomes secreted by MSCs can transfer bioactive molecules, including proteins and nucleic acid, to other cells in the tumor microenvironment to influence the progress of a tumor. However, whether the state of p53 in MSCs can impact the bioactive molecule secretion of exosomes to promote cancer progression and the regulatory mechanism remains elusive. Our study aimed to investigate the regulation of ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2 (UBR2) enriched in exosomes secreted by p53 deficient mouse bone marrow MSC (p53 -/- mBMMSC) in gastric cancer progression in vivo and in vitro. We found that the concentration of exosome was significantly higher in p53 -/- mBMMSC than that in p53 wild-type mBMMSC (p53 +/+ mBMMSC). In particular, UBR2 was highly expressed in p53 -/- mBMMSC cells and exosomes. P53 -/- mBMMSC exosomes enriched UBR2 could be internalized into p53 +/+ mBMMSC and murine foregastric carcinoma (MFC) cells and induce the overexpression of UBR2 in these cells which elevated cell proliferation, migration, and the expression of stemness-related genes. Mechanistically, the downregulation of UBR2 in p53 -/- mBMMSC exosomes could reverse these actions. Moreover, a majority of Wnt family members, β-catenin, and its downstream genes (CD44, CyclinD1, CyclinD3, and C-myc) were significantly decreased in MFC knockdown UBR2 and β-catenin depletion, an additional depletion of UBR2 had no significant difference in the expression of Nanog, OCT4, Vimentin, and E-cadherin. Taken together, our findings indicated that p53 -/- mBMMSC exosomes could deliver UBR2 to target cells and promote gastric cancer growth and metastasis by regulating Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Stem Cells 2017;35:2267-2279. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  15. Rsf-1 is overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancers and regulates cyclinD1 expression and ERK activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qingchang; Dong, Qianze; Wang, Enhua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Rsf-1 expression is elevated in non-small cell lung cancers. ► Rsf-1 depletion inhibits proliferation and increased apoptosis in lung cancer cells. ► Rsf-1 depletion decreases the level of cyclinD1 and phosphor-ERK expression. -- Abstract: Rsf-1 (HBXAP) was recently reported to be overexpressed in various cancers and associated with the malignant behavior of cancer cells. However, the expression of Rsf-1 in primary lung cancer and its biological roles in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been reported. The molecular mechanism of Rsf-1 in cancer aggressiveness remains ambiguous. In the present study, we analyzed the expression pattern of Rsf-1 in NSCLC tissues and found that Rsf-1 was overexpressed at both the mRNA and protein levels. There was a significant association between Rsf-1 overexpression and TNM stage (p = 0.0220) and poor differentiation (p = 0.0013). Furthermore, knockdown of Rsf-1 expression in H1299 and H460 cells with high endogenous Rsf-1 expression resulted in a decrease of colony formation ability and inhibition of cell cycle progression. Rsf-1 knockdown also induced apoptosis in these cell lines. Further analysis showed that Rsf-1 knockdown decreased cyclin D1 expression and phospho-ERK levels. In conclusion, Rsf-1 is overexpressed in NSCLC and contributes to malignant cell growth by cyclin D1 and ERK modulation, which makes Rsf-1 a candidate therapeutic target in lung cancer.

  16. p53 and cyclin G cooperate in mediating genome stability in somatic cells of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Fabienne E; Zimmermann, Mirjam; Fischer, Patrick; Gromoll, Christian; Preiss, Anette; Nagel, Anja C

    2017-12-20

    One of the key players in genome surveillance is the tumour suppressor p53 mediating the adaptive response to a multitude of stress signals. Here we identify Cyclin G (CycG) as co-factor of p53-mediated genome stability. CycG has been shown before to be involved in double-strand break repair during meiosis. Moreover, it is also important for mediating DNA damage response in somatic tissue. Here we find it in protein complexes together with p53, and show that the two proteins interact physically in vitro and in vivo in response to ionizing irradiation. In contrast to mammals, Drosophila Cyclin G is no transcriptional target of p53. Genetic interaction data reveal that p53 activity during DNA damage response requires the presence of CycG. Morphological defects caused by overexpression of p53 are ameliorated in cycG null mutants. Moreover, using a p53 biosensor we show that p53 activity is impeded in cycG mutants. As both p53 and CycG are likewise required for DNA damage repair and longevity we propose that CycG plays a positive role in mediating p53 function in genome surveillance of Drosophila.

  17. p53-Induced Apoptosis Occurs in the Absence of p14ARF in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Hopkins-Donaldson

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPMs are usually wild type for the p53 gene but contain homozygous deletions in the INK4A locus that encodes p14ARF, an inhibitor of p53-MDM2 interaction. Previous findings suggest that lack of p14ARF expression and the presence of SV40 large T antigen (L-Tag result in p53 inactivation in MPM. We did not detect SV40 L-Tag mRNA in either MPM cell lines or primary cultures, treatment of p14ARF-deficient cells with cisplatin (CDDP increased both total and phosphorylated p53 and enhanced p53 DNA-binding activity. On incubation with CDDP, levels of positively regulated p53 transcriptional targets p21WAF, PIG3, MDM2, Bax, PUMA increased in p14ARF-deficient cells, whereas negatively regulated survivin decreased. Significantly, p53-induced apoptosis was activated by CDDP in p14ARF-deficient cells, treatment with p53-specific siRNA rendered them more CDDP-resistant. p53 was also activated by: 1 inhibition of MDM2 (using nutlin-3; 2 transient overexpression of p14ARF; and 3 targeting of survivin using antisense oligonucleotides. However, it is noteworthy that only survivin downregulation sensitized cells to CDDP-induced apoptosis. These results suggest that p53 is functional in the absence of p14ARF in MPM and that targeting of the downstream apoptosis inhibitor survivin can sensitize to CDDP-induced apoptosis.

  18. Knockdown of MBP-1 in human foreskin fibroblasts induces p53-p21 dependent senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asish K Ghosh

    Full Text Available MBP-1 acts as a general transcriptional repressor. Overexpression of MBP-1 induces cell death in a number of cancer cells and regresses tumor growth. However, the function of endogenous MBP-1 in normal cell growth regulation remains unknown. To unravel the role of endogenous MBP-1, we knocked down MBP-1 expression in primary human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF by RNA interference. Knockdown of MBP-1 in HFF (HFF-MBPsi-4 resulted in an induction of premature senescence, displayed flattened cell morphology, and increased senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity. FACS analysis of HFF-MBPsi-4 revealed accumulation of a high number of cells in the G1-phase. A significant upregulation of cyclin D1 and reduction of cyclin A was detected in HFF-MBPsi-4 as compared to control HFF. Senescent fibroblasts exhibited enhanced expression of phosphorylated and acetylated p53, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21. Further analysis suggested that promyolocytic leukemia protein (PML bodies are dramatically increased in HFF-MBPsi-4. Together, these results demonstrated that knockdown of endogenous MBP-1 is involved in cellular senescence of HFF through p53-p21 pathway.

  19. Wild-type p53 controls the level of fibronectin expression in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Daeun; Jung, Seung Pil; Jeong, Yisun; Bae, Soo Youn; Kim, Sangmin

    2017-10-01

    Aberrant fibronectin (FN) expression is associated with poor prognosis, cell adhesion, and cell motility in a variety of cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the relationship between p53 and FN expression in breast cancer cells. Basal FN expression was significantly decreased by treatment with the p53 activator III, RITA, in MCF7 breast cancer cells with wild-type p53. In addition, overexpression of wild-type p53 markedly decreased the level of FN expression in p53-mutant breast cancer cells. To examine the mechanism underlying the relationship between p53 and FN expression, we treated MCF7 breast cancer cells with the tumor promoter TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate). Our results showed that basal FN expression was increased by TPA treatment in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, the level of p53 expression was decreased by TPA treatment. However, the expression of FN and p53 was not altered by TPA in p53-mutant breast cancer cells. Furthermore, the alterations in FN and p53 expression in response to TPA were prevented by a specific MEK inhibitor, UO126. Finally, we demonstrated that TPA triggers degradation of p53 through the proteasomal pathway in MCF7 cells. TPA-induced FN expression was decreased by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Under the same condition, p53 protein expression, but not mRNA expression, was reversed by MG132. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the level of FN expression is associated with the status and expression of p53 in breast cancer cells.

  20. p53 mutations in sweat gland carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernat, W; Peraud, A; Wozniak, L; Ohgaki, H

    1998-05-04

    Sweat gland carcinomas are rare skin tumours and little is known about their etiology and molecular basis. In this study, we analyzed p53 mutations in 16 sweat gland carcinomas with different histologic types, including 2 spiradenocarcinomas, 1 composed adnexal carcinoma, 5 porocarcinomas, 2 eccrine hidradenocarcinomas, 2 syringocystadenocarcinomas, 1 sclerosing sweat gland carcinoma, 1 adenoid cystic carcinoma, 1 cylindrocarcinoma and 1 apocrine adenocarcinoma. Single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analyses followed by direct DNA sequencing revealed that 5 carcinomas (31%) contained a p53 mutation, 4 of which were G:C-->A:T transition mutations and 1 of which was a deletion. Three G:C-->A:T mutations were located at dipyrimidine sequences on the antisense strand (2 spiradenocarcinomas, 1 eccrine hidradenocarcinoma), suggesting that UV light may play a role in the development of sweat gland carcinomas. In 2 spiradenocarcinomas, p53 mutations were present in the carcinoma but not in the adenoma portions, suggesting that p53 mutations may be associated with malignant progression in these rare adnexal tumours.

  1. Cyclin D1 gene amplification and overexpression are present in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, C. B.; ter Haar, N. T.; Peterse, J. L.; Cornelisse, C. J.; van de Vijver, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Cyclin D1 (CCND1) amplification is found in 10-15 per cent of invasive breast carcinomas, but it is not well established whether this gene alteration also occurs in the precursor of invasive breast carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). By Southern blot analysis, cyclin D1 gene amplification

  2. Mutant, wild type, or overall p53 expression: freedom from clinical progression in tumours of astrocytic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, F S; Hsu, D W; Zeheb, R; Efird, J T; Okunieff, P G; Malkin, D M

    2004-11-01

    Abnormalities of the p53 tumor-suppressor gene are found in a significant proportion of astrocytic brain tumours. We studied tumour specimens from 74 patients evaluated over 20 years at the Massachusetts General Hospital, where clinical outcome could be determined and sufficient pathologic material was available for immunostaining. p53 expression studies employed an affinity-purified p53 monoclonal antibody, whose specificity was verified in absorption studies and, in a minority of cases, a second antibody recognising a different epitope of p53. Significant overexpression of p53 protein was found in 48% of the 74 tumours included in this series and high levels of expression were associated with higher mortality from astrocytic tumours (Pexpression of p53 plays an important role in the pathobiology of these tumours. In a subset of 36 cases, coding regions of the p53 gene were completely sequenced via SSCP and direct DNA sequencing, revealing that overexpression of p53 protein is not always associated with point mutations in conserved exons of the p53 gene. Finally, we confirmed p53 protein expression in early-passage human glioma cell lines of known p53 mutational status and immunostaining scores. Although grade continues to be the strongest prognostic variable, the use of p53 staining as a prognostic indicator, in contrast to mutational DNA analyses, may be a useful adjunct in identifying patients at higher risk of treatment failure.

  3. cDNA sequencing improves the detection of P53 missense mutations in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szybka, Malgorzata; Kordek, Radzislaw; Zakrzewska, Magdalena; Rieske, Piotr; Pasz-Walczak, Grazyna; Kulczycka-Wojdala, Dominika; Zawlik, Izabela; Stawski, Robert; Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Liberski, Pawel P

    2009-01-01

    Recently published data showed discrepancies beteween P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing in glioblastomas. We hypothesised that similar discrepancies may be observed in other human cancers. To this end, we analyzed 23 colorectal cancers for P53 mutations and gene expression using both DNA and cDNA sequencing, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. We found P53 gene mutations in 16 cases (15 missense and 1 nonsense). Two of the 15 cases with missense mutations showed alterations based only on cDNA, and not DNA sequencing. Moreover, in 6 of the 15 cases with a cDNA mutation those mutations were difficult to detect in the DNA sequencing, so the results of DNA analysis alone could be misinterpreted if the cDNA sequencing results had not also been available. In all those 15 cases, we observed a higher ratio of the mutated to the wild type template by cDNA analysis, but not by the DNA analysis. Interestingly, a similar overexpression of P53 mRNA was present in samples with and without P53 mutations. In terms of colorectal cancer, those discrepancies might be explained under three conditions: 1, overexpression of mutated P53 mRNA in cancer cells as compared with normal cells; 2, a higher content of cells without P53 mutation (normal cells and cells showing K-RAS and/or APC but not P53 mutation) in samples presenting P53 mutation; 3, heterozygous or hemizygous mutations of P53 gene. Additionally, for heterozygous mutations unknown mechanism(s) causing selective overproduction of mutated allele should also be considered. Our data offer new clues for studying discrepancy in P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing analysis

  4. N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase inhibits p53-mediated cell cycle arrest and coordinates with p53 to determine sensitivity to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shanshan; Xing, Guichun; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shan; Yin, Yuxin; Tian, Chunyan; He, Fuchu; Zhang, Lingqiang

    2012-08-01

    Alkylating agents induce genome-wide base damage, which is repaired mainly by N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG). An elevated expression of MPG in certain types of tumor cells confers higher sensitivity to alkylation agents because MPG-induced apurinic/apyrimidic (AP) sites trigger more strand breaks. However, the determinant of drug sensitivity or insensitivity still remains unclear. Here, we report that the p53 status coordinates with MPG to play a pivotal role in such process. MPG expression is positive in breast, lung and colon cancers (38.7%, 43.4% and 25.3%, respectively) but negative in all adjacent normal tissues. MPG directly binds to the tumor suppressor p53 and represses p53 activity in unstressed cells. The overexpression of MPG reduced, whereas depletion of MPG increased, the expression levels of pro-arrest gene downstream of p53 including p21, 14-3-3σ and Gadd45 but not proapoptotic ones. The N-terminal region of MPG was specifically required for the interaction with the DNA binding domain of p53. Upon DNA alkylation stress, in p53 wild-type tumor cells, p53 dissociated from MPG and induced cell growth arrest. Then, AP sites were repaired efficiently, which led to insensitivity to alkylating agents. By contrast, in p53-mutated cells, the AP sites were repaired with low efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence to show that a DNA repair enzyme functions as a selective regulator of p53, and these findings provide new insights into the functional linkage between MPG and p53 in cancer therapy.

  5. Regulation of p53 tetramerization and nuclear export by ARC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Roger S-Y; Nam, Young-Jae; Ostreicher, Marc Jason; Metzl, Mark D; Whelan, Russell S; Peng, Chang-Fu; Ashton, Anthony W; Fu, Weimin; Mani, Kartik; Chin, Suet-Feung; Provenzano, Elena; Ellis, Ian; Figg, Nichola; Pinder, Sarah; Bennett, Martin R; Caldas, Carlos; Kitsis, Richard N

    2007-12-26

    Inactivation of the transcription factor p53 is central to carcinogenesis. Yet only approximately one-half of cancers have p53 loss-of-function mutations. Here, we demonstrate a mechanism for p53 inactivation by apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), a protein induced in multiple cancer cells. The direct binding in the nucleus of ARC to the p53 tetramerization domain inhibits p53 tetramerization. This exposes a nuclear export signal in p53, triggering Crm1-dependent relocation of p53 to the cytoplasm. Knockdown of endogenous ARC in breast cancer cells results in spontaneous tetramerization of endogenous p53, accumulation of p53 in the nucleus, and activation of endogenous p53 target genes. In primary human breast cancers with nuclear ARC, p53 is almost always WT. Conversely, nearly all breast cancers with mutant p53 lack nuclear ARC. We conclude that nuclear ARC is induced in cancer cells and negatively regulates p53.

  6. p53 Represses the Oncogenic Sno-MiR-28 Derived from a SnoRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yu

    Full Text Available p53 is a master tumour repressor that participates in vast regulatory networks, including feedback loops involving microRNAs (miRNAs that regulate p53 and that themselves are direct p53 transcriptional targets. We show here that a group of polycistronic miRNA-like non-coding RNAs derived from small nucleolar RNAs (sno-miRNAs are transcriptionally repressed by p53 through their host gene, SNHG1. The most abundant of these, sno-miR-28, directly targets the p53-stabilizing gene, TAF9B. Collectively, p53, SNHG1, sno-miR-28 and TAF9B form a regulatory loop which affects p53 stability and downstream p53-regulated pathways. In addition, SNHG1, SNORD28 and sno-miR-28 are all significantly upregulated in breast tumours and the overexpression of sno-miR-28 promotes breast epithelial cell proliferation. This research has broadened our knowledge of the crosstalk between small non-coding RNA pathways and roles of sno-miRNAs in p53 regulation.

  7. p53 alterations and HPV infections are common in oral SCC: p53 gene mutations correlate with the absence of HPV 16-E6 DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penhallow, J; Steingrimsdottir, H; Elamin, F; Warnakulasuriya, S; Farzaneh, F; Johnson, N; Tavassoli, M

    1998-01-01

    To examine the association between HPV infections and p53 gene aberrations, a panel of 28 oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and 12 potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions were analysed for p53 mutations in exons 2-9. p53 protein was analysed by immunocytochemistry using DO7 antibody. The same panel was also examined for the possible presence of HPV infection. p53 overexpression was detected in 13/26 (50%) malignant and 2/9 (22%) premalignant lesions. Mutations in the coding region of the p53 gene were found in 10 malignant samples. None of the premalignant lesions were shown to have p53 mutations. The total number of p53 mutations in 10 samples were 14 of which 12 (85%) were in exon 5 suggesting the presence of hot spots in exon 5 for carcinogens involved in the transformation of oral epithelial cells. The presence of HPV DNA was first screened with consensus primers to the L1 region and nested PCR approach. HPV 6 and HPV 16 were detected in 14/28 (50%) oral SCC and 4 of 12 (33%) precancerous lesions, 7 tumours harboured both types. The samples were then examined for the presence of E6 oncogenic sequence of HPV16 using E6 specific primers. 7/27 (26%) SCC and 5/9 (55%) premalignant lesions harboured E6 DNA of which 6 (3 SCC and 3 premalignant) were negative with L1 primers suggesting possible integration of the specific viral genes or loss of other viral DNA sequences after integration of larger viral fragments. 9/10 (90%) SCC with p53 mutations were negative for E6 DNA. Our results show that both p53 alterations and HPV infection may be important etiological factors in the development of oral cancer. However, there is: i) No concordance between p53 mutations and its overexpression. ii) the presence of HPV capsid DNA (L1) does not necessarily indicate the presence of HPV oncogenic genes. iii) p53 gene mutations, but not overexpression, correlate with the absence of HPV 16-E6 and not L1 gene.

  8. p53 Dimers Associate with a Head-to-Tail Response Element to Repress Cyclin B Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Lipski, Robert; Lippincott, Daniel J.; Durden, Brittany C.; Kaplan, Anne R.; Keiser, Hilary E.; Park, Jung-Ho; Levesque, Aime A.

    2012-01-01

    DNA damage induced by the topoisomerase I inhibitor SN38 activates cell cycle checkpoints which promote cell cycle arrest. This arrest can be abrogated in p53-defective cells by the Chk1 inhibitor 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01). Previously, we compared p53 wild-type MCF10A cells with derivatives whose p53 function was inhibited by over-expression of the tetramerization domain (MCF10A/OD) or expression of shRNA against p53 (MCF10A/Δp53). Treatment of SN38-arrested MCF10A/OD cells with UCN-01 ...

  9. Aberrations of the p53 pathway components p53, MDM2 and CDKN2A appear independent in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Ino, Y; Gerdes, A M

    1999-01-01

    , whereas p19ARF targets MDM2, a p53 inhibitory protein, for degradation. A deletion of CDKN2A would therefore disturb both pathways. To explore the p53 pathway genes as a functional unit in diffuse large B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (DLCL), we wanted to see whether there exists mutually exclusiveness...... of aberrations of CDKN2A, MDM2 and p53, since this has not been analysed previously. We investigated 37 DLCL for aberrations of p15, p16, p19ARF, MDM2, and p53 at the epigenetic, genetic and/or protein levels. Homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in seven (19%) of 37 tumours, and another three cases were...... and MDM2 overexpression in 16 (43%) tumours. Twenty-three (62%) tumours had alterations of one or more p53 pathway components (p53, p19ARF and MDM2). Furthermore, 7/9 (78%) p16-immunonegative tumours showed co-aberration of p53 and/or MDM2. The lack of correlation between these aberrations suggests...

  10. The p53 Isoform Δ133p53β Promotes Cancer Stem Cell Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Arsic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSC are responsible for cancer chemoresistance and metastasis formation. Here we report that Δ133p53β, a TP53 splice variant, enhanced cancer cell stemness in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, while its depletion reduced it. Δ133p53β stimulated the expression of the key pluripotency factors SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG. Similarly, in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, aggressiveness was coupled with enhanced CSC potential and Δ133p53β expression. Like in MCF-7 cells, SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression were positively regulated by Δ133p53β in these cells. Finally, treatment of MCF-7 cells with etoposide, a cytotoxic anti-cancer drug, increased CSC formation and SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression via Δ133p53, thus potentially increasing the risk of cancer recurrence. Our findings show that Δ133p53β supports CSC potential. Moreover, they indicate that the TP53 gene, which is considered a major tumor suppressor gene, also acts as an oncogene via the Δ133p53β isoform.

  11. p53 Aggregates penetrate cells and induce the co-aggregation of intracellular p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolyn J Forget

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are unique pathologies in which the infectious particles are prions, a protein aggregate. The prion protein has many particular features, such as spontaneous aggregation, conformation transmission to other native PrP proteins and transmission from an individual to another. Protein aggregation is now frequently associated to many human diseases, for example Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or type 2 diabetes. A few proteins associated to these conformational diseases are part of a new category of proteins, called prionoids: proteins that share some, but not all, of the characteristics associated with prions. The p53 protein, a transcription factor that plays a major role in cancer, has recently been suggested to be a possible prionoid. The protein has been shown to accumulate in multiple cancer cell types, and its aggregation has also been reproduced in vitro by many independent groups. These observations suggest a role for p53 aggregates in cancer development. This study aims to test the «prion-like» features of p53. Our results show in vitro aggregation of the full length and N-terminally truncated protein (p53C, and penetration of these aggregates into cells. According to our findings, the aggregates enter cells using macropinocytosis, a non-specific pathway of entry. Lastly, we also show that once internalized by the cell, p53C aggregates can co-aggregate with endogenous p53 protein. Together, these findings suggest prion-like characteristics for p53 protein, based on the fact that p53 can spontaneously aggregate, these aggregates can penetrate cells and co-aggregate with cellular p53.

  12. Late Cornified Envelope Group I, a Novel Target of p53, Regulates PRMT5 Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhong Deng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available p53 is one of the most important tumor suppressor genes involved in human carcinogenesis. Although downstream targets of p53 and their biologic functions in cancer cells have been extensively investigated, it is still far from the full understanding. Here, we demonstrate that Late Cornified Envelope Group I (LCE1 genes, which are located in the LCE gene clusters encoding multiple well-conserved stratum-corneum proteins, are novel downstream targets of p53. Exogenous p53 overexpression using an adenoviral vector system significantly enhanced the expression of LCE1 cluster genes. We also observed induction of LCE1 expressions by DNA damage, which was caused by treatment with adriamycin or UV irradiation in a wild-type p53-dependent manner. Concordantly, the induction of LCE1 by DNA damage was significantly attenuated by the knockdown of p53. Among predicted p53-binding sites within the LCE1 gene cluster, we confirmed one site to be a p53-enhancer sequence by reporter assays. Furthermore, we identified LCE1 to interact with protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5. Knockdown of LCE1 by specific small interfering RNAs significantly increased the symmetric dimethylation of histone H3 arginine 8, a substrate of PRMT5, and overexpression of LCE1F remarkably decreased its methylation level. Our data suggest that LCE1 is a novel p53 downstream target that can be directly transactivated by p53 and is likely to have tumor suppressor functions through modulation of the PRMT5 activity.

  13. Translational Control Protein 80 Stimulates IRES-Mediated Translation of p53 mRNA in Response to DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Jo Halaby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of the p53 tumor suppressor increases following DNA damage. This increase and subsequent activation of p53 are essential for the protection of normal cells against tumorigenesis. We previously discovered an internal ribosome entry site (IRES that is located at the 5′-untranslated region (UTR of p53 mRNA and found that the IRES activity increases following DNA damage. However, the mechanism underlying IRES-mediated p53 translation in response to DNA damage is still poorly understood. In this study, we discovered that translational control protein 80 (TCP80 has increased binding to the p53 mRNA in vivo following DNA damage. Overexpression of TCP80 also leads to increased p53 IRES activity in response to DNA damage. TCP80 has increased association with RNA helicase A (RHA following DNA damage and overexpression of TCP80, along with RHA, leads to enhanced expression of p53. Moreover, we found that MCF-7 breast cancer cells with decreased expression of TCP80 and RHA exhibit defective p53 induction following DNA damage and diminished expression of its downstream target PUMA, a proapoptotic protein. Taken together, our discovery of the function of TCP80 and RHA in regulating p53 IRES and p53 induction following DNA damage provides a better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate IRES-mediated p53 translation in response to genotoxic stress.

  14. Negative effect of cyclin D1 overexpression on recurrence-free survival in stage II-IIIA lung adenocarcinoma and its expression modulation by vorinostat in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunju; Jin, DongHao; Lee, Bo Bin; Kim, Yujin; Han, Joungho; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Duk-Hwan

    2015-12-17

    This study was aimed at identifying prognostic biomarkers for stage II-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) according to histology and at investigating the effect of vorinostat on the expression of these biomarkers. Expression levels of cyclin D1, cyclin A2, cyclin E, and p16 proteins that are involved in the G1-to-S phase progression of cell cycle were analyzed using immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 372 samples of stage II-IIIA NSCLC. The effect of vorinostat on the expression of these proteins, impacts on cell cycle, and histone modification was explored in lung cancer cells. Abnormal expression of cyclin A2, cyclin D1, cyclin E, and p16 was found in 66, 47, 34, and 51 % of 372 cases, respectively. Amongst the four proteins, only cyclin D1 overexpression was significantly associated with poor recurrence-free survival (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.87; 95 % confidence interval = 1.12 - 2.69, P = 0.02) in adenocarcinoma but not in squamous cell carcinoma (P = 0.44). Vorinostat inhibited cell cycle progression to the S-phase and induced down-regulation of cyclin D1 in vitro. The down-regulation of cyclin D1 by vorinostat was comparable to a siRNA-mediated knockdown of cyclin D1 in A549 cells, but vorinostat in the presence of benzo[a]pyrene showed a differential effect in different lung cancer cell lines. Cyclin D1 down-regulation by vorinostat was associated with the accumulation of dimethyl-H3K9 at the promoter of the gene. The present study suggests that cyclin D1 may be an independent prognostic factor for recurrence-free survival in stage II-IIIA adenocarcinoma of lung and its expression may be modulated by vorinostat.

  15. Survivin inhibits anti-growth effect of p53 activated by aurora B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ji-Eun; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Joong-Seob; Oh, Se-Yeong; Kwak, Sungwook; Jin, Xun; Sohn, Jin-Young; Song, Min-Keun; Sohn, Young-Woo; Lee, Soo-Yeon; Pian, Xumin; Lee, Jang-Bo; Chung, Yong Gu; Choi, Young Ki; You, Seungkwon; Kim, Hyunggee

    2005-01-01

    Genomic instability and apoptosis evasion are hallmarks of cancer, but the molecular mechanisms governing these processes remain elusive. Here, we found that survivin, a member of the apoptosis-inhibiting gene family, and aurora B kinase, a chromosomal passenger protein, were co-overexpressed in the various glioblastoma cell lines and tumors. Notably, exogenous introduction of the aurora B in human BJ cells was shown to decrease cell growth and increase the senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity by activation of p53 tumor suppressor. However, aurora B overexpression failed to inhibit cell proliferation in BJ and U87MG cells transduced with dominant-negative p53 as well as in p53 -/- mouse astrocytes. Aurora B was shown to increase centrosome amplification in the p53 -/- astrocytes. Survivin was shown to induce anchorage-independent growth and inhibit anti-proliferation and drug-sensitive apoptosis caused by aurora B. Overexpression of both survivin and aurora B further accelerated the proliferation of BJ cells. Taken together, the present study indicates that survivin should accelerate tumorigenesis by inhibiting the anti-proliferative effect of p53 tumor suppressor that is activated by aurora B in normal and glioblastoma cells containing intact p53

  16. PUMA decreases the growth of prostate cancer PC-3 cells independent of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Zhengfei; Liu, Qingzuo; Li, Yuling; Wu, Jitao; Sun, Dekang; Gao, Zhenli

    2017-03-01

    PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis), a member of the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) protein family, is a pro-apoptotic protein. PUMA expression is modulated by the tumor suppressor p53. PUMA has a role in rapid cell death via p53-dependent and -independent mechanisms. To evaluate whether p53 is required for PUMA-mediated apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, p53 protein was silenced in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells by using p53 small interfering RNA (siRNA). The interference efficiency of p53 on RNA and protein levels was detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Cell proliferation and p21 expression were subsequently examined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and western blot analysis, respectively. p53-silenced or control PC-3 cells were transfected with pCEP4-(hemagglutinin)-PUMA plasmid, or non-carrier plasmid. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine cell apoptosis by measuring histone release and caspase-3 activation, and MTT assay was used to measure cell viability. In addition, the expression of pro-apoptosis protein Bax and anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2 were evaluated. The results of the present study revealed that p53 siRNA significantly suppressed p53 RNA and protein expression in PC-3 cells. Deficiency of p53 increased the cell growth rate and decreased p21 expression. However, PUMA overexpression remained able to induce apoptosis in p53-silenced and control cells by increasing Bax expression and decreasing Bcl-2 expression, leading to the activation of caspase-3. These results suggest that PUMA may mediate apoptosis of prostate cancer PC-3 cells, potentially independently of p53. Furthermore, PUMA gene treatment to induce cancer cell apoptosis may be more efficient compared with p53-dependent apoptosis, where loss of p53 expression or function may lead to limited efficacy of PUMA expression. Therefore, the present study proposes the

  17. Amplification and protein overexpression of cyclin D1: Predictor of occult nodal metastasis in early oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorlag, Rob; Boeve, Koos; Witjes, Max J H; Koole, Ronald; Peeters, Ton L M; Schuuring, Ed; Willems, Stefan M; van Es, Robert J J

    2017-02-01

    Accurate nodal staging is pivotal for treatment planning in early (stage I-II) oral cancer. Unfortunately, current imaging modalities lack sensitivity to detect occult nodal metastases. Chromosomal region 11q13, including genes CCND1, Fas-associated death domain (FADD), and CTTN, is often amplified in oral cancer with nodal metastases. However, evidence in predicting occult nodal metastases is limited. In 158 patients with early tongue and floor of mouth (FOM) squamous cell carcinomas, both CCND1 amplification and cyclin D1, FADD, and cortactin protein expression were correlated with occult nodal metastases. CCND1 amplification and cyclin D1 expression correlated with occult nodal metastases. Cyclin D1 expression was validated in an independent multicenter cohort, confirming the correlation with occult nodal metastases in early FOM cancers. Cyclin D1 is a predictive biomarker for occult nodal metastases in early FOM cancers. Prospective research on biopsy material should confirm these results before implementing its use in routine clinical practice. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 326-333, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. p73 competes with p53 and attenuates its response in a human ovarian cancer cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Vikhanskaya, Faina; D’Incalci, Maurizio; Broggini, Massimo

    2000-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the p53 tumor suppressor protein is crucial for the regulation of cell growth, apoptosis and tumor progression. The first identified p53 relative, p73, was reported to be monoallelically expressed in normal tissues. In some tumors, loss of heterozygosity was associated with overexpression of the silent allele. Human p73α was transfected into the wild-type p53-expressing human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780. Unlike human osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells, A2780 cells...

  19. Cadmium Induces p53-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Prostate Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimola, Pierpaolo; Carmignani, Marco; Volpe, Anna Rita; Di Benedetto, Altomare; Claudio, Luigi; Waalkes, Michael P.; van Bokhoven, Adrie; Tokar, Erik J.; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium, a widespread toxic pollutant of occupational and environmental concern, is a known human carcinogen. The prostate is a potential target for cadmium carcinogenesis, although the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Furthermore, cadmium may induce cell death by apoptosis in various cell types, and it has been hypothesized that a key factor in cadmium-induced malignant transformation is acquisition of apoptotic resistance. We investigated the in vitro effects produced by cadmium exposure in normal or tumor cells derived from human prostate epithelium, including RWPE-1 and its cadmium-transformed derivative CTPE, the primary adenocarcinoma 22Rv1 and CWR-R1 cells and LNCaP, PC-3 and DU145 metastatic cancer cell lines. Cells were treated for 24 hours with different concentrations of CdCl2 and apoptosis, cell cycle distribution and expression of tumor suppressor proteins were analyzed. Subsequently, cellular response to cadmium was evaluated after siRNA-mediated p53 silencing in wild type p53-expressing RWPE-1 and LNCaP cells, and after adenoviral p53 overexpression in p53-deficient DU145 and PC-3 cell lines. The cell lines exhibited different sensitivity to cadmium, and 24-hour exposure to different CdCl2 concentrations induced dose- and cell type-dependent apoptotic response and inhibition of cell proliferation that correlated with accumulation of functional p53 and overexpression of p21 in wild type p53-expressing cell lines. On the other hand, p53 silencing was able to suppress cadmium-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that cadmium can induce p53-dependent apoptosis in human prostate epithelial cells and suggest p53 mutation as a possible contributing factor for the acquisition of apoptotic resistance in cadmium prostatic carcinogenesis. PMID:22448262

  20. p53 expression in colorectal carcinoma in relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p53 expression in colorectal carcinoma in relation to histopathological features in Ugandan patients. ... Molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer commonly involves mutation in p53 gene which leads to expression of p53 protein in tumor cells. Expression of p53 protein has been associated with poor clinical outcome and ...

  1. p53-independent DUX4 pathology in cell and animal models of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Bosnakovski

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is a genetically dominant myopathy caused by mutations that disrupt repression of the normally silent DUX4 gene, which encodes a transcription factor that has been shown to interfere with myogenesis when misexpressed at very low levels in myoblasts and to cause cell death when overexpressed at high levels. A previous report using adeno-associated virus to deliver high levels of DUX4 to mouse skeletal muscle demonstrated severe pathology that was suppressed on a p53-knockout background, implying that DUX4 acted through the p53 pathway. Here, we investigate the p53 dependence of DUX4 using various in vitro and in vivo models. We find that inhibiting p53 has no effect on the cytoxicity of DUX4 on C2C12 myoblasts, and that expression of DUX4 does not lead to activation of the p53 pathway. DUX4 does lead to expression of the classic p53 target gene Cdkn1a (p21 but in a p53-independent manner. Meta-analysis of 5 publicly available data sets of DUX4 transcriptional profiles in both human and mouse cells shows no evidence of p53 activation, and further reveals that Cdkn1a is a mouse-specific target of DUX4. When the inducible DUX4 mouse model is crossed onto the p53-null background, we find no suppression of the male-specific lethality or skin phenotypes that are characteristic of the DUX4 transgene, and find that primary myoblasts from this mouse are still killed by DUX4 expression. These data challenge the notion that the p53 pathway is central to the pathogenicity of DUX4.

  2. SIRT1 inhibition restores apoptotic sensitivity in p53-mutated human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, Katharine J.; Cook, Anthony L., E-mail: Anthony.Cook@utas.edu.au; Snow, Elizabeth T., E-mail: elizabeth.snow@utas.edu.au

    2014-06-15

    Mutations to the p53 gene are common in UV-exposed keratinocytes and contribute to apoptotic resistance in skin cancer. P53-dependent activity is modulated, in part, by a complex, self-limiting feedback loop imposed by miR-34a-mediated regulation of the lysine deacetylase, SIRT1. Expression of numerous microRNAs is dysregulated in squamous and basal cell carcinomas; however the contribution of specific microRNAs to the pathogenesis of skin cancer remains untested. Through use of RNAi, miRNA target site blocking oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors, this study explored the influence of p53 mutational status, SIRT1 activity and miR-34a levels on apoptotic sensitivity in primary (NHEK) and p53-mutated (HaCaT) keratinocyte cell lines. SIRT1 and p53 are overexpressed in p53-mutated keratinocytes, whilst miR-34a levels are 90% less in HaCaT cells. HaCaTs have impaired responses to p53/SIRT1/miR-34a axis manipulation which enhanced survival during exposure to the chemotherapeutic agent, camptothecin. Inhibition of SIRT1 activity in this cell line increased p53 acetylation and doubled camptothecin-induced cell death. Our results demonstrate that p53 mutations increase apoptotic resistance in keratinocytes by interfering with miR-34a-mediated regulation of SIRT1 expression. Thus, SIRT1 inhibitors may have a therapeutic potential for overcoming apoptotic resistance during skin cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Impaired microRNA biogenesis promotes apoptotic resistance in HaCaT keratinocytes. • TP53 mutations suppress miR-34a-mediated regulation of SIRT1 expression. • SIRT1 inhibition increases p53 acetylation in HaCaTs, restoring apoptosis.

  3. The p53 target Wig-1 regulates p53 mRNA stability through an AU-rich element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilborg, Anna; Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Wilhelm, Margareta T

    2009-01-01

    The p53 target gene Wig-1 encodes a double-stranded-RNA-binding zinc finger protein. We show here that Wig-1 binds to p53 mRNA and stabilizes it through an AU-rich element (ARE) in the 3' UTR of the p53 mRNA. This effect is mirrored by enhanced p53 protein levels in both unstressed cells and cells...... exposed to p53-activating stress agents. Thus, the p53 target Wig-1 is a previously undescribed ARE-regulating protein that acts as a positive feedback regulator of p53, with implications both for the steady-state levels of p53 and for the p53 stress response. Our data reveal a previously undescribed link...... between the tumor suppressor p53 and posttranscriptional gene regulation via AREs in mRNA....

  4. Molecular Dynamic Simulation Insights into the Normal State and Restoration of p53 Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available As a tumor suppressor protein, p53 plays a crucial role in the cell cycle and in cancer prevention. Almost 50 percent of all human malignant tumors are closely related to a deletion or mutation in p53. The activity of p53 is inhibited by over-active celluar antagonists, especially by the over-expression of the negative regulators MDM2 and MDMX. Protein-protein interactions, or post-translational modifications of the C-terminal negative regulatory domain of p53, also regulate its tumor suppressor activity. Restoration of p53 function through peptide and small molecular inhibitors has become a promising strategy for novel anti-cancer drug design and development. Molecular dynamics simulations have been extensively applied to investigate the conformation changes of p53 induced by protein-protein interactions and protein-ligand interactions, including peptide and small molecular inhibitors. This review focuses on the latest MD simulation research, to provide an overview of the current understanding of interactions between p53 and its partners at an atomic level.

  5. Nuclear inclusion bodies of mutant and wild-type p53 in cancer: a hallmark of p53 inactivation and proteostasis remodelling by p53 aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Frederik; Saiz Rubio, Mirian; Hompes, Daphne; Naus, Evelyne; De Baets, Greet; Langenberg, Tobias; Hipp, Mark S; Houben, Bert; Claes, Filip; Charbonneau, Sarah; Delgado Blanco, Javier; Plaisance, Stephane; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Ramkissoon, Lori; Simons, Colinda; van den Brandt, Piet; Weijenberg, Matty; Van England, Manon; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Amant, Frederic; D'Hoore, André; Ligon, Keith L; Sagaert, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2017-05-01

    Although p53 protein aggregates have been observed in cancer cell lines and tumour tissue, their impact in cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we extensively screened for p53 aggregation phenotypes in tumour biopsies, and identified nuclear inclusion bodies (nIBs) of transcriptionally inactive mutant or wild-type p53 as the most frequent aggregation-like phenotype across six different cancer types. p53-positive nIBs co-stained with nuclear aggregation markers, and shared molecular hallmarks of nIBs commonly found in neurodegenerative disorders. In cell culture, tumour-associated stress was a strong inducer of p53 aggregation and nIB formation. This was most prominent for mutant p53, but could also be observed in wild-type p53 cell lines, for which nIB formation correlated with the loss of p53's transcriptional activity. Importantly, protein aggregation also fuelled the dysregulation of the proteostasis network in the tumour cell by inducing a hyperactivated, oncogenic heat-shock response, to which tumours are commonly addicted, and by overloading the proteasomal degradation system, an observation that was most pronounced for structurally destabilized mutant p53. Patients showing tumours with p53-positive nIBs suffered from a poor clinical outcome, similar to those with loss of p53 expression, and tumour biopsies showed a differential proteostatic expression profile associated with p53-positive nIBs. p53-positive nIBs therefore highlight a malignant state of the tumour that results from the interplay between (1) the functional inactivation of p53 through mutation and/or aggregation, and (2) microenvironmental stress, a combination that catalyses proteostatic dysregulation. This study highlights several unexpected clinical, biological and therapeutically unexplored parallels between cancer and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great

  6. ARF and ATM/ATR cooperate in p53-mediated apoptosis upon oncogenic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauklin, Siim; Kristjuhan, Arnold; Maimets, Toivo; Jaks, Viljar

    2005-01-01

    Induction of apoptosis is pivotal for eliminating cells with damaged DNA or deregulated proliferation. We show that tumor suppressor ARF and ATM/ATR kinase pathways cooperate in the induction of apoptosis in response to elevated expression of c-myc, β-catenin or human papilloma virus E7 oncogenes. Overexpression of oncogenes leads to the formation of phosphorylated H2AX foci, induction of Rad51 protein levels and ATM/ATR-dependent phosphorylation of p53. Inhibition of ATM/ATR kinases abolishes both induction of Rad51 and phosphorylation of p53, and remarkably reduces the level of apoptosis induced by co-expression of oncogenes and ARF. However, the induction of apoptosis is downregulated in p53-/- cells and does not depend on activities of ATM/ATR kinases, indicating that efficient induction of apoptosis by oncogene activation depends on coordinated action of ARF and ATM/ATR pathways in the regulation of p53

  7. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  8. Promoter methylation of IGFBP-3 and p53 expression in ovarian endometrioid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Su-Cheng

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP-3 is an antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic and invasion suppressor protein which is transcriptionally regulated by p53. Promoter methylation has been linked to gene silencing and cancer progression. We studied the correlation between IGFBP-3 and p53 expression as well as IGFBP-3 promoter methylation in ovarian endometrioid carcinoma (OEC by immunohistochemical staining and quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP. Additionally, we assessed the molecular regulatory mechanism of wild type (wt p53 on IGFBP-3 expression using two subclones of OEC, the OVTW59-P0 (low invasive and P4 (high invasive sublines. Results In 60 cases of OEC, 40.0% showed lower IGFBP-3 expression which was significantly correlated with higher IGFBP-3 promoter methylation. p53 overexpression was detected in 35.0% of OEC and was unrelated to clinical outcomes and IGFBP-3. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, patients with lower IGFBP-3, higher IGFBP-3 promoter methylation, and normal p53 were associated most significantly with lower survival rates. In OEC cell line, IGFBP-3 expression was correlated with IGFBP-3 promoter methylation. IGFBP-3 expression was restored after treatment with a DNA methy-transferase inhibitors (5-aza-deoxycytidine and suppressed by a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α. The putative p53 regulatory sites on the promoter of IGFBP-3 were identified at -210, -206, -183 and -179 bases upstream of the transcription start site. Directed mutagenesis at these sites quantitatively reduced the transcription activity of IGFBP-3. Conclusion Our data suggests that IGFBP-3 silencing through IGFBP-3 promoter methylation in the absence of p53 overexpression is associated with cancer progression. These results support a potential role of IGFBP-3 methylation in the carcinogenesis of OEC.

  9. Promoter methylation of IGFBP-3 and p53 expression in ovarian endometrioid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torng, Pao-Ling; Lin, Ching-Wei; Chan, Michael Wy; Yang, Hui-Wen; Huang, Su-Cheng; Lin, Chin-Tarng

    2009-12-11

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP-3) is an antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic and invasion suppressor protein which is transcriptionally regulated by p53. Promoter methylation has been linked to gene silencing and cancer progression. We studied the correlation between IGFBP-3 and p53 expression as well as IGFBP-3 promoter methylation in ovarian endometrioid carcinoma (OEC) by immunohistochemical staining and quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP). Additionally, we assessed the molecular regulatory mechanism of wild type (wt) p53 on IGFBP-3 expression using two subclones of OEC, the OVTW59-P0 (low invasive) and P4 (high invasive) sublines. In 60 cases of OEC, 40.0% showed lower IGFBP-3 expression which was significantly correlated with higher IGFBP-3 promoter methylation. p53 overexpression was detected in 35.0% of OEC and was unrelated to clinical outcomes and IGFBP-3. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, patients with lower IGFBP-3, higher IGFBP-3 promoter methylation, and normal p53 were associated most significantly with lower survival rates. In OEC cell line, IGFBP-3 expression was correlated with IGFBP-3 promoter methylation. IGFBP-3 expression was restored after treatment with a DNA methy-transferase inhibitors (5-aza-deoxycytidine) and suppressed by a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-alpha). The putative p53 regulatory sites on the promoter of IGFBP-3 were identified at -210, -206, -183 and -179 bases upstream of the transcription start site. Directed mutagenesis at these sites quantitatively reduced the transcription activity of IGFBP-3. Our data suggests that IGFBP-3 silencing through IGFBP-3 promoter methylation in the absence of p53 overexpression is associated with cancer progression. These results support a potential role of IGFBP-3 methylation in the carcinogenesis of OEC.

  10. Wild type p53 transcriptionally represses the SALL2 transcription factor under genotoxic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Farkas

    Full Text Available SALL2- a member of the Spalt gene family- is a poorly characterized transcription factor found deregulated in various cancers, which suggests it plays a role in the disease. We previously identified SALL2 as a novel interacting protein of neurotrophin receptors and showed that it plays a role in neuronal function, which does not necessarily explain why or how SALL2 is deregulated in cancer. Previous evidences indicate that SALL2 gene is regulated by the WT1 and AP4 transcription factors. Here, we identified SALL2 as a novel downstream target of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the SALL2 gene revealed several putative p53 half sites along the promoter region. Either overexpression of wild-type p53 or induction of the endogenous p53 by the genotoxic agent doxorubicin repressed SALL2 promoter activity in various cell lines. However R175H, R249S, and R248W p53 mutants, frequently found in the tumors of cancer patients, were unable to repress SALL2 promoter activity, suggesting that p53 specific binding to DNA is important for the regulation of SALL2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated binding of p53 to one of the identified p53 half sites in the Sall2 promoter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed in vivo interaction of p53 with the promoter region of Sall2 containing this half site. Importantly, by using a p53ER (TAM knockin model expressing a variant of p53 that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity, we show that p53 activation diminished SALL2 RNA and protein levels during genotoxic cellular stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and radiosensitive tissues in vivo. Thus, our finding indicates that p53 represses SALL2 expression in a context-specific manner, adding knowledge to the understanding of SALL2 gene regulation, and to a potential mechanism for its deregulation in cancer.

  11. Imiquimod activates p53-dependent apoptosis in a human basal cell carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Chang, Shu-Hao; Mu, Szu-Wei; Jiang, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Sin-Ting; Kao, Jun-Kai; Huang, Jau-Ling; Wu, Chun-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ju; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2016-03-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 controls DNA repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy and numerous other cellular processes. Imiquimod (IMQ), a synthetic toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 ligand for the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC), eliminates cancer cells by activating cell-mediated immunity and directly inducing apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells. To evaluate the role of p53 in IMQ-induced cell death in skin cancer cells. The expression, phosphorylation and subcellular localization of p53 were detected by real-time PCR, luciferase reporter assay, cycloheximide chase analysis, immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Using BCC/KMC1 cell line as a model, the upstream signaling of p53 activation was dissected by over-expression of TLR7/8, the addition of ROS scavenger, ATM/ATR inhibitors and pan-caspase inhibitor. The role of p53 in IMQ-induced apoptosis and autophagy was assessed by genetically silencing p53 and evaluated by a DNA content assay, immunoblotting, LC3 puncta detection and acridine orange staining. IMQ induced p53 mRNA expression and protein accumulation, increased Ser15 phosphorylation, promoted nuclear translocation and up-regulated its target genes in skin cancer cells in a TLR7/8-independent manner. In BCC/KMC1 cells, the induction of p53 by IMQ was achieved through increased ROS production to stimulate the ATM/ATR-Chk1/Chk2 axis but was not mediated by inducing DNA damage. The pharmacological inhibition of ATM/ATR significantly suppressed IMQ-induced p53 activation and apoptosis. Silencing of p53 significantly decreased the IMQ-induced caspase cascade activation and apoptosis but enhanced autophagy. Mutant p53 skin cancer cell lines were more resistant to IMQ-induced apoptosis than wildtype p53 skin cancer cell lines. IMQ induced ROS production to stimulate ATM/ATR pathways and contributed to p53-dependent apoptosis in a skin basal cell carcinoma cell line BCC/KMC1. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology

  12. Tumor suppressor p53 biology, its role in radioresponse and the analysis of p53 mutation/expression among Filipino breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deocaris, Custer C.

    2004-01-01

    Ionizing radiation remains one of the most effective tools for the treatment of breast cancer. It combines properties of a potent DNA-damaging agent and high degree of spatial specificity to the target tissue. Nonetheless, there remain considerable differences in the outcome for treatment of tumors of differing histological type treated by radiotherapy. The identification of predictive indicators of radiosensitivity is crucial for selecting patients suited for preoperative radiotherapy as well as those unwarranted for postoperative treatments. To improve prognostication, numerous genes involved in the breast carcinogenesis have been studied and thus far over the last decade several multi-center researches converge on the role of tumor suppressor p53 in tumor biology. The p53 gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 17 and encodes a 53-kd nuclear protein, p-53, also referred to as 'the guardian of the genome', it orchestrates multiple cellular processes such as cell growth control, DNA repair and programmed cell death. During radiotherapy, genotoxic damage induces p53 overexpression in order to control the rate of proliferating damaged cells, repair damage or induce the apoptotic pathway. Its molecular inactivation in a tumor cell, typically by a point mutation, leads to chemo/radio resistance due to the inability of the molecule to trigger p53-dependent programmed cell death

  13. SV40 large T-p53 complex: evidence for the presence of two immunologically distinct forms of p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milner, J.; Gamble, J.

    1985-01-01

    The transforming protein of SV40 is the large T antigen. Large T binds a cellular protein, p53, which is potentially oncogenic by virtue of its functional involvement in the control of cell proliferation. This raises the possibility that p53 may mediate, in part, the transforming function of SV40 large T. Two immunologically distinct forms of p53 have been identified in normal cells: the forms are cell-cycle dependent, one being restricted to nondividing cells (p53-Go) and the second to dividing cells (p53-G divided by). The authors have now dissociated and probed the multimeric complex of SV40 large T-p53 for the presence of immunologically distinct forms of p53. Here they present evidence for the presence of p53-Go and p53-G divided by complexed with SV40 large T

  14. The p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-{alpha}, suppresses self-renewal of embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelalim, Essam Mohamed, E-mail: essam_abdelalim@yahoo.com [Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Department of Cytology and Histology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt); Tooyama, Ikuo [Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determine the role of p53 in ES cells under unstressful conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PFT-{alpha} suppresses ES cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PFT-{alpha} induces ES cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PFT-{alpha} downregulates Nanog and cyclin D1. -- Abstract: Recent studies have reported the role of p53 in suppressing the pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells after DNA damage and blocking the reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, to date no evidence has been presented to support the function of p53 in unstressed ES cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of pifithrin (PFT)-{alpha}, an inhibitor of p53-dependent transcriptional activation, on self-renewal of ES cells. Our results revealed that treatment of ES cells with PFT-{alpha} resulted in the inhibition of ES cell propagation in a dose-dependent manner, as indicated by a marked reduction in the cell number and colony size. Also, PFT-{alpha} caused a cell cycle arrest and significant reduction in DNA synthesis. In addition, inhibition of p53 activity reduced the expression levels of cyclin D1 and Nanog. These findings indicate that p53 pathway in ES cells rather than acting as an inactive gene, is required for ES cell proliferation and self-renewal under unstressful conditions.

  15. The p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, suppresses self-renewal of embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelalim, Essam Mohamed; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We determine the role of p53 in ES cells under unstressful conditions. ► PFT-α suppresses ES cell proliferation. ► PFT-α induces ES cell cycle arrest. ► PFT-α downregulates Nanog and cyclin D1. -- Abstract: Recent studies have reported the role of p53 in suppressing the pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells after DNA damage and blocking the reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, to date no evidence has been presented to support the function of p53 in unstressed ES cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of pifithrin (PFT)-α, an inhibitor of p53-dependent transcriptional activation, on self-renewal of ES cells. Our results revealed that treatment of ES cells with PFT-α resulted in the inhibition of ES cell propagation in a dose-dependent manner, as indicated by a marked reduction in the cell number and colony size. Also, PFT-α caused a cell cycle arrest and significant reduction in DNA synthesis. In addition, inhibition of p53 activity reduced the expression levels of cyclin D1 and Nanog. These findings indicate that p53 pathway in ES cells rather than acting as an inactive gene, is required for ES cell proliferation and self-renewal under unstressful conditions.

  16. Expression of TP53 isoforms p53β or p53γ enhances chemosensitivity in TP53(null cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Silden

    Full Text Available The carboxy-terminal truncated p53 alternative spliced isoforms, p53β and p53γ, are expressed at disparate levels in cancer and are suggested to influence treatment response and therapy outcome. However, their functional role in cancer remains to be elucidated. We investigated their individual functionality in the p53(null background of cell lines H1299 and SAOS-2 by stable retroviral transduction or transient transfection. Expression status of p53β and p53γ protein was found to correlate with increased response to camptothecin and doxorubicin chemotherapy. Decreased DNA synthesis and clonogenicity in p53β and p53γ congenic H1299 was accompanied by increased p21((CIP1/WAF1, Bax and Mdm2 proteins. Chemotherapy induced p53 isoform degradation, most prominent for p53γ. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib substantially increased basal p53γ protein level, while the level of p53β protein was unaffected. Treatment with dicoumarol, a putative blocker of the proteasome-related NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductase NQO1, effectively attenuated basal p53γ protein level in spite of bortezomib treatment. Although in vitro proliferation and clonogenicity assays indicated a weak suppressive effect by p53β and p53γ expression, studies of in vivo subcutaneous H1299 tumor growth demonstrated a significantly increased growth by expression of either p53 isoforms. This study suggests that p53β and p53γ share functionality in chemosensitizing and tumor growth enhancement but comprise distinct regulation at the protein level.

  17. The p53-Deficient Mouse as a Breast Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donehower, Laurence

    1998-01-01

    .... In order to better understand the role of p53 mutation and loss in breast cancer progression, we have developed a mouse model which is genetically programmed to develop mammary cancer in the presence and absence of p53...

  18. The p53-Deficient Mouse as a Breast Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donehower, Lawrence

    1997-01-01

    .... In order to better understand the role of p53 mutation and loss in breast cancer progression, we have developed a mouse model which is genetically programmed to develop mammary cancer in the presence and absence of p53...

  19. Restriction of human herpesvirus 6B replication by p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Bodil; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Bundgaard, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) induces significant accumulation of p53 in both the nucleus and cytoplasm during infection. Activation of p53 by DNA damage is known to induce either growth arrest or apoptosis; nevertheless, HHV-6B-infected cells are arrested in their cell cycle independently of p53......, and only a minor fraction of the infected cells undergoes apoptosis. Using pifithrin-alpha, a p53 inhibitor, and p53-null cells, this study showed that infected epithelial cells accumulated viral transcripts and proteins to a significantly higher degree in the absence of active p53. Moreover, HHV-6B......-induced cytopathic effects were greatly enhanced in the absence of p53. This suggests that, in epithelial cells, some of the functions of p53 leading to cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis are restrained by HHV-6B infection, whereas other cellular defences, causing inhibition of virus transcription, are partially...

  20. 14-3-3 Sigma And p53 Expression in Gastric Cancer and Its Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Mühlmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available 14-3-3 sigma (σ induces G2 arrest enabling the repair of damaged DNA. The function of 14-3-3 σ is frequently lost in tumor cells, indicating a potential tumor suppressor function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of 14-3-3 σ expression in human gastric cancer. 14-3-3 σ expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 157 tumor samples of patients, who underwent resection for gastric cancer. Since 14-3-3 σ is involved in the p53 network, p53 expression was detected in parallel and correlated with 14-3-3 σ. 14-3-3 σ was found to be overexpressed in 75 (47.8% of 157 cases, the overexpression rate of p53 protein was 27.4%. 14-3-3 σ overexpression was statistically significantly associated with pT-stage (p=0.041 pN-stage (p=0.015 and UICC-stage (p=0.019 and showed a borderline significance with Lauren classification (p=0.057. Univariate survival calculations revealed a coexistent 14-3-3 σ and p53 overexpression as a significant predictor of disease-free survival. Multivariate analysis did not unfold 14-3-3 as an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival and overall survival. Concomitant 14-3-3 σ and p53 overexpression in tumor cells of patients with gastric cancer identifies a population of patients with relatively unfavorable prognosis.

  1. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte clones, established by stimulation with the HLA-A2 binding p5365-73 wild type peptide loaded on dendritic cells In vitro, specifically recognize and lyse HLA-A2 tumour cells overexpressing the p53 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Annette Malene; Petersen, T R; Kirkin, A F

    2000-01-01

    Mutations in the tumour suppressor gene p53 are among the most frequent genetic alterations in human malignancies, often associated with an accumulation of the p53 protein in the cytoplasm. We have generated a number of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones that specifically recognize the HLA-A*0201...... p53 wild type peptide RMPEAAPPV [65-73], designated R9V, by the in vitro stimulation of CD8 enriched peripheral blood lymphocytes from a healthy HLA-A*0201 donor using peptide loaded autologous dendritic cells. A total of 22 CTL clones were generated from the same bulk culture and demonstrated...... to carry identical T-cell receptors. The CTL clone, 2D9, was shown to specifically lyse the HLA-A*0201+ squamous carcinoma cell line SCC9 and the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468. Our data demonstrate that human peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal healthy individuals comprise T cells capable...

  2. Dendritic cells, engineered to overexpress 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase and pulsed with a myelin antigen, provide myelin-specific suppression of ongoing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chih-Huang; Zhang, Jintao; Baylink, David J; Wang, Xiaohua; Goparaju, Naga Bharani; Xu, Yi; Wasnik, Samiksha; Cheng, Yanmei; Berumen, Edmundo Carreon; Qin, Xuezhong; Lau, Kin-Hing William; Tang, Xiaolei

    2017-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is caused by immune-mediated damage of myelin sheath. Current therapies aim to block such immune responses. However, this blocking is not sufficiently specific and hence compromises immunity, leading to severe side effects. In addition, blocking medications usually provide transient effects and require frequent administration, which further increases the chance to compromise immunity. In this regard, myelin-specific therapy may provide the desired specificity and a long-lasting therapeutic effect by inducing myelin-specific regulatory T (T reg ) cells. Tolerogenic dendritic cells (TolDCs) are one such therapy. However, ex vivo generated TolDCs may be converted into immunogenic DCs in a proinflammatory environment. In this study, we identified a potential novel myelin-specific therapy that works with immunogenic DCs, hence without the in vivo conversion concern. We showed that immunization with DCs, engineered to overexpress 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase for de novo synthesis of a focally high 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentration in the peripheral lymphoid tissues, induced T reg cells. In addition, such engineered DCs, when pulsed with a myelin antigen, led to myelin-specific suppression of ongoing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (an MS animal model), and the disease suppression depended on forkhead-box-protein-P3(foxp3) + T reg cells. Our data support a novel concept that immunogenic DCs can be engineered for myelin-specific therapy for MS.-Li, C.-H., Zhang, J., Baylink, D. J., Wang, X., Goparaju, N. B., Xu, Y., Wasnik, S., Cheng, Y., Berumen, E. C., Qin, X., Lau, K.-H. W., Tang, X. Dendritic cells, engineered to overexpress 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase and pulsed with a myelin antigen, provide myelin-specific suppression of ongoing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. © The Author(s).

  3. Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    bioreducible polymer-coated adenovirus (CD- PEG-RGD) The delivery method that provides the highest expression of the gene and highest cell-killing activity...difficult, due to the genel transfection inhibition by paclitaxel. In order to overcome these issues, a mitochondrially targeted p53 (p53-MTS) was used, and...p53, modified p53, tumor suppressor, high grade serous carcinoma, combination therapy, carboplatin, paclitaxel, polymeric drug delivery , polymer

  4. Mutual interactions between P53 and growth factors in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asschert, JGW; Vellenga, E; De Jong, S; De Vries, EGE

    1998-01-01

    The function of p53 armour suppressor protein is determined by various intrinsic properties of the protein. The effect of p53 DNA-binding, and platein-protein interactions are determined by the conformation of the protein. Thus p53 fulfils its role in cell cycle control and the onset of apoptotic

  5. p53 specific (auto)immunity in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauwen, Marjolein Monique

    2008-01-01

    Self-tolerance to p53 is a major potential limitation for the activation of the endogenous T-cell repertoire. So far, p53 specific CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell immunity has been described in cancer patients and healthy individuals. However, the restrictions of tolerance on the recruitment of p53 specific T

  6. Clinical applications of detecting dysfunctional p53 tumor suppressor protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, I. O.; Hruban, R. H.; Offerhaus, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    The p53 gene encodes for a protein, p53, which plays a critical role in controlling the cell cycle, in DNA repair and in programmed cell death (apoptosis). p53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human neoplasms and a variety of techniques have been developed to detect these mutations.

  7. The role of the tumor suppressor p53 in spermatogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, T. L.; Roepers-Gajadien, H. L.; Gademan, I. S.; van Buul, P. P.; Gil-Gomez, G.; Rutgers, D. H.; de rooij, D. G.

    1998-01-01

    The p53 protein appeared to be involved in both spermatogonial cell proliferation and radiation response. During normal spermatogenesis in the mouse, spermatogonia do not express p53, as analyzed by immunohistochemistry. However, after a dose of 4 Gy of X-rays, a distinct p53 staining was present in

  8. P53 MUTATIONS IN HUMAN LUNG-TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MILLER, CW; ASLO, A; KOK, K; YOKOTA, J; BUYS, CHCM; TERADA, M; KOEFFLER, HP; Simon, K.

    1992-01-01

    Mutation of one p53 allele and loss of the normal p53 allele [loss of heterozygosity (LOH)] occur in many tumors including lung cancers. These alterations apparently contribute to development of cancer by interfering with the tumor suppressor activity of p53. We directly sequenced amplified DNA in

  9. The p53-MDM2 network: from oscillations to apoptosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    activation. These stresses promote tumour formation, often culminating in cancer. The chief role of p53 is to guard cells against malignant transformation. .... is found to be digital in the form of a discrete number of p53 and MDM2 protein pulses. As already mentioned, the p53-MDM2 network can be described in terms of a ...

  10. P53 Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells to Hesperidin through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, hesperidin activates the proapoptotic (Bax) and cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor (p21) in only HCT116 p53+/+ cells. Interestingly, using p53 transcriptional inhibitor (pifithrin-), hesperidin-inducing Bax and p21 upregulation in only HCT116 p53+/+ cells was reduced by cotreatment with pifithrin- without ...

  11. Human neuroblastoma cells with acquired resistance to the p53 activator RITA retain functional p53 and sensitivity to other p53 activating agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michaelis, M.; Rothweiler, F.; Agha, B.; Barth, S.; Voges, Y.; Loeschmann, N.; von Deimling, A.; Breitling, R.; Doerr, H. Wilhelm; Roedel, F.; Speidel, D.; Cinatl, J.; Cinatl Jr., J.; Stephanou, A.

    Adaptation of wild-type p53 expressing UKF-NB-3 cancer cells to the murine double minute 2 inhibitor nutlin-3 causes de novo p53 mutations at high frequency (13/20) and multi-drug resistance. Here, we show that the same cells respond very differently when adapted to RITA, a drug that, like nutlin-3,

  12. Decreased Mdm2 expression inhibits tumor development and extends survival independent of Arf and dependent on p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Eischen

    Full Text Available Inactivation of the Arf-Mdm2-p53 tumor suppressor pathway is a necessary event for tumorigenesis. Arf controls Mdm2, which in turn regulates p53, but Arf and Mdm2 also have p53-independent functions that affect tumor development. Moreover, inhibition of oncogene-induced tumorigenesis relies on Arf and p53, but the requirements of Arf and p53 in tumor development initiated in the absence of overt oncogene overexpression and the role of Mdm2 in this process remain unclear. In a series of genetic experiments in mice with defined deficiencies in Arf, Mdm2 and/or p53, we show Mdm2 haploinsufficiency significantly delayed tumorigenesis in mice deficient in Arf and p53. Mdm2 heterozygosity significantly inhibited tumor development in the absence of Arf, and in contrast to Myc oncogene-driven cancer, this delay in tumorigenesis could not be rescued with the presence of one allele of Arf. Notably, Mdm2 haploinsufficieny blocked the accelerated tumor development in Arf deficient mice caused by p53 heterozygosity. However, tumorigenesis was not inhibited in Mdm2 heterozygous mice lacking both alleles of p53 regardless of Arf status. Surprisingly, loss of Arf accelerated tumor development in p53-null mice. Tumor spectrum was largely dictated by Arf and p53 status with Mdm2 haploinsufficiency only modestly altering the tumor type in some of the genotypes and not the number of primary tumors that arose. Therefore, the significant effects of Mdm2 haploinsufficiency on tumor latency were independent of Arf and required at least one allele of p53, and an Mdm2 deficiency had minor effects on the types of tumors that developed. These data also demonstrate that decreased levels of Mdm2 are protective in the presence of multiple genetic events in Arf and p53 genes that normally accelerate tumorigenesis.

  13. TEL/ETV6 induces apoptosis in 32D cells through p53-dependent pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Tetsuya; Maki, Kazuhiro; Waga, Kazuo; Mitani, Kinuko

    2006-01-01

    TEL is an ETS family transcription factor that is critical for maintaining hematopoietic stem cells in adult bone marrow. To investigate the roles of TEL in myeloid proliferation and differentiation, we introduced TEL cDNA into mouse myeloid 32Dcl3 cells. Overexpression of TEL repressed interleukin-3-dependent proliferation through blocking cell cycle progression. Also, the presence of TEL triggered apoptosis through the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway on exposure to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. We found an increase in p53 protein and its DNA binding in the TEL-overexpressing cells. Forced expression of TEL stimulated transcription via the p53-responsive element and increased the expression of cellular target genes for p53 such as cell cycle regulator p21 and apoptosis inducer Puma. Consistently, induction of apoptosis was delayed by pifithrin-α treatment and completely blocked by increased expression of Bcl-2 in the TEL-overexpressing cells. These data collectively suggest that TEL exerts a tumor suppressive function through augmenting the p53 pathway and facilitates normal development of myelopoiesis

  14. Involvement of hGLD-2 in cytoplasmic polyadenylation of human p53 mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Norrild, Bodil

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation is a post-transcriptional mechanism regulating mRNA stability and translation. The human p53 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) contains two regions similar to cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (CPEs) just upstream of the poly(A) hexanucleotide. Evaluation of the p53 CPE......-like elements was performed by luciferase reporter assays, qPCR, and poly(A) assays. Herein, we report the down regulation of a luciferase reporter fused to the p53 3'-UTR, when human CPE-binding protein 1 (hCPEB1) is overexpressed. This inhibition is partially rescued when hCPEB1fused to hGLD-2 [a human...... cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase] is overexpressed instead. The stability of a luciferase mRNA containing the p53 3'-UTR downstream, is decreased when hCPEB1 is overexpressed as seen by qPCR. Expression of hGLD-2 restores the mRNA stability. This is due to elongation of the poly(A) tail as seen by a PCR...

  15. The prognostic significance of accumulation of p53 protein in stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langendijk, J.A.; Thunnissen, F.B.J.M.; Lamers, R.J.S.; Jong, J.M.A. de; Velde, G.P.M. ten; Wouters, E.F.M.

    1995-01-01

    In the present study the prognostic significance of accumulation of nuclear p53 protein on survival and freedom from local progression was investigated. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections obtained by bronchoscopy or mediastinoscopy were used to examine the expression of nuclear p53 protein using immunohistochemistry. In 37 cases (57%), overexpression of the p53 protein was detected. No relation was found between p53 expression and other pretreatment variables. Response to radiotherapy was found in 11 p53-negative cases (65%) versus 10 p53-positive cases (42%). Freedom from local progression was significantly better in the p53-negative cases as compared with the p53-positive cases. The p53-negative cases who responded to radiotherapy showed an excellent freedom from local progression rate after 2 years of 100%, whereas all p53-positive cases without response to radiotherapy showed local progression within 24 months. Overall survival between p53-negative and -positive cases did not differ, however the disease-specific survival was found to be worse in the p53-positive cases as compared to the negative cases (median survival 8.4 vs. 14.4 months (P < 0.05)). No correlation was found between p53 expression and the frequency of distant metastases. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that p53 protein expression may be of prognostic value on freedom from local progression in non-small cell lung carcinoma

  16. A p53-bound enhancer region controls a long intergenic noncoding RNA required for p53 stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, C A; Léveillé, N; Rooijers, K; Wijchers, P J; Geeven, G; Tal, A; Melo, S A; de Laat, W; Agami, R

    2016-08-18

    Genome-wide chromatin studies identified the tumor suppressor p53 as both a promoter and an enhancer-binding transcription factor. As an enhancer factor, p53 can induce local production of enhancer RNAs, as well as transcriptional activation of distal neighboring genes. Beyond the regulation of protein-coding genes, p53 has the capacity to regulate long intergenic noncoding RNA molecules (lincRNAs); however, their importance to the p53 tumor suppressive function remains poorly characterized. Here, we identified and characterized a novel p53-bound intronic enhancer that controls the expression of its host, the lincRNA00475 (linc-475). We demonstrate the requirement of linc-475 for the proper induction of a p53-dependent cell cycle inhibitory response. We further confirm the functional importance of linc-475 in the maintenance of CDKN1A/p21 levels, a cell cycle inhibitor and a major p53 target gene, following p53 activation. Interestingly, loss of linc-475 reduced the binding of both p53 and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) to the promoter of p21, attenuating its transcription rate following p53 activation. Altogether, our data suggest a direct role of p53-bound enhancer domains in the activation of lincRNAs required for an efficient p53 transcriptional response.

  17. Malignant transformation rate and p53, and p16 expression in teratomatous skin of ovarian mature cystic teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hai-Li; Zou, Zhen-Ning; Lin, Pei-Xin; Li, Wen-Xia; Huang, Ye-En; Shi, Xiao-Xin; Shen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the incidence of malignant transformation and P53 and P16 expression in teratomatous skin of ovarian mature cystic teratoma. Data on ovarian teratoma specimens in nearly 10 years were reviewed. P53 and P16 expression were detected by immunohistochemistry in 25 cases of teratomatous skin of ovarian mature cystic teratoma, 20 cases of squamous cell carcinoma and 2 cases of squamous cell carcinoma originated from teratomatous skin. Of 1913 cases of ovarian mature cystic teratoma in nearly 10 years, only two cases of squamous cell carcinoma were found in teratomatous skin, with malignant transformation rate of 0.1045%. P53 expression was detected in 2 cases squamous cell carcinoma originated from teratomatous skin and P16 overexpression in one. There were no expressions of P53 and P16 in 25 cases of teratomatous skin of ovarian mature cystic teratoma. Of 20 cases of squamous cell carcinoma P53 overexpression (positive rate of 55%) was detected in 11 cases, P16 overexpression (positive rate of 35%) in 7 cases. The positive rates of P53 and P16 expression in squamous cell carcinomas were significantly higher than that in the teratomatous skins (povarian mature cystic teratoma which can be explained by lower P53 and P16 expressionin teratomas than that in squamous cell carcinoma.

  18. Expression of p53 and HER2/Neu in Kenyan Women With Primary Ovarian Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutuiri, Anderson P; Nzioka, Ancent; Busarla, Satya V P; Sayed, Shahin; Moloo, Zahir

    2016-11-01

    Ovarian carcinomas are a leading cause of cancer mortality among women. Two of the more commonly described markers of prognostic significance in primary ovarian carcinomas are p53 and HER2/neu. Overexpression of both markers is associated with poor prognosis. This study aimed to determine the frequency and pattern of p53 and HER2/neu expression in primary ovarian carcinomas in Kenyan women and to describe the clinical and pathologic features of ovarian carcinomas diagnosed at 3 different hospitals in Kenya. Primary ovarian carcinomas diagnosed at the Departments of Pathology at Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi; the Aga Khan Hospital, Kisumu; and the AIC Kijabe Hospital in Kenya over a period of 3 years from January 2009 to December 2011 were recorded. Sixty-seven ovarian carcinomas were identified and blocks retrieved from archives. Hematoxylin-eosin-stained slides of these were reviewed and appropriate sections were stained for p53 and HER2/neu using standard immunohistochemical techniques. The primary outcome was presence and intensity of staining for p53 and HER2/neu. The most frequent malignancy was serous carcinoma. A total of 43.3% (95% confidence interval, 32.1%-55.2%) of carcinomas were positive for p53, and 13.4% (95% confidence interval, 7.2%-23.6%) were positive for HER2/neu. Serous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified were more likely to be positive for p53. There was no association noted between the histologic grade or pathologic stage and positivity for either p53 or HER2/neu. The expression of p53 and HER2/neu in primary ovarian carcinomas in Kenyan women is not different from that described in the literature.

  19. p53 mutation is infrequent in clear cell carcinoma of the ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, E S; Lai, C R; Hsieh, Y T; Chen, J T; Lin, A J; Hung, M H; Liu, F S

    2001-02-01

    p53 gene alteration has been extensively studied in epithelial ovarian cancer. However, its occurrence in clear cell carcinoma, an infrequent histologic subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer, is rarely reported. The aim of this study is to determine the status of p53 gene alteration in this distinct type of ovarian carcinoma. Paraffin blocks of tumors from 38 patients with primary or recurrent ovarian clear cell carcinoma were studied for p53 alteration. All these tumors were subjected to immunohistochemical and molecular analysis. Two monoclonal antibodies (DO-7 and PAb 1801) were used for immunohistochemical staining. Genomic DNAs extracted from paraffin blocks of the 38 tumors were subscribed for a nested polymerase chain reaction/single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR/SSCP) analysis. Tumors showing band shift on SSCP were further prepared for DNA sequencing to determine the site of mutation. Overexpression of p53 was observed in only one stage III clear cell carcinoma. However, focal positive p53 staining was noted in another five tumors. Of the six tumors showing positive immunohistochemistry, p53 alterations were noted in four tumors. Three tumors revealed a missense point mutation: two were in exon 7 (TCT(227) --> TTT and GGC(245) --> AGC) and one was in exon 5 (CGC(156) --> CAC). Another tumor revealed a 12-bp deletion in two possible ways: it might involve the last four codons at the 3' end of exon 4 (nucleotides 12,288-12,299) or it might cross over the splice junction between exon 4 and intron 4 (nucleotides 12,290-12,301). The former would result in a predicted protein product of 389 amino acids whereas the latter would cause a frameshift in the gene sequence and would result in a truncated protein. Mutations in p53 appear to be much less frequent in clear cell carcinoma than in other histologic types of epithelial ovarian cancer. We suggest that p53 alterations may not play an important role in the development of clear cell carcinoma.

  20. p53, p21, Rb, and MDM2 proteins in tongue carcinoma from patients 75 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Dekker, N P; McMillan, A; Ramirez-Amador, V; Meneses-Garcia, A; Ruiz-Godoy Rivera, L M; Chrysomali, E; Ng, I O

    1999-07-01

    Relatively rare squamous cell carcinomas of the tongue in young patients may be associated with different etiologic factors and pathogenetic mechanisms than carcinomas from the same site in older patients. Alterations in cell cycle proteins likely contribute to the biologic behavior of these neoplasms. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate cell cycle proteins (p53, p21, Rb, MDM2) in lateral tongue cancers from patients at the two ends of the age spectrum. All available archived lateral tongue carcinomas from patients 75 years (23 males and 13 females) were stained and compared. Positive p53 staining was seen in 18/36 of the 75-year group (p = 0.149). Increased p21 staining (both percent of positive cells and intensity) was evident in 25/32 of the 75-year group (p = 1.0). Increased p21 expression was seen in both p53-positive and -negative cases in both age groups. Rb protein was increased in 16/29 of the 75-year group (p = 0.58). Fourteen cases (4/35 vs 10/36, p = 0.135) showed positive MDM2 staining; MDM2-positive cases were also p53 positive in 4/4 younger and 8/10 older patients. We conclude that p53, p21, Rb, and MDM2 are over-expressed in lateral tongue cancers, and that immunohistochemical profiles are heterogeneous. A p53-independent pathway of p21 induction is supported by the results; p53 suppression may be associated with MDM2 protein expression in a subset of cancers. Significant differences in the expression of p53, p21, Rb, and MDM2 proteins are not evident in lateral tongue carcinomas from patients 75 years.

  1. The expression of p53 protein in patients with multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Olivera

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although mutations of p53 are one of the most often acquired genetic changes in malignant tumors, these mutations are rare events in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM. Moreover, there are a few literature data about clinical significance of p53 overexpression in multiple myeloma. Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical significance of p53 immunoexpression in multiple myeloma. Method A total of 58 patients with newly diagnosed MM (26 females and 32 males, mean age 62 years were enrolled in the study. The diagnosis of MM was made according to criteria of Chronic Leukemia-Myeloma Task Force. Clinical staging was done according to Durie and Salmon classification (4 patients had disease stage I, 15 patients stage II and 39 patients stage III. The histological grade and histological stage were determined according to predominant plasma cell morphology and volume of myeloma infiltration, respectively. Standard immunohistochemical analysis with p53 antibody in B5-fixed and paraffin- embedded bone marrow specimens was used to evaluate the expression of p53 in myeloma cells. The specimens were considered positive when ≥5% of plasma cells exhibited clear nuclear positivity. Results Out of 58 patients, p53 expression was detected in 9 (15.52%. No significant correlation was found between p53 expression and clinical stage (I+II vs. III, Я2-microglobulin level (≤6 mg/L vs. >6mg/L, histological grade (I vs. II+III, histological stage (<20% vs. 21-50% vs. >50% and the extent of osteolytic lesions (≤3 vs. >3 lesions. Median survival of patients with p53 immunoreactivity in =>5% of plasma cells was 10 months, whilst median survival of patients with p53 immunoreactivity in <5% of plasma cells was 36 months. However, such difference was not significant (p=0.2. Conclusion The frequency of p53 immunoexpression in our group of newly diagnosed MM was relatively low. Although p53 immunoexpression was not

  2. The role of the 5' terminal region of p53 mRNA in the p53 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatkowska, Agata; Zydowicz, Paulina; Sroka, Joanna; Ciesiołka, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor protein is one of the major factors responsible for cell cycle regulation and protection against cancer development. This is why it is often referred to as "the guardian of the genome". On the other hand, mutations in the p53 gene are connected with more than 50% of tumours of various types. The thirty-six years of extensive research on the p53 gene and its protein products have shown how sophisticated the p53-based cell system control is. An additional level of complexity of the p53 research is connected with at least twelve p53 isoforms which have been identified in the cell. Importantly, disturbance of the p53 isoforms' expression seems to play a key role in tumorigenesis, cell differentiation and cell response to pathogenic bacteria, and RNA and DNA viruses. Expression of various p53 isoforms results from the usage of different transcription promoters, alternative splicing events and translation initiation from alternative AUG codons. The importance of the 5'-terminal regions of different p53 mRNA transcripts in the multi-level regulation of the p53 gene has recently been documented. In this review we focus on the structural features of these regions and their specific role in the p53 translation initiation process.

  3. Distribution of p53 expression in tissue from 774 Danish ovarian tumour patients and its prognostic significance in ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgdall, Estrid V S; Christensen, Lise; Høgdall, Claus K; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Gayther, Simon; Blaakaer, Jan; Jacobs, Ian J; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2008-05-01

    The clinical roles played by normal and altered p53 in cancer are under intensive investigation, but larger studies describing the pattern as well as the prognostic value are still needed. The aim of this study was, using tissue array (TA), to examine the overexpression of p53 protein in 774 epithelial ovarian tumour tissues from Danish women and to evaluate whether p53 tissue expression levels correlate with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis. The distribution of p53 expression levels at different stages of disease, in different histological subtypes, and the prognostic value of p53 tissue expression were examined. Overall, p53 was expressed in 24/189 (13%) low malignant potential ovarian tumours (LMP) and in 278/585 (48%) ovarian cancers (OC). No significant difference in frequency of p53 tissue expression in LMP tissue was noted with increasing tumour stage (p=0.98). By contrast, there was a significant increase in the frequency of p53 tissue expression in OC with increasing FIGO stage (pp53 was associated with longer OC disease-specific survival. Tissue p53 expression may be of prognostic value in women with OC.

  4. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  5. Mitofusin-2 is a novel direct target of p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Weilin; Cheng, Xiaofei; Lu, Jianju; Wei, Jianfeng [Key Lab of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Key Lab of Organ Transplantation, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Fu, Guanghou [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhu, Feng; Jia, Changku; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Haiyang [Key Lab of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Key Lab of Organ Transplantation, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Zheng, Shusen, E-mail: shusenzheng@zju.edu.cn [Key Lab of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Key Lab of Organ Transplantation, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China)

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Mfn2 is a novel target gene of p53. {yields} Mfn2 mRNA and protein levels can be up-regulated in a p53-dependent manner. {yields} Mfn2 promoter activity can be elevated by the p53 protein. {yields} P53 protein binds the Mfn2 promoter directly both in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: The tumor suppressor p53 modulates transcription of a number of target genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, and other important cellular responses. Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2) is a novel suppressor of cell proliferation that may also exert apoptotic effects via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Through bioinformatics analysis, we identified a p53 binding site in the Mfn2 promoter. Consistent with this, we showed that the p53 protein binds the Mfn2 promoter directly both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, we found that Mfn2 mRNA and protein levels are up-regulated in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, luciferase assays revealed that the activity of the wild-type Mfn2 promoter, but not a mutated version of the promoter, was up-regulated by p53. These results indicate that Mfn2 is a novel p53-inducible target gene, which provides insight into the regulation of Mfn2 and its associated activities in the inhibition of cell proliferation, promotion of apoptosis, and modulation of tumor suppression.

  6. Targeting the p53 Pathway in Ewing Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilsen, Paul M.; Pishas, Kathleen I.; Callen, David F.; Thomas, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor plays a pivotal role in the prevention of oncogenic transformation. Cancers frequently evade the potent antitumour surveillance mechanisms of p53 through mutation of the TP53 gene, with approximately 50% of all human malignancies expressing dysfunctional, mutated p53 proteins. Interestingly, genetic lesions in the TP53 gene are only observed in 10% of Ewing Sarcomas, with the majority of these sarcomas expressing a functional wild-type p53. In addition, the p53 downstream signaling pathways and DNA-damage cell cycle checkpoints remain functionally intact in these sarcomas. This paper summarizes recent insights into the functional capabilities and regulation of p53 in Ewing Sarcoma, with a particular focus on the cross-talk between p53 and the EWS-FLI1 gene rearrangement frequently associated with this disease. The development of several activators of p53 is discussed, with recent evidence demonstrating the potential of small molecule p53 activators as a promising systemic therapeutic approach for the treatment of Ewing Sarcomas with wild-type p53. PMID:21197471

  7. NAD+ Modulates p53 DNA Binding Specificity and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, Kevin G.; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kastan, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    DNA damage induces p53 DNA binding activity, which affects tumorigenesis, tumor responses to therapies, and the toxicities of cancer therapies (B. Vogelstein, D. Lane, and A. J. Levine, Nature 408:307-310, 2000; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Both transcriptional and transcription-independent activities of p53 contribute to DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and aneuploidy prevention (M. B. Kastan et al., Cell 71:587-597, 1992; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Small-molecule manipulation of p53 DNA binding activity has been an elusive goal, but here we show that NAD+ binds to p53 tetramers, induces a conformational change, and modulates p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro. Niacinamide (vitamin B3) increases the rate of intracellular NAD+ synthesis, alters radiation-induced p53 DNA binding specificity, and modulates activation of a subset of p53 transcriptional targets. These effects are likely due to a direct effect of NAD+ on p53, as a molecule structurally related to part of NAD+, TDP, also inhibits p53 DNA binding, and the TDP precursor, thiamine (vitamin B1), inhibits intracellular p53 activity. Niacinamide and thiamine affect two p53-regulated cellular responses to ionizing radiation: rereplication and apoptosis. Thus, niacinamide and thiamine form a novel basis for the development of small molecules that affect p53 function in vivo, and these results suggest that changes in cellular energy metabolism may regulate p53. PMID:15509798

  8. The different regulatory effects of p53 status on multidrug resistance are determined by autophagy in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dejuan; Ma, Shumei; Liang, Bing; Yi, Heqing; Zhao, Yinlong; Xin, Rui; Cui, Li; Jia, Lili; Liu, Xin; Liu, Xiaodong

    2012-06-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) has become an obstacle for chemotherapy of cancer. p53 is reported to participate in the regulation of MDR, but the association between p53 status and MDR are complicated and conditional. It has been verified that apoptosis is not the only mechanism for MDR regulation by p53, the roles of autophagy in MDR is less studied. Human ovarian carcinoma cell lines SKOV3 and multidrug resistant phenotype SKVCR cells were used and wild-type p53 (wt p53) and mutant 175H constructs were introduced into cells to establish cell models with different p53 status by gene engineering, the sensitivity to vincristine (VCR), cisplatin (DDP), pirarubicin (THP) and etoposide (VP-16) were detected by MTT assay, Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR were used to detect the expression of protein and mRNA, especially, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining was used for autophagy rate, Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide (PI) were used to assess apoptosis and necrosis. SKVCR cells induced by VCR shown overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and MDR, and also displayed an enhanced autophagy compared with parental SKOV3. Wt p53 and 175H has no influence on drug sensitivity in SKOV3, while both sensitized SKVCR cells to VCR, THP and VP-16, especially 175H. The introduction of wt p53-induced apoptosis only, while 175H trigged autophagic cell death, necrosis and apoptosis so as to reverse the MDR. The enhancement of autophagy in MDR cells allows to survive during chemotherapy stress, autophagy plays important role in wt p53 and mutant p53-immediated MDR. The different influence of p53 status on drug sensitivity hint the individual treatment strategies based on p53 status in patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Gelsolin negatively regulates the activity of tumor suppressor p53 through their physical interaction in hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Jung-Woong; Jang, Sang-Min; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kang, Eun-Jin; Choi, Kyung-Hee, E-mail: khchoi@cau.ac.kr

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} The actin binding protein Gelsolin (GSN) interacts with transcription factor p53. {yields} GSN interacts with transactivation- and DNA binding domains of p53. {yields} GSN represses transactivity of p53 via inhibition of nuclear translocation of p53. {yields} GSN inhibits the p53-mediated apoptosis in hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. -- Abstract: As a transcription factor, p53 modulates several cellular responses including cell-cycle control, apoptosis, and differentiation. In this study, we have shown that an actin regulatory protein, gelsolin (GSN), can physically interact with p53. The nuclear localization of p53 is inhibited by GSN overexpression in hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that GSN negatively regulates p53-dependent transcriptional activity of a reporter construct, driven by the p21-promoter. Furthermore, p53-mediated apoptosis was repressed in GSN-transfected HepG2 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that GSN binds to p53 and this interaction leads to the inhibition of p53-induced apoptosis by anchoring of p53 in the cytoplasm in HepG2 cells.

  10. Senescence and aging: the critical roles of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufini, A; Tucci, P; Celardo, I; Melino, G

    2013-10-24

    p53 functions as a transcription factor involved in cell-cycle control, DNA repair, apoptosis and cellular stress responses. However, besides inducing cell growth arrest and apoptosis, p53 activation also modulates cellular senescence and organismal aging. Senescence is an irreversible cell-cycle arrest that has a crucial role both in aging and as a robust physiological antitumor response, which counteracts oncogenic insults. Therefore, via the regulation of senescence, p53 contributes to tumor growth suppression, in a manner strictly dependent by its expression and cellular context. In this review, we focus on the recent advances on the contribution of p53 to cellular senescence and its implication for cancer therapy, and we will discuss p53's impact on animal lifespan. Moreover, we describe p53-mediated regulation of several physiological pathways that could mediate its role in both senescence and aging.

  11. Expression of p53 protein and prognosis in gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürel, S; Dolar, E; Yerci, O; Samli, B; Oztürk, H; Nak, S G; Gülten, M; Memik, F

    1999-01-01

    A study was carried out to assess whether p53 expression is related to tumour type, grade or pathological characteristics, or to prognosis, in gastric cancer. Immunohistochemical studies were performed to detect p53 protein in sections from 55 consecutive gastrectomy or partial gastrectomy specimens. Tumours were classified for T-stage, histopathological grade and pathological characteristics. Immunohistochemical staining detected p53 protein in 11 (19%) of the 55 specimens. There was no statistically significant difference between patients with p53 positively staining tumours and patients with p53 negatively staining tumours with regard to tumour grade, stage or pathological characteristics (lymph-node infiltration, depth of invasion, necrosis, or necrosis of vessels). Survival time was statistically significantly lower in patients with positively staining tumours (mean survival times 12.0 and 23.4 months, respectively). These results suggest that expression of p53 protein is related to poor prognosis in gastric carcinoma.

  12. "Super p53" mice display retinal astroglial changes.

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    Juan J Salazar

    Full Text Available Tumour-suppressor genes, such as the p53 gene, produce proteins that inhibit cell division under adverse conditions, as in the case of DNA damage, radiation, hypoxia, or oxidative stress (OS. The p53 gene can arrest proliferation and trigger death by apoptosis subsequent to several factors. In astrocytes, p53 promotes cell-cycle arrest and is involved in oxidative stress-mediated astrocyte cell death. Increasingly, astrocytic p53 is proving fundamental in orchestrating neurodegenerative disease pathogenesis. In terms of ocular disease, p53 may play a role in hypoxia due to ischaemia and may be involved in the retinal response to oxidative stress (OS. We studied the influence of the p53 gene in the structural and quantitative characteristics of astrocytes in the retina. Adult mice of the C57BL/6 strain (12 months old were distributed into two groups: 1 mice with two extra copies of p53 ("super p53"; n = 6 and 2 wild-type p53 age-matched control, as the control group (WT; n = 6. Retinas from each group were immunohistochemically processed to locate the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. GFAP+ astrocytes were manually counted and the mean area occupied for one astrocyte was quantified. Retinal-astrocyte distribution followed established patterns; however, morphological changes were seen through the retinas in relation to p53 availability. The mean GFAP+ area occupied by one astrocyte in "super p53" eyes was significantly higher (p<0.05; Student's t-test than in the WT. In addition, astroglial density was significantly higher in the "super p53" retinas than in the WT ones, both in the whole-retina (p<0,01 Student's t-test and in the intermediate and peripheral concentric areas of the retina (p<0.05 Student's t-test. This fact might improve the resistance of the retinal cells against OS and its downstream signalling pathways.

  13. Regulation of MCP-1 chemokine transcription by p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, Katrin; Rincon-Orozco, Bladimiro; Buchwalter, Gilles; Siehler, Simone Y; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Rösl, Frank

    2010-04-20

    Our previous studies showed that the expression of the monocyte-chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, a chemokine, which triggers the infiltration and activation of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, is abrogated in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive premalignant and malignant cells. In silico analysis of the MCP-1 upstream region proposed a putative p53 binding side about 2.5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start. The aim of this study is to monitor a physiological role of p53 in this process. The proposed p53 binding side could be confirmed in vitro by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays and in vivo by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Moreover, the availability of p53 is apparently important for chemokine regulation, since TNF-alpha can induce MCP-1 only in human keratinocytes expressing the viral oncoprotein E7, but not in HPV16 E6 positive cells, where p53 becomes degraded. A general physiological role of p53 in MCP-1 regulation was further substantiated in HPV-negative cells harboring a temperature-sensitive mutant of p53 and in Li-Fraumeni cells, carrying a germ-line mutation of p53. In both cases, non-functional p53 leads to diminished MCP-1 transcription upon TNF-alpha treatment. In addition, siRNA directed against p53 decreased MCP-1 transcription after TNF-alpha addition, directly confirming a crosstalk between p53 and MCP-1. These data support the concept that p53 inactivation during carcinogenesis also affects immune surveillance by interfering with chemokine expression and in turn communication with cells of the immunological compartment.

  14. Battle Against Cancer: An Everlasting Saga of p53

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    Qian Hao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the most life-threatening diseases characterized by uncontrolled growth and spread of malignant cells. The tumor suppressor p53 is the master regulator of tumor cell growth and proliferation. In response to various stress signals, p53 can be activated and transcriptionally induces a myriad of target genes, including both protein-encoding and non-coding genes, controlling cell cycle progression, DNA repair, senescence, apoptosis, autophagy and metabolism of tumor cells. However, around 50% of human cancers harbor mutant p53 and, in the majority of the remaining cancers, p53 is inactivated through multiple mechanisms. Herein, we review the recent progress in understanding the molecular basis of p53 signaling, particularly the newly identified ribosomal stress—p53 pathway, and the development of chemotherapeutics via activating wild-type p53 or restoring mutant p53 functions in cancer. A full understanding of p53 regulation will aid the development of effective cancer treatments.

  15. Targeting p53 by small molecules in hematological malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Manujendra N; Qiu, Lugui; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    p53 is a powerful tumor suppressor and is an attractive cancer therapeutic target. A breakthrough in cancer research came from the discovery of the drugs which are capable of reactivating p53 function. Most anti-cancer agents, from traditional chemo- and radiation therapies to more recently developed non-peptide small molecules exert their effects by enhancing the anti-proliferative activities of p53. Small molecules such as nutlin, RITA, and PRIMA-1 that can activate p53 have shown their ant...

  16. A negative regulation loop of long noncoding RNA HOTAIR and p53 in non-small-cell lung cancer

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    Zhai N

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nailiang Zhai,1 Yongfu Xia,1 Rui Yin,2 Jinping Liu,3 Fuquan Gao1 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical University, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, People’s Hospital of Binzhou City, 3Department of Pharmacology, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide, and the 5-year survival rate is still low despite advances in diagnosis and therapeutics. A long noncoding RNA (lncRNA HOX antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR has been revealed to play important roles in NSCLC carcinogenesis but the detailed mechanisms are still unclear. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the regulation between the lncRNA HOTAIR and p53 in the NSCLC patient samples and cell lines. Our results showed that HOTAIR expression was significantly higher in the cancer tissues than that in the adjacent normal tissue, and was negatively correlated with p53 functionality rather than expression. When p53 was overexpressed in A549 cells, the lncRNA HOTAIR expression was downregulated, and the cell proliferation rate and cell invasion capacity decreased as a consequence. We identified two binding sites of p53 on the promoter region of HOTAIR, where the p53 protein would bind to and suppress the HOTAIR mRNA transcription. Inversely, overexpression of lncRNA HOTAIR inhibited the expression of p53 in A549 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that HOTAIR modified the promoter of p53 and enhanced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3. These studies identified a specific negative regulation loop of lncRNA HOTAIR and p53 in NSCLC cells, which revealed a new understanding of tumorigenesis in p53 dysfunction NSCLC cells. Keywords: NSCLC, LncRNA HOTAIR, p53, negative loop

  17. Proteic expression of p53 and cellular proliferation in oral leukoplakias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-García, Antonio; Abad-Hernández, M Mar; Fonseca-Sánchez, Emilio; Cruz-Hernández, Juan Jesús; Bullón-Sopelana, Agustín

    2005-01-01

    We intend to know the protein expression of genetic alterations that take place in the early stages in the field cancerization of oral cavity in our means as well as to study the cellular proliferation by means of Ki-67 and the protein product expression of p53 to value if the alterations in the protein products expression of these markers happen in a sequential pathway through the different stages in the field cancerization of oral cavity. A study was made by immunohistochemistry on 53 patients that presented lesions of oral leukoplaquia, assisted by the ENT service at University Hospital of Salamanca, from 1.990 up to 2000. 11 samples of normal epithelium, 15 mild to moderate dysplasias, 15 in situ carcinomas and 12 microinvasive carcinomas are included in the study. we find an increased cellular proliferation and p53 over-expression as we advance in the grade of severity histopathologic of these lesions. The most early alterations are a significant increase of cell proliferation in mild and moderate dysplasias and an increased p53 over-expression. Oral leukoplaquia is a precancerous stage that constitutes a cancerisable lesion due to the genetic alterations that mediate in the evolution of lesion. Routine Immunohistochemical and molecular study of these lesions allow us to know the protein expression of genetic alterations that can help in the early diagnosis and treatment of this pathology, having special relevance the study of Ki-67 in early stages and p53 in advanced lesions.

  18. Cellular localization of human p53 expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: effect of NLSI deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmoula-Souissi, Salma; Delahodde, Agnès; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique; Gargouri, Ali; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2011-07-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in the regulation of cellular growth and apoptosis. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, over-expression of the human wtp53 leads to growth inhibition and cell death on minimal medium. In the present work, we showed that deletion of the nuclear localization signal (NLSI) of p53 restores the yeast growth. In this heterologous context, the level of p53∆NLSI was low and the protein mainly located in the cytoplasm while the wtp53 was observed in both the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. Interestingly, the wtp53 protein was observed in the mitochondria, whereas the p53∆NLSI protein failed to localize in mitochondria. Moreover, mitochondrial morphology defect and release of cytochrome c in the cytosol were noticed only in the yeast strain expressing the wtp53. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that the human wtp53 is active in S. cerevisiae probably through dependent and independent transcriptional mechanisms leading to cell death. The deletion of the NLSI sequence decreases p53 nuclear translocation as well as its mitochondrial localization and consequently its effect on yeast growth.

  19. Clinical significance of P53 and Bcl-2 in acute myeloid leukemia patients of Eastern India

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    Geetaram Sahu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of p53 and Bcl-2 protein expression in 100 newly diagnosed and 10 relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients was analyzed by immunocytochemistry (ICC. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for univariate and multivariate statistical analysis to assess the relationship between p53, Bcl-2 and clinico-hematologic feature with respect to overall survival (OS using SPSS statistical software. No statistical significance was found in univariate analysis (P=0.60. However, when the subgroups of patients (+1, +2, +3 and +4 were compared, expression of p53 and Bcl-2 protein (1-10%, 11- 30%, 31-50% and >50% was statistically significant (P<0.05. However, in multivariate analysis, p53, immunopositivity was independently associated with a shorter overall survival (OS (P=0.038 while Bcl-2 immunopositivity was associated with longer overall survival (OS (P=0.002. Our finding shows that p53 and Bcl-2 protein overexpression is a strong indicator of response to chemotherapy and overall survival. This study reports for the first time AML in patients from Eastern India.

  20. p53 inhibits the upregulation of sirtuin 1 expression induced by c-Myc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang; Liu, Lu; Lei, Yonghong; Tang, Peifu

    2017-10-01

    Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), a conserved NAD + dependent deacetylase, is a mediator of life span by calorie restriction. However, Sirt1 may paradoxically increase the risk of cancer. Accordingly, the expression level of Sirt1 is selectively elevated in numerous types of cancer cell; however, the mechanisms underlying the differential regulation remain largely unknown. The present study demonstrated that oncoprotein c-Myc was a direct regulator of Sirt1, which accounts for the upregulation of Sirt1 expression only in the cells without functional p53. In p53 deficient cells, the overexpression of c-Myc increased Sirt1 mRNA and protein expression levels as well as its promoter activity, whereas the inhibitor of c-Myc, 10058-F4, induced decreased Sirt1 basal mRNA and protein expression levels. Deletion/mutation mapping analyses revealed that c-Myc bound to the conserved E-box[-189 to -183 base pair (bp)] of the Sirt1 promoter. In addition, p53 and c-Myc shared at least response element and the presence of p53 may block the binding of c-Myc to the Sirt1 promoter, thus inhibit the c-Myc mediated upregulation of Sirt1 promoter activity. The present study indicated that the expression level of Sirt1 was tightly regulated by oncoprotein c-Myc and tumor suppressor p53, which aids an improved understanding of its expression regulation and tumor promoter role in certain conditions.

  1. Systemic Akt1 Deletion after Tumor Onset in p53−/− Mice Increases Lifespan and Regresses Thymic Lymphoma Emulating p53 Restoration

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    Wan-Ni Yu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Akt is frequently activated in human cancers. However, it is unknown whether systemic inhibition of a single Akt isoform could regress cancer progression in cancers that are not driven by Akt activation. We systemically deleted Akt1 after tumor onset in p53−/− mice, which develop tumors independently of Akt activation. Systemic Akt1 deletion regresses thymic lymphoma in p53−/− mice emulating p53 restoration. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of Akt selectively kills thymic lymphoma cells and not primary thymocytes. Mechanistically, Akt1 inhibition in p53−/− thymic lymphoma inhibits Skp2 expression and induces FasL, which is the primary cause of cell death. Skp2 exerts resistance to cell death by antagonizing the induction of FasL and reducing FAS expression, which is linked to cyclin D1 expression. The results established a paradigm whereby systemic Akt1 inhibition is sufficient to regress tumors that are not driven by Akt activation and a mechanism of cell survival by Skp2.

  2. p53 death signal is mainly mediated by Nuc1(EndoG) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Vanessa; Mangiapelo, Eleonora; Piloto, Cristina; Pieri, Luisa; Muscolini, Michela; Tuosto, Loretta; Mazzoni, Cristina

    2013-11-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in the regulation of cellular growth and apoptosis. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the overexpression of the human p53 leads to growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death on minimal medium. In the present work, we show that p53-expressing cells are more susceptible to cell death after an apoptotic stimulus such as H2O2. The analysis of mutants involved in yeast apoptosis-like death suggests that the observed cell death is Yca1 independent and mainly mediated through Nuc1p. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanisms underlying p53 regulation of PIK3CA transcription in ovarian surface epithelium and in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astanehe, Arezoo; Arenillas, David; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Leung, Peter C K; Dunn, Sandra E; Davies, Barry R; Mills, Gordon B; Auersperg, Nelly

    2008-03-01

    Inactivation of the transcription factor and tumor suppressor p53, and overexpression or mutational activation of PIK3CA, which encodes the p110alpha catalytic subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), are two of the most common deleterious genomic changes in cancer, including in ovarian carcinomas. We investigated molecular mechanisms underlying interactions between these two mediators and their possible roles in ovarian tumorigenesis. We identified two alternate PIK3CA promoters and showed direct binding of and transcriptional inhibition by p53 to one of these promoters. Conditional suppression of functional p53 increased p110alpha transcripts, protein levels and PI3K activity in immortalized, non-tumorigenic ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells, the precursors of ovarian carcinoma. Conversely, overexpression of p53 by adenoviral infection and activation of p53 by gamma-irradiation both diminished p110alpha protein levels in normal OSE and ovarian cancer cells. The demonstration that p53 binds directly to the PIK3CA promoter and inhibits its activity identifies a novel mechanism whereby these two mediators regulate cellular functions, and whereby inactivation of p53 and subsequent upregulation of PIK3CA might contribute to the pathophysiology of ovarian cancer.

  4. Frequent alteration of MDM2 and p53 in the molecular progression of recurring non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Nielsen, O; Pedersen, Niels Tinggaard

    2002-01-01

    -Hodgkin's lymphoma. METHODS AND RESULTS: We have analysed sequential biopsies from 42 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients immunohistochemically for p53 alterations (based on p53 and p21Waf1 expression), as well as for expression of MDM2, p27Kip1 and cyclin D3. Relapse of follicle centre lymphoma was associated with p53......-Hodgkin's lymphoma, as 2/5 (40%) diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and 3/9 (33%) T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with normal p53 at diagnosis showed p53 alterations at relapse. No indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma case showed MDM2 over-expression at diagnosis, whereas 4/5 (80%) transformed diffuse large B-cell lymphomas...... developed MDM2 over-expression. CONCLUSION: Our data are consistent with the notion that p53 alterations are important for the histological transformation of follicle centre lymphoma. However, the data also suggest that relapsing follicle centre lymphomas without overt transformation often have p53...

  5. Inter-relationship between microsatellite instability, thymidylate synthase expression, and p53 status in colorectal cancer: implications for chemoresistance

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    Wort Richard

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies indicate that thymidylate synthase (TS expression, p53 and mismatch repair status have potential to influence colorectal cancer (CRC outcome. There is, however, little data on the inter-relationship between these three markers. We sought to investigate whether relationships exist between these markers that might contribute to CRC phenotypes. Methods Four hundred and forty-one stage I-III CRCs were investigated. p53 status and TS expression were assessed by standard immunohistochemistry methods. Mismatch repair status was determined by assessment of microsatellite instability (MSI using radiolabelled microsatellite genotyping. Results 244 tumours (55% over-expressed p53, and 259 (58% expressed high TS levels. 65 tumours (15% had MSI. A significant relationship between p53 over-expression and high TS expression was observed (p = 0.01. This was independent of MSI status. A highly significant inverse relationship between MSI and p53 status was observed (p = 0.001. No relationship was seen between MSI status and TS expression (p = 0.59. Conclusion Relationships exist between p53 status and TS expression, and MSI and p53 status. These inter-relationships may contribute to the clinical phenotype of CRCs associated with each of the molecular markers. High TS expression is unlikely to account for the clinical behaviour of CRCs with MSI.

  6. Vaccination with p53 peptide-pulsed dendritic cells is associated with disease stabilization in patients with p53 expressing advanced breast cancer; monitoring of serum YKL-40 and IL-6 as response biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Pedersen, Anders E; Johansen, Julia S

    2007-01-01

    p53 Mutations are found in up to 30% of breast cancers and peptides derived from over-expressed p53 protein are presented by class I HLA molecules and may act as tumor-associated epitopes in cancer vaccines. A dendritic cell (DC) based p53 targeting vaccine was analyzed in HLA-A2+ patients...... with progressive advanced breast cancer. DCs were loaded with 3 wild-type and 3 P2 anchor modified HLA-A2 binding p53 peptides. Patients received up to 10 sc vaccinations with 5 x 10(6) p53-peptide loaded DC with 1-2 weeks interval. Concomitantly, 6 MIU/m(2) interleukine-2 was administered sc. Results from a phase...... attained stable disease (SD) or minor regression while 11/19 patients had progressive disease (PD), indicating an effect of p53-specific immune therapy. This was supported by: (1) a positive correlation between p53 expression of tumor and observed SD, (2) therapy induced p53 specific T cells in 4...

  7. The Proteasome Activator PA28γ, a Negative Regulator of p53, Is Transcriptionally Up-Regulated by p53

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    Zhen-Xing Wan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available PA28γ (also called REGγ, 11Sγ or PSME3 negatively regulates p53 activity by promoting its nuclear export and/or degradation. Here, using the RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE method, we identified the transcription start site of the PA28γ gene. Assessment with the luciferase assay demonstrated that the sequence −193 to +16 is the basal promoter. Three p53 binding sites were found within the PA28γ promoter utilizing a bioinformatics approach and were confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation and biotinylated DNA affinity precipitation experiments. The p53 protein promotes PA28γ transcription, and p53-stimulated transcription of PA28γ can be inhibited by PA28γ itself. Our results suggest that PA28γ and p53 form a negative feedback loop, which maintains the balance of p53 and PA28γ in cells.

  8. p53 autoantibodies, cytokine levels and ovarian carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai-Turton, Miyun; Santillan, Antonio; Lu, Dan; Bristow, Robert E; Chan, Kwun C; Shih, Ie-Ming; Roden, Richard B S

    2009-07-01

    To address the hypothesis that type II ovarian carcinoma, mutation of p53 and plasma levels of particular cytokines are associated with the generation of p53-specific serum autoantibody (AAb) responses in patients. Levels of CA125, 17 cytokines and AAbs to tumor-associated antigens including p53 were measured in plasma of 130 gynecologic tumor patients and 84 healthy controls. TP53 exons 4-9 were sequenced in tumor specimens. p53 AAbs are associated with high grade, but not low grade ovarian carcinoma. Seropositivity for p53 AAb occurred only in those ovarian carcinoma patients whose tumors contained mutated TP53, regardless of the exon targeted. Higher p53 AAb levels were detected in ovarian carcinoma patients who had higher stage disease, but p53 AAb levels were not correlated with CA125 levels. Among high-grade carcinoma patients, there was no relationship between p53 AAb seropositivity and seropositivity to other tumor-associated antigens tested, CA125 level or survival outcome. Both high and low grade ovarian carcinoma patients exhibited elevated levels of IL6, IL8 and IL10 as compared to healthy volunteers, although increased levels of IL5, MCP1, MIP1 and TNFalpha were associated only with high grade and advanced disease. Higher levels of p53AAb responses were correlated with elevated circulating IL4 and IL12, but reduced IL8 levels. Type II, but not type I, ovarian carcinoma patients had elevated serum levels of p53 AAb. P53 AAb is associated with mutation of TP53, higher plasma IL4 and IL12 but lower plasma IL8 levels and no survival advantage.

  9. Δ133p53 is an independent prognostic marker in p53 mutant advanced serous ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, G; Berger, A; Schuster, E; Wolf, A; Hager, G; Vergote, I; Cadron, I; Sehouli, J; Braicu, E I; Mahner, S; Speiser, P; Marth, C; Zeimet, A G; Ulmer, H; Zeillinger, R; Concin, N

    2011-01-01

    Background: We aimed to evaluate the clinical relevance of p53 and p73 isoforms that modulate the function of p53. Methods: This prospective multicentre study included 154 patients with stage III and IV serous ovarian cancer. A functional yeast-based assay and subsequent sequencing were performed to analyse the p53 mutational status. Expression of p53 and p73 isoforms was determined using RT–qPCR. Results: Δ133p53 expression constituted an independent prognostic marker for recurrence-free (hazard ratio=0.571, P=0.016, 95% CI: 0.362–0.899) and overall survival (hazard ratio=0.365, P=0.004, 95% CI: 0.182–0.731) in patients with p53 mutant ovarian cancer (n=121). High Δ40p53 expression was associated with favourable tumour grading (P=0.037) and improved recurrence-free survival (33.4 vs 19.6 months, P=0.029), but not overall survival (43.1 vs 33.6 months, P=0.139), in patients with p53 wild-type cancer (n=33). Neither the p53 mutational status nor p73 isoform expression possessed prognostic significance in the examined ovarian cancer cases. Conclusion: Δ133p53 expression was associated with prognosis in the vast majority of ovarian cancer cases, that is, patients with p53 mutant advanced serous carcinomas. Thus, our findings underline the importance of considering the complex p53 regulatory network. PMID:22009029

  10. Characterization of the p53 cistrome--DNA binding cooperativity dissects p53's tumor suppressor functions.

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    Katharina Schlereth

    Full Text Available p53 protects us from cancer by transcriptionally regulating tumor suppressive programs designed to either prevent the development or clonal expansion of malignant cells. How p53 selects target genes in the genome in a context- and tissue-specific manner remains largely obscure. There is growing evidence that the ability of p53 to bind DNA in a cooperative manner prominently influences target gene selection with activation of the apoptosis program being completely dependent on DNA binding cooperativity. Here, we used ChIP-seq to comprehensively profile the cistrome of p53 mutants with reduced or increased cooperativity. The analysis highlighted a particular relevance of cooperativity for extending the p53 cistrome to non-canonical binding sequences characterized by deletions, spacer insertions and base mismatches. Furthermore, it revealed a striking functional separation of the cistrome on the basis of cooperativity; with low cooperativity genes being significantly enriched for cell cycle and high cooperativity genes for apoptotic functions. Importantly, expression of high but not low cooperativity genes was correlated with superior survival in breast cancer patients. Interestingly, in contrast to most p53-activated genes, p53-repressed genes did not commonly contain p53 binding elements. Nevertheless, both the degree of gene activation and repression were cooperativity-dependent, suggesting that p53-mediated gene repression is largely indirect and mediated by cooperativity-dependently transactivated gene products such as CDKN1A, E2F7 and non-coding RNAs. Since both activation of apoptosis genes with non-canonical response elements and repression of pro-survival genes are crucial for p53's apoptotic activity, the cistrome analysis comprehensively explains why p53-induced apoptosis, but not cell cycle arrest, strongly depends on the intermolecular cooperation of p53 molecules as a possible safeguard mechanism protecting from accidental cell

  11. Enhancement of radiosensitivity of recombinant Ad-p53 gene on human lung adenocarcinoma cell with different p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang Dequan; Wang Peiguo; Wang Ping; Zhang Weiming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the enhancement of radiosensitivity of recombinant Ad-p53 gene on human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines(A549 and GLC-82) with different p53 status in vitro. Methods: Two human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines of A549 and GLC-82 were examined on their difference in p53 status with immunohistochemistry stain and PCR-SSCP technique. Expand Ad-wtp53 was transfected into tumor cells. Clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate the inhibition effect on cell growth and the degree of sensitization to irradiation. Apoptosis and cell cycle changes were determined using the flow cytometry assay. Results: The A549 cell line presented positive P53 expression while GLC-82 negative. GLC-82 bore mutant p53 on the exon 7. The wtp53 gene could be efficiently expressed in the two cell lines and greatly inhibit the cell growth. Its efficiency didn't depend on the intrinsic p53 genetic status. After irradiation, its function of inducing G 1 arrest and apoptosis on GLC-82 cell line was much stronger than the A549 cell line. In both the A549 and GLC-82 cell lines, the combination of Ad-p53 plus radiation resulted in more apoptosis than the others. There was no significant difference between two groups. Conclusions: Ad-p53 can depress the tumor growth and enhance the radiosensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma cells. And this effect is independent of endogenous p53 status. (authors)

  12. Hepatitis C Virus Indirectly Disrupts DNA Damage-Induced p53 Responses by Activating Protein Kinase R

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    Jonathan K. Mitchell

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Many DNA tumor viruses promote cellular transformation by inactivating the critically important tumor suppressor protein p53. In contrast, it is not known whether p53 function is disrupted by hepatitis C virus (HCV, a unique, oncogenic RNA virus that is the leading infectious cause of liver cancer in many regions of the world. Here we show that HCV-permissive, liver-derived HepG2 cells engineered to constitutively express microRNA-122 (HepG2/miR-122 cells have normal p53-mediated responses to DNA damage and that HCV replication in these cells potently suppresses p53 responses to etoposide, an inducer of DNA damage, or nutlin-3, an inhibitor of p53 degradation pathways. Upregulation of p53-dependent targets is consequently repressed within HCV-infected cells, with potential consequences for cell survival. Despite this, p53 function is not disrupted by overexpression of the complete HCV polyprotein, suggesting that altered p53 function may result from the host response to viral RNA replication intermediates. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9-mediated ablation of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR restored p53 responses while boosting HCV replication, showing that p53 inhibition results directly from viral activation of PKR. The hepatocellular abundance of phosphorylated PKR is elevated in HCV-infected chimpanzees, suggesting that PKR activation and consequent p53 inhibition accompany HCV infection in vivo. These findings reveal a feature of the host response to HCV infection that may contribute to hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

  13. Mdm2 is a novel activator of ApoCIII promoter which is antagonized by p53 and SHP inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yuxia [Departments of Medicine and Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Wang, Li, E-mail: l.wang@hsc.utah.edu [Departments of Medicine and Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mdm2 enhances HNF4{alpha} activation of the ApoCIII promoter via interaction with HNF4{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 antagonizes the effect of Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SHP strengthens p53 inhibition but abolishes Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mdm2 alters the enrichment of HNF4{alpha}, p53 and SHP to the ApoCIII promoter. -- Abstract: We examined the effect of Mdm2 on regulation of the ApoCIII promoter and its cross-talk with p53 and nuclear receptor SHP. Overexpression of Mdm2 markedly enhanced ApoCIII promoter activity by HNF4{alpha}. A direct association of Mdm2 protein with the HNF4{alpha} protein was observed by co-immunoprecipitation. Ectopic expression of p53 decreased HNF4{alpha} activation of the ApoCIII promoter and antagonized the effect of Mdm2. Co-expression of SHP further strengthened p53 inhibition and abolished Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Mdm2 inhibited p53-mediated enrichment of HNF4{alpha} to the ApoCIII promoter while simultaneously reducing p53 binding and increasing recruitment of SHP to the ApoCIII promoter. The results from this study implicate a potentially important function of Mdm2 in regulation of lipoprotein metabolism.

  14. Frequent alteration of MDM2 and p53 in the molecular progression of recurring non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Nielsen, O; Pedersen, Niels Tinggaard

    2002-01-01

    -Hodgkin's lymphoma. METHODS AND RESULTS: We have analysed sequential biopsies from 42 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients immunohistochemically for p53 alterations (based on p53 and p21Waf1 expression), as well as for expression of MDM2, p27Kip1 and cyclin D3. Relapse of follicle centre lymphoma was associated with p53...... alterations as 5/6 (83%) follicle centre lymphomas with normal p53 at diagnosis showed p53 alterations at relapse. Of these cases, three showed transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. p53 alteration was also associated with relapse of de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and T-cell non......-Hodgkin's lymphoma, as 2/5 (40%) diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and 3/9 (33%) T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with normal p53 at diagnosis showed p53 alterations at relapse. No indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma case showed MDM2 over-expression at diagnosis, whereas 4/5 (80%) transformed diffuse large B-cell lymphomas...

  15. Vaccines to Breast Cancer Based on p53 Mutants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ertl, Hildegund

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this proposal is to test vaccines expressing mouse mutant or wild-type p53 for induction of protective immunity against challenge with tumor cell lines expressing either mutant or high levels of wild-type p53...

  16. Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the role of endogenous nitric oxide (NO•) and influence of p53 status during apoptosis induced by a ... endogenous NO•, based on p53 status, and indicate manipulation of iNOS may offer exciting opportunities to improve the ..... agents, further research will be required to define more specifically the ...

  17. Chronology of p53 protein accumulation in gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craanen, M. E.; Blok, P.; Dekker, W.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    p53 Protein accumulation in early gastric carcinoma was studied in relation to the histological type (Lauren classification) and the type of growth pattern, including the chronology of p53 protein accumulation during carcinogenesis. Forty five, paraffin embedded gastrectomy specimens from early

  18. Involvement of p53-EGFR-ERK pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The tumour suppressor gene p53 is mutated in approximately 50% of the human cancers. p53 is involved in genotoxicstress-induced cellular responses. The role of EGFR and ERK in DNA-damage-induced apoptosis is well known. Weinvestigated the involvement of activation of ERK signalling as a consequence of ...

  19. Expression of P53 protein after exposure to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, A. M.; Salvador, C.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Ostrosky, P.; Brandan, M. E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the most important tumor suppressor genes is p53 gene, which is involved in apoptotic cell death, cell differentiation and cell cycle arrest. The expression of p53 gene can be evaluated by determining the presence of P53 protein in cells using Western Blot assay with a chemiluminescent method. This technique has shown variabilities that are due to biological factors. Film developing process can influence the quality of the p53 bands obtained. We irradiated tumor cell lines and human peripheral lymphocytes with 137Cs and 60Co gamma rays to standardize irradiation conditions, to compare ionizing radiation with actinomycin D and to reduce the observed variability of P53 protein induction levels. We found that increasing radiation doses increase P53 protein induction while it decreases viability. We also conclude that ionizing radiation could serve as a positive control for Western Blot analysis of protein P53. In addition, our results show that the developing process may play an important role in the quality of P53 protein bands and data interpretation.

  20. Narrowband image and the p53 protein immunoexpression in patients with ulcerative colitis and dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao González, Lissette

    2012-01-01

    Patients with pancolitis and long-standing ulcerative colitis are at increased risk of developing colorectal cancer, so it is advisable to colonoscopic surveillance. The objective of this study was to identify the endoscopic visualization system of imaging with narrowband and overexpression of the p53 protein as procedures useful for the research of Dysplasia in patients with ulcerative colitis and pancolitis, of eight or more years of evolution. A prospective, descriptive study was performed on 50 patients. The Fisher exact probability test was used for the statistical study and of square Chi, with a level of significance α = 0.05. Shown with narrow-band image increases the likelihood of finding suggestive areas of Dysplasia, reduces the amount of biopsy and gets a higher proportion of diagnoses of Dysplasia in fewer samples (70.4%). The overexpression of the p53 protein was associated with the presence of dysplasia (80.0%) p < 0.001 and is immunoexpress in samples with a high degree of severity of dysplasia and the low grade. Concluded that imaging with narrowband system and overexpression of the p53 protein are procedures useful for the research of Dysplasia in these patients. (author)

  1. p53 tumor suppressor gene: significance in neoplasia - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 17p13.1. Its function includes cell cycle control and apoptosis. Loss of p53 function, either due to decreased level or genetic transformation, is associated with loss of cell cycle control, decrease, apoptosis and genomic modification, such mutation of p53 gene is now assessed and the indicator of neoplasia of cancer of several organs and cell types, p53 has demonstrated to have critical role in defining various progressive stages of neoplasia, therapeutic strategies and clinical application. The present review briefly describes function of p53 in addition to its diagnostic and prognostic significance in detecting several types of neoplasia. (author)

  2. The Clinicopathologic Significance of p53 and BAF-250a (ARID1A) Expression in Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Endometrium

    OpenAIRE

    Fadare, Oluwole; Gwin, Katja; Desouki, Mohamed M.; Crispens, Marta A.; Jones, Howard W.; Khabele, Dineo; Liang, Sharon X.; Zheng, Wenxin; Mohammed, Khaled; Hecht, Jonathan L.; Parkash, Vinita

    2013-01-01

    TP53 mutation (and associated p53 protein overexpression) is probably a negative prognostic marker in endometrial cancers, but its relevance in the rarer histologic subtypes, including clear cell carcinomas, has not been delineated. Preclinical studies suggest functional interactions between p53 and the BAF250a protein, the product of a tumor suppressor gene ARID1A that is frequently mutated in ovarian clear cell carcinoma. In this study, we evaluated the significance of p53 and BAF250a expre...

  3. Phenolphthalein induces thymic lymphomas accompanied by loss of the p53 wild type allele in heterozygous p53-deficient (+/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, J K; Hardisty, J F; Herbert, R A; Seely, J C; Furedi-Machacek, E M; Foley, J F; Lacks, G D; Stasiewicz, S; French, J E

    1997-01-01

    Epidemiology studies have indicated that many human cancers are influenced by environmental factors. Genetically altered mouse model systems offer us the opportunity to study the interaction of chemicals with genetic predisposition to cancer. Using the heterozygous p53-deficient (+/-) mouse, an animal model carrying one wild type p53 gene and one p53 null allele, we studied the effects of phenolphthalein on tumor induction and p53 gene alterations. Earlier studies showed that phenolphthalein caused carcinogenic effects in Fisher 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice after a 2-yr dosing period (Dunnick and Hailey, Cancer Res. 56: 4922-4926, 1996). The p53 (+/-) mice received phenolphthalein in the feed at concentrations of 200, 375, 750, 3,000, or 12,000 ppm (approximately 43, 84, 174, 689, or 2,375 mg/kg body weight/day or 129, 252, 522, 2,867, or 7,128 mg/m2 body surface area/day) for up to 6 mo. A target organ cancer site that accumulated p53 protein in the B6C3F1 mouse (i.e., thymic lymphoma) was also a target site for cancer in the p53 (+/-) mouse. In the p53 (+/-) mouse, treatment-related atypical hyperplasia and malignant lymphoma of thymic origin were seen in the control and dosed groups at a combined incidence of 0, 5, 5, 25, 100, and 95%, respectively. Twenty-one of the thymic lymphomas were examined for p53 gene changes, and all showed loss of the p53 wild type allele. Chemical-induced ovarian tumors in the B6C3F1 mouse showed no evidence for p53 protein accumulation and did not occur in the p53 (+/-) mouse. The p53-deficient (+/-) mouse model responded to phenolphthalein treatment with a carcinogenic response in the thymus after only 4 mo of dosing. This carcinogenic response took 2 yr to develop in the conventional B6C3F1 mouse bioassay. The p53-deficient (+/-) mouse is an important model for identifying a carcinogenic response after short-term (phenolphthalein combined with a genetic predisposition to cancer can potentiate the carcinogenic process and cause p53

  4. p53-dependent and p53-independent anticancer activity of a new indole derivative in human osteosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappadone, C.; Stefanelli, C.; Malucelli, E.; Zini, M.; Onofrillo, C.; Locatelli, A.; Rambaldi, M.; Sargenti, A.; Merolle, L.; Farruggia, G.; Graziadio, A.; Montanaro, L.; Iotti, S.

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone, occurring most frequently in children and adolescents. The mechanism of formation and development of OS have been studied for a long time. Tumor suppressor pathway governed by p53 gene are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. Moreover, loss of wild-type p53 activity is thought to be a major predictor of failure to respond to chemotherapy in various human cancers. In previous studies, we described the activity of a new indole derivative, NSC743420, belonging to the tubulin inhibitors family, capable to induce apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle in the G2/M phase of various cancer cell lines. However, this molecule has never been tested on OS cell line. Here we address the activity of NSC743420 by examine whether differences in the p53 status could influence its effects on cell proliferation and death of OS cells. In particular, we compared the effect of the tested molecule on p53-wild type and p53-silenced U2OS cells, and on SaOS2 cell line, which is null for p53. Our results demonstrated that NSC743420 reduces OS cell proliferation by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. In particular, the molecule induces proliferative arrest that culminate to apoptosis in SaOS2 p53-null cells, while it brings a cytostatic and differentiating effect in U2OS cells, characterized by the cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and increased alkaline phosphatase activity. - Highlights: • The indole derivative NSC743420 induces antitumor effects on osteosarcoma cells. • p53 status could drive the activity of antitumor agents on osteosarcoma cells. • NSC743420 induces cytostatic and differentiating effects on U2OS cells. • NSC743420 causes apoptosis on p53-null SaOS2 cells.

  5. p53-dependent and p53-independent anticancer activity of a new indole derivative in human osteosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappadone, C., E-mail: concettina.cappadone@unibo.it [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Stefanelli, C. [Department for Life Quality Studies, University of Bologna, Rimini Campus, Rimini (Italy); Malucelli, E. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Zini, M. [Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Onofrillo, C. [Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Locatelli, A.; Rambaldi, M.; Sargenti, A. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Merolle, L. [ELETTRA–Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy); Farruggia, G. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, Roma (Italy); Graziadio, A. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Montanaro, L. [Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Iotti, S. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, Roma (Italy)

    2015-11-13

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone, occurring most frequently in children and adolescents. The mechanism of formation and development of OS have been studied for a long time. Tumor suppressor pathway governed by p53 gene are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. Moreover, loss of wild-type p53 activity is thought to be a major predictor of failure to respond to chemotherapy in various human cancers. In previous studies, we described the activity of a new indole derivative, NSC743420, belonging to the tubulin inhibitors family, capable to induce apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle in the G2/M phase of various cancer cell lines. However, this molecule has never been tested on OS cell line. Here we address the activity of NSC743420 by examine whether differences in the p53 status could influence its effects on cell proliferation and death of OS cells. In particular, we compared the effect of the tested molecule on p53-wild type and p53-silenced U2OS cells, and on SaOS2 cell line, which is null for p53. Our results demonstrated that NSC743420 reduces OS cell proliferation by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. In particular, the molecule induces proliferative arrest that culminate to apoptosis in SaOS2 p53-null cells, while it brings a cytostatic and differentiating effect in U2OS cells, characterized by the cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and increased alkaline phosphatase activity. - Highlights: • The indole derivative NSC743420 induces antitumor effects on osteosarcoma cells. • p53 status could drive the activity of antitumor agents on osteosarcoma cells. • NSC743420 induces cytostatic and differentiating effects on U2OS cells. • NSC743420 causes apoptosis on p53-null SaOS2 cells.

  6. p53 selectively regulates developmental apoptosis of rod photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Vuong

    Full Text Available Retinal cells become post-mitotic early during post-natal development. It is likely that p53, a well-known cell cycle regulator, is involved in regulating the genesis, differentiation and death of retinal cells. Furthermore, retinal cells are under constant oxidative stress that can result in DNA damage, due to the extremely high level of metabolic activity associated with phototransduction. If not repaired, this damage may result in p53-dependent cell death and ensuing vision loss. In this study, the role of p53 during retinal development and in the post-mitotic retina is investigated. A previously described super p53 transgenic mouse that expresses an extra copy of the mouse p53 gene driven by its endogenous promoter is utilized. Another transgenic mouse (HIP that expresses the p53 gene in rod and cone photoreceptors driven by the human interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein promoter was generated. The electroretinogram (ERG of the super p53 mouse exhibited reduced rod-driven scotopic a and b wave and cone-driven photopic b wave responses. This deficit resulted from a reduced number of rod photoreceptors and inner nuclear layer cells. However, the reduced photopic signal arose only from lost inner retinal neurons, as cone numbers did not change. Furthermore, cell loss was non-progressive and resulted from increased apoptosis during retinal developmental as determined by TUNEL staining. In contrast, the continuous and specific expression of p53 in rod and cone photoreceptors in the mature retinas of HIP mice led to the selective loss of both rods and cones. These findings strongly support a role for p53 in regulating developmental apoptosis in the retina and suggest a potential role, either direct or indirect, for p53 in the degenerative photoreceptor loss associated with human blinding disorders.

  7. Optimized p53 immunohistochemistry is an accurate predictor of TP53 mutation in ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbel, Martin; Piskorz, Anna M; Lee, Sandra; Lui, Shuhong; LePage, Cecile; Marass, Francesco; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Mes Masson, Anne-Marie; Brenton, James D

    2016-10-01

    TP53 mutations are ubiquitous in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOC), and the presence of TP53 mutation discriminates between high and low-grade serous carcinomas and is now an important biomarker for clinical trials targeting mutant p53. p53 immunohistochemistry (IHC) is widely used as a surrogate for TP53 mutation but its accuracy has not been established. The objective of this study was to test whether improved methods for p53 IHC could reliably predict TP53 mutations independently identified by next generation sequencing (NGS). Four clinical p53 IHC assays and tagged-amplicon NGS for TP53 were performed on 171 HGSOC and 80 endometrioid carcinomas (EC). p53 expression was scored as overexpression (OE), complete absence (CA), cytoplasmic (CY) or wild type (WT). p53 IHC was evaluated as a binary classifier where any abnormal staining predicted deleterious TP53 mutation and as a ternary classifier where OE, CA or WT staining predicted gain-of-function (GOF or nonsynonymous), loss-of-function (LOF including stopgain, indel, splicing) or no detectable TP53 mutations (NDM), respectively. Deleterious TP53 mutations were detected in 169/171 (99%) HGSOC and 7/80 (8.8%) EC. The overall accuracy for the best performing IHC assay for binary and ternary prediction was 0.94 and 0.91 respectively, which improved to 0.97 (sensitivity 0.96, specificity 1.00) and 0.95 after secondary analysis of discordant cases. The sensitivity for predicting LOF mutations was lower at 0.76 because p53 IHC detected mutant p53 protein in 13 HGSOC with LOF mutations. CY staining associated with LOF was seen in 4 (2.3%) of HGSOC. Optimized p53 IHC can approach 100% specificity for the presence of TP53 mutation and its high negative predictive value is clinically useful as it can exclude the possibility of a low-grade serous tumour. 4.1% of HGSOC cases have detectable WT staining while harboring a TP53 LOF mutation, which limits sensitivity for binary prediction of mutation to 96%.

  8. Expression of Egr1 and p53 in human carotid plaques and apoptosis induced by 7-oxysterol or p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Sayem; Zadeh, Shahram Nour Mohammad; Yuan, Xi-Ming; Li, Wei

    2013-07-01

    Egr-1 and p53 are involved in pathology of both atherosclerosis and cancer. However, it is unknown whether p53 and Egr1 are interactively involved in apoptosis in atherosclerosis. We found that in human carotid plaques, the expression of p53 was inversely correlated with Egr1. In U937 cells, 7β-hydroxycholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), transient up-regulation of Egr1 followed by late induction of p53 and apoptosis. Cells with nuclear fragmentation induced by 7-oxysterol or p53 showed increased levels of p53, but decreased levels of Egr1. In conclusion, ROS induced by 7-oxysterols may function as an early initiator of Egr1 expression. The late induced p53 by 7-oxysterols contributes to apoptotic cell death and is linked to the reduction of Egr1 levels, which resembles the differential expression of p53 and Egr1 in human atheroma progression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. A p53-bound enhancer region controls a long intergenic noncoding RNA required for p53 stress response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, C A; Léveillé, N; Rooijers, K; Wijchers, P J; Geeven, G; Tal, A; Melo, S A; de Laat, W; Agami, R

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide chromatin studies identified the tumor suppressor p53 as both a promoter and an enhancer-binding transcription factor. As an enhancer factor, p53 can induce local production of enhancer RNAs, as well as transcriptional activation of distal neighboring genes. Beyond the regulation of

  10. Energetic Landscape of MDM2-p53 Interactions by Computational Mutagenesis of the MDM2-p53 Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M Thayer

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin ligase MDM2, a principle regulator of the tumor suppressor p53, plays an integral role in regulating cellular levels of p53 and thus a prominent role in current cancer research. Computational analysis used MUMBO to rotamerize the MDM2-p53 crystal structure 1YCR to obtain an exhaustive search of point mutations, resulting in the calculation of the ΔΔG comprehensive energy landscape for the p53-bound regulator. The results herein have revealed a set of residues R65-E69 on MDM2 proximal to the p53 hydrophobic binding pocket that exhibited an energetic profile deviating significantly from similar residues elsewhere in the protein. In light of the continued search for novel competitive inhibitors for MDM2, we discuss possible implications of our findings on the drug discovery field.

  11. ZNF509S1 downregulates PUMA by inhibiting p53K382 acetylation and p53-DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Han, Dohyun; Kim, Min-Kyeong; Kim, Youngsoo; Choi, Seo-Hyun; Song, Jiyang; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Kim, Kunhong; Hur, Man-Wook

    2017-09-01

    Expression of the POK family protein ZNF509L, and -its S1 isoform, is induced by p53 upon exposure to genotoxic stress. Due to alternative splicing of the ZNF509 primary transcript, ZNF509S1 lacks the 6 zinc-fingers and C-terminus of ZNF509L, resulting in only one zinc-finger. ZNF509L and -S1 inhibit cell proliferation by activating p21/CDKN1A and RB transcription, respectively. When cells are exposed to severe DNA damage, p53 activates PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis) transcription. Interestingly, apoptosis due to transcriptional activation of PUMA by p53 is attenuated by ZNF509S1. Thus we investigated the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the transcriptional attenuation and anti-apoptotic effects of ZNF509S1. We show that ZNF509S1 modulation of p53 activity is important in PUMA gene transcription by modulating post-translational modification of p53 by p300. ZNF509S1 directly interacts with p53 and inhibits p300-mediated acetylation of p53 lysine K382, with deacetylation of p53 K382 leading to decreased DNA binding at the p53 response element 1 of the PUMA promoter. ZNF509S1 may play a role not only in cell cycle arrest, by activating RB expression, but also in rescuing cells from apoptotic death by repressing PUMA expression in cells exposed to severe DNA damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional interaction between DP-1 and p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, T S; Girling, R; Lee, C W; Gannon, J; Bandara, L R; La Thangue, N B

    1996-10-01

    The cellular transcription factor DRTF1/E2F and the tumor suppressor protein p53 play important roles in controlling early cell cycle events. DRTF1/E2F is believed to coordinate and integrate the transcription of cell cycle-regulating genes, for example, those involved in DNA synthesis, with the activity of regulatory proteins, such as the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene product (pRb), which modulate its transcriptional activity. In contrast, p53 is thought to monitor the integrity of chromosomal DNA and when appropriate interfere with cell cycle progression, for example, in response to DNA damage. Generic DRTF1/E2F DNA binding activity and transcriptional activation arise when members of two distinct families of proteins, such as DP-1 and E2F-1, interact as DP/E2F heterodimers. In many cell types, DP-1 is a widespread component of DRTF1/E2F DNA binding activity which when expressed at high levels oncogenically transforms embryonic fibroblasts. Here, we document an association between DP-1 and p53 and demonstrate its presence in mammalian cell extracts. In vitro p53 interacts with an immunochemically distinct form of DP-1 and in vivo can regulate transcription driven by the DP-1/E2F-1 heterodimer. At the biochemical level, p53 competes with E2F-1 for DP-1, with a consequent reduction in DNA binding activity. Mutational analysis defines within DP-1 a C-terminal region required for the interaction with p53 and within p53 an N-terminal region distinct from that required to bind to MDM2. Our results establish DRTF1/E2F as a common cellular target in growth control mediated through the activities of pRb and p53 and suggest an alternative mechanism through which p53 may regulate cellular proliferation.

  13. POSTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS OF P53: UPSTREAM SIGNALING PATHWAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2003-10-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is posttranslational modified at >20 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the upstream signaling pathways whose activation in response to various genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses result in p53 posttranslational modifications.

  14. P53 expression in prostatic cancer: an immunohistochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Nuaimy, W.M.; Al-Allaf, L.I.; Alnaimi, H.A.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and second leading cause of cancer death in the Western world. P53 alterations are the most frequent genetic changes in human cancers. Mutation of the p53 gene has been implicated in the development of >50% of all human cancer. The current study aims at evaluating the immuno-histochemical expression of p53 protein in patients with cancer of prostate, as prognostic parameter in correlation with other parameters including PSA receptors, and to correlate the results with those of other studies. (authors).

  15. p53 and survival in early onset breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentile, M; Bergman Jungeström, M; Olsen, K E

    1999-01-01

    The p53 protein has proven to be central in tumorigenesis by its cell cycle regulatory properties and both gene mutations and protein accumulation have been associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. The present study was undertaken to investigate the prognostic significance of gene mutations......, p53 protein accumulation and of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the TP53 locus in young (age ... (46%). Log rank analysis revealed no significant association between survival and TP53 mutations (in general), p53 protein accumulation or LOH. However, missense mutations localised to the zinc binding domain were significantly (P = 0.0007) associated with poorer prognosis. As indicated...

  16. Abrogation of Gli3 expression suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells via activation of p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Han Na; Oh, Sang Cheul; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoo, Young A.

    2012-01-01

    p53, the major human tumor suppressor, appears to be related to sonic hedgehog (Shh)–Gli-mediated tumorigenesis. However, the role of p53 in tumor progression by the Shh–Gli signaling pathway is poorly understood. Herein we investigated the critical regulation of Gli3–p53 in tumorigenesis of colon cancer cells and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the mRNA level of Shh and Gli3 in colon tumor tissues was significantly higher than corresponding normal tissues (P < 0.001). The inhibition of Gli3 by treatment with Gli3 siRNA resulted in a clear decrease in cell proliferation and enhanced the level of expression of p53 proteins compared to treatment with control siRNA. The half-life of p53 was dramatically increased by treatment with Gli3 siRNA. In addition, treatment with MG132 blocked MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation, and led to accumulation of p53 in Gli3 siRNA-overexpressing cells. Importantly, ectopic expression of p53 siRNA reduced the ability of Gli3 siRNA to suppress proliferation of those cells compared with the cells treated with Gli3 siRNA alone. Moreover, Gli3 siRNA sensitized colon cancer cells to treatment with anti-cancer agents (5-FU and bevacizumab). Taken together, our studies demonstrate that loss of Gli3 signaling leads to disruption of the MDM2–p53 interaction and strongly potentiate p53-dependent cell growth inhibition in colon cancer cells, indicating a basis for the rational use of Gli3 antagonists as a novel treatment option for colon cancer.

  17. SIRT3 deacetylates and promotes degradation of P53 in PTEN-defective non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanlu; Wang, Lei; Wang, Shan; Wang, Mingxing; Zhao, Jinbo; Zhang, Zhipei; Li, Xiaofei; Jia, Lintao; Han, Yong

    2018-02-01

    In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), success of targeted therapy has promoted researches explicitly orientated based on genetic background. Although PTEN deficiency is common in NSCLC, carcinogenesis about such genetic type has not been fully explored. Here, we have found that classical tumor suppressor P53 could be modulated by deacetylase sirtuin-3 (SIRT3) depending on the PTEN condition in NSCLC, which may be a novel breakpoint for handling PTEN deficiency NSCLC. First, we examined SIRT3 and P53 expression files in PTEN-deficient NSCLC clinical samples and investigated their correlation. Second, we built SIRT3 high or low expression models in different PTEN conditions by plasmid overexpression or si-RNA interference in NSCLC cell lines and explored the effect of SIRT3 upon P53. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of SIRT3 upon the ubiquitin-proteasome dependent degradation pathway of P53 in PTEN-deficient NSCLC cell lines. Finally, we probed into the deacetylation modification of P53 via SIRT3. We found that SIRT3 expression was strongly positive and P53 expression was almost negative in PTEN-deficient NSCLC clinical samples. Further, we demonstrated that SIRT3 promoted degradation of P53 in PTEN-deficient NSCLC cell lines via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Finally, we demonstrated that SIRT3 could deacetylate P53 at lysines 320 and 382, which may account for the observed degradation of P53 in PTEN-deficient tumor cells. We have identified a novel mechanism by which P53 was inactivated via SIRT3 in PTEN-deficient cells. This may shed light on the mechanisms underlying the malignancy of PTEN-deficient NSCLC.

  18. Abrogation of Gli3 expression suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells via activation of p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Han Na [Graduate School of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sang Cheul; Kim, Jun Suk [Division of Oncology/Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young A., E-mail: ydanbi@korea.ac.kr [Brain Korea 21 Program for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-10

    p53, the major human tumor suppressor, appears to be related to sonic hedgehog (Shh)-Gli-mediated tumorigenesis. However, the role of p53 in tumor progression by the Shh-Gli signaling pathway is poorly understood. Herein we investigated the critical regulation of Gli3-p53 in tumorigenesis of colon cancer cells and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the mRNA level of Shh and Gli3 in colon tumor tissues was significantly higher than corresponding normal tissues (P < 0.001). The inhibition of Gli3 by treatment with Gli3 siRNA resulted in a clear decrease in cell proliferation and enhanced the level of expression of p53 proteins compared to treatment with control siRNA. The half-life of p53 was dramatically increased by treatment with Gli3 siRNA. In addition, treatment with MG132 blocked MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation, and led to accumulation of p53 in Gli3 siRNA-overexpressing cells. Importantly, ectopic expression of p53 siRNA reduced the ability of Gli3 siRNA to suppress proliferation of those cells compared with the cells treated with Gli3 siRNA alone. Moreover, Gli3 siRNA sensitized colon cancer cells to treatment with anti-cancer agents (5-FU and bevacizumab). Taken together, our studies demonstrate that loss of Gli3 signaling leads to disruption of the MDM2-p53 interaction and strongly potentiate p53-dependent cell growth inhibition in colon cancer cells, indicating a basis for the rational use of Gli3 antagonists as a novel treatment option for colon cancer.

  19. Alterations in p53-specific T cells and other lymphocyte subsets in breast cancer patients during vaccination with p53-peptide loaded dendritic cells and low-dose interleukin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Pedersen, Anders E; Nikolajsen, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    We have previously established a cancer vaccine using autologous DCs, generated by in vitro stimulation with IL-4 and GM-CSF, and pulsed with six HLA-A*0201 binding wild-type p53 derived peptides. This vaccine was used in combination with low-dose interleukin-2 in a recently published clinical...... Phase II trial where 26 HLA-A2+ patients with progressive late-stage metastatic breast cancer (BC) were included. Almost 1/3rd of the patients obtained stable disease or minor regression during treatment with a positive correlation to tumour over-expression of p53. In the present study, we performed...... a comprehensive analysis of the effector stage of the p53-specific CD8+ T cells by the use of Dextramer Technology and multicolour FACS. Pre- and post-treatment blood samples from eight BC patients were analysed. Independent of clinical outcome p53-specific T cells were phenotypic distinctly antigen experienced...

  20. Clinical significance of altered nm23-H1, EGFR, RB and p53 expression in bilharzial bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaled, Hussein M; Bahnassy, Abeer A; Raafat, Amira A; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N; Madboul, Maha S; Mokhtar, Nadia M

    2009-01-01

    Clinical characterization of bladder carcinomas is still inadequate using the standard clinico-pathological prognostic markers. We assessed the correlation between nm23-H1, Rb, EGFR and p53 in relation to the clinical outcome of patients with muscle invasive bilharzial bladder cancer (MI-BBC). nm23-H1, Rb, EGFR and p53 expression was assessed in 59 MI-BBC patients using immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription (RT-PCR) and was correlated to the standard clinico-pathological prognostic factors, patient's outcome and the overall survival (OS) rate. Overexpression of EGFR and p53 proteins was detected in 66.1% and 35.6%; respectively. Loss of nm23-H1and Rb proteins was detected in 42.4% and 57.6%; respectively. Increased EGFR and loss of nm23-H1 RNA were detected in 61.5% and 36.5%; respectively. There was a statistically significant correlation between p53 and EGFR overexpression (p < 0.0001), nm23 loss (protein and RNA), lymph node status (p < 0.0001); between the incidence of local recurrence and EGFR RNA overexpression (p= 0.003) as well as between the incidence of metastasis and altered Rb expression (p = 0.026), p53 overexpression (p < 0.0001) and mutation (p = 0.04). Advanced disease stage correlated significantly with increased EGFR (protein and RNA) (p = 0.003 & 0.01), reduced nm23-H1 RNA (p = 0.02), altered Rb (p = 0.023), and p53 overexpression (p = 0.004). OS rates correlated significantly, in univariate analysis, with p53 overexpression (p = 0.011), increased EGFR (protein and RNA, p = 0.034&0.031), nm23-H1 RNA loss (p = 0.021) and aberrations of ≥ 2 genes. However, multivariate analysis showed that only high EGFR overexpression, metastatic recurrence, high tumor grade and the combination of ≥ 2 affected markers were independent prognostic factors. nm23-H1, EGFR and p53 could be used as prognostic biomarkers in MI-BBC patients. In addition to the standard pathological prognostic factors, a combination of these markers (≥ 2) has

  1. p53 mutations and codon 213 polymorphism of p53 in lung cancers of former uranium miners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, W; Vahrenholz, C; Schuster, H; Wiesner, B; Bauer, P; Täuscher, F; Plogmann, H; Morgenroth, K; Konietzko, N; Norpoth, K

    1999-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of G-->T transversions of p53 in lung cancers of smokers. One study has reported a special "hotspot" mutation at codon 249 of p53 in lung cancers of former uranium miners. The aim of our study was to look for mutational spectra of p53 in former German uranium miners with lung cancers. We investigated 16 patients with lung cancer who had worked as uranium miners in Germany and 13 lung cancer patients without a mining history of the same region. By means of the polymerase chain reaction and sequencing we looked for mutations in exons 5 7 of the p53 gene. We could not find any suggestion of hotspot mutations. The only G-->T mutation in former uranium miners was detected in the only nonsmoker. In 3 patients (19% of the total) we found a codon 213/3 polymorphism. The results indicate that G-->T transversions do not seem to be very common mutations in p53 in lung cancers probably caused by radiation. Therefore, p53 may be mutated early in lung cancer development if radiation exposure is a critical factor in carcinogenesis. In accordance with studies of thyroid cancer patients in the Chernobyl region, our results may indicate an overrepresentation of codon 213/3 polymorphism in p53 in radiation-caused cancers.

  2. Limited role of murine ATM in oncogene-induced senescence and p53-dependent tumor suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejo Efeyan

    Full Text Available Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability.

  3. A dynamic P53-MDM2 model with time delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalas, Gh.I. [Department of Biophysics and Medical Informatics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Piata Eftimie Murgu, nr. 3, 300041 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: mihalas@medinfo.umft.ro; Neamtu, M. [Department of Forecasting, Economic Analysis, Mathematics and Statistics, West University of Timisoara, Str. Pestalozzi, nr. 14A, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: mihaela.neamtu@fse.uvt.ro; Opris, D. [Department of Applied Mathematics, West University of Timisoara, Bd. V. Parvan, nr. 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: opris@math.uvt.ro; Horhat, R.F. [Department of Biophysics and Medical Informatics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Piata Eftimie Murgu, nr. 3, 300041 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: rhorhat@yahoo.com

    2006-11-15

    Specific activator and repressor transcription factors which bind to specific regulator DNA sequences, play an important role in gene activity control. Interactions between genes coding such transcription factors should explain the different stable or sometimes oscillatory gene activities characteristic for different tissues. Starting with the model P53-MDM2 described into [Mihalas GI, Simon Z, Balea G, Popa E. Possible oscillatory behaviour in P53-MDM2 interaction computer simulation. J Biol Syst 2000;8(1):21-9] and the process described into [Kohn KW, Pommier Y. Molecular interaction map of P53 and MDM2 logic elements, which control the off-on switch of P53 in response to DNA damage. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2005;331:816-27] we enveloped a new model of this interaction. Choosing the delay as a bifurcation parameter we study the direction and stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions. Some numerical examples are finally given for justifying the theoretical results.

  4. p53 and disease: when the guardian angel fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royds, J A; Iacopetta, B

    2006-06-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene (TP53) is mutated more often in human cancers than any other gene yet reported. Of importance, it is mutated frequently in the common human malignancies of the breast and colorectum and also, but less frequently, in other significant human cancers such as glioblastomas. There is also one inherited cancer predisposing syndrome called Li-Fraumeni that is caused by TP53 mutations. In this review, we discuss the significance of p53 mutations in some of the above tumors with a view to outlining how p53 contributes to malignant progression. We also discuss the usefulness of TP53 status as a prognostic marker and its role as a predictor of response to therapy. Finally, we outline some evidence that abnormalities in p53 function contribute to the etiology of other non-neoplastic diseases.

  5. p53-dependent delayed effects of radiation vary according to time of irradiation of p53 + / - mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that in p53 (+ / -) mice that had been given a whole-body dose of 3 Gy at 8 weeks of age, p53-dependent delayed effects of radiation, as manifested in T-cell receptor (TCR) variant fractions (VF) instability in mouse splenocytes, were biphasic, namely, induction of TCR-VF mutation reappeared at 44 weeks. The manifestation of the delayed effects and the measures of biological markers varied according to the timing of irradiation. We also reported that the decrease in function of the p53 gene was related to the effects of a delayed mutation. In the present study, we investigated the functions and mutations of the p53 gene in old age for p53 (+ / -) mice following irradiation at various ages. p53 (+ / -) mice were given a whole-body dose of 3 Gy at 8, 28 or 40 weeks of age. There were significant differences for all variables tested at 8 weeks of age. This was similarly the case for mice irradiated at 28 weeks of age, in which there were also significant differences in TCR VF and the percentage of apoptosis. In mice irradiated at 40 weeks of age, there were significant differences for all considered variables except for the p53 allele. We demonstrated that the different patterns of delayed mutation of the p53 gene at 56 weeks of age depended on the age at which mice had undergone 3-Gy whole-body irradiation. Our conclusions are limited to variation in p53-dependent delayed effects according to the time of irradiation.

  6. Cadherin-6 type 2, K-cadherin (CDH6) is regulated by mutant p53 in the fallopian tube but is not expressed in the ovarian surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Subbulakshmi; Lantvit, Daniel D; Chae, Dam Hee; Burdette, Joanna E

    2016-10-25

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy and may arise in either the fallopian tube epithelium (FTE) or ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). A mutation in p53 is reported in 96% of HGSOC, most frequently at R273 and R248. The goal of this study was to identify specific gene targets in the FTE that are altered by mutant p53, but not in the OSE. Gene analysis revealed that both R273 and R248 mutant p53 reduces CDH6 expression in the oviduct, but CDH6 was not detected in murine OSE cells. p53R273H induced SLUG and FOXM1 while p53R248W did not induce SLUG and only modestly increased FOXM1, which correlated with less migration as compared to p53R273H. An oviduct specific PAX8Cre/+/p53R270H/+ mouse model was created and confirmed that in vivo mutant p53 repressed CDH6 but was not sufficient to stabilize p53 expression alone. Overexpression of mutant p53 in the p53 null OVCAR5 cells decreased CDH6 levels indicating this was a gain-of-function. SLUG knockdown in murine oviductal cells with p53R273H restored CDH6 repression and a ChIP analysis revealed direct binding of mutant p53 on the CDH6 promoter. NSC59984, a small molecule that degrades mutant p53R273H, rescued CDH6 expression. In summary, CDH6 is expressed in the oviduct, but not the ovary, and is repressed by mutant p53. CDH6 expression with further validations may aide in establishing markers that inform upon the cell of origin of high grade serous tumors.

  7. Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    killing ovarian cancer cells in vitro. This is unreported, novel finding paves the way for using super p53 for ovarian cancer treatment. Main...This is unreported, novel finding paves the way for using super p53 for ovarian cancer treatment. Main activities and objectives completed to date...What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?  Now that the basic groundwork for the experimental assays has

  8. Structural effects and competition mechanisms targeting the interactions between p53 and MDM2 for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Xia; Geng, Yi-Zhao; Yan, Shi-Wei

    2017-06-01

    Approximately half of all human cancers show normal TP53 gene expression but aberrant overexpression of MDM2 and/or MDMX. This fact suggests a promising cancer therapeutic strategy in targeting the interactions between p53 and MDM2/MDMX. To help realize the goal of developing effective inhibitors to disrupt the p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction, we systematically investigated the structural and interaction characteristics of p53 with inhibitors of its interactions with MDM2 and MDMX from an atomistic perspective using stochastic molecular dynamics simulations. We found that some specific α helices in the structures of MDM2 and MDMX play key roles in their binding to inhibitors, and that the hydrogen bond formed by the Trp23 residue of p53 with its counterpart in MDM2 or MDMX determines the dynamic competition processes of the disruption of the MDM2-p53 interaction and replacement of p53 from the MDM2-p53 complex in vivo. The results reported in this paper are expected to provide basic information for designing functional inhibitors and realizing new strategies of cancer gene therapy.

  9. Ameloblastic carcinoma developing in preexisting ameloblastoma with a mutation of the p53 gene: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobusawa, Aiko; Sano, Takaaki; Yokoo, Satoshi; Oyama, Tetsunari

    2014-11-01

    Ameloblastic carcinoma is a rare malignant odontogenic tumor. Here we present a case of a large ameloblastic carcinoma, which developed in a preexisting ameloblastoma in the right submandibular region. The patient was an 84-year-old woman who had received several surgical procedures for ameloblastoma, including a segmental mandibulectomy. The dimensions of the tumor were 12 × 8 × 5 cm, and both benign ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma were observed histologically. Based on histologic diagnosis, immunohistochemical staining and sequence analysis for p53 were performed. Overexpression of p53 was observed only in the ameloblastic carcinoma. Additionally, a mutation of the p53 gene (TP53) in exon 5 was found by sequence analysis in the ameloblastic carcinoma. This is the first case of ameloblastic carcinoma with a mutation of the p53 gene that has been associated with carcinomatous transformation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. HPV and p53 expression in epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuscu, E; Ozdemir, B H; Erkanli, S; Haberal, A

    2005-01-01

    Human papillomavirus is the causal factor for cervical cancer. However, the role of HPV infection in ovarian cancer is unclear. This study aimed to determine the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in ovarian cancer tissues along with the expression of tumor suppressor gene p53. We also investigated any possible association of HPV with p53 gene mutations in ovarian carcinoma. Archived human ovarian cancer tissues (n = 40 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer) embedded in paraffin blocks were used. Controls were 32 non-malignant ovarian tumor tissue blocks. In situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to detect the presence of HPV and p53 expression, respectively. Of the total, 37.5% (n = 15) of malignant and 28.1% (n = 9) of benign ovarian tumors were positive for HPV (OR: 1.5 CI: 0.5-4.1, p = 0.4). The difference was not statistically significant. However, p53 was detected in 72.5% (n = 29) of malignant cases compared to 37.5% (n = 12) of benign cases (OR: 4.3 CI: 1.6-11.9, p = 0.003). Furthermore, a positive correlation between HPV and p53 expressions in ovarian cancer tissue samples was detected (r = 0.47, p = 0.001). HPV does not seem to be a major component in the development of ovarian carcinoma, nevertheless HPV positivity seems to contribute to the pathogenesis in at least some ovarian carcinoma cases by way of interaction with tumor suppressor p53.

  11. The p53 Transcriptional Network Influences Microglia Behavior and Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloi, Macarena S; Su, Wei; Garden, Gwenn A

    2015-01-01

    The tumor-suppressor protein p53 belongs to a family of proteins that play pivotal roles in multiple cellular functions including cell proliferation, cell death, genome stability, and regulation of inflammation. Neuroinflammation is a common feature of central nervous system (CNS) pathology, and microglia are the specialized resident population of CNS myeloid cells that initiate innate immune responses. Microglia maintain CNS homeostasis through pathogen containment, phagocytosis of debris, and initiation of tissue-repair cascades. However, an unregulated pro-inflammatory response can lead to tissue injury and dysfunction in both acute and chronic inflammatory states. Therefore, regulation of the molecular signals that control the induction, magnitude, and resolution of inflammation are necessary for optimal CNS health. We and others have described a novel mechanism by which p53 transcriptional activity modulates microglia behaviors in vitro and in vivo. Activation of p53 induces expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) that support microglia pro-inflammatory functions and suppress anti-inflammatory and tissue repair behaviors. In this review, we introduce the previously described roles of the p53 signaling network and discuss novel functions of p53 in the microglia-mediated inflammatory response in CNS health and disease. Ultimately, improved understanding of the molecular regulators modulated by p53 transcriptional activity in microglia will enhance the development of rational therapeutic strategies to harness the homeostatic and tissue repair functions of microglia.

  12. p53 gene analysis in childhood B non - Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudete Esteves Nogueira Pinto Klumb

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Mutations or deletions in the tumor-suppressor gene p53 are among the commonest genetic changes found in human neoplasms including breast, lung and bowel cancers. In hematological malignancies, p53 is most often mutated in Burkitt's lymphoma, with p53 mutations present in 30 to 40% of tumor samples and in 70% of cell lines. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the p53 gene alterations in child patients with B non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. DESIGN: Descriptive study. SETTING: Tertiary oncology care center. PARTICIPANTS: The study investigated 12 patients with childhood B non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Burkitt's lymphoma. Screening for p53 mutations was done by polymerase chain reaction - single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP analysis of exon 5 to 8/9 of the gene. RESULTS: Abnormal polymerase chain reaction - single strand conformational polymorphism migration pattern was observed in 4 patients (33.3%, one on exon 6 and three on exon 7. Positive cases included 2 patients who died from disease. CONCLUSION: These preliminary results suggest that p53 mutations are quite frequent in children with Burkitt's lymphoma and may play a role in lymphoma genesis or disease progression.

  13. Thymocyte apoptosis induced by p53-dependent and independent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, A.R.; Purdie, C.A.; Harrison, D.J.; Morris, R.G.; Bird, C.C.; Hooper, M.L.; Wyllie, A.H. (Edinburgh Univ. Medical School (United Kingdom). Dept. of Pathology)

    1993-04-29

    The authors studied the dependence of apoptosis on p53 expression in cells from the thymus cortex. Short-term thymocyte cultures were prepared from mice constitutively heterozygous or homozygous for a deletion in the p53 gene introduced into the germ line after gene targeting. Wild-type thymocytes readily undergo apoptosis after treatment with ionizing radiation, the glucocorticoid methylprednisolone, or etoposide (an inhibitor of topoisomerase II), or after Ca[sup 2+]-dependent activation by phorbol ester and a calcium ionophore. In contrast, homozygous null p53 thymocytes are resistant to induction of apoptosis by radiation or etoposide, but retain normal sensitivity to glucocorticoid and calcium. The time- dependent apoptosis that occurs in untreated cultures is unaffected by p53 status. Cells heterozygous for p53 deletion are partially resistant to radiation and etoposide. Results show that p53 exerts a significant and dose-dependent effect in the initiation of apoptosis, but only when it is induced by agents that cause DNA-strand breakage. (Author).

  14. p53 and Ceramide as Collaborators in the Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan Dbaibo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The sphingolipid ceramide mediates various cellular processes in response to several extracellular stimuli. Some genotoxic stresses are able to induce p53-dependent ceramide accumulation leading to cell death. However, in other cases, in the absence of the tumor suppressor protein p53, apoptosis proceeds partly due to the activity of this “tumor suppressor lipid”, ceramide. In the current review, we describe ceramide and its roles in signaling pathways such as cell cycle arrest, hypoxia, hyperoxia, cell death, and cancer. In a specific manner, we are elaborating on the role of ceramide in mitochondrial apoptotic cell death signaling. Furthermore, after highlighting the role and mechanism of action of p53 in apoptosis, we review the association of ceramide and p53 with respect to apoptosis. Strikingly, the hypothesis for a direct interaction between ceramide and p53 is less favored. Recent data suggest that ceramide can act either upstream or downstream of p53 protein through posttranscriptional regulation or through many potential mediators, respectively.

  15. miR-122 regulates p53/Akt signalling and the chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfè, Valentina; Biskup, Edyta; Rosbjerg, Anne

    2012-01-01

    R-122 was expressed in the malignant T-cell infiltrate and increased in the advanced stage mycosis fungoides. Surprisingly, miR-122 overexpression decreased the sensitivity to the chemotherapy-induced apoptosis via a signaling circuit involving the activation of Akt and inhibition of p53. We have also...... shown that induction of miR-122 occurred via p53 and that p53 post-transcriptionally up-regulated miR-122. miR-122 is thus an amplifier of the antiapoptotic Akt/p53 circuit and it is conceivable that a pharmacological intervention in this pathway may provide basis for novel therapies for CTCL....

  16. p53-Dependent radiation-induced apoptosis in vivo: relationship to Bcl-2 and Bax expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Furuta, Masaya; Yamakawa, Michitaka; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Saito, Yoshihiro; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Niibe, Hideo

    1997-01-01

    , but negative for p21 and Bax. They did not show significant differences between before and after irradiation. These three tumors often showed very weak staining for Bax, and it was much weaker than in the positive control slides. PCR-SSCP analysis showed a mutation in exon 7 of the p53 gene in the glioblastoma and the small cell lung cancer, but, no mutations were demonstrated in exons of the p53 gene in the ependymoblastoma. Conclusion: The radiation-induced apoptosis in the ependymoblastoma was highly correlated with p53 protein expression, but, the changes in Bcl-2 and Bax expression did not always correspond to the frequency of apoptosis. In the other two tumors, radiation induced apoptosis in only a few cells. These tumors showed overexpression of p53 and Bcl-2, and a mutation of p53 gene was also suggested by PCR-SSCP analysis

  17. Susceptibility to Radiation Induced Apoptosis and Senescence in p53 Wild Type and p53 Mutant Breast Tumor Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeMasters, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    .... The current studies address the basis for this interaction by evaluating DNA damage and repair, the impact of interference with reactive oxygen generation, the involvement of p53 and caspase 3...

  18. p300 and p53 levels determine activation of HIF-1 downstream targets in invasive breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleugel, M.M.; Shvarts, D.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2006-01-01

    In previous studies, we noted that overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)–1a in breast cancer, especially the diffuse form, does not always lead to functional activation of its downstream genes. Transcriptional activity of HIF-1 may be repressed by p53 through competition

  19. Ovarian serous carcinoma: relationship of p53 and bcl-2 with tumor angiogenesis and VEGF expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasta, Julian A; Mishra, Suniti; Vallikad, Elizabeth

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in ovarian serous carcinoma and to examine their relation with apoptosis.Paraffin-embedded specimens of 41 cases of ovarian serous carcinomas were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for VEGF, p53, and bcl-2 expression. MVD was assessed with CD31 staining. We investigated the association of tumor angiogenesis (MVD and VEGF) with clinicopathologic factors, p53 overexpression, and bcl-2 expression.There was a significant correlation between high MVD and suboptimal debulking and advanced stage disease. A significant negative correlation was expressed between bcl-2 and VEGF expression. In univariate analysis, only stage had a significant impact on disease-free survival.The results of this study suggest that higher degree of angiogenesis is associated with suboptimal debulking and advanced-stage disease. Expression of VEGF had negative association with VEGF expression.

  20. R248Q mutation--Beyond p53-DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jeremy W K; Lama, Dilraj; Lukman, Suryani; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S; Sim, Adelene Y L

    2015-12-01

    R248 in the DNA binding domain (DBD) of p53 interacts directly with the minor groove of DNA. Earlier nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies indicated that the R248Q mutation resulted in conformation changes in parts of DBD far from the mutation site. However, how information propagates from the mutation site to the rest of the DBD is still not well understood. We performed a series of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to dissect sterics and charge effects of R248 on p53-DBD conformation: (i) wild-type p53 DBD; (ii) p53 DBD with an electrically neutral arginine side-chain; (iii) p53 DBD with R248A; (iv) p53 DBD with R248W; and (v) p53 DBD with R248Q. Our results agree well with experimental observations of global conformational changes induced by the R248Q mutation. Our simulations suggest that both charge- and sterics are important in the dynamics of the loop (L3) where the mutation resides. We show that helix 2 (H2) dynamics is altered as a result of a change in the hydrogen bonding partner of D281. In turn, neighboring L1 dynamics is altered: in mutants, L1 predominantly adopts the recessed conformation and is unable to interact with the major groove of DNA. We focused our attention the R248Q mutant that is commonly found in a wide range of cancer and observed changes at the zinc-binding pocket that might account for the dominant negative effects of R248Q. Furthermore, in our simulations, the S6/S7 turn was more frequently solvent exposed in R248Q, suggesting that there is a greater tendency of R248Q to partially unfold and possibly lead to an increased aggregation propensity. Finally, based on the observations made in our simulations, we propose strategies for the rescue of R248Q mutants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. p16 and p53 in HPV-positive versus HPV-negative oral squamous cell carcinoma: do pathways differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vineeta; Husain, Nuzhat; Akhtar, Naseem; Khan, Mohammad Yahia; Sonkar, Abhinav A; Kumar, Vijay

    2017-10-01

    p16 overexpression and wild-type p53 expression are associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) in cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. Role of HPV-related carcinogenesis in the etiology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is still vague in Indian population. We aimed to explore the expression pattern of p16 and p53 in HPV-positive and HPV-negative OSCC to elicit differences, if any. Further their effect on survival of patients was studied. Thirty-one consecutive HPV-positive as well as 31 age and sex-matched HPV-negative OSCC cases from a case series of 369 histologically diagnosed cases of OSCC were included in this study. HPV was detected by two methods, viz. real-time PCR and conventional PCR in biopsy samples. p16 and p53 protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and p16 mRNA expression was quantified with real-time PCR using SYBR Green assay. p16 was expressed in six (19.4%) HPV-positive and in four (12.9%) HPV-negative cases. Overall mutant-type p53 expression in 62 OSCC cases was 54.8%. Out of ten p16-positive cases, eight expressed mutant-type p53 and only two cases expressed wild-type p53. Risk factors including oral tobacco consumption and alcohol were present in all these ten p16-positive cases. Survival of patients was not affected by HPV, p16 and p53 status. Presence of mutant-type p53 and exposure to tobacco-related risk factors in both HPV-positive and negative cases suggest existence of p53-related carcinogenesis in HPV-positive cases in Indian population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in granulosa cells involves JNK, p53 and Puma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongyan; Xie, Yan; Yang, Dongyu; Ren, Decheng

    2017-04-11

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in follicular development and survival. Granulosa cell death is associated with increased ROS, but the mechanism of granulosa cell death induced by ROS is not clear. In order to define the molecular link between ROS and granulosa cell death, COV434, human granulosa tumor cells, were treated with H2O2. Compared to control cells, H2O2 induced granulosa cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. H2O2 induced an increase in Bax, Bak and Puma, and a decrease in anti-apoptotic molecules such as Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Both knockdown of Puma and overexpression of Bcl-xL could inhibit H2O2-induced granulosa cell death. These results suggest that suppression of Puma and overexpression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members could improve granulosa cell survival. To explore the mechanisms responsible for these findings, ROS in granulosa cells treatment with H2O2 were measured. The results showed that ROS was increased in a H2O2 dose- and time-dependent manner at the earlier time point. In addition, H2O2 induced an increase in Nrf2 and phosphorylation of JNK and p53. SP600125, an inhibitor of JNK, inhibits H2O2-induced phosphorylation of JNK and p53, and granulosa cell death. Antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) dose-dependently prevents H2O2-induced granulosa cell death. Furthermore, NAC also prevents phosphorylation of JNK and p53 induced by H2O2. Taken together, these data suggest that H2O2 regulates cell death in granulosa cells via the ROS-JNK-p53 pathway. These findings provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms underlying granulosa cell apoptosis, which could potentially be useful for future clinical applications.

  3. Distinguishing Low-Risk Luminal A Breast Cancer Subtypes with Ki-67 and p53 Is More Predictive of Long-Term Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Kyung Lee

    Full Text Available Overexpression of p53 is the most frequent genetic alteration in breast cancer. Recently, many studies have shown that the expression of mutant p53 differs for each subtype of breast cancer and is associated with different prognoses. In this study, we aimed to determine the suitable cut-off value to predict the clinical outcome of p53 overexpression and its usefulness as a prognostic factor in each subtype of breast cancer, especially in luminal A breast cancer. Approval was granted by the Institutional Review Board of Samsung Medical Center. We analyzed a total of 7,739 patients who were surgically treated for invasive breast cancer at Samsung Medical Center between Dec 1995 and Apr 2013. Luminal A subtype was defined as ER&PR + and HER2- and was further subclassified according to Ki-67 and p53 expression as follows: luminal A (Ki-67-,p53-, luminal A (Ki-67+, p53-, luminal A (Ki-67 -, p53+ and luminal A (Ki-67+, p53+. Low-risk luminal A subtype was defined as negative for both Ki-67 and p53 (luminal A [ki-67-, p53-], and others subtypes were considered to be high-risk luminal A breast cancer. A cut-off value of 10% for p53 was a good predictor of clinical outcome in all patients and luminal A breast cancer patients. The prognostic role of p53 overexpression for OS and DFS was only significant in luminal A subtype. The combination of p53 and Ki-67 has been shown to have the best predictive power as calculated by the area under curve (AUC, especially for long-term overall survival. In this study, we have shown that overexpression of p53 and Ki-67 could be used to discriminate low-risk luminal A subtype in breast cancer. Therefore, using the combination of p53 and Ki-67 expression in discriminating low-risk luminal A breast cancer may improve the prognostic power and provide the greatest clinical utility.

  4. Conversion of Fibroblasts to Neural Cells by p53 Depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zhou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Conversion from fibroblasts to neurons has recently been successfully induced. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we find that depletion of p53 alone converts fibroblasts into all three major neural lineages. The induced neuronal cells express multiple neuron-specific proteins and generate action potentials and transmitter-receptor-mediated currents. Surprisingly, depletion does not affect the well-known tumorigenic p53 target, p21. Instead, knockdown of p53 upregulates neurogenic transcription factors, which in turn boosts fibroblast-neuron conversion. p53 binds the promoter of the neurogenic transcription factor Neurod2 and regulates its expression during fibroblast-neuron conversion. Furthermore, our method provides a high efficiency of conversion in late-passage fibroblasts. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis shows that the p53-deficiency-induced neurons exhibit an expression profile different from parental fibroblasts and similar to control-induced neurons. The results may help to understand and improve neural conversion mechanisms to develop robust neuron-replacement therapy strategies.

  5. Generation of a selectively cytotoxic fusion protein against p53 mutated cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousparou Christina A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant number of cancers are caused by defects in p21 causing functional defects in p21 or p53 tumour-suppressor proteins. This has led to many therapeutic approaches including restoration by gene therapy with wild-type p53 or p21 using viral or liposomal vectors, which have toxicity or side-effect limitations. We set out to develop a safer, novel fusion protein which has the ability to reconstitute cancer cell lines with active p21 by protein transduction. Methods The fusion protein was produced from the cell-translocating peptide Antennapedia (Antp and wild-type, full-length p21 (Antp-p21. This was expressed and refolded from E. coli and tested on a variety of cell lines and tumours (in a BALB/c nude xenograft model with differing p21 or p53 status. Results Antp-p21 penetrated and killed cancer cells that do not express wild type p53 or p21. This included cells that were matched to cogenic parental cell lines. Antp-p21 killed cancer cells selectively that were malignant as a result of mutations or nuclear exclusion of the p53 and p21 genes and over-expression of MDM2. Non-specific toxicity was excluded by showing that Antp-p21 penetrated but did not kill p53- or p21- wild-type cells. Antp-p21 was not immunogenic in normal New Zealand White rabbits. Recombinant Antp peptide alone was not cytotoxic, showing that killing was due to the transduction of the p21 component of Antp-p21. Antp-p21 was shown to penetrate cancer cells engrafted in vivo and resulted in tumour eradication when administered with conventionally-used chemotherapeutic agents, which alone were unable to produce such an effect. Conclusions Antp-p21 may represent a new and promising targeted therapy for patients with p53-associated cancers supporting the concept that rational design of therapies directed against specific cancer mutations will play a part in the future of medical oncology.

  6. Generation of a selectively cytotoxic fusion protein against p53 mutated cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kousparou, Christina A; Yiacoumi, Efthymia; Deonarain, Mahendra P; Epenetos, Agamemnon A

    2012-01-01

    A significant number of cancers are caused by defects in p21 causing functional defects in p21 or p53 tumour-suppressor proteins. This has led to many therapeutic approaches including restoration by gene therapy with wild-type p53 or p21 using viral or liposomal vectors, which have toxicity or side-effect limitations. We set out to develop a safer, novel fusion protein which has the ability to reconstitute cancer cell lines with active p21 by protein transduction. The fusion protein was produced from the cell-translocating peptide Antennapedia (Antp) and wild-type, full-length p21 (Antp-p21). This was expressed and refolded from E. coli and tested on a variety of cell lines and tumours (in a BALB/c nude xenograft model) with differing p21 or p53 status. Antp-p21 penetrated and killed cancer cells that do not express wild type p53 or p21. This included cells that were matched to cogenic parental cell lines. Antp-p21 killed cancer cells selectively that were malignant as a result of mutations or nuclear exclusion of the p53 and p21 genes and over-expression of MDM2. Non-specific toxicity was excluded by showing that Antp-p21 penetrated but did not kill p53- or p21- wild-type cells. Antp-p21 was not immunogenic in normal New Zealand White rabbits. Recombinant Antp peptide alone was not cytotoxic, showing that killing was due to the transduction of the p21 component of Antp-p21. Antp-p21 was shown to penetrate cancer cells engrafted in vivo and resulted in tumour eradication when administered with conventionally-used chemotherapeutic agents, which alone were unable to produce such an effect. Antp-p21 may represent a new and promising targeted therapy for patients with p53-associated cancers supporting the concept that rational design of therapies directed against specific cancer mutations will play a part in the future of medical oncology

  7. Distinct pattern of p53 mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruck, C H; Rideout, W M; Olumi, A F

    1993-01-01

    A distinct mutational spectrum for the p53 tumor suppressor gene in bladder carcinomas was established in patients with known exposures to cigarette smoke. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene showed inactivating mutations in 16 of 40 (40%) bladder...... double mutations, four of which were tandem mutations on the same allele. No double mutations were found in tumors from nonsmoking patients. None of the mutations in smokers were G:C-->T:A transversions, which would be anticipated for exposure to the suspected cigarette smoke carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl....... The results suggest that, although cigarette smoke exposure may not significantly alter the kinds of mutations sustained in the p53 gene, it may act to increase the extent of DNA damage per mutagenic event....

  8. p53 regulates cytoskeleton remodeling to suppress tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Keigo; Ebata, Takahiro; Guo, Alvin Kunyao; Tobiume, Kei; Wolf, Steven John; Kawauchi, Keiko

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cells possess unique characteristics such as invasiveness, the ability to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and an inherent stemness. Cell morphology is altered during these processes and this is highly dependent on actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is, therefore, important for determination of cell fate. Mutations within the TP53 (tumor suppressor p53) gene leading to loss or gain of function (GOF) of the protein are often observed in aggressive cancer cells. Here, we highlight the roles of p53 and its GOF mutants in cancer cell invasion from the perspective of the actin cytoskeleton; in particular its reorganization and regulation by cell adhesion molecules such as integrins and cadherins. We emphasize the multiple functions of p53 in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton remodeling in response to the extracellular microenvironment, and oncogene activation. Such an approach provides a new perspective in the consideration of novel targets for anti-cancer therapy.

  9. p53-Dependent suppression of genome instability in germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otozai, Shinji [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oda, Shoji [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Kamei, Yasuhiro [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ryo, Haruko [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Sato, Ayuko [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Nomura, Taisei [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Mitani, Hiroshi [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Tsujimura, Tohru [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Inohara, Hidenori [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Todo, Takeshi, E-mail: todo@radbio.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Radiation-induced microsatellite instability (MSI) was investigated in medaka fish. • msh2{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of spontaneous MSI. • p53{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of radiation-induced MSI. • p53 and msh2 suppress MSI by different pathways: mismatch removal and apoptosis. - Abstract: Radiation increases mutation frequencies at tandem repeat loci. Germline mutations in γ-ray-irradiated medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were studied, focusing on the microsatellite loci. Mismatch-repair genes suppress microsatellite mutation by directly removing altered sequences at the nucleotide level, whereas the p53 gene suppresses genetic alterations by eliminating damaged cells. The contribution of these two defense mechanisms to radiation-induced microsatellite instability was addressed. The spontaneous mutation frequency was significantly higher in msh2{sup −/−} males than in wild-type fish, whereas there was no difference in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations between msh2{sup −/−} and wild-type fish. By contrast, irradiated p53{sup −/−} fish exhibited markedly increased mutation frequencies, whereas their spontaneous mutation frequency was the same as that of wild-type fish. In the spermatogonia of the testis, radiation induced a high level of apoptosis both in wild-type and msh2{sup −/−} fish, but negligible levels in p53{sup −/−} fish. The results demonstrate that the msh2 and p53 genes protect genome integrity against spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation by two different pathways: direct removal of mismatches and elimination of damaged cells.

  10. p53-Mediated Molecular Control of Autophagy in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mrakovcic

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an indispensable mechanism of the eukaryotic cell, facilitating the removal and renewal of cellular components and thereby balancing the cell’s energy consumption and homeostasis. Deregulation of autophagy is now regarded as one of the characteristic key features contributing to the development of tumors. In recent years, the suppression of autophagy in combination with chemotherapeutic treatment has been approached as a novel therapy in cancer treatment. However, depending on the type of cancer and context, interference with the autophagic machinery can either promote or disrupt tumorigenesis. Therefore, disclosure of the major signaling pathways that regulate autophagy and control tumorigenesis is crucial. To date, several tumor suppressor proteins and oncogenes have emerged as eminent regulators of autophagy whose depletion or mutation favor tumor formation. The mammalian cell “janitor” p53 belongs to one of these tumor suppressors that are most commonly mutated in human tumors. Experimental evidence over the last decade convincingly reports that p53 can act as either an activator or an inhibitor of autophagy depending on its subcellular localization and its mode of action. This finding gains particular significance as p53 deficiency or mutant variants of p53 that accumulate in the cytoplasm of tumor cells enable activation of autophagy. Accordingly, we recently identified p53 as a molecular hub that regulates autophagy and apoptosis in histone deacetylase inhibitor-treated uterine sarcoma cells. In light of this novel experimental evidence, in this review, we focus on p53 signaling as a mediator of the autophagic pathway in tumor cells.

  11. Effect of the p53-tristetraprolin-stathmin-1 pathway on trophoblasts at maternal-fetal interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ling Ma

    Full Text Available To reveal the effect of p53-tristetraprolin-stathmin-1 signaling on trophoblasts and recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA.Stathmin-1 (STMN1, p53, and tristetraprolin (TTP expression in paraffin-embedded villus tissue was determined using immunohistochemistry. HTR-8/SVneo cells were treated with doxorubicin to activate p53; STMN1 and TTP levels were detected by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and western blotting. Western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to investigate STMN1 expression after TTP overexpression or knockdown in HTR-8 cells.STMN1 was downregulated and p53 was upregulated in the villus tissue from patients with RSA. Doxorubicin decreased STMN1 expression but enhanced TTP expression in HTR-8 cells. In vitro, TTP overexpression inhibited STMN1 production; TTP knockdown promoted it. TTP downregulated STMN1 expression in trophoblasts by directly binding its 3' untranslated region.TTP modulates trophoblast function and interacts with STMN1 and p53, and is related to pregnancy outcomes.

  12. COX-2 and p53 in human sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Cyr, Diane; Luce, Danièle

    2008-01-01

    to development of cancer. Many signals that activate COX-2 also induce tumor suppressor p53, a transcription factor central in cellular stress response. We investigated COX-2 and p53 expressions by immunohistochemistry in 50 SNCs (23 adenocarcinomas, and 27 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC); 48 analyzed for COX-2......The causal role of wood-dust exposure in sinonasal cancer (SNC) has been established in epidemiological studies, but the mechanisms of SNC carcinogenesis are still largely unknown. Increased amounts of COX-2 are found in both premalignant and malignant tissues, and experimental evidence link COX-2...

  13. P53 Suppression of Homologous Recombination and Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    401]. The more aggressive p53R172H point mutation is a dominant allele that results in a p53 protein product with a substantially misfolded DNA...MRE11 and NBS1 proteins to multiple DNA damage sites, J. Biol. Chem. 283 (2008) 1197–1208. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18025084 [34] J.-F...15,16], have an increased risk of developing MDS. CREB binding protein (CREBBP) interacts with DNA damage response/repair proteins , such as TP53 [17,18

  14. RBP-J-interacting and tubulin-associated protein induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human hepatocellular carcinoma by activating the p53–Fbxw7 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haihe [The Key Laboratory of Molecular Diagnosis in Laboratory Medicine, Department of Pathogenobiology, Daqing Branch of Harbin Medical University, Daqing 163319 (China); Yang, Zhanchun [Department of General Surgery of Fifth Clinical Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Daqing 163319 (China); Liu, Chunbo; Huang, Shishun; Wang, Hongzhi; Chen, Yingli [The Key Laboratory of Molecular Diagnosis in Laboratory Medicine, Department of Pathogenobiology, Daqing Branch of Harbin Medical University, Daqing 163319 (China); Chen, Guofu, E-mail: zhangyanjie3@aliyun.com [Department of General Surgery of Fifth Clinical Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Daqing 163319 (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • RITA overexpression increased protein expression of p53 and Fbxw7 and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, Hes-1 and NF-κB p65. • RITA can significantly inhibit the in vitro growth of SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. • RITA exerts tumor-suppressive effects in hepatocarcinogenesis through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and suggest a therapeutic application of RITA in HCC. - Abstract: Aberrant Notch signaling is observed in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and has been associated with the modulation of cell growth. However, the role of Notch signaling in HCC and its underlying mechanism remain elusive. RBP-J-interacting and tubulin-associated (RITA) mediates the nuclear export of RBP-J to tubulin fibers and downregulates Notch-mediated transcription. In this study, we found that RITA overexpression increased protein expression of p53 and Fbxw7 and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, Hes-1 and NF-κB p65. These changes led to growth inhibition and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. Our findings indicate that RITA exerts tumor-suppressive effects in hepatocarcinogenesis through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and suggest a therapeutic application of RITA in HCC.

  15. p53 Dimers associate with a head-to-tail response element to repress cyclin B transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lipski

    Full Text Available DNA damage induced by the topoisomerase I inhibitor SN38 activates cell cycle checkpoints which promote cell cycle arrest. This arrest can be abrogated in p53-defective cells by the Chk1 inhibitor 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01. Previously, we compared p53 wild-type MCF10A cells with derivatives whose p53 function was inhibited by over-expression of the tetramerization domain (MCF10A/OD or expression of shRNA against p53 (MCF10A/Δp53. Treatment of SN38-arrested MCF10A/OD cells with UCN-01 abrogated S, but not G2 arrest, while the MCF10A/Δp53 cells abrogated both S and G2 arrest. The MCF10A/OD cells had reduced levels of cyclin B, suggesting that tetramerization of p53 is not required for repression of cyclin B gene expression. In the present study, we analyzed p53 oligomerization status using glutaraldehyde cross-linking. Following SN38 treatment, MCF10A cells contained oligomeric forms of p53 with molecular weights approximating monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers. However, MCF10A/OD cells possessed only monomers and dimers suggesting that these complexes may be involved in repression of cyclin B. While genes transcriptionally activated by p53 contain a consensus sequence with elements repeated in a head-to-head orientation, the cyclin B promoter contains similar elements oriented head-to-tail. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed that p53 associates with this head-to-tail element in both MCF10A and MCF10A/OD. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA using a biotin-labeled probe containing the head-to-tail element showed a shift in mobility consistent with the molecular weight of tetramers and dimers in MCF10A nuclear extract, but only the dimer in MCF10A/OD nuclear extract. Taken together, these results suggest a novel mechanism whereby p53 dimers associate with the head-to-tail element to repress cyclin B transcription.

  16. p53 Dimers associate with a head-to-tail response element to repress cyclin B transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipski, Robert; Lippincott, Daniel J; Durden, Brittany C; Kaplan, Anne R; Keiser, Hilary E; Park, Jung-Ho; Levesque, Aime A

    2012-01-01

    DNA damage induced by the topoisomerase I inhibitor SN38 activates cell cycle checkpoints which promote cell cycle arrest. This arrest can be abrogated in p53-defective cells by the Chk1 inhibitor 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01). Previously, we compared p53 wild-type MCF10A cells with derivatives whose p53 function was inhibited by over-expression of the tetramerization domain (MCF10A/OD) or expression of shRNA against p53 (MCF10A/Δp53). Treatment of SN38-arrested MCF10A/OD cells with UCN-01 abrogated S, but not G2 arrest, while the MCF10A/Δp53 cells abrogated both S and G2 arrest. The MCF10A/OD cells had reduced levels of cyclin B, suggesting that tetramerization of p53 is not required for repression of cyclin B gene expression. In the present study, we analyzed p53 oligomerization status using glutaraldehyde cross-linking. Following SN38 treatment, MCF10A cells contained oligomeric forms of p53 with molecular weights approximating monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers. However, MCF10A/OD cells possessed only monomers and dimers suggesting that these complexes may be involved in repression of cyclin B. While genes transcriptionally activated by p53 contain a consensus sequence with elements repeated in a head-to-head orientation, the cyclin B promoter contains similar elements oriented head-to-tail. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays revealed that p53 associates with this head-to-tail element in both MCF10A and MCF10A/OD. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) using a biotin-labeled probe containing the head-to-tail element showed a shift in mobility consistent with the molecular weight of tetramers and dimers in MCF10A nuclear extract, but only the dimer in MCF10A/OD nuclear extract. Taken together, these results suggest a novel mechanism whereby p53 dimers associate with the head-to-tail element to repress cyclin B transcription.

  17. MicroRNA-214 Promotes Apoptosis in Canine Hemangiosarcoma by Targeting the COP1-p53 Axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Heishima

    Full Text Available MicroRNA-214 regulates both angiogenic function in endothelial cells and apoptosis in various cancers. However, the regulation and function of miR-214 is unclear in canine hemangiosarcoma, which is a spontaneous model of human angiosarcoma. The expression and functional roles of miR-214 in canine hemangiosarcoma were presently explored by performing miRNA TaqMan qRT-PCR and transfecting cells with synthetic microRNA. Here, we report that miR-214 was significantly down-regulated in the cell lines used and in clinical samples of canine hemangiosarcoma. Restoration of miR-214 expression reduced cell growth and induced apoptosis in canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines through transcriptional activation of p53-regulated genes although miR-214 had a slight effect of growth inhibition on normal endothelial cells. We identified COP1, which is a critical negative regulator of p53, as a novel direct target of miR-214. COP1 was overexpressed and the specific COP1 knockdown induced apoptosis through transcriptional activation of p53-regulated genes as well as did miR-214-transfection in HSA cell lines. Furthermore, p53 knockdown abolished the miR-214-COP1-mediated apoptosis; thus, miR-214 and COP1 regulated apoptosis through controlling p53 in HSA. In conclusion, miR-214 functioned as a tumor suppressor in canine hemangiosarcoma by inducing apoptosis through recovering the function of p53. miR-214 down-regulation and COP1 overexpression is likely to contribute to tumorigenesis of HSA. Therefore, targeting miR-214-COP1-p53 axis would possibly be a novel effective strategy for treatment of canine hemangiosarcoma and capable of being applied to the development of novel therapeutics for human angiosarcoma.

  18. MicroRNA-214 Promotes Apoptosis in Canine Hemangiosarcoma by Targeting the COP1-p53 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heishima, Kazuki; Mori, Takashi; Sakai, Hiroki; Sugito, Nobuhiko; Murakami, Mami; Yamada, Nami; Akao, Yukihiro; Maruo, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-214 regulates both angiogenic function in endothelial cells and apoptosis in various cancers. However, the regulation and function of miR-214 is unclear in canine hemangiosarcoma, which is a spontaneous model of human angiosarcoma. The expression and functional roles of miR-214 in canine hemangiosarcoma were presently explored by performing miRNA TaqMan qRT-PCR and transfecting cells with synthetic microRNA. Here, we report that miR-214 was significantly down-regulated in the cell lines used and in clinical samples of canine hemangiosarcoma. Restoration of miR-214 expression reduced cell growth and induced apoptosis in canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines through transcriptional activation of p53-regulated genes although miR-214 had a slight effect of growth inhibition on normal endothelial cells. We identified COP1, which is a critical negative regulator of p53, as a novel direct target of miR-214. COP1 was overexpressed and the specific COP1 knockdown induced apoptosis through transcriptional activation of p53-regulated genes as well as did miR-214-transfection in HSA cell lines. Furthermore, p53 knockdown abolished the miR-214-COP1-mediated apoptosis; thus, miR-214 and COP1 regulated apoptosis through controlling p53 in HSA. In conclusion, miR-214 functioned as a tumor suppressor in canine hemangiosarcoma by inducing apoptosis through recovering the function of p53. miR-214 down-regulation and COP1 overexpression is likely to contribute to tumorigenesis of HSA. Therefore, targeting miR-214-COP1-p53 axis would possibly be a novel effective strategy for treatment of canine hemangiosarcoma and capable of being applied to the development of novel therapeutics for human angiosarcoma.

  19. A Fusion Protein of the p53 Transaction Domain and the p53-Binding Domain of the Oncoprotein MdmX as an Efficient System for High-Throughput Screening of MdmX Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Zhou, Jingjing; Qin, Lingyun; Chen, Yao; Huang, Yongqi; Liu, Huili; Su, Zhengding

    2017-06-27

    In nearly half of cancers, the anticancer activity of p53 protein is often impaired by the overexpressed oncoprotein Mdm2 and its homologue, MdmX, demanding efficient therapeutics to disrupt the aberrant p53-MdmX/Mdm2 interactions to restore the p53 activity. While many potent Mdm2-specific inhibitors have already undergone clinical investigations, searching for MdmX-specific inhibitors has become very attractive, requiring a more efficient screening strategy for evaluating potential scaffolds or leads. In this work, considering that the intrinsic fluorescence residue Trp23 in the p53 transaction domain (p53p) plays an important role in determining the p53-MdmX/Mdm2 interactions, we constructed a fusion protein to utilize this intrinsic fluorescence signal to monitor high-throughput screening of a compound library. The fusion protein was composed of the p53p followed by the N-terminal domain of MdmX (N-MdmX) through a flexible amino acid linker, while the whole fusion protein contained a sole intrinsic fluorescence probe. The fusion protein was then evaluated using fluorescence spectroscopy against model compounds. Our results revealed that the variation of the fluorescence signal was highly correlated with the concentration of the ligand within 65 μM. The fusion protein was further evaluated with respect to its feasibility for use in high-throughput screening using a model compound library, including controls. We found that the imidazo-indole scaffold was a bona fide scaffold for template-based design of MdmX inhibitors. Thus, the p53p-N-MdmX fusion protein we designed provides a convenient and efficient tool for high-throughput screening of new MdmX inhibitors. The strategy described in this work should be applicable for other protein targets to accelerate drug discovery.

  20. Expression and mutation of p53 in tumor effusion cells of patients with ovarian carcinoma: response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, J K; Harłozińska, A; Popiela, A; Noga, L

    2001-01-01

    p53 alterations are considered as one of the most important factors responsible for drug resistance in ovarian carcinomas, although the relationship between p53 gene status and response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in ovarian cancer patients remains unclear. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between p53 protein accumulation, p53 gene mutation and response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with ovarian carcinoma considering conventional clinicopathological parameters. Tissue sections and corresponding cyst and/or ascitic fluid cells from 79 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer were analyzed immunohistochemically for p53 expression. The PCR-SSCP analysis was performed in 25 cases and the results were compared with immunohistochemical data. It was demonstrated that p53 expression reaching approximately 50% of positive cells in immunostaining was usually associated with PCR-amplified exons showing abnormal migration and suspected for mutation. p53 gene changes were not correlated with histological structure, grade of differentiation or residual tumor after cytoreductive surgery, despite being detected more frequently in III/IV than in II FIGO stages and in patients with residual disease above 2 cm. A significant correlation between p53 accumulation and p53 gene alteration and poor response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy was shown. The overall survival time of patients decreased with an increase in p53 protein expression. A strong p53 expression especially accompanied by p53 changes detectable by PCR-SSCP analysis appears to be a good indicator of the resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The association between strong p53 overexpression and shorter overall survival time was also revealed. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Prognostic Role of Serum Antibody Immunity to p53 Oncogenic Protein in Ovarian Cancer: A Systematic Review and a Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica Garziera

    Full Text Available Serum p53 autoantibodies (p53-AAbs are the product of an endogenous immune response against p53 overexpression driven by the ovarian tumour. The p53-AAbs are detectable only in a subset of patients. To date, the evidence of an association between the presence of p53-AAbs and ovarian cancer outcomes has been poorly investigated.A systematic literature search was performed to identify eligible studies investigating the association of serum p53-AAbs and overall survival (OS and disease free survival (DFS. Associations between presence of serum p53-AAbs and baseline tumour characteristics were also evaluated. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI were computed to estimate the prognostic impact of serum p53-AAbs. Heterogeneity between studies was assessed.A total of 583 patients (7 studies for OS and 356 patients (4 studies for DFS were included in the meta-analysis. Presence of p53-AAbs was not associated to OS (pooled uni- multivariate HR = 1.09; 95% CI: 0.55-2.16, and a large heterogeneity was found. When only multivariate HRs were pooled together (4 studies, presence of p53-AAbs was significantly associated to a better OS (pooled HR = 0.57; 95% CI: 0.40-0.81, and no significant heterogeneity was observed. A reduced DFS was associated to p53-AAbs (pooled uni- multivariate HR = 1.37; 95% CI: 0.83-2.25, though not significantly and with a moderate heterogeneity.The prognostic significance of serum p53-AAbs in ovarian cancer was diverging according to uni or multivariate models used. Since the results of this work were based on only few investigations, large prospective studies are needed to better define the role of antibody immunity against p53.

  2. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiang Xing

    Full Text Available Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant. Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis.

  3. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fuqiang; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Yiduo; Cui, Jiesheng; He, Sailing; Wang, Guanyu

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant). Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor) and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis. PMID:27689798

  4. The p53-Deficient Mouse as a Breast Cancer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Vogelstein, B. and Fornace, A.J., Jr. (1992). Cell 71:587-597. (6) Yonish-Rouach, E., Resnitsky, D., Lotem, J., Sachs, L., Kimchi , A., and Oren, M. (1991...Cell 70: 937-948. Yonish-Rouach, E., D. Resnitzky, J. Lotem, L. Sachs, A. Kimchi , and M. Oren. 1991. Wild-type p53 induces apoptosis of my- eloid

  5. p53 mutation in carcinomas arising in ovarian cystic teratomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T; Oguni, S; Kikuchi, M; Kanai, N; Saito, K

    1995-09-01

    Carcinomas arising in mature cystic teratomas of the ovaries from nine women were examined for the presence of p53 mutations. The nine tumors comprised six squamous cell carcinomas, one squamous cell carcinoma in situ, one undifferentiated small cell carcinoma, and one mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Abnormal nuclear accumulation of the p53 protein was observed in four of the tumors. Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks and subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for specific amplification of the p53 gene exons 5-8, followed by direct chemiluminescence sequencing analysis. A frameshift mutation in exon 8 (codon 278, CCT > del T; stop at codon 344) was detected in one poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The samples were also evaluated for the possible association of 'benign' and 'malignant' types of human papillomavirus (HPV) by PCR using universal primer sets. None of the samples contained detectable HPV genome. These data suggest that p53 mutations are relatively uncommon in secondary carcinomas developing in ovarian dermoid cysts, although the number of samples studied was admittedly small.

  6. Systematic and comprehensive analysis of mutant p53 proteins in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The gene p53 is a well-known tumour suppressor gene that prevents cancer formation. It is the most commonly mutated gene among individuals with a diagnosis of cancer. Through recent advances in DNA sequencing abilities, researchers are now in a position to take a patient's tumour and identify the exact mutation in ...

  7. Functional Significance of Mutant p53 in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Lear, Renee

    2001-01-01

    ... in those cells with irreparable damage. In human tumors, many hot-spot mutations are found within the DNA-binding domain of p53, rendering it incapable of sequence-specific transactivation of target genes such as p21, bax, and mdm2...

  8. Functional Significance of Mutant p53 in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Lear, Rene

    2002-01-01

    ... in those cells with irreparable damage. In human tumors, many hot-spot mutations are found within the DNA-binding domain of p53, rendering it incapable of sequence-specific transactivation of target genes such as p2l, bax, and mdm2...

  9. Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The data obtained provide insight into the mechanism of cell proliferation action of endogenous NO•, based on p53 status, and indicate manipulation of iNOS may offer exciting opportunities to improve the effectiveness of melanoma treatment. Keywords: Apoptosis, Human melanoma cells, Inducible nitric oxide ...

  10. Identification and design of p53-derived HLA-A2-binding peptides with increased CTL immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T R; Buus, S; Brunak, S

    2001-01-01

    of peptide binding to HLA-A2 molecules, we identified three p53 protein-derived nonamer peptides with intermediate binding owing to suboptimal amino acids in the P2 anchor position. These peptides were synthesized along with the corresponding analogs, where the natural P2 residue had been replaced...... HLA-A2 transgenic mouse fibrosarcoma cells transfected with human p53 DNA. The data suggest that modified self-peptides derived from overexpressed tumour-associated proteins can be used in vaccine development against cancer, and that quantitative predictions of HLA binding is of value in the rational...

  11. SB225002 promotes mitotic catastrophe in chemo-sensitive and -resistant ovarian cancer cells independent of p53 status in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirong Du

    Full Text Available Recent evidence indicates that CXCR2 signaling is crucial for cancer progression, and its antagonist SB225002 induces apoptosis in Wilms' tumor cells. Here, we investigated the effect of SB225002 on cell cycle progression and apoptosis induction in vitro, using CDDP-sensitive and -resistant OVCA cell lines with different p53 status (wild type, mutant or null. Adenovirus infection of wild-type p53 or transfection of p53 siRNA was used to over-express or knock-down p53. Cell cycle and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry or Hoechst staining and observation of nuclear morphology. Our data demonstrated that SB225002 induced apoptosis in both wild-type and p53-deficient ovarian cancer (OVCA cells through alternative mechanisms. SB225002 promoted mitotic catastrophe, as evidenced by the accumulation of mitotic cells with spindle abnormalities, chromosome mis-segregation, multi-polar cell division, multiple nuclei, aneuploidy/polyploidy and subsequent extensive apoptosis. SB225002-induced mitotic catastrophe appeared to be mediated by down-regulation of checkpoint kinase Chk1 and Cdk1-cyclin B activation. In cells expressing wild-type p53 (OV2008 and C13*, SB225002 increased total and phospho-Ser p53 levels, and p53 knock-down decreased SB225002-induced apoptosis, without affecting premature mitosis. These results suggest that SB225002 induces p53-dependent apoptosis, and provokes mitotic catastrophe in p53-independent manner in p53 wild-type cells. Reconstitution with wild-type P53 in P53-null SKOV3 cell attenuated SB225002-induced mitotic catastrophe, suggesting p53 prevented mitotic catastrophe induced by SB225002 in p53-deficient OVCA cells. Finally, the effect of SB225002 could not be prevented by pretreatment with CXCR2 ligand or its neutralizing antibody. The present studies demonstrate for the first time that SB225002 has dual actions in OVCA cells, inducing classic apoptosis through p53 activation and provoking mitotic catastrophe in

  12. TP53 Codon 72 Polymorphism and P53 Protein Expression in Colorectal Cancer Specimens in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Nikbahkt Dastjerdi

    2011-02-01

    proline allele. A significant difference between cases and controls was found for the arginine/arginine genotype compared with (grouped arginine/proline and proline/proline genotypes (Odds Ratio = 1.451 (1.002-2.103, P=0.048. Overexpression of p53 was observed in 50.8 percent of cancer specimens which most of them were arginine/arginine genotype (P<0.001. TP53 polymorphism and arginine/arginine genotype may be correlated with overexpression of p53 and increased risk for colorectal cancer in city of Isfahan.

  13. Knockdown of CDK2AP1 in primary human fibroblasts induces p53 dependent senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled N Alsayegh

    Full Text Available Cyclin Dependent Kinase-2 Associated Protein-1 (CDK2AP1 is known to be a tumor suppressor that plays a role in cell cycle regulation by sequestering monomeric CDK2, and targeting it for proteolysis. A reduction of CDK2AP1 expression is considered to be a negative prognostic indicator in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma and also associated with increased invasion in human gastric cancer tissue. CDK2AP1 overexpression was shown to inhibit growth, reduce invasion and increase apoptosis in prostate cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated the effect of CDK2AP1 downregulation in primary human dermal fibroblasts. Using a short-hairpin RNA to reduce its expression, we found that knockdown of CDK2AP1 in primary human fibroblasts resulted in reduced proliferation and in the induction of senescence associated beta-galactosidase activity. CDK2AP1 knockdown also resulted in a significant reduction in the percentage of cells in the S phase and an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Immunocytochemical analysis also revealed that the CDK2AP1 knockdown significantly increased the percentage of cells that exhibited γ-H2AX foci, which could indicate presence of DNA damage. CDK2AP1 knockdown also resulted in increased mRNA levels of p53, p21, BAX and PUMA and p53 protein levels. In primary human fibroblasts in which p53 and CDK2AP1 were simultaneously downregulated, there was: (a no increase in senescence associated beta-galactosidase activity, (b decrease in the number of cells in the G1-phase and increase in number of cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle, and (c decrease in the mRNA levels of p21, BAX and PUMA when compared with CDK2AP1 knockdown only fibroblasts. Taken together, this suggests that the observed phenotype is p53 dependent. We also observed a prominent increase in the levels of ARF protein in the CDK2AP1 knockdown cells, which suggests a possible role of ARF in p53 stabilization following CDK2AP1

  14. The structure formed by inverted repeats in p53 response elements determines the transactivation activity of p53 protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázda, Václav; Čechová, Jana; Battistin, M.; Coufal, Jan; Jagelská, Eva; Raimondi, I.; Inga, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 483, č. 1 (2017), s. 516-521 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21855S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : tumor-suppressor p53 * cruciform structures * dna-conformation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.466, year: 2016

  15. Differential sensitivity of p53+ and p53- cells to caffeine-induced radiosensitization and override of G2 delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, S.N.; DeFrank, J.S.; Connell, P.; Eogan, M.; Preffer, F.; Dombkowski, D.; Tang, W.; Friend, S.H.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Most drug discovery efforts have focused on finding new DNA damaging agents to kill tumor cells preferentially. An alternative approach is to find ways to increase tumor specific killing by modifying tumor specific responses to that damage. We asked whether cells lacking the G1/S arrest in response to X-rays are more sensitive to X-ray damage when treated with agents that override G2/M arrest. Materials and Methods: Mouse embryonic fibroblasts genetically matched to be (+/+) or (-/-) p53 and rat embryonic fibroblasts (REF) made (+) or (-) for wild-type p53 function by transfection were irradiated with and without caffeine, a known checkpoint inhibitor. Caffeine treatment was maintained for 24 hours from 1 hour prior to irradiation. Cell survival following ionizing radiation was measured by clonogenic assay. For cell-cycle analysis, cells were in exponential asynchronous growth at the time of irradiation. The proportion of cells in G1, S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle were recorded immediately before and following irradiation and subsequently at 3,6,9,12,24 and 48 hours following irradiation. Results: Caffeine was found to cause radiosensitzation at low dose (0.5mM) in (-/-) cells but not in (+/+) cells. The sensitization enhancement ratio (SER) was 1.45 at 0.1 survival and 1.56 at 0.01 survival. At this dose of caffeine, this SER reflected therapeutic gain as there was no detectable effect on (+/+) cells. At 1mM caffeine, sensitization of (-/-) cells was 1.77, but (+/+) cells now also showed sensitization (SER=1.25). In (-/-) cells at 0.1mM caffeine the SER was 1.5 at 0.01 survival. The transfected REF cells (functionally null for p53) also exhibited caffeine-induced radiosensitization at both 0.5 and 2mM caffeine with a SER 1.45 for 2mM at 0.1 survival. No significant sensitization could be demonstrated for REF cells at the same doses of caffeine. The REF cells, with wild-type p53, transfected with pCMVneo alone showed no change in radiosensitivity or

  16. A synthetic form of frizzled 8-associated antiproliferative factor enhances p53 stability through USP2a and MDM2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayoung Kim

    Full Text Available Frizzled 8-associated Antiproliferative Factor (APF is a sialoglycopeptide urinary biomarker of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS, a chronic condition of unknown etiology with variable symptoms that generally include pelvic and/or perineal pain, urinary frequency, and urgency. We previously reported that native human APF suppresses the proliferation of normal bladder epithelial cells through a mechanism that involves increased levels of p53. The goal of this study was to delineate the regulatory mechanism whereby p53 expression is regulated by APF. Two APF-responsive cell lines (T24 bladder carcinoma cells and the immortalized human bladder epithelial cell line, TRT-HU1 were treated with asialo-APF (as-APF, a chemically synthesized form of APF. Biochemical analysis revealed that as-APF increased p53 levels in two ways: by decreasing ubiquitin specific protease 2a (USP2a expression leading to enhanced ubiquitination of murine double minute 2 E3 ubiquitin ligase (MDM2, and by suppressing association of p53 with MDM2, thus impairing p53 ubiquitination. Biological responses to as-APF were suppressed by increased expression of wild type, but not mutant USP2a, which enhanced cell growth via upregulation of a cell cycle mediator, cyclin D1, at both transcription and protein levels. Consistent with this, gene silencing of USP2a with siRNA arrested cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that APF upregulates cellular p53 levels via functional attenuation of the USP2a-MDM2 pathway, resulting in p53 accumulation and growth arrest. These data also imply that targeting USP2a, MDM2, p53 and/or complex formation by these molecules may be relevant in the development of novel therapeutic approaches to IC/PBS.

  17. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor activates hypoxia-inducible factor in a p53-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiko Oda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is not only a cytokine which has a critical role in several inflammatory conditions but also has endocrine and enzymatic functions. MIF is identified as an intracellular signaling molecule and is implicated in the process of tumor progression, and also strongly enhances neovascularization. Overexpression of MIF has been observed in tumors from various organs. MIF is one of the genes induced by hypoxia in an hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1-dependent manner. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effect of MIF on HIF-1 activity was investigated in human breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, and osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells. We demonstrate that intracellular overexpression or extracellular administration of MIF enhances activation of HIF-1 under hypoxic conditions in MCF-7 cells. Mutagenesis analysis of MIF and knockdown of 53 demonstrates that the activation is not dependent on redox activity of MIF but on wild-type p53. We also indicate that the MIF receptor CD74 is involved in HIF-1 activation by MIF at least when MIF is administrated extracellularly. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: MIF regulates HIF-1 activity in a p53-dependent manner. In addition to MIF's potent effects on the immune system, MIF is linked to fundamental processes conferring cell proliferation, cell survival, angiogenesis, and tumor invasiveness. This functional interdependence between MIF and HIF-1alpha protein stabilization and transactivation activity provide a molecular mechanism for promotion of tumorigenesis by MIF.

  18. Distinct pattern of p53 mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruck, C H; Rideout, W M; Olumi, A F

    1993-01-01

    A distinct mutational spectrum for the p53 tumor suppressor gene in bladder carcinomas was established in patients with known exposures to cigarette smoke. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene showed inactivating mutations in 16 of 40 (40%) bladder...... tumors from smokers and 13 of 40 (33%) tumors from lifetime nonsmokers. Overall, 13 of the 50 (26%) total point mutations discovered in this and previous work were G:C-->C:G transversions, a relatively rare mutational type in human tumors. In six tumors, identical AGA (Arg)-->ACA (Thr) point mutations...... double mutations, four of which were tandem mutations on the same allele. No double mutations were found in tumors from nonsmoking patients. None of the mutations in smokers were G:C-->T:A transversions, which would be anticipated for exposure to the suspected cigarette smoke carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl...

  19. A Cohert Study of the Relationship Between c-erbB-2 and Cyclin D1 Overexpression, p53 Mutation and/or Protein Accumulation, and Risk of Progression from Benign Breast Disease to Breast Cancer; and Creation of a Bank of Benign Breast Tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kandel, Rita

    2000-01-01

    ... increase in risk to develop breast cancer. The purpose of this project is: 1) collect paraffm-embedded benign breast tissue from the remaining 4,336 cohort members who were not part of the case-control study. (2...

  20. The p53-MDM2 network: from oscillations to apoptosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    2 0165–0166. Javelaud D and Besançon F 2002 Inactivation of p21WAF1 sensitizes cells to apoptosis via an increase of both p14ARF and p53 Levels and an alteration of the Bax/Bcl-2 Ratio; J. Biol. Chem. 277. 37949–37954. Knudson A G 1971 Mutation and cancer: statistical study of retinoblastoma; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.

  1. Liver-specific expressions of HBx and src in the p53 mutant trigger hepatocarcinogenesis in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Wei Lu

    Full Text Available Hepatocarcinogenesis is a multistep process that starts from fatty liver and transitions to fibrosis and, finally, into cancer. Many etiological factors, including hepatitis B virus X antigen (HBx and p53 mutations, have been implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, potential synergistic effects between these two factors and the underlying mechanisms by which they promote hepatocarcinogenesis are still unclear. In this report, we show that the synergistic action of HBx and p53 mutation triggers progressive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC formation via src activation in zebrafish. Liver-specific expression of HBx in wild-type zebrafish caused steatosis, fibrosis and glycogen accumulation. However, the induction of tumorigenesis by HBx was only observed in p53 mutant fish and occurred in association with the up-regulation and activation of the src tyrosine kinase pathway. Furthermore, the overexpression of src in p53 mutant zebrafish also caused hyperplasia, HCC, and sarcomatoid HCC, which were accompanied by increased levels of the signaling proteins p-erk, p-akt, myc, jnk1 and vegf. Increased expression levels of lipogenic factors and the genes involved in lipid metabolism and glycogen storage were detected during the early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis in the HBx and src transgenic zebrafish. The up-regulation of genes involved in cell cycle regulation, tumor progression and other molecular hallmarks of human liver cancer were found at later stages in both HBx and src transgenic, p53 mutant zebrafish. Together, our study demonstrates that HBx and src overexpression induced hepatocarcinogenesis in p53 mutant zebrafish. This phenomenon mimics human HCC formation and provides potential in vivo platforms for drug screening for therapies for human liver cancer.

  2. Electrophoretic detection of protein p53 in human leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paponov, V.D.; Kupsik, E.G.; Shcheglova, E.G.; Yarullin, N.N.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have found an acid-soluble protein with mol. wt. of about 53 kD in peripheral blood leukocytes of persons with Down's syndrome. It was present in different quantities in all 20 patients tested, but was virtually not discovered in 12 healthy blood donors. This paper determines the possible identity of this protein with protein p53 from mouse ascites carcinoma by comparing their electrophoretic mobilities, because the accuracy of electrophoretic determination of the molecular weight of proteins is not sufficient to identify them. The paper also describes experiments to detect a protein with electrophoretic mobility identical with that of a protein in the leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome in leukocytes of patients with leukemia. To discover if protein p53 is involved in cell proliferation, the protein composition of leukocytes from healthy blood donors, cultured in the presence and absence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), was compared. Increased incorporation of H 3-thymidine by leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome is explained by the presence of a population of immature leukocytes actively synthesizing DNA in the peripheral blood of these patients, and this can also explain the presence of protein p53 in the leukocytes of these patients

  3. Post-transcriptional regulation of the tumor suppressor p53 by a novel miR-27a, with implications during hypoxia and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Raihana; Lone, Saife Niaz; Ul Hussain, Mahboob

    2016-10-15

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is intricately regulated by various signaling molecules, including non-coding small RNAs, called microRNAs (miRNAs). The in silico analysis and the inverse expression status in various cell lines raised the possibility of miR-27a being a new regulator of p53. Using luciferase reporter assay and various mutational and functional analysis, we identified two putative binding sites of miR-27a on the 3'-UTR of p53. The overexpression of miR-27a in the human colorectal cancer cell line HCT-116 +/+ resulted in the decreased expression of the endogenous p53 protein levels. During hypoxia of the HCT-116 +/+ cells, p53 showed increased accumulation after 3 h, and the levels were significantly up-regulated until 24 h of hypoxia. The p53 expression dynamics during hypoxia of the HCT-116 +/+ cells were found to be inversely regulated by miR-27a expression. Moreover, using a cell viability assay, we established that after 3 h of hypoxia, the accumulation of p53 results in a decreased number of the viable HCT-116 +/+ cells and the overexpression of miR-27a resulted in an increased number of viable HCT-116 +/+ cells with a concomitant decrease in p53 expression. Additionally, our data indicated that miR-27a and p53 depict inverse expression dynamics in 50% of the human colorectal cancer samples studied, when compared with that in the adjacent normal samples. Our data established that miR-27a and the tumor suppressor protein p53 are part of the same signaling network that has important implications during hypoxia and tumorigenesis. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bing; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  5. Correlation of cell cycle regulatory proteins (p53 and p16ink4a and bcl-2 oncoprotein with mitotic index and thickness of primary cutaneous malignant melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Kostov

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the frequency of expression p53 and p16INK4a proteins and bcl2- oncoprotein in malignant skin melanoma and to determine their correlation with the proliferative index and tumor thickness. The study involved 53 patients: 27 (51% male and 26 (49% female. Mitotic index showed a correlation with p53 protein expression, a negative correlation with p16INK4a protein expression. Statistically significant correlations were determined between the Breslow tumor thickness, Clark invasion level and p53 protein expression, as well as Breslow tumor thickness and bcl-2 oncoprotein expression (p<0.05, whereas there was no correlation between the p16INK4a protein expression and melanoma thicknes and Clark invasion level. Overexpression p53 protein and bcl-2 oncoprotein, with the loss p16INK4a protein of expression in the nodular melanoma, confirms a frequent loss of function of these tumor suppressor gene and oncogene, and indicates a vertical tumor growth phase. The loss of tumor suppression function the p53 protein and bcl-2 oncoprotein overexpression in cutaneous melanoma correlates with larger tumor thickness, whereas the overexpression of mutated p53 protein and loss p16INK4a protein of expression indicate a higher proliferative tumour potential. Therefore, these evaluated proteins may be the aggressive biological tumour activity markers.

  6. Changes in O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) Homeostasis Activate the p53 Pathway in Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Rafaela Muniz; Madan, Rashna; Chien, Jeremy; Dias, Wagner Barbosa; Slawson, Chad

    2016-09-02

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic post-translational modification consisting of the addition of a single N-acetylglucosamine sugar to serine and threonine residues in proteins by the enzyme O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT), whereas the enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) removes the modification. In cancer, tumor samples present with altered O-GlcNAcylation; however, changes in O-GlcNAcylation are not consistent between tumor types. Interestingly, the tumor suppressor p53 is modified by O-GlcNAc, and most solid tumors contain mutations in p53 leading to the loss of p53 function. Because ovarian cancer has a high frequency of p53 mutation rates, we decided to investigate the relationship between O-GlcNAcylation and p53 function in ovarian cancer. We measured a significant decrease in O-GlcNAcylation of tumor tissue in an ovarian tumor microarray. Furthermore, O-GlcNAcylation was increased, and OGA protein and mRNA levels were decreased in ovarian tumor cell lines not expressing the protein p53. Treatment with the OGA inhibitor Thiamet-G (TMG), silencing of OGA, or overexpression of OGA and OGT led to p53 stabilization, increased nuclear localization, and increased protein and mRNA levels of p53 target genes. These data suggest that changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis activate the p53 pathway. Combination treatment of the chemotherapeutic cisplatin with TMG decreased tumor cell growth and enhanced cell cycle arrest without impairing cytotoxicity. The effects of TMG on tumor cell growth were partially dependent on wild type p53 activation. In conclusion, changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis activate the wild type p53 pathway in ovarian cancer cells, and OGA inhibition has the potential as an adjuvant treatment for ovarian carcinoma. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Changes in O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) Homeostasis Activate the p53 Pathway in Ovarian Cancer Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Rafaela Muniz; Madan, Rashna; Chien, Jeremy; Dias, Wagner Barbosa; Slawson, Chad

    2016-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic post-translational modification consisting of the addition of a single N-acetylglucosamine sugar to serine and threonine residues in proteins by the enzyme O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT), whereas the enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) removes the modification. In cancer, tumor samples present with altered O-GlcNAcylation; however, changes in O-GlcNAcylation are not consistent between tumor types. Interestingly, the tumor suppressor p53 is modified by O-GlcNAc, and most solid tumors contain mutations in p53 leading to the loss of p53 function. Because ovarian cancer has a high frequency of p53 mutation rates, we decided to investigate the relationship between O-GlcNAcylation and p53 function in ovarian cancer. We measured a significant decrease in O-GlcNAcylation of tumor tissue in an ovarian tumor microarray. Furthermore, O-GlcNAcylation was increased, and OGA protein and mRNA levels were decreased in ovarian tumor cell lines not expressing the protein p53. Treatment with the OGA inhibitor Thiamet-G (TMG), silencing of OGA, or overexpression of OGA and OGT led to p53 stabilization, increased nuclear localization, and increased protein and mRNA levels of p53 target genes. These data suggest that changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis activate the p53 pathway. Combination treatment of the chemotherapeutic cisplatin with TMG decreased tumor cell growth and enhanced cell cycle arrest without impairing cytotoxicity. The effects of TMG on tumor cell growth were partially dependent on wild type p53 activation. In conclusion, changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis activate the wild type p53 pathway in ovarian cancer cells, and OGA inhibition has the potential as an adjuvant treatment for ovarian carcinoma. PMID:27402830

  8. Competing memories of mitogen and p53 signalling control cell-cycle entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee Won; Chung, Mingyu; Kudo, Takamasa; Meyer, Tobias

    2017-09-21

    Regulation of cell proliferation is necessary for immune responses, tissue repair, and upkeep of organ function to maintain human health. When proliferating cells complete mitosis, a fraction of newly born daughter cells immediately enter the next cell cycle, while the remaining cells in the same population exit to a transient or persistent quiescent state. Whether this choice between two cell-cycle pathways is due to natural variability in mitogen signalling or other underlying causes is unknown. Here we show that human cells make this fundamental cell-cycle entry or exit decision based on competing memories of variable mitogen and stress signals. Rather than erasing their signalling history at cell-cycle checkpoints before mitosis, mother cells transmit DNA damage-induced p53 protein and mitogen-induced cyclin D1 (CCND1) mRNA to newly born daughter cells. After mitosis, the transferred CCND1 mRNA and p53 protein induce variable expression of cyclin D1 and the CDK inhibitor p21 that almost exclusively determines cell-cycle commitment in daughter cells. We find that stoichiometric inhibition of cyclin D1-CDK4 activity by p21 controls the retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F transcription program in an ultrasensitive manner. Thus, daughter cells control the proliferation-quiescence decision by converting the memories of variable mitogen and stress signals into a competition between cyclin D1 and p21 expression. We propose a cell-cycle control principle based on natural variation, memory and competition that maximizes the health of growing cell populations.

  9. Paracrine Apoptotic Effect of p53 Mediated by Tumor Suppressor Par-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravshan Burikhanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The guardian of the genome, p53, is often mutated in cancer and may contribute to therapeutic resistance. Given that p53 is intact and functional in normal tissues, we harnessed its potential to inhibit the growth of p53-deficient cancer cells. Specific activation of p53 in normal fibroblasts selectively induced apoptosis in p53-deficient cancer cells. This paracrine effect was mediated by p53-dependent secretion of the tumor suppressor Par-4. Accordingly, the activation of p53 in normal mice, but not p53−/− or Par-4−/− mice, caused systemic elevation of Par-4, which induced apoptosis of p53-deficient tumor cells. Mechanistically, p53 induced Par-4 secretion by suppressing the expression of its binding partner, UACA, which sequesters Par-4. Thus, normal cells can be empowered by p53 activation to induce Par-4 secretion for the inhibition of therapy-resistant tumors.

  10. Ki67 and p53 in gastrointestinal stromal tumors - GIST Ki67 and p53 em tumores estromais gastrointestinais - GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Roberto de Oliveira das Neves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST is the most common mesenchymal tumor. Cellular proliferation and apoptosis is gaining importance for predicting prognosis in several cancers. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the Ki67 and p53 immunostaining in GISTs. METHODS: Specimens from 40 patients with GIST were assessed for immunohistochemical expression of Ki67 and p53. The tumors were divided according the risk of recurrence in two groups: I with high or intermediate risk and; II with low or very low risk. RESULTS: Among the 40 patients, 21 were men, the mean age was 56 years, 16 occurred in the small intestine and 13 in the stomach, 5 in the retroperitonium, 4 in the colon or rectum and 2 in the mesenterium. Thirty two tumors were from group I and 8 from group II. Half of the patients developed recurrence, being 90% of the group I (P = 0.114. The tumor Ki67 labelling index ranged from 0.02 to 0.35 (mean level 0.12. This index was marginally higher in the group I patients with recurrence (P = 0.09 compared to the patients of the same group without recurrence. p53 staining was expressed in 65% of the GISTs. A higher frequency of p53 and Ki67 had been found in the group I tumors when compared to the other group (P = 0.022; OR = 8.00 - IC 95%: 1.32-48.65. CONCLUSION: The most common site was the small intestine and 80% had a malignant potential justifying the high recurrence observed. No significant correlation was found between p53 and overall outcome of the patients. In group I patients, the evaluation Ki67LI may be a marker of prognosis. The positivity of both markers is higher among the patients with worst prognosis than in the others.CONTEXTO: Os tumores estromais gastrointestinais (GIST são os tumores mesenquimais mais frequentes. A proliferação intestinal e a apoptose são cada vez mais importantes na avaliação do prognóstico de diversos cânceres. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a imunoexpressão de Ki67 e p53 em GIST. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados a

  11. Expression of p53 protein in Barrett’s adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia and antrum

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    Jovanović Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Most studies of esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas have shown a very high rate of p53 gene mutation and/or protein overexpression, but the influence of the tumor site upon the frequency of p53 protein expression has not been evaluated (gastroesophageal junction, Barret's esophagus, and antrum. The aim of our study was to analyze the correlation between the selected clinico-pthological parameters, and p53 protein overexpression in regards to the particular tumor location. Methods. The material comprised 66 surgical specimens; 10 were Barrett’s carcinomas, 25 adenocarcinomas of the gastric cardia (type II adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction - EGJ, and 31 adenocarcinomas of the antrum. Immunostaining for p53 protein was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections, using the alkaline phosphatase - antialkaline phosphatase (APAAP method. The cases were considered positive for p53 if at least 5% of the tumor cells expressed this protein by immunostaining. Results. There was no significant difference observed between the studied groups in regards to age, sex, Lauren’s classification and tumor differentiation. There was, however, a significant difference observed in the depth of tumor invasion between Barrrett’s adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the cardia compared with the adenocarcinoma of the antrum. Namely, at the time of surgery, both Barrett’s adenocarcinomas and adenocarcinomas of the cardia, were significantly more advanced comparing with the adenocarcinomas of the antrum. Overexpression of p53 was found in 40% (4/10 of Barrett’s adenocarcinomas, 72% (18/25 of adenocarcinoma of the cardia and 65% (20/31 of adenocarcinoma of the antrum. No significant differences in p53 expression in relation to sex, type (Lauren of tumor, depth of invasion, lymph node involvement, or tumor differentiation were observed in any of the analyzed groups of tumors. Patients with more advanced Barrett

  12. The Inherited p53 Mutation in the Brazilian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achatz, Maria Isabel; Zambetti, Gerard P

    2016-12-01

    A common criticism of studying rare diseases is the often-limited relevance of the findings to human health. Here, we review ∼15 years of research into an unusual germline TP53 mutation (p.R337H) that began with its detection in children with adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC), a remarkably rare childhood cancer that is associated with poor prognosis. We have come to learn that the p.R337H mutation exists at a very high frequency in Southern and Southeastern Brazil, occurring in one of 375 individuals within a total population of ∼100 million. Moreover, it has been determined that carriers of this founder mutation display variable tumor susceptibility, ranging from isolated cases of pediatric ACC to Li-Fraumeni or Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL) syndromes, thus representing a significant medical issue for this country. Studying the biochemical and molecular consequences of this mutation on p53 tumor-suppressor activity, as well as the putative additional genetic alterations that cooperate with this mutation, is advancing our understanding of how p53 functions in tumor suppression in general. These studies, which originated with a rare childhood tumor, are providing important information for guiding genetic counselors and physicians in treating their patients and are already providing clinical benefit. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of the potential diagnostic value of serum p53 antibody for cancer: a meta-analysis.

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    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutant p53 protein over-expression has been reported to induce serum antibodies against p53. We assessed the diagnostic precision of serum p53 (s-p53 antibodies for diagnosis of cancer patients and compared the positive rates of the s-p53 antibody in different types of cancers. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed and Embase, through May 31, 2012. Studies were assessed for quality using QUADAS (quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy. The positive likelihood ratio (PLR and negative likelihood ratio (NLR were pooled separately and compared with overall accuracy measures using diagnostic odds ratios (DORs and Area under the curve(AUC. Meta regression and subgroup analyses were done, and heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. RESULTS: Of 1089 studies initially identified, 100 eligible studies with 23 different types of tumor met the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis (cases = 15953, controls = 8694. However, we could conduct independent meta analysis on only 13 of 36 types of tumors. Approximately 56% (56/100 of the included studies were of high quality (QUADAS score≥8. The summary estimates for quantitative analysis of serum p53 antibody in the diagnosis of cancers were: PLR 5.75 (95% CI: 4.60-7.19, NLR 0.81 (95%CI: 0.79-0.83 and DOR 7.56 (95% CI: 6.02-9.50. However, for the 13 types of cancers on which meta-analysis was conducted, the ranges for PLR (2.33-11.05, NLR (0.74-0.97, DOR (2.86-13.80, AUC(0.29-0.81, and positive rate (4.47%-28.36% indicated significant heterogeneity. We found that breast, colorectal, esophageal, gastric, hepatic, lymphoma, lung and ovarian cancer had relatively reasonable diagnostic accuracy. The remaining results of the five types of cancers suggested that s-p53 antibody had limited value. CONCLUSIONS: The current evidence suggests that s-p53 antibody has potential diagnostic value for cancer, especially for breast, colorectal, esophageal, gastric, hepatic

  14. Downregulated long non-coding RNA MEG3 in breast cancer regulates proliferation, migration and invasion by depending on p53’s transcriptional activity

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    Sun, Lin [West Biostatistics and Cost-effectiveness Research Center, Medical Insurance Office, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 610041, Sichuan (China); Li, Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 610041, Sichuan (China); Yang, Bangxiang, E-mail: b19933009@qq.coom [Department of Pain Management, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 610041, Sichuan (China)

    2016-09-09

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) was found to play critical roles in tumorigenesis, hence, screen of tumor-related lncRNAs, identification of their biological roles is important for understanding the processes of tumorigenesis. In this study, we identified the expressing difference of several tumor-related lncRNAs in breast cancer samples and found that, MEG3, which is downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor tissues, is also downregulated in breast cancer samples compared with adjacent tissues. For figuring out the effect of MEG3 in breast cancer cells MCF7 and MB231, we overexpressed MEG3 in these cells, and found that it resulted the inhibition of proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion capacities by enhancing p53’s transcriptional activity on its target genes, including p21, Maspin and KAI1. MEG3 presented similar effects in MB157, which is a p53-null breast cancer cell line, when functional p53 but not p53R273H mutant, which lacks transcriptional activity, was introduced. Surprisingly, overexpression of MEG3 activates p53’s transcriptional activity by decreasing MDM2’s transcription level, and thus stabilizes and accumulates P53. Taken together, our findings indicate that MEG3 is downregulated in breast cancer tissues and affects breast cancer cells’ malignant behaviors, which indicate MEG3 a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer. - Highlights: • MEG3 RNA is widely downregulated in breast tumor tissue. • MEG3 regulates P53 indirectly through transcriptional regulation of MDM2. • Under unstressed condition, MEG3-related P53 accumulation transcriptionally activates p53’s target genes. • MEG3 expression level tightly regulates proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in breast tumor cells.

  15. Phenotype specific analyses reveal distinct regulatory mechanism for chronically activated p53.

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    Kristina Kirschner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The downstream functions of the DNA binding tumor suppressor p53 vary depending on the cellular context, and persistent p53 activation has recently been implicated in tumor suppression and senescence. However, genome-wide information about p53-target gene regulation has been derived mostly from acute genotoxic conditions. Using ChIP-seq and expression data, we have found distinct p53 binding profiles between acutely activated (through DNA damage and chronically activated (in senescent or pro-apoptotic conditions p53. Compared to the classical 'acute' p53 binding profile, 'chronic' p53 peaks were closely associated with CpG-islands. Furthermore, the chronic CpG-island binding of p53 conferred distinct expression patterns between senescent and pro-apoptotic conditions. Using the p53 targets seen in the chronic conditions together with external high-throughput datasets, we have built p53 networks that revealed extensive self-regulatory 'p53 hubs' where p53 and many p53 targets can physically interact with each other. Integrating these results with public clinical datasets identified the cancer-associated lipogenic enzyme, SCD, which we found to be directly repressed by p53 through the CpG-island promoter, providing a mechanistic link between p53 and the 'lipogenic phenotype', a hallmark of cancer. Our data reveal distinct phenotype associations of chronic p53 targets that underlie specific gene regulatory mechanisms.

  16. Release of targeted p53 from the mitochondrion as an early signal during mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased accumulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein is an early response to low-level stressors. To investigate the fate of mitochondrial-sequestered p53, mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) on a p53-deficient genetic background were transfected with p53-EGFP fusion protei...

  17. p53-dependent non-coding RNA networks in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blume, C. J.; Hotz-Wagenblatt, A.; Hüllein, J.; Sellner, L.; Jethwa, A.; Stolz, T.; Slabicki, M.; Lee, K.; Sharathchandra, A.; Benner, A.; Dietrich, S.; Oakes, C. C.; Dreger, P.; te Raa, D.; Kater, A. P.; Jauch, A.; Merkel, O.; Oren, M.; Hielscher, T.; Zenz, T.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the tumor suppressor p53 lead to chemotherapy resistance and a dismal prognosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Whereas p53 targets are used to identify patient subgroups with impaired p53 function, a comprehensive assessment of non-coding RNA targets of p53 in CLL is missing. We

  18. Regulation of Mdmx and its role in the p53 pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulmeester, Erik

    2006-01-01

    The p53 protein is an important tumor suppressor that acts as a key regulator of the integrity of the genome. Two essential regulators of the p53 protein are Mdm2 and its homologue Mdmx. Like Mdm2, Mdmx represses p53-induced transcription. However, Mdmx cannot ubiquitinate or degrade p53 opposed to

  19. Mutant Mice Lacking the p53 C-Terminal Domain Model Telomere Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simeonova, I.; Jaber, S.; Draskovic, I.; Bardot, B.; Fang, M.; Bouarich-Bourimi, R.; Lejour, V.; Charbonnier, L.; Soudais, C.; Bourdon, J.C.; Huerre, M.; Londono-Vallejo, A.; Toledo, F.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in p53, although frequent in human cancers, have not been implicated in telomere-related syndromes. Here, we show that homozygous mutant mice expressing p53(Delta31), a p53 lacking the C-terminal domain, exhibit increased p53 activity and suffer from aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis,

  20. Expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), interleukin-11 (IL-11) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in p53-characterised human ovarian carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asschert, JGW; Vellenga, E; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ; de Vries, EGE

    1997-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is often associated with overexpression of cytokines that may exert autocrine and paracrine growth effects, as well as genetic alterations in (proto)oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes, such as p53. The p53 protein is not only involved in the regulation of cell cycle and

  1. Data for a proteomic analysis of p53-independent induction of apoptosis by bortezomib

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    Azmi Yerlikaya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article contains data related to the research article entitled, “A proteomic analysis of p53-independent induction of apoptosis by bortezomib in 4T1 breast cancer cell line” by Yerlikaya et al. [1]. The research article presented 2-DE and nLC-MS/MS based proteomic analysis of proteasome inhibitor bortezomib-induced changes in the expression of cellular proteins. The report showed that GRP78 and TCEB2 were over-expressed in response to treatment with bortezomib for 24 h. In addition, the report demonstrated that Hsp70, the 26S proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit 14 and sequestosome 1 were increased at least 2 fold in p53-deficient 4T1 cells. The data here show for the first time the increased expressions of Card10, Dffb, Traf3 and Trp53bp2 in response to inhibition of the 26S proteasome. The information presented here also shows that both Traf1 and Xiap (a member of IAPs are also downregulated simultaneously upon proteasomal inhibition. The increases in the level of Card10 and Trp53bp2 proteins were verified by Western blot analysis in response to varying concentrations of bortezomib for 24 h.

  2. CHIP stabilizes amyloid precursor protein via proteasomal degradation and p53-mediated trans-repression of β-secretase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amir Kumar; Pati, Uttam

    2015-01-01

    In patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), deposition of amyloid-beta Aβ, a proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase/BACE1, forms senile plaque in the brain. BACE1 activation is caused due to oxidative stresses and dysfunction of ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), which is linked to p53 inactivation. As partial suppression of BACE1 attenuates Aβ generation and AD-related pathology, it might be an ideal target for AD treatment. We have shown that both in neurons and in HEK-APP cells, BACE1 is a new substrate of E3-ligase CHIP and an inverse relation exists between CHIP and BACE1 level. CHIP inhibits ectopic BACE1 level by promoting its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus reducing APP processing; it stabilizes APP in neurons, thus reducing Aβ. CHIPUbox domain physically interacts with BACE1; however, both U-box and TPR domain are essential for ubiquitination and degradation of BACE1. Further, BACE1 is a downstream target of p53 and overexpression of p53 decreases BACE1 level. In HEK-APP cells, CHIP is shown to negatively regulate BACE1 promoter through stabilization of p53’s DNA-binding conformation and its binding upon 5′ UTR element (+127 to +150). We have thus discovered that CHIP regulates p53-mediated trans-repression of BACE1 at both transcriptional and post-translational level. We propose that a CHIP–BACE1–p53 feedback loop might control APP stabilization, which could further be utilized for new therapeutic intervention in AD. PMID:25773675

  3. Distinction between Asymptomatic Monoclonal B-cell Lymphocytosis with Cyclin D1 Overexpression and Mantle Cell Lymphoma: From Molecular Profiling to Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinet, Blanca; Ferrer, Ana; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Nonell, Lara; Salar, Antonio; Fernández-Rodríguez, Concepción; Puigdecanet, Eulàlia; Gimeno, Javier; Garcia-Garcia, Mar; Carmen Vela, Maria; Luño, Elisa; Collado, Rosa; Navarro, José Tomás; de la Banda, Esmeralda; Abrisqueta, Pau; Arenillas, Leonor; Serrano, Cristina; Lloreta, Josep; Miñana, Belén; Cerutti, Andrea; Florensa, Lourdes; Orfao, Alberto; Sanz, Ferran; Solé, Francesc; Dominguez-Sola, David; Serrano, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose According to current diagnostic criteria, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) encompasses the usual, aggressive variants and rare, nonnodal cases with monoclonal asymptomatic lymphocytosis, cyclin D1–positive (MALD1). We aimed to understand the biology behind this clinical heterogeneity and to identify markers for adequate identification of MALD1 cases. Experimental Design We compared 17 typical MCL cases with a homogeneous group of 13 untreated MALD1 cases (median follow-up, 71 months). We conducted gene expression profiling with functional analysis in five MCL and five MALD1. Results were validated in 12 MCL and 8 MALD1 additional cases by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in 24 MCL and 13 MALD1 cases by flow cytometry. Classification and regression trees strategy was used to generate an algorithm based on CD38 and CD200 expression by flow cytometry. Results We found 171 differentially expressed genes with enrichment of neoplastic behavior and cell proliferation signatures in MCL. Conversely, MALD1 was enriched in gene sets related to immune activation and inflammatory responses. CD38 and CD200 were differentially expressed between MCL and MALD1 and confirmed by flow cytometry (median CD38, 89% vs. 14%; median CD200, 0% vs. 24%, respectively). Assessment of both proteins allowed classifying 85% (11 of 13) of MALD1 cases whereas 15% remained unclassified. SOX11 expression by qRT-PCR was significantly different between MCL and MALD1 groups but did not improve the classification. Conclusion We show for the first time that MALD1, in contrast to MCL, is characterized by immune activation and driven by inflammatory cues. Assessment of CD38/CD200 by flow cytometry is useful to distinguish most cases of MALD1 from MCL in the clinical setting. MALD1 should be identified and segregated from the current MCL category to avoid overdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment. PMID:24352646

  4. INGN-225: a dendritic cell-based p53 vaccine (Ad.p53-DC) in small cell lung cancer: observed association between immune response and enhanced chemotherapy effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappori, Alberto A; Soliman, Hatem; Janssen, William E; Antonia, Scott J; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2010-06-01

    Novel approaches are needed for patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), as response after relapse is poor with standard therapies. p53 gene mutations often occur, resulting in tumoral protein overexpression and allowing for their recognition by p53-specific cytotoxic T cells. We describe the characteristics and manufacturing of INGN-225, a p53-modified adenovirus-tranduced dendritic cell vaccine, and review available data, to understand INGN-225's role in SCLC treatment. We discuss our pre-clinical, early Phase I/II, and ongoing randomized Phase II studies. INGN-225 was well tolerated (all toxicities anti-p53 immune response was positive in 18/43 (41.8%) patients, with overall post-INGN-225 response observed in 17/33 (51.5%) and immune response data available in 29 (14 positive, 15 negative). Post-INGN-225 response was observed in 11/14 (78.6%) and 5/15 (33%) patients with positive and negative immune responses, respectively. INGN-225 is safe, induces a significant immune response, and appears to sensitize SCLC to subsequent chemotherapy. Improvements in immune response induction and understanding the chemotherapy-immunotherapy synergism will determine INGN-225's future role as an anticancer therapy.

  5. P53 expression is significantly correlated with high risk of malignancy and epithelioid differentiation in GISTs. An immunohistochemical study of 104 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauser, Ursula; Schmedt auf der Günne, Nina; Klöppel, Günter; Merz, Hartmut; Feller, Alfred C

    2008-01-01

    Molecular analyses of the c-kit and PDGFRα genes have contributed greatly to our understanding of the development of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), but little is known about their malignant potential. The aim of our study was to evaluate cell cycle regulators as potential prognostic markers in GISTs. We investigated 104 KIT positive GISTs from various tumor sites in immunoassays on CD34, Ki67 and particularly on P53, BCL-2 and Cyclin D1. The results were compared with tumor size, mitotic rate, proliferative activity, histological subtype, nuclear atypia and risk assessment according to Fletcher and Miettinen. Occurrence of metastases and survival were also taken into account. The expression of P53 was significantly correlated with high risk criteria towards malignancy and epithelioid differentiation in GISTs. Likewise P53 label correlated significantly with the established prognostic indicators: tumor size, mitotic rate, nuclear atypia and proliferative activity. Regarding the site of tumor presentation, P53 was not a decisive factor. BCL-2 and Cyclin D1 expression was not related to any of the prognostic indicators. The present data identified P53 being a recommendable marker for predicting the risk of malignancy in GISTs. In addition, we found P53 significantly correlated with epithelioid tumor differentiation, independent of tumor site. BCL-2 and Cyclin D1, however, did not prove to be deciding markers for diagnosis and prognosis

  6. Gene expression profiles resulting from stable loss of p53 mirrors its role in tissue differentiation.

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    Oliver Couture

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene p53 is involved in a variety of cellular activities such as cellular stress responses, cell cycle regulation and differentiation. In our previous studies we have shown p53's transcription activating role to be important in osteoblast differentiation. There is still a debate in the literature as to whether p53 inhibits or promotes differentiation. We have found p53 heterozygous mice to show a p53 dependency on some bone marker gene expression that is absent in knockout mice. Mice heterozygous for p53 also show a higher incidence of osteosarcomas than p53 knockout mice. This suggests that p53 is able to modify the environment within osteoblasts. In this study we compare changes in gene expression resulting after either a transient or stable reduction in p53. Accordingly we reduced p53 levels transiently and stably in C2C12 cells, which are capable of both myoblast and osteoblast differentiation, and compared the changes in gene expression of candidate genes regulated by the p53 pathway. Using a PCR array to assay for p53 target genes, we have found different expression profiles when comparing stable versus transient knockdown of p53. As expected, several genes with profound changes after transient p53 loss were related to apoptosis and cell cycle regulation. In contrast, stable p53 loss produced a greater change in MyoD and other transcription factors with tissue specific roles, suggesting that long term loss of p53 affects tissue homeostasis to a greater degree than changes resulting from acute loss of p53. These differences in gene expression were validated by measuring promoter activity of different pathway specific genes involved in differentiation. These studies suggest that an important role for p53 is context dependent, with a stable reduction in p53 expression affecting normal tissue physiology more than acute loss of p53.

  7. Cystatin C as a p53?inducible apoptotic mediator that regulates cathepsin L activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Jinichi; Tanikawa, Chizu; Funauchi, Yuki; Lo, Paulisally Hau Yi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    In response to various cellular stresses, p53 is activated and inhibits malignant transformation through the transcriptional regulation of its target genes. However, the full picture of the p53 downstream pathway still remains to be elucidated. Here we identified cystatin C, a major inhibitor of cathepsins, as a novel p53 target. In response to DNA damage, activated p53 induced cystatin C expression through p53 binding sequence in the first intron. We showed that cathepsin L activity was decr...

  8. Radiosensitivity in lung cancer with focus on p53

    CERN Document Server

    Bergqvist, M

    2002-01-01

    In Sweden approximately 2800 new lung cancer patients are diagnosed every year. Radiotherapy is used with curative intention in certain groups of patients. The aim of this thesis is to study the basis of differences in radioresistance and the possibility to predict response to radiotherapy. In the first study we investigated, using the comet assay, four lung cancer cell lines with different sensitivity towards radiation. A clear dose-response relationship for radiation-induced DNA single strand and double strand breaks were found. All cell lines showed a remarkably efficient repair of both the DNA single strand and double strand breaks one hour after irradiation. However, further studies in one radioresistant and one radiosensitive cell line demonstrated that repair during the first 15 min had the best accordance with radiosensitivity measured as surviving fraction. In the second and third study, sequencing studies of the p53 gene were performed on cell lines as well as on tumour material. Cell lines that wer...

  9. PHTS, a novel putative tumor suppressor, is involved in the transformation reversion of HeLaHF cells independently of the p53 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dehua; Fan, Wufang; Liu, Guohong; Nguy, Vivian; Chatterton, Jon E.; Long Shilong; Ke, Ning; Meyhack, Bernd; Bruengger, Adrian; Brachat, Arndt; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Li, Qi-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    HeLaHF is a non-transformed revertant of HeLa cells, likely resulting from the activation of a putative tumor suppressor(s). p53 protein was stabilized in this revertant and reactivated for certain transactivation functions. Although p53 stabilization has not conclusively been linked to the reversion, it is clear that the genes in p53 pathway are involved. The present study confirms the direct role of p53 in HeLaHF reversion by demonstrating that RNAi-mediated p53 silencing partially restores anchorage-independent growth potential of the revertant through the suppression of anoikis. In addition, we identified a novel gene, named PHTS, with putative tumor suppressor properties, and showed that this gene is also involved in HeLaHF reversion independently of the p53 pathway. Expression profiling revealed that PHTS is one of the genes that is up-regulated in HeLaHF but not in HeLa. It encodes a putative protein with CD59-like domains. RNAi-mediated PHTS silencing resulted in the partial restoration of transformation (anchorage-independent growth) in HeLaHF cells, similar to that of p53 gene silencing, implying its tumor suppressor effect. However, the observed increased transformation potential by PHTS silencing appears to be due to an increased anchorage-independent proliferation rate rather than suppression of anoikis, unlike the effect of p53 silencing. p53 silencing did not affect PHTS gene expression, and vice versa, suggesting PHTS may function in a new and p53-independent tumor suppressor pathway. Furthermore, over-expression of PHTS in different cancer cell lines, in addition to HeLa, reduces cell growth likely via induced apoptosis, confirming the broad PHTS tumor suppressor properties

  10. Expression Profile of p53 and p21 in Large Bowel Mucosa as Biomarkers of Inflammatory-Related Carcinogenesis in Ulcerative Colitis

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    Cristiana Popp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis (UC is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory bowel disease that slightly increases the risk of colorectal cancer in patients with long-standing extended disease. Overexpression of p53 and p21 in colonic epithelia is usually detected in UC patients when no dysplasia is histologically seen and it is used by pathologists as a discriminator between regenerative changes and intraepithelial neoplasia, as well as a tissue biomarker useful to predict the risk of evolution toward malignancy. We present a one-year prospective observational study including a cohort of 45 patients with UC; p53 and p21 were evaluated in epithelial cells. p53 was positive in 74 samples revealed in 5% to 90% of epithelial cells, while 63 biopsies had strong positivity for p21 in 5% to 50% of epithelial cells. Architectural distortion was significantly correlated with p53 overexpression in epithelial cells. Thus, we consider that architectural distortion is a good substitute for p53 and p21 expression. We recommend use of p53 as the most valuable tissue biomarker in surveillance of UC patients, identifying the patients with higher risk for dysplasia. Association of p21 is also recommended for a better quantification of risk and for diminishing the false-negative results.

  11. A nanobody modulates the p53 transcriptional program without perturbing its functional architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethuyne, Jonas; De Gieter, Steven; Zwaenepoel, Olivier; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Durinck, Kaat; Verhelle, Adriaan; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Speleman, Frank; Loris, Remy; Gettemans, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The p53 transcription factor plays an important role in genome integrity. To perform this task, p53 regulates the transcription of genes promoting various cellular outcomes including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence. The precise regulation of this activity remains elusive as numerous mechanisms, e.g. posttranslational modifications of p53 and (non-)covalent p53 binding partners, influence the p53 transcriptional program. We developed a novel, non-invasive tool to manipulate endogenous p53. Nanobodies (Nb), raised against the DNA-binding domain of p53, allow us to distinctively target both wild type and mutant p53 with great specificity. Nb3 preferentially binds ‘structural’ mutant p53, i.e. R175H and R282W, while a second but distinct nanobody, Nb139, binds both mutant and wild type p53. The co-crystal structure of the p53 DNA-binding domain in complex with Nb139 (1.9 Å resolution) reveals that Nb139 binds opposite the DNA-binding surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nb139 does not disturb the functional architecture of the p53 DNA-binding domain using conformation-specific p53 antibody immunoprecipitations, glutaraldehyde crosslinking assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Functionally, the binding of Nb139 to p53 allows us to perturb the transactivation of p53 target genes. We propose that reduced recruitment of transcriptional co-activators or modulation of selected post-transcriptional modifications account for these observations. PMID:25324313

  12. Sublethal dose of irradiation enhances invasion of malignant glioma cells through p53-MMP 2 pathway in U87MG mouse brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Jian; Park, In-Ho; Ryu, Hyang-Hwa; Li, Song-Yuan; Li, Chun-Hao; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Wen, Min; Jang, Woo-Youl; Jung, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly lethal neoplasm that frequently recurs locally after radiotherapy, and most of these recurrences originate from near the irradiated target field. In the present study, we identified the effects of radiation on glioma invasion and p53, TIMP-2, and MMP-2 expression through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The U87MG (wt p53) and U251 (mt p53) human malignant glioma cell lines were prepared, and the U2OS (wt 53) and Saos2 (del p53) osteosarcoma cell lines were used as p53 positive and negative controls. The four cell lines and p53 knock-downed U87MG cells received radiation (2–6 Gy) and were analyzed for expression of p53 and TIMP-2 by Western blot, and MMP-2 activity was detected by zymography. In addition, the effects of irradiation on directional invasion of malignant glioma were evaluated by implanting nude mice with bioluminescent u87-Fluc in vivo followed by MMP-2, p53, and TIMP-2 immunohisto-chemistry and in situ zymography. MMP-2 activity and p53 expression increased in proportional to the radiation dose in cell lines with wt p53, but not in the cell lines with del or mt p53. TIMP-2 expression did not increase in U87MG cells. MMP-2 activity decreased in p53 knock-downed U87MG cells but increased in the control group. Furthermore, radiation enhanced MMP-2 activity and increased tumor margin invasiveness in vivo. Tumor cells invaded by radiation overexpressed MMP-2 and p53 and revealed high gelatinolytic activity compared with those of non-radiated tumor cells. Radiation-induced upregulation of p53 modulated MMP-2 activity, and the imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 may have an important role in glioblastoma invasion by degrading the extracellular matrix. Bioluminescent “U87-Fluc”was useful for observing tumor formation without sacrifice after implanting tumor cells in the mouse brain. These findings suggest that the radiotherapy involved field for malignant glioma needs to be reconsidered, and that future trials should investigate

  13. Fenofibrate inhibited pancreatic cancer cells proliferation via activation of p53 mediated by upregulation of LncRNA MEG3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Duanmin [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Su, Cunjin [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Jiang, Min [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Shen, Yating [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Shi, Aiming; Zhao, Fenglun [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Chen, Ruidong [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Shen, Zhu [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Bao, Junjie, E-mail: baojjsdfey@sina.com [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Tang, Wen, E-mail: sztangwen@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China)

    2016-03-04

    There is still no suitable drug for pancreatic cancer treatment, which is one of the most aggressive human tumors. Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3), a LncRNA, has been suggested as a tumor suppressor in a range of human tumors. Studies found fenofibrate exerted anti-tumor roles in various human cancer cell lines. However, its role in pancreatic cancer remains unknown. The present study aimed to explore the impacts of fenofibrate on pancreatic cancer cell lines, and to investigate MEG3 role in its anti-tumor mechanisms. We used MTT assay to determine cells proliferation, genome-wide LncRNA microarray analysis to identify differently expressed LncRNAs, siRNA or pCDNA-MEG3 transfection to interfere or upregulate MEG3 expression, western blot to detect protein levels, real-time PCR to determine MEG3 level. Fenofibrate significantly inhibited proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells, increased MEG3 expression and p53 levels. Moreover, knockdown of MEG3 attenuated cytotoxicity induced by fenofibrate. Furthermore, overexpression of MEG3 induced cells death and increased p53 expression. Our results indicated fenofibrate inhibited pancreatic cancer cells proliferation via activation of p53 mediated by upregulation of MEG3. - Highlights: • We found that fenofibrate suppressed proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. • We found fenofibrate increased LncRNA-MEG3 expression and p53 level in PANC-1 cells. • Inhibition of MEG3 expression attenuated anti-tumor effects of fenofibrate.

  14. Effect of p53 genotype on gene expression profiles in murine liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Suzanne M.; Akerman, Gregory S.; Desai, Varsha G.; Tsai, Chen-an; Tolleson, William H.; Melchior, William B.; Lin, Chien-Ju; Fuscoe, James C.; Casciano, Daniel A.; Chen, James J.

    2008-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is a key regulatory element in the cell and is regarded as the 'guardian of the genome'. Much of the present knowledge of p53 function has come from studies of transgenic mice in which the p53 gene has undergone a targeted deletion. In order to provide additional insight into the impact on the cellular regulatory networks associated with the loss of this gene, microarray technology was utilized to assess gene expression in tissues from both the p53 -/- and p53 +/- mice. Six male mice from each genotype (p53 +/+ , p53 +/- , and p53 -/- ) were humanely killed and the tissues processed for microarray analysis. The initial studies have been performed in the liver for which the Dunnett test revealed 1406 genes to be differentially expressed between p53 +/+ and p53 +/- or between p53 +/+ and p53 -/- at the level of p ≤ 0.05. Both genes with increased expression and decreased expression were identified in p53 +/- and in p53 -/- mice. Most notable in the gene list derived from the p53 +/- mice was the significant reduction in p53 mRNA. In the p53 -/- mice, not only was there reduced expression of the p53 genes on the array, but genes associated with DNA repair, apoptosis, and cell proliferation were differentially expressed, as expected. However, altered expression was noted for many genes in the Cdc42-GTPase pathways that influence cell proliferation. This may indicate that alternate pathways are brought into play in the unperturbed liver when loss or reduction in p53 levels occurs

  15. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis and p53 gene status in a cisplatin-resistant human ovarian carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajac, A; Da Silva, J; Ahomadegbe, J C; Rateau, J G; Bernaudin, J F; Riou, G; Bénard, J

    1996-09-27

    Cisplatin-induced apoptosis and p53 gene status were analyzed in human ovarian carcinoma using a parental IGR-OV1 line and a derived cisplatin-resistant IGR-OV1/DDP subline. Compared with parental cells, cisplatin-resistant cells exhibited a 5-fold higher resistance index and a 2-fold longer doubling time. Cisplatin induced apoptosis in both cell lines, as assessed by cell morphology and the presence of a DNA ladder. However, high concentrations were necessary to induce apoptosis in resistant cells. These cells elicited a 5-fold decrease in the number of platinum atoms bound per nucleotide. IGR-OV1/DDP cells also exhibited enhanced drug efflux and a higher glutathione content. Our data suggest that the levels of cisplatin-DNA lesions are critical for drug sensitivity and apoptosis induction in this in vitro ovarian carcinoma model. Comparative analysis of the p53 gene in sensitive and resistant cells revealed the presence of the same heterozygous mutation in exon 5. A 2-fold increase in p53 mRNA and protein amounts was observed in resistant cells as assessed by Northern and Western blots, respectively. Immunocytochemical staining revealed a higher percentage of p53 stained nuclei in resistant cells. RT-PCR analysis of p53 transcripts showed that both wild-type and mutated alleles were transcribed in sensitive as well as in resistant cells. However, mutated transcripts were 1.5-fold more abundant than wild-type transcripts in sensitive cells, whereas they were 2-fold higher in resistant cells. In addition, mdm-2 protein was over-expressed in resistant cells. Our results address the question of the functionality of p53 protein and its possible role in apoptosis induction in this model. In resistant cells, p53 protein might be inactivated by 2 mechanisms: mutation and complexation with mdm-2 protein. Therefore, the presence of non-functional p53 in resistant cells might be involved in the relative failure of cisplatin-induced apoptosis in these cells.

  16. Regulatory module involving FGF13, miR-504, and p53 regulates ribosomal biogenesis and supports cancer cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublik, Débora R.; Bursać, Slađana; Sheffer, Michal; Oršolić, Ines; Shalit, Tali; Tarcic, Ohad; Kotler, Eran; Mouhadeb, Odelia; Hoffman, Yonit; Fuchs, Gilad; Levin, Yishai; Volarević, Siniša; Oren, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    The microRNA miR-504 targets TP53 mRNA encoding the p53 tumor suppressor. miR-504 resides within the fibroblast growth factor 13 (FGF13) gene, which is overexpressed in various cancers. We report that the FGF13 locus, comprising FGF13 and miR-504, is transcriptionally repressed by p53, defining an additional negative feedback loop in the p53 network. Furthermore, we show that FGF13 1A is a nucleolar protein that represses ribosomal RNA transcription and attenuates protein synthesis. Importantly, in cancer cells expressing high levels of FGF13, the depletion of FGF13 elicits increased proteostasis stress, associated with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis. Notably, stepwise neoplastic transformation is accompanied by a gradual increase in FGF13 expression and increased dependence on FGF13 for survival (“nononcogene addiction”). Moreover, FGF13 overexpression enables cells to cope more effectively with the stress elicited by oncogenic Ras protein. We propose that, in cells in which activated oncogenes drive excessive protein synthesis, FGF13 may favor survival by maintaining translation rates at a level compatible with the protein quality-control capacity of the cell. Thus, FGF13 may serve as an enabler, allowing cancer cells to evade proteostasis stress triggered by oncogene activation. PMID:27994142

  17. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Ramakrishna, Gayatri, E-mail: gayatrirama1@gmail.com [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Laboratory of Cancer Cell Biology, Department of Research, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, Delhi 110070 (India)

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  18. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shi-Wei [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chun-Ying [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Yen-Ting [Department of Medical Research and Education, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kao, Jun-Kai [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Husan-Wen [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chuan-Hsun [Department of Surgical Oncology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Nutrition Therapy, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liang, Shu-Mei [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Ju [Department of Dermatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Jau-Ling [Department of Bioscience Technology, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Shieh, Jeng-Jer, E-mail: shiehjj@vghtc.gov.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Education and Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-15

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status.

  19. Loss of heterozygosity in P53, BRCA1, and estrogen receptor genes and correlation to expression of p53 protein in ovarian epithelial tumors of different cell types and biological behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis, C N; Krebs, P A; Quezado, M M; Albuquerque, A; Bryant, B; San Juan, X; Kleiner, D; Sobel, M E; Merino, M J

    2000-02-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) in ovarian epithelial tumors of differing cell types and biological behavior has not been thoroughly investigated. Moreover, there have been conflicting reports correlating LOH of the p53 gene to overexpression of p53 protein. This study evaluated 34 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded ovarian epithelial tumors for LOH by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the following microsatellite markers: TP53(17p13.1/p53 gene), D17S579(17q/BRCA1 gene), and ESR (6q24-27/estrogen receptor gene). LOH of the TP53 marker was detected in 4 (44%) of 9 informative serous cystadenocarcinomas (SCa) but in 0 of 4 informative clear cell carcinomas (CCa) and 0 of 5 informative serous tumors of low malignant potential (SLMP). LOH of the BRCA1 marker was detected in 5 (83%) of 6 informative SCa, but in 1 (13%) of 8 informative CCa and 1 (14%) of 7 informative SLMP. LOH of the ESR marker was detected in 4 (50%) of 8 informative SCa, but in 0 of 4 informative CCa and 1 (16%) of 6 informative SLMP. p53 protein overexpression was present in 8 of 12 SCa but did not correlate to TP53 LOH. LOH for TP53, D17S579/ BRCA1, and ESR is common in ovarian SCa, and is observed in primary tumors as well as metastases. In contrast, these genetic alterations are less common in CCa and in the biologically less aggressive SLMP tumors. These data suggest different mechanisms of oncogenesis in ovarian epithelial tumors of different cell types and biological behavior.

  20. DNA polymerase eta, the product of the xeroderma pigmentosum variant gene and a target of p53, modulates the DNA damage checkpoint and p53 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Chen, Xinbin

    2006-02-01

    DNA polymerase eta (PolH) is the product of the xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) gene and a well-characterized Y-family DNA polymerase for translesion synthesis. Cells derived from XPV patients are unable to faithfully bypass UV photoproducts and DNA adducts and thus acquire genetic mutations. Here, we found that PolH can be up-regulated by DNA breaks induced by ionizing radiation or chemotherapeutic agents, and knockdown of PolH gives cells resistance to apoptosis induced by DNA breaks in multiple cell lines and cell types in a p53-dependent manner. To explore the underlying mechanism, we examined p53 activation upon DNA breaks and found that p53 activation is impaired in PolH knockdown cells and PolH-null primary fibroblasts. Importantly, reconstitution of PolH into PolH knockdown cells restores p53 activation. Moreover, we provide evidence that, upon DNA breaks, PolH is partially colocalized with phosphorylated ATM at gamma-H2AX foci and knockdown of PolH impairs ATM to phosphorylate Chk2 and p53. However, upon DNA damage by UV, PolH knockdown cells exhibit two opposing temporal responses: at the early stage, knockdown of PolH suppresses p53 activation and gives cells resistance to UV-induced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner; at the late stage, knockdown of PolH suppresses DNA repair, leading to sustained activation of p53 and increased susceptibility to apoptosis in both a p53-dependent and a p53-independent manner. Taken together, we found that PolH has a novel role in the DNA damage checkpoint and that a p53 target can modulate the DNA damage response and subsequently regulate p53 activation.

  1. DNA Polymerase η, the Product of the Xeroderma Pigmentosum Variant Gene and a Target of p53, Modulates the DNA Damage Checkpoint and p53 Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Chen, Xinbin

    2006-01-01

    DNA polymerase η (PolH) is the product of the xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) gene and a well-characterized Y-family DNA polymerase for translesion synthesis. Cells derived from XPV patients are unable to faithfully bypass UV photoproducts and DNA adducts and thus acquire genetic mutations. Here, we found that PolH can be up-regulated by DNA breaks induced by ionizing radiation or chemotherapeutic agents, and knockdown of PolH gives cells resistance to apoptosis induced by DNA breaks in multiple cell lines and cell types in a p53-dependent manner. To explore the underlying mechanism, we examined p53 activation upon DNA breaks and found that p53 activation is impaired in PolH knockdown cells and PolH-null primary fibroblasts. Importantly, reconstitution of PolH into PolH knockdown cells restores p53 activation. Moreover, we provide evidence that, upon DNA breaks, PolH is partially colocalized with phosphorylated ATM at γ-H2AX foci and knockdown of PolH impairs ATM to phosphorylate Chk2 and p53. However, upon DNA damage by UV, PolH knockdown cells exhibit two opposing temporal responses: at the early stage, knockdown of PolH suppresses p53 activation and gives cells resistance to UV-induced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner; at the late stage, knockdown of PolH suppresses DNA repair, leading to sustained activation of p53 and increased susceptibility to apoptosis in both a p53-dependent and a p53-independent manner. Taken together, we found that PolH has a novel role in the DNA damage checkpoint and that a p53 target can modulate the DNA damage response and subsequently regulate p53 activation. PMID:16449651

  2. Identification and design of p53-derived HLA-A2-binding peptides with increased CTL immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T R; Buus, S; Brunak, S

    2001-01-01

    HLA-A2 transgenic mouse fibrosarcoma cells transfected with human p53 DNA. The data suggest that modified self-peptides derived from overexpressed tumour-associated proteins can be used in vaccine development against cancer, and that quantitative predictions of HLA binding is of value in the rational......The replacement of a suboptimal amino acid in a primary anchor position with an optimal residue improves human leucocyte antigen (HLA) binding and immunogenicity, while maintaining cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) specificity. Using a neural network capable of performing quantitative predictions...... of peptide binding to HLA-A2 molecules, we identified three p53 protein-derived nonamer peptides with intermediate binding owing to suboptimal amino acids in the P2 anchor position. These peptides were synthesized along with the corresponding analogs, where the natural P2 residue had been replaced...

  3. Effect of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on the growth and radiotherapeutic sensitivity of human lymphoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zeyang; Fan Wo; Li Dongqing; Zhu Ran; Wang Yongqing; Wu Jinchang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the inhibitory effect and radiation sensitization of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on human lymphoma cell lines. Methods: Human lymphoma cell lines Raji and Daudi were treated with rAd-p53, radiation therapy and combined treatment, respectively. The cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTT. The p53 protein expression was detected by Western blotting, and p53 mRNA was detected by BT-PCB. Results: The MTT results showed that the inhibitory effect and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 on human lymphoma cell lines were not obvious [Raji: (27.5±4.1)%; Daudi: (28.1±1.6)%]. The results of Western blotting and BT-PCB showed that extrinsic p53 protein and p53 mRNA were expressed to some degree, but not at high-level. In addition, the results didn't demonstrate obvious radiosensitivity enhancement. Conclusions: The role of inhibition and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 was not significant on human lymphoma cell lines. (authors)

  4. Drosophila Chk2 and p53 proteins induce stage -specific cell death independently during oogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhrat, Anna; Pritchett, Tracy; Peretz, Gabriella; McCall, Kimberly; Abdu, Uri

    2011-01-01

    In Drosophila, the checkpoint protein-2 kinase (DmChk2) and its downstream effector protein, Dmp53, are required for DNA damage-mediated cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis. In this study we focus on understanding the function of these two apoptosis inducing factors during ovarian development. We found that expression of Dmp53, but not DmChk2, led to loss of ovarian stem cells. We demonstrate that expression of DmChk2, but not Dmp53, induced mid-oogenesis cell death. DmChk2 induced cell death was not suppressed by Dmp53 mutant, revealing for the first time that in Drosophila, overexpression of DmChk2 can induce cell death which is independent of Dmp53. We found that over-expression of caspase inhibitors such as DIAP1, p35 and p49 did not suppress DmChk2- and Dmp53-induced cell death. Thus, our study reveals stage -specific effects of Dmp53 and DmChk2 in oogenesis. Moreover, our results demonstrate that although DmChk2 and Dmp53 affect different stages of ovarian development, loss of ovarian stem cells by p53 expression and mid-oogenesis cell death induced by DmChk2 do not require caspase activity. PMID:20838898

  5. The critical role of catalase in prooxidant and antioxidant function of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M Y; Kim, H-B; Piao, C; Lee, K H; Hyun, J W; Chang, I-Y; You, H J

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is an important regulator of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, although downstream mediators of p53 remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that p53 and its downstream targets, p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase (p53R2) and p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3), physically and functionally interact with catalase for efficient regulation of intracellular ROS, depending on stress intensity. Under physiological conditions, the antioxidant functions of p53 are mediated by p53R2, which maintains increased catalase activity and thereby protects against endogenous ROS. After genotoxic stress, high levels of p53 and PIG3 cooperate to inhibit catalase activity, leading to a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance toward an oxidative status, which could augment apoptotic cell death. These results highlight the essential role of catalase in p53-mediated ROS regulation and suggest that the p53/p53R2–catalase and p53/PIG3–catalase pathways are critically involved in intracellular ROS regulation under physiological conditions and during the response to DNA damage, respectively. PMID:22918438

  6. An adaptive molecular timer in p53-meidated cell fate decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Wang, Ping; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    The tumor suppressor p53 decides cellular outcomes in the DNA damage response. It is intriguing to explore the link between p53 dynamics and cell fates. We developed a theoretical model of p53 signaling network to clarify the mechanism of cell fate decision mediated by its dynamics. We found that the interplay between p53-Mdm2 negative feedback loop and p53-PTEN-Mdm2 positive feedback loop shapes p53 dynamics. Depending on the intensity of DNA damage, p53 shows three modes of dynamics: persistent pulses, two-phase dynamics with pulses followed by sustained high levels and straightforward high levels. Especially, p53 shows two-phase dynamics upon moderated damage and the required number of p53 pulses before apoptosis induction decreases with increasing DNA damage. Our results suggested there exists an adaptive molecular timer that determines whether and when the apoptosis switch should be triggered. We clarified the mechanism behind the switching of p53 dynamical modes by bifurcation analysis. Moreover, we reproduced the experimental results that drug additions alter p53 pulses to sustained p53 activation and leads to senescence. Our work may advance the understanding the significance of p53 dynamics in tumor suppression. This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11175084, 11204126 and 31361163003).

  7. eRNAs are required for p53-dependent enhancer activity and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Carlos A; Drost, Jarno; Wijchers, Patrick J; van de Werken, Harmen; de Wit, Elzo; Oude Vrielink, Joachim A F; Elkon, Ran; Melo, Sónia A; Léveillé, Nicolas; Kalluri, Raghu; de Laat, Wouter; Agami, Reuven

    2013-02-07

    Binding within or nearby target genes involved in cell proliferation and survival enables the p53 tumor suppressor gene to regulate their transcription and cell-cycle progression. Using genome-wide chromatin-binding profiles, we describe binding of p53 also to regions located distantly from any known p53 target gene. Interestingly, many of these regions possess conserved p53-binding sites and all known hallmarks of enhancer regions. We demonstrate that these p53-bound enhancer regions (p53BERs) indeed contain enhancer activity and interact intrachromosomally with multiple neighboring genes to convey long-distance p53-dependent transcription regulation. Furthermore, p53BERs produce, in a p53-dependent manner, enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) that are required for efficient transcriptional enhancement of interacting target genes and induction of a p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest. Thus, our results ascribe transcription enhancement activity to p53 with the capacity to regulate multiple genes from a single genomic binding site. Moreover, eRNA production from p53BERs is required for efficient p53 transcription enhancement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Knockdown of p53 suppresses Nanog expression in embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelalim, Essam Mohamed, E-mail: emohamed@qf.org.qa [Qatar Biomedical Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, Doha 5825 (Qatar); Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Department of Cytology and Histology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Tooyama, Ikuo [Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We investigate the role of p53 in ESCs in the absence of DNA damage. •p53 knockdown suppresses ESC proliferation. •p53 knockdown downregulates Nanog expression. •p53 is essential for mouse ESC self-renewal. -- Abstract: Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) express high levels of cytoplasmic p53. Exposure of mouse ESCs to DNA damage leads to activation of p53, inducing Nanog suppression. In contrast to earlier studies, we recently reported that chemical inhibition of p53 suppresses ESC proliferation. Here, we confirm that p53 signaling is involved in the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of p53 induced downregulation of p21 and defects in ESC proliferation. Furthermore, p53 knockdown resulted in a significant downregulation in Nanog expression at 24 and 48 h post-transfection. p53 knockdown also caused a reduction in Oct4 expression at 48 h post-transfection. Conversely, exposure of ESCs to DNA damage caused a higher reduction of Nanog expression in control siRNA-treated cells than in p53 siRNA-treated cells. These data show that in the absence of DNA damage, p53 is required for the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal by regulating Nanog expression.

  9. [Effects of p53 gene on drug resistance in human lung cancer cell lines.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hong; Zhu, Yunzhong; Wang, Hui; Lai, Baitang; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhan, Xiuping; Wang, Yue; Yang, Xuehui; Yue, Wentao; Zhang, Hongtao

    2008-04-20

    Drug resistance of lung cancer cells is one of main factors which affect the outcome of chemotherapy. It has been reported that abnormal p53 gene is well assosiated with chemotherapy resistance of tumor cells. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of p53 gene on drug resistance in human lung cancer cell lines, so as to provide foundation of choosing individual chemotherapy drugs in clinical treatment. The expression vectors which contain p53cDNA and p53 antisense cDNA respectively were constructed and were confirmed by sequencing. Transfected the 801D, a human lung cancer cell line with recombined plasmids by lipofectin mediating. Several kinds of monoclone cell lines, pEGFP-801D,pEGFP-sense p53-801D(including sense p53,pEGFP-p53(RS)-801D),pEGFP-antisense p53-801D(including antisense p53,pEGFP-p53(AS)-801D),which contained p53 of different status were obtained. Green fluorescence was observed through fluorescence microscopy. The extraneous gene was detected by PCR. MTT assay was taken to determine the drug resistance of each cell line to chemotherapy agents. Cell cycle and apoptosis induced by antitumor drugs were examined by flow cytometer. Extraneous sense p53 and antisense p53 were proved to be linked to plasmid respectively by sequencing.Green fluorescence was found in transfected cell lines. The IC50 of pEGFP-p53(AS)-801D cell line(0.26+/-0.09 mug/mL) to Cisplatin(DDP) decreased markedly compared with 801D(0.55+/-0.19 mug/mL,Phigher than that of pEGFP-p53(AS)-801D(P TAX) than 801D(8.40+/-1.50 ng/mL, P TAX induced G2 phase arrest in pEGFP-p53(RS)-801D. A increased S phase proportion was induced by 5FU in pEGFP-p53(RS)-801D. The cell lines experienced apoptosis and necrosis when they were treated with either DDP or TAX. p53 gene of different status have different effects on resistance of chemotherapy agents in lung cancer cell lines. p53 mutation and deletion are related to drug resistance of DDP. p53 deletion connects with chemoresistance of TAX and

  10. Importance of P53, Ki-67 expression in the differential diagnosis of benign/malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulku Kucuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventionally growth pattern, stromal overgrowth, stromal cellularity and stromal mitotic activity are the main parameters in the grading of phyllodes tumors (PTs. Recent studies revealed that both p53 and Ki-67 expressions are correlated with grade of PTs of the breast. Expression of hormone receptors and overexpression/amplification of HER2 has been studied in PTs to discover the roles of these markers as new treatment modalities. Materials and Method: We studied 26 PT cases. Seventeen benign and nine malignant PTs were re-evaluated as regards stromal cellularity mitotic activity, p53/Ki-67 expression rates and the relation between these parameters. Estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor (ER, PR positivity were determined by counting nuclear staining in five high-power fields. Also, the presence of any HER2 staining and staining patterns were documanted. Results: Stromal cellularity, mitotic rate, p53 and Ki-67 expression rates were all correlated with benign and malignant histologic subgroups (P = 0.000-0.001. Ki-67 and p53 expressions were statistically significantly correlated with histologic subgroups, stromal cellularity and mitotic rate (P < 0.005. ER and PR expressions in the epithelial component were not statistically significant between the two groups. HER2 showed different staining patterns in the epithelial component, and there was no staining in the stromal component. Conclusion: Ki-67 and p53 expression rates were statistically significantly correlated with grade of mammary PTs; therefore, they can be used in the determination of tumor grade, especially for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant tumors. Malignant and benign tumors did not differ significantly in terms of hormone receptor and HER2 expression. HER2 expression showed different patterns in the epithelial component of the PTs.

  11. Expression of p21/waf1 in oral squamous cell carcinomas--correlation with p53 and mdm2 and cellular proliferation index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, I O; Lam, K Y; Ng, M; Regezi, J A

    1999-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21/waf1 is regulated by p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways. In addition, mdm2 is an oncogene which forms an auto-regulatory loop with the normal p53 protein and its role has been implicated in oncogenesis. To determine whether a correlation exists between the expression of these gene products, tumor differentiation, tumor staging and radiation therapy, we investigated the expression of p21, p53 and mdm2, and cellular proliferation by Ki-67 (MIB1) labeling index using immunohistochemistry in 88 human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) samples from 56 patients. Tumor expression of all nuclear proteins was scored according to the percentage of positive cancer nuclei, both with the cancer tissue as a whole as well as in different epithelial compartments of differentiation. Positive p21, p53, mdm2 and MIB1 staining was present in 82.4, 67.8, 25.9 and 98.8% of the SCC samples. The staining in different epithelial compartments of differentiation varied: those of p21 and mdm2 present predominantly in suprabasal and upper regions of the tumors: those of p53 and MIB1 in basal and suprabasal regions. Higher levels of p21 expression were seen in actively proliferating tumors (P = 0.025). p21 expression positively correlated with mdm2 expression but not with p53 expression. Moreover, the level of p21 expression was higher in older patients (P = 0.024) and female patients (P = 0.008). There was no significant association among p53, mdm2 and MIB1. Expression of p53 was higher in tumors with poorer cellular differentiation and in younger patients (P = 0.038 and 0.028). There was no association between tumor stage by TNM classification and the expression of any of these gene products or proliferation index. Radiation therapy did not alter the expression of any of these. To conclude, p21 protein was overexpressed in oral SCCs, and this overexpression was related to cell proliferation index and mdm2 expression but independent of p53

  12. Mitochondrial localization of the low level p53 protein in proliferative cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferecatu, Ioana; Bergeaud, Marie; Rodriguez-Enfedaque, Aida; Le Floch, Nathalie [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Oliver, Lisa [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Rincheval, Vincent; Renaud, Flore [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vallette, Francois M. [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Mignotte, Bernard [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vayssiere, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jean-luc.vayssiere@uvsq.fr [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France)

    2009-10-02

    p53 protein plays a central role in suppressing tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Emerging publications suggest that following stress, a fraction of p53 translocates to mitochondria to induce cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the localization of p53 under unstressed conditions remains largely unexplored. Here we show that p53 is localized at mitochondria in absence of apoptotic stimuli, when cells are proliferating, localization observed in various cell types (rodent and human). This is also supported by acellular assays in which p53 bind strongly to mitochondria isolated from rat liver. Furthermore, the mitochondria subfractionation study and the alkaline treatment of the mitochondrial p53 revealed that the majority of mitochondrial p53 is present in the membranous compartments. Finally, we identified VDAC, a protein of the mitochondrial outer-membrane, as a putative partner of p53 in unstressed/proliferative cells.

  13. The tissue dependent interactions between p53 and Bcl-2 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Miao, Xiao; Wang, Hongshen; Xu, Zhixiang; Li, Bin

    2015-11-03

    To further investigate the role of p53 in apoptosis in vivo and the interaction between p53 and Bcl-2 in the regulation of cellular apoptosis in vivo, we depleted p53 in Bcl-2-null mice. We found that the interaction between p53 and Bcl-2 are tissue dependent. Specifically, loss of p53 in Bcl-2-/- mice inhibits apoptotic induction in spleen and subsequently inhibits the Bcl-2-null-induced spleen atrophy. Furthermore, p53 deficiency overcomes loss of melanocyte stem cell (MSC)-induced apoptosis and subsequently prevents hair graying in Bcl-2- null mice. In addition, p53 deletion partly inhibits apoptosis in hair follicle keratinocytes, leading to the alleviation of hair growth delay in Bcl-2-null mice. However, p53 absence in Bcl-2-null mice cannot restore other defects in Bcl-2-null mice, including retardation of growth, short ears and polycystic kidney disease.

  14. The Tumor Suppressor, P53, Decreases the Metal Transporter, ZIP14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Loss of p53’s proper function accounts for over half of identified human cancers. We identified the metal transporter ZIP14 (Zinc-regulated transporter (ZRT and Iron-regulated transporter (IRT-like Protein 14 as a p53-regulated protein. ZIP14 protein levels were upregulated by lack of p53 and downregulated by increased p53 expression. This regulation did not fully depend on the changes in ZIP14’s mRNA expression. Co-precipitation studies indicated that p53 interacts with ZIP14 and increases its ubiquitination and degradation. Moreover, knockdown of p53 resulted in higher non-transferrin-bound iron uptake, which was mediated by increased ZIP14 levels. Our study highlights a role for p53 in regulating nutrient metabolism and provides insight into how iron and possibly other metals such as zinc and manganese could be regulated in p53-inactivated tumor cells.

  15. Structure of the Tetrameric p53 Tumor Suppressor Bound to DNA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marmorstein, Ronen

    2002-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor binds DNA as a tetramer to regulate the transcription of genes involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and alterations in the DNA-binding core domain of p53 are the most...

  16. The wild type p53 gene radiosensitizes malignant cells and tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo, David; McBride, William

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To investigate the use of the wild-type p53 gene as a radiosensitizer of human malignant cells and tumors. Materials and Methods: An ovarian carcinoma cell line (SKOV) lacking the p53 gene was transfected in vitro with E1 deleted adenovirus containing the wild type p53 gene (Ad/p53). SKOV cells expressing the p53 protein were tested for intrinsic radiosensitivity with clonogenic survival assays. SKOV tumors growing in the flanks of SCID mice were injected with 1x10(9) PFU of Ad/p53 or Ad/luciferase. Injected tumors were either irradiated to 24 Gy in 4 Gy fractions or not irradiated. Tumor diameters were then monitored. Results: Cells expressing the p53 gene product were more sensitive to radiation than control cells expressing the luciferase gene in in vitro clonogenic survival assays. SKOV tumors injected with the Ad/p53 virus expressed the p53 protein as demonstrated through immunohistochemical analysis. Tumors injected with Ad/p53 grew more slowly than tumors injected with Ad/luciferase or saline. After irradiation with 24Gy, tumors injected with Ad/p53 were controlled while those injected with Ad/luciferase were not. Conclusions: Our results formally demonstrate that transfer of the wild-type p53 gene can increase the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of a malignant cell line lacking the p53 gene. We also demonstrate that intra-tumoral injection of an adenoviral vector containing the wild type p53 gene increases the radiation responsiveness of established tumors, consistent with the radiosensitizing activity of the wild type p53 gene demonstrated in vitro. These studies support clinical trials using p53 gene transfer to potentially improve the efficacy of radiation therapy in human malignancies

  17. p53 protein expression in sequential biopsies of oral dysplasias and in situ carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Zarbo, R J; Regev, E; Pisanty, S; Silverman, S; Gazit, D

    1995-01-01

    Immunohistochemically detectable levels of p53 may be seen early in the malignant transformation of some neoplasms. To determine if p53 is immunocytochemically detectable, and therefore presumptively abnormal, in oral dysplasias and in situ carcinomas, and to explore the natural history of p53 protein expression in these lesions, sequential biopsies from patients with lesions occurring in the same anatomic site were examined. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from 19 patients were evaluated immunohistochemically for p53 protein using antibody clones Pab1801 and BP53-12. With two exceptions, comparable results were observed with these antibodies. p53 protein was detected immunocytochemically in 6 of 13 patients with dysplasias; 3 of these progressed to p53-positive invasive carcinoma, one advanced to a more severe grade of p53-positive dysplasia, one developed into a p53-negative verrucous carcinoma, and one represented a p53-positive dysplasia developing five years after treatment of a p53-positive carcinoma. The p53-positive dysplasias, which were found in all subtypes (mild, moderate, severe), preceded histologic malignant change by months to years. p53 detection was evident in 4 of 6 patients with in situ lesions. Sequential biopsies of three of these lesions showed no change in lesion histology or p53 staining, and one lesion advanced to a p53-positive carcinoma. It is concluded that p53 protein may be detected early in the development of a subset of p53-positive oral squamous cell carcinomas. This phenomenon may be seen in dysplasias and in situ lesions, and it may have prognostic implications.

  18. Wild-type p53 gene transfer into mutated p53 HT29 cells improves sensitivity to photodynamic therapy via induction of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberi-Heyob, Muriel; Védrine, Pierre-Olivier; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Millon, Régine; Abecassis, Joseph; Poupon, Marie-France; Guillemin, François

    2004-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective local cancer treatment that induces cytotoxicity through the intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species. It is generally thought that p53 regulates chemotherapy and radiation therapy responsiveness via apoptosis induction control. The current study investigated whether cellular sensitivity to PDT is increased when a wild-type (wt) p53 status is restored by gene transfer in the established HT9blk Ala273-mutant p53 human colon cancer cell line. The photosensitizer accumulation was similar in both cell lines, and survival measurements using MTT test and clonogenic assays demonstrated that wt p53 transfected cells (HT29A4) were significantly more sensitive to chlorin e6-mediated PDT. P53 protein expression and its functionality as a transcription factor demonstrated through the induction of mdm2 transactivation, were not found to be directly involved in this differential photosensitivity. However, induction of caspase 3 activation (2.6-fold), leading to significant apoptosis induction 24-h after PDT was observed in HT29A4 cells. These results suggest that the introduction of wt p53 in HT29A4 potentiates the cell sensitivity to PDT through the induction of apoptosis in relation to p53 mutational status, but independently of p53 expression level and transcriptional activity.

  19. Specific killing of P53 mutated tumor cell lines by a cross-reactive human HLA-A2-restricted P53-specific CTL line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, P A; Pedersen, L O; Poulsen, H S

    2001-01-01

    p53 is upregulated in the majority of spontaneous tumors and the HLA class I molecule HLA-A2 is expressed by approximately 50% of the caucasians. Potentially, these facts make HLA-A2-binding p53 peptides for CTL-inducing immunotherapy applicable to a broad range of cancer patients. In our study, ...

  20. Analysis of p53 Transactivation Domain Mutants Reveals Acad11 as a Metabolic Target Important for p53 Pro-Survival Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadi Jiang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor plays a key role in maintaining cellular integrity. In response to diverse stress signals, p53 can trigger apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells or cell-cycle arrest to enable cells to cope with stress and survive. However, the transcriptional networks underlying p53 pro-survival function are incompletely understood. Here, we show that in oncogenic-Ras-expressing cells, p53 promotes oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS and cell survival upon glucose starvation. Analysis of p53 transcriptional activation domain mutants reveals that these responses depend on p53 transactivation function. Using gene expression profiling and ChIP-seq analysis, we identify several p53-inducible fatty acid metabolism-related genes. One such gene, Acad11, encoding a protein involved in fatty acid oxidation, is required for efficient OXPHOS and cell survival upon glucose starvation. This study provides new mechanistic insight into the pro-survival function of p53 and suggests that targeting this pathway may provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention based on metabolic perturbation.

  1. Phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation are distinct events contributing to the activation of p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hagan, Heather M.; Ljungman, Mats

    2004-01-01

    It has been recently shown that ionizing radiation (IR) and the mRNA synthesis inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) act in synergy to induce p53-mediated transactivation of reporter plasmids in human cells [Oncogene 19 (2000) 3829]. We have extended these studies and show that ionizing radiation and DRB also act in synergy to induce ATM-mediated phosphorylation of the ser15 site of p53 and enhance the expression of endogenous p21 protein. Examination of the localization of p53 revealed that while DRB did not induce phosphorylation of the ser15 site of p53 but efficiently accumulated p53 in the nucleus, ionizing radiation induced phosphorylation of the ser15 site of p53 without prolonged nuclear accumulation. Importantly, the combination of DRB and IR resulted in a strong accumulation of phosphorylated p53 in the nucleus that was more persistent then p53 accumulation after IR alone. Furthermore, the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B showed a similar synergy with IR as did DRB regarding ser15 phosphorylation of p53 and p21 induction. These results suggest that the synergistic activation of the p53 response by the combination treatment is due to the activation of two distinct pathways where DRB causes the prolonged nuclear accumulation of p53 while ionizing radiation activates p53 by ATM-mediated phosphorylation

  2. Doxycyclin induces p53 expression in SaOs (osteosarcoma) cell line ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The p53 tumour suppressor gene plays an important role in preventing cancer development. This study determined if p53 can be induced in osteosarcoma cell line upon treatment ... represent an important component of the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. Keywords: Tumor suppressor, oncogene, mdm2, cyclinE, apoptosis ...

  3. Loss of p53 Ser18 and Atm results in embryonic lethality without cooperation in tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Armata

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation at murine Serine 18 (human Serine 15 is a critical regulatory process for the tumor suppressor function of p53. p53Ser18 residue is a substrate for ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM and ATM-related (ATR protein kinases. Studies of mice with a germ-line mutation that replaces Ser18 with Ala (p53(S18A mice have demonstrated that loss of phosphorylation of p53Ser18 leads to the development of tumors, including lymphomas, fibrosarcomas, leukemia and leiomyosarcomas. The predominant lymphoma is B-cell lymphoma, which is in contrast to the lymphomas observed in Atm(-/- animals. This observation and the fact that multiple kinases phosphorylate p53Ser18 suggest Atm-independent tumor suppressive functions of p53Ser18. Therefore, in order to examine p53Ser18 function in relationship to ATM, we analyzed the lifespan and tumorigenesis of mice with combined mutations in p53Ser18 and Atm. Surprisingly, we observed no cooperation in survival and tumorigenesis in compound p53(S18A and Atm(-/- animals. However, we observed embryonic lethality in the compound mutant animals. In addition, the homozygous p53Ser18 mutant allele impacted the weight of Atm(-/- animals. These studies examine the genetic interaction of p53Ser18 and Atm in vivo. Furthermore, these studies demonstrate a role of p53Ser18 in regulating embryonic survival and motor coordination.

  4. Chronic p53-independent p21 expression causes genomic instability by deregulating replication licensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galanos, Panagiotis; Vougas, Konstantinos; Walter, David

    2016-01-01

    cells strongly expressing p21 showed proliferation features. This occurred predominantly in p53-mutant human cancers, suggesting p53-independent upregulation of p21 selectively in more aggressive tumour cells. Multifaceted phenotypic and genomic analyses of p21-inducible, p53-null, cancerous and near...

  5. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. In order ... from Indian patients, we checked 44 untreated primary gliomas for mutations in exons 5–9 of the p53 gene by. PCR-SSCP ... function of p53 is critical to the efficiency of many cancer treatment ...

  6. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. In order to study the significance of the p53 gene in the genesis and development of human glioma from Indian patients, we checked 44 untreated primary gliomas for mutations in exons 5–9 of the p53 ...

  7. A família do p53: aspectos estruturais e funcionais do p73 e do p63 The p53 family: structural and functional aspects of p73 and p63

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Ribeiro-Silva

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available O p53 é um gene regulador chave do ciclo celular que, quando sofre mutações, leva ao desenvolvimento de neoplasias, atuando, portanto, como um gene supressor tumoral em condições normais. Recentemente foram identificados genes homólogos ao p53 denominados p73 e p63, provavelmente oriundos de um gene ancestral comum. Apesar da grande homologia estrutural, os membros da família do p53 possuem diferenças funcionais entre si. O presente artigo tem por finalidade discorrer sobre os principais aspectos estruturais e funcionais do p73 e do p63, ressaltando seus papéis na tumorigênese humana. O p73 ativa vários genes responsivos ao p53 e, quando superexpresso, inibe a ação do p53. Raramente encontra-se mutado em neoplasias, e seu papel na tumorigênese humana ainda é motivo de controvérsias. O p63 não é um gene supressor tumoral clássico, sendo essencial para a manutenção de uma população de células precursoras (células-tronco em vários tecidos epiteliais. O p63 marca as células basais de vários órgãos epiteliais, como a pele e a próstata, podendo ser considerado um marcador de indiferenciação celular. O p63 é um marcador recentemente descrito e ainda requer maior investigação para determinar seu papel no desenvolvimento de neoplasias em humanos.The p53 gene has a key role in the cell cycle control. When mutated, it promotes the development of neoplasms, acting in so far as a tumor suppressor gene in normal conditions. Recently, genes homologue to p53 were identified, named p73 e p63, probably originated from a common ancestral gene. Despite the great structural homology, the members of p53 family have functional differences. This article aims to discourse about the major structural and functional aspects of p73 and p63, reinforcing their role in human tumorigenesis. P73 activates several p53 responsive genes and, when overexpressed, inhibits the p53 action. It is rarely mutated in neoplasms and its role in human

  8. Specific killing of P53 mutated tumor cell lines by a cross-reactive human HLA-A2-restricted P53-specific CTL line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, P A; Pedersen, L O; Poulsen, H S

    2001-01-01

    p53 is upregulated in the majority of spontaneous tumors and the HLA class I molecule HLA-A2 is expressed by approximately 50% of the caucasians. Potentially, these facts make HLA-A2-binding p53 peptides for CTL-inducing immunotherapy applicable to a broad range of cancer patients. In our study, we...... cancer cell lines. In addition, the recognition of 2 different p53 peptides by the same CTL clone suggests a promiscuous peptide recognition by the TCR involved. Taken together, these in vitro results suggest that vaccination with autologous DC pulsed with multiple p53 epitopes may induce an effective...... tumor-specific CTL response in vivo with the potential to eradicate p53-upregulated spontaneously occurring tumors....

  9. Infection with E1B-mutant adenovirus stabilizes p53 but blocks p53 acetylation and activity through E1A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savelyeva, I.; Dobbelstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    accumulation of p53, without obvious defects in p53 localization, phosphorylation, conformation and oligomerization. Nonetheless, p53 completely failed to induce its target genes in this scenario, for example, p21/CDKN1A, Mdm2 and PUMA. Two regions of the E1A gene products independently contributed......Wild-type adenovirus type 5 eliminates p53 through the E1B-55 kDa and E4-34 kDa gene products. Deletion or mutation of E1B-55 kDa has long been thought to confer p53-selective replication of oncolytic viruses. We show here that infection with E1B-defective adenovirus mutants induces massive...

  10. The responses of cancer cells to PLK1 inhibitors reveal a novel protective role for p53 in maintaining centrosome separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Linda; Farzan, Raed; Ali, Simak; Buluwela, Laki; Saurin, Adrian T; Meek, David W

    2017-11-23

    Polo-like kinase-1 (PLK1) plays a major role in driving mitotic events, including centrosome disjunction and separation, and is frequently over-expressed in human cancers. PLK1 inhibition is a promising therapeutic strategy and works by arresting cells in mitosis due to monopolar spindles. The p53 tumour suppressor protein is a short-lived transcription factor that can inhibit the growth, or stimulate the death, of developing cancer cells. Curiously, although p53 normally acts in an anti-cancer capacity, it can offer significant protection against inhibitors of PLK1, but the events underpinning this effect are not known. Here, we show that functional p53 reduces the sensitivity to PLK1 inhibitors by permitting centrosome separation to occur, allowing cells to traverse mitosis and re-enter cycle with a normal complement of 2N chromosomes. Protection entails the activation of p53 through the DNA damage-response enzymes, ATM and ATR, and requires the phosphorylation of p53 at the key regulatory site, Ser15. These data highlight a previously unrecognised link between p53, PLK1 and centrosome separation that has therapeutic implications for the use of PLK1 inhibitors in the clinic.

  11. Vaccination with p53-peptide-pulsed dendritic cells, of patients with advanced breast cancer: report from a phase I study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Pedersen, Anders E; Johnsen, Hans E

    2004-01-01

    ) loaded with a cocktail of three wild-type and three modified p53 peptides are being analysed in six HLA-A2+ patients with progressive advanced breast cancer. Vaccinations were well tolerated and no toxicity was observed. Disease stabilisation was seen in two of six patients, one patient had a transient......Peptides derived from over-expressed p53 protein are presented by class I MHC molecules and may act as tumour-associated epitopes. Due to the diversity of p53 mutations, immunogenic peptides representing wild-type sequences are preferable as a basis for a broad-spectrum p53-targeting cancer vaccine....... Our preclinical studies have shown that wild-type p53-derived HLA-A2-binding peptides are able to activate human T cells and that the generated effector T cells are cytotoxic to human HLA-A2+, p53+ tumour cells. In this phase I pilot study, the toxicity and efficacy of autologous dendritic cells (DCs...

  12. p53 and PPP1R13L (alias iASPP or RAI) form a feedback loop to regulate genotoxic stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laske, Magdalena J.; Vogel, Ulla; Jensen, Uffe B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: PPP1R13L gene has been found to be over-expressed in variety of cancers and its expression in p53 wild-type background is sufficient to promote tumor growth in vivo. However, in the non-transformed cells it acts as a tumor suppressor which suggests that the role of PPP1R13L...... is multifaceted. Methods: We have used siRNA optimized for inhibition of p53, PPP1R13L, BAX and GADD45 alpha expression and investigated the role of those gene products for PPP1R13L expression and induction in a variety of mouse and human cells with different p53 status. In addition we have applied Western Blot......, Q-PCR and proteasome inhibition analysis to further ascertain the link between PPP1R13L induction and p53 status. Results: We show that the pattern and extent of the PPP1R13L expression depend on the presence of active p53. Downregulation of p53 target genes BAX and/or GADD45 alpha led to decreased...

  13. Lack of Immunomodulatory Interleukin-27 Enhances Oncogenic Properties of Mutant p53 In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibra, Denada; Mitra, Abhisek; Newman, Melisa; Xia, Xueqing; Cutrera, Jeffry J; Gagea, Mihai; Kleinerman, Eugenie S; Lozano, Guillermina; Li, Shulin

    2016-08-01

    p53 is mutated in about 50% of human cancers, mostly through missense mutations. Expression of mutant p53 is associated with poor clinical outcomes or metastasis. Although mutant p53 is inherently instable, various stressors such as DNA damage or expression of the oncogenic Kras or c-myc affect the oncogenic properties of mutant p53. However, the effects of inflammation on mutant p53 are largely unknown. IL27 is an important immunomodulatory cytokine, but its impact on mutant p53-driven tumorigenesis has not been reported. IL27RA(-/-) mice were bred with mutant p53 heterozygous (p53(R172H/+)) mice to obtain IL27RA(-/-)p53(H/+) and IL27RA(-/-)p53(H/H) mice. Mouse survival and tumor spectra for the cohort were analyzed. Stability of p53 protein was analyzed via IHC and Western blot analysis. This study unraveled that lack of IL27 signaling significantly shortened the survival duration of mice with tumors expressing both copies of the mutant p53 gene (Li-Fraumeni mouse model). Interestingly, in mice that were heterozygous for mutant p53, lack of IL27 signaling not only significantly shortened survival time but also doubled the incidence of osteosarcomas. Furthermore, lack of IL27 signaling is closely associated with increased mutant p53 stability in vivo from early age. These results suggest that IL27 signaling modulates the oncogenic properties of mutant p53 in vivo Clin Cancer Res; 22(15); 3876-83. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. p53 expression in biopsies from children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Micha I; Lundegaard, Pia Rengtved; Carstensen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    based on CD1a positivity. The slides were stained with p53 antibody and semiquantitatively evaluated using a grading system from 1 to 5 as an estimate for 0% to 20%, 20% to 40%, 40% to 60%, 60% to 80%, and 80% to 100% p53-positive for pathologic Langerhans cells (pLC), respectively. RESULTS: The p53...... protein was expressed in various degrees in pLC in all lesions. The degree of p53 expression could not be correlated to either clinical manifestation or outcome. CONCLUSIONS: An increased expression of p53 in pLC indicates an altered DNA repair control with or without abnormal control of apoptosis....

  15. Transcriptional repressor NIR interacts with the p53-inhibiting ubiquitin ligase MDM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyne, Kristina; Förster, Juliane; Schüle, Roland; Roemer, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    NIR (novel INHAT repressor) can bind to p53 at promoters and inhibit p53-mediated gene transactivation by blocking histone acetylation carried out by p300/CBP. Like NIR, the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 can also bind and inhibit p53 at promoters. Here, we present data indicating that NIR, which shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, not only binds to p53 but also directly to MDM2, in part via the central acidic and zinc finger domain of MDM2 that is also contacted by several other nucleolus-based MDM2/p53-regulating proteins. Like some of these, NIR was able to inhibit the ubiquitination of MDM2 and stabilize MDM2; however, unlike these nucleolus-based MDM2 regulators, NIR did not inhibit MDM2 to activate p53. Rather, NIR cooperated with MDM2 to repress p53-induced transactivation. This cooperative repression may at least in part involve p300/CBP. We show that NIR can block the acetylation of p53 and MDM2. Non-acetylated p53 has been documented previously to more readily associate with inhibitory MDM2. NIR may thus help to sustain the inhibitory p53:MDM2 complex, and we present evidence suggesting that all three proteins can indeed form a ternary complex. In sum, our findings suggest that NIR can support MDM2 to suppress p53 as a transcriptional activator.

  16. Critical roles of p53 in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wang

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most malignant tumors and the biggest obstacle in curing HCC is its high metastasis potential. Alteration of p53 is the most frequent genetic change found in HCC. Although the biological function of p53 in tumor initiation and progression has been well characterized, whether or not p53 is implicated in metastasis of HCC is largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed the potential functions of p53 in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and metastasis of HCC cells. Both insulin- and TGF-β1-induced changes of critical EMT markers were greatly enhanced by p53 knockdown in HCC cells. The insulin- and TGF-β1-stimulated migration of HCC cells were enhanced by p53 knockdown. Furthermore, in vivo metastasis of HCC cells using different mouse models was robustly enhanced by p53 knockdown. In addition, we found that p53 regulation on EMT and metastasis involves β-catenin signaling. The nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity of β-catenin was modulated by p53. The enhanced EMT phenotype, cell migration and tumor metastasis of HCC cells by p53 knockdown were abrogated by inhibiting β-catenin signal pathway. In conclusion, this study reveals that p53 plays a pivotal role in EMT and metastasis of HCC cells via its regulation on β-catenin signaling.

  17. [Protein p53 in gastric carcinoma: clinical use of cancer research on neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzyńska, T

    1999-02-01

    Mutations of the tumour-suppressor p53 gene are a very frequent event in many human cancers. In normal cells and tissue, p53 protein has a very short half-life and attains such a low level that is not detectable immunohistochemically. In contrast, the altered forms, present in 30 to 80% of different neoplasms, are more stable and accumulate to concentration that can be detected by immunohistochemistry. Changes in the p53 gene product can be immunogenic. Thus a simple procedures as immunohistochemistry or Elisa test which stratifies cancer patients into those with and without p53 accumulation or p53 auto- antibodies can be analyzed for useful correlations with clinical and histopathological data. The p53 studies have demonstrated that in gastric carcinoma the expression of p53 protein can be properly assessed prior to surgery, using immunohistochemistry on a small tissue samples obtained during endoscopy. It has been shown that p53 assessment in this carcinoma can be helpful in identifying patients at high risk for metastatic spread, including regional lymph node involvement, and in the discrimination of those patients with especially poor prognosis. Furthermore it was demonstrated that in stomach p53 accumulation is a marker of malignancy. Thus, when combined with routine procedures, a simple test as p53 immunohistochemistry might allow better planing of appropriate treatment strategies and help in the pre-operative diagnosis of gastric carcinoma. Further studies are required to determine the clinical significance of p53 serum antibodies in gastric cancer.

  18. The DEAD box protein p68: a novel transcriptional coactivator of the p53 tumour suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Gaynor J; Nicol, Samantha M; Wilson, Brian J; Jacobs, Anne-Marie F; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe; Wardrop, Julie; Gregory, David J; Lane, David P; Perkins, Neil D; Fuller-Pace, Frances V

    2005-01-01

    The DEAD box RNA helicase, p68, has been implicated in various cellular processes and has been shown to possess transcriptional coactivator function. Here, we show that p68 potently synergises with the p53 tumour suppressor protein to stimulate transcription from p53-dependent promoters and that endogenous p68 and p53 co-immunoprecipitate from nuclear extracts. Strikingly, RNAi suppression of p68 inhibits p53 target gene expression in response to DNA damage, as well as p53-dependent apoptosis, but does not influence p53 stabilisation or expression of non-p53-responsive genes. We also show, by chromatin immunoprecipitation, that p68 is recruited to the p21 promoter in a p53-dependent manner, consistent with a role in promoting transcriptional initiation. Interestingly, p68 knock-down does not significantly affect NF-κB activation, suggesting that the stimulation of p53 transcriptional activity is not due to a general transcription effect. This study represents the first report of the involvement of an RNA helicase in the p53 response, and highlights a novel mechanism by which p68 may act as a tumour cosuppressor in governing p53 transcriptional activity. PMID:15660129

  19. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Matthias R; Joerger, Andreas C; Fersht, Alan R

    2016-09-06

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53's oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1(MET)(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells.

  20. Clinical and pathological correlations of marrow PUMA and P53 expressions in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Ozlen; Uner, Aysegul; Buyukasik, Yahya; Uz, Burak; Bozkurt, Sureyya; Eliacik, Eylem; Işik, Ayse; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Goker, Hakan; Demiroglu, Haluk; Aksu, Salih; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Sayinalp, Nilgun

    2015-05-01

    p53 is a key regulator of apoptosis. p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is a critical mediator of p53-dependent and independent apoptosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship of p53 and PUMA to the prognosis of MDS. Bone marrow biopsies of MDS patients at the time of diagnosis (n = 76) and at the time of transformation (n = 19) were included in the study group. The expression of p53 and PUMA was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. When compared to the control group, both p53 (p PUMA (p = 0.012) expression levels were significantly higher in MDS group. In MDS group, there was a moderate positive correlation between p53 and PUMA expressions. PUMA expression was not correlated with event free and overall survival. However, overall survival was significantly lower in cases with p53 expression in more than 50% of the cells. There was an increase in PUMA expression in cases that showed transformation as compared to the initial diagnostic bone marrows but was not statistically significant. The correlation that existed between p53 and PUMA was lost in transformed cases. Our results showed that PUMA and p53 expressions are increased in MDS marrows compared to normal marrows. PUMA expression increases further during transformation while the expression of p53 is not significantly altered which suggests that PUMA alterations might be a late event during the evolution of MDS. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Modeling the role of p53 pulses in DNA damage- induced cell death decision

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    Cui Jun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor suppressor p53 plays pivotal roles in tumorigenesis suppression. Although oscillations of p53 have been extensively studied, the mechanism of p53 pulses and their physiological roles in DNA damage response remain unclear. Results To address these questions we presented an integrated model in which Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM activation and p53 oscillation were incorporated with downstream apoptotic events, particularly the interplays between Bcl-2 family proteins. We first reproduced digital oscillation of p53 as the response of normal cells to DNA damage. Subsequent modeling in mutant cells showed that high basal DNA damage is a plausible cause for sustained p53 pulses observed in tumor cells. Further computational analyses indicated that p53-dependent PUMA accumulation and the PUMA-controlled Bax activation switch might play pivotal roles to count p53 pulses and thus decide the cell fate. Conclusion The high levels of basal DNA damage are responsible for generating sustained pulses of p53 in the tumor cells. Meanwhile, the Bax activation switch can count p53 pulses through PUMA accumulation and transfer it into death signal. Our modeling provides a plausible mechanism about how cells generate and orchestrate p53 pulses to tip the balance between survival and death.

  2. The role of p53 molecule in radiation and hyperthermic therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumoto, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, cancer-related genes have been analyzed at the molecular level as predictive indicators for cancer therapy. Among those genes, the tumor suppressor gene p53 is worthy of notice in cancer therapy, because the p53 molecule prevents the malignant degeneration of non-cancer cells by regulating cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, and DNA repair. An abnormality of the p53 gene introduces a genetic instability and increases the incidence of carcinogenesis and teratogenesis. Therefore, p53 is called a guardian of the genome. Mutations of p53 are observed at a high frequency in human tumors, and are recognized in about half of all malignant tumors in human head and neck cancers. We previously reported that radio- and heat-sensitivities of human cultured tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells are p53-dependent, and are closely correlated with the induction of apoptosis. In a human cell culture system, the interactive hyperthermic enhancement of radiosensitivity was observed in wild-type p53 cells, but not in mutated p53 cells. In a transplanted tumor system, the combination therapies of radiation and hyperthermia induced efficient tumor growth depression and apoptosis in the wild-type p53 tumors. In this review, we discuss the p53 activation signaling pathways through the modification of p53 molecules, such as phosphorylation after radiation and hyperthermia treatments. (author)

  3. Separase loss of function cooperates with the loss of p53 in the initiation and progression of T- and B-cell lymphoma, leukemia and aneuploidy in mice.

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    Malini Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Cohesin protease Separase plays a key role in faithful segregation of sister chromatids by cleaving the cohesin complex at the metaphase to anaphase transition. Homozygous deletion of ESPL1 gene that encodes Separase protein results in embryonic lethality in mice and Separase overexpression lead to aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. However, the effect of Separase haploinsufficiency has not been thoroughly investigated.Here we examined the effect of ESPL1 heterozygosity using a hypomorphic mouse model that has reduced germline Separase activity. We report that while ESPL1 mutant (ESPL1 (+/hyp mice have a normal phenotype, in the absence of p53, these mice develop spontaneous T- and B-cell lymphomas, and leukemia with a significantly shortened latency as compared to p53 null mice. The ESPL1 hypomorphic, p53 heterozygous transgenic mice (ESPL1(+/hyp, p53(+/- also show a significantly reduced life span with an altered tumor spectrum of carcinomas and sarcomas compared to p53(+/- mice alone. Furthermore, ESPL1(+/hyp, p53(-/- mice display significantly higher levels of genetic instability and aneuploidy in normal cells, as indicated by the abnormal metaphase counts and SKY analysis of primary splenocytes.Our results indicate that reduced levels of Separase act synergistically with loss of p53 in the initiation and progression of B- and T- cell lymphomas, which is aided by increased chromosomal missegregation and accumulation of genomic instability. ESPL1(+/hyp, p53(-/- mice provide a new animal model for mechanistic study of aggressive lymphoma and also for preclinical evaluation of new agents for its therapy.

  4. A comparison of p53 and WT1 immunohistochemical expression patterns in tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Laura; Köbel, Martin; Ganesan, Raji; Tam, Simone; Prasad, Rajeev; Böhm, Steffen; Lockley, Michelle; Jeyarajah, Arjun J; Brockbank, Eleanor; Faruqi, Asma; Gilks, C Blake; Singh, Naveena

    2017-11-01

    The treatment of patients with tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is increasingly based on diagnosis on small biopsy samples, and the first surgical sample is often taken post-chemotherapy. p53 and WT1 are important diagnostic markers for HGSC. The effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on p53 and WT1 expression has not been widely studied. We aimed to compare p53 and WT1 expression in paired pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy samples of HGSC. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was carried out for p53 and WT1 on paired omental HGSC samples pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy. p53 IHC was recorded as normal (wild-type) or abnormal (mutation-type), and was further classified as overexpression, complete absence, or cytoplasmic. WT1 IHC was classified as positive or negative. A subset of cases were further assessed for the extent of nuclear immunoreactivity of WT1 by use of the H-score. Fifty-seven paired samples were stained with p53. Fifty-six of 57 (98%) cases showed mutation-type p53 staining. Pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy IHC results were concordant in 55 of 57 (96%) cases. For WT1, pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy IHC results were concordant in 56 of 58 (97%) cases. In 23 paired WT1 cases, the mean post-treatment H-score decreased from 227 [range 20-298, standard deviation (SD) 64] to 151 (range 0-288, SD 78) (P = 0.0008). Immunohistochemical expression of p53 (abnormal/mutation-type pattern) and WT1 in HGSC is almost universal and is largely concordant before and after chemotherapy. This finding underscores the reliability of these diagnostic markers in small samples and in surgical samples following neoadjuvant chemotherapy, with very few exceptions. A novel finding was the significant diminution in intensity of WT1 staining following chemotherapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Association of p53 protein expression with clinical outcome in advanced supraglottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jin Oh; Hong, Seong Eon

    1998-01-01

    To determine the incidence and prognostic effect of p53 expression in patients with advanced supraglottic cancer. Twenty-one cases of total 48 advanced supraglottic cancer patients who received postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining employing p53 monoclonal antibody. Three out of six stage III patients and four out of fifteen stage IV patients showed p53 expression without statistically significant difference (p=0.608). Five year survival rates are 93% in p53 negative, 86% in p53 positive patients and there was no significant difference(p=0.776). p53 expression does not show statistically significant correlation with primary tumor status(p=0.877), lymph node status(p=0.874) and age(p=0.64). There was no statistically significant correlation between traditionally known risk factors and p53 expression

  6. Inhibition of Endothelial p53 Improves Metabolic Abnormalities Related to Dietary Obesity

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    Masataka Yokoyama

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has suggested a role for p53 activation in various age-associated conditions. Here, we identified a crucial role of endothelial p53 activation in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Endothelial expression of p53 was markedly upregulated when mice were fed a high-calorie diet. Disruption of endothelial p53 activation improved dietary inactivation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase that upregulated the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α in skeletal muscle, thereby increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and oxygen consumption. Mice with endothelial cell-specific p53 deficiency fed a high-calorie diet showed improvement of insulin sensitivity and less fat accumulation, compared with control littermates. Conversely, upregulation of endothelial p53 caused metabolic abnormalities. These results indicate that inhibition of endothelial p53 could be a novel therapeutic target to block the vicious cycle of cardiovascular and metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity.

  7. Human herpesvirus 6B inhibits cell proliferation by a p53-independent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Bodil; Kaspersen, M.D.; Kofod-Olsen, Emil

    2006-01-01

    inhibitor, did not reverse the HHV-6B-induced cell cycle block. In support of this, HHV-6B infection of p53(-/-) cells induced a cell cycle block before S-phase with kinetics similar to or faster than that observed by infection in wt cells. CONCLUSIONS: HHV-6B infection inhibited host cell proliferation......BACKGROUND: Various forms of cellular stress can activate the tumour suppressor protein p53, an important regulator of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Cells infected by human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) accumulate aberrant amounts of p53. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study...... was to investigate the role of p53 accumulation in the HHV-6B-induced cell cycle arrest. STUDY DESIGN: The role of p53 was studied using the p53 inhibitor pifithrin-a, and cells genetically deficient in functional p53 by homologous recombination. RESULTS: In response to HHV-6B infection, epithelial cells were...

  8. P53 and p73 differ in their ability to inhibit glucocorticoid receptor (GR transcriptional activity

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    Nie Linghu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 is a tumor suppressor and potent inhibitor of cell growth. P73 is highly similar to p53 at both the amino acid sequence and structural levels. Given their similarities, it is important to determine whether p53 and p73 function in similar or distinct pathways. There is abundant evidence for negative cross-talk between glucocorticoid receptor (GR and p53. Neither physical nor functional interactions between GR and p73 have been reported. In this study, we examined the ability of p53 and p73 to interact with and inhibit GR transcriptional activity. Results We show that both p53 and p73 can bind GR, and that p53 and p73-mediated transcriptional activity is inhibited by GR co-expression. Wild-type p53 efficiently inhibited GR transcriptional activity in cells expressing both proteins. Surprisingly, however, p73 was either unable to efficiently inhibit GR, or increased GR activity slightly. To examine the basis for this difference, a series of p53:p73 chimeric proteins were generated in which corresponding regions of either protein have been swapped. Replacing N- and C-terminal sequences in p53 with the corresponding sequences from p73 prevented it from inhibiting GR. In contrast, replacing p73 N- and C-terminal sequences with the corresponding sequences from p53 allowed it to efficiently inhibit GR. Differences in GR inhibition were not related to differences in transcriptional activity of the p53:p73 chimeras or their ability to bind GR. Conclusion Our results indicate that both N- and C-terminal regions of p53 and p73 contribute to their regulation of GR. The differential ability of p53 and p73 to inhibit GR is due, in part, to differences in their N-terminal and C-terminal sequences.

  9. The PRR11-SKA2 Bidirectional Transcription Unit Is Negatively Regulated by p53 through NF-Y in Lung Cancer Cells

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    Yitao Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously identified proline-rich protein 11 (PRR11 as a novel cancer-related gene that is implicated in the regulation of cell cycle and tumorigenesis. Our recent study demonstrated that PRR11 and its adjacent gene, kinetochore associated 2 (SKA2, constitute a classic head-to-head gene pair that is coordinately regulated by nuclear factor Y (NF-Y. In the present study, we further show that the PRR11-SKA2 bidirectional transcription unit is an indirect target of the tumor suppressor p53. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that overexpression of wild type p53, but not mutant p53, significantly represses the basal activity and NF-Y mediated transactivation of the PRR11-SKA2 bidirectional promoter. Deletion and mutation analysis of the PRR11-SKA2 promoter revealed that p53-mediated PRR11-SKA2 repression is dependent on the presence of functional NF-Y binding sites. Furthermore, a co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed that p53 associates with NF-Y in lung cancer cells, and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that p53 represses PRR11-SKA2 transcription by reducing the binding amount of NF-Y in the PRR11-SKA2 promoter region. Consistently, the ability of p53 to downregulate PRR11-SKA2 transcription was significantly attenuated upon siRNA-mediated depletion of nuclear factor Y subunit beta (NF-YB. Notably, lung cancer patients with lower expression of either PRR11 or SKA2 along with wild type p53 exhibited the best overall survival compared with others with p53 mutation and/or higher expression of either PRR11 or SKA2. Taken together, our results demonstrate that p53 negatively regulates the expression of the PRR11-SKA2 bidirectional transcription unit through NF-Y, suggesting that the inability to repress the PRR11-SKA2 bidirectional transcription unit after loss of p53 might contribute to tumorigenesis.

  10. Combined loss of PUMA and p21 accelerates c-MYC-driven lymphoma development considerably less than loss of one allele of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, L J; Grabow, S; Vandenberg, C J; Strasser, A; Janic, A

    2016-07-21

    The tumor suppressor p53 is mutated in ~50% of human cancers. P53 is activated by a range of stimuli and regulates several cellular processes, including apoptotic cell death, cell cycle arrest, senescence and DNA repair. P53 induces apoptosis via transcriptional induction of the BH3-only proteins PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis) and NOXA, and cell cycle arrest via p21. Induction of these processes was proposed to be critical for p53-mediated tumor suppression. It is therefore surprising that mice lacking PUMA, NOXA and p21, as well as mice bearing mutations in p53 that impair the transcriptional activation of these genes, are not tumor prone, unlike mice lacking p53 function, which spontaneously develop tumors with 100% incidence. These p53 target genes and the processes they regulate may, however, impact differently on tumor development depending on the oncogenic drivers. For example, loss of PUMA enhances c-MYC-driven lymphoma development in mice, but, interestingly, the acceleration was less impressive compared with that caused by the loss of even a single p53 allele. Different studies have reported that loss of p21 can accelerate, delay or have no impact on tumorigenesis. In an attempt to resolve this controversy, we examined whether loss of p21-mediated cell cycle arrest cooperates with PUMA deficiency in accelerating lymphoma development in Eμ-Myc mice (overexpressing c-MYC in B-lymphoid cells). We found that Eμ-Myc mice lacking both p21 and PUMA (Eμ-Myc;Puma(-/-);p21(-/-)) developed lymphoma at a rate comparable to Eμ-Myc;Puma(-/-) animals, notably with considerably longer latency than Eμ-Myc;p53(+/-)mice. Loss of p21 had no impact on the numbers, cycling or survival of pre-leukemic Eμ-Myc B-lymphoid cells, even when PUMA was lost concomitantly. These results demonstrate that even in the context of deregulated c-MYC expression, p53 must suppress tumor development by activating processes apart from, or in addition to, PUMA

  11. Long Non-Coding RNA Reprogramming (ROR) Promotes Cell Proliferation in Colorectal Cancer via Affecting P53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Jiang, Xiumei; Niu, Xuemei

    2017-02-20

    BACKGROUND Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common lethal malignant tumors worldwide. The correlation between lncRNAs expression and CRC development has not been well identified in the recent literature. This study focused on the role of lncRNA-ROR on CRC progression and development. MATERIAL AND METHODS Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay was conducted to identify the expression level of lncRNA-ROR. Cell proliferation and viability were examined by MTT assay and colony formation assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry. Expressions of p53, p21, and FAS protein levels were assessed by Western blotting. CRC cells transfected with lncRNA-shRNA were injection into nude mice to identify the function of lncRNA-ROR on tumorigenesis in vivo. RESULTS The expression level of lncRNA-ROR was elevated in CRC tissues when compared to adjacent tissues (n=78). lncRNA-ROR knockdown significantly suppressed cell proliferation and viability, while lncRNA-ROR overexpression had the opposite effect. Decreased lncRNA-ROR expression enhanced cell apoptosis and triggered cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase, while elevated lncRNA-ROR expression presented the opposite effect. Protein levels of p53 and p53 target genes were affected by lncRNA-ROR in vitro, and downregulation of lncRNA-ROR impeded tumorigenesis in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Our study demonstrates that lncRNA-ROR participates in controlling CRC proliferation, viability, and apoptosis, partially by modulating p53, which provides potential and prospective therapeutic targets for CRC.

  12. OSU-2S/sorafenib synergistic antitumor combination against hepatocellular carcinoma: The role of PKCδ/p53

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    Hany A Omar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sorafenib (Nexavar® is an FDA-approved systemic therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However, the low efficacy and adverse effects at high doses limit the clinical application of sorafenib and strongly recommend its combination with other agents aiming at ameliorating its drawbacks. OSU-2S, a PKCδ activator, was selected as a potential candidate anticancer agent to be combined with sorafenib to promote the anti-cancer activity through synergistic interaction. Methods: The antitumor effects of sorafenib, OSU-2S and their combination were assessed by MTT assay, caspase activation, Western blotting, migration/invasion assays in four different HCC cell lines. The synergistic interactions were determined by Calcusyn analysis. PKCδ knockdown was used to elucidate the role of PKCδ activation as a mechanism for the synergy. The knockdown/over-expression of p53 was used to explain the differential sensitivity of HCC cell lines to sorafenib and/or OSU-2S. Results: OSU-2S synergistically enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of sorafenib in the four used HCC cell lines with combination indices < 1. This effect was accompanied by parallel increases in caspase 3/7 activity, PARP cleavage, PKCδ activation and HCC cell migration/invasion. In addition, PKCδ knockdown abolished the synergy between sorafenib and OSU-2S. Furthermore, p53 restoration in Hep3B cells through the over-expression rendered them more sensitive to both agents while p53 knockdown from HepG2 cells increased their resistance to both agents. Conclusions: OSU-2S augments the anti-proliferative effect of sorafenib in HCC cell lines, in part, through the activation of PKCδ. The p53 status in HCC cells predicts their sensitivity towards both sorafenib and OSU-2S. The proposed combination represents a therapeutically relevant approach that can lead to a new HCC therapeutic protocol.

  13. p53 Gene status and response to topotecan-containing chemotherapy in advanced ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oggionni, M; Pilotti, S; Suardi, S; Ditto, A; Luoni, C; Mariani, L; Scambia, G; Fanfani, F; Zunino, F

    2005-01-01

    Since the p53 gene has been identified as a determinant of response to chemotherapy in ovarian carcinoma in previous studies, we investigated the significance of the p53 status in response to topotecan as second-line therapy. Twenty-eight patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma, pretreated with standard platinum/paclitaxel chemotherapy, received topotecan as single-agent second-line therapy. Tumors were investigated by molecular analysis for p53 mutations in tumor samples obtained at primary surgery (i.e. before first-line therapy). Wild-type p53 tumors responsive to first-line therapy maintained substantial responsiveness to topotecan. In contrast, p53 mutation was associated with a low responsiveness to second-line therapy. The better outcome in relapsed patients with wild-type p53 suggests that the presence of a functional wild-type p53 confers stability of the drug-sensitive phenotype. This outcome is consistent with the clinical observation that the efficacy of topotecan in the treatment of relapsed ovarian carcinoma patients is dependent on platinum sensitivity, because platinum-sensitive tumors are expected to carry wild-type p53. Although untreated mutant p53 tumors may be responsive to first-line paclitaxel-containing therapy, it is likely that loss of p53 leads to genomic instability resulting in rapid progression to drug resistance.

  14. Global analysis of p53-regulated transcription identifies its direct targets and unexpected regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mary Ann; Andrysik, Zdenek; Dengler, Veronica L; Mellert, Hestia S; Guarnieri, Anna; Freeman, Justin A; Sullivan, Kelly D; Galbraith, Matthew D; Luo, Xin; Kraus, W Lee; Dowell, Robin D; Espinosa, Joaquin M

    2014-05-27

    The p53 transcription factor is a potent suppressor of tumor growth. We report here an analysis of its direct transcriptional program using Global Run-On sequencing (GRO-seq). Shortly after MDM2 inhibition by Nutlin-3, low levels of p53 rapidly activate ∼200 genes, most of them not previously established as direct targets. This immediate response involves all canonical p53 effector pathways, including apoptosis. Comparative global analysis of RNA synthesis vs steady state levels revealed that microarray profiling fails to identify low abundance transcripts directly activated by p53. Interestingly, p53 represses a subset of its activation targets before MDM2 inhibition. GRO-seq uncovered a plethora of gene-specific regulatory features affecting key survival and apoptotic genes within the p53 network. p53 regulates hundreds of enhancer-derived RNAs. Strikingly, direct p53 targets harbor pre-activated enhancers highly transcribed in p53 null cells. Altogether, these results enable the study of many uncharacterized p53 target genes and unexpected regulatory mechanisms.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02200.001. Copyright © 2014, Allen et al.

  15. [An experimental study on recombinant adenovirus p53 transfected in oral dysplastic epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bo; Zhang, Song-Tao; Li, Long-Jiang; Han, Bo; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Pan, Jian

    2009-04-01

    To investigate and evaluate the appropriate virus titer and transfection efficiency of recombinant adenovirus p53 into the oral dysplastic epithelial cells (POE-9n) and provide reference for oral precancerosis research. The transfection sensitivity of adenovirus into oral dysplastic epithelial cells was evaluated by the recombinant adenovirus p53 containing green fluorescent protein (rAd-GFP). Different titre rAd -p53 was transfected into oral dysplastic epithelial cells to evaluate the effects of rAd-p53 on cell proliferation inhibition by MIT assay. The expression of exogenous p53 gene in POE-9n cells was detected by immunocytochemistry. More than 95% POE-9n cells were transfected by rAd-GFP with MOI from 100 to 500 and there was no statistical difference between different MOI values (r=-0.124, P>0.05). It was found that rAd-p53 had significant inhibition effects on POE-9n cell proliferation with MOI from 100 to 500, and there were no significant differences at 96 h and 120 h after the transfection on cell proliferation inhibition (P>0.05). P53 protein was well expressed in rAd-p53 transfected POE-9n cells. Exogenous p53 can be successfully transfected into POE-9n cells by rAd-p53 and the virus titer of MOI 100 was high enough to ensure efficient transfection.

  16. NGF-mediated transcriptional targets of p53 in PC12 neuronal differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labhart Paul

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 is recognized as a critical regulator of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Mounting evidence also suggests a role for p53 in differentiation of cells including neuronal precursors. We studied the transcriptional role of p53 during nerve growth factor-induced differentiation of the PC12 line into neuron-like cells. We hypothesized that p53 contributed to PC12 differentiation through the regulation of gene targets distinct from its known transcriptional targets for apoptosis or DNA repair. Results Using a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation cloning technique, we identified and validated 14 novel p53-regulated genes following NGF treatment. The data show p53 protein was transcriptionally activated and contributed to NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth during differentiation of PC12 cells. Furthermore, we describe stimulus-specific regulation of a subset of these target genes by p53. The most salient differentiation-relevant target genes included wnt7b involved in dendritic extension and the tfcp2l4/grhl3 grainyhead homolog implicated in ectodermal development. Additional targets included brk, sdk2, sesn3, txnl2, dusp5, pon3, lect1, pkcbpb15 and other genes. Conclusion Within the PC12 neuronal context, putative p53-occupied genomic loci spanned the entire Rattus norvegicus genome upon NGF treatment. We conclude that receptor-mediated p53 transcriptional activity is involved in PC12 differentiation and may suggest a contributory role for p53 in neuronal development.

  17. An N-terminal Region of Mot-2 Binds to p53 In Vitro

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    Sunil C. Kaul

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The mouse mot-2 protein was earlier shown to bind to the tumor suppressor protein, p53. The mot-2 binding site of p53 was mapped to C-terminal amino acid residues 312–352, which includes the cytoplasmic sequestration domain. In the present study, we have found that both mot-1 and mot-2 bind to p53 in vitro. By using His-tagged deletion mutant proteins, the p53-binding domain of mot-2 was mapped to its Nterminal amino acid residues 253–282, which are identical in mot-1 and mot-2 proteins. Some peptides containing the p53-binding region of mot-2 were able to compete with the full-length protein for p53 binding. The data provided rationale for in vitro binding of mot-1 and mot-2 proteins to p53 and supported the conclusion that inability of mot-1 protein to bind p53 in vivo depends on secondary structure or its binding to other cellular factors. Most interestingly, the p53-binding region of mot-2 was common to its MKT-077, a cationic dye that exhibits antitumor activity, binding region. Therefore it is most likely that MKT-077-induced nuclear translocation and restoration of wild-type p53 function in transformed cells takes place by a competitional mechanism.

  18. Oxidative stress activates a specific p53 transcriptional response that regulates cellular senescence and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, Valentina; De Michele, Giulia; Venezia, Oriella; Migliaccio, Pierluigi; Dall'Olio, Valentina; Bernard, Loris; Minardi, Simone Paolo; Della Fazia, Maria Agnese; Bartoli, Daniela; Servillo, Giuseppe; Alcalay, Myriam; Luzi, Lucilla; Giorgio, Marco; Scrable, Heidi; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Migliaccio, Enrica

    2013-06-01

    Oxidative stress is a determining factor of cellular senescence and aging and a potent inducer of the tumour-suppressor p53. Resistance to oxidative stress correlates with delayed aging in mammals, in the absence of accelerated tumorigenesis, suggesting inactivation of selected p53-downstream pathways. We investigated p53 regulation in mice carrying deletion of p66, a mutation that retards aging and confers cellular resistance and systemic resistance to oxidative stress. We identified a transcriptional network of ~200 genes that are repressed by p53 and encode for determinants of progression through mitosis or suppression of senescence. They are selectively down-regulated in cultured fibroblasts after oxidative stress, and, in vivo, in proliferating tissues and during physiological aging. Selectivity is imposed by p66 expression and activation of p44/p53 (also named Delta40p53), a p53 isoform that accelerates aging and prevents mitosis after protein damage. p66 deletion retards aging and increases longevity of p44/p53 transgenic mice. Thus, oxidative stress activates a specific p53 transcriptional response, mediated by p44/p53 and p66, which regulates cellular senescence and aging. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and the Anatomical Society.

  19. Reciprocal regulation of p53 and malic enzymes modulates metabolism and senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Du, Wenjing; Mancuso, Anthony; Wellen, Kathryn E; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-01-31

    Cellular senescence both protects multicellular organisms from cancer and contributes to their ageing. The pre-eminent tumour suppressor p53 has an important role in the induction and maintenance of senescence, but how it carries out this function remains poorly understood. In addition, although increasing evidence supports the idea that metabolic changes underlie many cell-fate decisions and p53-mediated tumour suppression, few connections between metabolic enzymes and senescence have been established. Here we describe a new mechanism by which p53 links these functions. We show that p53 represses the expression of the tricarboxylic-acid-cycle-associated malic enzymes ME1 and ME2 in human and mouse cells. Both malic enzymes are important for NADPH production, lipogenesis and glutamine metabolism, but ME2 has a more profound effect. Through the inhibition of malic enzymes, p53 regulates cell metabolism and proliferation. Downregulation of ME1 and ME2 reciprocally activates p53 through distinct MDM2- and AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated mechanisms in a feed-forward manner, bolstering this pathway and enhancing p53 activation. Downregulation of ME1 and ME2 also modulates the outcome of p53 activation, leading to strong induction of senescence, but not apoptosis, whereas enforced expression of either malic enzyme suppresses senescence. Our findings define physiological functions of malic enzymes, demonstrate a positive-feedback mechanism that sustains p53 activation, and reveal a connection between metabolism and senescence mediated by p53.

  20. Corellation of p53 expressions and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

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    Silvi Kintawati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Squamous cell carcinoma is a malignancy of oral cavity mostly occurred and can also metastasize. p53 gene is a tumor suppressor gene that plays an important role in carcinogenesis. The role of wild-type p53 is very important in suppressing the formation of a malignancy. p53 also has many other important functions. p53 is a suppressor of tumor/ cancer progression through the response of cell cycle to DNA damage and by giving time to repair DNA prior to replication of genes. p53 mutation, mostly occurs in a malignancy, so earlier histopathological transformation can be detected by observing p53 mutation. The prognosis of squamous cell carcinoma in oral cavity, therefore, depends on histopathological grading and clinical staging of the tumor. To enforce the histopathological grading, in addition based on histopathology differentiation, the earlier histopathological transformation can also be assessed. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the correlation of p53 expressions and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Method: This study was a retrospective study on 20 cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma examined at Department of Pathology Anatomy in Hasan Sadikin Hospital in Bandung. Immunohistochemical examination was then performed using p53 antibodies to determine the correlation of p53 expression and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma to predict prognosis. Result: The overall results showed that there was no correlation between p53 expression and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity although there was a very strong correlation between p53 expression and histopathological grading I (p<0.01. Conclusion: It can be concluded that there was no correlation between p53 expression and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Thus, p53 expression cannot be used to predict a prognosis.

  1. Sulforaphane increases the efficacy of doxorubicin in mouse fibroblasts characterized by p53 mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fimognari, Carmela [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)]. E-mail: carmela.fimognari@unibo.it; Nuesse, Michael [GSF-Flow Cytometry Group, Neuherberg (Germany); Lenzi, Monia [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Sciuscio, Davide [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Hrelia, Patrizia [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2006-10-10

    One novel strategy for increasing cancer chemotherapy efficacy and reversing chemoresistance involves co-administration of natural chemopreventive compounds alongside standard chemotherapeutic protocols. Sulforaphane is a particularly promising chemopreventive agent, which has been shown to exert proapoptotic effects on tumor cells containing p53 mutations. The p53{sup Ser220} mutation has been implicated in reduced efficacy and drug resistance in the context of osteosarcomas and breast tumors treated with doxorubicin-based protocols. We investigated the effects of a combination of doxorubicin and sulforaphane on cell viability and apoptosis induction in fibroblasts characterized by different p53 status (p53 wild-type, p53 knock-out, and p53{sup Ser220} mutation), and identified some of the molecular pathways triggered by the drug combination. Very high concentrations of doxorubicin were necessary to decrease the viability of p53{sup Ser220} and p53 knock-out (but not wild-type) cells. Treatment of p53{sup Ser220} and p53 knock-out cells with doxorubicin did not induce apoptosis, also at very high concentrations (10 {mu}M). Sulforaphane restored chemosensitivity and induced apoptosis in doxorubicin-resistant p53{sup Ser220} and p53 knock-out cells, irrespective of p53 status. The induction of apoptosis was caspase-3 dependent and caspase-8 independent. Bongkrekic acid, a mitochondrial membrane stabilizer, partially prevented the effects of doxorubicin plus sulforaphane on mitochondrial permeability but was unable to prevent the induction of apoptosis. N-acetyl-cysteine, a glutathione precursor, blocked the induction of apoptosis by doxorubicin plus sulforaphane. Considering the negligible safety profile of sulforaphane, our findings could prompt innovative clinical studies designed to investigate whether its coadministration can enhance the efficacy of doxorubicin-based regimens.

  2. The Increased Level of Serum p53 in Hepatitis B-Associated Liver Cirrhosis

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    Parisa Shahnazari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ability of tumour suppressor protein p53 (P53 to regulate cell cycle processes can be modulated by hepatitis B virus (HBV. While preliminary evidences indicates the involvement of protein-x of HBV (HBx in altering p53 DNA binding, no further data have been accumulated for the significance of serum p53 in chronic hepatitis B virus infected patients. Methods: 72 non-cirrhotic and 19 cirrhotic patients infected by HBV were enrolled for the analysis in this study. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was performed to study the concentrations of serum p53 protein. The tertiary structures of HBx and P53 were docked by Z-dock and Hex servers for in-silico protein-protein interaction analysis. Results: There was a significant association between the serum p53 and cirrhosis (OR=1.81 95% CI: 1.017-3.2, P=0.044. Cirrhotic patients had higher level of serum p53 compare with chronic infection of HBV (1.98±1.22 vs. 1.29±0.72 U/ml, P=0.05. No evidence of correlation was seen between the different variables such as age, gender, log viral load, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP and alanine aminotransferase (ALT with serum p53. Tertiary model shows that the amino acid residues from Arg110 to Lys132 of the N-terminal of P53 which is critical for ubiquitination, are bonded to a region in N- terminal of HBx amino acid residues from Arg19 to Ser33. Conclusion: There is an increase in serum p53 in HBV-related cirrhosis patients. In this case, HBx might be responsible for such higher concentration of p53 through HBx-p53 protein-protein interaction, as is shown by molecular modeling approach.

  3. Targeting Oct2 and P53: Formononetin prevents cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Di; Wang, Chuangyuan; Duan, Yingjie; Meng, Qiang; Liu, Zhihao; Huo, Xiaokui; Sun, Huijun; Ma, Xiaodong; Liu, Kexin

    2017-07-01

    Nephrotoxicity is one of major side effects of cisplatin in chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent medical need to develop drugs that may protect kidney from toxicity. In previous study, we found that it showed the protective effects of formononetin against apoptosis by upregulating Nrf2. In this study, we investigated the renoprotective effect of formononetin against cisplatin-induced AKI and tried to elucidate the possible mechanisms. The amelioration of renal function, histopathological changes, and apoptosis in tubular cells was observed after formononetin treatment. Formononetin decreased expression of organic cation transporter 2 (Oct2) and increased the expressions of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrps), which might result in a decrease accumulation of cisplatin in tubular cells after AKI. 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and Ki-67 staining assay indicated that formononetin could promote the renal tubular cells proliferation after cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Moreover, formononetin regulated cyclins and pro-apoptotic proteins to involve the regulation of cell cycle. Furthermore, formononetin decreased p53 expression via promoting the overexpression of murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and MDMX. Taken together, formononetin provided protective effects by promoting proliferation of surviving renal tubular cells and inhibiting apoptosis after cisplatin-induced AKI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. APAF1 is a key transcriptional target for p53 in the regulation of neuronal cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortin, A; Cregan, S P; MacLaurin, J G

    2001-01-01

    obtained from neurons undergoing p53-induced cell death, but not in healthy control cultures or when p53 or the p53 binding sites were inactivated by mutation. In transient transfections in a neuronal cell line with p53 and Apaf1 promoter-luciferase constructs, p53 directly activated the Apaf1 promoter via...

  5. The Histone Lysine Demethylase JMJD3/KDM6B Is Recruited to p53 Bound Promoters and Enhancer Elements in a p53 Dependent Manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Rappsilber, Juri

    2014-01-01

    linked to the regulation of different biological processes such as differentiation of embryonic stem cells, inflammatory responses in macrophages, and induction of cellular senescence via regulation of the INK4A-ARF locus. Here we show here that JMJD3 interacts with the tumour suppressor protein p53. We...... find that the interaction is dependent on the p53 tetramerization domain. Following DNA damage, JMJD3 is transcriptionally upregulated and by performing genome-wide mapping of JMJD3, we demonstrate that it binds genes involved in basic cellular processes, as well as genes regulating cell cycle......, response to stress and apoptosis. Moreover, we find that JMJD3 binding sites show significant overlap with p53 bound promoters and enhancer elements. The binding of JMJD3 to p53 target sites is increased in response to DNA damage, and we demonstrate that the recruitment of JMJD3 to these sites is dependent...

  6. Modulation of p53 expression using antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA in vitro and in the living cells.

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    Agnieszka Gorska

    Full Text Available The p53 protein is a key player in cell response to stress events and cancer prevention. However, up-regulation of p53 that occurs during radiotherapy of some tumours results in radio-resistance of targeted cells. Recently, antisense oligonucleotides have been used to reduce the p53 level in tumour cells which facilitates their radiation-induced apoptosis. Here we describe the rational design of antisense oligomers directed against the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA aimed to inhibit the synthesis of p53 protein and its ΔNp53 isoform. A comprehensive analysis of the sites accessible to oligomer hybridization in this mRNA region was performed. Subsequently, translation efficiency from the initiation codons for both proteins in the presence of selected oligomers was determined in rabbit reticulocyte lysate and in MCF-7 cells. The antisense oligomers with 2'-OMe and LNA modifications were used to study the mechanism of their impact on translation. It turned out that the remaining RNase H activity of the lysate contributed to modulation of protein synthesis efficiency which was observed in the presence of antisense oligomers. A possibility of changing the ratio of the newly synthetized p53 and ΔNp53 in a controlled manner was revealed which is potentially very attractive considering the relationship between the functioning of these two proteins. Selected antisense oligonucleotides which were designed based on accessibility mapping of the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA were able to significantly reduce the level of p53 protein in MCF-7 cells. One of these oligomers might be used in the future as a support treatment in anticancer therapy.

  7. Tumor Suppressor p53 Stimulates the Expression of Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianli; Lingel, Amy; Geiser, Vicki; Kwapnoski, Zachary; Zhang, Luwen

    2017-10-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple human malignancies. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is required for the efficient transformation of primary B lymphocytes in vitro and possibly in vivo The tumor suppressor p53 plays a seminal role in cancer development. In some EBV-associated cancers, p53 tends to be wild type and overly expressed; however, the effects of p53 on LMP1 expression is not clear. We find LMP1 expression to be associated with p53 expression in EBV-transformed cells under physiological and DNA damaging conditions. DNA damage stimulates LMP1 expression, and p53 is required for the stimulation. Ectopic p53 stimulates endogenous LMP1 expression. Moreover, endogenous LMP1 blocks DNA damage-mediated apoptosis. Regarding the mechanism of p53-mediated LMP1 expression, we find that interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), a direct target of p53, is associated with both p53 and LMP1. IRF5 binds to and activates a LMP1 promoter reporter construct. Ectopic IRF5 increases the expression of LMP1, while knockdown of IRF5 leads to reduction of LMP1. Furthermore, LMP1 blocks IRF5-mediated apoptosis in EBV-infected cells. All of the data suggest that cellular p53 stimulates viral LMP1 expression, and IRF5 may be one of the factors for p53-mediated LMP1 stimulation. LMP1 may subsequently block DNA damage- and IRF5-mediated apoptosis for the benefits of EBV. The mutual regulation between p53 and LMP1 may play an important role in EBV infection and latency and its related cancers. IMPORTANCE The tumor suppressor p53 is a critical cellular protein in response to various stresses and dictates cells for various responses, including apoptosis. This work suggests that an Epstein-Bar virus (EBV) principal viral oncogene is activated by cellular p53. The viral oncogene blocks p53-mediated adverse effects during viral infection and transformation. Therefore, the induction of the viral oncogene by p53 provides a means for the virus to cope with infection and

  8. Correlation between expression of p53, p21/WAF1, and MDM2 proteins and their prognostic significance in primary hepatocellular carcinoma

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    Fu Jia

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor Protein p53 (p53, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21/WAF1, and murine double minute 2 (MDM2 participate in the regulation of cell growth. Altered expression of these gene products has been found in malignant tumors and has been associated with poor prognosis. Our aim was to investigate the expression of the 3 proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and their prognostic significance. Methods We examined p53, p21/WAF1, and MDM2 expression in 181 pairs of HCC tissues and the adjacent hepatic tissues by performing immunohistochemistry and examined the expression of the 3 proteins in 7 pairs of HCC tissues and the adjacent hepatic tissues by using western blot analysis. Results The expression of p53, p21/WAF1, and MDM2 in the HCC tissues was significantly higher than those in the adjacent hepatic tissues (P P = 0.008. A statistical correlation was observed between expression of p53 and p21/WAF1 (R = 0.380, P = 0.000, p53 and MDM2 (R = 0.299, P = 0.000, p21/WAF1 and MDM2 (R = 0.285, P = 0.000 in 181 liver tissues adjacent to the tumor. Patients with a low pathologic grade HCC (I+II had a higher tendency to express p53 on tumor cells than the patients with high pathologic grade HCC (III+IV (P = 0.007. Survival analysis showed that positive p21/WAF1 expression or/and negative MDM2 expression in HCC was a predictor of better survival of patients after tumor resection (P Conclusions The proteins p53, p21/WAF1, and MDM2 were overexpressed in all the HCC cases in this study, and p53 and p21/WAF1 overexpression were positively correlated. The expression of p21/WAF1 and MDM2 can be considered as 2 useful indicators for predicting the prognosis of HCC.

  9. DNA double strand break repair is enhanced by P53 following induction by DNA damage and is dependent on the C-terminal domain of P53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Tang; Powell, Simon N.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor suppressor gene p53 can mediate cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage. Accumulating evidence suggests that it may also directly or indirectly influence the DNA repair machinery. In the present study, we investigated whether p53, induced by DNA damage, could enhance the rejoining of double-strand DNA breaks. Materials and Methods: DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) were made by restriction enzyme digestion of a plasmid, between a promoter and a 'reporter' gene: luciferase (LUC) or chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT). Linear or circular plasmid DNA (LUC or CAT) was co-transfected with circular β-Gal plasmid (to normalize for uptake) into mouse embryonic fibroblasts genetically matched to be (+/+) or (-/-) for p53. Their ability to rejoin linearized plasmid was measured by the luciferase or CAT activity detected in rescued plasmids. The activity detected in cells transfected with linear plasmid was scored relative to the activity detected in cells transfected with circular plasmid. Results: Ionizing radiation (IR, 2 Gy) enhanced the dsb repair activity in wild type p53 cells; however, p53 null cells lose this effect, indicating that the enhancement of dsb repair was p53-dependent. REF cells with dominant-negative mutant p53 showed a similar induction compared with the parental REF cells with wild-type p53. This ala-143 mutant p53 prevents cell cycle arrest and transactivation of p21 WAF1/cip1) following IR, indicating that the p53-dependent enhancement of DNA repair is distinct from transactivation. Immortalized murine embryonic fibroblasts, 10(1)VasK1 cells, which express p53 cDNA encoding a temperature-sensitive mutant in the DNA sequence specific binding domain (ala135 to val135) with an alternatively spliced C-terminal domain (ASp53: amino-acids 360-381) and, 10(1)Val5 cells, which express the normal spliced p53 (NSp53) with the same temperature-sensitive mutant were compared. It was found that 10(1)VasK1 cells showed no DNA

  10. Immunoexpression and prognostic role of p53 in different subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihong; Li, Lianxiang; Chen, Feng; He, Dalin

    2012-07-01

    We sought to investigate the significance of p53 expression for epithelial ovarian carcinoma. In this study, we used immunohistochemical method to investigate the expression patterns of p53 in different subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. We found that the expressions of p53 protein in epithelial ovarian cancer (pituita, serosity and intima) were 88.9%, 75% and 100%, respectively, while the recurrence rates among three cancer subtypes were significantly different (33.3%, 12.5% and 0%, respectively; P p53 in patients with lymph node metastasis was significantly strong (68.75% and 100%, respectively; P p53 protein in ovarian cancer between I-II (25%) stage and II-IV stage (100%) were significantly different (P p53 protein has an intimate relationship with the malignant degree and the prognosis of ovarian cancer.

  11. Clinical Significance of Autoantibodies to P53 Protein in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases

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    Takashi Himoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the p53 gene leading to conformational changes in the p53 protein have been well established in many human cancers. Conformational changes and/or cellular accumulation of the protein may induce an immune response, resulting in circulating autoantibodies to p53, which have been documented in several types of cancers. Although rarely associated with autoimmune disease, a few reports have documented titres of anti-p53 autoantibodies in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. The clinical relevance of circulating autoantibodies to p53, therefore, remains unclear. Accordingly, this study aimed to examine the prevalence and clinical relevance of anti-p53 autoantibodies in patients with selected autoimmune liver diseases.

  12. The pro-survival function of p53 in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Mi Young; Jang, Eun Yeong; Kim, Jin Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The rate of apoptosis and autophagy was variable with different p53 status after IR treatment of cells. The influence of p53 status on cell fate suggests a role of p53 in two fundamentally important cell biological pathways: autophagy and apoptosis. p53 coordinates cell cycle arrest and apoptosis to govern cell fate. This study was done to identify p53-mediated regulation of cell's fate. Autophagy induced by IR may prevent cells from undergoing apoptosis, implying an interlink modulation between autophagy and apoptosis. The rate of apoptosis and autophagy was determined with different p53 status after IR treatment of HeLa cells in this study. Our research on IR-induced cellular responses may provide new information about fate decision between the processes of apoptosis and autophagy.

  13. Tumor suppressor WWOX and p53 alterations and drug resistance in glioblastomas

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    Ming-Fu eChiang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor p53 are frequently mutated in glioblastomas (GBMs and appears to contribute, in part, to resistance to temozolomide and therapeutic drugs. WW domain-containing oxidoreductase WWOX (FOR or WOX1 is a proapoptotic protein and is considered as a tumor suppressor. Loss of WWOX gene expression is frequently seen in malignant cancer cells due to promoter hypermethylation, genetic alterations, and translational blockade. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of wild type WWOX preferentially induces apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells harboring mutant p53. WWOX is known to physically bind and stabilize wild type p53. Here, we provide an overview for the updated knowledge in p53 and WWOX, and postulate a potential scenarios that wild type and mutant p53, or isoforms, modulate the apoptotic function of WWOX. We propose that triggering WWOX activation by therapeutic drugs under p53 functional deficiency is needed to overcome TMZ resistance and induce GBM cell death.

  14. Isolation and characterization of DUSP11, a novel p53 target gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caprara, Greta; Zamponi, Raffaella; Melixetian, Marina

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT p53 regulates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle control, apoptosis and DNA damage repair. Here we demonstrate that DUSP11 (Dual Specificity Phosphatase 11), a member of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase family that binds to RNA-RNP complexes and RNA splicing factors, is a p53...... target gene. Consistent with this, the expression of DUSP11 is induced in a p53-dependent manner after treatment with DNA damaging agents. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that p53 binds to 2 putative p53 DNA binding sites in the promoter region of DUSP11. Colony formation and proliferation...... (Src-Associated protein in Mitotic cells) binds to DUSP11 in vitro and in vivo. Taken together these results suggest that DUSP11 contributes to p53-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation and that it might be involved in regulating RNA splicing through SAM68....

  15. Changes in protein expression in p53 deleted spontaneous thymic lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, Bent; Vorum, Henrik; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2004-01-01

    By the use of high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and computerized image analysis we investigated and compared the expression of cellular proteins from p53 positive (+/+) mouse thymocytes, p53-/- thymocytes before neoplastic transformation, and from cell lines derived from two...... spontaneous p53-/- thymic lymphomas, SM5 and SM7. A total of around 1500 proteins were detected on individual gels. Only changes in protein expression by a factor of 2 or more were considered. In the thymic lymphoma cells 3-5% of the proteins were found to be differentially regulated when compared...... with the protein expression in p53+/+ and p53-/- thymocytes. Only a minority (13 proteins) of the quantitatively changed proteins were common for the two thymic lymphoma cell lines, suggesting that the p53 deficiency mainly results in genetic dysfunctions which are individual for a given tumor. Two of the detected...

  16. p53 increases caspase-6 expression and activation in muscle tissue expressing mutant huntingtin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E; Skotte, Niels H; Ladha, Safia

    2014-01-01

    as in muscle tissues from two different HD mouse models. p53, a transcriptional activator of caspase-6, is upregulated in neuronal cells and tissues expressing mutant huntingtin. Activation of p53 leads to a dramatic increase in levels of caspase-6 mRNA, caspase-6 activity and cleavage of lamin A. Using mouse...... embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from YAC128 mice, we show that this increase in caspase-6 activity can be mitigated by pifithrin-α (pifα), an inhibitor of p53 transcriptional activity, but not through the inhibition of p53's mitochondrial pro-apoptotic function. Remarkably, the p53-mediated increase in caspase......-6 expression and activation is exacerbated in cells and tissues of both neuronal and peripheral origin expressing mutant huntingtin (Htt). These findings suggest that the presence of the mutant Htt protein enhances p53 activity and lowers the apoptotic threshold, which activates caspase-6...

  17. Preeclampsia is associated with alterations in the p53-pathway in villous trophoblast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew N Sharp

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE is characterized by exaggerated apoptosis of the villous trophoblast of placental villi. Since p53 is a critical regulator of apoptosis we hypothesized that excessive apoptosis in PE is mediated by abnormal expression of proteins participating in the p53 pathway and that modulation of the p53 pathway alters trophoblast apoptosis in vitro.Fresh placental villous tissue was collected from normal pregnancies and pregnancies complicated by PE; Western blotting and real-time PCR were performed on tissue lysate for protein and mRNA expression of p53 and downstream effector proteins, p21, Bax and caspases 3 and 8. To further assess the ability of p53 to modulate apoptosis within trophoblast, BeWo cells and placental villous tissue were exposed to the p53-activator, Nutlin-3, alone or in combination with the p53-inhibitor, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α. Equally, Mdm2 was knocked-down with siRNA.Protein expression of p53, p21 and Bax was significantly increased in pregnancies complicated by PE. Conversely, Mdm2 protein levels were significantly depleted in PE; immunohistochemistry showed these changes to be confined to trophoblast. Reduction in the negative feedback of p53 by Mdm2, using siRNA and Nutlin-3, caused an imbalance between p53 and Mdm2 that triggered apoptosis in term villous explants. In the case of Nutlin, this was attenuated by Pifithrin-α.These data illustrate the potential for an imbalance in p53 and Mdm2 expression to promote excessive apoptosis in villous trophoblast. The upstream regulation of p53 and Mdm2, with regard to exaggerated apoptosis and autophagy in PE, merits further investigation.

  18. Immunoexpression and prognostic role of p53 in different subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lihong; Li, Lianxiang; Chen, Feng; He, Dalin

    2012-01-01

    We sought to investigate the significance of p53 expression for epithelial ovarian carcinoma. In this study, we used immunohistochemical method to investigate the expression patterns of p53 in different subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. We found that the expressions of p53 protein in epithelial ovarian cancer (pituita, serosity and intima) were 88.9%, 75% and 100%, respectively, while the recurrence rates among three cancer subtypes were significantly different (33.3%, 12.5% and 0%, r...

  19. Mutation or Loss of p5